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Sample records for background radiation early

  1. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation - A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2008-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approximately 1100. Data from the first five years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown university; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  2. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation - A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2009-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approximately 1100. Data from the first five years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  3. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation - A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2009-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approx. 1100. Data from the first five years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time.

  4. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation-A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of 11 00. Data from the first seven years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  5. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation - A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2009-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approximately 1100. Data from the first five years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  6. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation - A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2009-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approx. 1100. Data from the first five years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time.

  7. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation-A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of 11 00. Data from the first seven years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at the Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown University; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  8. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation - A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary F.

    2008-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models, observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales reveals the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approximately 1100. Data from the first five years of operation of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite provide detailed full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization anisotropy. Together, the data provide a wealth of cosmological information, including the age of the universe, the epoch when the first stars formed, and the overall composition of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy. The results also provide constraints on the period of inflationary expansion in the very first moments of time. WMAP, part of NASA's Explorers program, was launched on June 30, 2001. The WMAP satellite was produced in a partnership between the Goddard Space Flight Center and Princeton University. The WMAP team also includes researchers at Johns Hopkins University; the Canadian Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics; University of Texas; Oxford University; University of Chicago; Brown university; University of British Columbia; and University of California, Los Angeles.

  9. Observing the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation: A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics,of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales will reveal the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approx. 1100. The validity of inflationary models will be tested and, if agreement is found, accurate values for most of the key cosmological parameters will result. If disagreement is found, we will need to rethink our basic ideas about the physics of the early universe. I will present an overview of the physical processes at work in forming the anisotropy and discuss what we have already learned from current observations. I will conclude with a brief overview of the recently launched Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission which will observe the anisotropy over the full sky with 0.21 degree angular resolution. At the time of this meeting, MAP will have just arrived at the L2 Lagrange point, marking the start of its observing campaign. The MAP hardware is being produced by Goddard in partnership with Princeton University.

  10. Observing the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation: A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinshaw, Gary; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics,of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales will reveal the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approx. 1100. The validity of inflationary models will be tested and, if agreement is found, accurate values for most of the key cosmological parameters will result. If disagreement is found, we will need to rethink our basic ideas about the physics of the early universe. I will present an overview of the physical processes at work in forming the anisotropy and discuss what we have already learned from current observations. I will conclude with a brief overview of the recently launched Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission which will observe the anisotropy over the full sky with 0.21 degree angular resolution. At the time of this meeting, MAP will have just arrived at the L2 Lagrange point, marking the start of its observing campaign. The MAP hardware is being produced by Goddard in partnership with Princeton University.

  11. Spectrum of the cosmic background radiation: early and recent measurements from the White Mountain Research Station

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, G.F.

    1985-09-01

    The White Mountain Research Station has provided a support facility at a high, dry, radio-quiet site for measurements that have established the blackbody character of the cosmic microwave background radiation. This finding has confirmed the interpretation of the radiation as a relic of the primeval fireball and helped to establish the hot Big Bang theory as the standard cosmological model.

  12. Cosmic Tachyon Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaschitz, Roman

    The equilibrium statistical mechanics of a background radiation of superluminal particles is investigated, based on a vectorial wave equation for tachyons of the Proca type. The partition function, the spectral energy density, and the various thermodynamic variables of an ideal Bose gas of tachyons in an open Robertson-Walker cosmology are derived. The negative mass square in the wave equation changes the frequency scaling in the Rayleigh-Jeans law, and there are also significant changes in the low temperature regime as compared to the microwave background, in particular in the caloric and thermal equations of state.

  13. Cosmic Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidharth, B. G.; Valluri, S. R.

    2015-08-01

    It is shown that a collection of photons with nearly the same frequency exhibits a "condensation" type of phenomenon corresponding to a peak intensity. The observed cosmic background radiation can be explained from this standpoint. We have obtained analogous results by extremization of the occupation number for photons with the use of the Lambert W function. Some of the interesting applications of this function are briefly discussed in the context of graphene which exhibits an interesting two dimensional structure with several characteristic properties and diverse practical applications.

  14. The early radiation of stem group molluscs against the environmental background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanov, A. P.

    2003-04-01

    The first helcionelloid molluscs appeared in the late Nemakit-Daldynian and were forerunners of the sudden molluscan diversification of the Cambrian explosion. The diversification of Mollusca is coincided with global changes in lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere coincident with the rearrangement of the Late Proterozoic supercontinent Rodinia, a distinct shift in oceanic water geochemistry, and a sudden abundance of shelled multicellular organisms. Some of these changes have left indicators in the morphology and chemical properties of molluscan shells that allow reconstruction of global settings which are essential for understanding early molluscan evolution. A combination of tectonic and climatic cyclic changes is resulted in a major global transgression at the beginning of the Cambrian and the formation of extensive shallow water habitats within which the first molluscs expanded. Diversification into new ecological niches has been recognised in two evolutionary-adaptive lineages. The lineage from Oelandiella to Watsonella shows adaptation to a soft substrate and infaunal mode of life. In contrast, the Oelandiella-Helcionella lineage was an adaptation to a harder substrate. Appearance of large helcionelloids with associated archaeocyathan reefs in the middle Tommotian may suggest evolution of a browsing carnivorous habit capable of supporting a considerably larger body. Despite of a few such examples, most helcionelloids remained a small size until the Early Ordovician. Early Cambrian helcionelloids show considerable morphological diversity providing a fertile ground for speculation about early molluscan evolution. While almost the all molluscan classes are known from the Cambro-Ordovician transition, the relationship of these, including Tergomya, Gastropoda, Cephalopoda, and Rostroconchia to helcionelloids remains highly problematic. Analysis of morphological variation and evolutionary trends within the earliest molluscs may support derivation of

  15. Physics of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wands, David; Piattella, Oliver F.; Casarini, Luciano

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation provides a remarkable window onto the early universe, revealing its composition and structure. In these lectures we review and discuss the physics underlying the main features of the CMB.

  16. The Spectrumof the Cosmic Background Radiation: Early and RecentMeasurements from the White Mountain Research Station

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, G.F.

    1985-09-01

    The White Mountain Research Station has provided a support facility at a high, dry, radio-quiet site for measurements that have established the blackbody character of the cosmic microwave background radiation. This finding has confirmed the interpretation of the radiation as a relic of the primeval fireball and helped to establish the hot Big Bang theory as the standard cosmological model.

  17. Ultraviolet Background Radiation (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    itself. A comprehensive summary of the observations is provided by Labov , Martin & Bowyer (59), and reviews of the relevant astronomy, which is...with William G. Fastie’s Apollo 17 experiment, our spurious background will translate into 0.2 units, which is negligible. If, on the other hand...grateful to all of my collaborators and supporters over the years, particularly Paul D. Feldman and William G. Fastie. Partial support for this

  18. Teaching about Natural Background Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also…

  19. Teaching about Natural Background Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also…

  20. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  1. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  2. Teaching about natural background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-07-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also demonstrated to emphasize the important role of shielding in radiation protection. The measurements were carried out with a Geiger-Muller (GM)-based dosimeter and a NaI scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer, which are normally available in physics laboratories. Radioactivity in household materials was demonstrated using a gas mantle as an example.

  3. Ponderable soliton stars and cosmic background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, Hongyee )

    1990-12-01

    A theory is developed to describe the possible perturbations of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) by radiation from ponderable soliton stars in the early universe. Since the temperature of such stars is in the range of 10 to the 6th K, thermalization of their emitted radiation is possible. Two models are considered: one in which thermalization is ignored and one in which decoupling from thermalization is considered as a sudden process. The expected perturbation of the CBR is probably less than 1 percent and is largely around the short-wavelength end, in the form of point radio sources. This result is consistent with the most recent COBE measurements. 17 refs.

  4. Ponderable soliton stars and cosmic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee

    1990-01-01

    A theory is developed to describe the possible perturbations of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) by radiation from ponderable soliton stars in the early universe. Since the temperature of such stars is in the range of 10 to the 6th K, thermalization of their emitted radiation is possible. Two models are considered: one in which thermalization is ignored and one in which decoupling from thermalization is considered as a sudden process. The expected perturbation of the CBR is probably less than 1 percent and is largely around the short-wavelength end, in the form of point radio sources. This result is consistent with the most recent COBE measurements.

  5. Early results from the MIT millimeter and sub-millimeter balloon-borne anisotropy measurement. [of cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Stephan S.; Cheng, Edward S.; Page, Lyman A.

    1991-01-01

    The MIT balloon-borne bolometric search for Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) anisotropies places the most stringent constraints to date on fluctuations in the CMBR. Four maps of half of the Northern Hemisphere at 1.8, 1.1, 0.63 and 0.44 mm wavelength, have a beam size of 3.8 deg with a 1 sigma sensitivity of less than 0.1 mK (thermodynamic) per FOV in each of the first two channels. Analysis of the sky map at 1.8 mm wavelength using a likelihood ratio test for galactic latitudes of 15 deg and greater yields a 95 percent confidence level (CL) upper limit on fluctuations of the CMBR at DeltaT/T less than or equal to 1.6 x 10 exp -5 with a statistical power of 92 percent for Gaussian fluctuations at a correlation angle of 13 deg. Between 3 deg and 22 deg, the upper limit for fluctuations is DeltaT/T less than or equal to 4.0 x 10 exp -5 (95 percent CL).

  6. A review on natural background radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Gholami, Mehrdad; Setayandeh, Samaneh

    2013-01-01

    The world is naturally radioactive and approximately 82% of human-absorbed radiation doses, which are out of control, arise from natural sources such as cosmic, terrestrial, and exposure from inhalation or intake radiation sources. In recent years, several international studies have been carried out, which have reported different values regarding the effect of background radiation on human health. Gamma radiation emitted from natural sources (background radiation) is largely due to primordial radionuclides, mainly 232Th and 238U series, and their decay products, as well as 40K, which exist at trace levels in the earth's crust. Their concentrations in soil, sands, and rocks depend on the local geology of each region in the world. Naturally occurring radioactive materials generally contain terrestrial-origin radionuclides, left over since the creation of the earth. In addition, the existence of some springs and quarries increases the dose rate of background radiation in some regions that are known as high level background radiation regions. The type of building materials used in houses can also affect the dose rate of background radiations. The present review article was carried out to consider all of the natural radiations, including cosmic, terrestrial, and food radiation. PMID:24223380

  7. Light bending in radiation background

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Taekoon E-mail: tlee@kunsan.ac.kr

    2014-01-01

    We consider the velocity shift of light in presence of radiation emitted by a black body. Within geometric optics formalism we calculate the bending angle of a light ray when there is a gradient in the energy density. We model the bending for two simplified cases. The bending angle is proportional to the inverse square power of the impact parameter (∝1/b{sup 2}) when the dilution of energy density is spherically symmetric. The bending angle is inversely proportional to the impact parameter (∝1/b) when the energy density dilutes cylindrically. Assuming that a neutron star is an isothermal black body, we estimate the order of magnitude for such bending angle and compare it with the bending angle by magnetic field.

  8. Backgrounds, radiation damage, and spacecraft orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Catherine E.; Miller, Eric D.; Bautz, Mark W.

    2017-08-01

    The scientific utility of any space-based observatory can be limited by the on-orbit charged particle background and the radiation-induced damage. All existing and proposed missions have had to make choices about orbit selection, trading off the radiation environment against other factors. We present simulations from ESA’s SPace ENVironment Information System (SPENVIS) of the radiation environment for spacecraft in a variety of orbits, from Low Earth Orbit (LEO) at multiple inclinations to High Earth Orbit (HEO) to Earth-Sun L2 orbit. We summarize how different orbits change the charged particle background and the radiation damage to the instrument. We also discuss the limitations of SPENVIS simulations, particularly outside the Earth’s trapped radiation and point to new resources attempting to address those limitations.

  9. Background ionising radiation: a pictorial perspective.

    PubMed

    Bibbo, Giovanni; Piotto, Lino

    2014-09-01

    Ionising radiation from natural sources, known as background radiation, has existed on earth since the earth's formation. The exposure of humans and other living creatures to this radiation is a feature of the earth's environment which is continuing and inescapable. The word "radiation" brings fear to many people: a fear of the unknown, as human's senses cannot detect the presence of ionising radiation. In this study, a catalogue of images of the distribution of radioactivity in every day objects and foods has been produced using an imaging plate from a computed radiography cassette. The aim of the study is that by visually demonstrating that every day objects and foods are radioactive would alleviate the fear of "radiation" by becoming aware that we live in a radioactive environment and even our body is radioactive.

  10. Background compensation for a radiation level monitor

    DOEpatents

    Keefe, D.J.

    1975-12-01

    Background compensation in a device such as a hand and foot monitor is provided by digital means using a scaler. With no radiation level test initiated, a scaler is down-counted from zero according to the background measured. With a radiation level test initiated, the scaler is up-counted from the previous down-count position according to the radiation emitted from the monitored object and an alarm is generated if, with the scaler having crossed zero in the positive going direction, a particular number is exceeded in a specific time period after initiation of the test. If the test is initiated while the scale is down-counting, the background count from the previous down- count stored in a memory is used as the initial starting point for the up-count.

  11. Gamma radiation background measurements from Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.; Gregory, John C.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    1988-01-01

    A Nuclear Radiation Monitor incorporating a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector was flown as part of the verification flight instrumentation on the Spacelab 2 mission, July 29 to August 6, 1985. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with better than 20 s resolution throughout most of the mission in the energy range 0.1 to 30 MeV. Knowledge of the decay characteristics and the geomagnetic dependence of the counting rates enable measurement of the various components of the Spacelab gamma-ray background: prompt secondary radiation, Earth albedo, and delayed induced radioactivity. The status of the data analysis and present relevant examples of typical background behavior are covered.

  12. Gamma radiation background measurements from Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, William S.; Gregory, John C.; Fishman, Gerald J.

    1989-01-01

    A Nuclear Radiation Monitor incorporating a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector was flown as part of the verification flight instrumentation on the Spacelab 2 mission, July 29 to August 6, 1985. Gamma-ray spectra were measured with better than 20 s resolution throughout most of the mission in the energy range 0.1 to 30 MeV. Knowledge of the decay characteristics and the geomagnetic dependence of the counting rates enable measurement of the various components of the Spacelab gamma-ray background: prompt secondary radiation, earth albedo, and delayed induced radioactivity. The status of the data analysis and present relevant examples of typical background behavior are covered.

  13. Modeling background radiation in Southern Nevada.

    PubMed

    Haber, Daniel A; Burnley, Pamela C; Adcock, Christopher T; Malchow, Russell L; Marsac, Kara E; Hausrath, Elisabeth M

    2017-02-06

    Aerial gamma ray surveys are an important tool for national security, scientific, and industrial interests in determining locations of both anthropogenic and natural sources of radioactivity. There is a relationship between radioactivity and geology and in the past this relationship has been used to predict geology from an aerial survey. The purpose of this project is to develop a method to predict the radiologic exposure rate of the geologic materials by creating a high resolution background model. The intention is for this method to be used in an emergency response scenario where the background radiation environment is unknown. Two study areas in Southern Nevada have been modeled using geologic data, images from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), geochemical data, and pre-existing low resolution aerial surveys from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Survey. Using these data, geospatial areas that are homogenous in terms of K, U, and Th, referred to as background radiation units, are defined and the gamma ray exposure rate is predicted. The prediction is compared to data collected via detailed aerial survey by the Department of Energy's Remote Sensing Lab - Nellis, allowing for the refinement of the technique. By using geologic units to define radiation background units of exposed bedrock and ASTER visualizations to subdivide and define radiation background units within alluvium, successful models have been produced for Government Wash, north of Lake Mead, and for the western shore of Lake Mohave, east of Searchlight, NV.

  14. High-energy radiation background in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rester, A. C., Jr.; Trombka, J. I.

    The radiation environment of near-earth space and its effects on biological and hardware systems are examined in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to particle interactions and propagation, data bases, instrument background and dosimetry, detectors and experimental progress, biological effects, and future needs and strategies. Particular attention is given to angular distributions and spectra of geomagnetically trapped protons in LEO, bremsstrahlung production by electrons, nucleon-interaction data bases for background estimates, instrumental and atmospheric background lines observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, the GRAD high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica, space protons and brain tumors, a new radioprotective antioxidative agent, LEO radiation measurements on the Space Station, and particle-background effects on the Hubble Space Telescope and the Lyman FUV Spectroscopic Explorer.

  15. High-energy radiation background in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rester, A. C., Jr. (Editor); Trombka, J. I. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The radiation environment of near-earth space and its effects on biological and hardware systems are examined in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to particle interactions and propagation, data bases, instrument background and dosimetry, detectors and experimental progress, biological effects, and future needs and strategies. Particular attention is given to angular distributions and spectra of geomagnetically trapped protons in LEO, bremsstrahlung production by electrons, nucleon-interaction data bases for background estimates, instrumental and atmospheric background lines observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, the GRAD high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica, space protons and brain tumors, a new radioprotective antioxidative agent, LEO radiation measurements on the Space Station, and particle-background effects on the Hubble Space Telescope and the Lyman FUV Spectroscopic Explorer.

  16. Measurements of the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the attributes of the 2.7-K microwave background radiation (CBR) are reviewed, with emphasis on the analytic phase of CBR studies. Methods for the direct measurement of the CBR spectrum are discussed; attention is given to receivers, antennas, absolute receiver calibration, atmospheric emission and absorption, the galactic background contribution, the analysis of LF measurements, and recent HF observations of the CBR spectrum. Measurements of the large-angular-scale intensity distribution of the CBR (the most convincing evidence that the radiation is of cosmological origin) are examined, along with limits on the linear polarization of the CBR. A description is given of the NASA-sponsored Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite mission. The results of the COBE mission will be a set of sky maps showing, in the wave number range from 1 to 10,000 kaysers, the galactic background radiation due to synchrotron emission from galactic cosmic rays, to diffuse thermal emission from H II regions, and to diffuse thermal emission from interstellar and interplanetary dust, as well as a residue consisting of the CBR and whatever other cosmological background might exist.

  17. Measurements of the cosmic background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements of the attributes of the 2.7-K microwave background radiation (CBR) are reviewed, with emphasis on the analytic phase of CBR studies. Methods for the direct measurement of the CBR spectrum are discussed. Attention is given to receivers, antennas, absolute receiver calibration, atmospheric emission and absorption, the galactic background contribution, the analysis of LF measurements, and recent HF observations of the CBR spectrum. Measurements of the large-angular-scale intensity distribution of the CBR (the most convincing evidence that the radiation is of cosmological origin) are examined, along with limits on the linear polarization of the CBR. A description is given of the NASA-sponsored Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite mission. The results of the COBE mission will be a set of sky maps showing, in the wave number range from 1 to 10,000 kaysers, the galactic background radiation due to synchrotron emission from galactic cosmic rays, to diffuse thermal emission from H II regions, and to diffuse thermal emission from interstellar and interplanetary dust, as well as a residue consisting of the CBR and whatever other cosmological background might exist.

  18. Could unstable relic particles distort the microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, A.; Loeb, A.; Nussinov, S.

    1989-03-01

    Three general classes of possible scenarios for the recently reported distortion of the microwave background radiation (MBR) via decaying relic weakly interacting particles are analyzed. The analysis shows that such particles could not reheat the universe and cause the spectral distortion of the MBR. Gravitational processes such as the early formation of massive black holes may still be plausible energy sources for producing the reported spectral distortion of the MBR at an early cosmological epoch. 24 references.

  19. The origin of the diffuse background gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV, and evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation were observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of big-bang cosmology, and connect these processes with the galaxy formation theory. A test of the theory is in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeK to 100 GeV energy range which are made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. The theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon-symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are discussed.

  20. The origin of the diffuse background gamma-radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations have now provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV. There is some evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation have been observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of the big-band cosmology and tie in these processes with galaxy fromation theory. A crucial test of the theory may lie in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV energy range which may be made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. A discussion of the theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are given.

  1. The origin of the diffuse background gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Recent observations provided evidence for diffuse background gamma radiation extending to energies beyond 100 MeV, and evidence of isotropy and implied cosmological origin. Significant features in the spectrum of this background radiation were observed which provide evidence for its origin in nuclear processes in the early stages of big-bang cosmology, and connect these processes with the galaxy formation theory. A test of the theory is in future observations of the background radiation in the 100 MeK to 100 GeV energy range which are made with large orbiting spark-chamber satellite detectors. The theoretical interpretations of present data, their connection with baryon-symmetric cosmology and galaxy formation theory, and the need for future observations are discussed.

  2. Polarization of the cosmic background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, P.M.

    1980-03-01

    The results and technique of a measurement of the linear polarization of the Cosmic Background Radiation are discussed. The ground-based experiment utilizes a single horn (7/sup 0/ beam width) Dicke-type microwave polarimeter operating at 33 GHz (9.1 mm). Data taken between May 1978 and February 1980 from both the northern hemisphere (Berkeley Lat. = 38/sup 0/N) and the southern hemisphere (Lima Lat. = 12/sup 0/S) show the radiation to be essentially unpolarized over all areas surveyed. For the 38/sup 0/ declination data the 95% confidence level limit on a linearly polarized component is 0.3 mK for the average and 12 and 24 hour periods. Fitting all data gives the 95% confidence level limit on a linearly polarized component of 0.3 mK for spherical harmonics through third order. Constraints on various cosmological models are discussed in light of these limits.

  3. Cosmic ultraviolet background radiation and zodiacal light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, P. D.; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Hartig, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of the diffuse cosmic UV background in the 1700-2850-A range are presented. In agreement with previous results, the data have resulted in the detection at high Galactic latitude of an intensity of 300 + or - 100 photons/sq cm s sr A at 1800 A without correction for starlight or airglow, a similar intensity over the 1900-2500-A range after correction for measured airglow, and a similar intensity over the 2500-2800-A range after correction for zodiacal light. It is suggested that this radiation may originate partly in line radiation from a Galactic halo and partly from extragalactic sources, perhaps the integrated light of distant galaxies.

  4. Polarization of the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, P. M.; Smoot, G. F.

    1981-04-01

    The technique and results of a measurement of the linear polarization of the cosmic background radiation at a wavelength of 9 mm are discussed. Data taken between 1978 May and 1980 February from both the Northern Hemisphere (Berkeley latitude 38 deg N) and the Southern Hemisphere (Lima latitude 12 deg S) over 11 declinations from -37 to +63 deg show the radiation to be essentially unpolarized over all areas surveyed. Fitting all data gives the 95% confidence level limit on a linearly polarized component of 0.3 mK for spherical harmonics through third order. A fit of all data to the anisotropic axisymmetric model of Rees (1968) yields a 95% confidence level limit of 0.15 mK for the magnitude of the polarized component. Constraints on various cosmological models are discussed in light of these limits.

  5. Polarization of the cosmic background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Philip M.; Smoot, George F.

    1980-08-01

    We discuss the technique and results of a measurement of the linear polarization of the Cosmic Background Radiation. Data taken between May 1978 and February 1980 from both the northern hemisphere (Berkeley Lat. 38{sup o}N) and the southern hemisphere (Lima Lat. 12{sup o}s) over 11 declinations from -37{sup o} to +63{sup o} show the radiation to be essentially unpolarized over all areas surveyed. Fitting all data gives the 95% confidence level limit on a linearly polarized component of 0.3 mK for spherical harmonics through third order. A fit of all data to the anisotropic axisymmetric model of Rees (1968) yields a 95% confidence level limit of 0.15 mK for the magnitude of the polarized component. Constraints on various cosmological models are discussed in light of these limits.

  6. Decoherence in the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, Mariano; Calzetta, Esteban

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we analyze the possibility of detecting nontrivial quantum phenomena in observations of the temperature anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR), for example, if the Universe could be found in a coherent superposition of two states corresponding to different CBR temperatures. Such observations are sensitive to scalar primordial fluctuations but insensitive to tensor fluctuations, which are therefore converted into an environment for the former. Even for a free inflaton field minimally coupled to gravity, scalar-tensor interactions induce enough decoherence among histories of the scalar fluctuations as to render them classical under any realistic probe of their amplitudes.

  7. Measurements of the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, P.; Villela, T.

    1987-01-01

    Maps of the large scale structure (theta is greater than 6 deg) of the cosmic background radiation covering 90 percent of the sky are now available. The data show a very strong 50-100 sigma (statistical error) dipole component, interpreted as being due to our motion, with a direction of alpha = 11.5 + or - 0.15 hours, sigma = -5.6 + or - 2.0 deg. The inferred direction of the velocity of our galaxy relative to the cosmic background radiation is alpha = 10.6 + or - 0.3 hours, sigma = -2.3 + or - 5 deg. This is 44 deg from the center of the Virgo cluster. After removing the dipole component, the data show a galactic signature but no apparent residual structure. An autocorrelation of the residual data, after substraction of the galactic component from a combined Berkeley (3 mm) and Princeton (12 mm) data sets, show no apparent structure from 10 to 180 deg with a rms of 0.01 mK(sup 2). At 90 percent confidence level limit of .00007 is placed on a quadrupole component.

  8. The Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation and its Polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, Edward

    2016-03-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation and its faint polarization have provided a unique means to constrain the physical state of the early Universe. Continued advances in instrumentation, observation, and analysis have revealed polarized radiation signatures associated with gravitational lensing and have heightened the prospects for using precision polarimetry to experimentally confront the inflationary paradigm. Characterization of this relic radiation field has the power to constrain or reveal the detailed properties of astroparticle species and long wave gravitational radiation. On going and planned CMB polarization efforts from the ground, balloon, and space borne platforms will be briefly surveyed. Recent community activities by the Inflation Probe Science Interest Group (IPSIG) will also be summarized. NASA PCOS mini-symposium (invited IPSIG talk).

  9. The local contribution to the microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecker, Jean-Claude; Narlikar, Jayant V.; Ochsenbein, Francois; Wickramasinghe, Chandra

    2015-04-01

    The observed microwave background radiation (MBR) is commonly interpreted as the relic of an early hot universe, and its observed features (spectrum and anisotropy) are explained in terms of properties of the early universe. Here we describe a complementary, even possibly alternative, interpretation of MBR, first proposed in the early 20th century, and adapt it to modern observations. For example, the stellar Hipparcos data show that the energy density of starlight from the Milky Way, if suitably thermalized, yields a temperature of ∼2.81 K. This and other arguments given here strongly suggest that the origin of MBR may lie, at least in a very large part, in re-radiation of thermalized galactic starlight. The strengths and weaknesses of this alternative radical explanation are discussed.

  10. X-Ray Background from Early Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    What impact did X-rays from the first binary star systems have on the universe around them? A new study suggests this radiation may have played an important role during the reionization of our universe.Ionizing the UniverseDuring the period of reionization, the universe reverted from being neutral (as it was during recombination, the previous period)to once again being ionized plasma a state it has remained in since then. This transition, which occurred between 150 million and one billion years after the Big Bang (redshift of 6 z 20), was caused by the formation of the first objects energetic enough to reionize the universes neutral hydrogen.ROSAT image of the soft X-ray background throughout the universe. The different colors represent different energy bands: 0.25 keV (red), 0.75 keV (green), 1.5 keV (blue). [NASA/ROSAT Project]Understanding this time period in particular, determining what sources caused the reionization, and what the properties were of the gas strewn throughout the universe during this time is necessary for us to be able to correctly interpret cosmological observations.Conveniently, the universe has provided us with an interesting clue: the large-scale, diffuse X-ray background we observe all around us. What produced these X-rays, and what impact did this radiation have on the intergalactic medium long ago?The First BinariesA team of scientists led by Hao Xu (UC San Diego) has suggested that the very first generation of stars might be an important contributor to these X-rays.This hypothetical first generation, Population III stars, are thought to have formed before and during reionization from large clouds of gas containing virtually no metals. Studies suggest that a large fraction of Pop III stars formed in binaries and when those stars ended their lives as black holes, ensuing accretion from their companions could produceX-ray radiation.The evolution with redshift of the mean X-ray background intensities. Each curve represents a different

  11. Cosmic Needles versus Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aigen

    2003-02-01

    It has been suggested by a number of authors that the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation might have arisen from the radiation of ``Population III'' objects thermalized by conducting cosmic graphite/iron needle-shaped dust. Due to a lack of an accurate solution to the absorption properties of exceedingly elongated grains, in existing literature which studies the CMB thermalizing process they are generally modeled as (1) needle-like spheroids in terms of the Rayleigh approximation, (2) infinite cylinders, and (3) antennae. We show here that the Rayleigh approximation is not valid since the Rayleigh criterion is not satisfied for highly conducting needles. We also show that the available intergalactic iron dust, if modeled as infinite cylinders, is not sufficient to supply the required opacity at long wavelengths to obtain the observed isotropy and Planckian nature of the CMB. If appealing to the antenna theory, conducting iron needles with exceedingly large elongations ( >104) appear able to provide sufficient opacity to thermalize the CMB within the iron density limit. But the applicability of the antenna theory to exceedingly thin needles of nanometer/micrometer thickness has not yet been verified.

  12. Background radiation: natural and man-made.

    PubMed

    Thorne, M C

    2003-03-01

    A brief overview and comparison is given of dose rates arising from natural background radiation and the fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons. Although there are considerable spatial variations in exposure to natural background radiation, it is useful to give estimates of worldwide average overall exposures from the various components of that background. Cosmic-ray secondaries of low linear energy transfer (LET), mainly muons and photons, deliver about 280 microSv a(-1). Cosmic-ray neutrons deliver about another 100 microSv a(-1). These low- and high-LET exposures are relatively uniform to the whole body. The effective dose rate from cosmogenic radionuclides is dominated by the contribution of 12 microSv a(-1) from 14C. This is due to relatively uniform irradiation of all organs and tissues from low-energy beta particles. Primordial radionuclides and their progeny (principally the 238U and 232Th series, and 40K) contribute about 480 microSv a(-1) of effective dose by external irradiation. This is relatively uniform photon irradiation of the whole body. Internally incorporated 40K contributes a further 165 microSv a(-1) of effective dose in adults, mainly from beta particles, but with a significant gamma component. Equivalent doses from 40K are somewhat higher in muscle than other soft tissues, but the distinction is less than a factor of three. Uranium and thorium series radionuclides give rise to an average effective dose rate of around 120 microSv a(-1). This includes a major alpha particle component, and exposures of radiosensitive tissues in lung, liver, kidney and the skeleton are recognised as important contributors to effective dose. Overall, these various sources give a worldwide average effective dose rate of about 1160 microSv a(-1). Exposure to 222Rn, 220Rn and their short-lived progeny has to be considered separately. This is very variable both within and between countries. For 222Rn and its progeny, a worldwide average effective dose

  13. Primordial helium and the cosmic background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Steigman, Gary

    2010-04-01

    The products of primordial nucleosynthesis, along with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons, are relics from the early evolution of the Universe whose observations probe the standard model of cosmology and provide windows on new physics beyond the standard models of cosmology and of particle physics. According to the standard, hot big bang cosmology, long before any stars have formed a significant fraction ( ∼ 25%) of the baryonic mass in the Universe should be in the form of helium-4 nuclei. Since current observations of {sup 4}He are restricted to low redshift regions where stellar nucleosynthesis has occurred, an observation of high redshift, prestellar, truly primordial {sup 4}He would constitute a fundamental test of the hot, big bang cosmology. At recombination, long after big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) has ended, the temperature anisotropy spectrum imprinted on the CMB depends on the {sup 4}He abundance through its connection to the electron density and the effect of the electron density on Silk damping. Since the relic abundance of {sup 4}He is relatively insensitive to the universal density of baryons, but is sensitive to a non-standard, early Universe expansion rate, the primordial mass fraction of {sup 4}He, Yp, offers a test of the consistency of the standard models of BBN and the CMB and, provides constraints on non-standard physics. Here, the WMAP seven year data (supplemented by other CMB experiments), which lead to an indirect determination of Yp at high redshift, are compared to the BBN predictions and to the independent, direct observations of {sup 4}He in low redshift, extragalactic HII regions. At present, given the very large uncertainties in the CMB-determined primordial {sup 4}He abundance (as well as for the helium abundances inferred from HII region observations), any differences between the BBN predictions and the CMB observations are small, at a level ∼<1.5σ.

  14. CERN-derived analysis of lunar radiation backgrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Svoboda, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The Moon produces radiation which background-limits scientific experiments there. Early analyses of these backgrounds have either failed to take into consideration the effect of charm in particle physics (because they pre-dated its discovery), or have used branching ratios which are no longer strictly valid (due to new accelerator data). We are presently investigating an analytical program for deriving muon and neutrino spectra generated by the Moon, converting an existing CERN computer program known as GEANT which does the same for the Earth. In so doing, this will (1) determine an accurate prompt neutrino spectrum produced by the lunar surface; (2) determine the lunar subsurface particle flux; (3) determine the consequence of charm production physics upon the lunar background radiation environment; and (4) provide an analytical tool for the NASA astrophysics community with which to begin an assessment of the Moon as a scientific laboratory versus its particle radiation environment. This will be done on a recurring basis with the latest experimental results of the particle data groups at Earth-based high-energy accelerators, in particular with the latest branching ratios for charmed meson decay. This will be accomplished for the first time as a full 3-dimensional simulation.

  15. Cosmic Infrared Background and Early Stellar Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.

    2005-01-01

    Cosmic infrared background (CIB) contains information about galaxy luminosities over the entire history of the Universe and can be a powerful diagnostic of the early populations otherwise inaccessible to telescopic studies. Its measurements are very difficult because of the strong IR foregrounds from the Solar system and the Galaxy. Nevertheless, substantial recent progress in measuring the CIB and its structure has been made. The measurements now allow to set significant constraints on early galaxy evolution and, perhaps, even detect the elusive Population III era. We discuss briefly the theory behind the CIB, review the latest measurements of the CIB and its structure, and discuss their implications for detecting and/or constraining the first stars and their epochs.

  16. The Local Contribution to the Microwave Background Radiation(MBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narlikar, Jayant V.; Pecker, Jean-Claude; Wickramasinghe, N. Ch.

    2010-11-01

    In the early fifties, from the early theories of the big bang universe, Gamow, Alpher & Herman have predicted the existence of a "cosmological" microwave background radiation, corresponding to a black body of a few Kelvins. When, in 1964, Penzias & Wilson, observed a radiation at 2.7K, the scientific world concluded quickly it was a proof, a final proof, of the big bang type cosmologies. But it should be realized that, in the beginning of the XX-th century, several authors, from Guillaume to Eddington, have predicted the same thing in a static Universe. We have redone the calculations of Eddington, and based them on the recent and very accurate photometric results from the satellite Hipparcos. In the absence of any expansion, of any big bang type behaviour, we compute the local temperature induced by the reradiation by local matter of stellar radiation, and we found it to be in excellent agreement with the observations. This result, completed by a careful discussion, could lead to a dramatic revision of the classical cosmological concepts.

  17. Spectral Analysis in High Radiation Space Backgrounds with Robust Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasche, G. P.; Coldwell, R. L.; Nobel, L. A.; Rester, A. C.; Trombka, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Spectral analysis software is tested for its ability to fit spectra from space. The approach, which emphasizes the background shape function, is uniquely suited to the identification of weak-strength nuclides in high-radiation background environments.

  18. Summary of the Workshop on Ultraviolet Cosmic Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The relationship of the ultraviolet background radiation to the X-ray background is shown. The ultraviolet background, which is four orders of magnitude brighter than the x-ray background, is much less well determined. The relationship of the ultraviolet background to the EUV background and an excellent summary of the discordant ultraviolet observations at high galactic latitudes are given. A picture of the universe from the point of view of those who study ultraviolet background radiation, with emphasis on the various sources of noise that can affect the measurements is presented. The altitudes of various observing platforms are also indicated.

  19. BACKGROUND RADIATION IN THE UNIVERSE - Short Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, R. D.

    A determination of the motion of the Sun and Local Group relative to the backdrop of galaxies extending to 70 Mpc is used to correct the observed dipole anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background. The resultant intrinsic dipole component of ΔT/T = 3±2×10-4 is consistent with no detected anisotropy.

  20. Cosmic far-ultraviolet background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    It is demonstrated that interstellar dust grains forward-scatter far-ultraviolet radiation extremely strongly: the value of the Henyey-Greenstein scattering parameter g at 1425 A is shown to be at least 0.75; the actual value is very likely greater than 0.9. Also, observations of the Virgo cluster of galaxies sets a limit of tau greater than 2 x 10 to the 25th sec on the lifetime of 17-20 ev/C-squared heavy neutrinos, if such neutrinos are responsible for the gravitational binding of the cluster.

  1. BACKGROUND RADIATION IN THE UNIVERSE - Short Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, J. D.; Juszkiewicz, R.; Sonoda, D. H.

    The authors predict the possible microwave background temperature distributions in anisotropic and inhomogeneous universes close to the Friedmann model. Homogeneous, anisotropic universes are found to possess either quadrupole or hot-spot temperature variations. The detailed appearance of the hot-spot is predicted. The discovery of such a feature would demonstrate the universe to be open and allow the total density to be measured directly.

  2. Spectrum and isotropy of the submillimeter background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlner, D.

    1977-01-01

    Infrared evidence referable to the spectrum and isotropy of the background radiation of the universe is considered, along with theoretical implications. Difficulties in the submillimeter region are indicated. Two types of anisotropy are treated: small-scale granularity (attributable to discrete sources such as galaxies or to condensation in the primordial plasma) and large-scale anisotropies; the anisotropies are discussed as possible indicators of the early history of the universe, and in relation to future possible generalized Michelson-Morley experiments (to detect effects on local physics of the existence of a universal rest frame). A complete blackbody spectrum is seen as the clear signature of the primordial fireball, and slight deviations from a perfect thermal spectrum (or perfect isotropy) are to be sought and scrutinized.

  3. Cancer Mortality Among People Living in Areas With Various Levels of Natural Background Radiation.

    PubMed

    Dobrzyński, Ludwik; Fornalski, Krzysztof W; Feinendegen, Ludwig E

    2015-01-01

    There are many places on the earth, where natural background radiation exposures are elevated significantly above about 2.5 mSv/year. The studies of health effects on populations living in such places are crucially important for understanding the impact of low doses of ionizing radiation. This article critically reviews some recent representative literature that addresses the likelihood of radiation-induced cancer and early childhood death in regions with high natural background radiation. The comparative and Bayesian analysis of the published data shows that the linear no-threshold hypothesis does not likely explain the results of these recent studies, whereas they favor the model of threshold or hormesis. Neither cancers nor early childhood deaths positively correlate with dose rates in regions with elevated natural background radiation.

  4. Cancer Mortality Among People Living in Areas With Various Levels of Natural Background Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Fornalski, Krzysztof W.; Feinendegen, Ludwig E.

    2015-01-01

    There are many places on the earth, where natural background radiation exposures are elevated significantly above about 2.5 mSv/year. The studies of health effects on populations living in such places are crucially important for understanding the impact of low doses of ionizing radiation. This article critically reviews some recent representative literature that addresses the likelihood of radiation-induced cancer and early childhood death in regions with high natural background radiation. The comparative and Bayesian analysis of the published data shows that the linear no-threshold hypothesis does not likely explain the results of these recent studies, whereas they favor the model of threshold or hormesis. Neither cancers nor early childhood deaths positively correlate with dose rates in regions with elevated natural background radiation. PMID:26674931

  5. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  6. Cosmic background radiation anisotropy in an open inflation, cold dark matter cosmogony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Ratra, Bharat; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We compute the cosmic background radiation anisotropy, produced by energy-density fluctuations generated during an early epoch of inflation, in an open cosmological model based on the cold dark matter scenario. At Omega(sub 0) is approximately 0.3-0.4, the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) normalized open model appears to be consistent with most observations.

  7. Is natural background or radiation from nuclear power plants leukemogenic

    SciTech Connect

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    The objective in this review is to provide some facts about normal hemopoietic cell proliferation relevant to leukemogenesis, physical, chemical, and biological facts about radiation effects with the hope that each person will be able to decide for themselves whether background radiation or emissions from nuclear power plants and facilities significantly add to the spontaneous leukemia incidence. 23 refs., 1 tab.

  8. Balloon measurements of the far-infrared background radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlner, D.; Weiss, R.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a balloon-borne radiometer designed to make direct measurements of the background radiation in the spectral range from 1 to 20 cm, and evaluation of the results of two balloon flights performed with the aid of this radiometer. Measurements in five different passbands in the spectral region below 20 per cm were made with a liquid-helium-cooled radiometer in two flights at approximately 40-km altitude. The results obtained are found to be consistent with a 2.7 K thermal radiation background. In addition, an atmospheric radiation of certain magnitude is found to dominate the region above 11 per cm.

  9. Balloon measurements of the far-infrared background radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlner, D.; Weiss, R.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a balloon-borne radiometer designed to make direct measurements of the background radiation in the spectral range from 1 to 20 cm, and evaluation of the results of two balloon flights performed with the aid of this radiometer. Measurements in five different passbands in the spectral region below 20 per cm were made with a liquid-helium-cooled radiometer in two flights at approximately 40-km altitude. The results obtained are found to be consistent with a 2.7 K thermal radiation background. In addition, an atmospheric radiation of certain magnitude is found to dominate the region above 11 per cm.

  10. Social Background Differences in Early Family Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoen, Robert; Landale, Nancy S.; Daniels, Kimberly; Cheng, Yen-Hsin Alice

    2009-01-01

    Social background has historically been recognized as a major factor influencing family behavior, though recent work has largely emphasized racial/ethnic influences. Here we use 1994 - 1995 and 2001 - 2002 Add Health data to examine the cohabitation, first marriage, and first birth experience of young women. In a multi state life table context,…

  11. Measurements of background gamma radiation on Spacelab 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.; Gregory, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear radiation monitor (NRM) which was flown as part of the verification instrumentation on the Spacelab 2 mission (July 29 - August 6, 1985) recorded spectra every 20 seconds and counting rates in coarse energy bands on finer time scales. The gamma radiation environment on Spacelab is characterized by cosmic-ray and trapped proton secondary radiation in the Spacelab/Shuttle, earth albedo radiation, and delayed induced radioactivity in the detector and surrounding materials. It is found that passages through South Atlantic Anomaly protons produce a well-defined background enhancement.

  12. Cosmic Background Radiation and “ether-drift” experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli, M.; Pluchino, A.; Rapisarda, A.

    2016-01-01

    “Ether-drift” experiments have played a crucial role for the origin of relativity. Though, a recent re-analysis shows that those original measurements where light was still propagating in gaseous systems, differently from the modern experiments in vacuum and in solid dielectrics, indicate a small universal anisotropy which is naturally interpreted in terms of a non-local thermal gradient. We argue that this could possibly be the effect, on weakly bound gaseous matter, of the temperature gradient due to the Earth's motion within the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR). Therefore, a check with modern laser interferometers is needed to reproduce the conditions of those early measurements with today's much greater accuracy. We emphasize that an unambiguous confirmation of our interpretation would have far-reaching consequences. For instance, it would imply that all physical systems on the moving Earth are exposed to a tiny energy flow, an effect which, in principle, could also induce forms of self-organization in matter.

  13. Ultraviolet background radiation and the search for decaying neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of the observed far-ultraviolet background at high galactic latitudes is studied in order to find evidence of radiation from neutrino decay. It is concluded that at latitudes above about 20 degrees, the limit on any light scattered from interstellar dust or the limit on light from any source other than stars is of order 300 photons/sq cm sec ster A. Superficial evidence for radiation from decaying neutrinos is provided by an examination of the spectrum of the observed background at the highest galactic latitudes, although the spectrum is so uncertain that conclusions are not possible.

  14. Ultraviolet background radiation and the search for decaying neutrinos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of the observed far-ultraviolet background at high galactic latitudes is studied in order to find evidence of radiation from neutrino decay. It is concluded that at latitudes above about 20 degrees, the limit on any light scattered from interstellar dust or the limit on light from any source other than stars is of order 300 photons/sq cm sec ster A. Superficial evidence for radiation from decaying neutrinos is provided by an examination of the spectrum of the observed background at the highest galactic latitudes, although the spectrum is so uncertain that conclusions are not possible.

  15. On the omnipresent background gamma radiation of the continuous spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banjanac, R.; Maletić, D.; Joković, D.; Veselinović, N.; Dragić, A.; Udovičić, V.; Aničin, I.

    2014-05-01

    The background spectrum of a germanium detector, shielded from the radiations arriving from the lower and open for the radiations arriving from the upper hemisphere, is studied by means of absorption measurements, both in a ground level and in an underground laboratory. The low-energy continuous portion of this background spectrum that peaks at around 100 keV, which is its most intense component, is found to be of very similar shape at the two locations. It is established that it is mostly due to the radiations of the real continuous spectrum, which is quite similar to the instrumental one. The intensity of this radiation is in our cases estimated to about 8000 photons/(m2s·2π·srad) in the ground level laboratory, and to about 5000 photons/(m2s·2π·srad) in the underground laboratory, at the depth of 25 m.w.e. Simulations by GEANT4 and CORSIKA demonstrate that this radiation is predominantly of terrestrial origin, due to environmental gamma radiations scattered off the materials that surround the detector (the "skyshine radiation"), and to a far less extent to cosmic rays of degraded energy.

  16. Cosmic microwave background radiation of black hole universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T. X.

    2010-11-01

    Modifying slightly the big bang theory, the author has recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe. This new cosmological model is consistent with the Mach principle, Einsteinian general theory of relativity, and observations of the universe. The origin, structure, evolution, and expansion of the black hole universe have been presented in the recent sequence of American Astronomical Society (AAS) meetings and published recently in a scientific journal: Progress in Physics. This paper explains the observed 2.725 K cosmic microwave background radiation of the black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present universe with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses. According to the black hole universe model, the observed cosmic microwave background radiation can be explained as the black body radiation of the black hole universe, which can be considered as an ideal black body. When a hot and dense star-like black hole accretes its ambient materials and merges with other black holes, it expands and cools down. A governing equation that expresses the possible thermal history of the black hole universe is derived from the Planck law of black body radiation and radiation energy conservation. The result obtained by solving the governing equation indicates that the radiation temperature of the present universe can be ˜2.725 K if the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole, and is therefore consistent with the observation of the cosmic microwave background radiation. A smaller or younger black hole universe usually cools down faster. The characteristics of the original star-like or supermassive black hole are not critical to the physical properties of the black hole universe at present, because matter and radiation are mainly from the outside space, i.e., the mother universe.

  17. Background radiation dose of dumpsites in Ota and Environs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usikalu, M. R.; Ola, O. O.; Achuka, J. A.; Babarimisa, I. O.; Ayara, W. A.

    2017-05-01

    In-situ measurement of background radiation dose from selected dumpsites in Ota and its environs was done using Radialert Nuclear Radiation Monitor (Digilert 200). Ten measurements were taken from each dumpsite. The measured background radiation range between 0.015 mRhr-1 for AOD and 0.028 mRhr-1 for SUS dumpsites. The calculated annual equivalent doses vary between 1.31 mSvyr-1 for AOD and 2.28 mSv/yr for SUS dumpsites. The air absorbed dose calculated ranged from 150 nGyhr-1 to 280 nGy/hr for AOD and SUS dumpsites respectively with an average value of 217 nGyhr-1 for all the locations. All the estimated parameters were higher than permissible limit set for background radiation for the general public. Conclusively, the associated challenge and radiation burden posed by the wastes on the studied locations and scavengers is high. Therefore, there is need by the regulatory authorities to look into the way and how waste can be properly managed so as to alleviate the effects on the populace leaving and working in the dumpsites vicinity.

  18. Effect of natural background radiation on dermatoglyphic traits.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, M K; Malik, S L; Grewal, M S; Singh, I P; Sudarshan, K J; Kochupillai, N; Verma, I C

    1980-01-01

    Long term exposure to natural background radiation could cause gross abnormalities in individuals and at the population level. Studies conducted on the coastal Kerala population which is known to be receiving fifteen times the normal permissible dose of radiation support this. This study aims at understanding the deviations, if any, in the normal human variation as a result of such high natural radiation. A detailed quantitative and qualitative dermatoglyphic study was done on two communities i.e. Hindus and Christians, living separately in the radiation area. The significant differences were observed between control and exposed groups with regard to d-t ridge count, distances c-t and angle atd. The susceptibility of the axial triradius to environmental distrubances is discussed.

  19. Search for the Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation using COBE Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hauser, Michael

    2001-01-01

    This project was initiated to allow completion of the primary investigation of the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) on NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (CORE) mission, and to study the implications of those findings. The Principal Investigator (PI) on this grant was also the Principal Investigator on the DIRBE team. The project had two specific goals: Goal 1: Seek improved limits upon, or detections of, the cosmic infrared background radiation using data from the COBE Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE). Goal 2: Explore the implications of the limits and measured values of the cosmic infrared background for energy releases in the Universe since the formation of the first luminous sources. Both of these goals have been successfully accomplished.

  20. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenfelter, J.; Yeh, M.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Fan, S.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Morrell, S.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Thompson, S. J.; Varner, R. L.; Wang, W.; Watson, S. M.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yen, Y. -R.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  1. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, B.; Baldenegro, C. X.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Fan, S.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Kettell, S.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez, D.; McKeown, R. D.; Morrell, S.; Mueller, P. E.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Thompson, S. J.; Varner, R. L.; Wang, W.; Watson, S. M.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yeh, M.; Yen, Y.-R.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2016-01-01

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  2. THE MYSTERY OF THE COSMIC DIFFUSE ULTRAVIOLET BACKGROUND RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, Richard Conn; Murthy, Jayant; Overduin, James; Tyler, Joshua E-mail: jmurthy@yahoo.com E-mail: 97tyler@cardinalmail.cua.edu

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic background radiation in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1300-1700 Å) is deduced to originate only partially in the dust-scattered radiation of FUV-emitting stars: the source of a substantial fraction of the FUV background radiation remains a mystery. The radiation is remarkably uniform at both far northern and far southern Galactic latitudes and increases toward lower Galactic latitudes at all Galactic longitudes. We examine speculation that this might be due to interaction of the dark matter with the nuclei of the interstellar medium, but we are unable to point to a plausible mechanism for an effective interaction. We also explore the possibility that we are seeing radiation from bright FUV-emitting stars scattering from a ''second population'' of interstellar grains—grains that are small compared with FUV wavelengths. Such grains are known to exist, and they scatter with very high albedo, with an isotropic scattering pattern. However, comparison with the observed distribution (deduced from their 100 μm emission) of grains at high Galactic latitudes shows no correlation between the grains' location and the observed FUV emission. Our modeling of the FUV scattering by small grains also shows that there must be remarkably few such ''smaller'' grains at high Galactic latitudes, both north and south; this likely means simply that there is very little interstellar dust of any kind at the Galactic poles, in agreement with Perry and Johnston. We also review our limited knowledge of the cosmic diffuse background at ultraviolet wavelengths shortward of Lyα—it could be that our ''second component'' of the diffuse FUV background persists shortward of the Lyman limit and is the cause of the reionization of the universe.

  3. The Mystery of the Cosmic Diffuse Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Richard Conn; Murthy, Jayant; Overduin, James; Tyler, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic background radiation in the Galaxy Evolution Explorer far-ultraviolet (FUV, 1300-1700 Å) is deduced to originate only partially in the dust-scattered radiation of FUV-emitting stars: the source of a substantial fraction of the FUV background radiation remains a mystery. The radiation is remarkably uniform at both far northern and far southern Galactic latitudes and increases toward lower Galactic latitudes at all Galactic longitudes. We examine speculation that this might be due to interaction of the dark matter with the nuclei of the interstellar medium, but we are unable to point to a plausible mechanism for an effective interaction. We also explore the possibility that we are seeing radiation from bright FUV-emitting stars scattering from a "second population" of interstellar grains—grains that are small compared with FUV wavelengths. Such grains are known to exist, and they scatter with very high albedo, with an isotropic scattering pattern. However, comparison with the observed distribution (deduced from their 100 μm emission) of grains at high Galactic latitudes shows no correlation between the grains' location and the observed FUV emission. Our modeling of the FUV scattering by small grains also shows that there must be remarkably few such "smaller" grains at high Galactic latitudes, both north and south; this likely means simply that there is very little interstellar dust of any kind at the Galactic poles, in agreement with Perry and Johnston. We also review our limited knowledge of the cosmic diffuse background at ultraviolet wavelengths shortward of Lyα—it could be that our "second component" of the diffuse FUV background persists shortward of the Lyman limit and is the cause of the reionization of the universe.

  4. Measurement of background gamma radiation in the northern Marshall Islands

    PubMed Central

    Bordner, Autumn S.; Crosswell, Danielle A.; Katz, Ainsley O.; Shah, Jill T.; Zhang, Catherine R.; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Hughes, Emlyn W.; Ruderman, Malvin A.

    2016-01-01

    We report measurements of background gamma radiation levels on six islands in the northern Marshall Islands (Enewetak, Medren, and Runit onEnewetak Atoll; Bikini and Nam on Bikini Atoll; and Rongelap on Rongelap Atoll). Measurable excess radiation could be expected from the decay of 137Cs produced by the US nuclear testing program there from 1946 to 1958. These recordings are of relevance to safety of human habitation and resettlement. We find low levels of gamma radiation for the settled island of Enewetak [mean = 7.6 millirem/year (mrem/y) = 0.076 millisievert/year (mSv/y)], larger levels of gamma radiation for the island of Rongelap (mean = 19.8 mrem/y = 0.198 mSv/y), and relatively high gamma radiation on the island of Bikini (mean = 184 mrem/y = 1.84 mSv/y). Distributions of gamma radiation levels are provided, and hot spots are discussed. We provide interpolated maps for four islands (Enewetak, Medren, Bikini, and Rongelap), and make comparisons to control measurements performed on the island of Majuro in the southern Marshall Islands, measurements made in Central Park in New York City, and the standard agreed upon by the United States and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) governments (100 mrem/y = 1 mSv/y). External gamma radiation levels on Bikini Island significantly exceed this standard (P = <<0.01), and external gamma radiation levels on the other islands are below the standard. To determine conclusively whether these islands are safe for habitation, radiation exposure through additional pathways such as food ingestion must be considered. PMID:27274073

  5. Measurement of background gamma radiation in the northern Marshall Islands.

    PubMed

    Bordner, Autumn S; Crosswell, Danielle A; Katz, Ainsley O; Shah, Jill T; Zhang, Catherine R; Nikolic-Hughes, Ivana; Hughes, Emlyn W; Ruderman, Malvin A

    2016-06-21

    We report measurements of background gamma radiation levels on six islands in the northern Marshall Islands (Enewetak, Medren, and Runit onEnewetak Atoll; Bikini and Nam on Bikini Atoll; and Rongelap on Rongelap Atoll). Measurable excess radiation could be expected from the decay of (137)Cs produced by the US nuclear testing program there from 1946 to 1958. These recordings are of relevance to safety of human habitation and resettlement. We find low levels of gamma radiation for the settled island of Enewetak [mean = 7.6 millirem/year (mrem/y) = 0.076 millisievert/year (mSv/y)], larger levels of gamma radiation for the island of Rongelap (mean = 19.8 mrem/y = 0.198 mSv/y), and relatively high gamma radiation on the island of Bikini (mean = 184 mrem/y = 1.84 mSv/y). Distributions of gamma radiation levels are provided, and hot spots are discussed. We provide interpolated maps for four islands (Enewetak, Medren, Bikini, and Rongelap), and make comparisons to control measurements performed on the island of Majuro in the southern Marshall Islands, measurements made in Central Park in New York City, and the standard agreed upon by the United States and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) governments (100 mrem/y = 1 mSv/y). External gamma radiation levels on Bikini Island significantly exceed this standard (P = <0.01), and external gamma radiation levels on the other islands are below the standard. To determine conclusively whether these islands are safe for habitation, radiation exposure through additional pathways such as food ingestion must be considered.

  6. Radiative properties of the background aerosol: absorption component of extinction.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A D; Charlson, R J

    1985-07-19

    The light-scattering and light-absorption coefficients of the global background aerosol define its single-scatter albedo. Continuous, simultaneous measurements of these optical coefficients were made on a daily basis for the remote marine mid-troposphere; such measurements are essential for assessment of the effects of aerosol on atmospheric radiative transfer. Measurements of light-absorption coefficients made at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii were higher than expected, and the single-scatter albedo was lower than the value often used in radiative transfer models. Soot appears to be the most likely primary absorber, and hemispheric dispersal of this combustion-derived material is suggested.

  7. Background radiation measurements at high power research reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Ashenfelter, J.; Yeh, M.; Balantekin, B.; ...

    2015-10-23

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including γ-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the backgroundmore » fields encountered. Furthermore, the general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.« less

  8. Cosmic background radiation temperature at 2. 64 millimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, P.; Hegyi, D.J.; Kutner, M.L.; Mandolesi, N. Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY CNR, Istituto di Studio e Tecnologie sulle Radiazzioni Estraterrestri, Bologna )

    1989-11-01

    A precise value for cosmic background radiation (CBR) temperature at 2.64 mm is reported using interstellar CN molecules in absorption in the direction of Zeta Oph. A search for CN emission at 2.64 mm makes it possible to set a strong limit on local excitation sources that could elevate the population of the 2.64 mm rotational states above that expected from the cosmic background radiation. To one standard deviation, observations show that T(loc) is not above 31 mK. A reanalysis of data previously reported has improved the precision of the optical equivalent widths so that this source of uncertainty is now 13.3 mK. Uncertainties in the saturation correction model add to the error budget. The final value for T(CBR) = 2.796(+0.014, -0.039) K. 27 refs.

  9. Study of Natural Background Radiation around Gurvanbulag Uranium Deposit Area

    SciTech Connect

    Enkhbat, N.; Norov, N.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.; Otgooloi, B.; Bat-Erdene, B.

    2009-03-31

    In this work, we will show the study of natural background radiation level around the Gurvanbulag (GB) uranium deposit area in the eastern part of Mongolia. We collected environmental soil samples from 102 points around GB Uranium deposit. Collected samples were measured by HPGe gamma spectrometer at Nuclear Research Center, National University of Mongolia. The averaged activity concentrations of Ra-226, Th-232, K-40, and Cs-137 were 37.1, 29, 939, and 17.7 Bq/kg, respectively.

