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Sample records for background synaptic inhibition

  1. Regulation of Cortical Dynamic Range by Background Synaptic Noise and Feedforward Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Khubieh, Ayah; Ratté, Stéphanie; Lankarany, Milad; Prescott, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    The cortex encodes a broad range of inputs. This breadth of operation requires sensitivity to weak inputs yet non-saturating responses to strong inputs. If individual pyramidal neurons were to have a narrow dynamic range, as previously claimed, then staggered all-or-none recruitment of those neurons would be necessary for the population to achieve a broad dynamic range. Contrary to this explanation, we show here through dynamic clamp experiments in vitro and computer simulations that pyramidal neurons have a broad dynamic range under the noisy conditions that exist in the intact brain due to background synaptic input. Feedforward inhibition capitalizes on those noise effects to control neuronal gain and thereby regulates the population dynamic range. Importantly, noise allows neurons to be recruited gradually and occludes the staggered recruitment previously attributed to heterogeneous excitation. Feedforward inhibition protects spike timing against the disruptive effects of noise, meaning noise can enable the gain control required for rate coding without compromising the precise spike timing required for temporal coding. PMID:26209846

  2. AMPA receptor inhibition by synaptically released zinc

    PubMed Central

    Kalappa, Bopanna I.; Anderson, Charles T.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    The vast amount of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the mammalian central nervous system is mediated by AMPA-subtype glutamate receptors (AMPARs). As a result, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission is implicated in nearly all aspects of brain development, function, and plasticity. Despite the central role of AMPARs in neurobiology, the fine-tuning of synaptic AMPA responses by endogenous modulators remains poorly understood. Here we provide evidence that endogenous zinc, released by single presynaptic action potentials, inhibits synaptic AMPA currents in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) and hippocampus. Exposure to loud sound reduces presynaptic zinc levels in the DCN and abolishes zinc inhibition, implicating zinc in experience-dependent AMPAR synaptic plasticity. Our results establish zinc as an activity-dependent, endogenous modulator of AMPARs that tunes fast excitatory neurotransmission and plasticity in glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26647187

  3. Synaptic background activity influences spatiotemporal integration in single pyramidal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bernander, O; Douglas, R J; Martin, K A; Koch, C

    1991-01-01

    The standard one-dimensional Rall cable model assumes that the electrotonic structure of neurons does not change in response to synaptic input. This model is used in a great number of both theoretical and anatomical-physiological structure-function studies. In particular, the membrane time constant, tau m, the somatic input resistance, Rin, and the electrotonic length are used to characterize single cells. However, these studies do not take into account that neurons are embedded in a network of spontaneously active cells. Synapses from these cells will contribute significantly to the membrane conductance, especially if recent evidence of very high specific membrane resistance, Rm = 100 k omega.cm2, is taken into account. We numerically simulated the electrical behavior of an anatomically reconstructed layer V cortical pyramidal cell receiving input from 4000 excitatory and 1000 inhibitory cells firing spontaneously at 0-7 Hz. We found that, over this range of synaptic background activity, tau m and Rin change by a factor of 10 (80-7 msec, 110-14 M omega) and the electrotonic length of the cell changes by a factor of 3. We show that this significantly changes the response of the cell to temporal desynchronized versus temporal synchronized synaptic input distributed throughout the neuron. Thus, the global activity of the network can control how individual cells perform spatial and temporal integration. PMID:1763072

  4. Extracellular ATP Hydrolysis Inhibits Synaptic Transmission by Increasing pH Buffering in the Synaptic Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Vroman, Rozan; Klaassen, Lauw J.; Howlett, Marcus H.C.; Cenedese, Valentina; Klooster, Jan; Sjoerdsma, Trijntje; Kamermans, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms), highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca2+ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form of synaptic modulation

  5. Putative synaptic mechanisms of inhibition in Limulus lateral eye.

    PubMed

    Adolph, A R

    1976-04-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) perfusion of a thin section of Limulus lateral eye hyperpolarizes retinular and eccentric cell membrane potential, and blocks spike action potentials fired by the eccenteric cell. The indoleamine does not directly affect retinular cell receptor potential or eccenteric cell generator potential in response to light stimuli. LSD perfusion blocks both this inhibitory action of 5-HT and light-evoked, synaptically mediated, lateral inhibition. Iontophoretic application of 5-HT to the synaptic neuropil produces shorter latency and duration and larger amplitude of inhibition than does the perfusion technique. This inhibition is dose dependent; the accompanying inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) appears to have an equilibrium potential more hyperpolarized than normal resting potential levels of ca. -50 mV. IPSP amplitude is sensitive to extracellular potassium ion concentration: it increases with decreased [K+]0 and decreases with increased [K+]0. LSD blocks the inhibition produced by iontophoretic application of 5-HT. Interaction between light-evoked, natural synaptic transmitter-mediated IPSP's and 5-HT IPSP's suggests a common postsynaptic receptor or transmitter-receptor-permeability change mechanism.

  6. Cannabidiol inhibits synaptic transmission in rat hippocampal cultures and slices via multiple receptor pathways

    PubMed Central

    Ledgerwood, CJ; Greenwood, SM; Brett, RR; Pratt, JA; Bushell, TJ

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cannabidiol (CBD) has emerged as an interesting compound with therapeutic potential in several CNS disorders. However, whether it can modulate synaptic activity in the CNS remains unclear. Here, we have investigated whether CBD modulates synaptic transmission in rat hippocampal cultures and acute slices. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effect of CBD on synaptic transmission was examined in rat hippocampal cultures and acute slices using whole cell patch clamp and standard extracellular recordings respectively. KEY RESULTS Cannabidiol decreased synaptic activity in hippocampal cultures in a concentration-dependent and Pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The effects of CBD in culture were significantly reduced in the presence of the cannabinoid receptor (CB1) inverse agonist, LY320135 but were unaffected by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY100135. In hippocampal slices, CBD inhibited basal synaptic transmission, an effect that was abolished by the proposed CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, in addition to LY320135 and WAY100135. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Cannabidiol reduces synaptic transmission in hippocampal in vitro preparations and we propose a role for both 5-HT1A and CB1 receptors in these CBD-mediated effects. These data offer some mechanistic insights into the effects of CBD and emphasize that further investigations into the actions of CBD in the CNS are required in order to elucidate the full therapeutic potential of CBD. PMID:20825410

  7. Irregular activity arises as a natural consequence of synaptic inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.; Rubin, J. E.; Diekman, C. O.

    2013-12-15

    Irregular neuronal activity is observed in a variety of brain regions and states. This work illustrates a novel mechanism by which irregular activity naturally emerges in two-cell neuronal networks featuring coupling by synaptic inhibition. We introduce a one-dimensional map that captures the irregular activity occurring in our simulations of conductance-based differential equations and mathematically analyze the instability of fixed points corresponding to synchronous and antiphase spiking for this map. We find that the irregular solutions that arise exhibit expansion, contraction, and folding in phase space, as expected in chaotic dynamics. Our analysis shows that these features are produced from the interplay of synaptic inhibition with sodium, potassium, and leak currents in a conductance-based framework and provides precise conditions on parameters that ensure that irregular activity will occur. In particular, the temporal details of spiking dynamics must be present for a model to exhibit this irregularity mechanism and must be considered analytically to capture these effects.

  8. Synaptic Inhibition in Avian Interaural Level Difference Sound Localizing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Synaptic inhibition plays a fundamental role in the neural computation of the interaural level difference (ILD), an important cue for the localization of high-frequency sound. Here, we studied the inhibitory synaptic currents in the chicken posterior portion of the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (LLDp), the first binaural level difference encoder of the avian auditory pathway. Using whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we provide the first evidence confirming a monosynaptic inhibition driven by direct electrical and chemical stimulation of the contralateral LLDp, establishing the reciprocal inhibitory connection between the two LLDps, a long-standing assumption in the field. This inhibition was largely mediated by GABAA receptors; however, functional glycine receptors were also identified. The reversal potential for the Cl− channels measured with gramicidin-perforated patch recordings was hyperpolarizing (−88 mV), corresponding to a low intracellular Cl− concentration (5.2 mm). Pharmacological manipulations of KCC2 (outwardly Cl− transporter) activity demonstrate that LLDp neurons can maintain a low intracellular Cl− concentration under a high Cl− load, allowing for the maintenance of hyperpolarizing inhibition. We further demonstrate that hyperpolarizing inhibition was more effective at regulating cellular excitability than depolarizing inhibition in LLDp neurons. PMID:28032116

  9. Glycinergic inhibition in thalamus revealed by synaptic receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Ghavanini, Ahmad A; Mathers, David A; Puil, Ernest

    2005-09-01

    Using juvenile rat brain slices, we examined the possibility that strychnine-sensitive receptors for glycine-like amino acids contributed to synaptic inhibition in ventrobasal thalamus, where gamma-aminobutyrate (GABA) is the prevalent inhibitory transmitter. Ventrobasal nuclei showed staining for antibodies against alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of the glycine receptor. Exogenously applied glycine, taurine and beta-alanine increased membrane conductance, effects antagonized by strychnine, indicative of functional glycine receptors. Using glutamate receptor antagonists, we isolated inhibitory postsynaptic potentials and currents (IPSPs and IPSCs) evoked by high-threshold stimulation of medial lemniscus. Like the responses to glycine agonists, these synaptic responses reversed near E(Cl). In comparative tests with GABA receptor antagonists, strychnine attenuated inhibition in a majority of neurons, but did not alter slow, GABA(B) inhibition. For complete blockade, the majority of fast IPSPs required co-application of strychnine with bicuculline or gabazine, GABA(A) receptor antagonists. Strychnine acting with an IC50 approximately = 33 nM, eliminated residual fast inhibition during selective GABA(A) receptor blockade with gabazine. The latency of onset for IPSPs was compatible with polysynaptic pathways or prolonged axonal propagation time. Strychnine lacked effects on monosynaptic, GABAergic IPSPs from zona incerta. The specific actions of strychnine implicated a glycine receptor contribution to fast inhibition in somatosensory thalamus.

  10. Synaptic transmission: inhibition of neurotransmitter release by botulinum toxins.

    PubMed

    Dolly, Oliver

    2003-01-01

    Botulinum toxin type A, a protein long used in the successful treatment of various dystonias, has a complex mechanism of action that results in muscle relaxation. At the neuromuscular junction, the presynaptic nerve ending is packed with synaptic vesicles filled with acetylcholine, and clustered at the tip of the folds of the postsynaptic muscle membrane are the acetylcholine receptors. Synaptic vesicles fuse with the membrane in response to an elevation of intraneuronal calcium concentration and undergo release of their transmitter by exocytosis. Intracellular proteins that contribute to the fusion of the vesicles with the plasma membrane during exocytosis include synaptosomal protein with a molecular weight of 25 kDa (SNAP-25); vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP), also known as synaptobrevin; and syntaxin. Through their proteolytic action on these proteins, botulinum toxins prevent exocytosis, thereby inhibiting the release of acetylcholine. There are 7 serotypes of this toxin-A, B, C1, D, E, F, and G-and each cleaves a different intracellular protein or the same target at distinct bonds. The separate cleavage sites in SNAP-25 for botulinum toxin types A and E contribute to their dissimilar durations of muscle relaxation. This report describes the molecular basis for the inhibition by botulinum toxins of neuroexocytosis and subsequent functional recovery at the neuromuscular junction.

  11. Nonmonotonic Synaptic Excitation and Imbalanced Inhibition Underlying Cortical Intensity Tuning

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guangying K.; Li, Pingyang; Tao, Huizhong W.; Zhang, Li I.

    2006-01-01

    Summary Intensity-tuned neurons, characterized by their nonmonotonic response-level function, may play important roles in the encoding of sound intensity-related information. The synaptic mechanisms underlying intensity-tuning remain yet unclear. Here, in vivo whole-cell recordings in rat auditory cortex revealed that intensity-tuned neurons, mostly clustered in a posterior zone, receive imbalanced tone-evoked excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. Excitatory inputs exhibit nonmonotonic intensity-tuning, whereas with tone intensity increments, the temporally-delayed inhibitory inputs increase monotonically in strength. In addition, this delay reduces with the increase of intensity, resulting in an enhanced suppression of excitation at high intensities and a significant sharpening of intensity-tuning. In contrast, non-intensity-tuned neurons exhibit covaried excitatory and inhibitory inputs and the relative time interval between them is stable with intensity increments, resulting in monotonic response-level function. Thus, cortical intensity-tuning is primarily determined by excitatory inputs, and shaped by cortical inhibition through a dynamic control of excitatory and inhibitory timing. PMID:17114053

  12. Phosphodiesterase Inhibition to Target the Synaptic Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bales, Kelly R.; Plath, Niels; Svenstrup, Niels; Menniti, Frank S.

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) is a disease of synaptic dysfunction that ultimately proceeds to neuronal death. There is a wealth of evidence that indicates the final common mediator of this neurotoxic process is the formation and actions on synaptotoxic b-amyloid (Aβ). The premise in this review is that synaptic dysfunction may also be an initiating factor in for AD and promote synaptotoxic Aβ formation. This latter hypothesis is consistent with the fact that the most common risk factors for AD, apolipoprotein E (ApoE) allele status, age, education, and fitness, encompass suboptimal synaptic function. Thus, the synaptic dysfunction in AD may be both cause and effect, and remediating synaptic dysfunction in AD may have acute effects on the symptoms present at the initiation of therapy and also slow disease progression. The cyclic nucleotide (cAMP and cGMP) signaling systems are intimately involved in the regulation of synaptic homeostasis. The phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a superfamily of enzymes that critically regulate spatial and temporal aspects of cyclic nucleotide signaling through metabolic inactivation of cAMP and cGMP. Thus, targeting the PDEs to promote improved synaptic function, or 'synaptic resilience', may be an effective and facile approach to new symptomatic and disease modifying therapies for AD. There continues to be a significant drug discovery effort aimed at discovering PDE inhibitors to treat a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we review the current status of those efforts as they relate to potential new therapies for AD.

  13. Strength and duration of perisomatic GABAergic inhibition depend on distance between synaptically connected cells

    PubMed Central

    Strüber, Michael; Jonas, Peter; Bartos, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    GABAergic perisoma-inhibiting fast-spiking interneurons (PIIs) effectively control the activity of large neuron populations by their wide axonal arborizations. It is generally assumed that the output of one PII to its target cells is strong and rapid. Here, we show that, unexpectedly, both strength and time course of PII-mediated perisomatic inhibition change with distance between synaptically connected partners in the rodent hippocampus. Synaptic signals become weaker due to lower contact numbers and decay more slowly with distance, very likely resulting from changes in GABAA receptor subunit composition. When distance-dependent synaptic inhibition is introduced to a rhythmically active neuronal network model, randomly driven principal cell assemblies are strongly synchronized by the PIIs, leading to higher precision in principal cell spike times than in a network with uniform synaptic inhibition. PMID:25583495

  14. Amnestic Concentrations of Etomidate Modulate GABAA, slow Synaptic Inhibition in Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Background γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor-mediated inhibition in the central nervous system exists in two forms: phasic (inhibitory postsynaptic currents, IPSCs) and tonic (non-synaptic). Phasic inhibition is further subdivided into fast (GABAA, fast) and slow (GABAA, slow) IPSCs. By virtue of its dendritic location and kinetics, GABAA, slow has been proposed to control synaptic plasticity and memory. Etomidate is a non-barbiturate, intravenous anesthetic that selectively modulates GABAA receptors and produces amnesia at low doses in vivo. Here we have tested whether correspondingly low concentrations of etomidate in vitro alter GABAA, fast and GABAA, slow phasic inhibition. Methods Electrophysiological recordings were obtained from hippocampal slices prepared from postnatal day 3–8 mice and maintained in organotypic culture for 10–14 days. Etomidate was applied at concentrations corresponding to one-half to four times the half maximal effective concentration that impairs hippocampus-dependent learning and memory – i.e. 0.125 to 1 μM. Results Etomidate 0.25 μM (the half maximal effective concentration) doubled the time constant of decay of GABAA, slow IPSCs but had no detectable effect on GABAA, fast IPSCs. Higher concentrations of etomidate had stronger effects on both types of phasic inhibition: 0.5 and 1 μM etomidate prolonged the time constant of decay by 310% and 410% for GABAA, slow and by 25% and 78% for GABAA, fast. Concentrations of etomidate up to 1 μM had no significant effects on the amplitudes of either GABAA, fast or GABAA, slow IPSCs. Conclusions At concentrations that impair hippocampus-dependent memory, etomidate modulates GABAA, slow more strongly than GABAA, fast IPSCs. Effects of etomidate on GABAA, slow IPSCs may contribute to etomidate-induced amnesia. PMID:19741493

  15. Serotonin inhibition of synaptic transmission: Galpha(0) decreases the abundance of UNC-13 at release sites.

    PubMed

    Nurrish, S; Ségalat, L; Kaplan, J M

    1999-09-01

    We show that serotonin inhibits synaptic transmission at C. elegans neuromuscular junctions, and we describe a signaling pathway that mediates this effect. Release of acetylcholine from motor neurons was assayed by measuring the sensitivity of intact animals to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. By this assay, exogenous serotonin inhibited acetylcholine release, whereas serotonin antagonists stimulated release. The effects of serotonin on synaptic transmission were mediated by GOA-1 (a Galpha0 subunit) and DGK-1 (a diacylglycerol [DAG] kinase), both of which act in the ventral cord motor neurons. Mutants lacking goa-1 G(alpha)0 accumulated abnormally high levels of the DAG-binding protein UNC-13 at motor neuron nerve terminals, suggesting that serotonin inhibits synaptic transmission by decreasing the abundance of UNC-13 at release sites.

  16. Developmental hearing loss disrupts synaptic inhibition: implications for auditory processing

    PubMed Central

    Takesian, Anne E; Kotak, Vibhakar C; Sanes, Dan H

    2009-01-01

    Hearing loss during development leads to central deficits that persist even after the restoration of peripheral function. One key class of deficits is due to changes in central inhibitory synapses, which play a fundamental role in all aspects of auditory processing. This review focuses on the anatomical and physiological alterations of inhibitory connections at several regions within the central auditory pathway following hearing loss. Such aberrant inhibitory synaptic function may be linked to deficits in encoding binaural and spectral cues. Understanding the cellular changes that occur at inhibitory synapses following hearing loss may provide specific loci that can be targeted to improve function. PMID:20161214

  17. Nothing can be coincidence: synaptic inhibition and plasticity in the cerebellar nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Jason R.; Raman, Indira M.

    2009-01-01

    Many cerebellar neurons fire spontaneously, generating 10–100 action potentials per second even without synaptic input. This high basal activity correlates with information-coding mechanisms that differ from those of cells that are quiescent until excited synaptically. For example, in the deep cerebellar nuclei, Hebbian patterns of coincident synaptic excitation and postsynaptic firing fail to induce long-term increases in the strength of excitatory inputs. Instead, excitatory synaptic currents are potentiated by combinations of inhibition and excitation that resemble the activity of Purkinje and mossy fiber afferents that is predicted to occur during cerebellar associative learning tasks. Such results indicate that circuits with intrinsically active neurons have rules for information transfer and storage that distinguish them from other brain regions. PMID:19178955

  18. Erk1/2 inhibit synaptic vesicle exocytosis through L type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Jaichandar; Morozov, Alexei

    2011-01-01

    L type calcium channels play only a minor role in basal neurotransmitter release in brain neurons, but contribute significantly after induction of plasticity. Very little is known about mechanisms that enable L type calcium channel participation in neurotransmitter release. Here, using mouse primary cortical neurons, we found that inhibition of Erk1/2 enhanced synaptic vesicle exocytosis by increasing calcium influx through L type calcium channels. Furthermore, inhibition of Erk1/2 increased the surface fraction of these channels. These findings indicate a novel inhibitory effect of Erk1/2 on synaptic transmission through L type calcium channels. PMID:21430174

  19. A diversity of synaptic filters are created by temporal summation of excitation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    George, Andrew A.; Lyons-Warren, Ariel M.; Ma, Xiaofeng; Carlson, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Temporal filtering is a fundamental operation of nervous systems. In peripheral sensory systems, the temporal pattern of spiking activity can encode various stimulus qualities, and temporal filtering allows postsynaptic neurons to detect behaviorally-relevant stimulus features from these spike trains. Intrinsic excitability, short-term synaptic plasticity, and voltage-dependent dendritic conductances have all been identified as mechanisms that can establish temporal filtering behavior in single neurons. Here we show that synaptic integration of temporally-summating excitation and inhibition can establish diverse temporal filters of presynaptic input. Mormyrid electric fish communicate by varying the intervals between electric organ discharges. The timing of each discharge is coded by peripheral receptors into precisely-timed spikes. Within the midbrain posterior exterolateral nucleus, temporal filtering by individual neurons results in selective responses to a particular range of presynaptic interspike intervals. These neurons are diverse in their temporal filtering properties, reflecting the wide range of intervals that must be detected during natural communication behavior. By manipulating presynaptic spike timing with high temporal resolution, we demonstrate that tuning to behaviorally-relevant patterns of presynaptic input is similar in vivo and in vitro. We reveal that GABAergic inhibition plays a critical role in establishing different temporal filtering properties. Further, our results demonstrate that temporal summation of excitation and inhibition establishes selective responses to high and low rates of synaptic input, respectively. Simple models of synaptic integration reveal that variation in these two competing influences provides a basic mechanism for generating diverse temporal filters of synaptic input. PMID:21994388

  20. Feedforward Inhibition and Synaptic Scaling – Two Sides of the Same Coin?

    PubMed Central

    Lücke, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    Feedforward inhibition and synaptic scaling are important adaptive processes that control the total input a neuron can receive from its afferents. While often studied in isolation, the two have been reported to co-occur in various brain regions. The functional implications of their interactions remain unclear, however. Based on a probabilistic modeling approach, we show here that fast feedforward inhibition and synaptic scaling interact synergistically during unsupervised learning. In technical terms, we model the input to a neural circuit using a normalized mixture model with Poisson noise. We demonstrate analytically and numerically that, in the presence of lateral inhibition introducing competition between different neurons, Hebbian plasticity and synaptic scaling approximate the optimal maximum likelihood solutions for this model. Our results suggest that, beyond its conventional use as a mechanism to remove undesired pattern variations, input normalization can make typical neural interaction and learning rules optimal on the stimulus subspace defined through feedforward inhibition. Furthermore, learning within this subspace is more efficient in practice, as it helps avoid locally optimal solutions. Our results suggest a close connection between feedforward inhibition and synaptic scaling which may have important functional implications for general cortical processing. PMID:22457610

  1. CNQX and AMPA inhibit electrical synaptic transmission: a potential interaction between electrical and glutamatergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Burrell, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Electrical synapses play an important role in signaling between neurons and the synaptic connections between many neurons possess both electrical and chemical components. Although modulation of electrical synapses is frequently observed, the cellular processes that mediate such changes have not been studied as thoroughly as plasticity in chemical synapses. In the leech (Hirudo sp), the competitive AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX inhibited transmission at the rectifying electrical synapse of a mixed glutamatergic/electrical synaptic connection. This CNQX-mediated inhibition of the electrical synapse was blocked by concanavalin A (Con A) and dynamin inhibitory peptide (DIP), both of which are known to inhibit endocytosis of neurotransmitter receptors. CNQX-mediated inhibition was also blocked by pep2-SVKI (SVKI), a synthetic peptide that prevents internalization of AMPA-type glutamate receptor. AMPA itself also inhibited electrical synaptic transmission and this AMPA-mediated inhibition was partially blocked by Con A, DIP and SVKI. Low frequency stimulation induced long-term depression (LTD) in both the electrical and chemical components of these synapses and this LTD was blocked by SVKI. GYKI 52466, a selective non-competitive antagonist of AMPA receptors, did not affect the electrical EPSP, although it did block the chemical component of these synapses. CNQX did not affect non-rectifying electrical synapses in two different pairs of neurons. These results suggest an interaction between AMPA-type glutamate receptors and the gap junction proteins that mediate electrical synaptic transmission. This putative interaction between glutamate receptors and gap junction proteins represents a novel mechanism for regulating the strength of synaptic transmission. PMID:18601913

  2. Isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle exocytosis through reduced Ca2+ influx, not Ca2+-exocytosis coupling

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Joel P.; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Hara, Masato; Cook, Daniel C.; Hoppa, Michael B.; Ryan, Timothy A.; Hemmings, Hugh C.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying presynaptic mechanisms of general anesthetics is critical to understanding their effects on synaptic transmission. We show that the volatile anesthetic isoflurane inhibits synaptic vesicle (SV) exocytosis at nerve terminals in dissociated rat hippocampal neurons through inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ influx without significantly altering the Ca2+ sensitivity of SV exocytosis. A clinically relevant concentration of isoflurane (0.7 mM) inhibited changes in [Ca2+]i driven by single action potentials (APs) by 25 ± 3%, which in turn led to 62 ± 3% inhibition of single AP-triggered exocytosis at 4 mM extracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]e). Lowering external Ca2+ to match the isoflurane-induced reduction in Ca2+ entry led to an equivalent reduction in exocytosis. These data thus indicate that anesthetic inhibition of neurotransmitter release from small SVs occurs primarily through reduced axon terminal Ca2+ entry without significant direct effects on Ca2+-exocytosis coupling or on the SV fusion machinery. Isoflurane inhibition of exocytosis and Ca2+ influx was greater in glutamatergic compared with GABAergic nerve terminals, consistent with selective inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission. Such alteration in the balance of excitatory to inhibitory transmission could mediate reduced neuronal interactions and network-selective effects observed in the anesthetized central nervous system. PMID:26351670

  3. Protein aggregation: From background to inhibition strategies.

    PubMed

    Alam, Parvez; Siddiqi, Khursheed; Chturvedi, Sumit Kumar; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2017-10-01

    The aggregation of specific proteins is hypothesized to cause several pathological conditions, which are collectively known as amyloid disorders. The aggregation of peptides and proteins is mainly associated with the perturbation of cellular function, ageing and various human disorders. Mounting evidence suggests that protein aggregation is often caused by mutation, environmental stress or the cellular response to an imbalanced protein homeostasis. This review summarizes the background information on the protein folding, misfolding, cellular strategies against protein aggregation, factors affecting protein aggregation and mechanism of protein aggregation. We then focus on various inhibitors for protein aggregation both in vitro and in vivo. We conclude with a perspective that better therapeutics could be developed by using cocktail of small molecule inhibitors for the treatment of amyloid diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Regulation of Persistent Activity by Background Inhibition in an In Vitro Model of a Cortical Microcircuit

    PubMed Central

    Fellous, Jean-Marc; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2010-01-01

    We combined in vitro intracellular recording from prefrontal cortical neurons with simulated synaptic activity of a layer 5 prefrontal microcircuit using a dynamic clamp. During simulated in vivo background conditions, the cell responded to a brief depolarization with a sequence of spikes that outlasted the depolarization, mimicking the activity of a cell recorded during the delay period of a working memory task in the behaving monkey. The onset of sustained activity depended on the number of action potentials elicited by the cue-like depolarization. Too few spikes failed to provide enough NMDA drive to elicit sustained reverberations; too many spikes activated a slow intrinsic hyperpolarization current that prevented spiking; an intermediate number of spikes produced sustained activity. When high dopamine levels were simulated by depolarizing the cell and by increasing the amount of NMDA current, the cell exhibited spontaneous ‘up-states’ that terminated by the activation of a slow intrinsic hyperpolarizing current. The firing rate during the delay period could be effectively modulated by the standard deviation of the inhibitory background synaptic noise without significant changes in the background firing rate before cue onset. These results suggest that the balance between fast feedback inhibition and slower AMPA and NMDA feedback excitation is critical in initiating persistent activity and that the maintenance of persistent activity may be regulated by the amount of correlated background inhibition. PMID:14576214

  5. Theory of optimal balance predicts and explains the amplitude and decay time of synaptic inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaekyung K.; Fiorillo, Christopher D.

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition counterbalances excitation, but it is not known what constitutes optimal inhibition. We previously proposed that perfect balance is achieved when the peak of an excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) is exactly at spike threshold, so that the slightest variation in excitation determines whether a spike is generated. Using simulations, we show that the optimal inhibitory postsynaptic conductance (IPSG) increases in amplitude and decay rate as synaptic excitation increases from 1 to 800 Hz. As further proposed by theory, we show that optimal IPSG parameters can be learned through anti-Hebbian rules. Finally, we compare our theoretical optima to published experimental data from 21 types of neurons, in which rates of synaptic excitation and IPSG decay times vary by factors of about 100 (5–600 Hz) and 50 (1–50 ms), respectively. From an infinite range of possible decay times, theory predicted experimental decay times within less than a factor of 2. Across a distinct set of 15 types of neuron recorded in vivo, theory predicted the amplitude of synaptic inhibition within a factor of 1.7. Thus, the theory can explain biophysical quantities from first principles. PMID:28281523

  6. Theory of optimal balance predicts and explains the amplitude and decay time of synaptic inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaekyung K.; Fiorillo, Christopher D.

    2017-03-01

    Synaptic inhibition counterbalances excitation, but it is not known what constitutes optimal inhibition. We previously proposed that perfect balance is achieved when the peak of an excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) is exactly at spike threshold, so that the slightest variation in excitation determines whether a spike is generated. Using simulations, we show that the optimal inhibitory postsynaptic conductance (IPSG) increases in amplitude and decay rate as synaptic excitation increases from 1 to 800 Hz. As further proposed by theory, we show that optimal IPSG parameters can be learned through anti-Hebbian rules. Finally, we compare our theoretical optima to published experimental data from 21 types of neurons, in which rates of synaptic excitation and IPSG decay times vary by factors of about 100 (5-600 Hz) and 50 (1-50 ms), respectively. From an infinite range of possible decay times, theory predicted experimental decay times within less than a factor of 2. Across a distinct set of 15 types of neuron recorded in vivo, theory predicted the amplitude of synaptic inhibition within a factor of 1.7. Thus, the theory can explain biophysical quantities from first principles.

  7. Functional roles of short-term synaptic plasticity with an emphasis on inhibition.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Haroon; Li, Xinping; Bucher, Dirk; Nadim, Farzan

    2017-04-01

    Almost all synapses show activity-dependent dynamic changes in efficacy. Numerous studies have explored the mechanisms underlying different forms of short-term synaptic plasticity (STP), but the functional role of STP for circuit output and animal behavior is less understood. This is particularly true for inhibitory synapses that can play widely varied roles in circuit activity. We review recent findings on the role of synaptic STP in sensory, pattern generating, thalamocortical, and hippocampal networks, with a focus on synaptic inhibition. These studies show a variety of functions including sensory adaptation and gating, dynamic gain control and rhythm generation. Because experimental manipulations of STP are difficult and nonspecific, a clear demonstration of STP function often requires a combination of experimental and computational techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Potential Role of Synaptic Activity to Inhibit LTD Induction in Rat Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Matthew R.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term depression (LTD), a widely studied form of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, is typically induced by prolonged low-frequency stimulation (LFS). Interestingly, LFS is highly effective in eliciting LTD in vitro, but much less so under in vivo conditions; the reasons for the resistance of the intact brain to express LTD are not well understood. We examined if levels of background electrocorticographic (ECoG) activity influence LTD induction in the thalamocortical visual system of rats under very deep urethane anesthesia, inducing a brain state of reduced spontaneous cortical activity. Under these conditions, LFS applied to the lateral geniculate nucleus resulted in LTD of field postsynaptic potentials (fPSPs) recorded in the primary visual cortex (V1). Pairing LFS with stimulation of the brainstem (pedunculopontine) reticular formation resulted in the appearance of faster, more complex activity in V1 and prevented LTD induction, an effect that did not require muscarinic or nicotinic receptors. Reticular stimulation alone (without LFS) had no effect on cortical fPSPs. These results show that excitation of the brainstem activating system blocks the induction of LTD in V1. Thus, higher levels of neural activity may inhibit depression at cortical synapses, a hypothesis that could explain discrepancies regarding LTD induction in previous in vivo and in vitro work. PMID:28050286

  9. Acute Stress Suppresses Synaptic Inhibition and Increases Anxiety via Endocannabinoid Release in the Basolateral Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Itoga, Christy A.; Fisher, Marc O.; Solomonow, Jonathan; Roltsch, Emily A.; Gilpin, Nicholas W.

    2016-01-01

    Stress and glucocorticoids stimulate the rapid mobilization of endocannabinoids in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Cannabinoid receptors in the BLA contribute to anxiogenesis and fear-memory formation. We tested for rapid glucocorticoid-induced endocannabinoid regulation of synaptic inhibition in the rat BLA. Glucocorticoid application to amygdala slices elicited a rapid, nonreversible suppression of spontaneous, but not evoked, GABAergic synaptic currents in BLA principal neurons; the effect was also seen with a membrane-impermeant glucocorticoid, but not with intracellular glucocorticoid application, implicating a membrane-associated glucocorticoid receptor. The glucocorticoid suppression of GABA currents was not blocked by antagonists of nuclear corticosteroid receptors, or by inhibitors of gene transcription or protein synthesis, but was blocked by inhibiting postsynaptic G-protein activity, suggesting a postsynaptic nongenomic steroid signaling mechanism that stimulates the release of a retrograde messenger. The rapid glucocorticoid-induced suppression of inhibition was prevented by blocking CB1 receptors and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) synthesis, and it was mimicked and occluded by CB1 receptor agonists, indicating it was mediated by the retrograde release of the endocannabinoid 2-AG. The rapid glucocorticoid effect in BLA neurons in vitro was occluded by prior in vivo acute stress-induced, or prior in vitro glucocorticoid-induced, release of endocannabinoid. Acute stress also caused an increase in anxiety-like behavior that was attenuated by blocking CB1 receptor activation and inhibiting 2-AG synthesis in the BLA. Together, these findings suggest that acute stress causes a long-lasting suppression of synaptic inhibition in BLA neurons via a membrane glucocorticoid receptor-induced release of 2-AG at GABA synapses, which contributes to stress-induced anxiogenesis. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We provide a cellular mechanism in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) for

  10. Fast Synaptic Inhibition in Spinal Sensory Processing and Pain Control

    PubMed Central

    Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich; Wildner, Hendrik; Yevenes, Gonzalo E.

    2013-01-01

    The two amino acids γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) and glycine mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in different CNS areas and serve pivotal roles in the spinal sensory processing. Under healthy conditions, they limit the excitability of spinal terminals of primary sensory nerve fibers and of intrinsic dorsal horn neurons through pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and thereby facilitate the spatial and temporal discrimination of sensory stimuli. Removal of fast inhibition not only reduces the fidelity of normal sensory processing but also provokes symptoms very much reminiscent of pathological and chronic pain syndromes. This review summarizes our knowledge of the molecular bases of spinal inhibitory neurotransmission and its organization in dorsal horn sensory circuits. Particular emphasis is placed on the role and mechanisms of spinal inhibitory malfunction in inflammatory and neuropathic chronic pain syndromes. PMID:22298656

  11. Chronic nicotine exposure inhibits estrogen-mediated synaptic functions in hippocampus of female rats.

    PubMed

    Raval, Ami P; Sick, Justin T; Gonzalez, Gabriel J; Defazio, R Anthony; Dong, Chuanhui; Sick, Thomas J

    2012-05-23

    Nicotine, the addictive agent in cigarettes, reduces circulating estradiol-17β (E₂) and inhibits E₂-mediated intracellular signaling in hippocampus of female rats. In hippocampus, E₂-signaling regulates synaptic plasticity by phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunit NR2B and cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (pCREB). Therefore, we hypothesized that chronic nicotine exposure induces synaptic dysfunction in hippocampus of female rats. Female rats were exposed to nicotine or saline for 16 days followed by electrophysiological analysis of hippocampus. Briefly, population measurements of excitatory post-synaptic field potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded from stratum radiatum of the CA1 hippocampal slice subfield. A strict software-controlled protocol was used which recorded 30 min of baseline data (stimulation rate of 1/min), a paired-pulse stimulation sequence followed by tetanic stimulation, and 1h of post-tetanus recording. EPSP amplitude and the initial EPSP slope were measured off-line. We then investigated by Western blot analysis the effects of nicotine on hippocampal estrogen receptor-beta (ER-β), NR2B and pCREB. The results demonstrated significantly decreased post-tetanic potentiation and paired-pulse facilitation at the 40, and 80 ms interval in nicotine-exposed rats compared to the saline group. Western blot analysis revealed that nicotine decreased protein levels of ER-β, NR2B, and pCREB. We also confirmed the role of E₂ in regulating NR2B and pCREB phosphorylation by performing Western blots in hippocapmal tissue obtained from E₂-treated ovariectomized rats. In conclusion, chronic nicotine exposure attenuates short-term synaptic plasticity, and the observed synaptic defects might be a consequence of loss of estradiol-17β-signaling. However, determining the exact molecular mechanisms of chronic nicotine exposure on synaptic plasticity specific to the female brain require further investigation. Copyright © 2012

  12. Tissue culture tube contaminant inhibits excitatory synaptic channels.

    PubMed

    Reuhl, T O; Amador, M; Dani, J A

    1990-09-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) were expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Large, slowly desensitizing macroscopic currents were induced by rapidly infusing an electrolyte solution containing 50 microM ACh in the presence of atropine. The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subset of glutamate receptors was studied in CA1 hippocampal neurons. Macroscopic currents were induced by rapidly applying 30 microM NMDA and 10 microM glycine in the presence of picrotoxin, strychnine and tetrodotoxin. Exposing the electrolyte solutions to Falcon brand polypropylene tissue culture tubes (Becton Dickinson Labware) decreased the current through the nAChR channels or through the NMDA receptor channels (1). Purified water shaken in the Falcon brand tubes showed a broad absorbance peak near 200 nm. Before exposing the water to the Falcon tubes, the purified water gave no absorbance signal. The results indicate that a substance released from the Falcon tubes inhibits the currents through nAChR and NMDA receptor channels. Our experiments were with 50-ml Falcon 2098 tubes from lot numbers 72180188 and 80290188 and with 15-ml Falcon 2097 tubes from lot number 83560283. These were the only Falcon tubes we tested.

  13. Spinal reflex adaptation in dancers changes with body orientation and role of pre-synaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Rachel; Kitano, Koichi; Koceja, David M

    2010-01-01

    Dancers undergo specific activity-dependent neuromuscular adaptations following long-term training that allow them to develop the refined motor skills required for success in dance. The spinal stretch reflex circuit has demonstrated specific adaptations following prolonged dance training. Adaptations in the spinal stretch reflex can be studied using H-reflex methodology, first described by Paul Hoffmann in 1910. This article discusses H-reflex methodology and presents data that examine the neural mechanisms that contribute to adaptations in the spinal stretch reflex with dance training. Two groups of subjects, modern dancers (N = 5) and untrained controls (N = 5), were tested. On one-half of the trials common peronal nerve (CPN) conditioning of the soleus H-reflex was used to assess one spinal mechanism, pre-synaptic inhibition; the other half tested the soleus H-reflex only (unconditioned). The dependent variables were the H(max)/M(max) ratios, unconditioned and with CPN conditioning, expressed as percent values. The results revealed three main findings: 1. Modern dancers had smaller H(max)/M(max) ratios than control subjects; 2. The H(max)/M(max) ratio was smaller in standing posture than in prone among both dancers and controls; and 3. Pre-synaptic inhibition was not different between dancers and controls in standing. In conclusion, modern dancers have smaller H-reflexes than untrained controls, but pre-synaptic inhibition does not appear to explain this difference.

  14. Imaging Synaptic Inhibition in Transgenic Mice Expressing the Chloride Indicator, Clomeleon

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, K.; Schleich, W.; Krieger, P.; Loo, L.S.; Wang, D.; Cant, N.B.; Feng, G.; Augustine, G.J.; Kuner, T.

    2009-01-01

    We describe here a molecular genetic approach for imaging synaptic inhibition. The thy-1 promoter was used to express high levels of Clomeleon, a ratiometric fluorescent indicator for chloride ions, in discrete populations of neurons in the brains of transgenic mice. Clomeleon was functional after chronic expression and provided non-invasive readouts of intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl−]i) in brain slices, allowing us to quantify age-dependent declines in resting [Cl−]i during neuronal development. Activation of hippocampal interneurons caused [Cl−]i to rise transiently in individual postsynaptic pyramidal neurons. [Cl−]i increased in direct proportion to the amount of inhibitory transmission, with peak changes as large as 4 mM. Integrating responses over populations of pyramidal neurons allowed sensitive detection of synaptic inhibition. Thus, Clomeleon imaging permits non-invasive, spatiotemporally resolved recordings of [Cl−]i in a large variety of neurons, opening up new opportunities for imaging synaptic inhibition and other forms of chloride signaling. PMID:18398684

  15. Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Inhibition Promotes Long-Term Depression and Synaptic Tagging/Capture.

    PubMed

    Li, Qin; Korte, Martin; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2016-06-01

    A balance of protein synthesis and degradation is critical for the dynamic regulation and implementation of long-term memory storage. The role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in regulating the plasticity at potentiated synapses is well studied, but its roles in depressed synaptic populations remain elusive. In this study, we probed the possibility of regulating the UPS by inhibiting the proteasome function during the induction of protein synthesis-independent form of hippocampal long-term depression (early-LTD), an important component of synaptic plasticity. Here, we show that protein degradation is involved in early-LTD induction and interfering with this process facilitates early-LTD to late-LTD. We provide evidence here that under the circumstances of proteasome inhibition brain-derived neurotrophic factor is accumulated as plasticity-related protein and it drives the weakly depressed or potentiated synapses to associativity. Thus, UPS inhibition promotes LTD and establishes associativity between weakly depressed or potentiated synapses through the mechanisms of synaptic tagging/capture or cross-capture.

  16. Crossover inhibition in the retina: circuitry that compensates for nonlinear rectifying synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Alyosha; Hsueh, Hain-Ann; Roska, Botond; Werblin, Frank S

    2009-12-01

    In the mammalian retina, complementary ON and OFF visual streams are formed at the bipolar cell dendrites, then carried to amacrine and ganglion cells via nonlinear excitatory synapses from bipolar cells. Bipolar, amacrine and ganglion cells also receive a nonlinear inhibitory input from amacrine cells. The most common form of such inhibition crosses over from the opposite visual stream: Amacrine cells carry ON inhibition to the OFF cells and carry OFF inhibition to the ON cells ("crossover inhibition"). Although these synapses are predominantly nonlinear, linear signal processing is required for computing many properties of the visual world such as average intensity across a receptive field. Linear signaling is also necessary for maintaining the distinction between brightness and contrast. It has long been known that a subset of retinal outputs provide exactly this sort of linear representation of the world; we show here that rectifying (nonlinear) synaptic currents, when combined thorough crossover inhibition can generate this linear signaling. Using simple mathematical models we show that for a large set of cases, repeated rounds of synaptic rectification without crossover inhibition can destroy information carried by those synapses. A similar circuit motif is employed in the electronics industry to compensate for transistor nonlinearities in analog circuits.

  17. Disrupted GABAAR Trafficking and Synaptic Inhibition in a Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Eunice Y.; Wei, Jing; Zhong, Ping; Yan, Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that Huntington’s disease (HD), a neurodegenerative movement disorder caused by the mutant huntingtin (htt) with an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) repeat, is associated with the altered intracellular trafficking and synaptic function. GABAA receptors, the key determinant of the strength of synaptic inhibition, have been found to bind to the huntingtin associated protein 1 (HAP1). HAP1 serves as an adaptor linking GABAA receptors to the kinesin family motor protein 5 (KIF5), controlling the transport of GABAA receptors along microtubules in dendrites. In this study, we found that GABAAR-mediated synaptic transmission is significantly impaired in a transgenic mouse model of HD expressing polyQ-htt, which is accompanied by the diminished surface expression of GABAA receptors. Moreover, the GABAAR/HAP1/KIF5 complex is disrupted and dissociated from microtubules in the HD mouse model. These results suggest that GABAAR trafficking and function is impaired in HD, presumably due to the interference of KIF5-mediated microtubule-based transport of GABAA receptors. The diminished inhibitory synaptic efficacy could contribute to the loss of the excitatory/inhibitory balance, leading to increased neuronal excitotoxicity in HD. PMID:22402331

  18. Pre-synaptic GABA receptors inhibit glutamate release through GIRK channels in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Ladera, Carolina; del Carmen Godino, María; José Cabañero, María; Torres, Magdalena; Watanabe, Masahiko; Luján, Rafael; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2008-12-01

    Neuronal G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels mediate the slow inhibitory effects of many neurotransmitters post-synaptically. However, no evidence exists that supports that GIRK channels play any role in the inhibition of glutamate release by GABA(B) receptors. In this study, we show for the first time that GABA(B) receptors operate through two mechanisms in nerve terminals from the cerebral cortex. As shown previously, GABA(B) receptors reduces glutamate release and the Ca(2+) influx mediated by N-type Ca(2+) channels in a mode insensitive to the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q and consistent with direct inhibition of this voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel. However, by means of weak stimulation protocols, we reveal that GABA(B) receptors also reduce glutamate release mediated by P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels, and that these responses are reversed by the GIRK channel blocker tertiapin-Q. Consistent with the functional interaction between GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels at nerve terminals we demonstrate by immunogold electron immunohistochemistry that pre-synaptic boutons of asymmetric synapses co-express GABA(B) receptors and GIRK channels, thus suggesting that the functional interaction of these two proteins, found at the post-synaptic level, also occurs at glutamatergic nerve terminals.

  19. Autaptic self-inhibition of cortical GABAergic neurons: synaptic narcissism or useful introspection?

    PubMed

    Deleuze, Charlotte; Pazienti, Antonio; Bacci, Alberto

    2014-06-01

    Fast synaptic inhibition sculpts all forms of cortical activity by means of a specialized connectivity pattern between highly heterogeneous inhibitory interneurons and principal excitatory cells. Importantly, inhibitory neurons connect also to each other extensively, following a detailed blueprint, and, indeed, specific forms of disinhibition affect important behavioral functions. Here we discuss a peculiar form of cortical disinhibition: the massive autaptic self-inhibition of parvalbumin-(PV) positive basket cells. Despite being described long ago, autaptic inhibition onto PV basket cells is rarely included in cortical circuit diagrams, perhaps because of its still elusive function. We propose here a potential dual role of autaptic feedback inhibition in temporally coordinating PV basket cells during cortical network activity.

  20. Transgenic inhibition of synaptic transmission reveals role of CA3 output in hippocampal learning.

    PubMed

    Nakashiba, Toshiaki; Young, Jennie Z; McHugh, Thomas J; Buhl, Derek L; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2008-02-29

    The hippocampus is an area of the brain involved in learning and memory. It contains parallel excitatory pathways referred to as the trisynaptic pathway (which carries information as follows: entorhinal cortex --> dentate gyrus --> CA3 --> CA1 --> entorhinal cortex) and the monosynaptic pathway (entorhinal cortex --> CA1 --> entorhinal cortex). We developed a generally applicable tetanus toxin-based method for transgenic mice that permits inducible and reversible inhibition of synaptic transmission and applied it to the trisynaptic pathway while preserving transmission in the monosynaptic pathway. We found that synaptic output from CA3 in the trisynaptic pathway is dispensable and the short monosynaptic pathway is sufficient for incremental spatial learning. In contrast, the full trisynaptic pathway containing CA3 is required for rapid one-trial contextual learning, for pattern completion-based memory recall, and for spatial tuning of CA1 cells.

  1. A SPONTANEOUS STATE OF WEAKLY CORRELATED SYNAPTIC EXCITATION AND INHIBITION IN VISUAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    TAN, A. Y. Y.; ANDONI, S.; PRIEBE, N. J.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical spontaneous activity reflects an animal’s behavioral state and affects neural responses to sensory stimuli. The correlation between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input to single neurons is a key parameter in models of cortical circuitry. Recent measurements demonstrated highly correlated synaptic excitation and inhibition during spontaneous “up-and-down” states, during which excitation accounted for approximately 80% of inhibitory variance (Shu et al., 2003; Haider et al., 2006). Here we report in vivo whole-cell estimates of the correlation between excitation and inhibition in the rat visual cortex under pentobarbital anesthesia, during which up-and-down states are absent. Excitation and inhibition are weakly correlated, relative to the up-and-down state: excitation accounts for less than 40% of inhibitory variance. Although these correlations are lower than when the circuit cycles between up-and-down states, both behaviors may arise from the same circuitry. Our observations provide evidence that different correlational patterns of excitation and inhibition underlie different cortical states. PMID:23727451

  2. Dynamic inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission by astrocyte-derived ATP in hippocampal cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Schuichi; Fujishita, Kayoko; Tsuda, Makoto; Shigemoto-Mogami, Yukari; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2003-09-01

    Originally ascribed passive roles in the CNS, astrocytes are now known to have an active role in the regulation of synaptic transmission. Neuronal activity can evoke Ca2+ transients in astrocytes, and Ca2+ transients in astrocytes can evoke changes in neuronal activity. The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate has been shown to mediate such bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. We demonstrate here that ATP, a primary mediator of intercellular Ca2+ signaling among astrocytes, also mediates intercellular signaling between astrocytes and neurons in hippocampal cultures. Mechanical stimulation of astrocytes evoked Ca2+ waves mediated by the release of ATP and the activation of P2 receptors. Mechanically evoked Ca2+ waves led to decreased excitatory glutamatergic synaptic transmission in an ATP-dependent manner. Exogenous application of ATP does not affect postsynaptic glutamatergic responses but decreased presynaptic exocytotic events. Finally, we show that astrocytes exhibit spontaneous Ca2+ waves mediated by extracellular ATP and that inhibition of these Ca2+ responses enhanced excitatory glutamatergic transmission. We therefore conclude that ATP released from astrocytes exerts tonic and activity-dependent down-regulation of synaptic transmission via presynaptic mechanisms.

  3. Spartin Regulates Synaptic Growth and Neuronal Survival by Inhibiting BMP-Mediated Microtubule Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Minyeop; Lee, Min-Jung; Parkinson, William; Lee, Mihye; Kim, Haeran; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Kim, Sungdae; Cho, Yi Sul; Min, Byung-Moo; Bae, Yong Chul; Broadie, Kendal; Lee, Seungbok

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Troyer syndrome is a hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by human spartin (SPG20) gene mutations. We have generated a Drosophila disease model showing that Spartin functions presynaptically with endocytic adaptor Eps15 to regulate synaptic growth and function. Spartin inhibits bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling by promoting endocytic degradation of BMP receptor wishful thinking (Wit). Drosophila fragile X mental retardation protein (dFMRP) and Futsch/MAP1B are downstream effectors of Spartin and BMP signaling in regulating microtubule stability and synaptic growth. Loss of Spartin or elevation of BMP signaling induces age-dependent progressive defects resembling hereditary spastic paraplegias, including motor dysfunction and brain neurodegeneration. Null spartin phenotypes are prevented by administration of the microtubule-destabilizing drug vinblastine. Together, these results demonstrate that Spartin regulates both synaptic development and neuronal survival by controlling microtubule stability via the BMP-dFMRP-Futsch pathway, suggesting that impaired regulation of microtubule stability is a core pathogenic component in Troyer syndrome. PMID:23439121

  4. Spartin regulates synaptic growth and neuronal survival by inhibiting BMP-mediated microtubule stabilization.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Minyeop; Lee, Min-Jung; Parkinson, William; Lee, Mihye; Kim, Haeran; Kim, Yoon-Jung; Kim, Sungdae; Cho, Yi Sul; Min, Byung-Moo; Bae, Yong Chul; Broadie, Kendal; Lee, Seungbok

    2013-02-20

    Troyer syndrome is a hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by human spartin (SPG20) gene mutations. We have generated a Drosophila disease model showing that Spartin functions presynaptically with endocytic adaptor Eps15 to regulate synaptic growth and function. Spartin inhibits bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling by promoting endocytic degradation of BMP receptor wishful thinking (Wit). Drosophila fragile X mental retardation protein (dFMRP) and Futsch/MAP1B are downstream effectors of Spartin and BMP signaling in regulating microtubule stability and synaptic growth. Loss of Spartin or elevation of BMP signaling induces age-dependent progressive defects resembling hereditary spastic paraplegias, including motor dysfunction and brain neurodegeneration. Null spartin phenotypes are prevented by administration of the microtubule-destabilizing drug vinblastine. Together, these results demonstrate that Spartin regulates both synaptic development and neuronal survival by controlling microtubule stability via the BMP-dFMRP-Futsch pathway, suggesting that impaired regulation of microtubule stability is a core pathogenic component in Troyer syndrome.

  5. Inhibition of protein kinase C affects on mode of synaptic vesicle exocytosis due to cholesterol depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Alexey M. Zakyrjanova, Guzalija F. Yakovleva, Anastasia A. Zefirov, Andrei L.

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • We examine the involvement of PKC in MCD induced synaptic vesicle exocytosis. • PKC inhibitor does not decrease the effect MCD on MEPP frequency. • PKC inhibitor prevents MCD induced FM1-43 unloading. • PKC activation may switch MCD induced exocytosis from kiss-and-run to a full mode. • Inhibition of phospholipase C does not lead to similar change in exocytosis. - Abstract: Previous studies demonstrated that depletion of membrane cholesterol by 10 mM methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD) results in increased spontaneous exocytosis at both peripheral and central synapses. Here, we investigated the role of protein kinase C in the enhancement of spontaneous exocytosis at frog motor nerve terminals after cholesterol depletion using electrophysiological and optical methods. Inhibition of the protein kinase C by myristoylated peptide and chelerythrine chloride prevented MCD-induced increases in FM1-43 unloading, whereas the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic events remained enhanced. The increase in FM1-43 unloading still could be observed if sulforhodamine 101 (the water soluble FM1-43 quencher that can pass through the fusion pore) was added to the extracellular solution. This suggests a possibility that exocytosis of synaptic vesicles under these conditions could occur through the kiss-and-run mechanism with the formation of a transient fusion pore. Inhibition of phospholipase C did not lead to similar change in MCD-induced exocytosis.

  6. Presynaptic serotonergic inhibition of GABAergic synaptic transmission in mechanically dissociated rat basolateral amygdala neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Susumu; Kubo, Chiharu; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Akaike, Norio

    1999-01-01

    The basolateral amygdala (ABL) nuclei contribute to the process of anxiety. GABAergic transmission is critical in these nuclei and serotonergic inputs from dorsal raphe nuclei also significantly regulate GABA release. In mechanically dissociated rat ABL neurons, spontaneous miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) arising from attached GABAergic presynaptic nerve terminals were recorded with the nystatin-perforated patch method and pharmacological isolation.5-HT reversibly reduced the GABAergic mIPSC frequency without affecting the mean amplitude. The serotonergic effect was mimicked by the 5-HT1A specific agonist 8-OH DPAT (8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin) and blocked by the 5-HT1A antagonist spiperone.The GTP-binding protein inhibitor N-ethylmaleimide removed the serotonergic inhibition of mIPSC frequency. In either K+-free or Ca2+-free external solution, 5-HT could inhibit mIPSC frequency.High K+ stimulation increased mIPSC frequency and 8-OH DPAT inhibited this increase even in the presence of Cd2+.Forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC), significantly increased synaptic GABA release frequency. Pretreatment with forskolin prevented the serotonergic inhibition of mIPSC frequency in both the standard and high K+ external solution.Ruthenium Red (RR), an agent facilitating the secretory process in a Ca2+-independent manner, increased synaptic GABA release. 5-HT also suppressed RR-facilitated mIPSC frequency.We conclude that 5-HT inhibits GABAergic mIPSCs by inactivating the AC-cAMP signal transduction pathway via a G-protein-coupled 5-HT1A receptor and this intracellular pathway directly acts on the GABA-releasing process independent of K+ and Ca2+ channels in the presynaptic nerve terminals. PMID:10381597

  7. Persistent CaMKII activation mediates learning-induced long-lasting enhancement of synaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sourav; Reuveni, Iris; Lamprecht, Raphael; Barkai, Edi

    2015-01-07

    Training rats in a particularly difficult olfactory-discrimination task results in acquisition of high skill to perform the task superbly, termed "rule learning" or "learning set." Such complex learning results in enhanced intrinsic neuronal excitability of piriform cortex pyramidal neurons, and in their excitatory synaptic interconnections. These changes, while subserving memory maintenance, must be counterbalanced by modifications that prevent overspreading of activity and uncontrolled synaptic strengthening. Indeed, we have previously shown that the average amplitude of GABAA-mediated miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs) in these neurons is enhanced for several days after learning, an enhancement mediated via a postsynaptic mechanism. To unravel the molecular mechanism of this long-term inhibition enhancement, we tested the role of key second-messenger systems in maintaining such long-lasting modulation. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) blocker, KN93, significantly reduced the average mIPSC amplitude in neurons from trained rats only to the average pretraining level. A similar effect was obtained by the CaMKII peptide inhibitor, tatCN21. Such reduction resulted from decreased single-channel conductance and not in the number of activated channels. The PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, reduced the average mIPSC amplitude in neurons from naive, pseudo-trained, and trained animals, and the difference between the trained and control groups remained. Such reduction resulted from a decrease in the number of activated channels. The PKA inhibitor H89 dihydrochloride did not affect the average mIPSC amplitude in neurons from any of the three groups. We conclude that learning-induced enhancement of GABAA-mediated synaptic inhibition is maintained by persistent CaMKII activation.

  8. Neurosteroid interactions with synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAa receptors: regulation of subunit plasticity, phasic and tonic inhibition, and neuronal network excitability

    PubMed Central

    Chase Matthew, Carver; Doodipala Samba, Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Neurosteroids are steroids synthesized within the brain with rapid effects on neuronal excitability. Allopregnanolone, allotetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone, and androstanediol are three widely explored prototype endogenous neurosteroids. They have very different targets and functions compared to conventional steroid hormones. Neuronal GABAa receptors are one of the prime molecular targets of neurosteroids. Objective This review provides a critical appraisal of recent advances in the pharmacology of endogenous neurosteroids that interact with GABAa receptors in the brain. Neurosteroids possess distinct, characteristic effects on the membrane potential and current conductance of the neuron, mainly via potentiation of GABAa receptors at low concentrations and direct activation of receptor chloride channel at higher concentrations. The GABAa receptor mediates two types of inhibition, now characterized as synaptic (phasic) and extrasynaptic (tonic) inhibition. Synaptic release of GABA results in the activation of low-affinity γ2-containing synaptic receptors, while high-affinity δ-containing extrasynaptic receptors are persistently activated by the ambient GABA present in the extracellular fluid. Neurosteroids are potent positive allosteric modulators of synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAa receptors and therefore enhance both phasic and tonic inhibition. Tonic inhibition is specifically more sensitive to neurosteroids. The resulting tonic conductance generates a form of shunting inhibition that controls neuronal network excitability, seizure susceptibility, and behavior. Conclusion The growing understanding of the mechanisms of neurosteroid regulation of the structure and function of the synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAa receptors provide many opportunities to create improved therapies for sleep, anxiety, stress, epilepsy, and other neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:24071826

  9. Short term synaptic plasticity regulates the level of olivocochlear inhibition to auditory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Ballestero, Jimena; de San Martín, Javier Zorrilla; Goutman, Juan; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén; Fuchs, Paul A.; Katz, Eleonora

    2011-01-01

    In the mammalian inner ear, the gain control of auditory inputs is exerted by medial olivocochlear (MOC) neurons that innervate cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs). OHCs mechanically amplify the incoming sound waves by virtue of their electromotile properties while the MOC system reduces the gain of auditory inputs by inhibiting OHCs function. How this process is orchestrated at the synaptic level remains unknown. In the present study, MOC firing was evoked by electrical stimulation in an isolated mouse cochlear preparation, while OHCs postsynaptic responses were monitored by whole-cell recordings. These recordings confirmed that electrically evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) are mediated solely by α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) functionally coupled to calcium-activated SK2 channels. Synaptic release occurred with low probability when MOC-OHC synapses were stimulated at 1Hz. However, as the stimulation frequency was raised, the reliability of release increased due to presynaptic facilitation. In addition, the relatively slow decay of eIPSCs gave rise to temporal summation at stimulation frequencies above 10 Hz. The combined effect of facilitation and summation resulted in a frequency-dependent increase in the average amplitude of inhibitory currents in OHCs. Thus, we have demonstrated that short-term plasticity is responsible for shaping MOC inhibition and, therefore, encodes the transfer function from efferent firing frequency to the gain of the cochlear amplifier. PMID:21994392

  10. Interferon alpha inhibits spinal cord synaptic and nociceptive transmission via neuronal-glial interactions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chien-Cheng; Gao, Yong-Jing; Luo, Hao; Berta, Temugin; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Ji, Ru-Rong; Tan, Ping-Heng

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that interferons (IFNs), such as type-I IFN (IFN-α) and type-II IFN (IFN-γ) are produced by immune cells to elicit antiviral effects. IFNs are also produced by glial cells in the CNS to regulate brain functions. As a proinflammatory cytokine, IFN-γ drives neuropathic pain by inducing microglial activation in the spinal cord. However, little is known about the role of IFN-α in regulating pain sensitivity and synaptic transmission. Strikingly, we found that IFN-α/β receptor (type-I IFN receptor) was expressed by primary afferent terminals in the superficial dorsal horn that co-expressed the neuropeptide CGRP. In the spinal cord IFN-α was primarily expressed by astrocytes. Perfusion of spinal cord slices with IFN-α suppressed excitatory synaptic transmission by reducing the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSCs). IFN-α also inhibited nociceptive transmission by reducing capsaicin-induced internalization of NK-1 and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in superficial dorsal horn neurons. Finally, spinal (intrathecal) administration of IFN-α reduced inflammatory pain and increased pain threshold in naïve rats, whereas removal of endogenous IFN-α by a neutralizing antibody induced hyperalgesia. Our findings suggest a new form of neuronal-glial interaction by which IFN-α, produced by astrocytes, inhibits nociceptive transmission in the spinal cord. PMID:27670299

  11. Inhibiting BACE1 to reverse synaptic dysfunctions in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Riqiang; Fan, Qingyuan; Zhou, John; Vassar, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, many studies have identified significant contributions of toxic β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) to the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which is the most common age-dependent neurodegenerative disease. AD is also recognized as a disease of synaptic failure. Aβ, generated by sequential proteolytic cleavages of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by BACE1 and γ-secretase, is one of major culprits that cause this failure. In this review, we summarize current findings on how BACE1-cleaved APP products impact learning and memory through proteins localized on glutamatergic, GABAergic, and dopaminergic synapses. Considering the broad effects of Aβ on all three types of synapses, BACE1 inhibition emerges as a practical approach for ameliorating Aβ-mediated synaptic dysfunctions. Since BACE1 inhibitory drugs are currently in clinical trials, this review also discusses potential complications arising from BACE1 inhibition. We emphasize that the benefits of BACE1 inhibitory drugs will outweigh the concerns. PMID:27044452

  12. Frequency tuning of synaptic inhibition underlying duration-tuned neurons in the mammalian inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Valdizón-Rodríguez, Roberto; Faure, Paul A

    2017-04-01

    Inhibition plays an important role in creating the temporal response properties of duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) in the mammalian inferior colliculus (IC). Neurophysiological and computational studies indicate that duration selectivity in the IC is created through the convergence of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs offset in time. We used paired-tone stimulation and extracellular recording to measure the frequency tuning of the inhibition acting on DTNs in the IC of the big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus). We stimulated DTNs with pairs of tones differing in duration, onset time, and frequency. The onset time of a short, best-duration (BD), probe tone set to the best excitatory frequency (BEF) was varied relative to the onset of a longer-duration, nonexcitatory (NE) tone whose frequency was varied. When the NE tone frequency was near or within the cell's excitatory bandwidth (eBW), BD tone-evoked spikes were suppressed by an onset-evoked inhibition. The onset of the spike suppression was independent of stimulus frequency, but both the offset and duration of the suppression decreased as the NE tone frequency departed from the BEF. We measured the inhibitory frequency response area, best inhibitory frequency (BIF), and inhibitory bandwidth (iBW) of each cell. We found that the BIF closely matched the BEF, but the iBW was broader and usually overlapped the eBW measured from the same cell. These data suggest that temporal selectivity of midbrain DTNs is created and preserved by having cells receive an onset-evoked, constant-latency, broadband inhibition that largely overlaps the cell's excitatory receptive field. We conclude by discussing possible neural sources of the inhibition.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Duration-tuned neurons (DTNs) arise from temporally offset excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. We used single-unit recording and paired-tone stimulation to measure the spectral tuning of the inhibitory inputs to DTNs. The onset of inhibition was independent of

  13. Orexin A induces bidirectional modulation of synaptic plasticity: Inhibiting long-term potentiation and preventing depotentiation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guan-Ling; Lee, Chia-Hsu; Chiou, Lih-Chu

    2016-08-01

    The orexin system consists of two peptides, orexin A and B and two receptors, OX1R and OX2R. It is implicated in learning and memory regulation while controversy remains on its role in modulating hippocampal synaptic plasticity in vivo and in vitro. Here, we investigated effects of orexin A on two forms of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs), at the Schaffer Collateral-CA1 synapse of mouse hippocampal slices. Orexin A (≧30 nM) attenuated LTP induced by theta burst stimulation (TBS) in a manner antagonized by an OX1R (SB-334867), but not OX2R (EMPA), antagonist. Conversely, at 1 pM, co-application of orexin A prevented the induction of depotentiation induced by low frequency stimulation (LFS), i.e. restoring LTP. This re-potentiation effect of sub-nanomolar orexin A occurred at LFS of 1 Hz, but not 2 Hz, and with LTP induced by either TBS or tetanic stimulation. It was significantly antagonized by SB-334867, EMPA and TCS-1102, selective OX1R, OX2R and dual OXR antagonists, respectively, and prevented by D609, SQ22536 and H89, inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC), adenylyl cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA), respectively. LFS-induced depotentiation was antagonized by blockers of NMDA, A1-adenosine and type 1/5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1/5) receptors, respectively. However, orexin A (1 pM) did not affect chemical-induced depotentiation by agonists of these receptors. These results suggest that orexin A bidirectionally modulates hippocampal CA1 synaptic plasticity, inhibiting LTP via OX1Rs at moderate concentrations while inducing re-potentiation via OX1Rs and OX2Rs, possibly through PLC and AC-PKA signaling at sub-nanomolar concentrations.

  14. In vivo mitochondrial inhibition alters corticostriatal synaptic function and the modulatory effects of neurotrophins.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, E; Miranda-Barrientos, J A; Vázquez-Roque, R A; Morales-Herrera, E; Ruelas, A; De la Rosa, G; Flores, G; Hernández-Echeagaray, E

    2014-11-07

    Experimental evidence has revealed the role of mitochondria in various aspects of neuronal physiology. Mitochondrial failure results in alterations that underlie the pathogeneses of many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease (HD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP) has been used to model failure; for example, systemic administration of 3-NP imitates the striatal degeneration that is exhibited in the postmortem tissue of patients afflicted with HD. We have demonstrated that low, sub-chronic doses of 3-NP are sufficient to initiate the damage to striatal neurons that is associated with changes in neurotrophin expression levels. However, the mechanisms underlying the alterations in neuronal activity and neurotransmission due to 3-NP-induced mitochondrial dysfunction remain to be elucidated. In this paper, we focus on how corticostriatal transmission and its modulation by neurotrophins are altered in vivo after 5 days of mitochondrial inhibition with 3-NP. Recordings of population spikes and a paired pulse (PP) stimulation protocol were used to document changes in corticostriatal synapses in 3-NP-treated brain slices. The corticostriatal synapses were modulated by neurotrophins but displayed differential amplitude increases in the presence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), or neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5) under control conditions. Neurotrophin-mediated synaptic modulation was decreased in slices from 3-NP-treated mice. The protein and mRNA levels of neurotrophins and their receptors were also modified in the 3-NP-treated tissue. Neuronal structural evaluation demonstrated that synaptic length and density were reduced in the 3-NP-treated mice, which partially explained the changes in the amplitudes of the synaptic field responses. Our results demonstrate that corticostriatal synapses are differentially modulated by neurotrophins

  15. Exonic microdeletions of the gephyrin gene impair GABAergic synaptic inhibition in patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Dejanovic, Borislav; Lal, Dennis; Catarino, Claudia B; Arjune, Sita; Belaidi, Abdel A; Trucks, Holger; Vollmar, Christian; Surges, Rainer; Kunz, Wolfram S; Motameny, Susanne; Altmüller, Janine; Köhler, Anna; Neubauer, Bernd A; Epicure Consortium; Nürnberg, Peter; Noachtar, Soheyl; Schwarz, Günter; Sander, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    Gephyrin is a postsynaptic scaffolding protein, essential for the clustering of glycine and γ-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs) at inhibitory synapses. An impairment of GABAergic synaptic inhibition represents a key pathway of epileptogenesis. Recently, exonic microdeletions in the gephyrin (GPHN) gene have been associated with neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and epileptic seizures. Here we report the identification of novel exonic GPHN microdeletions in two patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE), representing the most common group of genetically determined epilepsies. The identified GPHN microdeletions involve exons 5-9 (Δ5-9) and 2-3 (Δ2-3), both affecting the gephyrin G-domain. Molecular characterization of the GPHN Δ5-9 variant demonstrated that it perturbs the clustering of regular gephyrin at inhibitory synapses in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons in a dominant-negative manner, resulting in a significant loss of γ2-subunit containing GABAARs. GPHN Δ2-3 causes a frameshift resulting in a premature stop codon (p.V22Gfs*7) leading to haplo-insufficiency of the gene. Our results demonstrate that structural exonic microdeletions affecting the GPHN gene constitute a rare genetic risk factor for IGE and other neuropsychiatric disorders by an impairment of the GABAergic inhibitory synaptic transmission.

  16. Apomorphine-induced changes in synaptic dopamine levels: positron emission tomography evidence for presynaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    de La Fuente-Fernández, R; Lim, A S; Sossi, V; Holden, J E; Calne, D B; Ruth, T J; Stoessl, A J

    2001-10-01

    The authors developed a novel positron emission tomography method to estimate changes in the synaptic level of dopamine ([DA]) induced by direct dopamine agonists (for example, apomorphine) in patients with Parkinson disease. The method is based on the typical asymmetry of the nigrostriatal lesion that often occurs in Parkinson disease. Using the between-side difference (ipsilateral (I) and contralateral (C) putamen to the more affected body side) of the inverse of the putamen [11C]raclopride binding potential (BP), the authors obtained [equation: see text] at baseline (that is, before apomorphine administration) and [equation: see text] after apomorphine administration (assuming the concentration of apomorphine is equal in both putamina). The between-side difference in the estimated synaptic concentration of dopamine (diff[DA]) should remain constant unless apomorphine affects dopamine release differently between the two sides. The authors found that apomorphine given subcutaneously at doses of 0.03 and 0.06 mg/kg induced significant changes in their estimate of diff[DA] (P < 0.05). Such changes were more pronounced when only patients with a stable response to levodopa were considered (P < 0.01). These findings provide in vivo evidence that direct dopamine agonists can inhibit the release of endogenous dopamine. The authors propose that this effect is mainly mediated by the activation of presynaptic D2/D3 dopamine receptors.

