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Sample records for background temperature fluctuations

  1. Topology of microwave background fluctuations - Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gott, J. Richard, III; Park, Changbom; Bies, William E.; Bennett, David P.; Juszkiewicz, Roman

    1990-01-01

    Topological measures are used to characterize the microwave background temperature fluctuations produced by 'standard' scenarios (Gaussian) and by cosmic strings (non-Gaussian). Three topological quantities: total area of the excursion regions, total length, and total curvature (genus) of the isotemperature contours, are studied for simulated Gaussian microwave background anisotropy maps and then compared with those of the non-Gaussian anisotropy pattern produced by cosmic strings. In general, the temperature gradient field shows the non-Gaussian behavior of the string map more distinctively than the temperature field for all topology measures. The total contour length and the genus are found to be more sensitive to the existence of a stringy pattern than the usual temperature histogram. Situations when instrumental noise is superposed on the map, are considered to find the critical signal-to-noise ratio for which strings can be detected.

  2. Light incoherence due to background space fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maziashvili, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Working by analogy, we use the description of light fluctuations due to random collisions of the radiating atoms to figure out why the reduction of the coherence for light propagating a cosmological distance in the fluctuating background space is negligibly small to be observed by the stellar interferometry.

  3. Fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaldarriaga, Matias

    1998-06-01

    In this thesis we investigate several aspects related to the theory of fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave Background. We develop a new algorithm to calculate the angular power spectrum of the anisotropies which is two orders of magnitude faster than the standard Boltzmann hierarchy approach (Chapter 3). The new algorithm will become essential when comparing the observational results of the next generation of CMB experiments with theoretical predictions. The parameter space of the models is so large that an exhaustive exploration to find the best fit model will only be feasible with this new type of algorithm. We also investigate the polarization properties of the CMB field. We develop a new formalism to describe the statistics of the polarization variables that takes into account their spin two nature (Chapter 2). In Chapter 4 we explore several physical effects that create distinct features in the polarization power spectrum. We study the signature of the reionization of the universe and a stochastic background of gravitational waves. We also describe how the polarization correlation functions can be used to test the causal structure of the universe. Finally in Chapter 5 we quantify the amount of information the next generation of satellites can obtain by measuring both temperature and polarization anisotropies. We calculate the expected error bars on the cosmological parameters for the specifications of the MAP and Planck satellite missions.

  4. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations and Zodiacal Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J.

    2016-06-01

    We performed a specific observational test to measure the effect that the zodiacal light can have on measurements of the spatial fluctuations of the near-IR background. Previous estimates of possible fluctuations caused by zodiacal light have often been extrapolated from observations of the thermal emission at longer wavelengths and low angular resolution or from IRAC observations of high-latitude fields where zodiacal light is faint and not strongly varying with time. The new observations analyzed here target the COSMOS field at low ecliptic latitude where the zodiacal light intensity varies by factors of ˜2 over the range of solar elongations at which the field can be observed. We find that the white-noise component of the spatial power spectrum of the background is correlated with the modeled zodiacal light intensity. Roughly half of the measured white noise is correlated with the zodiacal light, but a more detailed interpretation of the white noise is hampered by systematic uncertainties that are evident in the zodiacal light model. At large angular scales (≳100″) where excess power above the white noise is observed, we find no correlation of the power with the modeled intensity of the zodiacal light. This test clearly indicates that the large-scale power in the infrared background is not being caused by the zodiacal light.

  5. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations and Zodiacal Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard G.; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S. H.; Mather, J.

    2017-01-01

    We performed a specific observational test to measure the effect that the zodiacal light can have on measurements of the spatial fluctuations of the near-IR (near-infrared)background. Previous estimates of possible fluctuations caused by zodiacal light have often been extrapolated from observations of the thermal emission at longer wavelengths and low angular resolution or from IRAC (Infrared Array Camera) observations of high-latitude fields where zodiacal light is faint and not strongly varying with time. The new observations analyzed here target the COSMOS (Cosmic Evolution Survey) field at low ecliptic latitude where the zodiacal light intensity varies by factors of approximately 2 over the range of solar elongations at which the field can be observed. We find that the white-noise component of the spatial power spectrum of the background is correlated with the modeled zodiacal light intensity. Roughly half of the measured white noise is correlated with the zodiacal light, but a more detailed interpretation of the white noise is hampered by systematic uncertainties that are evident in the zodiacal light model. At large angular scales (greater than or approximately equal to 100 arcseconds) where excess power above the white noise is observed, we find no correlation of the power with the modeled intensity of the zodiacal light. This test clearly indicates that the large-scale power in the infrared background is not being caused by the zodiacal light.

  6. Ultraviolet background fluctuations with clustered sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjacques, Vincent; Dizgah, Azadeh Moradinezhad; Biagetti, Matteo

    2014-11-01

    We develop a count-in-cells approach to the distribution of ultraviolet background fluctuations that includes source clustering. We demonstrate that an exact expression can be obtained if the clustering of ionizing sources follows the hierarchical ansatz. In this case, the intensity distribution depends solely on their two-point correlation function. We show that the void scaling function of high-redshift mock quasars is consistent with the negative binomial form, before applying our formalism to the description of He II-ionizing fluctuations at the end of helium reionization. The model inputs are the observed quasar luminosity function and two-point correlation at z ˜ 3. We find that, for an (comoving) attenuation length ≲55 Mpc, quasar clustering contributes less than 30 per cent of the variance of intensity fluctuations so long as the quasar correlation length does not exceed ˜15 Mpc. We investigate also the dependence of the intensity distribution on the large-scale environment. Differences in the mean He II-ionizing intensity between low- and high-density regions could be a factor of few if the sources are highly clustered. An accurate description of quasar demographics and their correlation with strong absorption systems is required to make more precise predictions.

  7. Fuel Temperature Fluctuations During Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitin, R. E.; Zemenkov, Yu D.

    2016-10-01

    When oil and petroleum products are stored, their temperature significantly impacts how their properties change. The paper covers the problem of determining temperature fluctuations of hydrocarbons during storage. It provides results of the authors’ investigations of the stored product temperature variations relative to the ambient temperature. Closeness and correlation coefficients between these values are given. Temperature variations equations for oil and petroleum products stored in tanks are deduced.

  8. Quantum entanglement and temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Ourabah, Kamel; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we consider entanglement in a system out of equilibrium, adopting the viewpoint given by the formalism of superstatistics. Such an approach yields a good effective description for a system in a slowly fluctuating environment within a weak interaction between the system and the environment. For this purpose, we introduce an alternative version of the formalism within a quantum mechanical picture and use it to study entanglement in the Heisenberg XY model, subject to temperature fluctuations. We consider both isotropic and anisotropic cases and explore the effect of different temperature fluctuations (χ^{2}, log-normal, and F distributions). Our results suggest that particular fluctuations may enhance entanglement and prevent it from vanishing at higher temperatures than those predicted for the same system at thermal equilibrium.

  9. Non-Gaussian microwave background fluctuations from nonlinear gravitational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salopek, D. S.; Kunstatter, G. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    Whether the statistics of primordial fluctuations for structure formation are Gaussian or otherwise may be determined if the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Satellite makes a detection of the cosmic microwave-background temperature anisotropy delta T(sub CMB)/T(sub CMB). Non-Gaussian fluctuations may be generated in the chaotic inflationary model if two scalar fields interact nonlinearly with gravity. Theoretical contour maps are calculated for the resulting Sachs-Wolfe temperature fluctuations at large angular scales (greater than 3 degrees). In the long-wavelength approximation, one can confidently determine the nonlinear evolution of quantum noise with gravity during the inflationary epoch because: (1) different spatial points are no longer in causal contact; and (2) quantum gravity corrections are typically small-- it is sufficient to model the system using classical random fields. If the potential for two scalar fields V(phi sub 1, phi sub 2) possesses a sharp feature, then non-Gaussian fluctuations may arise. An explicit model is given where cold spots in delta T(sub CMB)/T(sub CMB) maps are suppressed as compared to the Gaussian case. The fluctuations are essentially scale-invariant.

  10. On the mass enhancement of black body background fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hoa, Nguyen; Van Xuan, Le; Lan, Nguyen Tri; Viet, Nguyen Ai

    2017-06-01

    Motivated by the mass enhancement in the toy model of moving particle in Boltzmann and Gaussian background fluctuations, the contribution of black body background fluctuation to the eflective mass of massless and massive particles is considered in this work. As the black body radiation depends only on its temperature, the dependence of the eflective mass on the temperature is obtained. The results, therefore, provide several physical insights for the research of complex systems where the interaction and equilibrium of a system and its surroundings are still not clear. By interpreting a characteristic parameter of the environmental contribution as its “eflective temperature”, “the thermal equilibrium” condition for complex systems would be discussed in the context of a thermodynamic theory.

  11. Detecting temperature fluctuations at equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Purushottam D

    2015-05-21

    The Gibbs and the Boltzmann definition of temperature agree only in the macroscopic limit. The ambiguity in identifying the equilibrium temperature of a finite-sized 'small' system exchanging energy with a bath is usually understood as a limitation of conventional statistical mechanics. We interpret this ambiguity as resulting from a stochastically fluctuating temperature coupled with the phase space variables giving rise to a broad temperature distribution. With this ansatz, we develop the equilibrium statistics and dynamics of small systems. Numerical evidence using an analytically tractable model shows that the effects of temperature fluctuations can be detected in the equilibrium and dynamical properties of the phase space of the small system. Our theory generalizes statistical mechanics to small systems relevant in biophysics and nanotechnology.

  12. Mathematical Background of 1/f Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Musha, Toshimitsu

    2009-04-23

    Energy of harmonic oscillators in equilibrium decays exponentially in time when they are coupled in quadratic forms in amplitudes. In reality, however, their Hamiltonian includes higher-order coupling terms. Not all of the higher-order coupling terms contribute to the energy decay of oscillators after averaging over reservoir oscillators, and we find that one of the lowest higher-order terms makes a finite contribution to the energy decay. This effect is equivalently represented by a modified coupling coefficient of quadratic coupling terms. This modification works as a positive feedback to the action-reaction process between oscillators. Eventually the modified coupling terms generate 1/f fluctuations in energy partition among oscillators in equilibrium. It is concluded that 1/f type of energy partition is observable with harmonic oscillators if they obey the Bose-Einstein statistics regardless of whether the collective system is classical or quantum mechanical regime.

  13. Thermal fluctuations in a hyperscaling-violation background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourhassan, Behnam; Faizal, Mir; Upadhyay, Sudhaker; Asfar, Lina Al

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we study the effect of thermal fluctuations on the thermodynamics of a black geometry with hyperscaling violation. These thermal fluctuations in the thermodynamics of this system are produced from quantum corrections of geometry describing this system. We discuss the stability of this system using specific heat and the entire Hessian matrix of the free energy. We will analyze the effects of thermal fluctuations on the stability of this system. We also analyze the effects of thermal fluctuations on the criticality of the hyperscaling-violation background.

  14. Response of Fusarium solani to Fluctuating Temperatures

    Treesearch

    Keith F. Jensen; Phillip E. Reynolds; Phillip E. Reynolds

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure growth under a range of constant temperatures and under a series of fluctuating temperature regimes, and to determine if growth in the fluctuating temperiture regimes could be predicted satisfactorily from the growth data collected in the constant temperature experiments. Growth was measured on both agar and liquid culture to...

  15. Arcminute fluctuations in the microwave background from clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markevitch, M.; Blumenthal, G. R.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.; Suniaev, R. A.

    1992-01-01

    A method for computing arcmin microwave fluctuations produced by Compton scattering of the cosmic background photons by hot electrons in clusters of galaxies is described. Microwave images of the sky for a range of Omega and primordial fluctuation spectral index n are generated which are then 'observed' to determine Delta T/T in precisely the same manner as actual observations to determine if the cluster-induced fluctuations are consistent with the measured upper limit. The geometry used by Uson and Wilkinson (1984) in the NRAO experiment and Readhead et al. (1989) in the OVRO experiment are applied to the simulated images. The 95 percent confidence lower limit for Omega is found to be about 1/10 for n = -1 (which approximates the CDM mass spectrum for clusters), while for n = 0 it is 1/7; for n = +1 the limit is 1/5 if the gas density profile extends to five core radii.

  16. Resonance of plankton communities with temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Benincà, Elisa; Dakos, Vasilis; Van Nes, Egbert H; Huisman, Jef; Scheffer, Marten

    2011-10-01

    The interplay between intrinsic population dynamics and environmental variation is still poorly understood. It is known, however, that even mild environmental noise may induce large fluctuations in population abundances. This is due to a resonance effect that occurs in communities on the edge of stability. Here, we use a simple predator-prey model to explore the sensitivity of plankton communities to stochastic environmental fluctuations. Our results show that the magnitude of resonance depends on the timescale of intrinsic population dynamics relative to the characteristic timescale of the environmental fluctuations. Predator-prey communities with an intrinsic tendency to oscillate at a period T are particularly responsive to red noise characterized by a timescale of τ = T/2π. We compare these theoretical predictions with the timescales of temperature fluctuations measured in lakes and oceans. This reveals that plankton communities will be highly sensitive to natural temperature fluctuations. More specifically, we demonstrate that the relatively fast temperature fluctuations in shallow lakes fall largely within the range to which rotifers and cladocerans are most sensitive, while marine copepods and krill will tend to resonate more strongly with the slower temperature variability of the open ocean.

  17. Temperature-polarization correlations from tensor fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Crittenden, R.G.; Coulson, D.; Turok, N.G. |

    1995-11-15

    We study the polarization-temperature correlations on the cosmic microwave sky resulting from an initial scale-invariant spectrum of tensor (gravity wave) fluctuations, such as those which might arise during inflation. The correlation function has the opposite sign to that for scalar fluctuations on large scales, raising the possibility of a direct determination of whether the microwave anisotropies have a significant tensor component. We briefly discuss the important problem of estimating the expected foreground contamination.

  18. Classical and quantum temperature fluctuations via holography

    SciTech Connect

    Balatsky, Alexander V.; Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Thorlacius, Larus; Zarembo, Konstantin; Krikun, Alexander; Kedem, Yaron

    2014-05-27

    We study local temperature fluctuations in a 2+1 dimensional CFT on the sphere, dual to a black hole in asymptotically AdS space-time. The fluctuation spectrum is governed by the lowest-lying hydrodynamic sound modes of the system whose frequency and damping rate determine whether temperature fluctuations are thermal or quantum. We calculate numerically the corresponding quasinormal frequencies and match the result with the hydrodynamics of the dual CFT at large temperature. As a by-product of our analysis we determine the appropriate boundary conditions for calculating low-lying quasinormal modes for a four-dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom black hole in global AdS.