  10. Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation of Black Hole Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianxi

    2009-05-01

    Recently, the author has proposed an alternative cosmological model called black hole universe. According to this model, the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole with several solar masses, and gradually grew up through a supermassive black hole with billion solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillion solar masses by accreting ambient materials and merging with other black holes. The entire space is structured with infinite layers hierarchically. The innermost three layers are the universe that we are living, the outside called mother universe, and the inside star-like and supermassive black holes called child universes. The outermost layer is infinite in radius and limits to zero for both the mass density and absolute temperature. The observed cosmic microwave background radiation can be explained as the black body radiation of the black hole universe. When a hot and dense star-like black hole accretes its ambient matter and radiation or merges with other black holes, it expands and cools down. In terms of the Planck law of the black body radiation, a possible thermal history of the black hole universe is obtained. The result shows that the temperature of the present universe can be 3 K as observed if the universe originated from a hot star-like black hole. The initial properties (e.g., temperature, angular momentum, etc.) of the star-like black hole are not critical to the present universe, because most matter and radiation are from the mother universe. Therefore, the black hole universe model is also consistent with the observation of the cosmic microwave background radiation.

  11. High Precision Cosmology with the Cosmic Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhang, Marzieh

    In this thesis we investigate the two cosmic epochs of inflation and recombination, through their imprints on the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background radiation. To probe the early universe we develop a map-based maximum-likelihood estimator to measure the amplitude of inflation-induced gravity waves, parametrized by r, from the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization maps. Being optimal by construction, the estimator avoids E-B mixing, a possible source of contamination in the tiny B-mode detection, the target of many current and near future CMB experiments. We explore the leakage from the E- to the B-mode of polarization by using this estimator to study the linear response of the B-mode signal at different scales to variations in the E- mode power. Similarly, for various observational cases, we probe the dependence of r measurement on the signal from different scales of E and B polarization. The estimator is used to make forecasts for Spider-like and Planck-like experimental specifications and to investigate the sky-coverage optimization of the Spider-like case. We compare the forecast errors on r to the results from a similar multipole-based estimator which, by ignoring the mode-mixing, sets a lower limit on the achievable error on r. We find that an experiment with Spider-like specifications with fsky ˜ 0:02--0:2 could place a 2sigma r ≈ 0:014 bound (˜ 95% CL), which rises to 0:02 with an ℓ-dependent foreground residual left over from an assumed efficient component separation. For the Planck-like survey, a Galaxy-masked ( fsky = 0:75) sky would give 2sigmar ≈ 0:015, rising to ≈ 0:05 with the foreground residuals. We also use a novel information-based framework to compare how different generations of CMB experiments reveal information about the early universe, through their measurements of r. We also probe the epoch of recombination by investigating possible fluctuations in the free electron fraction Xe

  12. Assessment of Radiation Background Variation for Moving Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, James Christopher; Rennie, John Alan; Toevs, James Waldo; Wallace, Darrin J.; Abhold, Mark Edward

    2015-07-13

    The introduction points out that radiation backgrounds fluctuate across very short distances: factors include geology, soil composition, altitude, building structures, topography, and other manmade structures; and asphalt and concrete can vary significantly over short distances. Brief descriptions are given of the detection system, experimental setup, and background variation measurements. It is concluded that positive and negative gradients can greatly reduce the detection sensitivity of an MDS: negative gradients create opportunities for false negatives (nondetection), and positive gradients create a potentially unacceptable FAR (above 1%); the location of use for mobile detection is important to understand; spectroscopic systems provide more information for screening out false alarms and may be preferred for mobile use; and mobile monitor testing at LANL accounts for expected variations in the background.

  13. Radiometer system to map the cosmic background radiation.

    PubMed

    Gorenstein, M V; Muller, R A; Smoot, G F; Tyson, J A

    1978-04-01

    We have developed a 33-GHz airborne radiometer system to map large angular scale variations in the temperature of the 3 K cosmic background radiation. A ferrite circulator switches a room-temperature mixer between two antennas pointing 60 degrees apart in the sky. In 40 min of observing, the radiometer can measure the anisotropy of the microwave background with an accuracy of +/-1 mK rms, or about 1 part in 3000 of 3 K. The apparatus is flown in a U-2 jet to 20 km altitude where 33-GHz thermal microwave emission from the atmosphere is at a low level. A second radiometer, tuned to 54 GHz near oxygen emission lines, monitors spurious signals from residual atmospheric radiation. The antennas, which have an extremely low side-lobe response of less than -65 dB past 60 degrees , reject anisotropic radiation from the earth's surface. Periodic interchange of the antenna positions and reversal of the aircraft's flight direction cancel equipment-based imbalances. The system has been operated successfully in U-2 aircraft flown from NASA-Ames at Moffett Field, CA.

  14. Radiometer system to map the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Muller, R. A.; Smoot, G. F.; Tyson, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A 33-GHz airborne radiometer system has been developed to map large angular scale variations in the temperature of the 3 K cosmic background radiation. A ferrite circulator switches a room-temperature mixer between two antennas pointing 60 deg apart in the sky. In 40 min of observing, the radiometer can measure the anisotropy of the microwave background with an accuracy of plus or minus 1 mK rms, or about 1 part in 3000 of 3 K. The apparatus is flown in a U-2 jet to 20 km altitude where 33-GHz thermal microwave emission from the atmosphere is at a low level. A second radiometer, tuned to 54 GHz near oxygen emission lines, monitors spurious signals from residual atmospheric radiation. The antennas, which have an extremely low side-lobe response of less than -65 dB past 60 deg, reject anisotropic radiation from the earth's surface. Periodic interchange of the antenna positions and reversal of the aircraft's flight direction cancel equipment-based imbalances. The system has been operated successfully in U-2 aircraft flown from NASA-Ames at Moffett Field, Calif.

  15. GEANT4 simulation of APEX background radiation and shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaluarachchi, Maduka M.; Cates, Gordon D.; Wojtsekhowski, B.

    2015-04-01

    The A' Experiment (APEX), which is approved to run at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) Hall A, will search for a new vector boson that is hypothesized to be a possible force carrier that couples to dark matter. APEX results should be sensitive to the mass range of 65 MeV to 550 MeV, and high sensitivity will be achieved by means of a high intensity 100 μA beam on a 0.5 g/cm2 Tungsten target resulting in very high luminosity. The experiment should be able to observe the A ' with a coupling constant α ' ~ 1 × 107 times smaller than the electromagnetic coupling constant α. To deal safely with such enormous intensity and luminosity, a full radiation analysis must be used to help with the design of proper radiation shielding. The purpose of this talk is to present preliminary results obtained by simulating radiation background from the APEX experiment using the 3D Monte-Carlo transport code Geant4. Included in the simulation is a detailed Hall A setup: the hall, spectrometers and shield house, beam dump, beam line, septa magnet with its field, as well as the production target. The results were compared to the APEX test run data and used in development of the radiation shielding for sensitive electronics.

  16. The ROSCOE MANUAL. Volume 27: Natural background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlin, D. A.; Schoonover, M. R.

    1980-07-01

    The Natural Background Radiation Module computes the Earth's natural upwelling spectral radiance (from 2 to 5 micrometers) by averaging over paths in an Earth-tangent cone with vertex at each selected altitude. The processes contributing to the radiance are emission from air, Earth's surface, and clouds and reflection of solar radiation from Earth's surface and clouds; attenuation is by molecules and aerosols. The Module integrates ROSCOE-IR models for atmosphere, atmospheric thermal emission, molecular transmittance, aerosols, clouds, Earth's surface characterization and radiance, solar radiation, and upwelling natural radiation. The last 3 models are documented fully; other models (three of which were developed by other organizations) are documented mainly in terms of functions performed, inputs, and outputs. The user selects the modeled Earth's surface from one of seven categories (with possibly an associated descriptor): Lambertian surface (and diffuse reflectance), wind-ruffled water (and wind speed), snow (and its age parameter), sand, soil, foliage, and urban material (and degree-of-urbanization parameter).

  17. Large-angular-scale anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1981-03-01

    Results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3-K cosmic background radiation are reported. A dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz flown aboard a U-2 aircraft to 20-km altitude on 11 flights between December 1976 and May 1978 measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the Northern Hemisphere. Measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fitted by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 3.6 + or - 0.5 mK, corresponding to a velocity of 360 + or - 50 km/s toward the direction 11.2 + or - 0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 deg + or - 8 deg declination.

  18. Human response to high-background radiation environments on Earth and in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Manti, L.

    The main long-term goal of the space exploration program is the colonization of the planets of the Solar System The high cosmic radiation equivalent dose rate represents a major problem for a stable and safe colonization of the planets The dose rate on Mars ranges between 60 and 150 mSv year depending on the Solar cycle and altitude and can reach values as high as 360 mSv year on the Moon The average dose rate on the Earth is about 3 mSv year reduced to about 1 mSv year excluding the internal exposure to Rn daughters However some areas of the Earth have anomalously high levels of background radiation Values 200-400 times higher than the world average are found in regions where monazite sand deposits are abundant Population in Tibet experience a high cosmic radiation background Epidemiological studies did not detect any adverse health effects in the populations living in those high-background radiation areas on Earth Chromosomal aberrations in the peripheral blood lymphocytes from the population living in the high-background radiation areas have been measured in several studies because the chromosomal damage represents an early biomarker of cancer risk Similar cytogenetic studies have been recently performed in cohort of astronauts involved in single or repeated space flights over many years A comparison of the cytogenetic findings in populations exposed at high dose rate on Earth or in space will be described

  19. Maser radiometer for cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1982-06-01

    A maser amplifier was incorporated into a low noise radiometer designed to measure large-scale anisotropy in the 3 deg K microwave background radiation. To minimize emission by atmospheric water vapor and oxygen, the radiometer is flown in a small balloon to an altitude to 25 km. Three successful flights were made - two from Palestine, Texas and one from Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. Good sky coverage is important to the experiment. Data from the northern hemisphere flights has been edited and calibrated.

  20. The submillimeter spectrum of the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Hayakawa, S.; Matsuo, H.; Murakami, H.; Sato, S.

    1988-01-01

    The diffuse brightness of the sky has been measured in six submillimeter passbands, using a rocket-borne, liquid helium-cooled, absolute radiometer. The flux measured at 1160 microns is in good agreement with the average of longer wavelength measurements of the temperature of the cosmic background radiation. The fluxes measured at 709 microns and 481 microns show a rapid decrease toward shorter wavelength, but correspond to significantly higher temperatures. No local source of this excess flux has been identified. The spectrum of the excess significantly constrains cosmological models. Data at 262, 137, and 102 microns are consistent with emission from interstellar dust.

  1. Maser radiometer for cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fixsen, D. J.; Wilkinson, D. T.

    1982-01-01

    A maser amplifier was incorporated into a low noise radiometer designed to measure large-scale anisotropy in the 3 deg K microwave background radiation. To minimize emission by atmospheric water vapor and oxygen, the radiometer is flown in a small balloon to an altitude to 25 km. Three successful flights were made - two from Palestine, Texas and one from Sao Jose dos Campos, Brazil. Good sky coverage is important to the experiment. Data from the northern hemisphere flights has been edited and calibrated.

  2. Anisotropies of the cosmic background radiation by domain wall networks

    SciTech Connect

    Nambu, Yasusada; Ishihara, Hideki; Gouda, Naoteru; Sugiyama, Naoshi )

    1991-06-01

    This paper discusses cosmological effects by domain wall formation associated with a late time phase transition after decoupling. Assuming the existence of rigid domain wall networks, a simple one-dimensional model is constructed and the quadrupole anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) is calculated. Contrary to expectation, the gravitational potential of a domain wall itself does not disturb the isotropy of CBR. Estimating the quadrupole anisotropy of CBR induced by the wall-driven growth of matter density perturbations, a 100/h Mpc periodic wall structure is found to be consistent with the observed upper bound. 12 refs.

  3. Spectrum of the cosmic background radiation at millimeter wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.B.; Richards, P.L.; Timusk, T.

    1985-07-15

    We have measured the spectrum of the cosmic background radiation in five frequency bands extending from 2.3 to 11.0 cm/sup -1/ with a balloon-borne liquid-helium cooled pho- tometer. The photometer compares the flux from the sky to the flux from an internal blackbody at 3.2 K. All five measurements are consistent with temperatures in the range 2.78 +- 0.11 K, which is in good agreement with temperatures measured at lower frequencies. We find no significant deviation from a thermal spectrum.

  4. New Measurements of the Cosmic Background Radiation Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, G.F.; De Amici, G.; Levin, S.; Witebsky, C.

    1984-12-01

    We have continued our program to measure the long-wavelength spectrum of the cosmic background radiation. Our previous observations were at five wavelengths--0.33, 0.9, 3.0, 6.3, and 12.0 cm--and had a weighted average value of 2.73 {+-} 0.05 K and deviated from a Planckian spectrum by less than 6%. In August 1984, we repeated our observations at 3.0, 0.9, and 0.33 cm and made new observations with a radiometer tunable from 1.7 to 15 cm. Preliminary analysis indicate that the new data are consistent with our previous results.

  5. Distortion of the cosmic background radiation by superconducting strings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostriker, J. P.; Thompson, C.

    1987-01-01

    Superconducting cosmic strings can be significant energy sources, keeping the universe ionized past the commonly assumed epoch of recombination. As a result, the spectrum of the cosmic background radiation is distorted in the presence of heated primordial gas via the Suniaev-Zel'dovich effect. Thiis distortion can be relatively large: the Compton y parameter attains a maximum in the range 0.001-0.005, with these values depending on the mass scale of the string. A significant contribution to y comes from loops decaying at high redshift when the universe is optically thick to Thomson scattering. Moreover, the isotropic spectral distortion is large compared to fluctuations at all angular scales.

  6. Search for Linear Polarization of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lubin, P. M.; Smoot, G. F.

    1978-10-01

    We present preliminary measurements of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background (3 deg K blackbody) radiation. These ground-based measurements are made at 9 mm wavelength. We find no evidence for linear polarization, and set an upper limit for a polarized component of 0.8 m deg K with a 95% confidence level. This implies that the present rate of expansion of the Universe is isotropic to one part in 10{sup 6}, assuming no re-ionization of the primordial plasma after recombination

  7. A Comparison between High-Energy Radiation Background Models and SPENVIS Trapped-Particle Radiation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krizmanic, John F.

    2013-01-01

    We have been assessing the effects of background radiation in low-Earth orbit for the next generation of X-ray and Cosmic-ray experiments, in particular for International Space Station orbit. Outside the areas of high fluxes of trapped radiation, we have been using parameterizations developed by the Fermi team to quantify the high-energy induced background. For the low-energy background, we have been using the AE8 and AP8 SPENVIS models to determine the orbit fractions where the fluxes of trapped particles are too high to allow for useful operation of the experiment. One area we are investigating is how the fluxes of SPENVIS predictions at higher energies match the fluxes at the low-energy end of our parameterizations. I will summarize our methodology for background determination from the various sources of cosmogenic and terrestrial radiation and how these compare to SPENVIS predictions in overlapping energy ranges.

  8. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1�}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  9. Radiation in the Einstein universe and the cosmic background

    SciTech Connect

    Segal, I.E.

    1983-11-15

    It is shown that the cosmic background radiation is not at all uniquely or scientifically relatively economically indicative of a ''big bang.'' Specifically, essentially any temporally homogeneous theory in the Einstein universe is consistent with the existence of a cosmic background radiation (CBR) conforming to the Planck law; in particular, the chronometric cosmology is such. It is noted that the Einstein universe appears particularly natural as a habitat for photons by virtue of the absence of infrared divergences and of the absolute convergence of the trace for associated Gibbs-state density matrices. These features are connected with the closed character of space in the Einstein universe, and facilitate the use of the latter in modeling local phenomena, in place of Minkowski space with periodic boundary conditions or the like, with minimal loss of covariance or effect on the wave functions. In particular, the Einstein universe may be used in the analysis of the perturbation of a Planck-law spectrum due to a local nonvanishing isotropic angular momentum of the CBR, of whatever origin. The estimated distortion of the spectrum due to such a kinematically admissible effect is in very good agreement with that observed by Woody and Richards, which is opposite in direction to those earlier predicted by big-bang theories. The theoretical analysis involves a preliminary treatment of equilibria of linear quantum fields with supplementary quasilinear constraints.

  10. A flat Universe from high-resolution maps of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    PubMed

    de Bernardis P; Ade; Bock; Bond; Borrill; Boscaleri; Coble; Crill; De Gasperis G; Farese; Ferreira; Ganga; Giacometti; Hivon; Hristov; Iacoangeli; Jaffe; Lange; Martinis; Masi; Mason; Mauskopf; Melchiorri; Miglio; Montroy; Netterfield

    2000-04-27

    The blackbody radiation left over from the Big Bang has been transformed by the expansion of the Universe into the nearly isotropic 2.73 K cosmic microwave background. Tiny inhomogeneities in the early Universe left their imprint on the microwave background in the form of small anisotropies in its temperature. These anisotropies contain information about basic cosmological parameters, particularly the total energy density and curvature of the Universe. Here we report the first images of resolved structure in the microwave background anisotropies over a significant part of the sky. Maps at four frequencies clearly distinguish the microwave background from foreground emission. We compute the angular power spectrum of the microwave background, and find a peak at Legendre multipole Ipeak = (197 +/- 6), with an amplitude delta T200 = (69 +/- 8) microK. This is consistent with that expected for cold dark matter models in a flat (euclidean) Universe, as favoured by standard inflationary models.

  11. A Flat Universe from High-Resolution Maps of the Cosmic MicrowaveBackground Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    de Bernardis, P.; Ade, P.A.R.; Bock, J.J.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill,J.; Boscaleri, A.; Coble, K.; Crill, B.P.; De Gasperis, G.; Farese, P.C.; Ferreira, P.G.; Ganga, K.; Giacometti, M.; Hivon, E.; Hristov, V.V.; Iacoangeli, A.; Jaffe, A.H.; Lange, A.E.; Martinis, L.; Masi, S.; Mason,P.; Mauskopf, P.D.; Melchiorri, A.; Miglio, L.; Montroy, T.; Netterfield,C.B.; Pascale, E.; Piacentini, F.; Pogosyan, D.; Prunet, S.; Rao, S.; Romeo, G.; Ruhl, J.E.; Scaramuzzi, F.; Sforna, D.; Vittorio, N.

    2000-04-28

    The blackbody radiation left over from the Big Bang has been transformed by the expansion of the Universe into the nearly isotropic 2.73 K Cosmic Microwave Background. Tiny inhomogeneities in the early Universe left their imprint on the microwave background in the form of small anisotropies in its temperature. These anisotropies contain information about basic cosmological parameters, particularly the total energy density and curvature of the universe. Here we report the first images of resolved structure in the microwave background anisotropies over a significant part of the sky. Maps at four frequencies clearly distinguish the microwave background from foreground emission. We compute the angular power spectrum of the microwave background, and find a peak at Legendre multipole {ell}{sub peak} = (197 {+-} 6), with an amplitude DT{sub 200} = (69 {+-} 8){mu}K. This is consistent with that expected for cold dark matter models in a flat (euclidean) Universe, as favored by standard inflationary scenarios.

  12. Annual radiation background in the City of Isfahan.

    PubMed

    Tavakoli, Mohammad Bagher

    2003-07-01

    Measurement of environmental exposure is very important from different points of view especially for human health. In Iran, it is measured in some cities especially in high background areas such as Ramsar, but so far there is not any measurement in Isfahan. Measurements were performed using CaSO4: Dy TLDs. The locations under investigations were 52 health centers distributed all around Isfahan city. Each TLD badge was put in a special plastic bag and left over the roofs of the selected health center for a month. The procedure was repeated for all 12 months of the year 1379 (21st March 2000 to 20th March 2001). The maximum and the minimum of obtained results for dose equivalent in different months and locations were 15.9 x 10(-2) and 6.5 x 10(-2) mSv. Obtained maximum and minimum of the means between all the locations were 10.5 x 10(-2) and 8.6 x 10(2) mSv for the whole year. Monthly mean and SD for Isfahan city for the whole year were 9.7 x 10(-2) and 1.5 x 10(-2) respectively therefore mean annual dose equivalent in Isfahan city is 1.16 x 0.18 mSv. The results do not show any high background radiation area. From the total of 624 measurements at 52 sites of Isfahan, obtained annual outdoor X and gamma ray dose equivalent for a person living in isfahan is 1.16 x 0.18 mSv. This figure is about 48.3% of the world average total radiation background reported by UNSCEAR.

  13. Ralph A. Alpher, Robert C. Herman, and the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpher, Victor S.

    2012-09-01

    Much of the literature on the history of the prediction and discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) is incorrect in some respects. I focus on the early history of the CMBR, from its prediction in 1948 to its measurement in 1964, basing my discussion on the published literature, the private papers of Ralph A. Alpher, and interviews with several of the major figures involved in the prediction and measurement of the CMBR. I show that the early prediction of the CMBR continues to be widely misunderstood.

  14. Far Infrared Spectrometry of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Mather, J. C.

    1974-01-01

    I describe two experiments to measure the cosmic background radiation near 1 mm wavelength. The first was a ground-based search for spectral lines, made with a Fabry-Perot interferometer and an InSb detector. The second is a measurement of the spectrum from 3 to 18 cm{sup -1}, made with a balloon-borne Fourier transform spectrometer. It is a polarizing Michelson interferometer, cooled in liquid helium, and operated with a germanium bolometer. I give the theory of operation, construction details, and experimental results. The first experiment was successfully completed but the second suffered equipment malfunction on its first flight. I describe the theory of Fourier transformations and give a new understanding of convolutional phase correction computations. I discuss for infrared bolometer calibration procedures, and tabulate test results on nine detectors. I describe methods of improving bolometer sensitivity with immersion optics and with conductive film blackening.

  15. New 33 GHz measurements of the cosmic background radiation intensity

    SciTech Connect

    De Amici, G.; Smoot, G.; Friedman, S.D.; Witebsky, C.

    1985-11-15

    New measurements have been made of the intensity of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 33 GHz (0.91 cm). The experiment was part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the CBR between 2.5 and 90 GHz (12 and 0.33 cm). Details are given of the experimental equipment and measurement procedures. The results of measurements made in 1982 and 1983 are presented and discussed in relation to preliminary results from the other radiometers. The measured value, T/sub CBR/ = (2.81 +- 0.12) K at 68% of confidence limits, is in very good agreement both with those previously published and those reported by our collaborators.

  16. Background radiation measurements at 2200 ft depth in limestone mine.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olling Back, Henning; Vogelaar, R. Bruce; Johnson, D. Nathan

    2003-10-01

    An active limestone mine in southwestern Virginia is being investigated as a possible site for detectors requiring a low muon flux. The current depth of the mine is 2200 feet. However, the mining operations continue to follow a vain of pure limestone at a 30-degree downward plane under a rising escarpment, and so greater depths can be achieved relatively quickly. With over 50 miles of drifts, many 100 ft high and 40 ft wide, and drive in access, this is a potential venue for future low background detectors. We will be reporting initial measurements of the muon flux as a function of zenith angle, as well as the ambient gamma radiation from the surrounding rock.

  17. Characterization of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiJulio, Douglas D.; Cherkashyna, Nataliia; Scherzinger, Julius; Khaplanov, Anton; Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Fissum, Kevin G.; Kanaki, Kalliopi; Kirstein, Oliver; Ehlers, Georg; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Hornbach, Donald E.; Iverson, Erik B.; Newby, Robert J.; Hall-Wilton, Richard J.; Bentley, Phillip M.

    2016-09-01

    We present a survey of the radiation background at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA during routine daily operation. A broad range of detectors was used to characterize primarily the neutron and photon fields throughout the facility. These include a WENDI-2 extended range dosimeter, a thermoscientific NRD, an Arktis 4He detector, and a standard NaI photon detector. The information gathered from the detectors was used to map out the neutron dose rates throughout the facility and also the neutron dose rate and flux profiles of several different beamlines. The survey provides detailed information useful for developing future shielding concepts at spallation neutron sources, such as the European Spallation Source (ESS), currently under construction in Lund, Sweden.

  18. Formation of Subgalactic Clouds under Ultraviolet Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitayama, Tetsu; Ikeuchi, Satoru

    2000-02-01

    The effects of the ultraviolet (UV) background radiation on the formation of subgalactic clouds are studied by means of one-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations. The radiative transfer of the ionizing photons caused by the absorption by H I, He I, and He II, neglecting the emission, is explicitly taken into account. We find that the complete suppression of collapse occurs for the clouds with circular velocities typically in the range Vc~15-40 km s-1 and the 50% reduction in the cooled gas mass with Vc~20-55 km s-1. These values depend most sensitively on the collapse epoch of the cloud, the shape of the UV spectrum, and the evolution of the UV intensity. Compared with the optically thin case, previously investigated by Thoul & Weinberg in 1996, the absorption of the external UV photons by the intervening medium systematically lowers the above threshold values by ΔVc~5 km s-1. Whether the gas can contract or keeps expanding is roughly determined by the balance between the gravitational force and the thermal pressure gradient when it is maximally exposed to the external UV flux. Based on our simulation results, we discuss a number of implications on galaxy formation, cosmic star formation history, and the observations of quasar absorption lines. In the Appendix, we derive analytical formulae for the photoionization coefficients and heating rates, which incorporate the frequency/direction-dependent transfer of external photons.

  19. Radioactivity in the groundwater of a high background radiation area.

    PubMed

    Shabana, E I; Kinsara, A A

    2014-11-01

    Natural radioactivity was measured in groundwater samples collected from 37 wells scattered in an inhabited area of high natural background radiation, in a purpose of radiation protection. The study area is adjacent to Aja heights of granitic composition in Hail province, Saudi Arabia. Initial screening for gross α and gross β activities showed levels exceeded the national regulation limits set out for gross α and gross β activities in drinking water. The gross α activity ranged from 0.17 to 5.41 Bq L(-)(1) with an average value of 2.15 Bq L(-)(1), whereas gross β activity ranged from 0.48 to 5.16 Bq L(-)(1), with an average value of 2.60 Bq L(-)(1). The detail analyses indicated that the groundwater of this province is contaminated with uranium and radium ((226)Ra and (228)Ra). The average activity concentrations of (238)U, (234)U, (226)Ra and (228)Ra were 0.40, 0.77, 0.29 and 0.46 Bq L(-)(1), respectively. The higher uranium content was found in the samples of granitic aquifers, whereas the higher radium content was found in the samples of sandstone aquifers. Based on the obtained results, mechanism of leaching of the predominant radionuclides has been discussed in detail.

  20. Investigation of background radiation and associated anomalies in Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Smuin, D.R.; Wilson, M.J.; Crutcher, J.W.

    1988-02-01

    In addition to examining anomalies and establishing the background gamma exposure rate range, the study presents a formula to convert thousand counts per minute (kcpm) from a gamma scintillator to microroentgen per hour (..mu..Rh) for the Rifle region. Also, a method is presented to identify contaminated areas containing excess /sup 226/Ra, by using a GR-410 gamma spectrometer. This method is suggested to be applied to all property surveys in the Rifle area. The Wasatch Formation, which outcrops extensively in the Rifle area, was found to have a major influence on the background radiation. Varying potassium concentrations and naturally occurring uranium in this rock unit reveal varying gamma exposure rates. Examining RaTh ratios from laboratory analysis of soil samples or use of RaTh ratios from GR-410 gamma spectrometer readings on site allows discrimination between mill related contamination and naturally occuring radioactivity. Radioactive coal clinkers were found used as fill material throughout the Rifle region and have been determined to be a product of the mill and subject to remediation. Finally, windblown mill tailings contamination is addressed in some detail. Mill tailings redistributed from the Rifle uranium mill tailings piles by prevailing winds were detected extensively on vicinity properties in Rifle. Some radioactive components of the windblown tailings were found to have leached into the subsurface soil. The combination of Wasatch Formation, radioactive coal clinkers, and windblown tailings accounts for many of the anomalous gamma exposure rates observed by the radiological survey teams. 11 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs

  1. The grand unified photon spectrum: A coherent view of the diffuse extragalactic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ressell, M. Ted; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-10-01

    The spectrum of diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA) at wavelengths from 105 to 10-24 cm is presented in a coherent fashion. Each wavelength region, from the radio to ultra-high energy photons and cosmic rays, is treated both separately and as part of the grand unified photon spectrum (GUPS). A discussion of, and references to, the relevant literature for each wavelength region is included. This review should provide a useful tool for those interested in diffuse backgrounds, the epoch of galaxy formation, astrophysical/cosmological constraints to particle properties, exotic early Universe processes, and many other astrophysical and cosmological enterprises. As a worked example, researchers derive the cosmological constraints to an unstable-neutrino spies (with arbitrary branching ratio to a radiative decay mode) that follow from the GUPS.

  2. The grand unified photon spectrum: A coherent view of the diffuse extragalactic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ressell, M. Ted; Turner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA) at wavelengths from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp -24) cm is presented in a coherent fashion. Each wavelength region, from the radio to ultra-high energy photons and cosmic rays, is treated both separately and as part of the grand unified photon spectrum (GUPS). A discussion of, and references to, the relevant literature for each wavelength region is included. This review should provide a useful tool for those interested in diffuse backgrounds, the epoch of galaxy formation, astrophysical/cosmological constraints to particle properties, exotic early Universe processes, and many other astrophysical and cosmological enterprises. As a worked example, researchers derive the cosmological constraints to an unstable-neutrino spies (with arbitrary branching ratio to a radiative decay mode) that follow from the GUPS.

  3. Early radiographic changes in radiation bone injury

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, M.; Tanimoto, K.; Wada, T.

    1986-06-01

    A chronologic series of periapical radiographs was evaluated for the purpose of detecting damage to bone and tooth-supporting tissues in a patient receiving radiation therapy for a basal cell carcinoma of the mandibular gingiva. Widening of the periodontal space was one of the early radiographic changes observed. It is suggested, from the sequence of radiographic changes, that radiation-induced changed in the circulatory system of the bone might be primarily responsible for the resulting changes.

  4. Temporal Dependence of Chromosomal Aberration on Radiation Quality and Cellular Genetic Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Krieger, Stephanie; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Goss, Rosalin; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Radiation induced cancer risks are driven by genetic instability. It is not well understood how different radiation sources induce genetic instability in cells with different genetic background. Here we report our studies on genetic instability, particularly chromosome instability using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), in human primary lymphocytes, normal human fibroblasts, and transformed human mammary epithelial cells in a temporal manner after exposure to high energy protons and Fe ions. The chromosome spread was prepared 48 hours, 1 week, 2 week, and 1 month after radiation exposure. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed with whole chromosome specific probes (chr. 3 and chr. 6). After exposure to protons and Fe ions of similar cumulative energy (??), Fe ions induced more chromosomal aberrations at early time point (48 hours) in all three types of cells. Over time (after 1 month), more chromosome aberrations were observed in cells exposed to Fe ions than in the same type of cells exposed to protons. While the mammary epithelial cells have higher intrinsic genetic instability and higher rate of initial chromosome aberrations than the fibroblasts, the fibroblasts retained more chromosomal aberration after long term cell culture (1 month) in comparison to their initial frequency of chromosome aberration. In lymphocytes, the chromosome aberration frequency at 1 month after exposure to Fe ions was close to unexposed background, and the chromosome aberration frequency at 1 month after exposure to proton was much higher. In addition to human cells, mouse bone marrow cells isolated from strains CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 were irradiated with proton or Fe ions and were analyzed for chromosome aberration at different time points. Cells from CBA mice showed similar frequency of chromosome aberration at early and late time points, while cells from C57 mice showed very different chromosome aberration rate at early and late time points. Our results suggest that relative

  5. Background radiation and cancer mortality in Bavaria: an ecological analysis.

    PubMed

    Körblein, Alfred; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigated a possible association between background gamma radiation (BGR) and cancer and infant mortality rates. In an in-country ecological study, they performed a population-weighted linear regression of cancer (infant) mortality rates on BGR, adjusted for unemployment rate and population density. Crude cancer rates showed a highly significant increase with BGR: 38 excess cases per 100,000 person-years per millisievert/year (p < .0001). After adjusting for unemployment rate and population density, the authors found that the excess absolute risk reduced to 23.6 cases per 100,000 person-years per mSv/year (p = .0014). The corresponding excess relative risk was 10.2% (95% confidence interval = 3.9-16.7) per mSv/year. The excess relative risk for infant mortality rates was 24% (95% confidence interval = 9-42) per mSv/year. The cancer risk derived from this ecological study is 0.24/Sv, which compares with an International Commission on Radiological Protection value of 0.05/Sv. However, because they are based on highly aggregated data, the results should be interpreted with caution.

  6. A map of the cosmic background radiation at 3 millimeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lubin, P.; Villela, T.; Epstein, G.; Smoot, G.

    1985-01-01

    Data from a series of balloon flights covering both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, measuring the large angular scale anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation at 3.3 mm wavelength are presented. The data cover 85 percent of the sky to a limiting sensitivity of 0.7 mK per 7 deg field of view. The data show a 50-sigma (statistical error only) dipole anisotropy with an amplitude of 3.44 + or - 0.17 mK and a direction of alpha = 11.2 h + or - 0.1 h, and delta = -6.0 deg + or - 1.5 deg. A 90 percent confidence level upper limit of 0.00007 is obtained for the rms quadrupole amplitude. Flights separated by 6 months show the motion of earth around the sun. Galactic contamination is very small, with less than 0.1 mK contribution to the dipole quadrupole terms. A map of the sky has been generated from the data.

  7. Microwave background radiation anisotropy from scalar field gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Stebbins, A. ); Veeraraghavan, S. Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 )

    1993-09-15

    Analytic calculations of the cosmological density fluctuations and microwave background radiation anisotropies induced by gradients in a topologically trivial scalar field are presented. This anlaytic solution should provide a good test for numerical simulations of microwave anisotropy from scalar fields. To the extent that these results generalize to other scalar field models and configurations, they imply that (1) MBR measurements limit large-scale primordial variations greater than about 5[times]10[sup 16] GeV within our horizon, (2) the total scalar field variation is a fair predictor of the magnitude of the MBR anisotropy, but is only accurate to within a factor of about three, (3) scalar fields as well as other models of seeded perturbations produce a few times more anisotropy [Delta][ital T]/[ital T] for a given density fluctuation [delta][rho]/[rho] (on the same scale) than do primordial adiabatic perturbations, (4) models of scalar field seeds which produce a scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations seem to require galaxies to be more clustered than the mass on small scales, and (5) scalar fields do not tilt'' the Universe.

  8. On the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the cosmic radiations using COBE FIRAS instrument data: I. Cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir

    2014-07-01

    Using the explicit form of the functions to describe the monopole and dipole spectra of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation, the exact expressions for the temperature dependences of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, such as the total radiation power per unit area, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, and pressure in the finite range of frequencies v 1≤ v≤ v 2 are obtained. Since the dependence of temperature upon the redshift z is known, the obtained expressions can be simply presented in z representation. Utilizing experimental data for the monopole and dipole spectra measured by the COBE FIRAS instrument in the 60-600 GHz frequency interval at the temperature T=2.72548 K, the values of the radiative and thermodynamic functions, as well as the radiation density constant a and the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ are calculated. In the case of the dipole spectrum, the constants a and σ, and the radiative and thermodynamic properties of the CMB radiation are obtained using the mean amplitude T amp=3.358 mK. It is shown that the Doppler shift leads to a renormalization of the radiation density constant a, the Stefan-Boltzmann constant σ, and the corresponding constants for the thermodynamic functions. The expressions for new astrophysical parameters, such as the entropy density/Boltzmann constant, and number density of CMB photons are obtained. The radiative and thermodynamic properties of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation for the monopole and dipole spectra at redshift z≈1089 are calculated.

  9. The origin and early radiation of dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusatte, Stephen L.; Nesbitt, Sterling J.; Irmis, Randall B.; Butler, Richard J.; Benton, Michael J.; Norell, Mark A.

    2010-07-01

    Dinosaurs were remarkably successful during the Mesozoic and one subgroup, birds, remain an important component of modern ecosystems. Although the extinction of non-avian dinosaurs at the end of the Cretaceous has been the subject of intense debate, comparatively little attention has been given to the origin and early evolution of dinosaurs during the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic, one of the most important evolutionary radiations in earth history. Our understanding of this keystone event has dramatically changed over the past 25 years, thanks to an influx of new fossil discoveries, reinterpretations of long-ignored specimens, and quantitative macroevolutionary analyses that synthesize anatomical and geological data. Here we provide an overview of the first 50 million years of dinosaur history, with a focus on the large-scale patterns that characterize the ascent of dinosaurs from a small, almost marginal group of reptiles in the Late Triassic to the preeminent terrestrial vertebrates of the Jurassic and Cretaceous. We provide both a biological and geological background for early dinosaur history. Dinosaurs are deeply nested among the archosaurian reptiles, diagnosed by only a small number of characters, and are subdivided into a number of major lineages. The first unequivocal dinosaurs are known from the late Carnian of South America, but the presence of their sister group in the Middle Triassic implies that dinosaurs possibly originated much earlier. The three major dinosaur lineages, theropods, sauropodomorphs, and ornithischians, are all known from the Triassic, when continents were joined into the supercontinent Pangaea and global climates were hot and arid. Although many researchers have long suggested that dinosaurs outcompeted other reptile groups during the Triassic, we argue that the ascent of dinosaurs was more of a matter of contingency and opportunism. Dinosaurs were overshadowed in most Late Triassic ecosystems by crocodile-line archosaurs and

  10. Human response to high-background radiation environments on Earth and in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durante, M.; Manti, L.

    2008-09-01

    The main long-term objective of the space exploration program is the colonization of the planets of the Solar System. The high cosmic radiation equivalent dose rate represents an inescapable problem for the safe establishment of permanent human settlements on these planets. The unshielded equivalent dose rate on Mars ranges between 100 and 200 mSv/year, depending on the Solar cycle and altitude, and can reach values as high as 360 mSv/year on the Moon. The average annual effective dose on Earth is about 3 mSv, nearly 85% of which comes from natural background radiation, reduced to less than 1 mSv if man-made sources and the internal exposure to Rn daughters are excluded. However, some areas on Earth display anomalously high levels of background radiation, as is the case with thorium-rich monazite bearing sand deposits where values 200 400 times higher than the world average can be found. About 2% of the world’s population live above 3 km and receive a disproportionate 10% of the annual effective collective dose due to cosmic radiation, with a net contribution to effective dose by the neutron component which is 3 4 fold that at sea level. Thus far, epidemiological studies have failed to show any adverse health effects in the populations living in these terrestrial high-background radiation areas (HBRA), which provide an unique opportunity to study the health implications of an environment that, as closely as possibly achievable on Earth, resembles the chronic exposure of future space colonists to higher-than-normal levels of ionizing radiation. Chromosomal aberrations in the peripheral blood lymphocytes from the HBRA residents have been measured in several studies because chromosomal damage represents an early biomarker of cancer risk. Similar cytogenetic studies have been recently performed in a cohort of astronauts involved in single or repeated space flights over many years. The cytogenetic findings in populations exposed to high dose-rate background radiation

  11. Human exposure to high natural background radiation: what can it teach us about radiation risks?

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Jolyon H; Simon, Steven L; Wojcik, Andrzej; Sohrabi, Mehdi; Burkart, Werner; Cardis, Elisabeth; Laurier, Dominique; Tirmarche, Margot; Hayata, Isamu

    2014-01-01

    Natural radiation is the major source of human exposure to ionising radiation, and its largest contributing component to effective dose arises from inhalation of 222Rn and its radioactive progeny. However, despite extensive knowledge of radiation risks gained through epidemiologic investigations and mechanistic considerations, the health effects of chronic low-level radiation exposure are still poorly understood. The present paper reviews the possible contribution of studies of populations living in high natural background radiation (HNBR) areas (Guarapari, Brazil; Kerala, India; Ramsar, Iran; Yangjiang, China), including radon-prone areas, to low dose risk estimation. Much of the direct information about risk related to HNBR comes from case–control studies of radon and lung cancer, which provide convincing evidence of an association between long-term protracted radiation exposures in the general population and disease incidence. The success of these studies is mainly due to the careful organ dose reconstruction (with relatively high doses to the lung), and to the fact that large-scale collaborative studies have been conducted to maximise the statistical power and to ensure the systematic collection of information on potential confounding factors. In contrast, studies in other (non-radon) HNBR areas have provided little information, relying mainly on ecological designs and very rough effective dose categorisations. Recent steps taken in China and India to establish cohorts for follow-up and to conduct nested case–control studies may provide useful information about risks in the future, provided that careful organ dose reconstruction is possible and information is collected on potential confounding factors. PMID:19454802

  12. Thailand radiation monitoring program: a preliminary result analysis of the country's background radiation.

    PubMed

    Krisanangkura, Piyawan; Udomsomporn, Suchin

    2014-08-01

    Environmental monitoring in the context of nuclear-related activities refers to the measurements of ambient gamma dose rates in the environment and radioactivity in air, water, soil etc. Since nuclear power programme in Thailand has not yet been in place, the environment surveillance programme in Thailand currently focuses on establishing 'baseline' environmental radiation levels and radioactivity for the purpose of establishing impacts of future possible sources such as nuclear accidents. The objective is to assure assessments concerning radiation safety for the environment and public. At present, Thailand's monitoring programme operates eight fixed monitoring stations installed in various regions of Thailand; four of which have been in operation since late 2010. The ambient gamma dose rate data are routinely collected from those four real-time monitoring stations starting from October 2010 to September 2011 as described in this study. Also, the radiation data from each station are statically analysed. This study found that the dose rate from the stations located in north and north-east of Thailand showed an apparent tendency towards a diurnal pattern. With these routine data, the average exposure dose rate was possible to estimate in Thailand. Additionally, the assessment of the equivalent dose from natural background radiation was estimated.

  13. Rain-induced increase in background radiation detected by Radiation Portal Monitors.

    PubMed

    Livesay, R J; Blessinger, C S; Guzzardo, T F; Hausladen, P A

    2014-11-01

    A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to enhance partner country capability to deter, detect, and interdict the illicit movement of special nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma-ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates primarily from the wet-deposition of two radioactive daughters of (222)Rn, namely, (214)Pb and (214)Bi. In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and high-purity germanium spectra. The data verify that these radionuclides are responsible for the largest environmental background fluctuations in RPMs. Analytical expressions for the detector response function in Poly-Vinyl Toluene have been derived. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

  14. Rain-Induced Increase in Background Radiation Detected by Radiation Portal Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hausladen, Paul; Blessinger, Christopher S; Guzzardo, Tyler; Livesay, Jake

    2012-07-01

    A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to detect the illicit movement of nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates from the atmospheric deposition of two radioactive daughters of radon-222, namely lead-214 and bismuth-214 (henceforth {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and High Purity Germanium spectra. The data verifies these radionuclides are responsible for the dominant transient natural background fluctuations in RPMs. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

  15. Synchrotron radiation backgrounds for the FCC-hh experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collamati, F.; Boscolo, M.; Burkhardt, H.; Kersevan, R.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we present a detailed analysis of the Synchrotron Radiation emitted by the 50 TeV protons of the FCC-hh in the last bending and quadrupole magnets upstream of the interaction region. We discuss the characteristics of this radiation in terms of power, flux, photon spectrum and fans with and without crossing angle for comparison. We mainly focus our study on the fraction of photons that may hit the detector, with a full tracking in GEANT4 that simulates the interaction within the central beam pipe.

  16. Radiation Background and Attenuation Model Validation and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Peplow, Douglas E.; Santiago, Claudio P.

    2015-08-05

    This report describes the initial results of a study being conducted as part of the Urban Search Planning Tool project. The study is comparing the Urban Scene Simulator (USS), a one-dimensional (1D) radiation transport model developed at LLNL, with the three-dimensional (3D) radiation transport model from ORNL using the MCNP, SCALE/ORIGEN and SCALE/MAVRIC simulation codes. In this study, we have analyzed the differences between the two approaches at every step, from source term representation, to estimating flux and detector count rates at a fixed distance from a simple surface (slab), and at points throughout more complex 3D scenes.

  17. Influence on cell proliferation of background radiation or exposure to very low, chronic gamma radiation. [Paramecium tetraurelia; Synechococcus lividus

    SciTech Connect

    Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Tixador, R.; Richoilley, G.; Conter, A.; Croute, F.; Caratero, C.; Gaubin, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Investigations carried out on the protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia and the cyanobacteria Synechococcus lividus, which were shielded against background radiation or exposed to very low doses of gamma radiation, demonstrated that radiation can stimulate the proliferation of these two single-cell organisms. Radiation hormesis depends on internal factors (age of starting cells) and external factors (lighting conditions). The stimulatory effect occurred only in a limited range of doses and disappeared for dose rates higher than 50 mGy/y.

  18. Hawking's radiation in non-stationary rotating de Sitter background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibohal, N.; Ibungochouba, T.

    2011-05-01

    Hawking's radiation effect of Klein-Gordon scalar field, Dirac particles and Maxwell's electromagnetic field in the non-stationary rotating de Sitter cosmological space-time is investigated by using a method of generalized tortoise co-ordinates transformation. The locations and the temperatures of the cosmological horizons of the non-stationary rotating de Sitter model are derived. It is found that the locations and the temperatures of the rotating cosmological model depend not only on the time but also on the angle. The stress-energy regularization techniques are applied to the two dimensional analog of the de Sitter metrics and the calculated stress-energy tensor contains the thermal radiation effect.

  19. Flux limited Diffusion Theory of Microwave Background Radiation Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanno, A.; Antonuccio-Delogu, V.

    1995-08-01

    A physically satisfactory treatment of the radiative transfer during the recombination epoch is complicated by the fact that the Universe has a quite rapid (Dz~400 at z_dec~1200) transition into the optically thin regime. We show here that all previous approaches (e.g. Peebles and Yu,1968 [1],Bond and Efstathiou,1987 [2],up to the most recent by Holtzmann,1992 [3] and Stompor,1994 [4]) are based on analytic expansions in powers of the mean free path which run into physical inconsistencies (the predicted radiation flux is larger than the product of speed of light and radiation density). To remedy to this situation, we apply to this problem the Covariant Flux-Limited Diffusion (CFLD) theory recently formulated by Bonanno and Romano (1993)[4]. Flux-limited diffusion theories are currently adopted in plasma physics, and offer a physical description free of the above mentioned inconsistency. We calculate the spectrum of the resulting perturbations for a few CDM models. Our physical treatment improves consistently on small (<=50') scales over previous treatments: the resulting spectra for the corresponding high wavenumbers are then substantially different from those found by the previous authors.

  20. Modeling Early Galaxies Using Radiation Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    This simulation uses a flux-limited diffusion solver to explore the radiation hydrodynamics of early galaxies, in particular, the ionizing radiation created by Population III stars. At the time of this rendering, the simulation has evolved to a redshift of 3.5. The simulation volume is 11.2 comoving megaparsecs, and has a uniform grid of 10243 cells, with over 1 billion dark matter and star particles. This animation shows a combined view of the baryon density, dark matter density, radiation energy and emissivity from this simulation. The multi-variate rendering is particularly useful because is shows both the baryonic matter ("normal") and dark matter, and the pressure and temperature variables are properties of only the baryonic matter. Visible in the gas density are "bubbles", or shells, created by the radiation feedback from young stars. Seeing the bubbles from feedback provides confirmation of the physics model implemented. Features such as these are difficult to identify algorithmically, but easily found when viewing the visualization. Simulation was performed on Kraken at the National Institute for Computational Sciences. Visualization was produced using resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory.

  1. Detecting a Non-Gaussian Stochastic Background of Gravitational Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drasco, Steve; Flanagan, Éanna É.

    2002-12-01

    We derive a detection method for a stochastic background of gravitational waves produced by events where the ratio of the average time between events to the average duration of an event is large. Such a signal would sound something like popcorn popping. Our derivation is based on the somewhat unrealistic assumption that the duration of an event is smaller than the detector time resolution.

  2. Spectral observations of the extreme ultraviolet astronomical background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labov, S.; Bowyer, S.

    1988-01-01

    Observations in the FUV and soft X-ray bands suggest that the ISM contains several components of high-temperature gas (100,000-1 million K). If large volumes of local interstellar space are filled with this hot plasma, emission lines will be produced in the EUV. Diffuse EUV radiation, however, has only been detected with photometric instruments; no spectral measurements exist below 520 A. A unique grazing-incidence spectrometer to study the diffuse emission between 80 and 650 A with resolution 10-30 A was successfully flown on a sounding rocket in April 1986, and a preliminary analysis reveals several features. In addition to the expected interplanetary He I 584 A emission and the geocoronal He II 304 A emission, other features appear which may orginate in the hot ionized interstellar gas.

  3. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation.

    PubMed

    Dodelson, S; Knox, L

    2000-04-17

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  4. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, S.; Knox, L.

    2000-01-01

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  5. Dark energy and the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, S.; Knox, L.

    2000-01-01

    We find that current cosmic microwave background anisotropy data strongly constrain the mean spatial curvature of the Universe to be near zero, or, equivalently, the total energy density to be near critical-as predicted by inflation. This result is robust to editing of data sets, and variation of other cosmological parameters (totaling seven, including a cosmological constant). Other lines of argument indicate that the energy density of nonrelativistic matter is much less than critical. Together, these results are evidence, independent of supernovae data, for dark energy in the Universe.

  6. A measurement of the low frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, S.M.

    1987-04-01

    As part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR) at low frequencies, the intensity of the CBR has been measured at a frequency of 1.410 GHz. The measurement was made by comparing the power received from the sky with the power received from a specially designed cooled calibration target with known properties. Sources of radiation other than the CBR were then identified and subtracted to calculate the antenna temperature of the CBR at 1.410 GHz. The instrument used to measure the CBR was a total-power microwave radiometer with a 25 MHz bandwidth centered at 1.410 GHz. The radiometer had a noise temperature of 80 K, and sufficient data were taken that radiometer noise did not contribute significantly to the total measurement error. The sources of error were predominantly systematic in nature, and the largest error was due to uncertainty in the reflection characteristics of the cold-load calibrator. Identification and subtraction of signals from the Galaxy (0.7 K) and the Earth's atmosphere (0.8 K) were also significant parts of the data reduction and error analysis. The brightness temperature of the Cosmic Background Radiation at 1.410 GHz is 222. +- 0.55 Kelvin. The spectrum of the CBR, as determined by this measurement and other published results, is consistent with a blackbody spectrum of temperature 2.741 +- 0.016. Constraints on the amount by which the CBR spectrum deviates from Planck spectrum are used to place limits on energy releases early in the history of the universe. 55 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  7. Modeling Background Radiation in our Environment Using Geochemical Data

    SciTech Connect

    Malchow, Russell L.; Marsac, Kara; Burnley, Pamela; Hausrath, Elisabeth; Haber, Daniel; Adcock, Christopher

    2015-02-01

    Radiation occurs naturally in bedrock and soil. Gamma rays are released from the decay of the radioactive isotopes K, U, and Th. Gamma rays observed at the surface come from the first 30 cm of rock and soil. The energy of gamma rays is specific to each isotope, allowing identification. For this research, data was collected from national databases, private companies, scientific literature, and field work. Data points were then evaluated for self-consistency. A model was created by converting concentrations of U, K, and Th for each rock and soil unit into a ground exposure rate using the following equation: D=1.32 K+ 0.548 U+ 0.272 Th. The first objective of this research was to compare the original Aerial Measurement System gamma ray survey to results produced by the model. The second objective was to improve the method and learn the constraints of the model. Future work will include sample data analysis from field work with a goal of improving the geochemical model.

  8. BACKGROUND RADIATION MEASUREMENTS AND CANCER RISK ESTIMATES FOR SEBINKARAHISAR, TURKEY.

    PubMed

    Kurnaz, Asli

    2013-07-19

    This paper presents the measurement results of environmental radioactivity levels for Şebinkarahisar district (uranium-thorium area), Giresun, Turkey. The radioactivity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K and the fission product (137)Cs in soil samples collected from 73 regions from the surroundings of the study area were determined. In situ measurements of the gamma dose rate in air were performed in the same 73 locations where the soil samples were collected using a portable NaI detector. Also the mean radioactivity concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K in rock samples collected from 50 regions were determined. The mean estimated cancer risk value was found. The seasonal variations of the indoor radon activity concentrations were determined in the 30 dwellings in the study area. In addition, the mean gross alpha, gross beta and radon activities in tap water samples were determined in the same 30 dwellings. The excess lifetime cancer risk was calculated using the risk factors of International Commission on Radiological Protection and Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation. Radiological maps of the Şebinkarahisar region were composed using the results obtained from this study.

  9. EARLY FAILURES IN AUTOMOBILE PARTS: A BACKGROUND STUDY IN RELIABILITY,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The early mortality of automobile parts is examined here through the analysis of warranty-claim information from one American manufacturer of...passenger cars for the model year 1961. The Weibull probability distribution is fitted to the early claims data to indicate the trend -- increasing, or

  10. The Cosmic Background Radiation circa ν2K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, J. Richard; Pogosyan, Dmitry; Prunet, Simon

    We describe the implications of cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and galaxy and cluster surveys of large scale structure (LSS) for theories of cosmic structure formation, especially emphasizing the recent Boomerang and Maxima CMB balloon experiments. The inflation-based cosmic structure formation paradigm we have been operating with for two decades has never been in better shape. Here we primarily focus on a simplified inflation parameter set, {ωb, ωcdm, Ωtot, ΩΛ, ns, τC, σ8}. Combining all of the current CMB+LSS data points to the remarkable conclusion that the local Hubble patch we can access has little mean curvature (Ωtot = 1.08 +/- 0.06) and the initial fluctuations were nearly scale invariant (ns = 1.03 +/- 0.08), both predictions of (non-baroque) inflation theory. The baryon density is found to be slightly larger than that preferred by independent Big Bang Nucleosynthesis estimates (ωb --- Ωbh2 = 0.030 +/- 0.005 cf. 0.019 +/- 0.002). The CDM density is in the expected range (ωcdm = 0.17+/-0.02). Even stranger is the CMB+LSS evidence that the density of the universe is dominated by unclustered energy akin to the cosmological constant (ΩΛ = 0.66 +/- 0.06), at the same level as that inferred from high redshift supernova observations. We also sketch the CMB+LSS implications for massive neutrinos.

  11. THE HIGH BACKGROUND RADIATION AREA IN RAMSAR IRAN: GEOLOGY, NORM, BIOLOGY, LNT, AND POSSIBLE REGULATORY FUN

    SciTech Connect

    Karam, P. A.

    2002-02-25

    The city of Ramsar Iran hosts some of the highest natural radiation levels on earth, and over 2000 people are exposed to radiation doses ranging from 1 to 26 rem per year. Curiously, inhabitants of this region seem to have no greater incidence of cancer than those in neighboring areas of normal background radiation levels, and preliminary studies suggest their blood cells experience fewer induced chromosomal abnormalities when exposed to 150 rem ''challenge'' doses of radiation than do the blood cells of their neighbors. This paper will briefly describe the unique geology that gives Ramsar its extraordinarily high background radiation levels. It will then summarize the studies performed to date and will conclude by suggesting ways to incorporate these findings (if they are borne out by further testing) into future radiation protection standards.

  12. A method to characterise site, urban and regional ambient background radiation.

    PubMed

    Passmore, C; Kirr, M

    2011-03-01

    Control dosemeters are routinely provided to customers to monitor the background radiation so that it can be subtracted from the gross response of the dosemeter to arrive at the occupational dose. Landauer, the largest dosimetry processor in the world with subsidiaries in Australia, Brazil, China, France, Japan, Mexico and the UK, has clients in approximately 130 countries. The Glenwood facility processes over 1.1 million controls per year. This network of clients around the world provides a unique ability to monitor the world's ambient background radiation. Control data can be mined to provide useful historical information regarding ambient background rates and provide a historical baseline for geographical areas. Historical baseline can be used to provide site or region-specific background subtraction values, document the variation in ambient background radiation around a client's site or provide a baseline for measuring the efficiency of clean-up efforts in urban areas after a dirty bomb detonation.

  13. Multifrequency analysis of cosmic microwave background radiation and radiation transport in simulations of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffenberger, Kevin Michael

    2006-06-01

    We explore two means for probing cosmology, through multifrequency microwave background measurements and through future observations of the epoch of reionization. We use multi-frequency information in first year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data to search for the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect. We derive an optimal combination of WMAP cross-spectra to extract SZ, limiting the SZ contribution to less than 2% (95% c.l.) at the first acoustic peak in W band. Under the assumption that the removed radio point sources are not correlated with SZ, this limit implies s 8 < 1.07 at 95% c.l. The next generation of microwave telescopes will study the sky at high resolution, scales where both primary and secondary anisotropies are important. We focus on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), simulating observations in three channels, and extracting power spectra in a multifrequency analysis. We find that both radio and infrared extragalactic point sources are important contaminants, but can be effectively removed given three (or more) channels and a good understanding of their frequency dependence. However, improper treatment of the scatter in the point source frequency dependence introduces a large systematic bias. The kinetic SZ effect corrupts measurements of the primordial slope and amplitude on small scales. We discuss the non-Gaussianity of the one- point probability distribution function as a way to constrain the kinetic SZ effect, developing a method for distinguishing this effect. We explore the simulation of maps for ACT, their application to the ACT survey geometry, and filtering techniques to recover signals. Recent work suggests that cosmological fluctuations in reionization developon scales of tens or hundreds of comoving megaparsecs.We build models of ionizing sources from simulations, concluding that a large-scale simulation will require radiation transport from a large fraction of the grid cells. Simulations at a reasonable resolution will have

  14. Early detection of ovarian cancer: background, rationale, and structure of the Yale Early Detection Program.

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, P. E.; Chambers, J. T.; Taylor, K. J.; Pellerito, J.; Hammers, L.; Cole, L. A.; Yang-Feng, T. L.; Smith, P.; Mayne, S. T.; Makuch, R.