  17. SALM4 suppresses excitatory synapse development by cis-inhibiting trans-synaptic SALM3–LAR adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Lie, Eunkyung; Ko, Ji Seung; Choi, Su-Yeon; Roh, Junyeop Daniel; Cho, Yi Sul; Noh, Ran; Kim, Doyoun; Li, Yan; Kang, Hyeyeon; Choi, Tae-Yong; Nam, Jungyong; Mah, Won; Lee, Dongmin; Lee, Seong-Gyu; Kim, Ho Min; Kim, Hyun; Choi, Se-Young; Um, Ji Won; Kang, Myoung-Goo; Bae, Yong Chul; Ko, Jaewon; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate various aspects of synapse development, function and plasticity. These functions mainly involve trans-synaptic interactions and positive regulations, whereas cis-interactions and negative regulation are less understood. Here we report that SALM4, a member of the SALM/Lrfn family of synaptic adhesion molecules, suppresses excitatory synapse development through cis inhibition of SALM3, another SALM family protein with synaptogenic activity. Salm4-mutant (Salm4−/−) mice show increased excitatory synapse numbers in the hippocampus. SALM4 cis-interacts with SALM3, inhibits trans-synaptic SALM3 interaction with presynaptic LAR family receptor tyrosine phosphatases and suppresses SALM3-dependent presynaptic differentiation. Importantly, deletion of Salm3 in Salm4−/− mice (Salm3−/−; Salm4−/−) normalizes the increased excitatory synapse number. These results suggest that SALM4 negatively regulates excitatory synapses via cis inhibition of the trans-synaptic SALM3–LAR adhesion. PMID:27480238

  18. A learning rule for local synaptic interactions between excitation and shunting inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mo, Chun-Hui; Gu, Ming; Koch, Christof

    2004-12-01

    The basic requirement for direction selectivity is a nonlinear interaction between two different inputs in space-time. In some models, the interaction is hypothesized to occur between excitation and inhibition of the shunting type in the neuron's dendritic tree. How can the required spatial specificity be acquired in an unsupervised manner? We here propose an activity-based, local learning model that can account for direction selectivity in visual cortex based on such a local veto operation and that depends on synaptically induced changes in intracellular calcium concentration. Our biophysical simulations suggest that a model cell with our learning algorithm can develop direction selectivity organically after unsupervised training. The learning rule is also applicable to a neuron with multiple-direction-selective subunits and to a pair of cells with opposite-direction selectivities and is stable under different starting conditions, delays, and velocities.

  19. CB1 cannabinoid receptor inhibits synaptic release of glutamate in rat dorsolateral striatum.

    PubMed

    Gerdeman, G; Lovinger, D M

    2001-01-01

    CB1 cannabinoid receptors in the neostriatum mediate profound motor deficits induced when cannabinoid drugs are administered to rodents. Because the CB1 receptor has been shown to inhibit neurotransmitter release in various brain areas, we investigated the effects of CB1 activation on glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the dorsolateral striatum of the rat where the CB1 receptor is highly expressed. We performed whole cell voltage-clamp experiments in striatal brain slices and applied the CB1 agonists HU-210 or WIN 55,212-2 during measurement of synaptic transmission. Excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs), evoked by electrical stimulation of afferent fibers, were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by CB1 agonist application. EPSC inhibition was accompanied by an increase in two separate indices of presynaptic release, the paired-pulse response ratio and the coefficient of variation, suggesting a decrease in neurotransmitter release. These effects were prevented by application of the CB1 antagonist SR141716A. When Sr(2+) was substituted for Ca(2+) in the extracellular solution, application of HU-210 (1 microM) significantly reduced the frequency, but not amplitude, of evoked, asynchronous quantal release events. Spontaneous release events were similarly decreased in frequency with no change in amplitude. These findings further support the interpretation that CB1 activation leads to a decrease of glutamate release from afferent terminals in the striatum. These results reveal a novel potential role for cannabinoids in regulating striatal function and thus basal ganglia output and may suggest CB1-targeted drugs as potential therapeutic agents in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and other basal ganglia disorders.

  20. Post-synaptic inhibition of bulbar inspiratory neurones in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Ballantyne, D; Richter, D W

    1984-01-01

    Stable intracellular recordings from thirty-six bulbar inspiratory neurones revealed three centrally originating, rhythmic patterns of synaptic inhibition (i.p.s.p.s). (i) A declining pattern of i.p.s.p.s accompanying the early stages of inspiration (early inspiratory inhibition) was identified in a total of twenty neurones representing examples of each of the functional classes of bulbar neurones examined, i.e. six R alpha- and two R beta-neurones of the dorsal respiratory group and twelve R alpha-neurones of the ventral respiratory group. (ii) A transient pattern of i.p.s.p.s just preceding or coinciding with the cessation of inspiration (late inspiratory inhibition) was present in the remaining sixteen neurones which were tested, representing six R alpha-neurones and three R beta-neurones of the dorsal respiratory group and seven R alpha-neurones of the ventral respiratory group. (iii) An augmenting pattern of expiratory i.p.s.p.s was present in all thirty-six neurones. Late inspiratory and expiratory i.p.s.p.s in the same neurones showed a similar time course of reversal when chloride was injected or allowed to diffuse into the cells and were associated with similar increases in input conductance. Both patterns of i.p.s.p.s appear to arise at or close to the cell soma. Early inspiratory i.p.s.p.s required a relatively longer period of chloride injection for reversal to be accomplished. Input conductance changes were either absent or smaller than those associated with late inspiratory or expiratory inhibition. These i.p.s.p.s appear to arise at more distal dendritic sites. These patterns of i.p.s.p.s are discussed in relation to the mechanisms shaping the growth of central inspiratory activity, bringing this activity to an end, and suppressing its redevelopment during expiration. PMID:6716297

  1. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat dentate gyrus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chang, M; Saito, H; Abe, K

    1998-07-01

    We investigated the effects of histamine H3-receptor ligands on hippocampal synaptic transmission by using anesthetized rats in vivo. The medial perforant path was stimulated, and the population excitatory postsynaptic potential (pEPSP) and population spike were recorded from the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus. Intracerebroventricular injection of the H3-receptor agonist (R)-alpha-methylhistamine decreased both the pEPSP and population spike, while H3-receptor antagonists, clobenpropit and thioperamide, increased both the pEPSP and population spike. These results suggest that the histaminergic system plays a role in inhibition of hippocampal synaptic excitation via the H3 receptor.

  2. CB₂ cannabinoid receptors inhibit synaptic transmission when expressed in cultured autaptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Brady K; Straiker, Alex; Mackie, Ken

    2012-09-01

    The role of CB₂ in the central nervous system, particularly in neurons, has generated much controversy. Fueling the controversy are imperfect tools, which have made conclusive identification of CB₂ expressing neurons problematic. Imprecise localization of CB₂ has made it difficult to determine its function in neurons. Here we avoid the localization controversy and directly address the question if CB₂ can modulate neurotransmission. CB₂ was expressed in excitatory hippocampal autaptic neurons obtained from CB₁ null mice. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from these neurons to determine the effects of CB₂ on short-term synaptic plasticity. CB₂ expression restored depolarization induced suppression of excitation to these neurons, which was lost following genetic ablation of CB₁. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) mimicked the effects of depolarization in CB₂ expressing neurons. Interestingly, ongoing basal production of 2-AG resulted in constitutive activation of CB₂, causing a tonic inhibition of neurotransmission that was relieved by the CB₂ antagonist AM630 or the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor RHC80267. Through immunocytochemistry and analysis of spontaneous EPSCs, paired pulse ratios and coefficients of variation we determined that CB₂ exerts its function at a presynaptic site of action, likely through inhibition of voltage gated calcium channels. Therefore CB₂ expressed in neurons effectively mimics the actions of CB₁. Thus neuronal CB₂ is well suited to integrate into conventional neuronal endocannabinoid signaling processes, with its specific role determined by its unique and highly inducible expression profile.

  3. Inactivation of clathrin heavy chain inhibits synaptic recycling but allows bulk membrane uptake

    PubMed Central

    Kasprowicz, Jaroslaw; Kuenen, Sabine; Miskiewicz, Katarzyna; Habets, Ron L.P.; Smitz, Liesbet; Verstreken, Patrik

    2008-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle reformation depends on clathrin, an abundant protein that polymerizes around newly forming vesicles. However, how clathrin is involved in synaptic recycling in vivo remains unresolved. We test clathrin function during synaptic endocytosis using clathrin heavy chain (chc) mutants combined with chc photoinactivation to circumvent early embryonic lethality associated with chc mutations in multicellular organisms. Acute inactivation of chc at stimulated synapses leads to substantial membrane internalization visualized by live dye uptake and electron microscopy. However, chc-inactivated membrane cannot recycle and participate in vesicle release, resulting in a dramatic defect in neurotransmission maintenance during intense synaptic activity. Furthermore, inactivation of chc in the context of other endocytic mutations results in membrane uptake. Our data not only indicate that chc is critical for synaptic vesicle recycling but they also show that in the absence of the protein, bulk retrieval mediates massive synaptic membrane internalization. PMID:18762582

  4. GCP II (NAALADase) Inhibition Suppresses Mossy Fiber-CA3 Synaptic Neurotransmission by a Presynaptic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Garrido Sanabria, Emilio R.; Wozniak, Krystyna M.; Slusher, Barbara S.; Keller, Asaf

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that endogenous N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) presynaptically inhibits glutamate release at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses. For this purpose, we made use of 2-(3-mercaptopropyl)pentanedioic acid (2-MPPA), an inhibitor of glutamate carboxypeptidase II [GCP II; also known as N-acetylated alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase (NAALADase)], the enzyme that hydrolyzes NAAG into N-acetylaspartate and glutamate. Application of 2-MPPA (1–20 μM) had no effect on intrinsic membrane properties of CA3 pyramidal neurons recorded in vitro in whole cell current- or voltage-clamp mode. Bath application of 10 μM 2-MPPA suppressed evoked excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) amplitudes. Attenuation of EPSC amplitudes was accompanied by a significant increase in paired-pulse facilitation (50-ms interpulse intervals), suggesting that a presynaptic mechanism is involved. The group II metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonist 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycyclopropyl-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-y l) propanoic acid (LY341495) prevented the 2-MPPA-dependent suppression of EPSC amplitudes. 2-MPPA reduced the frequencies of TTX-insensitive miniature EPSCs (mEPSC), without affecting their amplitudes, further supporting a presynaptic action for GCP II inhibition. 2-MPPA-induced reduction of mEPSC frequencies was prevented by LY341495, reinforcing the role of presynaptic group II mGluR. Because GCP II inhibition is thought to increase NAAG levels, these results suggest that NAAG suppresses synaptic transmission at mossy fiber-CA3 synapses through presynaptic activation of group II mGluRs. PMID:12917384

  5. Efficacy of Synaptic Inhibition Depends on Multiple, Dynamically Interacting Mechanisms Implicated in Chloride Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Doyon, Nicolas; Prescott, Steven A.; Castonguay, Annie; Godin, Antoine G.; Kröger, Helmut; De Koninck, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Chloride homeostasis is a critical determinant of the strength and robustness of inhibition mediated by GABAA receptors (GABAARs). The impact of changes in steady state Cl− gradient is relatively straightforward to understand, but how dynamic interplay between Cl− influx, diffusion, extrusion and interaction with other ion species affects synaptic signaling remains uncertain. Here we used electrodiffusion modeling to investigate the nonlinear interactions between these processes. Results demonstrate that diffusion is crucial for redistributing intracellular Cl− load on a fast time scale, whereas Cl−extrusion controls steady state levels. Interaction between diffusion and extrusion can result in a somato-dendritic Cl− gradient even when KCC2 is distributed uniformly across the cell. Reducing KCC2 activity led to decreased efficacy of GABAAR-mediated inhibition, but increasing GABAAR input failed to fully compensate for this form of disinhibition because of activity-dependent accumulation of Cl−. Furthermore, if spiking persisted despite the presence of GABAAR input, Cl− accumulation became accelerated because of the large Cl− driving force that occurs during spikes. The resulting positive feedback loop caused catastrophic failure of inhibition. Simulations also revealed other feedback loops, such as competition between Cl− and pH regulation. Several model predictions were tested and confirmed by [Cl−]i imaging experiments. Our study has thus uncovered how Cl− regulation depends on a multiplicity of dynamically interacting mechanisms. Furthermore, the model revealed that enhancing KCC2 activity beyond normal levels did not negatively impact firing frequency or cause overt extracellular K− accumulation, demonstrating that enhancing KCC2 activity is a valid strategy for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21931544

  6. Respiration drives network activity and modulates synaptic and circuit processing of lateral inhibition in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Matthew E.; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Willhite, David C.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2012-01-01

    Respiration produces rhythmic activity in the entire olfactory system, driving neurons in the olfactory epithelium, bulb (OB) and cortex. The rhythmic nature of this activity is believed to be a critical component of sensory processing. OB projection neurons, mitral and tufted cells, exhibit both spiking and subthreshold membrane potential oscillations rhythmically coupled to respiration. Yet, the network and synaptic mechanisms that produce respiration-coupled activity, and the effects of respiration on lateral inhibition, a major component of sensory processing in OB circuits, are not known. Is respiration-coupled activity in mitral and tufted cells produced by sensory synaptic inputs from nasal airflow alone, cortico-bulbar feedback, or intrinsic membrane properties of the projection neurons? Does respiration facilitate or modulate the activity of inhibitory lateral circuits in the OB? Here, in vivo intracellular recordings from identified mitral and tufted cells in anesthetized rats demonstrate that nasal airflow provides excitatory synaptic inputs to both cell types and drives respiration-coupled spiking. Lateral inhibition, inhibitory post-synaptic potentials evoked by intrabulbar microstimulation, was modulated by respiration. In individual mitral and tufted cells inhibition was larger at specific respiratory phases. However, lateral inhibition was not uniformly larger during a particular respiratory phase in either cell type. Removing nasal airflow abolished respiration-coupled spiking in both cell types and nearly eliminated spiking in mitral, but not tufted cells. In the absence of nasal airflow, lateral inhibition was weaker in mitral cells and less modulated in tufted cells. Thus, respiration drives distinct network activities that functionally modulate sensory processing in the OB. PMID:22219272

  7. GABA type a receptor trafficking and the architecture of synaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lorenz-Guertin, Joshua M; Jacob, Tija C

    2017-09-13

    Ubiquitous expression of GABA type A receptors (GABAA R) in the central nervous system establishes their central role in coordinating most aspects of neural function and development. Dysregulation of GABAergic neurotransmission manifests in a number of human health disorders and conditions that in certain cases can be alleviated by drugs targeting these receptors. Precise changes in the quantity or activity of GABAA Rs localized at the cell surface and at GABAergic postsynaptic sites directly impact the strength of inhibition. The molecular mechanisms constituting receptor trafficking to and from these compartments therefore dictate the efficacy of GABAA R function. Here we review the current understanding of how GABAA Rs traffic through biogenesis, plasma membrane transport, and degradation. Emphasis is placed on discussing novel GABAergic synaptic proteins, receptor and scaffolding post-translational modifications, activity-dependent changes in GABAA R confinement, and neuropeptide and neurosteroid mediated changes. We further highlight modern techniques currently advancing the knowledge of GABAA R trafficking and clinically relevant neurodevelopmental diseases connected to GABAergic dysfunction. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Facilitates Massed Pattern-Induced Synaptic Plasticity and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Kiran; Sharma, Kaushik P.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2015-01-01

    Massed training is less effective for long-term memory formation than the spaced training. The role of acetylation in synaptic plasticity and memory is now well established. However, the role of this important protein modification in synaptic plasticity induced by massed pattern of stimulation or memory induced by massed training is not well…

  9. Histone Deacetylase Inhibition Facilitates Massed Pattern-Induced Synaptic Plasticity and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Kiran; Sharma, Kaushik P.; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2015-01-01

    Massed training is less effective for long-term memory formation than the spaced training. The role of acetylation in synaptic plasticity and memory is now well established. However, the role of this important protein modification in synaptic plasticity induced by massed pattern of stimulation or memory induced by massed training is not well…

  10. Tonic and phasic differential GABAergic inhibition of synaptic actions of joint afferents in the cat.

    PubMed

    Rudomin, P; Hernández, E; Lomelí, J

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the functional organization of the spinal neuronal networks activated by myelinated afferent fibers in the posterior articular nerve (PAN) of the anesthetized cat. Particular attention was given to the tonic and phasic GABAa inhibitory modulation of these networks. Changes in the synaptic effectiveness of the joint afferents were inferred from changes in the intraspinal focal potentials produced by electrical stimulation of the PAN. We found that conditioning stimulation of cutaneous nerves (sural, superficial peroneus and saphenous) and of the nucleus raphe magnus often inhibited, in a differential manner, the early and late components of the intraspinal focal potentials produced by stimulation of low and high threshold myelinated PAN afferents, respectively. The degree of the inhibition depended on the strength of both the conditioning and test stimuli and on the segmental level of recording. Conditioning stimulation of group I muscle afferents was less effective, but marked depression of the early and late focal potentials was produced by stimuli exceeding 5 xT. The i.v. injection of 1-2.5 mg/kg of picrotoxin, a GABAa blocker, had relatively minor effects on the early components of the PAN focal potentials, but was able to induce a significant increase of the late components. It also reduced the inhibitory effects of cutaneous and joint nerve conditioning on PAN focal responses. Conditioning autogenetic stimulation with high-frequency trains depressed the PAN focal potentials. The late components of the PAN responses remained depressed several minutes after discontinuing the conditioning train, even after picrotoxin administration. The present observations indicate that the neuronal networks activated by the low threshold PAN afferents show a relatively small post-activation depression and appear to be subjected to a minor tonic inhibitory GABAa control. In contrast, the pathways activated by stimulation of high threshold

  11. Synaptic NMDA receptor stimulation activates PP1 by inhibiting its phosphorylation by Cdk5

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hailong; Sun, Lu; Siddoway, Benjamin A.; Petralia, Ronald S.; Yang, Hongtian; Gu, Hua; Nairn, Angus C.

    2013-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein phosphatase protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is known to play an important role in learning and memory by mediating local and downstream aspects of synaptic signaling, but how PP1 activity is controlled in different forms of synaptic plasticity remains unknown. We find that synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor stimulation in neurons leads to activation of PP1 through a mechanism involving inhibitory phosphorylation at Thr320 by Cdk5. Synaptic stimulation led to proteasome-dependent degradation of the Cdk5 regulator p35, inactivation of Cdk5, and increased auto-dephosphorylation of Thr320 of PP1. We also found that neither inhibitor-1 nor calcineurin were involved in the control of PP1 activity in response to synaptic NMDA receptor stimulation. Rather, the PP1 regulatory protein, inhibitor-2, formed a complex with PP1 that was controlled by synaptic stimulation. Finally, we found that inhibitor-2 was critical for the induction of long-term depression in primary neurons. Our work fills a major gap regarding the regulation of PP1 in synaptic plasticity. PMID:24189275

  12. Leptin inhibits 4-aminopyridine- and pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures and AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission in rodents.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lin; Rensing, Nicholas; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Hai Xia; Thio, Liu Lin; Rothman, Steven M; Weisenfeld, Aryan E; Wong, Michael; Yamada, Kelvin A

    2008-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone that reduces excitability in some hypothalamic neurons via leptin receptor activation of the JAK2 and PI3K intracellular signaling pathways. We hypothesized that leptin receptor activation in other neuronal subtypes would have anticonvulsant activity and that intranasal leptin delivery would be an effective route of administration. We tested leptin's anticonvulsant action in 2 rodent seizure models by directly injecting it into the cortex or by administering it intranasally. Focal seizures in rats were induced by neocortical injections of 4-aminopyridine, an inhibitor of voltage-gated K+ channels. These seizures were briefer and less frequent upon coinjection of 4-aminopyridine and leptin. In mice, intranasal administration of leptin produced elevated brain and serum leptin levels and delayed the onset of chemical convulsant pentylenetetrazole-induced generalized convulsive seizures. Leptin also reduced neuronal spiking in an in vitro seizure model. Leptin inhibited alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole proprionic acid (AMPA) receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in mouse hippocampal slices but failed to inhibit synaptic responses in slices from leptin receptor-deficient db/db mice. JAK2 and PI3K antagonists prevented leptin inhibition of AMPAergic synaptic transmission. We conclude that leptin receptor activation and JAK2/PI3K signaling may be novel targets for anticonvulsant treatments. Intranasal leptin administration may have potential as an acute abortive treatment for convulsive seizures in emergency situations.

  13. Leptin inhibits 4-aminopyridine– and pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures and AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Rensing, Nicholas; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, Hai Xia; Thio, Liu Lin; Rothman, Steven M.; Weisenfeld, Aryan E.; Wong, Michael; Yamada, Kelvin A.

    2007-01-01

    Leptin is a hormone that reduces excitability in some hypothalamic neurons via leptin receptor activation of the JAK2 and PI3K intracellular signaling pathways. We hypothesized that leptin receptor activation in other neuronal subtypes would have anticonvulsant activity and that intranasal leptin delivery would be an effective route of administration. We tested leptin’s anticonvulsant action in 2 rodent seizure models by directly injecting it into the cortex or by administering it intranasally. Focal seizures in rats were induced by neocortical injections of 4-aminopyridine, an inhibitor of voltage-gated K+ channels. These seizures were briefer and less frequent upon coinjection of 4-aminopyridine and leptin. In mice, intranasal administration of leptin produced elevated brain and serum leptin levels and delayed the onset of chemical convulsant pentylenetetrazole-induced generalized convulsive seizures. Leptin also reduced neuronal spiking in an in vitro seizure model. Leptin inhibited α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole proprionic acid (AMPA) receptor–mediated synaptic transmission in mouse hippocampal slices but failed to inhibit synaptic responses in slices from leptin receptor–deficient db/db mice. JAK2 and PI3K antagonists prevented leptin inhibition of AMPAergic synaptic transmission. We conclude that leptin receptor activation and JAK2/PI3K signaling may be novel targets for anticonvulsant treatments. Intranasal leptin administration may have potential as an acute abortive treatment for convulsive seizures in emergency situations. PMID:18097472

  14. Pre-synaptic adenosine A2A receptors control cannabinoid CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of striatal glutamatergic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Martire, Alberto; Tebano, Maria Teresa; Chiodi, Valentina; Ferreira, Samira G; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Köfalvi, Attila; Popoli, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    An interaction between adenosine A(2A) receptors (A(2A) Rs) and cannabinoid CB(1) receptors (CB(1) Rs) has been consistently reported to occur in the striatum, although the precise mechanisms are not completely understood. As both receptors control striatal glutamatergic transmission, we now probed the putative interaction between pre-synaptic CB(1) R and A(2A) R in the striatum. In extracellular field potentials recordings in corticostriatal slices from Wistar rats, A(2A) R activation by CGS21680 inhibited CB(1) R-mediated effects (depression of synaptic response and increase in paired-pulse facilitation). Moreover, in superfused rat striatal nerve terminals, A(2A) R activation prevented, while A(2A) R inhibition facilitated, the CB(1) R-mediated inhibition of 4-aminopyridine-evoked glutamate release. In summary, the present study provides converging neurochemical and electrophysiological support for the occurrence of a tight control of CB(1) R function by A(2A) Rs in glutamatergic terminals of the striatum. In view of the key role of glutamate to trigger the recruitment of striatal circuits, this pre-synaptic interaction between CB(1) R and A(2A) R may be of relevance for the pathogenesis and the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders affecting the basal ganglia.

  15. Presynaptic inhibition of synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus by activation of muscarinic receptors: involvement of presynaptic calcium influx

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Jing; Saggau, Peter

    1997-01-01

    Modulation of presynaptic voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) by muscarinic receptors at the CA3–CA1 synapse of rat hippocampal slices was investigated by using the calcium indicator fura-2. Stimulation-evoked presynaptic calcium transients ([Capre]t) and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fe.p.s.ps) were simultaneously recorded. The relationship between presynaptic calcium influx and synaptic transmission was studied. Activation of muscarinic receptors inhibited [Capre]t, thereby reducing synaptic transmission. Carbachol (CCh, 10 μM) inhibited [Capre]t by 35% and reduced fe.p.s.p. by 85%. The inhibition was completely antagonized by 1 μM atropine. An approximate 4th power relationship was found between presynaptic calcium influx and postsynaptic responses. Application of the N-type VDCC-blocking peptide toxin ω-conotoxin GVIA (ω-CTx GVIA, 1 μM) inhibited [Capre]t and fe.p.s.ps by 21% and 49%, respectively, while the P/Q-type VDCC blocker ω-agatoxin IVA (ω-Aga IVA, 1 μM) reduced [Capre]t and fe.p.s.ps by 35% and 85%, respectively. Muscarinic receptor activation differentially inhibited distinct presynaptic VDCCs. ω-CTx GVIA-sensitive calcium channels were inhibited by muscarinic receptors, while ω-Aga IVA-sensitive channels were not. The percentage inhibition of ω-CTx GVIA-sensitive [Capre]t was about 63%. Muscarinic receptors inhibited presynaptic VDCCs in a way similar to adenosine (Ad) receptors. The percentage inhibition of ω-CTx GVIA-sensitive [Capre]t by Ad (100 μM) was about 59%. There was no significant inhibition of ω-Aga IVA-sensitive channels by Ad. The inhibitions of [Capre]t by CCh and Ad were mutually occlusive. These results indicate that inhibition of synaptic transmission by muscarinic receptors is mainly the consequence of a reduction of the [Capre]t due to inhibition of presynaptic VDCCs. PMID:9351508

  16. The Role of cGMP on Adenosine A1 Receptor-mediated Inhibition of Synaptic Transmission at the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Isa; Serpa, André; Sebastião, Ana M.; Cascalheira, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Both adenosine A1 receptor and cGMP inhibit synaptic transmission at the hippocampus and recently it was found that A1 receptor increased cGMP levels in hippocampus, but the role of cGMP on A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of synaptic transmission remains to be established. In the present work we investigated if blocking the NOS/sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway using nitric oxide synthase (NOS), protein kinase G (PKG), and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitors modify the A1 receptor effect on synaptic transmission. Neurotransmission was evaluated by measuring the slope of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation at hippocampal slices. N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 15 nM), a selective A1 receptor agonist, reversibly decreased the fEPSPs by 54 ± 5%. Incubation of the slices with an inhibitor of NOS (L-NAME, 200 μM) decreased the CPA effect on fEPSPs by 57 ± 9% in female rats. In males, ODQ (10 μM), an sGC inhibitor, decreased the CPA inhibitory effect on fEPSPs by 23 ± 6%, but only when adenosine deaminase (ADA,1 U/ml) was present; similar results were found in females, where ODQ decreased CPA-induced inhibition of fEPSP slope by 23 ± 7%. In male rats, the presence of the PKG inhibitor (KT5823, 1 nM) decreased the CPA effect by 45.0 ± 9%; similar results were obtained in females, where KT5823 caused a 32 ± 9% decrease on the CPA effect. In conclusion, the results suggest that the inhibitory action of adenosine A1 receptors on synaptic transmission at hippocampus is, in part, mediated by the NOS/sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway. PMID:27148059

  17. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for characterizing synaptic efficacy.

    PubMed

    Chance, Frances S

    2007-02-01

    The role of background synaptic activity in cortical processing has recently received much attention. How do individual neurons extract information when embedded in a noisy background? When examining the impact of a synaptic input on postsynaptic firing, it is important to distinguish a change in overall firing probability from a true change in neuronal sensitivity to a particular input (synaptic efficacy) that corresponds to a change in detection performance. Here we study the impact of background synaptic input on neuronal sensitivity to individual synaptic inputs using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. We use the area under the ROC curve as a measure of synaptic efficacy, here defined as the ability of a postsynaptic action potential to identify a particular synaptic input event. An advantage of using ROC analysis to measure synaptic efficacy is that it provides a measure that is independent of postsynaptic firing rate. Furthermore, changes in mean excitation or inhibition, although affecting overall firing probability, do not modulate synaptic efficacy when measured in this way. Changes in overall conductance also affect firing probability but not this form of synaptic efficacy. Input noise, here defined as the variance of the input current, does modulate synaptic efficacy, however. This effect persists when the change in input variance is coupled with a change in conductance (as would result from changing background activity).

  18. Excitation/inhibition imbalance and impaired synaptic inhibition in hippocampal area CA3 of Mecp2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Calfa, Gaston; Li, Wei; Rutherford, John M; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2015-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopment disorder associated with intellectual disabilities and caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator Methyl-CpG-binding Protein-2 (MeCP2). Neuronal dysfunction and changes in cortical excitability occur in RTT individuals and Mecp2-deficient mice, including hippocampal network hyperactivity and higher frequency of spontaneous multiunit spikes in the CA3 cell body layer. Here, we describe impaired synaptic inhibition and an excitation/inhibition (E/I) imbalance in area CA3 of acute slices from symptomatic Mecp2 knockout male mice (referred to as Mecp2(-/y) ). The amplitude of TTX-resistant miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) was smaller in CA3 pyramidal neurons of Mecp2(-/y) slices than in wildtype controls, while the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) was significantly larger in Mecp2(-/y) neurons. Consistently, quantitative confocal immunohistochemistry revealed significantly lower intensity of the alpha-1 subunit of GABAA Rs in the CA3 cell body layer of Mecp2(-/y) mice, while GluA1 puncta intensities were significantly higher in the CA3 dendritic layers of Mecp2(-/y) mice. In addition, the input/output (I/O) relationship of evoked IPSCs had a shallower slope in CA3 pyramidal neurons Mecp2(-/y) neurons. Consistent with the absence of neuronal degeneration in RTT and MeCP2-based mouse models, the density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons in area CA3 was not affected in Mecp2(-/y) mice. Furthermore, the intrinsic membrane properties of several interneuron subtypes in area CA3 were not affected by Mecp2 loss. However, mEPSCs are smaller and less frequent in CA3 fast-spiking basket cells of Mecp2(-/y) mice, suggesting an impaired glutamatergic drive in this interneuron population. These results demonstrate that a loss-of-function mutation in Mecp2 causes impaired E/I balance onto CA3 pyramidal neurons, leading to a

  19. Excitation/Inhibition Imbalance and Impaired Synaptic Inhibition in Hippocampal Area CA3 of Mecp2 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Calfa, Gaston; Li, Wei; Rutherford, John M.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopment disorder associated with intellectual disabilities and caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator Methyl-CpG-binding Protein-2 (MeCP2). Neuronal dysfunction and changes in cortical excitability occur in RTT individuals and Mecp2-deficient mice, including hippocampal network hyperactivity and higher frequency of spontaneous multi-unit spikes in the CA3 cell body layer. Here, we describe impaired synaptic inhibition and an excitation/inhibition (E/I) imbalance in area CA3 of acute slices from symptomatic Mecp2 knockout male mice (referred to as Mecp2-/y). The amplitude of TTX-resistant miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) was smaller in CA3 pyramidal neurons of Mecp2-/y slices than in wildtype controls, while the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSC) was significantly larger in Mecp2-/y neurons. Consistently, quantitative confocal immunohistochemistry revealed significantly lower intensity of the alpha-1 subunit of GABAARs in the CA3 cell body layer of Mecp2-/y mice, while GluA1 puncta intensities were significantly higher in the CA3 dendritic layers of Mecp2-/y mice. In addition, the input/output (I/O) relationship of evoked IPSCs had a shallower slope in CA3 pyramidal neurons Mecp2-/y neurons. Consistent with the absence of neuronal degeneration in RTT and MeCP2-based mouse models, the density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons in area CA3 was not affected in Mecp2-/y mice. Furthermore, the intrinsic membrane properties of several interneuron subtypes in area CA3 were not affected by Mecp2 loss. However, mEPSCs are smaller and less frequent in CA3 fast-spiking basket cells of Mecp2-/y mice, suggesting an impaired glutamatergic drive in this interneuron population. These results demonstrate that a loss-of-function mutation in Mecp2 causes impaired E/I balance onto CA3 pyramidal neurons, leading to a hyperactive

  20. Endogenous N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) inhibits synaptic plasticity/transmission in the amygdala in a mouse inflammatory pain model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The peptide neurotransmitter N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) is widely expressed throughout the vertebrate nervous system, including the pain processing neuraxis. Inhibitors of NAAG peptidases are analgesic in animal models of pain. However, the brain regions involved in NAAG's analgesic action have not been rigorously defined. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR2/3) play a role in pain processing in the laterocapsular part of the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeLC). Given the high concentration of NAAG in the amygdala and its activation of group II mGluRs (mGluR3 > mGluR2), this study was undertaken using the mouse formalin model of inflammatory pain to test the hypothesis that NAAG influences pain processing in the amygdala. Evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) were studied in neurons in the CeLC of mouse brain slices following stimulation of the spinoparabrachial amygdaloid afferents. Results Application of a NAAG peptidase inhibitor, ZJ43, dose dependently inhibited the amplitude of the eEPSCs by up to 50% in control CeLC demonstrating the role of NAAG in regulation of excitatory transmission at this synapse. A group II mGluR agonist (SLx-3095-1) similarly inhibited eEPSC amplitude by about 30%. Both effects were blocked by the group II mGluR antagonist LY341495. ZJ43 was much less effective than SLx in reducing eEPSCs 24 hours post inflammation suggesting an inflammation induced reduction in NAAG release or an increase in the ratio of mGluR2 to mGluR3 expression. Systemic injection of ZJ43 proximal to the time of inflammation blocked peripheral inflammation-induced increases in synaptic transmission of this pathway 24 hrs later and blocked the induction of mechanical allodynia that developed by this time point. Conclusions The main finding of this study is that NAAG and NAAG peptidase inhibition reduce excitatory neurotransmission and inflammation-induced plasticity at the spinoparabrachial synapse within the pain

  1. Isoflurane enhances both fast and slow synaptic inhibition in the hippocampus at amnestic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Shuiping; Perouansky, Misha; Pearce, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptors has long been considered an important target for a variety of general anesthetics. In the hippocampus, two types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition coexist: GABAA,fast, which is expressed primarily at peri-somatic sites, and GABAA,slow, which is expressed primarily in the dendrites. Their spatial segregation suggests distinct functions: GABAA,slow may control plasticity of dendritic synapses, while GABAA,fast controls action potential initiation at the soma. We examined modulation of GABAA,fast and GABAA,slow inhibition by isoflurane at amnesic concentrations, and compared it to modulation by behaviorally equivalent doses of the GABAA receptor-selective drug etomidate. Methods Whole-cell recordings were conducted at near-physiological temperature from pyramidal cells in organotypic hippocampal cultures obtained from C57BL/6 x 129/SvJ F1 hybrid mice. GABAA receptor-mediated currents were isolated using glutamate receptor antagonists. GABAA,slow currents were evoked by electrical stimulation in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare. Miniature GABAA,fast currents were recorded in the presence of tetrodotoxin. Results 100 µM isoflurane (approximately EC50,amnesia) slowed fast and slow inhibitory postsynaptic current decay by approximately 25%. Higher concentrations, up to 400 µM, produced proportionally greater effects without altering current amplitudes. The effects on GABAA,slow were approximately one-half those produced by equi-amnesic concentrations of etomidate. Conclusions Isoflurane enhances both types of phasic GABAA receptor-mediated inhibition to similar degrees at amnesic concentrations. This pattern differs from etomidate, which at low concentrations selectively enhances slow inhibition. These effects of isoflurane are sufficiently large that they may contribute substantially to its suppression of hippocampal learning and memory. PMID:22343472

  2. Ethanol inhibits epileptiform activity and NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in rat amygdaloid slices

    SciTech Connect

    Gean, P.W. )

    1992-02-26

    The effect of ethanol on the epileptiform activity induced by Mg{sup ++}-free solution was studied in rat amygdalar slices using intracellular recording techniques. The spontaneous and evoked epileptiform discharges consisting of an initial burst followed by afterdischarges were observed 20-30 min after switching to Mg{sup ++}-free medium. Superfusion with ethanol reversibly reduced the duration of spontaneous and evoked bursting discharges in a concentration-dependent manner. Synaptic response mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation was isolated by application of a solution containing the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and either in Mg{sup ++}-free solution or in the presence of 50 {mu}M bicuculline. Application of ethanol reversibly suppressed the duration of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic response. These results suggest that intoxicating concentrations of ethanol possess anticonvulsant activity through blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic excitation.

  3. Sertraline inhibits pre-synaptic Na⁺ channel-mediated responses in hippocampus-isolated nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Aldana, Blanca I; Sitges, María

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, a possible sertraline action on cerebral pre-synaptic Na(+) channels was investigated. For this purpose, the effect of sertraline on responses induced by the Na(+) channel opener, veratridine, namely the increase in Na(+) and in neurotransmitter release in hippocampus-isolated nerve endings was investigated. Results show that sertraline in the low μM range (1.5-25 μM) progressively inhibits the rise in Na(+) and the release of pre-loaded [(3) H]Glu as well as the release of endogenous 5-HT, Glu and GABA (detected by HPLC) induced by veratridine depolarization either under external Ca(2+) -free conditions or in the presence of external Ca(2+) . In addition, under non-depolarized conditions, sertraline (25 μM) increased the external concentration of 5-HT at expense of its internal concentration, and unchanged the external and internal concentrations of the amino acid neurotransmitters and of the 5-HT main metabolite, 5-HIAA. This result is consistent with the sertraline inhibitory action of the serotonin transporter. However, sertraline is unlikely to inhibit pre-synaptic Na(+) channels permeability by increasing external 5-HT. Because 5-HT in a wide concentration range (1-1000 μM) did not change the veratridine-induced increase in Na(+) . In summary, present findings demonstrate that besides the inhibition of 5-HT reuptake, sertraline is an effective inhibitor of pre-synaptic Na(+) channels controlling neurotransmitter release. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. SRC Inhibition Reduces NR2B Surface Expression and Synaptic Plasticity in the Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinai, Laleh; Duffy, Steven; Roder, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The Src protein tyrosine kinase plays a central role in the regulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity by regulating NMDAR subunit 2B (NR2B) surface expression. In the amygdala, NMDA-dependent synaptic plasticity resulting from convergent somatosensory and auditory inputs contributes to emotional memory; however, the role of Src…

  5. Acute increase of α-synuclein inhibits synaptic vesicle recycling evoked during intense stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Busch, David J.; Oliphint, Paul A.; Walsh, Rylie B.; Banks, Susan M. L.; Woods, Wendy S.; George, Julia M.; Morgan, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is associated with multiplication of the α-synuclein gene and abnormal accumulation of the protein. In animal models, α-synuclein overexpression broadly impairs synaptic vesicle trafficking. However, the exact steps of the vesicle trafficking pathway affected by excess α-synuclein and the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Therefore we acutely increased synuclein levels at a vertebrate synapse and performed a detailed ultrastructural analysis of the effects on presynaptic membranes. At stimulated synapses (20 Hz), excess synuclein caused a loss of synaptic vesicles and an expansion of the plasma membrane, indicating an impairment of vesicle recycling. The N-terminal domain (NTD) of synuclein, which folds into an α-helix, was sufficient to reproduce these effects. In contrast, α-synuclein mutants with a disrupted N-terminal α-helix (T6K and A30P) had little effect under identical conditions. Further supporting this model, another α-synuclein mutant (A53T) with a properly folded NTD phenocopied the synaptic vesicle recycling defects observed with wild type. Interestingly, the vesicle recycling defects were not observed when the stimulation frequency was reduced (5 Hz). Thus excess α-synuclein impairs synaptic vesicle recycling evoked during intense stimulation via a mechanism that requires a properly folded N-terminal α-helix. PMID:25273557

  6. SRC Inhibition Reduces NR2B Surface Expression and Synaptic Plasticity in the Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinai, Laleh; Duffy, Steven; Roder, John C.

    2010-01-01

    The Src protein tyrosine kinase plays a central role in the regulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity by regulating NMDAR subunit 2B (NR2B) surface expression. In the amygdala, NMDA-dependent synaptic plasticity resulting from convergent somatosensory and auditory inputs contributes to emotional memory; however, the role of Src…

  7. Increased synaptic inhibition in dentate gyrus of mice with reduced levels of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Olofsdotter, K; Lindvall, O; Asztély, F

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the role of endogenous neurotrophins for inhibitory synaptic transmission in the dentate gyrus of adult mice. Heterozygous knockout (+/-) mice or neurotrophin scavenging proteins were used to reduce the levels of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor and neurotrophin-3. Patch-clamp recordings from dentate granule cells in brain slices showed that the frequency, but not the kinetics or amplitude, of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents was modulated in brain-derived neurotrophic factor +/- compared to wild-type (+/+) mice. Furthermore, paired-pulse depression of evoked inhibitory synaptic responses was increased in brain-derived neurotrophic factor +/- mice. Similar results were obtained in brain slices from brain-derived neurotrophic factor +/+ mice incubated with tyrosine receptor kinase B-immunoglobulin G, which scavenges endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor. The increased inhibitory synaptic activity in brain-derived neurotrophic factor +/- mice was accompanied by decreased excitability of the granule cells. No differences in the frequency, amplitude or kinetics of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents were seen between neurotrophin-3 +/- and +/+ mice. From these results we suggest that endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor, but not neurotrophin-3, has acute modulatory effects on synaptic inhibition onto dentate granule cells. The site of action seems to be located presynaptically, i.e. brain-derived neurotrophic factor regulates the properties of inhibitory interneurons, leading to increased excitability of dentate granule cells. We propose that through this mechanism, brain-derived neurotrophic factor can change the gating/filtering properties of the dentate gyrus for incoming information from the entorhinal cortex to hippocampus. This will have consequences for the recruitment of hippocampal neural circuitries both under physiological and pathological conditions, such as epileptogenesis.

  8. Visualization of Synaptic Inhibition with an Optogenetic Sensor Developed by Cell-Free Protein Engineering Automation

    PubMed Central

    Grimley, Joshua S.; Li, Li; Wang, Weina; Wen, Lei; Beese, Lorena S.

    2013-01-01

    We describe an engineered fluorescent optogenetic sensor, SuperClomeleon, that robustly detects inhibitory synaptic activity in single, cultured mouse neurons by reporting intracellular chloride changes produced by exogenous GABA or inhibitory synaptic activity. Using a cell-free protein engineering automation methodology that bypasses gene cloning, we iteratively constructed, produced, and assayed hundreds of mutations in binding-site residues to identify improvements in Clomeleon, a first-generation, suboptimal sensor. Structural analysis revealed that these improvements involve halide contacts and distant side chain rearrangements. The development of optogenetic sensors that respond to neural activity enables cellular tracking of neural activity using optical, rather than electrophysiological, signals. Construction of such sensors using in vitro protein engineering establishes a powerful approach for developing new probes for brain imaging. PMID:24107961

  9. Distinct forms of synaptic inhibition and neuromodulation regulate calretinin-positive neuron excitability in the spinal cord dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Smith, K M; Boyle, K A; Mustapa, M; Jobling, P; Callister, R J; Hughes, D I; Graham, B A

    2016-06-21

    The dorsal horn (DH) of the spinal cord contains a heterogenous population of neurons that process incoming sensory signals before information ascends to the brain. We have recently characterized calretinin-expressing (CR+) neurons in the DH and shown that they can be divided into excitatory and inhibitory subpopulations. The excitatory population receives high-frequency excitatory synaptic input and expresses delayed firing action potential discharge, whereas the inhibitory population receives weak excitatory drive and exhibits tonic or initial bursting discharge. Here, we characterize inhibitory synaptic input and neuromodulation in the two CR+ populations, in order to determine how each is regulated. We show that excitatory CR+ neurons receive mixed inhibition from GABAergic and glycinergic sources, whereas inhibitory CR+ neurons receive inhibition, which is dominated by glycine. Noradrenaline and serotonin produced robust outward currents in excitatory CR+ neurons, predicting an inhibitory action on these neurons, but neither neuromodulator produced a response in CR+ inhibitory neurons. In contrast, enkephalin (along with selective mu and delta opioid receptor agonists) produced outward currents in inhibitory CR+ neurons, consistent with an inhibitory action but did not affect the excitatory CR+ population. Our findings show that the pharmacology of inhibitory inputs and neuromodulator actions on CR+ cells, along with their excitatory inputs can define these two subpopulations further, and this could be exploited to modulate discrete aspects of sensory processing selectively in the DH.

  10. Inhibiting 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 prevents stress effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and impairs contextual fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Sarabdjitsingh, R Angela; Zhou, Ming; Yau, Joyce L W; Webster, Scott P; Walker, Brian R; Seckl, Jonathan R; Joëls, Marian; Krugers, Harm J

    2014-06-01

    11β-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) catalyzes intracellular regeneration of corticosterone and cortisol, thereby enhancing glucocorticoid action. Inhibition of 11β-HSD1 reverses the deficits in cognition with aging, a state of elevated glucocorticoid levels. However, any impact of 11β-HSD1 inhibition during high glucocorticoid states in younger animals is unknown. Here we examined whether a single injection of the selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitor UE2316 modifies the effect of stress on hippocampal long-term potentiation and fear conditioning, a learning paradigm that is strongly modulated by glucocorticoids. We found that novelty stress suppresses hippocampal synaptic potentiation. This effect was completely prevented by administration of UE2316 one hour before stress exposure. A single injection of UE2316 also impaired contextual, but not tone-cue-fear conditioning. These observations suggest that local metabolism of glucocorticoids is relevant for the outcome of stress effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity and contextual fear conditioning. Selective 11β-HSD1 inhibitors may be an interesting new approach to the prevention of trauma-associated psychopathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Somatostatin-positive interneurons in the dentate gyrus of mice provide local- and long-range septal synaptic inhibition.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Mei; Meyer, Thomas; Benkowitz, Christoph; Savanthrapadian, Shakuntala; Ansel-Bollepalli, Laura; Foggetti, Angelica; Wulff, Peer; Alcami, Pepe; Elgueta, Claudio; Bartos, Marlene

    2017-04-03

    Somatostatin-expressing-interneurons (SOMIs) in the dentate gyrus (DG) control formation of granule cell (GC) assemblies during memory acquisition. Hilar-perforant-path-associated interneurons (HIPP cells) have been considered to be synonymous for DG-SOMIs. Deviating from this assumption, we show two functionally contrasting DG-SOMI-types. The classical feedback-inhibitory HIPPs distribute axon fibers in the molecular layer. They are engaged by converging GC-inputs and provide dendritic inhibition to the DG circuitry. In contrast, SOMIs with axon in the hilus, termed hilar interneurons (HILs), provide perisomatic inhibition onto GABAergic cells in the DG and project to the medial septum. Repetitive activation of glutamatergic inputs onto HIPP cells induces long-lasting-depression (LTD) of synaptic transmission but long-term-potentiation (LTP) of synaptic signals in HIL cells. Thus, LTD in HIPPs may assist flow of spatial information from the entorhinal cortex to the DG, whereas LTP in HILs may facilitate the temporal coordination of GCs with activity patterns governed by the medial septum.

  12. Gastrodin protects against chronic inflammatory pain by inhibiting spinal synaptic potentiation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Mei-Mei; Zhang, Yu-Qi; Wang, Wen-Ting; Han, Wen-Juan; Lin, Zhen; Xie, Rou-Gang; Cao, Zhi; Lu, Na; Hu, San-Jue; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Dong, Hui; Luo, Ceng

    2016-01-01

    Tissue injury is known to produce inflammation and pain. Synaptic potentiation between peripheral nociceptors and spinal lamina I neurons has been proposed to serve as a trigger for chronic inflammatory pain. Gastrodin is a main bioactive constituent of the traditional Chinese herbal medicine Gastrodia elata Blume, which has been widely used as an analgesic since ancient times. However, its underlying cellular mechanisms have remained elusive. The present study demonstrated for the first time that gastrodin exhibits an analgesic effect at the spinal level on spontaneous pain, mechanical and thermal pain hypersensitivity induced by peripheral inflammation, which is not dependent on opioid receptors and without tolerance. This analgesia by gastrodin is at least in part mediated by depressing spinal synaptic potentiation via blockade of acid-sensing ion channels. Further studies with miniature EPSCs and paired-pulse ratio analysis revealed the presynaptic origin of the action of gastrodin, which involves a decrease in transmitter release probability. In contrast, neither basal nociception nor basal synaptic transmission was altered. This study revealed a dramatic analgesic action of gastrodin on inflammatory pain and uncovered a novel spinal mechanism that could underlie the analgesia by gastrodin, pointing the way to a new analgesic for treating chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:27853254

  13. Inhibition of DNA Methylation Impairs Synaptic Plasticity during an Early Time Window in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Paula; Ardiles, Álvaro O.

    2016-01-01

    Although the importance of DNA methylation-dependent gene expression to neuronal plasticity is well established, the dynamics of methylation and demethylation during the induction and expression of synaptic plasticity have not been explored. Here, we combined electrophysiological, pharmacological, molecular, and immunohistochemical approaches to examine the contribution of DNA methylation and the phosphorylation of Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) to synaptic plasticity. We found that, at twenty minutes after theta burst stimulation (TBS), the DNA methylation inhibitor 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (5AZA) impaired hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). Surprisingly, after two hours of TBS, when LTP had become a transcription-dependent process, 5AZA treatment had no effect. By comparing these results to those in naive slices, we found that, at two hours after TBS, an intergenic region of the RLN gene was hypomethylated and that the phosphorylation of residue S80 of MeCP2 was decreased, while the phosphorylation of residue S421 was increased. As expected, 5AZA affected only the methylation of the RLN gene and exerted no effect on MeCP2 phosphorylation patterns. In summary, our data suggest that tetanic stimulation induces critical changes in synaptic plasticity that affects both DNA methylation and the phosphorylation of MeCP2. These data also suggest that early alterations in DNA methylation are sufficient to impair the full expression of LTP. PMID:27493805

  14. Generation of Intensity Selectivity by Differential Synaptic Tuning: Fast-Saturating Excitation But Slow-Saturating Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mu; Tao, Huizhong W.

    2012-01-01

    Intensity defines one fundamental aspect of sensory information and is specifically represented in each sensory modality. Interestingly, only in the central auditory system are intensity-selective neurons evolved. These neurons are characterized by nonmonotonic response-level functions. The synaptic circuitry mechanisms underlying the generation of intensity selectivity from nonselective auditory nerve inputs remain largely unclear. Here, we performed in vivo whole-cell recordings from pyramidal neurons in the rat dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), where intensity selectivity first emerges along the auditory neuraxis. Our results revealed that intensity-selective cells received fast-saturating excitation but slow-saturating inhibition with intensity increments, whereas in intensity-nonselective cells excitation and inhibition were similarly slow-saturating. The differential intensity tuning profiles of the monotonic excitation and inhibition qualitatively determined the intensity selectivity of output responses. In addition, the selectivity was further strengthened by significantly lower excitation/inhibition ratios at high-intensity levels compared with intensity-nonselective neurons. Our results demonstrate that intensity selectivity in the DCN is generated by extracting the difference between tuning profiles of nonselective excitatory and inhibitory inputs, which we propose can be achieved through a differential circuit mediated by feedforward inhibition. PMID:23238722

  15. Activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors persistently enhances hippocampal synaptic transmission and prevents Aß-mediated inhibition of LTP in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ondrejcak, Tomas; Wang, Qinwen; Kew, James N C; Virley, David J; Upton, Neil; Anwyl, Roger; Rowan, Michael J

    2012-02-29

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors mediate fast cholinergic modulation of glutamatergic transmission and synaptic plasticity. Here we investigated the effects of subtype selective activation of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on hippocampal transmission and the inhibition of synaptic long-term potentiation by the Alzheimer's disease associated amyloid ß-protein (Aß). The α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist "compound A" ((R)-N-(1-azabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-3-yl)(5-(2-pyridyl))thiophene-2-carboxamide) induced a rapid-onset persistent enhancement of synaptic transmission in the dentate gyrus in vitro. Consistent with a requirement for activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, the type II α7-selective positive allosteric modulator PheTQS ((3aR, 4S, 9bS)-4-(4-methylphenyl)-3a,4,5,9b-tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline-8-sulfonamide) potentiated, and the antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA) prevented the persistent enhancement. Systemic injection of the agonist also induced a similar MLA-sensitive persistent enhancement of synaptic transmission in the CA1 area in vivo. Remarkably, although compound A did not affect control long-term potentiation (LTP) in vitro, it prevented the inhibition of LTP by Aß1-42 and this effect was inhibited by MLA. These findings strongly indicate that activation of α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors is sufficient to persistently enhance hippocampal synaptic transmission and to overcome the inhibition of LTP by Aß.

  16. RGS2 determines short-term synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons by regulating Gi/o-mediated inhibition of presynaptic Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Mark, Melanie D; Li, Xiang; Xie, Mian; Waka, Sayumi; Rettig, Jens; Herlitze, Stefan

    2006-09-07

    RGS2, one of the small members of the regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) family, is highly expressed in brain and regulates G(i/o) as well as G(q)-coupled receptor pathways. RGS2 modulates anxiety, aggression, and blood pressure in mice, suggesting that RGS2 regulates synaptic circuits underlying animal physiology and behavior. How RGS2 in brain influences synaptic activity is unknown. We therefore analyzed the synaptic function of RGS2 in hippocampal neurons by comparing electrophysiological recordings from RGS2 knockout and wild-type mice. Our study provides a general mechanism of the action of the RGS family containing RGS2 by demonstrating that RGS2 increases synaptic vesicle release by downregulating the G(i/o)-mediated presynaptic Ca(2+) channel inhibition and therefore provides an explanation of how regulation of RGS2 expression can modulate the function of neuronal circuits underlying behavior.

  17. Fast synaptic inhibition promotes synchronized gamma oscillations in hippocampal interneuron networks

    PubMed Central

    Bartos, Marlene; Vida, Imre; Frotscher, Michael; Meyer, Axel; Monyer, Hannah; Geiger, Jörg R. P.; Jonas, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Networks of GABAergic interneurons are of critical importance for the generation of gamma frequency oscillations in the brain. To examine the underlying synaptic mechanisms, we made paired recordings from “basket cells” (BCs) in different subfields of hippocampal slices, using transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the parvalbumin promoter. Unitary inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) showed large amplitude and fast time course with mean amplitude-weighted decay time constants of 2.5, 1.2, and 1.8 ms in the dentate gyrus, and the cornu ammonis area 3 (CA3) and 1 (CA1), respectively (33–34°C). The decay of unitary IPSCs at BC–BC synapses was significantly faster than that at BC–principal cell synapses, indicating target cell-specific differences in IPSC kinetics. In addition, electrical coupling was found in a subset of BC–BC pairs. To examine whether an interneuron network with fast inhibitory synapses can act as a gamma frequency oscillator, we developed an interneuron network model based on experimentally determined properties. In comparison to previous interneuron network models, our model was able to generate oscillatory activity with higher coherence over a broad range of frequencies (20–110 Hz). In this model, high coherence and flexibility in frequency control emerge from the combination of synaptic properties, network structure, and electrical coupling. PMID:12235359

  18. Synaptic inhibition by glycine acting at a metabotropic receptor in tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Hou, Mingli; Duan, Lei; Slaughter, Malcolm M

    2008-06-15

    Glycine is the lone fast neurotransmitter for which a metabotropic pathway has not been identified. In retina, we found a strychnine-insensitive glycine response in bipolar and ganglion cells. This glycine response reduced high voltage-activated calcium current. It was G-protein mediated and protein kinase A dependent. The EC(50) of the metabotropic glycine response is 3 mum, an order of magnitude lower than the ionotropic glycine receptor in the same retina. The bipolar cell glutamatergic input to ganglion cells was suppressed by metabotropic glycine action. The synaptic output of about two-thirds of bipolar cells and calcium current in two-thirds of ganglion cells are sensitive to the action of glycine at metabotropic receptors, suggesting this signal regulates specific synaptic pathways in proximal retina. This study resolves the curious absence of a metabotropic glycine pathway in the nervous system and reveals that the major fast inhibitory neurotransmitters, GABA and glycine, both activate G-protein-coupled pathways as well.

  19. mTORC1 Inhibition Corrects Neurodevelopmental and Synaptic Alterations in a Human Stem Cell Model of Tuberous Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Veronica; Aigner, Stefan; Vukcevic, Mirko; Sauter, Evelyn; Behr, Katharina; Ebeling, Martin; Dunkley, Tom; Friedlein, Arno; Zoffmann, Sannah; Meyer, Claas A; Knoflach, Frédéric; Lugert, Sebastian; Patsch, Christoph; Fjeldskaar, Fatiha; Chicha-Gaudimier, Laurie; Kiialainen, Anna; Piraino, Paolo; Bedoucha, Marc; Graf, Martin; Jessberger, Sebastian; Ghosh, Anirvan; Bischofberger, Josef; Jagasia, Ravi

    2016-04-05

    Hyperfunction of the mTORC1 pathway has been associated with idiopathic and syndromic forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), including tuberous sclerosis, caused by loss of either TSC1 or TSC2. It remains largely unknown how developmental processes and biochemical signaling affected by mTORC1 dysregulation contribute to human neuronal dysfunction. Here, we have characterized multiple stages of neurogenesis and synapse formation in human neurons derived from TSC2-deleted pluripotent stem cells. Homozygous TSC2 deletion causes severe developmental abnormalities that recapitulate pathological hallmarks of cortical malformations in patients. Both TSC2(+/-) and TSC2(-/-) neurons display altered synaptic transmission paralleled by molecular changes in pathways associated with autism, suggesting the convergence of pathological mechanisms in ASD. Pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 corrects developmental abnormalities and synaptic dysfunction during independent developmental stages. Our results uncouple stage-specific roles of mTORC1 in human neuronal development and contribute to a better understanding of the onset of neuronal pathophysiology in tuberous sclerosis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Adenosine (ADO) released during orthodromic stimulation of the frog sympathetic ganglion inhibits phosphatidylinositol turnover (PI) associated with synaptic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Curnish, R.; Bencherif, M.; Rubio, R.; Berne, R.M.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously demonstrated that /sup 3/H-purine release was enhanced during synaptic activation of the prelabelled frog sympathetic ganglion. In addition, during orthodromic stimulation, there is an increased /sup 3/H-inositol release (an index of PI) that occurs during the poststimulation period and not during the period of stimulation. They hypothesized that endogenous ADO inhibits PI turnover during orthodromic stimulation. To test this hypothesis (1) they performed experiments to directly measure ADO release in the extracellular fluid by placing the ganglion in a 5 ..mu..l drop of Ringer's and let it come to equilibrium with the interstitial fluid, (2) they destroyed endogenous ADO by suffusing adenosine deaminase (ADA) during the stimulation period. Their results show (1) orthodromic stimulation increases release of ADO into the bathing medium, (2) ADA induced an increase of PI during the stimulation period in contrast to an increase seen only during the poststimulation period when ADA was omitted. They conclude that there is dual control of PI during synaptic activity, a stimulatory effect (cause unknown) and a short lived inhibitory effect that is probably caused by adenosine.

  1. LSPS/Optogenetics to Improve Synaptic Connectivity Mapping: Unmasking the Role of Basket Cell-Mediated Feedforward Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Brill, Julia; Mattis, Joanna; Deisseroth, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neocortical pyramidal cells (PYRs) receive synaptic inputs from many types of GABAergic interneurons. Connections between parvalbumin (PV)-positive, fast-spiking interneurons (“PV cells”) and PYRs are characterized by perisomatic synapses and high-amplitude, short-latency IPSCs. Here, we present novel methods to study the functional influence of PV cells on layer 5 PYRs using optogenetics combined with laser-scanning photostimulation (LSPS). First, we examined the strength and spatial distribution of PV-to-PYR inputs. To that end, the fast channelrhodopsin variant AAV5-EF1α-DIO-hChR2(E123T)-eYFP (ChETA) was expressed in PV cells in somatosensory cortex of mice using an adeno-associated virus-based viral construct. Focal blue illumination (100–150 µm half-width) was directed through the microscope objective to excite PV cells along a spatial grid covering layers 2–6, while IPSCs were recorded in layer 5 PYRs. The resulting optogenetic input maps showed evoked PV cell inputs originating from an ∼500-μm-diameter area surrounding the recorded PYR. Evoked IPSCs had the short-latency/high-amplitude characteristic of PV cell inputs. Second, we investigated how PV cell activity modulates PYR output in response to synaptic excitation. We expressed halorhodopsin (eNpHR3.0) in PV cells using the same strategy as for ChETA. Yellow illumination hyperpolarized eNpHR3.0-expressing PV cells, effectively preventing action potential generation and thus decreasing the inhibition of downstream targets. Synaptic input maps onto layer 5 PYRs were acquired using standard glutamate-photolysis LSPS either with or without full-field yellow illumination to silence PV cells. The resulting IPSC input maps selectively lacked short-latency perisomatic inputs, while EPSC input maps showed increased connectivity, particularly from upper layers. This indicates that glutamate uncaging LSPS-based excitatory synaptic maps will consistently underestimate connectivity. PMID

  2. Decrease of SYNGAP1 in GABAergic cells impairs inhibitory synapse connectivity, synaptic inhibition and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Berryer, Martin H; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Xing, Paul; Riebe, Ilse; Bosoi, Ciprian; Sanon, Nathalie; Antoine-Bertrand, Judith; Lévesque, Maxime; Avoli, Massimo; Hamdan, Fadi F; Carmant, Lionel; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Michaud, Jacques L; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-11-09

    Haploinsufficiency of the SYNGAP1 gene, which codes for a Ras GTPase-activating protein, impairs cognition both in humans and in mice. Decrease of Syngap1 in mice has been previously shown to cause cognitive deficits at least in part by inducing alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission and premature maturation of excitatory connections. Whether Syngap1 plays a role in the development of cortical GABAergic connectivity and function remains unclear. Here, we show that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency significantly reduces the formation of perisomatic innervations by parvalbumin-positive basket cells, a major population of GABAergic neurons, in a cell-autonomous manner. We further show that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency in GABAergic cells derived from the medial ganglionic eminence impairs their connectivity, reduces inhibitory synaptic activity and cortical gamma oscillation power, and causes cognitive deficits. Our results indicate that Syngap1 plays a critical role in GABAergic circuit function and further suggest that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency in GABAergic circuits may contribute to cognitive deficits.

  3. RhoA-ROCK Inhibition Reverses Synaptic Remodeling and Motor and Cognitive Deficits Caused by Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Mulherkar, Shalaka; Firozi, Karen; Huang, Wei; Uddin, Mohammad Danish; Grill, Raymond J; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Robertson, Claudia; Tolias, Kimberley F

    2017-09-06

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes extensive neural damage, often resulting in long-term cognitive impairments. Unfortunately, effective treatments for TBI remain elusive. The RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target since it is activated by TBI and can promote the retraction of dendritic spines/synapses, which are critical for information processing and memory storage. To test this hypothesis, RhoA-ROCK signaling was blocked by RhoA deletion from postnatal neurons or treatment with the ROCK inhibitor fasudil. We found that TBI impairs both motor and cognitive performance and inhibiting RhoA-ROCK signaling alleviates these deficits. Moreover, RhoA-ROCK inhibition prevents TBI-induced spine remodeling and mature spine loss. These data argue that TBI elicits pathological spine remodeling that contributes to behavioral deficits by altering synaptic connections, and RhoA-ROCK inhibition enhances functional recovery by blocking this detrimental effect. As fasudil has been safely used in humans, our results suggest that it could be repurposed to treat TBI.

  4. Signaling Cascades for δ-Opioid Receptor-Mediated Inhibition of GABA Synaptic Transmission and Behavioral Antinociception

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi

    2012-01-01

    Membrane trafficking of the δ-opioid receptor (DOR) from intracellular compartments to plasma membrane in central neurons, induced by various pathological conditions such as long-term opioid exposure, represents unique receptor plasticity involved in the mechanisms of long-term opioid effects in opioid addiction and opioid treatment of chronic pain. However, the signaling pathways coupled to the newly emerged functional DOR in central neurons are largely unknown at present. In this study, we investigated the signaling cascades of long-term morphine-induced DOR for its cellular and behavioral effects in neurons of the rat brainstem nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), a key supraspinal site for opioid analgesia. We found that, among the three phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-regulated arachidonic acid (AA) metabolic pathways of lipoxygenase, cyclooxygenase, and epoxygenase, 12-lipoxygenase of the lipoxygenase pathway primarily mediated DOR inhibition of GABA synaptic transmission, because inhibitors of 12-lipoxygenase as well as lipoxygenases and PLA2 largely blocked the DOR- or AA-induced GABA inhibition in NRM neurons in brainstem slices in vitro. Blockade of the epoxygenase pathway was ineffective, whereas blocking either 5-lipoxygenase of the lipoxygenase pathway or the cyclooxygenase pathway enhanced the DOR-mediated GABA inhibition. Behaviorally in rats in vivo, NRM infusion of 12-lipoxygenase inhibitors significantly reduced DOR-induced antinociceptive effect whereas inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase augmented the DOR antinociception. These findings suggest the PLA2-AA-12-lipoxygenase pathway as a primary signaling cascade for DOR-mediated analgesia through inhibition of GABA neurotransmission and indicate potential therapeutic benefits of combining 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase inhibitors for maximal pain inhibition. PMID:22144670

  5. Mechanism of synaptic inhibition by noradrenaline acting at alpha 2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Surprenant, A; North, R A

    1988-06-22

    agonist action. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin abolished the inhibitory synaptic potential (IPSP) and agonist-induced hyperpolarizations. Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate, forskolin, cholera toxin and sodium fluoride did not affect the responses to alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists. The synaptic hyperpolarization resulting from sympathetic nerve stimulation, or the hyperpolarization evoked by a brief (3-5 ms) application of noradrenaline, began after a latency of about 30 and 60 ms respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  6. Decrease of SYNGAP1 in GABAergic cells impairs inhibitory synapse connectivity, synaptic inhibition and cognitive function

    PubMed Central

    Berryer, Martin H.; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Xing, Paul; Riebe, Ilse; Bosoi, Ciprian; Sanon, Nathalie; Antoine-Bertrand, Judith; Lévesque, Maxime; Avoli, Massimo; Hamdan, Fadi F.; Carmant, Lionel; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Michaud, Jacques L.; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of the SYNGAP1 gene, which codes for a Ras GTPase-activating protein, impairs cognition both in humans and in mice. Decrease of Syngap1 in mice has been previously shown to cause cognitive deficits at least in part by inducing alterations in glutamatergic neurotransmission and premature maturation of excitatory connections. Whether Syngap1 plays a role in the development of cortical GABAergic connectivity and function remains unclear. Here, we show that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency significantly reduces the formation of perisomatic innervations by parvalbumin-positive basket cells, a major population of GABAergic neurons, in a cell-autonomous manner. We further show that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency in GABAergic cells derived from the medial ganglionic eminence impairs their connectivity, reduces inhibitory synaptic activity and cortical gamma oscillation power, and causes cognitive deficits. Our results indicate that Syngap1 plays a critical role in GABAergic circuit function and further suggest that Syngap1 haploinsufficiency in GABAergic circuits may contribute to cognitive deficits. PMID:27827368

  7. Blocking the Interaction between Apolipoprotein E and Aβ Reduces Intraneuronal Accumulation of Aβ and Inhibits Synaptic Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kuszczyk, Magdalena A.; Sanchez, Sandrine; Pankiewicz, Joanna; Kim, Jungsu; Duszczyk, Malgorzata; Guridi, Maitea; Asuni, Ayodeji A.; Sullivan, Patrick M.; Holtzman, David M.; Sadowski, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain is a key event in Alzheimer disease pathogenesis. Apolipoprotein (Apo) E is a lipid carrier protein secreted by astrocytes, which shows inherent affinity for Aβ and has been implicated in the receptor-mediated Aβ uptake by neurons. To characterize ApoE involvement in the intraneuronal Aβ accumulation and to investigate whether blocking the ApoE/Aβ interaction could reduce intraneuronal Aβ buildup, we used a noncontact neuronal-astrocytic co-culture system, where synthetic Aβ peptides were added into the media without or with cotreatment with Aβ12-28P, which is a nontoxic peptide antagonist of ApoE/Aβ binding. Compared with neurons cultured alone, intraneuronal Aβ content was significantly increased in neurons co-cultured with wild-type but not with ApoE knockout (KO) astrocytes. Neurons co-cultured with astrocytes also showed impaired intraneuronal degradation of Aβ, increased level of intraneuronal Aβ oligomers, and marked down-regulation of several synaptic proteins. Aβ12-28P treatment significantly reduced intraneuronal Aβ accumulation, including Aβ oligomer level, and inhibited loss of synaptic proteins. Furthermore, we showed significantly reduced intraneuronal Aβ accumulation in APPSW/PS1dE9/ApoE KO mice compared with APPSW/PS1dE9/ApoE targeted replacement mice that expressed various human ApoE isoforms. Data from our co-culture and in vivo experiments indicate an essential role of ApoE in the mechanism of intraneuronal Aβ accumulation and provide evidence that ApoE/Aβ binding antagonists can effectively prevent this process. PMID:23499462

  8. The effect of sevoflurane on the cognitive function of rats and its association with the inhibition of synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Deng-Xin; Jiang, Shan; Yu, Li-Na; Zhang, Feng-Jiang; Zhuang, Qing; Yan, Min

    2015-01-01

    To observe the effects of different concentrations of sevoflurane on synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) expression, synaptic long term depression (LTD), and paired pulse depression (PPD) in the rat hippocampus as well as to investigate the association between these effects and the cognitive function of rats. A total of 24 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were selected and randomly divided into 3 groups: the control group (group A), which inhaled air; group B, which inhaled 0.65 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) sevoflurane for 2 h; and group C, which inhaled 1.30 MAC sevoflurane for 2 h. The subsequent experiments were performed after one day. (1) Y maze tests were performed, and the expression of Syt1 in hippocampal tissues was detected using western blot. (2) The changes in LTD and PPD in rat hippocampal slices were examined using electrophysiological techniques. Compared to the control group, the cognitive function was decreased and Syt1 expression in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in rats in the 1.30 MAC sevoflurane inhalation group. After 60 min of low frequency stimulation, the amplitudes of population spike (PS) potentials in rat hippocampal slices were significantly decreased. After induction of PPD, the P2/P1 ratio was significantly increased. No indicators in the 0.65 MAC sevoflurane inhalation group showed any significant changes. Inhalation of high concentrations of sevoflurane significantly reduced Syt1 protein levels in the rat hippocampus, significantly inhibited the release of presynaptic neurotransmitters, and reduced the efficiency of synaptic transmission, thus causing memory impairment. PMID:26885010

  9. The traditional anti-diarrheal remedy, Garcinia buchananii stem bark extract, inhibits propulsive motility and fast synaptic potentials in the guinea pig distal colon

    PubMed Central

    Balemba, Onesmo B.; Bhattarai, Yogesh; Stenkamp-Strahm, Chloe; Lesakit, Mellau S.B.; Mawe, Gary M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Garcinia buchananii bark extract is a traditional African remedy for diarrhea, dysentery, abdominal discomfort and pain. We investigated the mechanisms and efficacy of this extract using the guinea pig distal colon model of gastrointestinal motility. Methods Stem bark was collected from G. buchananii trees in their natural habitat of Karagwe, Tanzania. Bark was sun dried and ground into fine powder, which was suspended in Krebs to obtain an aqueous extract. Isolated guinea pig distal colon was used to determine the effect of the G. buchananii bark extract on fecal pellet propulsion. Intracellular recording was used to evaluate the extract action on evoked fast excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in S- neurons of the myenteric plexus. Key Results G. buchananii bark extract inhibited pellet propulsion in a concentration-dependent manner, with an optimal concentration of ~10 mg powder ml−1. Interestingly, washout of the extract resulted in an increase in pellet propulsion to a level above basal activity. The extract reversibly reduced the amplitude of evoked fEPSPs in myenteric neurons. The extract’s inhibitory action on propulsive motility and fEPSPs was not affected by the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, or the alpha- 2 adrenoceptor antagonist, yohimbine. The extract inhibited pellet motility in the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), GABAA and GABAB receptor antagonists picrotoxin and phaclofen, respectively. However, phaclofen and picrotoxin inhibited recovery rebound of motility during washout. Conclusions & Inferences G. buchananii extract has the potential to provide an effective, non-opiate anti-diarrheal drug. Further studies are required to characterize bioactive components and elucidate the mechanisms of action, efficacy and safety. PMID:20718943

  10. ZD7288, a selective hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel blocker, inhibits hippocampal synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-xue; Min, Xiao-chun; Xu, Xu-lin; Zheng, Min; Guo, Lian-jun

    2016-01-01

    The selective hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker 4-(N-ethyl-N-phenylamino)-1,2-dimethyl-6-(methylamino) pyrimidinium chloride (ZD7288) blocks the induction of long-term potentiation in the perforant path–CA3 region in rat hippocampus in vivo. To explore the mechanisms underlying the action of ZD7288, we recorded excitatory postsynaptic potentials in perforant path–CA3 synapses in male Sprague-Dawley rats. We measured glutamate content in the hippocampus and in cultured hippocampal neurons using high performance liquid chromatography, and determined intracellular Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]i) using Fura-2. ZD7288 inhibited the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation, and these effects were mirrored by the nonspecific HCN channel blocker cesium. ZD7288 also decreased glutamate release in hippocampal tissue and in cultured hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, ZD7288 attenuated glutamate-induced rises in [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner and reversed 8-Br-cAMP-mediated facilitation of these glutamate-induced [Ca2+]i rises. Our results suggest that ZD7288 inhibits hippocampal synaptic plasticity both glutamate release and resultant [Ca2+]i increases in rat hippocampal neurons. PMID:27335562

  11. Botulinum neurotoxin type A inhibits synaptic vesicle 2 expression in breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Bandala, C; Cortés-Algara, AL; Mejía-Barradas, CM; Ilizaliturri-Flores, I; Dominguez-Rubio, R; Bazán-Méndez, CI; Floriano-Sánchez, E; Luna-Arias, JP; Anaya-Ruiz, M; Lara-Padilla, E

    2015-01-01

    Aim: It is known that botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNTA) improves some kinds of cancer (e.g. prostate) and that synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) is the molecular target of this neurotoxin. Besides having potential therapeutic value, this glycoprotein has recently been proposed as a molecular marker for several types of cancer. Although the mechanisms of cancer development and the improvement found with botulinum treatment are not well understood, the formation of the botulinum-SV2 complex may influence the presence and distribution of SV2 and the function of vesicles. To date, there are no reports on the possible effect of botulinum on breast cancer of unknown causes, which have a great impact on women’s health. Thus we determined the presence of SV2 in three breast cancer cell lines and the alterations found with botulinum application. Materials and methods: With and without adding 10 units of botulinum, SV2 protein expression was determined by optical densitometry in T47D, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-453 cell lines and the distribution of SV2 was observed with immunochemistry (hematoxylin staining). Results: The SV2 protein was abundant in the cancer cells herein tested, and maximally so in T47D. In all three cancer cell lines botulinum diminished SV2 expression, which was found mostly in the cell periphery. Conclusion: SV2 could be a molecular marker in breast cancer. Its expression and distribution is regulated by botulinum, suggesting an interesting control mechanism for SV2 expression and a possible alternative therapy. Further studies are needed in this sense. PMID:26339411

  12. PDE-4 Inhibition Rescues Aberrant Synaptic Plasticity in Drosophila and Mouse Models of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Catherine H.; Schoenfeld, Brian P.; Weisz, Eliana D.; Bell, Aaron J.; Chambers, Daniel B.; Hinchey, Joseph; Choi, Richard J.; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Gertner, Michael J.; Ferrick, Neal J.; Terlizzi, Allison M.; Yohn, Nicole; Koenigsberg, Eric; Liebelt, David A.; Zukin, R. Suzanne; Woo, Newton H.; Tranfaglia, Michael R.; Louneva, Natalia; Arnold, Steven E.; Siegel, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading cause of both intellectual disability and autism resulting from a single gene mutation. Previously, we characterized cognitive impairments and brain structural defects in a Drosophila model of FXS and demonstrated that these impairments were rescued by treatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists or lithium. A well-documented biochemical defect observed in fly and mouse FXS models and FXS patients is low cAMP levels. cAMP levels can be regulated by mGluR signaling. Herein, we demonstrate PDE-4 inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to ameliorate memory impairments and brain structural defects in the Drosophila model of fragile X. Furthermore, we examine the effects of PDE-4 inhibition by pharmacologic treatment in the fragile X mouse model. We demonstrate that acute inhibition of PDE-4 by pharmacologic treatment in hippocampal slices rescues the enhanced mGluR-dependent LTD phenotype observed in FXS mice. Additionally, we find that chronic treatment of FXS model mice, in adulthood, also restores the level of mGluR-dependent LTD to that observed in wild-type animals. Translating the findings of successful pharmacologic intervention from the Drosophila model into the mouse model of FXS is an important advance, in that this identifies and validates PDE-4 inhibition as potential therapeutic intervention for the treatment of individuals afflicted with FXS. PMID:25568131

  13. PDE-4 inhibition rescues aberrant synaptic plasticity in Drosophila and mouse models of fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Choi, Catherine H; Schoenfeld, Brian P; Weisz, Eliana D; Bell, Aaron J; Chambers, Daniel B; Hinchey, Joseph; Choi, Richard J; Hinchey, Paul; Kollaros, Maria; Gertner, Michael J; Ferrick, Neal J; Terlizzi, Allison M; Yohn, Nicole; Koenigsberg, Eric; Liebelt, David A; Zukin, R Suzanne; Woo, Newton H; Tranfaglia, Michael R; Louneva, Natalia; Arnold, Steven E; Siegel, Steven J; Bolduc, Francois V; McDonald, Thomas V; Jongens, Thomas A; McBride, Sean M J

    2015-01-07

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading cause of both intellectual disability and autism resulting from a single gene mutation. Previously, we characterized cognitive impairments and brain structural defects in a Drosophila model of FXS and demonstrated that these impairments were rescued by treatment with metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) antagonists or lithium. A well-documented biochemical defect observed in fly and mouse FXS models and FXS patients is low cAMP levels. cAMP levels can be regulated by mGluR signaling. Herein, we demonstrate PDE-4 inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to ameliorate memory impairments and brain structural defects in the Drosophila model of fragile X. Furthermore, we examine the effects of PDE-4 inhibition by pharmacologic treatment in the fragile X mouse model. We demonstrate that acute inhibition of PDE-4 by pharmacologic treatment in hippocampal slices rescues the enhanced mGluR-dependent LTD phenotype observed in FXS mice. Additionally, we find that chronic treatment of FXS model mice, in adulthood, also restores the level of mGluR-dependent LTD to that observed in wild-type animals. Translating the findings of successful pharmacologic intervention from the Drosophila model into the mouse model of FXS is an important advance, in that this identifies and validates PDE-4 inhibition as potential therapeutic intervention for the treatment of individuals afflicted with FXS.