  19. The North Ecliptic Pole Extragalactic Background LIght Fluctuations Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James; Zemcov, Michael; Cooray, Asantha; Smidt, Joseph; Serjeant, Stephen; Malkan, Matt; Matsuhara, Hideo; Matsumoto, Toshia; Matsuura, Shuji; Clements, David; Pearson, Chris; Im, Myung Shin

    2013-10-01

    We propose to image 6 deg^2 in the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) with IRAC to determine the origin of Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) fluctuations. These Spitzer images will be combined with CIBER data at 1.1 and 1.6 um, and Akari data at 2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 um, to probe the spectrum and band-to-band correlations of the fluctuations. The fluctuations have been reported by Spitzer and Akari, and are now positively detected in new and CIBER data, but their origin is controversial. This multi-wavelength analysis will allow us to determine if EBL fluctuations arise from epoch of reionization galaxies or diffuse intra-halo light emission both by measuring their spectral energy distribution (SED) from 1.0 to 4.5 um, and by measuring the cross-correlation between different bands. The analysis uses multiple field combinations in Spitzer, CIBER and Akari data to carry out a robust measurement with multiple data combinations for internal consistency tests. In addition, the proposed survey will be used in conjunction with Akari and Herschel data in the NEP survey that has the most comprehensive multi-band infrared coverage of any degree-scale field on the sky and the best available constraints on dust phases (e.g. PAH, silicate absorption, AGN dust tori, GMCs) in galaxies. We will use this multi-wavelength coverage to cross-identify IRAC counterparts to Herschel and Akari sources and obtain SEDs of dusty, star bursting galaxies at z ~ 1 to 3 from the UV to radio, and obtain accurate PAH luminosities of Akari 7.7 um-rest detected galaxies and AGNs.

  20. Fluctuations In The Cosmic Infrared Background Using the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, Joseph; Arai, T.; Battle, J.; Bock, J. J.; Cooray, A.; Frazer, C.; Hristov, V.; Keating, B.; Kim, M.; Lee, D.; Mason, P.; Matsumoto, T.; Mitchell-Wynne, K.; Nam, U.; Renbarger, T.; Smith, A.; Sullivan, I.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.; Zemcov, M.

    2012-01-01

    The clustering properties of faint unresolved sources may be probed by examining the anisotropies they create in the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB). Using information from fluctuations in the CIB at different wavelengths allows us to disentangle how clustering relates to redshift. In this talk, preliminary measurements of clustering using data from the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER), a rocket-borne experiment designed to detect the signatures of unresolved infrared galaxies during reionization, will be discussed. The CIBER payload contains four instruments including two wide field imagers designed to measure fluctuations in the near IR cosmic infrared background (CIB) at 1.0 and 1.6 microns on scales between 0.2 and 100 arcmin in both bands, where the clustering of high-redshift sources is expected to peak. CIBER observations may be combined with Akari/NEP and Spitzer/NDWFS near-infrared surveys to check systematic errors and to fully characterize the electromagnetic spectrum of CIB fluctuations.

  1. Probing Reionization through Near-Infrared Background Fluctuations with CIBER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Ian S.

    2010-01-01

    The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) is a NASA sounding rocket payload that was first launched in February 2009. CIBER consists of four co-aligned instruments designed with foreground subtraction and control of systematics in mind. In addition, the platform of a sounding rocket enables observations of the NIRB outside of narrow atmospheric windows that are uncontaminated by airglow. We will present preliminary results from the first flight. CIBER seeks to measure the absolute brightness spectrum of the extragalactic NIRB, and has two spectrometers dedicated to that purpose. One, a high-resolution Fabry-Perot spectometer, is tuned to the 8545 nm Ca II line of the solar spectrum, and is designed to measure the absolute brightness of the Zodiacal Light directly, which is the source of greatest uncertainty in the NIRB spectrum. The second spectrometer measures the NIRB spectrum from 700nm to 1800nm, which spans the wavelength range where a Lyman cutoff feature from Reionization could appear. CIBER also houses two Infrared imaging telescopes, which have identical optics that give 2º x 2º field of views with 7 arcsec pixels, but have different band defining filters. The first imager has a wide band centered at 1600nm, and images the background at the expected peak of the spectrum. The imagers’ wide field of view allows them to measure the distinctive power spectrum peaking at 10 arcminutes. The second imager has a wide band centered at 1000nm that is intended to image at wavelengths shorter than the Lyman cutoff, and provides a powerful systematic test for any detection made at 1600 nm. First-light fluctuations should have a distinctive spatial power spectrum with very red 1600nm / 1000nm color, distinctly redder than the approximately solar color of any residual fluctuations arising from Zodiacal light, Galactic starlight, or low-redshift galaxies.

  2. THE COSMIC NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND. II. FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Elizabeth R.; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Shapiro, Paul R.; Iliev, Ilian T.

    2010-02-20

    The near-infrared background (NIRB) is one of a few methods that can be used to observe the redshifted light from early stars at a redshift of 6 and above, and thus it is imperative to understand the significance of any detection or nondetection of the NIRB. Fluctuations of the NIRB can provide information on the first structures, such as halos and their surrounding ionized regions in the intergalactic medium (IGM). We combine, for the first time, N-body simulations, radiative transfer code, and analytic calculations of luminosity of early structures to predict the angular power spectrum (C{sub l} ) of fluctuations in the NIRB. We study in detail the effects of various assumptions about the stellar mass, the initial mass spectrum of stars, the metallicity, the star formation efficiency (f{sub *}), the escape fraction of ionizing photons (f{sub esc}), and the star formation timescale (t{sub SF}), on the amplitude as well as the shape of C{sub l} . The power spectrum of NIRB fluctuations is maximized when f{sub *} is the largest (as C{sub l} {proportional_to} f {sup 2}{sub *}) and f{sub esc} is the smallest (as more nebular emission is produced within halos). A significant uncertainty in the predicted amplitude of C{sub l} exists due to our lack of knowledge of t{sub SF} of these early populations of galaxies, which is equivalent to our lack of knowledge of the mass-to-light ratio of these sources. We do not see a turnover in the NIRB angular power spectrum of the halo contribution, which was claimed to exist in the literature, and explain this as the effect of high levels of nonlinear bias that was ignored in the previous calculations. This is partly due to our choice of the minimum mass of halos contributing to NIRB ({approx}2 x 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}), and a smaller minimum mass, which has a smaller nonlinear bias, may still exhibit a turnover. Therefore, our results suggest that both the amplitude and shape of the NIRB power spectrum provide important information

  3. Minimal cosmic background fluctuations implied by streaming motions

    SciTech Connect

    Juszkiewicz, R.; Gorski, K.; Silk, J.

    1987-12-01

    The minimal cosmic background radiation (CBR) anisotropy implied by the presence of peculiar motions of a given amplitude on some specified scale is calculated using a new, power spectrum-independent approach. If the tentative evidence for deviations from the Hubble flow of magnitude delta V/V roughly 0.1 at V roughly 5000 km/s is confirmed, microwave background fluctuations with a coherence scale of about 2 deg and dispersion delta T/T greater than 10 to the -5th are predicted. It is found that the existing upper limits on delta T/T are not inconsistent with v(r) = 500 km/s at r = 50/h Mpc. A reduction of the observational limits on the CBR anisotropy below the authors' minimal predictions for delta T/T would challenge the current interpretation of measurements of deviations from the Hubble flow. Gravitational instability without reheating as a mechanism for generation of the large-scale structure of the universe would be in severe difficulty. 38 references.

  4. Minimal cosmic background fluctuations implied by streaming motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Gorski, Krzysztof; Silk, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    The minimal cosmic background radiation (CBR) anisotropy implied by the presence of peculiar motions of a given amplitude on some specified scale is calculated using a new, power spectrum-independent approach. If the tentative evidence for deviations from the Hubble flow of magnitude delta V/V roughly 0.1 at V roughly 5000 km/s is confirmed, microwave background fluctuations with a coherence scale of about 2 deg and dispersion delta T/T greater than 10 to the -5th are predicted. It is found that the existing upper limits on delta T/T are not inconsistent with v(r) = 500 km/s at r = 50/h Mpc. A reduction of the observational limits on the CBR anisotropy below the authors' minimal predictions for delta T/T would challenge the current interpretation of measurements of deviations from the Hubble flow. Gravitational instability without reheating as a mechanism for generation of the large-scale structure of the universe would be in severe difficulty.

  5. Minimal cosmic background fluctuations implied by streaming motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Gorski, Krzysztof; Silk, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    The minimal cosmic background radiation (CBR) anisotropy implied by the presence of peculiar motions of a given amplitude on some specified scale is calculated using a new, power spectrum-independent approach. If the tentative evidence for deviations from the Hubble flow of magnitude delta V/V roughly 0.1 at V roughly 5000 km/s is confirmed, microwave background fluctuations with a coherence scale of about 2 deg and dispersion delta T/T greater than 10 to the -5th are predicted. It is found that the existing upper limits on delta T/T are not inconsistent with v(r) = 500 km/s at r = 50/h Mpc. A reduction of the observational limits on the CBR anisotropy below the authors' minimal predictions for delta T/T would challenge the current interpretation of measurements of deviations from the Hubble flow. Gravitational instability without reheating as a mechanism for generation of the large-scale structure of the universe would be in severe difficulty.

  6. Studying extragalactic background fluctuations with the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment 2 (CIBER-2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, Alicia; Arai, Toshiaki; Battle, John; Bock, James; Cooray, Asantha; Hristov, Viktor; Korngut, Phillip; Lee, Dae Hee; Mason, Peter; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Morford, Tracy; Onishi, Yosuke; Shirahata, Mai; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Zemcov, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Fluctuations in the extragalactic background light trace emission from the history of galaxy formation, including the emission from the earliest sources from the epoch of reionization. A number of recent near-infrared measure- ments show excess spatial power at large angular scales inconsistent with models of z < 5 emission from galaxies. These measurements have been interpreted as arising from either redshifted stellar and quasar emission from the epoch of reionization, or the combined intra-halo light from stars thrown out of galaxies during merging activity at lower redshifts. Though astrophysically distinct, both interpretations arise from faint, low surface brightness source populations that are difficult to detect except by statistical approaches using careful observations with suitable instruments. The key to determining the source of these background anisotropies will be wide-field imaging measurements spanning multiple bands from the optical to the near-infrared. The Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment 2 (CIBER-2) will measure spatial anisotropies in the extra- galactic infrared background caused by cosmological structure using six broad spectral bands. The experiment uses three 2048 x 2048 Hawaii-2RG near-infrared arrays in three cameras coupled to a single 28.5 cm telescope housed in a reusable sounding rocket-borne payload. A small portion of each array will also be combined with a linear-variable filter to make absolute measurements of the spectrum of the extragalactic background with high spatial resolution for deep subtraction of Galactic starlight. The large field of view and multiple spectral bands make CIBER-2 unique in its sensitivity to fluctuations predicted by models of lower limits on the luminosity of the first stars and galaxies and in its ability to distinguish between primordial and foreground anisotropies. In this paper the scientific motivation for CIBER-2 and details of its first flight instrumentation will be discussed, including

  7. Measurement of small temperature fluctuations at high average temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, James W.; Scholl, Marija S.

    1988-01-01

    Both absolute and differential temperature measurements were simultaneously performed as a function of time for a pixel on a high-temperature, multi-spectral, spatially and temporally varying infrared target simulator. A scanning laser beam was used to maintain a pixel at an on-the-average constant temperature of 520 K. The laser refresh rate of up to 1 kHz resulted in small-amplitude temperature fluctuations with a peak-to-peak amplitude of less than 1 K. The experimental setup to accurately measure the differential and the absolute temperature as a function of time is described.

  8. THE TEMPERATURE OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Fixsen, D. J.

    2009-12-20

    The Far InfraRed Absolute Spectrophotometer data are independently recalibrated using the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data to obtain a cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature of 2.7260 +- 0.0013. Measurements of the temperature of the CMB are reviewed. The determination from the measurements from the literature is CMB temperature of 2.72548 +- 0.00057 K.

  9. Discovery about temperature fluctuations in turbulent air flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-02-01

    The law of spatial fluctuations of temperature in a turbulent flow in the atmosphere was studied. The turbulent movement of air in the atmosphere manifests itself in random changes in wind velocity and in the dispersal of smoke. If a miniature thermometer with sufficient sensitivity and speed of response were placed in a air flow, its readings would fluctuate chaotically against the background of average temperature. This is Characteristic of practically every point of the flow. The temperature field forms as a result of the mixing of the air. A method using the relation of the mean square of the difference in temperatures of two points to the distance between these points as the structural characteristic of this field was proposed. It was found that the dissipation of energy in a flow and the equalization of temperatures are connected with the breaking up of eddies in a turbulent flow into smaller ones. Their energy in turn is converted into heat due to the viscosity of the medium. The law that has been discovered makes for a much broader field of application of physical methods of analyzing atmospheric phenomena.

  10. ECE imaging of electron temperature and electron temperature fluctuations (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, B. H.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Brower, D. L.; Cima, G.; Donne, A. J. H.; Oyevaar, T.; van de Pol, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    Electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECE imaging or ECEI) is a novel plasma diagnostic technique for the study of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations in magnetic fusion plasma devices. Instead of a single receiver located in the tokamak midplane as in conventional ECE radiometers, ECEI systems utilize large diameter imaging optics coupled with planar millimeter-wave imaging arrays to form multichannel ECE diagnostics with excellent spatial resolution. Combined with specially designed imaging optics, the use of these compact, low cost arrays has resulted in the excellent spatial resolution of the ECEI systems, the unique capability of two-dimensional measurements, and flexibility in the measurement of plasma fluctuations. Technical details and principles of this emerging diagnostic technique are described in this article. Illustrative experimental results are presented, together with a discussion of the further development of the diagnostic.

  11. Low level activity determination by means of gamma spectrometry with respect to the natural background fluctuation.

    PubMed

    Dragounová, Lenka; Rulík, Petr

    2013-11-01

    The determination of low level activities of natural radionuclides from the uranium and thorium series by gamma-spectrometry faces the problem of proper natural background subtraction. Background fluctuation can cause differences in activity determination. Also the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of natural and artificial radionuclides can be influenced by background fluctuation. In this paper, results of the background fluctuation of shielded HPGe detectors with relative efficiency of 50-150% are presented together with the assessment of its influence on the determination of natural and artificial radionuclides. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Adaptive log-quadratic approach for target detection in nonhomogeneous backgrounds perturbed with speckle fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Magraner, Eric; Bertaux, Nicolas; Réfrégier, Philippe

    2008-12-01

    An approach for point target detection in the presence of speckle fluctuations with nonhomogeneous backgrounds is proposed. This approach is based on an automatic selection between the standard constant background model and a quadratic model for the logarithm of the background values. An improvement of the regulation of the false alarm probability in nonhomogeneous backgrounds is demonstrated.

  13. Mesoscale Temperature Fluctuations in the Southern Hemisphere Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Bruce L.

    2008-01-01

    Isentrope surfaces in the Southern Hemisphere stratosphere reveal that air parcels undergo mesoscale temperature fluctuations that depend on latitude and season. The largest temperature fluctuations occur at high latitude winter, whereas the smallest fluctuations occur at high latitude summer. This is the same pattern found for the Northern Hemisphere stratosphere. However, the amplitude of the seasonal dependence in the Southern Hemisphere is only 37% of the Northern Hemisphere's seasonal amplitude.

  14. Mesoscale Temperature Fluctuations in the Southern Hemisphere Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Bruce L.

    2008-01-01

    Isentrope surfaces in the Southern Hemisphere stratosphere reveal that air parcels undergo mesoscale temperature fluctuations that depend on latitude and season. The largest temperature fluctuations occur at high latitude winter, whereas the smallest fluctuations occur at high latitude summer. This is the same pattern found for the Northern Hemisphere stratosphere. However, the amplitude of the seasonal dependence in the Southern Hemisphere is only 37% of the Northern Hemisphere's seasonal amplitude.