    1991-01-01

    Ovarian cancer has received national attention as a highly virulent disease. Its lack of early warning symptoms and the failure to develop highly sensitive screening tests have led some physicians to recommend prophylactic oophorectomies to women with relatives who have had ovarian cancer. Others have recommended routine screening of otherwise normal women for CA 125, a circulating tumor marker, and ultrasound examinations. Each of these techniques is associated with substantial false-positive rates that could lead to unnecessary surgery. A review of epidemiologic data suggests that familial ovarian cancer kindreds are rare, but women with first-degree relatives who have had ovarian cancer have a significant risk themselves for developing ovarian cancer. In addition, women with a great number of ovulatory cycles are at an increased risk for the disease. Circulating tumor markers are frequently elevated in women with advanced ovarian cancer, but their value in early detection of ovarian cancer has yet to be established. Advances in endovaginal ultrasound and color Doppler flow technology have significantly improved our ability to assess pelvic organs. This article presents the background, rationale, and structure of the Yale Early Detection Program for ovarian cancer, whose goals are to identify the best techniques for diagnosing ovarian cancer in an early stage, to determine the frequency with which such tests should be employed, to assess false-positive results, and to identify women who might benefit from prophylactic oophorectomies. PMID:1810100

  15. Family Background and Early Life Course Transitions in Kinshasa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambashe, B. Oleko; Shapiro, David

    1996-01-01

    Examines the impact of a woman's family background on transitions to sexual activity, marriage, and motherhood. Documents how parental education, parental survival status, and other factors are important in the transition to adult roles. Findings suggest that increases in educational levels should contribute to delays in these transitions and…

  16. State background-radiation levels: results of measurements taken during 1975-1979

    SciTech Connect

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1981-11-01

    Background radiation levels across the United States have been measured by the Off-Site Pollutant Measurements Group of the Health and Safety Research Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These measurements have been conducted as part of the ORNL program of radiological surveillance at inactive uranium mills and sites formerly utilized during Manhattan Engineer District and early Atomic Energy Commission projects. The measurements included determination of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U concentrations in surface soil samples and measurement of external gamma-ray exposure rates at 1 m above the ground surface at the location of soil sampling. This information is being utilized for comparative purposes to determine the extent of contamination present at the survey sites and surrounding off-site areas. The sampling program to date has provided background information at 356 locations in 33 states. External gamma-ray exposure rates were found to range from less than 1 to 34 ..mu..R/h, with an US average of 8.5 ..mu..R/h. The nationwide average concentrations of /sup 226/Ra, /sup 232/Th, and /sup 238/U in surface soil were determined to be 1.1, 0.98, and 1.0 pCi/g, respectively.

  17. Below-Background Ionizing Radiation as an Environmental Cue for Bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Castillo, Hugo; Smith, Geoffrey B.

    2017-02-14

    All organisms on earth grow under the influence of a natural and relatively constant dose of ionizing radiation referred to as background radiation, and so cells have different mechanisms to prevent the accumulation of damage caused by its different components. However, current knowledge of the deleterious effects of radiation on cells is based on the exposure to acute and high or to chronic, above background doses of radiation and therefore is not appropriate to explain the cellular and biochemical mechanisms that cells employ to sense and respond to chronic below-background levels. Studies at below-background radiation doses can provide insight intomore » the biological role of radiation, as suggested by several examples of what appears to be a stress response in cells grown at doses that range from 10 to 79 times lower than background. Here, we discuss some of the technical constraints to shield cells from radiation to below-background levels, as well as different approaches used to detect and measure responses to such unusual environmental conditions. Then, we present data from Shewanella oneidensis and Deinococcus radiodurans experiments that show how two taxonomically distant bacterial species sense and respond to unnaturally low levels of radiation. Finally, in brief, we grew S. oneidensis and D. radiodurans in liquid culture at dose rates of 72.05 (control) and 0.91 (treatment) nGy hr-1 (including radon) for up to 72 h and measured cell density and the expression of stress-related genes. Our results suggest that a stress response is triggered in the absence of normal levels of radiation.« less

  18. Comparison of Measured Galactic Background Radiation at L-Band with Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, David M.; Abraham, Saji; Kerr, Yann H.; Wilson, William J.; Skou, Niels; Sobjaerg, Sten

    2004-01-01

    Radiation from the celestial sky in the spectral window at 1.413 GHz is strong and an accurate accounting of this background radiation is needed for calibration and retrieval algorithms. Modern radio astronomy measurements in this window have been converted into a brightness temperature map of the celestial sky at L-band suitable for such applications. This paper presents a comparison of the background predicted by this map with the measurements of several modern L-band remote sensing radiometer Keywords-Galactic background, microwave radiometry; remote sensing;

  19. DNDO Report: Predicting Solar Modulation Potentials for Modeling Cosmic Background Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Behne, Patrick Alan

    2016-08-08

    The modeling of the detectability of special nuclear material (SNM) at ports and border crossings requires accurate knowledge of the background radiation at those locations. Background radiation originates from two main sources, cosmic and terrestrial. Cosmic background is produced by high-energy galactic cosmic rays (GCR) entering the atmosphere and inducing a cascade of particles that eventually impact the earth’s surface. The solar modulation potential represents one of the primary inputs to modeling cosmic background radiation. Usosokin et al. formally define solar modulation potential as “the mean energy loss [per unit charge] of a cosmic ray particle inside the heliosphere…” Modulation potential, a function of elevation, location, and time, shares an inverse relationship with cosmic background radiation. As a result, radiation detector thresholds require adjustment to account for differing background levels, caused partly by differing solar modulations. Failure to do so can result in higher rates of false positives and failed detection of SNM for low and high levels of solar modulation potential, respectively. This study focuses on solar modulation’s time dependence, and seeks the best method to predict modulation for future dates using Python. To address the task of predicting future solar modulation, we utilize both non-linear least squares sinusoidal curve fitting and cubic spline interpolation. This material will be published in transactions of the ANS winter meeting of November, 2016.

  20. Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

    2007-02-07

    Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash.

  1. Early results from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.; Hauser, M. G.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Gulkis, S.; Isaacman, R. B.; Janssen, M.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer, launched 18 Nov. 1989, has nearly completed its first full mapping of the sky with all three of its instruments: A Far Infrared Absolute Spectrometer (FIRAS) covering 0.1 to 10 mm, a set of Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) operating at 3.3, 5.7, and 9.6 mm, and a diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) spanning 1 to 300 microns in ten bands. A preliminary map of the sky derived from DIRBE data is presented. Initial cosmological implications include: a limit on the comptonization parameter of 0.001, on the chemical potential parameter of 0.01, a strong limit on the existence of a hot smooth intergalactic medium, and a confirmation that the dipole anisotropy has the spectrum expected from a Doppler shift of a blackbody. There are no significant anisotropies in the microwave sky detected, other than from our own galaxy and a cos theta dipole anisotropy whose amplitude and direction agree with previous data. At shorter wavelengths, the sky spectrum and anisotropies are dominated by emission from local sources of emission within our Galaxy and Solar System. Preliminary comparison of IRAS (Infrared Astronomical Satellite) and DRIBE sky brightnesses toward the ecliptic poles shows the IRAS values to be significantly higher than found by DRIBE at 100 microns. The presence of gain and zero point errors in the IRAS total brightness data is suggested. The spacecraft, instrument designs, and data reduction methods are described.

  2. The temperature of the cosmic background radiation: Results from the 1987 and 1988 measurements at 3. 8 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Amici, G. De; Bensadoun, M.; Bersanelli, M.; Kogut, A.; Levin, S.; Smoot, G.F.; Witebsky, C. )

    1990-08-10

    The low-frequency (Rayleigh-Jeans) spectrum of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) is expected to contain information relevant to the physical processes that occurred in the early universe. In this paper, the authors have measured the temperature of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at a frequency of 3.8 GHz (7.9 cm wavelength), during two consecutive summers, obtaining a brightness temperature, T{sub CBR}, of 2.56 {plus minus} 0.08 K in 1987 and 2.71 {plus minus} 0.07 K in 1988 (68% confidence level). The new results are in agreement with their previous measurement at 3.7 GHz obtained in 1986 and have smaller error bars. Combining measurements from all 3 years, they obtain T{sub CBR} = 2.64 {plus minus} 0.07 K.

  3. Early results from the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.; Hauser, M. G.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Eplee, R. E., Jr.; Freudenreich, H. T.; Isaacman, R. B.; Kelsall, T.; Gulkis, S.

    1991-01-01

    Data obtained with the FIR Absolute Spectrophotometer, Differential Microwave Radiometers, and Diffuse IR Background Experiment (DIRBE) on the COBE satellite since its launch in November 1989 are briefly characterized. The COBE spacecraft and its 900-km 99-deg orbit are described; the scientific goals and capabilities of the instruments are reviewed; and sample DIRBE data are presented in a map and graph. Upper limits on the Comptonization parameter (y less than 0.001) and the chemical potential (mu less than 0.01 at the 3sigma level) are determined, and the spectrum of the dipole anisotropy is shown to be that of a Doppler-shifted blackbody. The DIRBE 100-micron sky brightness values at the ecliptic poles are found to be significantly lower than those measured by IRAS.

  4. Quantum Gravity, very early universe and the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupt, Brajesh; Ashtekar, Abhay

    2017-01-01

    The standard model of cosmology in conjunction with inflation is a robust paradigm of the evolution of our Universe from today all the way up to the energy scale 1016 GeV . However, the framework fails to provide a faithful understanding of the physics at Planck scale since it excludes quantum gravity correction. Furthermore, recent observations reveal the presence of large scale CMB anomalies which could be signatures of new physics preceding inflation. We present a quantum gravitational extension of the current inflationary paradigm and its possible connection with the CMB anomalies. We highlight the predictions for the future observations and potential avenues where the interplay between the UV physics of very early Universe and the IR behavior of large scale perturbations can have interesting implications for late time Universe. NSF

  5. Background radiation and childhood leukemia: A nationwide register-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nikkilä, Atte; Erme, Sini; Arvela, Hannu; Holmgren, Olli; Raitanen, Jani; Lohi, Olli; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-11-01

    High doses of ionizing radiation are an established cause of childhood leukemia. However, substantial uncertainty remains about the effect of low doses of radiation, including background radiation and potential differences between genetic subgroups of leukemia have rarely been explored. We investigated the effect of the background gamma radiation on childhood leukemia using a nationwide register-based case-control study. For each of the 1,093 cases, three age- and gender matched controls were selected (N = 3,279). Conditional logistic regression analyses were adjusted for confounding by Down syndrome, birth weight (large for gestational age), and maternal smoking. Complete residential histories and previously collected survey data of the background gamma radiation in Finland were used to assess the exposure of the study subjects to indoor and outdoor gamma radiation. Overall, background gamma radiation showed a non-significant association with the OR of childhood leukemia (OR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97, 1.05 for 10 nSv/h increase in average equivalent dose rate to red bone marrow). In subgroup analyses, age group 2-<7 years displayed a larger effect (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.01, 1.60 for 1 mSv increase in equivalent cumulative dose to red bone marrow). Suggestive difference in OR by genetic subtype was found. Our results provide further support to the notion that low doses of ionizing radiation increase the risk for childhood leukemia, particularly at age 2-<7 years. Our findings suggest a larger effect of radiation on leukemia with high hyperpdiploidy than other subgroups, but this result requires further confirmation.

  6. Calculations of background beta-gamma radiation dose through geologic time.

    PubMed

    Karam, P A; Leslie, S A

    1999-12-01

    Life on earth is exposed to a background level of ionizing radiation from a number of sources, including beta and gamma radiation from geologic and biologic materials. Radiation dose from geologic emitters has changed because of the chemical evolution of the continental crust, changes in the relative abundances of 235U and 238U, and the radioactive decay of uranium, thorium, and 40K with time. The radiation dose from internal 40K has decreased by a factor of about eight because of changes in the activity concentration of 40K in potassium over the past 4 billion years. Radiation exposure from geologic materials has decreased from about 1.6 mGy y(-1) to 0.66 mGy y(-1) over the past 4 billion years, and radiation exposure to an organism with a potassium concentration of 250 mmol L(-1) has decreased from about 5.5 to about 0.70 mGy y(-1). Accordingly, background radiation exposure from these two sources has dropped from about 7.0 to 1.35 mGy y(-1) during the time life has existed on Earth. The conservative nature of mutation repair mechanisms in modern organisms suggest that these mechanisms may have evolved in the distant past and that organisms may retain some of the capability of efficiently repairing damage from higher radiation levels than exist at present.

  7. Radiation and energy release in a background field of axion-like dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei

    2017-09-01

    We find that a fuzzy dark matter background and the mG scale magnetic field in the galactic center can give rise to a radiation with a very large energy release. The frequency of the radiation field is the same as the frequency of the oscillating axion-like background field. We show that there is an energy transfer between the fuzzy dark matter sector and the electromagnetic sector because of the presence of the generated radiation field and the galactic magnetic field. The energy release rate of radiation is found to be very slow in comparison with the energy of fuzzy dark matter but could be significant comparing with the energy of galactic magnetic field in the source region. Using this example, we show that the fuzzy dark matter together with a large scale magnetic field is possible to give rise to fruitful physics.

  8. Spectral distortions of the microwave background radiation resulting from the damping of pressure waves

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, R.A. )

    1991-04-01

    Initial perturbations of the energy density of the radiation field associated with initial perturbations of the mass density on scales relevant for galaxies and clusters of galaxies are not observable as anisotropies of the temperature of the microwave background radiation. By the recombination epoch, the initial inhomogeneities in the photon distribution is smoothed out by the processes of nonlinear dissipation and photon diffusion on mass scales. As initial inhomogenities of the energy density of the radiation field on scales less than the damping scale at recombination is not seen as an anisotropy in the microwave background but as a spectral distortion of the background. Signatures of pressure wave damping over certain redshift intervals are identified, and an upper bound is obtained for the index of the initial power spectrum of the mass distribution. 35 refs.

  9. Cosmological implication of a new measurement of the submillimeter background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayakawa, Satio; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Murakami, Hiroshi; Sato, Shinji

    1987-01-01

    A new submillimeter measurement of the cosmic background radiation (T. Matsumoto et al., 1988) reveals excess brightness between 1000 and 300 microns. The excess corresponds to about 10 percent of the undistorted blackbody radiation. The observed excess is consistent with thermal emission from dust with a relative density of 0.0001-0.00001, if the dust is heated at a redshift z of about 10-40.

  10. Simulating the Impact of the Natural Radiation Background on Bacterial Systems: Implications for Very Low Radiation Biological Experiments.

    PubMed

    Lampe, Nathanael; Biron, David G; Brown, Jeremy M C; Incerti, Sébastien; Marin, Pierre; Maigne, Lydia; Sarramia, David; Seznec, Hervé; Breton, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    At very low radiation dose rates, the effects of energy depositions in cells by ionizing radiation is best understood stochastically, as ionizing particles deposit energy along tracks separated by distances often much larger than the size of cells. We present a thorough analysis of the stochastic impact of the natural radiative background on cells, focusing our attention on E. coli grown as part of a long term evolution experiment in both underground and surface laboratories. The chance per day that a particle track interacts with a cell in the surface laboratory was found to be 6 × 10-5 day-1, 100 times less than the expected daily mutation rate for E. coli under our experimental conditions. In order for the chance cells are hit to approach the mutation rate, a gamma background dose rate of 20 μGy hr-1 is predicted to be required.

  11. Simulating the Impact of the Natural Radiation Background on Bacterial Systems: Implications for Very Low Radiation Biological Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Lampe, Nathanael; Biron, David G.; Brown, Jeremy M. C.; Incerti, Sébastien; Marin, Pierre; Maigne, Lydia; Sarramia, David; Seznec, Hervé; Breton, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    At very low radiation dose rates, the effects of energy depositions in cells by ionizing radiation is best understood stochastically, as ionizing particles deposit energy along tracks separated by distances often much larger than the size of cells. We present a thorough analysis of the stochastic impact of the natural radiative background on cells, focusing our attention on E. coli grown as part of a long term evolution experiment in both underground and surface laboratories. The chance per day that a particle track interacts with a cell in the surface laboratory was found to be 6 × 10−5 day−1, 100 times less than the expected daily mutation rate for E. coli under our experimental conditions. In order for the chance cells are hit to approach the mutation rate, a gamma background dose rate of 20 μGy hr−1 is predicted to be required. PMID:27851794

  12. Level crossing analysis of cosmic microwave background radiation: a method for detecting cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadegh Movahed, M.; Khosravi, Shahram

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we study the footprint of cosmic string as the topological defects in the very early universe on the cosmic microwave background radiation. We develop the method of level crossing analysis in the context of the well-known Kaiser-Stebbins phenomenon for exploring the signature of cosmic strings. We simulate a Gaussian map by using the best fit parameter given by WMAP-7 and then superimpose cosmic strings effects on it as an incoherent and active fluctuations. In order to investigate the capability of our method to detect the cosmic strings for the various values of tension, Gμ, a simulated pure Gaussian map is compared with that of including cosmic strings. Based on the level crossing analysis, the superimposed cosmic string with Gμgtrsim4 × 10-9 in the simulated map without instrumental noise and the resolution R = 1' could be detected. In the presence of anticipated instrumental noise the lower bound increases just up to Gμgtrsim5.8 × 10-9.

  13. Level crossing analysis of cosmic microwave background radiation: a method for detecting cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Movahed, M. Sadegh; Khosravi, Shahram E-mail: khosravi@ipm.ir

    2011-03-01

    In this paper we study the footprint of cosmic string as the topological defects in the very early universe on the cosmic microwave background radiation. We develop the method of level crossing analysis in the context of the well-known Kaiser-Stebbins phenomenon for exploring the signature of cosmic strings. We simulate a Gaussian map by using the best fit parameter given by WMAP-7 and then superimpose cosmic strings effects on it as an incoherent and active fluctuations. In order to investigate the capability of our method to detect the cosmic strings for the various values of tension, Gμ, a simulated pure Gaussian map is compared with that of including cosmic strings. Based on the level crossing analysis, the superimposed cosmic string with Gμ∼>4 × 10{sup −9} in the simulated map without instrumental noise and the resolution R = 1' could be detected. In the presence of anticipated instrumental noise the lower bound increases just up to Gμ∼>5.8 × 10{sup −9}.

  14. LOWER BOUND ON THE COSMIC TeV GAMMA-RAY BACKGROUND RADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T.

    2016-02-20

    The Fermi gamma-ray space telescope has revolutionized our understanding of the cosmic gamma-ray background radiation in the GeV band. However, investigation on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation still remains sparse. Here, we report the lower bound on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background spectrum placed by the cumulative flux of individual detected extragalactic TeV sources including blazars, radio galaxies, and starburst galaxies. The current limit on the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background above 0.1 TeV is obtained as 2.8 × 10{sup −8}(E/100 GeV){sup −0.55} exp(−E/2100GeV)[GeV cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} sr{sup −1}] < E{sup 2}dN/dE < 1.1 × 10{sup −7}(E/100 GeV){sup −0.49} [GeV cm{sup −2} s{sup −1} sr{sup −1}], where the upper bound is set by requirement that the cascade flux from the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation can not exceed the measured cosmic GeV gamma-ray background spectrum. Two nearby blazars, Mrk 421 and Mrk 501, explain ∼70% of the cumulative background flux at 0.8–4 TeV, while extreme blazars start to dominate at higher energies. We also provide the cumulative background flux from each population, i.e., blazars, radio galaxies, and starburst galaxies which will be the minimum requirement for their contribution to the cosmic TeV gamma-ray background radiation.

  15. Self-amplifying Hawking radiation and its background: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Jeff; de Nova, Juan Ramón Muñoz

    2017-03-01

    We numerically study an analog black hole with two horizons with parameters similar to a recent experiment. We find that the Hawking radiation exists on a background which contains a density oscillation, a zero-frequency ripple. The Hawking radiation evolves from spontaneous to self-amplifying, while the background ripple grows steadily with no qualitative change. It is seen that the self-amplifying Hawking radiation has a nonzero frequency. This frequency is independent of the reference frame since it is the magnitude of the wave which oscillates, as in a standing wave. The background ripple appears even before the inner horizon is created, in contrast to predictions. Furthermore, we find that technical noise and shot-to-shot variations in the number of atoms are not sufficient to cause the observed correlation function. This work is in agreement with the recent observation of self-amplifying Hawking radiation, and explains some of the features seen. In contrast to some recent works, our study differentiates between the Hawking radiation observed, and the evolution of the background.

  16. Background radiation in two locations in Deaf Smith and Swisher Counties within the Palo Duro Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    Data on external background radiation doses resulting from cosmic, terrestrial, and fallout sources and on concentrations of radioactivity in environmental media are presented and discussed. Doses to individuals located at the approximate centers of two locations in Texas, one in Deaf Smith County and the other in Swisher County, are given, as are the population doses to people residing within 50 miles of each of the approximate centers. No adjustments have been made for the effects of buildings on radiation doses - that is, the shielding from external radiation afforded by the buildings and radiation from building materials are not accounted for. Concentrations of radioactivity in air, water, and milk in the region are also given. Because of the lack of specific information on background radiation at the locations, the external-dose rates to people and the radioactivity levels in environmental media for the region have been taken from the literature. A background radiation survey will be conducted in the Palo Duro Basin to obtain additional data. 26 references, 3 figures, 15 tables.

  17. Measurement of the Intensity of the Cosmic Background Radiation at3.7 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    De Amici, G.; Smoot, G.F.; Aymon, J.; Bersanelli, M.; Kogut, A.; Levine, S.M.; Witebsky, C.

    1987-04-01

    We measured the temperature of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at a frequency of 3.7 GHz (8.1 cm wavelength), using a total power, direct RF-gain receiver. The results give a brightness temperature, T{sub CBR}, of 2.58 {+-} 0.13 K (68% C.L.). Details of the instrument and of the experimental procedure are given. This measurement is part of a larger experiment to measure the spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation between 0.6 and 90 GHz (50 and 0.33 cm wavelength).

  18. Cosmic far-ultraviolet background radiation - Probe of a dense hot intergalactic medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, R. D.; Silk, J.

    1979-01-01

    Line and continuum radiation fluxes have been computed for a wide range of enriched intergalactic medium (IGM) models. Observations of the diffuse extragalactic light at optical and far-ultraviolet wavelengths are found to provide a potentially important probe of a dense hot intergalactic medium. If the diffuse X-ray background is produced by this gas, the models constrain the cosmological density parameter (Omega) to be less than 0.4. The associated Compton distortions of the cosmic blackbody background radiation and the optical depths to distant quasars at X-ray wavelengths are also evaluated.

  19. Advanced Undergraduate Computer Based Astronomy Lab. The 3K Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slovak, M. H.

    2002-05-01

    A challenging computer based astronomy lab for advanced astronomy undergraduate students has been developed using satellite (COBE) and ground-based observations of the 3K cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). Students are provided the observations and background information on the discovery and interpretation of the CMBR. They also review relevant radiation laws such as the Stefan-Boltzmann law and Wein's law. The data are modeled using Microsoft(c) Excel to calculate a Planckian intensity distribution in order to determine the temperature and peak wavelength of the CMBR. This lab is one in a series being designed to provide astronomy majors experience in mathematically modeling astronomical data.

  20. Long-Wavelength Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave BackgroundRadiation Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, G.F.; Bensadoun, M.; Bersanelli, M.; pDe Amici, G.; Kogut,A.; Levine, S.; Witebsky, C.

    1987-02-01

    We have measured the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation at wavelengths of 0.33, 3.0, 8.2 and 21.3 cm. These measurements represent a continuation of the work reported by Smoot et al. (1985). The new results have a weighted average of 2.70 {+-} 0.05 K and are consistent with past measurements. They limit the possible distortion of the cosmic microwave background radiation spectrum to less than 6%. The results of all measurements to date are consistent with a Planckian spectrum with temperature 2.74 {+-} 0.02 K spanning a wavelength range of 0.1 to 21 cm.

  1. Contribution to the ultraviolet metagalactic background from radiative recombination in intervening absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. M.

    1997-05-01

    Recently, Haardt & Madau (HM) showed that QSO absorption-line systems are not only sinks of the ultraviolet metagalactic background (UMB), but also significant sources of the UMB due to recombination radiation within photoionized absorbers. We demonstrate that the contribution to the UMB from H I and He II recombination radiation may be less than Haardt & Madau's by a factor of about 0.4 if intervening absorbers are modeled as a slab illuminated isotropically on two sides and the recombination radiation is assumed to be isotropic. This is the case which most closely approximates QSOs absorption-line systems.

  2. Analysis of Spectral Variation in Background Gamma Radiation at U.S. Ports of Entry

    SciTech Connect

    Homolka, Kaylee Lynn

    2014-07-01

    This project exists to improve the ability to detect nuclear material crossing the borders. The purpose of my portion of this project was to analyze spectral variations of backgrounds measured by radiation portal monitor detectors at ports of entry using available data to determine whether or not the measured background variation includes changes in the spectral shape in addition to changes in the gross counts.

  3. The cosmic microwave background radiation temperature at a redshift of 2.34.

    PubMed

    Srianand, R; Petitjean, P; Ledoux, C

    The existence of the cosmic microwave background radiation is a fundamental prediction of hot Big Bang cosmology, and its temperature should increase with increasing redshift. At the present time (redshift z = 0), the temperature has been determined with high precision to be T(CMBR)(0) = 2.726 +/- 0.010 K. In principle, the background temperature can be determined using measurements of the relative populations of atomic fine-structure levels, which are excited by the background radiation. But all previous measurements have achieved only upper limits, thus still formally permitting the radiation temperature to be constant with increasing redshift. Here we report the detection of absorption lines from the first and second fine-structure levels of neutral carbon atoms in an isolated cloud of gas at z = 2.3371. We also detected absorption due to several rotational transitions of molecular hydrogen, and fine-structure lines of singly ionized carbon. These constraints enable us to determine that the background radiation was indeed warmer in the past: we find that T(CMBR)(z = 2.3371) is between 6.0 and 14 K. This is in accord with the temperature of 9.1 K predicted by hot Big Bang cosmology.

  4. Balloon-based measurements of the cosmic background radiation. [with Far IR spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.; Richards, P. L.; Woody, D. P.

    1974-01-01

    A balloon-borne liquid-helium-cooled spectrometer was developed and flown to measure the cosmic background radiation in the 3- to 18-per-cm region. It features a cooled horn antenna, a polarizing Michelson interferometer, and a germanium bolometer. These design features and the performance of the instrument are discussed.

  5. Infrared radiation scene generation of stars and planets in celestial background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Hong, Yaohui; Xu, Xiaojian

    2014-10-01

    An infrared (IR) radiation generation model of stars and planets in celestial background is proposed in this paper. Cohen's spectral template1 is modified for high spectral resolution and accuracy. Based on the improved spectral template for stars and the blackbody assumption for planets, an IR radiation model is developed which is able to generate the celestial IR background for stars and planets appearing in sensor's field of view (FOV) for specified observing date and time, location, viewpoint and spectral band over 1.2μm ~ 35μm. In the current model, the initial locations of stars are calculated based on midcourse space experiment (MSX) IR astronomical catalogue (MSX-IRAC) 2 , while the initial locations of planets are calculated using secular variations of the planetary orbits (VSOP) theory. Simulation results show that the new IR radiation model has higher resolution and accuracy than common model.

  6. Propagation of Polarized Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation in an Anisotropic Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Moskaliuk, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    The polarization plane of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) can be rotated either in a space-time with metric of anisotropic type and in a magnetized plasma or in the presence of a quintessential background with pseudoscalar coupling to electromagnetism. A unified treatment of these three phenomena is presented for cold anisotropic plasma at the pre-recombination epoch. It is argued that the generalized expressions derived in the present study may be relevant for direct searches of a possible rotation of the cosmic microwave background polarization.

  7. Thyroid nodularity and chromosome aberrations among women in areas of high background radiation in China

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.Y.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Wei, L.X.; Beebe, G.W.; Zha, Y.R.; Kaplan, M.M.; Tao, Z.F.; Maxon, H.R. III; Zhang, S.Z.; Schneider, A.B. )

    1990-03-21

    Thyroid nodularity following continuous low-dose radiation exposure in China was determined in 1,001 women aged 50-65 years who resided in areas of high background radiation (330 mR/yr) their entire lives, and in 1,005 comparison subjects exposed to normal levels of radiation (114 mR/yr). Cumulative doses to the thyroid were estimated to be of the order of 14 cGy and 5 cGy, respectively. Personal interviews and physical examinations were conducted, and measurements were made of serum thyroid hormone levels, urinary iodine concentrations, and chromosome aberrations in circulating lymphocytes. For all nodular disease, the prevalences in the high background and control areas were 9.5% and 9.3%, respectively. For single nodules, the prevalences were 7.4% in the high background area and 6.6% in the control area (prevalence ratio = 1.13; 95% confidence interval = 0.82-1.55). There were no differences found in serum levels of thyroid hormones. Women in the high background region, however, had significantly lower concentrations of urinary iodine and significantly higher frequencies of stable and unstable chromosome aberrations. Increased intake of allium vegetables such as garlic and onions was associated with a decreased risk of nodular disease, which seems consistent with experimental studies suggesting that allium compounds can inhibit tumor growth and proliferation. The prevalence of mild diffuse goiter was higher in the high background radiation region, perhaps related to a low dietary intake of iodine. These data suggest that continuous exposure to low-level radiation throughout life is unlikely to appreciably increase the risk of thyroid cancer. However, such exposure may cause chromosomal damage.

  8. Investigation of background radiation levels and geologic unit profiles in Durango, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Triplett, G.H. ); Foutz, W.L.; Lesperance, L.R. )

    1989-11-01

    As part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed radiological surveys on 435 vicinity properties (VPs) in the Durango area. This study was undertaken to establish the background radiation levels and geologic unit profiles in the Durango VP area. During the months of May through June, 1986, extensive radiometric measurements and surface soil samples were collected in the Durango VP area by personnel from ORNL's Grand Junction Office. A majority of the Durango VP surveys were conducted at sites underlain by Quaternary alluvium, older Quaternary gravels, and Cretaceous Lewis and Mancos shales. These four geologic units were selected to be evaluated. The data indicated no formation anomalies and established regional background radiation levels. Durango background radionuclide concentrations in surface soil were determined to be 20.3 {plus minus} 3.4 pCi/g for {sup 40}K, 1.6 {plus minus} 0.5 pCi/g for {sup 226}Ra, and 1.2 {plus minus} 0.3 pCi/g for {sup 232}Th. The Durango background gamma exposure rate was found to be 16.5 {plus minus} 1.3 {mu}R/h. Average gamma spectral count rate measurements for {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th were determined to be 553, 150, and 98 counts per minute (cpm), respectively. Geologic unit profiles and Durango background radiation measurements are presented and compared with other areas. 19 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Correlations between 21-cm radiation and the cosmic microwave background from active sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berndsen, Aaron; Pogosian, Levon; Wyman, Mark

    2010-09-01

    Neutral hydrogen is ubiquitous, absorbing and emitting 21-cm radiation throughout much of the Universe's history. Active sources of perturbations, such as cosmic strings, would generate simultaneous perturbations in the distribution of neutral hydrogen and in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation from recombination. Moving strings would create wakes leading to 21-cm brightness fluctuations, while also perturbing CMB light via the Gott-Kaiser-Stebbins effect. This would lead to spatial correlations between the 21-cm and CMB anisotropies. Passive sources, like inflationary perturbations, predict no cross-correlations prior to the onset of reionization. Thus, observation of any cross-correlation between CMB and 21-cm radiation from dark ages would constitute evidence for new physics. We calculate the cosmic string-induced correlations between CMB and 21-cm radiation and evaluate their observability.

  10. Thermodynamics of viscous matter and radiation in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, A.; Magdy, H.

    2012-05-01

    Assuming that the background geometry is filled with free gas consisting of matter and radiation and no phase transitions being occurred in the early Universe, we discuss the thermodynamics of this {\\it closed} system using classical approaches. We find that essential cosmological quantities, such as Hubble parameter $H$, scale factor $a$ and curvature parameter $k$, can be derived from this simple model, which on one hand fulfills and entirely obeys the laws of thermodynamics. On the other hand, the results are compatible with the Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker model and the Einstein field equations. The inclusion of finite bulk viscosity coefficient derives to important changes in all these cosmological quantities. Accordingly, our picture about the evolution of the Universe and its astrophysical consequences seems to be a subject of a radical revision. We find that $k$ strongly depends on the thermodynamics of background matter. The time scale, at which negative curvature might take place, depends on the relation between the matter content and the total energy. Using quantum and statistical approaches, we assume that the size of the Universe is given by the volume occupied one particle and one photon. Different types of their interactions are taken into account. Expressions for $H$ and $a$ are introduced. Therefore, the expansion of the Universe turns to be accessible.

  11. natural background radiation dosimetry in the highest altitude region of Iran.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush

    2003-09-01

    The natural background radiation has been measured in one of the highest altitude regions (Zagros Mountains), Chaharmahal and Bakhtiari province, in the south west of Iran. The outdoors-environmental monitoring exposure rate of radiation was measured in 200 randomly chosen regions using portable Geiger-Muller and scintillation detectors. Eight measurements were made in each region and an average value was used to calculate the exposure rate from natural background radiation. The average exposure rate was found to be 0.246 microGy/h and the annual average effective dose equivalent was found to be 0.49 mSv. An overall population-weighted mean outdoor dose rate was calculated to be 49 nGy/h, which is higher than the world-wide mean value of 44 nGy/h, as reported by UNSCEAR in 1998, and is comparable to the annual effective dose equivalent of 0.38 mSv. A good correlation between the altitude and the exposure rate was observed, as the higher altitude regions have higher natural background radiation levels.

  12. QUaD: A millimeter-wave polarimeter for observation of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinderks, James R.

    2005-11-01

    This thesis describes the design and performance of the QUaD experiment and presents some of its earliest results. QUaD is a millimeter-wavelength polarimeter designed for observing the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). QUaD was commissioned at the MAPO observatory at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in the Austral Summer of 2004/2005, achieved first light in Feb 2005, and began science observation in May. QUaD observes the CMB with an array of 31 polarization-sensitive Neutron Transmutation Doped (NTD) germanium bolometers split between two frequency bands centered at 100 and 150 GHz. The telescope is a 2.6 m on-axis Cassegrain design with beam sizes of 6.3' and 4.2' at the two respective observing frequencies. The resolution and scan strategy are optimized to probe the CMB E- mode power spectrum over a multipole range of 100 to 2500. The performance of the system has been characterized with commissioning observations and a high signal-to-noise map of the CMB temperature anisotropy has been made over a ~50 square degree area. CMB polarization anisotropies, only recently detected, promise a wealth of new cosmological information. Their observation complements the many successful temperature anisotropy measurements already performed, confirming our basic understanding of the early universe and leading to tighter constraints on cosmological parameters. Furthermore, polarization observations provide a probe of structure since the last scattering surface and promise unique constraints on inflation through the imprint of relict gravitational radiation.

  13. Many-body heat radiation and heat transfer in the presence of a nonabsorbing background medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Boris; Incardone, Roberta; Antezza, Mauro; Emig, Thorsten; Krüger, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Heat radiation and near-field radiative heat transfer can be strongly manipulated by adjusting geometrical shapes, optical properties, or the relative positions of the objects involved. Typically, these objects are considered as embedded in vacuum. By applying the methods of fluctuational electrodynamics, we derive general closed-form expressions for heat radiation and heat transfer in a system of N arbitrary objects embedded in a passive nonabsorbing background medium. Taking into account the principle of reciprocity, we explicitly prove the symmetry and positivity of transfer in any such system. Regarding applications, we find that the heat radiation of a sphere as well as the heat transfer between two parallel plates is strongly enhanced by the presence of a background medium. Regarding near- and far-field transfer through a gas like air, we show that a microscopic model (based on gas particles) and a macroscopic model (using a dielectric contrast) yield identical results. We also compare the radiative transfer through a medium like air and the energy transfer found from kinetic gas theory.

  14. Impact of the Fukushima nuclear accident on background radiation doses measured by control dosimeters in Japan.

    PubMed

    Romanyukha, Alexander; King, David L; Kennemur, Lisa K

    2012-05-01

    After the 9.0 magnitude earthquake and subsequent massive tsunami on 11 March 2011 in Japan, several reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant suffered severe damage. There was immediate participation of U.S. Navy vessels and other United States Department of Defense (DoD) teams that were already in the area at the time of the disaster or arrived shortly thereafter. The correct determination of occupational dose equivalent requires estimation of the background dose component measured by control dosimeters, which is subsequently subtracted from the total dose equivalent measured by personal dosimeters. The purpose of the control dosimeters is to determine the amount of radiation dose equivalent that has accumulated on the dosimeter from background or other non-occupational sources while they are in transit or being stored. Given the release of radioactive material and potential exposure to radiation from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and the process by which the U.S. Navy calculates occupational exposure to ionizing radiation, analysis of pre- and post-event control dosimeters is warranted. Several hundred historical dose records from the Naval Dosimetry Center (NDC) database were analyzed and compared with the post-accident dose equivalent data of control dosimeters. As result, it was shown that the dose contribution of the radiation and released radiological materials from the Fukushima nuclear accident to background radiation doses is less than 0.375 μSv d for shallow and deep photon dose equivalent. There is no measurable effect on neutron background exposure. The latter has at least two important conclusions. First, the NDC can use doses measured by control dosimeters at issuing sites in Japan for determination of personnel dose equivalents; second, the dose data from control dosimeters prior to and after the Fukushima accident may be used to assist in dose reconstruction of non-radiological (non-badged) personnel at these locations.

  15. Histologic characteristics of skin cancer in Hiroshima and Nagasaki: background incidence and radiation effects.

    PubMed

    Kishikawa, Masao; Koyama, Kojiro; Iseki, Masachika; Kobuke, Toshihiro; Yonehara, Shuji; Soda, Midori; Ron, Elaine; Tokunaga, Masayoshi; Preston, Dale L; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Tokuoka, Shoji

    2005-11-10

    Skin cancers, though rare in Japan, have reportedly been on the rise, but little else is known about epidemiologic features of different histologic types of skin cancer. The Life Span Study cohort, which consists of 93,700 atomic-bomb survivors, many of whom were exposed to negligibly low radiation doses, and 26,600 people not exposed to radiation, enables a population-based study of spontaneous as well as radiation-related cancer risk. Skin tumor incident cases diagnosed between 1958 and 1987 were ascertained by linkage to the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries augmented by searches of other data sources. Study pathologists reviewed tumor specimens and pathology reports and classified tumors using the World Health Organization classification scheme. They identified 274 primary incident skin cancers, of which 106 were basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 81 were squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 14 were malignant melanomas. Background incidence rates and radiation effects were assessed by Poisson regression models allowing for the effects of demographic and other covariates. BCC and SCC background incidence rates were both about 3 per 100,000 per year. BCCs were mainly on the head/neck (81%), whereas SCCs occurred most frequently on the arms/legs (45%) and head/neck (29%), consistent with the presumed role played by solar UV exposure in skin cancer. The BCC rates increased significantly between 1958 and 1987, whereas the SCC rates remained unchanged. The excess absolute risk of BCC per unit skin surface area related to atomic-bomb radiation exposure did not differ between UV-exposed and shielded parts of the body, suggesting the additivity of the radiation-related and background BCC risks. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Probing Reionization with the Cross-power Spectrum of 21 cm and Near-infrared Radiation Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiao-Chun

    2014-08-01

    The cross-correlation between the 21 cm emission from the high-redshift intergalactic medium and the near-infrared (NIR) background light from high-redshift galaxies promises to be a powerful probe of cosmic reionization. In this paper, we investigate the cross-power spectrum during the epoch of reionization. We employ an improved halo approach to derive the distribution of the density field and consider two stellar populations in the star formation model: metal-free stars and metal-poor stars. The reionization history is further generated to be consistent with the electron-scattering optical depth from cosmic microwave background measurements. Then, the intensity of the NIR background is estimated by collecting emission from stars in first-light galaxies. On large scales, we find that the 21 cm and NIR radiation backgrounds are positively correlated during the very early stages of reionization. However, these two radiation backgrounds quickly become anti-correlated as reionization proceeds. The maximum absolute value of the cross-power spectrum is |\\Delta ^2_{21,NIR}|\\sim 10^{-4} mK nW m-2 sr-1, reached at l ~ 1000 when the mean fraction of ionized hydrogen is \\bar{x}_{i}\\sim 0.9. We find that Square Kilometer Array can measure the 21 cm-NIR cross-power spectrum in conjunction with mild extensions to the existing CIBER survey, provided that the integration time independently adds up to 1000 and 1 hr for 21 cm and NIR observations, and that the sky coverage fraction of the CIBER survey is extended from 4 × 10-4 to 0.1. Measuring the cross-correlation signal as a function of redshift provides valuable information on reionization and helps confirm the origin of the "missing" NIR background.

  17. Probing reionization with the cross-power spectrum of 21 cm and near-infrared radiation backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Xiao-Chun

    2014-08-01

    The cross-correlation between the 21 cm emission from the high-redshift intergalactic medium and the near-infrared (NIR) background light from high-redshift galaxies promises to be a powerful probe of cosmic reionization. In this paper, we investigate the cross-power spectrum during the epoch of reionization. We employ an improved halo approach to derive the distribution of the density field and consider two stellar populations in the star formation model: metal-free stars and metal-poor stars. The reionization history is further generated to be consistent with the electron-scattering optical depth from cosmic microwave background measurements. Then, the intensity of the NIR background is estimated by collecting emission from stars in first-light galaxies. On large scales, we find that the 21 cm and NIR radiation backgrounds are positively correlated during the very early stages of reionization. However, these two radiation backgrounds quickly become anti-correlated as reionization proceeds. The maximum absolute value of the cross-power spectrum is |Δ{sub 21,NIR}{sup 2}|∼10{sup −4} mK nW m{sup –2} sr{sup –1}, reached at ℓ ∼ 1000 when the mean fraction of ionized hydrogen is x-bar{sub i}∼0.9. We find that Square Kilometer Array can measure the 21 cm-NIR cross-power spectrum in conjunction with mild extensions to the existing CIBER survey, provided that the integration time independently adds up to 1000 and 1 hr for 21 cm and NIR observations, and that the sky coverage fraction of the CIBER survey is extended from 4 × 10{sup –4} to 0.1. Measuring the cross-correlation signal as a function of redshift provides valuable information on reionization and helps confirm the origin of the 'missing' NIR background.

  18. Background Ionizing Radiation and the Risk of Childhood Cancer: A Census-Based Nationwide Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lupatsch, Judith E.; Zwahlen, Marcel; Röösli, Martin; Niggli, Felix; Grotzer, Michael A.; Rischewski, Johannes; Egger, Matthias; Kuehni, Claudia E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exposure to medium or high doses of ionizing radiation is a known risk factor for cancer in children. The extent to which low-dose radiation from natural sources contributes to the risk of childhood cancer remains unclear. Objectives In a nationwide census-based cohort study, we investigated whether the incidence of childhood cancer was associated with background radiation from terrestrial gamma and cosmic rays. Methods Children < 16 years of age in the Swiss National Censuses in 1990 and 2000 were included. The follow-up period lasted until 2008, and incident cancer cases were identified from the Swiss Childhood Cancer Registry. A radiation model was used to predict dose rates from terrestrial and cosmic radiation at locations of residence. Cox regression models were used to assess associations between cancer risk and dose rates and cumulative dose since birth. Results Among 2,093,660 children included at census, 1,782 incident cases of cancer were identified including 530 with leukemia, 328 with lymphoma, and 423 with a tumor of the central nervous system (CNS). Hazard ratios for each millisievert increase in cumulative dose of external radiation were 1.03 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.05) for any cancer, 1.04 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.08) for leukemia, 1.01 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.05) for lymphoma, and 1.04 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.08) for CNS tumors. Adjustment for a range of potential confounders had little effect on the results. Conclusions Our study suggests that background radiation may contribute to the risk of cancer in children, including leukemia and CNS tumors. Citation Spycher BD, Lupatsch JE, Zwahlen M, Röösli M, Niggli F, Grotzer MA, Rischewski J, Egger M, Kuehni CE, for the Swiss Pediatric Oncology Group and the Swiss National Cohort. 2015. Background ionizing radiation and the risk of childhood cancer: a census-based nationwide cohort study. Environ Health Perspect 123:622–628; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408548 PMID:25707026

  19. The Cow on the High Street: Effects of Background Context on Early Naming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meints, Kerstin; Plunkett, Kim; Harris, Paul L.; Dimmock, Debbie

    2004-01-01

    What role does contextual information play in children's early word comprehension? Using an inter-modal preferential looking task, we investigated how different background contexts influence children's looking times before and after an image has been named. Prior to the experiment, early comprehension of words was assessed using parental…

  20. The Cow on the High Street: Effects of Background Context on Early Naming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meints, Kerstin; Plunkett, Kim; Harris, Paul L.; Dimmock, Debbie

    2004-01-01

    What role does contextual information play in children's early word comprehension? Using an inter-modal preferential looking task, we investigated how different background contexts influence children's looking times before and after an image has been named. Prior to the experiment, early comprehension of words was assessed using parental…

  1. Early cardiac changes related to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ikaeheimo, M.J.N.; Niemelae, K.O.L.; Linnaluoto, M.M.; Jakobsson, M.J.; Takkunen, J.T.; Taskinen, P.J.

    1985-12-01

    To investigate the incidence and severity of possible radiation-induced cardiac changes, 21 women without heart disease were investigated serially by echocardiography and by measuring systolic time intervals before and up to 6 months after postoperative radiation therapy because of breast cancer. Radiation was associated with a decrease in fractional systolic shortening of the left ventricular (LV) minor-axis diameter, from 0.35 +/- 0.05 to 0.32 +/- 0.06 (p less than 0.005), and in the systolic blood pressure/end-systolic diameter ratio, from 4.4 +/- 1.2 to 3.9 +/- 0.9 mm Hg/mm (p less than 0.005). The mitral E point-septal separation increased, from 2.8 +/- 1.5 to 4.2 +/- 2.5 mm (p less than 0.005). The preejection period/LV ejection time ratio of systolic time intervals increased, but only the decrease within 6 months after therapy was significant (p less than 0.005). All these changes reflect slight transient depression of LV function, which became normalized within 6 months after therapy. Up to 6 months after therapy, a slight pericardial effusion was found in 33% of the patients. Hence, conventional radiation therapy appeared to cause an acute transient and usually symptomless decrease in LV function, and later, slight pericardial effusion in one-third of the patients.

  2. A shallow underground laboratory for low-background radiation measurements and materials development.

    PubMed

    Aalseth, C E; Bonicalzi, R M; Cantaloub, M G; Day, A R; Erikson, L E; Fast, J; Forrester, J B; Fuller, E S; Glasgow, B D; Greenwood, L R; Hoppe, E W; Hossbach, T W; Hyronimus, B J; Keillor, M E; Mace, E K; McIntyre, J I; Merriman, J H; Myers, A W; Overman, C T; Overman, N R; Panisko, M E; Seifert, A; Warren, G A; Runkle, R C

    2012-11-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory recently commissioned a new shallow underground laboratory, located at a depth of approximately 30 meters-water-equivalent. This new addition to the small class of radiation measurement laboratories located at modest underground depths houses the latest generation of custom-made, high-efficiency, low-background gamma-ray spectrometers and gas proportional counters. This paper describes the unique capabilities present in the shallow underground laboratory; these include large-scale ultra-pure materials production and a suite of radiation detection systems. Reported data characterize the degree of background reduction achieved through a combination of underground location, graded shielding, and rejection of cosmic-ray events. We conclude by presenting measurement targets and future opportunities.

  3. The space microwave interferometer and the search for cosmic background gravitational wave radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel

    1989-01-01

    Present and planned investigations which use interplanetary spacecraft for gravitational wave searches are severely limited in their detection capability. This limitation has to do both with the Earth-based tracking procedures used and with the configuration of the experiments themselves. It is suggested that a much improved experiment can now be made using a multiarm interferometer designed with current operating elements. An important source of gravitational wave radiation, the cosmic background, may well be within reach of detection with these procedures. It is proposed to make a number of experimental steps that can now be carried out using TDRSS spacecraft and would conclude in the establishment of an operating multiarm microwave interferometer. This interferometer is projected to have a sensitivity to cosmic background gravitational wave radiation with an energy of less than 10(exp -4) cosmic closure density and to periodic waves generating spatial strain approaching 10(exp -19) in the range 0.1 to 0.001 Hz.

  4. Cosmic background radiation must appear smooth in an optically thick universe

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, D.W. )

    1990-01-01

    The recent discovery by Schneider, Schmidt, and Gunn (Astronomical Journal, 98(6), December 1989, 1951-58) of a quasar with a redshift factor z of 4.73 raises anew the question of how the universe could be so structured at that epoch despite being so smooth at the epoch of the cosmic background radiation (CBR). The smoothness of the CBR may, however, be illusory. In 1984, the author proved from relativistically invariant radiative transfer theory that, in an optically thick gas, the radiation should show only monopole, dipole, and quadrupole components with all higher-order multipole moments vanishing. Since Schneider Schmidt, and Gunn also measured an increase in intergalactic opacity for z > 4, the appearance of any inhomogeneities in the CBR may be washed out by opacity effects. Thus the smoothness of the CBR may be only a weak constraint on theories of galaxy formation.

  5. Scale covariance and G-varying cosmology. II - Thermodynamics, radiation, and the 3 K background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Hsieh, S.-H.

    1979-01-01

    Within the framework of a scale-covariant theory of gravitation, a semiclassical description of particles and photons is given. Thermodynamic relations consistent with the modified conservation equations are derived. Application to a system of radiation shows that the observed 3-K background radiation can be interpreted, within the present framework, as a remnant of equilibrium radiation in the past. As the theory postulates a nonstandard coupling between gravitation and electrodynamics, the assumption that Einstein's theory of gravitation is unchanged forces modifications at the atomic level. The use of Minkowskian spacetime in atomic physics is found to be adequate only over small, but not large, time scales compared with the age of the universe. As a result, a relation between energy and the frequency of a free photon is demonstrated. Possible observational consequences of this relation are discussed.

  6. Low Frequency Measurement of the Spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smoot, G. F.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S. D.; Witebsky, C.; Mandolesi, N.; Partridge, R. B.; Sironi, G.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.

    1983-06-01

    We have made measurements of the cosmic background radiation spectrum at 5 wavelengths (0.33, 0.9, 3, 6.3, and 12 cm) using radiometers with wavelength-scaled corrugated horn antennas having very low sidelobes. A single large-mouth (0.7 m diameter) liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load was used for all five radiometers. The results of the observations are consistent with previous measurements and represent a significant improvement in accuracy.

  7. Low Frequency measurment of the Spectrum of the Cosmic BackgroundRadiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, G.F.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S.D.; Witebsky, C.; Mandolesi, N.; Partridge, R.b.; Sironi, G.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.

    1983-06-01

    We have made measurements of the cosmic background radiation spectrum at 5 wavelengths (0.33, 0.9, 3, 6.3, and 12 cm) using radiometers with wavelength-scaled corrugated horn antennas having very low sidelobes. A single large-mouth (0.7 m diameter) liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load was used for all five radiometers. The results of the observations are consistent with previous measurements and represent a significant improvement in accuracy.

  8. New measurements of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 3. 3 millimeter wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.; Smoot, G.; De amici, G.; Friedman, S.D.

    1986-11-01

    The results of measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm are reported, and the instrument, system operation, and data analysis procedures are described in detail. A CBR brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1 sigma uncertainty of + or - 0.12 K is obtained. The results are compared with measurements by other authors, and the cold-load antenna temperature and atmospheric model used in the study are discussed in appendices. 32 references.

  9. Unified field theories, the early big bang, and the microwave background paradox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that a superunified field theory incorporating gravity and possessing asymptotic freedom could provide a solution to the paradox of the isotropy of the universal 3K background radiation. Thermal equilibrium could be established in this context through interactions occurring in a temporally indefinite preplanckian era.

  10. Asymptotic freedom in the early big-bang and the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    The isotropy of the universal 3K background radiation is discussed and a superunified field theory incorporating gravity and possessing asymptotic freedom is suggested to provide a solution to the problem. Thermal equilibrium is established in this context through interactions occurring in a temporally indefinite preplanckian era.

  11. Asymptotic freedom in the early big bang and the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that a superunified field theory incorporating gravity and possessing asymptotic freedom could provide a solution to the problem of the isotropy of the universal 3 K background radiation. Thermal equilibrium could be established in this context through interactions occurring in a temporally indefinite pre-Planckian era.

  12. Asymptotic freedom in the early big bang and the isotropy of the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that a superunified field theory incorporating gravity and possessing asymptotic freedom could provide a solution to the problem of the isotropy of the universal 3 K background radiation. Thermal equilibrium could be established in this context through interactions occurring in a temporally indefinite pre-Planckian era.

  13. Radiation detection and wireless networked early warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, David A.; Litz, Marc S.; Carroll, James J.; Katsis, Dimosthenis

    2012-06-01

    We have designed a compact, wireless, GPS-enabled array of inexpensive radiation sensors based on scintillation counting. Each sensor has a scintillator, photomultiplier tube, and pulse-counting circuit that includes a comparator, digital potentiometer and microcontroller. This design provides a high level of sensitivity and reliability. A 0.2 m2 PV panel powers each sensor providing a maintenance-free 24/7 energy source. The sensor can be mounted within a roadway light-post and monitor radiological activity along transport routes. Each sensor wirelessly transmits real-time data (as counts per second) up to 2 miles with a XBee radio module, and the data is received by a XBee receive-module on a computer. Data collection software logs the information from all sensors and provides real-time identification of radiation events. Measurements performed to-date demonstrate the ability of a sensor to detect a 20 μCi source at 3.5 meters when packaged with a PVT (plastic) scintillator, and 7 meters for a sensor with a CsI crystal (more expensive but ~5 times more sensitive). It is calculated that the sensor-architecture can detect sources moving as fast as 130 km/h based on the current data rate and statistical bounds of 3-sigma threshold detection. The sensor array is suitable for identifying and tracking a radiation threat from a dirty bomb along roadways.

  14. Multi-frequency survey of background radiations of the Universe. The "Cosmological Gene" project. First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parijskij, Yu. N.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Nizhel'Skii, N. A.; Bursov, N. N.; Berlin, A. B.; Grechkin, A. A.; Zharov, V. I.; Zhekanis, G. V.; Majorova, E. K.; Semenova, T. A.; Stolyarov, V. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Kratov, D. V.; Udovitskii, R. Yu.; Khaikin, V. B.

    2011-10-01

    The results of the first stage of the "Cosmological Gene" project of the Russian Academy of Sciences are reported. These results consist in the accumulation of multi-frequency data in 31 frequency channels in the wavelength interval 1-55 cm with maximum achievable statistical sensitivity limited by the noise of background radio sources at all wavelengths exceeding 1.38 cm. The survey region is determined by constraints 00 h < RA < 24 h and 40°30' < DEC < 42°30'. The scientific goals of the project are refined in view of recent proposals to use cosmological background radiation data for the development of a unified physical theory. Experimental data obtained with the RATAN-600 radio telescope are used to refine the contribution of the main "screens" located between the observer and the formation epoch of cosmic background radiation ( z = 1100). Experimental data for synchrotron radiation and free-free noise on scales that are of interest for the anisotropy of cosmic microwave background are reported as well as the contribution of these noise components in millimeter-wave experiments to be performed in the nearest years. The role of dipole radio emission of fullerene-type dust nanostructures is shown to be small. The most precise estimates of the role of background radio sources with inverted spectra are given and these sources are shown to create no serious interference in experiments. The average spectral indices of the weakest sources of the NVSS and FIRST catalogs are estimated. The "saturation" data for all wavelengths allowed a constraint to be imposed on the Sunyaev-Zeldovich noise (the SZ noise) at all wavelengths, and made it possible to obtain independent estimates of the average sky temperature from sources, substantially weaker than those listed in the NVSS catalog. These estimates are inconsistent with the existence of powerful extragalactic synchrotron background associated with radio sources. Appreciable "quadrupole" anisotropy in is detected in the

  15. Modeling background radiation using geochemical data: A case study in and around Cameron, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Marsac, Kara E; Burnley, Pamela C; Adcock, Christopher T; Haber, Daniel A; Malchow, Russell L; Hausrath, Elisabeth M

    2016-12-01

    This study compares high resolution forward models of natural gamma-ray background with that measured by high resolution aerial gamma-ray surveys. The ability to predict variations in natural background radiation levels should prove useful for those engaged in measuring anthropogenic contributions to background radiation for the purpose of emergency response and homeland security operations. The forward models are based on geologic maps and remote sensing multi-spectral imagery combined with two different sources of data: 1) bedrock geochemical data (uranium, potassium and thorium concentrations) collected from national databases, the scientific literature and private companies, and 2) the low spatial resolution NURE (National Uranium Resource Evaluation) aerial gamma-ray survey. The study area near Cameron, Arizona, is located in an arid region with minimal vegetation and, due to the presence of abandoned uranium mines, was the subject of a previous high resolution gamma-ray survey. We found that, in general, geologic map units form a good basis for predicting the geographic distribution of the gamma-ray background. Predictions of background gamma-radiation levels based on bedrock geochemical analyses were not as successful as those based on the NURE aerial survey data sorted by geologic unit. The less successful result of the bedrock geochemical model is most likely due to a number of factors including the need to take into account the evolution of soil geochemistry during chemical weathering and the influence of aeolian addition. Refinements to the forward models were made using ASTER visualizations to create subunits of similar exposure rate within the Chinle Formation, which contains multiple lithologies and by grouping alluvial units by drainage basin rather than age. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling background radiation using geochemical data: A case study in and around Cameron, Arizona

    DOE PAGES

    Marsac, Kara E.; Burnley, Pamela C.; Adcock, Christopher T.; ...