  14. Opioid Peptides Inhibit Excitatory But Not Inhibitory Synaptic Transmission in the Rat Dorsal Motor Nucleus of the Vagus

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Kirsteen N.; Kalyuzhny, Alexander E.; Travagli, R. Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Opioid peptides produce gastrointestinal inhibition and increase feeding when applied to the brainstem. The present studies were designed to determine the actions of opioid peptides on synaptic transmission within the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) and the localization of μ-opioid receptors. Whole-cell recordings were made from identified gastrointestinal-projecting DMV neurons in thin brainstem slices of the rat. Electrical stimulation of the nucleus of the tractus solitarius evoked EPSCs and IPSCs. In all neurons tested, methionine (Met)-enkephalin (0.003–30 μm) inhibited the peak amplitude of the EPSCs. The effect was prevented by naloxone (1 μm) as well as by naloxonazine (0.2 μm). An increase in the ratio of the evoked paired pulses indicated that the inhibition was attributable to actions at presynaptic receptors. This presynaptic inhibitory action was mimicked by [d-Ala2, N-Me-Phe4, Gly5-ol]-enkephalin (0.1 μm) and the analgesic dipeptide kyotorphin (10 μm) but not by cyclic[d-Pen2, d-Pen5]-enkephalin (1 μm) and trans-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidinyl)-cyclohexyl]benzeneacetamide methanesulfonate (1 μm). In contrast, the amplitude of evoked IPSCs was not altered either by Met-enkephalin or by any of the opioid receptor-selective agonists. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that nerve terminals apposing DMV neurons showed immunoreactivity to μ-opioid receptors colocalized with glutamate immunoreactivity but not glutamic acid decarboxylase immunoreactivity. These results suggest that within the DMV, μ-opioid receptors are present on the nerve terminals of excitatory but not inhibitory inputs to GI motoneurons. Such specificity may imply that the central inhibitory action of opioid peptides on gastrointestinal function targets selected pathways. PMID:11943802

  15. Adenosine effects on inhibitory synaptic transmission and excitation–inhibition balance in the rat neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pei; Bannon, Nicholas M; Ilin, Vladimir; Volgushev, Maxim; Chistiakova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adenosine might be the most widespread neuromodulator in the brain: as a metabolite of ATP it is present in every neuron and glial cell. However, how adenosine affects operation of neurons and networks in the neocortex is poorly understood, mostly because modulation of inhibitory transmission by adenosine has been so little studied. To clarify adenosine's role at inhibitory synapses, and in excitation–inhibition balance in pyramidal neurons, we recorded pharmacologically isolated inhibitory responses, compound excitatory–inhibitory responses and spontaneous events in layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in slices from rat visual cortex. We show that adenosine (1–150 μm) suppresses inhibitory transmission to these neurons in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner. The suppression was mediated by presynaptic A1 receptors (A1Rs) because it was blocked by a selective A1 antagonist, DPCPX, and associated with changes of release indices: paired-pulse ratio, inverse coefficient of variation and frequency of miniature events. At some synapses (12 out of 24) we found evidence for A2ARs: their blockade led to a small but significant increase of the magnitude of adenosine-mediated suppression. This effect of A2AR blockade was not observed when A1Rs were blocked, suggesting that A2ARs do not have their own effect on transmission, but can modulate the A1R-mediated suppression. At both excitatory and inhibitory synapses, the magnitude of A1R-mediated suppression and A2AR–A1R interaction expressed high variability, suggesting high heterogeneity of synapses in the sensitivity to adenosine. Adenosine could change the balance between excitation and inhibition at a set of inputs to a neuron bidirectionally, towards excitation or towards inhibition. On average, however, these bidirectional changes cancelled each other, and the overall balance of excitation and inhibition was maintained during application of adenosine. These results suggest that changes of adenosine

  16. Synaptic inhibition controls transient oscillatory synchronization in a model of the insect olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Assisi, Collins; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2011-01-01

    In a variety of neuronal systems it has been hypothesized that inhibitory interneurons corral principal neurons into synchronously firing groups that encode sensory information and sub-serve behavior (Buzsáki and Chrobak, 1995; Buzsáki, 2008). This mechanism is particularly relevant to the olfactory system where spatiotemporal patterns of projection neuron (PN) activity act as robust markers of odor attributes (Laurent et al., 1996; Wehr and Laurent, 1996). In the insect antennal lobe (AL), a network of local inhibitory interneurons arborizes extensively throughout the AL (Leitch and Laurent, 1996) providing inhibitory input to the cholinergic PNs. Our theoretical work has attempted to elaborate the exact role of inhibition in the generation of odor specific PN responses (Bazhenov et al., 2001a,b; Assisi et al., 2011). In large-scale AL network models we characterized the inhibitory sub-network by its coloring (Assisi et al., 2011) and showed that it can entrain excitatory PNs to the odor specific patterns of transient synchronization. In this focused review, we further examine the dynamics of entrainment in more detail by simulating simple model networks in various parameter regimes. Our simulations in conjunction with earlier studies point to the key role played by lateral (between inhibitory interneurons) and feedback (from inhibitory interneurons to principal cells) inhibition in the generation of experimentally observed patterns of transient synchrony. PMID:22529800

  17. Betahistine produces post-synaptic inhibition of the excitability of the primary afferent neurons in the vestibular endorgans.

    PubMed

    Soto, E; Chávez, H; Valli, P; Benvenuti, C; Vega, R

    2001-01-01

    Betahistine has been used to treat several vestibular disorders of both central and peripheral origin. The objective of this work was to study the action of betahistine in the vestibular endorgans. Experiments were done in wild larval axolotl (Ambystoma tigrinum). Multiunit extracellular recordings were obtained from the semicircular canal nerve using a suction electrode. Betahistine (10 microM to 10 mM; n = 32) inhibited the basal spike discharge of the vestibular afferent neurons with an IC50 of 600 microM. To define the site of action of betahistine, its interactions with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine (3 microM) and with the cholinergic antagonists atropine (10 microM; n = 3) and d-tubocurarine (10 microM; n = 3) were studied. The action of betahistine when co-administered with these drugs was the same as that in control experiments, indicating that its effects did not include nitric oxide production or the activation of cholinergic receptors. In contrast, 0.01-1 mM betahistine reduced the excitatory action of kainic acid (10 microM; n = 6) and quiscualic acid (1 microM; n = 13). These results indicate that the action of betahistine on the spike discharge of afferent neurons seems to be due to a post-synaptic inhibitory action on the primary afferent neuron response to the hair cell neurotransmitter.

  18. Interaction of inhibition and triplets of excitatory spikes modulates the NMDA-R-mediated synaptic plasticity in a computational model of spike timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Cutsuridis, Vassilis

    2013-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) experiments have shown that a synapse is strengthened when a presynaptic spike precedes a postsynaptic one and depressed vice versa. The canonical form of STDP has been shown to have an asymmetric shape with the peak long-term potentiation at +6 ms and the peak long-term depression at -5 ms. Experiments in hippocampal cultures with more complex stimuli such as triplets (one presynaptic spike combined with two postsynaptic spikes or one postsynaptic spike with two presynaptic spikes) have shown that pre-post-pre spike triplets result in no change in synaptic strength, whereas post-pre-post spike triplets lead to significant potentiation. The sign and magnitude of STDP have also been experimentally hypothesized to be modulated by inhibition. Recently, a computational study showed that the asymmetrical form of STDP in the CA1 pyramidal cell dendrite when two spikes interact switches to a symmetrical one in the presence of inhibition under certain conditions. In the present study, I investigate computationally how inhibition modulates STDP in the CA1 pyramidal neuron dendrite when it is driven by triplets. The model uses calcium as the postsynaptic signaling agent for STDP and is shown to be consistent with the experimental triplet observations in the absence of inhibition: simulated pre-post-pre spike triplets result in no change in synaptic strength, whereas simulated post-pre-post spike triplets lead to significant potentiation. When inhibition is bounded by the onset and offset of the triplet stimulation, then the strength of the synapse is decreased as the strength of inhibition increases. When inhibition arrives either few milliseconds before or at the onset of the last spike in the pre-post-pre triplet stimulation, then the synapse is potentiated. Variability in the frequency of inhibition (50 vs. 100 Hz) produces no change in synaptic strength. Finally, a 5% variation in model's calcium parameters (calcium thresholds

  19. Drosophila spichthyin inhibits BMP signaling and regulates synaptic growth and axonal microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinnan; Shaw, W. Robert; Tsang, Hilda T. H.; Reid, Evan; O'Kane, Cahir J.

    2008-01-01

    Summary To understand the functions of SPG6, mutated in the neurodegenerative disease hereditary spastic paraplegia, and of ichthyin, mutated in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, we have studied their Drosophila ortholog, spichthyin (Spict). Spict is found on early endosomes. Loss of Spict leads to upregulation of BMP signaling and expansion of the neuromuscular junction. BMP signaling is also necessary for a normal microtubule cytoskeleton and axonal transport; analysis of loss and gain-of-function phenotypes suggests that Spict antagonizes this function of BMP signaling. Spict interacts with BMP receptors and promotes their internalization from the plasma membrane, suggesting that it inhibits BMP signaling by regulating BMP receptor traffic. This is the first demonstration of a role for an SPG protein or ichthyin family member in a specific signaling pathway, and suggests disease mechanisms for hereditary spastic paraplegia that involve dependence of the microtubule cytoskeleton on BMP signaling. PMID:17220882

  20. Drosophila spichthyin inhibits BMP signaling and regulates synaptic growth and axonal microtubules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinnan; Shaw, W Robert; Tsang, Hilda T H; Reid, Evan; O'Kane, Cahir J

    2007-02-01

    To understand the functions of NIPA1, mutated in the neurodegenerative disease hereditary spastic paraplegia, and of ichthyin, mutated in autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis, we have studied their Drosophila melanogaster ortholog, spichthyin (Spict). Spict is found on early endosomes. Loss of Spict leads to upregulation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling and expansion of the neuromuscular junction. BMP signaling is also necessary for a normal microtubule cytoskeleton and axonal transport; analysis of loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes indicate that Spict may antagonize this function of BMP signaling. Spict interacts with BMP receptors and promotes their internalization from the plasma membrane, implying that it inhibits BMP signaling by regulating BMP receptor traffic. This is the first demonstration of a role for a hereditary spastic paraplegia protein or ichthyin family member in a specific signaling pathway, and implies disease mechanisms for hereditary spastic paraplegia that involve dependence of the microtubule cytoskeleton on BMP signaling.

  1. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic, and Parvalbumin Neurons in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; Franciosi, Serena; Brown, Ritchie E.

    2013-01-01

    Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF) region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV) neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made from BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic and PV neurons with the size (>20 μm) and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents) corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min) bath application of adenosine (100 μM) decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic, and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM). Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required

  2. Activation of Presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) Receptors Inhibits Synaptic Transmission at Mammalian Inhibitory Cholinergic Olivocochlear–Hair Cell Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Wedemeyer, Carolina; Zorrilla de San Martín, Javier; Ballestero, Jimena; Gómez-Casati, María Eugenia; Torbidoni, Ana Vanesa; Fuchs, Paul A.; Bettler, Bernhard; Elgoyhen, Ana Belén

    2013-01-01

    The synapse between olivocochlear (OC) neurons and cochlear mechanosensory hair cells is cholinergic, fast, and inhibitory. The inhibitory sign of this cholinergic synapse is accounted for by the activation of Ca2+-permeable postsynaptic α9α10 nicotinic receptors coupled to the opening of hyperpolarizing Ca2+-activated small-conductance type 2 (SK2)K+ channels. Acetylcholine (ACh) release at this synapse is supported by both P/Q- and N-type voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Although the OC synapse is cholinergic, an abundant OC GABA innervation is present along the mammalian cochlea. The role of this neurotransmitter at the OC efferent innervation, however, is for the most part unknown. We show that GABA fails to evoke fast postsynaptic inhibitory currents in apical developing inner and outer hair cells. However, electrical stimulation of OC efferent fibers activates presynaptic GABAB(1a,2) receptors [GABAB(1a,2)Rs] that downregulate the amount of ACh released at the OC–hair cell synapse, by inhibiting P/Q-type VGCCs. We confirmed the expression of GABABRs at OC terminals contacting the hair cells by coimmunostaining for GFP and synaptophysin in transgenic mice expressing GABAB1–GFP fusion proteins. Moreover, coimmunostaining with antibodies against the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase and synaptophysin support the idea that GABA is directly synthesized at OC terminals contacting the hair cells during development. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time a physiological role for GABA in cochlear synaptic function. In addition, our data suggest that the GABAB1a isoform selectively inhibits release at efferent cholinergic synapses. PMID:24068816

  3. Activation of kappa opioid receptors decreases synaptic transmission and inhibits long-term potentiation in the basolateral amygdala of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Huge, Volker; Rammes, Gerhard; Beyer, Antje; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Azad, Shahnaz C

    2009-02-01

    The amygdala plays an important role in the processing of chronic pain and pain memory formation. Particularly, it is involved in the emotional and affective components of the pain circuitry. The role of kappa opioid receptors in these pain conditions is only partly known. The present study investigates the effect of kappa receptor activation on synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity in the amygdala. Electrophysiological in vitro experiments were carried out in brain slices of male C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice. The effect of the kappa opioid receptor agonist U50,488H (5 microM) and the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist nor-BNI (3 microM) on field potential (FP) amplitude and the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) was examined. High frequency stimulation (HFS) of afferents in the lateral amygdala with two trains of 100 pulses at 50 Hz increased the FP amplitudes to 119+/-2% (mean+/-SEM; n=6) in the BLA. U50,488H decreased synaptic transmission (baseline: 100+/-0.5%; U50,488H: 86.3+/-2.4%; n=6) and blocked the induction of LTP (U50,488H: 100+/-4.1%; HFS: 102.6+/-7%; n=6). The effect on synaptic transmission and on LTP was completely reversed or prevented by application of nor-BNI, which itself had no effect on synaptic transmission or the induction of LTP. Kappa opioid receptor activation decreases synaptic transmission and inhibits the induction of LTP in the BLA of the mouse. These findings may be associated with the effects of kappa opioid agonists in chronic pain and pain memory formation.

  4. Depolarizing GABA/glycine synaptic events switch from excitation to inhibition during frequency increases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Branchereau, Pascal; Cattaert, Daniel; Delpy, Alain; Allain, Anne-Emilie; Martin, Elodie; Meyrand, Pierre

    2016-02-01

    By acting on their ionotropic chloride channel receptors, GABA and glycine represent the major inhibitory transmitters of the central nervous system. Nevertheless, in various brain structures, depolarizing GABAergic/glycinergic postsynaptic potentials (dGPSPs) lead to dual inhibitory (shunting) and excitatory components, the functional consequences of which remain poorly acknowledged. Indeed, the extent to which each component prevails during dGPSP is unclear. Understanding the mechanisms predicting the dGPSP outcome on neural network activity is therefore a major issue in neurobiology. By combining electrophysiological recordings of spinal embryonic mouse motoneurons and modelling study, we demonstrate that increasing the chloride conductance (gCl) favors inhibition either during a single dGPSP or during trains in which gCl summates. Finally, based on this summation mechanism, the excitatory effect of EPSPs is overcome by dGPSPs in a frequency-dependent manner. These results reveal an important mechanism by which dGPSPs protect against the overexcitation of neural excitatory circuits.

  5. Depolarizing GABA/glycine synaptic events switch from excitation to inhibition during frequency increases

    PubMed Central

    Branchereau, Pascal; Cattaert, Daniel; Delpy, Alain; Allain, Anne-Emilie; Martin, Elodie; Meyrand, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    By acting on their ionotropic chloride channel receptors, GABA and glycine represent the major inhibitory transmitters of the central nervous system. Nevertheless, in various brain structures, depolarizing GABAergic/glycinergic postsynaptic potentials (dGPSPs) lead to dual inhibitory (shunting) and excitatory components, the functional consequences of which remain poorly acknowledged. Indeed, the extent to which each component prevails during dGPSP is unclear. Understanding the mechanisms predicting the dGPSP outcome on neural network activity is therefore a major issue in neurobiology. By combining electrophysiological recordings of spinal embryonic mouse motoneurons and modelling study, we demonstrate that increasing the chloride conductance (gCl) favors inhibition either during a single dGPSP or during trains in which gCl summates. Finally, based on this summation mechanism, the excitatory effect of EPSPs is overcome by dGPSPs in a frequency-dependent manner. These results reveal an important mechanism by which dGPSPs protect against the overexcitation of neural excitatory circuits. PMID:26912194

  6. Acid-sensing ion channels contribute to synaptic transmission and inhibit cocaine-evoked plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kreple, Collin J; Lu, Yuan; Taugher, Rebecca J; Schwager-Gutman, Andrea L; Du, Jianyang; Stump, Madeliene; Wang, Yimo; Ghobbeh, Ali; Fan, Rong; Cosme, Caitlin V; Sowers, Levi P; Welsh, Michael J; Radley, Jason J; LaLumiere, Ryan T; Wemmie, John A

    2014-08-01

    Acid-sensing ion channel 1A (ASIC1A) is abundant in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a region known for its role in addiction. Because ASIC1A has been suggested to promote associative learning, we hypothesized that disrupting ASIC1A in the NAc would reduce drug-associated learning and memory. However, contrary to this hypothesis, we found that disrupting ASIC1A in the mouse NAc increased cocaine-conditioned place preference, suggesting an unexpected role for ASIC1A in addiction-related behavior. Moreover, overexpressing ASIC1A in rat NAc reduced cocaine self-administration. Investigating the underlying mechanisms, we identified a previously unknown postsynaptic current during neurotransmission that was mediated by ASIC1A and ASIC2 and thus well positioned to regulate synapse structure and function. Consistent with this possibility, disrupting ASIC1A altered dendritic spine density and glutamate receptor function, and increased cocaine-evoked plasticity, which resemble changes previously associated with cocaine-induced behavior. Together, these data suggest that ASIC1A inhibits the plasticity underlying addiction-related behavior and raise the possibility of developing therapies for drug addiction by targeting ASIC-dependent neurotransmission.

  7. Pre-Synaptic Inhibition of Afferent Feedback in the Macaque Spinal Cord Does Not Modulate with Cycles of Peripheral Oscillations Around 10 Hz

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Ferran; Baker, Stuart N.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal interneurons are partially phase-locked to physiological tremor around 10 Hz. The phase of spinal interneuron activity is approximately opposite to descending drive to motoneurons, leading to partial phase cancellation and tremor reduction. Pre-synaptic inhibition of afferent feedback modulates during voluntary movements, but it is not known whether it tracks more rapid fluctuations in motor output such as during tremor. In this study, dorsal root potentials (DRPs) were recorded from the C8 and T1 roots in two macaque monkeys following intra-spinal micro-stimulation (random inter-stimulus interval 1.5–2.5 s, 30–100 μA), whilst the animals performed an index finger flexion task which elicited peripheral oscillations around 10 Hz. Forty one responses were identified with latency < 5 ms; these were narrow (mean width 0.59 ms), and likely resulted from antidromic activation of afferents following stimulation near terminals. Significant modulation during task performance occurred in 16/41 responses, reflecting terminal excitability changes generated by pre-synaptic inhibition (Wall's excitability test). Stimuli falling during large-amplitude 8–12 Hz oscillations in finger acceleration were extracted, and sub-averages of DRPs constructed for stimuli delivered at different oscillation phases. Although some apparent phase-dependent modulation was seen, this was not above the level expected by chance. We conclude that, although terminal excitability reflecting pre-synaptic inhibition of afferents modulates over the timescale of a voluntary movement, it does not follow more rapid changes in motor output. This suggests that pre-synaptic inhibition is not part of the spinal systems for tremor reduction described previously, and that it plays a role in overall—but not moment-by-moment—regulation of feedback gain. PMID:26635536

  8. Activation of the anti-inflammatory reflex blocks lipopolysaccharide-induced decrease in synaptic inhibition in the temporal cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Peña, David; Housini, Mohammad; Cheng, Derek; Lopez, Diego; Cuevas-Olguin, Roberto; Saderi, Nadia; Salgado Delgado, Roberto; Galindo Charles, Luis; Salgado Burgos, Humberto; Rose-John, Stefan; Flores, Gonzalo; Kilgard, Michael P; Atzori, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Stress is a potential trigger for a number of neuropsychiatric conditions, including anxiety syndromes and schizophrenic psychoses. The temporal neocortex is a stress-sensitive area involved in the development of such conditions. We have recently shown that aseptic inflammation and mild electric shock shift the balance between synaptic excitation and synaptic inhibition in favor of the former in this brain area (Garcia-Oscos et al., 2012), as well as in the prefrontal cortex (Garcia-Oscos et al., 2014). Given the potential clinical importance of this phenomenon in the etiology of hyperexcitable neuropsychiatric illness, this study investigates whether inactivation of the peripheral immune system by the "anti-inflammatory reflex" would reduce the central response to aseptic inflammation. For a model of aseptic inflammation, this study used i.p. injections of the bacterial toxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 µM) and activated the anti-inflammatory reflex either pharmacologically by i.p. injections of the nicotinic α7 receptor agonist PHA543613 or physiologically through electrical stimulation of the left vagal nerve (VNS). Patch-clamp recording was used to monitor synaptic function. Recordings from LPS-injected Sprague Dawley rats show that activation of the anti-inflammatory reflex either pharmacologically or by VNS blocks or greatly reduces the LPS-induced decrease of the synaptic inhibitory-to-excitatory ratio and the saturation level of inhibitory current input-output curves. Given the ample variety of pharmacologically available α7 nicotinic receptor agonists as well as the relative safety of clinical VNS already approved by the FDA for the treatment of epilepsy and depression, our findings suggest a new therapeutic avenue in the treatment of stress-induced hyperexcitable conditions mediated by a decrease in synaptic inhibition in the temporal cortex. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Optogenetic inhibition of cortical afferents in the nucleus accumbens simultaneously prevents cue-induced transient synaptic potentiation and cocaine-seeking behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stefanik, Michael T.; Kupchik, Yonatan M.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of relapse reveal that the motivation to seek drug is regulated by enduring morphological and physiological changes in the nucleus accumbens, as well as transient synaptic potentiation in the accumbens core (NAcore) that parallels drug-seeking behavior. The current study sought to examine the link between the behavioral and synaptic consequences of cue-induced cocaine seeking by optically silencing glutamatergic afferents to the NAcore from the prelimbic cortex (PL). Adeno-associated virus coding for the inhibitory opsin archaerhodopsin was microinjected into PL, and optical fibers were targeted to NAcore. Animals were trained to self-administer cocaine followed by extinction training, and then underwent cue-induced reinstatement in the presence or absence of 15 min of optically-induced inhibition of PL fibers in NAcore. Inhibiting the PL-to-NAcore projection blocked reinstated behavior and was paralleled by decreased dendritic spine head diameter and AMPA/NMDA ratio relative to sham-laser control rats. Interestingly, while spine density was elevated after extinction training, no further effects were observed by cued reinstatement or optical inhibition. These findings validate the critical role for PL afferents to the NAcore in simultaneously regulating both reinstated behavior and the associated transient synaptic potentiation. PMID:25663648

  10. Optogenetic inhibition of cortical afferents in the nucleus accumbens simultaneously prevents cue-induced transient synaptic potentiation and cocaine-seeking behavior.

    PubMed

    Stefanik, Michael T; Kupchik, Yonatan M; Kalivas, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Animal models of relapse reveal that the motivation to seek drug is regulated by enduring morphological and physiological changes in the nucleus accumbens, as well as transient synaptic potentiation in the accumbens core (NAcore) that parallels drug-seeking behavior. The current study sought to examine the link between the behavioral and synaptic consequences of cue-induced cocaine seeking by optically silencing glutamatergic afferents to the NAcore from the prelimbic cortex (PL). Adeno-associated virus coding for the inhibitory opsin archaerhodopsin was microinjected into PL, and optical fibers were targeted to NAcore. Animals were trained to self-administer cocaine followed by extinction training, and then underwent cue-induced reinstatement in the presence or absence of 15 min of optically induced inhibition of PL fibers in NAcore. Inhibiting the PL-to-NAcore projection blocked reinstated behavior and was paralleled by decreased dendritic spine head diameter and AMPA/NMDA ratio relative to sham-laser control rats. Interestingly, while spine density was elevated after extinction training, no further effects were observed by cued reinstatement or optical inhibition. These findings validate the critical role for PL afferents to the NAcore in simultaneously regulating both reinstated behavior and the associated transient synaptic potentiation.

  11. Excitatory Synaptic Drive and Feedforward Inhibition in the Hippocampal CA3 Circuit Are Regulated by SynCAM 1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kellie A.; Ribic, Adema; Laage Gaupp, Fabian M.; Coman, Daniel; Huang, Yuegao; Dulla, Chris G.; Hyder, Fahmeed

    2016-01-01

    Select adhesion proteins control the development of synapses and modulate their structural and functional properties. Despite these important roles, the extent to which different synapse-organizing mechanisms act across brain regions to establish connectivity and regulate network properties is incompletely understood. Further, their functional roles in different neuronal populations remain to be defined. Here, we applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a modality of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to map connectivity changes in knock-out (KO) mice lacking the synaptogenic cell adhesion protein SynCAM 1. This identified reduced fractional anisotropy in the hippocampal CA3 area in absence of SynCAM 1. In agreement, mossy fiber refinement in CA3 was impaired in SynCAM 1 KO mice. Mossy fibers make excitatory inputs onto postsynaptic specializations of CA3 pyramidal neurons termed thorny excrescences and these structures were smaller in the absence of SynCAM 1. However, the most prevalent targets of mossy fibers are GABAergic interneurons and SynCAM 1 loss unexpectedly reduced the number of excitatory terminals onto parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in CA3. SynCAM 1 KO mice additionally exhibited lower postsynaptic GluA1 expression in these PV-positive interneurons. These synaptic imbalances in SynCAM 1 KO mice resulted in CA3 disinhibition, in agreement with reduced feedforward inhibition in this network in the absence of SynCAM 1-dependent excitatory drive onto interneurons. In turn, mice lacking SynCAM 1 were impaired in memory tasks involving CA3. Our results support that SynCAM 1 modulates excitatory mossy fiber inputs onto both interneurons and principal neurons in the hippocampal CA3 area to balance network excitability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study advances our understanding of synapse-organizing mechanisms on two levels. First, the data support that synaptogenic proteins guide connectivity and can function in distinct brain regions even if they are

  12. A Presynaptic Group III mGluR Recruits Gβγ/SNARE Interactions to Inhibit Synaptic Transmission by Cone Photoreceptors in the Vertebrate Retina.

    PubMed

    Van Hook, Matthew J; Babai, Norbert; Zurawski, Zack; Yim, Yun Young; Hamm, Heidi E; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2017-04-26

    G-protein βγ subunits (Gβγ) interact with presynaptic proteins and regulate neurotransmitter release downstream of Ca(2+) influx. To accomplish their roles in sensory signaling, photoreceptor synapses use specialized presynaptic proteins that support neurotransmission at active zone structures known as ribbons. While several G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) influence synaptic transmission at ribbon synapses of cones and other retinal neurons, it is unknown whether Gβγ contributes to these effects. We tested whether activation of one particular GPCR, a metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR), can reduce cone synaptic transmission via Gβγ in tiger salamander retinas. In recordings from horizontal cells, we found that an mGluR agonist (L-AP4) reduced cone-driven light responses and mEPSC frequency. In paired recordings of cones and horizontal cells, L-AP4 slightly reduced cone ICa (∼10%) and caused a larger reduction in cone-driven EPSCs (∼30%). Proximity ligation assay revealed direct interactions between SNAP-25 and Gβγ subunits in retinal synaptic layers. Pretreatment with the SNAP-25 cleaving protease BoNT/A inhibited L-AP4 effects on synaptic transmission, as did introduction of a peptide derived from the SNAP-25 C terminus. Introducing Gβγ subunits directly into cones reduced EPSC amplitude. This effect was inhibited by BoNT/A, supporting a role for Gβγ/SNAP-25 interactions. However, the mGluR-dependent reduction in ICa was not mimicked by Gβγ, indicating that this effect was independent of Gβγ. The finding that synaptic transmission at cone ribbon synapses is regulated by Gβγ/SNAP-25 interactions indicates that these mechanisms are shared by conventional and ribbon-type synapses. Gβγ liberated from other photoreceptor GPCRs is also likely to regulate synaptic transmission.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dynamic regulation of synaptic transmission by presynaptic G-protein coupled receptors shapes information flow through neural circuits. At

  13. cAMP-dependent insulin modulation of synaptic inhibition in neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus is altered in diabetic mice

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Camille B.

    2014-01-01

    Pathologies in which insulin is dysregulated, including diabetes, can disrupt central vagal circuitry, leading to gastrointestinal and other autonomic dysfunction. Insulin affects whole body metabolism through central mechanisms and is transported into the brain stem dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) and nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), which mediate parasympathetic visceral regulation. The NTS receives viscerosensory vagal input and projects heavily to the DMV, which supplies parasympathetic vagal motor output. Normally, insulin inhibits synaptic excitation of DMV neurons, with no effect on synaptic inhibition. Modulation of synaptic inhibition in DMV, however, is often sensitive to cAMP-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesized that an effect of insulin on GABAergic synaptic transmission may be uncovered by elevating resting cAMP levels in GABAergic terminals. We used whole cell patch-clamp recordings in brain stem slices from control and diabetic mice to identify insulin effects on inhibitory neurotransmission in the DMV in the presence of forskolin to elevate cAMP levels. In the presence of forskolin, insulin decreased the frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) and the paired-pulse ratio of evoked IPSCs in DMV neurons from control mice. This effect was blocked by brefeldin-A, a Golgi-disrupting agent, or indinavir, a GLUT4 blocker, indicating that protein trafficking and glucose transport were involved. In streptozotocin-treated, diabetic mice, insulin did not affect IPSCs in DMV neurons in the presence of forskolin. Results suggest an impairment of cAMP-induced insulin effects on GABA release in the DMV, which likely involves disrupted protein trafficking in diabetic mice. These findings provide insight into mechanisms underlying vagal dysregulation associated with diabetes. PMID:24990858

  14. Inhibition of G9a/GLP Complex Promotes Long-Term Potentiation and Synaptic Tagging/Capture in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mahima; Razali, Nuralyah Bte; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2016-06-01

    Epigenetic regulations play an important role in regulating the learning and memory processes. G9a/G9a-like protein (GLP) lysine dimethyltransferase complex controls a prominent histone H3 lysine9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) that results in transcriptional silencing of the chromatin. Here, we report that the inhibition of G9a/GLP complex by either of the substrate competitive inhibitors UNC 0638 or BIX 01294 reinforces protein synthesis-independent long-term potentiation (early-LTP) to protein synthesis-dependent long-term potentiation (late-LTP). The reinforcement effect was observed if the inhibitors were present during the induction of early-LTP and in addition when G9a/GLP complex inhibition was carried out by priming of synapses within an interval of 30 min before or after the induction of early-LTP. Surprisingly, the reinforced LTP by G9a/GLP complex inhibition was able to associate with a weak plasticity event from nearby independent synaptic populations, resulting in synaptic tagging/capture (STC). We have identified brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a critical plasticity protein that maintains G9a/GLP complex inhibition-mediated LTP facilitation and its STC. Our study reveals an epigenetic mechanism for promoting plasticity and associativity by G9a/GLP complex inhibition, and it may engender a promising epigenetic target for enhancing memory in neural networks.

  15. Perturbations of Respiratory Rhythm and Pattern by Disrupting Synaptic Inhibition within Pre-Bötzinger and Bötzinger Complexes123

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Hidehiko; Mosher, Bryan; Tariq, Mohammad F.; Zhang, Ruli; Molkov, Yaroslav I.

    2016-01-01

    The pre-Bötzinger (pre-BötC) and Bötzinger (BötC) complexes are the brainstem compartments containing interneurons considered to be critically involved in generating respiratory rhythm and motor pattern in mammals. Current models postulate that both generation of the rhythm and coordination of the inspiratory-expiratory pattern involve inhibitory synaptic interactions within and between these regions. Both regions contain glycinergic and GABAergic neurons, and rhythmically active neurons in these regions receive appropriately coordinated phasic inhibition necessary for generation of the normal three-phase respiratory pattern. However, recent experiments attempting to disrupt glycinergic and GABAergic postsynaptic inhibition in the pre-BötC and BötC in adult rats in vivo have questioned the critical role of synaptic inhibition in these regions, as well as the importance of the BötC, which contradicts previous physiological and pharmacological studies. To further evaluate the roles of synaptic inhibition and the BötC, we bilaterally microinjected the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine and glycinergic receptor antagonist strychnine into the pre-BötC or BötC in anesthetized adult rats in vivo and in perfused in situ brainstem–spinal cord preparations from juvenile rats. Muscimol was microinjected to suppress neuronal activity in the pre-BötC or BötC. In both preparations, disrupting inhibition within pre-BötC or BötC caused major site-specific perturbations of the rhythm and disrupted the three-phase motor pattern, in some experiments terminating rhythmic motor output. Suppressing BötC activity also potently disturbed the rhythm and motor pattern. We conclude that inhibitory circuit interactions within and between the pre-BötC and BötC critically regulate rhythmogenesis and are required for normal respiratory motor pattern generation. PMID:27200412

  16. Interplay between low threshold voltage-gated K(+) channels and synaptic inhibition in neurons of the chicken nucleus laminaris along its frequency axis.

    PubMed

    Hamlet, William R; Liu, Yu-Wei; Tang, Zheng-Quan; Lu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Central auditory neurons that localize sound in horizontal space have specialized intrinsic and synaptic cellular mechanisms to tightly control the threshold and timing for action potential generation. However, the critical interplay between intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and extrinsic synaptic conductances in determining neuronal output are not well understood. In chicken, neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) encode sound location using interaural time difference (ITD) as a cue. Along the tonotopic axis of NL, there exist robust differences among low, middle, and high frequency (LF, MF, and HF, respectively) neurons in a variety of neuronal properties such as low threshold voltage-gated K(+) (LTK) channels and depolarizing inhibition. This establishes NL as an ideal model to examine the interactions between LTK currents and synaptic inhibition across the tonotopic axis. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings prepared from chicken embryos (E17-E18), we found that LTK currents were larger in MF and HF neurons than in LF neurons. Kinetic analysis revealed that LTK currents in MF neurons activated at lower voltages than in LF and HF neurons, whereas the inactivation of the currents was similar across the tonotopic axis. Surprisingly, blockade of LTK currents using dendrotoxin-I (DTX) tended to broaden the duration and increase the amplitude of the depolarizing inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in NL neurons without dependence on coding frequency regions. Analyses of the effects of DTX on inhibitory postsynaptic currents led us to interpret this unexpected observation as a result of primarily postsynaptic effects of LTK currents on MF and HF neurons, and combined presynaptic and postsynaptic effects in LF neurons. Furthermore, DTX transferred subthreshold IPSPs to spikes. Taken together, the results suggest a critical role for LTK currents in regulating inhibitory synaptic strength in ITD-coding neurons at various frequencies.

  17. Interplay between low threshold voltage-gated K+ channels and synaptic inhibition in neurons of the chicken nucleus laminaris along its frequency axis

    PubMed Central

    Hamlet, William R.; Liu, Yu-Wei; Tang, Zheng-Quan; Lu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Central auditory neurons that localize sound in horizontal space have specialized intrinsic and synaptic cellular mechanisms to tightly control the threshold and timing for action potential generation. However, the critical interplay between intrinsic voltage-gated conductances and extrinsic synaptic conductances in determining neuronal output are not well understood. In chicken, neurons in the nucleus laminaris (NL) encode sound location using interaural time difference (ITD) as a cue. Along the tonotopic axis of NL, there exist robust differences among low, middle, and high frequency (LF, MF, and HF, respectively) neurons in a variety of neuronal properties such as low threshold voltage-gated K+ (LTK) channels and depolarizing inhibition. This establishes NL as an ideal model to examine the interactions between LTK currents and synaptic inhibition across the tonotopic axis. Using whole-cell patch clamp recordings prepared from chicken embryos (E17–E18), we found that LTK currents were larger in MF and HF neurons than in LF neurons. Kinetic analysis revealed that LTK currents in MF neurons activated at lower voltages than in LF and HF neurons, whereas the inactivation of the currents was similar across the tonotopic axis. Surprisingly, blockade of LTK currents using dendrotoxin-I (DTX) tended to broaden the duration and increase the amplitude of the depolarizing inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in NL neurons without dependence on coding frequency regions. Analyses of the effects of DTX on inhibitory postsynaptic currents led us to interpret this unexpected observation as a result of primarily postsynaptic effects of LTK currents on MF and HF neurons, and combined presynaptic and postsynaptic effects in LF neurons. Furthermore, DTX transferred subthreshold IPSPs to spikes. Taken together, the results suggest a critical role for LTK currents in regulating inhibitory synaptic strength in ITD-coding neurons at various frequencies. PMID:24904297

  18. Slow feedback inhibition in the CA3 area of the rat hippocampus by synergistic synaptic activation of mGluR1 and mGluR5.

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro; Gerber, Urs

    2002-11-01

    Interneurons are critical in regulating the excitability of principal cells in neuronal circuits, thereby modulating the output of neuronal networks. We investigated synaptically evoked inhibitory responses in CA3 pyramidal cells mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) expressed somatodendritically by interneurons. Although pharmacological activation of mGluRs in interneurons has been shown to enhance their excitability, the inability to record mGluR-mediated synaptic responses has precluded detailed characterization of mGluR function in hippocampal interneurons. We found that a single extracellular pulse in CA3 stratum pyramidale was sufficient to induce disynaptic inhibitory responses mediated by postsynaptic mGluRs of the interneurons in CA3 pyramidal cells of hippocampal slice cultures. The disynaptic inhibitory response followed a short-latency monosynaptic inhibitory response, and was observed at stimulus intensities evoking half-maximal monosynaptic IPSCs. Synergistic activation of mGluR1 and mGluR5 was required to induce the full inhibitory response. When recordings were obtained from interneurons in CA3 stratum radiatum or stratum oriens, a single extracellular stimulus induced a slow inward cationic current with a time course corresponding to the slow inhibitory response measured in pyramidal cells. DCG IV, a group II mGluR agonist, which specifically blocks synaptic transmission through mossy fibres, had no effect on mGluR-mediated synaptic responses in interneurons, suggesting that feed-forward inhibition via mossy fibres is not involved. Thus, postsynaptic mGluR1 and mGluR5 in hippocampal interneurons cooperatively mediate slow feedback inhibition of CA3 pyramidal cells. This mechanism may allow interneurons to monitor activity levels from populations of neighbouring principal cells to adapt inhibitory tone to the state of the network.

  19. Tyrosine kinase inhibition reverses TDP-43 effects on synaptic protein expression, astrocytic function and amino acid dis-homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Heyburn, Lanier; Hebron, Michaeline L; Smith, Jacqueline; Winston, Charisse; Bechara, John; Li, Zhaoxia; Lonskaya, Irina; Burns, Mark P; Harris, Brent T; Moussa, Charbel E-H

    2016-11-01

    The trans-activating response of DNA/RNA-binding protein (TDP)-43 pathology is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases via unknown mechanisms. Here, we use a transgenic mouse model over-expressing human wild-type neuronal TDP-43 to study the effects of TDP-43 pathology on glutamate metabolism and synaptic function. We found that neuronal TDP-43 over-expression affects synaptic protein expression, including Synapsin I, and alters surrounding astrocytic function. TDP-43 over-expression is associated with an increase in glutamate and γ-amino butyric acid and reduction of glutamine and aspartate levels, indicating impairment of presynaptic terminal. TDP-43 also decreases tricarboxylic acid cycle metabolism and induces oxidative stress via lactate accumulation. Neuronal TDP-43 does not alter microglia activity or significantly changes systemic and brain inflammatory markers compared to control. We previously demonstrated that brain-penetrant tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), nilotinib and bosutinib, reduce TDP-43-induced cell death in transgenic mice. Here, we show that TKIs reverse the effects of TDP-43 on synaptic proteins, increase astrocytic function and restore glutamate and neurotransmitter balance in TDP-43 mice. Nilotinib, but not bosutinib, reverses mitochondrial impairment and oxidative metabolism. Taken together, these data suggest that TKIs can attenuate TDP-43 toxicity and improve synaptic and astrocytic function, independent of microglial or other inflammatory effects. In conclusion, our data demonstrate novel mechanisms of the effects of neuronal TDP-43 over-expression on synaptic protein expression and alteration of astrocytic function. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Substance P Depolarizes Lamprey Spinal Cord Neurons by Inhibiting Background Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Thörn Pérez, Carolina; Hill, Russell H.; Grillner, Sten

    2015-01-01

    Substance P is endogenously released in the adult lamprey spinal cord and accelerates the burst frequency of fictive locomotion. This is achieved by multiple effects on interneurons and motoneurons, including an attenuation of calcium currents, potentiation of NMDA currents and reduction of the reciprocal inhibition. While substance P also depolarizes spinal cord neurons, the underlying mechanism has not been resolved. Here we show that effects of substance P on background K+ channels are the main source for this depolarization. Hyperpolarizing steps induced inward currents during whole-cell voltage clamp that were reduced by substance P. These background K+ channels are pH sensitive and are selectively blocked by anandamide and AVE1231. These blockers counteracted the effect of substance P on these channels and the resting membrane potential depolarization in spinal cord neurons. Thus, we have shown now that substance P inhibits background K+ channels that in turn induce depolarization, which is likely to contribute to the frequency increase observed with substance P during fictive locomotion. PMID:26197458

  1. Prenatal melamine exposure impairs spatial cognition and hippocampal synaptic plasticity by presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition of glutamatergic transmission in adolescent offspring.

    PubMed

    An, Lei; Sun, Wei

    2017-03-05

    Our previous studies showed that prenatal melamine exposure (PME) could impair spatial cognition and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). More importantly, the synaptic dysfunction induced by PME was associated with the probability of presynaptic glutamate release. Considering the crucial role of the other form of synaptic plasticity, long-term depression (LTD), in some types of learning and memory process, the aim of present study was to investigate if the hippocampal LTD and cognitive flexibility were affected. And then we attempted to explore the underlying mechanism. The animal model was produced by melamine exposure throughout gestational period with 400mg/kg bodyweight, the male offspring rats were used in the study. Morris water maze (MWM) test was performed, and then LTD was recorded from Schaffer collaterals to CA1 region in the hippocampus. Behavioral test showed that learning, reference memory and re-acquisition learning abilities were impaired significantly by PME. The field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) slopes of LTD were significantly higher after PME. Furthermore, the data of whole-cell patch-clamp experiments showed that PME markedly diminished the frequencies of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) and simultaneously reduced the amplitude of sEPSCs. In conclusion, PME inhibited glutamate transmission presynaptically and postsynaptically which could contribute importantly to the depressed hippocampal synaptic plasticity and further induced cognitive deficits in MWM tests.

  2. Partial Amelioration of Synaptic and Cognitive Deficits by Inhibiting Cofilin Dephosphorylation in an Animal Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yulei; Wei, Jing; Cheng, Jia; Zhong, Ping; Xiong, Zhe; Liu, Aiyi; Lin, Lin; Chen, Shengdi; Yan, Zhen

    2016-06-28

    The loss of synaptic structure and function has been linked to the cognitive impairment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dysregulation of the actin cytoskeleton, which plays a key role in regulating the integrity of synapses and the transport of synaptic proteins, has been suggested to contribute to the pathology of AD. In this study, we found that glutamate receptor surface expression and synaptic function in frontal cortical neurons were significant diminished in a familial AD (FAD) model, which was correlated with the reduction of phosphorylated cofilin, a key protein regulating the dynamics of actin filaments. Injecting a cofilin dephosphorylation inhibitory peptide to FAD mice led to the partial rescue of the surface expression of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits, as well as the partial restoration of AMPAR- and NMDAR-mediated synaptic currents. Moreover, the impaired working memory and novel object recognition memory in FAD mice were partially ameliorated by injections of the cofilin dephosphorylation inhibitory peptide. These results suggest that targeting the cofilin-actin signaling holds promise to mitigate the physiological and behavioral abnormality in AD.

  3. Synaptic and Cognitive Improvements by Inhibition of 2-AG Metabolism Are through Upregulation of MicroRNA-188-3p in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Hu, Mei; Teng, Zhaoqian; Tang, Ya-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) is the major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms underlying aberrant Aβ formation in AD remain unclear. We showed previously that inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the primary enzyme that metabolizes the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the brain, robustly reduces Aβ by inhibiting β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), a key enzyme responsible for Aβ formation. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppression of BACE1 by inhibition of 2-AG metabolism are largely unknown. We demonstrate here that expression of the noncoding small RNA miR-188-3p that targets BACE1 was significantly downregulated both in the brains of AD humans and APP transgenic (TG) mice, a mouse model of AD. The downregulated miR-188-3p expression was restored by MAGL inhibition. Overexpression of miR-188-3p in the hippocampus reduced BACE1, Aβ, and neuroinflammation and prevented deteriorations in hippocampal basal synaptic transmission, long-term potentiation, spatial learning, and memory in TG mice. 2-AG-induced suppression of BACE1 was prevented by miR-188-3p loss of function. Moreover, miR-188-3p expression was upregulated by 2-AG or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists and suppressed by PPARγ antagonism or NF-κB activation. Reducing Aβ and neuroinflammation by MAGL inhibition was occluded by PPARγ antagonism. In addition, BACE1 suppression by 2-AG and PPARγ activation was eliminated by knockdown of NF-κB. Our study provides a novel molecular mechanism underlying improved synaptic and cognitive function in TG mice by 2-AG signaling, which upregulates miR-188-3p expression through PPARγ and NF-κB signaling pathway, resulting in suppressions of BACE1 expression and Aβ formation. PMID:25378159

  4. Increased Spinal Cord Na+-K+-2Cl− Cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) Activity Contributes to Impairment of Synaptic Inhibition in Paclitaxel-induced Neuropathic Pain*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shao-Rui; Zhu, Lihong; Chen, Hong; Wen, Lei; Laumet, Geoffroy; Pan, Hui-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule-stabilizing agents, such as paclitaxel (Taxol), are effective chemotherapy drugs for treating many cancers, and painful neuropathy is a major dose-limiting adverse effect. Cation-chloride cotransporters, such as Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter-1 (NKCC1) and K+-Cl− cotransporter-2 (KCC2), critically influence spinal synaptic inhibition by regulating intracellular chloride concentrations. Here we show that paclitaxel treatment in rats significantly reduced GABA-induced membrane hyperpolarization and caused a depolarizing shift in GABA reversal potential of dorsal horn neurons. However, paclitaxel had no significant effect on AMPA or NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic input from primary afferents to dorsal horn neurons. Paclitaxel treatment significantly increased protein levels, but not mRNA levels, of NKCC1 in spinal cords. Inhibition of NKCC1 with bumetanide reversed the paclitaxel effect on GABA-mediated hyperpolarization and GABA reversal potentials. Also, intrathecal bumetanide significantly attenuated hyperalgesia and allodynia induced by paclitaxel. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that NKCC1 interacted with β-tubulin and β-actin in spinal cords. Remarkably, paclitaxel increased NKCC1 protein levels at the plasma membrane and reduced NKCC1 levels in the cytosol of spinal cords. In contrast, treatment with an actin-stabilizing agent had no significant effect on NKCC1 protein levels in the plasma membrane or cytosolic fractions of spinal cords. In addition, inhibition of the motor protein dynein blocked paclitaxel-induced subcellular redistribution of NKCC1, whereas inhibition of kinesin-5 mimicked the paclitaxel effect. Our findings suggest that increased NKCC1 activity contributes to diminished spinal synaptic inhibition and neuropathic pain caused by paclitaxel. Paclitaxel disrupts intracellular NKCC1 trafficking by interfering with microtubule dynamics and associated motor proteins. PMID:25253692

  5. Cerebrolysin prevents deficits in social behavior, repetitive conduct, and synaptic inhibition in a rat model of autism.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Olguin, Roberto; Roychowdhury, Swagata; Banerjee, Anwesha; Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Esquivel-Rendon, Eric; Bringas, María Elena; Kilgard, Michael P; Flores, Gonzalo; Atzori, Marco

    2017-06-13

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a syndrome of diverse neuropsychiatric diseases of growing incidence characterized by repetitive conduct and impaired social behavior and communication for which effective pharmacological treatment is still unavailable. While the mechanisms and etiology of ASD are still unknown, a consensus is emerging about the synaptic nature of the syndrome, suggesting a possible avenue for pharmacological treatment with synaptogenic compounds. The peptidic mixture cerebrolysin (CBL) has been successfully used during the last three decades in the treatment of stroke and neurodegenerative disease. Animal experiments indicate that at least one possible mechanism of action of CBL is through neuroprotection and/or synaptogenesis. In the present study, we tested the effect of CBL treatment (daily injection of 2.5 mL/Kg i.p. during 15 days) on a rat model of ASD. This was based on the offspring (43 male and 51 female pups) of a pregnant female rat injected with valproic acid (VPA, 600 mg/Kg) at the embryonic day 12.5, which previous work has shown to display extensive behavioral, as well as synaptic impairment. Comparison between saline vs. CBL-injected VPA animals shows that CBL treatment improves behavioral as well as synaptic impairments, measured by behavioral performance (social interaction, Y-maze, plus-maze), maximal response of inhibitory γ-amino butyric acid type A receptor (GABAA R)-mediated synaptic currents, as well as their kinetic properties and adrenergic and muscarinic modulation. We speculate that CBL might be a viable and effective candidate for pharmacological treatment or co-treatment of ASD patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Subchronic glucocorticoid receptor inhibition rescues early episodic memory and synaptic plasticity deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lanté, Fabien; Chafai, Magda; Raymond, Elisabeth Fabienne; Pereira, Ana Rita Salgueiro; Mouska, Xavier; Kootar, Scherazad; Barik, Jacques; Bethus, Ingrid; Marie, Hélène

    2015-06-01

    The early phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by hippocampus-dependent memory deficits and impaired synaptic plasticity. Increasing evidence suggests that stress and dysregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, marked by the elevated circulating glucocorticoids, are risk factors for AD onset. How these changes contribute to early hippocampal dysfunction remains unclear. Using an elaborated version of the object recognition task, we carefully monitored alterations in key components of episodic memory, the first type of memory altered in AD patients, in early symptomatic Tg2576 AD mice. We also combined biochemical and ex vivo electrophysiological analyses to reveal novel cellular and molecular dysregulations underpinning the onset of the pathology. We show that HPA axis, circadian rhythm, and feedback mechanisms, as well as episodic memory, are compromised in this early symptomatic phase, reminiscent of human AD pathology. The cognitive decline could be rescued by subchronic in vivo treatment with RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. These observed phenotypes were paralleled by a specific enhancement of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR)-dependent LTD in CA1 pyramidal neurons, whereas LTP and metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent LTD remain unchanged. NMDAR transmission was also enhanced. Finally, we show that, as for the behavioral deficit, RU486 treatment rescues this abnormal synaptic phenotype. These preclinical results define glucocorticoid signaling as a contributing factor to both episodic memory loss and early synaptic failure in this AD mouse model, and suggest that glucocorticoid receptor targeting strategies could be beneficial to delay AD onset.

  7. 3-Methylcrotonylglycine disrupts mitochondrial energy homeostasis and inhibits synaptic Na(+),K (+)-ATPase activity in brain of young rats.

    PubMed

    Moura, Alana Pimentel; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Zanatta, Ângela; Busanello, Estela Natacha Brandt; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Wajner, Moacir

    2012-03-01

    Deficiency of 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase activity is an inherited metabolic disease biochemically characterized by accumulation and high urinary excretion of 3-methylcrotonylglycine (3MCG), and also of 3-hydroisovalerate in lesser amounts. Affected patients usually have neurologic dysfunction, brain abnormalities and cardiomyopathy, whose pathogenesis is still unknown. The present study investigated the in vitro effects of 3MCG on important parameters of energy metabolism, including CO(2) production from labeled acetate, enzyme activities of the citric acid cycle, as well as of the respiratory chain complexes I-IV (oxidative phosphorylation), creatine kinase (intracellular ATP transfer), and synaptic Na(+),K(+)-ATPase (neurotransmission) in brain cortex of young rats. 3MCG significantly reduced CO(2) production, implying that this compound compromises citric acid cycle activity. Furthermore, 3MCG diminished the activities of complex II-III of the respiratory chain, mitochondrial creatine kinase and synaptic membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase. Furthermore, antioxidants were able to attenuate or fully prevent the inhibitory effect of 3MCG on creatine kinase and synaptic membrane Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activities. We also observed that lipid peroxidation was elicited by 3MCG, suggesting the involvement of free radicals on 3MCG-induced effects. Considering the importance of the citric acid cycle and the electron flow through the respiratory chain for brain energy production, creatine kinase for intracellular energy transfer, and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase for the maintenance of the cell membrane potential, the present data indicate that 3MCG potentially impairs mitochondrial brain energy homeostasis and neurotransmission. It is presumed that these pathomechanisms may be involved in the neurological damage found in patients affected by 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency.

  8. Subchronic Glucocorticoid Receptor Inhibition Rescues Early Episodic Memory and Synaptic Plasticity Deficits in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lanté, Fabien; Chafai, Magda; Raymond, Elisabeth Fabienne; Salgueiro Pereira, Ana Rita; Mouska, Xavier; Kootar, Scherazad; Barik, Jacques; Bethus, Ingrid; Marie, Hélène

    2015-01-01

    The early phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by hippocampus-dependent memory deficits and impaired synaptic plasticity. Increasing evidence suggests that stress and dysregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, marked by the elevated circulating glucocorticoids, are risk factors for AD onset. How these changes contribute to early hippocampal dysfunction remains unclear. Using an elaborated version of the object recognition task, we carefully monitored alterations in key components of episodic memory, the first type of memory altered in AD patients, in early symptomatic Tg2576 AD mice. We also combined biochemical and ex vivo electrophysiological analyses to reveal novel cellular and molecular dysregulations underpinning the onset of the pathology. We show that HPA axis, circadian rhythm, and feedback mechanisms, as well as episodic memory, are compromised in this early symptomatic phase, reminiscent of human AD pathology. The cognitive decline could be rescued by subchronic in vivo treatment with RU486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. These observed phenotypes were paralleled by a specific enhancement of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR)-dependent LTD in CA1 pyramidal neurons, whereas LTP and metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent LTD remain unchanged. NMDAR transmission was also enhanced. Finally, we show that, as for the behavioral deficit, RU486 treatment rescues this abnormal synaptic phenotype. These preclinical results define glucocorticoid signaling as a contributing factor to both episodic memory loss and early synaptic failure in this AD mouse model, and suggest that glucocorticoid receptor targeting strategies could be beneficial to delay AD onset. PMID:25622751

  9. The Space-Clamped Hodgkin-Huxley System with Random Synaptic Input: Inhibition of Spiking by Weak Noise and Analysis with Moment Equations.

    PubMed

    Tuckwell, Henry C; Ditlevsen, Susanne

    2016-10-01

    We consider a classical space-clamped Hodgkin-Huxley model neuron stimulated by synaptic excitation and inhibition with conductances represented by Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes. Using numerical solutions of the stochastic model system obtained by an Euler method, it is found that with excitation only, there is a critical value of the steady-state excitatory conductance for repetitive spiking without noise, and for values of the conductance near the critical value, small noise has a powerfully inhibitory effect. For a given level of inhibition, there is also a critical value of the steady-state excitatory conductance for repetitive firing, and it is demonstrated that noise in either the excitatory or inhibitory processes or both can powerfully inhibit spiking. Furthermore, near the critical value, inverse stochastic resonance was observed when noise was present only in the inhibitory input process. The system of deterministic differential equations for the approximate first- and second-order moments of the model is derived. They are solved using Runge-Kutta methods, and the solutions are compared with the results obtained by simulation for various sets of parameters, including some with conductances obtained by experiment on pyramidal cells of rat prefrontal cortex. The mean and variance obtained from simulation are in good agreement when there is spiking induced by strong stimulation and relatively small noise or when the voltage is fluctuating at subthreshold levels. In the occasional spike mode sometimes exhibited by spinal motoneurons and cortical pyramidal cells, the assumptions underlying the moment equation approach are not satisfied. The simulation results show that noisy synaptic input of either an excitatory or inhibitory character or both may lead to the suppression of firing in neurons operating near a critical point and this has possible implications for cortical networks. Although suppression of firing is corroborated for the system of moment equations

  10. A model of order-selectivity based on dynamic changes in the balance of excitation and inhibition produced by short-term synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Goudar, Vishwa

    2014-01-01

    Determining the order of sensory events separated by a few hundred milliseconds is critical to many forms of sensory processing, including vocalization and speech discrimination. Although many experimental studies have recorded from auditory order-sensitive and order-selective neurons, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that universal properties of cortical synapses—short-term synaptic plasticity of excitatory and inhibitory synapses—are well suited for the generation of order-selective neural responses. Using computational models of canonical disynaptic circuits, we show that the dynamic changes in the balance of excitation and inhibition imposed by short-term plasticity lead to the generation of order-selective responses. Parametric analyses predict that among the forms of short-term plasticity expressed at excitatory-to-excitatory, excitatory-to-inhibitory, and inhibitory-to-excitatory synapses, the single most important contributor to order-selectivity is the paired-pulse depression of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs). A topographic model of the auditory cortex that incorporates short-term plasticity accounts for both context-dependent suppression and enhancement in response to paired tones. Together these results provide a framework to account for an important computational problem based on ubiquitous synaptic properties that did not yet have a clearly established computational function. Additionally, these studies suggest that disynaptic circuits represent a fundamental computational unit that is capable of processing both spatial and temporal information. PMID:25339707

  11. Inhibition of PI3K-Akt Signaling Blocks Exercise-Mediated Enhancement of Adult Neurogenesis and Synaptic Plasticity in the Dentate Gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Bruel-Jungerman, Elodie; Veyrac, Alexandra; Dufour, Franck; Horwood, Jennifer; Laroche, Serge; Davis, Sabrina

    2009-01-01

    Background Physical exercise has been shown to increase adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and enhances synaptic plasticity. The antiapoptotic kinase, Akt has also been shown to be phosphorylated following voluntary exercise; however, it remains unknown whether the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway is involved in exercise-induced neurogenesis and the associated facilitation of synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus. Methodology/Principal Findings To gain insight into the potential role of this signaling pathway in exercise-induced neurogenesis and LTP in the dentate gyrus rats were infused with the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002 or vehicle control solution (icv) via osmotic minipumps and exercised in a running wheel for 10 days. Newborn cells in the dentate gyrus were date-labelled with BrdU on the last 3 days of exercise. Then, they were either returned to the home cage for 2 weeks to assess exercise-induced LTP and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, or were killed on the last day of exercise to assess proliferation and activation of the PI3K-Akt cascade using western blotting. Conclusions/Significance Exercise increases cell proliferation and promotes survival of adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus. Immediately after exercise, we found that Akt and three downstream targets, BAD, GSK3β and FOXO1 were activated. LY294002 blocked exercise-induced phosphorylation of Akt and downstream target proteins. This had no effect on exercise-induced cell proliferation, but it abolished most of the beneficial effect of exercise on the survival of newly generated dentate gyrus neurons and prevented exercise-induced increase in dentate gyrus LTP. These results suggest that activation of the PI3 kinase-Akt signaling pathway plays a significant role via an antiapoptotic function in promoting survival of newly formed granule cells generated during exercise and the associated increase in synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus. PMID:19936256

  12. Inhibition of calcium oxalate monohydrate growth by citrate and the effect of the background electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Matthew L.; Qiu, S. Roger; Hoyer, John R.; Casey, William H.; Nancollas, George H.; De Yoreo, James J.

    2007-08-01

    Pathological mineralization is a common phenomenon in broad range of plants and animals. In humans, kidney stone formation is a well-known example that afflicts approximately 10% of the population. Of the various calcium salt phases that comprise human kidney stones, the primary component is calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM). Citrate, a naturally occurring molecule in the urinary system and a common therapeutic agent for treating stone disease, is a known inhibitor of COM. Understanding the physical mechanisms of citrate inhibition requires quantification of the effects of both background electrolytes and citrate on COM step kinetics. Here we report the results of an in situ AFM study of these effects, in which we measure the effect of the electrolytes LiCl, NaCl, KCl, RbCl, and CsCl, and the dependence of step speed on citrate concentration for a range of COM supersaturations. We find that varying the background electrolyte results in significant differences in the measured step speeds and in step morphology, with KCl clearly producing the smallest impact and NaCl the largest. The kinetic coefficient for the former is nearly three times larger than for the latter, while the steps change from smooth to highly serrated when KCl is changed to NaCl. The results on the dependence of step speed on citrate concentration show that citrate produces a dead zone whose width increases with citrate concentration as well as a continual reduction in kinetic coefficient with increasing citrate level. We relate these results to a molecular-scale view of inhibition that invokes a combination of kink blocking and step pinning. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the classic step-pinning model of Cabrera and Vermilyea (C-V model) does an excellent job of predicting the effect of citrate on COM step kinetics provided the model is reformulated to more realistically account for impurity adsorption, include an expression for the Gibbs-Thomson effect that is correct for all supersaturations

  13. Synaptic and cognitive improvements by inhibition of 2-AG metabolism are through upregulation of microRNA-188-3p in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Hu, Mei; Teng, Zhaoqian; Tang, Ya-Ping; Chen, Chu

    2014-11-05

    Abnormal accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) is the major neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms underlying aberrant Aβ formation in AD remain unclear. We showed previously that inhibition of monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL), the primary enzyme that metabolizes the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the brain, robustly reduces Aβ by inhibiting β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), a key enzyme responsible for Aβ formation. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for suppression of BACE1 by inhibition of 2-AG metabolism are largely unknown. We demonstrate here that expression of the noncoding small RNA miR-188-3p that targets BACE1 was significantly downregulated both in the brains of AD humans and APP transgenic (TG) mice, a mouse model of AD. The downregulated miR-188-3p expression was restored by MAGL inhibition. Overexpression of miR-188-3p in the hippocampus reduced BACE1, Aβ, and neuroinflammation and prevented deteriorations in hippocampal basal synaptic transmission, long-term potentiation, spatial learning, and memory in TG mice. 2-AG-induced suppression of BACE1 was prevented by miR-188-3p loss of function. Moreover, miR-188-3p expression was upregulated by 2-AG or peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists and suppressed by PPARγ antagonism or NF-κB activation. Reducing Aβ and neuroinflammation by MAGL inhibition was occluded by PPARγ antagonism. In addition, BACE1 suppression by 2-AG and PPARγ activation was eliminated by knockdown of NF-κB. Our study provides a novel molecular mechanism underlying improved synaptic and cognitive function in TG mice by 2-AG signaling, which upregulates miR-188-3p expression through PPARγ and NF-κB signaling pathway, resulting in suppressions of BACE1 expression and Aβ formation. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3414919-15$15.00/0.

  14. Thioredoxin and its reductase are present on synaptic vesicles, and their inhibition prevents the paralysis induced by botulinum neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Pirazzini, Marco; Azarnia Tehran, Domenico; Zanetti, Giulia; Megighian, Aram; Scorzeto, Michele; Fillo, Silvia; Shone, Clifford C; Binz, Thomas; Rossetto, Ornella; Lista, Florigio; Montecucco, Cesare

    2014-09-25

    Botulinum neurotoxins consist of a metalloprotease linked via a conserved interchain disulfide bond to a heavy chain responsible for neurospecific binding and translocation of the enzymatic domain in the nerve terminal cytosol. The metalloprotease activity is enabled upon disulfide reduction and causes neuroparalysis by cleaving the SNARE proteins. Here, we show that the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin protein disulfide-reducing system is present on synaptic vesicles and that it is functional and responsible for the reduction of the interchain disulfide of botulinum neurotoxin serotypes A, C, and E. Specific inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase or thioredoxin prevent intoxication of cultured neurons in a dose-dependent manner and are also very effective inhibitors of the paralysis of the neuromuscular junction. We found that this group of inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxins is very effective in vivo. Most of them are nontoxic and are good candidates as preventive and therapeutic drugs for human botulism.