  15. GENERAL: Fluctuation of Mesoscopic RLC Circuit at Finite Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Ji-Suo; Fan, Hong-Yi

    2008-09-01

    We consider the fluctuation of mesoscopic RLC circuit at finite temperature since a resistance always produces Joule heat when the circuit is working. By virtue of the thermo Geld dynamics and the coherent thermo state representation we show that the quantum mechanical zero-point fluctuations of both charge and current increase with the rising temperature and the resistance value.

  16. Small-scale fluctuations in the microwave background radiation and multiple gravitational lensing

    SciTech Connect

    Kashlinsky, A.

    1988-08-01

    It is shown that multiple gravitational lensing of the microwave background radiation (MBR) by static compact objects significantly attenuates small-scale fluctuations in the MBR. Gravitational lensing, by altering trajectories of MBR photons reaching an observer, leads to (phase) mixing of photons from regions with different initial fluctuations. As a result of this diffusion process the original fluctuations are damped on scales up to several arcmin. An equation that describes this process and its general solution are given. It is concluded that the present upper limits on the amplitude of the MBR fluctuations on small scales cannot constrain theories of galaxy formation. 25 references.

  17. Fluctuations in microwave background radiation due to secondary ionization of the intergalactic gas in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunyayev, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Secondary heating and ionization of the intergalactic gas at redshifts z approximately 10-30 could lead to the large optical depth of the Universe for Thomson scattering and could smooth the primordial fluctuations formed at z approximately 1500. It is shown that the gas motions connected with the large scale density perturbations at z approximately 10-15 must lead to the generation of secondary fluctuations of microwave background. The contribution of the rich clusters of galaxies and young galaxies to the fluctuations of microwave background is also estimated.

  18. Fluctuational shift of nematic-isotropic phase transition temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kats, E. I.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we discuss a macroscopic counterpart to the microscopic mechanism of the straightening dimer mesogens conformations, proposed recently by S.M. Saliti, M.G.Tamba, S.N. Sprunt, C.Welch, G.H.Mehl, A. Jakli, J.T. Gleeson (Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 217801 (2016)) to explain their experimental observation of the unprecedentedly large shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our interpretation is based on singular longitudinal fluctuations of the nematic order parameter. Since these fluctuations are governed by the Goldstone director fluctuations they exist only in the nematic state. External magnetic field suppresses the singular longitudinal fluctuations of the order parameter (similarly as it is the case for the transverse director fluctuations, although with a different scaling over the magnetic field). The reduction of the fluctuations changes the equilibrium value of the modulus of the order parameter in the nematic state. Therefore it leads to additional (with respect to the mean field contribution) fluctuational shift of the nematic-isotropic transition temperature. Our mechanism works for any nematic liquid crystals, however the magnitude of the fluctuational shift increases with decrease of the Frank elastic moduli. Since some of these moduli supposed to be anomalously small for so-called bent-core or dimer nematic liquid crystals, just these liquid crystals are promising candidates for the observation of the predicted fluctuational shift of the phase transition temperature.

  19. Minute Temperature Fluctuations Detected in Eta Bootis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-11-01

    periods around 20 minutes. These periods are longer than those of the Sun, as expected for a star that is larger and heavier than the Sun. The figure accompanying this Press Release shows these oscillations in the form of a "power spectrum", i.e., the amount of temperature change at different values of the period. Most of the highest peaks correspond to the real oscillations in the star. The changes (fluctuations) of the temperature of Eta Bootis vary with the oscillation mode and, at the time of these observations, were mostly between 0.03 and 0.08 degrees. This diagramme provides the first strong evidence ever for solar-type oscillations in a star other than the Sun. An article with the detailed results will soon appear in the "Astronomical Journal". Agreement with Stellar Theory The measured periods of the main oscillation modes give important information about the interior of Eta Bootis. Theoretical models of the star have now been compared with these observations and the astronomers were pleased to find that the agreement is excellent, implying that current stellar theory is remarkably good. This shows that we apparently understand stars quite well, but there is of course still much to be learned. Future observations of this kind, with ground-based telescopes and possibly in a more distant future also from space, promise to open up a new and exciting way of studying stars. From now on, we will be able "to look inside" stars in great detail. Appendix: Spectral Analysis Dark spectral lines were first seen in the solar spectrum by the German physicist Johann Fraunhofer in 1814. Later, in the mid-nineteenth century, such lines were also seen in the spectra of other stars. It is now known that they are due to the upper, cooler layers in the solar and stellar atmospheres, whose atoms and molecules absorb the radiation from the hotter, deeper layers at specific wavelengths. These wavelengths serve as "footprints" of these atoms and molecules and allow astronomers to

  20. Prediction of Turbulent Temperature Fluctuations in Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debonis, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Large-eddy simulations were used to investigate turbulent temperature fluctuations and turbulent heat flux in hot jets. A high-resolution finite-difference Navier-Stokes solver, WRLES, was used to compute the flow from a 2-inch round nozzle. Several different flow conditions, consisting of different jet Mach numbers and temperature ratios, were examined. Predictions of mean and fluctuating velocities were compared to previously obtained particle image velocimetry data. Predictions of mean and fluctuating temperature were compared to new data obtained using Raman spectroscopy. Based on the good agreement with experimental data for the individual quantities, the combined quantity turbulent heat flux was examined.

  1. Zonal modes of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Jo; Coles, Peter

    2010-02-01

    All-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations are usually represented by a spherical harmonic decomposition, involving modes labelled by their degree l and order m (where -l <= m <= +l). The zonal modes (i.e. those with m = 0) are of particular interest because they vary only with galactic latitude; any anomalous behaviour in them might therefore be an indication of erroneous foreground substraction. We perform a simple statistical analysis of the modes with low l for sky maps derived via different cleaning procedures from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and show that the zonal modes provide a useful diagnostic of possible systematics.

  2. Fluctuations and disorder in high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatter, Gianni; Ivlev, Boris

    1994-02-01

    The special material parameters of the oxide superconductors lead to a dramatic increase of the importance of thermal and quantum fluctuations. The latter can be quantified by the Ginzburg number Gi = {[T c/ }/{H 2c(0)ɛξ 3(0)] 2/2 } and the quantum resistance Q u = {(e 2/ }/{h̵}) {[ϱN/}/{ɛξ(0)]}, where H c(0), ξ(0), and ϱ N denote the thermodynamic critical field, the planar coherence length (both linearly extrapolated to zero), and the planar normal resistivity. ɛ 2 = {m/}/{M} < 1 is the anisotropy parameter. In the high Tc's (specifically for YBCO) we have Gi ≅ 10 -2 and Qu ≅ 1 and thus these parameters are by orders of magnitude larger than in conventional low- Tc superconductors. The large fluctuations lead to the melting of the vortex lattice well below the upper critical field line. The inclusion of quenched disorder as parametrized by the critical current density ratio jc/ jo drastically changes the dynamic behavior of the vortex system ( jc and jo denote the depinning and depairing current densities). We discuss the equilibrium statistical mechanics (vortex lattice melting) and the dynamic behavior (creep) of the vortex system with a particular emphasis on the role of quantum fluctuations.

  3. Correlated fluctuations of daytime skin temperature and vigilance.

    PubMed

    Romeijn, Nico; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2011-02-01

    Skin temperature shows spontaneous ultradian fluctuations during everyday-life wakefulness. Previous work showed that mild manipulations of skin temperature affect human sleep and vigilance, presumably by influencing neuronal systems involved in both thermal sensing and arousal regulation. We therefore examined whether fluctuations in skin temperature are associated with those in vigilance level under conditions similar to everyday-life situations requiring sustained attention. Eight healthy participants (30.1 ± 8.1 years, M ± SD) participated in a 2-day protocol, during which vigilance and skin temperature were assessed 4 times per day in a silent, dimly lit, temperature-controlled room. Vigilance was assessed by measuring reaction speed and lapses on a novel sustained vigilance task specifically designed to increase lapse rate and range of reaction times. Skin temperature was sampled at 30-second intervals from 3 locations: distal, intermediate, and proximal temperatures were obtained from the middle finger (T(finger) ), the wrist (T(wrist)), and the infraclavicular area (T(chest)), respectively. Furthermore, 3 distal to proximal gradients were calculated. Mixed-effect regression analyses were used to evaluate the association of the fluctuations in temperatures and gradients and those in response speed and lapse probability. Especially the spontaneous fluctuations in proximal temperature were negatively associated with fluctuations in response speed and positively with lapse rate. If individual T(chest) temperature ranges were classified into 10 deciles, they accounted for 23% of the variance in response speed and 11% of the variance in lapse rate. The findings indicate coupling between the spontaneous fluctuations in skin temperature and vigilance during the day and are compatible with the hypothesis of overlap in brain networks involved in the regulation of temperature and vigilance. From an applied point of view, especially proximal skin temperature

  4. Maps of the little bangs through energy density and temperature fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Sumit Chatterjee, Rupa; Nayak, Tapan K.

    2016-01-22

    Heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies are often referred to as little bangs. We propose for the first time to map the heavy-ion collisions at ultra-relativistic energies, similar to the maps of the cosmic microwave background radiation, using fluctuations of energy density and temperature in small phase space bins. We study the evolution of fluctuations at each stage of the collision using an event-by-event hydrodynamic framework. We demonstrate the feasibility of making fluctuation maps from experimental data and its usefulness in extracting considerable information regarding the early stages of the collision and its evolution.

  5. Coupling of infraslow fluctuations in autonomic and central vigilance markers: skin temperature, EEG β power and ERP P300 latency.

    PubMed

    Ramautar, Jennifer R; Romeijn, Nico; Gómez-Herrero, Germán; Piantoni, Giovanni; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2013-08-01

    Even under thermoneutral conditions, skin temperature fluctuates spontaneously, most prominently at distal parts of the body. These fluctuations were shown to be associated with fluctuations in vigilance: mild manipulation of skin temperature during nocturnal sleep affects sleep depth and the power spectral density of the electroencephalogram (EEG), and fluctuations in skin temperature during daytime wakefulness are related to sleep propensity and task performance. The association of daytime skin temperature fluctuations with EEG markers of vigilance has not previously been investigated. Therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate the association between daytime fluctuations in skin temperature with those in two quantitative EEG measures: the power spectral density of background EEG, and the event related potential (ERP) elicited by visual stimuli. High-density EEG and skin temperature were obtained in eight healthy adults five times a day while they performed a visual sustained-attention task. Assessments were made after a night of normal sleep and after the challenge of a night of total sleep deprivation. Fluctuations in the distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient measured from the earlobe and mastoid were associated with fluctuations in parieto-occipital high beta band (20-40 Hz) power of the pre-stimulus background EEG, but only after sleep deprivation. The temperature fluctuations were moreover associated with fluctuations in the latency of the P300 elicited by the stimulus. The findings demonstrate close association between fluctuations in an autonomic correlate of the vigilance state (i.e. the distal-to-proximal skin temperature gradient), and fluctuations in central nervous system correlates of the vigilance state (i.e. background EEG and ERP). The findings are of theoretical and practical relevance for the assessment and manipulation of vigilance.

  6. Influence of temperature fluctuations on infrared limb radiance: a new simulation code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rialland, Valérie; Chervet, Patrick

    2006-08-01

    Airborne infrared limb-viewing detectors may be used as surveillance sensors in order to detect dim military targets. These systems' performances are limited by the inhomogeneous background in the sensor field of view which impacts strongly on target detection probability. This background clutter, which results from small-scale fluctuations of temperature, density or pressure must therefore be analyzed and modeled. Few existing codes are able to model atmospheric structures and their impact on limb-observed radiance. SAMM-2 (SHARC-4 and MODTRAN4 Merged), the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) background radiance code can be used to in order to predict the radiance fluctuation as a result of a normalized temperature fluctuation, as a function of the line-of-sight. Various realizations of cluttered backgrounds can then be computed, based on these transfer functions and on a stochastic temperature field. The existing SIG (SHARC Image Generator) code was designed to compute the cluttered background which would be observed from a space-based sensor. Unfortunately, this code was not able to compute accurate scenes as seen by an airborne sensor especially for lines-of-sight close to the horizon. Recently, we developed a new code called BRUTE3D and adapted to our configuration. This approach is based on a method originally developed in the SIG model. This BRUTE3D code makes use of a three-dimensional grid of temperature fluctuations and of the SAMM-2 transfer functions to synthesize an image of radiance fluctuations according to sensor characteristics. This paper details the working principles of the code and presents some output results. The effects of the small-scale temperature fluctuations on infrared limb radiance as seen by an airborne sensor are highlighted.

  7. Prediction of Turbulent Temperature Fluctuations in Hot Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeBonis, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) were used to investigate turbulent temperature fluctuations and turbulent heat flux in hot jets. A high-resolution finite-difference Navier-Stokes solver was used to compute the flow from a 2-inch round nozzle. Three different flow conditions of varying jet Mach numbers and temperature ratios were examined. The LES results showed that the temperature field behaves similar to the velocity field, but with a more rapidly spreading mixing layer. Predictions of mean, mu-bar(sub i), and fluctuating, mu'(sub i), velocities were compared to particle image velocimetry data. Predictions of mean, T-bar, and fluctuating, T', temperature were compared to data obtained using Rayleigh scattering and Raman spectroscopy. Very good agreement with experimental data was demonstrated for the mean and fluctuating velocities. The LES correctly predicts the behavior of the turbulent temperature field, but over-predicts the levels of the fluctuations. The turbulent heat flux was examined and compared to Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) results. The LES and RANS simulations produced very similar results for the radial heat flux. However, the axial heat flux obtained from the LES differed significantly from the RANS result in both structure and magnitude, indicating that the gradient diffusion type model in RANS is inadequate. Finally, the LES data was used to compute the turbulent Prandtl number and verify that a constant value of 0.7 used in the RANS models is a reasonable assumption.

  8. Analysis of the decay of temperature fluctuations in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durbin, P. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Lagrangian dispersion theory of Durbin (1980) is used to analyze experiments by Warhaft and Lumley (1978) and by Sreenivasan et al. (1980) on temperature fluctuations in grid-generated turbulence. Both theory and experiment show that the decay exponent m depends on the ratio of the initial length scales of velocity and temperature, although when this ratio is greater than 2.5 such dependence is negligible. The theory shows that m is not truly constant, but within the range covered by the experiments it is nearly so. The agreement between theory and experiment lends credence to the idea that the decay of fluctuations is controlled largely by turbulent relative dispersion.

  9. AKARI OBSERVATION OF THE SUB-DEGREE SCALE FLUCTUATION OF THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, H. J.; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Matsumoto, T.; Jeong, W.-S.; Pyo, J.

    2015-07-10

    We report spatial fluctuation analysis of the sky brightness in the near-infrared from observations toward the north ecliptic pole (NEP) by the AKARI at 2.4 and 3.2 μm. As a follow-up study of our previous work on the Monitor field of AKARI, we used NEP deep survey data, which covered a circular area of about 0.4 square degrees, in order to extend fluctuation analysis at angular scales up to 1000″. We found residual fluctuation over the estimated shot noise at larger angles than the angular scale of the Monitor field. The excess fluctuation of the NEP deep field smoothly connects with that of the Monitor field at angular scales of a few hundred arcseconds and extends without any significant variation to larger angular scales up to 1000″. By comparing excess fluctuations at two wavelengths, we confirm a blue spectral feature similar to the result of the Monitor field. We find that the result of this study is consistent with Spitzer Space Telescope observations at 3.6 μm. The origin of the excess fluctuation in the near-infrared background remains to be determined, but we could exclude zodiacal light, diffuse Galactic light, and unresolved faint galaxies at low redshift based on the comparison with mid- and far-infrared brightness, ground-based near-infrared images.