    2016-09-16

    Here, this study compares high-resolution forward models of natural gamma-ray background with that measured by high resolution aerial gamma-ray surveys. The ability to predict variations in natural background radiation levels should prove useful for those engaged in measuring anthropogenic contributions to background radiation for the purpose of emergency response and homeland security operations. The forward models are based on geologic maps and remote sensing multi-spectral imagery combined with two different sources of data: 1) bedrock geochemical data (uranium, potassium and thorium concentrations) collected from national databases, the scientific literature and private companies, and 2) the low spatial resolution NURE (Nationalmore » Uranium Resource Evaluation) aerial gamma-ray survey. The study area near Cameron, Arizona, is located in an arid region with minimal vegetation and, due to the presence of abandoned uranium mines, was the subject of a previous high resolution gamma-ray survey. We found that, in general, geologic map units form a good basis for predicting the geographic distribution of the gamma-ray background. Predictions of background gamma-radiation levels based on bedrock geochemical analyses were not as successful as those based on the NURE aerial survey data sorted by geologic unit. The less successful result of the bedrock geochemical model is most likely due to a number of factors including the need to take into account the evolution of soil geochemistry during chemical weathering and the influence of aeolian addition. Refinements to the forward models were made using ASTER visualizations to create subunits of similar exposure rate within the Chinle Formation, which contains multiple lithologies and by grouping alluvial units by drainage basin rather than age.« less

  17. The REPAIR Project: Examining the Biological Impacts of Sub-Background Radiation Exposure within SNOLAB, a Deep Underground Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Thome, Christopher; Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Pirkkanen, Jake; Zarnke, Andrew; Laframboise, Taylor; Boreham, Douglas R

    2017-07-19

    Considerable attention has been given to understanding the biological effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure at levels slightly above background. However, relatively few studies have been performed to examine the inverse, where natural background radiation is removed. The limited available data suggest that organisms exposed to sub-background radiation environments undergo reduced growth and an impaired capacity to repair genetic damage. Shielding from background radiation is inherently difficult due to high-energy cosmic radiation. SNOLAB, located in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, is a unique facility for examining the effects of sub-background radiation exposure. Originally constructed for astroparticle physics research, the laboratory is located within an active nickel mine at a depth of over 2,000 m. The rock overburden provides shielding equivalent to 6,000 m of water, thereby almost completely eliminating cosmic radiation. Additional features of the facility help to reduce radiological contamination from the surrounding rock. We are currently establishing a biological research program within SNOLAB: Researching the Effects of the Presence and Absence of Ionizing Radiation (REPAIR project). We hypothesize that natural background radiation is essential for life and maintains genomic stability, and that prolonged exposure to sub-background radiation environments will be detrimental to biological systems. Using a combination of whole organism and cell culture model systems, the effects of exposure to a sub-background environment will be examined on growth and development, as well as markers of genomic damage, DNA repair capacity and oxidative stress. The results of this research will provide further insight into the biological effects of low-dose radiation exposure as well as elucidate some of the processes that may drive evolution and selection in living systems. This Radiation Research focus issue contains reviews and original articles, which relate to the

  18. Radiation Backgrounds at Cosmic Dawn: X-Rays from Compact Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madau, Piero; Fragos, Tassos

    2017-05-01

    We compute the expected X-ray diffuse background and radiative feedback on the intergalactic medium (IGM) from X-ray binaries prior to and during the epoch of reionization. The cosmic evolution of compact binaries is followed using a population synthesis technique that treats separately neutron stars and black hole binaries in different spectral states and is calibrated to reproduce the observed X-ray properties of galaxies at z ≲ 4. Together with an updated empirical determination of the cosmic history of star formation, recent modeling of the stellar mass-metallicity relation, and a scheme for absorption by the IGM that accounts for the presence of ionized H ii bubbles during the epoch of reionization, our detailed calculations provide refined predictions of the X-ray volume emissivity and filtered radiation background from “normal” galaxies at z ≳ 6. Radiative transfer effects modulate the background spectrum, which shows a characteristic peak between 1 and 2 keV. Because of the energy dependence of photoabsorption, soft X-ray photons are produced by local sources, while more energetic radiation arrives unattenuated from larger cosmological volumes. While the filtering of X-ray radiation through the IGM slightly increases the mean excess energy per photoionization, it also weakens the radiation intensity below 1 keV, lowering the mean photoionization and heating rates. Numerical integration of the rate and energy equations shows that the contribution of X-ray binaries to the ionization of the bulk IGM is negligible, with the electron fraction never exceeding 1%. Direct He i photoionizations are the main source of IGM heating, and the temperature of the largely neutral medium in between H ii cavities increases above the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) only at z ≲ 10, when the volume filling factor of H ii bubbles is already ≳0.1. Therefore, in this scenario, it is only at relatively late epochs that neutral intergalactic hydrogen

  19. Radionuclides and Radiation Indices of High Background Radiation Area in Chavara-Neendakara Placer Deposits (Kerala, India)

    PubMed Central

    Derin, Mary Thomas; Vijayagopal, Perumal; Venkatraman, Balasubramaniam; Chaubey, Ramesh Chandra; Gopinathan, Anilkumar

    2012-01-01

    The present paper describes a detailed study on the distribution of radionuclides along Chavara – Neendakara placer deposit, a high background radiation area (HBRA) along the Southwest coast of India (Kerala). Judged from our studies using HPGe gamma spectrometric detector, it becomes evident that Uranium (238U), Thorium (232Th) and Potassium (40K) are the major sources for radioactivity prevailing in the area. Our statistical analyses reveal the existence of a high positive correlation between 238U and 232Th, implicating that the levels of these elements are interdependent. Our SEM-EDAX analyses reveal that titanium (Ti) and zircon (Zr) are the major trace elements in the sand samples, followed by aluminum, copper, iron, ruthenium, magnesium, calcium, sulphur and lead. This is first of its kind report on the radiation hazard indices on this placer deposit. The average absorbed dose rates (9795 nGy h−1) computed from the present study is comparable with the top-ranking HBRAs in the world, thus offering the Chavara-Neendakara placer the second position, after Brazil; pertinently, this value is much higher than the World average. The perceptibly high absorbed gamma dose rates, entrained with the high annual external effective dose rates (AEED) and average annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE) values existing in this HBRA, encourage us to suggest for a candid assessment of the impact of the background radiation, if any, on the organisms that inhabit along this placer deposit. Future research could effectively address the issue of the possible impact of natural radiation on the biota inhabiting this HBRA. PMID:23185629

  20. Radionuclides and radiation indices of high background radiation area in Chavara-Neendakara placer deposits (Kerala, India).

    PubMed

    Derin, Mary Thomas; Vijayagopal, Perumal; Venkatraman, Balasubramaniam; Chaubey, Ramesh Chandra; Gopinathan, Anilkumar

    2012-01-01

    The present paper describes a detailed study on the distribution of radionuclides along Chavara - Neendakara placer deposit, a high background radiation area (HBRA) along the Southwest coast of India (Kerala). Judged from our studies using HPGe gamma spectrometric detector, it becomes evident that Uranium ((238)U), Thorium ((232)Th) and Potassium ((40)K) are the major sources for radioactivity prevailing in the area. Our statistical analyses reveal the existence of a high positive correlation between (238)U and (232)Th, implicating that the levels of these elements are interdependent. Our SEM-EDAX analyses reveal that titanium (Ti) and zircon (Zr) are the major trace elements in the sand samples, followed by aluminum, copper, iron, ruthenium, magnesium, calcium, sulphur and lead. This is first of its kind report on the radiation hazard indices on this placer deposit. The average absorbed dose rates (9795 nGy h(-1)) computed from the present study is comparable with the top-ranking HBRAs in the world, thus offering the Chavara-Neendakara placer the second position, after Brazil; pertinently, this value is much higher than the World average. The perceptibly high absorbed gamma dose rates, entrained with the high annual external effective dose rates (AEED) and average annual gonadal dose equivalent (AGDE) values existing in this HBRA, encourage us to suggest for a candid assessment of the impact of the background radiation, if any, on the organisms that inhabit along this placer deposit. Future research could effectively address the issue of the possible impact of natural radiation on the biota inhabiting this HBRA.

  1. Radiation background in a LaBr3(Ce) gamma-ray scintillation detector.

    PubMed

    Rosson, Robert; Lahr, Jeffrey; Kahn, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    Gamma-ray spectral analyses with a 5-cm × 5-cm LaBr3(Ce) detector and a NaI(Tl) detector of the same size show that the LaBr3(Ce) has much better gamma-ray peak resolution and full-energy peak counting efficiency but worse detection sensitivity. The LaBr3(Ce) detector has relatively high intrinsic radiation background due to the naturally occurring La radioisotope in lanthanum. Although this La background is entirely below the energy of 1,500 keV, additional background is in the energy region between 1,500 keV and 2,750 keV. The manufacturer attributes this radiation to alpha particles emitted by the five short-lived progeny of an Ac impurity. Comparative values for peak resolution, full-energy peak counting efficiency, and detection sensitivity are reported for Am, Co, and Cs. Results of counting Cs sources at two activity levels demonstrate the impact of background on detection sensitivity.

  2. The use of pKZ1 mouse chromosomal inversion assay to study biological effects of environmental background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capece, D.; Fratini, E.

    2012-04-01

    Life has evolved on Earth for 3 billion years in the presence of background ionizing radiation (IR). All organisms on Earth are continuously exposed to varying amounts of natural radiation and they have therefore incorporated in their normal biology a daily stimulus of ultra-low-dose radiation. A question arises about the biological effects of environmental background radiation and whether the biochemical behavior of living organisms would differ if it was absent. Here, we report our experimental design to address these scientific questions, which use pKZ1 mouse chromosomal inversion assay to study the biological behavior of different cell cultures maintained in "cosmic silence" and in reference background conditions.

  3. The Effects of Nearby Clusters of Galaxies on the Microwave Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birkinshaw, M.

    1999-01-01

    This project proposed to use the COBE (Cosmic Background Explorer) DMR sky-maps to measure the anisotropies introduced into the microwave background radiation by the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich and Rees-Sciama effects of nearby clusters and superclusters of galaxies. We intended to seek these effects by making maps of the best-fit anisotropies on particular angular scales and comparing the apparent anisotropies near target clusters and superclusters with the statistical noise and sky variance. The locations of the clusters and superclusters were to be found using HEAO-1 (High Energy Astronomy Observatory) A2 and Einstein X-ray maps. Checks against biases were to be made using radio and X-ray sky-maps as guides to the properties of the clusters and superclusters. Any signals detected would have implications for the gas properties and baryonic masses of clusters and superclusters. The scientific background, project activities and references to published papers are included.

  4. Early Events in Ionic Liquid Radiation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Wishart, J.F.; Cook, A.; Rimmer, R.D.; Gohdo, M.

    2010-09-14

    Ionic liquids are interesting and useful materials whose solvation time scales are up to thousands of times longer than in conventional solvents. The extended lifetimes of pre-solvated electrons and other energetic species in ionic liquids has profound consequences for the radiolytic product distributions and reactivity patterns. We use a newly developed, multiplexed variation of pulse-probe spectroscopy to measure the kinetics of the early dynamical and reactive events in ionic liquids.

  5. The Impact of Radiation Oncologists on the Early Adoption of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Boero, Isabel J; Gillespie, Erin F; Hou, Jiayi; Paravati, Anthony J; Kim, Ellen; Einck, John P; Yashar, Catheryn; Mell, Loren K; Murphy, James D

    2017-03-01

    Despite multiple randomized trials showing the efficacy of hypofractionated radiation therapy in early-stage breast cancer, the United States has been slow to adopt this treatment. The goal of this study was to evaluate the impact of individual radiation oncologists on the early adoption of hypofractionated radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. We identified 22,233 Medicare beneficiaries with localized breast cancer that was diagnosed from 2004 to 2011 who underwent breast-conserving surgery with adjuvant radiation. Multilevel, multivariable logistic models clustered by radiation oncologist and geographic practice area were used to determine the impact of the provider and geographic region on the likelihood of receiving hypofractionated compared with standard fractionated radiation therapy while controlling for a patient's clinical and demographic covariates. Odds ratios (OR) describe the impact of demographic or clinical covariates, and the median OR (MOR) describes the relative impact of the individual radiation oncologist and geographic region on the likelihood of undergoing hypofractionated radiation therapy. Among the entire cohort, 2333 women (10.4%) were treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy, with unadjusted rates ranging from 0.0% in the bottom quintile of radiation oncologists to 30.4% in the top quintile. Multivariable analysis found that the individual radiation oncologist (MOR 3.08) had a greater impact on the use of hypofractionation than did geographic region (MOR 2.10) or clinical and demographic variables. The impact of the provider increased from the year 2004 to 2005 (MOR 2.82) to the year 2010 to 2011 (MOR 3.16) despite the publication of long-term randomized trial results in early 2010. Male physician and radiation oncologists treating the highest volume of breast cancer patients were less likely to perform hypofractionation (P<.05). The individual radiation oncologist strongly influenced the likelihood of a patient

  6. Background radiation measurements at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site, Carlsbad, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Minnema, D.M.; Brewer, L.W.

    1983-09-01

    A series of background radiation measurements was performed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site, Carlsbad, New Mexico. The survey consisted of gross gamma and gamma spectral measurements of the radiation fields, soil and salt grab sample gamma analysis, and radon and working level measurements. The survey included locations at the surface and also within the mine itself. Background radiation levels on the surface were measured to average 7.65 microR/hour, and 0.7 microR/hour within the mine. Radon and working levels were at or below detection levels at all locations, and the radon concentration was estimated to be about 0.01 pCi/liter on the surface based on spectral measurements. The spectral measurements were performed using an intrinsic germanium spectrometer, and calculations from the spectra indicated that potassium-40 contributed about 28% to the surface level dose rates, natural uranium daughters contributed about 64%, and cesium-137 from weapons testing fallout contributed about 8%. In the mine potassium-40 was the only identifiable contributor to the dose rate.

  7. Levels of thoron and progeny in high background radiation area of southeastern coast of Odisha, India.

    PubMed

    Ramola, R C; Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Sagar, D V; Prasad, G; Shahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Omori, Y; Janik, M; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S

    2012-11-01

    Exposure to radon, (222)Rn, is assumed to be the most significant source of natural radiation to human beings in most cases. It is thought that radon and its progeny are major factors that cause cancer. The presence of thoron, (220)Rn, was often neglected because it was considered that the quantity of thoron in the environment is less than that of radon. However, recent studies have shown that a high thoron concentration was found in some regions and the exposure to (220)Rn and its progeny can equal or several time exceed that of (220)Rn and its progeny. The results of thoron and its progeny measurements in the houses of high background radiation area (HBRA) of the southeastern coast of Odisha, India presented here. This area is one of the high background radiation areas in India with a large deposit of monazite sand which is the probable source of thoron. Both active and passive methods were employed for the measurement of thoron and its progeny in cement, brick and mud houses in the study area. Thoron concentration was measured using RAD-7 and Raduet. A CR-39 track detector was employed for the measurement of environmental thoron progeny, both in active and passive modes. Thoron and its progeny concentrations were found to be comparatively high in the area. A comparison between the results obtained with various techniques is presented in this paper.

  8. Twisted pair of optic fibers for background removal in radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, P Z Y; Suchowerska, N; McKenzie, D R

    2013-08-01

    In many situations in which an optic fiber carries a signal through a radiation field, an unwanted background signal is produced consisting of fluorescent and/or Cerenkov light. This presents a major problem in the measurement of the light signal, for example, in scintillation dosimetry of medical therapeutic beams. In this paper, we demonstrate a new method of measuring and removing the background signal through the use of a twisted pair of optic fibers. The twisted pair consists of a fiber carrying the scintillation signal that is twisted with a second optic fiber to form a double helix. The two twisted fibers will experience the same radiation environment provided the periodicity of the twist is correlated to the dose rate gradient. An expression for the required twist periodicity is presented. A scintillation dosimeter with a twisted pair optic fiber was tested in a megavoltage beam and found to accurately measure its beam characteristics. The twisted pair approach is not restricted to medical applications and can be used in many situations in which optical signals are carried through radiation fields.

  9. Short-lived variations in the background gamma-radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Burnett, J L; Croudace, I W; Warwick, P E

    2010-09-01

    Sudden increases in the background gamma-radiation dose may occur due to the removal of (222)Rn and (220)Rn progeny from the atmosphere by wet deposition mechanisms. This contribution has been measured using a Geiger-Muller detector at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (Aldermaston, UK) during July 2005-April 2006. The results are approximated by a log-normal distribution and there were nine separate occurrences of the gamma-radiation dose exceeding 125% of the geometric mean value. The increases were associated with periods of heavy rainfall, although no correlation was evident between the dose rate and the amount of rainfall, as increased rainfall dilutes the activity further rather than increasing its atmospheric removal. The events were preceded by periods of fine weather and atmospheric stability that allow for the build-up of (222)Rn and (220)Rn progeny. Similar increases in gamma-radiation dose have been measured at a nearby monitoring station situated approximately 11 miles from Aldermaston. Increases in gamma-radiation dose during heavy rainfall have also been observed throughout the UK, that followed the trajectory of an air mass. All events decreased to typical values within 1-2 h as the water permeated into the ground below and the radioactivity decayed away.

  10. Predictions of induced background radiations at gamma/X-ray experiment envelopes in NASA spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischbein, W. L.; Debiak, T.; Rossi, M.; Stauber, M.; Suh, P.

    1979-01-01

    This work seeks to predict secondary radiation levels induced in spacecraft structures by space protons. The radiations analyzed are secondary neutrons from spallation and evaporation reactions and gamma and beta rays from the decay of induced radioactivity, as sources of interfering background to spaceborne measurements of galactic and planetary gamma rays below 10 MeV. The spacecraft considered are the Multi-Mission Spacecraft (MMS) and the Space Shuttle, modeled as spherical shells. The proton environment is that of the South Atlantic Anomaly, as well as cosmic ray protons. The induced radioactivity is analyzed in terms of its interference with various gamma-ray lines of astrophysical interest, as well as its contribution to several spectral regions of the gamma-ray continuum. The buildup of the line and continuum radioactivity background is predicted for a period of nearly 9 months in orbit (approximately 4100 orbits). In addition, background contributions from cosmic ray electron bremsstrahlung and earth gamma-ray albedo are estimated.

  11. Ultraviolet Radiation on the Early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quarles, Billy

    2008-03-01

    What gave life the initial spark? Some mythical force that governs all or some natural reaction that was a product of the conditions of environment set in place by physics. There is still much debate, but our search is in a more academic environment. The evolution of the Sun could be an indicator to how the atmosphere has evolved to accommodate life. In the early era of the Earth we do know from other sources that there was no oxygen or ozone to help support life. What made life possible under such harsh conditions. The answer to this inquiry can be found by knowing the UV flux from the Sun during this time period.

  12. 3 mm Anisotropy Measurement: On the Quadrupole Component in theCosmic Background Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lubin, Philip M.; Epstein, Gerald L.; Smoot, George F.

    1982-11-01

    We have mapped the large-scale anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation at 3 mm wavelength using a liquid-helium-cooled balloon-borne radiometer sensitive enough to detect the dipole in one gondola rotation (1 minute). Statistical errors on the dipole and quadrupole components are below 0.1 mK with less than 0.1 m K galactic contribution. We find a dipole consistent with previous measurements but disagree with recent quadrupole reports. The measurement is also useful in searching for spectral distortions.

  13. A measurement of the spectrum of the cosmic background radiation from 1 to 3 millimeter wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, G. M.; Fischer, M. L.; Richards, P. L.; Peterson, J. B.; Timusk, T.

    1990-01-01

    The brightness temperature of the sky is measured in five bands from 1 to 3 mm using apparatus related to that of Woody and Richards (1981) and Peterson et al. (1985). Examination of the data reveals the presence of two previously unknown systematic effects which limit the accuracy of the measurements. Similar systematic effects are most likely present in the data obtained previously with this apparatus. Upper limits to the temperature of the cosmic background radiation are set in four bands; the most stringent is T(CBR) less than 2.88 K at 1.1 mm (95 percent CL).

  14. Measurements of the Cosmic Background Radiation Temperature at 3.3and 9.1 MM

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Smoot, G.F.; Friedman, S.D.

    1983-06-01

    The authors report the results of measurements of the cosmic background radiation temperature at wavelengths of 9.1 and 3.3 mm. The 9.1 mm result, T{sub CBR} = 2.87 {+-} 0.21 K, is in good agreement with previous results and those obtained at longer wavelengths during the same experiment. The 3.3 mm result, T{sub CBR} = 2.4 {+-} 1.0 K, is consistent with previous measurements, but has a large error due to uncertainty in the atmospheric correction.

  15. New 33 GHz Measurements of the Cosmic Background RadiationIntensity

    SciTech Connect

    De Amici, G.; Smoot, G.; Friedman, S.G.; Witebsky, C.

    1985-03-01

    New measurements have been made of the intensity of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 33 GHz (0.91 cm). The experiment was part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the CBR between 2.5 and 90 GHz (12 and 0.33 cm). Details are given of the experimental equipment and measurement procedures. The results of measurements made in 1982 and 1983 are presented and discussed in relation to preliminary results from the other radiometers. The measured value, T{sub CBR} = (2.81 {+-} 0.12) K, is in very good agreement both with those previously published and those reported by our collaborators.

  16. Measurements of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 6. 3 centimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Mandolesi, N.; Calzolari, P.; Cortiglioni, S.; Morigi, G.; Danese, L.

    1986-11-01

    New measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) intensity at 4.75 GHz (6.3 cm), made as a part of a large experiment to measure the CBR spectrum between 2.5 and 90 GHz, are reported. The present result, T(CBR) = 2.70 + or - 0.07 K, agrees with, but is substantially more accurate than, that previously reported by Mandolesi et al. (1984). Careful new observations of the emission from the atmosphere and from the Galaxy are also presented and discussed. 17 references.

  17. Small-scale fluctuations in the microwave background radiation and multiple gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Kashlinsky, A.

    1988-08-01

    It is shown that multiple gravitational lensing of the microwave background radiation (MBR) by static compact objects significantly attenuates small-scale fluctuations in the MBR. Gravitational lensing, by altering trajectories of MBR photons reaching an observer, leads to (phase) mixing of photons from regions with different initial fluctuations. As a result of this diffusion process the original fluctuations are damped on scales up to several arcmin. An equation that describes this process and its general solution are given. It is concluded that the present upper limits on the amplitude of the MBR fluctuations on small scales cannot constrain theories of galaxy formation. 25 references.

  18. Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles

    DOEpatents

    Rodgers, John C.; McFarland, Andrew R.; Oritz, Carlos A.; Marlow, William H.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus having reduced background for measuring radiation activity in aerosol particles. A continuous air monitoring sampler is described for use in detecting the presence of alpha-emitting aerosol particles. An inlet fractionating screen has been demonstrated to remove about 95% of freshly formed radon progeny from the aerosol sample, and approximately 33% of partially aged progeny. Addition of an electrical condenser and a modified dichotomous virtual impactor are expected to produce considerable improvement in these numbers, the goal being to enrich the transuranic (TRU) fraction of the aerosols. This offers the possibility of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for the detected alpha-particle energy spectrum in the region of interest for detecting TRU materials associated with aerosols, thereby enhancing the performance of background-compensation algorithms for improving the quality of alarm signals intended to warn personnel of potentially harmful quantities of TRU materials in the ambient air.

  19. Biaxial lidar efficiency increase based on improving spatial selectivity and stability against background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agishev, Ravil R.; Bajazitov, Ravil A.; Galeyev, Marat M.

    1996-11-01

    A criterion of spatial-angular efficiency (SAE) of remote electro-optical systems for atmosphere monitoring is formulated. The dependencies of the SAE from normalized range and minimal operating range for different optical receiving schemes of ground-based biaxial LIDAR are analyzed. It is shown that low SAE of traditional VIS & NIR systems is a main cause of a low signal-to-background-noise ratio at the photodetector input, the considerably measurements errors, and the following low accuracy of atmospheric optical parameters reconstruction. The most effective protection against sky background radiation in such systems consists in forming an angular field according to the introduced SAE criterion. Some approaches to achieve high value of the SAE-parameter for receiving system optimization are discussed.

  20. The phenomenological status of late time phase transition models after cosmic background radiation anisotropy measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1994-01-01

    Some relatively model-independent results for structure formation via late time phase transitions (LTPT) are discussed. In particular, generic LTPT power spectra are presented. The implication of the recent Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) detection of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) anisotropy at large angular scales (greater than or approximately equal to 7 deg) and the tight upper limits from small angular scales (approximately 1 deg) to LTPT models are discussed. Special attention is focused on the observational constraints and possible non-Gaussian signatures of CBR temperature anisotropies from LTPT and other non-Gaussian models. It is shown that while LTPT have been seriously constrained by the recent data, viable models do remain which provide more power on the 100-200 Mpc scales than do more traditional primordial Gaussian density fluctuation models. Tests for such models are presented, including possible anisotropies on angular scales less than 8 min.

  1. Radiation Plus Chemotherapy in Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    Adding radiation therapy to chemotherapy may improve outcomes in patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, according to a paper published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in February 2011, but the long-term effects of this regimen are not

  2. Radiation Plus Chemotherapy in Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    Adding radiation therapy to chemotherapy may improve outcomes in patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, according to a paper published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in February 2011, but the long-term effects of this regimen are not

  3. Statistics of Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation with the Cosmic String Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mähönen, Petri; Hara, Tetsuya; Voll, Toivo; Miyoshi, Shigeru

    We have studied the cosmic microwave background radiation by simulating the cosmic string network induced anisotropies on the sky. The large-angular size simulations are based on the Kaiser-Stebbins effect calculated from full cosmic-string network simulation. The small-angular size simulations are done by Monte-Carlo simulation of perturbations from a time-discretized toy model. We use these results to find the normalization of μ, the string mass per unit length, and compare this result with one needed for large-scale structure formation. We show that the cosmic string scenario is in good agreement with COBE, SK94, and MSAM94 microwave background radiation experiments with reasonable string network parameters. The predicted rms-temperature fluctuations for SK94 and MSAM94 experiments are Δ T/T=1.57×10-5 and Δ T/T=1.62×10-5, respectively, when the string mass density parameter is chosen to be Gμ=1.4×10-6. The possibility of detecting non-Gaussian signals using the present day experiments is also discussed.

  4. Interstellar cyanogen and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Katherine C.; Meyer, David M.; Hawkins, Isabel

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a recently completed effort to determine the amount of CN rotational excitation in five diffuse interstellar clouds for the purpose of accurately measuring the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). In addition, we report a new detection of emission from the strongest hyperfine component of the 2.64 mm CN rotational transition (N = 1-0) in the direction toward HD 21483. We have used this result in combination with existing emission measurements toward our other stars to correct for local excitation effects within diffuse clouds which raise the measured CN rotational temperature above that of the CMBR. After making this correction, we find a weighted mean value of T(CMBR) = 2.729 (+0.023, -0.031) K. This temperature is in excellent agreement with the new COBE measurement of 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (Mather et al., 1993). Our result, which samples the CMBR far from the near-Earth environment, attests to the accuracy of the COBE measurement and reaffirms the cosmic nature of this background radiation. From the observed agreement between our CMBR temperature and the COBE result, we conclude that corrections for local CN excitation based on millimeter emission measurements provide an accurate adjustment to the measured rotational excitation.

  5. Background radiation in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, U.S.A., area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brookins, Douglas G.

    1992-01-01

    Background radiation levels in the Albuquerque, New Mexico, area are elevated when compared to much of the United States. Soil K, U, and Th are somewhat elevated compared to average values in this country and generate roughly 60 mrem per year to the average resident. Cosmic ray contribution, due to the mean elevation of 5,200 ft above sea level, is 80 mrem/yr—well over the average for the United States. Thirty percent of the homes in Albuquerque contain indoor radon levels over the EPA action level of 4 pCi/ℓ compared to 10 12 percent of homes for the entire United States. Indoor radon contributes about 100 300 mrem/yr. Food, beverages, and x-ray doses are assumed at an average-equivalent for the United States and locally yield 96 mrem/yr. Total contributions from other minor sources (color TV, coal, weapons fallout, etc.) are under 10 mrem/yr. Thus total background radiation received by Albuquerque residents is about 330 530 mrem/yr, well in excess of the rest of the United States. The spread in mrem values is due to variations in the contribution from indoor radon.

  6. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic BackgroundRadiation

    SciTech Connect

    Gorenstein, M.V.; Smoot, G.F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (0.89 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup -1/2}. The measurements show clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360 {+-} 50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2 {+-} 0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+-} 8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypothesis of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  7. Genetic background modulates lncRNA-coordinated tissue response to low dose ionizing radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Tang, Jonathan; Huang, Yurong; Nguyen, David H.; ...

    2015-02-04

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of diverse cell functions and processes. However, the relevance of lncRNAs in the cell and tissue response to ionizing radiation has not yet been characterized. Here we used microarray profiling to determine lncRNA and mRNA expression in mammary glands of BALB/c and SPRET/EiJ mice after low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) exposure. We found that unirradiated mammary tissues of these strains differed significantly in baseline expressions of 290 lncRNAs. LDIR exposure (10 cGy) induced a significant change in the expression of many lncRNAs. The vast majority of lncRNAs identified to be differentially expressed aftermore » LDIR in either BALB/c or SPRET/EiJ had a significantly correlated expression pattern with at least one LDIR responsive mRNA. Functional analysis revealed that the response to LDIR in BALB/c mice is highly dynamic with enrichment for genes involved in tissue injury, inflammatory responses, and mammary gland development at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after LDIR, respectively. Our study demonstrates that genetic background strongly influences the expression of lncRNAs and their response to radiation and that lncRNAs may coordinate the tissue response to LDIR exposure via regulation of coding mRNAs.« less

  8. Enhancement of natural background gamma-radiation dose around uranium microparticles in the human body.

    PubMed

    Pattison, John E; Hugtenburg, Richard P; Green, Stuart

    2010-04-06

    Ongoing controversy surrounds the adverse health effects of the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. The biological effects of gamma-radiation arise from the direct or indirect interaction between secondary electrons and the DNA of living cells. The probability of the absorption of X-rays and gamma-rays with energies below about 200 keV by particles of high atomic number is proportional to the third to fourth power of the atomic number. In such a case, the more heavily ionizing low-energy recoil electrons are preferentially produced; these cause dose enhancement in the immediate vicinity of the particles. It has been claimed that upon exposure to naturally occurring background gamma-radiation, particles of DU in the human body would produce dose enhancement by a factor of 500-1000, thereby contributing a significant radiation dose in addition to the dose received from the inherent radioactivity of the DU. In this study, we used the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc to accurately estimate the likely maximum dose enhancement arising from the presence of micrometre-sized uranium particles in the body. We found that although the dose enhancement is significant, of the order of 1-10, it is considerably smaller than that suggested previously.

  9. Genetic Background Modulates lncRNA-Coordinated Tissue Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jonathan; Huang, Yurong; Nguyen, David H.; Costes, Sylvain V.; Snijders, Antoine M.; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of diverse cell functions and processes. However, the relevance of lncRNAs in the cell and tissue response to ionizing radiation has not yet been characterized. Here we used microarray profiling to determine lncRNA and mRNA expression in mammary glands of BALB/c and SPRET/EiJ mice after low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) exposure. We found that unirradiated mammary tissues of these strains differed significantly in baseline expressions of 290 lncRNAs. LDIR exposure (10 cGy) induced a significant change in the expression of many lncRNAs. The vast majority of lncRNAs identified to be differentially expressed after LDIR in either BALB/c or SPRET/EiJ had a significantly correlated expression pattern with at least one LDIR responsive mRNA. Functional analysis revealed that the response to LDIR in BALB/c mice is highly dynamic with enrichment for genes involved in tissue injury, inflammatory responses, and mammary gland development at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after LDIR, respectively. Our study demonstrates that genetic background strongly influences the expression of lncRNAs and their response to radiation and that lncRNAs may coordinate the tissue response to LDIR exposure via regulation of coding mRNAs. PMID:25802832

  10. Enhancement of natural background gamma-radiation dose around uranium microparticles in the human body

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, John E.; Hugtenburg, Richard P.; Green, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Ongoing controversy surrounds the adverse health effects of the use of depleted uranium (DU) munitions. The biological effects of gamma-radiation arise from the direct or indirect interaction between secondary electrons and the DNA of living cells. The probability of the absorption of X-rays and gamma-rays with energies below about 200 keV by particles of high atomic number is proportional to the third to fourth power of the atomic number. In such a case, the more heavily ionizing low-energy recoil electrons are preferentially produced; these cause dose enhancement in the immediate vicinity of the particles. It has been claimed that upon exposure to naturally occurring background gamma-radiation, particles of DU in the human body would produce dose enhancement by a factor of 500–1000, thereby contributing a significant radiation dose in addition to the dose received from the inherent radioactivity of the DU. In this study, we used the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc to accurately estimate the likely maximum dose enhancement arising from the presence of micrometre-sized uranium particles in the body. We found that although the dose enhancement is significant, of the order of 1–10, it is considerably smaller than that suggested previously. PMID:19776147

  11. Stability analysis for the background equations for inflation with dissipation and in a viscous radiation bath

    SciTech Connect

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Cerezo, Rafael; Berera, Arjun; Ramos, Rudnei O.; Vicente, Gustavo S. E-mail: ab@ph.ed.ac.uk E-mail: rudnei@uerj.br

    2012-11-01

    The effects of bulk viscosity are examined for inflationary dynamics in which dissipation and thermalization are present. A complete stability analysis is done for the background inflaton evolution equations, which includes both inflaton dissipation and radiation bulk viscous effects. Three representative approaches of bulk viscous irreversible thermodynamics are analyzed: the Eckart noncausal theory, the linear and causal theory of Israel-Stewart and a more recent nonlinear and causal bulk viscous theory. It is found that the causal theories allow for larger bulk viscosities before encountering an instability in comparison to the noncausal Eckart theory. It is also shown that the causal theories tend to suppress the radiation production due to bulk viscous pressure, because of the presence of relaxation effects implicit in these theories. Bulk viscosity coefficients derived from quantum field theory are applied to warm inflation model building and an analysis is made of the effects to the duration of inflation. The treatment of bulk pressure would also be relevant to the reheating phase after inflation in cold inflation dynamics and during the radiation dominated regime, although very little work in both areas has been done; the methodology developed in this paper could be extended to apply to these other problems.

  12. Formation of disc galaxies in the presence of a background UVX radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedel, H.; Hellsten, U.; Sommer-Larsen, J.

    1994-12-01

    In order to investigate the effects of a hard ultraviolet (uVX) photon field on the formation of large disc galaxies, we have performed 3D hydrodynamic and N-body simulations of the formation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy. We use a TREE-SPH code to follow the collapse of an overdense region with 95 per cent collisionless dark matter and 5 per cent baryonic gas. The principal effect of the UVX flux is to ionize the gas, significantly reducing its ability to dissipate energy by line-cooling mechanisms. We present the results of two simulations starting from the same initial conditions: one of the simulations includes the presence of a uVX radiation field while the other does not. Based on the results of these and other simulations, we conclude that a background uVX radiation field can significantly affect not only the formation of small galaxies, as proposed by Efstathiou, but also the global properties of large disc galaxies. Key words: hydrodynamics - galaxies: evolution - galaxies: formation - diffuse radiation.

  13. Primordial Gravitational Waves and Rescattered Electromagnetic Radiation in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Hoon; Trippe, Sascha

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the interaction of primordial gravitational waves (GWs) with the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) plasma is important for observational cosmology. In this article, we provide an analysis of an apparently as-yet-overlooked effect. We consider a single free electric charge and suppose that it can be agitated by primordial GWs propagating through the CMB plasma, resulting in periodic, regular motion along particular directions. Light reflected by the charge will be partially polarized, and this will imprint a characteristic pattern on the CMB. We study this effect by considering a simple model in which anisotropic incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation is rescattered by a charge sitting in spacetime perturbed by GWs, and becomes polarized. As the charge is driven to move along particular directions, we calculate its dipole moment to determine the leading-order rescattered EM radiation. The Stokes parameters of the rescattered radiation exhibit a net linear polarization. We investigate how this polarization effect can be schematically represented out of the Stokes parameters. We work out the representations of gradient modes (E-modes) and curl modes (B-modes) to produce polarization maps. Although the polarization effect results from GWs, we find that its representations, the E- and B-modes, do not practically reflect the GW properties such as strain amplitude, frequency, and polarization states.

  14. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, Ricardo; Balascuta, S.; Benson, Stephen V.; Bertozzi, William; Boyce, James R.; Cowan, Ray; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisher, P.; Ihloff, Ernest E.; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kelleher, Aidan Michael; Krossler, W. J.; Legg, Robert A.; Long, Elena; Milner, Richard; Neil, George R.; Ou, Longwu; Schmookler, Barack Abraham; Tennant, Christopher D.; Tschalar, C.; Williams, Gwyn P.; Zhang, Shukui

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

  15. Fluctuations in radiation backgrounds at high redshift and the first stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbauer, Lauren Nicole

    The first stars to light up our universe are as yet unseen, but there have been many attempts to elucidate their properties. The characteristics of these stars (`Population/Pop III' stars) that we do know lie mostly within theory; they formed out of metal-free hydrogen and helium gas contained in dark matter minihalos at redshifts z 20-30. The extent to which Pop III star formation reached into later times is unknown. Current and near future instruments are incapable of resolving individual Pop III stars. Consequently, astronomers must devise creative means with which to indirectly predict and measure and their properties. In this thesis, we will investigate a few of those means. We use a new method to model fluctuations of the Lyman-Werner (LW) and Lyman-alpha radiation backgrounds at high redshift. At these early epochs the backgrounds are symptoms of a universe newly lit with its first stars. LW photons (11.5-13.6 eV) are of particular interest because they dissociate molecular hydrogen, the primary coolant in the first minihalos that is necessary for star formation. By using a variation of the `halo model', which describes the spatial distribution and clustering of halos, we can efficiently generate power spectra for these backgrounds. Spatial fluctuations in the LW and (indirectly) the Lyman-alpha BG can tell us about the transition from primordial star formation to a more metal-enriched mode that marks the beginning of the second generation of stars in our Universe. The Near Infrared Background (NIRB) has for some time been considered a potential tool with which to indirectly observe the first stars. Ultraviolet (UV) emission from these stars is redshifted into the NIR band, making the NIRB amenable for hunting Pop III stellar signatures. There have been several measurements of the NIRB and subsequent theoretical studies attempting to explain them in recent years. Though controversial, residual levels of the mean NIRB intensity and anisotropies have been

  16. Federal Guidance Report No. 1: Background Material for the Development of Radiation Protection Standards (Federal Radiation Council)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report provides required interim radiation protection recommendations. It includes recommendations for additional research which will provide a firmer basis for the formulation of radiation standards.

  17. Auditory-neurophysiological responses to speech during early childhood: Effects of background noise

    PubMed Central

    White-Schwoch, Travis; Davies, Evan C.; Thompson, Elaine C.; Carr, Kali Woodruff; Nicol, Trent; Bradlow, Ann R.; Kraus, Nina

    2015-01-01

    Early childhood is a critical period of auditory learning, during which children are constantly mapping sounds to meaning. But learning rarely occurs under ideal listening conditions—children are forced to listen against a relentless din. This background noise degrades the neural coding of these critical sounds, in turn interfering with auditory learning. Despite the importance of robust and reliable auditory processing during early childhood, little is known about the neurophysiology underlying speech processing in children so young. To better understand the physiological constraints these adverse listening scenarios impose on speech sound coding during early childhood, auditory-neurophysiological responses were elicited to a consonant-vowel syllable in quiet and background noise in a cohort of typically-developing preschoolers (ages 3–5 yr). Overall, responses were degraded in noise: they were smaller, less stable across trials, slower, and there was poorer coding of spectral content and the temporal envelope. These effects were exacerbated in response to the consonant transition relative to the vowel, suggesting that the neural coding of spectrotemporally-dynamic speech features is more tenuous in noise than the coding of static features—even in children this young. Neural coding of speech temporal fine structure, however, was more resilient to the addition of background noise than coding of temporal envelope information. Taken together, these results demonstrate that noise places a neurophysiological constraint on speech processing during early childhood by causing a breakdown in neural processing of speech acoustics. These results may explain why some listeners have inordinate difficulties understanding speech in noise. Speech-elicited auditory-neurophysiological responses offer objective insight into listening skills during early childhood by reflecting the integrity of neural coding in quiet and noise; this paper documents typical response properties

  18. Auditory-neurophysiological responses to speech during early childhood: Effects of background noise.

    PubMed

    White-Schwoch, Travis; Davies, Evan C; Thompson, Elaine C; Woodruff Carr, Kali; Nicol, Trent; Bradlow, Ann R; Kraus, Nina

    2015-10-01

    Early childhood is a critical period of auditory learning, during which children are constantly mapping sounds to meaning. But this auditory learning rarely occurs in ideal listening conditions-children are forced to listen against a relentless din. This background noise degrades the neural coding of these critical sounds, in turn interfering with auditory learning. Despite the importance of robust and reliable auditory processing during early childhood, little is known about the neurophysiology underlying speech processing in children so young. To better understand the physiological constraints these adverse listening scenarios impose on speech sound coding during early childhood, auditory-neurophysiological responses were elicited to a consonant-vowel syllable in quiet and background noise in a cohort of typically-developing preschoolers (ages 3-5 yr). Overall, responses were degraded in noise: they were smaller, less stable across trials, slower, and there was poorer coding of spectral content and the temporal envelope. These effects were exacerbated in response to the consonant transition relative to the vowel, suggesting that the neural coding of spectrotemporally-dynamic speech features is more tenuous in noise than the coding of static features-even in children this young. Neural coding of speech temporal fine structure, however, was more resilient to the addition of background noise than coding of temporal envelope information. Taken together, these results demonstrate that noise places a neurophysiological constraint on speech processing during early childhood by causing a breakdown in neural processing of speech acoustics. These results may explain why some listeners have inordinate difficulties understanding speech in noise. Speech-elicited auditory-neurophysiological responses offer objective insight into listening skills during early childhood by reflecting the integrity of neural coding in quiet and noise; this paper documents typical response

  19. Determination of the health hazards due to background radiation sources in the city of Adapazari, Northwestern Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kapdan, Enis; Altinsoy, Nesrin; Karahan, Gursel; Taskin, Halim

    2011-03-01

    Human body is exposed to ionising radiations both internally and externally by mainly high-energy cosmic ray particles incident on the earth's atmosphere and radioactive nuclides that originated in the earth's crust. The main objective of this study is to assess the health hazards due to environmental radiation sources in the city of Adapazari, one of the most important industrial cities of the country, Northwestern Turkey. For this purpose, natural radiation sources, external terrestrial radiations, cosmic radiations, and inhalation exposures have been investigated. The annual average external terrestrial radiation doses were determined as 0.08 and 0.35 mSv at outdoor and indoor atmospheres, respectively. The annual average cosmic radiation doses were found to be 0.08 and 0.05 mSv for directly ionising photon components and neutron components, respectively. The annual average inhalation exposure doses due to radon and thoron were obtained as 1.42 and 0.19 mSv, respectively, in the region. The annual average effective dose due to natural radiation sources was determined as a total of 2.35 mSv with the predetermined ingestion radiation dose. The lifetime cancer risk due to the background ionising radiations has been determined as 0.9×10(-2) for the residents of the Adapazari city, with the average lifespan of 70 years. The results of the effective doses due to background radiation sources in the region and the worldwide averages were discussed.

  20. New clade of enigmatic early archosaurs yields insights into early pseudosuchian phylogeny and the biogeography of the archosaur radiation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The origin and early radiation of archosaurs and closely related taxa (Archosauriformes) during the Triassic was a critical event in the evolutionary history of tetrapods. This radiation led to the dinosaur-dominated ecosystems of the Jurassic and Cretaceous, and the high present-day archosaur diversity that includes around 10,000 bird and crocodylian species. The timing and dynamics of this evolutionary radiation are currently obscured by the poorly constrained phylogenetic positions of several key early archosauriform taxa, including several species from the Middle Triassic of Argentina (Gracilisuchus stipanicicorum) and China (Turfanosuchus dabanensis, Yonghesuchus sangbiensis). These species act as unstable ‘wildcards’ in morphological phylogenetic analyses, reducing phylogenetic resolution. Results We present new anatomical data for the type specimens of G. stipanicicorum, T. dabanensis, and Y. sangbiensis, and carry out a new morphological phylogenetic analysis of early archosaur relationships. Our results indicate that these three previously enigmatic taxa form a well-supported clade of Middle Triassic archosaurs that we refer to as Gracilisuchidae. Gracilisuchidae is placed basally within Suchia, among the pseudosuchian (crocodile-line) archosaurs. The approximately contemporaneous and morphologically similar G. stipanicicorum and Y. sangbiensis may be sister taxa within Gracilisuchidae. Conclusions Our results provide increased resolution of the previously poorly constrained relationships of early archosaurs, with increased levels of phylogenetic support for several key early pseudosuchian clades. Moreover, they falsify previous hypotheses suggesting that T. dabanensis and Y. sangbiensis are not members of the archosaur crown group. The recognition of Gracilisuchidae provides further support for a rapid phylogenetic diversification of crown archosaurs by the Middle Triassic. The disjunct distribution of the gracilisuchid clade in China and

  1. The effects of early postoperative radiation on vascularized bone grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.B.; Brown, S.; Hurst, L.N. )

    1991-06-01

    The effects of early postoperative radiation were assessed in free nonvascularized and free vascularized rib grafts in the canine model. The mandibles of one-half of the dogs were exposed to a cobalt 60 radiation dose of 4080 cGy over a 4-week period, starting 2 weeks postoperatively. The patency of vascularized grafts was confirmed with bone scintigraphy. Histological studies, including ultraviolet microscopy with trifluorochrome labeling, and histomorphometric analyses were performed. Osteocytes persist within the cortex of the vascularized nonradiated grafts to a much greater extent than in nonvascularized, nonradiated grafts. Cortical osteocytes do not persist in either vascularized or nonvascularized grafts subjected to radiation. New bone formation is significantly retarded in radiated grafts compared with nonradiated grafts. Periosteum and endosteum remained viable in the radiated vascularized grafts, producing both bone union and increased bone turnover, neither of which were evident to any significant extent in nonvascularized grafts. Bone union was achieved in vascularized and non-vascularized nonradiated bone. In the radiated group of dogs, union was only seen in the vascularized bone grafts.

  2. Detecting a stochastic background of gravitational radiation: Signal processing strategies and sensitivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Bruce; Romano, Joseph D.

    1999-05-01

    We analyze the signal processing required for the optimal detection of a stochastic background of gravitational radiation using laser interferometric detectors. Starting with basic assumptions about the statistical properties of a stochastic gravity-wave background, we derive expressions for the optimal filter function and signal-to-noise ratio for the cross-correlation of the outputs of two gravity-wave detectors. Sensitivity levels required for detection are then calculated. Issues related to (i) calculating the signal-to-noise ratio for arbitrarily large stochastic backgrounds, (ii) performing the data analysis in the presence of nonstationary detector noise, (iii) combining data from multiple detector pairs to increase the sensitivity of a stochastic background search, (iv) correlating the outputs of 4 or more detectors, and (v) allowing for the possibility of correlated noise in the outputs of two detectors are discussed. We briefly describe a computer simulation that was used to ``experimentally'' verify the theoretical calculations derived in the paper, and which mimics the generation and detection of a simulated stochastic gravity-wave signal in the presence of simulated detector noise. Numerous graphs and tables of numerical data for the five major interferometers (LIGO-WA, LIGO-LA, VIRGO, GEO-600, and TAMA-300) are also given. This information consists of graphs of the noise power spectra, overlap reduction functions, and optimal filter functions; also included are tables of the signal-to-noise ratios and sensitivity levels for cross-correlation measurements between different detector pairs. The treatment given in this paper should be accessible to both theorists involved in data analysis and experimentalists involved in detector design and data acquisition.

  3. Output of acoustical sources. [effects of structural elements and background flow on immobile multipolar point radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic radiation from a source, here viewed as an immobile point singularity with periodic strength and a given multipolar nature, is affected by the presence of nearly structural elements (e.g., rigid or impedance surfaces) as well as that of a background flow in the medium. An alternative to the conventional manner of calculating the net source output by integrating the energy flux over a distant control surface is described; this involves a direct evaluation of the secondary wavefunction at the position of the primary source and obviates the need for a (prospectively difficult) flux integration. Various full and half-planar surface configurations with an adjacent source are analyzed in detail, and the explicit results obtained, in particular, for the power factor of a dipole brings out a substantial rise in its output as the source nears the sharp edge of a half-plane.

  4. Output of acoustical sources. [effects of structural elements and background flow on immobile multipolar point radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, H.

    1980-01-01

    Acoustic radiation from a source, here viewed as an immobile point singularity with periodic strength and a given multipolar nature, is affected by the presence of nearly structural elements (e.g., rigid or impedance surfaces) as well as that of a background flow in the medium. An alternative to the conventional manner of calculating the net source output by integrating the energy flux over a distant control surface is described; this involves a direct evaluation of the secondary wavefunction at the position of the primary source and obviates the need for a (prospectively difficult) flux integration. Various full and half-planar surface configurations with an adjacent source are analyzed in detail, and the explicit results obtained, in particular, for the power factor of a dipole brings out a substantial rise in its output as the source nears the sharp edge of a half-plane.

  5. The cosmic microwave background radiation and the dog in the night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, R. B.

    The spectrum and angular distribution of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) are characterized, summarizing the results of recent observations. The emphasis is on null experiments which have established upper limits on anisotropies and spectral distortion. The benefits and pitfalls of null experiments are recalled; the generally observed isotropy of the CMBR and the possible ways anisotropy could be introduced are discussed; and data from searches for anisotropy on arcmin, degree, and arcsec scales are presented in tables and graphs and analyzed in detail. The observed CMBR spectrum is shown to be generally consistent with a black body at temperature 2.75 + or - 0.04 K at wavelengths from 0.1 to 12 cm, although some recent data (Kogut et al., 1988) seem to confirm the presence of distortion due to the Suniaev-Zel'dovich effect at wavelength 3.0 cm.

  6. Measurement of the intensity of the cosmic background radiation at 3. 0 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    The intensity of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) has been measured at a wavelength of 3.0 cm as part of a program to measure th Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum of the CBR at five wavelengths between 0.33 cm and 12 cm. The instrument used is a dual-antenna Dicke-switched radiometer with a double-sideband noise temperature of 490 K and a sensitivity of 46 mK/Hz/sup 1/2/. The entire radiometer is mounted on bearings. The atmospheric emission was measured by rotating the radiometer, and thus directing one antenna to zenith angles of +- 30/sup 0/ and +- 40/sup 0/. 61 references, 24 figures, 18 tables.

  7. Measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 3. 3 mm wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.

    1985-05-01

    Measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm wavelength (90 GHz) have yielded a brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1sigma uncertainty of +-0.12 K. The observations were made from the Barcroft Laboratory of the White Mountain Research Station, at an altitude of 3800 m, initially on 5 and 6 July 1982 and again on 4,5, and 6 September 1983, as part of a program to measure the spectrum of the CBR at five wavelengths from 12.0 cm to 3.3 mm (Smoot, et al. 1985; Smoot, De Amici, Levin, and Witebsky 1985). The weighted mean of the temperature measurements at all five wavelengths is 2.72 +- 0.04 K. 97 refs., 13 figs., 14 tabs.

  8. A degree-scale measurement of anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, Todd; Schuster, Jeffrey; Gundersen, Joshua; Koch, Timothy; Seiffert, Michael; Meinhold, Peter; Lubin, Philip

    1992-01-01

    We report on the preliminary result of a search for anisotropy in the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with a beam size of about 1.5 deg FWHM over a wavelength range of 8-12 mm. The system operated successfully for 500 hr at the South Pole during the 1990-1991 austral summer. The data from one region, representing 25 hr after editing, are presented here. A strong signal is present in the lower frequency channels with a spectrum unlike CBR fluctuations, and is probably due to foreground emission. The highest frequency channel has the smallest contribution from this signal and has been used to set a 95-percent confidence level upper limit of not greater than 1.4 x 10 exp -5 for fluctuations with a Gaussian autocorrelation function at a coherence angle of 1.2 deg. This is significantly more sensitive than previous experiments at this angle scale.

  9. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3mm

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, G.L.

    1983-12-01

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anistropy at 90 GHz (3 mm wavelength) is 2.82 +- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anistropy of 3.48 +- mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7/sup 0/ +- 1.8/sup 0/ declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence-level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anistropy. 22 figures, 17 tables.

  10. Ribbons on the Cosmic Background Radiation Sky: A Powerful Test of a Baryon Symmetric Universe

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, W.H.; Kolb, E.W.; Turner, M.S.; Turner, M.S.

    1997-10-01

    If the Universe consists of domains of matter and antimatter, annihilations at domain interfaces leave a distinctive imprint on the cosmic background radiation (CBR) sky. The signature is anisotropies in the form of long, thin ribbons of width {theta}{sub W}{approximately}0.1{sup {circ}} , separated by angle {theta}{sub L}{approx_equal}1{sup {circ}}(L/100h{sup {minus}1} Mpc) (L is the characteristic domain size) and with distortion parameter y{approx}10{sup {minus}6} . Such a pattern could potentially be detected by the high-resolution CBR anisotropy experiments planned for the next decade, and such experiments may finally settle the question of whether or not our Hubble volume is baryon symmetric. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Rocket measurement of the cosmic-background-radiation mm-wave spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Gush, H.P.; Halpern, M.; Wishnow, E.H. )

    1990-07-30

    We report here the most precise constraint to date on the spectrum of the cosmic background radiation (CBR), obtained from measurements made with a liquid-helium-cooled spectrometer carried above the atmosphere on a rocket. The spectrum is very well fitted by a Planck function of temperature {ital T}=2.736 K. The scatter of the equivalent temperature in the band 3--16 cm{sup {minus}1} is {plus minus}10 mK, about 1/3% of the mean whereas the estimated overall accuracy of the mean temperature is {plus minus}17 mK. These results are inconsistent with a previously reported excess IR intensity in the CBR but are in good agreement with COBE results.

  12. A precise measurement of the cosmic background radiation at 1. 32 millimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Palazzi, E.; Mandolesi, N.; Crane, P.; Kutner, M.L.; Blades, J.C. European Southern Observatory, Garching Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD )

    1990-07-01

    A precise value of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 1.32 mm has been determined from the interstellar absorption lines of the CN molecule toward HD 154368. Equivalent widths for CN and (C-13)N in the main cloud are reported. A very weak secondary cloud has been discovered. Millimeter observations at 2.64 mm revealed weak CN emission from the main cloud with T-asterisk(R) = 19.0 + or - 5.1 mK. Thus there is some local excitation of CN. Correcting for this yields T(CBR) = 2.832 + or - 0.072 K at 1.32 mm which when combined with the result of Meyer et al. (1989) gives the T(CBR) = 2.831 + or - 0.056 K at 1.32 mm. At 2.64 mm, T(CBR) = 2.834 + or - 0.085 K is found. 25 refs.

  13. Black-body radiation in a curved Robertson-Walker background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yaobing; Mannheim, Philip D.

    1987-07-01

    In the standard Friedmann cosmology the black-body radiation spectrum is usually taken to have the same familiar T4-form that it has in a flat space. With explicit use of the equation of motion of a quantized massless field propagating in a curved background Robertson-Walker metric the authors show (for the readily tractable scalar field case) that the assumption is in fact true for an open Universe. For a closed Universe, it is found that there is an in principle modification to the T4-law. Unfortunately, the correction turns out to be too small to be experimentally detectable. In passing, the authors also obtain a simple derivation for the cosmological red shift of frequencies.

  14. Cosmic background radiation anisotropies in universes dominated by nonbaryonic dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, J. R.; Efstathiou, G.

    1984-01-01

    Detailed calculations of the temperature fluctuations in the cosmic background radiation for universes dominated by massive collisionless relics of the big bang are presented. An initially adiabatic constant curvature perturbation spectrum is assumed. In models with cold dark matter, the simplest hypothesis - that galaxies follow the mass distribution leads to small-scale anisotropies which exceed current observational limits if omega is less than 0.2 h to the -4/3. Since low values of omega are indicated by dynamical studies of galaxy clustering, cold particle models in which light traces mass are probably incorrect. Reheating of the pregalactic medium is unlikely to modify this conclusion. In cold particle or neutrino-dominated universes with omega = 1, presented predictions for small-scale and quadrupole anisotropies are below current limits. In all cases, the small-scale fluctuations are predicted to be about 10 percent linearly polarized.

  15. A comparative study of thorium activity in NORM and high background radiation area.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, S K; Ishikawa, T; Tokonami, S; Sorimachi, A; Kranrod, C; Janik, M; Hosoda, M; Hassan, N M; Chanyotha, S; Parami, V K; Yonehara, H; Ramola, R C

    2010-10-01

    Several industrial processes are known to enrich naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). To assess such processes with respect to their radiological relevance, characteristic parameters describing this enrichment will lead to interesting information useful to UNSCEAR. In case of mineral treatment plants, the high temperatures used in smelting and refining processes lead to high concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th. Also due to thermal power combustion, concentration of U and Th in the fly ash increases manifold. NORM samples were collected from a Thailand mineral treatment plant and Philippine coal-fired thermal power plants for investigation. Some studies are initiated from a high background radiation area near Gopalpur of Orissa state in India. These NORM samples were analysed by gamma-ray spectrometry as well as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The radioactivity in case of Orissa soil samples is found to be mainly contributed from thorium. This study attempts to evaluate levels of thorium activity in NORM samples.

  16. New Measurements of the Cosmic Background Radiation Temperature at3.3 mm Wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.; Smoot, G.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S.D.

    1986-02-01

    We have measured the temperature of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm wavelength in 1982, 1983, and 1984 as part of a larger project to determine the CBR temperature at five wavelengths from 12 cm to 3.3 mm (Smoot et al. 1985). The 3.3-mm measurements yield a brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1{sigma} uncertainty of 20.12 K. This paper describes the instrument, the measurement techniques, and the data-analysis procedures used. Our result is in good agreement with recent measurements at comparable wavelengths by Meyer and Jura (1985) and by Peterson, Richards, and Timusk (1985), but it disagrees with the temperatures reported by Woody and Richards (1981).

  17. Upper limits on the isotropic gravitational radiation background from pulsar timing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hellings, R. W.; Downs, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    A pulsar and the earth may be thought of as end masses of a free-mass gravitational wave antenna in which the relative motion of the masses is monitored by observing the Doppler shift of the pulse arrival times. Using timing residuals from PSR 1133 + 16, 1237 + 25, 1604-00, and 2045-16, an upper limit to the spectrum of the isotropic gravitational radiation background has been derived in the frequency band 4 x 10 to the -9th to 10 to the -7th Hz. This limit is found to be S(E) = 10 to the 21st f-cubed ergs/cu cm Hz, where S(E) is the energy density spectrum and f is the frequency in Hz. This would limit the energy density at frequencies below 10 to the -8th Hz to be 0.00014 times the critical density.

  18. Anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation on Large and Medium Angular Scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, Anthony; Timbie, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This grant has supported work at Brown University on measurements of the 2.7 K Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMB). The goal has been to characterize the spatial variations in the temperature of the CMB in order to understand the formation of large-scale structure in the universe. We have concurrently pursued two measurements using millimeter-wave telescopes carried aloft by scientific balloons. Both systems operate over a range of wavelengths, chosen to allow spectral removal of foreground sources such as the atmosphere, Galaxy, etc. The angular resolution of approx. 25 arcminutes is near the angular scale at which the most structure is predicted by current models to be visible in the CMB angular power spectrum. The main goal is to determine the angular scale of this structure; in turn we can infer the density parameter, Omega, for the universe as well as other cosmological parameters, such as the Hubble constant.

  19. Large scale anisotropy of the 3K cosmic background radiation at 24. 8, 31. 4 and 46. 0 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, E.S.