  15. A Model of Synaptic Reconsolidation

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, David B.; Schwalger, Tilo; Ziegler, Lorric; Gerstner, Wulfram

    2016-01-01

    Reconsolidation of memories has mostly been studied at the behavioral and molecular level. Here, we put forward a simple extension of existing computational models of synaptic consolidation to capture hippocampal slice experiments that have been interpreted as reconsolidation at the synaptic level. The model implements reconsolidation through stabilization of consolidated synapses by stabilizing entities combined with an activity-dependent reservoir of stabilizing entities that are immune to protein synthesis inhibition (PSI). We derive a reduced version of our model to explore the conditions under which synaptic reconsolidation does or does not occur, often referred to as the boundary conditions of reconsolidation. We find that our computational model of synaptic reconsolidation displays complex boundary conditions. Our results suggest that a limited resource of hypothetical stabilizing molecules or complexes, which may be implemented by protein phosphorylation or different receptor subtypes, can underlie the phenomenon of synaptic reconsolidation. PMID:27242410

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptic Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Margeta, Milica A.; Shen, Kang

    2011-01-01

    Synapses are specialized junctions that mediate information flow between neurons and their targets. A striking feature of the nervous system is the specificity of its synaptic connections: an individual neuron will form synapses only with a small subset of available presynaptic and postsynaptic partners. Synaptic specificity has been classically thought to arise from homophilic or heterophilic interactions between adhesive molecules acting across the synaptic cleft. Over the past decade, many new mechanisms giving rise to synaptic specificity have been identified. Synapses can be specified by secreted molecules that promote or inhibit synaptogenesis, and their source can be a neighboring guidepost cell, not just presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. Furthermore, lineage, fate, and timing of development can also play critical roles in shaping neural circuits. Future work utilizing large-scale screens will aim to elucidate the full scope of cellular mechanisms and molecular players that can give rise to synaptic specificity. PMID:19969086

  17. Destabilization of the Postsynaptic Density by PSD-95 Serine 73 Phosphorylation Inhibits Spine Growth and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Pascal; Higley, Michael J.; Xu, Weifeng; Czervionke, Brian L.; Malenka, Robert C.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Long-term potentiation (LTP) is accompanied by dendritic spine growth and changes in the composition of the postsynaptic density (PSD). We find that activity-dependent growth of apical spines of CA1 pyramidal neurons is accompanied by destabilization of the PSD that results in transient loss and rapid replacement of PSD-95 and SHANK2. Signaling through PSD-95 is required for activity-dependent spine growth and trafficking of SHANK2. N-terminal PDZ and C-terminal guanylate kinase domains of PSD-95 are required for both processes, indicating that PSD-95 coordinates multiple signals to regulate morphological plasticity. Activity-dependent trafficking of PSD-95 is triggered by phosphorylation at serine 73, a conserved calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) consensus phosphorylation site, which negatively regulates spine growth and potentiation of synaptic currents. We propose that PSD-95 and CaMKII act at multiple steps during plasticity induction to initially trigger and later terminate spine growth by trafficking growth-promoting PSD proteins out of the active spine. PMID:19081375

  18. Presynaptic inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acidB-mediated synaptic current by adenosine recorded in vitro in midbrain dopamine neurons.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y N; Mercuri, N B; Johnson, S W

    1995-05-01

    Adenosine receptor antagonists such as caffeine cause dopamine-dependent behavioral arousal and hyperlocomotion in rodents. In the present study, we used the whole-cell recording technique in the rat brain slice to investigate effects of adenosine on dopamine neurons and their synaptic inputs in the substantia nigra zona compacta and ventral tegmental area. Adenosine was most potent for inhibiting the amplitude of the inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptors (EC50 = 47 +/- 3 microM) compared with inhibition of the GABAA-mediated IPSC (117 +/- 51 microM) and the excitatory amino acid-mediated excitatory postsynaptic current (119 +/- 36 microM). Adenosine failed to inhibit current evoked by exogenous GABA or baclofen, suggesting that adenosine acted presynaptically to reduce GABA release from nerve terminals. Adenosine inhibited the GABAB-mediated IPSC by acting at the adenosine A1 receptor, because its effect was blocked by the selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (100 nM), as well as by the methylxanthines caffeine (1 mM) and theophylline (300 microM). The rank-order of potency of adenosine agonists [N6-cyclohexyladenosine > R-(-)-N6-(2-phenylisopropyl)-adenosine = N6- cyclohexyladenosine > 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine > 2-chloroadenosine] also was consistent with activation of the adenosine A1 receptor, whereas the selective adenosine A2A agonist CGS 21680 [2-p-(2-carboxyethyl)phenethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine] had no effect on the GABAB IPSC. None of the adenosine agonists or antagonists affected holding current or membrane conductance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Selective Loss of Dentate Hilar Interneurons Contributes to Reduced Synaptic Inhibition of Granule Cells in an Electrical Stimulation-Based Animal Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    SUN, CHENGSAN; MTCHEDLISHVILI, ZAKARIA; BERTRAM, EDWARD H.; ERISIR, ALEV; KAPUR, JAIDEEP

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptide-containing hippocampal interneurons and dentate granule cell inhibition were investigated at different periods following electrical stimulation-induced, self-sustaining status epilepticus (SE) in rats. Immunohistochemistry for somatostatin (SOM), neuropeptide Y (NPY), parvalbumin (PV), cholecystokinin (CCK), and Fluoro-Jade B was performed on sections from hippocampus contralateral to the stimulated side and studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Compared to paired age-matched control animals, there were fewer SOM and NPY-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus in animals with epilepsy (40 – 60 days after SE), and 1, 3, and 7 days following SE. In the hilus of animals that had recently undergone SE, some SOM-IR and NPY-IR interneurons also stained for Fluoro-Jade B. Furthermore, there was electron microscopic evidence of the degeneration of SOM-IR interneurons following SE. In contrast, the number of CCK and PV-IR basket cells in epileptic animals was similar to that in controls, although it was transiently diminished following SE; there was no evidence of degeneration of CCK or PV-IR interneurons. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a diminished frequency of inhibitory postsynaptic currents in dentate granule cells (DGCs) recorded from epileptic animals and animals that had recently undergone SE compared with controls. These results confirm the selective vulnerability of a particular subset of dentate hilar interneurons after prolonged SE. This loss may contribute to the reduced GABAergic synaptic inhibition of granule cells in epileptic animals. PMID:17177260

  20. Histone deacetylase 3 inhibition re-establishes synaptic tagging and capture in aging through the activation of nuclear factor kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mahima; Shivarama Shetty, Mahesh; Arumugam, Thiruma Valavan; Sajikumar, Sreedharan

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with impaired plasticity and memory. Altered epigenetic mechanisms are implicated in the impairment of memory with advanced aging. Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) is an important negative regulator of memory. However, the role of HDAC3 in aged neural networks is not well established. Late long-term potentiation (late-LTP), a cellular correlate of memory and its associative mechanisms such as synaptic tagging and capture (STC) were studied in the CA1 area of hippocampal slices from 82–84 week old rats. Our findings demonstrate that aging is associated with deficits in the magnitude of LTP and impaired STC. Inhibition of HDAC3 augments the late-LTP and re-establishes STC. The augmentation of late-LTP and restoration of STC is mediated by the activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) pathway. We provide evidence for the promotion of associative plasticity in aged neural networks by HDAC3 inhibition and hence propose HDAC3 and NFκB as the possible therapeutic targets for treating age -related cognitive decline. PMID:26577291

  1. L-DOPA inhibits excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat nucleus tractus solitarius through release of dopamine.

    PubMed

    Ohi, Y; Kodama, D; Haji, A

    2017-09-30

    The mode of action of L-DOPA on excitatory synaptic transmission in second-order neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) was studied using the rat brainstem slices. Superfusion of L-DOPA (10μM) reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) without any effect on the amplitude. A low concentration (1μM) was ineffective on the mEPSCs, and the highest concentration (100μM) exerted a stronger inhibitory effect. L-DOPA (10μM) decreased the amplitude of EPSCs (eEPSCs) evoked by electrical stimulation of the tractus solitarius and increased the paired-pulse ratio. The inhibitory effects of L-DOPA on mEPSCs and eEPSCs were similar to those of dopamine (100μM). The effects of L-DOPA were blocked by a competitive antagonist, L-DOPA methyl ester (100μM) and also by a D2 receptor antagonist, sulpiride (10μM), while those of dopamine were blocked by the latter but not by the former. In reserpine (5mg/kg, s.c.)-treated rats, the effects of L-DOPA on both mEPSCs and eEPSCs were completely abolished, but those of dopamine remained unchanged. The present results suggest a possibility that L-DOPA may induce the release of dopamine from the axon terminals in the NTS and the released dopamine suppresses the glutamatergic transmission through activation of the presynaptic D2 receptors. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Imbalance between excitation and inhibition among synaptic connections of CA3 pyramidal neurons in cultured hippocampal slices.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Martín, Alberto; Schweizer, Felix E

    2008-03-01

    A fundamental property of small neuronal ensembles is their ability to be selectively activated by distinct stimuli. One cellular mechanism by which neurons achieve this input selectivity is by modulating the temporal dynamics of excitation and inhibition. We explored the interplay of excitation and inhibition in synapses between pyramidal neurons of cornu ammonis field 3 of the hippocampal formation (CA3) in cultured rat hippocampal slices, where activation of a single excitatory cell can readily recruit local interneurons. Simultaneous whole-cell recordings from pairs of CA3 pyramidal neurons revealed that the strength of connections was neither uniform nor balanced. Rather, stimulation of presynaptic neurons elicited distinct combinations of excitatory postsynaptic current-inhibitory postsynaptic current (EPSC-IPSC) amplitudes in the postsynaptic neurons. EPSC-IPSC sequences with small EPSCs had large IPSCs and sequences that contained large EPSCs had small IPSCs. In addition to differences in the amplitudes of the responses, the kinetics of the EPSCs were also different, creating distinct temporal dynamics of excitation and inhibition. Weaker EPSCs had significantly slower kinetics and were efficiently occluded by IPSCs, thereby further limiting their contribution to depolarizing the postsynaptic membrane. Our data suggest that hippocampal pyramidal cells may use an imbalance between excitation and inhibition as a filter to enhance selectivity toward preferential excitatory connections.

  3. Changing the Chevreul illusion by a background luminance ramp: lateral inhibition fails at its traditional stronghold--a psychophysical refutation.

    PubMed

    Geier, János; Hudák, Mariann

    2011-01-01

    The Chevreul illusion is a well-known 19(th) century brightness illusion, comprising adjacent homogeneous grey bands of different luminance, which are perceived as inhomogeneous. It is generally explained by lateral inhibition, according to which brighter areas projected to the retina inhibit the sensitivity of neighbouring retinal areas. Lateral inhibition has been considered the foundation-stone of early vision for a century, upon which several computational models of brightness perception are built. One of the last strongholds of lateral inhibition is the Chevreul illusion, which is often illustrated even in current textbooks. Here we prove that lateral inhibition is insufficient to explain the Chevreul illusion. For this aim, we placed the Chevreul staircase in a luminance ramp background, which noticeably changed the illusion. In our psychophysical experiments, all 23 observers reported a strong illusion, when the direction of the ramp was identical to that of the staircase, and all reported homogeneous steps (no illusion) when its direction was the opposite. When the background of the staircase was uniform, 14 saw the illusion, and 9 saw no illusion. To see whether the change of the entire background area or that of the staircase boundary edges were more important, we placed another ramp around the staircase, whose direction was opposite to that of the original, larger ramp. The result is that though the inner ramp is rather narrow (mean = 0.51 deg, SD = 0.48 deg, N = 23), it still dominates perception. Since all conditions of the lateral inhibition account were untouched within the staircase, lateral inhibition fails to model these perceptual changes. Area ratios seem insignificant; the role of boundary edges seems crucial. We suggest that long range interactions between boundary edges and areas enclosed by them, such that diffusion-based models describe, provide a much more plausible account for these brightness phenomena, and local models are

  4. GABAB receptor modulation of synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Chalifoux, Jason R.; Carter, Adam G.

    2011-01-01

    Neuromodulators have complex effects on both the presynaptic release and postsynaptic detection of neurotransmitters. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of synaptic modulation by metabotropic GABAB receptors. By inhibiting multivesicular release from the presynaptic terminal, these receptors decrease the synaptic glutamate signal. GABAB receptors also inhibit the Ca2+ permeability of NMDA receptors to decrease Ca2+ signals in postsynaptic spines. These new findings highlight the importance of GABAB receptors in regulating many aspects of synaptic transmission. They also point to novel questions about the spatiotemporal dynamics and sources of synaptic modulation in the brain. PMID:21376567

  5. Acsl, the Drosophila ortholog of intellectual-disability-related ACSL4, inhibits synaptic growth by altered lipids.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Huang, Sheng; Lam, Sin Man; Liu, Zhihua; Shui, Guanghou; Zhang, Yong Q

    2016-11-01

    Nervous system development and function are tightly regulated by metabolic processes, including the metabolism of lipids such as fatty acids. Mutations in long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 4 (ACSL4) are associated with non-syndromic intellectual disabilities. We previously reported that Acsl, the Drosophila ortholog of mammalian ACSL3 and ACSL4, inhibits neuromuscular synapse growth by suppressing bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. Here, we report that Acsl regulates the composition of fatty acids and membrane lipids, which in turn affects neuromuscular junction (NMJ) synapse development. Acsl mutant brains had a decreased abundance of C16:1 fatty acyls; restoration of Acsl expression abrogated NMJ overgrowth and the increase in BMP signaling. A lipidomic analysis revealed that Acsl suppressed the levels of three lipid raft components in the brain, including mannosyl glucosylceramide (MacCer), phosphoethanolamine ceramide and ergosterol. The MacCer level was elevated in Acsl mutant NMJs and, along with sterol, promoted NMJ overgrowth, but was not associated with the increase in BMP signaling in the mutants. These findings suggest that Acsl inhibits NMJ growth by stimulating C16:1 fatty acyl production and concomitantly suppressing raft-associated lipid levels.

  6. Maresin 1 Inhibits TRPV1 in Temporomandibular Joint-Related Trigeminal Nociceptive Neurons and TMJ Inflammation-Induced Synaptic Plasticity in the Trigeminal Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    In the trigeminal system, disruption of acute resolution processing may lead to uncontrolled inflammation and chronic pain associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Currently, there are no effective treatments for TMJ pain. Recently, it has been recognized that maresin 1, a newly identified macrophage-derived mediator of inflammation resolution, is a potent analgesic for somatic inflammatory pain without noticeable side effects in mice and a potent endogenous inhibitor of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) in the somatic system. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the analgesic actions of maresin 1 on TMJ pain are unclear in the trigeminal system. Here, by performing TMJ injection of a retrograde labeling tracer DiI (a fluorescent dye), I showed that maresin 1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 currents and neuronal activity via Gαi-coupled G-protein coupled receptors in DiI-labeled trigeminal nociceptive neurons. Further, maresin 1 blocked TRPV1 agonist-evoked increases in spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current frequency and abolished TMJ inflammation-induced synaptic plasticity in the trigeminal nucleus. These results demonstrate the potent actions of maresin 1 in regulating TRPV1 in the trigeminal system. Thus, maresin 1 may serve as a novel endogenous inhibitor for treating TMJ-inflammatory pain in the orofacial region. PMID:26617436

  7. Norepinephrine transporter inhibition with desipramine exacerbates L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia: role for synaptic dopamine regulation in denervated nigrostriatal terminals.

    PubMed

    Chotibut, Tanya; Fields, Victoria; Salvatore, Michael F

    2014-12-01

    Pharmacological dopamine (DA) replacement with Levodopa [L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA)] is the gold standard treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, long-term L-DOPA treatment is complicated by eventual debilitating abnormal involuntary movements termed L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), a clinically significant obstacle for the majority of patients who rely on L-DOPA to alleviate PD-related motor symptoms. The manifestation of LID may in part be driven by excessive extracellular DA derived from L-DOPA, but potential involvement of DA reuptake in LID severity or expression is unknown. We recently reported that in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned striatum, norepinephrine transporter (NET) expression increases and may play a significant role in DA transport. Furthermore, L-DOPA preferentially inhibits DA uptake in lesioned striatum. Therefore, we hypothesized that desipramine (DMI), a NET antagonist, could affect the severity of LID in an established LID model. Whereas DMI alone elicited no dyskinetic effects in lesioned rats, DMI + L-DOPA-treated rats gradually expressed more severe dyskinesia compared with L-DOPA alone over time. At the conclusion of the study, we observed reduced NET expression and norepinephrine-mediated inhibition of DA uptake in the DMI + L-DOPA group compared with L-DOPA-alone group in lesioned striatum. LID severity positively correlated with striatal extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase phosphorylation among the three treatment groups, with increased ppERK1/2 in DMI + L-DOPA group compared with the L-DOPA- and DMI-alone groups. Taken together, these results indicate that the combination of chronic L-DOPA and NET-mediated DA reuptake in lesioned nigrostriatal terminals may have a role in LID severity in experimental Parkinsonism.

  8. Astrocytes Potentiate Synaptic Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni, Suhita

    2005-03-01

    A recent experimental study shows that astrocytes, a subtype of glia, are able to influence the spontaneous activity in the brain via calcium dependent glutamate release. We model the coupling mechanism between an astrocyte and a neuron based on experimental data. This coupling is dynamic and bi-directional, such that the modulations in intracellular calcium concentrations in astrocytes affect neuronal excitability and vice versa via a glutamatergic pathway. We demonstrate through simple neural-glial circuits that increases in the intracellular calcium concentration in astrocytes nearby can enhance spontaneous activity in a neuron, a significant mechanism said to be involved in plasticity and learning. The pattern of this marked increase in spontaneous firing rate in our model quantitatively follows that observed in the experiment. Further, depending on the type of synaptic connections diverging from the neuron, it can either inhibit or excite the ensuing dynamics and potentiate synaptic transmission, thus reinstating the integral role played by astrocytes in normal neuronal dynamics.

  9. FAAH inhibition produces antidepressant-like efforts of mice to acute stress via synaptic long-term depression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Xia

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the major degradative enzyme of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA), produced antidepressant behavioral responses, but its underlying mechanism is not clear. Here we find that a systemic administration of the FAAH inhibitor PF3845 or an intra-CA1 application of AEA elicits an in vivo long-term depression (LTD) at excitatory glutamatergic CA3-CA1 synapses of the hippocampus. The PF3845- and/or AEA-elicited LTD are abolished by the LTD-blocking peptide Tat-GluR2. PF3845 significantly decreases passive behavioral coping of naïve mice to acute inescapable stress, which is also abolished by Tat-GluR2 peptide. However, PF3845 does not significantly affect sucrose assumption ratio of mice receiving chronic administration of corticosterone. These results suggest that FAAH inhibitors are able to produce antidepressant effects in naïve animals in response to acute stress through LTD at hippocampal glutamatergic CA3-CA1 synapses.

  10. Inhibition of a slow synaptic response by a metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal cells.

    PubMed

    Gerber, U; Lüthi, A; Gähwiler, B H

    1993-11-22

    The effects of a novel antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptors were investigated in CA3 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slice cultures of the rat. Earlier experiments showed that selective activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors with low concentrations of an agonist, 1S, 3R-1-amino-cyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (ACPD), induced an inward current associated with a decrease in membrane conductance and inhibition of the slow calcium-dependent potassium current. These responses were strongly and reversibly reduced by the antagonist, (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG, 0.5-1 mM). In the presence of antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors, stimulation of the afferent mossy fibres evoked postsynaptic responses in CA3 pyramidal cells which paralleled those observed with exogenously applied metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists, i.e. a slow inward current and a reduction of calcium-dependent potassium current. Both responses were greatly reduced by bath-applied MCPG (1 mM). These results show that MCPG acts as an effective antagonist at metabotropic glutamate receptors coupled to potassium conductances in the hippocampus. Furthermore, they confirm that glutamate release from presynaptic terminals can modulate postsynaptic properties by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  11. Inhibition of recombinase polymerase amplification by background DNA: a lateral flow-based method for enriching target DNA.

    PubMed

    Rohrman, Brittany; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2015-02-03

    Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) may be used to detect a variety of pathogens, often after minimal sample preparation. However, previous work has shown that whole blood inhibits RPA. In this paper, we show that the concentrations of background DNA found in whole blood prevent the amplification of target DNA by RPA. First, using an HIV-1 RPA assay with known concentrations of nonspecific background DNA, we show that RPA tolerates more background DNA when higher HIV-1 target concentrations are present. Then, using three additional assays, we demonstrate that the maximum amount of background DNA that may be tolerated in RPA reactions depends on the DNA sequences used in the assay. We also show that changing the RPA reaction conditions, such as incubation time and primer concentration, has little effect on the ability of RPA to function when high concentrations of background DNA are present. Finally, we develop and characterize a lateral flow-based method for enriching the target DNA concentration relative to the background DNA concentration. This sample processing method enables RPA of 10(4) copies of HIV-1 DNA in a background of 0-14 μg of background DNA. Without lateral flow sample enrichment, the maximum amount of background DNA tolerated is 2 μg when 10(6) copies of HIV-1 DNA are present. This method requires no heating or other external equipment, may be integrated with upstream DNA extraction and purification processes, is compatible with the components of lysed blood, and has the potential to detect HIV-1 DNA in infant whole blood with high proviral loads.

  12. Decrease of rotenone inhibition is a sensitive parameter of complex I damage in brain non-synaptic mitochondria of aged rats.

    PubMed

    Genova, M L; Bovina, C; Marchetti, M; Pallotti, F; Tietz, C; Biagini, G; Pugnaloni, A; Viticchi, C; Gorini, A; Villa, R F; Lenaz, G

    1997-06-30

    We investigated NADH oxidation in non-synaptic and synaptic mitochondria from brain cortex of 4- and 24-month-old rats. The NADH oxidase activity was significantly lower in non-synaptic mitochondria from aged rats; we also found a significant decrease of sensitivity of NADH oxidation to the specific Complex I inhibitor, rotenone. Since the rotenone-binding site encompasses Complex I subunits encoded by mtDNA, these results are in accordance with the mitochondrial theory of aging, whereby somatic mtDNA mutations are at the basis of cellular senescence. Accordingly, a 5 kb deletion was detected only in the cortex of the aged animals.

  13. EDITORIAL: Synaptic electronics Synaptic electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna; Gimzewski, James K.; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Conventional computers excel in logic and accurate scientific calculations but make hard work of open ended problems that human brains handle easily. Even von Neumann—the mathematician and polymath who first developed the programming architecture that forms the basis of today's computers—was already looking to the brain for future developments before his death in 1957 [1]. Neuromorphic computing uses approaches that better mimic the working of the human brain. Recent developments in nanotechnology are now providing structures with very accommodating properties for neuromorphic approaches. This special issue, with guest editors James K Gimzewski and Dominique Vuillaume, is devoted to research at the serendipitous interface between the two disciplines. 'Synaptic electronics', looks at artificial devices with connections that demonstrate behaviour similar to synapses in the nervous system allowing a new and more powerful approach to computing. Synapses and connecting neurons respond differently to incident signals depending on the history of signals previously experienced, ultimately leading to short term and long term memory behaviour. The basic characteristics of a synapse can be replicated with around ten simple transistors. However with the human brain having around 1011 neurons and 1015 synapses, artificial neurons and synapses from basic transistors are unlikely to accommodate the scalability required. The discovery of nanoscale elements that function as 'memristors' has provided a key tool for the implementation of synaptic connections [2]. Leon Chua first developed the concept of the 'The memristor—the missing circuit element' in 1971 [3]. In this special issue he presents a tutorial describing how memristor research has fed into our understanding of synaptic behaviour and how they can be applied in information processing [4]. He also describes, 'The new principle of local activity, which uncovers a minuscule life-enabling "Goldilocks zone", dubbed the

  14. Spike-Timing Precision and Neuronal Synchrony Are Enhanced by an Interaction between Synaptic Inhibition and Membrane Oscillations in the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Daftary, Shabrine; Madsen, Teresa E.; Rainnie, Donald G.

    2012-01-01

    The basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA) is a critical component of the neural circuit regulating fear learning. During fear learning and recall, the amygdala and other brain regions, including the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex, exhibit phase-locked oscillations in the high delta/low theta frequency band (∼2–6 Hz) that have been shown to contribute to the learning process. Network oscillations are commonly generated by inhibitory synaptic input that coordinates action potentials in groups of neurons. In the rat BLA, principal neurons spontaneously receive synchronized, inhibitory input in the form of compound, rhythmic, inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs), likely originating from burst-firing parvalbumin interneurons. Here we investigated the role of compound IPSPs in the rat and rhesus macaque BLA in regulating action potential synchrony and spike-timing precision. Furthermore, because principal neurons exhibit intrinsic oscillatory properties and resonance between 4 and 5 Hz, in the same frequency band observed during fear, we investigated whether compound IPSPs and intrinsic oscillations interact to promote rhythmic activity in the BLA at this frequency. Using whole-cell patch clamp in brain slices, we demonstrate that compound IPSPs, which occur spontaneously and are synchronized across principal neurons in both the rat and primate BLA, significantly improve spike-timing precision in BLA principal neurons for a window of ∼300 ms following each IPSP. We also show that compound IPSPs coordinate the firing of pairs of BLA principal neurons, and significantly improve spike synchrony for a window of ∼130 ms. Compound IPSPs enhance a 5 Hz calcium-dependent membrane potential oscillation (MPO) in these neurons, likely contributing to the improvement in spike-timing precision and synchronization of spiking. Activation of the cAMP-PKA signaling cascade enhanced the MPO, and inhibition of this cascade blocked the MPO. We discuss these results in

  15. Diminished neurosteroid sensitivity of synaptic inhibition and altered location of the alpha4 subunit of GABA(A) receptors in an animal model of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chengsan; Mtchedlishvili, Zakaria; Erisir, Alev; Kapur, Jaideep

    2007-11-14

    In animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), neurosteroid sensitivity of GABA(A) receptors on dentate granule cells (DGCs) is diminished; the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. The current study investigated a mechanism for loss of neurosteroid sensitivity of synaptic GABA(A) receptors in TLE. Synaptic currents recorded from DGCs of epileptic animals (epileptic DGCs) were less frequent, larger in amplitude, and less sensitive to allopregnanolone modulation than those recorded from DGCs of control animals (control DGCs). Synaptic currents recorded from epileptic DGCs were less sensitive to diazepam and had altered sensitivity to benzodiazepine inverse agonist RO 15-4513 (ethyl-8-azido-6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5alpha][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylate) and furosemide than those recorded from control DGCs. Properties of synaptic currents recorded from epileptic DGCs appeared similar to those of recombinant receptors containing the alpha4 subunit. Expression of the alpha4 subunit and its colocalization with the synaptic marker GAD65 was increased in epileptic DGCs. Location of the alpha4 subunit in relation to symmetric (inhibitory) synapses on soma and dendrites of control and epileptic DGCs was examined with postembedding immunogold electron microscopy. The alpha4 immunogold labeling was present more commonly within the synapse in epileptic DGCs compared with control DGCs, in which the subunit was extrasynaptic. These studies demonstrate that, in epileptic DGCs, the neurosteroid modulation of synaptic currents is diminished and alpha4 subunit-containing receptors are present at synapses and participate in synaptic transmission. These changes may facilitate seizures in epileptic animals.

  16. Microbial background flora in small-scale cheese production facilities does not inhibit growth and surface attachment of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Schirmer, B C T; Heir, E; Møretrø, T; Skaar, I; Langsrud, S

    2013-10-01

    The background microbiota of 5 Norwegian small-scale cheese production sites was examined and the effect of the isolated strains on the growth and survival of Listeria monocytogenes was investigated. Samples were taken from the air, food contact surfaces (storage surfaces, cheese molds, and brine) and noncontact surfaces (floor, drains, and doors) and all isolates were identified by sequencing and morphology (mold). A total of 1,314 isolates were identified and found to belong to 55 bacterial genera, 1 species of yeast, and 6 species of mold. Lactococcus spp. (all of which were Lactococcus lactis), Staphylococcus spp., Microbacterium spp., and Psychrobacter sp. were isolated from all 5 sites and Rhodococcus spp. and Chryseobacterium spp. from 4 sites. Thirty-two genera were only found in 1 out of 5 facilities each. Great variations were observed in the microbial background flora both between the 5 producers, and also within the various production sites. The greatest diversity of bacteria was found in drains and on rubber seals of doors. The flora on cheese storage shelves and in salt brines was less varied. A total of 62 bacterial isolates and 1 yeast isolate were tested for antilisterial activity in an overlay assay and a spot-on-lawn assay, but none showed significant inhibitory effects. Listeria monocytogenes was also co-cultured on ceramic tiles with bacteria dominating in the cheese production plants: Lactococcus lactis, Pseudomonas putida, Staphylococcus equorum, Rhodococcus spp., or Psychrobacter spp. None of the tested isolates altered the survival of L. monocytogenes on ceramic tiles. The conclusion of the study was that no common background flora exists in cheese production environments. None of the tested isolates inhibited the growth of L. monocytogenes. Hence, this study does not support the hypothesis that the natural background flora in cheese production environments inhibits the growth or survival of L. monocytogenes. Copyright © 2013 American

  17. Emergence of Functional Specificity in Balanced Networks with Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sadeh, Sadra; Clopath, Claudia; Rotter, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In rodent visual cortex, synaptic connections between orientation-selective neurons are unspecific at the time of eye opening, and become to some degree functionally specific only later during development. An explanation for this two-stage process was proposed in terms of Hebbian plasticity based on visual experience that would eventually enhance connections between neurons with similar response features. For this to work, however, two conditions must be satisfied: First, orientation selective neuronal responses must exist before specific recurrent synaptic connections can be established. Second, Hebbian learning must be compatible with the recurrent network dynamics contributing to orientation selectivity, and the resulting specific connectivity must remain stable for unspecific background activity. Previous studies have mainly focused on very simple models, where the receptive fields of neurons were essentially determined by feedforward mechanisms, and where the recurrent network was small, lacking the complex recurrent dynamics of large-scale networks of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Here we studied the emergence of functionally specific connectivity in large-scale recurrent networks with synaptic plasticity. Our results show that balanced random networks, which already exhibit highly selective responses at eye opening, can develop feature-specific connectivity if appropriate rules of synaptic plasticity are invoked within and between excitatory and inhibitory populations. If these conditions are met, the initial orientation selectivity guides the process of Hebbian learning and, as a result, functionally specific and a surplus of bidirectional connections emerge. Our results thus demonstrate the cooperation of synaptic plasticity and recurrent dynamics in large-scale functional networks with realistic receptive fields, highlight the role of inhibition as a critical element in this process, and paves the road for further computational studies of sensory

  18. TRESK Background K+ Channel Is Inhibited by PAR-1/MARK Microtubule Affinity-Regulating Kinases in Xenopus Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Gabriella; Nemcsics, Balázs; Enyedi, Péter; Czirják, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    TRESK (TWIK-related spinal cord K+ channel, KCNK18) is a major background K+ channel of sensory neurons. Dominant-negative mutation of TRESK is linked to familial migraine. This important two-pore domain K+ channel is uniquely activated by calcineurin. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase directly binds to the channel and activates TRESK current several-fold in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells. We have recently shown that the kinase, which is responsible for the basal inhibition of the K+ current, is sensitive to the adaptor protein 14-3-3. Therefore we have examined the effect of the 14-3-3-inhibited PAR-1/MARK, microtubule-associated-protein/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase on TRESK in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. MARK1, MARK2 and MARK3 accelerated the return of TRESK current to the resting state after the calcium-dependent activation. Several other serine-threonine kinase types, generally involved in the modulation of other ion channels, failed to influence TRESK current recovery. MARK2 phosphorylated the primary determinant of regulation, the cluster of three adjacent serine residues (S274, 276 and 279) in the intracellular loop of mouse TRESK. In contrast, serine 264, the 14-3-3-binding site of TRESK, was not phosphorylated by the kinase. Thus MARK2 selectively inhibits TRESK activity via the S274/276/279 cluster, but does not affect the direct recruitment of 14-3-3 to the channel. TRESK is the first example of an ion channel phosphorylated by the dynamically membrane-localized MARK kinases, also known as general determinants of cellular polarity. These results raise the possibility that microtubule dynamics is coupled to the regulation of excitability in the neurons, which express TRESK background potassium channel. PMID:22145024

  19. Imbalanced pattern completion vs. separation in cognitive disease: network simulations of synaptic pathologies predict a personalized therapeutics strategy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diverse Mouse genetic models of neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative causes of impaired cognition exhibit at least four convergent points of synaptic malfunction: 1) Strength of long-term potentiation (LTP), 2) Strength of long-term depression (LTD), 3) Relative inhibition levels (Inhibition), and 4) Excitatory connectivity levels (Connectivity). Results To test the hypothesis that pathological increases or decreases in these synaptic properties could underlie imbalances at the level of basic neural network function, we explored each type of malfunction in a simulation of autoassociative memory. These network simulations revealed that one impact of impairments or excesses in each of these synaptic properties is to shift the trade-off between pattern separation and pattern completion performance during memory storage and recall. Each type of synaptic pathology either pushed the network balance towards intolerable error in pattern separation or intolerable error in pattern completion. Imbalances caused by pathological impairments or excesses in LTP, LTD, inhibition, or connectivity, could all be exacerbated, or rescued, by the simultaneous modulation of any of the other three synaptic properties. Conclusions Because appropriate modulation of any of the synaptic properties could help re-balance network function, regardless of the origins of the imbalance, we propose a new strategy of personalized cognitive therapeutics guided by assay of pattern completion vs. pattern separation function. Simulated examples and testable predictions of this theorized approach to cognitive therapeutics are presented. PMID:20704756

  20. Lovastatin improves impaired synaptic plasticity and phasic alertness in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common genetic disorders causing learning disabilities by mutations in the neurofibromin gene, an important inhibitor of the RAS pathway. In a mouse model of NF1, a loss of function mutation of the neurofibromin gene resulted in increased gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibition which led to decreased synaptic plasticity and deficits in attentional performance. Most importantly, these defictis were normalized by lovastatin. This placebo-controlled, double blind, randomized study aimed to investigate synaptic plasticity and cognition in humans with NF1 and tried to answer the question whether potential deficits may be rescued by lovastatin. Methods In NF1 patients (n = 11; 19–44 years) and healthy controls (HC; n = 11; 19–31 years) paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to study intracortical inhibition (paired pulse) and synaptic plasticity (paired associative stimulation). On behavioural level the Test of Attentional Performance (TAP) was used. To study the effect of 200 mg lovastatin for 4 days on all these parameters, a placebo-controlled, double blind, randomized trial was performed. Results In patients with NF1, lovastatin revealed significant decrease of intracortical inhibition, significant increase of synaptic plasticity as well as significant increase of phasic alertness. Compared to HC, patients with NF1 exposed increased intracortical inhibition, impaired synaptic plasticity and deficits in phasic alertness. Conclusions This study demonstrates, for the first time, a link between a pathological RAS pathway activity, intracortical inhibition and impaired synaptic plasticity and its rescue by lovastatin in humans. Our findings revealed mechanisms of attention disorders in humans with NF1 and support the idea of a potential clinical benefit of lovastatin as a therapeutic option. PMID:24088225

  1. Finite Post Synaptic Potentials Cause a Fast Neuronal Response

    PubMed Central

    Helias, Moritz; Deger, Moritz; Rotter, Stefan; Diesmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    A generic property of the communication between neurons is the exchange of pulses at discrete time points, the action potentials. However, the prevalent theory of spiking neuronal networks of integrate-and-fire model neurons relies on two assumptions: the superposition of many afferent synaptic impulses is approximated by Gaussian white noise, equivalent to a vanishing magnitude of the synaptic impulses, and the transfer of time varying signals by neurons is assessable by linearization. Going beyond both approximations, we find that in the presence of synaptic impulses the response to transient inputs differs qualitatively from previous predictions. It is instantaneous rather than exhibiting low-pass characteristics, depends non-linearly on the amplitude of the impulse, is asymmetric for excitation and inhibition and is promoted by a characteristic level of synaptic background noise. These findings resolve contradictions between the earlier theory and experimental observations. Here we review the recent theoretical progress that enabled these insights. We explain why the membrane potential near threshold is sensitive to properties of the afferent noise and show how this shapes the neural response. A further extension of the theory to time evolution in discrete steps quantifies simulation artifacts and yields improved methods to cross check results. PMID:21427776

  2. Aqua-soluble DDQ reduces the levels of Drp1 and Aβ and inhibits abnormal interactions between Aβ and Drp1 and protects Alzheimer's disease neurons from Aβ- and Drp1-induced mitochondrial and synaptic toxicities.

    PubMed

    Kuruva, Chandra Sekhar; Manczak, Maria; Yin, Xiangling; Ogunmokun, Gilbert; Reddy, Arubala P; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of our study was to develop a therapeutic target that can reduce Aβ and Drp1 levels, and also can inhibit abnormal interactions between Aβ and Drp1 in AD neurons. To achieve this objective, we designed various compounds and their 3-dimensional molecular structures were introduced into Aβ and Drp1 complex and identified their inhibitory properties against Aβ-Drp1 interaction. Among all, DDQ was selected for further investigation because of 1) its best docking score and 2) its binding capability at interacting sites of Drp1 and Aβ complex. We synthesized DDQ using retro-synthesis and analyzed its structure spectrally. Using biochemical, molecular biology, immunostaining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods, we studied DDQ's beneficial effects in AD neurons. We measured the levels of Aβ and Drp1, Aβ and Drp1 interaction, mRNA and protein levels of mitochondrial dynamics, biogenesis and synaptic genes, mitochondrial function and cell viability and mitochondrial number in DDQ-treated and untreated AD neurons. Our qRT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis revealed that reduced levels of mitochondrial fission and increased fusion, biogenesis and synaptic genes in DDQ-treated AD neurons. Our immunoblotting and immunostaining analyses revealed that Aβ and Drp1 levels were reduced in DDQ-treated AD neurons. Interaction between Aβ and Drp1 is reduced in DDQ-treated AD neurons. Aβ42 levels were significantly reduced in DDQ-treated mutant APPSwe/Ind cells. Mitochondrial number is significantly reduced and mitochondrial length is significantly increased. Mitochondrial function and cell viability were maintained in AD neurons treated with DDQ. These observations indicate that DDQ reduces excessive mitochondrial fragmentation, enhances fusion, biogenesis and synaptic activity and reduces Aβ42 levels and protects AD neurons against Aβ-induced mitochondrial and synaptic toxicities. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights

  3. Anesthetic activation of central respiratory chemoreceptor neurons involves inhibition of a THIK-1-like background K+ current

    PubMed Central

    Lazarenko, Roman M.; Fortuna, Michal G.; Shi, Yingtang; Mulkey, Daniel K.; Takakura, Ana C.; Moreira, Thiago S.; Guyenet, Patrice G.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    At surgical depths of anesthesia, inhalational anesthetics cause a loss of motor response to painful stimuli (i.e., immobilization) that is characterized by profound inhibition of spinal motor circuits. Yet, although clearly depressed, the respiratory motor system continues to provide adequate ventilation under these same conditions. Here, we show that isoflurane causes robust activation of CO2/pH-sensitive, Phox2b-expressing neurons located in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) of the rodent brainstem, in vitro and in vivo. In brainstem slices from Phox2b-eGFP mice, the firing of pH-sensitive RTN neurons was strongly increased by isoflurane, independent of prevailing pH conditions. At least two ionic mechanisms contributed to anesthetic activation of RTN neurons: activation of a Na+-dependent cationic current and inhibition of a background K+ current. Single cell RT-PCR analysis of dissociated GFP-labeled RTN neurons revealed expression of THIK-1 (K2P13.1), a channel that shares key properties with the native RTN current (i.e., suppression by inhalational anesthetics, weak rectification, inhibition by extracellular Na+, and pH-insensitivity). Isoflurane also increased firing rate of RTN chemosensitive neurons in urethane-anesthetized rats, again independent of CO2 levels. In these animals, isoflurane transiently enhanced activity of the respiratory system, an effect that was most prominent at low levels of respiratory drive and mediated largely by an increase in respiratory frequency. These data indicate that inhalational anesthetics cause activation of RTN neurons, which serve an important integrative role in respiratory control; the increased drive provided by enhanced RTN neuronal activity may contribute, in part, to maintaining respiratory motor activity under immobilizing anesthetic conditions. PMID:20610767

  4. GPCR Mediated Regulation of Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Betke, Katherine M.; Wells, Christopher A.; Hamm, Heidi E.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic transmission is a finely regulated mechanism of neuronal communication. The release of neurotransmitter at the synapse is not only the reflection of membrane depolarization events, but rather, is the summation of interactions between ion channels, G protein coupled receptors, second messengers, and the exocytotic machinery itself which exposes the components within a synaptic vesicle to the synaptic cleft. The focus of this review is to explore the role of G protein signaling as it relates to neurotransmission, as well as to discuss the recently determined inhibitory mechanism of Gβγ dimers acting directly on the exocytotic machinery proteins to inhibit neurotransmitter release. PMID:22307060

  5. Inhibition of PI3K-Akt signaling blocks exercise-mediated enhancement of adult neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Bruel-Jungerman, Elodie; Veyrac, Alexandra; Dufour, Franck; Horwood, Jennifer; Laroche, Serge; Davis, Sabrina

    2009-11-19

    Physical exercise has been shown to increase adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and enhances synaptic plasticity. The antiapoptotic kinase, Akt has also been shown to be phosphorylated following voluntary exercise; however, it remains unknown whether the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway is involved in exercise-induced neurogenesis and the associated facilitation of synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus. To gain insight into the potential role of this signaling pathway in exercise-induced neurogenesis and LTP in the dentate gyrus rats were infused with the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002 or vehicle control solution (icv) via osmotic minipumps and exercised in a running wheel for 10 days. Newborn cells in the dentate gyrus were date-labelled with BrdU on the last 3 days of exercise. Then, they were either returned to the home cage for 2 weeks to assess exercise-induced LTP and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, or were killed on the last day of exercise to assess proliferation and activation of the PI3K-Akt cascade using western blotting. Exercise increases cell proliferation and promotes survival of adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus. Immediately after exercise, we found that Akt and three downstream targets, BAD, GSK3beta and FOXO1 were activated. LY294002 blocked exercise-induced phosphorylation of Akt and downstream target proteins. This had no effect on exercise-induced cell proliferation, but it abolished most of the beneficial effect of exercise on the survival of newly generated dentate gyrus neurons and prevented exercise-induced increase in dentate gyrus LTP. These results suggest that activation of the PI3 kinase-Akt signaling pathway plays a significant role via an antiapoptotic function in promoting survival of newly formed granule cells generated during exercise and the associated increase in synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus.

  6. Synaptic Vesicle Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Saheki, Yasunori; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Neurons can sustain high rates of synaptic transmission without exhausting their supply of synaptic vesicles. This property relies on a highly efficient local endocytic recycling of synaptic vesicle membranes, which can be reused for hundreds, possibly thousands, of exo-endocytic cycles. Morphological, physiological, molecular, and genetic studies over the last four decades have provided insight into the membrane traffic reactions that govern this recycling and its regulation. These studies have shown that synaptic vesicle endocytosis capitalizes on fundamental and general endocytic mechanisms but also involves neuron-specific adaptations of such mechanisms. Thus, investigations of these processes have advanced not only the field of synaptic transmission but also, more generally, the field of endocytosis. This article summarizes current information on synaptic vesicle endocytosis with an emphasis on the underlying molecular mechanisms and with a special focus on clathrin-mediated endocytosis, the predominant pathway of synaptic vesicle protein internalization. PMID:22763746

  7. Inhibition by efferent nerve fibres: action on hair cells and afferent synaptic transmission in the lateral line canal organ of the burbot Lota lota.

    PubMed Central

    Flock, A; Russell, I

    1976-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings were made from morphologically identified hair cells in the lateral line canal organs of the burbot Lota lota. 2. I.p.s.p.s were recorded from hair cells when the efferent fibres were excited by electrical stimulation of the lateral line nerve. The i.p.s.p.s were abolished when the fish was injected with immobilizing concentration of Flaxedil which is known to block the efferent synapses. 3. The i.p.s.p.s are accompanied by a decrease in the resistance of the hair cell membrane and an increase in the intracellular receptor potential. 4. Spontaneous and mechanically evoked e.p.s.p.s which were recorded intracellularly from the post-synaptic afferent nerve terminals were reduced in amplitude for the duration of the i.p.s.p. Images A, B C PMID:948076

  8. States and synaptic algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulis, David J.; Jenčová, Anna; Pulmannová, Sylvia

    2017-02-01

    Different versions of the notion of a state have been formulated for various so-called quantum structures. In this paper, we investigate the interplay among states on synaptic algebras and on its sub-structures. A synaptic algebra is a generalization of the partially ordered Jordan algebra of all bounded self-adjoint operators on a Hilbert space. The paper culminates with a characterization of extremal states on a commutative generalized Hermitian algebra, a special kind of synaptic algebra.

  9. Synaptic Mitochondria Sustain More Damage than Non-Synaptic Mitochondria after Traumatic Brain Injury and Are Protected by Cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Kulbe, Jacqueline R; Hill, Rachel L; Singh, Indrapal N; Wang, Juan A; Hall, Edward D

    2016-10-13

    Currently, there are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapies for the treatment of those with traumatic brain injury (TBI). As central mediators of the secondary injury cascade, mitochondria are promising therapeutic targets for prevention of cellular death and dysfunction after TBI. One of the most promising and extensively studied mitochondrial targeted TBI therapies is inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) by the FDA-approved drug, cyclosporine A (CsA). A number of studies have evaluated the effects of CsA on total brain mitochondria after TBI; however, no study has investigated the effects of CsA on isolated synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria. Synaptic mitochondria are considered essential for proper neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity, and their dysfunction has been implicated in neurodegeneration. Synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria have heterogeneous characteristics, but their heterogeneity can be masked in total mitochondrial (synaptic and non-synaptic) preparations. Therefore, it is essential that mitochondria targeted pharmacotherapies, such as CsA, be evaluated in both populations. This is the first study to examine the effects of CsA on isolated synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria after experimental TBI. We conclude that synaptic mitochondria sustain more damage than non-synaptic mitochondria 24 h after severe controlled cortical impact injury (CCI), and that intraperitoneal administration of CsA (20 mg/kg) 15 min after injury improves synaptic and non-synaptic respiration, with a significant improvement being seen in the more severely impaired synaptic population. As such, CsA remains a promising neuroprotective candidate for the treatment of those with TBI.

  10. Bilinearity in Spatiotemporal Integration of Synaptic Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songting; Liu, Nan; Zhang, Xiao-hui; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David

    2014-01-01

    Neurons process information via integration of synaptic inputs from dendrites. Many experimental results demonstrate dendritic integration could be highly nonlinear, yet few theoretical analyses have been performed to obtain a precise quantitative characterization analytically. Based on asymptotic analysis of a two-compartment passive cable model, given a pair of time-dependent synaptic conductance inputs, we derive a bilinear spatiotemporal dendritic integration rule. The summed somatic potential can be well approximated by the linear summation of the two postsynaptic potentials elicited separately, plus a third additional bilinear term proportional to their product with a proportionality coefficient . The rule is valid for a pair of synaptic inputs of all types, including excitation-inhibition, excitation-excitation, and inhibition-inhibition. In addition, the rule is valid during the whole dendritic integration process for a pair of synaptic inputs with arbitrary input time differences and input locations. The coefficient is demonstrated to be nearly independent of the input strengths but is dependent on input times and input locations. This rule is then verified through simulation of a realistic pyramidal neuron model and in electrophysiological experiments of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. The rule is further generalized to describe the spatiotemporal dendritic integration of multiple excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. The integration of multiple inputs can be decomposed into the sum of all possible pairwise integration, where each paired integration obeys the bilinear rule. This decomposition leads to a graph representation of dendritic integration, which can be viewed as functionally sparse. PMID:25521832

  11. Inhibition of Calpains Protects Mn-Induced Neurotransmitter release disorders in Synaptosomes from Mice: Involvement of SNARE Complex and Synaptic Vesicle Fusion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Can; Xu, Bin; Ma, Zhuo; Liu, Chang; Deng, Yu; Liu, Wei; Xu, Zhao-Fa

    2017-06-16

    Overexposure to manganese (Mn) could disrupt neurotransmitter release via influencing the formation of SNARE complex, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. A previous study demonstrated that SNAP-25 is one of substrate of calpains. The current study investigated whether calpains were involved in Mn-induced disorder of SNARE complex. After mice were treated with Mn for 24 days, Mn deposition increased significantly in basal nuclei in Mn-treated and calpeptin pre-treated groups. Behaviorally, less time spent in the center of the area and decreased average velocity significantly in an open field test after 24 days of Mn exposure. With the increase in MnCl2 dosage, intracellular Ca(2+) increased significantly, but pretreatment with calpeptin caused a dose-dependent decrease in calpains activity. There were fragments of N-terminal of SNAP-25 protein appearance in Mn-treated groups, but it is decreased with pretreatment of calpeptin. FM1-43-labeled synaptic vesicles also provided evidence that the treatment with Mn resulted in increasing first and then decreasing, which was consistent with Glu release and the 80 kDa protein levels of SNARE complexes. In summary, Mn induced the disorder of neurotransmitter release through influencing the formation of SNARE complex via cleaving SNAP-25 by overactivation of calpains in vivo.

  12. Inhibition of Ca2+-activated large-conductance K+ channel activity alters synaptic AMPA receptor phenotype in mouse cerebellar stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Savtchouk, Iaroslav; Acharjee, Shoana; Liu, Siqiong June

    2011-07-01

    Many fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons, including cerebellar stellate cells, fire brief action potentials and express α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPAR) that are permeable to Ca(2+) and do not contain the GluR2 subunit. In a recent study, we found that increasing action potential duration promotes GluR2 gene transcription in stellate cells. We have now tested the prediction that activation of potassium channels that control the duration of action potentials can suppress the expression of GluR2-containing AMPARs at stellate cell synapses. We find that large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (BK) channels mediate a large proportion of the depolarization-evoked noninactivating potassium current in stellate cells. Pharmacological blockade of BK channels prolonged the action potential duration in postsynaptic stellate cells and altered synaptic AMPAR subtype from GluR2-lacking to GluR2-containing Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPARs. An L-type channel blocker abolished an increase in Ca(2+) entry that was associated with spike broadening and also prevented the BK channel blocker-induced switch in AMPAR phenotype. Thus blocking BK potassium channels prolongs the action potential duration and increases the expression of GluR2-containing receptors at the synapse by enhancing Ca(2+) entry in cerebellar stellate cells.

  13. Inhibition of Ca2+-activated large-conductance K+ channel activity alters synaptic AMPA receptor phenotype in mouse cerebellar stellate cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Savtchouk, Iaroslav; Acharjee, Shoana

    2011-01-01

    Many fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons, including cerebellar stellate cells, fire brief action potentials and express α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (AMPAR) that are permeable to Ca2+ and do not contain the GluR2 subunit. In a recent study, we found that increasing action potential duration promotes GluR2 gene transcription in stellate cells. We have now tested the prediction that activation of potassium channels that control the duration of action potentials can suppress the expression of GluR2-containing AMPARs at stellate cell synapses. We find that large-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium (BK) channels mediate a large proportion of the depolarization-evoked noninactivating potassium current in stellate cells. Pharmacological blockade of BK channels prolonged the action potential duration in postsynaptic stellate cells and altered synaptic AMPAR subtype from GluR2-lacking to GluR2-containing Ca2+-impermeable AMPARs. An L-type channel blocker abolished an increase in Ca2+ entry that was associated with spike broadening and also prevented the BK channel blocker-induced switch in AMPAR phenotype. Thus blocking BK potassium channels prolongs the action potential duration and increases the expression of GluR2-containing receptors at the synapse by enhancing Ca2+ entry in cerebellar stellate cells. PMID:21562198

  14. Nitric oxide signaling modulates synaptic inhibition in the superior paraolivary nucleus (SPN) via cGMP-dependent suppression of KCC2

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Lina; Radtke-Schuller, Susanne; Asraf, Hila; Grothe, Benedikt; Hershfinkel, Michal; Forsythe, Ian D.; Kopp-Scheinpflug, Cornelia

    2014-01-01

    Glycinergic inhibition plays a central role in the auditory brainstem circuitries involved in sound localization and in the encoding of temporal action potential firing patterns. Modulation of this inhibition has the potential to fine-tune information processing in these networks. Here we show that nitric oxide (NO) signaling in the auditory brainstem (where activity-dependent generation of NO is documented) modulates the strength of inhibition by changing the chloride equilibrium potential. Recent evidence demonstrates that large inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in neurons of the superior paraolivary nucleus (SPN) are enhanced by a very low intracellular chloride concentration, generated by the neuronal potassium chloride co-transporter (KCC2) expressed in the postsynaptic neurons. Our data show that modulation by NO caused a 15 mV depolarizing shift of the IPSC reversal potential, reducing the strength of inhibition in SPN neurons, without changing the threshold for action potential firing. Regulating inhibitory strength, through cGMP-dependent changes in the efficacy of KCC2 in the target neuron provides a postsynaptic mechanism for rapidly controlling the inhibitory drive, without altering the timing or pattern of the afferent spike train. Therefore, this NO-mediated suppression of KCC2 can modulate inhibition in one target nucleus (SPN), without influencing inhibitory strength of other target nuclei (MSO, LSO) even though they are each receiving collaterals from the same afferent nucleus (a projection from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body, MNTB). PMID:24987336

  15. Deletion of the synaptic protein interaction site of the N-type (CaV2.2) calcium channel inhibits secretion in mouse pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Harkins, Amy B; Cahill, Anne L; Powers, James F; Tischler, Arthur S; Fox, Aaron P

    2004-10-19

    Presynaptic N-type Ca2+ channels (CaV2.2, alpha1B) are thought to bind to SNARE (SNAP-25 receptor) complex proteins through a synaptic protein interaction (synprint) site on the intracellular loop between domains II and III of the alpha1B subunit. Whether binding of syntaxin to the N-type Ca2+ channels is required for coupling Ca2+ ion influx to rapid exocytosis has been the subject of considerable investigation. In this study, we deleted the synprint site from a recombinant alpha1B Ca2+ channel subunit and transiently transfected either the wild-type alpha1B or the synprint deletion mutant into mouse pheochromocytoma (MPC) cell line 9/3L, a cell line that has the machinery required for rapid stimulated exocytosis but lacks endogenous voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Secretion was elicited by activation of exogenously transfected Ca2+ channel subunits. The current-voltage relationship was similar for the wild-type and mutant alpha1B-containing Ca2+ channels. Although total Ca2+ entry was slightly larger for the synprint deletion channel, compared with the wild-type channel, when Ca2+ entry was normalized to cell size and limited to cells with similar Ca2+ entry (approximately 150 x 10(6) Ca2+ ions/pF cell size), total secretion and the rate of secretion, determined by capacitance measurements, were significantly reduced in cells expressing the synprint deletion mutant channels, compared with wild-type channels. Furthermore, the amount of endocytosis was significantly reduced in cells with the alpha1B synprint deletion mutant, compared with the wild-type subunit. These results suggest that the synprint site is necessary for efficient coupling of Ca2+ influx through alpha1B-containing Ca2+ channels to exocytosis.

  16. Impact of DPP-4 inhibition on acute and chronic endothelial function in humans with type 2 diabetes on background metformin therapy.

    PubMed

    Widlansky, Michael E; Puppala, Venkata K; Suboc, Tisha M; Malik, Mobin; Branum, Amberly; Signorelli, Kara; Wang, Jingli; Ying, Rong; Tanner, Michael J; Tyagi, Sudhi

    2017-01-01

    Cell culture and animal work indicate that dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibition may exert cardiovascular benefits through favorable effects on the vascular endothelium. Prior human studies evaluating DPP-4 inhibition have shown conflicting results that may in part be related to heterogeneity of background anti-diabetes therapies. No study has evaluated the acute response of the vasculature to DPP-4 inhibition in humans. We recruited 38 patients with type 2 diabetes on stable background metformin therapy for a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial of DPP-4 inhibition with sitagliptin (100 mg/day). Each treatment period was 8 weeks long separated by 4 weeks of washout. Endothelial function and plasma markers of endothelial activation (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1)) were measured prior to and 2 hours following acute dosing of sitagliptin or placebo, as well as following 8 weeks of intervention with each pill. Thirty subjects completed the study and were included in analyses. Neither acute nor chronic sitagliptin therapy resulted in significant changes in vascular endothelial function. While post-acute sitagliptin ICAM-1 levels were lower than that post-chronic sitagliptin, the ICAM-1 concentration was not significantly different than pre-acute sitagliptin levels or levels measured in relationship to placebo. There were no significant changes in plasma VCAM-1 levels at any time point. Acute and chronic sitagliptin therapies have neutral effects on the vascular endothelium in the setting of metformin background therapy. In conclusion, our findings suggest DPP-4 inhibition has a neutral effect on cardiovascular risk in patients without a history of heart failure or renal insufficiency.

  17. Astrocytes optimize synaptic fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter; Levine, Herbert

    2007-03-01

    Most neuronal synapses in the central nervous system are enwrapped by an astrocytic process. This relation allows the astrocyte to listen to and feed back to the synapse and to regulate synaptic transmission. We combine a tested mathematical model for the Ca^2+ response of the synaptic astrocyte and presynaptic feedback with a detailed model for vesicle release of neurotransmitter at active zones. The predicted Ca^2+ dependence of the presynaptic synaptic vesicle release compares favorably for several types of synapses, including the Calyx of Held. We hypothesize that the feedback regulation of the astrocyte onto the presynaptic terminal optimizes the fidelity of the synapse in terms of information transmission.

  18. Calcineurin mediates homeostatic synaptic plasticity by regulating retinoic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Kristin L.; Zhang, Zhenjie; Ganesan, Subhashree; Hintze, Maik; Shin, Maggie M.; Tang, Yitai; Cho, Ahryon; Graef, Isabella A.; Chen, Lu

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity is a form of non-Hebbian plasticity that maintains stability of the network and fidelity for information processing in response to prolonged perturbation of network and synaptic activity. Prolonged blockade of synaptic activity decreases resting Ca2+ levels in neurons, thereby inducing retinoic acid (RA) synthesis and RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity; however, the signal transduction pathway that links reduced Ca2+-levels to RA synthesis remains unknown. Here we identify the Ca2+-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) as a key regulator for RA synthesis and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Prolonged inhibition of CaN activity promotes RA synthesis in neurons, and leads to increased excitatory and decreased inhibitory synaptic transmission. These effects of CaN inhibitors on synaptic transmission are blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of RA synthesis or acute genetic deletion of the RA receptor RARα. Thus, CaN, acting upstream of RA, plays a critical role in gating RA signaling pathway in response to synaptic activity. Moreover, activity blockade-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity is absent in CaN knockout neurons, demonstrating the essential role of CaN in RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Interestingly, in GluA1 S831A and S845A knockin mice, CaN inhibitor- and RA-induced regulation of synaptic transmission is intact, suggesting that phosphorylation of GluA1 C-terminal serine residues S831 and S845 is not required for CaN inhibitor- or RA-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Thus, our study uncovers an unforeseen role of CaN in postsynaptic signaling, and defines CaN as the Ca2+-sensing signaling molecule that mediates RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity. PMID:26443861

  19. Neuropeptides as synaptic transmitters.

    PubMed

    Salio, Chiara; Lossi, Laura; Ferrini, Francesco; Merighi, Adalberto

    2006-11-01

    Neuropeptides are small protein molecules (composed of 3-100 amino-acid residues) that have been localized to discrete cell populations of central and peripheral neurons. In most instances, they coexist with low-molecular-weight neurotransmitters within the same neurons. At the subcellular level, neuropeptides are selectively stored, singularly or more frequently in combinations, within large granular vesicles. Release occurs through mechanisms different from classical calcium-dependent exocytosis at the synaptic cleft, and thus they account for slow synaptic and/or non-synaptic communication in neurons. Neuropeptide co-storage and coexistence can be observed throughout the central nervous system and are responsible for a series of functional interactions that occur at both pre- and post-synaptic levels. Thus, the subcellular site(s) of storage and sorting mechanisms into different neuronal compartments are crucial to the mode of release and the function of neuropeptides as neuronal messengers.

  20. Glutamine transport in rat brain synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Roberg, B; Torgner, I A; Kvamme, E

    1999-03-01

    Glutamine transport into rat brain mitochondria (synaptic and non-synaptic) was monitored by the uptake of [3H]glutamine as well as by mitochondrial swelling. The uptake is inversely correlated to medium osmolarity, temperature-dependent, saturable and inhibited by mersalyl, and glutamine is upconcentrated in the mitochondria. These results indicate that glutamine is transported into an osmotically active space by a protein catalyzed mechanism. The uptake is slightly higher in synaptic mitochondria than in non-synaptic ones. It is inhibited both by rotenone and the protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, the latter at pH 6.5, showing that the transport is activated by an electrochemical proton gradient. The K+/H+ ionophore nigericin also inhibits the uptake at pH 6.5 in the presence of external K+, which indicates that glutamine, at least in part, is taken up by a proton symport transporter. In addition, glutamine uptake as measured by the swelling technique revealed an additional glutamine transport activity with at least 10 times higher Km value. This uptake is inhibited by valinomycin in the presence of K+ and is thus also activated by the membrane potential. Otherwise, the two methods show similar results. These data indicate that glutamine transport in brain mitochondria cannot be described by merely a simple electroneutral uniport mechanism, but are consistent with the uptake of both the anionic and the zwitterionic glutamine.

  1. Context-Dependent Modulation of Excitatory Synaptic Strength by Synaptically Released Zinc

    PubMed Central

    Kalappa, Bopanna I.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Synaptically released zinc inhibits baseline excitatory neurotransmission; however, the role of this neuromodulator on short-term plasticity during different levels of synaptic activity remains largely unknown. This lack of knowledge prevents our understanding of information transfer across zinc-releasing synapses, including 50% of excitatory synapses in cortical areas. We used in vitro electrophysiology in mouse brain slices and discovered that the effects of zinc on excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) amplitudes are context-dependent. At lower frequencies of activity, synaptically released zinc reduces EPSC amplitudes. In contrast, at higher stimulation frequencies and vesicular release probability (Pr), zinc inhibits EPSC amplitudes during the first few stimuli but leads to enhanced steady-state EPSC amplitudes during subsequent stimuli. This paradoxical enhancement is due to zinc-dependent potentiation of synaptic facilitation via the recruitment of endocannabinoid signaling. Together, these findings demonstrate that synaptically released zinc is a modulator of excitatory short-term plasticity, which shapes information transfer among excitatory synapses. PMID:28275718

  2. Cell-specific gain modulation by synaptically released zinc in cortical circuits of audition.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Charles T; Kumar, Manoj; Xiong, Shanshan; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2017-09-09

    In many excitatory synapses, mobile zinc is found within glutamatergic vesicles and is coreleased with glutamate. Ex vivo studies established that synaptically released (synaptic) zinc inhibits excitatory neurotransmission at lower frequencies of synaptic activity but enhances steady state synaptic responses during higher frequencies of activity. However, it remains unknown how synaptic zinc affects neuronal processing in vivo. Here, we imaged the sound-evoked neuronal activity of the primary auditory cortex in awake mice. We discovered that synaptic zinc enhanced the gain of sound-evoked responses in CaMKII-expressing principal neurons, but it reduced the gain of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons. This modulation was sound intensity-dependent and, in part, NMDA receptor-independent. By establishing a previously unknown link between synaptic zinc and gain control of auditory cortical processing, our findings advance understanding about cortical synaptic mechanisms and create a new framework for approaching and interpreting the role of the auditory cortex in sound processing.

  3. Synaptic Control of Motoneuronal Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Rekling, Jens C.; Funk, Gregory D.; Bayliss, Douglas A.; Dong, Xiao-Wei; Feldman, Jack L.

    2016-01-01

    Movement, the fundamental component of behavior and the principal extrinsic action of the brain, is produced when skeletal muscles contract and relax in response to patterns of action potentials generated by motoneurons. The processes that determine the firing behavior of motoneurons are therefore important in understanding the transformation of neural activity to motor behavior. Here, we review recent studies on the control of motoneuronal excitability, focusing on synaptic and cellular properties. We first present a background description of motoneurons: their development, anatomical organization, and membrane properties, both passive and active. We then describe the general anatomical organization of synaptic input to motoneurons, followed by a description of the major transmitter systems that affect motoneuronal excitability, including ligands, receptor distribution, pre- and postsynaptic actions, signal transduction, and functional role. Glutamate is the main excitatory, and GABA and glycine are the main inhibitory transmitters acting through ionotropic receptors. These amino acids signal the principal motor commands from peripheral, spinal, and supraspinal structures. Amines, such as serotonin and norepinephrine, and neuropeptides, as well as the glutamate and GABA acting at metabotropic receptors, modulate motoneuronal excitability through pre- and postsynaptic actions. Acting principally via second messenger systems, their actions converge on common effectors, e.g., leak K+ current, cationic inward current, hyperpolarization-activated inward current, Ca2+ channels, or presynaptic release processes. Together, these numerous inputs mediate and modify incoming motor commands, ultimately generating the coordinated firing patterns that underlie muscle contractions during motor behavior. PMID:10747207

  4. Coordination of Protein Phosphorylation and Dephosphorylation in Synaptic Plasticity*

    PubMed Central

    Woolfrey, Kevin M.; Dell'Acqua, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A central theme in nervous system function is equilibrium: synaptic strengths wax and wane, neuronal firing rates adjust up and down, and neural circuits balance excitation with inhibition. This push/pull regulatory theme carries through to the molecular level at excitatory synapses, where protein function is controlled through phosphorylation and dephosphorylation by kinases and phosphatases. However, these opposing enzymatic activities are only part of the equation as scaffolding interactions and assembly of multi-protein complexes are further required for efficient, localized synaptic signaling. This review will focus on coordination of postsynaptic serine/threonine kinase and phosphatase signaling by scaffold proteins during synaptic plasticity. PMID:26453308

  5. [Memory and synaptic plasticity].

    PubMed

    Maitre, M

    1996-01-01

    Short term memory traces are probably induced by a sustained and specific functional activation of some sensory and/or motor circuits in brain. These modifications, which could concern a large proportion of the brain but especially the limbic areas, are constituted primarily by ionic mechanisms and second messengers cascades induced by the activation of glutamatergic receptors (namely NMDA). In the invertebrate (Drosophilia melanogaster, aplysia), the role of serotonergic receptors seems to be more important. The activated cAMP-dependent and calcium dependent protein kinases target several proteins which are reversibly phosphorylated modifying the synaptic functions which in turn induce potentiated (PLT) or depressed (DLT) post-synaptic responses. These phenomena are at the basis of specific protein neosynthesis which is initiated by several early genes or trancription factor (cfos, zif 268, jun, CREB). Specific mRNA migrate to the potentiated synapse or dendritic spine where activated polyribosomes synthesize trophic factor, adhesion molecules and synaptic constituents. The building of new synaptic contacts and/or the plastic evolution of existing synapses could explain long-term LTP and long-term memory traces.

  6. Synaptic growth: dancing with adducin.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Robin J; Littleton, J Troy

    2011-05-24

    Manipulations of the actin-capping protein adducin in Drosophila and mammalian neurons provide new insights into the mechanisms linking structural changes to synaptic plasticity and learning. Adducin regulates synaptic remodeling, providing a molecular switch that controls synaptic growth versus disassembly during plasticity.

  7. NMDA Receptors Mediate Synaptic Competition in Culture

    PubMed Central

    She, Kevin; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background Activity through NMDA type glutamate receptors sculpts connectivity in the developing nervous system. This topic is typically studied in the visual system in vivo, where activity of inputs can be differentially regulated, but in which individual synapses are difficult to visualize and mechanisms governing synaptic competition can be difficult to ascertain. Here, we develop a model of NMDA-receptor dependent synaptic competition in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. Methodology/Principal Findings GluN1 -/- (KO) mouse hippocampal neurons lacking the essential NMDA receptor subunit were cultured alone or cultured in defined ratios with wild type (WT) neurons. The absence of functional NMDA receptors did not alter neuron survival. Synapse development was assessed by immunofluorescence for postsynaptic PSD-95 family scaffold and apposed presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut1. Synapse density was specifically enhanced onto minority wild type neurons co-cultured with a majority of GluN1 -/- neighbour neurons, both relative to the GluN1 -/- neighbours and relative to sister pure wild type cultures. This form of synaptic competition was dependent on NMDA receptor activity and not conferred by the mere physical presence of GluN1. In contrast to these results in 10% WT and 90% KO co-cultures, synapse density did not differ by genotype in 50% WT and 50% KO co-cultures or in 90% WT and 10% KO co-cultures. Conclusions/Significance The enhanced synaptic density onto NMDA receptor-competent neurons in minority coculture with GluN1 -/- neurons represents a cell culture paradigm for studying synaptic competition. Mechanisms involved may include a retrograde ‘reward’ signal generated by WT neurons, although in this paradigm there was no ‘punishment’ signal against GluN1 -/- neurons. Cell culture assays involving such defined circuits may help uncover the rules and mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic competition in the developing nervous

  8. Sleep, Clocks and Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sleep is widely believed to play an essential role in synaptic plasticity. However, the precise mechanisms governing this presumptive function are largely unknown. There is also evidence for independent circadian oscillations in synaptic strength and morphology. Therefore, synaptic changes observed after sleep reflect interactions between state-dependent (e.g. wake vs. sleep) and state-independent (circadian) processes. In this article we review how sleep and biological clocks influence synaptic plasticity. We discuss these findings in the context of current plasticity-based theories of sleep function and propose a new model that integrates circadian and brain state influences on synaptic plasticity. PMID:25087980

  9. Sleep, clocks, and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marcos G; Cantera, Rafael

    2014-09-01

    Sleep is widely believed to play an essential role in synaptic plasticity. However, the precise mechanisms governing this presumptive function are largely unknown. There is also evidence for independent circadian oscillations in synaptic strength and morphology. Therefore, synaptic changes observed after sleep reflect interactions between state-dependent (e.g., wake versus sleep) and state-independent (circadian) processes. In this review we consider how sleep and biological clocks influence synaptic plasticity. We discuss these findings in the context of current plasticity-based theories of sleep function and propose a new model that integrates circadian and brain-state influences on synaptic plasticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Optical fiber synaptic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarchik, A. N.; Jaimes-Reátegui, R.; Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; García-Lopez, J. H.; Kazantsev, V. B.

    2011-06-01

    Understanding neuron connections is a great challenge, which is needed to solve many important problems in neurobiology and neuroengineering for recreation of brain functions and efficient biorobotics. In particular, a design of an optical synapse capable to communicate with neuron spike sequences would be crucial to improve the functionality of neuromimmetic networks. In this work we propose an optical synaptic sensor based on an erbium-doped fiber laser driven by a FitzHung-Nagumo electronic neuron, to connect with another electronic neuron. Two possible optical synaptic configurations are analyzed for optoelectronic coupling between neurons: laser cavity loss modulation and pump laser modulation. The control parameters of the proposed optical synapse provide additional degrees of flexibility to the neuron connection traditionally controlled only by coupling strengths in artificial networks.