  10. Fatty acid composition and extreme temperature tolerance following exposure to fluctuating temperatures in a soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Suring, Wouter; Ellers, Jacintha

    2011-09-01

    Ectotherms commonly adjust their lipid composition to ambient temperature to counteract detrimental thermal effects on lipid fluidity. However, the extent of lipid remodeling and the associated fitness consequences under continuous temperature fluctuations are not well-described. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of repeated temperature fluctuations on fatty acid composition and thermal tolerance. We exposed the springtail Orchesella cincta to two constant temperatures of 5 and 20°C, and a continuously fluctuating treatment between 5 and 20°C every 2 days. Fatty acid composition differed significantly between constant low and high temperatures. As expected, animals were most cold tolerant in the low temperature treatment, while heat tolerance was highest under high temperature. Under fluctuating temperatures, fatty acid composition changed with temperature initially, but later in the experiment fatty acid composition stabilized and closely resembled that found under constant warm temperatures. Consistent with this, heat tolerance in the fluctuating temperature treatment was comparable to the constant warm treatment. Cold tolerance in the fluctuating temperature treatment was intermediate compared to animals acclimated to constant cold or warmth, despite the fact that fatty acid composition was adjusted to warm conditions. This unexpected finding suggests that in animals acclimated to fluctuating temperatures an additional underlying mechanism is involved in the cold shock response. Other aspects of homeoviscous adaptation may protect animals during extreme cold. This paper forms a next step to fully understand the functioning of ectotherms in more thermally variable environments.

  11. Imaging the Spatial Fluctuations in Cosmic IR Background from Reionization with CIBER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazer, Chris; Bock, J.; Cooray, A.; Kawada, M.; Kim, M.; Lee, D.; Levenson, L.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsumuura, S.; Mitchell-Wynne, K.; Renbarger, T.; Smidt, J.; Sullivan, I.; Arai, T.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.; Zemcov, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER) is a rocket-born absolute photometry imaging and spectroscopy experiment optimized to detect unresolved infrared signatures of first-light galaxies that were present during reionization. The signatures from reionization are theorized to be dominant at the wavelengths upon which CIBER surveys. CIBER consists of two wide field imagers to measure the extragalactic background fluctuations in the H and I-Bands (1.6 and 0.9 microns respectively) of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) as well as two spectrometers designed to take measurements of the foreground zodiacal light and the absolute Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) spectrum They imagers are capable of examining high-redshift (z 10-20) CIB fluctuations which will facilitate in the study of surface densities of sources associated with reionization. Studies of galaxies with similar redshift parameters (z > 6) are largely unaccounted for. The spectrometer configuration consists of one low resolution spectrometer and one narrow band spectrometer. They are respectively designed to take measurements of the absolute Extragalactic Background Light (EBL) spectrum, and foreground zodiacal light. In this poster we present the specifications for both CIBER imagers and detail how the fluctuations from galaxies during reionization will be measured.

  12. Temperature fluctuations in canonical systems: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, J.; Mishin, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a quasiharmonic solid are conducted to elucidate the meaning of temperature fluctuations in canonical systems and validate a well-known but frequently contested equation predicting the mean square of such fluctuations. The simulations implement two virtual and one physical (natural) thermostat and examine the kinetic, potential, and total energy correlation functions in the time and frequency domains. The results clearly demonstrate the existence of quasiequilibrium states in which the system can be characterized by a well-defined temperature that follows the mentioned fluctuation equation. The emergence of such states is due to the wide separation of time scales between thermal relaxation by phonon scattering and slow energy exchanges with the thermostat. The quasiequilibrium states exist between these two time scales when the system behaves as virtually isolated and equilibrium.

  13. Effects of spatial fluctuations in the extragalactic background light on hard gamma-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoda, A. M.; Faltenbacher, A.

    2017-05-01

    This study investigates the impact of the fluctuations in the extragalactic background light (EBL) on the attenuation of the hard γ-ray spectra of distant blazars. EBL fluctuations occur on the scales up to 100 Mpc and are caused by the clustering of galaxies. The EBL photons interact with high-energy γ-rays via the electron-positron pair production mechanism: γ + γ΄ → e+ + e-. The attenuation of γ-rays depends on their energy and the density of the intervening EBL photon field. Using a simple model for the evolution of the mean EBL photon density, we implement an analytical description of the EBL fluctuations. We find that the amplitudes of the EBL energy density can vary by ±1 per cent as a function of environment. The EBL fluctuations lead to mild alterations of the optical depth or equivalently the transmissivity for γ-rays from distant blazars. Our model predicts maximum changes of ±10 per cent in the γ-ray transmissivity. However, this translates into marginal differences in the power-law slopes of currently observed γ-ray spectra. The slopes of deabsorbed γ-ray spectra differ by not more than ±1 per cent if EBL fluctuations are included.

  14. Imprint of First Stars Era in the Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashlinsky, Alexander

    2008-06-01

    We present the latest results on Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) fluctuations from early epochs from deep Spitzer data. The results show the existence of significant CIB fluctuations at the IRAC wavelengths (3.6 to 8 μm) which remain after removing galaxies down to very faint levels. These fluctuations must arise from populations with a significant clustering component, but only low levels of the shot noise. There are no correlations between the source-subtracted IRAC maps and the corresponding fields observed with the HST ACS at optical wavelengths. Taken together, these data imply that 1) the sources producing the CIB fluctuations are individually faint with Sν < a few nJy at 3.6 and 4.5 μm 2) have different clustering pattern than the more recent galaxy populations; 3) are located within the first 0.7 Gyr (unless these fluctuations can somehow be produced by - so far unobserved - local galaxies of extremely low luminosity and with the unusual for local populations clustering pattern), 4) produce contribution to the net CIB flux of at least 1-2 nW m-2 sr-1 at 3.6 and 4.5 μm and must have mass-to-light ratio significantly below the present-day populations, and 5) they have angular density of ~ a few per arcsec2 and are in the confusion of the present day instruments, but can be individually observable with JWST.

  15. Correlation between low level fluctuations in the x ray background and faint galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolstoy, Eline; Griffiths, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    A correlation between low-level x-ray fluctuations in the cosmic x-ray background flux and the large numbers of galaxies found in deep optical imaging, to m(sub v) is less than or equal to 24 - 26, is desired. These (faint) galaxies by their morphology and color in deep multi-color CCD images and plate material were optically identified. Statistically significant correlations between these galaxies and low-level x-ray fluctuations at the same positions in multiple deep Einstein HRI observations in PAVO and in a ROSAT PSPC field were searched for. Our aim is to test the hypothesis that faint 'star burst' galaxies might contribute significantly to the cosmic x-ray background (at approximately 1 keV).

  16. A self-consistent 3D model of fluctuations in the helium-ionizing background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Frederick B.; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Dixon, Keri L.

    2017-03-01

    Large variations in the effective optical depth of the He II Lyα forest have been observed at z ≳ 2.7, but the physical nature of these variations is uncertain: either the Universe is still undergoing the process of He II reionization, or the Universe is highly ionized but the He II-ionizing background fluctuates significantly on large scales. In an effort to build upon our understanding of the latter scenario, we present a novel model for the evolution of ionizing background fluctuations. Previous models have assumed the mean free path of ionizing photons to be spatially uniform, ignoring the dependence of that scale on the local ionization state of the intergalactic medium (IGM). This assumption is reasonable when the mean free path is large compared to the average distance between the primary sources of He II-ionizing photons, ≳ L⋆ quasars. However, when this is no longer the case, the background fluctuations become more severe, and an accurate description of the average propagation of ionizing photons through the IGM requires additionally accounting for the fluctuations in opacity. We demonstrate the importance of this effect by constructing 3D semi-analytic models of the helium-ionizing background from z = 2.5-3.5 that explicitly include a spatially varying mean free path of ionizing photons. The resulting distribution of effective optical depths at large scales in the He II Lyα forest is very similar to the latest observations with HST/COS at 2.5 ≲ z ≲ 3.5.

  17. Ion temperature fluctuation measurements using a retarding field analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Nedzelskiy, I. S.; Silva, C.; Duarte, P.; Fernandes, H.

    2011-04-15

    The retarding field analyzer (RFA) is a widely used diagnostic tool for the ion temperature measurement in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) of the thermonuclear plasma devices. However, the temporal resolution in the standard RFA application is restricted to the ms timescale. In this paper, a dc operation of the RFA is considered, which allows for the measurement of the plasma ion temperature fluctuations. The method is based on the relation for the RFA current-voltage (I-V) characteristic resulted from a common RFA model of shifted Maxwellian distribution of the analyzed ions, and the measurements of two points on the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic with two differently dc biased RFA electrodes. The method has been tested and compared with conventional RFA measurements of the ion temperature in the tokamak ISTTOK SOL plasma. An ion temperature of T{sub i}= 17 eV is obtained near the limiter position. The agreement between the results of the two methods is within {approx}25%. The amplitude of the ion temperature fluctuations is found to be around 5 eV at this location. The method has been validated by taking into account the effect of fluctuations in the plasma potential and the noise contamination, proving the reliability of the results obtained. Finally, constrains to the method application are discussed that include a negligible electron emission from the RFA grids and the restriction to operate in the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic.

  18. Ion temperature fluctuation measurements using a retarding field analyzer.

    PubMed

    Nedzelskiy, I S; Silva, C; Duarte, P; Fernandes, H

    2011-04-01

    The retarding field analyzer (RFA) is a widely used diagnostic tool for the ion temperature measurement in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) of the thermonuclear plasma devices. However, the temporal resolution in the standard RFA application is restricted to the ms timescale. In this paper, a dc operation of the RFA is considered, which allows for the measurement of the plasma ion temperature fluctuations. The method is based on the relation for the RFA current-voltage (I-V) characteristic resulted from a common RFA model of shifted Maxwellian distribution of the analyzed ions, and the measurements of two points on the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic with two differently dc biased RFA electrodes. The method has been tested and compared with conventional RFA measurements of the ion temperature in the tokamak ISTTOK SOL plasma. An ion temperature of T(i) = 17 eV is obtained near the limiter position. The agreement between the results of the two methods is within ∼25%. The amplitude of the ion temperature fluctuations is found to be around 5 eV at this location. The method has been validated by taking into account the effect of fluctuations in the plasma potential and the noise contamination, proving the reliability of the results obtained. Finally, constrains to the method application are discussed that include a negligible electron emission from the RFA grids and the restriction to operate in the exponentially decaying region of the I-V characteristic.

  19. Effect of Background Fluctuations on Kinetic Alfvén Wave Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Anju; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    The localization of Kinetic Alfvén wave (KAW) caused by finite amplitude background density fluctuations has been studied in intermediate beta plasma. The dynamical equations are derived taking into account the ponderomotive nonlinearity of the KAW as well as background density fluctuations and then studied numerically. Numerical simulation has been performed to analyze the effect of background density fluctuations on localized structures and resulting turbulent spectrum of KAW applicable to the magnetopause. Simulation results reveal that the power spectrum deviates from Kolmogorov scaling at the transverse size of KAW, equal to ion gyroradius. Steepening of the power spectrum at shorter wavelengths may be accountable for heating and acceleration of the plasma particles. Thus the presented coupling suggests a mechanism of energy transfer from larger length-scales to smaller length-scales. The relevance of present investigation with observations collected from the THEMIS spacecraft in magnetopause is also discussed [Chaston et al., 2008]. Reference Chaston, C., J. Bonnell, J. P. McFadden, C. W. Carlson, C. Cully, O. Le Contel A. Roux, H. U. Auster, K. H. Glassmeier, V. Angelopoulos, C. T. Russell (2008), Turbulent heating and cross-field transport near the magnetopause from THEMIS, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L17S08.

  20. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations in Deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera Images: Data Processing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S.; Mather, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of the data reduction and analysis procedures that have been employed in our previous studies of spatial fluctuation of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) using deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations. The self-calibration we apply removes a strong instrumental signal from the fluctuations that would otherwise corrupt the results. The procedures and results for masking bright sources and modeling faint sources down to levels set by the instrumental noise are presented. Various tests are performed to demonstrate that the resulting power spectra of these fields are not dominated by instrumental or procedural effects. These tests indicate that the large-scale ([greater, similar]30') fluctuations that remain in the deepest fields are not directly related to the galaxies that are bright enough to be individually detected. We provide the parameterization of these power spectra in terms of separate instrument noise, shot noise, and power-law components. We discuss the relationship between fluctuations measured at different wavelengths and depths, and the relations between constraints on the mean intensity of the CIB and its fluctuation spectrum. Consistent with growing evidence that the [approx]1-5 [mu]m mean intensity of the CIB may not be as far above the integrated emission of resolved galaxies as has been reported in some analyses of DIRBE and IRTS observations, our measurements of spatial fluctuations of the CIB intensity indicate the mean emission from the objects producing the fluctuations is quite low ([greater, similar]1 nW m-2 sr-1 at 3-5 [mu]m), and thus consistent with current [gamma]-ray absorption constraints. The source of the fluctuations may be high-z Population III objects, or a more local component of very low luminosity objects with clustering properties that differ from the resolved galaxies. Finally, we discuss the prospects of the upcoming space-based surveys to directly measure the epochs

  1. Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations in Deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera Images: Data Processing and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arendt, Richard; Kashlinsky, A.; Moseley, S.; Mather, J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a detailed description of the data reduction and analysis procedures that have been employed in our previous studies of spatial fluctuation of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) using deep Spitzer Infrared Array Camera observations. The self-calibration we apply removes a strong instrumental signal from the fluctuations that would otherwise corrupt the results. The procedures and results for masking bright sources and modeling faint sources down to levels set by the instrumental noise are presented. Various tests are performed to demonstrate that the resulting power spectra of these fields are not dominated by instrumental or procedural effects. These tests indicate that the large-scale ([greater, similar]30') fluctuations that remain in the deepest fields are not directly related to the galaxies that are bright enough to be individually detected. We provide the parameterization of these power spectra in terms of separate instrument noise, shot noise, and power-law components. We discuss the relationship between fluctuations measured at different wavelengths and depths, and the relations between constraints on the mean intensity of the CIB and its fluctuation spectrum. Consistent with growing evidence that the [approx]1-5 [mu]m mean intensity of the CIB may not be as far above the integrated emission of resolved galaxies as has been reported in some analyses of DIRBE and IRTS observations, our measurements of spatial fluctuations of the CIB intensity indicate the mean emission from the objects producing the fluctuations is quite low ([greater, similar]1 nW m-2 sr-1 at 3-5 [mu]m), and thus consistent with current [gamma]-ray absorption constraints. The source of the fluctuations may be high-z Population III objects, or a more local component of very low luminosity objects with clustering properties that differ from the resolved galaxies. Finally, we discuss the prospects of the upcoming space-based surveys to directly measure the epochs

  2. OH* imager response to turbulence-induced temperature fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Chester S.; Vargas, Fabio A.