    1983-01-01

    The 3K cosmic background radiation (CBR), believed to be the signature of the initial singularity in ''big bang'' cosmologies, is a fundamental tool for understanding the structure of the early universe. Here a measurement of the spatial anisotropy of this radiation at a sensitivity of 6 parts in 10/sup 5/ is described. The observations were carried out in a balloon-borne package using three room temperature, correlation-type microwave radiometers, with 500 MHz bandwidths centered at 24.8, 31.4 and 46.0 GHz. The achieved system noise temperatures for the three receivers is 800K. Three flights between August 1978 and July 1980 cover the entire northern hemisphere sky, allowing for tests of both dipole and higher order anisotropies. A dipole effect is detected at the 4 mK level with heliocentric equatorial components (T/sub x/, T/sub y/, T/sub z/) = (-3.80, 0.63, -0.25) + (0.21, 0.20, 0.21)mK. If this is interpreted as a purely kinematic effect, the data imply a solar velocity of 410 + 20 km/sec towards ..cap alpha.. = 11.4 + 0.2 hours, delta = -3/sup 0/ + 3/sup 0/ relative to the CBR reference frame. The temperature spectral index of the dipole is determined to be -0.09 + 0.20, confirming that the radiation, in this frequency range, is that of a blackbody. No quadrupole anisotropy is present in the data, which place a 90% confidence upper limit of 0.4 mK on the quadrupole magnitude.

  20. Scaled Experiment to Investigate Auroral Kilometric Radiation Mechanisms in the Presence of Background Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConville, S. L.; Ronald, K.; Speirs, D. C.; Gillespie, K. M.; Phelps, A. D. R.; Cross, A. W.; Bingham, R.; Robertson, C. W.; Whyte, C. G.; He, W.; King, M.; Bryson, R.; Vorgul, I.; Cairns, R. A.; Kellett, B. J.

    2014-05-01

    Auroral Kilometric Radiation (AKR) emissions occur at frequencies ~300kHz polarised in the X-mode with efficiencies ~1-2% [1,2] in the auroral density cavity in the polar regions of the Earth's magnetosphere, a region of low density plasma ~3200km above the Earth's surface, where electrons are accelerated down towards the Earth whilst undergoing magnetic compression. As a result of this magnetic compression the electrons acquire a horseshoe distribution function in velocity space. Previous theoretical studies have predicted that this distribution is capable of driving the cyclotron maser instability. To test this theory a scaled laboratory experiment was constructed to replicate this phenomenon in a controlled environment, [3-5] whilst 2D and 3D simulations are also being conducted to predict the experimental radiation power and mode, [6-9]. The experiment operates in the microwave frequency regime and incorporates a region of increasing magnetic field as found at the Earth's pole using magnet solenoids to encase the cylindrical interaction waveguide through which an initially rectilinear electron beam (12A) was accelerated by a 75keV pulse. Experimental results showed evidence of the formation of the horseshoe distribution function. The radiation was produced in the near cut-off TE01 mode, comparable with X-mode characteristics, at 4.42GHz. Peak microwave output power was measured ~35kW and peak efficiency of emission ~2%, [3]. A Penning trap was constructed and inserted into the interaction waveguide to enable generation of a background plasma which would lead to closer comparisons with the magnetospheric conditions. Initial design and measurements are presented showing the principle features of the new geometry.

  1. The excess flux in the cosmic submillimeter background radiation and the primordial deuterium abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Dermer, C.D.; Guessoum, N.; National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD . Lab. for High Energy Astrophysics)

    1989-10-27

    Recent measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) show an enhanced flux in the submillimeter regime, compared to the spectrum of a 2.7 K blackbody. Thermal Comptonization of the relic radiation by a hot nonrelativistic plasma has long been known to produce distortions in the CBR spectrum, similar to what has now been observed. Heating of the primeval plasma to temperatures T {approximately} 10{sup 6} {minus} 10{sup 8} K could result from the injection of subcosmic ray protons at epoch z {approximately} 10--100. The intensity of the subcosmic ray flux that provide conditions needed to explain the submillimeter excess by thermal Comptonization also leads to the production of cosmologically significant amounts of deuterium in collisions between subcosmic ray protons and primordial protons and {alpha}-particles. However, the amount of lithium produced through {alpha}-{alpha} reactions is in conflict with the observed Li abundance. If lithium is depleted, for example, by processing through Population II stars, arguments for the baryon content of the universe based on primordial deuterium and He abundances are weakened. 12 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Low-frequency measurement of the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    As part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at low frequencies, the intensity of the CBR was measured at 1.410 GHz. The measurement was made by comparing the power received from the sky with the power received from a specially designed cooled calibration target with known properties. Sources of radiation other than the CBR were then identified and subtracted to calculate the antenna temperatures of the CBR at 1.410 GHz. The instrument used to measure the CBR was a total-power microwave radiometer with a 25 MHz bandwidth centered at 1.410 GHz. The radiometer had a noise temperature of 80 K, and sufficient data were taken that radiometer noise did not contribute significantly to the total measurement error. Identification and subtraction of signals from the Galaxy (0.7 K) and the Earth's atmosphere (0.8K) were also significant parts of the data reduction and error analysis. The brightness temperatures of the CBR at 1.410 GHz is 2.22 +/- 0.55 K. The spectrum of the CBR, as determined by this measurement and other published results, is consistent with a blackbody spectrum of temperature 2.741 +/- 0.016.

  3. An Instrument for Investigation of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at Intermediate Angular Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, Ed J.; Devlin, M. J.; Jarosik, Norman; Netterfield, C. Barth; Page, Lyman; Wilkinson, David

    1996-01-01

    We describe an off-axis microwave telescope for observations of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales between 0.5 deg. and 3 deg. The receiver utilizes cryogenic high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifiers and detects the total power in multiple 3 GHz wide channels. Both frequency and polarization information are recorded allowing discrimination between CMB radiation and potential foreground sources and allowing checks for systematic effects. The instrumental radiometric offset is small (approx. 1 mK). Data are taken by rapidly sampling while sweeping the beam many beamwidths across the sky. After detection, a spatio-temporal filter is formed in software which optimizes the sensitivity in a multipole band in the presence of atmospheric fluctuations. Observations were made from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (SK), Canada during the winter of 1993 with six channels between 27.6 and 34.0 GHz, in 1994 with twelve channels between 27.6 and 44.1 GHz, and in 1995 with six channels between 38.2 and 44.1 GHz. The performance of the instrument and assessment of the atmospheric noise at this site are discussed.

  4. An Instrument for Investigation of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation at Intermediate Angular Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollack, E. J.; Devlin, M. J.; Jarosik, N.; Netterfield, C. B.; Page, L.; Wilkinson, D.

    1997-02-01

    We describe an off-axis microwave telescope for observations of the anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation on angular scales between 0.5d and 3°. The receiver utilizes cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifiers and detects the total power in multiple 3 GHz wide channels. Both frequency and polarization information are recorded allowing discrimination between CMB radiation and potential foreground sources and allowing checks for systematic effects. The instrumental radiometric offset is small (~1 mK). Data are taken by rapidly sampling while sweeping the beam many beamwidths across the sky. After detection, a spatio-temporal filter is formed in software that optimizes the sensitivity in a multipole band in the presence of atmospheric fluctuations. Observations were made from Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (SK), Canada, during the winter of 1993 with six channels between 27.6 and 34.0 GHz, in 1994 with 12 channels between 27.6 and 44.1 GHz, and in 1995 with six channels between 38.2 and 44.1 GHz. The performance of the instrument and assessment of the atmospheric noise at this site are discussed.

  5. Cosmic background radiation in the vicinity of a Schwarzschild black hole: No classic firewall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wielgus, M.; Ellis, G. F. R.; Vincent, F. H.; Abramowicz, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    The cosmic blackbody background radiation pervades the entire Universe, and so falls into every astrophysical black hole. The blueshift of the infalling photons, measured by a static observer, is infinite at the event horizon. This raises a question as to whether a "firewall" of high energy density may form just outside the horizon, or whether the effect can be attributed exclusively to a singular behavior of the static observer's frame at the horizon. In principle, the presence of such a firewall may alter the motion of the infalling matter, influence the black hole evolution, or even invalidate the vacuum Einstein field equation solution as a realistic approximation for black holes. In this paper we show by means of analytic calculations that all these effects indeed exist, but their magnitude is typically negligibly small, even though the matter stress tensor is divergent in the static frame at r =2 M . That is not surprising because of the divergent relation of that frame to a freely falling frame as r →2 M ; however, it represents a kind of classical analogue for the black hole complementarity principle that has been proposed for quantum effects near a black hole. What is perhaps more surprising is the divergence of the radiation stress tensor for massive particles moving on circular geodesic orbits for values of r approaching r =3 M . However such orbits will not occur for infalling matter in realistic accretion discs.

  6. Early test facilities and analytic methods for radiation shielding: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Ingersoll, D T; Ingersoll, J K

    1992-11-01

    This report represents a compilation of eight papers presented at the 1992 American Nuclear Society/European Nuclear Society International Meeting. The meeting is of special significance since it commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the first controlled nuclear chain reaction. The papers contained in this report were presented in a special session organized by the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division in keeping with the historical theme of the meeting. The paper titles are good indicators of their content and are: (1) The origin of radiation shielding research: The Oak Ridge experience, (2) Shielding research at the hanford site, (3) Aircraft shielding experiments at General Dynamics Fort Worth, 1950-1962, (4) Where have the neutrons gone , a history of the tower shielding facility, (5) History and evolution of buildup factors, (6) Early shielding research at Bettis atomic power laboratory, (7) UK reactor shielding: then and now, (8) A very personal view of the development of radiation shielding theory.

  7. The impact of solar UV radiation on the early biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, G.

    2007-08-01

    Stratospheric ozone, photochemically produced from atmospheric oxygen, is a protective filter of the Earth's atmosphere by absorbing most of the biologically harmful UV radiation of our sun in the UV-C (190-280 nm) and short wavelength-region of the UV-B (280-315 nm). Numerous lines of isotopic and geologic evidence suggest that the Archean atmosphere was essentially anoxic. As a result the column abundance of ozone would have been insufficient to affect the surface UV radiation environment. Thus, as well as UV-B radiation, UV-C radiation would have penetrated to the Earth's surface with its associated biological consequences. The history of this ultraviolet stress for the early Earth has been determined from theoretical data and data obtained in Earth orbit on the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis spores under a simulated ozone layer of different thicknesses. Although the UV-C and UV-B regions contribute only 2 % of the entire solar extraterrestrial irradiance, photobiological experiments in space have demonstrated a high mutagenicity and lethality of this UV range to living organisms. The reason for these severe effects of extraterrestrial solar UV radiation - compared to conditions on present-day Earth - lies in the absorption characteristics of the DNA, which is the decisive target for inactivation and mutation induction at this UV range. Being a strong mutagen, UV-radiation is considered as a powerful promoter of biological evolution on the one hand, one the other hand, it may have deleterious consequences to individual cells and organisms, e.g. by causing inactivation, mutations or cancer induction. In response to potential harmful effects of environmental UV radiation, life on Earth has developed several strategies of survival, either avoiding exposure to UV radiation or restoring UV damage. Mechanisms of avoidance of exposure to UV radiation include (i) moving away from the UV radiation into shadowed areas, which requires the development of UV radiation

  8. An Analysis of Recent Measurements of the Temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smoot, G.; Levin, S. M.; Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the results of recent temperature measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). The observations for wavelengths longer than 0.1 cum are well fit by a blackbody spectrum at 2.74{+ or -}0.0w K; however, including the new data of Matsumoto et al. (1987) the result is no longer consistent with a Planckian spectrum. The data are described by a Thomson-distortion parameter u=0.021{+ or -}0.002 and temperature 2.823{+ or -}0.010 K at the 68% confidence level. Fitting the low-frequency data to a Bose-Einstein spectral distortion yields a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.4 x 10{sup -2} on the chemical potential mu{sub 0}. These limits on spectral distortions place restrictions on a number of potentially interesting sources of energy release to the CMBR, including the hot intergalactic medium proposed as the source of the X-ray background.

  9. LSO background radiation as a transmission source using time of flight.

    PubMed

    Rothfuss, Harold; Panin, Vladimir; Moor, Andrew; Young, John; Hong, Inki; Michel, Christian; Hamill, James; Casey, Michael

    2014-09-21

    LSO scintillators (Lu2Sio5:Ce) have a background radiation which originates from the isotope Lu-176 that is present in natural occurring lutetium. The decay that occurs in this isotope is a beta decay that is in coincidence with cascade gamma emissions with energies of 307,202 and 88 keV. The coincidental nature of the beta decay with the gamma emissions allow for separation of emission data originating from a positron annihilation event from transmission type data from the Lu-176 beta decay. By using the time of flight information, and information of the chord length between two LSO pixels in coincidence as a result of a beta emission and emitted gamma, a second time window can be set to observe transmission events simultaneously to emission events. Using the time when the PET scanner is not actively acquiring positron emission data, a continuous blank can be acquired and used to reconstruct a transmission image. With this blank and the measured transmission data, a transmission image can be reconstructed. This reconstructed transmission image can be used to perform emission data corrections such as attenuation correction and scatter corrections or starting images for algorithms that estimate emission and attenuation simultaneously. It is observed that the flux of the background activity is high enough to create useful transmission images with an acquisition time of 10 min.

  10. A measurement of the temperature and polarization anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William C.

    We describe the design and performance of the BOOMERANG experiment, and report on measurements of the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) obtained during the January 2003 flight of BOOMERANG (B2K). To enable these studies, we have developed a bolometric detector which is intrinsically sensitive to linear polarization. The receiver consists of a pair of colocated silicon nitride micromesh absorbers that couple anisotropically to linearly polarized radiation through a corrugated waveguide structure. This system allows simultaneous background limited measurements of the Stokes I and Q parameters over ~30% bandwidths at frequencies from ~60 to 400 GHz. The science results reported here are derived from 195 hours of observation with four 145 GHz Polarization Sensitive Bolometer (PSB) pairs [83]. The data include 75 hours of observations distributed over 1.8% of the sky with an additional 120 hours concentrated on the central portion of the field, itself representing 0.22% of the full sky. The B2K data improve significantly on existing measurements of the CMB temperature power spectrum at angular scales of 500 [Special characters omitted.] [cursive l] [Special characters omitted.] 1100. In addition, we have measured a spectrum of curl-free polarization anisotropies that, in the context of the most simple adiabatic inflationary models, are consistent with the predictions of the currently favored LCDM cosmology.

  11. LSO background radiation as a transmission source using time of flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothfuss, Harold; Panin, Vladimir; Moor, Andrew; Young, John; Hong, Inki; Michel, Christian; Hamill, James; Casey, Michael

    2014-09-01

    LSO scintillators (Lu2Sio5:Ce) have a background radiation which originates from the isotope Lu-176 that is present in natural occurring lutetium. The decay that occurs in this isotope is a beta decay that is in coincidence with cascade gamma emissions with energies of 307,202 and 88 keV. The coincidental nature of the beta decay with the gamma emissions allow for separation of emission data originating from a positron annihilation event from transmission type data from the Lu-176 beta decay. By using the time of flight information, and information of the chord length between two LSO pixels in coincidence as a result of a beta emission and emitted gamma, a second time window can be set to observe transmission events simultaneously to emission events. Using the time when the PET scanner is not actively acquiring positron emission data, a continuous blank can be acquired and used to reconstruct a transmission image. With this blank and the measured transmission data, a transmission image can be reconstructed. This reconstructed transmission image can be used to perform emission data corrections such as attenuation correction and scatter corrections or starting images for algorithms that estimate emission and attenuation simultaneously. It is observed that the flux of the background activity is high enough to create useful transmission images with an acquisition time of 10 min.

  12. An Analysis of Recent Measurements of the Temperature of theCosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, G.; Levin, S.M.; Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the results of recent temperature measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). The observations for wavelengths longer than 0.1 cm are well fit by a blackbody spectrum at 2.74 {+-} 0.02 K; however, including the new data of Matsumoto et al. (1987) the result is no longer consistent with a Planckian spectrum. The data are described by a Thomson-distortion parameter u = 0.021 {+-} 0.002 and temperature 2.823 {+-} 0.010 K at the 68% confidence level. Fitting the low-frequency data to a Bose-Einstein spectral distortion yields a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.4 x 10{sup -2} on the chemical potential {mu}{sub 0}. These limits on spectral distortions place restrictions on a number of potentially interesting sources of energy release to the CMBR, including the hot intergalactic medium proposed as the source of the X-ray background.

  13. Effects of reduced natural background radiation on Drosophila melanogaster growth and development as revealed by the FLYINGLOW program.

    PubMed

    Morciano, Patrizia; Iorio, Roberto; Iovino, Daniela; Cipressa, Francesca; Esposito, Giuseppe; Porrazzo, Antonella; Satta, Luigi; Alesse, Edoardo; Tabocchini, Maria Antonella; Cenci, Giovanni

    2018-01-01

    Natural background radiation of Earth and cosmic rays played a relevant role during the evolution of living organisms. However, how chronic low doses of radiation can affect biological processes is still unclear. Previous data have indicated that cells grown at the Gran Sasso Underground Laboratory (LNGS, L'Aquila) of National Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN) of Italy, where the dose rate of cosmic rays and neutrons is significantly reduced with respect to the external environment, elicited an impaired response against endogenous damage as compared to cells grown outside LNGS. This suggests that environmental radiation contributes to the development of defense mechanisms at cellular level. To further understand how environmental radiation affects metabolism of living organisms, we have recently launched the FLYINGLOW program that aims at exploiting Drosophila melanogaster as a model for evaluating the effects of low doses/dose rates of radiation at the organismal level. Here, we will present a comparative data set on lifespan, motility and fertility from different Drosophila strains grown in parallel at LNGS and in a reference laboratory at the University of L'Aquila. Our data suggest the reduced radiation environment can influence Drosophila development and, depending on the genetic background, may affect viability for several generations even when flies are moved back to normal background radiation. As flies are considered a valuable model for human biology, our results might shed some light on understanding the effect of low dose radiation also in humans. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The high energy gamma-ray background and the interstellar radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Ranga-Ram

    This thesis provides an independent estimate of the high latitude (! b! > 20°) contribution to the E > 30 MeV gamma-ray background from Galactic nucleon-nucleon, electron bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton processes. In particular, the inverse Compton contribution has been estimated for different cosmic ray electron distributions and after factoring in the anisotropy in the interstellar radiation field and the anisotropic Klein-Nishina scattering cross section. A model for the interstellar radiation field from 0.1 μm to 1000 μm is also presented to fit the intensities observed by recent satellite experiments, especially the DIRBE and FIRAS instruments on COBE. I find that the emission from the inverse Compton process when the anisotropy in the radiation field is included can be higher by up to 50% when compared to estimates that adopt an isotropic radiation field. Simulated inverse Compton maps with a cosmic ray electron distribution represented by a ``pill box'' extending up to a distance of 5 kpc above the Galactic plane provide better fits to the EGRET intensity maps suggesting that the cosmic ray halo may be larger than previously thought. With this distribution, I find that the net contribution from the IC process to the gamma-ray background can be as high as 20% at high Galactic latitudes. Fitting for the Galactic components of gamma-ray emission confirms the existence of an isotropic component with an intensity that can be represented by the form 27.7 × E(MeV)-2.16 photons m-2 s-1 sr -1 MeV-1, in excellent agreement with previous estimates. The spectrum of the isotropic component further argues strongly in favor of unresolved gamma-ray blazars being the source of this emission. Introduction of an anisotropic component improves the quality of the fits. However, this component, which could potentially arise from the dark matter in the Galactic halo, is not well characterized by a single power law which might be associated with any single dark matter

  15. Ingestion of polonium ((210)Po) via dietary sources in high background radiation areas of south India.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Kantha Deivi; Baskaran, Kamesh Viswanathan; Rao, D D; Sathyapriya, R; Annamalai, Sathesh Kumar; Kuruva, Jaya Krishna; Hari, Shanmugamsundaram

    2014-10-01

    To study the distribution of Polonium ((210)Po) activity in dietary sources in the high background radiation zone of Puttetti in southern Tamil Nadu. (210)Po was analyzed in the food materials consumed by the male and female individual representatives living in the high background areas by 24-h Duplicate Diet Study (DDS) and Market Basket Study (MBS). The MBS was performed by collecting the food samples such as, cereals, fruits, leafy vegetables, roots and tubers, other vegetables, fish, meat and milk grown in the high background radiation zone of southern Tamil Nadu as a part of baseline study in this region. The DDS was done by collecting the food materials consumed including the beverages in 24 h from different age groups of male and female individuals living in the village of Puttetti. The intake and ingestion dose of the radionuclide (210)Po was estimated. The average concentration of (210)Po in DDS (n = 33) was found to be 74 mBq.kg(- 1) of fresh weight. The MBS was collected based on food consumption representing more than 85-95% of annual supply, and were divided into eight food groups. The average concentration of (210)Po in the eight food groups namely leafy vegetables was 2176 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 3), vegetables 55 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 10), roots and tubers 251 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 4), fruits 65 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 5), fish 345 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 2), meat food 117 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 3), milk 20 mBq.kg(- 1) (n = 1) and cereal 290 (n = 1) mBq.kg(- 1) of fresh weight, respectively. The annual intake and ingestion dose due to (210)Po was estimated by DDS and MBS in adults, adolescents and children. The overall results showed that the MBS was moderately higher than the DDS in all age groups. Moreover, a DDS approach may even be more realistic, as cooked foodstuffs are used for dietary exposure assessment. The study confirms that the current levels of (210)Po do not pose a significant radiological risk to the local inhabitants.

  16. Accelerated versus conventional radiation fractionation in early stage carcinoma larynx.

    PubMed

    Alam, M S; Perween, R; Siddiqui, S A

    2016-01-01

    In our study, we have treated cases of early glottic carcinoma by two different dose-fractionation schedules in relation to overall treatment time. This is an analysis of 29 patients with invasive, previously untreated T1and T2squamous cell carcinoma of true vocal cord that was treated by radical radiation therapy. All patients were treated with a continuous course of radiation therapy with once-daily fractionation. All the patients were treated 5 days a week from Monday to Friday. The fractionation regime was either: (1) 62.5 Gy/25fractions/5 weeks at 2.5 Gy fractions (Regimen 1), (2) 70 Gy/35 fractions/7 weeks at 2 Gy/fraction (Regimen 2). Regimen 1 included 15/29 patients (51.72%) and Regimen 2 included 14/29 patients (48.27%). Patients were evaluated for: (1) Locoregional control, (2) acute and late radiation toxicities, (3) quality of voice. There was no significant difference in terms of locoregional control rate, acute and late radiation toxicities in both groups. Voice quality during and after radiation was comparable in both arms. Use of high dose per fraction schedule with shorter duration of treatment results in comparable local control as well as the quality of voice to the protracted course of radiotherapy without increase in treatment-related toxicities. Shorter overall treatment time can be of great advantage in terms of time, cost, comfort, and acceptability by the patients.

  17. Observations from Juno's Radiation Monitoring Investigation during Juno's Early Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Jorgensen, John L.; Adriani, Alberto; Mura, Alessandro; Connerney, John E. P.; Santos-Costa, Daniel; Bolton, Scott J.; Levin, Steven M.; Alexander, James W.; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Manor-Chapman, Emily A.; Daubar, Ingrid J.; Lee, Clifford; Benn, Mathias; Denver, Troelz; Sushkova, Julia; Cicchetti, Andrea; Noschese, Raffaella; Thorne, Richard M.

    2017-04-01

    Juno's Radiation Monitoring (RM) Investigation profiles Jupiter's >10-MeV electron environment throughout unexplored regions of the Jovian magnetosphere. RM's measurement approach involves active retrieval of the characteristic noise signatures from penetrating radiation in images obtained by Juno's heavily shielded star cameras and science instruments. Collaborative observation campaigns of "radiation image" collection and penetrating particle counts are conducted at targeted opportunities within the magnetosphere during each of Juno's perijove passes using the spacecraft Stellar Reference Unit, the Magnetic Field Investigation's Advanced Stellar Compass Imagers, and the JIRAM infrared imager. Simultaneous observations gathered from these very different instruments provide comparative spectral information due to substantial differences in instrument shielding. Juno's orbit provides a unique sampling of energetic particles within Jupiter's innermost radiation belts and polar regions. We present a survey of observations of the high energy radiation environment made by Juno's SRU and ASC star cameras and the JIRAM infrared imager during Juno's early perijove passes on August 27 and December 11, 2016; and February 2 and March 27, 2017. The JPL author's copyright for this publication is held by the California Institute of Technology. Government Sponsorship acknowledged.

  18. Reduced Ovarian Cancer Incidence in Women Exposed to Low Dose Ionizing Background Radiation or Radiation to the Ovaries after Treatment for Breast Cancer or Rectosigmoid Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Steven; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2016-01-01

    High dose ionizing radiation can induce ovarian cancer, but the effect of low dose radiation on the development of ovarian cancer has not been extensively studied. We evaluated the effect of low dose radiation and total background radiation, and the radiation delivered to the ovaries during the treatment of rectosigmoid cancer and breast cancer on ovarian cancer incidence. Background radiation measurements are from Assessment of Variations in Radiation Exposure in the United States, 2011. Ovarian cancer incidence data are from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) of ovarian cancer following breast cancer and rectosigmoid cancer are from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data. Obesity data by US state are from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Mean ages of US state populations are from the United States Census Bureau. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIR) from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data, which reveal that in 194,042 cases of breast cancer treated with beam radiation, there were 796 cases of ovarian cancer by 120+ months of treatment (0.41%); in 283, 875 cases of breast cancer not treated with radiation, there were 1,531 cases of ovarian cancer by 120+ months (0.54%). The difference in ovarian cancer incidence in the two groups was significant (<0.001, two tailed Fisher exact test). The small dose of scattered ovarian radiation (about 3.09 cGy) from beam radiation to the breast appears to have reduced the risk of ovarian cancer by 24%. In 13,099 cases of rectal or rectosigmoid junction cancer treated with beam radiation in the SEER data, there were 20 cases of ovarian cancer by 120+ months of treatment (0.15%). In 33,305 cases of rectal or rectosigmoid junction cancer not treated with radiation, there were 91 cases of ovarian cancer by 120+ months (0.27%). The difference in ovarian cancer incidence in the two groups was significant (p = 0.017, two

  19. Far-UV Radiation of the Early Sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sally

    2005-01-01

    Far-UV radiation is responsible for the photolysis of important greenhouse gases such as CO2, NH3 (ammonia), CH4 (methane) and more generally, the global UV photochemistry of the early atmosphere. In our project, we are concentrating on the young Sun's effect on methane, since UV sunlight (lambda less than 1450 Angstroms) was the main destruction mechanism for methane in the early Earth's atmosphere. Since the UV luminosity of the early Sun cannot be calculated a priori; it can only be estimated from observations of stars similar to the young Sun. We report our results based on Hubble + FUSE spectra of stars selected from Gaidos (1998) Catalog of Nearby Young Solar Analogs (YSA's).

  20. Solar Radiation as Driving Force In Early Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has provided an evolutionary challenge to life on Earth in that it is both an agent of mutation and as well as a selective force. Today surface fluxes of UVR vary diurnally, seasonally, etc. Still, the UVR flux was probably substantially higher during the early phases of evolution, suggesting that its role in evolution was even more prominent during this time. In this presentation, the creative role of UVR in evolution is discussed, specifically in connection with the role that UVR may have played in the evolution of early microbial ecosystems. The presentation will include discussions of the direct influence of UVR on such processes as photosynthesis and genetic damage, as well as the indirect influence of UVR as mediated through the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological effects of UVR will be viewed against the backdrop of the physical nature of the early Earth, surely a very different place then than now.

  1. Solar Radiation as Driving Force In Early Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, Lynn J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has provided an evolutionary challenge to life on Earth in that it is both an agent of mutation and as well as a selective force. Today surface fluxes of UVR vary diurnally, seasonally, etc. Still, the UVR flux was probably substantially higher during the early phases of evolution, suggesting that its role in evolution was even more prominent during this time. In this presentation, the creative role of UVR in evolution is discussed, specifically in connection with the role that UVR may have played in the evolution of early microbial ecosystems. The presentation will include discussions of the direct influence of UVR on such processes as photosynthesis and genetic damage, as well as the indirect influence of UVR as mediated through the production of reactive oxygen species. These biological effects of UVR will be viewed against the backdrop of the physical nature of the early Earth, surely a very different place then than now.

  2. The effect of hot gas in early-type galaxies on the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trester, Jeffrey J.; Canizares, Claude R.

    1989-01-01

    The effects on the cosmic microwave background which are due to Compton scattering by the hot gas contained in early-type galaxies (the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect) are computed. Using the known properties of the gas deduced from X-ray observations, it is found that the fractional attenuation DeltaT/T at the center of a gas-rich galaxy is likely to be less than 10 to the -5th, which is just below current limits of detectability. A distribution function is derived for the attenuation which is due to a population of early-type galaxies out to some redshift and the expected rms fluctuations in the background on subarcmin scales are computed. These fluctuations are comparable to those intrinsic to the microwave background in the 'cold dark matter' scenario on these angular scales, but they fall orders of magnitude below the detection limits and below the level of fluctuations expected from nonlinear density perturbations at the epoch of galaxy formation.

  3. Radiative Transfer in a Translucent Cloud Illuminated by an Extended Background Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biganzoli, Davide; Potenza, Marco A. C.; Robberto, Massimo

    2017-05-01

    We discuss the radiative transfer theory for translucent clouds illuminated by an extended background source. First, we derive a rigorous solution based on the assumption that multiple scatterings produce an isotropic flux. Then we derive a more manageable analytic approximation showing that it nicely matches the results of the rigorous approach. To validate our model, we compare our predictions with accurate laboratory measurements for various types of well-characterized grains, including purely dielectric and strongly absorbing materials representative of astronomical icy and metallic grains, respectively, finding excellent agreement without the need to add free parameters. We use our model to explore the behavior of an astrophysical cloud illuminated by a diffuse source with dust grains having parameters typical of the classic ISM grains of Draine & Lee and protoplanetary disks, with an application to the dark silhouette disk 114-426 in Orion Nebula. We find that the scattering term modifies the transmitted radiation, both in terms of intensity (extinction) and shape (reddening) of the spectral distribution. In particular, for small optical thickness, our results show that scattering makes reddening almost negligible at visible wavelengths. Once the optical thickness increases enough and the probability of scattering events becomes close to or larger than 1, reddening becomes present but is appreciably modified with respect to the standard expression for line-of-sight absorption. Moreover, variations of the grain refractive index, in particular the amount of absorption, also play an important role in changing the shape of the spectral transmission curve, with dielectric grains showing the minimum amount of reddening.

  4. High background radiation investigated by gamma spectrometry of the soil in the southwestern region of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ele Abiama, P; Owono Ateba, P; Ben-Bolie, G H; Ekobena, F H P; El Khoukhi, T

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the radioactivity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in sub-surface (0-5 cm) soil samples collected from Awanda, Bikoué, Ngombas in the southwestern region of Cameroon, to assess their contribution to the external dose exposure relative to the United Nation Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) data. An HPGe p-type detector coupled to a multichannel analyzer was used to perform measurements and data processing. The activity concentrations of (226)Ra varied from 0.06+/-0.01 to 0.27+/-0.02 kBq kg(-1) with a mean value of 0.13+/-0.01 kBq kg(-1) wet weight. The activity concentrations of (232)Th varied from 0.10+/-0.01 to 0.70+/-0.05 kBq kg(-1) with a mean value of 0.39+/-0.03 kBq kg(-1) wet weight, and (40)K concentrations varied from 0.37+/-0.02 to 1.53+/-0.11 kBq kg(-1) with a mean value of 0.85+/-0.07 kBq kg(-1) wet weight, respectively. The mean value of outdoor annual effective doses were estimated to be 0.48 mSv y(-1), 0.39 mSv y(-1) and 0.38 mSv y(-1) from Ngombas, Awanda and Bikoué, respectively. The studied areas can be said to have a high background radiation level.

  5. Space weather circulation model of plasma clouds as background radiation medium of space environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalu, A. E.

    A model for Space Weather (SW) Circulation with Plasma Clouds as background radiation medium of Space Environment has been proposed and discussed. Major characteristics of the model are outlined and the model assumes a baroclinic Space Environment in view of observed pronounced horizontal electron temperature gradient with prevailing weak vertical temperature gradient. The primary objective of the study is to be able to monitor and realistically predict on real- or near real-time SW and Space Storms (SWS) affecting human economic systems on Earth as well as the safety and Physiologic comfort of human payload in Space Environment in relation to planned increase in human space flights especially with reference to the ISS Space Shuttle Taxi (ISST) Programme and other prolonged deep Space Missions. Although considerable discussions are now available in the literature on SW issues, routine Meteorological operational applications of SW forecast data and information for Space Environment are still yet to receive adequate attention. The paper attempts to fill this gap in the literature of SW. The paper examines the sensitivity and variability in 3-D continuum of Plasmas in response to solar radiation inputs into the magnetosphere under disturbed Sun condition. Specifically, the presence of plasma clouds in the form of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is stressed as a major source of danger to Space crews, spacecraft instrumentation and architecture charging problems as well as impacts on numerous radiation - sensitive human economic systems on Earth. Finally, the paper considers the application of model results in the form of effective monitoring of each of the two major phases of manned Spaceflights - take-off and re-entry phases where all-time assessment of spacecraft transient ambient micro-incabin and outside Space Environment is vital for all manned Spaceflights as recently evidenced by the loss of vital information during take-off of the February 1, 2003 US Columbia

  6. Aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties at regional background insular sites in the western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicard, Michaël; Barragan, Rubén; Dulac, François; Alados-Arboledas, Lucas; Mallet, Marc

    2016-09-01

    In the framework of the ChArMEx (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr/) program, the seasonal variability of the aerosol optical, microphysical and radiative properties derived from AERONET (Aerosol Robotic Network; http://aeronet.gsfc.nasa.gov/) is examined in two regional background insular sites in the western Mediterranean Basin: Ersa (Corsica Island, France) and Palma de Mallorca (Mallorca Island, Spain). A third site, Alborán (Alborán Island, Spain), with only a few months of data is considered for examining possible northeast-southwest (NE-SW) gradients of the aforementioned aerosol properties. The AERONET dataset is exclusively composed of level 2.0 inversion products available during the 5-year period 2011-2015. AERONET solar radiative fluxes are compared with ground- and satellite-based flux measurements. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that AERONET fluxes are compared with measurements at the top of the atmosphere. Strong events (with an aerosol optical depth at 440 nm greater than 0.4) of long-range transport aerosols, one of the main drivers of the observed annual cycles and NE-SW gradients, are (1) mineral dust outbreaks predominant in spring and summer in the north and in summer in the south and (2) European pollution episodes predominant in autumn. A NE-SW gradient exists in the western Mediterranean Basin for the aerosol optical depth and especially its coarse-mode fraction, which all together produces a similar gradient for the aerosol direct radiative forcing. The aerosol fine mode is rather homogeneously distributed. Absorption properties are quite variable because of the many and different sources of anthropogenic particles in and around the western Mediterranean Basin: North African and European urban areas, the Iberian and Italian peninsulas, most forest fires and

  7. Language background in early life may be related to neuropsychiatry symptoms in patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Chien; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Wang, Shuu-Jin; Yip, Ping-Keung; Meguro, Kenichi; Fuh, Jong-Ling

    2017-02-10

    The relationship between early life experience and the occurrence of neuropsychiatry symptoms (NPSs) in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) is unclear. From 2012 to 2014, we prospectively recruited 250 patients with probable AD from the memory clinic of Taipei Veterans General Hospital. All patients underwent standard assessments, including brain magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography, neuropsychological tests, neuropsychiatry inventory (NPI-Q) and related blood tests. A linear regression analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between NPSs and age, gender, disease severity, depression, language background (with or without Japanese education). Among the 250 participants, 113 (45.2%) were women. Their average age was 82.6 years. Of all the participants, 93 (37.2%) had received formal Japanese education, whereas 157 (62.8%) did not receive Japanese education. The participants with Japanese education were slightly younger (83.1 ± 3.6 vs. 81.4 ± 3.4, P = 0.006), with a higher proportion of them were women (30.5% vs. 69.8%, P < 0.001) and fewer years of total education (10.8 ± 4.5 vs. 7.7 ± 3.2, P < 0.001), compared to the participants without Japanese education. NPI-Q scores significantly differed between the two groups (15.8 vs. 24.1, P = 0.024). Both disease severity and language background predicted NPI-Q scores. Language background in early life may be related to NPSs in patients with AD, and this effect is more significant in patients with a lower education level than in those with a higher education level. More NPSs may be the result of negative effects on dominant language or early life experiences.

  8. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in NASA Spacecraft Hangar AE (background) remove sections of the transportation canister from around the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), which has been returned to the hangar from the launch pad. Additional workers (foreground) prepare the Delta payload attach fitting, from which SIRTF was demated, for further use. SIRTF will remain in the clean room until it returns to the pad in early August. One of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched, SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-05-02

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Workers in NASA Spacecraft Hangar AE (background) remove sections of the transportation canister from around the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF), which has been returned to the hangar from the launch pad. Additional workers (foreground) prepare the Delta payload attach fitting, from which SIRTF was demated, for further use. SIRTF will remain in the clean room until it returns to the pad in early August. One of NASA's largest infrared telescopes to be launched, SIRTF will obtain images and spectra by detecting the infrared energy, or heat, radiated by objects in space.

  9. Analysis of small-scale microwave background radiation anisotropy in the presence of foreground contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodelson, Scott; Stebbins, Albert

    1994-01-01

    Many of the current round of experiments searching for anisotropies in the microwave background radiation (MBR) are confronting the problem of how to disentangle the cosmic signal from contamination due to Galactic and intergalactic foreground sources. Here we show how commonly used likelihood function techniques can be generalized to account for foreground. Specifically we set some restrictions on the spectrum of foreground contamination but allow the amplitude to vary arbitrarily. The likelihood function thus generalized gives reasonable limits on the MBR anisotropy which, in some cases, are not much less restrictive than what one would get from more detailed modeling of the foreground. Furthermore, the likelihood function is exactly the same as one would obtain by simply projecting out foreground contamination and looking at the reduced data set. We apply this generalized analysis to the recent medium-angle data sets of ACME-HEMT (Gaier et al. 1992; Schuster et al. 1993) and MAX (Meinhold et al. 1993; Gunderson et al. 1993). The resulting analysis constrains the one free parameter in the standard cold dark matter theory to be Q(sub rms-ps) = 18(sub -5 sup +8) microKelvin. This best fit value, although in striking agreement with the normalization from Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), is not a very good fit, with an overall chi-squared/degrees of freedom = 208/168. We also argue against three commonly used methods of dealing with foreground: (1) ignoring it completely; (2) subtracting off a best-fit foreground and treating the residuals as if uncontaminated; and (3) culling data which appears to be contaminated by foreground.

  10. Early-matter-like dark energy and the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Aurich, R.; Lustig, S. E-mail: sven.lustig@uni-ulm.de

    2016-01-01

    Early-matter-like dark energy is defined as a dark energy component whose equation of state approaches that of cold dark matter (CDM) at early times. Such a component is an ingredient of unified dark matter (UDM) models, which unify the cold dark matter and the cosmological constant of the ΛCDM concordance model into a single dark fluid. Power series expansions in conformal time of the perturbations of the various components for a model with early-matter-like dark energy are provided. They allow the calculation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from the primordial initial values of the perturbations. For a phenomenological UDM model, which agrees with the observations of the local Universe, the CMB anisotropy is computed and compared with the CMB data. It is found that a match to the CMB observations is possible if the so-called effective velocity of sound c{sub eff} of the early-matter-like dark energy component is very close to zero. The modifications on the CMB temperature and polarization power spectra caused by varying the effective velocity of sound are studied.

  11. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3 mm

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    A balloon borne differential radiometer measured the large scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anisotropy at 90 GHz (3mm wavelength) is 2.82 +/- 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anisotropy of 3.48 +/- 0.24 mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. The dipole direction, 11.3 +/- 0.1 hours right ascension and -5.7/sup 0/ +/- 1.8/sup 0/ declination, agrees well with measurements at other frequencies. Calibration error dominates magnitude uncertainty, with statistical errors on dipole terms being under 0.1 mK. No significant quadrupole power is found, placing a 90% confidence level upper limit of 0.27 mK on the RMS thermodynamic quadrupolar anisotropy. The cryogenically-cooled receiver has a double-sideband noise temperature of 135 K and a sensitivity of 12 mK for one second of integration time. Comparing two sky regions 45/sup 0/ from zenith and 180/sup 0/ apart in azimuth, it can resolve the dipole anisotropy in real-time as the balloon gondola rotates. In-flight calibrations show that gain stability is better than +/-1%.

  12. Simple analytical methods for computing the gravity-wave contribution to the cosmic background radiation anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.

    1996-01-01

    We present two simple analytical methods for computing the gravity-wave contribution to the cosmic background radiation (CBR) anisotropy in inflationary models; one method uses a time-dependent transfer function, the other methods uses an approximate gravity-mode function which is a simple combination of the lowest order spherical Bessel functions. We compare the CBR anisotropy tensor multipole spectrum computed using our methods with the previous result of the highly accurate numerical method, the {open_quote}{open_quote}Boltzmann{close_quote}{close_quote} method. Our time-dependent transfer function is more accurate than the time-independent transfer function found by Turner, White, and Lindsey; however, we find that the transfer function method is only good for {ital l}{approx_lt}120. Using our approximate gravity-wave mode function, we obtain much better accuracy; the tensor multipole spectrum we find differs by less than 2{percent} for {ital l}{approx_lt}50, less than 10{percent} for {ital l}{approx_lt}120, and less than 20{percent} for {ital l}{le}300 from the {open_quote}{open_quote}Boltzmann{close_quote}{close_quote} result. Our approximate graviton mode function should be quite useful in studying tensor perturbations from inflationary models. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Why COBE and CN spectroscopy cosmic background radiation temperature measurements differ, and a remedy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Sydney

    2012-04-01

    In 2004, the cosmic background radiation (CBR) temperature Tγ(CN) determined from interstellar CN absorption spectra was found to be 50 ± 20 mK higher than the COBE bolometer measured value. It was proposed that this was due, at least in part, to an error in the evaluation of the rotational components of the oscillator strengths of the rovibronic transitions corresponding to the CN B 2Σ+-X 2Σ+(0 - 0), R(0), R(1) and P(1) lines. Corrections to the standard Hönl-London (HL) rotational line intensity factors used were determined. New data on interstellar CN absorption show that Tγ(CN) is 29 ± 2 mK greater than the latest value of the cosmological CBR temperature, Tγ(COBE) = 2.72548 ± 0.00057 K. These new results and CN fluorescence lifetime data are shown to give similar derived values for improved HL corrections as well as providing further evidence for the intramolecular coupling between the relevant B 2Σ+ state rotational levels and close-lying levels of the A 2Π state which invalidates the standard HL factors. Revised HL factors may be required in future Tγ(CN) measurements, in particular in high-redshift sites, which cannot be studied by bolometric means.

  14. Measurement of the intensity of the cosmic background radiation at 3. 0 cm

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    The intensity of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) was measured at a wavelength of 3.0 cm as part of a program to measure the Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum of the CBR at five wavelengths between 0.33 cm and 12 cm. The instrument used is a dual-antenna Dicke-switched radiometer with a double-sideband noise temperature of 490 K and a sensitivity of 46 mK/Hz/sup 1/2/. The entire radiometer is mounted on bearings. The atmospheric emission was measured by rotating the radiometer, and thus directing one antenna to zenith angles of +/-30 and +/-40/sup 0/. The CBR temperature is found by direct comparison with a liquid-helium-cooled absolute-reference load. This load consists of a large cylindrical waveguide, 70 cm in diameter and 130 cm long, terminated by a microwave absorder immersed in LHe. Only two thin polyethylene windows are between the antenna and the LHe. The load has extremely low loss at all five wavelengths of observation. At 3.0 cm reflected power and insertion loss from the walls and windows contribute an additional 20 +/- 10 mK to the antenna temperature of the LHe.

  15. Measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 3. 3 mm wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm wavelength (90 GHz) yielded a brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1sigma uncertainty of +/-0.12 K. The observations were made from the Barcroft Laboratory of the White Mountain Research Station, at an altitude of 3800 m, initially on 5 and 6 July 1982 and again on 4, 5 and 6 September 1983, as part of a program to measure the spectrum of the CBR at five wavelengths from 12.0 cm to 3.3 mm. The weighted mean of the temperature measurements at all five wavelengths is 2.72 +/- 0.04 K. The instrument used for the 3.3 mm measurements is a differential, dual-antenna, Dicke-switched, superheterodyne radiometer with an RF bandwidth of 1.9 GHz and a sensitivity of 125 mK/..sqrt..Hz. The radiometer is mounted on bearings, which allow it to rotate. Either antenna can view a large liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load while the other antenna views the zenith. The antenna temperature of the reference load, 2.083 +/- 0.037 K, is added to the measured zenith/cold-load temperature difference to yield the zenith antenna temperature, typically 9 to 12 K. The atmospheric contribution to the zenith temperature is measured by means of zenith scans.

  16. Reconstructing single-field inflationary actions from cosmic microwave background radiation data

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, Christopher S; Akhoury, Ratindranath E-mail: akhoury@umich.edu

    2008-07-15

    This paper describes a general program for deriving the action of single-field inflation models with non-standard kinetic energy terms using cosmic microwave background radiation power spectrum data. This method assumes that an action depends on a set of undetermined functions, each of which is a function of either the inflaton wavefunction or its time derivative. The scalar, tensor and non-Gaussianity of the curvature perturbation spectrum are used to derive a set of reconstruction equations whose solution set can specify up to three of the undetermined functions. The method is then used to find the undetermined functions in various types of action assuming power law type scalar and tensor spectra. In actions that contain only two unknown functions, the third reconstruction equation implies a consistency relation between the non-Gaussianity, sound speed and slow roll parameters. In particular we focus on reconstructing a generalized Dirac-Born-Infeld action with an unknown potential and warp factor. We find that for realistic scalar and tensor spectra, the reconstructed warp factor and potential are very similar to the theoretically derived result. Furthermore, physical consistency of the reconstructed warp factor and potential imposes strict constraints on the scalar and tensor spectral indices.

  17. Measurement of the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation at 3 MM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, G. L.

    A balloon-borne differential radiometer has measured the large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) with high sensitivity. The antenna temperature dipole anisotropy at 90 GHz (3mm wavelength) is 2.82 + or - 0.19 mK, corresponding to a thermodynamic anisotropy of 3.48 + or - 0.24 mK for a 2.7 K blackbody CBR. Since the magnitude of the dipole anisotropy induced by motion through the CBR depends on both the CBR intensity and its spectral index, anisotropy measurements at several frequencies provide information about the CBR spectrum. The ratio of the dipole magnitudes measured at 90 GHz by this experiment and at 24.5 GHz by another recent observation is consistent with a 2.7 K blackbody CBR but does not require such a spectrum. If the CBR spectrum is blackbody, the two measurements establish a 90% confidence-level lower limit of 2.2 K on its temperature.

  18. Doses and risks from uranium are not increased significantly by interactions with natural background photon radiation.

    PubMed

    Tanner, R J; Eakins, J S; Jansen, J T M; Harrison, J D

    2012-08-01

    The impact of depleted uranium (DU) on human health has been the subject of much conjecture. Both the chemical and radiological aspects of its behaviour in the human body have previously been investigated in detail, with the radiological impact being assumed to be linked to the alpha decay of uranium. More recently, it has been proposed that the accumulation in tissue of high-Z materials, such as DU, may give rise to enhanced local energy deposition in the presence of natural background photon radiation due to the high photoelectric interaction cross sections of high-Z atoms. It is speculated that, in addition to producing short-range photoelectrons, these events will be followed by intense Auger and Coster-Kronig electron emission, thereby causing levels of cell damage that are unaccounted for in conventional models of radiological risk. In this study, the physical and biological bases of these claims are investigated. The potential magnitudes of any effect are evaluated and discussed, and compared with the risks from other radiological or chemical hazards. Monte Carlo calculations are performed to estimate likely energy depositions due to the presence of uranium in human tissues in photon fields: whole body doses, organ doses in anthropomorphic phantoms and nano-/micro-dosimetric scenarios are each considered. The proposal is shown generally to be based on sound physics, but overall the impact on human health is expected to be negligible.

  19. Lightning initiation mechanism based on the development of relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation: Numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Babich, L. P. Bochkov, E. I.; Kutsyk, I. M.

    2011-05-15

    The mechanism of lightning initiation due to electric field enhancement by the polarization of a conducting channel produced by relativistic runaway electron avalanches triggered by background cosmic radiation has been simulated numerically. It is shown that the fields at which the start of a lightning leader is possible even in the absence of precipitations are locally realized for realistic thundercloud configurations and charges. The computational results agree with the in-situ observations of penetrating radiation enhancement in thunderclouds.

  20. A Question of Quality: Do Children from Disadvantaged Backgrounds Receive Lower Quality Early Childhood Education and Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambaro, Ludovica; Stewart, Kitty; Waldfogel, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how the quality of early childhood education and care accessed by 3- and 4-year-olds in England varies by children's background. Focusing on the free entitlement to early education, the analysis combines information from three administrative datasets for 2010-2011, the Early Years Census, the Schools Census and the Ofsted…

  1. A Question of Quality: Do Children from Disadvantaged Backgrounds Receive Lower Quality Early Childhood Education and Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambaro, Ludovica; Stewart, Kitty; Waldfogel, Jane

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how the quality of early childhood education and care accessed by 3- and 4-year-olds in England varies by children's background. Focusing on the free entitlement to early education, the analysis combines information from three administrative datasets for 2010-2011, the Early Years Census, the Schools Census and the Ofsted…

  2. Looking for early black holes signatures in the anisotropies of Cosmic backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelluti, Nico

    2016-04-01

    We currently do not know how Super Massive Black Holes are seeded and grow to form the observed massive QSO at z~7. This is puzzling, because at that redshift the Universe was still too young to allow the growth of such massive black holes from stellar remnant black hole seeds. Theoretical models, taking into account the paucity of metals in the early Universe, explain this by invoking the formation of massive black holes seeds at z>10 as Direct Collapse Black holes of remnants of dead POPIII stars. As of today we cannot claim any detection of any high-z (z>7) black hole in their early stage of life. However, our recent measures of the arcminute scale joint fluctuations of the Cosmic X-ray Background and the Cosmic Infrared Background by Chandra and Spitzer can be explained by a population of highly absorbed z>10 Direct Collapse Black Holes.I will review the recent discoveries obtained with different instruments and by different teams and critically discuss these findings and the interpretations.

  3. Assessment of indoor radiation dose received by the residents of natural high background radiation areas of coastal villages of Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deva Jayanthi, D.; Maniyan, C. G.; Perumal, S.

    2011-07-01

    Radiation exposure and effective dose received through two routes of exposure, viz. external and internal, via inhalation, by residents of 10 villages belonging to Natural High Background Radiation Areas (NHBRA) of coastal regions of Kanyakumari District and Tamil Nadu in India were studied. While the indoor gamma radiation levels were monitored using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs), the indoor radon and thoron gas concentrations were measured using twin chamber dosimeters employing Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs, LR-115-II). The average total annual effective dose was estimated and found to be varying from 2.59 to 8.76 mSv.

  4. Pioneer 10 search for gravitational waves - Limits on a possible isotropic cosmic background of radiation in the microhertz region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. D.; Mashhoon, B.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of the response of the Doppler tracking system to a stochastic background of gravitational radiation is discussed. Using data acquired in 1981 by the Deep Space Network with the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, interesting upper limits are placed on the energy density of the background in three frequency bands extending from 7 x 10 to the -7th to 10 to the -4th Hz, a region that has been inaccessible previously by any technique.

  5. Real-time airborne gamma-ray background estimation using NASVD with MLE and radiation transport for calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulisek, J. A.; Schweppe, J. E.; Stave, S. C.; Bernacki, B. E.; Jordan, D. V.; Stewart, T. N.; Seifert, C. E.; Kernan, W. J.

    2015-06-01

    Helicopter-mounted gamma-ray detectors can provide law enforcement officials the means to quickly and accurately detect, identify, and locate radiological threats over a wide geographical area. The ability to accurately distinguish radiological threat-generated gamma-ray signatures from background gamma radiation in real time is essential in order to realize this potential. This problem is non-trivial, especially in urban environments for which the background may change very rapidly during flight. This exacerbates the challenge of estimating background due to the poor counting statistics inherent in real-time airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. To address this challenge, we have developed a new technique for real-time estimation of background gamma radiation from aerial measurements without the need for human analyst intervention. The method can be calibrated using radiation transport simulations along with data from previous flights over areas for which the isotopic composition need not be known. Over the examined measured and simulated data sets, the method generated accurate background estimates even in the presence of a strong, 60Co source. The potential to track large and abrupt changes in background spectral shape and magnitude was demonstrated. The method can be implemented fairly easily in most modern computing languages and environments.

  6. Background Mutational Features of the Radiation-Resistant Bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans.

    PubMed

    Long, Hongan; Kucukyildirim, Sibel; Sung, Way; Williams, Emily; Lee, Heewook; Ackerman, Matthew; Doak, Thomas G; Tang, Haixu; Lynch, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Deinococcus bacteria are extremely resistant to radiation, oxidation, and desiccation. Resilience to these factors has been suggested to be due to enhanced damage prevention and repair mechanisms, as well as highly efficient antioxidant protection systems. Here, using mutation-accumulation experiments, we find that the GC-rich Deinococcus radiodurans has an overall background genomic mutation rate similar to that of E. coli, but differs in mutation spectrum, with the A/T to G/C mutation rate (based on a total count of 88 A:T → G:C transitions and 82 A:T → C:G transversions) per site per generation higher than that in the other direction (based on a total count of 157 G:C → A:T transitions and 33 G:C → T:A transversions). We propose that this unique spectrum is shaped mainly by the abundant uracil DNA glycosylases reducing G:C → A:T transitions, adenine methylation elevating A:T → C:G transversions, and absence of cytosine methylation decreasing G:C → A:T transitions. As opposed to the greater than 100× elevation of the mutation rate in MMR(-) (DNA Mismatch Repair deficient) strains of most other organisms, MMR(-) D. radiodurans only exhibits a 4-fold elevation, raising the possibility that other DNA repair mechanisms compensate for a relatively low-efficiency DNA MMR pathway. As D. radiodurans has plentiful insertion sequence (IS) elements in the genome and the activities of IS elements are rarely directly explored, we also estimated the insertion (transposition) rate of the IS elements to be 2.50 × 10(-3) per genome per generation in the wild-type strain; knocking out MMR did not elevate the IS element insertion rate in this organism.

  7. Modeling estimates of the effect of acid rain on background radiation dose.

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, S C; Sheppard, M I

    1988-01-01

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially 226Ra and 137Cs, are among these materials. Okamoto is apparently the only researcher to date who has attempted to quantify the effect of acid rain on the "background" radiation dose to man. He estimated an increase in dose by a factor of 1.3 following a decrease in soil pH of 1 unit. We reviewed literature that described the effects of changes in pH on mobility and plant uptake of Ra and Cs. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will increase mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Thus, Okamoto's dose estimate may be too low. We applied several simulation models to confirm Okamoto's ideas, with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modeled a typical, acid-rain sensitive soil using meteorological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed essentially direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. This supports some of the assumptions invoked by Okamoto. We conclude that a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor of 2 or more. Our models predict that this will lead to similar increases in plant uptake and radiological dose to man. Although health effects following such a small increase in dose have not been statistically demonstrated, any increase in dose is probably undesirable. PMID:3203639

  8. Radiation-induced bystander effect: early process and rapid assessment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Yu, K N; Hou, Jue; Liu, Qian; Han, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is a biological process that has received attention over the past two decades. RIBE refers to a plethora of biological effects in non-irradiated cells, including induction of genetic damages, gene expression, cell transformation, proliferation and cell death, which are initiated by receiving bystander signals released from irradiated cells. RIBE brings potential hazards to normal tissues in radiotherapy, and imparts a higher risk from low-dose radiation than we previously thought. Detection with proteins related to DNA damage and repair, cell cycle control, proliferation, etc. have enabled rapid assessment of RIBE in a number of research systems such as cultured cells, three-dimensional tissue models and animal models. Accumulated experimental data have suggested that RIBE may be initiated rapidly within a time frame as short as several minutes after radiation. These have led to the requirement of techniques capable of rapidly assessing RIBE itself as well as assessing the early processes involved. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The imprint of the cosmic supermassive black hole growth history on the 21 cm background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takamitsu L.; O'Leary, Ryan M.; Perna, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    The redshifted 21 cm transition line of hydrogen tracks the thermal evolution of the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) at `cosmic dawn', during the emergence of the first luminous astrophysical objects (˜100 Myr after the big bang) but before these objects ionized the IGM (˜400-800 Myr after the big bang). Because X-rays, in particular, are likely to be the chief energy courier for heating the IGM, measurements of the 21 cm signature can be used to infer knowledge about the first astrophysical X-ray sources. Using analytic arguments and a numerical population synthesis algorithm, we argue that the progenitors of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) should be the dominant source of hard astrophysical X-rays - and thus the primary driver of IGM heating and the 21 cm signature - at redshifts z ≳ 20, if (i) they grow readily from the remnants of Population III stars and (ii) produce X-rays in quantities comparable to what is observed from active galactic nuclei and high-mass X-ray binaries. We show that models satisfying these assumptions dominate over contributions to IGM heating from stellar populations, and cause the 21 cm brightness temperature to rise at z ≳ 20. An absence of such a signature in the forthcoming observational data would imply that SMBH formation occurred later (e.g. via so-called direct collapse scenarios), that it was not a common occurrence in early galaxies and protogalaxies, or that it produced far fewer X-rays than empirical trends at lower redshifts, either due to intrinsic dimness (radiative inefficiency) or Compton-thick obscuration close to the source.

  10. Federal Guidance Report No. 2: Background Material for the Development of Radiation Protection Standards (Federal Radiation Council)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report discusses how to provide guidance for Federal agencies in activities designed to limit exposure of members of population groups to radiation from radioactive materials deposited in the body as a result of their occurrence in the environment.

  11. Adaptive response of blood lymphocytes of inhabitants residing in high background radiation areas of ramsar- micronuclei, apoptosis and comet assays.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Shahla; Taghavi-Dehaghani, Mahnaz; Gharaati, Mohammad R; Masoomi, Reza; Ghiassi-Nejad, Mehdi

    2006-11-01

    The hot springs in certain areas of Ramsar contain (226)Ra and (222)Rn. The effects of natural radiation on the inhabitants of these areas and the inhabitant's radiosensitivity or adaptive responses were studied. One group of volunteers from areas with high natural background radiation and another group from areas with normal background radiation were chosen as the case and control group respectively. The frequency of micronuclei, apoptosis, and DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells were measured following gamma irradiation (4 Gy). The incidence of micronuclei in the case group was significantly lower than that in the control group while their frequency of apoptosis was higher (P < 0.05). However, the rates of induced DNA damage and repair were significantly higher in the case group (P < 0.05). Smaller number of micronuclei and higher levels of apoptosis in the case group could be the result of higher resistance to radiation stress and a more rigorous checkpoint at cell division. However, regarding the alkaline labile sites, the individuals in the case group are more sensitive and susceptible to DNA damage. The results of micronuclei, apoptosis and repair studies suggest that an adaptive response might be induced in people residing in areas with high background radiation.