  11. Transient ECM protease activity promotes synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Magnowska, Marta; Gorkiewicz, Tomasz; Suska, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rutkowska-Wlodarczyk, Izabela; Kaczmarek, Leszek; Wlodarczyk, Jakub

    2016-01-01

    Activity-dependent proteolysis at a synapse has been recognized as a pivotal factor in controlling dynamic changes in dendritic spine shape and function; however, excessive proteolytic activity is detrimental to the cells. The exact mechanism of control of these seemingly contradictory outcomes of protease activity remains unknown. Here, we reveal that dendritic spine maturation is strictly controlled by the proteolytic activity, and its inhibition by the endogenous inhibitor (Tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases-1 – TIMP-1). Excessive proteolytic activity impairs long-term potentiation of the synaptic efficacy (LTP), and this impairment could be rescued by inhibition of protease activity. Moreover LTP is altered persistently when the ability of TIMP-1 to inhibit protease activity is abrogated, further demonstrating the role of such inhibition in the promotion of synaptic plasticity under well-defined conditions. We also show that dendritic spine maturation involves an intermediate formation of elongated spines, followed by their conversion into mushroom shape. The formation of mushroom-shaped spines is accompanied by increase in AMPA/NMDA ratio of glutamate receptors. Altogether, our results identify inhibition of protease activity as a critical regulatory mechanism for dendritic spines maturation. PMID:27282248

  12. Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Südhof, Thomas C.; Rizo, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Presynaptic nerve terminals release neurotransmitters by synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Membrane fusion mediating synaptic exocytosis and other intracellular membrane traffic is affected by a universal machinery that includes SNARE (for “soluble NSF-attachment protein receptor”) and SM (for “Sec1/Munc18-like”) proteins. During fusion, vesicular and target SNARE proteins assemble into an α-helical trans-SNARE complex that forces the two membranes tightly together, and SM proteins likely wrap around assembling trans-SNARE complexes to catalyze membrane fusion. After fusion, SNARE complexes are dissociated by the ATPase NSF (for “N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor”). Fusion-competent conformations of SNARE proteins are maintained by chaperone complexes composed of CSPα, Hsc70, and SGT, and by nonenzymatically acting synuclein chaperones; dysfunction of these chaperones results in neurodegeneration. The synaptic membrane-fusion machinery is controlled by synaptotagmin, and additionally regulated by a presynaptic protein matrix (the “active zone”) that includes Munc13 and RIM proteins as central components. PMID:22026965

  13. Optogenetics and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yu-feng; Jackson, Michael F; Macdonald, John F

    2013-11-01

    The intricate and complex interaction between different populations of neurons in the brain has imposed limits on our ability to gain detailed understanding of synaptic transmission and its integration when employing classical electrophysiological approaches. Indeed, electrical field stimulation delivered via traditional microelectrodes does not permit the targeted, precise and selective control of neuronal activity amongst a varied population of neurons and their inputs (eg, cholinergic, dopaminergic or glutamatergic neurons). Recently established optogenetic techniques overcome these limitations allowing precise control of the target neuron populations, which is essential for the elucidation of the neural substrates underlying complex animal behaviors. Indeed, by introducing light-activated channels (ie, microbial opsin genes) into specific neuronal populations, optogenetics enables non-invasive optical control of specific neurons with milliseconds precision. These approaches can readily be applied to freely behaving live animals. Recently there is increased interests in utilizing optogenetics tools to understand synaptic plasticity and learning/memory. Here, we summarize recent progress in applying optogenetics in in the study of synaptic plasticity.

  14. Optogenetics and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yu-feng; Jackson, Michael F; MacDonald, John F

    2013-01-01

    The intricate and complex interaction between different populations of neurons in the brain has imposed limits on our ability to gain detailed understanding of synaptic transmission and its integration when employing classical electrophysiological approaches. Indeed, electrical field stimulation delivered via traditional microelectrodes does not permit the targeted, precise and selective control of neuronal activity amongst a varied population of neurons and their inputs (eg, cholinergic, dopaminergic or glutamatergic neurons). Recently established optogenetic techniques overcome these limitations allowing precise control of the target neuron populations, which is essential for the elucidation of the neural substrates underlying complex animal behaviors. Indeed, by introducing light-activated channels (ie, microbial opsin genes) into specific neuronal populations, optogenetics enables non-invasive optical control of specific neurons with milliseconds precision. These approaches can readily be applied to freely behaving live animals. Recently there is increased interests in utilizing optogenetics tools to understand synaptic plasticity and learning/memory. Here, we summarize recent progress in applying optogenetics in in the study of synaptic plasticity. PMID:24162508

  15. Synaptic unreliability facilitates information transmission in balanced cortical populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatys, Leon A.; Ecker, Alexander S.; Tchumatchenko, Tatjana; Bethge, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    Synaptic unreliability is one of the major sources of biophysical noise in the brain. In the context of neural information processing, it is a central question how neural systems can afford this unreliability. Here we examine how synaptic noise affects signal transmission in cortical circuits, where excitation and inhibition are thought to be tightly balanced. Surprisingly, we find that in this balanced state synaptic response variability actually facilitates information transmission, rather than impairing it. In particular, the transmission of fast-varying signals benefits from synaptic noise, as it instantaneously increases the amount of information shared between presynaptic signal and postsynaptic current. Furthermore we show that the beneficial effect of noise is based on a very general mechanism which contrary to stochastic resonance does not reach an optimum at a finite noise level.

  16. HCN1 channels reduce the rate of exocytosis from a subset of cortical synaptic terminals

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhuo; Li, Gengyu; Aguado, Carolina; Lujan, Rafael; Shah, Mala M.

    2017-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN1) channels are predominantly located in pyramidal cell dendrites within the cortex. Recent evidence suggests these channels also exist pre-synaptically in a subset of synaptic terminals within the mature entorhinal cortex (EC). Inhibition of pre-synaptic HCN channels enhances miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) onto EC layer III pyramidal neurons, suggesting that these channels decrease the release of the neurotransmitter, glutamate. Thus, do pre-synaptic HCN channels alter the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and thereby enhance neurotransmitter release? To address this, we imaged the release of FM1-43, a dye that is incorporated into synaptic vesicles, from EC synaptic terminals using two photon microscopy in slices obtained from forebrain specific HCN1 deficient mice, global HCN1 knockouts and their wildtype littermates. This coupled with electrophysiology and pharmacology showed that HCN1 channels restrict the rate of exocytosis from a subset of cortical synaptic terminals within the EC and in this way, constrain non-action potential-dependent and action potential-dependent spontaneous release as well as synchronous, evoked release. Since HCN1 channels also affect post-synaptic potential kinetics and integration, our results indicate that there are diverse ways by which HCN1 channels influence synaptic strength and plasticity. PMID:28071723

  17. The effects of nerve stimulation and hemicholinium on synaptic vesicles at the mammalian neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S. F.; Kwanbunbumpen, Suthiwan

    1970-01-01

    1. Electron micrographs of nerve terminals in rat phrenic nerve—diaphragm preparations have been studied. This has been done before and after prolonged nerve stimulation. The effectiveness of nerve stimulation has been monitored by intracellular micro-electrode recordings from the muscle cells. 2. Characteristic changes in the form and distribution of the nerve terminal mitochondria were noted after nerve stimulation. 3. Synaptic vesicle numbers in the region of nerve terminal less than 1800 Å from the synaptic cleft were significantly greater in tissue taken 2 and 3 min after nerve stimulation, than in unstimulated preparations. 4. The long and short diameters of the synaptic vesicle profiles less than 1800 Å from the synaptic cleft were measured. Analysis of the distribution of the diameters indicated synaptic vesicles to be basically spherical structures. Estimates of synaptic vesicle volume were made from the measurements. Synaptic vesicle volume was significantly reduced in tissue taken 2 and 4 min following nerve stimulation. 5. If hemicholinium, a compound which inhibits acetylcholine synthesis, was present during the period of nerve stimulation, much greater reductions in synaptic vesicle volume occurred. Synaptic vesicle numbers in the region of nerve terminal less than 1800 Å from the synaptic cleft were also reduced, compared with unstimulated control preparations. 6. These results are regarded as support for the hypothesis that the synaptic vesicles in nerve terminals at the mammalian neuromuscular junction represent stores of the transmitter substance, acetylcholine. ImagesABABPlate 2AB PMID:5503879

  18. Nicotine withdrawal disrupts both foreground and background contextual fear conditioning but not pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    André, Jessica M; Gulick, Danielle; Portugal, George S; Gould, Thomas J

    2008-07-19

    Nicotine withdrawal is associated with multiple symptoms such as anxiety, increased appetite, and disrupted cognition in humans. Although animal models have provided insights into the somatic and affective symptoms of nicotine withdrawal, less research has focused on the effects of nicotine withdrawal on cognition. Therefore, in this study, C57BL/6J mice were used to test the effects of withdrawal from chronic nicotine on foreground and background contextual fear conditioning, which present the context as a primary or secondary stimulus, respectively. Mice withdrawn from 12 days of chronic nicotine (6.3mg/kg/day) or saline were trained and tested in either foreground or background contextual fear conditioning; nicotine withdrawal-associated deficits in contextual fear conditioning were observed in both conditions. Mice were also tested for the effects of withdrawal on pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (PPI), a measure of sensory gating, and on the acoustic startle reflex. Mice withdrawn from 12 days of chronic nicotine (6.3 or 12.6 mg/kg/day) or saline underwent one 30-min PPI and startle session; no effect of withdrawal from chronic nicotine on PPI or startle was observed for either dose at 24h after nicotine removal. Therefore, mice were tested at different time points following withdrawal from 12.6 mg/kg/day chronic nicotine (8, 24, and 48 h after nicotine removal). No effect of withdrawal from chronic nicotine was observed at any time point for PPI. Overall, these results demonstrate that nicotine withdrawal disrupts two methods of contextual learning but not sensory gating in C57BL/6J mice.

  19. Modulation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors by synaptic and tonic zinc

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Charles T.; Radford, Robert J.; Zastrow, Melissa L.; Zhang, Daniel Y.; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Lippard, Stephen J.; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    Many excitatory synapses contain high levels of mobile zinc within glutamatergic vesicles. Although synaptic zinc and glutamate are coreleased, it is controversial whether zinc diffuses away from the release site or whether it remains bound to presynaptic membranes or proteins after its release. To study zinc transmission and quantify zinc levels, we required a high-affinity rapid zinc chelator as well as an extracellular ratiometric fluorescent zinc sensor. We demonstrate that tricine, considered a preferred chelator for studying the role of synaptic zinc, is unable to efficiently prevent zinc from binding low-nanomolar zinc-binding sites, such as the high-affinity zinc-binding site found in NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Here, we used ZX1, which has a 1 nM zinc dissociation constant and second-order rate constant for binding zinc that is 200-fold higher than those for tricine and CaEDTA. We find that synaptic zinc is phasically released during action potentials. In response to short trains of presynaptic stimulation, synaptic zinc diffuses beyond the synaptic cleft where it inhibits extrasynaptic NMDARs. During higher rates of presynaptic stimulation, released glutamate activates additional extrasynaptic NMDARs that are not reached by synaptically released zinc, but which are inhibited by ambient, tonic levels of nonsynaptic zinc. By performing a ratiometric evaluation of extracellular zinc levels in the dorsal cochlear nucleus, we determined the tonic zinc levels to be low nanomolar. These results demonstrate a physiological role for endogenous synaptic as well as tonic zinc in inhibiting extrasynaptic NMDARs and thereby fine tuning neuronal excitability and signaling. PMID:25947151

  20. Synaptic encoding of temporal contiguity

    PubMed Central

    Ostojic, Srdjan; Fusi, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Often we need to perform tasks in an environment that changes stochastically. In these situations it is important to learn the statistics of sequences of events in order to predict the future and the outcome of our actions. The statistical description of many of these sequences can be reduced to the set of probabilities that a particular event follows another event (temporal contiguity). Under these conditions, it is important to encode and store in our memory these transition probabilities. Here we show that for a large class of synaptic plasticity models, the distribution of synaptic strengths encodes transitions probabilities. Specifically, when the synaptic dynamics depend on pairs of contiguous events and the synapses can remember multiple instances of the transitions, then the average synaptic weights are a monotonic function of the transition probabilities. The synaptic weights converge to the distribution encoding the probabilities also when the correlations between consecutive synaptic modifications are considered. We studied how this distribution depends on the number of synaptic states for a specific model of a multi-state synapse with hard bounds. In the case of bistable synapses, the average synaptic weights are a smooth function of the transition probabilities and the accuracy of the encoding depends on the learning rate. As the number of synaptic states increases, the average synaptic weights become a step function of the transition probabilities. We finally show that the information stored in the synaptic weights can be read out by a simple rate-based neural network. Our study shows that synapses encode transition probabilities under general assumptions and this indicates that temporal contiguity is likely to be encoded and harnessed in almost every neural circuit in the brain. PMID:23641210

  1. Reduced synaptic activity precedes synaptic stripping in vagal motoneurons after axotomy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Jun; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Jinno, Shozo; Wu, Zhou; Inoue, Kazuhide; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2008-10-01

    Activated microglia, which spread on the motor neurons following nerve injury, engage in the displacement of detached afferent synaptic boutons from the surface of regenerating motor neurons. This phenomenon is known as "synaptic stripping." The present study attempted to examine whether changes in the synaptic inputs after motor nerve injury correlated with the microglial attachment to the dorsal motor neurons of the vagus (DMV). DMV neurons in Wistar rats could survive after nerve injury, whereas most of injured DMV neurons in the C57BL/6 mice died. At 2 days after nerve injury, a significant decrease was observed in the frequencies of both spontaneous and miniature EPSCs and IPSCs recorded from DMV neurons in the slice preparation but not from the mechanically dissociated neurons in the Wistar rats. At this stage, no direct apposition of microglia on the injured neurons was observed. High-K(+) stimulation restored their frequencies to control levels. Furthermore, PPADS and DPCPX, antagonists of P2 and adenosine receptors, respectively, also stimulated the recovery of their frequencies. In contrast, no significant change was detected in the spontaneous EPSCs frequency recorded from the severely injured DMV neurons in the slice preparation of the C57BL/6 mice. These observations strongly suggest that presynaptic inhibition through glia-derived ATP and adenosine, thus precedes synaptic stripping in regenerating DMV neurons following nerve injury.

  2. Synaptic Plasticity and Translation Initiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klann, Eric; Antion, Marcia D.; Banko, Jessica L.; Hou, Lingfei

    2004-01-01

    It is widely accepted that protein synthesis, including local protein synthesis at synapses, is required for several forms of synaptic plasticity. Local protein synthesis enables synapses to control synaptic strength independent of the cell body via rapid protein production from pre-existing mRNA. Therefore, regulation of translation initiation is…

  3. Synaptic Plasticity and Translation Initiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klann, Eric; Antion, Marcia D.; Banko, Jessica L.; Hou, Lingfei

    2004-01-01

    It is widely accepted that protein synthesis, including local protein synthesis at synapses, is required for several forms of synaptic plasticity. Local protein synthesis enables synapses to control synaptic strength independent of the cell body via rapid protein production from pre-existing mRNA. Therefore, regulation of translation initiation is…

  4. Synaptic electronics: materials, devices and applications.

    PubMed

    Kuzum, Duygu; Yu, Shimeng; Wong, H-S Philip

    2013-09-27

    In this paper, the recent progress of synaptic electronics is reviewed. The basics of biological synaptic plasticity and learning are described. The material properties and electrical switching characteristics of a variety of synaptic devices are discussed, with a focus on the use of synaptic devices for neuromorphic or brain-inspired computing. Performance metrics desirable for large-scale implementations of synaptic devices are illustrated. A review of recent work on targeted computing applications with synaptic devices is presented.

  5. Dystroglycan mediates homeostatic synaptic plasticity at GABAergic synapses.

    PubMed

    Pribiag, Horia; Peng, Huashan; Shah, Waris Ali; Stellwagen, David; Carbonetto, Salvatore

    2014-05-06

    Dystroglycan (DG), a cell adhesion molecule well known to be essential for skeletal muscle integrity and formation of neuromuscular synapses, is also present at inhibitory synapses in the central nervous system. Mutations that affect DG function not only result in muscular dystrophies, but also in severe cognitive deficits and epilepsy. Here we demonstrate a role of DG during activity-dependent homeostatic regulation of hippocampal inhibitory synapses. Prolonged elevation of neuronal activity up-regulates DG expression and glycosylation, and its localization to inhibitory synapses. Inhibition of protein synthesis prevents the activity-dependent increase in synaptic DG and GABAA receptors (GABAARs), as well as the homeostatic scaling up of GABAergic synaptic transmission. RNAi-mediated knockdown of DG blocks homeostatic scaling up of inhibitory synaptic strength, as does knockdown of like-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (LARGE)--a glycosyltransferase critical for DG function. In contrast, DG is not required for the bicuculline-induced scaling down of excitatory synaptic strength or the tetrodotoxin-induced scaling down of inhibitory synaptic strength. The DG ligand agrin increases GABAergic synaptic strength in a DG-dependent manner that mimics homeostatic scaling up induced by increased activity, indicating that activation of this pathway alone is sufficient to regulate GABAAR trafficking. These data demonstrate that DG is regulated in a physiologically relevant manner in neurons and that DG and its glycosylation are essential for homeostatic plasticity at inhibitory synapses.

  6. On how correlations between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs maximize the information rate of neuronal firing

    PubMed Central

    Puzerey, Pavel A.; Galán, Roberto F.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical neurons receive barrages of excitatory and inhibitory inputs which are not independent, as network structure and synaptic kinetics impose statistical correlations. Experiments in vitro and in vivo have demonstrated correlations between inhibitory and excitatory synaptic inputs in which inhibition lags behind excitation in cortical neurons. This delay arises in feed-forward inhibition (FFI) circuits and ensures that coincident excitation and inhibition do not preclude neuronal firing. Conversely, inhibition that is too delayed broadens neuronal integration times, thereby diminishing spike-time precision and increasing the firing frequency. This led us to hypothesize that the correlation between excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs modulates the encoding of information of neural spike trains. We tested this hypothesis by investigating the effect of such correlations on the information rate (IR) of spike trains using the Hodgkin-Huxley model in which both synaptic and membrane conductances are stochastic. We investigated two different synaptic input regimes: balanced synaptic conductances and balanced currents. Our results show that correlations arising from the synaptic kinetics, τ, and millisecond lags, δ, of inhibition relative to excitation strongly affect the IR of spike trains. In the regime of balanced synaptic currents, for short time lags (δ ~ 1 ms) there is an optimal τ that maximizes the IR of the postsynaptic spike train. Given the short time scales for monosynaptic inhibitory lags and synaptic decay kinetics reported in cortical neurons under physiological contexts, we propose that FFI in cortical circuits is poised to maximize the rate of information transfer between cortical neurons. Our results also provide a possible explanation for how certain drugs and genetic mutations affecting the synaptic kinetics can deteriorate information processing in the brain. PMID:24936182

  7. Differential Modulation of Synaptic Strength and Timing Regulate Synaptic Efficacy in a Motor Network

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica M.; Kvarta, Mark D.; Lu, Jay Y. J.; Schneider, Lauren R.; Nadim, Farzan; Harris-Warrick, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    Neuromodulators modify network output by altering neuronal firing properties and synaptic strength at multiple sites; however, the functional importance of each site is often unclear. We determined the importance of monoamine modulation of a single synapse for regulation of network cycle frequency in the oscillatory pyloric network of the lobster. The pacemaker kernel of the pyloric network receives only one chemical synaptic feedback, an inhibitory synapse from the lateral pyloric (LP) neuron to the pyloric dilator (PD) neurons, which can limit cycle frequency. We measured the effects of dopamine (DA), octopamine (Oct), and serotonin (5HT) on the strength of the LP→PD synapse and the ability of the modified synapse to regulate pyloric cycle frequency. DA and Oct strengthened, whereas 5HT weakened, LP→PD inhibition. Surprisingly, the DA-strengthened LP→PD synapse lost its ability to slow the pyloric oscillations, whereas the 5HT-weakened LP→PD synapse gained a greater influence on the oscillations. These results are explained by monoamine modulation of factors that determine the firing phase of the LP neuron in each cycle. DA acts via multiple mechanisms to phase-advance the LP neuron into the pacemaker's refractory period, where the strengthened synapse has little effect. In contrast, 5HT phase-delays LP activity into a region of greater pacemaker sensitivity to LP synaptic input. Only Oct enhanced LP regulation of cycle period simply by enhancing LP→PD synaptic strength. These results show that modulation of the strength and timing of a synaptic input can differentially affect the synapse's efficacy in the network. PMID:21047938

  8. SYNAPTIC DEPRESSION IN DEEP NEURAL NETWORKS FOR SPEECH PROCESSING

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhao; Li, Hanyu; Yang, Minda; Mesgarani, Nima

    2017-01-01

    A characteristic property of biological neurons is their ability to dynamically change the synaptic efficacy in response to variable input conditions. This mechanism, known as synaptic depression, significantly contributes to the formation of normalized representation of speech features. Synaptic depression also contributes to the robust performance of biological systems. In this paper, we describe how synaptic depression can be modeled and incorporated into deep neural network architectures to improve their generalization ability. We observed that when synaptic depression is added to the hidden layers of a neural network, it reduces the effect of changing background activity in the node activations. In addition, we show that when synaptic depression is included in a deep neural network trained for phoneme classification, the performance of the network improves under noisy conditions not included in the training phase. Our results suggest that more complete neuron models may further reduce the gap between the biological performance and artificial computing, resulting in networks that better generalize to novel signal conditions. PMID:28286424

  9. SYNAPTIC DEPRESSION IN DEEP NEURAL NETWORKS FOR SPEECH PROCESSING.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhao; Li, Hanyu; Yang, Minda; Mesgarani, Nima

    2016-03-01

    A characteristic property of biological neurons is their ability to dynamically change the synaptic efficacy in response to variable input conditions. This mechanism, known as synaptic depression, significantly contributes to the formation of normalized representation of speech features. Synaptic depression also contributes to the robust performance of biological systems. In this paper, we describe how synaptic depression can be modeled and incorporated into deep neural network architectures to improve their generalization ability. We observed that when synaptic depression is added to the hidden layers of a neural network, it reduces the effect of changing background activity in the node activations. In addition, we show that when synaptic depression is included in a deep neural network trained for phoneme classification, the performance of the network improves under noisy conditions not included in the training phase. Our results suggest that more complete neuron models may further reduce the gap between the biological performance and artificial computing, resulting in networks that better generalize to novel signal conditions.

  10. Synaptic and nonsynaptic plasticity approximating probabilistic inference

    PubMed Central

    Tully, Philip J.; Hennig, Matthias H.; Lansner, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Learning and memory operations in neural circuits are believed to involve molecular cascades of synaptic and nonsynaptic changes that lead to a diverse repertoire of dynamical phenomena at higher levels of processing. Hebbian and homeostatic plasticity, neuromodulation, and intrinsic excitability all conspire to form and maintain memories. But it is still unclear how these seemingly redundant mechanisms could jointly orchestrate learning in a more unified system. To this end, a Hebbian learning rule for spiking neurons inspired by Bayesian statistics is proposed. In this model, synaptic weights and intrinsic currents are adapted on-line upon arrival of single spikes, which initiate a cascade of temporally interacting memory traces that locally estimate probabilities associated with relative neuronal activation levels. Trace dynamics enable synaptic learning to readily demonstrate a spike-timing dependence, stably return to a set-point over long time scales, and remain competitive despite this stability. Beyond unsupervised learning, linking the traces with an external plasticity-modulating signal enables spike-based reinforcement learning. At the postsynaptic neuron, the traces are represented by an activity-dependent ion channel that is shown to regulate the input received by a postsynaptic cell and generate intrinsic graded persistent firing levels. We show how spike-based Hebbian-Bayesian learning can be performed in a simulated inference task using integrate-and-fire (IAF) neurons that are Poisson-firing and background-driven, similar to the preferred regime of cortical neurons. Our results support the view that neurons can represent information in the form of probability distributions, and that probabilistic inference could be a functional by-product of coupled synaptic and nonsynaptic mechanisms operating over several timescales. The model provides a biophysical realization of Bayesian computation by reconciling several observed neural phenomena whose

  11. Studying synaptic efficiency by post-hoc immunolabelling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In terms of vesicular recycling, synaptic efficiency is a key determinant of the fidelity of synaptic transmission. The ability of a presynaptic terminal to reuse its vesicular content is thought to be a signature of synaptic maturity and this process depends on the activity of several proteins that govern exo/endocytosis. Upon stimulation, individual terminals in networks of cultured cerebellar granule neurons exhibit heterogeneous exocytic responses, which reflect the distinct states of maturity and plasticity intrinsic to individual synaptic terminals. This dynamic scenario serves as the substrate for processes such as scaling, plasticity and synaptic weight redistribution. Presynaptic strength has been associated with the activity of several types of proteins, including the scaffolding proteins that form the active zone cytomatrix and the proteins involved in presynaptic exocytosis. Methods We have combined fluorescence imaging techniques using the styryl dye FM1-43 in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells with subsequent post-hoc immunocytochemistry in order to study synaptic efficiency in terms of vesicular release. We describe a protocol to easily quantify these results with minimal user intervention. Results In this study we describe a technique that specifically correlates presynaptic activity with the levels of presynaptic markers. This method involves the use of the styryl dye FM1-43 to estimate the release capacity of a synaptic terminal, and the subsequent post-hoc immunolabelling of thousands of individual nerve terminals. We observed a strong correlation between the release capacity of the nerve terminal and the levels of the RIM1α but not the Munc13-1 protein in the active zone. Conclusions Our findings support those of previous studies and point out to RIM1α as a crucial factor in determining synaptic efficiency. These results also demonstrate that this technique is a useful tool to analyse the molecular differences

  12. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Marcos G.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity. PMID:27420105

  13. Synaptic Tagging During Memory Allocation

    PubMed Central

    Rogerson, Thomas; Cai, Denise; Frank, Adam; Sano, Yoshitake; Shobe, Justin; Aranda, Manuel L.; Silva, Alcino J.

    2014-01-01

    There is now compelling evidence that the allocation of memory to specific neurons (neuronal allocation) and synapses (synaptic allocation) in a neurocircuit is not random and that instead specific mechanisms, such as increases in neuronal excitability and synaptic tagging and capture, determine the exact sites where memories are stored. We propose an integrated view of these processes, such that neuronal allocation, synaptic tagging and capture, spine clustering and metaplasticity reflect related aspects of memory allocation mechanisms. Importantly, the properties of these mechanisms suggest a set of rules that profoundly affect how memories are stored and recalled. PMID:24496410

  14. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Frank, Marcos G

    2016-07-13

    Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity.

  15. Isolation of Synaptosomes, Synaptic Plasma Membranes, and Synaptic Junctional Complexes.

    PubMed

    Michaelis, Mary L; Jiang, Lei; Michaelis, Elias K

    2017-01-01

    Isolation of synaptic nerve terminals or synaptosomes provides an opportunity to study the process of neurotransmission at many levels and with a variety of approaches. For example, structural features of the synaptic terminals and the organelles within them, such as synaptic vesicles and mitochondria, have been elucidated with electron microscopy. The postsynaptic membranes are joined to the presynaptic "active zone" of transmitter release through cell adhesion molecules and remain attached throughout the isolation of synaptosomes. These "post synaptic densities" or "PSDs" contain the receptors for the transmitters released from the nerve terminals and can easily be seen with electron microscopy. Biochemical and cell biological studies with synaptosomes have revealed which proteins and lipids are most actively involved in synaptic release of neurotransmitters. The functional properties of the nerve terminals, such as responses to depolarization and the uptake or release of signaling molecules, have also been characterized through the use of fluorescent dyes, tagged transmitters, and transporter substrates. In addition, isolated synaptosomes can serve as the starting material for the isolation of relatively pure synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) that are devoid of organelles from the internal environment of the nerve terminal, such as mitochondria and synaptic vesicles. The isolated SPMs can reseal and form vesicular structures in which transport of ions such as sodium and calcium, as well as solutes such as neurotransmitters can be studied. The PSDs also remain associated with the presynaptic membranes during isolation of SPM fractions, making it possible to isolate the synaptic junctional complexes (SJCs) devoid of the rest of the plasma membranes of the nerve terminals and postsynaptic membrane components. Isolated SJCs can be used to identify the proteins that constitute this highly specialized region of neurons. In this chapter, we describe the steps involved

  16. The interplay between neuronal activity and actin dynamics mimic the setting of an LTD synaptic tag

    PubMed Central

    Szabó, Eszter C.; Manguinhas, Rita; Fonseca, Rosalina

    2016-01-01

    Persistent forms of plasticity, such as long-term depression (LTD), are dependent on the interplay between activity-dependent synaptic tags and the capture of plasticity-related proteins. We propose that the synaptic tag represents a structural alteration that turns synapses permissive to change. We found that modulation of actin dynamics has different roles in the induction and maintenance of LTD. Inhibition of either actin depolymerisation or polymerization blocks LTD induction whereas only the inhibition of actin depolymerisation blocks LTD maintenance. Interestingly, we found that actin depolymerisation and CaMKII activation are involved in LTD synaptic-tagging and capture. Moreover, inhibition of actin polymerisation mimics the setting of a synaptic tag, in an activity-dependent manner, allowing the expression of LTD in non-stimulated synapses. Suspending synaptic activation also restricts the time window of synaptic capture, which can be restored by inhibiting actin polymerization. Our results support our hypothesis that modulation of the actin cytoskeleton provides an input-specific signal for synaptic protein capture. PMID:27650071

  17. Interplay of Intrinsic and Synaptic Conductances in the Generation of High-Frequency Oscillations in Interneuronal Networks with Irregular Spiking

    PubMed Central

    Baroni, Fabiano; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Grayden, David B.

    2014-01-01

    High-frequency oscillations (above 30 Hz) have been observed in sensory and higher-order brain areas, and are believed to constitute a general hallmark of functional neuronal activation. Fast inhibition in interneuronal networks has been suggested as a general mechanism for the generation of high-frequency oscillations. Certain classes of interneurons exhibit subthreshold oscillations, but the effect of this intrinsic neuronal property on the population rhythm is not completely understood. We study the influence of intrinsic damped subthreshold oscillations in the emergence of collective high-frequency oscillations, and elucidate the dynamical mechanisms that underlie this phenomenon. We simulate neuronal networks composed of either Integrate-and-Fire (IF) or Generalized Integrate-and-Fire (GIF) neurons. The IF model displays purely passive subthreshold dynamics, while the GIF model exhibits subthreshold damped oscillations. Individual neurons receive inhibitory synaptic currents mediated by spiking activity in their neighbors as well as noisy synaptic bombardment, and fire irregularly at a lower rate than population frequency. We identify three factors that affect the influence of single-neuron properties on synchronization mediated by inhibition: i) the firing rate response to the noisy background input, ii) the membrane potential distribution, and iii) the shape of Inhibitory Post-Synaptic Potentials (IPSPs). For hyperpolarizing inhibition, the GIF IPSP profile (factor iii)) exhibits post-inhibitory rebound, which induces a coherent spike-mediated depolarization across cells that greatly facilitates synchronous oscillations. This effect dominates the network dynamics, hence GIF networks display stronger oscillations than IF networks. However, the restorative current in the GIF neuron lowers firing rates and narrows the membrane potential distribution (factors i) and ii), respectively), which tend to decrease synchrony. If inhibition is shunting instead of

  18. Growth factors in synaptic function

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Vivian Y.; Choi, Sojoong; Park, Mikyoung

    2013-01-01

    Synapses are increasingly recognized as key structures that malfunction in disorders like schizophrenia, mental retardation, and neurodegenerative diseases. The importance and complexity of the synapse has fuelled research into the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis, synaptic transmission, and plasticity. In this regard, neurotrophic factors such as netrin, Wnt, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and others have gained prominence for their ability to regulate synaptic function. Several of these factors were first implicated in neuroprotection, neuronal growth, and axon guidance. However, their roles in synaptic development and function have become increasingly clear, and the downstream signaling pathways employed by these factors have begun to be elucidated. In this review, we will address the role of these factors and their downstream effectors in synaptic function in vivo and in cultured neurons. PMID:24065916

  19. Synaptic dynamics in analog VLSI.

    PubMed

    Bartolozzi, Chiara; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2007-10-01

    Synapses are crucial elements for computation and information transfer in both real and artificial neural systems. Recent experimental findings and theoretical models of pulse-based neural networks suggest that synaptic dynamics can play a crucial role for learning neural codes and encoding spatiotemporal spike patterns. Within the context of hardware implementations of pulse-based neural networks, several analog VLSI circuits modeling synaptic functionality have been proposed. We present an overview of previously proposed circuits and describe a novel analog VLSI synaptic circuit suitable for integration in large VLSI spike-based neural systems. The circuit proposed is based on a computational model that fits the real postsynaptic currents with exponentials. We present experimental data showing how the circuit exhibits realistic dynamics and show how it can be connected to additional modules for implementing a wide range of synaptic properties.

  20. Ethanol Modulation of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    McCool, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity in the most general terms represents the flexibility of neurotransmission in response to neuronal activity. Synaptic plasticity is essential both for the moment-by-moment modulation of neural activity in response to dynamic environmental cues and for long-term learning and memory formation. These temporal characteristics are served by an array of pre- and post-synaptic mechanisms that are frequently modulated by ethanol exposure. This modulation likely makes significant contributions to both alcohol abuse and dependence. In this review, I discuss the modulation of both short-term and long-term synaptic plasticity in the context of specific ethanol-sensitive cellular substrates. A general discussion of the available preclinical, animal-model based neurophysiology literature provides a comparison between results from in vitro and in vivo studies. Finally, in the context of alcohol abuse and dependence, the review proposes potential behavioral contributions by ethanol modulation of plasticity. PMID:21195719

  1. Dendritic spikes veto inhibition.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Greg J

    2012-09-06

    How inhibition regulates dendritic excitability is critical to an understanding of the way neurons integrate the many thousands of synaptic inputs they receive. In this issue of Neuron, Müller et al. (2012) show that inhibition blocks the generation of weak dendritic spikes, leaving strong dendritic spikes intact. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Odor-Specific Habituation Arises from Interaction of Afferent Synaptic Adaptation and Intrinsic Synaptic Potentiation in Olfactory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linster, Christiane; Menon, Alka V.; Singh, Christopher Y.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    Segmentation of target odorants from background odorants is a fundamental computational requirement for the olfactory system and is thought to be behaviorally mediated by olfactory habituation memory. Data from our laboratory have shown that odor-specific adaptation in piriform neurons, mediated at least partially by synaptic adaptation between…

  3. Odor-Specific Habituation Arises from Interaction of Afferent Synaptic Adaptation and Intrinsic Synaptic Potentiation in Olfactory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linster, Christiane; Menon, Alka V.; Singh, Christopher Y.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2009-01-01

    Segmentation of target odorants from background odorants is a fundamental computational requirement for the olfactory system and is thought to be behaviorally mediated by olfactory habituation memory. Data from our laboratory have shown that odor-specific adaptation in piriform neurons, mediated at least partially by synaptic adaptation between…

  4. Synaptic activity protects against AD and FTD-like pathology via autophagic-lysosomal degradation.

    PubMed

    Akwa, Y; Gondard, E; Mann, A; Capetillo-Zarate, E; Alberdi, E; Matute, C; Marty, S; Vaccari, T; Lozano, A M; Baulieu, E E; Tampellini, D

    2017-07-11

    Changes in synaptic excitability and reduced brain metabolism are among the earliest detectable alterations associated with the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Stimulation of synaptic activity has been shown to be protective in models of AD beta-amyloidosis. Remarkably, deep brain stimulation (DBS) provides beneficial effects in AD patients, and represents an important therapeutic approach against AD and other forms of dementia. While several studies have explored the effect of synaptic activation on beta-amyloid, little is known about Tau protein. In this study, we investigated the effect of synaptic stimulation on Tau pathology and synapses in in vivo and in vitro models of AD and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We found that chronic DBS or chemically induced synaptic stimulation reduced accumulation of pathological forms of Tau and protected synapses, while chronic inhibition of synaptic activity worsened Tau pathology and caused detrimental effects on pre- and post-synaptic markers, suggesting that synapses are affected. Interestingly, degradation via the proteasomal system was not involved in the reduction of pathological Tau during stimulation. In contrast, chronic synaptic activation promoted clearance of Tau oligomers by autophagosomes and lysosomes. Chronic inhibition of synaptic activity resulted in opposite outcomes, with build-up of Tau oligomers in enlarged auto-lysosomes. Our data indicate that synaptic activity counteracts the negative effects of Tau in AD and FTD by acting on autophagy, providing a rationale for therapeutic use of DBS and synaptic stimulation in tauopathies.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 11 July 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2017.142.

  5. Opposing Effects of Intrinsic Conductance and Correlated Synaptic Input on Vm-Fluctuations during Network Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kolind, Jens; Hounsgaard, Jørn; Berg, Rune W.

    2012-01-01

    Neurons often receive massive concurrent bombardment of synaptic inhibition and excitation during functional network activity. This increases membrane conductance and causes fluctuations in membrane potential (Vm) and spike timing. The conductance increase is commonly attributed to synaptic conductance, but also includes the intrinsic conductances recruited during network activity. These two sources of conductance have contrasting dynamic properties at sub-threshold membrane potentials. Synaptic transmitter gated conductance changes abruptly and briefly with each presynaptic action potential. If the spikes arrive at random times the changes in synaptic conductance are therefore stochastic and rapid during intense network activity. In comparison, sub-threshold intrinsic conductances vary smoothly in time. In the present study this discrepancy is investigated using two conductance-based models: a (1) compartment model and a (2) compartment with realistic slow intrinsic conductances. We examine the effects of varying the relative contributions of non-fluctuating intrinsic conductance with fluctuating concurrent inhibitory and excitatory synaptic conductance. For given levels of correlation in the synaptic input we find that the magnitude of the membrane fluctuations uniquely determines the relative contribution of synaptic and intrinsic conductance. We also quantify how Vm-fluctuations vary with synaptic correlations for fixed ratios of synaptic and intrinsic conductance. Interestingly, the levels of Vm -fluctuations and conductance observed experimentally during functional network activity leave little room for intrinsic conductance to contribute. Even without intrinsic conductances the variance in Vm -fluctuations can only be explained by a high degree of correlated firing among presynaptic neurons. PMID:22783184

  6. Millisecond Coupling of Local Field Potentials to Synaptic Currents in the Awake Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Bilal; Schulz, David P.A.; Häusser, Michael; Carandini, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    Summary The cortical local field potential (LFP) is a common measure of population activity, but its relationship to synaptic activity in individual neurons is not fully established. This relationship has been typically studied during anesthesia and is obscured by shared slow fluctuations. Here, we used patch-clamp recordings in visual cortex of anesthetized and awake mice to measure intracellular activity; we then applied a simple method to reveal its coupling to the simultaneously recorded LFP. LFP predicted membrane potential as accurately as synaptic currents, indicating a major role for synaptic currents in the relationship between cortical LFP and intracellular activity. During anesthesia, cortical LFP predicted excitation far better than inhibition; during wakefulness, it predicted them equally well, and visual stimulation further enhanced predictions of inhibition. These findings reveal a central role for synaptic currents, and especially inhibition, in the relationship between the subthreshold activity of individual neurons and the cortical LFP during wakefulness. PMID:27021173

  7. Defective Glycinergic Synaptic Transmission in Zebrafish Motility Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiromi; Carta, Eloisa; Yamanaka, Iori; Harvey, Robert J.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2009-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo) mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR) β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho) mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch-once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch-once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs. PMID:20161699

  8. Sensory Deprivation Triggers Synaptic and Intrinsic Plasticity in the Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Milshtein-Parush, Hila; Frere, Samuel; Regev, Limor; Lahav, Coren; Benbenishty, Amit; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar; Goshen, Inbal; Slutsky, Inna

    2017-04-12

    Hippocampus, a temporal lobe structure involved in learning and memory, receives information from all sensory modalities. Despite extensive research on the role of sensory experience in cortical map plasticity, little is known about whether and how sensory experience regulates functioning of the hippocampal circuits. Here, we show that 9 ± 2 days of whisker deprivation during early mouse development depresses activity of CA3 pyramidal neurons by several principal mechanisms: decrease in release probability, increase in the fraction of silent synapses, and reduction in intrinsic excitability. As a result of deprivation-induced presynaptic inhibition, CA3-CA1 synaptic facilitation was augmented at high frequencies, shifting filtering properties of synapses. The changes in the AMPA-mediated synaptic transmission were accompanied by an increase in NR2B-containing NMDA receptors and a reduction in the AMPA/NMDA ratio. The observed reconfiguration of the CA3-CA1 connections may represent a homeostatic adaptation to augmentation in synaptic activity during the initial deprivation phase. In adult mice, tactile disuse diminished intrinsic excitability without altering synaptic facilitation. We suggest that sensory experience regulates computations performed by the hippocampus by tuning its synaptic and intrinsic characteristics.

  9. TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptors through lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Sumioka, Akio; Yan, Dan; Tomita, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Summary Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate across synapses, constructing neural circuits in the brain. AMPA-type glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors mediating fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors localize at synapses by forming protein complexes with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and PSD-95-like MAGUKs. Among the three classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-, NMDA, kainate-type), AMPA receptor activity is most regulatable by neuronal activity to adjust synaptic strength. Here, we mutated the prototypical TARP, stargazin, and found that TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptor activity in vivo. We also found that stargazin interacts with negatively-charged lipid bilayers in its phosphorylation dependent manner, and that the lipid interaction inhibited stargazin binding to PSD-95. Cationic lipids dissociated stargazin from lipid bilayers and enhanced synaptic AMPA receptor activity in a stargazin phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thus, TARP phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission via a lipid bilayer interaction. PMID:20547132

  10. TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptors through lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sumioka, Akio; Yan, Dan; Tomita, Susumu

    2010-06-10

    Neurons use neurotransmitters to communicate across synapses, constructing neural circuits in the brain. AMPA-type glutamate receptors are the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter receptors mediating fast synaptic transmission. AMPA receptors localize at synapses by forming protein complexes with transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) and PSD-95-like membrane-associated guanylate kinases. Among the three classes of ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA, NMDA, and kainate type), AMPA receptor activity is most regulatable by neuronal activity to adjust synaptic strength. Here, we mutated the prototypical TARP, stargazin, and found that TARP phosphorylation regulates synaptic AMPA receptor activity in vivo. We also found that stargazin interacts with negatively charged lipid bilayers in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and that the lipid interaction inhibited stargazin binding to PSD-95. Cationic lipids dissociated stargazin from lipid bilayers and enhanced synaptic AMPA receptor activity in a stargazin phosphorylation-dependent manner. Thus, TARP phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating AMPA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission via a lipid bilayer interaction.

  11. Alterations in hippocampal excitability, synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity in a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Thomas M; Cotel, Marie-Caroline; O'Neill, Michael J; Tricklebank, Mark D; Collingridge, Graham L; Sher, Emanuele

    2012-03-01

    The risk of developing schizophrenia has been linked to perturbations in embryonic development, but the physiological alterations that result from such insults are incompletely understood. Here, we have investigated aspects of hippocampal physiology in a proposed neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia, induced during gestation in rats by injection of the antimitotic agent methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) at embryonic day 17 (MAM(E17)). We observed a reduction in synaptic innervation and synaptic transmission in the dorsal hippocampus of MAM(E17) treated rats, accompanied by a pronounced increase in CA1 pyramidal neuron excitability. Pharmacological investigations suggested that a deficit in GABAergic inhibition could account for the increase in excitability; furthermore, some aspects of the hyper-excitability could be normalised by the GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)R) potentiator diazepam. Despite these alterations, two major forms of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) could be readily induced. In contrast, there was a substantial deficit in the reversal of LTP, depotentiation. These findings suggest that delivering neurodevelopmental insults at E17 may offer insights into some of the physiological alterations that underlie behavioural and cognitive symptoms observed in schizophrenia.

  12. The role of synaptic ion channels in synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Voglis, Giannis; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2006-01-01

    The nervous system receives a large amount of information about the environment through elaborate sensory routes. Processing and integration of these wide-ranging inputs often results in long-term behavioural alterations as a result of past experiences. These relatively permanent changes in behaviour are manifestations of the capacity of the nervous system for learning and memory. At the cellular level, synaptic plasticity is one of the mechanisms underlying this process. Repeated neural activity generates physiological changes in the nervous system that ultimately modulate neuronal communication through synaptic transmission. Recent studies implicate both presynaptic and postsynaptic ion channels in the process of synapse strength modulation. Here, we review the role of synaptic ion channels in learning and memory, and discuss the implications and significance of these findings towards deciphering the molecular biology of learning and memory. PMID:17077866

  13. Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecules in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative brain disorder associated with the loss of synapses between neurons in the brain. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules are cell surface glycoproteins which are expressed at the synaptic plasma membranes of neurons. These proteins play key roles in formation and maintenance of synapses and regulation of synaptic plasticity. Genetic studies and biochemical analysis of the human brain tissue, cerebrospinal fluid, and sera from AD patients indicate that levels and function of synaptic cell adhesion molecules are affected in AD. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules interact with Aβ, a peptide accumulating in AD brains, which affects their expression and synaptic localization. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules also regulate the production of Aβ via interaction with the key enzymes involved in Aβ formation. Aβ-dependent changes in synaptic adhesion affect the function and integrity of synapses suggesting that alterations in synaptic adhesion play key roles in the disruption of neuronal networks in AD. PMID:27242933

  14. Tolerance to Anesthesia Depends on Synaptic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hasan, Yazan M.; Krishnan, Harish R.; Ghezzi, Alfredo; Prado, Francisco J.; Robles, Roseanna B.; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2011-01-01

    The hypnotic effects of anesthetics are caused by their interactions with neuronal components vital for proper signaling. An understanding of the adaptive mechanisms that lead to the development of anesthetic tolerance can offer insight into the regulation of neuroexcitability and plasticity that alter behavioral output. Here we use genetic and pharmacological manipulation of Drosophila to investigate the mechanisms of tolerance to benzyl alcohol. The mutants tested were temperature-sensitive paralytics that interfere with neuronal signaling: two mutations in dynamin that affect vesicle recycling, shits1 and shits2, and one that affects the voltage-activated Na+ channel, parats1. We also used N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) to pharmacologically interfere with synaptic function. We found that blocking the generation of action potentials using a temperature-sensitive paralytic mutation does not induce nor prevent the development of functional tolerance to benzyl alcohol, but that disruption of synaptic signaling using mutations in the dynamin gene or by NEM treatment inhibits the induction of tolerance. PMID:21318409

  15. Neuromorphic System Based on CMOS Inverters and Si-Based Synaptic Device.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungjin; Kwon, Min-Woo; Kim, Hyungjin; Park, Byung-Gook

    2016-05-01

    We developed an analog neuron circuit that can work with Si-based synaptic devices. N-channel and p-channel synaptic devices connected to current mirrors constitute the synaptic connection and integration parts to implement the excitation and inhibition mechanisms of biological neurons. The normal inverter controlling delay time and the modified inverter making negative pulse constitute the action-potential generation part to generate output action-potential. Connecting output potential to the synaptic device, we implement the spike-timing-dependent-plasticity (STDP) mechanism, adjusting the conductance of synapse. As we have constituted the analog neuron circuit using 4-terminal synaptic device without additional switch and logic operation, we can emulate the operation of the neuron with minimum number of devices and power dissipation.

  16. Genetic differences in hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Prakash, S; Ambrosio, E; Alguacil, L F; Del Olmo, N

    2009-06-30

    Synaptic plasticity is considered a physiological substrate for learning and memory [Lynch MA (2004) Long-term potentiation and memory. Physiol Rev 84:87-136] that contributes to maladaptive learning in drug addiction [Schoenbaum G, Roesch MR, Stalnaker TA (2006) Orbitofrontal cortex, decision-making and drug addiction. Trends Neurosci 29:116-124]. Many studies have revealed that drug addiction has a strong hereditary component [Kosten TA, Ambrosio E (2002) HPA axis function and drug addictive behaviors: insights from studies with Lewis and Fischer 344 inbred rats. Psychoneuroendocrinology 27:35-69; Uhl GR (2004) Molecular genetic underpinnings of human substance abuse vulnerability: likely contributions to understanding addiction as a mnemonic process. Neuropharmacology 47 (Suppl 1):140-147], however the contribution of the genetic background to drug-induced changes in synaptic plasticity has been scarcely studied. The present study reports on an analysis of long-term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation in Lewis (LEW) and Fischer-344 (F344) rats, two inbred rat strains that show different proneness to drugs of abuse and are considered an experimental model of genetic vulnerability to addiction [Kosten TA, Ambrosio E (2002) HPA axis function and drug addictive behaviors: insights from studies with Lewis and Fischer 344 inbred rats. Psychoneuroendocrinology 27:35-69]. The induction of saturated-LTP was similar in LEW and F344 rats treated with saline or cocaine. However, only slices from LEW saline-treated rats showed the reversal of LTP; thus, the depotentiation of saturated-LTP was not observed in cocaine-injected LEW rats and in F344 animals (treated either with cocaine or saline). These results suggest significant differences in hippocampal synaptic plasticity between Lewis and Fischer 344 rats.

  17. Interaction of Acetylcholinesterase with Neurexin-1β regulates Glutamatergic Synaptic stability in Hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Excess expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the cortex and hippocampus causes a decrease in the number of glutamatergic synapses and alters the expression of neurexin and neuroligin, trans-synaptic proteins that control synaptic stability. The molecular sequence and three-dimensional structure of AChE are homologous to the corresponding aspects of the ectodomain of neuroligin. This study investigated whether excess AChE interacts physically with neurexin to destabilize glutamatergic synapses. Results The results showed that AChE clusters colocalized with neurexin assemblies in the neurites of hippocampal neurons and that AChE co-immunoprecipitated with neurexin from the lysate of these neurons. Moreover, when expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, N-glycosylated AChE co-immunoprecipitated with non-O–glycosylated neurexin-1β, with N-glycosylation of the AChE being required for this co-precipitation to occur. Increasing extracellular AChE decreased the association of neurexin with neuroligin and inhibited neuroligin-induced synaptogenesis. The number and activity of excitatory synapses in cultured hippocampal neurons were reduced by extracellular catalytically inactive AChE. Conclusions Excessive glycosylated AChE could competitively disrupt a subset of the neurexin–neuroligin junctions consequently impairing the integrity of glutamatergic synapses. This might serve a molecular mechanism of excessive AChE induced neurodegeneration. PMID:24594013

  18. Synaptic Effects of Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Asif

    Learning and sensory processing in the brain relies on the effective transmission of information across synapses. The strength and efficacy of synaptic transmission is modifiable through training and can be modulated with noninvasive electrical brain stimulation. Transcranial electrical stimulation (TES), specifically, induces weak intensity and spatially diffuse electric fields in the brain. Despite being weak, electric fields modulate spiking probability and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. These effects critically depend on the direction of the electric field relative to the orientation of the neuron and on the level of endogenous synaptic activity. TES has been used to modulate a wide range of neuropsychiatric indications, for various rehabilitation applications, and cognitive performance in diverse tasks. How can a weak and diffuse electric field, which simultaneously polarizes neurons across the brain, have precise changes in brain function? Designing therapies to maximize desired outcomes and minimize undesired effects presents a challenging problem. A series of experiments and computational models are used to define the anatomical and functional factors leading to specificity of TES. Anatomical specificity derives from guiding current to targeted brain structures and taking advantage of the direction-sensitivity of neurons with respect to the electric field. Functional specificity originates from preferential modulation of neuronal networks that are already active. Diffuse electric fields may recruit connected brain networks involved in a training task and promote plasticity along active synaptic pathways. In vitro, electric fields boost endogenous synaptic plasticity and raise the ceiling for synaptic learning with repeated stimulation sessions. Synapses undergoing strong plasticity are preferentially modulated over weak synapses. Therefore, active circuits that are involved in a task could be more susceptible to stimulation than inactive circuits

  19. Dendrobium alkaloids prevent Aβ25–35-induced neuronal and synaptic loss via promoting neurotrophic factors expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jing; Tian, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Lu, Yan-Liu; Li, Li-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Neuronal and synaptic loss is the most important risk factor for cognitive impairment. Inhibiting neuronal apoptosis and preventing synaptic loss are promising therapeutic approaches for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In this study, we investigate the protective effects of Dendrobium alkaloids (DNLA), a Chinese medicinal herb extract, on β-amyloid peptide segment 25–35 (Aβ25-35)-induced neuron and synaptic loss in mice. Method Aβ25–35(10 µg) was injected into the bilateral ventricles of male mice followed by an oral administration of DNLA (40 mg/kg) for 19 days. The Morris water maze was used for evaluating the ability of spatial learning and memory function of mice. The morphological changes were examined via H&E staining and Nissl staining. TUNEL staining was used to check the neuronal apoptosis. The ultrastructure changes of neurons were observed under electron microscope. Western blot was used to evaluate the protein expression levels of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus and cortex. Results DNLA significantly attenuated Aβ25–35-induced spatial learning and memory impairments in mice. DNLA prevented Aβ25–35-induced neuronal loss in the hippocampus and cortex, increased the number of Nissl bodies, improved the ultrastructural injury of neurons and increased the number of synapses in neurons. Furthermore, DNLA increased the protein expression of neurotrophic factors BDNF, CNTF and GDNF in the hippocampus and cortex. Conclusions DNLA can prevent neuronal apoptosis and synaptic loss. This effect is mediated at least in part via increasing the expression of BDNF, GDNF and CNTF in the hippocampus and cortex; improving Aβ-induced spatial learning and memory impairment in mice. PMID:27994964

  20. Virion Background and Efficiency of Virion Incorporation Determine Susceptibility of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Env-Driven Viral Entry to Inhibition by IFITM Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wrensch, Florian; Hoffmann, Markus; Gärtner, Sabine; Nehlmeier, Inga; Winkler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) can inhibit the cellular entry of several enveloped viruses, including simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). The blockade of SIV by IFITMs is isolate specific, raising the question of which parameters impact sensitivity to IFITM. We show that the virion context in which SIV-Env is presented and the efficiency of virion incorporation determine Env susceptibility to inhibition by IFITMs. Thus, determinants other than the nature of the envelope protein can impact the IFITM sensitivity of viral entry. IMPORTANCE The host cell-encoded IFITM proteins can block viral entry and are an important component of the innate defenses against viral infection. However, the determinants controlling whether a virus is susceptible to blockade by IFITM proteins are incompletely understood. Our study shows that the amount of envelope proteins incorporated into virions as well as the nature of the virion particle itself can impact the sensitivity of viral entry to IFITMs. These results show for the first time that determinants other than the viral envelope protein can impact sensitivity to IFITM and have implications for the interpretation of previously published data on inhibition of viruses by IFITM proteins. Moreover, our findings might help to define the mechanism underlying the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins. PMID:27807233

  1. Virion Background and Efficiency of Virion Incorporation Determine Susceptibility of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Env-Driven Viral Entry to Inhibition by IFITM Proteins.

    PubMed

    Wrensch, Florian; Hoffmann, Markus; Gärtner, Sabine; Nehlmeier, Inga; Winkler, Michael; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2017-01-15

    Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs) can inhibit the cellular entry of several enveloped viruses, including simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). The blockade of SIV by IFITMs is isolate specific, raising the question of which parameters impact sensitivity to IFITM. We show that the virion context in which SIV-Env is presented and the efficiency of virion incorporation determine Env susceptibility to inhibition by IFITMs. Thus, determinants other than the nature of the envelope protein can impact the IFITM sensitivity of viral entry. The host cell-encoded IFITM proteins can block viral entry and are an important component of the innate defenses against viral infection. However, the determinants controlling whether a virus is susceptible to blockade by IFITM proteins are incompletely understood. Our study shows that the amount of envelope proteins incorporated into virions as well as the nature of the virion particle itself can impact the sensitivity of viral entry to IFITMs. These results show for the first time that determinants other than the viral envelope protein can impact sensitivity to IFITM and have implications for the interpretation of previously published data on inhibition of viruses by IFITM proteins. Moreover, our findings might help to define the mechanism underlying the antiviral activity of IFITM proteins. Copyright © 2017 Wrensch et al.

  2. The low synaptic release probability in vivo.

    PubMed

    Borst, J Gerard G

    2010-06-01

    The release probability, the average probability that an active zone of a presynaptic terminal releases one or more vesicles following an action potential, is tightly regulated. Measurements in cultured neurons or in slices indicate that this probability can vary greatly between synapses, but on average it is estimated to be as high as 0.5. In vivo, however, the size of synaptic potentials is relatively independent of recent history, suggesting that release probability is much lower. Possible causes for this discrepancy include maturational differences, a higher spontaneous activity, a lower extracellular calcium concentration and more prominent tonic inhibition by ambient neurotransmitters during in vivo recordings. Existing evidence thus suggests that under physiological conditions in vivo, presynaptic action potentials trigger the release of neurotransmitter much less frequently than what is observed in in vitro preparations.

  3. Cellular and Synaptic Properties of Local Inhibitory Circuits.

    PubMed

    Hull, Court

    2017-05-01

    Inhibitory interneurons play a key role in sculpting the information processed by neural circuits. Despite the wide range of physiologically and morphologically distinct types of interneurons that have been identified, common principles have emerged that have shed light on how synaptic inhibition operates, both mechanistically and functionally, across cell types and circuits. This introduction summarizes how electrophysiological approaches have been used to illuminate these key principles, including basic interneuron circuit motifs, the functional properties of inhibitory synapses, and the main roles for synaptic inhibition in regulating neural circuit function. It also highlights how some key electrophysiological methods and experiments have advanced our understanding of inhibitory synapse function. © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  4. Synaptic vesicle distribution by conveyor belt.

    PubMed

    Moughamian, Armen J; Holzbaur, Erika L F

    2012-03-02

    The equal distribution of synaptic vesicles among synapses along the axon is critical for robust neurotransmission. Wong et al. show that the continuous circulation of synaptic vesicles throughout the axon driven by molecular motors ultimately yields this even distribution.

  5. An essential role of Rab5 in uniformity of synaptic vesicle size.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hideyuki; Kawamura, Satoru; Ozaki, Koichi

    2003-09-01

    Rab5 small GTPase is a famous regulator of endocytic vesicular transport from plasma membrane to early endosomes. In neurons, Rab5 is found not only on endocytic vesicles in cell bodies but also on synaptic vesicles in nerve terminals. However, the function of Rab5 on synaptic vesicles remains unclear. Here, we elucidate the function of Rab5 on synaptic vesicles with in vivo and in vitro experiments using Drosophila photoreceptor cells. Functional inhibition of Rab5 with Rab5N142I, a dominant negative version of Drosophila Rab5, induced enlargement of synaptic vesicles. This enlargement was, however, suppressed by enhancing synaptic vesicle recycling under light illumination. In addition, synaptic vesicles prepared from Rab5N142I-expressing flies exhibited homotypic fusion in vitro. These results indicate that Rab5 functions to keep the size of synaptic vesicles uniform by preventing their homotypic fusion. By contrast, Rab5 was not involved in the endocytic reformation of synaptic vesicles, contrary to expectation from its conventional function. Furthermore, we electrophysiologically and behaviourally showed that the function of Rab5 is essential for efficient signal transmission across synapses.

  6. VEGF-Mediated Cognitive and Synaptic Improvement in Chronic Cerebral Hypoperfusion Rats Involves Autophagy Process.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Jingyu; Wang, Faqi; Liu, Chunhua; Yang, Xuening; Yang, Jiajia; Ming, Dong

    2017-08-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is associated with various neurodegenerative diseases characterized by cognitive impairment. Dozens of studies including ours have indicated that exogenous administration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) could exert effective cognitive protection during ischemia. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanism has not been well clarified. To address this issue, we explored the synaptic mechanisms in vivo since hippocampal synaptic function is essential to the learning and memory process. Besides, the role of autophagy in cognitive dysfunction under conditions of CCH is still controversial. And abnormal autophagy could threaten normal neurotransmission at synapse where a large amount of protein synthesis and degradation take place. Hence, we further examined whether the altered synaptic function was associated with autophagy. The results showed that CCH impaired spatial cognition as evidenced in Morris water maze. We further found that VEGF mitigated impaired hippocampal synaptic function including basal synaptic transmission, paired-pulse facilitation, short-term, long-term plasticity, depotentiation, and the level of synaptic proteins as assessed by electrophysiological examination and western blot assay. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that CCH could induce excessive autophagy which could be inhibited by VEGF. Thus, we speculated that VEGF could ameliorate impaired synaptic function induced by CCH because of its ability to inhibit excessive autophagy, and eventually improve spatial learning and memory function. Importantly, our findings shed light on potential therapeutic strategies to be exploited in the usage of VEGF.

  7. EEA1 restores homeostatic synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons from Rett syndrome mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2017-08-15

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Mecp2 deletion in mice results in an imbalance of excitation and inhibition in hippocampal neurons, which affects 'Hebbian' synaptic plasticity. We show that Mecp2-deficient neurons also lack homeostatic synaptic plasticity, likely due to reduced levels of EEA1, a protein involved in AMPA receptor endocytosis. Expression of EEA1 restored homeostatic synaptic plasticity in Mecp2-deficient neurons, providing novel targets of intervention in Rett syndrome. Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Deletion of Mecp2 in mice results in an imbalance of synaptic excitation and inhibition in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which affects 'Hebbian' long-term synaptic plasticity. Since the excitatory-inhibitory balance is maintained by homeostatic mechanisms, we examined the role of MeCP2 in homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) at excitatory synapses. Negative feedback HSP, also known as synaptic scaling, maintains the global synaptic strength of individual neurons in response to sustained alterations in neuronal activity. Hippocampal neurons from Mecp2 knockout (KO) mice do not show the characteristic homeostatic scaling up of the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and of synaptic levels of the GluA1 subunit of AMPA-type glutamate receptors after 48 h silencing with the Na(+) channel blocker tetrodotoxin. This deficit in HSP is bidirectional because Mecp2 KO neurons also failed to scale down mEPSC amplitudes and GluA1 synaptic levels after 48 h blockade of type A GABA receptor (GABAA R)-mediated inhibition with bicuculline. Consistent with the role of synaptic trafficking of AMPA-type of glutamate receptors in HSP, Mecp2 KO neurons

  8. Mitochondria, synaptic plasticity, and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ben-Shachar, Dorit; Laifenfeld, Daphna

    2004-01-01

    The conceptualization of schizophrenia as a disorder of connectivity, i.e., of neuronal?synaptic plasticity, suggests abnormal synaptic modeling and neuronal signaling, possibly as a consequence of flawed interactions with the environment, as at least a secondary mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. Indeed, deficits in episodic memory and malfunction of hippocampal circuitry, as well as anomalies of axonal sprouting and synapse formation, are all suggestive of diminished neuronal plasticity in schizophrenia. Evidence supports a dysfunction of mitochondria in schizophrenia, including mitochondrial hypoplasia, and a dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation system, as well as altered mitochondrial-related gene expression. Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to alterations in ATP production and cytoplasmatic calcium concentrations, as well as reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production. All of the latter processes have been well established as leading to altered synaptic strength or plasticity. Moreover, mitochondria have been shown to play a role in plasticity of neuronal polarity, and studies in the visual cortex show an association between mitochondria and synaptogenesis. Finally, mitochondrial gene upregulation has been observed following synaptic and neuronal activity. This review proposes that mitochondrial dysfunction in schizophrenia could cause, or arise from, anomalies in processes of plasticity in this disorder.

  9. Three synaptic components contributing to robust network synchronization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Fan, H.; Aihara, K.

    2011-05-01

    Robust synchronized activity is widely observed in real neural systems. However, a mechanism for robust synchronization that can be understood analytically, and has a clear physical meaning, remains elusive. This paper considers such a mechanism by formalizing three synaptic components contributing to robust synchronization in networks with heterogeneous external drive currents and conductance-based synapses. The first component arises from the assumption that the aggregate post-synaptic potential of a neuron decays more if it fires later within a spike volley. The second component results because neurons with smaller drives have reached a lower membrane potential at the time when the volley of inputs arrives than that reached by neurons with larger drives. The third component arises from the assumption that neurons firing later in the previous volley have had less time to integrate their drives than neurons firing earlier have had, again causing a lower membrane potential at the time when the volley of inputs arrives. Because of the voltage-dependent properties of synaptic currents, either of the last two components will cause smaller inhibitions for the later-firing neurons if the synapses are inhibitory. This smaller inhibition causes the later-firing neurons to fire earlier in the next cycle, thereby forcing them toward synchrony. With these three synaptic components, we discuss the relationship between the robustness of the synchrony and the parameters, search for the optimal parameter set for the robust network synchronization of a certain frequency band, and demonstrate the key role of the voltage-dependent properties of synaptic currents in robust or stable synchronization.

  10. Emerging Link between Alzheimer's Disease and Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung-Soo; Chung, Hee Jung

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible brain disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and neurodegeneration of brain regions that are crucial for learning and memory. Although intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques, composed of insoluble amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, have been the hallmarks of postmortem AD brains, memory impairment in early AD correlates better with pathological accumulation of soluble Aβ oligomers and persistent weakening of excitatory synaptic strength, which is demonstrated by inhibition of long-term potentiation, enhancement of long-term depression, and loss of synapses. However, current, approved interventions aiming to reduce Aβ levels have failed to retard disease progression; this has led to a pressing need to identify and target alternative pathogenic mechanisms of AD. Recently, it has been suggested that the disruption of Hebbian synaptic plasticity in AD is due to aberrant metaplasticity, which is a form of homeostatic plasticity that tunes the magnitude and direction of future synaptic plasticity based on previous neuronal or synaptic activity. This review examines emerging evidence for aberrant metaplasticity in AD. Putative mechanisms underlying aberrant metaplasticity in AD will also be discussed. We hope this review inspires future studies to test the extent to which these mechanisms contribute to the etiology of AD and offer therapeutic targets. PMID:27019755

  11. Diffusion dynamics of synaptic molecules during inhibitory postsynaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Petrini, Enrica Maria; Barberis, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The plasticity of inhibitory transmission is expected to play a key role in the modulation of neuronal excitability and network function. Over the last two decades, the investigation of the determinants of inhibitory synaptic plasticity has allowed distinguishing presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. While there has been a remarkable progress in the characterization of presynaptically-expressed plasticity of inhibition, the postsynaptic mechanisms of inhibitory long-term synaptic plasticity only begin to be unraveled. At postsynaptic level, the expression of inhibitory synaptic plasticity involves the rearrangement of the postsynaptic molecular components of the GABAergic synapse, including GABAA receptors, scaffold proteins and structural molecules. This implies a dynamic modulation of receptor intracellular trafficking and receptor surface lateral diffusion, along with regulation of the availability and distribution of scaffold proteins. This Review will focus on the mechanisms of the multifaceted molecular reorganization of the inhibitory synapse during postsynaptic plasticity, with special emphasis on the key role of protein dynamics to ensure prompt and reliable activity-dependent adjustments of synaptic strength. PMID:25294987

  12. Slob, a Slowpoke channel–binding protein, modulates synaptic transmission

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiaming

    2011-01-01

    Modulation of ion channels by regulatory proteins within the same macromolecular complex is a well-accepted concept, but the physiological consequences of such modulation are not fully understood. Slowpoke (Slo), a potassium channel critical for action potential repolarization and transmitter release, is regulated by Slo channel–binding protein (Slob), a Drosophila melanogaster Slo (dSlo) binding partner. Slob modulates the voltage dependence of dSlo channel activation in vitro and exerts similar effects on the dSlo channel in Drosophila central nervous system neurons in vivo. In addition, Slob modulates action potential duration in these neurons. Here, we investigate further the functional consequences of the modulation of the dSlo channel by Slob in vivo, by examining larval neuromuscular synaptic transmission in flies in which Slob levels have been altered. In Slob-null flies generated through P-element mutagenesis, as well as in Slob knockdown flies generated by RNA interference (RNAi), we find an enhancement of synaptic transmission but no change in the properties of the postsynaptic muscle cell. Using targeted transgenic rescue and targeted expression of Slob-RNAi, we find that Slob expression in neurons (but not in the postsynaptic muscle cell) is critical for its effects on synaptic transmission. Furthermore, inhibition of dSlo channel activity abolishes these effects of Slob. These results suggest that presynaptic Slob, by regulating dSlo channel function, participates in the modulation of synaptic transmission. PMID:21282401

  13. Distinct roles for Cav2.1–2.3 in activity-dependent synaptic dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ricoy, Ulises M.

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic transmission throughout most of the CNS is steeply dependent on presynaptic calcium influx through the voltage-gated calcium channels Cav2.1–Cav2.3. In addition to triggering exocytosis, this calcium influx also recruits short-term synaptic plasticity. During the complex patterns of presynaptic activity that occur in vivo, several forms of plasticity combine to generate a synaptic output that is dynamic, in which the size of a given excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) in response to a given spike depends on the short-term history of presynaptic activity. It remains unclear whether the different Cav2 channels play distinct roles in defining these synaptic dynamics and, if so, under what conditions different Cav2 family members most effectively determine synaptic output. We examined these questions by measuring the effects of calcium channel-selective toxins on synaptic transmission at the Schaffer collateral synapse in hippocampal slices from adult mice in response to both low-frequency stimulation and complex stimulus trains derived from in vivo recordings. Blockade of Cav2.1 had a greater inhibitory effect on synaptic transmission during low-frequency components of the stimulus train than on synaptic transmission during high-frequency components of the train, indicating that Cav2.1 had a greater fractional contribution to synaptic transmission at low frequencies than at high frequencies. Relative to Cav2.1, Cav2.2 had a disproportionately reduced contribution to synaptic transmission at frequencies >20 Hz, while Cav2.3 had a disproportionately increased contribution to synaptic transmission at frequencies >1 Hz. These activity-dependent effects of different Cav2 family members shape the filtering characteristics of GABAB receptor-mediated presynaptic inhibition. Thus different Cav2 channels vary in their coupling to synaptic transmission over different frequency ranges, with consequences for the frequency tuning of both synaptic dynamics and

  14. Vorinostat positively regulates synaptic plasticity genes expression and spine density in HIV infected neurons: role of nicotine in progression of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occurs in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. In the United States, the prevalence of cigarette smoking ranges from 35-70% in HIV-infected individuals compared to 20% in general population. Cognitive impairment in heavy cigarette smokers has been well reported. However, the synergistic effects of nicotine and HIV infection and the underlying mechanisms in the development of HAND are unknown. Results In this study, we explored the role of nicotine in the progression of HAND using SK-N-MC, a neuronal cell line. SK-N-MC cells were infected with HIV-1 in the presence or absence of nicotine for 7 days. We observed significant increase in HIV infectivity in SK-N-MC treated with nicotine compared to untreated HIV-infected neuronal cells. HIV and nicotine synergize to significantly dysregulate the expression of synaptic plasticity genes and spine density; with a concomitant increase of HDAC2 levels in SK-N-MC cells. In addition, inhibition of HDAC2 up-regulation with the use of vorinostat resulted in HIV latency breakdown and recovery of synaptic plasticity genes expression and spine density in nicotine/HIV alone and in co-treated SK-N-MC cells. Furthermore, increased eIF2 alpha phosphorylation, which negatively regulates eukaryotic translational process, was observed in HIV alone and in co-treatment with nicotine compared to untreated control and nicotine alone treated SK-N-MC cells. Conclusions These results suggest that nicotine and HIV synergize to negatively regulate the synaptic plasticity gene expression and spine density and this may contribute to the increased risk of HAND in HIV infected smokers. Apart from disrupting latency, vorinostat may be a useful therapeutic to inhibit the negative regulatory effects on synaptic plasticity in HIV infected nicotine abusers. PMID:24886748

  15. Sapap3 deletion anomalously activates short-term endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng; Wan, Yehong; Ade, Kristen; Ting, Jonathan; Feng, Guoping; Calakos, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Retrograde synaptic signaling by endocannabinoids is a widespread mechanism for activity-dependent inhibition of synaptic strength in the brain. Although prevalent, the conditions for eliciting endocannabinoid (eCB)-mediated synaptic depression vary among brain circuits. As yet, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this variation, although the initial signaling events are likely dictated by postsynaptic proteins. SAPAPs are a family of postsynaptic proteins unique to excitatory synapses. Using Sapap3 knock-out (KO) mice, we find that, in the absence of SAPAP3, striatal medium spiny neuron (MSN) excitatory synapses exhibit eCB-mediated synaptic depression under conditions that do not normally activate this process. The anomalous synaptic plasticity requires type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5), which are dysregulated in Sapap3 KO MSNs. Both surface expression and activity of mGluR5 are increased in Sapap3 KO MSNs, suggesting that enhanced mGluR5 activity may drive the anomalous synaptic plasticity. In direct support of this possibility, we find that, in wildtype (WT) MSNs, pharmacological enhancement of mGluR5 by a positive allosteric modulator is sufficient to reproduce the increased synaptic depression seen in Sapap3 KO MSNs. The same pharmacologic treatment, however, fails to elicit further depression in KO MSNs. Under conditions that are sufficient to engage eCB-mediated synaptic depression in WT MSNs, Sapap3 deletion does not alter the magnitude of the response. These results identify a role for SAPAP3 in the regulation of postsynaptic mGluRs and eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity. SAPAPs, through their effect on mGluR activity, may serve as regulatory molecules gating the threshold for inducing eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity. PMID:21715621

  16. A synaptic mechanism for retinal adaptation to luminance and contrast

    PubMed Central

    Jarsky, Tim; Cembrowski, Mark; Logan, Stephen M.; Kath, William L.; Riecke, Hermann; Demb, Jonathan B.; Singer, Joshua H.