    2016-12-01

    The layer of the excited state hydroxyl radical (OH*) is formed in the mesopause region by the reaction of ozone (O3) and atomic hydrogen (H). We derive the theoretical expressions for the OH* brightness and rotational temperature (T*) responses to high-frequency atmospheric temperature perturbations. The theory is used to calculate the 1-D and 2-D horizontal wave number spectra of the OH* and T* image fluctuations induced by atmospheric turbulence. By applying the theory to images of a breaking gravity wave packet, acquired by the Utah State University Advanced Mesospheric Temperature Mapper, we show that existing infrared OH* imager technology can observe the evolution of gravity wave breakdown and characterize the resulting turbulent eddies in the source region and in the inertial subrange of the turbulence spectrum. For the example presented here, the RMS OH* brightness fluctuations induced by the gravity wave packet was 2.90% and by the associated turbulence was 1.07%. Unfortunately, the T* fluctuations induced by turbulence are usually too small to be observed in the OH* rotational temperature maps.

  3. Effect of temperature and temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of cattle manure.

    PubMed

    El-Mashad, Hamed M; Zeeman, Grietje; van Loon, Wilko K P; Bot, Gerard P A; Lettinga, Gatze

    2004-11-01

    The influence of temperature, 50 and 60 degrees C, at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 20 and 10 days, on the performance of anaerobic digestion of cow manure has been investigated in completely stirred tank reactors (CSTRs). Furthermore, the effect of both daily downward and daily upward temperature fluctuations has been studied. In the daily downward temperature fluctuation regime the temperatures of each reactor was reduced by 10 degrees C for 10 h while in the daily upward fluctuation regime the temperature of each reactor was increased 10 degrees C for 5 h. The results show that the methane production rate at 60 degrees C is lower than that at 50 degrees C at all experimental conditions of imposed HRT except when downward temperature fluctuations were applied at an HRT of 10 days. It also was found that the free ammonia concentration not only affects the acetate-utilising bacteria but also the hydrolysis and acidification process. The upward temperature fluctuation affects the maximum specific methanogenesis activity more severely as compared to imposed downward temperature fluctuations. The results clearly reveal the possibility of using available solar energy at daytime to heat up the reactor(s) without the need of heat storage during nights, especially at an operational temperature of 50 degrees C and at a 20 days HRT, and without the jeopardising of the overheating.

  4. Low-temperature quantum fluctuations in overdamped ratchets.

    PubMed

    Maier, Stefan A; Ankerhold, Joachim

    2010-08-01

    At low temperatures and strong friction the time evolution of the density distribution in position follows a quantum Smoluchowski equation. Recently, also higher-order contributions of quantum fluctuations to drift and diffusion coefficients have been systematically derived. As a nontrivial situation to reveal the impact of subleading quantum corrections and to demonstrate convergence properties of the perturbation series, directed transport in ratchets is studied. It is shown that the perturbation series typically has a nonmonotonous behavior. Depending on symmetry properties higher-order contributions may even compensate current reversals induced by leading quantum fluctuations. This analysis demonstrates how to consistently treat the dynamics of overdamped quantum systems at low temperatures also in numerical applications.

  5. Baryon number fluctuations at finite temperature and density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-jie; Pawlowski, Jan M.; Rennecke, Fabian; Schaefer, Bernd-Jochen

    2016-12-01

    We investigate baryon number fluctuations for finite temperature and density in two-flavor QCD. This is done within a QCD-improved low-energy effective theory in an extension of the approach put forward by Fu and Pawlowski [Phys. Rev. D 92, 116006 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevD.92.116006 and Phys. Rev. D 93, 091501 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.091501]. In the present work, we aim to improve the predictive power of this approach for large temperatures and, in partitular, large densities, that is, for small collision energies. This is achieved by taking into account the full frequency dependence of the quark dispersion. This ensures the necessary Silver Blaze property of finite density QCD for the first time, which so far was only implemented approximately. Moreover, we show that Polyakov-loop fluctuations have a sizeable impact at large temperatures and density. The results for the kurtosis of baryon number fluctuations are compared to previous effective theory results, lattice results, and recent experimental data from STAR.

  6. Brain temperature homeostasis: physiological fluctuations and pathological shifts.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2010-01-01

    Brain temperature is a physiological parameter, reflecting the balance between metabolism-related intra-brain heat production and heat loss by cerebral circulation to the rest of the body and then to the external environment. First, we present data on brain temperature fluctuations occurring under physiological and behavioral conditions and discuss their mechanisms. Since most processes governing neural activity are temperature-dependent, we consider how naturally occurring temperature fluctuations could affect neural activity and neural functions. We also consider psychomotor stimulants and show that their hyperthermic effects are state-dependent and modulated by environmental conditions. Since high temperature could irreversibly damage neural cells and worsen various pathological processes, we consider the situations associated with pathological brain hyperthermia and evaluate its role in acute perturbations of brain functions, neurotoxicity, and neurodegeneration. We also discuss the limitations in consideration of brain temperature within the frameworks of physiological regulation and homeostasis. While different adaptive mechanisms could, within some limits, compensate for altered intra-brain heat balance, these mechanisms could fail in real-life situations, resulting in life-threatening health complications.

  7. AKARI near-infrared background fluctuations arise from normal galaxy populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helgason, K.; Komatsu, E.

    2017-05-01

    We show that measurements of the fluctuations in the near-infrared background (NIRB) from the AKARI satellite can be explained by faint galaxy populations at low redshifts. We demonstrate this using reconstructed images from deep galaxy catalogues (Hawk-I UDS/GOODS Survey and S-Cosmic Assembly Deep Near-Infrared Extragalactic Legacy Survey) and two independent galaxy population models. In all cases, we find that the NIRB fluctuations measured by AKARI are consistent with faint galaxies and there is no need for a contribution from unknown populations. We find that a steep Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum for the underlying sources is not required as previously reported. The apparent Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum at large angular scales is likely a consequence of galaxies being removed systematically to deeper levels in the longer wavelength channels.

  8. Cosmic birefringence fluctuations and cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seokcheon; Liu, Guo-Chin; Ng, Kin-Wang

    2015-06-01

    Recently, BICEP2 measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization has indicated the presence of primordial gravitational waves at degree angular scales, inferring the tensor-to-scalar ratio of r = 0.2 and a running scalar spectral index, provided that dust contamination is low. In this Letter, we show that the existence of the fluctuations of cosmological birefringence can give rise to CMB B-mode polarization that fits BICEP2 data with r < 0.11 and no running of the scalar spectral index. When dust contribution is taken into account, we derive an upper limit on the cosmological birefringence, Aβ2 < 0.0075, where A is the amplitude of birefringence fluctuations that couple to electromagnetism with a coupling strength β.

  9. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-05-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10≲ z≲ 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)/NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.5-5 μm. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at ˜2-5 μm, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10≲ z≲ 30 as the universe comes out of the “Dark Ages.” We apply the proposed tomography to the current Spitzer/IRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z≳ 30.

  10. Reconstructing Emission from Pre-Reionization Sources with Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuation Measurements by the JWST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Helgason, K.; Arendt, R. G.; Bromm, V.; Moseley, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    We present new methodology to use cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to probe sources at 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 from a James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) NIRCam configuration that will isolate known galaxies to 28 AB mag at 0.55 m. At present significant mutually consistent source-subtracted CIB fluctuations have been identified in the Spitzer and AKARI data at 25 m, but we demonstrate internal inconsistencies at shorter wavelengths in the recent CIBER data. We evaluate CIB contributions from remaining galaxies and show that the bulk of the high-z sources will be in the confusion noise of the NIRCam beam, requiring CIB studies. The accurate measurement of the angular spectrum of the fluctuations and probing the dependence of its clustering component on the remaining shot noise power would discriminate between the various currently proposed models for their origin and probe the flux distribution of its sources. We show that the contribution to CIB fluctuations from remaining galaxies is large at visible wavelengths for the current instruments precluding probing the putative Lyman-break of the CIB fluctuations. We demonstrate that with the proposed JWST configuration such measurements will enable probing the Lyman-break. We develop a Lyman-break tomography method to use the NIRCam wavelength coverage to identify or constrain, via the adjacent two-band subtraction, the history of emissions over 10 less than or approx. equal to z less than or approx. equal to 30 as the universe comes out of the Dark Ages. We apply the proposed tomography to the current SpitzerIRAC measurements at 3.6 and 4.5 m, to find that it already leads to interestingly low upper limit on emissions at z greater than or approx. equal to 30.

  11. Glacier fluctuations, global temperature and sea-level change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclercq, P. W.

    2012-02-01

    The current world-wide glacier retreat is a clear sign of global warming. In addition, glaciers contribute to sea-level rise as a consequence of the current retreat. In this thesis we use records of past glacier fluctuations to reconstruct past climate variations and the glacier contribution to sea-level change. Firstly, a coherent data set of world-wide glacier fluctuations over the past centuries is compiled. Most available information of glacier fluctuations concerns glacier length fluctuations. There is currently a large number of sources available, varying from field observations, satellite images and aerial photography to reconstructions from historical documents and geological evidence. The data set, resulting from the compilation of available data, contains 374 length records of glaciers from all continents and is described in Chapter 2. In Chapter 3, a climatic interpretation of the length fluctuations of Glaciar Frías is presented. This glacier in North Patagonia has the longest detailed length record in southern South America. The glacier behaviour is modelled with a simplified mass balance model that is coupled with a flow line model. A warming of North Patagonian climate with 1.16 °Csince the mid 17th century, or a decrease in precipitation of 34%, would best explain the observed retreat since 1639. Driving the glacier model with existing climate reconstructions shows that the uncertainties in these reconstructions are rather large. In addition, it appears that the length fluctuations are mainly driven by variations in temperature rather than variations in precipitation. The development of such detailed models is not feasible for all glaciers in the length fluctuations data set. In the next chapter a simplified approach is used to reconstruct global and hemispheric temperature for the period 1600-2000 from world-wide glacier length fluctuations. The reconstructions show that global temperature was more or less constant from 1600 until the middle of

  12. Measurements of fluctuating gas temperatures using compensated fine wire thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nina, M. N. R.; Pita, G. P.

    1985-09-01

    Thermocouples with three different wire diameters (15, 40 and 50 microns) were used in association with an analog compensation circuit connected to a data acquisition system. Measurements of the time constant were performed using two different heating techniques; Joule effect and external heating by laser beam. The thermocouples were used to quantify the fluctuating temperature field in a hot air jet and in a premixed propane flame. In the reacting case the catalytic effect was evaluated by comparing coated and uncoated wires. Conclusions were also obtained regarding frequency spectra, temperature probability distribution function and time constant.

  13. Small-scale spatial fluctuations in the soft-X-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, Kip Dee

    In order to isolate the diffuse extragalactic component of the soft X-ray background, we have used a combination of ROSAT All-Sky Survey and IRAS 100 mum data to separate the soft X-ray background into five components. We find a Local Hot Bubble similar to that described by Snowden et al (1998). We make a first calculation of the contribution by unresolved Galactic stars to the diffuse background. We constrain the normalization, of the Extragalactic Power Law (the contribution of the unresolved extragalactic point sources such as AGN, QSO's, and normal galaxies) to 9.5 +/- 0.9 keV cm -2 s-1 sr-1 keV -1, assuming a power-law index of 1.46. We show that the remaining emission, which is some combination of Galactic halo emission and the putative diffuse extragalactic emission, must be composed of at least two components which we have characterized by thermal spectra. The softer component has log T ˜ 6.08 and a patchy distribution; thus it is most probably part of the Galactic halo. The harder component has log T ˜ 6.46 and is nearly isotropic; some portion may be due to the Galactic halo and some portion may be due to the diffuse extragalactic emission. The maximum upper limit to the strength of the emission by the diffuse extragalactic component is the total of the hard component, ˜7.4 +/- 1.0 keV cm-2 s-1 sr-1 keV-1 in the ¾ keV band. We have made the first direct measure of the fluctuations due to the diffuse extragalactic emission in the ¾ keV band. Physical arguments suggest that small angular scale (˜10') fluctuations in the Local Hot Bubble or the Galactic halo will have very short dissipation times (˜105 years). Therefore, the fluctuation spectrum of the soft X-ray background should measure the distribution of the diffuse extragalactic emission. Using mosaics of deep, overlapping PSPC pointings, we find an autocorrelation function value of ˜0.0025 for 10' < theta < 20', and a value consistent with zero on larger scales. Measurement of the fluctuations

  14. Small-Scale Spatial Fluctuations in the Soft X-Ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, K. D.

    2001-02-01

    In order to isolate the diffuse extragalactic component of the soft X-ray background, we have used a combination of ROSAT All-Sky Survey and IRAS 100 micron data to separate the soft X-ray background into five components. We find a Local Hot Bubble similar to that described by Snowden et al (1998). We make a first calculation of the contribution by unresolved Galactic stars to the diffuse background. We constrain the normalization of the Extragalactic Power Law (the contribution of the unresolved extragalactic point sources such as AGN, QSO'S, and normal galaxies) to 9.5 +/- 0.9 keV/(sq cm s sr keV), assuming a power-law index of 1.46. We show that the remaining emission, which is some combination of Galactic halo emission and the putative diffuse extragalactic emission, must be composed of at least two components which we have characterized by thermal spectra. The softer component has log T - 6.08 and a patchy distribution; thus it is most probably part of the Galactic halo. The harder component has log T - 6.46 and is nearly isotropic; some portion may be due to the Galactic halo and some portion may be due to the diffuse extragalactic emission. The maximum upper limit to the strength of the emission by the diffuse extragalactic component is the total of the hard component, approx. 7.4 +/- 1.0 keV/(sq cm s sr keV) in the 3/4 keV band. We have made the first direct measure of the fluctuations due to the diffuse extragalactic emission in the 3/4 keV band. Physical arguments suggest that small angular scale (approx. 10') fluctuations in the Local Hot Bubble or the Galactic halo will have very short dissipation times (about 105 years). Therefore, the fluctuation spectrum of the soft X-ray background should measure the distribution of the diffuse extragalactic emission. Using mosaics of deep, overlapping PSPC pointings, we find an autocorrelation function value of approx. 0.0025 for 10' < theta < 20', and a value consistent with zero on larger scales. Measurement of

  15. Small-Scale Spatial Fluctuations in the Soft X-ray Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuntz, K. D.

    2001-01-01

    In order to isolate the diffuse extragalactic component of the soft X-ray background, we have used a combination of ROSAT All-Sky Survey and IRAS 100 micrometer data to separate the soft X-ray background into five components: (1) We find a Local Hot Bubble similar to that described by Snowden et al.; (2) We make a first calculation of the contribution by unresolved galactic stars to the diffuse background; (3) We constrain the normalization of the Extragalactic Power Law (the contribution of the unresolved extragalactic point sources such as AGN, QSO's, and normal galaxies) to 9.5 +/- 0.9 keV/sq cm/s/sr/kEv, assuming a power-law index of 1.46; (4) We show that the remaining emission, which is some combination of galactic halo emission and the putative diffuse extragalactic emission, must be composed of at least two components which we have characterized by thermal spectra. The softer component has logT approx. = 6.08 and a patchy distribution; thus it is most probably part of the Galactic halo. The harder component has log T approx. = 6.46 and is nearly isotropic; some portion may be due to the Galactic halo and some portion may be due to the diffuse extragalactic emission. The maximum upper limit to the strength of the emission by the diffuse extragalactic component is the total of the hard component, approx. 7.4 +/- 1.0 keV/sq cm/s/sr/keV in the 3/4 keV band; (5) We have made the first direct measure of the fluctuations due to the diffuse extragalactic emission in the 1 keV band. Physical arguments suggest that small angular scale (approx. 10 min) fluctuations in the Local Hot Bubble or the Galactic halo will have very short dissipation times (approx. 105 years). Therefore, the fluctuation spectrum of the soft X-ray background should measure the distribution of the diffuse extragalactic emission. Using mosaics of deep, overlapping PSPC pointings, we find an autocorrelation function value of approx. 0.0025 for 10 min < theta < 20 min, and a value consistent with

  16. Phase correlations in cosmic microwave background temperature maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coles, Peter; Dineen, Patrick; Earl, John; Wright, Dean

    2004-05-01

    We study the statistical properties of spherical harmonic modes of temperature maps of the cosmic microwave background. Unlike other studies, which focus mainly on properties of the amplitudes of these modes, we look instead at their phases. In particular, we present a simple measure of phase correlation that can be diagnostic of departures from the standard assumption that primordial density fluctuations constitute a statistically homogeneous and isotropic Gaussian random field, which should possess phases that are uniformly random on the unit circle. The method we discuss checks for the uniformity of the distribution of phase angles using a non-parametric descriptor based on the use of order statistics, which is known as Kuiper's statistic. The particular advantage of the method we present is that, when coupled to the judicious use of Monte Carlo simulations, it can deliver very interesting results from small data samples. In particular, it is useful for studying the properties of spherical harmonics at low l for which there are only a small number of independent values of m and which therefore furnish only a small number of phases for analysis. We apply the method to the COBE Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps, and find departures from uniformity in both. In the case of WMAP, our results probably reflect Galactic contamination or the known variation of signal-to-noise ratio across the sky rather than primordial non-Gaussianity.