  12. The effect of early radiation in N-body simulations of cosmic structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamek, Julian; Brandbyge, Jacob; Fidler, Christian; Hannestad, Steen; Rampf, Cornelius; Tram, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Newtonian N-body simulations have been employed successfully over the past decades for the simulation of the cosmological large-scale structure. Such simulations usually ignore radiation perturbations (photons and massless neutrinos) and the impact of general relativity (GR) beyond the background expansion. This approximation can be relaxed and we discuss three different approaches that are accurate to leading order in GR. For simulations that start at redshift less than about 100, we find that the presence of early radiation typically leads to per cent-level effects on the numerical power spectra at large scales. Our numerical results agree across the three methods, and we conclude that all of the three methods are suitable for simulations in a standard cosmology. Two of the methods modify the N-body evolution directly, while the third method can be applied as a post-processing prescription.

  13. Translational anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation and far-infrared emission by galactic dust clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.

    1977-01-01

    The predicted emission spectrum of galactic dust at about 10 K is compared with the spectrum of 2.8-K universal blackbody radiation and with the spectrum of the anisotropy expected in the 2.8-K radiation due to motion of earth with respect to the coordinate system in which the radiation was last scattered. The extremely anisotropic galactic-dust emission spectrum may contribute a significant background to anisotropy measurements which scan through the galactic plane. The contamination would appear in an 8-mm scan around the celestial equator, for example, as a spurious 200 km/s velocity toward declination 0 deg, right ascension 19 hr, if predictions are correct. The predicted spectrum of dust emission in the galactic plane at longitudes not exceeding about 30 deg falls below the total 2.8-K cosmic background intensity at wavelengths of at least 1 mm.

  14. Background radiation, electrical work, and some other exposures associated with acute myeloid leukemia in a case-referent study.

    PubMed

    Flodin, U; Fredriksson, M; Persson, B; Hardell, L; Axelson, O

    1986-01-01

    The effect of potential risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia was evaluated in a case-referent study encompassing 59 cases and 354 referents, all of whom were alive. Information on exposure was obtained through a questionnaire mailed to the subjects. The possible effect of background radiation was evaluated by means of a gamma radiation index, which accounted for the differences between cases and referents in this respect, i.e., in time spent in concrete buildings both at home and at work places. In the 20-54 yr old age group, there was an association between leukemia morbidity and index of background radiation. X-ray treatment and electrical work were also associated with increased rate ratios. With regard to solvents, only styrene appeared as a risk factor, but the number of exposed subjects was small. Other exposures were less clearly associated with increased risks.

  15. Effect of the early reionization on the cosmic microwave background and cosmological parameter estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qing-Guo; Wang, Ke

    2017-07-01

    The early reionization (ERE) is supposed to be a physical process which happens after recombination, but before the instantaneous reionization caused by the first generation of stars. We investigate the effect of the ERE on the temperature and polarization power spectra of cosmic microwave background (CMB), and adopt principal components analysis (PCA) to model-independently reconstruct the ionization history during the ERE. In addition, we also discuss how the ERE affects the cosmological parameter estimates, and find that the ERE does not impose any significant influences on the tensor-to-scalar ratio r and the neutrino mass at the sensitivities of current experiments. The better CMB polarization data can be used to give a tighter constraint on the ERE and might be important for more precisely constraining cosmological parameters in the future.

  16. Large scale anisotropy of the 3K cosmic background radiation at 24.8, 31.4 and 46.0 GHZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, E. S.

    The 3K cosmic background radiation (CBR), believed to be the signature of the initial singularity in "big bang" cosmologies, is a fundamental tool for understanding the structure of the early universe. We describe here a measurement of the spatial anisotropy of this radiation at a sensitivity of 6 parts in 10 to the 5th. The observations were carried out in a balloon-borne package using three room temperature, correlation-type microwave radiometers, with 500 MHz bandwidths centered at 24,8,31.4 and 46.0 GHz. The achieved system noise temperatures for the three receivers is 800K. Three flights between August 1978 and July 1980 cover the entire Northern Hemisphere sky, allowing for tests of both dipole and higher order anisotropies.

  17. Gamma radiation induced background determination for (n,γ) measurements with 4π detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Reifarth, R.; Browne, J. C.; Esch, E. I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Kronenberg, A.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Greife, U.

    2003-07-29

    The main focus of this report is to investigate possibilities to disentangle the target originating γ- background from background caused by scattered neutrons at the sample assuming a DANCE like detector to measure detect the capture events.

  18. Does shared family background influence the impact of educational differences on early mortality?

    PubMed

    Søndergaard, Grethe; Mortensen, Laust H; Nybo Andersen, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Per Kragh; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Madsen, Mia; Osler, Merete

    2012-10-15

    The mechanisms behind social differences in mortality rates have been debated. The authors examined the extent to which shared family background and health in early life could explain the association between educational status and all-cause mortality rates using a sibling design. The study was register-based and included all individuals born in Denmark between 1950 and 1979 who had at least 1 full sibling born in the same time period (n = 1,381,436). All individuals were followed from 28 years of age until death, emigration, or December 2009. The authors used Cox regression analyses to estimate hazard ratios for mortality according to educational level. Conventional cohort and intersibling analyses were carried out and conducted separately for deaths occurring before and after the age of 45 years, respectively. The cohort analyses showed an inverse association between educational status and all-cause mortality that was strongest for males, increased with younger birth cohorts, and tended to be strongest in the analyses of death before 45 years of age. The associations were attenuated slightly in the intersibling analyses and after adjustment for serious health conditions in early life. Hence, health selection and confounding by factors shared by siblings explained only a minor part of the association between educational level and all-cause mortality.

  19. High-impedance NbSi TES sensors for studying the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nones, C.; Marnieros, S.; Benoit, A.; Bergé, L.; Bideaud, A.; Camus, P.; Dumoulin, L.; Monfardini, A.; Rigaut, O.

    2012-12-01

    Precise measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are crucial in cosmology because any proposed model of the universe must account for the features of this radiation. The CMB has a thermal blackbody spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K, i.e. the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9-mm wavelength. Of all CMB measurements that the scientific community has not yet been able to perform, the CMB B-mode polarization is probably the most challenging from the instrumental point of view. The signature of primordial gravitational waves, which give rise to a B-type polarization, is one of the goals in cosmology today and amongst the first objectives in the field. For this purpose, high-performance low-temperature bolometric cameras, made of thousands of pixels, are currently being developed by many groups, which will improve the sensitivity to B-mode CMB polarization by one or two orders of magnitude compared to the Planck satellite HFI detectors. We present here a new bolometer structure that is able to increase the pixel sensitivities and to simplify the fabrication procedure. This innovative device replaces delicate membrane-based structures and eliminates the mediation of phonons: the incoming energy is directly captured and measured in the electron bath of an appropriate sensor and the thermal decoupling is achieved via the intrinsic electron-phonon decoupling of the sensor at very low temperature. Reported results come from a 204-pixel array of NbxSi1-x transition edge sensors with a meander structure fabricated on a 2-inch silicon wafer using electron-beam co-evaporation and a cleanroom lithography process. To validate the application of this device to CMB measurements, we have performed an optical calibration of our sample in the focal plane of a dilution cryostat test bench. We have demonstrated a light absorption close to 20% and an optical noise equivalent power of about 7×10-16 W/√Hz, which is highly

  20. Changing universe model of the cosmic microwave background, early type galaxies, redshift, and discrete redshifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2005-04-01

    Developing the changing universe model (CUM) toward an alternate cosmological model provides motivation to investigate cosmological observations. The black body nature of the CMB is consistent with the CUM. Since the CUM posits the photons are quantized, positing quantum oscillators in the wall of the black body cavity is unnecessary. The CMB temperature and mass content of our universe is controlled by a feedback mechanism. If our universe is stable, the temperature of the CMB radiation should be 2.718 K. The CUM suggests the higher measured CMB temperature indicates an imbalance between energy injection and energy ejection rates of the Sources and Sinks. Several differences among galaxy types suggest that spiral galaxies are Sources and that early type and irregular galaxies are Sinks. The redshift calculation explored previously (SESAPS '04,session GD 15) is improved. Further, the CUM suggests the discrete variations in redshift, reported by W. G. Tifft, 1997, Astrophy. J. 485, 465 (and references therein) and confirmed by others, are consistent with the Sink's effect on redshift in clusters. Full text: http://web.infoave.net/ scjh.

  1. The proportion of childhood leukaemia incidence in Great Britain that may be caused by natural background ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Wakeford, R; Kendall, G M; Little, M P

    2009-04-01

    The aetiology of childhood leukaemia remains generally unknown, although exposure to moderate and high levels of ionizing radiation, such as those experienced during the atomic bombings of Japan or from radiotherapy, is an established cause. Risk models based primarily on studies of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors imply that low-level exposure to ionizing radiation, including ubiquitous natural background radiation, also raises the risk of childhood leukaemia. Using two sets of recently published leukaemia risk models and estimates of natural background radiation red-bone-marrow doses received by children, about 20% of the cases of childhood leukaemia in Great Britain are predicted to be attributable to this source. However, for one of these sets of risk models this attributable fraction is materially dependent on how the radiation-induced risk is assumed to be transferred between the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and Western children. Over a range of annual doses representing the range (0.5-2.5 mSv/year) experienced by most populations, the attributable proportion for the preferred risk-transfer model varies between 8 and 30%, with small deviations from a linear relationship that are largely due to the saturation of the model, although again this range of attributable fractions depends on the assumed transfer of risk between populations.

  2. Assessment of impact of urbanisation on background radiation exposure and human health risk estimation in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sanusi, M S M; Ramli, A T; Hassan, W M S W; Lee, M H; Izham, A; Said, M N; Wagiran, H; Heryanshah, A

    2017-07-01

    Kuala Lumpur has been undergoing rapid urbanisation process, mainly in infrastructure development. The opening of new township and residential in former tin mining areas, particularly in the heavy mineral- or tin-bearing alluvial soil in Kuala Lumpur, is a contentious subject in land-use regulation. Construction practices, i.e. reclamation and dredging in these areas are potential to enhance the radioactivity levels of soil and subsequently, increase the existing background gamma radiation levels. This situation is worsened with the utilisation of tin tailings as construction materials apart from unavoidable soil pollutions due to naturally occurring radioactive materials in construction materials, e.g. granitic aggregate, cement and red clay brick. This study was conducted to assess the urbanisation impacts on background gamma radiation in Kuala Lumpur. The study found that the mean value of measured dose rate was 251±6nGyh(-1) (156-392nGyh(-1)) and 4 times higher than the world average value. High radioactivity levels of (238)U (95±12Bqkg(-1)), (232)Th (191±23Bqkg(-1),) and (40)K (727±130Bqkg(-1)) in soil were identified as the major source of high radiation exposure. Based on statistical ANOVA, t-test, and analyses of cumulative probability distribution, this study has statistically verified the dose enhancements in the background radiation. The effective dose was estimated to be 0.31±0.01mSvy(-1) per man. The recommended ICRP reference level (1-20mSvy(-1)) is applicable to the involved existing exposure situation in this study. The estimated effective dose in this study is lower than the ICRP reference level and too low to cause deterministic radiation effects. Nevertheless based on estimations of lifetime radiation exposure risks, this study found that there was small probability for individual in Kuala Lumpur being diagnosed with cancer and dying of cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Real-Time Airborne Gamma-Ray Background Estimation Using NASVD with MLE and Radiation Transport for Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Jordan, David V.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Kernan, Warnick J.

    2015-06-01

    Helicopter-mounted gamma-ray detectors can provide law enforcement officials the means to quickly and accurately detect, identify, and locate radiological threats over a wide geographical area. The ability to accurately distinguish radiological threat-generated gamma-ray signatures from background gamma radiation in real time is essential in order to realize this potential. This problem is non-trivial, especially in urban environments for which the background may change very rapidly during flight. This exacerbates the challenge of estimating background due to the poor counting statistics inherent in real-time airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. To address this, we have developed a new technique for real-time estimation of background gamma radiation from aerial measurements. This method is built upon on the noise-adjusted singular value decomposition (NASVD) technique that was previously developed for estimating the potassium (K), uranium (U), and thorium (T) concentrations in soil post-flight. The method can be calibrated using K, U, and T spectra determined from radiation transport simulations along with basis functions, which may be determined empirically by applying maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) to previously measured airborne gamma-ray spectra. The method was applied to both measured and simulated airborne gamma-ray spectra, with and without man-made radiological source injections. Compared to schemes based on simple averaging, this technique was less sensitive to background contamination from the injected man-made sources and may be particularly useful when the gamma-ray background frequently changes during the course of the flight.

  4. Computational Assessment of Naturally Occurring Neutron and Photon Background Radiation Produced by Extraterrestrial Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Thomas Martin; de Wet, Wouter C.; Patton, Bruce W.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, a computational assessment of the variation in terrestrial neutron and photon background from extraterrestrial sources is presented. The motivation of this assessment is to evaluate the practicality of developing a tool or database to estimate background in real time (or near–real time) during an experimental measurement or to even predict the background for future measurements. The extraterrestrial source focused on during this assessment is naturally occurring galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). The MCNP6 transport code was used to perform the computational assessment. However, the GCR source available in MCNP6 was not used. Rather, models developed and maintained by NASA were used to generate the GCR sources. The largest variation in both neutron and photon background spectra was found to be caused by changes in elevation on Earth's surface, which can be as large as an order of magnitude. All other perturbations produced background variations on the order of a factor of 3 or less. The most interesting finding was that ~80% and 50% of terrestrial background neutrons and photons, respectively, are generated by interactions in Earth's surface and other naturally occurring and man-made objects near a detector of particles from extraterrestrial sources and their progeny created in Earth's atmosphere. In conclusion, this assessment shows that it will be difficult to estimate the terrestrial background from extraterrestrial sources without a good understanding of a detector's surroundings. Therefore, estimating or predicting background during a measurement environment like a mobile random search will be difficult.

  5. Ultraviolet radiation and the photobiology of earth's early oceans.

    PubMed

    Cockell, C S

    2000-10-01

    During the Archean era (3.9-2.5 Ga ago) the earth was dominated by an oceanic lithosphere. Thus, understanding how life arose and persisted in the Archean oceans constitutes a major challenge in understanding early life on earth. Using a radiative transfer model of the late Archean oceans, the photobiological environment of the photic zone and the surface microlayer is explored at the time before the formation of a significant ozone column. DNA damage rates might have been approximately three orders of magnitude higher in the surface layer of the Archean oceans than on the present-day oceans, but at 30 m depth, damage may have been similar to the surface of the present-day oceans. However at this depth the risk of being transported to surface waters in the mixed layer was high. The mixed layer may have been inhabited by a low diversity UV-resistant biota. But it could have been numerically abundant. Repair capabilities similar to Deinococcus radiodurans would be sufficient to survive in the mixed layer. Diversity may have been greater in the region below the mixed layer and above the light compensation point corresponding to today's 'deep chlorophyll maximum'. During much of the Archean the air-water interface was probably an uninhabitable extreme environment for neuston. The habitability of some regions of the photic zone is consistent with the evidence embodied in the geologic record, which suggests an oxygenated upper layer in the Archean oceans. During the early Proterozoic, as ozone concentrations increased to a column abundance above 1 x 10(17) cm-2, UV stress would have been reduced and possibly a greater diversity of organisms could have inhabited the mixed layer. However, nutrient upwelling from newly emergent continental crusts may have been more significant in increasing total planktonic abundance in the open oceans and coastal regions than photobiological factors. The phohobiological environment of the Archean oceans has implications for the potential

  6. Systems and methods for detecting nuclear radiation in the presence of backgrounds

    DOEpatents

    Bross, Alan D.; Mellott, Kerry L.; Pla-Dalmau, Anna

    2005-06-21

    Systems and methods for the simultaneous detection and identification of radiation species, including neutrons, gammas/x-rays and minimum ionizing particles (MIPs). A plurality of rectangular and/or triangularly shaped radiation sensitive scintillators can be configured from a plurality of nano-sized particles, dopants and an extruded plastic material. A wavelength-shifting fiber can then be located within a central hole of each extruded scintillator, wherein the wavelength-shifting fiber absorbs scintillation light and re-emits the light at a longer wavelength, thereby piping the light to a photodetector whose response to the light indicates the presence of radiation The resulting method and system can simultaneously detect neutrons, gamma rays, x-rays and cosmic rays (MIPs) and identify each.

  7. Hybrid radiation background monitoring in operational control and forecasting of environmental contamination by nuclear power station discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Ermeev, I.S.; Eremenko, V.A.; Makarov, Y.A.; Matueev, V.V.; Zhernov, V.S.

    1986-05-01

    Rapid developments in nuclear power have stimulated research on monitoring and forecasting environmental radiation pollution (ERP), and in particular the amounts, compositions, and distributions of radionuclides in the environment. A conceptual model is presented for hybrid environmental radiation pollution monitoring. When there is an emergency, the model operates in a fashion most closely corresponding to the actual meteorological conditions, and the ERP data given by the model enable one to distinguish changes due to the man-made component from random fluctuations in the natural background. The measurement system in general includes mobile and stationary data-acquisition facilities linked by wire or radio to the central point. The system also accumulates and stores data on the radiation environment, which are edited on the basis of radioactive, chemical, and other transformations. The purpose of hybrid monitoring is ultimately to analyze trends in order to detect elevated discharges and thus to output data to the regional monitoring system.

  8. Anisotropy and polarization of the microwave background radiation as a test of nonequilibrium ionization of the pregalactic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nasel'skii, P.D.; Polnarev, A.G.

    1987-11-01

    The formation of small-scale anisotropy and polarization in a model of nonstationary ionization of the pregalactic plasma is considered. It is shown that the ratio of the degree of polarization to the degree of anisotropy is rather insensitive to the actual regime of ionization and is 7-8%. However, the characteristic correlation angle is in the distribution of the anisotropy and polarization of the background radiation on the celestial sphere depends strongly on the parameters of the nonequilibrium.

  9. On unitary evolution of a massless scalar field in a Schwarzschild background: Hawking radiation and the information paradox

    SciTech Connect

    Melnikov, Kirill

    2002-08-08

    We develop a Hamiltonian formalism which can be used to discuss the physics of a massless scalar field in a gravitational background of a Schwarzschild black hole. Using this formalism we show that the time evolution of the system is unitary and yet all known results such as the existence of Hawking radiation can be readily understood. We then point out that the Hamiltonian formalism leads to interesting observations about black hole entropy and the information paradox.

  10. The Effects of Ionising Radiation on MEMS Silicon Strain Gauges: Preliminary Background and Methodology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    tuneable radar, structural health monitoring (corrosion and strain sensing) and power production . 2. Ionising Radiation Susceptibility of...materials this displacement damage affects the electronic energy states, which can give rise to several processes, including increased thermal ...are smaller and lighter than the current generation of detectors. The lower costs associated with mass- production of MEMS could also allow greater

  11. Federal Guidance Report No. 5: Background Material for the Development of Radiation Protection Standards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This report contains background material used in the development of guidance for Federal agencies in respect to planning protective actions to reduce potential doses from radioactive fission products to the population.

  12. Simulation of Radiation Backgrounds associated with the HEXRI Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Khater, H; Dauffy, L; Tommasini, R; Eckart, M; Eder, D

    2009-10-05

    Experiments resulting in a significant neutron yield are scheduled to start in 2010 at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A wide range of diagnostics will be used to measure several parameters of implosion such as the core and fuel shape, temperatures and densities, and neutron yield. Accurate evaluations of the neutron and gamma backgrounds are important for several diagnostics, such as the High Energy X-ray Imager (HEXRI). Several Monte-Carlo simulations were performed to identify the expected signal to background ratios at several potential locations for the HEXRI diagnostics. Gamma backgrounds were significantly reduced by using tungsten collimators. The collimators resulted in the reduction of the gamma background at the HEXRI scintillators by more than an order of magnitude during the first 40 ns following a THD shot.

  13. Computational Assessment of Naturally Occurring Neutron and Photon Background Radiation Produced by Extraterrestrial Sources

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Thomas Martin; de Wet, Wouter C.; Patton, Bruce W.

    2015-10-28

    In this study, a computational assessment of the variation in terrestrial neutron and photon background from extraterrestrial sources is presented. The motivation of this assessment is to evaluate the practicality of developing a tool or database to estimate background in real time (or near–real time) during an experimental measurement or to even predict the background for future measurements. The extraterrestrial source focused on during this assessment is naturally occurring galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). The MCNP6 transport code was used to perform the computational assessment. However, the GCR source available in MCNP6 was not used. Rather, models developed and maintained bymore » NASA were used to generate the GCR sources. The largest variation in both neutron and photon background spectra was found to be caused by changes in elevation on Earth's surface, which can be as large as an order of magnitude. All other perturbations produced background variations on the order of a factor of 3 or less. The most interesting finding was that ~80% and 50% of terrestrial background neutrons and photons, respectively, are generated by interactions in Earth's surface and other naturally occurring and man-made objects near a detector of particles from extraterrestrial sources and their progeny created in Earth's atmosphere. In conclusion, this assessment shows that it will be difficult to estimate the terrestrial background from extraterrestrial sources without a good understanding of a detector's surroundings. Therefore, estimating or predicting background during a measurement environment like a mobile random search will be difficult.« less

  14. The diffuse far-ultraviolet cosmic background radiation field observed from the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, J.; Henry, R. C.; Feldman, P. D.; Tennyson, P. D.

    1989-01-01

    The paper presents 17-A resolution spectra of the diffuse far-ultraviolet (1200-1700 A) cosmic background in eight regions of the sky obtained from the Johns Hopkins University UVX experiment aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-61C) in January 1986. A spectrally flat background is found with brightnesses between 100 and 700 + or - 200 photons/sq cm s sr A, with some evidence for spatial variations, but not for the high-intensity regions found by other experiments.

  15. The X-ray log N-log S relation. [background radiation in extragalactic media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boldt, Elihu

    1989-01-01

    Results from various surveys are reviewed as regards X-ray source counts at high galactic latitudes and the luminosity functions determined for extragalactic sources. Constraints on the associated log N-log S relation provided by the extragalactic X-ray background are emphasized in terms of its spatial fluctuations and spectrum as well as absolute flux level. The large number of sources required for this background suggests that there is not a sharp boundary in the redshift distribution of visible matter.

  16. Genetic background of enhanced radioresistance in an anhydrobiotic insect: transcriptional response to ionizing radiations and desiccation.

    PubMed

    Ryabova, Alina; Mukae, Kyosuke; Cherkasov, Alexander; Cornette, Richard; Shagimardanova, Elena; Sakashita, Tetsuya; Okuda, Takashi; Kikawada, Takahiro; Gusev, Oleg

    2017-01-01

    It is assumed that resistance to ionizing radiation, as well as cross-resistance to other abiotic stresses, is a side effect of the evolutionary-based adaptation of anhydrobiotic animals to dehydration stress. Larvae of Polypedilum vanderplanki can withstand prolonged desiccation as well as high doses of ionizing radiation exposure. For a further understanding of the mechanisms of cross-tolerance to both types of stress exposure, we profiled genome-wide mRNA expression patterns using microarray techniques on the chironomid larvae collected at different stages of desiccation and after exposure to two types of ionizing radiation-70 Gy of high-linear energy transfer (LET) ions ((4)He) and the same dose of low-LET radiation (gamma rays). In expression profiles, a wide transcriptional response to desiccation stress that much exceeded the amount of up-regulated transcripts to irradiation exposure was observed. An extensive group of coincidently up-regulated overlapped transcripts in response to desiccation and ionizing radiation was found. Among this, overlapped set of transcripts was indicated anhydrobiosis-related genes: antioxidants, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, and heat-shock proteins. The most overexpressed group was that of protein-L-isoaspartate/D-aspartate O-methyltransferase (PIMT), while probes, corresponding to LEA proteins, were the most represented. Performed functional analysis showed strongly enriched gene ontology terms associated with protein methylation. In addition, active processes of DNA repair were detected. We assume that the cross-tolerance of the sleeping chironomid to both desiccation and irradiation exposure comes from a complex mechanism of adaptation to anhydrobiosis.

  17. Effects of early visual experience on the background preference in juvenile cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yi-Hsin; Yan, Hong Young; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2012-01-01

    Although cuttlefish are capable of showing diverse camouflage body patterns against a variety of background substrates, whether they show background preference when given a choice of substrates is not well known. In this study, we characterized the background choice of post-embryonic cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis) and examined the effects of rearing visual environments on their background preferences. Different rearing backgrounds (enriched, uniformly grey and checkerboard) were used to raise cuttlefish from eggs or hatchlings, and four sets of two-background-choice experiments (differences in contrast, shape, size and side) were conducted at day 1 and weeks 4, 8 and 12 post-hatch. Cuttlefish reared in the enriched environment preferred high-contrast backgrounds at all post-embryonic stages. In comparison, those reared in the impoverished environments (uniformly grey and checkerboard) had either reversed or delayed high-contrast background preference. In addition, cuttlefish raised on the uniformly grey background, exposed to a checkerboard briefly (0.5 or 3 h) at week 4 and tested at week 8 showed increased high-contrast background preference. Interestingly, cuttlefish in the enriched group preferred an object size similar to their body size at day 1 and week 4, but changed this preference to smaller objects at week 12. These results suggest that high-contrast backgrounds may be more adaptive for juvenile cuttlefish, and visually enriched environments are important for the development of these background preference behaviours. PMID:22791707

  18. Effects of early visual experience on the background preference in juvenile cuttlefish Sepia pharaonis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hsin; Yan, Hong Young; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2012-10-23

    Although cuttlefish are capable of showing diverse camouflage body patterns against a variety of background substrates, whether they show background preference when given a choice of substrates is not well known. In this study, we characterized the background choice of post-embryonic cuttlefish (Sepia pharaonis) and examined the effects of rearing visual environments on their background preferences. Different rearing backgrounds (enriched, uniformly grey and checkerboard) were used to raise cuttlefish from eggs or hatchlings, and four sets of two-background-choice experiments (differences in contrast, shape, size and side) were conducted at day 1 and weeks 4, 8 and 12 post-hatch. Cuttlefish reared in the enriched environment preferred high-contrast backgrounds at all post-embryonic stages. In comparison, those reared in the impoverished environments (uniformly grey and checkerboard) had either reversed or delayed high-contrast background preference. In addition, cuttlefish raised on the uniformly grey background, exposed to a checkerboard briefly (0.5 or 3 h) at week 4 and tested at week 8 showed increased high-contrast background preference. Interestingly, cuttlefish in the enriched group preferred an object size similar to their body size at day 1 and week 4, but changed this preference to smaller objects at week 12. These results suggest that high-contrast backgrounds may be more adaptive for juvenile cuttlefish, and visually enriched environments are important for the development of these background preference behaviours.

  19. Natural radionuclide and radiological assessment of building materials in high background radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Bavarnegin, Elham; Moghaddam, Masoud Vahabi; Fathabadi, Nasrin

    2013-01-01

    Building materials, collected from different sites in Ramsar, a northern coastal city in Iran, were analyzed for their natural radionuclide contents. The measurements were carried out using a high resolution high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer system. The activity concentration of 226Ra, 232Th, and 40K content varied from below the minimum detection limit up to 86,400 Bqkg-1, 187 Bqkg-1, and 1350 Bqkg-1, respectively. The radiological hazards incurred from the use of these building materials were estimated through various radiation hazard indices. The result of this survey shows that values obtained for some samples are more than the internationally accepted maximum limits and as such, the use of them as a building material pose significant radiation hazard to individuals. PMID:23776313

  20. Natural radionuclide and radiological assessment of building materials in high background radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran.

    PubMed

    Bavarnegin, Elham; Moghaddam, Masoud Vahabi; Fathabadi, Nasrin

    2013-04-01

    Building materials, collected from different sites in Ramsar, a northern coastal city in Iran, were analyzed for their natural radionuclide contents. The measurements were carried out using a high resolution high purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer system. The activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K content varied from below the minimum detection limit up to 86,400 Bqkg(-1), 187 Bqkg(-1), and 1350 Bqkg(-1), respectively. The radiological hazards incurred from the use of these building materials were estimated through various radiation hazard indices. The result of this survey shows that values obtained for some samples are more than the internationally accepted maximum limits and as such, the use of them as a building material pose significant radiation hazard to individuals.

  1. A radiation-hard, low-background multiplexer design for spacecraft imager applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staller, Craig; Ramirez, Luis; Niblack, Curtiss; Blessinger, Michael; Kleinhans, William

    1992-01-01

    A possible multiplexer design for the focal plane for the Cassini Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) is reviewed. The instrument's requirements for the multiplexed array are summarized. The VIMS instrument has a modest radiation-hardness requirement due to the trajectory and planetary environments in which the instrument will be required to operate. The total ionizing dose hardness requirement is a few tens of kilorads. A thin-gate oxide of a few hundred angstroms thickness is to be used. Field hardness is to be achieved by guard bands or hardened dielectric isolation. The design is argued to meet the low-noise and radiation-hardness required for imaging at Saturn. The design is versatile enough to provide double-correlated and double-uncorrelated sampling, which is accomplished in the signal processing electronics outside the focal plane.

  2. The modulating impact of illumination and background radiation on 8 Hz-induced infrasound effect on physicochemical properties of physiolagical solution.

    PubMed

    Baghdasaryan, Naira; Mikayelyan, Yerazik; Barseghyan, Sedrak; Dadasyan, Erna; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2012-12-01

    At present, when the level of background ionizing radiation is increasing in a number of world locations, the problem of the study of biological effect of high background radiation becomes one of the extremely important global problems in modern life sciences. The modern research in biophysics proved that water is a most essential target, through which the biological effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiations are realized. Therefore, there is no doubt about the strong dependency of non-ionizing radiation-induced effect on the level of background radiation. Findings have shown that illumination and background radiation have a strong modulation effect on infrasound-induced impacts on water physicochemical properties, which could also have appropriate effect on living organisms.

  3. Fluctuations in microwave background radiation due to secondary ionization of the intergalactic gas in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunyayev, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Secondary heating and ionization of the intergalactic gas at redshifts z approximately 10-30 could lead to the large optical depth of the Universe for Thomson scattering and could smooth the primordial fluctuations formed at z approximately 1500. It is shown that the gas motions connected with the large scale density perturbations at z approximately 10-15 must lead to the generation of secondary fluctuations of microwave background. The contribution of the rich clusters of galaxies and young galaxies to the fluctuations of microwave background is also estimated.

  4. Early corticosteroid administration in experimental radiation-induced heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, W.C.; Stryker, J.A.; Abt, A.A.; Chung, C.K.; Whitesell, L.; Zelis, R.

    1980-02-01

    The ability of dexamethasone (DEX) to reduce the severity of the late stage of radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) was assessed in 25 New Zealand white rabbits. Ten rabbits served as unirradiated controls (CONT). In Group A, seven rabbits received intravenous DEX prior to irradiation and every 24 hours for three consecutive days. DEX was not administered to the eight rabbits in Group B. At 100 days postirradiation, the severity of the late state was determined by microscopic examination (MICRO) for myocardial fibrosis and determination of myocardial hydroxyproline content (MHP). Myocardial fibrosis was evident in groups A (40%) and B (80%) while none was present in CONT by MICRO. One rabbit in Group B with no fibrosis by MICRO had abnormally increased MHP. MHP was significantly increased in Groups A and B, as compared to CONT (p < 0.01). In addition to less fibrosis by MICRO, Group A demonstrated a significant reduction of MHP when compared to Group B (p < 0.05). Determination of MHP may be superior to MICRO in the detection of the late stage of RIHD. Also, early DEX administration appears to reduce myocardial collagen content (fibrosis) in this experimental model.

  5. Triassic origin and early radiation of multicellular volvocine algae.

    PubMed

    Herron, Matthew D; Hackett, Jeremiah D; Aylward, Frank O; Michod, Richard E

    2009-03-03

    Evolutionary transitions in individuality (ETIs) underlie the watershed events in the history of life on Earth, including the origins of cells, eukaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi. Each of these events constitutes an increase in the level of complexity, as groups of individuals become individuals in their own right. Among the best-studied ETIs is the origin of multicellularity in the green alga Volvox, a model system for the evolution of multicellularity and cellular differentiation. Since its divergence from unicellular ancestors, Volvox has evolved into a highly integrated multicellular organism with cellular specialization, a complex developmental program, and a high degree of coordination among cells. Remarkably, all of these changes were previously thought to have occurred in the last 50-75 million years. Here we estimate divergence times using a multigene data set with multiple fossil calibrations and use these estimates to infer the times of developmental changes relevant to the evolution of multicellularity. Our results show that Volvox diverged from unicellular ancestors at least 200 million years ago. Two key innovations resulting from an early cycle of cooperation, conflict and conflict mediation led to a rapid integration and radiation of multicellular forms in this group. This is the only ETI for which a detailed timeline has been established, but multilevel selection theory predicts that similar changes must have occurred during other ETIs.

  6. First results of the COBE satellite measurement of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, G. F.; Aymon, J.; De Amici, G.; Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Gulkis, S.; Backus, C.; Galuk, K.; Jackson, P. D.; Keegstra, P.

    1991-01-01

    The concept and operation of the Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) instrument aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer satellite are reviewed, with emphasis on the software identification and subtraction of potential systematic effects. Preliminary results obtained from the first six months of DMR data are presented, and implications for cosmology are discussed.

  7. Methods for assessing background levels of radiation and radioactive materials in the environment around uranium mills

    SciTech Connect

    Wogman, N.A.; Silker, W.B.; Glissmeyer, J.A.; Endres, G.W.R.

    1980-04-01

    Techniques and costs for determining background levels and mill contributions to the environment are assessed. Three specific programs are identified for the determination of natural background and mill contributions to that background. Since the most significant radiological impact to man within 10 km of mill tailings occurs through airborne /sup 222/Rn and its daughters, their measurement is emphasized in the suggested procedures. The next major radiological impact from the mills occurs through airborne movement of particulates from the mill and its tailings piles. Thus, the more sophisticated measurement technologies presented include measurements of airborne radionuclide particulates, as well as methods to measure the dose from /sup 222/Rn and its daughters. The most expensive methods for assessing background levels of radioactive materials around uranium mills allow a determination of uranium, thorium, and radium in water, soil, and vegetation, as well as air. The methodologies are organized by their increasing capital and operating costs. The more expensive techniques provide a better evaluation of the mill contribution to the environment. There is no single universal technique that is applicable to all mills.

  8. Studies of Background Levels for the NIF Yield Diagnostics from Neutron and Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P; Eder, D; Moran, M; Landen, O; O'Brien, D; Hsing, W

    2007-08-27

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is nearing completion of construction and is preparing for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) with potentially significant yield in 2010. The design of a wide range of yield diagnostics in and outside the target-bay of the NIF must consider scattered background neutrons and neutron-induced gamma rays to measure neutrons and x-rays from target. The large and complex target chamber and facility make the calculation of scattered neutrons and gamma rays extremely challenging. The NIF was designed with shielded locations for many of the yield diagnostics including the neutron alcove and four diagnostic mezzanines. Accurate calculation of the background levels in these shielded locations requires advanced Monte Carlo techniques, e.g., variance reduction. Placement, size, and materials of collimators on the line of sight (LOS) through the shielding must be evaluated to trade off signal levels and unwanted backgrounds. The background at these locations is also affected by neutrons that pass through the laser beam tubes and scatter off of structures and walls in the switch yards. Detailed 3D Monte Carlo analyses are performed to determine neutron and gamma fluxes for some of the yield diagnostics.

  9. An ultraviolet-radiation-independent pathway to melanoma carcinogenesis in the red hair/fair skin background.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Devarati; Luo, Xi; Morgan, Ann; Wang, Jin; Hoang, Mai P; Lo, Jennifer; Guerrero, Candace R; Lennerz, Jochen K; Mihm, Martin C; Wargo, Jennifer A; Robinson, Kathleen C; Devi, Suprabha P; Vanover, Jillian C; D'Orazio, John A; McMahon, Martin; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Haigis, Kevin M; Haber, Daniel A; Wang, Yinsheng; Fisher, David E

    2012-11-15

    People with pale skin, red hair, freckles and an inability to tan--the 'red hair/fair skin' phenotype--are at highest risk of developing melanoma, compared to all other pigmentation types. Genetically, this phenotype is frequently the product of inactivating polymorphisms in the melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene. MC1R encodes a cyclic AMP-stimulating G-protein-coupled receptor that controls pigment production. Minimal receptor activity, as in red hair/fair skin polymorphisms, produces the red/yellow pheomelanin pigment, whereas increasing MC1R activity stimulates the production of black/brown eumelanin. Pheomelanin has weak shielding capacity against ultraviolet radiation relative to eumelanin, and has been shown to amplify ultraviolet-A-induced reactive oxygen species. Several observations, however, complicate the assumption that melanoma risk is completely ultraviolet-radiation-dependent. For example, unlike non-melanoma skin cancers, melanoma is not restricted to sun-exposed skin and ultraviolet radiation signature mutations are infrequently oncogenic drivers. Although linkage of melanoma risk to ultraviolet radiation exposure is beyond doubt, ultraviolet-radiation-independent events are likely to have a significant role. Here we introduce a conditional, melanocyte-targeted allele of the most common melanoma oncoprotein, BRAF(V600E), into mice carrying an inactivating mutation in the Mc1r gene (these mice have a phenotype analogous to red hair/fair skin humans). We observed a high incidence of invasive melanomas without providing additional gene aberrations or ultraviolet radiation exposure. To investigate the mechanism of ultraviolet-radiation-independent carcinogenesis, we introduced an albino allele, which ablates all pigment production on the Mc1r(e/e) background. Selective absence of pheomelanin synthesis was protective against melanoma development. In addition, normal Mc1r(e/e) mouse skin was found to have significantly greater oxidative DNA and lipid

  10. Sensitivity to Antibiotics of Bacteria Exposed to Gamma Radiation Emitted from Hot Soils of the High Background Radiation Areas of Ramsar, Northern Iran.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad; Zarei, Samira; Taheri, Mohammad; Tajbakhsh, Saeed; Mortazavi, Seyed Alireza; Ranjbar, Sahar; Momeni, Fatemeh; Masoomi, Samaneh; Ansari, Leila; Movahedi, Mohammad Mehdi; Taeb, Shahram; Zarei, Sina; Haghani, Masood

    2017-04-01

    Over the past several years our laboratories have investigated different aspects of the challenging issue of the alterations in bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics induced by physical stresses. To explore the bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics in samples of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium), Staphylococcus aureus, and Klebsiella pneumoniae after exposure to gamma radiation emitted from the soil samples taken from the high background radiation areas of Ramsar, northern Iran. Standard Kirby-Bauer test, which evaluates the size of the zone of inhibition as an indicator of the susceptibility of different bacteria to antibiotics, was used in this study. The maximum alteration of the diameter of inhibition zone was found for K. pneumoniae when tested for ciprofloxacin. In this case, the mean diameter of no growth zone in non-irradiated control samples of K. pneumoniae was 20.3 (SD 0.6) mm; it was 14.7 (SD 0.6) mm in irradiated samples. On the other hand, the minimum changes in the diameter of inhibition zone were found for S. typhimurium and S. aureus when these bacteria were tested for nitrofurantoin and cephalexin, respectively. Gamma rays were capable of making significant alterations in bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. It can be hypothesized that high levels of natural background radiation can induce adaptive phenomena that help microorganisms better cope with lethal effects of antibiotics.

  11. A balloon borne maser measurement of the anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fixsen, D. J.

    A 24.6 GHz maser served as a low noise front end amplifier for the radiometer. The system noise temperature was 33 K and the bandwidth was 300 MHz. Effects of low frequency drifts were reduced by switching between two horns and by rotating the gondola. A model of galactic radiation was subtracted from the antenna temperature distribution, and the remainder was fit to dipole and quadrupole distributions. The parameters obtained for the dipole distribution are: Tx = 2.9 + or - .13 Ty = .84 + or - .07, Tz = .40 + or - .06 mK antenna temperature, in celestial coordinates. No significant quadrupole was found, but an upper limit of .13 mK was placed on the rms value of a quadrupole distribution. The results are consistent with a model in which the sun is moving 353 + or - 15 km/s towards 11.0 + or - .15 hours right ascension, -7 deg + or - 2 deg declination, in uniform 2.7 K blackbody radiation.

  12. Small-scale primordial magnetic fields and anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jedamzik, Karsten; Abel, Tom E-mail: tabel@slac.stanford.edu

    2013-10-01

    It is shown that small-scale magnetic fields present before recombination induce baryonic density inhomogeneities of appreciable magnitude. The presence of such inhomogeneities changes the ionization history of the Universe, which in turn decreases the angular scale of the Doppler peaks and increases Silk damping by photon diffusion. This unique signature could be used to (dis)prove the existence of primordial magnetic fields of strength as small as B ≅ 10{sup −11} Gauss by cosmic microwave background observations.

  13. Measuring the stochastic gravitational-radiation background with laser-interferometric antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Nelson

    1992-12-01

    A study of the method of detecting a stochastic gravitation-wave background (SGWB) with laser-interferometric gravitational-wave antennas is presented. The SGWB can be measured by correlating the output of two or more detectors. The results in this paper can be applied to the planned new generation of kilometer length interferometers, such as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) in the United States, or similar systems in other countries. Advanced detectors will be able to limit the gravity-wave background energy density per logarithmic interval at 100 Hz to 2×10-10 times the closure density of the Universe. A survey of potential sources indicates that a pair of antennas will be able to confirm or deny the existence of cosmic strings, or may detect the background produced by extragalactic neutron star binaries. Elements of the optimal interferometer design and orientation for detecting the SGWB, or any gravity wave, are given. In particular, the criteria for orienting a pair of antennas, the trade-off between sensitivity and bandwidth, and the effect of antenna separation on the correlation are presented. A procedure for obtaining the correlated signal from two interferometers is given. The statistical basis of the correlation experiment is presented. The cause and effect of correlated noise is examined. Filtering and data analysis issues are also discussed.

  14. An overview of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and its observations - New sky maps of the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, George F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the three instruments aboard NASA's Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite and presents early results obtained from the first six months of observations. The three instruments (FIRAS, DMR, and DIRBE) have operated well and produced significant new results. The FIRAS measurement of the CMB spectrum supports the standard Big Bang model. The maps made from the DMR instrument measurements show a spatially smooth early universe. The maps of galactic and zodiacal emission produced by the DIRBE instrument are needed to identify the foreground emissions from extragalactic and thus to interpret its and the other COBE results in terms of events in the early universe.

  15. TeV gamma rays from the blazar H 1426+428 and the diffuse extragalactic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonian, F.; Akhperjanian, A.; Barrio, J.; Beilicke, M.; Bernlöhr, K.; Börst, H.; Bojahr, H.; Bolz, O.; Contreras, J.; Cornils, R.; Cortina, J.; Denninghoff, S.; Fonseca, V.; Girma, M.; Gonzalez, J.; Götting, N.; Heinzelmann, G.; Hermann, G.; Heusler, A.; Hofmann, W.; Horns, D.; Jung, I.; Kankanyan, R.; Kestel, M.; Kettler, J.; Kohnle, A.; Konopelko, A.; Kornmeyer, H.; Kranich, D.; Krawczynski, H.; Lampeitl, H.; Lopez, M.; Lorenz, E.; Lucarelli, F.; Magnussen, N.; Mang, O.; Meyer, H.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Ona, E.; Padilla, L.; Panter, M.; Plaga, R.; Plyasheshnikov, A.; Pühlhofer, G.; Rauterberg, G.; Röhring, A.; Rhode, W.; Robrade, J.; Rowell, G.; Sahakian, V.; Samorski, M.; Schilling, M.; Schröder, F.; Sevilla, I.; Siems, M.; Stamm, W.; Tluczykont, M.; Völk, H. J.; Wiedner, C. A.; Wittek, W.

    2002-03-01

    The detection of TeV gamma -rays from the blazar H 1426+428 at an integral flux level of (4 +/- 2stat +/- 1syst) x 10-12 erg cm-2 s-1 above 1 TeV with the HEGRA imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope system is reported. H 1426+428 is located at a redshift of z = 0.129, which makes it the most distant source detected in TeV gamma -rays so far. The TeV radiation is expected to be strongly absorbed by the diffuse extragalactic background radiation (DEBRA). The observed energy spectrum of TeV photons is in good agreement with an intrinsic power law spectrum of the source ~ E-1.9 corrected for DEBRA absorption. Statistical errors as well as uncertainties about the intrinsic source spectrum, however, do not permit strong statements about the density of the DEBRA infrared photon field.

  16. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for inoperable early stage lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Robert; Paulus, Rebecca; Galvin, James; Michalski, Jeffrey; Straube, William; Bradley, Jeffrey; Fakiris, Achilles; Bezjak, Andrea; Videtic, Gregory; Johnstone, David; Fowler, Jack; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2010-03-17

    Patients with early stage but medically inoperable lung cancer have a poor rate of primary tumor control (30%-40%) and a high rate of mortality (3-year survival, 20%-35%) with current management. To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy in a high-risk population of patients with early stage but medically inoperable lung cancer. Phase 2 North American multicenter study of patients aged 18 years or older with biopsy-proven peripheral T1-T2N0M0 non-small cell tumors (measuring <5 cm in diameter) and medical conditions precluding surgical treatment. The prescription dose was 18 Gy per fraction x 3 fractions (54 Gy total) with entire treatment lasting between 1(1/2) and 2 weeks. The study opened May 26, 2004, and closed October 13, 2006; data were analyzed through August 31, 2009. The primary end point was 2-year actuarial primary tumor control; secondary end points were disease-free survival (ie, primary tumor, involved lobe, regional, and disseminated recurrence), treatment-related toxicity, and overall survival. A total of 59 patients accrued, of which 55 were evaluable (44 patients with T1 tumors and 11 patients with T2 tumors) with a median follow-up of 34.4 months (range, 4.8-49.9 months). Only 1 patient had a primary tumor failure; the estimated 3-year primary tumor control rate was 97.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 84.3%-99.7%). Three patients had recurrence within the involved lobe; the 3-year primary tumor and involved lobe (local) control rate was 90.6% (95% CI, 76.0%-96.5%). Two patients experienced regional failure; the local-regional control rate was 87.2% (95% CI, 71.0%-94.7%). Eleven patients experienced disseminated recurrence; the 3-year rate of disseminated failure was 22.1% (95% CI, 12.3%-37.8%). The rates for disease-free survival and overall survival at 3 years were 48.3% (95% CI, 34.4%-60.8%) and 55.8% (95% CI, 41.6%-67.9%), respectively. The median overall survival was 48.1 months (95% CI, 29.6 months to not

  17. Probing the cosmic x-ray and MeV gamma ray background radiation through the anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Murase, Kohta; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Uchiyama, Yasunobu

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve a sensitivity better than 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV—although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors—angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  18. Probing the Cosmic X-Ray and MeV Gamma-Ray Background Radiation through the Anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Murase, Kohta; Madejski, Grzegorz M.; Uchiyama, Yasunobu

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once the future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve the sensitivity better than 10-12 erg/cm2/s-1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV - although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors - angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  19. Solar modulation of the neutron component of the radiation background observed simultaneously in different space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, Maxim; Mitrofanov, Igor; Nuzhdin, Igor; Sanin, Anton; Fedosov, Fedor; Golovin, Dmitry

    2016-04-01

    We have studied variability of neutron component of radiation environment at Earth, Moon and Mars vicinities over a long period of time produced by the solar modulation of the GCR flux in the 23rd and 24th solar cycles. The global behavior of the neutron flux is in relatively good agreement with different observations performed simultaneously onboard various space missions, including instruments HEND onboard Mars Odyssey orbiter, BTN onboard International Space Station and LEND onboard Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter as well as with the modeled behavior of the GCR flux derived from a global network of neutron monitors on the Earth. The local differences in the time history and character of different observations have been also evaluated. The joint analysis of different data sets, where some of them are gathered far away from the Earth, reveals a multi-dimensional view and new patterns of the solar modulation of GCRs within current unusual solar cycle.

  20. A Mentor Training Program Improves Mentoring Competency for Researchers Working with Early-Career Investigators from Underrepresented Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mallory O.; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective…

  1. A Mentor Training Program Improves Mentoring Competency for Researchers Working with Early-Career Investigators from Underrepresented Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mallory O.; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective…

  2. Background Information for Think Tank on Planning, Governance and System Building Early Care and Education--NYC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boressoff, Todd

    2008-01-01

    This document provides some background on early childhood planning and system building around the country. Since mid-December, the author has been studying these efforts for Child Care, Inc. (CCI) interviewing national experts and reading widely. This outline provides insights and lesson learned from those inquiries. The goal at this meeting will…

  3. Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Only Intraoperative Electron Radiation Therapy in Early Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Maluta, Sergio; Dall'Oglio, Stefano; Marciai, Nadia; Gabbani, Milena; Franchini, Zeno; Pietrarota, Paolo; Meliado, Gabriele; Guariglia, Stefania; Cavedon, Carlo

    2012-10-01

    Background: We report the results of a single-institution, phase II trial of accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using a single dose of intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) in patients with low-risk early stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 226 patients with low-risk, early stage breast cancer were treated with local excision and axillary management (sentinel node biopsy with or without axillary node dissection). After the surgeon temporarily reapproximated the excision cavity, a dose of 21 Gy using IOERT was delivered to the tumor bed, with a margin of 2 cm laterally. Results: With a mean follow-up of 46 months (range, 28-63 months), only 1 case of local recurrence was reported. The observed toxicity was considered acceptable. Conclusions: APBI using a single dose of IOERT can be delivered safely in women with early, low-risk breast cancer in carefully selected patients. A longer follow-up is needed to ascertain its efficacy compared to that of the current standard treatment of whole-breast irradiation.

  4. Risk of Fatal Cerebrovascular Accidents after External Beam Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Glottic Larynx Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Lin, Alexander; Ahn, Peter; Wan, Fei; O’Malley, Bert; Weinstein, Gregory S.; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    Background This study compared the risk of fatal cerebrovascular accidents (CVA) in patients with early stage glottic larynx cancer receiving surgery or external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials Using a competing risks survival analysis, we compared the risk of death due to CVA among patients with early stage glottic larynx cancer receiving surgery or EBRT in the SEER database. Results The cumulative incidence of fatal CVA at 15 years was higher in patients receiving EBRT (2.8 %; 95% CI 2.3%–3.4%) compared to surgery (1.5 %; 95% CI 0.8 %–2.3%, p= 0.024). In multivariable competing risks regression models, EBRT remained associated with an increased risk of fatal CVA compared to surgery (adjusted HR 1.75; 95% CI 1.04–2.96, p= 0.037). Conclusion Treatment of early stage glottic larynx cancer with EBRT was associated with a small increase in the risk of late fatal CVA events relative to surgery. PMID:23595858

  5. The Temperature of the Cosmic Background Radiation: Results fromthe 1987 and 1988 Measurements at 3.8 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    De Amici, Giovanni; Bensadoun, M.; Bersanelli, M.; Kogut, A.; Levine, S.; Smoot, George F.; Witebsky, C.

    1989-11-10

    We have measured the temperature of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at a frequency of 3.8 GHz (7.9 cm wavelength), during two consecutive summers, obtaining a brightness temperature, T{sub CBR}, of 2.56 {+-} 0.08 K in 1987 and 2.71 {+-} 0.07 K in 1988 (68% confidence level). The new results are in agreement with our previous measurement at 3.7 GHz obtained in 1986, and have smaller error bars. Combining measurements from all three years we obtain T{sub CBR} = 2.64 {+-} 0.07 K.

  6. Consequences of a possible violation of the Strong Equivalence Principle. I. Statistical Physics, Thermodynamics and the Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serna, A.

    1996-06-01

    We analyze the consequences of a possible (scale-covariant) violation of the Strong Equivalence Principle on the basic expressions of statistical physics and thermodynamics. To this end, we use the kinetic theory generalized to a Weyl geometry, developed by Dominguez-Tenreiro and Serna (1990). We find that, although the entropy per particle is constant, the universe expansion is not adiabatic in this framework. However, it is possible to define a quantity with dimensions of entropy that is, instead, conserevd during the universe expansion. We also show that the obtained generalized equations are compatible with some observational results as, for example, the cosmic background radiation

  7. The absolute temperature of the sky and the temperature of the cosmic background radiation at 600 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, G.; Limon, M.; Marcellino, G.; Bonelli, G.; Bersanelli, M. CNR, Istituto di Fisica Cosmica e Tecnologie Relative, Milan )

    1990-07-01

    The absolute temperature of the sky at delta = 46.5 deg has been measured at 600 MHz (50 cm wavelength) using a differential radiometer and a cold calibrator at liquid helium temperature. To separate the cosmic background radiation (CBR) from the remaining components of the sky temperature, observations at other frequencies, now under way, are necessary. A preliminary estimate of the CBR temperature at 600 MHz made using data of T(sky) at 600 MHz and maps of the sky at 408 MHz already in the literature gives T(cbr) = (3.0 + or - 1.2) K, in good agreement with previous measurements at nearby frequencies. 45 refs.

  8. Time Domain Analysis of ARIANNA Data Acquisition: Distinguishing Askaryan Radiation from Thermal Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Jordan

    2014-03-01

    The Antarctica Ross Ice Shelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) is a high energy astrophysical neutrino detector, currently under construction near McMurdo Station, Antarctica. The ARIANNA detector design is optimized for detection of Askaryan radio frequency pulses, created in the ice shelf above the Antarctic ocean, that originate from cosmogenic GZK neutrino interactions. A formal analysis of the electromagnetic properties of the ARIANNA detection chain in the time domain is presented, and combined with a theoretical understanding of the Askaryan signal. This combination produces signal templates, used to distinguish thermal backgrounds from true signal in the current ARIANNA data. The results of this data analysis are also presented.

  9. Entanglement of particles as a result of their coupling through the common background zero-point radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Peña, L.; Valdés-Hernández, A.; Cetto, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is intended to disclose a possible physical mechanism underlying entanglement, by allowing an (otherwise classical) system of two non-interacting particles to interact with the stochastic background zero-point radiation field. The present analysis is made in the framework of linear stochastic electrodynamics (LSED), a theory that has been shown to recover the corresponding matrix formulation of quantum mechanics when applied to a one-particle (or atomic) system. We start by briefly recalling the basic elements of LSED and then extend the theory to consider the system formed of two particles. It is found that when both particles resonate to at least one common frequency of the background field, a new class of non-factorizable states emerge that correspond just to the entangled states of quantum mechanics. In the particular case of two equal particles the ensuing states are those of maximum entanglement.

  10. Reduction of radioactive backgrounds in electroformed copper for ultra-sensitive radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, E. W.; Aalseth, C. E.; Farmer, O. T.; Hossbach, T. W.; Liezers, M.; Miley, H. S.; Overman, N. R.; Reeves, J. H.

    2014-11-01

    Ultra-pure construction materials are required for the next generation of neutrino physics, dark matter and environmental science applications. These materials are also important for use in high-purity germanium spectrometers used in screening materials for radiopurity. The next-generation science applications require materials with radiopurity levels at or below 1 μBq/kg 232Th and 238U. Yet radiometric analysis lacks sensitivity below 10 μBq/kg for the U and Th decay chains. This limits both the selection of clean materials and the validation of purification processes. Copper is an important high-purity material for low-background experiments due to the ease with which it can be purified by electrochemical methods. Electroplating for purification into near-final shapes, known as electroforming, is one such method. Continued refinement of the copper electroforming process is underway, for the first time guided by an ICP-MS based assay method that can measure 232Th and 238U near the desired purity levels. An assay of electroformed copper at a μBq/kg level has been achieved and is described. The implications of electroformed copper at or better than this purity on next-generation low-background experiments are discussed.

  11. Reduction of Radioactive Backgrounds in Electroformed Copper for Ultra-Sensitive Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Aalseth, Craig E.; Farmer, Orville T.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Liezers, Martin; Miley, Harry S.; Overman, Nicole R.; Reeves, James H.

    2014-07-07

    Abstract Ultra-pure construction materials are required for the next generation of neutrino physics, dark matter and environmental science applications. These new efforts require materials with purity levels at or below 1 uBq/kg 232Th and 238U. Yet radiometric analysis lacks sensitivity below ~10 uBq/kg for the U and Th decay chains. This limits both the selection of clean materials and the validation of purification processes. Copper is an important high-purity material for low-background experiments due to the ease with which it can be purified by electrochemical methods. Electroplating for purification into near-final shapes, known as electroforming, is one such method. Continued refinement of the copper electroforming process is underway, for the first time guided by an ICP-MS based assay method that can measure 232Th and 238U near the desired purity levels. An assay of electroformed copper at 10 uBq/kg for 232Th has been achieved and is described. The implications of electroformed copper at or better than this purity on next-generation low-background experiments are discussed.

  12. The cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic neutrino background is expected to consist of relic neutrinos from the big bang, of neutrinos produced during nuclear burning in stars, of neutrinos released by gravitational stellar collapse, and of neutrinos produced by cosmic ray interactions with matter and radiation in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. Formation of baryonic dark matter in the early universe, matter-antimatter annihilation in a baryonic symmetric universe, and dark matter annihilation could have also contributed significantly to the cosmic neutrino background. The purpose of this paper is to review the properties of these cosmic neutrino backgrounds, the indirect evidence for their existence, and the prospects for their detection.

  13. Background Radiation Survey of the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Center

    SciTech Connect

    Colin Okada

    2010-09-16

    In preparation for operations at the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC), the Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DHS/DNDO) requested that personnel from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) conduct a survey of the present radiological conditions at the facility. The measurements consist of the exposure rate from a high-pressure ion chamber (HPIC), high-resolution spectra from a high-purity germanium (HPGe) system in an in situ configuration, and low-resolution spectra from a sodium iodide (NaI) detector in a radiation detection backpack. Measurements with these systems were collected at discrete locations within the facility. Measurements were also collected by carrying the VECTOR backpack throughout the complex to generate a map of the entire area. The area was also to be surveyed with the Kiwi (an array of eight-2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch NaI detectors) from the Aerial Measuring Systems; however, conflicts with test preparation activities at the site prevented this from being accomplished.