    2011-01-01

    The gain of signaling in primary sensory circuits is matched to the stimulus intensity by the process of adaptation. Retinal neural circuits adapt to visual scene statistics, including the mean (background adaptation) and the temporal variance (contrast adaptation) of the light stimulus. The intrinsic properties of retinal bipolar cells and synapses contribute to background and contrast adaptation, but it is unclear whether both forms of adaptation depend on the same cellular mechanisms. Studies of bipolar cell synapses identified synaptic mechanisms of gain control, but the relevance of these mechanisms to visual processing is uncertain owing to the historical focus on fast, phasic transmission rather than the tonic transmission evoked by ambient light. Here, we studied use-dependent regulation of bipolar cell synaptic transmission evoked by small, ongoing modulations of membrane potential (VM) in the physiological range. We made paired whole-cell recordings from rod bipolar (RB) and AII amacrine cells in a mouse retinal slice preparation. Quasi-white noise voltage commands modulated RB VM and evoked EPSCs in the AII. We mimicked changes in background luminance or contrast, respectively, by depolarizing the VM or increasing its variance. A linear systems analysis of synaptic transmission showed that increasing either the mean or the variance of the presynaptic VM reduced gain. Further electrophysiological and computational analyses demonstrated that adaptation to mean potential resulted from both Ca channel inactivation and vesicle depletion, whereas adaptation to variance resulted from vesicle depletion alone. Thus, background and contrast adaptation apparently depend in part on a common synaptic mechanism. PMID:21795549

  17. Activity Induces Fmr1-Sensitive Synaptic Capture of Anterograde Circulating Neuropeptide Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Cavolo, Samantha L.; Bulgari, Dinara; Deitcher, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic neuropeptide and neurotrophin stores are maintained by constitutive bidirectional capture of dense-core vesicles (DCVs) as they circulate in and out of the nerve terminal. Activity increases DCV capture to rapidly replenish synaptic neuropeptide stores following release. However, it is not known whether this is due to enhanced bidirectional capture. Here experiments at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction, where DCVs contain neuropeptides and a bone morphogenic protein, show that activity-dependent replenishment of synaptic neuropeptides following release is evident after inhibiting the retrograde transport with the dynactin disruptor mycalolide B or photobleaching DCVs entering a synaptic bouton by retrograde transport. In contrast, photobleaching anterograde transport vesicles entering a bouton inhibits neuropeptide replenishment after activity. Furthermore, tracking of individual DCVs moving through boutons shows that activity selectively increases capture of DCVs undergoing anterograde transport. Finally, upregulating fragile X mental retardation 1 protein (Fmr1, also called FMRP) acts independently of futsch/MAP-1B to abolish activity-dependent, but not constitutive, capture. Fmr1 also reduces presynaptic neuropeptide stores without affecting activity-independent delivery and evoked release. Therefore, presynaptic motoneuron neuropeptide storage is increased by a vesicle capture mechanism that is distinguished from constitutive bidirectional capture by activity dependence, anterograde selectivity, and Fmr1 sensitivity. These results show that activity recruits a separate mechanism than used at rest to stimulate additional synaptic capture of DCVs for future release of neuropeptides and neurotrophins. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Synaptic release of neuropeptides and neurotrophins depends on presynaptic accumulation of dense-core vesicles (DCVs). At rest, DCVs are captured bidirectionally as they circulate through Drosophila motoneuron terminals by

  18. Open Syntaxin Docks Synaptic Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Shawn; Jorgensen, Erik M

    2007-01-01

    Synaptic vesicles dock to the plasma membrane at synapses to facilitate rapid exocytosis. Docking was originally proposed to require the soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive fusion attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins; however, perturbation studies suggested that docking was independent of the SNARE proteins. We now find that the SNARE protein syntaxin is required for docking of all vesicles at synapses in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The active zone protein UNC-13, which interacts with syntaxin, is also required for docking in the active zone. The docking defects in unc-13 mutants can be fully rescued by overexpressing a constitutively open form of syntaxin, but not by wild-type syntaxin. These experiments support a model for docking in which UNC-13 converts syntaxin from the closed to the open state, and open syntaxin acts directly in docking vesicles to the plasma membrane. These data provide a molecular basis for synaptic vesicle docking. PMID:17645391

  19. Optimal Degrees of Synaptic Connectivity.

    PubMed

    Litwin-Kumar, Ashok; Harris, Kameron Decker; Axel, Richard; Sompolinsky, Haim; Abbott, L F

    2017-03-08

    Synaptic connectivity varies widely across neuronal types. Cerebellar granule cells receive five orders of magnitude fewer inputs than the Purkinje cells they innervate, and cerebellum-like circuits, including the insect mushroom body, also exhibit large divergences in connectivity. In contrast, the number of inputs per neuron in cerebral cortex is more uniform and large. We investigate how the dimension of a representation formed by a population of neurons depends on how many inputs each neuron receives and what this implies for learning associations. Our theory predicts that the dimensions of the cerebellar granule-cell and Drosophila Kenyon-cell representations are maximized at degrees of synaptic connectivity that match those observed anatomically, showing that sparse connectivity is sometimes superior to dense connectivity. When input synapses are subject to supervised plasticity, however, dense wiring becomes advantageous, suggesting that the type of plasticity exhibited by a set of synapses is a major determinant of connection density.

  20. Synaptic dynamics and decision making

    PubMed Central

    Deco, Gustavo; Rolls, Edmund T.; Romo, Ranulfo

    2010-01-01

    During decision making between sequential stimuli, the first stimulus must be held in memory and then compared with the second. Here, we show that in systems that encode the stimuli by their firing rate, neurons can use synaptic facilitation not only to remember the first stimulus during the delay but during the presentation of the second stimulus so that they respond to a combination of the first and second stimuli, as has been found for “partial differential” neurons recorded in the ventral premotor cortex during vibrotactile flutter frequency decision making. Moreover, we show that such partial differential neurons provide important input to a subsequent attractor decision-making network that can then compare this combination of the first and second stimuli with inputs from other neurons that respond only to the second stimulus. Thus, both synaptic facilitation and neuronal attractor dynamics can account for sequential decision making in such systems in the brain. PMID:20360555

  1. Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Formation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-05-31

    The name " Ampakines " has been used to describe this family; when more is known about structure-activity relationships, it should be possible to...regarding the physiological effects of the drugs. Excised patch studies have shown that Ampakines prolong the duration of AMPA receptor-mediated...also revealed that Ampakines produce the expected facilitation and prolongation of synaptic responses in situ; these drugs are thus the first compounds

  2. Systematic Discovery of Rab GTPases with Synaptic Functions in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chih-Chiang; Scoggin, Shane; Wang, Dong; Cherry, Smita; Dembo, Todd; Greenberg, Ben; Jin, Eugene Jennifer; Kuey, Cansu; Lopez, Antonio; Mehta, Sunil Q.; Perkins, Theodore J.; Brankatschk, Marko; Rothenfluh, Adrian; Buszczak, Michael; Hiesinger, P. Robin

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Neurons require highly specialized intracellular membrane trafficking, especially at synapses. Rab GTPases are considered master regulators of membrane trafficking in all cells and only very few Rabs have known neuron-specific functions. Here, we present the first systematic characterization of neuronal expression, subcellular localization and function of Rab GTPases in an organism with a brain. Results We report the surprising discovery that half of all Drosophila Rabs function specifically or predominantly in distinct subsets of neurons in the brain. Furthermore, functional profiling of the GTP/GDP-bound states reveals that these neuronal Rabs are almost exclusively active at synapses and the majority of these synaptic Rabs specifically mark synaptic recycling endosomal compartments. Our profiling strategy is based on Gal4 knock-ins in large genomic fragments that are additionally designed to generated mutants by ends-out homologous recombination. We generated 36 large genomic targeting vectors and transgenic rab-Gal4 fly strains for 25 rab genes. Proof-of-principle knock-out of the synaptic rab27 reveals a sleep phenotype that matches its cell-specific expression. Conclusions Our findings suggest that up to half of all Drosophila Rabs exert specialized synaptic functions. The tools presented here allow systematic functional studies of these Rabs and provide a method that is applicable to any large gene family in Drosophila. PMID:22000105

  3. All for One But Not One for All: Excitatory Synaptic Scaling and Intrinsic Excitability Are Coregulated by CaMKIV, Whereas Inhibitory Synaptic Scaling Is Under Independent Control.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Annelise; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2017-07-12

    preventing circuit disorders, and is accomplished through a set of negative feedback mechanisms that sense and compensate for perturbations in activity. These "homeostatic" mechanisms can target synaptic excitation, synaptic inhibition, and intrinsic excitability, but whether they are independently controlled is not known. We find that synaptic excitation and intrinsic excitability are coregulated in individual neurons through CaMKIV signaling, which is tightly controlled by neuronal activity. In contrast, synaptic inhibition is unaffected by changes in firing or CaMKIV signaling in individual neurons. These results show that circuit stability is controlled both through cell-autonomous mechanisms that regulate some aspects of excitability, as well as circuit-level mechanisms that adjust inhibition. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376778-08$15.00/0.

  4. Action of suramin upon ecto-apyrase activity and synaptic depression of Torpedo electric organ.

    PubMed Central

    Martí, E.; Cantí, C.; Gómez de Aranda, I.; Miralles, F.; Solsona, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. The role of ATP, which is co-released with acetylcholine in synaptic contacts of Torpedo electric organ, was investigated by use of suramin. Suramin [8-(3-benzamido-4-methylbenzamido)naphthalene-1,3,5-trisulphoni c acid], a P2 purinoceptor antagonist, potently inhibited in a non-competitive manner the ecto-apyrase activity associated with plasma membrane isolated from cholinergic nerve terminals of Torpedo electric organ. The Ki was 30 microM and 43 microM for Ca(2+)-ADPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase respectively. 2. In Torpedo electric organ, repetitive stimulation decreased the evoked synaptic current by 51%. However, when fragments of electric organ were incubated with suramin the evoked synaptic current declined by only 14%. Fragments incubated with the selective A1 purinoceptor antagonist, DPCPX, showed 5% synaptic depression. 3. The effects of suramin and DPCPX on synaptic depression were not addictive. Synaptic depression may thus be linked to endogenous adenosine formed by dephosphorylation of released ATP by an ecto-apyrase. The final effector in synaptic depression, adenosine, acts via the A1 purinoceptor. 4. ATP hydrolysis is prevented in the presence of suramin. It slightly increased (20%) the mean amplitude of spontaneous miniature endplate currents. The frequency distribution of the amplitude of spontaneous events was shifted to the right, indicating that ATP, when not degraded, may modulate the activation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors activated by the quantal secretion of acetycholine. PMID:8818348

  5. Pro-BDNF-induced synaptic depression and retraction at developing neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Je, Hyun-Soo; Ji, Yuanyuan; Nagappan, Guhan; Hempstead, Barbara; Lu, Bai

    2009-05-18

    Postsynaptic cells generate positive and negative signals that retrogradely modulate presynaptic function. At developing neuromuscular synapses, prolonged stimulation of muscle cells induces sustained synaptic depression. We provide evidence that pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a negative retrograde signal that can be converted into a positive signal by metalloproteases at the synaptic junctions. Application of pro-BDNF induces a dramatic decrease in synaptic efficacy followed by a retraction of presynaptic terminals, and these effects are mediated by presynaptic pan-neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75(NTR)), the pro-BDNF receptor. A brief stimulation of myocytes expressing cleavable or uncleavable pro-BDNF elicits synaptic potentiation or depression, respectively. Extracellular application of metalloprotease inhibitors, which inhibits the cleavage of endogenous pro-BDNF, facilitates the muscle stimulation-induced synaptic depression. Inhibition of presynaptic p75(NTR) or postsynaptic BDNF expression also blocks the activity-dependent synaptic depression and retraction. These results support a model in which postsynaptic secretion of a single molecule, pro-BDNF, may stabilize or eliminate presynaptic terminals depending on its proteolytic conversion at the synapses.

  6. Pro-BDNF–induced synaptic depression and retraction at developing neuromuscular synapses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feng; Je, Hyun-Soo; Ji, Yuanyuan; Nagappan, Guhan; Hempstead, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Postsynaptic cells generate positive and negative signals that retrogradely modulate presynaptic function. At developing neuromuscular synapses, prolonged stimulation of muscle cells induces sustained synaptic depression. We provide evidence that pro–brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a negative retrograde signal that can be converted into a positive signal by metalloproteases at the synaptic junctions. Application of pro-BDNF induces a dramatic decrease in synaptic efficacy followed by a retraction of presynaptic terminals, and these effects are mediated by presynaptic pan-neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR), the pro-BDNF receptor. A brief stimulation of myocytes expressing cleavable or uncleavable pro-BDNF elicits synaptic potentiation or depression, respectively. Extracellular application of metalloprotease inhibitors, which inhibits the cleavage of endogenous pro-BDNF, facilitates the muscle stimulation–induced synaptic depression. Inhibition of presynaptic p75NTR or postsynaptic BDNF expression also blocks the activity-dependent synaptic depression and retraction. These results support a model in which postsynaptic secretion of a single molecule, pro-BDNF, may stabilize or eliminate presynaptic terminals depending on its proteolytic conversion at the synapses. PMID:19451278

  7. Neural ECM molecules in synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory.

    PubMed

    Senkov, Oleg; Andjus, Pavle; Radenovic, Lidija; Soriano, Eduardo; Dityatev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Neural extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules derived from neurons and glial cells accumulate in the extracellular space and regulate synaptic plasticity through modulation of perisomal GABAergic inhibition, intrinsic neuronal excitability, integrin signaling, and activities of L-type Ca(2+) channels, NMDA receptors, and Rho-associated kinase. Genetic or enzymatic targeting of ECM molecules proved to bidirectionally modulate acquisition of memories, depending on experimental conditions, and to promote cognitive flexibility and extinction of fear and drug memories. Furthermore, evidence is accumulating that dysregulation of ECM is linked to major psychiatric and neurodegenerative diseases and that targeting ECM molecules may rescue cognitive deficits in animal models of these diseases. Thus, the ECM emerged as a key component of synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory and as an attractive target for developing new generation of synapse plasticizing drugs.

  8. [COX-2 regulation of prostaglandins in synaptic signaling].

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong-Wei

    2009-10-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a rate-limiting enzyme converting arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs), which is a key messenger in traumatic brain injury- and ischemia-induced neuronal damage and in neuroinflammation. COX-2 is implicated in the pathogeneses of neurodegenerative diseases. Growing evidence implies that the contribution of COX-2 to neuropathology is associated with its involvement in synaptic alteration. Elevation or inhibition of COX-2 has been shown to enhance or suppress excitatory glutamatergic neurotransmission and long-term potentiation (LTP). These events are mainly mediated via PGE2, the predominant reaction product of COX-2, and the PGE2 subtype 2 receptor (EP2). Thus, elucidation of COX-2 in synaptic signaling may provide a mechanistic basis for designing new drugs aimed at preventing, treating or alleviating neuroinflammation-associated neurological disorders.

  9. Maintenance and termination of neocortical oscillations by dynamic modulation of intrinsic and synaptic excitability

    PubMed Central

    FRÖHLICH, FLAVIO; BAZHENOV, MAXIM; TIMOFEEV, IGOR; SEJNOWSKI, TERRENCE J.

    2010-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying seizure cessation remain elusive. The Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, a severe childhood epileptic disorder, is characterized by episodes of seizure with alternating epochs of spike-wave and fast run discharges. In a detailed computational model that incorporates extracellular potassium dynamics, we studied the dynamics of these state transitions between slow and fast oscillations. We show that dynamic modulation of synaptic transmission can cause termination of paroxysmal activity. An activity-dependent shift in the balance between synaptic excitation and inhibition towards more excitation caused seizure termination by favoring the slow oscillatory state, which permits recovery of baseline extracellular potassium concentration. We found that slow synaptic depression and change in chloride reversal potential can have similar effects on the seizure dynamics. Our results indicate a novel role for synaptic dynamics during epileptic neural activity patterns. PMID:20556224

  10. Clathrin regenerates synaptic vesicles from endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Shigeki; Trimbuch, Thorsten; Camacho-Pérez, Marcial; Rost, Benjamin R.; Brokowski, Bettina; Söhl-Kielczynski, Berit; Felies, Annegret; Davis, M. Wayne; Rosenmund, Christian; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Ultrafast endocytosis can retrieve a single large endocytic vesicle as fast as 50-100 ms after synaptic vesicle fusion. However, the fate of the large endocytic vesicles is not known. Here we demonstrate that these vesicles transition to a synaptic endosome about one second after stimulation. The endosome is resolved into coated vesicles after 3 seconds, which in turn become small-diameter synaptic vesicles 5-6 seconds after stimulation. We disrupted clathrin function using RNAi and found that clathrin is not required for ultrafast endocytosis but is required to generate synaptic vesicles from the endosome. Ultrafast endocytosis fails when actin polymerization is disrupted, or when neurons are stimulated at room temperature instead of physiological temperature. In the absence of ultrafast endocytosis, synaptic vesicles are retrieved directly from the plasma membrane by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These results explain in large part discrepancies among published experiments concerning the role of clathrin in synaptic vesicle endocytosis. PMID:25296249

  11. LRRK2 kinase activity regulates synaptic vesicle trafficking and neurotransmitter release through modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex

    PubMed Central

    Cirnaru, Maria D.; Marte, Antonella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Russo, Isabella; Gabrielli, Martina; Longo, Francesco; Arcuri, Ludovico; Murru, Luca; Bubacco, Luigi; Matteoli, Michela; Fedele, Ernesto; Sala, Carlo; Passafaro, Maria; Morari, Michele; Greggio, Elisa; Onofri, Franco; Piccoli, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 is a complex protein that consists of multiple domains executing several functions, including GTP hydrolysis, kinase activity, and protein binding. Robust evidence suggests that LRRK2 acts at the synaptic site as a molecular hub connecting synaptic vesicles to cytoskeletal elements via a complex panel of protein-protein interactions. Here we investigated the impact of pharmacological inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity on synaptic function. Acute treatment with LRRK2 inhibitors reduced the frequency of spontaneous currents, the rate of synaptic vesicle trafficking and the release of neurotransmitter from isolated synaptosomes. The investigation of complementary models lacking LRRK2 expression allowed us to exclude potential off-side effects of kinase inhibitors on synaptic functions. Next we studied whether kinase inhibition affects LRRK2 heterologous interactions. We found that the binding among LRRK2, presynaptic proteins and synaptic vesicles is affected by kinase inhibition. Our results suggest that LRRK2 kinase activity influences synaptic vesicle release via modulation of LRRK2 macro-molecular complex. PMID:24904275

  12. New Tools for Targeted Disruption of Cholinergic Synaptic Transmission in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Monica; Heghinian, Mari D.; Marí, Frank; Godenschwege, Tanja A.

    2013-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels. The α7 subtype of nAChRs is involved in neurological pathologies such as Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, addiction, epilepsy and autism spectrum disorders. The Drosophila melanogaster α7 (Dα7) has the closest sequence homology to the vertebrate α7 subunit and it can form homopentameric receptors just as the vertebrate counterpart. The Dα7 subunits are essential for the function of the Giant Fiber circuit, which mediates the escape response of the fly. To further characterize the receptor function, we generated different missense mutations in the Dα7 nAChR’s ligand binding domain. We characterized the effects of targeted expression of two UAS-constructs carrying a single mutation, D197A and Y195T, as well as a UAS-construct carrying a triple D77T, L117Q, I196P mutation in a Dα7 null mutant and in a wild type background. Expression of the triple mutation was able to restore the function of the circuit in Dα7 null mutants and had no disruptive effects when expressed in wild type. In contrast, both single mutations severely disrupted the synaptic transmission of Dα7-dependent but not glutamatergic or gap junction dependent synapses in wild type background, and did not or only partially rescued the synaptic defects of the null mutant. These observations are consistent with the formation of hybrid receptors, consisting of D197A or Y195T subunits and wild type Dα7 subunits, in which the binding of acetylcholine or acetylcholine-induced conformational changes of the Dα7 receptor are altered and causes inhibition of cholinergic responses. Thus targeted expression of D197A or Y195T can be used to selectively disrupt synaptic transmission of Dα7-dependent synapses in neuronal circuits. Hence, these constructs can be used as tools to study learning and memory or addiction associated behaviors by allowing the manipulation of neuronal processing in the circuits

  13. Reflections on the specificity of synaptic connections.

    PubMed

    White, Edward L

    2007-10-01

    The principal focus of this treatise is the specificity of synaptic connectivity in the mammalian central nervous system. The occurrence of stereotypical patterns of connection at the macro level (e.g., the general consistency with which axonal pathways impinge on and originate within specific cortical areas and layers) implies that the cerebral cortex is a highly ordered structure. Order is seen also at the more micro level of synaptic connectivity, for instance, in the contrasting synaptic patterns of spiny vs. non-spiny neurons. Quantitative electron microscopic studies of synapses between identified neurons and correlative anatomical/electrophysiological investigations indicate that the high degree of order characterizing many aspects of cortical organization is mirrored by an equally ordered arrangement of synaptic connections between specific types of neurons. The recognition of recurring synaptic patterns has generated increased support for the notion of synaptic specificity as opposed to randomness, and we have begun now to understand the role of specificity in cortical function. At the core of cortical processing lie myriad possibilities for computation provided by the wealth of synaptic connections involving each neuron. Specificity, by limiting possibilities for connection, imposes an order on synaptic interactions even as processes of dynamic selection or synaptic remodeling ensure the constant formation and dissolution of cortical circuits. Collectively, these operations make maximal use of the richness of cortical synaptic connections to produce a highly flexible system, irrespective of the degree of hard-wiring, mutability, randomness or specificity that obtains for cortical wiring at any particular time. A brief, historical account of developments leading to our current understanding of cortical synaptic organization will precede the presentation of evidence for synaptic specificity.

  14. Graded Synaptic Transmission between Spiking Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graubard, Katherine; Raper, Jonathan A.; Hartline, Daniel K.

    1980-06-01

    Graded synaptic transmission occurs between spiking neurons of the lobster stomatogastric ganglion. In addition to eliciting spike-evoked inhibitory potentials in postsynaptic cells, these neurons also release functionally significant amounts of transmitter below the threshold for action potentials. The spikeless postsynaptic potentials grade in amplitude with presynaptic voltage and can be maintained for long periods. Graded synaptic transmission can be modulated by synaptic input to the presynaptic neuron.

  15. Network response synchronization enhanced by synaptic plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobov, S.; Simonov, A.; Kastalskiy, I.; Kazantsev, V.

    2016-02-01

    Synchronization of neural network response on spatially localized periodic stimulation was studied. The network consisted of synaptically coupled spiking neurons with spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP). Network connectivity was defined by time evolving matrix of synaptic weights. We found that the steady-state spatial pattern of the weights could be rearranged due to locally applied external periodic stimulation. A method for visualization of synaptic weights as vector field was introduced to monitor the evolving connectivity matrix. We demonstrated that changes in the vector field and associated weight rearrangements underlay an enhancement of synchronization range.

  16. Nonvolatile programmable neural network synaptic array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawel, Raoul (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A floating-gate metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) transistor is implemented for use as a nonvolatile analog storage element of a synaptic cell used to implement an array of processing synaptic cells. These cells are based on a four-quadrant analog multiplier requiring both X and Y differential inputs, where one Y input is UV programmable. These nonvolatile synaptic cells are disclosed fully connected in a 32 x 32 synaptic cell array using standard very large scale integration (VLSI) complementary MOS (CMOS) technology.

  17. Synaptic NMDA Receptors Mediate Hypoxic Excitotoxic Death

    PubMed Central

    Wroge, Christine M.; Hogins, Joshua; Eisenman, Larry; Mennerick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Excessive NMDA receptor activation and excitotoxicity underlies pathology in many neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, including hypoxia/ischemia. Thus, the development of effective therapeutics for these disorders demands a complete understanding of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation during excitotoxic insults. The extrasynaptic NMDAR hypothesis posits that synaptic NMDARs are neurotrophic/neuroprotective and extrasynaptic NMDARs are neurotoxic. In part, the extrasynaptic hypothesis is built on observed selectivity for extrasynaptic receptors of a neuroprotective use-dependent NMDAR channel blocker, memantine. In rat hippocampal neurons we found that a neuroprotective concentration of memantine shows little selectivity for extrasynaptic NMDARs when all receptors are tonically activated by exogenous glutamate. This led us to test the extrasynaptic NMDAR hypothesis using metabolic challenge, where the source of excitotoxic glutamate buildup may be largely synaptic. Three independent approaches suggest strongly that synaptic receptors participate prominently in hypoxic excitotoxicity. First, block of glutamate transporters with a non-substrate antagonist exacerbated rather than prevented damage, consistent with a primarily synaptic source of glutamate. Second, selective, preblock of synaptic NMDARs with a slowly reversible, use-dependent antagonist protected nearly fully against prolonged hypoxic insult. Third, glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), which degrades ambient but not synaptic glutamate, did not protect against hypoxia but protected against exogenous glutamate damage. Together, these results suggest that synaptic NMDARs can mediate excitotoxicity, particularly when the glutamate source is synaptic and when synaptic receptor contributions are rigorously defined. Moreover, the results suggest that in some situations therapeutically targeting extrasynaptic receptors may be inappropriate. PMID:22573696

  18. Lovastatin improves impaired synaptic plasticity and phasic alertness in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Mainberger, Florian; Jung, Nikolai H; Zenker, Martin; Wahlländer, Ute; Freudenberg, Leonie; Langer, Susanne; Berweck, Steffen; Winkler, Tobias; Straube, Andreas; Heinen, Florian; Granström, Sofia; Mautner, Victor-Felix; Lidzba, Karen; Mall, Volker

    2013-10-02

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is one of the most common genetic disorders causing learning disabilities by mutations in the neurofibromin gene, an important inhibitor of the RAS pathway. In a mouse model of NF1, a loss of function mutation of the neurofibromin gene resulted in increased gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibition which led to decreased synaptic plasticity and deficits in attentional performance. Most importantly, these defictis were normalized by lovastatin. This placebo-controlled, double blind, randomized study aimed to investigate synaptic plasticity and cognition in humans with NF1 and tried to answer the question whether potential deficits may be rescued by lovastatin. In NF1 patients (n = 11; 19-44 years) and healthy controls (HC; n = 11; 19-31 years) paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to study intracortical inhibition (paired pulse) and synaptic plasticity (paired associative stimulation). On behavioural level the Test of Attentional Performance (TAP) was used. To study the effect of 200 mg lovastatin for 4 days on all these parameters, a placebo-controlled, double blind, randomized trial was performed. In patients with NF1, lovastatin revealed significant decrease of intracortical inhibition, significant increase of synaptic plasticity as well as significant increase of phasic alertness. Compared to HC, patients with NF1 exposed increased intracortical inhibition, impaired synaptic plasticity and deficits in phasic alertness. This study demonstrates, for the first time, a link between a pathological RAS pathway activity, intracortical inhibition and impaired synaptic plasticity and its rescue by lovastatin in humans. Our findings revealed mechanisms of attention disorders in humans with NF1 and support the idea of a potential clinical benefit of lovastatin as a therapeutic option.

  19. Regulation of synaptic structure by ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Anna E; Djakovic, Stevan N; Salehi, Afshin; Wilson, Scott M; Masliah, Eliezer; Patrick, Gentry N

    2009-06-17

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) is a deubiquitinating enzyme that is selectively and abundantly expressed in the brain, and its activity is required for normal synaptic function. Here, we show that UCH-L1 functions in maintaining normal synaptic structure in hippocampal neurons. We found that UCH-L1 activity is rapidly upregulated by NMDA receptor activation, which leads to an increase in the levels of free monomeric ubiquitin. Conversely, pharmacological inhibition of UCH-L1 significantly reduces monomeric ubiquitin levels and causes dramatic alterations in synaptic protein distribution and spine morphology. Inhibition of UCH-L1 activity increases spine size while decreasing spine density. Furthermore, there is a concomitant increase in the size of presynaptic and postsynaptic protein clusters. Interestingly, however, ectopic expression of ubiquitin restores normal synaptic structure in UCH-L1-inhibited neurons. These findings point to a significant role of UCH-L1 in synaptic remodeling, most likely by modulating free monomeric ubiquitin levels in an activity-dependent manner.

  20. The HVC microcircuit: the synaptic basis for interactions between song motor and vocal plasticity pathways.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Richard; Prather, Jonathan F

    2005-02-23

    Synaptic interactions between telencephalic neurons innervating descending motor or basal ganglia pathways are essential in the learning, planning, and execution of complex movements. Synaptic interactions within the songbird telencephalic nucleus HVC are implicated in motor and auditory activity associated with learned vocalizations. HVC contains projection neurons (PNs) (HVC(RA)) that innervate song premotor areas, other PNs (HVC(X)) that innervate a basal ganglia pathway necessary for vocal plasticity, and interneurons (HVC(INT)). During singing, HVC(RA) fire in temporally sparse bursts, possibly because of HVC(INT)-HVC(RA) interactions, and a corollary discharge can be detected in the basal ganglia pathway, likely because of synaptic transmission from HVC(RA) to HVC(X) cells. During song playback, local interactions, including inhibition onto HVC(X) cells, shape highly selective responses that distinguish HVC from its auditory afferents. To better understand the synaptic substrate for the motor and auditory properties of HVC, we made intracellular recordings from pairs of HVC neurons in adult male zebra finch brain slices and used spike-triggered averages to assess synaptic connectivity. A major synaptic interaction between the PNs was a disynaptic inhibition from HVC(RA) to HVC(X), which could link song motor signals in the two outputs of HVC and account for some of the song playback-evoked inhibition in HVC(X) cells. Furthermore, single interneurons made divergent connections onto PNs of both types, and either PN type could form reciprocal connections with interneurons. In these two regards, the synaptic architecture of HVC resembles that described in some pattern-generating networks, underscoring features likely to be important to singing and song learning.

  1. Autism-linked neuroligin-3 R451C mutation differentially alters hippocampal and cortical synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Etherton, Mark; Földy, Csaba; Sharma, Manu; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Liu, Xinran; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Malenka, Robert C; Südhof, Thomas C

    2011-08-16

    Multiple independent mutations in neuroligin genes were identified in patients with familial autism, including the R451C substitution in neuroligin-3 (NL3). Previous studies showed that NL3(R451C) knock-in mice exhibited modestly impaired social behaviors, enhanced water maze learning abilities, and increased synaptic inhibition in the somatosensory cortex, and they suggested that the behavioral changes in these mice may be caused by a general shift of synaptic transmission to inhibition. Here, we confirm that NL3(R451C) mutant mice behaviorally exhibit social interaction deficits and electrophysiologically display increased synaptic inhibition in the somatosensory cortex. Unexpectedly, however, we find that the NL3(R451C) mutation produced a strikingly different phenotype in the hippocampus. Specifically, in the hippocampal CA1 region, the NL3(R451C) mutation caused an ∼1.5-fold increase in AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory synaptic transmission, dramatically altered the kinetics of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic responses, induced an approximately twofold up-regulation of NMDA receptors containing NR2B subunits, and enhanced long-term potentiation almost twofold. NL3 KO mice did not exhibit any of these changes. Quantitative light microscopy and EM revealed that the NL3(R451C) mutation increased dendritic branching and altered the structure of synapses in the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus. Thus, in NL3(R451C) mutant mice, a single point mutation in a synaptic cell adhesion molecule causes context-dependent changes in synaptic transmission; these changes are consistent with the broad impact of this mutation on murine and human behaviors, suggesting that NL3 controls excitatory and inhibitory synapse properties in a region- and circuit-specific manner.

  2. Elevated serotonergic signaling amplifies synaptic noise and facilitates the emergence of epileptiform network oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Puzerey, Pavel A.; Decker, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin fibers densely innervate the cortical sheath to regulate neuronal excitability, but its role in shaping network dynamics remains undetermined. We show that serotonin provides an excitatory tone to cortical neurons in the form of spontaneous synaptic noise through 5-HT3 receptors, which is persistent and can be augmented using fluoxetine, a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor. Augmented serotonin signaling also increases cortical network activity by enhancing synaptic excitation through activation of 5-HT2 receptors. This in turn facilitates the emergence of epileptiform network oscillations (10–16 Hz) known as fast runs. A computational model of cortical dynamics demonstrates that these two combined mechanisms, increased background synaptic noise and enhanced synaptic excitation, are sufficient to replicate the emergence fast runs and their statistics. Consistent with these findings, we show that blocking 5-HT2 receptors in vivo significantly raises the threshold for convulsant-induced seizures. PMID:25122717

  3. A synaptic nidogen: Developmental regulation and role of nidogen-2 at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael A; Ho, Matthew SP; Smyth, Neil; Sanes, Joshua R

    2008-01-01

    Background The skeletal neuromuscular junction is a useful model for elucidating mechanisms that regulate synaptogenesis. Developmentally important intercellular interactions at the neuromuscular junction are mediated by the synaptic portion of a basal lamina that completely ensheaths each muscle fiber. Basal laminas in general are composed of four main types of glycosylated proteins: laminins, collagens IV, heparan sulfate proteoglycans and nidogens (entactins). The portion of the muscle fiber basal lamina that passes between the motor nerve terminal and postsynaptic membrane has been shown to bear distinct isoforms of the first three of these. For laminins and collagens IV, the proteins are deposited by the muscle; a synaptic proteoglycan, z-agrin, is deposited by the nerve. In each case, the synaptic isoform plays key roles in organizing the neuromuscular junction. Here, we analyze the fourth family, composed of nidogen-1 and -2. Results In adult muscle, nidogen-1 is present throughout muscle fiber basal lamina, while nidogen-2 is concentrated at synapses. Nidogen-2 is initially present throughout muscle basal lamina, but is lost from extrasynaptic regions during the first three postnatal weeks. Neuromuscular junctions in mutant mice lacking nidogen-2 appear normal at birth, but become topologically abnormal as they mature. Synaptic laminins, collagens IV and heparan sulfate proteoglycans persist in the absence of nidogen-2, suggesting the phenotype is not secondary to a general defect in the integrity of synaptic basal lamina. Further genetic studies suggest that synaptic localization of each of the four families of synaptic basal lamina components is independent of the other three. Conclusion All four core components of the basal lamina have synaptically enriched isoforms. Together, they form a highly specialized synaptic cleft material. Individually, they play distinct roles in the formation, maturation and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction. PMID

  4. Synaptic Vesicle Pools: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Annette; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2010-01-01

    During the last few decades synaptic vesicles have been assigned to a variety of functional and morphological classes or “pools”. We have argued in the past (Rizzoli and Betz, 2005) that synaptic activity in several preparations is accounted for by the function of three vesicle pools: the readily releasable pool (docked at active zones and ready to go upon stimulation), the recycling pool (scattered throughout the nerve terminals and recycling upon moderate stimulation), and finally the reserve pool (occupying most of the vesicle clusters and only recycling upon strong stimulation). We discuss here the advancements in the vesicle pool field which took place in the ensuing years, focusing on the behavior of different pools under both strong stimulation and physiological activity. Several new findings have enhanced the three-pool model, with, for example, the disparity between recycling and reserve vesicles being underlined by the observation that the former are mobile, while the latter are “fixed”. Finally, a number of altogether new concepts have also evolved such as the current controversy on the identity of the spontaneously recycling vesicle pool. PMID:21423521

  5. Interaural Level Difference Dependent Gain Control and Synaptic Scaling Underlying Binaural Computation

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiaorui R.; Liang, Feixue; Li, Haifu; Mesik, Lukas; Zhang, Ke K.; Polley, Daniel B.; Tao, Huizhong W.; Xiao, Zhongju; Zhang, Li I.

    2013-01-01

    Binaural integration in the central nucleus of inferior colliculus (ICC) plays a critical role in sound localization. However, its arithmetic nature and underlying synaptic mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we showed in mouse ICC neurons that the contralateral dominance is created by a “push-pull”-like mechanism, with contralaterally dominant excitation and more bilaterally balanced inhibition. Importantly, binaural spiking response is generated apparently from an ipsilaterally-mediated scaling of contralateral response, leaving frequency tuning unchanged. This scaling effect is attributed to a divisive attenuation of contralaterally-evoked synaptic excitation onto ICC neurons with their inhibition largely unaffected. Thus, a gain control mediates the linear transformation from monaural to binaural spike responses. The gain value is modulated by interaural level difference (ILD) primarily through scaling excitation to different levels. The ILD-dependent synaptic scaling and gain adjustment allow ICC neurons to dynamically encode interaural sound localization cues while maintaining an invariant representation of other independent sound attributes. PMID:23972599

  6. Synaptic Transmission Correlates of General Mental Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRorie, Margaret; Cooper, Colin

    2004-01-01

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and efficiency of synaptic transmission are two possible biological mechanisms that may underpin intelligence. Direct assessments of NCV, without synaptic transmission, show few substantial or reliable correlations with cognitive abilities ["Intelligence" 16 (1992) 273]. We therefore assessed the latencies…

  7. Synaptic Transmission Correlates of General Mental Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRorie, Margaret; Cooper, Colin

    2004-01-01

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and efficiency of synaptic transmission are two possible biological mechanisms that may underpin intelligence. Direct assessments of NCV, without synaptic transmission, show few substantial or reliable correlations with cognitive abilities ["Intelligence" 16 (1992) 273]. We therefore assessed the latencies…

  8. Selective molecular impairment of spontaneous neurotransmission modulates synaptic efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Devon C.; Ramirez, Denise M. O.; Trauterman, Brent; Monteggia, Lisa M.; Kavalali, Ege T.

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that stimulus-evoked and spontaneous neurotransmitter release processes are mechanistically distinct. Here we targeted the non-canonical synaptic vesicle SNAREs Vps10p-tail-interactor-1a (vti1a) and vesicle-associated membrane protein 7 (VAMP7) to specifically inhibit spontaneous release events and probe whether these events signal independently of evoked release to the postsynaptic neuron. We found that loss of vti1a and VAMP7 impairs spontaneous high-frequency glutamate release and augments unitary event amplitudes by reducing postsynaptic eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) activity subsequent to the reduction in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activity. Presynaptic, but not postsynaptic, loss of vti1a and VAMP7 occludes NMDAR antagonist-induced synaptic potentiation in an intact circuit, confirming the role of these vesicular SNAREs in setting synaptic strength. Collectively, these results demonstrate that spontaneous neurotransmission signals independently of stimulus-evoked release and highlight its role as a key regulator of postsynaptic efficacy. PMID:28186166

  9. Synaptic Mechanisms of Direction Selectivity in Primary Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Chang-quan; Poo, Mu-ming; Dan, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-hui

    2010-01-01

    Frequency modulation (FM) is a prominent feature in animal vocalization and human speech. Although many neurons in the auditory cortex are known to be selective for FM direction, the synaptic mechanisms underlying this selectivity are not well understood. Previous studies of both visual and auditory neurons have suggested two general mechanisms for direction selectivity: 1) differential delays of excitatory inputs across the spatial/spectral receptive field and 2) spatial/spectral offset between excitatory and inhibitory inputs. In this study, we have examined the contributions of both mechanisms to FM direction selectivity in rat primary auditory cortex. The excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to each cortical neuron were measured by in vivo whole-cell recording. The spectrotemporal receptive field (STRF) of each type of inputs was mapped with random tone pips and compared with direction selectivity of the neuron measured with FM stimuli. We found that both the differential delay of the excitatory input and the spectral offset between excitation and inhibition are positively correlated with direction selectivity of the neuron. Thus, both synaptic mechanisms are likely to contribute to FM direction selectivity in the auditory cortex. Finally, direction selectivity measured from the spiking output is significantly stronger than that based on the subthreshold membrane potentials, indicating that the selectivity is further sharpened by the spike generation mechanism. PMID:20130195

  10. VEGF modulates synaptic activity in the developing spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Guérit, Sylvaine; Allain, Anne-Emilie; Léon, Céline; Cazenave, William; Ferrara, Napoleone; Branchereau, Pascal; Bikfalvi, Andréas

    2014-11-01

    Although it has been documented that the nervous and the vascular systems share numerous analogies and are closely intermingled during development and pathological processes, interactions between the two systems are still poorly described. In this study, we investigated whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which is a key regulator of vascular development, also modulates neuronal developmental processes. We report that VEGF enhances the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)/glycinergic but not glutamatergic synaptic activity in embryonic spinal motoneurons (MNs), without affecting MNs excitability. In response to VEGF, the frequency of these synaptic events but not their amplitude was increased. Blocking endogenous VEGF led to an opposite effect by decreasing frequency of synaptic events. We found that this effect occurred specifically at early developmental stages (E13.5 and E15.5) and vanished at the prenatal stage E17.5. Furthermore, VEGF was able to increase vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter density at the MN membrane. Inhibition of single VEGF receptors did not modify electrophysiological parameters indicating receptor combinations or an alternative pathway. Altogether, our findings identify VEGF as a modulator of the neuronal activity during synapse formation and highlight a new ontogenic role for this angiogenic factor in the nervous system. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Synaptic activity and Alzheimer's disease: a critical update

    PubMed Central

    Tampellini, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Synapses have been known for many years to be the crucial target of pathology in different forms of dementia, in particular Alzheimer's disease (AD). Synapses and their appropriate activation or inhibition are fundamental for the proper brain function. Alterations in synaptic/neuronal activity and brain metabolism are considered among the earliest symptoms linked to the progression of AD, and lead to a central question in AD research: what is the role played by synaptic activity in AD pathogenesis? Intriguingly, in the last decade, important studies demonstrated that the state of activation of synapses affects the homeostasis of beta-amyloid (Aβ) and tau, both of which aggregate and accumulate during AD, and are involved in neuronal dysfunction. In this review we aim to summarize the up-to-date data linking synaptic/neuronal activity with Aβ and tau; moreover, we also intend to provide a critical overview on brain activity alterations in AD, and their role in the disease's pathophysiology. PMID:26582973

  12. Histone deacetylase 2 cell autonomously suppresses excitatory and enhances inhibitory synaptic function in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jesse E; Deng, Lunbin; Hackos, David H; Lo, Shih-Ching; Lauffer, Benjamin E; Steiner, Pascal; Zhou, Qiang

    2013-04-03

    Histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2) negatively regulates excitatory synapse number and memory performance. However, whether HDAC2 regulation of excitatory synapses occurs in a cell-autonomous manner and whether HDAC2 regulates inhibitory synaptic functions are not well understood. To examine these aspects of HDAC2 function, we used sparse transfection of rat hippocampal slice cultures and whole-cell recordings in pyramidal neurons. HDAC2 knockdown (KD) in single postsynaptic pyramidal neurons enhanced, whereas HDAC2 overexpression (OE) reduced, excitatory synaptic transmission. Postsynaptic KD of HDAC2 also facilitated expression of long-term potentiation induced by subthreshold induction stimuli, without altering long-term depression. In contrast, HDAC2 KD reduced, whereas HDAC2 OE enhanced, inhibitory synaptic transmission. Alterations of postsynaptic GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) likely underlie the impact of HDAC2 on inhibitory transmission. Consistent with this, we observed reduced transcript and protein levels of the GABA(A)R γ2 subunit and reduced surface expression of the α2 subunit after HDAC2 KD. Furthermore, we observed a reduction in synaptic but not tonic GABA(A)R currents by HDAC2 KD, suggesting that HDAC2 selectively affects synaptic abundance of functional GABA(A)Rs. Immunostaining for postsynaptic GABA(A)Rs confirmed that HDAC2 KD and OE can regulate the synaptic abundance of these receptors. Together, these results highlight a role for HDAC2 in suppressing synaptic excitation and enhancing synaptic inhibition of hippocampal neurons. Therefore, a shift in the balance of synaptic excitation versus inhibition favoring excitation could contribute to the beneficial effects of reducing HDAC2 function in wild-type mice or of inhibiting HDACs in models of cognitive impairment.

  13. Synaptic vesicle chips to assay botulinum neurotoxins

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    BoNTs (botulinum neurotoxins), considered to be the most toxic of all biological substances, inhibit neurotransmission through proteolytic cleavage of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins [VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein, or synaptobrevin), SNAP-25 (25 kDa synaptosome-associated protein) or syntaxin]. Expansion in the use of BoNTs as therapeutic and cosmetic agents, and the potential threat they constitute as biological weapons, underlines the need for rapid and sensitive in vitro assays. Here, we present new automatized bioassays to detect VAMP cleavage by BoNT/B and F. Western blotting and SPR (surface plasmon resonance) methods revealed that BoNT/B and F totally cleave their substrate on immunoisolated SVs (synaptic vesicles). Real-time monitoring of the immunocapture of native SVs from crude lysates on SPR sensor chips enabled the detection of picogram amounts of different SV proteins. Pre-incubation of a membrane fraction containing SVs with BoNT specifically inhibited capture by anti-VAMP antibodies, and amounts as low as 0.1 pg of BoNT/B were detected. This automated SPR assay is approx. 200 times more sensitive, and 25 times more rapid, than the in vivo BoNT/B test currently used. Moreover, the method can be performed using a few thousand cultured neurons and constitutes a new screening assay for inhibitors. Our data indicate that native VAMP is an optimal substrate for in vitro BoNT assays that can be monitored by SPR. PMID:16011482

  14. Programmable synaptic chip for electronic neural networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moopenn, A.; Langenbacher, H.; Thakoor, A. P.; Khanna, S. K.

    1988-01-01

    A binary synaptic matrix chip has been developed for electronic neural networks. The matrix chip contains a programmable 32X32 array of 'long channel' NMOSFET binary connection elements implemented in a 3-micron bulk CMOS process. Since the neurons are kept off-chip, the synaptic chip serves as a 'cascadable' building block for a multi-chip synaptic network as large as 512X512 in size. As an alternative to the programmable NMOSFET (long channel) connection elements, tailored thin film resistors are deposited, in series with FET switches, on some CMOS test chips, to obtain the weak synaptic connections. Although deposition and patterning of the resistors require additional processing steps, they promise substantial savings in silicon area. The performance of synaptic chip in a 32-neuron breadboard system in an associative memory test application is discussed.

  15. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention. PMID:27148040

  16. [The mechanisms of depression by benzodiazepines, barbiturates and propofol of excitatory synaptic transmissions mediated by adenosine neuromodulation].

    PubMed

    Narimatsu, Eichi; Niiya, Tomohisa; Kawamata, Mikito; Namiki, Akiyoshi

    2006-06-01

    Adenosine is known to modulate synaptic functions through adenosine receptors and the related adenosine neuromodulatory system. Benzodiazepines, barbiturates and propofol, the main actins of which are facilitation of GABAA receptor functions, also facilitate accumulation of endogenous adenosine in the extracellular space by inhibiting adenosine uptake via adenosine transporters. The accumulated adenosine depresses excitatory synaptic transmission by decreasing transmitter release, depressing postsynaptic sensitivity and inhibiting neuronal excitability through adenosine A1 receptors and the related adenosine neuromodulatory system. The adenosine-induced depressions of excitatory synaptic transmissions probably contribute to the mechanisms of the anesthetic, sedative, anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of these anesthetics and sedatives. An understanding of the synaptic mechanisms of these anesthetics and sedatives through the adenosine neuromodulatory system is needed for rational clinical use of the drugs.

  17. Thalamic synaptic transmission of sensory information modulated by synergistic interaction of adenosine and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Chin; Hu, Chun-Chang; Huang, Chen-Syuan; Chou, Pei-Yu

    2014-03-01

    The thalamic synapses relay peripheral sensory information to the cortex, and constitute an important part of the thalamocortical network that generates oscillatory activities responsible for different vigilance (sleep and wakefulness) states. However, the modulation of thalamic synaptic transmission by potential sleep regulators, especially by combination of regulators in physiological scenarios, is not fully characterized. We found that somnogen adenosine itself acts similar to wake-promoting serotonin, both decreasing synaptic strength as well as short-term depression, at the retinothalamic synapse. We then combined the two modulators considering the coexistence of them in the hypnagogic (sleep-onset) state. Adenosine plus serotonin results in robust synergistic inhibition of synaptic strength and dramatic transformation of short-term synaptic depression to facilitation. These synaptic effects are not achievable with a single modulator, and are consistent with a high signal-to-noise ratio but a low level of signal transmission through the thalamus appropriate for slow-wave sleep. This study for the first time demonstrates that the sleep-regulatory modulators may work differently when present in combination than present singly in terms of shaping information flow in the thalamocortical network. The major synaptic characters such as the strength and short-term plasticity can be profoundly altered by combination of modulators based on physiological considerations.

  18. Antibody-mediated Impairment and Homeostatic Plasticity of Autonomic Ganglionic Synaptic Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengbei; Low, Phillip A.; Vernino, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Antibodies against ganglionic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) are implicated as the cause of autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG). To characterize ganglionic neurotransmission in an animal model of AAG, evoked and spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSP) were recorded from neurons in isolated mouse superior cervical ganglia (SCG). In vitro exposure of ganglia to IgG from AAG patients progressively inhibited synaptic transmission. After passive transfer of antibody to mice, evoked EPSP amplitude decreased, and some neurons showed no synaptic responses. EPSP amplitude recovered by day seven despite persistence of ganglionic AChR antibody in the mouse serum. There was a more persistent (at least 14 day) reduction in miniature EPSP amplitude consistent with antibody-mediated reduction in post-synaptic AChR. Although the quantal size was reduced, a progressive increase in the frequency of spontaneous synaptic events occurred, suggesting a compensatory increase in presynaptic efficacy. The quantal size returned to baseline by 21 days while the frequency remained increased for at least four weeks. Ganglionic AChR antibodies cause an impairment of autonomic ganglionic synaptic transmission. Homeostatic plasticity in autonomic neurotransmission could help explain the spontaneous clinical recovery seen in some AAG patients and may also play an important role in regulating normal autonomic reflexes. PMID:20044994

  19. Morphological and functional abnormalities in mitochondria associated with synaptic degeneration in prion disease.

    PubMed

    Sisková, Zuzana; Mahad, Don Joseph; Pudney, Carianne; Campbell, Graham; Cadogan, Mark; Asuni, Ayodeji; O'Connor, Vincent; Perry, Victor Hugh

    2010-09-01

    Synaptic and dendritic pathology is a well-documented component of prion disease. In common with other neurodegenerative diseases that contain an element of protein misfolding, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of synaptic degeneration. In particular, in prion disease the relationship between synaptic malfunction, degeneration, and mitochondria has been neglected. We investigated a wide range of mitochondrial parameters, including changes in mitochondrial density, inner membrane ultrastructure, functional properties and nature of mitochondrial DNA from hippocampal tissue of mice with prion disease, which have ongoing synaptic pathology. Our results indicate that despite a lack of detectable changes in either mitochondrial density or expression of the mitochondrial proteins, mitochondrial function was impaired when compared with age-matched control animals. We observed changes in mitochondrial inner membrane morphology and a reduction in the cytochrome c oxidase activity relative to a sustained level of mitochondrial proteins such as porin and individual, functionally important subunits of complex II and complex IV. These data support the idea that mitochondrial dysfunction appears to occur due to inhibition or modification of respiratory complex rather than deletions of mitochondrial DNA. Indeed, these changes were seen in the stratum radiatum where synaptic pathology is readily detected, indicating that mitochondrial function is impaired and could potentially contribute to or even initiate the synaptic pathology in prion disease.

  20. Synaptic dynamics: linear model and adaptation algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yousefi, Ali; Dibazar, Alireza A; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-08-01

    In this research, temporal processing in brain neural circuitries is addressed by a dynamic model of synaptic connections in which the synapse model accounts for both pre- and post-synaptic processes determining its temporal dynamics and strength. Neurons, which are excited by the post-synaptic potentials of hundred of the synapses, build the computational engine capable of processing dynamic neural stimuli. Temporal dynamics in neural models with dynamic synapses will be analyzed, and learning algorithms for synaptic adaptation of neural networks with hundreds of synaptic connections are proposed. The paper starts by introducing a linear approximate model for the temporal dynamics of synaptic transmission. The proposed linear model substantially simplifies the analysis and training of spiking neural networks. Furthermore, it is capable of replicating the synaptic response of the non-linear facilitation-depression model with an accuracy better than 92.5%. In the second part of the paper, a supervised spike-in-spike-out learning rule for synaptic adaptation in dynamic synapse neural networks (DSNN) is proposed. The proposed learning rule is a biologically plausible process, and it is capable of simultaneously adjusting both pre- and post-synaptic components of individual synapses. The last section of the paper starts with presenting the rigorous analysis of the learning algorithm in a system identification task with hundreds of synaptic connections which confirms the learning algorithm's accuracy, repeatability and scalability. The DSNN is utilized to predict the spiking activity of cortical neurons and pattern recognition tasks. The DSNN model is demonstrated to be a generative model capable of producing different cortical neuron spiking patterns and CA1 Pyramidal neurons recordings. A single-layer DSNN classifier on a benchmark pattern recognition task outperforms a 2-Layer Neural Network and GMM classifiers while having fewer numbers of free parameters and

  1. Convergent synaptic and circuit substrates underlying autism genetic risks

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Aaron; Li, Guohui; Lu, Zhongming; Qiu, Shenfeng

    2014-01-01

    There has been a surge of diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) over the past decade. While large, high powered genome screening studies of children with ASD have identified numerous genetic risk factors, research efforts to understanding how each of these risk factors contributes to the development autism has met with limited success. Revealing the mechanisms by which these genetic risk factors affect brain development and predispose a child to autism requires mechanistic understanding of the neurobiological changes underlying this devastating group of developmental disorders at multifaceted molecular, cellular and system levels. It has been increasingly clear that the normal trajectory of neurodevelopment is compromised in autism, in multiple domains as much as aberrant neuronal production, growth, functional maturation, patterned connectivity, and balanced excitation and inhibition of brain networks. Many autism risk factors identified in humans have been now reconstituted in experimental mouse models to allow mechanistic interrogation of the biological role of the risk gene. Studies utilizing these mouse models have revealed that underlying the enormous heterogeneity of perturbed cellular events, mechanisms directing synaptic and circuit assembly may provide a unifying explanation for the pathophysiological changes and behavioral endophenotypes seen in autism, although synaptic perturbations are far from being the only alterations relevant for ASD. In this review, we discuss synaptic and circuit abnormalities obtained from several prevalent mouse models, particularly those reflecting syndromic forms of ASD that are caused by single gene perturbations. These compiled results reveal that ASD risk genes contribute to proper signaling of the developing gene networks that maintain synaptic and circuit homeostasis, which is fundamental to normal brain development. PMID:24999357

  2. Cholinergic synaptic vesicle heterogeneity: evidence for regulation of acetylcholine transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gracz, L.M.; Wang, W.; Parsons, S.M.

    1988-07-12

    Crude cholinergic synaptic vesicles from a homogenate of the electric organ of Torpedo californica were centrifuged to equilibrium in an isosmotic sucrose density gradient. The classical VP/sub 1/ synaptic vesicles banding at 1.055 g/mL actively transported (/sup 3/H)acetylcholine (AcCh). An organelle banding at about 1.071 g/mL transported even more (/sup 3/H)AcCh. Transport by both organelles was inhibited by the known AcCh storage blockers trans-2-(4-phenylpiperidino)cyclohexanol (vesamicol, formerly AH5183) and nigericin. Relative to VP/sub 1/ vesicles the denser organelle was slightly smaller as shown by size-exclusion chromatography. It is concluded that the denser organelle corresponds to the recycling VP/sub 2/ synaptic vesicle originally described in intact Torpedo marmorata electric organ. The properties of the receptor for vesamicol were studied by measuring binding of (/sup 3/H)vesamicol, and the amount of SV2 antigen characteristic of secretory vesicles was assayed with a monoclonal antibody directed against it. Relative to VP/sub 1/ vesicles the VP/sub 2/ vesicles had a ratio of (/sup 3/H)AcCh transport activity to vesamicol receptor concentration that typically was 4-7-fold higher, whereas the ratio of SV2 antigen concentration to vesamicol receptor concentration was about 2-fold higher. The Hill coefficients ..cap alpha../sub H/ and equilibrium dissociation constants K for vesamicol binding to VP/sub 1/ and VP/sub 2/ vesicles were essentially the same. The positive Hill coefficient suggests that the vesamicol receptor exists as a homotropic oligomeric complex. The results demonstrate that VP/sub 1/ and VP/sub 2/ synaptic vesicles exhibit functional differences in the AcCh transport system, presumably as a result of regulatory phenomena.

  3. The reserve pool of synaptic vesicles acts as a buffer for proteins involved in synaptic vesicle recycling

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Annette; Kröhnert, Katharina; Bückers, Johanna; Neher, Erwin; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2011-01-01

    Presynaptic nerve terminals contain between several hundred vesicles (for example in small CNS synapses) and several tens of thousands (as in neuromuscular junctions). Although it has long been assumed that such high numbers of vesicles are required to sustain neurotransmission during conditions of high demand, we found that activity in vivo requires the recycling of only a few percent of the vesicles. However, the maintenance of large amounts of reserve vesicles in many evolutionarily distinct species suggests that they are relevant for synaptic function. We suggest here that these vesicles constitute buffers for soluble accessory proteins involved in vesicle recycling, preventing their loss into the axon. Supporting this hypothesis, we found that vesicle clusters contain a large variety of proteins needed for vesicle recycling, but without an obvious function within the clusters. Disrupting the clusters by application of black widow spider venom resulted in the diffusion of numerous soluble proteins into the axons. Prolonged stimulation and ionomycin application had a similar effect, suggesting that calcium influx causes the unbinding of soluble proteins from vesicles. Confirming this hypothesis, we found that isolated synaptic vesicles in vitro sequestered soluble proteins from the cytosol in a process that was inhibited by calcium addition. We conclude that the reserve vesicles support neurotransmission indirectly, ensuring that soluble recycling proteins are delivered upon demand during synaptic activity. PMID:21903923

  4. Hemifusion in Synaptic Vesicle Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kweon, Dae-Hyuk; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Yeon-Kyun

    2017-01-01

    In the neuron, early neurotransmitters are released through the fusion pore prior to the complete vesicle fusion. It has been thought that the fusion pore is a gap junction-like structure made of transmembrane domains (TMDs) of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins. However, evidence has accumulated that lipid mixing occurs prior to the neurotransmitter release through the fusion pore lined predominantly with lipids. To explain these observations, the hemifusion, a membrane structure in which two bilayers are partially merged, has emerged as a key step preceding the formation of the fusion pore. Furthermore, the hemifusion appears to be the bona fide intermediate step not only for the synaptic vesicle cycle, but for a wide range of membrane remodeling processes, such as viral membrane fusion and endocytotic membrane fission. PMID:28360835

  5. Anesthetic action on extra-synaptic receptors: effects in neural population models of EEG activity

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Meysam; Hutt, Axel; Sleigh, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The role of extra-synaptic receptors in the regulation of excitation and inhibition in the brain has attracted increasing attention. Because activity in the extra-synaptic receptors plays a role in regulating the level of excitation and inhibition in the brain, they may be important in determining the level of consciousness. This paper reviews briefly the literature on extra-synaptic GABA and NMDA receptors and their affinity to anesthetic drugs. We propose a neural population model that illustrates how the effect of the anesthetic drug propofol on GABAergic extra-synaptic receptors results in changes in neural population activity and the electroencephalogram (EEG). Our results show that increased tonic inhibition in inhibitory cortical neurons cause a dramatic increase in the power of both δ− and α− bands. Conversely, the effects of increased tonic inhibition in cortical excitatory neurons and thalamic relay neurons have the opposite effect and decrease the power in these bands. The increased δ-activity is in accord with observed data for deepening propofol anesthesia; but is absolutely dependent on the inclusion of extrasynaptic (tonic) GABA action in the model. PMID:25540612

  6. Synaptic currents in anatomically identified CA3 neurons during hippocampal gamma oscillations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Oren, Iris; Mann, Edward O; Paulsen, Ole; Hájos, Norbert

    2006-09-27

    Gamma-frequency oscillations are prominent during active network states in the hippocampus. An intrahippocampal gamma generator has been identified in the CA3 region. To better understand the synaptic mechanisms involved in gamma oscillogenesis, we recorded action potentials and synaptic currents in distinct types of anatomically identified CA3 neurons during carbachol-induced (20-25 microM) gamma oscillations in rat hippocampal slices. We wanted to compare and contrast the relationship between excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents in pyramidal cells and perisomatic-targeting interneurons, cell types implicated in gamma oscillogenesis, as well as in other interneuron subtypes, and to relate synaptic currents to the firing properties of the cells. We found that phasic synaptic input differed between cell classes. Most strikingly, the dominant phasic input to pyramidal neurons was inhibitory, whereas phase-coupled perisomatic-targeting interneurons often received a strong phasic excitatory input. Differences in synaptic input could account for some of the differences in firing rate, action potential phase precision, and mean action potential phase angle, both between individual cells and between cell types. There was a strong positive correlation between the ratio of phasic synaptic excitation to inhibition and firing rate over all neurons and between the phase precision of excitation and action potentials in interneurons. Moreover, mean action potential phase angle correlated with the phase of the peak of the net-estimated synaptic reversal potential in all phase-coupled neurons. The data support a recurrent mechanism of gamma oscillations, whereby spike timing is controlled primarily by inhibition in pyramidal cells and by excitation in interneurons.

  7. Imbalanced pattern completion vs. separation in cognitive disease: network simulations of synaptic pathologies predict a personalized therapeutics strategy.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Jesse E; Madison, Daniel V

    2010-08-13

    Diverse Mouse genetic models of neurodevelopmental, neuropsychiatric, and neurodegenerative causes of impaired cognition exhibit at least four convergent points of synaptic malfunction: 1) Strength of long-term potentiation (LTP), 2) Strength of long-term depression (LTD), 3) Relative inhibition levels (Inhibition), and 4) Excitatory connectivity levels (Connectivity). To test the hypothesis that pathological increases or decreases in these synaptic properties could underlie imbalances at the level of basic neural network function, we explored each type of malfunction in a simulation of autoassociative memory. These network simulations revealed that one impact of impairments or excesses in each of these synaptic properties is to shift the trade-off between pattern separation and pattern completion performance during memory storage and recall. Each type of synaptic pathology either pushed the network balance towards intolerable error in pattern separation or intolerable error in pattern completion. Imbalances caused by pathological impairments or excesses in LTP, LTD, inhibition, or connectivity, could all be exacerbated, or rescued, by the simultaneous modulation of any of the other three synaptic properties. Because appropriate modulation of any of the synaptic properties could help re-balance network function, regardless of the origins of the imbalance, we propose a new strategy of personalized cognitive therapeutics guided by assay of pattern completion vs. pattern separation function. Simulated examples and testable predictions of this theorized approach to cognitive therapeutics are presented.

  8. Initiation of spreading depression by synaptic and network hyperactivity: Insights into trigger mechanisms of migraine aura.

    PubMed

    Vinogradova, Lyudmila V

    2017-01-01

    Background Cortical spreading depression (SD) is thought to underlie migraine aura but mechanisms of triggering SD in the structurally normal, well-nourished cortex of migraine patients remain unknown. Synaptic and network dysfunctions appear to underlie episodic neurological disorders, including migraine. The narrative review summarizes old and recent experimental evidence for triggering SD by synaptic/network mechanisms and discusses the relevance of the data to migraine pathogenesis. Our hypothesis is that under some conditions synaptic/network hyperactivity may reliably ignite SD, and this mechanism may underlie triggering migraine aura in patients. Findings High-frequency tetanic stimulation of the cortex reliably triggers SD in synaptically connected regions; SD is a reliable cortical response to acute hyperexcitability (epileptic seizures), though chronic epilepsy prevents triggering SD; in the hyperexcitable cortex, SD may be triggered by sensory stimulation; compromised glutamatergic transmission plays the critical role in triggering SD. Conclusion SD may be triggered by dynamic network instability produced by dysfunction of calcium-dependent glutamate release. Synaptic drive from subcortical sensory processing structures (brainstem and/or thalamocortical networks) is able to evoke depolarization of hyperexcitable cortical neurons sufficient to initiate the regenerative SD process. Studying SD initiation by synaptic/network hyperexcitability may provide insights into basic mechanisms underlying SD generation in migraine brain.

  9. Synaptic vesicle recycling: steps and principles

    PubMed Central

    Rizzoli, Silvio O

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle recycling is one of the best-studied cellular pathways. Many of the proteins involved are known, and their interactions are becoming increasingly clear. However, as for many other pathways, it is still difficult to understand synaptic vesicle recycling as a whole. While it is generally possible to point out how synaptic reactions take place, it is not always easy to understand what triggers or controls them. Also, it is often difficult to understand how the availability of the reaction partners is controlled: how the reaction partners manage to find each other in the right place, at the right time. I present here an overview of synaptic vesicle recycling, discussing the mechanisms that trigger different reactions, and those that ensure the availability of reaction partners. A central argument is that synaptic vesicles bind soluble cofactor proteins, with low affinity, and thus control their availability in the synapse, forming a buffer for cofactor proteins. The availability of cofactor proteins, in turn, regulates the different synaptic reactions. Similar mechanisms, in which one of the reaction partners buffers another, may apply to many other processes, from the biogenesis to the degradation of the synaptic vesicle. PMID:24596248

  10. Recruiting extrasynaptic NMDA receptors augments synaptic signaling.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alexander Z; Pettit, Diana L

    2008-02-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation may promote cell survival or initiate cell death, with the outcome dependent on whether synaptic or extrasynaptic receptors are activated. Similarly, this differential activation has been proposed to govern the direction of plasticity. However, the physiological parameters necessary to activate extrasynaptic NMDARs in brain slices remain unknown. Using the irreversible use-dependent NMDAR antagonist MK-801 to isolate extrasynaptic NMDARs, we have tested the ability of short-stimulation trains from 5 to 400 Hz to activate these receptors on CA1 hippocampal slice pyramidal neurons. Frequencies as low as 25 Hz engage extrasynaptic NMDARs, with maximal activation at frequencies between 100 and 200 Hz. Since similar bursts of synaptic input occur during exploratory behavior in rats, our results demonstrate that "extrasynaptic" NMDARs regularly participate in synaptic transmission. Further, 175-Hz-stimulation trains activate all available synaptic and extrasynaptic dendritic NMDARs, suggesting these NMDARs act as synaptic receptors as needed, transiently increasing synaptic strength. Thus extrasynaptic NMDARs play a vital role in synaptic physiology, calling into question their status as "extrasynaptic."

  11. Dynamic modulation of short term synaptic plasticity in the auditory cortex: the role of norepinephrine

    PubMed Central

    Humberto, Salgado; Francisco, García-Oscos; Lu, Dinh

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is an important modulator of neuronal activity in the auditory cortex. Using patch-clamp recording and a pair pulse protocol on an auditory cortex slice preparation we recently demonstrated that NE affects cortical inhibition in a layer-specific manner, by decreasing apical but increasing basal inhibition onto layer II/III pyramidal cell dendrites. In the present study we used a similar protocol to investigate the dependence of noradrenergic modulation of inhibition on stimulus frequency, using 1s-long train pulses at 5, 10, and 20 Hz. The study was conducted using pharmacologically isolated inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) evoked by electrical stimulation of axons either in layer I (LI-eIPSCs) or in layer II/III (LII/III-eIPSCs). We found that: 1) LI-eIPSC display less synaptic depression than LII/III-eIPSCs at all the frequencies tested, 2) in both type of synapses depression had a presynaptic component which could be altered manipulating [Ca2+]o, 3) NE modestly altered short-term synaptic plasticity at low or intermediate (5–10 Hz) frequencies, but selectively enhanced synaptic facilitation in LI-eIPSCs while increasing synaptic depression of LII/III-eIPSCs in the latest (>250 ms) part of the response, at high stimulation frequency (20 Hz). We speculate that these mechanisms may limit the temporal window for top-down synaptic integration as well as the duration and intensity of stimulus-evoked gamma oscillations triggered by complex auditory stimuli during alertness. PMID:20816739

  12. Recruitment of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors during synaptic potentiation is regulated by CaM-kinase I.

    PubMed

    Guire, Eric S; Oh, Michael C; Soderling, Thomas R; Derkach, Victor A

    2008-06-04

    Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) at central glutamatergic synapses are of special interest because of their unique biophysical and signaling properties that contribute to synaptic plasticity and their roles in multiple neuropathologies. However, intracellular signaling pathways that recruit synaptic CP-AMPARs are unknown, and involvement of CP-AMPARs in hippocampal region CA1 synaptic plasticity is controversial. Here, we report that intracellular infusion of active CaM-kinase I (CaMKI) into cultured hippocampal neurons enhances miniature EPSC amplitude because of recruitment of CP-AMPARs, likely from an extrasynaptic pool. The ability of CaMKI, which regulates the actin cytoskeleton, to recruit synaptic CP-AMPARs was blocked by inhibiting actin polymerization with latrunculin A. CaMK regulation of CP-AMPARs was also confirmed in hippocampal slices. CA1 long-term potentiation (LTP) after theta bursts, but not high-frequency tetani, produced a rapid, transient expression of synaptic CP-AMPARs that facilitated LTP. This component of TBS LTP was blocked by inhibition of CaM-kinase kinase (CaMKK), the upstream activator of CaMKI. Our calculations show that adding CP-AMPARs numbering <5% of existing synaptic AMPARs is sufficient to account for the potentiation observed in LTP. Thus, synaptic expression of CP-AMPARs is a very efficient mechanism for rapid enhancement of synaptic strength that depends on CaMKK/CaMKI signaling, actin dynamics, and the pattern of synaptic activity used to induce CA1 LTP.

  13. The APP Intracellular Domain Is Required for Normal Synaptic Morphology, Synaptic Plasticity, and Hippocampus-Dependent Behavior.