  17. Tracing the first stars with fluctuations of the cosmic infrared background.

    PubMed

    Kashlinsky, A; Arendt, R G; Mather, J; Moseley, S H

    2005-11-03

    The deepest space- and ground-based observations find metal-enriched galaxies at cosmic times when the Universe was less than 1 Gyr old. These stellar populations had to be preceded by the metal-free first stars, known as 'population III'. Recent cosmic microwave background polarization measurements indicate that stars started forming early--when the Universe was < or =200 Myr old. It is now thought that population III stars were significantly more massive than the present metal-rich stellar populations. Although such sources will not be individually detectable by existing or planned telescopes, they would have produced significant cosmic infrared background radiation in the near-infrared, whose fluctuations reflect the conditions in the primordial density field. Here we report a measurement of diffuse flux fluctuations after removing foreground stars and galaxies. The anisotropies exceed the instrument noise and the more local foregrounds; they can be attributed to emission from population III stars, at an era dominated by these objects.

  18. Producing small scale temperature fluctuations in an airstream.

    PubMed

    Schacher, G E; Fairall, C W

    1978-10-01

    A 4.5-microm ''hot'' wire is used to heat a low-speed airstream at frequencies from dc to 400 Hz. For dc excitation the thermal noise spectrum produced was white to a frequency of 2 kHz. ac heating of the wire up to a frequency of 400 Hz (800 Hz thermal fluctuation of the airstream) yielded a good thermal signal as far as 2 cm from the hot wire. Calculation shows excellent heat transfer between the wire and airstream. The technique is very useful for calibrating the frequency response of temperature sensors and for investigating turbulent heat transfer for various flow configurations.

  19. The existence of a limiting wavelength for small-scale temperature fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    La, D. )

    1989-06-01

    It is proposed that any small-scale temperature fluctuation measurement of the submillimeter cosmic background radiation (CBR) cannot be a reliable indicator of the physical conditions of the universe at the time of decoupling. This is due to the fact that after decoupling, Lyman continuum absorption and elastic Rayleigh scattering of photons with the ambient neutral hydrogen medium would destroy and regenerate the high-energy portion of the original blackbody continuum. Detailed analyses for these processes are shown under the assumption that decoupling occurred at z of about 1500 in an Einstein-de Sitter universe with zero cosmological constant. For any value of the baryonic fraction of Omega(Crit) ranging between 1-0.1, small-scale temperature fluctuations at wavelengths shortward of 1 mm of the 2.7 K CBR will be under strong suppression from the initial scale. 20 refs.

  20. Temperature fluctuation of the Iceland mantle plume through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spice, Holly E.; Fitton, J. Godfrey; Kirstein, Linda A.

    2016-02-01

    The newly developed Al-in-olivine geothermometer was used to find the olivine-Cr-spinel crystallization temperatures of a suite of picrites spanning the spatial and temporal extent of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), which is widely considered to be the result of a deep-seated mantle plume. Our data confirm that start-up plumes are associated with a pulse of anomalously hot mantle over a large spatial area before becoming focused into a narrow upwelling. We find that the thermal anomaly on both sides of the province at Baffin Island/West Greenland and the British Isles at ˜61 Ma across an area ˜2000 km in diameter was uniform, with Al-in-olivine temperatures up to ˜300°C above that of average mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) primitive magma. Furthermore, by combining our results with geochemical data and existing geophysical and bathymetric observations, we present compelling evidence for long-term (>107 year) fluctuations in the temperature of the Iceland mantle plume. We show that the plume temperature fell from its initial high value during the start-up phase to a minimum at about 35 Ma, and that the mantle temperature beneath Iceland is currently increasing.

  1. Cross-Correlating the Cosmic Infrared and Cosmic X-Ray Background Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Rachel Ann; Cappelluti, Nico; Li, Yanxia; Urry, C. Megan; Guo, Joyce

    2017-01-01

    Studying unresolved (i.e., undetected) sources is a way to probe the faintest, and thus the least understood, source populations. In particular, such studies have suggested a population of high redshift accreting black holes. We present cross-power spectra and coherence between the cosmic infrared and cosmic x-ray background fluctuations, using infrared images from Spitzer Space Telescope and x-ray images from XMM-Newton of the ˜2 square degree area of the COSMOS field. We first masked all known sources and subtracted model images of the masked x-ray sources’ PSF tails so as to isolate the unresolved cosmic backgrounds. We have considered infrared data from two bands, 3.6 and 4.5 μm, and x-ray data from five bands, [0.3-0.5], [0.5-1], [1-2], [0.5-2], and [2-10] keV. We find strong correlation between the cosmic infrared and cosmic x-ray backgrounds, which suggests an origin in a common population, i.e., stars and/or growing black holes.

  2. Probing the High-Redshift Universe Using Fluctuations in the Cosmic Microwave and Infrared Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, Joseph Michael

    Background (CIB) continues to be one of the best probes of physics at the early stages of the universe. If the CMB were a purely Gaussian field, all statistical information would be contained in the power spectrum or two-point correlation function. However, non-Gaussianities ensure that new physics may be extracted from higher n-point correlation functions including the bispectrum and trispectrum of the CMB. In this thesis discuss new estimators we have formulated to probe primordial non-Gaussianity in the bispectrum and trispectrum of CMB data and the constraints we have made using WMAP data while discussing implications for inflationary models. I discuss how these same methods may be used to probe CMB Lensing. Finally, I discuss how upcoming measurements of near and far-infrared CIB fluctuations may be used to constrain the redshift of reionization and clustering of various populations of galaxies. Some preliminary results involving CANDELS, Spitzer SDWFS, CIBER and Herschel datasets is presented.

  3. Fast, background-free, 3D super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI).

    PubMed

    Dertinger, T; Colyer, R; Iyer, G; Weiss, S; Enderlein, J

    2009-12-29

    Super-resolution optical microscopy is a rapidly evolving area of fluorescence microscopy with a tremendous potential for impacting many fields of science. Several super-resolution methods have been developed over the last decade, all capable of overcoming the fundamental diffraction limit of light. We present here an approach for obtaining subdiffraction limit optical resolution in all three dimensions. This method relies on higher-order statistical analysis of temporal fluctuations (caused by fluorescence blinking/intermittency) recorded in a sequence of images (movie). We demonstrate a 5-fold improvement in spatial resolution by using a conventional wide-field microscope. This resolution enhancement is achieved in iterative discrete steps, which in turn allows the evaluation of images at different resolution levels. Even at the lowest level of resolution enhancement, our method features significant background reduction and thus contrast enhancement and is demonstrated on quantum dot-labeled microtubules of fibroblast cells.

  4. Objective differentiation of neonatal EEG background grades using detrended fluctuation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Matic, Vladimir; Cherian, Perumpillichira Joseph; Koolen, Ninah; Ansari, Amir H.; Naulaers, Gunnar; Govaert, Paul; Van Huffel, Sabine; De Vos, Maarten; Vanhatalo, Sampsa

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative and objective assessment of background electroencephalograph (EEG) in sick neonates remains an everyday clinical challenge. We studied whether long range temporal correlations quantified by detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) could be used in the neonatal EEG to distinguish different grades of abnormality in the background EEG activity. Long-term EEG records of 34 neonates were collected after perinatal asphyxia, and their background was scored in 1 h epochs (8 h in each neonate) as mild, moderate or severe. We applied DFA on 15 min long, non-overlapping EEG epochs (n = 1088) filtered from 3 to 8 Hz. Our formal feasibility study suggested that DFA exponent can be reliably assessed in only part of the EEG epochs, and in only relatively short time scales (10–60 s), while it becomes ambiguous if longer time scales are considered. This prompted further exploration whether paradigm used for quantifying multifractal DFA (MF-DFA) could be applied in a more efficient way, and whether metrics from MF-DFA paradigm could yield useful benchmark with existing clinical EEG gradings. Comparison of MF-DFA metrics showed a significant difference between three visually assessed background EEG grades. MF-DFA parameters were also significantly correlated to interburst intervals quantified with our previously developed automated detector. Finally, we piloted a monitoring application of MF-DFA metrics and showed their evolution during patient recovery from asphyxia. Our exploratory study showed that neonatal EEG can be quantified using multifractal metrics, which might offer a suitable parameter to quantify the grade of EEG background, or to monitor changes in brain state that take place during long-term brain monitoring. PMID:25954174

  5. Temperature fluctuations as a source of brown dwarf variability

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Marley, Mark S.

    2014-04-20

    A number of brown dwarfs are now known to be variable with observed amplitudes as large as 10%-30% at some wavelengths. While spatial inhomogeneities in cloud coverage and thickness are likely responsible for much of the observed variability, it is possible that some of the variations arise from atmospheric temperature fluctuations instead of, or in addition to, clouds. To better understand the role that thermal variability might play we present a case study of brown dwarf variability using a newly developed one-dimensional, time-stepping model of atmospheric thermal structure. We focus on the effects of thermal perturbations, intentionally simplifying the problem through omission of clouds and atmospheric circulation. Model results demonstrate that thermal perturbations occurring deep in the atmosphere (at pressures greater than 10 bar) of a model T-dwarf can be communicated to the upper atmosphere through radiative heating via the windows in near-infrared water opacity. The response time depends on where in the atmosphere a thermal perturbation is introduced. We show that, for certain periodic perturbations, the emission spectrum can have complex time- and wavelength-dependent behaviors, including phase shifts in times of maximum flux observed at different wavelengths. Since different wavelengths probe different levels in the atmosphere, these variations track a wavelength-dependent set of radiative exchanges happening between different atmospheric levels as a perturbation evolves in time. We conclude that thermal—as well as cloud—fluctuations must be considered as possible contributors to the observed brown dwarf variability.

  6. Can AGN and galaxy clusters explain the surface brightness fluctuations of the cosmic X-ray background?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolodzig, Alexander; Gilfanov, Marat; Hütsi, Gert; Sunyaev, Rashid

    2017-04-01

    Fluctuations of the surface brightness of cosmic X-ray background (CXB) carry unique information about faint and low-luminosity source populations, which is inaccessible for conventional large-scale structure (LSS) studies based on resolved sources. We used XBOOTES (5ks deep Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-I maps of the ∼ 9 deg2 Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey) to conduct the most accurate measurement to date of the power spectrum of fluctuations of the unresolved CXB on the angular scales of 3 arcsec-17 arcmin. We find that at sub-arcmin angular scales, the power spectrum is consistent with the active galactic nucleus (AGN) shot noise, without much need for any significant contribution from their one-halo term. This is consistent with the theoretical expectation that low-luminosity AGN reside alone in their dark matter haloes. However, at larger angular scales, we detect a significant LSS signal above the AGN shot noise. Its power spectrum, obtained after subtracting the AGN shot noise, follows a power law with the slope of -0.8 ± 0.1 and its amplitude is much larger than what can be plausibly explained by the two-halo term of AGN. We demonstrate that the detected LSS signal is produced by unresolved clusters and groups of galaxies. For the flux limit of the XBOOTES survey, their flux-weighted mean redshift equals ∼ 0.3, and the mean temperature of their intracluster medium (ICM), ≈ 1.4 keV, corresponds to the mass of M500 ∼ 1013.5 M⊙. The power spectrum of CXB fluctuations carries information about the redshift distribution of these objects and the spatial structure of their ICM on the linear scales of up to ∼Mpc, i.e. of the order of the virial radius.

  7. Observing temperature fluctuations in humans using infrared imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei-Min; Meyer, Joseph; Scully, Christopher G.; Elster, Eric; Gorbach, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate that functional infrared imaging is capable of detecting low frequency temperature fluctuations in intact human skin and revealing spatial, temporal, spectral, and time-frequency based differences among three tissue classes: microvasculature, large sub-cutaneous veins, and the remaining surrounding tissue of the forearm. We found that large veins have stronger contractility in the range of 0.005-0.06 Hz compared to the other two tissue classes. Wavelet phase coherence and power spectrum correlation analysis show that microvasculature and skin areas without vessels visible by IR have high phase coherence in the lowest three frequency ranges (0.005-0.0095 Hz, 0.0095-0.02 Hz, and 0.02-0.06 Hz), whereas large veins oscillate independently. PMID:23538682

  8. Improved treatment of cosmic microwave background fluctuations induced by a late-decaying massive neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplinghat, Manoj; Lopez, Robert E.; Dodelson, Scott

    1999-12-15

    A massive neutrino which decays after recombination (t{>=}10{sup 13} sec) into relativistic decay products produces an enhanced integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect, allowing constraints to be placed on such neutrinos from present cosmic microwave background anisotropy data. Previous treatments of this problem have approximated the decay products as an additional component of the neutrino background. This approach violates energy-momentum conservation, and we show that it leads to serious errors for some neutrino masses and lifetimes. We redo this calculation more accurately, by correctly incorporating the spatial distribution of the decay products. For low neutrino masses and long lifetimes, we obtain a much smaller distortion in the CMB fluctuation spectrum than have previous treatments. We combine these new results with a recent set of CMB data to exclude the mass and lifetime range m{sub h}>100 eV, {tau}>10{sup 12} sec. Masses as low as 30 eV are excluded for a narrower range in lifetime. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  9. Microwave background fluctuations due to the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects in pancakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subbarao, M. U.; Szalay, A. S.; Schaefer, R. K.; Gulkis, S.; Von Gronefeld, P.

    1994-01-01

    We calculate distortions in the microwave background radiation from the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, produced by hot gas in large (approximately 100 Mpc) pancakes. The large-scale distribution of the pancakes is taken to be that of a Voronoi foam. Fluctuations for this scenario are estimated to be on the order of delta T/T is approximately 10(exp -5). Using computer simulations, we produce several 32 deg x 32 deg images with 0.25 deg resolution. These images show characteristic linear features produced when a pancake is viewed nearly edge-on. By calculating the two-point and the degenerate three-point correlation functions, we are able to statistically detect such non-Gaussian features even in the presence of a relatively large amount of Gaussian noise. The degenerate three-point correlation function is found to be particularly useful since it is insensitive to correlated Gaussian noise. We also smooth our data over a 7 deg Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) Gaussian window to simulate the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) observations. We find that under such low-resolution conditions, the features are highly suppressed.