  14. Interpretation of the cosmic microwave background radiation anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, E. L.; Meyer, S. S.; Bennett, C. L.; Boggess, N. W.; Cheng, E. S.; Hauser, M. G.; Kogut, A.; Lineweaver, C.; Mather, J. C.; Smoot, G. F.

    1992-01-01

    The large-scale cosmic background anisotropy detected by the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument is compared to the sensitive previous measurements on various angular scales, and to the predictions of a wide variety of models of structure formation driven by gravitational instability. The observed anisotropy is consistent with all previously measured upper limits and with a number of dynamical models of structure formation. For example, the data agree with an unbiased cold dark matter (CDM) model with H0 = 50 km/s Mpc and Delta-M/M = 1 in a 16 Mpc radius sphere. Other models, such as CDM plus massive neutrinos (hot dark matter (HDM)), or CDM with a nonzero cosmological constant are also consistent with the COBE detection and can provide the extra power seen on 5-10,000 km/s scales.

  15. Information geometry with correlated data: Bayesian explorations of cosmological predictions for the microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Katherine; de Bernardis, Francesco; Niemack, Michael; Sethna, James

    We developed a new, generalized fitting algorithm for miltiparameter models which incorporates varying and correlated errors. This was combined with geometrical methods of sampling to explore model prediction space, notably to plot geodesics and determine the size and edges of the model manifold. We illustrate this using the microwave background spectra for all possible universes, as described by the standard Λ-cold dark matter (Λ-CDM) cosmological model. In this case, the predicted data are fluctuations and highly correlated with varying errors, resulting in a manifold with a varying metric (as the natural metric to use is given by the Fisher information matrix). Furthermore, the model manifold shares the hyperribbon structure seen in other models, with the edges forming a strongly distorted image of a hypercube. Practical applications of such an analysis include optimizing experimental instrumentation designed to test more detailed cosmological theories. Funding supported in part by NSERC.

  16. Isotropic blackbody cosmic microwave background radiation as evidence for a homogeneous universe.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Timothy; Clarkson, Chris; Bull, Philip

    2012-08-03

    The question of whether the Universe is spatially homogeneous and isotropic on the largest scales is of fundamental importance to cosmology but has not yet been answered decisively. Surprisingly, neither an isotropic primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) nor combined observations of luminosity distances and galaxy number counts are sufficient to establish such a result. The inclusion of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in CMB observations, however, dramatically improves this situation. We show that even a solitary observer who sees an isotropic blackbody CMB can conclude that the Universe is homogeneous and isotropic in their causal past when the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect is present. Critically, however, the CMB must either be viewed for an extended period of time, or CMB photons that have scattered more than once must be detected. This result provides a theoretical underpinning for testing the cosmological principle with observations of the CMB alone.

  17. Early mechanisms in radiation-induced biological damage

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    An introduction to the mechanisms of radiation action in biological systems is presented. Several questions about the nature of the radiation damage process are discussed, including recognition of the oxygen effects, dose-response relationships, and the importance of the hydroxyl radical. (ACR)

  18. Measurements of the anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation and diffuse galactic emission at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Mark; Benford, Richard; Meyer, Stephan; Muehlner, Dirk; Weiss, Rainer

    1988-09-01

    The authors report the results of a balloon-borne observing program to measure the large angular scale brightness distribution of the 2.7K cosmic background radiation (CBR) at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths. It is found that the dipole moment anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation has the spectrum expected of a Doppler-shifted blackbody out to 3 times the frequency of peak intensity. A reliable estimate of the brightness of the dipole moment is obtained by averaging the best modern data under the assumption that the CBR has a Planckian spectrum with TCBR= 2.74K. The result is that ΔTdipole= 3.29±0.11 mK corresponding to a velocity of 360±12 km s-1 towards R.A. = 11h.13±0h.04, δ = -7°.7±0°.55. The present data are not consistent with a reported short-wavelength rise in the brightness of the CBR. Diffuse Galactic emission is seen to have a complicated spectrum and its shape depends on the wavelength of observation. The authors have found an extended source which runs parallel to the Galactic plane at b = 20° from l = 40° to l = 110° with a brightness of 3mK. Observations and upper limits at various frequencies are consistent with this source being a thermal emitter at a temperature of 6K.

  19. The interaction of natural background gamma radiation with depleted uranium micro-particles in the human body.

    PubMed

    Pattison, John E

    2013-03-01

    In this study, some characteristics of the photo-electrons produced when natural background gamma radiation interacts with micron-sized depleted uranium (DU) particles in the human body have been estimated using Monte Carlo simulations. In addition, an estimate has been made of the likelihood of radiological health effects occurring due to such an exposure. Upon exposure to naturally occurring background gamma radiation, DU particles in the body will produce an enhancement of the dose to the tissue in the immediate vicinity of the particles due to the photo-electric absorption of the radiation in the particle. In this study, the photo-electrons produced by a 10 μm-size particle embedded in tissue at the centre of the human torso have been investigated. The mean energies of the photo-electrons in the DU particle and in the two consecutive immediately surrounding 2 μm-wide tissue shells around the particle were found to be 38, 49 and 50 keV, respectively, with corresponding ranges of 1.3, 38 and 39 μm, respectively. The total photo-electron fluence-rates in the two consecutive 2 μm-wide tissue layers were found to be 14% and 7% of the fluence-rate in the DU particle, respectively. The estimated dose enhancement due to one 10 μm-sized DU particle in 1 cm(3) of tissue was less than 2 in 10 million of the dose received by the tissue without a particle being present. The increase in risk of death from cancer due to this effect is consequently insignificant.

  20. Peak-peak correlations in the cosmic background radiation from cosmic strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, M. Sadegh; Javanmardi, B.; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2013-10-01

    We examine the two-point correlation function of local maxima in temperature fluctuations at the last scattering surface when this stochastic field is modified by the additional fluctuations produced by straight cosmic strings via the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We demonstrate that one can detect the imprint of cosmic strings with tension Gμ ≳ 1.2 × 10-8 on noiseless 1 arcmin resolution cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps at 95 per cent confidence interval. Including the effects of foregrounds and anticipated systematic errors increases the lower bound to Gμ ≳ 9.0 × 10-8 at 2σ confidence level. Smearing by beams of the order of 4 arcmin degrades the bound further to Gμ ≳ 1.6 × 10-7. Our results indicate that two-point statistics are more powerful than one-point statistics (e.g. number counts) for identifying the non-Gaussianity in the CMB due to straight cosmic strings.

  1. Constraints on AGN feedback from its Sunyaev-Zel'dovich imprint on the cosmic background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soergel, Bjoern; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Efstathiou, George; Puchwein, Ewald; Sijacki, Debora

    2017-06-01

    We derive constraints on feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGN) by setting limits on their thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) imprint on the cosmic microwave background. The amplitude of any SZ signature is small and degenerate with the poorly known sub-mm spectral energy distribution of the AGN host galaxy and other unresolved dusty sources along the line of sight. Here we break this degeneracy by combining microwave and sub-mm data from Planck with all-sky far-infrared maps from the AKARI satellite. We first test our measurement pipeline using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) redMaPPer catalogue of galaxy clusters, finding a highly significant detection (>20σ) of the SZ effect together with correlated dust emission. We then constrain the SZ signal associated with spectroscopically confirmed quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) from SDSS data release 7 (DR7) and the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) DR12. We obtain a low-significance (1.6σ) hint of an SZ signal, pointing towards a mean thermal energy of ≃5 × 1060 erg, lower than reported in some previous studies. A comparison of our results with high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations including AGN feedback suggests QSO host masses of M200c ˜ 4 × 1012 h-1 M⊙, but with a large uncertainty. Our analysis provides no conclusive evidence for an SZ signal specifically associated with AGN feedback.

  2. A possible cold imprint of voids on the microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Cole, Shaun; Frenk, Carlos S.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szapudi, István

    2014-05-10

    We measure the average temperature decrement on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) produced by voids selected in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 spectroscopic redshift galaxy catalog, spanning redshifts 0 < z < 0.44. We find an imprint amplitude between 2.6 and 2.9 μK as viewed through a compensated top-hat filter scaled to the radius of each void, we assess the statistical significance of the imprint at ∼2σ, and we make crucial use of N-body simulations to calibrate our analysis. As expected, we find that large voids produce cold spots on the CMB through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. However, we also find that small voids in the halo density field produce hot spots, because they reside in contracting, larger-scale overdense regions. This is an important effect to consider when stacking CMB imprints from voids of different radii. We have found that the same filter radius that gives the largest ISW signal in simulations also yields close to the largest detected signal in the observations. However, although it is low in significance, our measured signal has a much higher amplitude than expected from ISW in the concordance ΛCDM universe. The discrepancy is also at the ∼2σ level. We have demonstrated that our result is robust against the varying of thresholds over a wide range.

  3. Gravitational radiation from cosmic (super)strings: Bursts, stochastic background, and observational windows

    SciTech Connect

    Damour, Thibault; Vilenkin, Alexander

    2005-03-15

    The gravitational wave (GW) signals emitted by a network of cosmic strings are reexamined in view of the possible formation of a network of cosmic superstrings at the end of brane inflation. The reconnection probability p of intersecting fundamental or Dirichlet strings might be much smaller than 1, and the properties of the resulting string network may differ significantly from those of ordinary strings (which have p=1). In addition, it has been recently suggested that the typical length of newly formed loops may differ by a factor {epsilon}<<1 from its standard estimate. Here, we analyze the effects of the two parameters p and {epsilon} on the GW signatures of strings. We consider both the GW bursts emitted from cusps of oscillating string loops, which have been suggested as candidate sources for the LIGO/VIRGO and LISA interferometers, and the stochastic GW background, which may be detectable by pulsar-timing observations. In both cases we find that previously obtained results are quite robust, at least when the loop sizes are not suppressed by many orders of magnitude relative to the standard scenario. We urge pulsar observers to reanalyze a recently obtained 17-yr combined data set to see whether the large scatter exhibited by a fraction of the data might be due to a transient GW burst activity of some sort, e.g., to a near cusp event.

  4. Late Effects May Not Warrant Using Radiation to Treat Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma who were treated with multidrug chemotherapy alone were more likely to be alive 12 years later than patients who received treatment that included radiation therapy, according to findings from a clinical trial.

  5. Late Effects May Not Warrant Using Radiation to Treat Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma who were treated with multidrug chemotherapy alone were more likely to be alive 12 years later than patients who received treatment that included radiation therapy, according to findings from a clinical trial.

  6. The Sail-Backed Reptile Ctenosauriscus from the Latest Early Triassic of Germany and the Timing and Biogeography of the Early Archosaur Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Richard J.; Brusatte, Stephen L.; Reich, Mike; Nesbitt, Sterling J.; Schoch, Rainer R.; Hornung, Jahn J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Archosaurs (birds, crocodilians and their extinct relatives including dinosaurs) dominated Mesozoic continental ecosystems from the Late Triassic onwards, and still form a major component of modern ecosystems (>10,000 species). The earliest diverse archosaur faunal assemblages are known from the Middle Triassic (c. 244 Ma), implying that the archosaur radiation began in the Early Triassic (252.3–247.2 Ma). Understanding of this radiation is currently limited by the poor early fossil record of the group in terms of skeletal remains. Methodology/Principal Findings We redescribe the anatomy and stratigraphic position of the type specimen of Ctenosauriscus koeneni (Huene), a sail-backed reptile from the Early Triassic (late Olenekian) Solling Formation of northern Germany that potentially represents the oldest known archosaur. We critically discuss previous biomechanical work on the ‘sail’ of Ctenosauriscus, which is formed by a series of elongated neural spines. In addition, we describe Ctenosauriscus-like postcranial material from the earliest Middle Triassic (early Anisian) Röt Formation of Waldhaus, southwestern Germany. Finally, we review the spatial and temporal distribution of the earliest archosaur fossils and their implications for understanding the dynamics of the archosaur radiation. Conclusions/Significance Comprehensive numerical phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that both Ctenosauriscus and the Waldhaus taxon are members of a monophyletic grouping of poposauroid archosaurs, Ctenosauriscidae, characterised by greatly elongated neural spines in the posterior cervical to anterior caudal vertebrae. The earliest archosaurs, including Ctenosauriscus, appear in the body fossil record just prior to the Olenekian/Anisian boundary (c. 248 Ma), less than 5 million years after the Permian–Triassic mass extinction. These earliest archosaur assemblages are dominated by ctenosauriscids, which were broadly distributed across northern Pangea and which

  7. Re-Examining the Associations between Family Backgrounds and Children's Cognitive Developments in Early Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tu, Yu-Kang; Law, Graham R.

    2010-01-01

    A recent English study found that children from poor families who did well in cognitive tests at age three are expected to be overtaken in the cognitive test by the age of seven by children from rich families who did poorly in cognitive tests at age three. The conclusion was that family background seems to have a dominant influence on a child's…

  8. Re-Examining the Associations between Family Backgrounds and Children's Cognitive Developments in Early Ages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tu, Yu-Kang; Law, Graham R.

    2010-01-01

    A recent English study found that children from poor families who did well in cognitive tests at age three are expected to be overtaken in the cognitive test by the age of seven by children from rich families who did poorly in cognitive tests at age three. The conclusion was that family background seems to have a dominant influence on a child's…

  9. Effects of Teacher Educational Background and Experience on Student Achievement in the Early Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leak, James Alexander

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the relationship between teacher educational background, teacher experience, and student achievement in preschool, kindergarten, and first grade. The first essay of this dissertation, "Effects of Teacher Degree Level, Coursework, and Certification on Student Achievement in Math and Reading in Kindergarten,"…

  10. Decreasing Reading Differences in Children from Disadvantaged Backgrounds: The Effects of an Early Literacy Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagans, Kristi S.; Good, Roland H., III

    2013-01-01

    Children from low socioeconomic backgrounds (SES) are at increased risk of reading problems. Although phonological awareness consistently emerges as a critical literacy skill for children, little research exists regarding the effects of the acquisition of phonological awareness skills on decreasing the reading achievement gap between children of…

  11. Learning in Complex Environments: The Effects of Background Speech on Early Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Brianna T. M.; Saffran, Jenny R.

    2016-01-01

    Although most studies of language learning take place in quiet laboratory settings, everyday language learning occurs under noisy conditions. The current research investigated the effects of background speech on word learning. Both younger (22- to 24-month-olds; n = 40) and older (28- to 30-month-olds; n = 40) toddlers successfully learned novel…

  12. Learning in Complex Environments: The Effects of Background Speech on Early Word Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Brianna T. M.; Saffran, Jenny R.

    2016-01-01

    Although most studies of language learning take place in quiet laboratory settings, everyday language learning occurs under noisy conditions. The current research investigated the effects of background speech on word learning. Both younger (22- to 24-month-olds; n = 40) and older (28- to 30-month-olds; n = 40) toddlers successfully learned novel…

  13. Early Childhood Development and Social Integration: The Mediterranean Experience. A Background Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Oudenhoven, Nico; Wazir, Rekha

    This paper explores early childhood education (ECD) and social integration within a common framework and against the backdrop of experience gained in these fields in the following 12 Mediterranean nations: Algeria, Cyprus, Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Malta, Morocco, Palestine, Syrian Arab Republic, Tunisia, and Turkey. The paper notes that…

  14. The Need for the Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood: Background Research and Evaluation Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Social Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In FY 2009, the Children's Bureau funded the Center for the Study of Social Policy, in partnership with ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families, and the National Alliance of Children's Trust and Prevention Funds, to create a National Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood (QIC-EC) focused on child maltreatment…

  15. The cosmic background explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Gulkis, G. ); Lubin, P.M. ); Meyer, S.S. ); Silverberg, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Late last year the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched its first satellite dedicated to the study of phenomena related to the origins of the universe. The satellite, called the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), carries three complementary detectors that will make fundamental measurements of the celestial radiation. Part of that radiation is believed to have originated in processes that occurred at the very dawn of the universe. By measuring the remnant radiation at wavelengths from one micrometer to one centimeter across the entire sky, scientists hope to be able to solve many mysteries regarding the origin and evolution of the early universe. Unfortunately, these radiative relics of the early universe are weak and veiled by local astrophysical and terrestrial sources of radiation. The wavelengths of the various cosmic components may also overlap, thereby making the understanding of the diffuse celestial radiation a challenge. Nevertheless, the COBE instruments, with their full-sky coverage, high sensitivity to a wide range of wavelengths and freedom from interference from the earth's atmosphere, will constitute for astrophysicists an observatory of unprecedented sensitivity and scope. The interesting cosmic signals will then be separated from one another and from noncosmic radiation sources by a comprehensive analysis of the data.

  16. A common genetic background could explain early-onset Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Anna Monica; Zanin, Valentina; Girardelli, Martina; Magnolato, Andrea; Martelossi, Stefano; Martellossi, Stefano; Tommasini, Alberto; Marcuzzi, Annalisa; Crovella, Sergio

    2012-04-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a multifactorial disease, in which environmental, microbial and genetic factors play important roles. CD is characterized by a chronic granulomatous inflammation by necrotic scarring with aspects of full-thickness wall. In spite of affecting mainly young adults, sometimes, CD can be present in the first year of life (early onset Crohn disease, EOCD) showing an unpredictable course and being often more severe than at older ages. In this paper we propose the hypothesis that EOCD patients should be analyzed using a Mendelian approach with family studies aimed to identify new loci directly involved in the early onset Crohn's disease. So we will leave the classic association study approach used until now for the identification of genes responsible for susceptibility to CD and propose linkage family analysis as alternative and powerful tool for the identification of new genetic variants associated with familiar cases of EOCD.

  17. Sulodexide ameliorates early but not late kidney disease in models of radiation nephropathy and diabetic nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Rossini, Michele; Naito, Takashi; Yang, Haichun; Freeman, Michael; Donnert, Ellen; Ma, Li-Jun; Dunn, Stephen R.; Sharma, Kumar; Fogo, Agnes B.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Sulodexide is a glycosaminoglycan with anticoagulant and antithrombotic activities. Although sulodexide reduced albuminuria in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, long-term effects on chronic renal injury are not established. We investigated sulodexide effects and mechanisms in a rat radiation nephropathy model and in the db/db mouse model of diabetic kidney disease. Methods. Sprague–Dawley rats received kidney radiation and were treated as follows: 15 mg/kg/day sulodexide s.c., 6 day/week (SUL) or no treatment (CONT). Subsets of animals were sacrificed after 8 weeks and 12 weeks. Blood pressure, serum creatinine, creatinine clearance (CrCl) and urinary protein excretion were measured every 4 weeks. Sclerosis and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression were assessed at 8 and 12 weeks, and collagen I, total collagen content and phospho-smad-2 expressions were determined at 12 weeks. Twelve-week-old db/db mice received sulodexide as above or vehicle. Albuminuria and CrCl were assessed at intervals till sacrifice at week 9 with assessment of urinary transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and glomerular lesions. Results. Blood pressure, serum creatinine and CrCl were not different in radiation rat CONT vs SUL at any time. Proteinuria was significantly lower in SUL compared to CONT at 4 and 8 weeks but not at 12 weeks. Sclerosis and PAI-1 expression trended lower in SUL vs CONT at 8 weeks. There was no difference between the groups in sclerosis, collagen I mRNA, total collagen content or PAI-1 expression at 12 weeks. Phospho-smad 2 expression was significantly decreased in SUL compared to CONT at 12 weeks. Db/db mice with or without SUL showed no difference in urinary albumin/creatinine ratio, urine TGF-β or mesangial matrix expansion. Conclusions. Our data show that sulodexide can reduce the early, but not late, proteinuria in radiation nephropathy in rats. In addition, sulodexide did not affect urine TGF-β established albuminuria or

  18. RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN A CLUMPY UNIVERSE. IV. NEW SYNTHESIS MODELS OF THE COSMIC UV/X-RAY BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Haardt, Francesco; Madau, Piero E-mail: pmadau@ucolick.org

    2012-02-20

    We present improved synthesis models of the evolving spectrum of the UV/X-ray diffuse background, updating and extending our previous results. Five new main components are added to our radiative transfer code CUBA: (1) the sawtooth modulation of the background intensity from resonant line absorption in the Lyman series of cosmic hydrogen and helium; (2) the X-ray emission from the obscured and unobscured quasars that gives origin to the X-ray background; (3) a piecewise parameterization of the distribution in redshift and column density of intergalactic absorbers that fits recent measurements of the mean free path of 1 ryd photons; (4) an accurate treatment of the photoionization structure of absorbers, which enters in the calculation of the helium continuum opacity and recombination emissivity; and (5) the UV emission from star-forming galaxies at all redshifts. We provide tables of the predicted H I and He II photoionization and photoheating rates for use, e.g., in cosmological hydrodynamics simulations of the Ly{alpha} forest and a new metallicity-dependent calibration to the UV luminosity density-star formation rate density relation. A 'minimal cosmic reionization model' is also presented in which the galaxy UV emissivity traces recent determinations of the cosmic history of star formation, the luminosity-weighted escape fraction of hydrogen-ionizing radiation increases rapidly with look-back time, the clumping factor of the high-redshift intergalactic medium evolves following the results of hydrodynamic simulations, and Population III stars and miniquasars make a negligible contribution to the metagalactic flux. The model provides a good fit to the hydrogen-ionization rates inferred from flux decrement and proximity effect measurements, predicts that cosmological H II (He III) regions overlap at redshift 6.7 (2.8), and yields an optical depth to Thomson scattering, {tau}{sub es} = 0.084 that is in agreement with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results

  19. Radiative Transfer in a Clumpy Universe. IV. New Synthesis Models of the Cosmic UV/X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haardt, Francesco; Madau, Piero

    2012-02-01

    We present improved synthesis models of the evolving spectrum of the UV/X-ray diffuse background, updating and extending our previous results. Five new main components are added to our radiative transfer code CUBA: (1) the sawtooth modulation of the background intensity from resonant line absorption in the Lyman series of cosmic hydrogen and helium; (2) the X-ray emission from the obscured and unobscured quasars that gives origin to the X-ray background; (3) a piecewise parameterization of the distribution in redshift and column density of intergalactic absorbers that fits recent measurements of the mean free path of 1 ryd photons; (4) an accurate treatment of the photoionization structure of absorbers, which enters in the calculation of the helium continuum opacity and recombination emissivity; and (5) the UV emission from star-forming galaxies at all redshifts. We provide tables of the predicted H I and He II photoionization and photoheating rates for use, e.g., in cosmological hydrodynamics simulations of the Lyα forest and a new metallicity-dependent calibration to the UV luminosity density-star formation rate density relation. A "minimal cosmic reionization model" is also presented in which the galaxy UV emissivity traces recent determinations of the cosmic history of star formation, the luminosity-weighted escape fraction of hydrogen-ionizing radiation increases rapidly with look-back time, the clumping factor of the high-redshift intergalactic medium evolves following the results of hydrodynamic simulations, and Population III stars and miniquasars make a negligible contribution to the metagalactic flux. The model provides a good fit to the hydrogen-ionization rates inferred from flux decrement and proximity effect measurements, predicts that cosmological H II (He III) regions overlap at redshift 6.7 (2.8), and yields an optical depth to Thomson scattering, τes = 0.084 that is in agreement with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe results. Our new

  20. Differential proteome analysis of a selected bacterial strain isolated from a high background radiation area in response to radium stress.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Farideh; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Kardan, Mohammad Reza; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Ahmadian, Gholamreza; Masoumi, Fatemeh; Sharafi, Hakimeh; Rigi, Garshasb; Vali, Hojatollah; Akbari Noghabi, Kambiz

    2012-08-03

    The present study describes the response of a bacterial strain, isolated from a hot spring in an area with the highest levels of natural radiation, under radium ((226)Ra) stress. The bacterium has been characterized as a novel and efficient radium biosorbent and identified as a variant of Serratia marcescens by biochemical tests and molecular recognition. In order to gain insights into key cellular events that allow this strain to survive and undergo (226)Ra adaptation and biosorption, the strain was tested under two experimental conditions of 1000 and 6000 Bq (226)Ra stress. A proteomic approach involving two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins under (226)Ra stress. Functional assessment of identified proteins with significantly altered expression levels revealed several mechanisms thought to be involved in (226)Ra adaptation and conferring resistant phenotype to the isolate, including general stress adaptation, anti-oxidative stress, protein and nucleic acid synthesis, energy metabolism, efflux and transport proteins. It suggests that this strain through evolution is particularly well adapted to the high background radiation environment and could represent an alternative source to remove (226)Ra from such areas as well as industrial radionuclide polluted wastewaters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Serum microRNAs are early indicators of survival after radiation-induced hematopoietic injury

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Sanket S.; Fendler, Wojciech; Watson, Jacqueline; Hamilton, Abigail; Pan, Yunfeng; Gaudiano, Emily; Moskwa, Patryk; Bhanja, Payel; Saha, Subhrajit; Guha, Chandan; Parmar, Kalindi; Chowdhury, Dipanjan

    2015-01-01

    Accidental radiation exposure is a threat to human health that necessitates effective clinical planning and diagnosis. Minimally invasive biomarkers that can predict long-term radiation injury are urgently needed for optimal management after a radiation accident. We have identified serum microRNA (miRNA) signatures that indicate long-term impact of total body irradiation (TBI) in mice when measured within 24 hours of exposure. Impact of TBI on the hematopoietic system was systematically assessed to determine a correlation of residual hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with increasing doses of radiation. Serum miRNA signatures distinguished untreated mice from animals exposed to radiation and correlated with the impact of radiation on HSCs. Mice exposed to sublethal (6.5 Gy) and lethal (8 Gy) doses of radiation were indistinguishable for 3 to 4 weeks after exposure. A serum miRNA signature detectable 24 hours after radiation exposure consistently segregated these two cohorts. Furthermore, using either a radioprotective agent before, or radiation mitigation after, lethal radiation, we determined that the serum miRNA signature correlated with the impact of radiation on animal health rather than the radiation dose. Last, using humanized mice that had been engrafted with human CD34+ HSCs, we determined that the serum miRNA signature indicated radiation-induced injury to the human bone marrow cells. Our data suggest that serum miRNAs can serve as functional dosimeters of radiation, representing a potential breakthrough in early assessment of radiation-induced hematopoietic damage and timely use of medical countermeasures to mitigate the long-term impact of radiation. PMID:25972001

  2. Validation of a modified early warning score-linked Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation communication tool: A mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Burger, Debora; Jordan, Sue; Kyriacos, Una

    2017-09-01

    To develop and validate a modified Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation communication tool incorporating components of the Cape Town modified early warning score vital signs chart for reporting early signs of clinical deterioration. Reporting early signs of physiological and clinical deterioration could prevent "failure to rescue" or unexpected intensive care admission, cardiac arrest or death. A structured communication tool incorporating physiological and clinical parameters allows nurses to provide pertinent information about a deteriorating patient in a logical order. Mixed methods instrument development and validation. We used a sequential three-phase method: cognitive interviews, content validation and inter-rater reliability testing to validate a self-designed communication tool. Participants were purposively selected expert nurses and doctors in government sector hospitals in Cape Town. Cognitive interviews with five experts prompted most changes to the communication tool: 15/42 (35.71%) items were modified. Content validation of a revised tool was high by a predetermined ≥70% of 18 experts: 4/49 (8.2%) items were modified. Inter-rater reliability testing by two nurses indicated substantial to full agreement (Cohen's kappa .61-1) on 37/45 (82%) items. The one item achieving slight agreement (Cohen's kappa .20) indicated a difference in clinical judgement. The high overall percentage agreement (82%) suggests that the modified items are sound. Overall, 45 items remained on the validated tool. The first modified early warning score-linked Situation-Background-Assessment-Recommendation communication tool developed in South Africa was found to be valid and reliable in a local context. Nurses in South Africa can use the validated tool to provide doctors with pertinent information about a deteriorating patient in a logical order to prevent a serious adverse event. Our findings provide a reference for other African countries to develop and validate

  3. Hypofractionated radiation therapy in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Gary M

    2012-02-01

    Hypofractionated radiation refers to the use of fewer, larger-dose radiation treatments that are usually given over a shorter time period compared to conventional radiation fraction sizes. Randomized trials of hypofractionated whole breast irradiation (WBI) have demonstrated comparable outcomes as conventional fractionation. For a higher-risk population for local recurrence, a phase 3 trial by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) is currently studying hypofractionated WBI with a concurrent tumor bed boost over 3 weeks. Accelerated partial breast irradiation limits radiation to the region of the tumor bed for 1-3 weeks and is the subject of an ongoing randomized trial by the National Surgical Breast and Bowel Project and RTOG. Questions remain for hypofractionation about optimal patient selection, radiation techniques, and the risk of late toxicity. But results from current trials could make hypofractionation more widely accepted for patients with early-stage breast cancer.

  4. Intraoperative radiation therapy in malignant glioma: early clinical results.

    PubMed

    Ortiz de Urbina, D; Santos, M; Garcia-Berrocal, I; Bustos, J C; Samblas, J; Gutierrez-Diaz, J A; Delgado, J M; Donckaster, G; Calvo, F A

    1995-08-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) with high energy electron beams is a treatment modality that has been included in multimodal programs in oncology to improve local tumor control. From August 1991 to December 1993, 17 patients with primary (8) or recurrent (9) high grade malignant gliomas, anaplastic astrocytoma (4), anaplastic oligodendroglioma (6) and glioblastoma multiforme (7), underwent surgical resection and a single dose of 10-20 Gy intraoperative radiation therapy was delivered in tumor bed. Fourteen patients received either pre-operative (8) or post-operative (6) external beam radiation therapy. Primary gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate has been 56% (range: 1-21+ months) and the median survival time has not yet been achieved. Four patients developed tumor progression (median time to tumor progression: 9 months). Recurrent gliomas: 18-months actuarial survival rate and median survival time has been 47% and 13 months (range: 6-32+ months) respectively. The median time to tumor progression was 11 months. No IORT related mortality has been observed. IORT is an attractive, tolerable and feasible treatment modality as antitumoral intensification procedure in high grade malignant gliomas.

  5. Abnormal endothelium-dependent responses in early radiation nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Juncos, L I; Cornejo, J C; Gomes, J; Baigorria, S; Juncos, L A

    1997-09-01

    While arterial hypertension and renal dysfunction are well recognized complications of renal irradiation, the mechanisms that trigger the development of these complications are unknown. Recently, it was reported that the endothelium is a major target in radiation injury. Because dysfunction of the endothelial cells may lead or contribute to the development of hypertension and renal dysfunction in radiation nephropathy, we tested the hypothesis that endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired in radiated kidneys prior to the onset of hypertension. To test this hypothesis, we used Long-Evans rats that had undergone left nephrectomy (3 weeks earlier) and irradiation (3000 r's) to the right kidney 8 days earlier (mean blood pressures in the irradiated rats were not different than in the controls). We then measured the changes in renal blood flow (RBF) induced by endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine and bradykinin) and -independent (nitroprusside, norepinephrine, and angiotensin II) vasoactive agents. We found that the increases in RBF induced by the endothelium-dependent but not independent vasodilators were markedly impaired in the irradiated kidneys. Blocking nitric oxide synthesis with nitro L-arginine methyl ester in sham rats mimicked the blunted responsiveness of the irradiated rats, whereas indomethacin (an inhibitor of prostaglandin synthesis) had no effect on either sham or irradiated rats. Finally, the RBF responses to the endothelium-independent vasoconstrictors, norepinephrine and angiotensin II, were not altered in the irradiated kidneys. These results suggest that renal irradiation causes endothelial dysfunction (prior to the onset of hypertension) but spares the vascular smooth muscle cells.

  6. On background radiation gradients--the use of airborne surveys when searching for orphan sources using mobile gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kock, Peder; Rääf, Christopher; Samuelsson, Christer

    2014-02-01

    Systematic background radiation variations can lead to both false positives and failures to detect an orphan source when searching using car-borne mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. The stochastic variation at each point is well described by Poisson statistics, but when moving in a background radiation gradient the mean count rate will continually change, leading to inaccurate background estimations. Airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) surveys conducted on the national level, usually in connection to mineral exploration, exist in many countries. These data hold information about the background radiation gradients which could be used at the ground level. This article describes a method that aims to incorporate the systematic as well as stochastic variations of the background radiation. We introduce a weighted moving average where the weights are calculated from existing AGS data, supplied by the Geological Survey of Sweden. To test the method we chose an area with strong background gradients, especially in the thorium component. Within the area we identified two roads which pass through the high-variability locations. The proposed method is compared with an unweighted moving average. The results show that the weighting reduces the excess false positives in the positive background gradients without introducing an excess of failures to detect a source during passage in negative gradients.

  7. Hierarchical Bayesian detection algorithm for early-universe relics in the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeney, Stephen M.; Johnson, Matthew C.; McEwen, Jason D.; Mortlock, Daniel J.; Peiris, Hiranya V.

    2013-08-01

    A number of theoretically well-motivated additions to the standard cosmological model predict weak signatures in the form of spatially localized sources embedded in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) fluctuations. We present a hierarchical Bayesian statistical formalism and a complete data analysis pipeline for testing such scenarios. We derive an accurate approximation to the full posterior probability distribution over the parameters defining any theory that predicts sources embedded in the CMB, and perform an extensive set of tests in order to establish its validity. The approximation is implemented using a modular algorithm, designed to avoid a posteriori selection effects, which combines a candidate-detection stage with a full Bayesian model-selection and parameter-estimation analysis. We apply this pipeline to theories that predict cosmic textures and bubble collisions, extending previous analyses by using: (1) adaptive-resolution techniques, allowing us to probe features of arbitrary size, and (2) optimal filters, which provide the best possible sensitivity for detecting candidate signatures. We conclude that the WMAP 7-year data do not favor the addition of either cosmic textures or bubble collisions to ΛCDM, and place robust constraints on the predicted number of such sources. The expected numbers of bubble collisions and cosmic textures on the CMB sky within our detection thresholds are constrained to be fewer than 4.0 and 5.2 at 95% confidence, respectively.

  8. Radon Monitoring and Early Low Background Counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Mei, D.-M.; Heise, J.; Durben, D.; Salve, R.

    2011-04-27

    Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

  9. Radon monitoring and early low background counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K.J.; Mei, D.M.; Heise, J.; Durben, D.; Salve, R.

    2010-09-01

    Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

  10. Before the Microwave Background: Early Big Bang Cosmology (The J. Robert Oppenheimer Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kragh, Helge

    2006-04-01

    Finite-age (or big-bang) cosmological models can be traced back to G. Lemaître's relativistic model of 1931 (or even earlier, to A. Friedmann in 1922). However, the big bang concept does not exclusively belong to the class of relativistic models, and in the 1930s it was often associated with E.A. Milne's very different, so-called kinematic cosmology. But it was only with G. Gamow's research program in the late 1940s that the big-bang scenario became widely known and turned into a nuclear-physical theory of the early universe. How does the theory of Gamow and his collaborators R. Alpher and R. Herman compare with Lemaître's earlier ideas of a ``primeval atom''? And with the post-1965 version of big bang cosmology? The strange fate of the Gamow-Alpher-Herman hot big bang theory can only be understood if taking into account that relativistic evolution cosmology faced stiff competition throughout the 1950s from the steady-state theory of F. Hoyle and others.

  11. Early active sun - Radiation history of distinct components in fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crozaz, G.; Taylor, G. J.; Walker, R. M.; Seitz, M. G.

    1974-01-01

    Plagioclase feldspars were separated from lunar soil samples and their compositions were determined by electron-microprobe analysis followed by etching and track counting in an effort to find effects of early solar activity. The feldspars were assigned on this basis to three major lithologies: mare basalts, anorthositic rocks, and KREEP rock. The results are in sharp contrast to Poupeau et al.'s (1973) observations on track densities in plagioclase crystals in the Luna 16 soil: no evidence is found for an early active sun, although the evidence does not preclude this possibility, either.

  12. Radiation therapy for early glottic cancer (T1N0M0): II. Prospective randomized study concerning radiation field

    SciTech Connect

    Teshima, T.; Chatani, M.; Inoue, T. )

    1990-01-01

    A prospective randomized study to determine the effect of radiation field on the local control of early glottic cancer was performed. From May 1982 through December 1985, a total of 87 patients with early glottic cancer (T1N0M0) were treated at our department with an individualized wedge filter technique using a shell to improve the dose distribution and immobilization during radiotherapy with 4 MV X ray. Patients were randomly allocated to either treatment group A (radiation field size: 5 x 5 cm2) or B (6 x 6 cm2) using bilateral parallel opposed portals. Total radiation dose administered was 60 Gy in 30 fractions over a 6-week period. The 3-year recurrence-free survival rates were 93% in group A and 96% in group B (no significant difference). Comparison with historical control showed that both arms achieved better results. These results were mainly due to the improved local control of whole-length lesions of single vocal cords. Acute mucosal reaction (p less than 0.05) and persistent arytenoid edema lasting more than 6 months (p less than 0.02) were more frequently observed in group B than in group A. It is concluded that the critical factor in getting optimal results in the treatment of early glottic cancer is careful attention to the technique of treatment.

  13. Urinary metabolic signatures and early triage of acute radiation exposure in rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingxiao; Lau, Kim Kt; Zhou, Xian; Wu, Jianfang; Yang, Jun; Wang, Chang

    2017-03-28

    After a large-scale radiological accident, early-response biomarkers to assess radiation exposure over a broad dose range are not only the basis of rapid radiation triage, but are also the key to the rational use of limited medical resources and to the improvement of treatment efficiency. Because of its high throughput, rapid assays and minimally invasive sample collection, metabolomics has been applied to research into radiation exposure biomarkers in recent years. Due to the complexity of radiobiological effects, most of the potential biomarkers are both dose-dependent and time-dependent. In reality, it is very difficult to find a single biomarker that is both sensitive and specific in a given radiation exposure scenario. Therefore, a multi-parameters approach for radiation exposure assessment is more realistic in real nuclear accidents. In this study, untargeted metabolomic profiling based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and targeted amino acid profiling based on LC-MS/MS were combined to investigate early urinary metabolite responses within 48 h post-exposure in a rat model. A few of the key early-response metabolites for radiation exposure were identified, which revealed the most relevant metabolic pathways. Furthermore, a panel of potential urinary biomarkers was selected through a multi-criteria approach and applied to early triage following irradiation. Our study suggests that it is feasible to use a multi-parameters approach to triage radiation damage, and the urinary excretion levels of the relevant metabolites provide insights into radiation damage and repair.

  14. Regulation of early and delayed radiation responses in rat small intestine by capsaicin-sensitive nerves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Zheng Huaien; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Ou Xuemei; Hauer-Jensen, Martin . E-mail: mhjensen@life.uams.edu

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: Mast cells protect against the early manifestations of intestinal radiation toxicity, but promote chronic intestinal wall fibrosis. Intestinal sensory nerves are closely associated with mast cells, both anatomically and functionally, and serve an important role in the regulation of mucosal homeostasis. This study examined the effect of sensory nerve ablation on the intestinal radiation response in an established rat model. Methods and Materials: Rats underwent sensory nerve ablation with capsaicin or sham ablation. Two weeks later, a localized segment of ileum was X-irradiated or sham irradiated. Structural, cellular, and molecular changes were examined 2 weeks (early injury) and 26 weeks (chronic injury) after irradiation. The mast cell dependence of the effect of sensory nerve ablation on intestinal radiation injury was assessed using c-kit mutant (Ws/Ws) mast cell-deficient rats. Results: Capsaicin treatment caused a baseline reduction in mucosal mast cell density, crypt cell proliferation, and expression of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, two neuropeptides released by sensory neurons. Sensory nerve ablation strikingly exacerbated early intestinal radiation toxicity (loss of mucosal surface area, inflammation, intestinal wall thickening), but attenuated the development of chronic intestinal radiation fibrosis (collagen I accumulation and transforming growth factor {beta} immunoreactivity). In mast cell-deficient rats, capsaicin treatment exacerbated postradiation epithelial injury (loss of mucosal surface area), but none of the other aspects of radiation injury were affected by capsaicin treatment. Conclusions: Ablation of capsaicin-sensitive enteric neurons exacerbates early intestinal radiation toxicity, but attenuates development of chronic fibroproliferative changes. The effect of capsaicin treatment on the intestinal radiation response is partly mast cell dependent.

  15. Measurements of the anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation and diffuse galactic emission at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    SciTech Connect

    Halpern, M.; Benford, R.; Meyer, S.; Muehlner, D.; Weiss, R.

    1988-09-01

    The results of a balloon-borne observing program to measure the large angular scale brightness distribution of the 2.7 K cosmic background radiation (CBR) at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths are reported. A new determination of the dipole anisotropy of the CBR is found with 3.40 + or - 0.42 mK toward alpha = 12.1 + or - 0.24 hr, delta = - 23 + or - 5 deg in a 1.2 to 8/cm band and 4.7 + or - 1.4 mK toward alpha = 9.9 + 1.7 or - 1.1 hr, delta = - 38 + or - 21 deg between 5 and 18/cm, where the amplitudes are listed as thermodynamic temperatures. New estimates of the absolute temperature in these two bands of 2.86 + or - 0.26 K and 3.01 + or - 0.31 are obtained under the assumption that the CBR has a Planck spectrum. The diffuse Galactic emission is fitted by a secant distribution in Galactic latitude, and the resulting Galactic pole antenna temperatures are given. Maps of sky brightness, measurements of zodiacal emission, and measurements of fluctuations of the atmospheric emission which dominates the noise budget are also presented. 40 references.

  16. Measurements of the anisotropy of the cosmic background radiation and diffuse galactic emission at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Mark; Benford, Richard; Meyer, Stephan; Muehlner, Dirk; Weiss, Rainer

    1988-01-01

    The results of a balloon-borne observing program to measure the large angular scale brightness distribution of the 2.7 K cosmic background radiation (CBR) at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths are reported. A new determination of the dipole anisotropy of the CBR is found with 3.40 + or - 0.42 mK toward alpha = 12.1 + or - 0.24 hr, delta = - 23 + or - 5 deg in a 1.2 to 8/cm band and 4.7 + or - 1.4 mK toward alpha = 9.9 + 1.7 or - 1.1 hr, delta = - 38 + or - 21 deg between 5 and 18/cm, where the amplitudes are listed as thermodynamic temperatures. New estimates of the absolute temperature in these two bands of 2.86 + or - 0.26 K and 3.01 + or - 0.31 are obtained under the assumption that the CBR has a Planck spectrum. The diffuse Galactic emission is fitted by a secant distribution in Galactic latitude, and the resulting Galactic pole antenna temperatures are given. Maps of sky brightness, measurements of zodiacal emission, and measurements of fluctuations of the atmospheric emission which dominates the noise budget are also presented.

  17. Study of radiation background at various high altitude locations in preparation for rare event search in cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, R.; Dey, S.; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Maulik, A.; Raha, Sibaji; Syam, D.

    2017-04-01

    Various phenomenological models presented over the years have hinted at the possible presence of strangelets, which are nuggets of Strange Quark Matter (SQM), in cosmic rays. One way to search for such rare events is through the deployment of large area Nuclear Track Detector (NTD) arrays at high mountain altitudes. Before the deployment of any such array can begin, a detailed study of the radiation background is essential. Also, a proper understanding of the response of detectors exposed to extreme weather conditions is necessary. With that aim, pilot studies were carried out at various high altitude locations in India such as Darjeeling (2200 m a.m.s.l), Ooty (2200 m a.m.s.l) and Hanle (4500 m a.m.s.l). Small arrays of CR-39 as well as high threshold Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) detectors were given open air exposures for periods ranging from three months to two years. The findings of such studies are reported in this paper.

  18. New clade of enigmatic early archosaurs yields insights into early pseudosuchian phylogeny and the biogeography of the archosaur radiation.

    PubMed

    Butler, Richard J; Sullivan, Corwin; Ezcurra, Martín D; Liu, Jun; Lecuona, Agustina; Sookias, Roland B

    2014-06-10

    The origin and early radiation of archosaurs and closely related taxa (Archosauriformes) during the Triassic was a critical event in the evolutionary history of tetrapods. This radiation led to the dinosaur-dominated ecosystems of the Jurassic and Cretaceous, and the high present-day archosaur diversity that includes around 10,000 bird and crocodylian species. The timing and dynamics of this evolutionary radiation are currently obscured by the poorly constrained phylogenetic positions of several key early archosauriform taxa, including several species from the Middle Triassic of Argentina (Gracilisuchus stipanicicorum) and China (Turfanosuchus dabanensis, Yonghesuchus sangbiensis). These species act as unstable 'wildcards' in morphological phylogenetic analyses, reducing phylogenetic resolution. We present new anatomical data for the type specimens of G. stipanicicorum, T. dabanensis, and Y. sangbiensis, and carry out a new morphological phylogenetic analysis of early archosaur relationships. Our results indicate that these three previously enigmatic taxa form a well-supported clade of Middle Triassic archosaurs that we refer to as Gracilisuchidae. Gracilisuchidae is placed basally within Suchia, among the pseudosuchian (crocodile-line) archosaurs. The approximately contemporaneous and morphologically similar G. stipanicicorum and Y. sangbiensis may be sister taxa within Gracilisuchidae. Our results provide increased resolution of the previously poorly constrained relationships of early archosaurs, with increased levels of phylogenetic support for several key early pseudosuchian clades. Moreover, they falsify previous hypotheses suggesting that T. dabanensis and Y. sangbiensis are not members of the archosaur crown group. The recognition of Gracilisuchidae provides further support for a rapid phylogenetic diversification of crown archosaurs by the Middle Triassic. The disjunct distribution of the gracilisuchid clade in China and Argentina demonstrates that early

  19. Diversity in the early tertiary anthropoidean radiation in Africa.

    PubMed Central

    Simons, E L

    1992-01-01

    Between 1987 and 1991 recent field seasons in the Fayum Depression of Egypt have yielded five species and genera of primates that were earlier unknown. Three of these species and genera are described below. All these genera and species are known only from Fayum site L-41, which has been dated as of late Eocene age. In the Fayum, these 5 species from L-41 are added to 3 kinds of prosimians (1 species formally described) and 11 earlier named species of Anthropoidea. When certain undescribed species are added, the total of known Fayum primate species comes to 21, belonging to at least 10 genera, genera that, in turn, could belong to as many as seven families. This arguably represents more taxonomic diversity of primates, especially higher primates, than has been demonstrated before in one so spatially and temporally limited area. These facts argue that an important, perhaps primary, radiation of anthropoideans took place in the African Eocene. Images PMID:1438271

  20. The earth radiation budget experiment: Early validation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. Louis; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Harrison, Edwin F.

    The Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) consists of radiometers on a dedicated spacecraft in a 57° inclination orbit, which has a precessional period of 2 months, and on two NOAA operational meteorological spacecraft in near polar orbits. The radiometers include scanning narrow field-of-view (FOV) and nadir-looking wide and medium FOV radiometers covering the ranges 0.2 to 5 μm and 5 to 50 μm and a solar monitoring channel. This paper describes the validation procedures and preliminary results. Each of the radiometer channels underwent extensive ground calibration, and the instrument packages include in-flight calibration facilities which, to date, show negligible changes of the instruments in orbit, except for gradual degradation of the suprasil dome of the shortwave wide FOV (about 4% per year). Measurements of the solar constant by the solar monitors, wide FOV, and medium FOV radiometers of two spacecraft agree to a fraction of a percent. Intercomparisons of the wide and medium FOV radiometers with the scanning radiometers show agreement of 1 to 4%. The multiple ERBE satellites are acquiring the first global measurements of regional scale diurnal variations in the Earth's radiation budget. These diurnal variations are verified by comparison with high temporal resolution geostationary satellite data. Other principal investigators of the ERBE Science Team are: R. Cess, SUNY, Stoneybrook; J. Coakley, NCAR; C. Duncan, M. King and A Mecherikunnel, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA; A. Gruber and A.J. Miller, NOAA; D. Hartmann, U. Washington; F.B. House, Drexel U.; F.O. Huck, Langley Research Center, NASA; G. Hunt, Imperial College, London U.; R. Kandel and A. Berroir, Laboratory of Dynamic Meteorology, Ecole Polytechique; V. Ramanathan, U. Chicago; E. Raschke, U. of Cologne; W.L. Smith, U. of Wisconsin and T.H. Vonder Haar, Colorado State U.

  1. Dependence of Early and Late Chromosomal Aberrations on Radiation Quality and Cell Types

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Krieger, Stephanie; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Goss, Rosalin; Bowler, Deborah; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2017-01-01

    Exposure to radiation induces different types of DNA damage, increases mutation and chromosome aberration rates, and increases cellular transformation in vitro and in vivo. The susceptibility of cells to radiation depends on genetic background and growth condition of cells, as well as types of radiation. Mammalian cells of different tissue types and with different genetic background are known to have different survival rate and different mutation rate after cytogenetic insults. Genomic instability, induced by various genetic, metabolic, and environmental factors including radiation, is the driving force of tumorigenesis. Accurate measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is important for estimating radiation-related risks. To further understand genomic instability induced by charged particles and their RBE, we exposed human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblast AG1522, human mammary epithelial cells (CH184B5F5/M10), and bone marrow cells isolated from CBA/CaH(CBA) and C57BL/6 (C57) mice to high energy protons and Fe ions. Normal human fibroblasts AG1522 have apparently normal DNA damage response and repair mechanisms, while mammary epithelial cells (M10) are deficient in the repair of DNA DSBs. Mouse strain CBA is radio-sensitive while C57 is radio-resistant. Metaphase chromosomes at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and chromosome aberrations were analyzed as RBE for different cell lines exposed to different radiations at various time points up to one month post irradiation.

  2. Radiative transfer in CO2-rich atmospheres: 1. Collisional line mixing implies a colder early Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozak, N.; Aharonson, O.; Halevy, I.

    2016-06-01

    Fast and accurate radiative transfer methods are essential for modeling CO2-rich atmospheres, relevant to the climate of early Earth and Mars, present-day Venus, and some exoplanets. Although such models already exist, their accuracy may be improved as better theoretical and experimental constraints become available. Here we develop a unidimensional radiative transfer code for CO2-rich atmospheres, using the correlated k approach and with a focus on modeling early Mars. Our model differs from existing models in that it includes the effects of CO2 collisional line mixing in the calculation of the line-by-line absorption coefficients. Inclusion of these effects results in model atmospheres that are more transparent to infrared radiation and, therefore, in colder surface temperatures at radiative-convective equilibrium, compared with results of previous studies. Inclusion of water vapor in the model atmosphere results in negligible warming due to the low atmospheric temperatures under a weaker early Sun, which translate into climatically unimportant concentrations of water vapor. Overall, the results imply that sustained warmth on early Mars would not have been possible with an atmosphere containing only CO2 and water vapor, suggesting that other components of the early Martian climate system are missing from current models or that warm conditions were not long lived.

  3. Sparsely Ionizing Diagnostic and Natural Background Radiations are Likely Preventing Cancer and Other Genomic-Instability-Associated Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Bobby R.; Di Palma, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Routine diagnostic X-rays (e.g., chest X-rays, mammograms, computed tomography scans) and routine diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures using sparsely ionizing radiation forms (e.g., beta and gamma radiations) stimulate the removal of precancerous neo-plastically transformed and other genomically unstable cells from the body (medical radiation hormesis). The indicated radiation hormesis arises because radiation doses above an individual-specific stochastic threshold activate a system of cooperative protective processes that include high-fidelity DNA repair/apoptosis (presumed p53 related), an auxiliary apoptosis process (PAM process) that is presumed p53-independent, and stimulated immunity. These forms of induced protection are called adapted protection because they are associated with the radiation adaptive response. Diagnostic X-ray sources, other sources of sparsely ionizing radiation used in nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures, as well as radioisotope-labeled immunoglobulins could be used in conjunction with apopto-sis-sensitizing agents (e.g., the natural phenolic compound resveratrol) in curing existing cancer via low-dose fractionated or low-dose, low-dose-rate therapy (therapeutic radiation hormesis). Evidence is provided to support the existence of both therapeutic (curing existing cancer) and medical (cancer prevention) radiation hormesis. Evidence is also provided demonstrating that exposure to environmental sparsely ionizing radiations, such as gamma rays, protect from cancer occurrence and the occurrence of other diseases via inducing adapted protection (environmental radiation hormesis). PMID:18648608

  4. Sulfur, ultraviolet radiation, and the early evolution of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasting, J. F.; Zahnle, K. J.; Pinto, J. P.; Young, A. T.

    1989-01-01

    The present biosphere is shielded from harmful solar near ultraviolet (UV) radiation by atmospheric ozone. It is suggested that elemental sulfur vapor could have played a similar role in an anoxic, ozone-free, primitive atmosphere. Sulfur vapor would have been produced photochemically from volcanogenic SO2 and H2S. It is composed of ring molecules, primarily S8, that absorb strongly throughout the near UV, yet are expected to be relatively stable against photolysis and chemical attack. It is also insoluble in water and would thus have been immune to rainout or surface deposition over the oceans. Since the concentration of S8 in the primitive atmosphere would have been limited by its saturation vapor pressure, surface temperatures of 45 C or higher, corresponding to carbon dioxide partial pressures exceeding 2 bars, are required to sustain an effective UV screen. A warm, sulfur-rich, primitive atmosphere is consistent with inferences drawn from molecular phylogeny, which suggest that some of the earliest organisms were thermophilic bacteria that metabolized elemental sulfur.

  5. The impact of ionizing radiation on the formation of a supermassive star in the early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chon, Sunmyon; Latif, Muhammad A.

    2017-06-01

    A massive primordial halo near an intensely star-forming galaxy may collapse into a supermassive star (SMS) and leave a massive black hole seed of about 105 M⊙. To investigate the impact of ionizing radiation on the formation of an SMS from a nearby galaxy, we perform three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations by selecting a pair of massive dark matter haloes forming at z > 10. We find that rich structures such as clumps and filaments around the source galaxy shield the cloud from ionizing radiation. In fact, in some cases, cloud collapse is accelerated under ionizing radiation. This fact suggests that the ionization of the cloud's surroundings helps its collapse. Only strong radiation at the early stage of structure formation can halt the cloud collapse, but this is much stronger than observationally allowed value. We also explored the effect of ionizing radiation on a sample of 68 haloes by employing an analytical model and found that increase in the mean density of the gas between the SMS-forming cloud and the source galaxy protects the gas cloud from ionizing radiation as they approach each other. Thus, we conclude that ionizing radiation does not prevent the formation of an SMS in most of the cases.

  6. Spatial and depth wise characterization of radionuclides and minerals in various beach sediments from high background radiation area, Kerala, India.

    PubMed

    Ramasamy, V; Sundarrajan, M; Paramasivam, K; Suresh, G

    2014-11-04

    The activity concentrations ((238)U, (232)Th and (40)K) and mineralogical characterization of different layer (upper surface, first, second and third feet) Kerala beach sediments have been assessed with an aim of evaluating the radioactivity content profile, its relation to specific minerals and their distributions (spatial and depth wise). The eight different radiological indices are calculated for all samples and compared with either recommended values or the world average values of radioactivity content of the three primordial radionuclides to assess the complete radiological profile of the sediments. The radioactivity study suggests that the average specific activities of radionuclides ((238)U and (232)Th) are higher than the world average values as given in UNSCEAR reports and all radiological parameters in all layer samples are more than the recommended safety levels. These results are on the expected lines since the samples are from a well-known high background radiation area. Using FTIR, mineralogical characteristics of the sediments were analyzed and the extinction coefficient is calculated to find the relative distribution of major minerals. The calculated values show that the amount of major minerals decreases in the order of quartz>calcite>kaolinite>microcline feldspar in all layers. To confirm the results obtained from FTIR, XRD analysis was also carried out. The observations made through the XRD technique are matched with FTIR observations. Statistical analyses (cluster and factor analysis) are carried out to assess the relation between the radionuclides and minerals, and also assess their distribution patterns in different layers. The analyses suggest that the concentration of (40)K may have a strong association with the light mineral calcite and also suggest that spatial distributions of (40)K and calcite are almost similar in every layer. The concentrations of (238)U, (232)Th and absorbed dose rate are evenly distributed (spatial) and other

  7. Molecular dating and biogeography of the early placental mammal radiation.

    PubMed

    Eizirik, E; Murphy, W J; O'Brien, S J

    2001-01-01

    The timing and phylogenetic hierarchy of early placental mammal divergences was determined based on combined DNA sequence analysis of 18 gene segments (9779 bp) from 64 species. Using rooted and unrooted phylogenies derived from distinct theoretical approaches, strong support for the divergence of four principal clades of eutherian mammals was achieved. Minimum divergence dates of the earliest nodes in the placental mammal phylogeny were estimated with a quartet-based maximum-likelihood method that accommodates rate variation among lineages using conservative fossil calibrations from nine different nodes in the eutherian tree. These minimum estimates resolve the earliest placental mammal divergence nodes at periods between 64 and 104 million years ago, in essentially every case predating the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary. The pattern and timing of these divergences allow a geographic interpretation of the primary branching events in eutherian history, likely originating in the southern supercontinent Gondwanaland coincident with its breakup into Africa and South America 95-105 million years ago. We propose an integrated genomic, paleontological, and biogeographic hypothesis to account for these earliest splits on the placental mammal family tree and address current discrepancies between fossil and molecular evidence.

  8. Potentially Missing Physics of the Early Universe: Nonlinear Vacuum Polarization in Intense Blackbody Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S Q; Hartemann, F V

    2010-04-13

    The standard Big Bang universe model is mainly based on linear interactions, except during exotic periods such as inflation. The purpose of the present proposal is to explore the effects, if any, of vacuum polarization in the very high energy density environment of the early universe. These conditions can be found today in astrophysical settings and may also be emulated in the laboratory using high intensity advanced lasers. Shortly after the Big Bang, there once existed a time when the energy density of the universe corresponded to a temperature in the range 10{sup 8} - 10{sup 9} K, sufficient to cause vacuum polarization effects. During this period, the nonlinear vacuum polarization may have had significant modifications on the propagation of radiation. Thus the thermal spectrum of the early universe may have been starkly non-Planckian. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background today show a spectrum relatively close to an ideal blackbody. Could the early universe have shown spectral deviations due to nonlinear vacuum effects? If so, is it possible to detect traces of those relic photons in the universe today? Found in galactic environments, compact objects such as blazars and magnetars can possess astronomically large energy densities that far exceed anything that can be created in the laboratory. Their field strengths are known to reach energy levels comparable to or surpassing the energy corresponding to the Schwinger critical field E {approx} 10{sup 18} V/m. Nonlinear vacuum effects become prominent under these conditions and have garnered much interest from the astronomical and theoretical physics communities. The effects of a nonlinear vacuum may be of crucial importance for our understanding of these objects. At energies of the order of the electron rest mass, the most important interactions are described by quantum electrodynamics (QED). It is predicted that nonlinear photon-photon interactions will occur at energies approaching the Schwinger

  9. Preliminary test Results for a 25K Sorption Cryocooler Designed for the UCSB Long Duration Balloon Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, L. A.; Levy, A. R.