    PubMed

    Klevanski, Maja; Herrmann, Ulrike; Weyer, Sascha W; Fol, Romain; Cartier, Nathalie; Wolfer, David P; Caldwell, John H; Korte, Martin; Müller, Ulrike C

    2015-12-09

    The amyloid precursor protein family (APP/APLPs) has essential roles for neuromuscular synapse development and for the formation and plasticity of synapses within the CNS. Despite this, it has remained unclear whether APP mediates its functions primarily as a cell surface adhesion and signaling molecule or via its numerous proteolytic cleavage products. To address these questions, we followed a genetic approach and used APPΔCT15 knockin mice lacking the last 15 amino acids of APP, including the highly conserved YENPTY protein interaction motif. To circumvent functional compensation by the closely related APLP2, these mice were bred to an APLP2-KO background to generate APPΔCT15-DM double mutants. These APPΔCT15-DM mice were partially viable and displayed defects in neuromuscular synapse morphology and function with impairments in the ability to sustain transmitter release that resulted in muscular weakness. In the CNS, we demonstrate pronounced synaptic deficits including impairments in LTP that were associated with deficits in spatial learning and memory. Thus, the APP-CT15 domain provides essential physiological functions, likely via recruitment of specific interactors. Together with the well-established role of APPsα for synaptic plasticity, this shows that multiple domains of APP, including the conserved C-terminus, mediate signals required for normal PNS and CNS physiology. In addition, we demonstrate that lack of the APP-CT15 domain strongly impairs Aβ generation in vivo, establishing the APP C-terminus as a target for Aβ-lowering strategies. Synaptic dysfunction and cognitive decline are early hallmark features of Alzheimer's disease. Thus, it is essential to elucidate the in vivo function(s) of APP at the synapse. At present, it is unknown whether APP family proteins function as cell surface receptors, or mainly via shedding of their secreted ectodomains, such as neurotrophic APPsα. Here, to dissect APP functional domains, we used APP mutant mice

  14. Spectrotemporal Dynamics of Auditory Cortical Synaptic Receptive Field Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Froemke, Robert C.; Martins, Ana Raquel O.

    2011-01-01

    The nervous system must dynamically represent sensory information in order for animals to perceive and operate within a complex, changing environment. Receptive field plasticity in the auditory cortex allows cortical networks to organize around salient features of the sensory environment during postnatal development, and then subsequently refine these representations depending on behavioral context later in life. Here we review the major features of auditory cortical receptive field plasticity in young and adult animals, focusing on modifications to frequency tuning of synaptic inputs. Alteration in the patterns of acoustic input, including sensory deprivation and tonal exposure, leads to rapid adjustments of excitatory and inhibitory strengths that collectively determine the suprathreshold tuning curves of cortical neurons. Long-term cortical plasticity also requires co-activation of subcortical neuromodulatory control nuclei such as the cholinergic nucleus basalis, particularly in adults. Regardless of developmental stage, regulation of inhibition seems to be a general mechanism by which changes in sensory experience and neuromodulatory state can remodel cortical receptive fields. We discuss recent findings suggesting that the microdynamics of synaptic receptive field plasticity unfold as a multi-phase set of distinct phenomena, initiated by disrupting the balance between excitation and inhibition, and eventually leading to wide-scale changes to many synapses throughout the cortex. These changes are coordinated to enhance the representations of newly-significant stimuli, possibly for improved signal processing and language learning in humans. PMID:21426927

  15. Fusion of Endosomes Involved in Synaptic Vesicle Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Holroyd, Claudia; Kistner, Ute; Annaert, Wim; Jahn, Reinhard

    1999-01-01

    Recycling of vesicles of the regulated secretory pathway presumably involves passage through an early endosomal compartment as an intermediate step. To learn more about the involvement of endosomes in the recycling of synaptic and secretory vesicles we studied in vitro fusion of early endosomes derived from pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Fusion was not affected by cleavage of the SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins synaptobrevin and syntaxin 1 that operate at the exocytotic limb of the pathway. Furthermore, fusion was inhibited by the fast Ca2+ chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetra-acetic acid but not by the slow Ca2+ chelator EGTA. Endosome fusion was restored by the addition of Ca2+ with an optimum at a free Ca2+ concentration of 0.3 × 10−6 M. Other divalent cations did not substitute for Ca2+. A membrane-permeant EGTA derivative caused inhibition of fusion, which was reversed by addition of Ca2+. We conclude that the fusion of early endosomes participating in the recycling of synaptic and neurosecretory vesicles is mediated by a set of SNAREs distinct from those involved in exocytosis and requires the local release of Ca2+ from the endosomal interior. PMID:10473644

  16. Enhanced GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons and potent modulation by oxycodone in a bone cancer pain model

    PubMed Central

    Takasu, Keiko; Ogawa, Koichi; Nakamura, Atsushi; Kanbara, Tomoe; Ono, Hiroko; Tomii, Takako; Morioka, Yasuhide; Hasegawa, Minoru; Shibasaki, Masahiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Sakaguchi, Gaku

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose We demonstrated previously that oxycodone has potent antinociceptive effects at supraspinal sites. In this study, we investigated changes in neuronal function and antinociceptive mechanisms of oxycodone at ventrolateral periaqueductal gray (VLPAG) neurons, which are a major site of opioid action, in a femur bone cancer (FBC) model with bone cancer-related pain. Experimental Approach We characterized the supraspinal antinociceptive profiles of oxycodone and morphine on mechanical hypersensitivity in the FBC model. Based on the disinhibition mechanism underlying supraspinal opioid antinociception, the effects of oxycodone and morphine on GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) in VLPAG neurons were evaluated in slices from the FBC model. Key Results The supraspinal antinociceptive effects of oxycodone, but not morphine, were abolished by blocking G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium1 (Kir3.1) channels. In slices from the FBC model, GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons was enhanced, as indicated by a leftward shift of the input–output relationship curve of evoked IPSCs, the increased paired-pulse facilitation and the enhancement of miniature IPSC frequency. Following treatment with oxycodone and morphine, IPSCs were reduced in the FBC model, and the inhibition of presynaptic GABA release by oxycodone, but not morphine was enhanced and dependent on Kir3.1 channels. Conclusion and Implications Our results demonstrate that Kir3.1 channels are important for supraspinal antinociception and presynaptic GABA release inhibition by oxycodone in the FBC model. Enhanced GABAergic synaptic transmission at VLPAG neurons in the FBC model is an important site of supraspinal antinociception by oxycodone via Kir3.1 channel activation. PMID:25521524

  17. Prelimbic Cortex and Ventral Tegmental Area Modulate Synaptic Plasticity Differentially in Nucleus Accumbens During Cocaine-Reinstated Drug Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hao-wei; Gipson, Cassandra D; Huits, Martijn; Kalivas, Peter W

    2014-01-01

    Addictive drug use causes long-lasting changes in synaptic strength and dendritic spine morphology in the nucleus accumbens that might underlie the vulnerability to relapse. Although activity in mesocorticolimbic circuitry is required for reinstating cocaine seeking, its role in reinstatement-associated synaptic plasticity is not well characterized. Using rats extinguished from cocaine self-administration, we found potentiated synaptic strength (assessed as the AMPA/NMDA current amplitude ratio) and increased spine head diameter in medium spiny neurons in the accumbens core (NAcore). The basal changes in synaptic strength and morphology in cocaine-extinguished animals were further augmented during cocaine-induced reinstatement. Two NAcore afferents contributing to cocaine reinstatement are glutamatergic inputs from the prelimbic prefrontal cortex (PL) and dopamine from the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Pharmacological inhibition of either PL or VTA prevented cocaine-primed reinstatement. However, inhibiting the PL further potentiated AMPA/NMDA and spine head diameter, while inactivating the VTA or the combined systemic administration of dopamine D1 and D2 antagonists prevented the increase in AMPA/NMDA and spine diameter induced by cocaine priming. These data indicate that neuronal activity in the VTA and associated dopamine receptor stimulation is necessary for the synaptic potentiation in the NAcore during cocaine-induced reinstatement. Although activity in the PL was necessary for reinstatement, it inhibited synaptic potentiation initiated by an acute cocaine injection. Thus, although the PL and VTA differentially regulate the direction of synaptic plasticity induced by a cocaine-priming injection, coordinated synaptic potentiation by both NAcore afferents is necessary for cocaine-induced relapse. PMID:24232172

  18. Prelimbic cortex and ventral tegmental area modulate synaptic plasticity differentially in nucleus accumbens during cocaine-reinstated drug seeking.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao-wei; Gipson, Cassandra D; Huits, Martijn; Kalivas, Peter W

    2014-04-01

    Addictive drug use causes long-lasting changes in synaptic strength and dendritic spine morphology in the nucleus accumbens that might underlie the vulnerability to relapse. Although activity in mesocorticolimbic circuitry is required for reinstating cocaine seeking, its role in reinstatement-associated synaptic plasticity is not well characterized. Using rats extinguished from cocaine self-administration, we found potentiated synaptic strength (assessed as the AMPA/NMDA current amplitude ratio) and increased spine head diameter in medium spiny neurons in the accumbens core (NAcore). The basal changes in synaptic strength and morphology in cocaine-extinguished animals were further augmented during cocaine-induced reinstatement. Two NAcore afferents contributing to cocaine reinstatement are glutamatergic inputs from the prelimbic prefrontal cortex (PL) and dopamine from the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Pharmacological inhibition of either PL or VTA prevented cocaine-primed reinstatement. However, inhibiting the PL further potentiated AMPA/NMDA and spine head diameter, while inactivating the VTA or the combined systemic administration of dopamine D1 and D2 antagonists prevented the increase in AMPA/NMDA and spine diameter induced by cocaine priming. These data indicate that neuronal activity in the VTA and associated dopamine receptor stimulation is necessary for the synaptic potentiation in the NAcore during cocaine-induced reinstatement. Although activity in the PL was necessary for reinstatement, it inhibited synaptic potentiation initiated by an acute cocaine injection. Thus, although the PL and VTA differentially regulate the direction of synaptic plasticity induced by a cocaine-priming injection, coordinated synaptic potentiation by both NAcore afferents is necessary for cocaine-induced relapse.

  19. Neuroimmune regulation of homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Pribiag, Horia; Stellwagen, David

    2014-03-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity refers to a set of negative-feedback mechanisms that are used by neurons to maintain activity within a functional range. While it is becoming increasingly clear that homeostatic regulation of synapse function is a key principle in the nervous system, the molecular details of this regulation are only beginning to be uncovered. Recent evidence implicates molecules classically associated with the peripheral immune system in the modulation of homeostatic synaptic plasticity. In particular, the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα, class I major histocompatibility complex, and neuronal pentraxin 2 are essential in the regulation of the compensatory synaptic response that occurs in response to prolonged neuronal inactivity. This review will present and discuss current evidence implicating neuroimmune molecules in the homeostatic regulation of synapse function. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity'.

  20. Programmable synaptic devices for electronic neural nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moopenn, A.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    The architecture, design, and operational characteristics of custom VLSI and thin film synaptic devices are described. The devices include CMOS-based synaptic chips containing 1024 reprogrammable synapses with a 6-bit dynamic range, and nonvolatile, write-once, binary synaptic arrays based on memory switching in hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. Their suitability for embodiment of fully parallel and analog neural hardware is discussed. Specifically, a neural network solution to an assignment problem of combinatorial global optimization, implemented in fully parallel hardware using the synaptic chips, is described. The network's ability to provide optimal and near optimal solutions over a time scale of few neuron time constants has been demonstrated and suggests a speedup improvement of several orders of magnitude over conventional search methods.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of synaptic remodeling in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pandey, Subhash C

    2015-08-05

    Alcohol use and alcohol addiction represent dysfunctional brain circuits resulting from neuroadaptive changes during protracted alcohol exposure and its withdrawal. Alcohol exerts a potent effect on synaptic plasticity and dendritic spine formation in specific brain regions, providing a neuroanatomical substrate for the pathophysiology of alcoholism. Epigenetics has recently emerged as a critical regulator of gene expression and synaptic plasticity-related events in the brain. Alcohol exposure and withdrawal induce changes in crucial epigenetic processes in the emotional brain circuitry (amygdala) that may be relevant to the negative affective state defined as the "dark side" of addiction. Here, we review the literature concerning synaptic plasticity and epigenetics, with a particular focus on molecular events related to dendritic remodeling during alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Targeting epigenetic processes that modulate synaptic plasticity may yield novel treatments for alcoholism. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  2. Programmable synaptic devices for electronic neural nets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moopenn, A.; Thakoor, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    The architecture, design, and operational characteristics of custom VLSI and thin film synaptic devices are described. The devices include CMOS-based synaptic chips containing 1024 reprogrammable synapses with a 6-bit dynamic range, and nonvolatile, write-once, binary synaptic arrays based on memory switching in hydrogenated amorphous silicon films. Their suitability for embodiment of fully parallel and analog neural hardware is discussed. Specifically, a neural network solution to an assignment problem of combinatorial global optimization, implemented in fully parallel hardware using the synaptic chips, is described. The network's ability to provide optimal and near optimal solutions over a time scale of few neuron time constants has been demonstrated and suggests a speedup improvement of several orders of magnitude over conventional search methods.

  3. Synaptic Release at Mammalian Bipolar Cell Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qun-Fang; Heidelberger, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    Bipolar cells play a vital role in the transfer of visual information across the vertebrate retina. The synaptic output of these neurons is regulated by factors that are extrinsic and intrinsic. Relatively little is known about the intrinsic factors that regulate neurotransmitter exocytosis. Much of what we know about intrinsic presynaptic mechanisms that regulate glutamate release has come from the study of the unusually large and accessible synaptic terminal of the goldfish rod-dominant bipolar cell, the Mb1 bipolar cell. However, over the past several years, examination of presynaptic mechanisms governing neurotransmitter release has been extended to the mammalian rod bipolar cell. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in our understanding of synaptic vesicle dynamics and neurotransmitter release in rodent rod bipolar cells and consider how these properties help shape the synaptic output of the mammalian retina. PMID:21272392

  4. Quantitative proteomics of synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria: insights for synaptic mitochondrial vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Stauch, Kelly L; Purnell, Phillip R; Fox, Howard S

    2014-05-02

    Synaptic mitochondria are essential for maintaining calcium homeostasis and producing ATP, processes vital for neuronal integrity and synaptic transmission. Synaptic mitochondria exhibit increased oxidative damage during aging and are more vulnerable to calcium insult than nonsynaptic mitochondria. Why synaptic mitochondria are specifically more susceptible to cumulative damage remains to be determined. In this study, the generation of a super-SILAC mix that served as an appropriate internal standard for mouse brain mitochondria mass spectrometry based analysis allowed for the quantification of the proteomic differences between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria isolated from 10-month-old mice. We identified a total of 2260 common proteins between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria of which 1629 were annotated as mitochondrial. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the proteins common between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria revealed significant differential expression of 522 proteins involved in several pathways including oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial fission/fusion, calcium transport, and mitochondrial DNA replication and maintenance. In comparison to nonsynaptic mitochondria, synaptic mitochondria exhibited increased age-associated mitochondrial DNA deletions and decreased bioenergetic function. These findings provide insights into synaptic mitochondrial susceptibility to damage.

  5. Quantitative Proteomics of Synaptic and Nonsynaptic Mitochondria: Insights for Synaptic Mitochondrial Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic mitochondria are essential for maintaining calcium homeostasis and producing ATP, processes vital for neuronal integrity and synaptic transmission. Synaptic mitochondria exhibit increased oxidative damage during aging and are more vulnerable to calcium insult than nonsynaptic mitochondria. Why synaptic mitochondria are specifically more susceptible to cumulative damage remains to be determined. In this study, the generation of a super-SILAC mix that served as an appropriate internal standard for mouse brain mitochondria mass spectrometry based analysis allowed for the quantification of the proteomic differences between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria isolated from 10-month-old mice. We identified a total of 2260 common proteins between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria of which 1629 were annotated as mitochondrial. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the proteins common between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria revealed significant differential expression of 522 proteins involved in several pathways including oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial fission/fusion, calcium transport, and mitochondrial DNA replication and maintenance. In comparison to nonsynaptic mitochondria, synaptic mitochondria exhibited increased age-associated mitochondrial DNA deletions and decreased bioenergetic function. These findings provide insights into synaptic mitochondrial susceptibility to damage. PMID:24708184

  6. Lateral regulation of synaptic transmission by astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Covelo, A; Araque, A

    2016-05-26

    Fifteen years ago the concept of the "tripartite synapse" was proposed to conceptualize the functional view that astrocytes are integral elements of synapses. The signaling exchange between astrocytes and neurons within the tripartite synapse results in the synaptic regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity through an autocrine form of communication. However, recent evidence indicates that the astrocyte synaptic regulation is not restricted to the active tripartite synapse but can be manifested through astrocyte signaling at synapses relatively distant from active synapses, a process termed lateral astrocyte synaptic regulation. This phenomenon resembles the classical heterosynaptic modulation but is mechanistically different because it involves astrocytes and its properties critically depend on the morphological and functional features of astrocytes. Therefore, the functional concept of the tripartite synapse as a fundamental unit must be expanded to include the interaction between tripartite synapses. Through lateral synaptic regulation, astrocytes serve as an active processing bridge for synaptic interaction and crosstalk between synapses with no direct neuronal connectivity, supporting the idea that neural network function results from the coordinated activity of astrocytes and neurons.

  7. Time‐invariant feed‐forward inhibition of Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Blot, Antonin; de Solages, Camille; Ostojic, Srdjan; Szapiro, German; Hakim, Vincent; Léna, Clément

    2016-01-01

    Key points We performed extracellular recording of pairs of interneuron–Purkinje cells in vivo.A single interneuron produces a substantial, short‐lasting, inhibition of Purkinje cells.Feed‐forward inhibition is associated with characteristic asymmetric cross‐correlograms. In vivo, Purkinje cell spikes only depend on the most recent synaptic activity. Abstract Cerebellar molecular layer interneurons are considered to control the firing rate and spike timing of Purkinje cells. However, interactions between these cell types are largely unexplored in vivo. Using tetrodes, we performed simultaneous extracellular recordings of neighbouring Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons, presumably basket cells, in adult rats in vivo. The high levels of afferent synaptic activity encountered in vivo yield irregular spiking and reveal discharge patterns characteristic of feed‐forward inhibition, thus suggesting an overlap of the afferent excitatory inputs between Purkinje cells and basket cells. Under conditions of intense background synaptic inputs, interneuron spikes exert a short‐lasting inhibitory effect, delaying the following Purkinje cell spike by an amount remarkably independent of the Purkinje cell firing cycle. This effect can be explained by the short memory time of the Purkinje cell potential as a result of the intense incoming synaptic activity. Finally, we found little evidence for any involvement of the interneurons that we recorded with the cerebellar high‐frequency oscillations promoting Purkinje cell synchrony. The rapid interactions between interneurons and Purkinje cells might be of particular importance in fine motor control because the inhibitory action of interneurons on Purkinje cells leads to deep cerebellar nuclear disinhibition and hence increased cerebellar output. PMID:26918702

  8. Time-invariant feed-forward inhibition of Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex in vivo.

    PubMed

    Blot, Antonin; de Solages, Camille; Ostojic, Srdjan; Szapiro, German; Hakim, Vincent; Léna, Clément

    2016-05-15

    We performed extracellular recording of pairs of interneuron-Purkinje cells in vivo. A single interneuron produces a substantial, short-lasting, inhibition of Purkinje cells. Feed-forward inhibition is associated with characteristic asymmetric cross-correlograms. In vivo, Purkinje cell spikes only depend on the most recent synaptic activity. Cerebellar molecular layer interneurons are considered to control the firing rate and spike timing of Purkinje cells. However, interactions between these cell types are largely unexplored in vivo. Using tetrodes, we performed simultaneous extracellular recordings of neighbouring Purkinje cells and molecular layer interneurons, presumably basket cells, in adult rats in vivo. The high levels of afferent synaptic activity encountered in vivo yield irregular spiking and reveal discharge patterns characteristic of feed-forward inhibition, thus suggesting an overlap of the afferent excitatory inputs between Purkinje cells and basket cells. Under conditions of intense background synaptic inputs, interneuron spikes exert a short-lasting inhibitory effect, delaying the following Purkinje cell spike by an amount remarkably independent of the Purkinje cell firing cycle. This effect can be explained by the short memory time of the Purkinje cell potential as a result of the intense incoming synaptic activity. Finally, we found little evidence for any involvement of the interneurons that we recorded with the cerebellar high-frequency oscillations promoting Purkinje cell synchrony. The rapid interactions between interneurons and Purkinje cells might be of particular importance in fine motor control because the inhibitory action of interneurons on Purkinje cells leads to deep cerebellar nuclear disinhibition and hence increased cerebellar output. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  9. Alpha-adrenergic modulation of synaptic transmission in rabbit pancreatic ganglia.

    PubMed

    Yi, Eunyoung; Love, Jeffrey A

    2005-10-30

    Pancreatic ganglia contain noradrenergic nerve terminals whose role in ganglionic transmission is unknown. Intracellular recordings from rabbit pancreatic neurons were used to study the effects of alpha-adrenergic agonists and antagonists on ganglionic transmission and to determine if endogenously released norepinephrine contributed to synaptic depression. Significant regional differences in alpha adrenergic effects were observed. In neurons from ganglia of the head/neck region norepinephrine or selective alpha(2) agonists presynaptically inhibited ganglionic transmission and this effect was antagonized by the alpha(2) antagonist yohimbine. In the majority of cells membrane hyperpolarization accompanied presynaptic inhibition during superfusion of alpha(2) agonists. Repetitive nerve stimulation evoked a presynaptic post-train depression (PTD) of ganglionic transmission in all neurons tested. A combination of nisoxetine (selective inhibitor of the norepinephrine transporter) and tyramine (releaser of endogenous catecholamines) increased PTD. Pretreatment with clonidine inhibited synaptic transmission and abolished PTD while yohimbine did not affect it. Pretreatment with guanethidine (>or=3.5 h) also failed reduce PTD while neurons unresponsive to alpha(2) adrenoceptor agonists routinely exhibited PTD, implying the presence of other inhibitory neurotransmitters sharing a common presynaptic mechanism with alpha(2) agonists. In the majority of neurons from ganglia of the body region superfusion of norepinephrine or the selective alpha(1) agonist phenylephrine evoked membrane depolarization and facilitated ganglionic transmission. These effects were antagonized by the alpha(1) antagonist prazosin. The remaining neurons exhibited either alpha(2)-mediated synaptic inhibition or no-response. In conclusion, inhibitory alpha(2) and excitatory alpha(1) adrenoceptors exist in pancreatic ganglia and predominate in the head/neck and body, respectively. Norepinephrine, released

  10. Synaptic Mechanisms of Tight Spike Synchrony at Gamma Frequency in Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Salkoff, David B.; Zagha, Edward; Yüzgeç, Özge

    2015-01-01

    During the generation of higher-frequency (e.g., gamma) oscillations, cortical neurons can exhibit pairwise tight (<10 ms) spike synchrony. To understand how synaptic currents contribute to rhythmic activity and spike synchrony, we performed dual whole-cell recordings in mouse entorhinal cortical slices generating periodic activity (the slow oscillation). This preparation exhibited a significant amount of gamma-coherent spike synchrony during the active phase of the slow oscillation (Up state), particularly among fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. IPSCs arriving in pairs of either pyramidal or fast-spiking neurons during the Up state were highly synchronized and exhibited significant coherence at frequencies from 10 to 100 Hz, peaking at ∼40 Hz, suggesting both synchronous discharge of, and synaptic divergence from, nearby inhibitory neurons. By inferring synaptic currents related to spike generation in simultaneously recorded pyramidal or fast-spiking neurons, we detected a decay of inhibition ∼20 ms before spiking. In fast-spiking interneurons, this was followed by an even larger excitatory input immediately before spike generation. Consistent with an important role for phasic excitation in driving spiking, we found that the correlation of excitatory inputs was highly predictive of spike synchrony in pairs of fast-spiking interneurons. Interestingly, spike synchrony in fast-spiking interneurons was not related to the strength of gap junctional coupling, and was still prevalent in connexin 36 knock-out animals. Our results support the pyramidal-interneuron gamma model of fast rhythmic oscillation in the cerebral cortex and suggest that spike synchrony and phase preference arises from the precise interaction of excitatory–inhibitory postsynaptic currents. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We dissected the cellular and synaptic basis of spike synchrony occurring at gamma frequency (30–80 Hz). We used simultaneous targeted whole-cell recordings in an active slice

  11. Synaptic Targets of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Alexander F.; Lupica, Carl R.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of potent synthetic agonists for cannabinoid receptors has facilitated our understanding of cannabinoid actions on synaptic transmission in the central nervous system. Moreover, the ability of these compounds to inhibit neurotransmitter release at many central synapses is thought to underlie most of the behavioral effects of cannabinoid agonists. However, despite the widespread use and misuse of marijuana, and recognition of its potential adverse psychological effects in humans, comparatively few studies have examined the actions of its primary psychoactive constituent, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), at well-defined synaptic pathways. Here we examine the recent literature describing the effects of acute and repeated THC exposure on synaptic function in several brain regions and explore the importance of these neurobiological actions of THC in drug addiction. PMID:23209160

  12. Artificial Synaptic Devices Based on Natural Chicken Albumen Coupled Electric-Double-Layer Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guodong; Feng, Ping; Wan, Xiang; Zhu, Liqiang; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-03-01

    Recent progress in using biomaterials to fabricate functional electronics has got growing attention for the new generation of environmentally friendly and biocompatible electronic devices. As a kind of biological material with rich source, proteins are essential natural component of all organisms. At the same time, artificial synaptic devices are of great significance for neuromorphic systems because they can emulate the signal process and memory behaviors of biological synapses. In this report, natural chicken albumen with high proton conductivity was used as the coupling electrolyte film for organic/inorganic hybrid synaptic devices fabrication. Some important synaptic functions including paired-pulse facilitation, dynamic filtering, short-term to long-term memory transition and spatial summation and shunting inhibition were successfully mimicked. Our results are very interesting for biological friendly artificial neuron networks and neuromorphic systems.

  13. Excitatory Synaptic Responses Mediated by GABA_A Receptors in the Hippocampus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelson, Hillary B.; Wong, Robert K. S.

    1991-09-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the cortex. Activation of postsynaptic GABA_A receptors hyperpolarizes cells and inhibits neuronal activity. Synaptic responses mediated by GABA_A receptors also strongly excited hippocampal neurons. This excitatory response was recorded in morphologically identified interneurons in the presence of 4-aminopyridine or after elevation of extracellular potassium concentrations. The synaptic excitation sustained by GABA_A receptors synchronized the activity of inhibitory interneurons. This synchronized discharge of interneurons in turn elicited large-amplitude inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in pyramidal and granule cells. Excitatory synaptic responses mediated by GABA_A receptors may thus provide a mechanism for the recruitment of GABAergic interneurons through their recurrent connections.

  14. Developmental Synaptic Plasticity at the Thalamocortical Input to Barrel Cortex: Mechanisms and Roles

    PubMed Central

    Daw, Michael I.; Scott, Helen L.; Isaac, John T.R.

    2007-01-01

    The thalamocortical (TC) input to layer IV provides the major pathway for ascending sensory information to the mammalian sensory cortex. During development there is a dramatic refinement of this input that underlies the maturation of the topographical map in layer IV. Over the last ten years our understanding of the mechanisms of the developmental and experience-driven changes in synaptic function at TC synapses has been greatly advanced. Here we describe these studies that point to a key role for NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity, a role for kainate receptors and for a rapid maturation in GABAergic inhibition. The expression mechanisms of some of the forms of neonatal synaptic plasticity are novel and, in combination with other mechanisms, produce a layer IV circuit that exhibits functional properties necessary for mature sensory processing. PMID:17329121

  15. GABA and neuroligin signaling: linking synaptic activity and adhesion in inhibitory synapse development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z. Josh; Scheiffele, Peter

    2013-01-01

    GABA-mediated synaptic inhibition is crucial in neural circuit operations. In mammalian brains, the development of inhibitory synapses and innervation patterns is often a prolonged postnatal process, regulated by neural activity. Emerging evidence indicates that GABA acts beyond inhibitory transmission and regulates inhibitory synapse development. Indeed, GABAA receptors not only function as chloride channels that regulate membrane voltage and conductance but also play structural roles in synapse maturation and stabilization. The link from GABAA receptors to post- and pre- synaptic adhesion is likely mediated, in part, by neuroligin-reurexin interactions, which are potent in promoting GABAergic synapse formation. Therefore, similar to glutamate signaling at excitatory synapse, GABA signaling may coordinate maturation of pre- and post- synaptic sites at inhibitory synapses. Defining the many steps from GABA signaling to receptor trafficking/stability and neuroligin function will provide further mechanistic insights into activity-dependent development and possibly plasticity of inhibitory synapses. PMID:18513949

  16. Artificial Synaptic Devices Based on Natural Chicken Albumen Coupled Electric-Double-Layer Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guodong; Feng, Ping; Wan, Xiang; Zhu, Liqiang; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in using biomaterials to fabricate functional electronics has got growing attention for the new generation of environmentally friendly and biocompatible electronic devices. As a kind of biological material with rich source, proteins are essential natural component of all organisms. At the same time, artificial synaptic devices are of great significance for neuromorphic systems because they can emulate the signal process and memory behaviors of biological synapses. In this report, natural chicken albumen with high proton conductivity was used as the coupling electrolyte film for organic/inorganic hybrid synaptic devices fabrication. Some important synaptic functions including paired-pulse facilitation, dynamic filtering, short-term to long-term memory transition and spatial summation and shunting inhibition were successfully mimicked. Our results are very interesting for biological friendly artificial neuron networks and neuromorphic systems. PMID:27008981

  17. Transcriptional Control of Synaptic Plasticity by Transcription Factor NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Christian; Haenold, Ronny

    2016-01-01

    Activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) transcription factors is required for the induction of synaptic plasticity and memory formation. All components of this signaling pathway are localized at synapses, and transcriptionally active NF-κB dimers move to the nucleus to translate synaptic signals into altered gene expression. Neuron-specific inhibition results in altered connectivity of excitatory and inhibitory synapses and functionally in selective learning deficits. Recent research on transgenic mice with impaired or hyperactivated NF-κB gave important insights into plasticity-related target gene expression that is regulated by NF-κB. In this minireview, we update the available data on the role of this transcription factor for learning and memory formation and comment on cross-sectional activation of NF-κB in the aged and diseased brain that may directly or indirectly affect κB-dependent transcription of synaptic genes.

  18. Synaptic disinhibition during maintenance of long-term potentiation in the CA1 hippocampal subfield.

    PubMed Central

    Stelzer, A; Simon, G; Kovacs, G; Rai, R

    1994-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is widely believed to occur through a strengthening of efficacy of excitatory synapses between afferent fibers and pyramidal cells. An alternative mechanism of LTP, reduction of efficacy of synaptic inhibition, was examined in the present report. The present study demonstrates that the maintenance of LTP in the CA1 hippocampal subfield of guinea pigs is accompanied by impairment of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor function, particularly at apical dendritic sites of CA1 pyramidal cells. Enhanced excitability of GABAergic interneurons during LTP represents a strengthening of inhibitory efficacy. The net effect of opposite modifications of synaptic inhibition during LTP of CA1 pyramidal cells is an overall impairment of the strength of GABAergic inhibition, and disinhibition could contribute importantly to CA1 pyramidal cell LTP. Images PMID:8159706

  19. Synaptic Disinhibition During Maintenance of Long-Term Potentiation in the CA1 Hippocampal Subfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, Armin; Simon, Gabor; Kovacs, Gabor; Rai, Rabindra

    1994-04-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus is widely believed to occur through a strengthening of efficacy of excitatory synapses between afferent fibers and pyramidal cells. An alternative mechanism of LTP, reduction of efficacy of synaptic inhibition, was examined in the present report. The present study demonstrates that the maintenance of LTP in the CA1 hippocampal subfield of guinea pigs is accompanied by impairment of type A γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor function, particularly at apical dendritic sites of CA1 pyramidal cells. Enhanced excitability of GABAergic interneurons during LTP represents a strengthening of inhibitory efficacy. The net effect of opposite modifications of synaptic inhibition during LTP of CA1 pyramidal cells is an overall impairment of the strength of GABAergic inhibition, and disinhibition could contribute importantly to CA1 pyramidal cell LTP.

  20. Reversed synaptic effects of hypocretin and NPY mediated by excitatory GABA-dependent synaptic activity in developing MCH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Xu, Youfen

    2013-01-01

    In mature neurons, GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter. In contrast, in developing neurons, GABA exerts excitatory actions, and in some neurons GABA-mediated excitatory synaptic activity is more prevalent than glutamate-mediated excitation. Hypothalamic neuropeptides that modulate cognitive arousal and energy homeostasis, hypocretin/orexin and neuropeptide Y (NPY), evoked reversed effects on synaptic actions that were dependent on presynaptic GABA release onto melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons. MCH neurons were identified by selective green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in transgenic mice. In adults, hypocretin increased GABA release leading to reduced excitation. In contrast, in the developing brain as studied here with analysis of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, paired-pulse ratios, and evoked potentials, hypocretin acted presynaptically to enhance the excitatory actions of GABA. The ability of hypocretin to enhance GABA release increases inhibition in adult neurons but paradoxically enhances excitation in developing MCH neurons. In contrast, NPY attenuation of GABA release reduced inhibition in mature neurons but enhanced inhibition during development by attenuating GABA excitation. Both hypocretin and NPY also evoked direct actions on developing MCH neurons. Hypocretin excited MCH cells by activating a sodium-calcium exchanger and by reducing potassium currents; NPY reduced activity by increasing an inwardly rectifying potassium current. These data for the first time show that both hypocretin and NPY receptors are functional presynaptically during early postnatal hypothalamic development and that both neuropeptides modulate GABA actions during development with a valence of enhanced excitation or inhibition opposite to that of the adult state, potentially allowing neuropeptide modulation of use-dependent synapse stabilization. PMID:23255725

  1. Different effects of bisphenol-A on memory behavior and synaptic modification in intact and estrogen-deprived female mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohong; Gu, Ting; Shen, Qiaoqiao

    2015-03-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) has the capability of interfering with the effects of estrogens on modulating brain function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of BPA on memory and synaptic modification in the hippocampus of female mice under different levels of cycling estrogen. BPA exposure (40, 400 μg/kg/day) for 8 weeks did not affect spatial memory and passive avoidance task of gonadally intact mice but improved ovariectomy (Ovx)-induced memory impairment, whereas co-exposure of BPA with estradiol benzoate (EB) diminished the rescue effect of EB on memory behavior of Ovx mice. The results of morphometric measurement showed that BPA positively modified the synaptic interface structure and increased the synaptic density of CA1 pyramidal cell in the hippocampus of Ovx females, but inhibited the enhancement of EB on synaptic modification and synaptogenesis of Ovx mice. Furthermore, BPA up-regulated synaptic proteins synapsin I and PSD-95 and NMDA receptor NR2B but inhibited EB-induced increase in PSD-95 and NR2B in the hippocampus of Ovx mice. These results suggest that BPA interfered with normal hormonal regulation in synaptic plasticity and memory of female mice as a potent estrogen mimetic and as a disruptor of estrogen under various concentrations of cycling estrogen.

  2. Synaptic glutamate spillover due to impaired glutamate uptake mediates heroin relapse.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hao-wei; Scofield, Michael D; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W

    2014-04-16

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration.

  3. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor differentially regulates excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal cultures.

    PubMed

    Bolton, M M; Pittman, A J; Lo, D C

    2000-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been postulated to be a key signaling molecule in regulating synaptic strength and overall circuit activity. In this context, we have found that BDNF dramatically increases the frequency of spontaneously initiated action potentials in hippocampal neurons in dissociated culture. Using analysis of unitary synaptic transmission and immunocytochemical methods, we determined that chronic treatment with BDNF potentiates both excitatory and inhibitory transmission, but that it does so via different mechanisms. BDNF strengthens excitation primarily by augmenting the amplitude of AMPA receptor-mediated miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) but enhances inhibition by increasing the frequency of mIPSC and increasing the size of GABAergic synaptic terminals. In contrast to observations in other systems, BDNF-mediated increases in AMPA-receptor mediated mEPSC amplitudes did not require activity, because blocking action potentials with tetrodotoxin for the entire duration of BDNF treatment had no effect on the magnitude of this enhancement. These forms of synaptic regulations appear to be a selective action of BDNF because intrinsic excitability, synapse number, and neuronal survival are not affected in these cultures. Thus, although BDNF induces a net increase in overall circuit activity, this results from potentiation of both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic drive through distinct and selective physiological mechanisms.

  4. Ketones prevent oxidative impairment of hippocampal synaptic integrity through KATP channels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Young; Abdelwahab, Mohammed G; Lee, Soo Han; O'Neill, Derek; Thompson, Roger J; Duff, Henry J; Sullivan, Patrick G; Rho, Jong M

    2015-01-01

    Dietary and metabolic therapies are increasingly being considered for a variety of neurological disorders, based in part on growing evidence for the neuroprotective properties of the ketogenic diet (KD) and ketones. Earlier, we demonstrated that ketones afford hippocampal synaptic protection against exogenous oxidative stress, but the mechanisms underlying these actions remain unclear. Recent studies have shown that ketones may modulate neuronal firing through interactions with ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. Here, we used a combination of electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical assays to determine whether hippocampal synaptic protection by ketones is a consequence of KATP channel activation. Ketones dose-dependently reversed oxidative impairment of hippocampal synaptic integrity, neuronal viability, and bioenergetic capacity, and this action was mirrored by the KATP channel activator diazoxide. Inhibition of KATP channels reversed ketone-evoked hippocampal protection, and genetic ablation of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel subunit Kir6.2, a critical component of KATP channels, partially negated the synaptic protection afforded by ketones. This partial protection was completely reversed by co-application of the KATP blocker, 5-hydoxydecanoate (5HD). We conclude that, under conditions of oxidative injury, ketones induce synaptic protection in part through activation of KATP channels.

  5. Ketones Prevent Oxidative Impairment of Hippocampal Synaptic Integrity through KATP Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Young; Abdelwahab, Mohammed G.; Lee, Soo Han; O’Neill, Derek; Thompson, Roger J.; Duff, Henry J.; Sullivan, Patrick G.; Rho, Jong M.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary and metabolic therapies are increasingly being considered for a variety of neurological disorders, based in part on growing evidence for the neuroprotective properties of the ketogenic diet (KD) and ketones. Earlier, we demonstrated that ketones afford hippocampal synaptic protection against exogenous oxidative stress, but the mechanisms underlying these actions remain unclear. Recent studies have shown that ketones may modulate neuronal firing through interactions with ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. Here, we used a combination of electrophysiological, pharmacological, and biochemical assays to determine whether hippocampal synaptic protection by ketones is a consequence of KATP channel activation. Ketones dose-dependently reversed oxidative impairment of hippocampal synaptic integrity, neuronal viability, and bioenergetic capacity, and this action was mirrored by the KATP channel activator diazoxide. Inhibition of KATP channels reversed ketone-evoked hippocampal protection, and genetic ablation of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel subunit Kir6.2, a critical component of KATP channels, partially negated the synaptic protection afforded by ketones. This partial protection was completely reversed by co-application of the KATP blocker, 5-hydoxydecanoate (5HD). We conclude that, under conditions of oxidative injury, ketones induce synaptic protection in part through activation of KATP channels. PMID:25848768

  6. Role of Rab27 in synaptic transmission at the squid giant synapse

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Eunah; Kanno, Eiko; Choi, Soonwook; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Moreira, Jorge E.; Llinás, Rodolfo R.; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2008-01-01

    Small GTPase Rab is a member of a large family of Ras-related proteins, highly conserved in eukaryotic cells, and thought to regulate specific type(s) and/or specific step(s) in intracellular membrane trafficking. Given our interest in synaptic transmission, we addressed the possibility that Rab27 (a close isoform of Rab3) could be involved in cytosolic synaptic vesicle mobilization. Indeed, preterminal injection of a specific antibody against squid Rab27 (anti-sqRab27 antibody) combined with confocal microscopy demonstrated that Rab27 is present on squid synaptic vesicles. Electrophysiological study of injected synapses showed that the anti-sqRab27 antibody inhibited synaptic release in a stimulation-dependent manner without affecting presynaptic action potentials or inward Ca2+ current. This result was confirmed in in vitro synaptosomes by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Thus, synaptosomal Ca2+-stimulated release of FM1-43 dye was greatly impaired by intraterminal anti-sqRab27 antibody. Ultrastructural analysis of the injected giant preterminal further showed a reduced number of docked synaptic vesicles and an increase in nondocked vesicular profiles distant from the active zone. These results, taken together, indicate that Rab27 is primarily involved in the maturation of recycled vesicles and/or their transport to the presynaptic active zone in the squid giant synapse. PMID:18840683

  7. Role of Rab27 in synaptic transmission at the squid giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Yu, Eunah; Kanno, Eiko; Choi, Soonwook; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Moreira, Jorge E; Llinás, Rodolfo R; Fukuda, Mitsunori

    2008-10-14

    Small GTPase Rab is a member of a large family of Ras-related proteins, highly conserved in eukaryotic cells, and thought to regulate specific type(s) and/or specific step(s) in intracellular membrane trafficking. Given our interest in synaptic transmission, we addressed the possibility that Rab27 (a close isoform of Rab3) could be involved in cytosolic synaptic vesicle mobilization. Indeed, preterminal injection of a specific antibody against squid Rab27 (anti-sqRab27 antibody) combined with confocal microscopy demonstrated that Rab27 is present on squid synaptic vesicles. Electrophysiological study of injected synapses showed that the anti-sqRab27 antibody inhibited synaptic release in a stimulation-dependent manner without affecting presynaptic action potentials or inward Ca(2+) current. This result was confirmed in in vitro synaptosomes by using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. Thus, synaptosomal Ca(2+)-stimulated release of FM1-43 dye was greatly impaired by intraterminal anti-sqRab27 antibody. Ultrastructural analysis of the injected giant preterminal further showed a reduced number of docked synaptic vesicles and an increase in nondocked vesicular profiles distant from the active zone. These results, taken together, indicate that Rab27 is primarily involved in the maturation of recycled vesicles and/or their transport to the presynaptic active zone in the squid giant synapse.

  8. Reinstatement of long-term memory following erasure of its behavioral and synaptic expression in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shanping; Cai, Diancai; Pearce, Kaycey; Sun, Philip Y-W; Roberts, Adam C; Glanzman, David L

    2014-11-17

    Long-term memory (LTM) is believed to be stored in the brain as changes in synaptic connections. Here, we show that LTM storage and synaptic change can be dissociated. Cocultures of Aplysia sensory and motor neurons were trained with spaced pulses of serotonin, which induces long-term facilitation. Serotonin (5HT) triggered growth of new presynaptic varicosities, a synaptic mechanism of long-term sensitization. Following 5HT training, two antimnemonic treatments-reconsolidation blockade and inhibition of PKM--caused the number of presynaptic varicosities to revert to the original, pretraining value. Surprisingly, the final synaptic structure was not achieved by targeted retraction of the 5HT-induced varicosities but, rather, by an apparently arbitrary retraction of both 5HT-induced and original synapses. In addition, we find evidence that the LTM for sensitization persists covertly after its apparent elimination by the same antimnemonic treatments that erase learning-related synaptic growth. These results challenge the idea that stable synapses store long-term memories.

  9. Synaptic Glutamate Spillover Due to Impaired Glutamate Uptake Mediates Heroin Relapse

    PubMed Central

    Scofield, Michael D.; Boger, Heather; Hensley, Megan; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the enduring vulnerability to relapse is a therapeutic goal in treating drug addiction. Studies with animal models of drug addiction show a marked increase in extrasynaptic glutamate in the core subcompartment of the nucleus accumbens (NAcore) during reinstated drug seeking. However, the synaptic mechanisms linking drug-induced changes in extrasynaptic glutamate to relapse are poorly understood. Here, we discovered impaired glutamate elimination in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration that leads to spillover of synaptically released glutamate into the nonsynaptic extracellular space in NAcore and investigated whether restoration of glutamate transport prevented reinstated heroin seeking. Through multiple functional assays of glutamate uptake and analyzing NMDA receptor-mediated currents, we show that heroin self-administration produced long-lasting downregulation of glutamate uptake and surface expression of the transporter GLT-1. This downregulation was associated with spillover of synaptic glutamate to extrasynaptic NMDA receptors within the NAcore. Ceftriaxone restored glutamate uptake and prevented synaptic glutamate spillover and cue-induced heroin seeking. Ceftriaxone-induced inhibition of reinstated heroin seeking was blocked by morpholino-antisense targeting GLT-1 synthesis. These data reveal that the synaptic glutamate spillover in the NAcore results from reduced glutamate transport and is a critical pathophysiological mechanism underling reinstated drug seeking in rats extinguished from heroin self-administration. PMID:24741055

  10. Synaptic Basis for the Generation of Response Variation in Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Can; Zhang, Guangwei; Zhou, Chang; Wang, Lijuan; Yan, Sumei; Zhang, Li I.; Zhou, Yi; Xiong, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Cortical neurons can exhibit significant variation in their responses to the same sensory stimuli, as reflected by the reliability and temporal precision of spikes. However the synaptic mechanism underlying response variation still remains unclear. Here, in vivo whole-cell patch-clamp recording of excitatory neurons revealed variation in the amplitudes as well as the temporal profiles of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs evoked by the same sound stimuli in layer 4 of the rat primary auditory cortex. Synaptic inputs were reliably induced by repetitive stimulation, although with large variation in amplitude. The variation in the amplitude of excitation was much higher than that of inhibition. In addition, the temporal jitter of the synaptic onset latency was much smaller than the jitter of spike response. We further demonstrated that the amplitude variation of excitatory inputs can largely account for the spike variation, while the jitter in spike timing can be primarily attributed to the temporal variation of excitatory inputs. Furthermore, the spike reliability of excitatory but not inhibitory neurons is dependent on tone frequency. Our results thus revealed an inherent cortical synaptic contribution for the generation of variation in the spike responses of auditory cortical neurons. PMID:27484928

  11. Involvement of Synaptic Genes in the Pathogenesis of Autism Spectrum Disorders: The Case of Synapsins

    PubMed Central

    Giovedí, Silvia; Corradi, Anna; Fassio, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by deficits in social interaction and social communication, restricted interests, and repetitive behaviors. Many synaptic protein genes are linked to the pathogenesis of ASDs, making them prototypical synaptopathies. An array of mutations in the synapsin (Syn) genes in humans has been recently associated with ASD and epilepsy, diseases that display a frequent comorbidity. Syns are pre-synaptic proteins regulating synaptic vesicle traffic, neurotransmitter release, and short-term synaptic plasticity. In doing so, Syn isoforms control the tone of activity of neural circuits and the balance between excitation and inhibition. As ASD pathogenesis is believed to result from dysfunctions in the balance between excitatory and inhibitory transmissions in neocortical areas, Syns are novel ASD candidate genes. Accordingly, deletion of single Syn genes in mice, in addition to epilepsy, causes core symptoms of ASD by affecting social behavior, social communication, and repetitive behaviors. Thus, Syn knockout mice represent a good experimental model to define synaptic alterations involved in the pathogenesis of ASD and epilepsy. PMID:25237665

  12. Synaptic Basis for the Generation of Response Variation in Auditory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Tao, Can; Zhang, Guangwei; Zhou, Chang; Wang, Lijuan; Yan, Sumei; Zhang, Li I; Zhou, Yi; Xiong, Ying

    2016-08-03

    Cortical neurons can exhibit significant variation in their responses to the same sensory stimuli, as reflected by the reliability and temporal precision of spikes. However the synaptic mechanism underlying response variation still remains unclear. Here, in vivo whole-cell patch-clamp recording of excitatory neurons revealed variation in the amplitudes as well as the temporal profiles of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs evoked by the same sound stimuli in layer 4 of the rat primary auditory cortex. Synaptic inputs were reliably induced by repetitive stimulation, although with large variation in amplitude. The variation in the amplitude of excitation was much higher than that of inhibition. In addition, the temporal jitter of the synaptic onset latency was much smaller than the jitter of spike response. We further demonstrated that the amplitude variation of excitatory inputs can largely account for the spike variation, while the jitter in spike timing can be primarily attributed to the temporal variation of excitatory inputs. Furthermore, the spike reliability of excitatory but not inhibitory neurons is dependent on tone frequency. Our results thus revealed an inherent cortical synaptic contribution for the generation of variation in the spike responses of auditory cortical neurons.

  13. Synaptic damage underlies EEG abnormalities in postanoxic encephalopathy: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Ruijter, B J; Hofmeijer, J; Meijer, H G E; van Putten, M J A M

    2017-09-01

    In postanoxic coma, EEG patterns indicate the severity of encephalopathy and typically evolve in time. We aim to improve the understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these EEG abnormalities. We used a mean field model comprising excitatory and inhibitory neurons, local synaptic connections, and input from thalamic afferents. Anoxic damage is modeled as aggravated short-term synaptic depression, with gradual recovery over many hours. Additionally, excitatory neurotransmission is potentiated, scaling with the severity of anoxic encephalopathy. Simulations were compared with continuous EEG recordings of 155 comatose patients after cardiac arrest. The simulations agree well with six common categories of EEG rhythms in postanoxic encephalopathy, including typical transitions in time. Plausible results were only obtained if excitatory synapses were more severely affected by short-term synaptic depression than inhibitory synapses. In postanoxic encephalopathy, the evolution of EEG patterns presumably results from gradual improvement of complete synaptic failure, where excitatory synapses are more severely affected than inhibitory synapses. The range of EEG patterns depends on the excitation-inhibition imbalance, probably resulting from long-term potentiation of excitatory neurotransmission. Our study is the first to relate microscopic synaptic dynamics in anoxic brain injury to both typical EEG observations and their evolution in time. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Chemogenetic synaptic silencing of neural circuits localizes a hypothalamus→midbrain pathway for feeding behavior

    PubMed Central

    Stachniak, Tevye J.; Ghosh, Anirvan; Sternson, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Brain function is mediated by neural circuit connectivity, and elucidating the role of connections is aided by techniques to block their output. We developed cell type-selective, reversible synaptic inhibition tools for mammalian neural circuits by leveraging G-protein signaling pathways to suppress synaptic vesicle release. Here, we find that the pharmacologically selective designer Gi-protein coupled receptor, hM4D, is a presynaptic silencer in the presence of its cognate ligand clozapine-N-oxide (CNO). Activation of hM4D signaling sharply reduced synaptic release probability and synaptic current amplitude. To demonstrate the utility of this tool for neural circuit perturbations, we developed an axon-selective hM4D–neurexin variant and used spatially targeted intracranial CNO injections to localize circuit connections from the hypothalamus to the midbrain responsible for feeding behavior. This synaptic silencing approach is broadly applicable for cell type-specific and axon projection-selective functional analysis of diverse neural circuits. PMID:24768300

  15. A role for synaptic plasticity in the adolescent development of executive function

    PubMed Central

    Selemon, L D

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent brain maturation is characterized by the emergence of executive function mediated by the prefrontal cortex, e.g., goal planning, inhibition of impulsive behavior and set shifting. Synaptic pruning of excitatory contacts is the signature morphologic event of late brain maturation during adolescence. Mounting evidence suggests that glutamate receptor-mediated synaptic plasticity, in particular long term depression (LTD), is important for elimination of synaptic contacts in brain development. This review examines the possibility (1) that LTD mechanisms are enhanced in the prefrontal cortex during adolescence due to ongoing synaptic pruning in this late developing cortex and (2) that enhanced synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex represents a key molecular substrate underlying the critical period for maturation of executive function. Molecular sites of interaction between environmental factors, such as alcohol and stress, and glutamate receptor mediated plasticity are considered. The accentuated negative impact of these factors during adolescence may be due in part to interference with LTD mechanisms that refine prefrontal cortical circuitry and when disrupted derail normal maturation of executive function. Diminished prefrontal cortical control over risk-taking behavior could further exacerbate negative outcomes associated with these behaviors, as for example addiction and depression. Greater insight into the neurobiology of the adolescent brain is needed to fully understand the molecular basis for heightened vulnerability during adolescence to the injurious effects of substance abuse and stress. PMID:23462989

  16. Homeostatic control of synaptic activity by endogenous adenosine is mediated by adenosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Diógenes, Maria José; Neves-Tomé, Raquel; Fucile, Sergio; Martinello, Katiuscia; Scianni, Maria; Theofilas, Panos; Lopatár, Jan; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Maggi, Laura; Frenguelli, Bruno G; Limatola, Cristina; Boison, Detlev; Sebastião, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine, a key regulator of neuronal excitability, is metabolized by astrocyte-based enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). We hypothesized that ADK might be an upstream regulator of adenosine-based homeostatic brain functions by simultaneously affecting several downstream pathways. We therefore studied the relationship between ADK expression, levels of extracellular adenosine, synaptic transmission, intrinsic excitability, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent synaptic actions in transgenic mice underexpressing or overexpressing ADK. We demonstrate that ADK: 1) Critically influences the basal tone of adenosine, evaluated by microelectrode adenosine biosensors, and its release following stimulation; 2) determines the degree of tonic adenosine-dependent synaptic inhibition, which correlates with differential plasticity at hippocampal synapses with low release probability; 3) modulates the age-dependent effects of BDNF on hippocampal synaptic transmission, an action dependent upon co-activation of adenosine A2A receptors; and 4) influences GABAA receptor-mediated currents in CA3 pyramidal neurons. We conclude that ADK provides important upstream regulation of adenosine-based homeostatic function of the brain and that this mechanism is necessary and permissive to synaptic actions of adenosine acting on multiple pathways. These mechanistic studies support previous therapeutic studies and implicate ADK as a promising therapeutic target for upstream control of multiple neuronal signaling pathways crucial for a variety of neurological disorders.

  17. Synaptic adhesion molecule IgSF11 regulates synaptic transmission and plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyewon; van Riesen, Christoph; Whitcomb, Daniel; Warburton, Julia M.; Jo, Jihoon; Kim, Doyoun; Kim, Sun Gyun; Um, Seung Min; Kwon, Seok-kyu; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Roh, Junyeop Daniel; Woo, Jooyeon; Jun, Heejung; Lee, Dongmin; Mah, Won; Kim, Hyun; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Cho, Kwangwook; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Choquet, Daniel; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Summary Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate synapse development and plasticity through mechanisms including trans-synaptic adhesion and recruitment of diverse synaptic proteins. We report here that the immunoglobulin superfamily member 11 (IgSF11), a homophilic adhesion molecule preferentially expressed in the brain, is a novel and dual-binding partner of the postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95 and AMPAR glutamate receptors (AMPARs). IgSF11 requires PSD-95 binding for its excitatory synaptic localization. In addition, IgSF11 stabilizes synaptic AMPARs, as shown by IgSF11 knockdown-induced suppression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission and increased surface mobility of AMPARs, measured by high-throughput, single-molecule tracking. IgSF11 deletion in mice leads to suppression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission in the dentate gyrus and long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. IgSF11 does not regulate the functional characteristics of AMPARs, including desensitization, deactivation, or recovery. These results suggest that IgSF11 regulates excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity through its tripartite interactions with PSD-95 and AMPARs. PMID:26595655

  18. Presynaptic establishment of the synaptic cleft extracellular matrix is required for post-synaptic differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbough, Jeffrey; Rushton, Emma; Woodruff, Elvin; Fergestad, Tim; Vigneswaran, Krishanthan; Broadie, Kendal

    2007-01-01

    Formation and regulation of excitatory glutamatergic synapses is essential for shaping neural circuits throughout development. In a Drosophila genetic screen for synaptogenesis mutants, we identified mind the gap (mtg), which encodes a secreted, extracellular N-glycosaminoglycan-binding protein. MTG is expressed neuronally and detected in the synaptic cleft, and is required to form the specialized transsynaptic matrix that links the presynaptic active zone with the post-synaptic glutamate receptor (GluR) domain. Null mtg embryonic mutant synapses exhibit greatly reduced GluR function, and a corresponding loss of localized GluR domains. All known post-synaptic signaling/scaffold proteins functioning upstream of GluR localization are also grossly reduced or mislocalized in mtg mutants, including the dPix–dPak–Dock cascade and the Dlg/PSD-95 scaffold. Ubiquitous or neuronally targeted mtg RNA interference (RNAi) similarly reduce post-synaptic assembly, whereas post-synaptically targeted RNAi has no effect, indicating that presynaptic MTG induces and maintains the post-synaptic pathways driving GluR domain formation. These findings suggest that MTG is secreted from the presynaptic terminal to shape the extracellular synaptic cleft domain, and that the cleft domain functions to mediate transsynaptic signals required for post-synaptic development. PMID:17901219

  19. Modulation of GABA-mediated synaptic transmission by endogenous zinc in the immature rat hippocampus in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Xie, X; Hider, R C; Smart, T G

    1994-01-01

    1. Intracellular recordings from postnatal 2- to 12-day-old (P2-12) rat hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurones exhibited spontaneous synaptic potentials mediated by GABAA receptors. These potentials can be separated on the basis of amplitude into two classes which are referred to as small and large. 2. The large depolarizing potentials were reversibly inhibited by the Zn2+ chelator 1,2-diethyl-3-hydroxypyridin-4-one (CP94). The small inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. (IPSPs) were apparently unaffected. 3. Stimulation of the mossy fibre pathway evoked composite excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) and IPSPs. Threshold stimulus-evoked synaptic potentials were mediated by GABAA receptors and were reversibly blocked by CP94. The responses evoked by suprathreshold stimulation and persisting in the presence of bicuculline or CP94 were partially inhibited by 2-amino-5-phosphonopropionic acid (AP5) and were completely blocked with 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). 4. L-Histidine, which preferentially forms complexes with Cu2+ > Zn2+ > Fe2+ > Mn2+, inhibited both naturally occurring spontaneous and evoked GABAA-mediated large synaptic potentials without affecting the neuronal resting membrane properties. Exogenously applied Zn2+ induced large spontaneous synaptic potentials and prolonged the duration of the evoked potentials. These effects were reversibly blocked by histidine. 5. The metal chelating agent diethyldithiocarbamate had little effect on the large amplitude synaptic potentials. 6. The transition metal divalent cations Fe2+ and Mn2+ did not initiate large synaptic potentials in CA3 neurones; however, Cu2+ depolarized the membrane and enhanced both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission, resulting in a transient increase in the frequency of the large amplitude events. In comparison, zinc increased the frequency of the large potentials and also induced such events in neurons (P4-21) where innate potentials were absent. The postsynaptic

  20. Coexistence of Multiple Types of Synaptic Plasticity in Individual Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Edelmann, Elke; Cepeda-Prado, Efrain; Leßmann, Volkmar

    2017-01-01

    Understanding learning and memory mechanisms is an important goal in neuroscience. To gain insights into the underlying cellular mechanisms for memory formation, synaptic plasticity processes are studied with various techniques in different brain regions. A valid model to scrutinize different ways to enhance or decrease synaptic transmission is recording of long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term depression (LTD). At the single cell level, spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) protocols have emerged as a powerful tool to investigate synaptic plasticity with stimulation paradigms that also likely occur during memory formation in vivo. Such kind of plasticity can be induced by different STDP paradigms with multiple repeat numbers and stimulation patterns. They subsequently recruit or activate different molecular pathways and neuromodulators for induction and expression of STDP. Dopamine (DA) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been recently shown to be important modulators for hippocampal STDP at Schaffer collateral (SC)-CA1 synapses and are activated exclusively by distinguishable STDP paradigms. Distinct types of parallel synaptic plasticity in a given neuron depend on specific subcellular molecular prerequisites. Since the basal and apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons are known to be heterogeneous, and distance-dependent dendritic gradients for specific receptors and ion channels are described, the dendrites might provide domain specific locations for multiple types of synaptic plasticity in the same neuron. In addition to the distinct signaling and expression mechanisms of various types of LTP and LTD, activation of these different types of plasticity might depend on background brain activity states. In this article, we will discuss some ideas why multiple forms of synaptic plasticity can simultaneously and independently coexist and can contribute so effectively to increasing the efficacy of memory storage and processing capacity of the

  1. Changed Synaptic Plasticity in Neural Circuits of Depressive-Like and Escitalopram-Treated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Li; Yuan, Yong-Gui; Xu, Hua; Wu, Di; Gong, Wei-Gang; Geng, Lei-Yu; Wu, Fang-Fang; Tang, Hao; Xu, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although progress has been made in the detection and characterization of neural plasticity in depression, it has not been fully understood in individual synaptic changes in the neural circuits under chronic stress and antidepressant treatment. Methods: Using electron microscopy and Western-blot analyses, the present study quantitatively examined the changes in the Gray’s Type I synaptic ultrastructures and the expression of synapse-associated proteins in the key brain regions of rats’ depressive-related neural circuit after chronic unpredicted mild stress and/or escitalopram administration. Meanwhile, their depressive behaviors were also determined by several tests. Results: The Type I synapses underwent considerable remodeling after chronic unpredicted mild stress, which resulted in the changed width of the synaptic cleft, length of the active zone, postsynaptic density thickness, and/or synaptic curvature in the subregions of medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, as well as the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus of the amygdala, accompanied by changed expression of several synapse-associated proteins. Chronic escitalopram administration significantly changed the above alternations in the chronic unpredicted mild stress rats but had little effect on normal controls. Also, there was a positive correlation between the locomotor activity and the maximal synaptic postsynaptic density thickness in the stratum radiatum of the Cornu Ammonis 1 region and a negative correlation between the sucrose preference and the length of the active zone in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus region in chronic unpredicted mild stress rats. Conclusion: These findings strongly indicate that chronic stress and escitalopram can alter synaptic plasticity in the neural circuits, and the remodeled synaptic ultrastructure was correlated with the rats’ depressive behaviors, suggesting a therapeutic target for further exploration. PMID:25899067

  2. A quantitative analytic pipeline for evaluating neuronal activities by high throughput synaptic vesicle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Xia, Xiaofeng; Li, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle dynamics play an important role in the study of neuronal and synaptic activities of neurodegradation diseases ranging from the epidemic Alzheimer’s disease to the rare Rett syndrome. A high-throughput assay with a large population of neurons would be useful and efficient to characterize neuronal activity based on the dynamics of synaptic vesicles for the study of mechanisms or to discover drug candidates for neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the massive amounts of image data generated via high throughput screening require enormous manual processing time and effort, restricting the practical use of such an assay. This paper presents an automated analytic system to process and interpret the huge data set generated by such assays. Our system enables the automated detection, segmentation, quantification, and measurement of neuron activities based on the synaptic vesicle assay. To overcome challenges such as noisy background, inhomogeneity, and tiny object size, we first employ MSVST (Multi-Scale Variance Stabilizing Transform) to obtain a denoised and enhanced map of the original image data. Then, we propose an adaptive thresholding strategy to solve the inhomogeneity issue, based on the local information, and to accurately segment synaptic vesicles. We design algorithms to address the issue of tiny objects-of-interest overlapping. Several post-processing criteria are defined to filter false positives. A total of 152 features are extracted for each detected vesicle. A score is defined for each synaptic vesicle image to quantify the neuron activity. We also compare the unsupervised strategy with the supervised method. Our experiments on hippocampal neuron assays showed that the proposed system can automatically detect vesicles and quantify their dynamics for evaluating neuron activities. The availability of such an automated system will open opportunities for investigation of synaptic neuropathology and identification of

  3. Short term synaptic depression imposes a frequency dependent filter on synaptic information transfer.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Robert; Rubin, Jonathan; Doiron, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Depletion of synaptic neurotransmitter vesicles induces a form of short term depression in synapses throughout the nervous system. This plasticity affects how synapses filter presynaptic spike trains. The filtering properties of short term depression are often studied using a deterministic synapse model that predicts the mean synaptic response to a presynaptic spike train, but ignores variability introduced by the probabilistic nature of vesicle release and stochasticity in synaptic recovery time. We show that this additional variability has important consequences for the synaptic filtering of presynaptic information. In particular, a synapse model with stochastic vesicle dynamics suppresses information encoded at lower frequencies more than information encoded at higher frequencies, while a model that ignores this stochasticity transfers information encoded at any frequency equally well. This distinction between the two models persists even when large numbers of synaptic contacts are considered. Our study provides strong evidence that the stochastic nature neurotransmitter vesicle dynamics must be considered when analyzing the information flow across a synapse.

  4. NR2B-dependent Cyclophilin D translocation suppresses the recovery of synaptic transmission after oxygen-glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shijun; Du, Fang; Yan, Shirley Shidu

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) subunit 2B (NR2B)-containing NMDA receptors and mitochondrial protein cyclophilin D (CypD) are well characterized in mediating neuronal death after ischemia, respectively. However, whether and how NR2B and CypD work together in mediating synaptic injury after ischemia remains elusive. Using a de novo ischemia model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in hippocampal slices, we identified a NR2B-dependent mechanism for CypD translocation onto the mitochondrial inner membrane. CypD depletion (CypD null mice) prevented OGD-induced impairment in synaptic transmission recovery. Overexpression of neuronal CypD mice (CypD+) exacerbated OGD-induced loss of synaptic transmission. Inhibition of CypD-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening by cyclosporine A (CSA) attenuated ischemia-induced synaptic perturbation in CypD+ and non-transgenic (nonTg) mice. The treatment of antioxidant EUK134 to suppress mitochondrial oxidative stress rescued CypD-mediated synaptic dysfunction following OGD in CypD+ slices. Furthermore, OGD provoked the interaction of CypD with P53, which was enhanced in slices overexpressing CypD but was diminished in CypD-null slices Inhibition of p53 using a specific inhibitor of p53 (pifithrin-μ) attenuated the CypD/p53 interaction following OGD, along with a restored synaptic transmission in both nonTg and CypD+ hippocampal slices. Our results indicate that OGD-induced CypD translocation potentiates CypD/P53 interaction in a NR2B dependent manner, promoting oxidative stress and loss of synaptic transmission. We also evaluate a new ex-vivo chronic OGD-induced ischemia model for studying the effect of oxidative stress on synaptic damage. PMID:26232180

  5. NR2B-dependent cyclophilin D translocation suppresses the recovery of synaptic transmission after oxygen-glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihua; Wang, Yongfu; Yan, Shijun; Du, Fang; Yan, Shirley Shidu

    2015-10-01

    N-methyl d-aspartate receptor (NMDA) subunit 2B (NR2B)-containing NMDA receptors and mitochondrial protein cyclophilin D (CypD) are well characterized in mediating neuronal death after ischemia, respectively. However, whether and how NR2B and CypD work together in mediating synaptic injury after ischemia remains elusive. Using an ex vivo ischemia model of oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in hippocampal slices, we identified a NR2B-dependent mechanism for CypD translocation onto the mitochondrial inner membrane. CypD depletion (CypD null mice) prevented OGD-induced impairment in synaptic transmission recovery. Overexpression of neuronal CypD mice (CypD+) exacerbated OGD-induced loss of synaptic transmission. Inhibition of CypD-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening by cyclosporine A (CSA) attenuated ischemia-induced synaptic perturbation in CypD+ and non-transgenic (non-Tg) mice. The treatment of antioxidant EUK134 to suppress mitochondrial oxidative stress rescued CypD-mediated synaptic dysfunction following OGD in CypD+ slices. Furthermore, OGD provoked the interaction of CypD with P53, which was enhanced in slices overexpressing CypD but was diminished in CypD-null slices. Inhibition of p53 using a specific inhibitor of p53 (pifithrin-μ) attenuated the CypD/p53 interaction following OGD, along with a restored synaptic transmission in both non-Tg and CypD+ hippocampal slices. Our results indicate that OGD-induced CypD translocation potentiates CypD/P53 interaction in a NR2B dependent manner, promoting oxidative stress and loss of synaptic transmission. We also evaluate a new ex vivo chronic OGD-induced ischemia model for studying the effect of oxidative stress on synaptic damage.

  6. Taurine allosterically modulates flunitrazepam binding to synaptic membranes.

    PubMed

    Quinn, M R; Miller, C L

    1992-09-01

    Taurine is hypothesized to exert its inhibitory neuromodulatory effects, in part, by interaction with the GABAA receptor. Although taurine displaces GABA agonist binding to synaptic membranes, its allosteric effects on the benzodiazepine recognition site of the GABAA receptor complex is unsettled. We determined the effects of taurine on [3H]flunitrazepam (Flu) binding to well-washed, frozen-thawed synaptic membranes prepared from rat cortex. Comparative binding studies were conducted at 37 degrees C and on ice (0-4 degrees C). At 37 degrees C taurine increased Flu binding in a concentration dependent way by interaction with a bicuculline sensitive site, similar to GABA. Taurine increased Flu binding by causing a decrease in KD. The maximal effectiveness of taurine on Flu binding could not be increased further by addition of GABA. In contrast, the maximal stimulation of Flu binding by GABA was decreased by addition of taurine to the level attained by taurine alone. These mixed agonist/antagonist effects of taurine are pharmacologically specific and qualify taurine as a partial GABA agonist in this type of allosteric interaction. However, taurine causes opposite effects on Flu binding when measured at 0-4 degrees C: taurine interacts with a bicuculline insensitive site to inhibit Flu binding by increasing the KD. Taurine inhibition of Flu binding is not overcome by increasing concentrations of GABA. Although the mechanism of taurine inhibition of Flu binding at 0-4 degrees C is unclear, it may be an indirect effect of taurine interaction with membrane phospholipids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Diacylglycerol Kinases in the Coordination of Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongwon; Kim, Eunjoon; Tanaka-Yamamoto, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is activity-dependent modification of the efficacy of synaptic transmission. Although, detailed mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity are diverse and vary at different types of synapses, diacylglycerol (DAG)-associated signaling has been considered as an important regulator of many forms of synaptic plasticity, including long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). Recent evidences indicate that DAG kinases (DGKs), which phosphorylate DAG to phosphatidic acid to terminate DAG signaling, are important regulators of LTP and LTD, as supported by the results from mice lacking specific DGK isoforms. This review will summarize these studies and discuss how specific DGK isoforms distinctly regulate different forms of synaptic plasticity at pre- and postsynaptic sites. In addition, we propose a general role of DGKs as coordinators of synaptic plasticity that make local synaptic environments more permissive for synaptic plasticity by regulating DAG concentration and interacting with other synaptic proteins. PMID:27630986

  8. Exosomes neutralize synaptic-plasticity-disrupting activity of Aβ assemblies in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exosomes, small extracellular vesicles of endosomal origin, have been suggested to be involved in both the metabolism and aggregation of Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-associated amyloid β-protein (Aβ). Despite their ubiquitous presence and the inclusion of components which can potentially interact with Aβ, the role of exosomes in regulating synaptic dysfunction induced by Aβ has not been explored. Results We here provide in vivo evidence that exosomes derived from N2a cells or human cerebrospinal fluid can abrogate the synaptic-plasticity-disrupting activity of both synthetic and AD brain-derived Aβ. Mechanistically, this effect involves sequestration of synaptotoxic Aβ assemblies by exosomal surface proteins such as PrPC rather than Aβ proteolysis. Conclusions These data suggest that exosomes can counteract the inhibitory action of Aβ, which contributes to perpetual capability for synaptic plasticity. PMID:24284042

  9. Metabolic Turnover of Synaptic Proteins: Kinetics, Interdependencies and Implications for Synaptic Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Laurie D.; Zuchman, Rina; Sorokina, Oksana; Müller, Anke; Dieterich, Daniela C.; Armstrong, J. Douglas; Ziv, Tamar; Ziv, Noam E.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical synapses contain multitudes of proteins, which in common with all proteins, have finite lifetimes and therefore need to be continuously replaced. Given the huge numbers of synaptic connections typical neurons form, the demand to maintain the protein contents of these connections might be expected to place considerable metabolic demands on each neuron. Moreover, synaptic proteostasis might differ according to distance from global protein synthesis sites, the availability of distributed protein synthesis facilities, trafficking rates and synaptic protein dynamics. To date, the turnover kinetics of synaptic proteins have not been studied or analyzed systematically, and thus metabolic demands or the aforementioned relationships remain largely unknown. In the current study we used dynamic Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC), mass spectrometry (MS), Fluorescent Non–Canonical Amino acid Tagging (FUNCAT), quantitative immunohistochemistry and bioinformatics to systematically measure the metabolic half-lives of hundreds of synaptic proteins, examine how these depend on their pre/postsynaptic affiliation or their association with particular molecular complexes, and assess the metabolic load of synaptic proteostasis. We found that nearly all synaptic proteins identified here exhibited half-lifetimes in the range of 2–5 days. Unexpectedly, metabolic turnover rates were not significantly different for presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins, or for proteins for which mRNAs are consistently found in dendrites. Some functionally or structurally related proteins exhibited very similar turnover rates, indicating that their biogenesis and degradation might be coupled, a possibility further supported by bioinformatics-based analyses. The relatively low turnover rates measured here (∼0.7% of synaptic protein content per hour) are in good agreement with imaging-based studies of synaptic protein trafficking, yet indicate that the metabolic load

  10. Modeling synaptic transmission of the tripartite synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter

    2007-03-01

    The tripartite synapse denotes the junction of a pre- and postsynaptic neuron modulated by a synaptic astrocyte. Enhanced transmission probability and frequency of the postsynaptic current-events are among the significant effects of the astrocyte on the synapse as experimentally characterized by several groups. In this paper we provide a mathematical framework for the relevant synaptic interactions between neurons and astrocytes that can account quantitatively for both the astrocytic effects on the synaptic transmission and the spontaneous postsynaptic events. Inferred from experiments, the model assumes that glutamate released by the astrocytes in response to synaptic activity regulates store-operated calcium in the presynaptic terminal. This source of calcium is distinct from voltage-gated calcium influx and accounts for the long timescale of facilitation at the synapse seen in correlation with calcium activity in the astrocytes. Our model predicts the inter-event interval distribution of spontaneous current activity mediated by a synaptic astrocyte and provides an additional insight into a novel mechanism for plasticity in which a low fidelity synapse gets transformed into a high fidelity synapse via astrocytic coupling.