  10. Cross-correlation between X-Ray and Optical/Near-infrared Background Intensity Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell-Wynne, Ketron; Cooray, Asantha; Xue, Yongquan; Luo, Bin; Brandt, William; Koekemoer, Anton

    2016-12-01

    Angular power spectra of optical and infrared background anisotropies at wavelengths between 0.5 and 5 μm are a useful probe of faint sources present during reionization, in addition to faint galaxies and diffuse signals at low redshift. The cross-correlation of these fluctuations with backgrounds at other wavelengths can be used to separate some of these signals. A previous study on the cross-correlation between X-ray and Spitzer fluctuations at 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm has been interpreted as evidence for direct collapse black holes present at z > 12. Here we return to this cross-correlation and study its wavelength dependence from 0.5 to 4.5 μm using Hubble and Spitzer data in combination with a subset of the 4 Ms Chandra observations in GOODS-S/ECDFS. Our study involves five Hubble bands at 0.6, 0.7, 0.85, 1.25, and 1.6 μm, and two Spitzer-IRAC bands at 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm. We confirm the previously seen cross-correlation between 3.6 μm (4.5 μm) and X-rays with 3.7σ (4.2σ) and 2.7σ (3.7σ) detections in the soft [0.5-2] keV and hard [2-8] keV X-ray bands, respectively, at angular scales above 20 arcsec. The cross-correlation of X-rays with Hubble is largely anticorrelated, ranging between the levels of 1.4σ-3.5σ for all the Hubble and X-ray bands. This lack of correlation in the shorter optical/NIR bands implies the sources responsible for the cosmic infrared background at 3.6 and 4.5 μm are at least partly dissimilar to those at 1.6 μm and shorter.

  11. The dynamics of core temperature fluctuations during sawtooth oscillations on TEXT-U

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, C.; Gandy, R.F.

    1995-05-03

    Core electron temperature fluctuations are measured in a tokamak plasma where some degree of time resolution is achieved. There is a strong correlation between the turbulence level and the phase of the sawtooth oscillation. A global linear relationship between the temperature fluctuation amplitude and the electron temperature gradient scale length is found. The enhancement in fluctuations at the sawtooth crash is correlated to a steepening of the electron temperature gradient created as the sawtooth heat pulse propagates outward.

  12. A comparison of the cosmic microwave and cosmic X-ray backgrounds - Constraints on local sources of the fluctuations observed by COBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boughn, S. P.; Jahoda, K.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested by Hogan (1992) that the microwave background anisotropy detected by the COBE DMR experiment (Smoot et al., 1992) might be produced by inverse Compton scattering from hot diffuse clouds of electrons in nearby superclusters. If the COBE fluctuations are due to this mechanism, then the absence of anticorrelations between maps of the cosmic microwave and cosmic X-ray backgrounds constrains the temperature (16 keV) and density (less than 2 x 10 exp -6/cu cm) of the ionized supercluster gas. Since the COBE limits on spectral distortion indicate that the temperature of the intergalactic medium is less than 10 keV, we conclude that the fluctuations observed by COBE are probably not produced by this mechanism.

  13. Fluctuations in radiation backgrounds at high redshift and the first stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbauer, Lauren Nicole

    The first stars to light up our universe are as yet unseen, but there have been many attempts to elucidate their properties. The characteristics of these stars (`Population/Pop III' stars) that we do know lie mostly within theory; they formed out of metal-free hydrogen and helium gas contained in dark matter minihalos at redshifts z 20-30. The extent to which Pop III star formation reached into later times is unknown. Current and near future instruments are incapable of resolving individual Pop III stars. Consequently, astronomers must devise creative means with which to indirectly predict and measure and their properties. In this thesis, we will investigate a few of those means. We use a new method to model fluctuations of the Lyman-Werner (LW) and Lyman-alpha radiation backgrounds at high redshift. At these early epochs the backgrounds are symptoms of a universe newly lit with its first stars. LW photons (11.5-13.6 eV) are of particular interest because they dissociate molecular hydrogen, the primary coolant in the first minihalos that is necessary for star formation. By using a variation of the `halo model', which describes the spatial distribution and clustering of halos, we can efficiently generate power spectra for these backgrounds. Spatial fluctuations in the LW and (indirectly) the Lyman-alpha BG can tell us about the transition from primordial star formation to a more metal-enriched mode that marks the beginning of the second generation of stars in our Universe. The Near Infrared Background (NIRB) has for some time been considered a potential tool with which to indirectly observe the first stars. Ultraviolet (UV) emission from these stars is redshifted into the NIR band, making the NIRB amenable for hunting Pop III stellar signatures. There have been several measurements of the NIRB and subsequent theoretical studies attempting to explain them in recent years. Though controversial, residual levels of the mean NIRB intensity and anisotropies have been

  14. Transport and fluctuations in high temperature spheromak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLean, Harry

    2005-10-01

    A systematic analysis is presented of thermal transport in a driven spheromak that extends well into the collisionless regime and spans a wide range of magnetic fluctuation levels. The relationship between internal fluctuations and energy/helicity transport is of fundamental interest to many self-organized configurations in laboratory and space plasmas and the subject of ongoing multi-institutional collaborations. With the recent achievement on the SSPX spheromak[1] of electron temperature Te˜350eV in the core, and good confinement (core electron thermal diffusivity χe<10m^2/ for Te>200eV), we are now comparing heat transport in the experiment with a variety of models including classical, Bohm, and stochastic[2]/diffusive[3]/open[4] field lines. Using Thomson scattering to measure Te, ne profiles and the CORSICA equilibrium code to calculate internal current profiles from magnetic probe fits, we find that χe decreases as Te increases, a scaling behavior more classical-like than Bohm or open field line models would indicate. Lower Te and higher χe is observed in the transition region between the core and the separatrix where NIMROD 3d resistive MHD calculations[5] show the possible existence of chaotic field lines. We will also discuss plans including multi-pulse Thomson scattering and neutral beam heating. [1] E.B. Hooper, et al., Nucl. Fusion 39, 863 (1999). [2] A.B. Rechester and M.N. Rosenbluth, Phys. Rev. Lett. 40, 38 (1978). [3] J.D. Callen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 055002 (2005). [4] R.W. Moses, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 4839 (2001). [5] B.I. Cohen, et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 056106 (2005). This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  15. Temperature fluctuations driven by magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac; Yang, Chao-Chin E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org E-mail: ccyang@astro.lu.se

    2014-08-10

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order-unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well-resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are required to resolve energy dissipation than to resolve the magnetic field strength or accretion stresses. The temperature variations are large enough to have major consequences for mineral formation in disks, including melting chondrules, remelting calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, and annealing silicates; and may drive hysteresis: current sheets in MRI active regions could be significantly more conductive than the remainder of the disk.

  16. Temperature Fluctuations Driven by Magnetorotational Instability in Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Yang, Chao-Chin; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark

    2014-08-01

    The magnetorotational instability (MRI) drives magnetized turbulence in sufficiently ionized regions of protoplanetary disks, leading to mass accretion. The dissipation of the potential energy associated with this accretion determines the thermal structure of accreting regions. Until recently, the heating from the turbulence has only been treated in an azimuthally averaged sense, neglecting local fluctuations. However, magnetized turbulence dissipates its energy intermittently in current sheet structures. We study this intermittent energy dissipation using high resolution numerical models including a treatment of radiative thermal diffusion in an optically thick regime. Our models predict that these turbulent current sheets drive order-unity temperature variations even where the MRI is damped strongly by Ohmic resistivity. This implies that the current sheet structures where energy dissipation occurs must be well-resolved to correctly capture the flow structure in numerical models. Higher resolutions are required to resolve energy dissipation than to resolve the magnetic field strength or accretion stresses. The temperature variations are large enough to have major consequences for mineral formation in disks, including melting chondrules, remelting calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, and annealing silicates; and may drive hysteresis: current sheets in MRI active regions could be significantly more conductive than the remainder of the disk.

  17. Cosmic Microwave Background Fluctuations from the Kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect as a Cosmological Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunbae; Shapiro, P.; Komatsu, E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a calculation of the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect on of the Comic Microwave Background fluctuation. We focus on the scale at the multipole moment of l = 3000 10000 that is currently being probed by the South Pole Telescope (SPT) and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. For the post-reionization contribution of the total signal, we use the 3rd order perturbation theory (3PT) to model non-linearity of post-reionization epoch. We evaluate a non-linear expression for momentum powerspectrum in Ma and Fry (2002) with the 3PT density and velocity powerspectrum. And, we use the 3PT momentum powerspectrum to calculate the kSZ signal. We show that the 3PT is a reasonable approximation by comparing our result with previous work by Zhang, Pen and Trac (2004). For reionization contribution, we use our N-body radiative transfer simulations to take patchiness of ionization of intergalactic medium in reionization epoch into account. Using ionized fraction field in the simulation, we calculate the momentum field of the ionized gas. And, we correct for the missing power in finite size boxes of simulations. Finally, we show the kSZ calculation for different simulations with reionization scenarios. With contributions from each epoch, we predict total kSZ signal for different reionization history and put constraint on reionization scenario using an upper bound of the signal from recent SPT measurement.

  18. Effect of Energy Equalization on the Intelligibility of Speech in Fluctuating Background Interference for Listeners With Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    D’Aquila, Laura A.; Desloge, Joseph G.; Braida, Louis D.

    2017-01-01

    The masking release (MR; i.e., better speech recognition in fluctuating compared with continuous noise backgrounds) that is evident for listeners with normal hearing (NH) is generally reduced or absent for listeners with sensorineural hearing impairment (HI). In this study, a real-time signal-processing technique was developed to improve MR in listeners with HI and offer insight into the mechanisms influencing the size of MR. This technique compares short-term and long-term estimates of energy, increases the level of short-term segments whose energy is below the average energy, and normalizes the overall energy of the processed signal to be equivalent to that of the original long-term estimate. This signal-processing algorithm was used to create two types of energy-equalized (EEQ) signals: EEQ1, which operated on the wideband speech plus noise signal, and EEQ4, which operated independently on each of four bands with equal logarithmic width. Consonant identification was tested in backgrounds of continuous and various types of fluctuating speech-shaped Gaussian noise including those with both regularly and irregularly spaced temporal fluctuations. Listeners with HI achieved similar scores for EEQ and the original (unprocessed) stimuli in continuous-noise backgrounds, while superior performance was obtained for the EEQ signals in fluctuating background noises that had regular temporal gaps but not for those with irregularly spaced fluctuations. Thus, in noise backgrounds with regularly spaced temporal fluctuations, the energy-normalized signals led to larger values of MR and higher intelligibility than obtained with unprocessed signals. PMID:28602128

  19. The bispectrum of cosmic string temperature fluctuations including recombination effects

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, Donough; Hindmarsh, Mark E-mail: m.b.hindmarsh@sussex.ac.uk

    2015-10-01

    We calculate the cosmic microwave background temperature bispectrum from cosmic strings, including the contributions from the last scattering surface, using a well-established Gaussian model for the string energy-momentum correlation functions, and a simplified model for the cosmic fluid. We check our approximation for the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) contribution against the bispectrum obtained from the full sky map of the cosmic string ISW signal used by the Planck team, obtaining good agreement. We validate our model for the last scattering surface contribution by comparing the predicted temperature power spectrum with that obtained from a full Boltzmann code treatment applied to the Unconnected Segment Model of a string network. We find that including the last scattering contribution has only a small impact on the upper limit on the string tension resulting from the bispectrum at Planck resolutions, and argue that the bispectrum is unlikely to be competitive with the power spectrum at any resolution.

  20. Effects of gas temperature fluctuations on the evolution of Nitrogenous species during coal devolatilization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H.T.; Zhang, J.

    2009-02-15

    The effects of gas temperature fluctuations on the instantaneous evolution processes of nitrogenous species were investigated for pulverized coal particles undergoing devolatilization in a hot gas. The instantaneous mass variations of nitrogenous species released from the particles with diameters of 10-50 {mu} m were computed for different conditions. The instantaneous gas temperature was varied with time either in a simple harmonic way or in a random way. The calculated results showed that, under different time-average gas temperatures, the HCN evolution behaviors of particles with different diameters were all affected by the gas temperature fluctuations. The gas temperature fluctuations led to more rapid HCN release from the pulverized coal particles compared to the results obtained without gas temperature fluctuations. The effects were further enhanced by increasing the amplitude or intensity of the gas temperature fluctuations.

  1. High-frequency fluctuations of surface temperatures in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, Andreas; Meier, Fred; Scherer, Dieter

    2012-04-01

    This study presents an attempt to resolve fluctuations in surface temperatures at scales of a few seconds to several minutes using time-sequential thermography (TST) from a ground-based platform. A scheme is presented to decompose a TST dataset into fluctuating, high-frequency, and long-term mean parts. To demonstrate the scheme's application, a set of four TST runs (day/night, leaves-on/leaves-off) recorded from a 125-m-high platform above a complex urban environment in Berlin, Germany is used. Fluctuations in surface temperatures of different urban facets are measured and related to surface properties (material and form) and possible error sources. A number of relationships were found: (1) Surfaces with surface temperatures that were significantly different from air temperature experienced the highest fluctuations. (2) With increasing surface temperature above (below) air temperature, surface temperature fluctuations experienced a stronger negative (positive) skewness. (3) Surface materials with lower thermal admittance (lawns, leaves) showed higher fluctuations than surfaces with high thermal admittance (walls, roads). (4) Surface temperatures of emerged leaves fluctuate more compared to trees in a leaves-off situation. (5) In many cases, observed fluctuations were coherent across several neighboring pixels. The evidence from (1) to (5) suggests that atmospheric turbulence is a significant contributor to fluctuations. The study underlines the potential of using high-frequency thermal remote sensing in energy balance and turbulence studies at complex land-atmosphere interfaces.

  2. The gravitational wave contribution to cosmic microwave background anisotropies and the amplitude of mass fluctuations from COBE results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchin, Francesco; Matarrese, Sabino; Mollerach, Silvia

    1992-01-01

    A stochastic background of primordial gravitational waves may substantially contribute, via the Sachs-Wolfe effect, to the large-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies recently detected by COBE. This implies a bias in any resulting determination of the primordial amplitude of density fluctuations. We consider the constraints imposed on n is less than 1 ('tilted') power-law fluctuation spectra, taking into account the contribution from both scalar and tensor waves, as predicted by power-law inflation. The gravitational wave contribution to CMB anisotropies generally reduces the required rms level of mass fluctuation, thereby increasing the linear bias parameter, even in models where the spectral index is close to the Harrison-Zel'dovich value n = 1. This 'gravitational wave bias' helps to reconcile the predictions of CDM models with observations on pairwise galaxy velocity dispersion on small scales.

  3. High-temperature microphone system. [for measuring pressure fluctuations in gases at high temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, A. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Pressure fluctuations in air or other gases in an area of elevated temperature are measured using a condenser microphone located in the area of elevated temperature and electronics for processing changes in the microphone capacitance located outside the area the area and connected to the microphone by means of high-temperature cable assembly. The microphone includes apparatus for decreasing the undesirable change in microphone sensitivity at high temperatures. The high temperature cable assembly operates as a half-wavelength transmission line in an AM carrier system and maintains a large temperature gradient between the two ends of the cable assembly. The processing electronics utilizes a voltage controlled oscillator for automatic tuning thereby increasing the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus.