    1996-01-01

    A continuous operation, vibration-free, long-life 25K sorption cryocooler has been built and is now in final integration and performance testing. This cooler wil be flown on the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) Long Duration Balloon (LDB) Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Experiment.

  10. [The influence of circadian rhythms of geomagnetic field variations and the background cosmic radiation on nitric oxide production in human organism].

    PubMed

    Iamshanov, V A; Koshelevskiĭ, V K

    2012-01-01

    The circadian rhythms of background gamma-radiation and Ki-indexes of geomagnetic activity (GMF) during August-September 2008, January-February 2010 and March 2011 were studied. The authors show that in summer period the maximum of Ki-indexes and gamma-radiation were at 3 p.m. of local time. In winter these maximums were shifted at more last time. It was suggested that an organism produces the own free radicals as nitric oxide to neutralize radicals from background radiation. They are formed during decay of neutrophiles when GMF-activity falls. On the other side, the production of NO is regulated by melatonin synthesis which has a circadian rhythm.

  11. A mentor training program improves mentoring competency for researchers working with early-career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mallory O.; Gandhi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Background Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective mentors, and the few that exist have a dearth of empirical support of their impact. Methods In 2013, we recruited 34 faculty from across the U.S. engaged in HIV-related clinical research to participate in a two-day Mentoring the Mentors workshop. The workshop included didactic and interactive content focused on a range of topics, such as mentor-mentee communication, leadership styles, emotional intelligence, understanding the impact of diversity (unconscious bias, microaggressions, discrimination, tokenism) for mentees, and specific tools and techniques for effective mentoring. Results Pre- and post-workshop online evaluations documented high rates of satisfaction with the program and statistically significant improvements in self-appraised mentoring skills (e.g. addressing diversity in mentoring, communication with mentees, aligning mentor-mentee expectations), as assessed via a validated mentoring competency tool. Discussion This is the first mentoring training program focused on enhancing mentors’ abilities to nurture investigators of diversity, filling an important gap, and evaluation results offer support for its effectiveness. Results suggest a need for refinement and expansion of the program and for more comprehensive, long-term evaluation of distal mentoring outcomes for those who participate in the program. PMID:25274417

  12. Radiation therapy of early carcinoma of the breast without mastectomy. [Linear acceleraor and iridium implants

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, S.; Harris, J.R.; Levene, M.B.

    1980-08-15

    The results of the treatment of 176 patients with early breast cancer, using radiation therapy without mastectomy are reported. The likelihood of local recurrence was 5% for Stage I patients and 7% for Stage II patients. Local control was significantly greater in those patients receiving an iridium implant. The cumulative survival probability at five years is 96% for Stage I and 68% for Stage II. Gross tumor resection with careful reapproximation of the breast tissue and well-placed incisions facilitates the radiation therapy. Homogeneous external beam radiation to the breast and draining lymph nodes (4500 to 5000 rads) and supplemental local radiation to the sites of the primary lesion (in this series using interstitial implantation) are recommended. The frequency of normal tissue complications was low.

  13. Early degeneration of photoreceptor synapse in Ccl2/Cx3cr1-deficient mice on Crb1(rd8) background.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Tuo, Jingsheng; Cao, Xiaoguan; Shen, Defen; Li, Wei; Chan, Chi-Chao

    2013-08-01

    Photoreceptor ribbon synapse releases glutamate to postsynaptic targets. The synaptic ribbon may play multiple roles in ribbon synapse development, synaptic vesicle recycling, and synaptic transmission. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients appear to have fewer or no detectable synaptic ribbons as well as abnormal swelling in the photoreceptor terminals in the macula. However, reports on changes of photoreceptor synapses in AMD are scarce and photoreceptor type and quantity affected in early AMD is still unclear. Here, we employed multiple anatomical techniques to investigate these questions in Ccl2⁻/⁻/Cx3cr1⁻/⁻ mouse on Crb1(rd8) background (DKO rd8) at one month of age. We found that approximately 17% of photoreceptors over the focal lesion were lost. Immunostaining for synapse-associated proteins (CtBP2, synaptophysin, and vesicular glutamate transporter 1) showed significantly reduced expression and ectopic localization. Cone opsins demonstrated dramatic reduction in expression (S-opsins) and extensive mislocalization (M-opsins). Quantitative ultrastructural analysis confirmed a significant decrease in the number of cone terminals and nuclei, numerous vacuoles in remaining cone terminals, reduction in the number of synaptic ribbons in photoreceptor terminals, and ectopic rod ribbon synapses. In addition, glutamate receptor immunoreactivity on aberrant sprouting of rod bipolar cells and horizontal cells were identified at the ectopic synapses. These results indicate that synaptic alterations occur at the early stages of disease and cones are likely more susceptible to damage caused by DKO rd8 mutation. They provide a new insight into potential mechanism of vision function lost due to synaptic degeneration before cell death in the early stages of AMD. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. [Efficacy of early invasive strategy of diagnostics and treatment of unstable angina at the background of preexisting ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Gazarian, G A; Zakharov, I V; Mikailova, N G; Prelovskaia, G Iu; Golikov, A P

    2012-01-01

    Study aim was assessment of efficacy of early invasive tactics of treatment of patients with various forms of unstable angina at the background of preexisting ischemic heart disease. We compared noninvasive and invasive estimation of risk in 354 patients admitted to the N.V.Sklifosofsky Institute of Urgent Aid in 2002 to 2008. Percutaneous coronary interventions on infarct related artery (IRA) during 1 procedure were carried out in 144 patients (41%), indications to coronary artery (CA) bypass surgery were found in 167 patients (47%), 43 patients (12%) were treated conservatively. Coronary angiography performed in the first 48 hours gives an opportunity to determine indications to myocardial revascularization, to avoid discrepancy between choice of treatment tactics and noninvasive assessment of risk. The latter can be used with the aim of optimization of timing of early invasive strategy. In high risk it is expedient to employ it immediately, in medium - without delay allowed in recommended time intervals. Rentgenoendovascular restoration of IRA conducted during one procedure is an optimal type of myocardial revascularization in many patients including those with multiple CA involvement. Method of choice in patients with stenoses of left CA trunk or its equivalents is surgical revascularization of the myocardium. Detection of indications for myocardial revascularization in patients with unstable angina including those at medium and low risk confirms necessity of application of early invasive strategy as conventional strategy ensuring timeliness of pathogenetic treatment. Absence of indications to myocardial revascularization in a limited group of patients gives an opportunity to clarify diagnosis, prescribe drug therapy and prevent unjustified hospitalizations.

  15. Recombinant Thrombomodulin (Solulin) Ameliorates Early Intestinal Radiation Toxicity in a Preclinical Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rupak; Wang, Junru; Garg, Sarita; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal radiation toxicity occurs during and after abdominopelvic radiotherapy. Endothelial cells play a significant role in modulating radiation-induced intestinal damage. We demonstrated that the endothelial cell surface receptor thrombomodulin (TM), a protein with anticoagulant, antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties, mitigates radiation-induced lethality in mice. The goal of this study was to determine whether recombinant TM (Solulin) can protect the intestine from toxicity in a clinically relevant rat model. A 4 cm loop of rat small bowel was exposed to fractionated 5 Gy X radiation for 9 consecutive days. The animals were randomly assigned to receive daily subcutaneous injections of vehicle or Solulin (3 mg/kg/day or 10 mg/kg/day) for 27 days starting 4 days before irradiation. Early intestinal injury was assessed two weeks after irradiation by quantitative histology, morphometry, immunohistochemistry and luminol bioluminescence imaging. Solulin treatment significantly ameliorated intestinal radiation injury, made evident by a decrease in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) immunoreactivity, collagen-I deposition, radiation injury score (RIS) and intestinal serosal thickening. These findings indicate the need for further development of Solulin as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic agent to mitigate radiation-induced intestinal damage. PMID:27459702

  16. Early and Late Damages in Chromosome 3 of Human Lymphocytes After Radiation Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunagawa, Mayumi; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Kahdim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    Tumor formation in humans or animals is a multi-step process. An early stage of cancer development is believed to be genomic instability (GI) which accelerates the mutation rate in the descendants of the cells surviving radiation exposure. GI is defined as elevated or persistent genetic damages occurring many generations after the cells are exposed. While early studies have demonstrated radiation-induced GI in several cell types as detected in endpoints such as mutation, apoptosis and damages in chromosomes, the dependence of GI on the quality of radiation remains uncertain. To investigate GI in human lymphocytes induced by both low- and high-LET radiation, we initially exposed white blood cells collected from healthy subjects to gamma rays in vitro, and cultured the cells for multiple generations. Chromosome aberrations were analyzed in cells collected at first mitosis post irradiation and at several intervals during the culture period. Among a number of biological endpoints planned for the project, the multi-color banding fluorescent in situ hybridization (mBAND) allows identification of inversions that were expected to be stable. We present here early and late chromosome aberrations detected with mBAND in chromosome 3 after gamma exposure. Comparison of chromosome damages in between human lymphocytes and human epithelial cells is also discussed

  17. Maps of Dust Infrared Emission for Use in Estimation of Reddening and Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Foregrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlegel, David J.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Davis, Marc

    1998-06-01

    standard reddening law and use the colors of elliptical galaxies to measure the reddening per unit flux density of 100 μm emission. We find consistent calibration using the B-R color distribution of a sample of the 106 brightest cluster ellipticals, as well as a sample of 384 ellipticals with B-V and Mg line strength measurements. For the latter sample, we use the correlation of intrinsic B-V versus Mg2 index to tighten the power of the test greatly. We demonstrate that the new maps are twice as accurate as the older Burstein-Heiles reddening estimates in regions of low and moderate reddening. The maps are expected to be significantly more accurate in regions of high reddening. These dust maps will also be useful for estimating millimeter emission that contaminates cosmic microwave background radiation experiments and for estimating soft X-ray absorption. We describe how to access our maps readily for general use.

  18. Effects of gamma radiation on the early developmental stages of Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Praveen Kumar, M K; Shyama, S K; Kashif, Shamim; Dubey, S K; Avelyno, D'costa; Sonaye, B H; Kadam Samit, B; Chaubey, R C

    2017-08-01

    The zebrafish is gaining importance as a popular vertebrate model organism and is widely employed in ecotoxicological studies, especially for the biomonitoring of pollution in water bodies. There is limited data on the genetic mechanisms governing the adverse health effects in regards to an early developmental exposure to gamma radiation. In the present study zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to 1, 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10Gy of gamma radiation at 3h post fertilization (hpf). Different developmental toxicity endpoints were investigated. Further, expression of genes associated with the development and DNA damage i.e. (sox2 sox19a and p53) were evaluated using Quantitative PCR (qPCR). The significant changes in the expression of sox2 sox19a and p53 genes were observed. This data was supported the developmental defects observed in the zebrafish embryo exposed to gamma radiation such as i.e. increased DNA damage, decreased hatching rate, increase in median hatching time, decreased body length, increased mortality rate, increased morphological deformities. Further, study shows that the potential ecotoxicological threat of gamma radiation on the early developmental stages of zebrafish. Further, it revealed that the above parameters can be used as predictive biomarkers of gamma radiation exposure. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Early administration of IL-6RA does not prevent radiation-induced lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Toshiyuki; Yamazaki, Hideya; Teshima, Teruki; Kihara, Ayaka; Suzumoto, Yuko; Inoue, Takehiro; Nishimoto, Norihiro; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2010-04-07

    Radiation pneumonia and subsequent radiation lung fibrosis are major dose-limiting complications for patients undergoing thoracic radiotherapy. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pleiotropic cytokine and plays important roles in the regulation of immune response and inflammation. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether anti-IL-6 monoclonal receptor antibody (IL-6RA) could ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury in mice. BALB/cAnNCrj mice having received thoracic irradiation of 21 Gy were injected intraperitoneally with IL-6RA (MR16-1) or control rat IgG twice, immediately and seven days after irradiation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to examine the plasma level of IL-6 and serum amyloid A (SAA). Lung injury was assessed by histological staining with haematoxylin and eosin or Azan, measuring lung weight, and hydroxyproline. The mice treated with IL-6RA did not survive significantly longer than the rat IgG control. We observed marked up-regulation of IL-6 in mice treated with IL-6RA 150 days after irradiation, whereas IL-6RA temporarily suppressed early radiation-induced increase in the IL-6 release level. Histopathologic assessment showed no differences in lung section or lung weight between mice treated with IL-6RA and control. Our findings suggest that early treatment with IL-6RA after irradiation alone does not protect against radiation-induced lung injury.

  20. Prospective Study of Local Control and Late Radiation Toxicity After Intraoperative Radiation Therapy Boost for Early Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, David W.; Marvelde, Luc te; Chua, Boon H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report the local recurrence rate and late toxicity of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) boost to the tumor bed using the Intrabeam System followed by external-beam whole-breast irradiation (WBI) in women with early-stage breast cancer in a prospective single-institution study. Methods and Materials: Women with breast cancer ≤3 cm were recruited between February 2003 and May 2005. After breast-conserving surgery, a single dose of 5 Gy IORT boost was delivered using 50-kV x-rays to a depth of 10 mm from the applicator surface. This was followed by WBI to a total dose of 50 Gy in 25 fractions. Patients were reviewed at regular, predefined intervals. Late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring systems. Results: Fifty-five patients completed both IORT boost and external-beam WBI. Median follow-up was 3.3 years (range, 1.4-4.1 years). There was no reported locoregional recurrence or death. One patient developed distant metastases. Grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis was detected in 29 (53%) and 8 patients (15%), respectively. Conclusions: The use of IORT as a tumor bed boost using kV x-rays in breast-conserving therapy was associated with good local control but a clinically significant rate of grade 2 and 3 subcutaneous fibrosis.

  1. Radiation hazards of radio frequency waves on the early embryonic development of Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harkless, Ryan; Al-Quraishi, Muntather; Vagula, Mary C.

    2014-06-01

    With the growing use of wireless devices in almost all day-to-day activities, exposure to radio-frequency radiation has become an immediate health concern. It is imperative that the effects of such radiation not only on humans, but also on other organisms be well understood. In particular, it is critical to understand if RF radiation has any bearing on the gene expression during embryonic development, as this is a crucial and delicate phase for any organism. Owing to possible effects that RF radiation may have on gene expression, it is essential to explore the carcinogenic or teratogenic properties that it may show. This study observed the effects of RF radiation emitted from a cellular telephone on the embryonic development of zebra fish. The expression of the gene shha plays a key role in the early development of the fish. This gene has homologs in humans as well as in other model organisms. Additionally, several biomarkers indicative of cell stress were examined: including lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Results show a significant decrease in the expression of shha, a significant decrease in LDH activity. There was no significant increase in SOD and LPO activity. No morphological abnormalities were observed in the developing embryos. At present, these results indicate that exposure to cell phone radiation may have a suppressive effect on expression of shha in D. rerio, though such exposure does not appear to cause morphological detriments. More trials are underway to corroborate these results.

  2. COLLAPSE OF MASSIVE MAGNETIZED DENSE CORES USING RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS: EARLY FRAGMENTATION INHIBITION

    SciTech Connect

    Commercon, Benoit; Henning, Thomas; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2011-11-20

    We report the results of radiation-magnetohydrodynamics calculations in the context of high-mass star formation, using for the first time a self-consistent model for photon emission (i.e., via thermal emission and in radiative shocks) and with the high resolution necessary to properly resolve magnetic braking effects and radiative shocks on scales <100 AU. We investigate the combined effects of magnetic field, turbulence, and radiative transfer on the early phases of the collapse and the fragmentation of massive dense cores. We identify a new mechanism that inhibits initial fragmentation of massive dense cores where magnetic field and radiative transfer interplay. We show that this interplay becomes stronger as the magnetic field strength increases. Magnetic braking is transporting angular momentum outward and is lowering the rotational support and is thus increasing the infall velocity. This enhances the radiative feedback owing to the accretion shock on the first core. We speculate that highly magnetized massive dense cores are good candidates for isolated massive star formation while moderately magnetized massive dense cores are more appropriate forming OB associations or small star clusters.

  3. Timing and Tempo of Early and Successive Adaptive Radiations in Macaronesia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Chul; McGowen, Michael R.; Lubinsky, Pesach; Barber, Janet C.; Mort, Mark E.; Santos-Guerra, Arnoldo

    2008-01-01

    The flora of Macaronesia, which encompasses five Atlantic archipelagos (Azores, Canaries, Madeira, Cape Verde, and Salvage), is exceptionally rich and diverse. Spectacular radiation of numerous endemic plant groups has made the Macaronesian islands an outstanding area for studies of evolution and speciation. Despite intensive investigation in the last 15 years, absolute age and rate of diversification are poorly known for the flora of Macaronesia. Here we report molecular divergence estimates and rates of diversification for five representative, putative rapid radiations of monophyletic endemic plant lineages across the core eudicot clade of flowering plants. Three discrete windows of colonization during the Miocene and early Pliocene are suggested for these lineages, all of which are inferred to have had a single colonization event followed by rapid radiation. Subsequent inter-archipelago dispersal events into Madeira and the Cape Verdes took place very recently during the late Pliocene and Pleistocene after initial diversification on the Canary Islands. The tempo of adaptive radiations differs among the groups, but is relatively rapid compared to continental and other island radiations. Our results demonstrate that opportunity for island colonization and successful radiation may have been constrained to discrete time periods of profound climatic and geological changes in northern African and the Mediterranean. PMID:18478126

  4. Biological effects of high ultraviolet radiation on early earth--a theoretical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Cockell, C S

    1998-08-21

    The surface of early Earth was exposed to both UVC radiation (< 280 nm) and higher doses of UVB (280-315 nm) compared with the surface of present day Earth. The degree to which this radiation environment acted as a selection pressure on organisms and biological systems has rarely been theoretically examined with respect to the biologically effective irradiances that ancient organisms would receive. Here action spectra for DNA inactivation and isolated chloroplast inhibition are used to estimate biologically effective irradiances on archean Earth. Comparisons are made with present day Earth. The theoretical estimations on the UV radiation screening required to protect DNA on archean Earth compare well with field and laboratory observations on protection strategies found in present day microbial communities. They suggest that many physical and biological methods may have been effective and would have allowed for the radiation of life even under the high UV radiation regimes of archean Earth. Such strategies would also have provided effective reduction of photoinhibition by UV radiation. The data also suggest that the UV regime on the surface of Mars is not a life limiting factor per se, although other environmental factors such as desiccation and low temperatures may contribute towards the apparent lack of a surface biota.

  5. Early Cenozoic radiations in the Antarctic marine realm and their evolutionary implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crame, Alistair

    2014-05-01

    The extensive and very well exposed Late Cretaceous - Early Paleogene sedimentary succession of Seymour Island, NE Antarctic Peninsula presents a unique opportunity to examine Early Cenozoic evolutionary radiations in a variety of macrofaunal taxa. Building on the extensive pioneer studies by US and Argentinian palaeontologists, recent investigations have focused on refining litho-, bio- and chronostratigraphies, and taxonomic revisions to a number of key groups. Within the numerically dominant Mollusca, the balance of faunas changes significantly across the Cretaceous/Paleogene boundary, with gastropods becoming numerically dominant for the first time in the Early Paleocene Sobral Formation (SF). At this level seven of the 31 gastropod genera present (= 23%) can be referred to modern Southern Ocean taxa and the same figure is maintained in the Early Eocene La Meseta Formation (LMF) where 21 of 63 genera are modern. A major reason for the rise of the gastropods in the earliest Cenozoic of Antarctica is a significant radiation of the Neogastropoda, which today forms one of the largest clades in the sea. 50% of the SF gastropod fauna and 53% of the LMF at the species level are neogastropods. This important burst of speciation is linked to a major pulse of global warming from ~63 - 43Ma when warm temperate conditions prevailed for long intervals of time at 65ºS. The marked Early Paleogene radiation of neogastropods in Antarctica represents a distinct pulse of southern high-latitude taxa that was coeval with similar tropical/subtropical radiations in localities such as the US Gulf Coast and NW Europe. Thus it would appear that the Early Cenozoic radiation of this major taxon was truly global in scale and not just confined to one latitudinal belt. Whereas it is possible to regard a significant proportion of the modern bivalve fauna as relicts, and thus Antarctica as an evolutionary refugium, or sink, it is much less easy to do so for the Neogastropoda. At least in the

  6. A mentor training program improves mentoring competency for researchers working with early-career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mallory O; Gandhi, Monica

    2015-08-01

    Mentoring is increasingly recognized as a critical element in supporting successful careers in academic research in medicine and related disciplines, particularly for trainees and early career investigators from underrepresented backgrounds. Mentoring is often executed ad hoc; there are limited programs to train faculty to become more effective mentors, and the few that exist have a dearth of empirical support of their impact. In 2013, we recruited 34 faculty from across the US engaged in HIV-related clinical research to participate in a 2-day Mentoring the Mentors workshop. The workshop included didactic and interactive content focused on a range of topics, such as mentor-mentee communication, leadership styles, emotional intelligence, understanding the impact of diversity (unconscious bias, microaggressions, discrimination, tokenism) for mentees, and specific tools and techniques for effective mentoring. Pre- and post-workshop online evaluations documented high rates of satisfaction with the program and statistically significant improvements in self-appraised mentoring skills (e.g. addressing diversity in mentoring, communication with mentees, aligning mentor-mentee expectations), as assessed via a validated mentoring competency tool. This is the first mentoring training program focused on enhancing mentors' abilities to nurture investigators of diversity, filling an important gap, and evaluation results offer support for its effectiveness. Results suggest a need for refinement and expansion of the program and for more comprehensive, long-term evaluation of distal mentoring outcomes for those who participate in the program.

  7. Warming early Mars with carbon dioxide clouds that scatter infrared radiation.

    PubMed

    Forget, F; Pierrehumbert, R T

    1997-11-14

    Geomorphic evidence that Mars was warm enough to support flowing water about 3.8 billion years ago presents a continuing enigma that cannot be explained by conventional greenhouse warming mechanisms. Model calculations show that the surface of early Mars could have been warmed through a scattering variant of the greenhouse effect, resulting from the ability of the carbon dioxide ice clouds to reflect the outgoing thermal radiation back to the surface. This process could also explain how Earth avoided an early irreversible glaciation and could extend the size of the habitable zone on extrasolar planets around stars.

  8. Cell phone radiations affect early growth of Vigna radiata (mung bean) through biochemical alterations.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ved Parkash; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2010-01-01

    The indiscriminate use of wireless technologies, particularly of cell phones, has increased the health risks among living organisms including plants. We investigated the impact of cell phone electromagentic field (EMF) radiations (power density, 8.55 microW cm(-2)) on germination, early growth, proteins and carbohydrate contents, and activities of some enzymes in Vigna radiata. Cell phone EMF radiations significantly reduced the seedling length and dry weight of V radiata after exposure for 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h. Furthermore, the contents of proteins and carbohydrates were reduced in EMF-exposed plants. However, the activities of proteases, alpha-amylases, beta-amylases, polyphenol oxidases, and peroxidases were enhanced in EMF-exposed radicles indicating their role in providing protection against EMF-induced stress. The study concludes that cell phone EMFs impair early growth of V radiata seedlings by inducing biochemical changes.

  9. Information Needs of Older Women With Early-Stage Breast Cancer When Making Radiation Therapy Decisions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Yi; Kelly, Gabrielle; Gross, Cary; Killelea, Brigid K; Mougalian, Sarah; Presley, Carolyn; Fraenkel, Liana; Evans, Suzanne B

    2017-07-15

    To identify the information older women with early-stage breast cancer need when making radiation therapy decisions, and who patients identify as the main decision maker. We surveyed (through face-to-face interview, telephone, or mail) women aged ≥65 years who received lumpectomy and were considering or receiving adjuvant radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer. The survey instrument was constructed with input from patient and professional advisory committees, including breast cancer survivors, advocates of breast cancer care and aging, clinicians, and researchers. Participants rated the importance (on a 4-point scale) of 24 statements describing the benefits, side effects, impact on daily life, and other issues of radiation therapy in relation to radiation therapy decision making. Participants also designated who was considered the key decision maker. The response rate was 56.4% (93 of 165). Mean age was 72.5 years, ranging from 65 to 93 years. More than 96% of participants indicated they were the main decision maker on receiving radiation therapy. There was wide variation in information needs regarding radiation therapy decision making. Participants rated a mean of 18 (range, 3-24) items as "essential." Participants rated items related to benefits highest, followed by side effects. Participants who were older than 75 years rated 13.9 questions as essential, whereas participants aged ≤74 years rated 18.7 as essential (P=.018). Older women desire information and have more agency and input in the decision-making process than prior literature would suggest. The variation in information needs indicates that future decision support tools should provide options to select what information would be of interest to the participants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Early development and characterization of a DNA-based radiation dosimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avarmaa, Kirsten A.

    It is the priority of first responders to minimize damage to persons and infrastructure in the case of a nuclear emergency due to an accident or deliberate terrorist attack -- if this emergency includes a radioactive hazard, first responders require a simple-to-use, accurate and complete dosimeter for radiation protection purposes in order to minimize the health risk to these individuals and the general population at large. This work consists of the early evaluation of the design and performance of a biologically relevant dosimeter which uses DNA material that can respond to the radiation of any particle type. The construct consists of fluorescently tagged strands of DNA. The signalling components of this dosimeter are also investigated for their sensitivity to radiation damage and light exposure. The dual-labelled dosimeter that is evaluated in this work gave a measurable response to gamma radiation at dose levels of 10 Gy for the given detector design and experimental setup. Further testing outside of this work confirmed this finding and indicated a working range of 100 mGy to 10 Gy using a custom-built fluorimeter as part of a larger CRTI initiative. Characterization of the chromatic components of the dosimeter showed that photobleaching is not expected to have an effect on dosimeter performance, but that radiation can damage the non-DNA signalling components at higher dose levels, although this damage is minimal at lower doses over the expected operating ranges. This work therefore describes the early steps in the quantification of the behaviour of the DNA dosimeter as a potential biologically-based device to measure radiation dose.

  11. Activation of Protease Activated Receptor 2 by Exogenous Agonist Exacerbates Early Radiation Injury in Rat Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Junru; Boerma, Marjan; Kulkarni, Ashwini; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR{sub 2}) is highly expressed throughout the gut and regulates the inflammatory, mitogenic, fibroproliferative, and nociceptive responses to injury. PAR{sub 2} is strikingly upregulated and exhibits increased activation in response to intestinal irradiation. We examined the mechanistic significance of radiation enteropathy development by assessing the effect of exogenous PAR{sub 2} activation. Methods and Materials: Rat small bowel was exposed to localized single-dose radiation (16.5 Gy). The PAR{sub 2} agonist (2-furoyl-LIGRLO-NH{sub 2}) or vehicle was injected intraperitoneally daily for 3 days before irradiation (before), for 7 days after irradiation (after), or both 3 days before and 7 days after irradiation (before-after). Early and delayed radiation enteropathy was assessed at 2 and 26 weeks after irradiation using quantitative histologic examination, morphometry, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results: The PAR{sub 2} agonist did not elicit changes in the unirradiated (shielded) intestine. In contrast, in the irradiated intestine procured 2 weeks after irradiation, administration of the PAR{sub 2} agonist was associated with more severe mucosal injury and increased intestinal wall thickness in all three treatment groups (p <.05) compared with the vehicle-treated controls. The PAR{sub 2} agonist also exacerbated the radiation injury score, serosal thickening, and mucosal inflammation (p <.05) in the before and before-after groups. The short-term exogenous activation of PAR{sub 2} did not affect radiation-induced intestinal injury at 26 weeks. Conclusion: The results of the present study support a role for PAR{sub 2} activation in the pathogenesis of early radiation-induced intestinal injury. Pharmacologic PAR{sub 2} antagonists might have the potential to reduce the intestinal side effects of radiotherapy and/or as countermeasures in radiologic accidents or terrorism scenarios.

  12. Involved Node Radiation Therapy: An Effective Alternative in Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Petersen, Peter M.; Specht, Lena

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: The involved node radiation therapy (INRT) strategy was introduced for patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) to reduce the risk of late effects. With INRT, only the originally involved lymph nodes are irradiated. We present treatment outcome in a retrospective analysis using this strategy in a cohort of 97 clinical stage I-II HL patients. Methods and Materials: Patients were staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography scans, treated with adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine chemotherapy, and given INRT (prechemotherapy involved nodes to 30 Gy, residual masses to 36 Gy). Patients attended regular follow-up visits until 5 years after therapy. Results: The 4-year freedom from disease progression was 96.4% (95% confidence interval: 92.4%-100.4%), median follow-up of 50 months (range: 4-71 months). Three relapses occurred: 2 within the previous radiation field, and 1 in a previously uninvolved region. The 4-year overall survival was 94% (95% confidence interval: 88.8%-99.1%), median follow-up of 58 months (range: 4-91 months). Early radiation therapy toxicity was limited to grade 1 (23.4%) and grade 2 (13.8%). During follow-up, 8 patients died, none from HL, 7 malignancies were diagnosed, and 5 patients developed heart disease. Conclusions: INRT offers excellent tumor control and represents an effective alternative to more extended radiation therapy in the combined modality treatment for early-stage HL.

  13. Exposure to indoor background radiation and urinary concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, a marker of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Sperati, A; Abeni, D D; Tagesson, C; Forastiere, F; Miceli, M; Axelson, O

    1999-01-01

    We investigated whether exposure to indoor [gamma]-radiation and radon might be associated with enough free radical formation to increase urinary concentrations of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a sensitive marker of DNA damage, due to a hydroxyl radical attack at the C8 of guanine. Indoor radon and [gamma]-radiation levels were measured in 32 dwellings for 6 months by solid-state nuclear track detectors and thermoluminescent dosimeters, respectively. Urine samples for 8-OHdG determinations were obtained from 63 healthy adult subjects living in the measured dwellings. An overall tendency toward increasing levels of 8-OHdG with increasing levels of radon and [gamma]-radiation was seen in the females, presumably due to their estimated longer occupancy in the dwellings measured. Different models were considered for females, with the steepest slopes obtained for [gamma]-radiation with a coefficient of 0.500 (log nmol/l of 8-OHdG for each unit increase of [gamma]-radiation on a log scale) (p<0.01), and increasing to 0.632 (p = 0.035), but with larger variance, when radon was included in the model. In conclusion, there seems to be an effect of indoor radioactivity on the urinary excretion of 8-OHdG for females, who are estimated to have a higher occupancy in the dwellings measured than for males, for whom occupational and other agents may also influence 8-OHdG excretion. ree radicals; [gamma]-radiation; radon. PMID:10064551

  14. Radiation protection program for early detection of breast cancer in a mammography facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagomez Casimiro, Mariana; Ruiz Trejo, Cesar; Espejo Fonseca, Ruby

    2014-11-01

    Mammography is the best tool for early detection of Breast Cancer. In this diagnostic radiology modality it is necessary to establish the criteria to ensure the proper use and operation of the equipment used to obtain mammographic images in order to contribute to the safe use of ionizing radiation. The aim of the work was to implement at FUCAM-AC the radiation protection program which must be established for patients and radiation workers according to Mexican standards [1-4]. To achieve this goal, radiation protection and quality control manuals were elaborated [5]. Furthermore, a quality control program (QCP) in the mammography systems (analog/digital), darkroom included, has been implemented. Daily sensitometry, non-variability of the image quality, visualizing artifacts, revision of the equipment mechanical stability, compression force and analysis of repetition studies are some of the QCP routine tests that must be performed by radiological technicians of this institution as a set of actions to ensure the protection of patients. Image quality and patients dose assessment were performed on 4 analog equipment installed in 2 mobile units. In relation to dose assessment, all equipment passed the acceptance criteria (<3 mGy per projection). The image quality test showed that most images (70%)- presented artifacts. A brief summary of the results of quality control tests applied to the equipment and film processor are presented. To maintain an adequate level of quality and safety at FUCAM-AC is necessary that the proposed radiation protection program in this work is applied.

  15. Effect of ozone oxidative preconditioning in preventing early radiation-induced lung injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bakkal, B H; Gultekin, F A; Guven, B; Turkcu, U O; Bektas, S; Can, M

    2013-09-01

    Ionizing radiation causes its biological effects mainly through oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species. Previous studies showed that ozone oxidative preconditioning attenuated pathophysiological events mediated by reactive oxygen species. As inhalation of ozone induces lung injury, the aim of this study was to examine whether ozone oxidative preconditioning potentiates or attenuates the effects of irradiation on the lung. Rats were subjected to total body irradiation, with or without treatment with ozone oxidative preconditioning (0.72 mg/kg). Serum proinflammatory cytokine levels, oxidative damage markers, and histopathological analysis were compared at 6 and 72 h after total body irradiation. Irradiation significantly increased lung malondialdehyde levels as an end-product of lipoperoxidation. Irradiation also significantly decreased lung superoxide dismutase activity, which is an indicator of the generation of oxidative stress and an early protective response to oxidative damage. Ozone oxidative preconditioning plus irradiation significantly decreased malondialdehyde levels and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, which might indicate protection of the lung from radiation-induced lung injury. Serum tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta levels, which increased significantly following total body irradiation, were decreased with ozone oxidative preconditioning. Moreover, ozone oxidative preconditioning was able to ameliorate radiation-induced lung injury assessed by histopathological evaluation. In conclusion, ozone oxidative preconditioning, repeated low-dose intraperitoneal administration of ozone, did not exacerbate radiation-induced lung injury, and, on the contrary, it provided protection against radiation-induced lung damage.

  16. Gaugessence: a dark energy model with early time radiation-like equation of state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrabi, Ahmad; Maleknejad, Azade; Kamali, Vahid

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we study a new quintessence model associated with non-Abelian gauge fields, minimally coupled to Einstein gravity. This gauge theory has been recently introduced and studied as an inflationary model, called gauge-flation. Here, however, we are interested in the late time cosmology of the model in the presence of matter and radiation to explain the present time accelerating Universe. During the radiation and matter eras, the gauge field tracks radiation and basically acts like a dark radiation sector. As we approach lower redshifts, the dark component takes the form of a dark energy source which eventually becomes the dominate part of the energy budget of the Universe. Due to the tracking feature of our model, solutions with different initial values are attracted to a common trajectory. The existence of early dark radiation is a robust prediction of our model which contributes to the effective number of relativistic species, N_{eff} and has its own interesting observational features.

  17. Radiation protection program for early detection of breast cancer in a mammography facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mariana, Villagomez Casimiro E-mail: cesar@fisica.unam.mx; Cesar, Ruiz Trejo E-mail: cesar@fisica.unam.mx; Ruby, Espejo Fonseca

    2014-11-07

    Mammography is the best tool for early detection of Breast Cancer. In this diagnostic radiology modality it is necessary to establish the criteria to ensure the proper use and operation of the equipment used to obtain mammographic images in order to contribute to the safe use of ionizing radiation. The aim of the work was to implement at FUCAM-AC the radiation protection program which must be established for patients and radiation workers according to Mexican standards [1–4]. To achieve this goal, radiation protection and quality control manuals were elaborated [5]. Furthermore, a quality control program (QCP) in the mammography systems (analog/digital), darkroom included, has been implemented. Daily sensitometry, non-variability of the image quality, visualizing artifacts, revision of the equipment mechanical stability, compression force and analysis of repetition studies are some of the QCP routine tests that must be performed by radiological technicians of this institution as a set of actions to ensure the protection of patients. Image quality and patients dose assessment were performed on 4 analog equipment installed in 2 mobile units. In relation to dose assessment, all equipment passed the acceptance criteria (<3 mGy per projection). The image quality test showed that most images (70%)– presented artifacts. A brief summary of the results of quality control tests applied to the equipment and film processor are presented. To maintain an adequate level of quality and safety at FUCAM-AC is necessary that the proposed radiation protection program in this work is applied.

  18. Scientific background of contemporary approach in the priority areas of medical science in the field of radiation medicine and radiobiology.

    PubMed

    Chumak, A A; Medvedovska, N V; Ovsannikova, L M

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To analyze the results of scientific research on the problems of radiation medicine and radiobiology for the further outlining of the priority fields of research in this area. MATERIALS. Perspective plans and annual summary of research (R & D) NAMS of Ukraine, interim and final reports on implementation of research, reports on the activities of institutions, thematic scientific publications. METHODS. Semantic and content analysis, bibliometry, historical and logical analysis. RESULTS. The definition of major oncological risks of radiation effects, study of radiation risks of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, cognitive effects and cataract in liquidators of the Chornobyl nuclear power plant accident, study of transgenic effects of the brain irradiation, other organs and systems in various stages of ontogenesis in exposed in utero, in offspring of exposed parents; study of the effects of occupational exposure were recognized as perspective and requiring further research in radiation medicine. CONCLUSION. Issues of NNCRM scientific activity are consistent with priority areas of research in Ukraine defined by the Law "On priority directions of science and technology", namely, aimed at substantiating of the development and preservation of human potential, aimed at the creation of modern technologies on prevention and treatment of most common diseases. Chumak A. A., Medvedovska N. V., Ovsjannikova L. M. 2013.

  19. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  20. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  1. Exact solutions of the Klein–Gordon equation in the Kerr–Newman background and Hawking radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira, H.S.; Bezerra, V.B.; Muniz, C.R.

    2014-11-15

    This work considers the influence of the gravitational field produced by a charged and rotating black hole (Kerr–Newman spacetime) on a charged massive scalar field. We obtain exact solutions of both angular and radial parts of the Klein–Gordon equation in this spacetime, which are given in terms of the confluent Heun functions. From the radial solution, we obtain the exact wave solutions near the exterior horizon of the black hole, and discuss the Hawking radiation of charged massive scalar particles. - Highlights: • The covariant Klein–Gordon equation for a charged massive scalar field in the Kerr–Newman black hole is solved. • Both angular and radial parts are transformed to a Heun-type equation. • The resulting Hawking radiation spectrum of scalar particles has a thermal character.

  2. Blazar Duty-Cycle at Gamma-Ray Frequecies: Constraints From Extragalactic Background Radiation And Prospects for AGILE And GLAST

    SciTech Connect

    Pittori, Carlotta; Cavazzuti, Elisabetta; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Giommi, Paolo

    2011-11-29

    We take into account the constraints from the observed extragalactic {gamma}-ray background to estimate the maximum duty cycle allowed for a selected sample of WMAP Blazars, in order to be detectable by AGILE and GLAST {gamma}-ray experiments. For the nominal sensitivity values of both instruments, we identify a subset of sources which can in principle be detectable also in a steady state without over-predicting the extragalactic background. This work is based on the results of a recently derived Blazar radio LogN-LogS obtained by combining several multi-frequency surveys.

  3. Roles and types of radiation in breast cancer treatment: early breast cancer, locoregionally advanced, and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Susan A; Lee, Steve P; Steinberg, Michael L

    2011-02-01

    To describe the current role of radiation therapy and specific types of radiation therapy used in the management of early stage, locoregionally advanced, and metastatic breast cancer. The role of radiation therapy in the management of breast cancer has not changed in recent decades, however methods of treatment delivery have advanced considerably. Hypofractionation and accelerated partial breast irradiation, which substantially reduce radiation treatment duration, have emerged as appropriate alternatives to conventional whole breast radiation in select patient subsets, and intensity modulated radiation therapy, breathing-adapted radiation therapy, and prone-positioning technique address challenging anatomic issues and reduce treatment-associated toxicity. Stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiation therapy continue to advance the management of distant metastatic disease. Radiation therapy plays a significant role in the management of early stage, locoregionally advanced, and metastatic breast cancer. Technological advances are allowing for greater patient convenience and comfort in locoregional radiation therapy delivery and for expanded radiation therapy indications in the setting of metastatic disease.

  4. Biophysical modelling of early and delayed radiation damage at chromosome level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, S.; Eidelman, Y.

    Exposure by ionising radiation increases cancer risk in human population Cancer is thought to originate from an altered expression of certain number of specific genes It is now widely recognised that chromosome aberrations CA are involved in stable change in expression of genes by gain or loss of their functions Thus CA can contribute to initiation or progression of cancer Therefore understanding mechanisms of CA formation in the course of cancer development might be valuable tool for quantification and prognosis of different stages of radiation carcinogenesis Early CA are defined as aberrations induced in first post-irradiation mitotic cycle The present work describes the original biophysical technique for early CA modelling It includes the following simulation steps the ionising particle track structure the structural organisation of all chromosomes in G 0 G 1 cell nucleus spatial distribution of radiation induced DNA double-strand breaks dsb within chromosomes dsb rejoining and misrejoining modelling cell cycle taking into account mitotic delay which results in complex time dependence of aberrant cells in first mitosis The results on prediction of dose-response curves for simple and complex CA measured in cells undergoing first division cycle are presented in comparison with recent experimental data There is increasing evidence that CA are also observed in descendents of irradiated cells many generations after direct DNA damage These delayed CA or chromosome instability CI are thought to be a manifestation of genome

  5. Early Cognitive Outcomes Following Proton Radiation in Pediatric Patients With Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pulsifer, Margaret B.; Sethi, Roshan V.; Kuhlthau, Karen A.; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I.

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: To report, from a longitudinal study, cognitive outcome in pediatric patients treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT) for central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients receiving PRT for medulloblastoma (38.3%), gliomas (18.3%), craniopharyngioma (15.0%), ependymoma (11.7%), and other CNS tumors (16.7%) were administered age-appropriate measures of cognitive abilities at or near PRT initiation (baseline) and afterward (follow-up). Patients were aged ≥6 years at baseline to ensure consistency in neurocognitive measures. Results: Mean age was 12.3 years at baseline; mean follow-up interval was 2.5 years. Treatment included prior surgical resection (76.7%) and chemotherapy (61.7%). Proton radiation therapy included craniospinal irradiation (46.7%) and partial brain radiation (53.3%). At baseline, mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ was 104.6; means of all 4 Index scores were also in the average range. At follow-up, no significant change was observed in mean Wechsler Full Scale IQ, Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning/Organization, or Working Memory. However, Processing Speed scores declined significantly (mean 5.2 points), with a significantly greater decline for subjects aged <12 years at baseline and those with the highest baseline scores. Cognitive outcome was not significantly related to gender, extent of radiation, radiation dose, tumor location, histology, socioeconomic status, chemotherapy, or history of surgical resection. Conclusions: Early cognitive outcomes after PRT for pediatric CNS tumors are encouraging, compared with published outcomes from photon radiation therapy.

  6. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: How Gamow calculated the temperature of the background radiation or a few words about the fine art of theoretical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, Artur D.

    1994-08-01

    In a paper published in 1953, i.e., more than a decade before the observational discovery of the cosmic microwave background radiation, George Gamow predicted theoretically the temperature of this radiation. He estimated it to be 7 K, which is very close to the subsequently measured value of about 3 K. Gamow found the present temperature of the background radiation on the basis of general formulas of cosmological dynamics. This prediction was in no way related to primordial nucleosynthesis.This circumstance has and is still causing misunderstanding in those cases in which the authors have raised doubts about Gamow's results, although an actual error has never been demonstrated. A detailed analysis makes it possible to understand how Gamow's calculation is possible. The problem lies in the fact that Gamow makes a certain additional implicit assumption which allows him to dispense with information on nucleosynthesis. This assumption is discussed in the context of the state of cosmology in the period from the fifties to the seventies, and of the current status of this branch of science.

  7. Inhalation exposures due to radon and thoron ((222)Rn and (220)Rn): Do they differ in high and normal background radiation areas in India?

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rosaline; Sapra, B K; Prajith, R; Rout, R P; Jalaluddin, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-09-01

    In India, High Background Radiation Areas (HBRAs) due to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil (thorium and, to a lesser extent, uranium), are located along some parts of the coastal tracts viz. the coastal belt of Kerala, Tamilnadu and Odisha. It is conjectured that these deposits will result in higher emissions of radon isotopes ((222)Rn and (220)Rn) and their daughter products as compared to Normal Background Radiation Areas (NBRAs). While the annual external dose rates contributed by gamma radiations in these areas are about 5-10 times higher, the extent of increase in the inhalation dose rates attributable to (222)Rn and (220)Rn and their decay products is not well quantified. Towards this, systematic indoor surveys were conducted wherein simultaneous measurements of time integrated (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay product concentrations was carried out in around 800 houses in the HBRAs of Kerala and Odisha to estimate the inhalation doses. All gas measurements were carried out using pin-hole cup dosimeters while the progeny measurements were with samplers and systems based on the Direct radon/thoron Progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS). To corroborate these passive measurements of decay products concentrations, active sampling was also carried out in a few houses. The results of the surveys provide a strong evidence to conclude that the inhalation doses due to (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay products in these HBRAs are in the same range as observed in the NBRAs in India.

  8. A record-based case-control study of natural background radiation and the incidence of childhood leukaemia and other cancers in Great Britain during 1980-2006.

    PubMed

    Kendall, G M; Little, M P; Wakeford, R; Bunch, K J; Miles, J C H; Vincent, T J; Meara, J R; Murphy, M F G

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a large record-based case-control study testing associations between childhood cancer and natural background radiation. Cases (27,447) born and diagnosed in Great Britain during 1980-2006 and matched cancer-free controls (36,793) were from the National Registry of Childhood Tumours. Radiation exposures were estimated for mother's residence at the child's birth from national databases, using the County District mean for gamma rays, and a predictive map based on domestic measurements grouped by geological boundaries for radon. There was 12% excess relative risk (ERR) (95% CI 3, 22; two-sided P=0.01) of childhood leukaemia per millisievert of cumulative red bone marrow dose from gamma radiation; the analogous association for radon was not significant, ERR 3% (95% CI -4, 11; P=0.35). Associations for other childhood cancers were not significant for either exposure. Excess risk was insensitive to adjustment for measures of socio-economic status. The statistically significant leukaemia risk reported in this reasonably powered study (power ~50%) is consistent with high-dose rate predictions. Substantial bias is unlikely, and we cannot identify mechanisms by which confounding might plausibly account for the association, which we regard as likely to be causal. The study supports the extrapolation of high-dose rate risk models to protracted exposures at natural background exposure levels.

  9. A record-based case-control study of natural background radiation and the incidence of childhood leukaemia and other cancers in Great Britain during 1980–2006

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Gerald M.; Little, Mark P.; Wakeford, Richard; Bunch, Kathryn J.; Miles, Jon C.H.; Vincent, Timothy J.; Meara, Jill R.; Murphy, Michael F.G.

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a large record-based case-control study testing associations between childhood cancer and natural background radiation. Cases (27 447) born and diagnosed in Great Britain during 1980–2006 and matched cancer-free controls (36 793) were from the National Registry of Childhood Tumours. Radiation exposures were estimated for mother’s residence at the child’s birth from national databases, using the County District mean for gamma-rays, and a predictive map based on domestic measurements grouped by geological boundaries for radon. There was 12% excess relative risk (95% CI 3, 22; 2-sided p=0.01) of childhood leukaemia per millisievert of cumulative red-bone-marrow dose from gamma-radiation; the analogous association for radon was not significant, excess relative risk 3% (95% CI −4, 11; p=0.35). Associations for other childhood cancers were not significant for either exposure. Excess risk was insensitive to adjustment for measures of socio-economic status. The statistically significant leukaemia risk reported in this reasonably-powered study (power ~50%) is consistent with high dose-rate predictions. Substantial bias is unlikely, and we cannot identify mechanisms by which confounding might plausibly account for the association, which we regard as likely to be causal. The study supports the extrapolation of high dose-rate risk models to protracted exposures at natural background exposure levels. PMID:22766784

  10. [An epidemiological method for studying the effect of elevated background radiation on the neuropsychic health of children].

    PubMed

    Sukhotina, N K; Kashnikova, A A; Preĭs, V B; Tatarova, I N; Terekhina, T V

    1993-01-01

    The children living in 4 regions of Russia contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl catastrophe were investigated. The control group consisted of the children of 2 regions which did not undergo this influence. The investigations were made 1-3 years after the catastrophe took place. An increase of etiologically non-clear asthenic-vegetative disorders was determined in the regions of radiation contamination. They were observed mainly among the children who had light residual organic cerebral deficiency. The authors cannot exclude the impact of the psychogenic factors.

  11. Radiation exposure and disease questionnaires of early entrants after the Hiroshima bombing.

    PubMed

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Endo, Satoru; Kawano, Noriyuki; Tanaka, Kenichi

    2012-03-01

    It is popularly known that people who entered into the ground-zero area shortly after the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffered from various syndromes similar to acute radiation effects. External exposures from neutron-induced radionuclides in soil have recently been reassessed based on DS02 calculations as functions of both distance from the hypocentres and elapsed time after the explosions. Significant exposure due to induced radiation can be determined for those who entered the area within 1000 m from the hypocentres shortly after the bombing. Although it was impossible to track the action of each of the survivors over the days or weeks following the bombings in order to make reliable dose estimates for their exposures to soil activation or fallout, four individuals among those early entrants were investigated here to describe useful information of what happened shortly after the bombing.

  12. Early growth dynamical implications for the steerability of stratospheric solar radiation management via sulfur aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benduhn, François; Schallock, Jennifer; Lawrence, Mark G.

    2016-09-01

    Aerosol growth dynamics may have implications for the steerability of stratospheric solar radiation management via sulfur particles. This paper derives a set of critical initial growth conditions that are analyzed as a function of two key parameters: the initial concentration of the injected sulfuric acid and its dilution rate with the surrounding air. Based upon this analysis, early aerosol growth dynamical regimes may be defined and classified in terms of their likelihood to serve as candidates for the controlled generation of a radiatively effective aerosol. Our results indicate that the regime that fulfills all critical conditions would require that airplane turbines be used to provide sufficient turbulence. The regime's parameter space is narrow and related to steep gradients, thus pointing to potential fine tuning requirements. More research, development, and testing would be required to refine our findings and determine their global-scale implications.

  13. The Origin and Early Radiation of Archosauriforms: Integrating the Skeletal and Footprint Record

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Massimo; Klein, Hendrik; Petti, Fabio Massimo; Ezcurra, Martín D.

    2015-01-01

    We present a holistic approach to the study of early archosauriform evolution by integrating body and track records. The ichnological record supports a Late Permian–Early Triassic radiation of archosauriforms not well documented by skeletal material, and new footprints from the Upper Permian of the southern Alps (Italy) provide evidence for a diversity not yet sampled by body fossils. The integrative study of body fossil and footprint data supports the hypothesis that archosauriforms had already undergone substantial taxonomic diversification by the Late Permian and that by the Early Triassic archosauromorphs attained a broad geographical distribution over most parts of Pangea. Analysis of body size, as deduced from track size, suggests that archosauriform average body size did not change significantly from the Late Permian to the Early Triassic. A survey of facies yielding both skeletal and track record indicate an ecological preference for inland fluvial (lacustrine) environments for early archosauromorphs. Finally, although more data is needed, Late Permian chirotheriid imprints suggest a shift from sprawling to erect posture in archosauriforms before the end-Permian mass extinction event. We highlight the importance of approaching palaeobiological questions by using all available sources of data, specifically through integrating the body and track fossil record. PMID:26083612

  14. Early transient radiation-induced brachial plexopathy in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Etiz, Durmus

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Early transient brachial plexopathy following radiotherapy (RT) in patients with head and neck cancer may be underreported and associated with a dose-response. Our purpose was to determine the incidence of early transient radiation-ınduced brachial plexopathy (RIBP) in patients receiving primary RT (± chemotherapy) for locally advanced head and neck cancer (HNC). Material and methods Twenty-seven locally advanced HNC patients who have no finding of brachial plexopathy at the diagnosis were evaluated 3 times by a specifically developed 13-item questionnaire for determining early transient RIBP. The 54 brachial plexus in 27 patients were delineated and dose volume histograms were calculated. Results Median follow-up period was 28 (range: 15–40) months. The mean BP volume was 7.9 ±3.6 cm3, and the mean and maximum doses to the BP were 45.3 (range: 32.3–59.3) Gy, and 59.4 (range: 41.4–70.3) Gy, respectively. Maximum dose to the BP was ≥ 70 Gy only in 2 nasopharyngeal cancer patients. Two (7%) early transient RIBP were reported at 7th and 8th month after RT under maximum 67.17 and 55.37 Gy, and mean 52.95 and 38.60 Gy RT doses. Conclusions Two (7%) early RIBP were seen in the patient group, although brachial plexus maximum doses were ≥ 66 Gy in 75% of patients. PMID:27095943

  15. The Origin and Early Radiation of Archosauriforms: Integrating the Skeletal and Footprint Record.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Massimo; Klein, Hendrik; Petti, Fabio Massimo; Ezcurra, Martín D

    2015-01-01

    We present a holistic approach to the study of early archosauriform evolution by integrating body and track records. The ichnological record supports a Late Permian-Early Triassic radiation of archosauriforms not well documented by skeletal material, and new footprints from the Upper Permian of the southern Alps (Italy) provide evidence for a diversity not yet sampled by body fossils. The integrative study of body fossil and footprint data supports the hypothesis that archosauriforms had already undergone substantial taxonomic diversification by the Late Permian and that by the Early Triassic archosauromorphs attained a broad geographical distribution over most parts of Pangea. Analysis of body size, as deduced from track size, suggests that archosauriform average body size did not change significantly from the Late Permian to the Early Triassic. A survey of facies yielding both skeletal and track record indicate an ecological preference for inland fluvial (lacustrine) environments for early archosauromorphs. Finally, although more data is needed, Late Permian chirotheriid imprints suggest a shift from sprawling to erect posture in archosauriforms before the end-Permian mass extinction event. We highlight the importance of approaching palaeobiological questions by using all available sources of data, specifically through integrating the body and track fossil record.

  16. Predicting the macroseismic intensity from early radiated P wave energy for on-site earthquake early warning in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brondi, P.; Picozzi, M.; Emolo, A.; Zollo, A.; Mucciarelli, M.

    2015-10-01

    Earthquake Early Warning Systems (EEWS) are potentially effective tools for risk mitigation in active seismic regions. The present study explores the possibility of predicting the macroseismic intensity within EEW timeframes using the squared velocity integral (IV2) measured on the early P wave signals, a proxy for the P wave radiated energy of earthquakes. This study shows that IV2 correlates better than the peak displacement measured on P waves with both the peak ground velocity and the Housner Intensity, with the latter being recognized by engineers as a reliable proxy for damage assessment. Therefore, using the strong motion recordings of the Italian Accelerometric Archive, a novel relationship between the parameter IV2 and the macroseismic intensity (IM) has been derived. The validity of this relationship has been assessed using the strong motion recordings of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia Strong Motion Data and Osservatorio Sismico delle Strutture databases, as well as, in the case of the MW 6, 29 May 2012 Emilia earthquake (Italy), comparing the predicted intensities with the ones observed after a macroseismic survey. Our results indicate that P wave IV2 can become a key parameter for the design of on-site EEWS, capable of proving real-time predictions of the IM at target sites.

  17. Radiation Therapy Planning for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Dabaja, Bouthaina S.; Filippi, Andrea R.; Illidge, Tim; Tsang, Richard; Ricardi, Umberto; Petersen, Peter M.; Schut, Deborah A.; Garcia, John; Headley, Jayne; Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit; Ragona, Riccardo; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Results: Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. Conclusions: RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs.

  18. Radiation therapy planning for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma: experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Maraldo, Maja V; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Filippi, Andrea R; Illidge, Tim; Tsang, Richard; Ricardi, Umberto; Petersen, Peter M; Schut, Deborah A; Garcia, John; Headley, Jayne; Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit; Ragona, Riccardo; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fraction size in radiation therapy for breast conservation in early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Brigid E; James, Melissa L; Lehman, Margot; Hider, Phil N; Jeffery, Mark; Francis, Daniel P; See, Adrienne M

    2016-07-18

    Shortening the duration of radiation therapy would benefit women with early breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery. It may also improve access to radiation therapy by improving efficiency in radiation oncology departments globally. This can only happen if the shorter treatment is as effective and safe as conventional radiation therapy. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2008 and updated in 2009. To assess the effect of altered radiation fraction size for women with early breast cancer who have had breast conserving surgery. We searched the Cochrane Breast Cancer Specialised Register (23 May 2015), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2015, Issue 4), MEDLINE (Jan 1996 to May 2015), EMBASE (Jan 1980 to May 2015), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) search portal (June 2010 to May 2015) and ClinicalTrials.gov (16 April 2015), reference lists of articles and relevant conference proceedings. No language or publication constraints were applied. Randomised controlled trials of altered fraction size versus conventional fractionation for radiation therapy in women with early breast cancer who had undergone breast conserving surgery. Two authors performed data extraction independently, with disagreements resolved by discussion. We sought missing data from trial authors. We studied 8228 women in nine studies. Eight out of nine studies were at low or unclear risk of bias. Altered fraction size (delivering radiation therapy in larger amounts each day but over fewer days than with conventional fractionation) did not have a clinically meaningful effect on: local recurrence-free survival (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.94, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.15, 7095 women, four studies, high-quality evidence), cosmetic outcome (Risk ratio (RR) 0.90, 95% CI 0.81 to 1.01, 2103 women, four studies, high-quality evidence) or overall survival (HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.03, 5685 women, three studies, high-quality evidence). Acute radiation skin toxicity (RR

  20. Measurements of background radiation levels around Indian station Bharati, during 33rd Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, A K; Prajith, Rama; Chinnaesakki, S; Pal, Rupali; Sathian, Deepa; Dhar, Ajay; Selvam, T Palani; Sapra, B K; Datta, D

    2017-02-01

    A comprehensive measurement of radioactivity concentrations of the primordial radionuclides (238)U, (232)Th and (40)K and their decay products in the soil samples collected from the sites of Indian research stations, Bharati and Maitri, at Antarctica was carried out using gamma spectrometric method. The activity concentrations in the soil samples of Bharati site were observed to be few times higher than of Maitri site. The major contributor to radioactivity content in the soil at Bharati site is (232)Th radionuclide in higher concentration. The gamma radiation levels based on the measured radioactivity of soil samples were calculated using the equation given in UNSCEAR 2000. The calculated radiation levels were compared with the measured values and found to correlate reasonably well. The study could be useful for the scientists working at Antarctica especially those at Indian station to take decision to avoid areas with higher radioactivity before erecting any facility for long term experiment or use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.