  11. Synaptic connectivity in engineered neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Molnar, Peter; Kang, Jung-Fong; Bhargava, Neelima; Das, Mainak; Hickman, James J

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a method to organize cells in dissociated cultures using engineered chemical clues on a culture surface and determined their connectivity patterns. Although almost all elements of the synaptic transmission machinery can be studied separately in single cell models in dissociated cultures, the complex physiological interactions between these elements are usually lost. Thus, factors affecting synaptic transmission are generally studied in organotypic cultures, brain slices, or in vivo where the cellular architecture generally remains intact. However, by utilizing engineered neuronal networks complex phenomenon such as synaptic transmission or synaptic plasticity can be studied in a simple, functional, cell culture-based system. We have utilized self-assembled monolayers and photolithography to create the surface templates. Embryonic hippocampal cells, plated on the resultant patterns in serum-free medium, followed the surface clues and formed the engineered neuronal networks. Basic whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology was applied to characterize the synaptic connectivity in these engineered two-cell networks. The same technology has been used to pattern other cell types such as cardiomyocytes or skeletal muscle fibers.

  12. Synaptic Conductances during Interictal Discharges in Pyramidal Neurons of Rat Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Amakhin, Dmitry V.; Ergina, Julia L.; Chizhov, Anton V.; Zaitsev, Aleksey V.

    2016-01-01

    In epilepsy, the balance of excitation and inhibition underlying the basis of neural network activity shifts, resulting in neuronal network hyperexcitability and recurrent seizure-associated discharges. Mechanisms involved in ictal and interictal events are not fully understood, in particular, because of controversial data regarding the dynamics of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances. In the present study, we estimated AMPAR-, NMDAR-, and GABAA R-mediated conductances during two distinct types of interictal discharge (IID) in pyramidal neurons of rat entorhinal cortex in cortico-hippocampal slices. Repetitively emerging seizure-like events and IIDs were recorded in high extracellular potassium, 4-aminopyridine, and reduced magnesium-containing solution. An original procedure for estimating synaptic conductance during IIDs was based on the differences among the current-voltage characteristics of the synaptic components. The synaptic conductance dynamics obtained revealed that the first type of IID is determined by activity of GABAA R channels with depolarized reversal potential. The second type of IID is determined by the interplay between excitation and inhibition, with early AMPAR and prolonged depolarized GABAA R and NMDAR-mediated components. The study then validated the contribution of these components to IIDs by intracellular pharmacological isolation. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms of seizures generation, development, and cessation. PMID:27790093

  13. Synaptic reorganization of inhibitory hilar interneuron circuitry after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Robert F; Scheff, Stephen W; Smith, Bret N

    2011-05-04

    Functional plasticity of synaptic networks in the dentate gyrus has been implicated in the development of posttraumatic epilepsy and in cognitive dysfunction after traumatic brain injury, but little is known about potentially pathogenic changes in inhibitory circuits. We examined synaptic inhibition of dentate granule cells and excitability of surviving GABAergic hilar interneurons 8-13 weeks after cortical contusion brain injury in transgenic mice that express enhanced green fluorescent protein in a subpopulation of inhibitory neurons. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in granule cells revealed a reduction in spontaneous and miniature IPSC frequency after head injury; no concurrent change in paired-pulse ratio was found in granule cells after paired electrical stimulation of the hilus. Despite reduced inhibitory input to granule cells, action potential and EPSC frequencies were increased in hilar GABA neurons from slices ipsilateral to the injury versus those from control or contralateral slices. Furthermore, increased excitatory synaptic activity was detected in hilar GABA neurons ipsilateral to the injury after glutamate photostimulation of either the granule cell or CA3 pyramidal cell layers. Together, these findings suggest that excitatory drive to surviving hilar GABA neurons is enhanced by convergent input from both pyramidal and granule cells, but synaptic inhibition of granule cells is not fully restored after injury. This rewiring of circuitry regulating hilar inhibitory neurons may reflect an important compensatory mechanism, but it may also contribute to network destabilization by increasing the relative impact of surviving individual interneurons in controlling granule cell excitability in the posttraumatic dentate gyrus.

  14. Rapid desynchronization of an electrically coupled interneuron network with sparse excitatory synaptic input.

    PubMed

    Vervaeke, Koen; Lorincz, Andrea; Gleeson, Padraig; Farinella, Matteo; Nusser, Zoltan; Silver, R Angus

    2010-08-12

    Electrical synapses between interneurons contribute to synchronized firing and network oscillations in the brain. However, little is known about how such networks respond to excitatory synaptic input. To investigate this, we studied electrically coupled Golgi cells (GoC) in the cerebellar input layer. We show with immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and electrophysiology that Connexin-36 is necessary for functional gap junctions (GJs) between GoC dendrites. In the absence of coincident synaptic input, GoCs synchronize their firing. In contrast, sparse, coincident mossy fiber input triggered a mixture of excitation and inhibition of GoC firing and spike desynchronization. Inhibition is caused by propagation of the spike afterhyperpolarization through GJs. This triggers network desynchronization because heterogeneous coupling to surrounding cells causes spike-phase dispersion. Detailed network models predict that desynchronization is robust, local, and dependent on synaptic input properties. Our results show that GJ coupling can be inhibitory and either promote network synchronization or trigger rapid network desynchronization depending on the synaptic input.

  15. N-type and L-type calcium channels mediate glycinergic synaptic inputs to retinal ganglion cells of tiger salamanders.

    PubMed

    Bieda, Mark C; Copenhagen, David R

    2004-01-01

    Synaptically localized calcium channels shape the timecourse of synaptic release, are a prominent site for neuromodulation, and have been implicated in genetic disease. In retina, it is well established that L-type calcium channels play a major role in mediating release of glutamate from the photoreceptors and bipolar cells. However, little is known about which calcium channels are coupled to synaptic exocytosis of glycine, which is primarily released by amacrine cells. A recent report indicates that glycine release from spiking AII amacrine cells relies exclusively upon L-type calcium channels. To identify calcium channel types controlling neurotransmitter release from the population of glycinergic neurons that drive retinal ganglion cells, we recorded electrical and potassium evoked inhibitory synaptic currents (IPSCs) from these postsynaptic neurons in retinal slices from tiger salamanders. The L-channel antagonist nifedipine strongly inhibited release and FPL64176, an L-channel agonist, greatly enhanced it, indicating a significant role for L-channels. omega-Conotoxin MVIIC, an N/P/Q-channel antagonist, strongly inhibited release, indicating an important role for non-L channels. While the P/Q-channel blocker omega-Aga IVA produced only small effects, the N-channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA strongly inhibited release. Hence, N-type and L-type calcium channels appear to play major roles, overall, in mediating synaptic release of glycine onto retinal ganglion cells.

  16. A small pool of vesicles maintains synaptic activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Denker, Annette; Bethani, Ioanna; Kröhnert, Katharina; Körber, Christoph; Horstmann, Heinz; Wilhelm, Benjamin G.; Barysch, Sina V.; Kuner, Thomas; Neher, Erwin; Rizzoli, Silvio O.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical synapses contain substantial numbers of neurotransmitter-filled synaptic vesicles, ranging from approximately 100 to many thousands. The vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane to release neurotransmitter and are subsequently reformed and recycled. Stimulation of synapses in vitro generally causes the majority of the synaptic vesicles to release neurotransmitter, leading to the assumption that synapses contain numerous vesicles to sustain transmission during high activity. We tested this assumption by an approach we termed cellular ethology, monitoring vesicle function in behaving animals (10 animal models, nematodes to mammals). Using FM dye photooxidation, pHluorin imaging, and HRP uptake we found that only approximately 1–5% of the vesicles recycled over several hours, in both CNS synapses and neuromuscular junctions. These vesicles recycle repeatedly, intermixing slowly (over hours) with the reserve vesicles. The latter can eventually release when recycling is inhibited in vivo but do not seem to participate under normal activity. Vesicle recycling increased only to ≈5% in animals subjected to an extreme stress situation (frog predation on locusts). Synapsin, a molecule binding both vesicles and the cytoskeleton, may be a marker for the reserve vesicles: the proportion of vesicles recycling in vivo increased to 30% in synapsin-null Drosophila. We conclude that synapses do not require numerous reserve vesicles to sustain neurotransmitter release and thus may use them for other purposes, examined in the accompanying paper. PMID:21903928

  17. Synaptic mechanisms of persistent reverberatory activity in neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Lau, Pak-Ming; Bi, Guo-Qiang

    2005-07-19

    For brain functions such as working memory and motor planning, neuronal circuits are able to sustain persistent activity after transient inputs. Theoretical studies have suggested that persistent activity can exist in recurrently connected networks as active reverberation. However, the actual cellular processes underlying such reverberation are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the basic synaptic mechanisms responsible for reverberatory activity in small networks of rat hippocampal neurons in vitro. We found that brief stimulation of one neuron in a network could evoke, in an all-or-none fashion, reverberatory activity lasting for seconds. The reverberation was likely to arise from recurrent excitation because it was eliminated by partial inhibition of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (but not by blockade of NMDA receptors). In contrast, blocking inhibitory transmission with bicuculline enhanced the reverberation. Furthermore, paired-pulse stimuli with interpulse intervals of 200-400 ms were more effective than single pulses in triggering reverberation, apparently by eliciting higher levels of asynchronous transmitter release. Suppressing asynchronous release by EGTA-AM abolished reverberation, whereas elevating asynchronous release by strontium substantially enhanced reverberation. Finally, manipulating calcium uptake into or release from intracellular stores also modulated the level of reverberation. Thus, the oft-overlooked asynchronous phase of synaptic transmission plays a central role in the emergent phenomenon of network reverberation.

  18. Synaptic mechanisms of persistent reverberatory activity in neuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Pak-Ming; Bi, Guo-Qiang

    2005-01-01

    For brain functions such as working memory and motor planning, neuronal circuits are able to sustain persistent activity after transient inputs. Theoretical studies have suggested that persistent activity can exist in recurrently connected networks as active reverberation. However, the actual cellular processes underlying such reverberation are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the basic synaptic mechanisms responsible for reverberatory activity in small networks of rat hippocampal neurons in vitro. We found that brief stimulation of one neuron in a network could evoke, in an all-or-none fashion, reverberatory activity lasting for seconds. The reverberation was likely to arise from recurrent excitation because it was eliminated by partial inhibition of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)-type glutamate receptors (but not by blockade of NMDA receptors). In contrast, blocking inhibitory transmission with bicuculline enhanced the reverberation. Furthermore, paired-pulse stimuli with interpulse intervals of 200–400 ms were more effective than single pulses in triggering reverberation, apparently by eliciting higher levels of asynchronous transmitter release. Suppressing asynchronous release by EGTA-AM abolished reverberation, whereas elevating asynchronous release by strontium substantially enhanced reverberation. Finally, manipulating calcium uptake into or release from intracellular stores also modulated the level of reverberation. Thus, the oft-overlooked asynchronous phase of synaptic transmission plays a central role in the emergent phenomenon of network reverberation. PMID:16006530

  19. Tonic regulation of GABAergic synaptic activity on vasopressin neurones by cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Armstrong, W E

    2012-04-01

    Synaptic activity in magnocellular neurosecretory neurones is influenced by the retrograde (i.e. somatodendritic) release of vasopressin, oxytocin and cannabinoids (CBs). For oxytocin neurones, oxytocin exerts constitutive effects on pre-synaptic activity through its ability to release CBs post-synaptically. In the present study, we examined evoked inhibitory post-synaptic currents (eIPSCs) and spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents (sIPSCs) in identified vasopressin (VP) neurones in coronal slices from virgin rats to determine: (i) the extent to which CBs may also tonically modulate VP synaptic activity; and (ii) to determine whether depolarisation-induced suppression of inhibition was present in VP neurones, and if so, whether it was mediated by VP or CBs. The CB1 antagonists AM251 (1 μm) and SR14171 (1 μm) consistently increased the frequency of sIPSCs in VP neurones without affecting their amplitude, suggesting a tonic CB presence. This effect on frequency was independent of action potential activity, and blocked by chelating intracellular calcium with 10 mm ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA). AM251 also increased the amplitude of eIPSCs and decreased the paired-pulse ratio (PPR) in VP neurones-effects that were completely blocked with even low (1 mm EGTA) internal calcium chelation. Bouts of evoked firing of VP neurones consistently suppressed sIPSCs but had no effect on eIPSCs or the PPR. This depolarisation-induced suppression of IPSCs was reduced by AM251, and was totally blocked by 10 μm of the mixed vasopressin/oxytocin antagonist, Manning compound. We then tested the effect of vasopressin on IPSCs at the same time as blocking CB1 receptors. Vasopressin (10-100 nm) inhibited sIPSC frequency but had no effect on sIPSC or eIPSC amplitudes, or on the PPR, in the presence of AM251. Taken together, these results suggest a tonic, pre-synaptic inhibitory modulation of IPSCs in VP neurones by CBs that is largely dependent on post-synaptic calcium

  20. Astrocytes Optimize the Synaptic Transmission of Information

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter; Levine, Herbert

    2008-01-01

    Chemical synapses transmit information via the release of neurotransmitter-filled vesicles from the presynaptic terminal. Using computational modeling, we predict that the limited availability of neurotransmitter resources in combination with the spontaneous release of vesicles limits the maximum degree of enhancement of synaptic transmission. This gives rise to an optimal tuning that depends on the number of active zones. There is strong experimental evidence that astrocytes that enwrap synapses can modulate the probabilities of vesicle release through bidirectional signaling and hence regulate synaptic transmission. For low-fidelity hippocampal synapses, which typically have only one or two active zones, the predicted optimal values lie close to those determined by experimentally measured astrocytic feedback, suggesting that astrocytes optimize synaptic transmission of information. PMID:18516277

  1. Astroglial Metabolic Networks Sustain Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouach, Nathalie; Koulakoff, Annette; Abudara, Veronica; Willecke, Klaus; Giaume, Christian

    2008-12-01

    Astrocytes provide metabolic substrates to neurons in an activity-dependent manner. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in this function, as well as its role in synaptic transmission, remain unclear. Here, we show that the gap-junction subunit proteins connexin 43 and 30 allow intercellular trafficking of glucose and its metabolites through astroglial networks. This trafficking is regulated by glutamatergic synaptic activity mediated by AMPA receptors. In the absence of extracellular glucose, the delivery of glucose or lactate to astrocytes sustains glutamatergic synaptic transmission and epileptiform activity only when they are connected by gap junctions. These results indicate that astroglial gap junctions provide an activity-dependent intercellular pathway for the delivery of energetic metabolites from blood vessels to distal neurons.

  2. Actin Out: Regulation of the Synaptic Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Erin F.; Soderling, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    The small size of dendritic spines belies the elaborate role they play in excitatory synaptic transmission and ultimately complex behaviors. The cytoskeletal architecture of the spine is predominately composed of actin filaments. These filaments, which at first glance might appear simple, are also surprisingly complex. They dynamically assemble into different structures and serve as a platform for orchestrating the elaborate responses of the spine during spinogenesis and experience-dependent plasticity. Multiple mutations associated with human neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders involve genes that encode regulators of the synaptic cytoskeleton. A major, unresolved question is how the disruption of specific actin filament structures leads to the onset and progression of complex synaptic and behavioral phenotypes. This review will cover established and emerging mechanisms of actin cytoskeletal remodeling and how this influences specific aspects of spine biology that are implicated in disease. PMID:26453304

  3. Synaptic integration by NG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenjing; Dietrich, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    NG2 expressing oligodendrocyte precursor cells stand out from other types of glial cells by receiving classical synaptic contacts from many neurons. This unconventional form of signaling between neurons and glial cells enables NG2 cells to receive information about the activity of presynaptic neurons with high temporal and spatial precision and has been postulated to be involved in activity-dependent myelination. While this still unproven concept is generally compelling, how NG2 cells may integrate synaptic input has hardly been addressed to date. Here we review the biophysical characteristics of synaptic currents and membrane properties of NG2 cells and discuss their capabilities to perform complex temporal and spatial signal integration and how this may be important for activity-dependent myelination. PMID:24391539

  4. Synaptic activity: An emerging player in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Anindita; Marchetto, Maria C; Gage, Fred H

    2017-02-01

    Schizophrenia is a polygenic disorder with a complex etiology. While the genetic and molecular underpinnings of the disease are poorly understood, variations in genes encoding synaptic pathways are consistently implicated. Although its impact is still an open question, a deficit in synaptic activity provides an attractive model to explain the cognitive etiology of schizophrenia. Recent advances in high-throughput imaging and functional studies bring new hope for the application of in vitro disease modeling with patient-derived neurons to empirically ascertain the extent to which these synaptic pathways are involved in the disease. In addition, the emergent avenue of research targeted to probe neuronal connections is revealing critical insight into circuitry and may influence how we think about psychiatric disorders in the near future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Exploiting human neurons.

  5. Fluoxetine suppresses synaptically induced [Ca²⁺]i spikes and excitotoxicity in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jung; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Choi, Se Joon; Hong, Yi Jae; Yang, Ji Seon; Sung, Ki-Wug; Rhie, Duck-Joo; Hahn, Sang June; Yoon, Shin Hee

    2013-01-15

    Fluoxetine is a widely used antidepressant with an action that is primarily attributed to the inhibition of serotonin re-uptake into the synaptic terminals of the central nervous system. Fluoxetine also has blocking effects on various ion channels, including Ca(2+) channels. It remains unclear, however, how fluoxetine may affect synaptically induced [Ca(2+)](i) spikes. We investigated the effects of fluoxetine on [Ca(2+)](i) spikes, along with the subsequent neurotoxicity that is synaptically evoked by lowering extracellular Mg(2+) in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Fluoxetine inhibited the synaptically induced [Ca(2+)](i) spikes in p-chloroamphetamine-treated and non-treated neurons, in a concentration-dependent manner. However, other selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, such as paroxetine and citalopram, did not significantly affect the spikes. Pretreatment with fluoxetine for 5 min inhibited [Ca(2+)](i) increases induced by glutamate, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid, and N-methyl-d-aspartate. Fluoxetine also inhibited α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-induced currents. In addition, fluoxetine decreased the [Ca(2+)](i) responses induced by the metabotrophic glutamate receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine or the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine. Fluoxetine inhibited [Ca(2+)](i) responses induced by 20mM KCl. Fluoxetine decreased the release of FM1-43 induced by electric field stimulation. Furthermore, fluoxetine inhibited 0.1mM [Mg(2+)](o)-induced cell death. Collectively, our results suggest that fluoxetine suppresses the spikes and protects neurons against excitotoxicity, particularly in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, presumably due to both direct inhibition of presynaptic glutamate release and postsynaptic glutamate receptor-mediated [Ca(2+)](i) signaling. In addition to an indirect inhibitory effect via 5-HT levels, these data suggest a new, possibly direct inhibitory action of fluoxetine on

  6. Homeostatic regulation of synaptic excitability: tonic GABAA receptor currents replace Ih in cortical pyramidal neurons of HCN1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangdong; Shu, Shaofang; Schwartz, Lauren C.; Sun, Chengsan; Kapur, Jaideep; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2010-01-01

    Homeostatic control of synaptic efficacy is often mediated by dynamic regulation of excitatory synaptic receptors. Here, we report a novel form of homeostatic synaptic plasticity based on regulation of shunt currents that control dendritosomatic information transfer. In cortical pyramidal neurons from wild type mice, HCN1 channels underlie a dendritic hyperpolarization-activated cationic current (Ih) that serves to limit temporal summation of synaptic inputs. In HCN1 knockout mice, as expected, Ih is reduced in pyramidal neurons and its effects on synaptic summation are strongly diminished. Unexpectedly, we found a markedly enhanced bicuculline- and L-655,708-sensitive background GABAA current in these cells that could be attributed to selective up-regulation of GABAA α5 subunit expression in the cortex of HCN1 knockout mice. Strikingly, despite diminished Ih, baseline sub-linear summation of evoked EPSPs was unchanged in pyramidal neurons from HCN1 knockout mice; however, blocking tonic GABAA currents with bicuculline enhanced synaptic summation more strongly in pyramidal cells from HCN1 knockout mice than in those cells from wild type mice. Increasing tonic GABAA receptor conductance in the context of reduced Ih, using computational or pharmacological approaches, restored normal baseline synaptic summation, as observed in neurons from HCN1 knockout mice. These data indicate that up-regulation of α5 subunit-mediated GABAA receptor tonic current compensates quantitatively for loss of dendritic Ih in cortical pyramidal neurons from HCN1 knockout mice to maintain normal synaptic summation; they further imply that dendritosomatic synaptic efficacy is a controlled variable for homeostatic regulation of cortical neuron excitability in vivo. PMID:20164346

  7. Sleep and Synaptic Renormalization: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Olcese, Umberto; Esser, Steve K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that net synaptic strength in cortical and other networks increases during wakefulness and returns to a baseline level during sleep. These homeostatic changes in synaptic strength are accompanied by corresponding changes in sleep slow wave activity (SWA) and in neuronal firing rates and synchrony. Other evidence indicates that sleep is associated with an initial reactivation of learned firing patterns that decreases over time. Finally, sleep can enhance performance of learned tasks, aid memory consolidation, and desaturate the ability to learn. Using a large-scale model of the corticothalamic system equipped with a spike-timing dependent learning rule, in agreement with experimental results, we demonstrate a net increase in synaptic strength in the waking mode associated with an increase in neuronal firing rates and synchrony. In the sleep mode, net synaptic strength decreases accompanied by a decline in SWA. We show that the interplay of activity and plasticity changes implements a control loop yielding an exponential, self-limiting renormalization of synaptic strength. Moreover, when the model “learns” a sequence of activation during waking, the learned sequence is preferentially reactivated during sleep, and reactivation declines over time. Finally, sleep-dependent synaptic renormalization leads to increased signal-to-noise ratios, increased resistance to interference, and desaturation of learning capabilities. Although the specific mechanisms implemented in the model cannot capture the variety and complexity of biological substrates, and will need modifications in line with future evidence, the present simulations provide a unified, parsimonious account for diverse experimental findings coming from molecular, electrophysiological, and behavioral approaches. PMID:20926617

  8. Synaptic organisation of the basal ganglia

    PubMed Central

    BOLAM, J. P.; HANLEY, J. J.; BOOTH, P. A. C.; BEVAN, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    The basal ganglia are a group of subcortical nuclei involved in a variety of processes including motor, cognitive and mnemonic functions. One of their major roles is to integrate sensorimotor, associative and limbic information in the production of context-dependent behaviours. These roles are exemplified by the clinical manifestations of neurological disorders of the basal ganglia. Recent advances in many fields, including pharmacology, anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology have provided converging data that have led to unifying hypotheses concerning the functional organisation of the basal ganglia in health and disease. The major input to the basal ganglia is derived from the cerebral cortex. Virtually the whole of the cortical mantle projects in a topographic manner onto the striatum, this cortical information is ‘processed’ within the striatum and passed via the so-called direct and indirect pathways to the output nuclei of the basal ganglia, the internal segment of the globus pallidus and the substantia nigra pars reticulata. The basal ganglia influence behaviour by the projections of these output nuclei to the thalamus and thence back to the cortex, or to subcortical ‘premotor’ regions. Recent studies have demonstrated that the organisation of these pathways is more complex than previously suggested. Thus the cortical input to the basal ganglia, in addition to innervating the spiny projection neurons, also innervates GABA interneurons, which in turn provide a feed-forward inhibition of the spiny output neurons. Individual neurons of the globus pallidus innervate basal ganglia output nuclei as well as the subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra pars compacta. About one quarter of them also innervate the striatum and are in a position to control the output of the striatum powerfully as they preferentially contact GABA interneurons. Neurons of the pallidal complex also provide an anatomical substrate, within the basal ganglia, for the synaptic

  9. Cellular and synaptic network defects in autism.

    PubMed

    Peça, João; Feng, Guoping

    2012-10-01

    Many candidate genes are now thought to confer susceptibility to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Here we review four interrelated complexes, each composed of multiple families of genes that functionally coalesce on common cellular pathways. We illustrate a common thread in the organization of glutamatergic synapses and suggest a link between genes involved in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex, Fragile X syndrome, Angelman syndrome and several synaptic ASD candidate genes. When viewed in this context, progress in deciphering the molecular architecture of cellular protein-protein interactions together with the unraveling of synaptic dysfunction in neural networks may prove pivotal to advancing our understanding of ASDs. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Synaptic transmission at retinal ribbon synapses

    PubMed Central

    Heidelberger, Ruth; Thoreson, Wallace B.; Witkovsky, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The molecular organization of ribbon synapses in photoreceptors and ON bipolar cells is reviewed in relation to the process of neurotransmitter release. The interactions between ribbon synapse-associated proteins, synaptic vesicle fusion machinery and the voltage-gated calcium channels that gate transmitter release at ribbon synapses are discussed in relation to the process of synaptic vesicle exocytosis. We describe structural and mechanistic specializations that permit the ON bipolar cell to release transmitter at a much higher rate than the photoreceptor does, under in vivo conditions. We also consider the modulation of exocytosis at photoreceptor synapses, with an emphasis on the regulation of calcium channels. PMID:16027025

  11. Guanine derivatives modulate L-glutamate uptake into rat brain synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Tasca, Carla I; Santos, Tiago G; Tavares, Rejane G; Battastini, Ana M O; Rocha, João B T; Souza, Diogo O

    2004-05-01

    Glutamate uptake into synaptic vesicles is driven by a proton electrochemical gradient generated by a vacuolar H(+)-ATPase and stimulated by physiological concentrations of chloride. This uptake plays an important role in glutamatergic transmission. We show here that vesicular glutamate uptake is selectively inhibited by guanine derivatives, in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Guanosine, GMP, GDP, guanosine-5'-O-2-thiodiphosphate, GTP, or 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp) inhibited glutamate uptake in 1.5 and 3 min incubations, however, when incubating for 10 min, only GTP or GppNHp displayed such inhibition. By increasing ATP concentrations, the inhibitory effect of GTP was no longer observed, but GppNHp still inhibited glutamate uptake. In the absence of ATP, vesicular ATPase can hydrolyze GTP in order to drive glutamate uptake. However, 5mM GppNHp inhibited ATP hydrolysis by synaptic vesicle preparations. GTP or GppNHp decreased the proton electrochemical gradient, whereas the other guanine derivatives did not. Glutamate saturation curves were assayed in order to evaluate the specificity of inhibition of the vesicular glutamate carrier by the guanine derivatives. The maximum velocity of the initial rate of glutamate uptake was decreased by all guanine derivatives. These results indicate that, although GppNHp can inhibit ATPase activity, guanine derivatives are more likely to be acting through interaction with vesicular glutamate carrier.

  12. Bidirectional Control of Synaptic GABAAR Clustering by Glutamate and Calcium.

    PubMed

    Bannai, Hiroko; Niwa, Fumihiro; Sherwood, Mark W; Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Arizono, Misa; Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Sugiura, Kotomi; Lévi, Sabine; Triller, Antoine; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-29

    GABAergic synaptic transmission regulates brain function by establishing the appropriate excitation-inhibition (E/I) balance in neural circuits. The structure and function of GABAergic synapses are sensitive to destabilization by impinging neurotransmitters. However, signaling mechanisms that promote the restorative homeostatic stabilization of GABAergic synapses remain unknown. Here, by quantum dot single-particle tracking, we characterize a signaling pathway that promotes the stability of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) postsynaptic organization. Slow metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling activates IP3 receptor-dependent calcium release and protein kinase C to promote GABAAR clustering and GABAergic transmission. This GABAAR stabilization pathway counteracts the rapid cluster dispersion caused by glutamate-driven NMDA receptor-dependent calcium influx and calcineurin dephosphorylation, including in conditions of pathological glutamate toxicity. These findings show that glutamate activates distinct receptors and spatiotemporal patterns of calcium signaling for opposing control of GABAergic synapses.

  13. GABA Metabolism and Transport: Effects on Synaptic Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Fabian C.; Draguhn, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    GABAergic inhibition is an important regulator of excitability in neuronal networks. In addition, inhibitory synaptic signals contribute crucially to the organization of spatiotemporal patterns of network activity, especially during coherent oscillations. In order to maintain stable network states, the release of GABA by interneurons must be plastic in timing and amount. This homeostatic regulation is achieved by several pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms and is triggered by various activity-dependent local signals such as excitatory input or ambient levels of neurotransmitters. Here, we review findings on the availability of GABA for release at presynaptic terminals of interneurons. Presynaptic GABA content seems to be an important determinant of inhibitory efficacy and can be differentially regulated by changing synthesis, transport, and degradation of GABA or related molecules. We will discuss the functional impact of such regulations on neuronal network patterns and, finally, point towards pharmacological approaches targeting these processes. PMID:22530158

  14. Endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic plasticity and addiction-related behavior.

    PubMed

    Sidhpura, Nimish; Parsons, Loren H

    2011-12-01

    Endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) are retrograde messengers that provide feedback inhibition of both excitatory and inhibitory transmission in brain through the activation of presynaptic CB₁ receptors. Substantial evidence indicates that eCBs mediate various forms of short- and long-term plasticity in brain regions involved in the etiology of addiction. The present review provides an overview of the mechanisms through which eCBs mediate various forms of synaptic plasticity and discusses evidence that eCB-mediated plasticity is disrupted following exposure to a variety of abused substances that differ substantially in pharmacodynamic mechanism including alcohol, psychostimulants and cannabinoids. The possible involvement of dysregulated eCB signaling in maladaptive behaviors that evolve over long-term drug exposure is also discussed, with a particular focus on altered behavioral responses to drug exposure, deficient extinction of drug-related memories, increased drug craving and relapse, heightened stress sensitivity and persistent affective disruption (anxiety and depression).

  15. Endocannabinoid-mediated synaptic plasticity and addiction-related behavior

    PubMed Central

    Sidhpura, Nimish; Parsons, Loren H.

    2011-01-01

    Endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) are retrograde messengers that provide feedback inhibition of both excitatory and inhibitory transmission in brain through the activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors. Substantial evidence indicates that eCBs mediate various forms of short- and long-term plasticity in brain regions involved in the etiology of addiction. The present review provides an overview of the mechanisms through which eCBs mediate various forms of synaptic plasticity and discusses evidence that eCB-mediated plasticity is disrupted following exposure to a variety of abused substances that differ substantially in pharmacodynamic mechanism including alcohol, psychostimulants and cannabinoids. The possible involvement of dysregulated eCB signaling in maladaptive behaviors that evolve over long-term drug exposure is also discussed, with a particular focus on altered behavioral responses to drug exposure, deficient extinction of drug-related memories, increased drug craving and relapse, heightened stress sensitivity and persistent affective disruption (anxiety and depression). PMID:21669214

  16. Bidirectional Control of Synaptic GABAAR Clustering by Glutamate and Calcium

    PubMed Central

    Bannai, Hiroko; Niwa, Fumihiro; Sherwood, Mark W.; Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Arizono, Misa; Miyamoto, Akitoshi; Sugiura, Kotomi; Lévi, Sabine; Triller, Antoine; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Summary GABAergic synaptic transmission regulates brain function by establishing the appropriate excitation-inhibition (E/I) balance in neural circuits. The structure and function of GABAergic synapses are sensitive to destabilization by impinging neurotransmitters. However, signaling mechanisms that promote the restorative homeostatic stabilization of GABAergic synapses remain unknown. Here, by quantum dot single-particle tracking, we characterize a signaling pathway that promotes the stability of GABAA receptor (GABAAR) postsynaptic organization. Slow metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling activates IP3 receptor-dependent calcium release and protein kinase C to promote GABAAR clustering and GABAergic transmission. This GABAAR stabilization pathway counteracts the rapid cluster dispersion caused by glutamate-driven NMDA receptor-dependent calcium influx and calcineurin dephosphorylation, including in conditions of pathological glutamate toxicity. These findings show that glutamate activates distinct receptors and spatiotemporal patterns of calcium signaling for opposing control of GABAergic synapses. PMID:26711343

  17. Recombinant probes for visualizing endogenous synaptic proteins in living neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Garrett G.; Junge, Jason A.; Mora, Rudy J.; Kwon, Hyung-Bae; Olson, C. Anders; Takahashi, Terry T.; Liman, Emily R.; Ellis-Davies, Graham C.R.; McGee, Aaron W.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.; Roberts, Richard W.; Arnold, Don B.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The ability to visualize endogenous proteins in living neurons provides a powerful means to interrogate neuronal structure and function. Here we generate recombinant antibody-like proteins, termed FingRs (Fibronectin intrabodies generated with mRNA display), that bind endogenous neuronal proteins PSD-95 and Gephyrin with high affinity and which, when fused to GFP, allow excitatory and inhibitory synapses to be visualized in living neurons. Design of the FingR incorporates a novel transcriptional regulation system that ties FingR expression to the level of the target and reduces background fluorescence. In dissociated neurons and brain slices FingRs generated against PSD-95 and Gephyrin did not affect the expression patterns of their endogenous target proteins or the number or strength of synapses. Together, our data indicate that PSD-95 and Gephyrin FingRs can report the localization and amount of endogenous synaptic proteins in living neurons and thus may be used to study changes in synaptic strength in vivo. PMID:23791193

  18. Exogenous and endogenous cannabinoids control synaptic transmission in mice nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Robbe, David; Alonso, Gerard; Manzoni, Oliver J

    2003-11-01

    Addictive drugs are thought to alter normal brain function and cause the remodeling of synaptic functions in areas important to memory and reward. Excitatory transmission to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) is involved in the actions of most drugs of abuse, including cannabis. We have explored the functions of the endocannabinoid system at the prefrontal cortex-NAc synapses. Immunocytochemistry showed cannabinoid receptor (CB1) expression on axonal terminals making contacts with NAc neurons. In NAc slices, synthetic cannabinoids inhibit spontaneous and evoked glutamate-mediated transmission through presynaptic activation of presynaptic K+ channels and GABA-mediated transmission most likely via a direct presynaptic action on the vesicular release machinery. How does synaptic activity lead to the production of endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) in the NAc? More generally, do eCBs participate in long-term synaptic plasticity in the brain? We found that tetanic stimulation (mimicking naturally occurring frequencies) of prelimbic glutamatergic afferents induced a presynaptic LTD dependent on eCB and CB1 receptors (eCB-LTD). Induction of eCB-LTD required postsynaptic activation of mGlu5 receptors and a rise in postsynaptic Ca2+ from ryanodine-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores. This retrograde signaling cascade involved postsynaptic eCB release and activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors. In the NAc, eCB-LTD might be part of a negative feedback loop, reducing glutamatergic synaptic strength during sustained cortical activity. The fact that this new form of LTD was occluded by an exogenous cannabinoid suggested that cannabis derivatives, such as marijuana, may alter normal eCB-mediated synaptic plasticity. These data suggest a major role of the eCB system in long-term synaptic plasticity and give insights into how cannabis derivatives, such as marijuana, alter normal eCB functions in the brain reward system.

  19. Impact of Synaptic Neurotransmitter Concentration Time Course on the Kinetics and Pharmacological Modulation of Inhibitory Synaptic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Barberis, Andrea; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2011-01-01

    The time course of synaptic currents is a crucial determinant of rapid signaling between neurons. Traditionally, the mechanisms underlying the shape of synaptic signals are classified as pre- and post-synaptic. Over the last two decades, an extensive body of evidence indicated that synaptic signals are critically shaped by the neurotransmitter time course which encompasses several phenomena including pre- and post-synaptic ones. The agonist transient depends on neurotransmitter release mechanisms, diffusion within the synaptic cleft, spill-over to the extra-synaptic space, uptake, and binding to post-synaptic receptors. Most estimates indicate that the neurotransmitter transient is very brief, lasting between one hundred up to several hundreds of microseconds, implying that post-synaptic activation is characterized by a high degree of non-equilibrium. Moreover, pharmacological studies provide evidence that the kinetics of agonist transient plays a crucial role in setting the susceptibility of synaptic currents to modulation by a variety of compounds of physiological or clinical relevance. More recently, the role of the neurotransmitter time course has been emphasized by studies carried out on brain slice models that revealed a striking, cell-dependent variability of synaptic agonist waveforms ranging from rapid pulses to slow volume transmission. In the present paper we review the advances on studies addressing the impact of synaptic neurotransmitter transient on kinetics and pharmacological modulation of synaptic currents at inhibitory synapses. PMID:21734864

  20. Spike Timing Regulation on the Millisecond Scale by Distributed Synaptic Plasticity at the Cerebellum Input Stage: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Jesús A.; Ros, Eduardo; D’Angelo, Egidio

    2013-01-01

    The way long-term synaptic plasticity regulates neuronal spike patterns is not completely understood. This issue is especially relevant for the cerebellum, which is endowed with several forms of long-term synaptic plasticity and has been predicted to operate as a timing and a learning machine. Here we have used a computational model to simulate the impact of multiple distributed synaptic weights in the cerebellar granular-layer network. In response to mossy fiber (MF) bursts, synaptic weights at multiple connections played a crucial role to regulate spike number and positioning in granule cells. The weight at MF to granule cell synapses regulated the delay of the first spike and the weight at MF and parallel fiber to Golgi cell synapses regulated the duration of the time-window during which the first-spike could be emitted. Moreover, the weights of synapses controlling Golgi cell activation regulated the intensity of granule cell inhibition and therefore the number of spikes that could be emitted. First-spike timing was regulated with millisecond precision and the number of spikes ranged from zero to three. Interestingly, different combinations of synaptic weights optimized either first-spike timing precision or spike number, efficiently controlling transmission and filtering properties. These results predict that distributed synaptic plasticity regulates the emission of quasi-digital spike patterns on the millisecond time-scale and allows the cerebellar granular layer to flexibly control burst transmission along the MF pathway. PMID:23720626

  1. Synaptic proteome changes in the hypothalamus of mother rats.

    PubMed

    Udvari, Edina Brigitta; Völgyi, Katalin; Gulyássy, Péter; Dimén, Diána; Kis, Viktor; Barna, János; Szabó, Éva Rebeka; Lubec, Gert; Juhász, Gábor; Kékesi, Katalin Adrienna; Dobolyi, Árpád

    2017-04-21

    To establish synaptic proteome changes associated with motherhood, we isolated synaptosome fractions from the hypothalamus of mother rats and non-maternal control females at the 11th postpartum day. Proteomic analysis by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometric protein identification established 26 significant proteins, 7 increasing and 19 decreasing protein levels in the dams. The altered proteins are mainly involved in energy homeostasis, protein folding, and metabolic processes suggesting the involvement of these cellular processes in maternal adaptations. The decrease in a significantly altered protein, complement component 1q subcomponent-binding protein (C1qbp) was validated with Western blotting. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed its presence in hypothalamic fibers and terminals in agreement with its presence in synaptosomes. We also found the expression of C1qbp in different hypothalamic nuclei including the preoptic area and the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus at the protein and at the mRNA level using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization histochemistry, respectively. Bioinformatical network analysis revealed that cytokines, growth factors, and protein kinases are common regulators, which indicates a complex regulation of the proteome change in mothers. The results suggest that maternal responsiveness is associated with synaptic proteins level changes in the hypothalamus, and that growth factors and cytokines may govern these alterations. The period of motherhood is accompanied with several behavioral, neuroendocrine, emotional and metabolic adaptations in the brain. Although it is established that various hypothalamic networks participate in the maternal adaptations of the rodent brain, our knowledge on the molecular background of these alterations remains seriously limited. In the present study, we first determined that the functional alterations of the maternal brain can be detected at the

  2. Neuronal cytoskeleton in synaptic plasticity and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Weeks, Phillip R; Fournier, Alyson E

    2014-04-01

    During development, dynamic changes in the axonal growth cone and dendrite are necessary for exploratory movements underlying initial axo-dendritic contact and ultimately the formation of a functional synapse. In the adult central nervous system, an impressive degree of plasticity is retained through morphological and molecular rearrangements in the pre- and post-synaptic compartments that underlie the strengthening or weakening of synaptic pathways. Plasticity is regulated by the interplay of permissive and inhibitory extracellular cues, which signal through receptors at the synapse to regulate the closure of critical periods of developmental plasticity as well as by acute changes in plasticity in response to experience and activity in the adult. The molecular underpinnings of synaptic plasticity are actively studied and it is clear that the cytoskeleton is a key substrate for many cues that affect plasticity. Many of the cues that restrict synaptic plasticity exhibit residual activity in the injured adult CNS and restrict regenerative growth by targeting the cytoskeleton. Here, we review some of the latest insights into how cytoskeletal remodeling affects neuronal plasticity and discuss how the cytoskeleton is being targeted in an effort to promote plasticity and repair following traumatic injury in the central nervous system. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity and memory.

    PubMed

    Elgersma, Y; Silva, A J

    1999-04-01

    To unravel the molecular and cellular bases of learning and memory is one of the most ambitious goals of modern science. The progress of recent years has not only brought us closer to understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying stable, long-lasting changes in synaptic strength, but it has also provided further evidence that these mechanisms are required for memory formation.

  4. Targeting synaptic dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Nisticò, Robert; Pignatelli, Marco; Piccinin, Sonia; Mercuri, Nicola B; Collingridge, Graham

    2012-12-01

    In the past years, major efforts have been made to understand the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), which has been translated into extensive experimental approaches aimed at slowing down or halting disease progression. Advances in transgenic (Tg) technologies allowed the engineering of different mouse models of AD recapitulating a range of AD-like features. These Tg models provided excellent opportunities to analyze the bases for the temporal evolution of the disease. Several lines of evidence point to synaptic dysfunction as a cause of AD and that synapse loss is a pathological correlate associated with cognitive decline. Therefore, the phenotypic characterization of these animals has included electrophysiological studies to analyze hippocampal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation, a widely recognized cellular model for learning and memory. Transgenic mice, along with non-Tg models derived mainly from exogenous application of Aβ, have also been useful experimental tools to test the various therapeutic approaches. As a result, numerous pharmacological interventions have been reported to attenuate synaptic dysfunction and improve behavior in the different AD models. To date, however, very few of these findings have resulted in target validation or successful translation into disease-modifying compounds in humans. Here, we will briefly review the synaptic alterations across the different animal models and we will recapitulate the pharmacological strategies aimed at rescuing hippocampal plasticity phenotypes. Finally, we will highlight intrinsic limitations in the use of experimental systems and related challenges in translating preclinical studies into human clinical trials.

  5. A synaptic mechanism for network synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Simon T.; Alpert, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Within neural networks, synchronization of activity is dependent upon the synaptic connectivity of embedded microcircuits and the intrinsic membrane properties of their constituent neurons. Synaptic integration, dendritic Ca2+ signaling, and non-linear interactions are crucial cellular attributes that dictate single neuron computation, but their roles promoting synchrony and the generation of network oscillations are not well understood, especially within the context of a defined behavior. In this regard, the lamprey spinal central pattern generator (CPG) stands out as a well-characterized, conserved vertebrate model of a neural network (Smith et al., 2013a), which produces synchronized oscillations in which neural elements from the systems to cellular level that control rhythmic locomotion have been determined. We review the current evidence for the synaptic basis of oscillation generation with a particular emphasis on the linkage between synaptic communication and its cellular coupling to membrane processes that control oscillatory behavior of neurons within the locomotor network. We seek to relate dendritic function found in many vertebrate systems to the accessible lamprey central nervous system in which the relationship between neural network activity and behavior is well understood. This enables us to address how Ca2+ signaling in spinal neuron dendrites orchestrate oscillations that drive network behavior. PMID:25278839

  6. Retinal synaptic regeneration via microfluidic guiding channels

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ping-Jung; Liu, Zongbin; Zhang, Kai; Han, Xin; Saito, Yuki; Xia, Xiaojun; Yokoi, Kenji; Shen, Haifa; Qin, Lidong

    2015-01-01

    In vitro culture of dissociated retinal neurons is an important model for investigating retinal synaptic regeneration (RSR) and exploring potentials in artificial retina. Here, retinal precursor cells were cultured in a microfluidic chip with multiple arrays of microchannels in order to reconstruct the retinal neuronal synapse. The cultured retinal cells were physically connected through microchannels. Activation of electric signal transduction by the cells through the microchannels was demonstrated by administration of glycinergic factors. In addition, an image-based analytical method was used to quantify the synaptic connections and to assess the kinetics of synaptic regeneration. The rate of RSR decreased significantly below 100 μM of inhibitor glycine and then approached to a relatively constant level at higher concentrations. Furthermore, RSR was enhanced by chemical stimulation with potassium chloride. Collectively, the microfluidic synaptic regeneration chip provides a novel tool for high-throughput investigation of RSR at the cellular level and may be useful in quality control of retinal precursor cell transplantation. PMID:26314276

  7. Nanoscale analysis of structural synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, Jennifer N.; Harris, Kristen M.

    2011-01-01

    In the 1950’s, transmission electron microscopy was first used to reveal the diversity in synaptic structure and composition in the central nervous system [1;2]. Since then, visualization and reconstruction of serial thin sections have provided three-dimensional contexts in which to understand how synapses are modified with plasticity, learning, and sensory input [3–17]. Three-dimensional reconstruction from serial section electron microscopy (ssEM) has proven invaluable for the comprehensive analysis of structural synaptic plasticity. It has provided the needed nanometer resolution to localize and measure key subcellular structures, such as the postsynaptic density (PSD) and presynaptic vesicles which define a synapse, polyribosomes as sites of local protein synthesis, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) for local regulation of calcium and trafficking of membrane proteins, endosomes for recycling, and fine astroglial processes at the perimeter of some synapses. Thus, ssEM is an essential tool for nanoscale analysis of the cell biological and anatomical modifications that underlie changes in synaptic strength. Here we discuss several important issues associated with interpreting the functional significance of structural synaptic plasticity, especially during long-term potentiation, a widely studied cellular model of learning and memory. PMID:22088391

  8. Synaptic ribbon. Conveyor belt or safety belt?

    PubMed

    Parsons, T D; Sterling, P

    2003-02-06

    The synaptic ribbon in neurons that release transmitter via graded potentials has been considered as a conveyor belt that actively moves vesicles toward their release sites. But evidence has accumulated to the contrary, and it now seems plausible that the ribbon serves instead as a safety belt to tether vesicles stably in mutual contact and thus facilitate multivesicular release by compound exocytosis.

  9. Potentiation of Schaffer-Collateral CA1 Synaptic Transmission by eEF2K and p38 MAPK Mediated Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Weiguang; Chen, Ying; Wang, Man; Zhuang, Yinghan; Behnisch, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K), likewise known as CaMKIII, has been demonstrated to be involved in antidepressant responses of NMDA receptor antagonists. Even so, it remains open whether direct inhibition of eEF2K without altering up-stream or other signaling pathways affects hippocampal synaptic transmission and neuronal network synchrony. Inhibition of eEF2K by the selective and potent eEF2K inhibitor A-484954 induced a fast pre-synaptically mediated enhancement of synaptic transmission and synchronization of neural network activity. The eEF2K-inhibition mediated potentiation of synaptic transmission of hippocampal CA1 neurons is most notably independent of protein synthesis and does not rely on protein kinase C, protein kinase A or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2. Moreover, the strengthening of synaptic transmission in the response to the inhibition of eEF2K was strongly attenuated by the inhibition of p38 MAPK. In addition, we show the involvement of barium-sensitive and more specific the TWIK-related potassium-1 (TREK-1) channels in the eEF2K-inhibition mediated potentiation of synaptic transmission. These findings reveal a novel pathway of eEF2K mediated regulation of hippocampal synaptic transmission. Further research is required to study whether such compounds could be beneficial for the development of mood disorder treatments with a fast-acting antidepressant response. PMID:27826228

  10. NMDA currents modulate the synaptic input-output functions of neurons in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus in Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Porres, Christian P; Meyer, Elisabeth M M; Grothe, Benedikt; Felmy, Felix

    2011-03-23

    Neurons in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral lemniscus (DNLL) receive excitatory and inhibitory inputs from the superior olivary complex (SOC) and convey GABAergic inhibition to the contralateral DNLL and the inferior colliculi. Unlike the fast glycinergic inhibition in the SOC, this GABAergic inhibition outlasts auditory stimulation by tens of milliseconds. Two mechanisms have been postulated to explain this persistent inhibition. One, an "integration-based" mechanism, suggests that postsynaptic excitatory integration in DNLL neurons generates prolonged activity, and the other favors the synaptic time course of the DNLL output itself. The feasibility of the integration-based mechanism was tested in vitro in DNLL neurons of Mongolian gerbils by quantifying the cellular excitability and synaptic input-output functions (IO-Fs). All neurons were sustained firing and generated a near monotonic IO-F on current injections. From synaptic stimulations, we estimate that activation of approximately five fibers, each on average liberating ∼18 vesicles, is sufficient to trigger a single postsynaptic action potential. A strong single pulse of afferent fiber stimulation triggered multiple postsynaptic action potentials. The steepness of the synaptic IO-F was dependent on the synaptic NMDA component. The synaptic NMDA receptor current defines the slope of the synaptic IO-F by enhancing the temporal and spatial EPSP summation. Blocking this NMDA-dependent amplification during postsynaptic integration of train stimulations resulted into a ∼20% reduction of the decay time course of the GABAergic inhibition. Thus, our data show that the NMDA-dependent amplification of the postsynaptic activity contributes to the GABAergic persistent inhibition generated by DNLL neurons.

  11. The role of microglia in synaptic stripping and synaptic degeneration: a revised perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hugh Perry, V; O'Connor, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Chronic neurodegenerative diseases of the CNS (central nervous system) are characterized by the loss of neurons. There is, however, growing evidence to show that an early stage of this process involves degeneration of presynaptic terminals prior to the loss of the cell body. Synaptic plasticity in CNS pathology has been associated with microglia and the phenomenon of synaptic stripping. We review here the evidence for the involvement of microglia in synaptic stripping and synapse degeneration and we conclude that this is a case of guilt by association. In disease models of chronic neurodegeneration, there is no evidence that microglia play an active role in either synaptic stripping or synapse degeneration, but the degeneration of the synapse and the envelopment of a degenerating terminal appears to be a neuron autonomous event. We highlight here some of the gaps in our understanding of synapse degeneration in chronic neurodegenerative disease. PMID:20967131

  12. Synaptic modulation of excitatory synaptic transmission by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in spinal ventral horn neurons.

    PubMed

    Mine, N; Taniguchi, W; Nishio, N; Izumi, N; Miyazaki, N; Yamada, H; Nakatsuka, T; Yoshida, M

    2015-04-02

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are distributed widely in the central nervous system and play important roles in higher brain functions, including learning, memory, and recognition. However, functions of the cholinergic system in spinal motoneurons remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the actions of presynaptic and postsynaptic nAChRs in spinal ventral horn neurons by performing whole-cell patch-clamp recordings on lumbar slices from male rats. The application of nicotine or acetylcholine generated slow inward currents and increased the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). Slow inward currents by acetylcholine or nicotine were not inhibited by tetrodotoxin (TTX) or glutamate receptor antagonists. In the presence of TTX, the frequency and amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) were also increased by acetylcholine or nicotine. A selective α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist, dihydro-β-erythroidine hydrobromide (DhβE), significantly decreased nicotine-induced inward currents without affecting the enhancement of sEPSCs and mEPSCs. In addition, a selective α7 nicotinic receptor antagonist, methyllycaconitine, did not affect either nicotine-induced inward currents or the enhancement of sEPSCs and mEPSCs. These results suggest that α4β2 AChRs are localized at postsynaptic sites in the spinal ventral horn, non-α4β2 and non-α7 nAChRs are located presynaptically, and nAChRs enhance excitatory synaptic transmission in the spinal ventral horn.

  13. Synaptic Plasticity, Dementia and Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Skaper, Stephen D; Facci, Laura; Zusso, Morena; Giusti, Pietro

    2017-01-13

    Neuroplasticity is not only shaped by learning and memory but is also a mediator of responses to neuron attrition and injury (compensatory plasticity). As an ongoing process it reacts to neuronal cell activity and injury, death, and genesis, which encompasses the modulation of structural and functional processes of axons, dendrites, and synapses. The range of structural elements that comprise plasticity includes long-term potentiation (a cellular correlate of learning and memory), synaptic efficacy and remodelling, synaptogenesis, axonal sprouting and dendritic remodelling, and neurogenesis and recruitment. Degenerative diseases of the human brain continue to pose one of biomedicine's most intractable problems. Research on human neurodegeneration is now moving from descriptive to mechanistic analyses. At the same time, it is increasing apparent that morphological lesions traditionally used by neuropathologists to confirm post-mortem clinical diagnosis might furnish us with an experimentally tractable handle to understand causative pathways. Consider the aging-dependent neurodegenerative disorder Alzheimer's disease (AD) which is characterised at the neuropathological level by deposits of insoluble amyloid b-peptide (Ab) in extracellular plaques and aggregated tau protein, which is found largely in the intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. We now appreciate that mild cognitive impairment in early AD may be due to synaptic dysfunction caused by accumulation of non-fibrillar, oligomeric Ab, occurring well in advance of evident widespread synaptic loss and neurodegeneration. Soluble Ab oligomers can adversely affect synaptic structure and plasticity at extremely low concentrations, although the molecular substrates by which synaptic memory mechanisms are disrupted remain to be fully elucidated. The dendritic spine constitutes a primary locus of excitatory synaptic transmission in the mammalian central nervous system. These structures protruding from dendritic shafts

  14. Fragile X mental retardation protein and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Sidorov, Michael S; Auerbach, Benjamin D; Bear, Mark F

    2013-04-08

    Loss of the translational repressor FMRP causes Fragile X syndrome. In healthy neurons, FMRP modulates the local translation of numerous synaptic proteins. Synthesis of these proteins is required for the maintenance and regulation of long-lasting changes in synaptic strength. In this role as a translational inhibitor, FMRP exerts profound effects on synaptic plasticity.

  15. Synaptic gating and ADHD: a biological theory of comorbidity of ADHD and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Levy, Florence

    2004-09-01

    To derive a biologically based theory of comorbidity in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Theoretical concepts and empirical studies were reviewed to determine whether the behavioral inhibition concept provided an understanding of biological processes involved in comorbidity in ADHD. Empirical studies of ADHD have shown comorbidity of ADHD and anxiety, while studies of behavioral inhibition tend to suggest independent disruptive and anxiety traits. This paradox can be resolved by an understanding of the dynamics of mesolimbic dopamine (DA) systems, where reward and delay of reinforcement are determined by tonic/phasic DA relationships, resulting in impulsive 'fearless' responses when impaired. On the other hand, comorbid anxiety is related to impaired synaptic processes, which selectively gate fear (or aggressive) responses from the amygdala at the accumbens. Monosynaptic convergence between prefrontal, hippocampal, and amygdala projection neurons at the accumbens allows the operation of a synaptic gating mechanism between prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, and amygdala. Impairment of this mechanism by lowered PFC inhibition allows greater amygdala input, and anxiety-related processes more impact, over the accumbens. In conclusion, a dual theory incorporating long-term tonic/phasic mesolimbic DA relationships and secondly impairment of PFC and hippocampal inputs to synaptic gating of anxiety at the accumbens has implications for comorbidity in ADHD, as well as for possible pharmacological interventions, utilizing either stimulant or axiolytic interventions. The use of DA partial agonists may also be of interest.

  16. Noradrenergic Modulation of Intrinsic and Synaptic Properties of Lumbar Motoneurons in the Neonatal Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Tartas, Maylis; Morin, France; Barrière, Grégory; Goillandeau, Michel; Lacaille, Jean-Claude; Cazalets, Jean-René; Bertrand, Sandrine S.

    2009-01-01

    Although it is known that noradrenaline (NA) powerfully controls spinal motor networks, few data are available regarding the noradrenergic (NAergic) modulation of intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons in motor networks. Our work explores the cellular basis of NAergic modulation in the rat motor spinal cord. We first show that lumbar motoneurons express the three classes of adrenergic receptors at birth. Using patch-clamp recordings in the newborn rat spinal cord preparation, we characterized the effects of NA and of specific agonists of the three classes of adrenoreceptors on motoneuron membrane properties. NA increases the motoneuron excitability partly via the inhibition of a KIR like current. Methoxamine (α1), clonidine (α2) and isoproterenol (β) differentially modulate the motoneuron membrane potential but also increase motoneuron excitability, these effects being respectively inhibited by the antagonists prazosin (α1), yohimbine (α2) and propranolol (β). We show that the glutamatergic synaptic drive arising from the T13-L2 network is enhanced in motoneurons by NA, methoxamine and isoproterenol. On the other hand, NA, isoproterenol and clonidine inhibit both the frequency and amplitude of miniature glutamatergic EPSCs while methoxamine increases their frequency. The T13-L2 synaptic drive is thereby differentially modulated from the other glutamatergic synapses converging onto motoneurons and enhanced by presynaptic α1 and β receptor activation. Our data thus show that the NAergic system exerts a powerful and complex neuromodulation of lumbar motor networks in the neonatal rat spinal cord. PMID:20300468

  17. Endocannabinoids in Synaptic Plasticity and Neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian-Yi; Chen, Chu

    2014-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are endogenous lipid mediators involved in a variety of physiological, pharmacological, and pathological processes. While activation of the eCB system primarily induces inhibitory effects on both GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity through acting on presynaptically-expressed CB1 receptors in the brain, accumulated information suggests that eCB signaling is also capable of facilitating or potentiating excitatory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Recent studies show that a long-lasting potentiation of excitatory synaptic transmission at Schaffer collateral (SC)-CA1 synapses is induced by spatiotemporally primed inputs, accompanying with a long-term depression of inhibitory synaptic transmission (I-LTD) in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. This input-timing-dependent long-lasting synaptic potentiation at SC-CA1 synapses is mediated by 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) signaling triggered by activation of postsynaptic NMDA receptors, group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and a concurrent rise in intracellular Ca2+. Emerging evidence now also indicates that 2-AG is an important signaling mediator keeping brain homeostasis by exerting its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in response to harmful insults through CB1/2 receptor-dependent and/or independent mechanisms. Activation of the nuclear receptor protein peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) apparently is one of the important mechanisms in resolving neuroinflammation and protecting neurons produced by 2-AG signaling. Thus, the information summarized in this review suggests that the role of eCB signaling in maintaining integrity of brain function is greater than what we thought previously. PMID:24571856

  18. Synaptic plasticity with discrete state synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abarbanel, Henry D. I.; Talathi, Sachin S.; Gibb, Leif; Rabinovich, M. I.

    2005-09-01

    Experimental observations on synaptic plasticity at individual glutamatergic synapses from the CA3 Shaffer collateral pathway onto CA1 pyramidal cells in the hippocampus suggest that the transitions in synaptic strength occur among discrete levels at individual synapses [C. C. H. Petersen , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 85, 4732 (1998); O’Connor, Wittenberg, and Wang, D. H. O’Connor , Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (to be published); J. M. Montgomery and D. V. Madison, Trends Neurosci. 27, 744 (2004)]. This happens for both long term potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD) induction protocols. O’Connor, Wittenberg, and Wang have argued that three states would account for their observations on individual synapses in the CA3-CA1 pathway. We develop a quantitative model of this three-state system with transitions among the states determined by a competition between kinases and phosphatases shown by D. H. O’Connor , to be determinant of LTP and LTD, respectively. Specific predictions for various plasticity protocols are given by coupling this description of discrete synaptic α -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor ligand gated ion channel conductance changes to a model of postsynaptic membrane potential and associated intracellular calcium fluxes to yield the transition rates among the states. We then present various LTP and LTD induction protocols to the model system and report the resulting whole cell changes in AMPA conductance. We also examine the effect of our discrete state synaptic plasticity model on the synchronization of realistic oscillating neurons. We show that one-to-one synchronization is enhanced by the plasticity we discuss here and the presynaptic and postsynaptic oscillations are in phase. Synaptic strength saturates naturally in this model and does not require artificial upper or lower cutoffs, in contrast to earlier models of plasticity.

  19. Ceramidase Regulates Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbough, Jeffrey; Rushton, Emma; Palanker, Laura; Woodruff, Elvin; Matthies, Heinrich J. G.; Acharya, Usha; Acharya, Jairaj K.; Broadie, Kendal

    2009-01-01

    A screen for Drosophila synaptic dysfunction mutants identified slug-a-bed (slab). The slab gene encodes ceramidase, a central enzyme in sphingolipid metabolism and regulation. Sphingolipids are major constituents of lipid rafts, membrane domains with roles in vesicle trafficking, and signaling pathways. Null slab mutants arrest as fully developed embryos with severely reduced movement. The SLAB protein is widely expressed in different tissues but enriched in neurons at all stages of development. Targeted neuronal expression of slab rescues mutant lethality, demonstrating the essential neuronal function of the protein. C5-ceramide applied to living preparations is rapidly accumulated at neuromuscular junction (NMJ) synapses dependent on the SLAB expression level, indicating that synaptic sphingolipid trafficking and distribution is regulated by SLAB function. Evoked synaptic currents at slab mutant NMJs are reduced by 50–70%, whereas postsynaptic glutamate-gated currents are normal, demonstrating a specific presynaptic impairment. Hypertonic saline-evoked synaptic vesicle fusion is similarly impaired by 50–70%, demonstrating a loss of readily releasable vesicles. In addition, FM1-43 dye uptake is reduced in slab mutant presynaptic terminals, indicating a smaller cycling vesicle pool. Ultrastructural analyses of mutants reveal a normal vesicle distribution clustered and docked at active zones, but fewer vesicles in reserve regions, and a twofold to threefold increased incidence of vesicles linked together and tethered at the plasma membrane. These results indicate that SLAB ceramidase function controls presynaptic terminal sphingolipid composition to regulate vesicle fusion and trafficking, and thus the strength and reliability of synaptic transmission. PMID:15356190

  20. Active dendrites, potassium channels and synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Daniel; Christie, Brian R; Frick, Andreas; Gray, Richard; Hoffman, Dax A; Schexnayder, Lalania K; Watanabe, Shigeo; Yuan, Li-Lian

    2003-01-01

    The dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus express numerous types of voltage-gated ion channel, but the distributions or densities of many of these channels are very non-uniform. Sodium channels in the dendrites are responsible for action potential (AP) propagation from the axon into the dendrites (back-propagation); calcium channels are responsible for local changes in dendritic calcium concentrations following back-propagating APs and synaptic potentials; and potassium channels help regulate overall dendritic excitability. Several lines of evidence are presented here to suggest that back-propagating APs, when coincident with excitatory synaptic input, can lead to the induction of either long-term depression (LTD) or long-term potentiation (LTP). The induction of LTD or LTP is correlated with the magnitude of the rise in intracellular calcium. When brief bursts of synaptic potentials are paired with postsynaptic APs in a theta-burst pairing paradigm, the induction of LTP is dependent on the invasion of the AP into the dendritic tree. The amplitude of the AP in the dendrites is dependent, in part, on the activity of a transient, A-type potassium channel that is expressed at high density in the dendrites and correlates with the induction of the LTP. Furthermore, during the expression phase of the LTP, there are local changes in dendritic excitability that may result from modulation of the functioning of this transient potassium channel. The results support the view that the active properties of dendrites play important roles in synaptic integration and synaptic plasticity of these neurons. PMID:12740112

  1. Adaptor protein complexes 1 and 3 are essential for generation of synaptic vesicles from activity-dependent bulk endosomes.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Giselle; Cousin, Michael A

    2012-04-25

    Activity-dependent bulk endocytosis is the dominant synaptic vesicle retrieval mode during high intensity stimulation in central nerve terminals. A key event in this endocytosis mode is the generation of new vesicles from bulk endosomes, which replenish the reserve vesicle pool. We have identified an essential requirement for both adaptor protein complexes 1 and 3 in this process by employing morphological and optical tracking of bulk endosome-derived synaptic vesicles in rat primary neuronal cultures. We show that brefeldin A inhibits synaptic vesicle generation from bulk endosomes and that both brefeldin A knockdown and shRNA knockdown of either adaptor protein 1 or 3 subunits inhibit reserve pool replenishment from bulk endosomes. Conversely, no plasma membrane function was found for adaptor protein 1 or 3 in either bulk endosome formation or clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Simultaneous knockdown of both adaptor proteins 1 and 3 indicated that they generated the same population of synaptic vesicles. Thus, adaptor protein complexes 1 and 3 play an essential dual role in generation of synaptic vesicles during activity-dependent bulk endocytosis.

  2. Modulation of synaptic transmission by adenosine in layer 2/3 of the rat visual cortex in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Nicholas; Zhang, Pei; Ilin, Vladimir; Chistiakova, Marina; Volgushev, Maxim

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a wide-spread endogenous neuromodulator. In the central nervous system it activates A1 and A2A receptors (A1Rs and A2ARs) which have differential distributions, different affinities to adenosine, are coupled to different G-proteins, and have opposite effects on synaptic transmission. Although effects of adenosine are studied in detail in several brain areas, such as hippocampus and striatum, the heterogeneity of the effects of A1R and A 2A R activation and their differential distribution preclude generalization over brain areas and cell types. Here we study adenosine's effects on excitatory synaptic transmission to layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in slices of the rat visual cortex. We measured effects of bath application of adenosine receptor ligands on evoked EPSPs, miniature EPSPs (mEPSPs), and membrane properties. Adenosine reduced the amplitude of evoked EPSPs and EPSCs, and reduced frequency of mEPSPs in a concentration dependent and reversible manner. Concurrent with EPSP/C amplitude reduction was an increase in the paired-pulse ratio. These effects were blocked by application of the selective A1R antagonist DPCPX, suggesting that activation of presynaptic A1Rs suppresses excitatory transmission by reducing release probability. Adenosine (20 μM) hyperpolarized the cell membrane from 65.3±1.5 to -67.7±1.8 mV, and reduced input resistance from 396.5±44.4 to 314.0±36.3 MOhm (~20%). These effects were also abolished by DPCPX, suggesting postsynaptic A1Rs. Application of the selective A2AR antagonist SCH-58261 on the background of high adenosine concentrations revealed an additional decrease in EPSP amplitude. Moreover, application of the A2AR agonist CGS-21680 led to an A1R-dependent increase in mEPSP frequency. Dependence of the A2AR effects on the A1R availability suggests interaction between these receptors, whereby A2ARs exert their facilitatory effect on synaptic transmission by inhibiting the A1R mediated suppression. Our results demonstrate

  3. Signal transduction and functional selectivity of F15599, a preferential post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptor agonist

    PubMed Central

    Newman-Tancredi, A; Martel, J-C; Assié, M-B; Buritova, J; Lauressergues, E; Cosi, C; Heusler, P; Slot, L Bruins; Colpaert, FC; Vacher, B; Cussac, D

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Activation of post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors may provide enhanced therapy against depression. We describe the signal transduction profile of F15599, a novel 5-HT1A receptor agonist. Experimental approach: F15599 was compared with a chemical congener, F13714, and with (+)8-OH-DPAT in models of signal transduction in vitro and ex vivo. Key results: F15599 was highly selective for 5-HT1A receptors in binding experiments and in [35S]-GTPγS autoradiography of rat brain, where F15599 increased labelling in regions expressing 5-HT1A receptors. In cell lines expressing h5-HT1A receptors, F15599 more potently stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation, compared with G-protein activation, internalization of h5-HT1A receptors or inhibition of cAMP accumulation. F13714, (+)8-OH-DPAT and 5-HT displayed a different rank order of potency for these responses. F15599 stimulated [35S]-GTPγS binding more potently in frontal cortex than raphe. F15599, unlike 5-HT, more potently and efficaciously stimulated Gαi than Gαo activation. In rat prefrontal cortex (a region expressing post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors), F15599 potently activated ERK1/2 phosphorylation and strongly induced c-fos mRNA expression. In contrast, in raphe regions (expressing pre-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors) F15599 only weakly or did not induce c-fos mRNA expression. Finally, despite its more modest affinity in vitro, F15599 bound to 5-HT1A receptors in vivo almost as potently as F13714. Conclusions and implications: F15599 showed a distinctive activation profiles for 5-HT1A receptor-mediated signalling pathways, unlike those of reference agonists and consistent with functional selectivity at 5-HT1A receptors. In rat, F15599 potently activated signalling in prefrontal cortex, a feature likely to underlie its beneficial effects in models of depression and cognition. PMID:19154445

  4. Fragile X mental retardation protein regulates trans-synaptic signaling in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Samuel H; Dani, Neil; Rushton, Emma; Broadie, Kendal

    2013-11-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited determinant of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders, is caused by loss of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene product (FMRP), an mRNA-binding translational repressor. A number of conserved FMRP targets have been identified in the well-characterized Drosophila FXS disease model, but FMRP is highly pleiotropic in function and the full spectrum of FMRP targets has yet to be revealed. In this study, screens for upregulated neural proteins in Drosophila fmr1 (dfmr1) null mutants reveal strong elevation of two synaptic heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs): GPI-anchored glypican Dally-like protein (Dlp) and transmembrane Syndecan (Sdc). Our recent work has shown that Dlp and Sdc act as co-receptors regulating extracellular ligands upstream of intracellular signal transduction in multiple trans-synaptic pathways that drive synaptogenesis. Consistently, dfmr1 null synapses exhibit altered WNT signaling, with changes in both Wingless (Wg) ligand abundance and downstream Frizzled-2 (Fz2) receptor C-terminal nuclear import. Similarly, a parallel anterograde signa