  4. Temporal structure of gas temperature fluctuations and ignition of fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevich, I. V.; Galdina, D. D.

    2016-11-01

    The paper studies ignition of fine particles, i.e., irreversible growth of particle temperature from an exothermal heterogeneous reaction, with the rate approximated with the Arrhenius law. The particles are suspended in gas with fluctuating temperature, and heat transfer from the particle surface occurs according to the Newtonian law. The equations take into account the temporal structure of gas temperature fluctuations. Modern methods of functional analysis were applied for deriving a closed equation for the probability density function for the particle temperature distribution. The gas temperature fluctuations lessen the threshold for the particle ignition in the hot gas as compared with the deterministic variant. The equations for probability density function produce a closed system of conjugate equations for the average temperature and dispersion of particle temperature fluctuations. The results of simulation illustrate the phenomenon of self-speeding drift of particle temperature towards the temperature of ignition startup.

  5. AKARI OBSERVATION OF THE FLUCTUATION OF THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Seo, H. J.; Lee, H. M.; Jeong, W.-S.; Pyo, J.; Matsuura, S.; Matsuhara, H.; Oyabu, S.; Wada, T.

    2011-12-01

    We report a search for fluctuations of the sky brightness toward the north ecliptic pole with the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI, at 2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 {mu}m. We obtained circular maps with 10' diameter fields of view, which clearly show a spatial structure on the scale of a few hundred arcseconds. A power spectrum analysis shows that there is a significant excess fluctuation at angular scales larger than 100'' that cannot be explained by zodiacal light, diffuse Galactic light, shot noise of faint galaxies, or clustering of low-redshift galaxies. These results are consistent with observations at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The fluctuating component observed at large angular scales has a blue stellar spectrum which is similar to that of the spectrum of the excess isotropic emission observed with the Infrared Telescope in Space. A significant spatial correlation between wavelength bands was found, and the slopes of the linear correlations are consistent with the spectrum of the excess fluctuation. These findings indicate that the detected fluctuation could be attributed to the first stars of the universe, i.e., Population III stars. The observed fluctuation provides an important constraint on the era of the first stars.

  6. NEW MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS IN DEEP SPITZER/IRAC SURVEY DATA AND THEIR COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Kashlinsky, A.; Arendt, R. G.; Mather, J.; Moseley, S. H.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.

    2012-07-01

    We extend previous measurements of cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign using new data from the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Two fields with depths of {approx_equal} 12 hr pixel{sup -1} over three epochs are analyzed at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. Maps of the fields were assembled using a self-calibration method uniquely suitable for probing faint diffuse backgrounds. Resolved sources were removed from the maps to a magnitude limit of mag{sub AB} {approx_equal} 25, as indicated by the level of the remaining shot noise. The maps were then Fourier transformed and their power spectra were evaluated. Instrumental noise was estimated from the time-differenced data, and subtracting this isolates the spatial fluctuations of the actual sky. The power spectra of the source-subtracted fields remain identical (within the observational uncertainties) for the three epochs indicating that zodiacal light contributes negligibly to the fluctuations. Comparing to 8 {mu}m power spectra shows that Galactic cirrus cannot account for the fluctuations. The signal appears isotropically distributed on the sky as required for an extragalactic origin. The CIB fluctuations continue to diverge to >10 times those of known galaxy populations on angular scales out to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign . The low shot-noise levels remaining in the diffuse maps indicate that the large-scale fluctuations arise from the spatial clustering of faint sources well below the confusion noise. The spatial spectrum of these fluctuations is in reasonable agreement with an origin in populations clustered according to the standard cosmological model ({Lambda}CDM) at epochs coinciding with the first stars era.

  7. Squeezing the fundamental temperature fluctuations of a high-Q microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xuan; Luo, Rui; Zhang, Xi-Cheng; Lin, Qiang

    2017-02-01

    Temperature fluctuations of an optical resonator underlie a fundamental limit of its cavity stability. Here we show that the fundamental temperature fluctuations of a high-Q microresonator can be suppressed remarkably by pure optical means without cooling the device temperature. An optical wave launched into the cavity is able to produce strong photothermal backaction which dramatically suppresses the spectral intensity of temperature fluctuations and squeezes its overall level by orders of magnitude. The proposed photothermal temperature squeezing is expected to significantly improve the stability of optical resonances, with potentially profound impact on broad applications of high-Q cavities in sensing, metrology, and nonlinear and quantum optics.

  8. Small-scale angular fluctuations in the microwave background radiation and the existence of isolated large-scale structures in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Goicoechea, L.J.; Sanz, J.L.

    1985-06-01

    The relative fluctuation of the present temperature associated with the microwave background radiation (MBR) on a small angular scale, (deltaT/T)/sub 0/, can be related for a general inhomogeneous cosmological model to the kinematical quantities, their gradients, and the Weyl tensor through the geodesic deviation equation. We apply this result to calculate the induction of temperature fluctuations in the MBR by a spherically symmetric cluster (or void) of matter or radiation or both, considered as a perturbation in a flat Friedmann universe, with negligible pressure. For an isolated object (void or cluster) with radius roughly-equal10/sup 3/h/sup -1/ Mpc and located outside our present horizon, we have found, taking into account recent data on the anisotropies of the MBR at an angular scale 6/sup 0/, that the relative mass fluctuation is bounded by deltaVertical BarM/MVertical Bar< or approx. =10%. On the other hand, if we are near the cluster (or void) center (radius of the object roughly-equal6 x 10/sup 2/h/sup -1/ Mpc and distance from the observer to the center approx. =10h/sup -1/ Mpc), the observational angular fluctuations of the MBR imply that deltaVertical BarM/MVertical Bar< or approx. =10%.

  9. Effects of fluctuating daily temperatures at critical thermal extremes on Aedes aegypti life-history traits.

    PubMed

    Carrington, Lauren B; Armijos, M Veronica; Lambrechts, Louis; Barker, Christopher M; Scott, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    The effect of temperature on insect biology is well understood under constant temperature conditions, but less so under more natural, fluctuating conditions. A fluctuating temperature profile around a mean of 26°C can alter Aedes aegypti vector competence for dengue viruses as well as numerous life-history traits, however, the effect of fluctuations on mosquitoes at critical thermal limits is unknown. We investigated the effects of large and small daily temperature fluctuations at low (16°C) and high (35-37°C) mean temperatures, after we identified these temperatures as being thresholds for immature development and/or adult reproduction under constant temperature conditions. We found that temperature effects on larval development time, larval survival and adult reproduction depend on the combination of mean temperature and magnitude of fluctuations. Importantly, observed degree-day estimates for mosquito development under fluctuating temperature profiles depart significantly (around 10-20%) from that predicted by constant temperatures of the same mean. At low mean temperatures, fluctuations reduce the thermal energy required to reach pupation relative to constant temperature, whereas at high mean temperatures additional thermal energy is required to complete development. A stage-structured model based on these empirical data predicts that fluctuations can significantly affect the intrinsic growth rate of mosquito populations. Our results indicate that by using constant temperatures, one could under- or over-estimate values for numerous life-history traits compared to more natural field conditions dependent upon the mean temperature. This complexity may in turn reduce the accuracy of population dynamics modeling and downstream applications for mosquito surveillance and disease prevention.

  10. Stable and fluctuating temperature effects on the development rate and survival of two malaria vectors, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the biology of malaria vector mosquitoes is crucial to understanding many aspects of the disease, including control and future outcomes. The development rates and survival of two Afrotropical malaria vectors, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus, are investigated here under conditions of constant and fluctuating temperatures. These data can provide a good starting point for modelling population level consequences of temperature change associated with climate change. For comparative purposes, these data were considered explicitly in the context of those available for the third African malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. Methods Twenty five replicates of 20–30 eggs were placed at nine constant and two fluctuating temperatures for development rate experiments and survival estimates. Various developmental parameters were estimated from the data, using standard approaches. Results Lower development threshold (LDT) for both species was estimated at 13-14°C. Anopheles arabiensis developed consistently faster than An. funestus. Optimum temperature (Topt) and development rate at this temperature (μmax) differed significantly between species for overall development and larval development. However, Topt and μmax for pupal development did not differ significantly between species. Development rate and survival of An. funestus was negatively influenced by fluctuating temperatures. By contrast, development rate of An. arabiensis at fluctuating temperatures either did not differ from constant temperatures or was significantly faster. Survival of this species declined by c. 10% at the 15°C to 35°C fluctuating temperature regime, but was not significantly different between the constant 25°C and the fluctuating 20°C to 30°C treatment. By comparison, previous data for An. gambiae indicated fastest development at a constant temperature of 28°C and highest survival at 24°C. Conclusions The three most important African malaria vectors all differ

  11. Controllable effects of quantum fluctuations on spin free-induction decay at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang-Qin; Pan, Xin-Yu; Jiang, Zhan-Feng; Zhao, Nan; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2012-01-01

    Fluctuations of local fields cause decoherence of quantum objects. Usually at high temperatures, thermal noises are much stronger than quantum fluctuations unless the thermal effects are suppressed by certain techniques such as spin echo. Here we report the discovery of strong quantum-fluctuation effects of nuclear spin baths on free-induction decay of single electron spins in solids at room temperature. We find that the competition between the quantum and thermal fluctuations is controllable by an external magnetic field. These findings are based on Ramsey interference measurement of single nitrogen-vacancy center spins in diamond and numerical simulation of the decoherence, which are in excellent agreement.

  12. Reduction of thermal emission background in high temperature microheaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Philip R.; Mah, Merlin L.; Olson, Kyle D.; Taylor, Lucas N.; Talghader, Joseph J.

    2016-05-01

    High temperature microheaters have been designed and constructed to reduce the background thermal emission radiation produced by the heater. Such heaters allow one to probe luminescence with very low numbers of photons where the background emission would overwhelm the desired signal. Two methods to reduce background emission are described: one with low emission materials and the other with interference coating design. The first uses platforms composed of material that is transparent to mid-infrared light and therefore of low emissivity. Heating elements are embedded in the periphery of the heater. The transparent platform is composed of aluminum oxide, which is largely transparent for wavelengths less than about 8 μm. In the luminescent microscopy used to test the heater, an optical aperture blocks emission from the heating coils while passing light from the heated objects on the transparent center of the microheater. The amount of infrared light transmitted through the aperture was reduced by 90% as the aperture was moved from the highly emissive heater coils at 450 °C to the largely transparent center at the same temperature. The second method uses microheaters with integrated multilayer interference structures designed to limit background emission in the spectral range of the low-light luminescence object being measured. These heaters were composed of aluminum oxide, titanium dioxide, and platinum and were operated over a large range of temperatures, from 50 °C to 600 °C. At 600 °C, they showed a background photon emission only 1/800 that of a comparison heater without the multilayer interference structure. In this structure, the radiation background was sufficiently reduced to easily monitor weak thermoluminescent emission from CaSO4:Ce,Tb microparticles.

  13. Cosmic infrared background fluctuations of the COSMOS field in the SPLASH survey: new measurements and the cosmological explanations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanxia

    2017-01-01

    The cosmic infrared background (CIB) is the integrated emission of all sources through cosmic time and carries an abundance of information about the star formation and galaxy growth in the Universe. Due to significant and complex foregrounds from our Galaxy, the optimal way to study the unresolved background is to actually study its fluctuations, especially at large angular scales where they reflect the clustering of unresolved galaxies. Our new measurements of the CIB fluctuations reach the largest angular scale to date for such a study, thanks to new observations of the COSMOS field from the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH). We analyzed Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 um data of the whole field, with an average depth of 1.33 hour/pixel over 4 epochs spanning 2 years. We found that the auto-power spectra are consistent among various epochs and are correlated at the two channels. We confirmed the previously detected excess flux at large scales of the power spectra.The cross-correlation of the CIB fluctuations with backgrounds at other wavelengths is an extremely useful technique to understand the excess flux. The previously seen CIB and X-ray background (CXB) cross-correlation suggests significant contribution to the CIB fluctuations from accreting black holes that is much higher than among any known populations, and such a cross-correlation is also used as an evidence for the existence of direct collapse black holes in the early Universe.In this talk, we will present the first CIB fluctuation measurements of the COSMOS field using the new SPLASH data and we will also revisit the CIB and CXB cross-correlation in this field, which is about 20 times larger than the previous study and therefore with much improved significance levels. Measuring CIB fluctuations is a powerful tool to study the large-scale structure of the Universe. The CIB and CXB cross-correlation can not only provide observational constrains on the theoretical modeling of the CIB

  14. New Measurements of the Cosmic Infrared Background Fluctuations in Deep SpitzerllRAC Survey Data and their Cosmological Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashlinsky, A.; Arendt, R. G.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.; Mather, J.; Moseley, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    We extend the previous measurements of CIB fluctuations to angular scales of less than or equal to 1 degree new data obtained in the course of the 2,000+ hour Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Two fields with completed observations of approximately equal to 12 hr/pixel are analyzed for source-subtracted CIB fluctuations at 3.6 and 4.5 micrometers. The fields, EGS and UDS, cover a total area of approximately 0.25 deg and lie at high Galactic and Ecliptic latitudes, thus minimizing cirrus and zodiacal light contributions to the fluctuations. The observations have been conducted at 3 distinct epochs separated by about 6 months. As in our previous studies, the fields were assembled using the self-calibration method which is uniquely suitable for probing faint diffuse backgrounds. The assembled fields were cleaned off the bright sources down to the low shot noise levels corresponding to AB mag approximately equal to 25, Fourier-transformed and their power spectra evaluated. The noise was estimated from the time-differenced data and subtracted from the signal isolating the fluctuations remaining above the noise levels. The power spectra of the source-subtracted fields remain identical (within the observational uncertainties) for the three epochs of observations indicating that zodiacal light contributes negligibly to the fluctuations. By comparing to the measurements for the same regions at 8 micrometers we demonstrate that Galactic cirrus cannot account for the levels of the fluctuations either. The signal appears isotropically distributed on the sky as required by its origin in the CIB fluctuations. This measurement thus extends our earlier results to the important range of sub-degree scales. We find that the CIB fluctuations continue to diverge to more than 10 times those of known galaxy populations on angular scales out to less than or equal to 1 degree. The low shot noise levels remaining in the diffuse maps indicate that the large scale fluctuations arise from spatial

  15. RECONSTRUCTING THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS FROM KNOWN GALAXY POPULATIONS USING MULTIBAND MEASUREMENTS OF LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Helgason, Kari; Ricotti, Massimo; Kashlinsky, Alexander

    2012-06-20

    We model fluctuations in the cosmic infrared background (CIB) arising from known galaxy populations using 233 measured UV, optical, and near-IR luminosity functions (LFs) from a variety of surveys spanning a wide range of redshifts. We compare best-fit Schechter parameters across the literature and find clear indication of evolution with redshift. Providing fitting formulae for the multi-band evolution of the LFs out to z {approx} 5, we calculate the total emission redshifted into the near-IR bands in the observer frame and recover the observed optical and near-IR galaxy counts to good accuracy. Our empirical approach, in conjunction with a halo model describing the clustering of galaxies, allows us to compute the fluctuations of the unresolved CIB and compare the models to current measurements. We find that fluctuations from known galaxy populations are unable to account for the large-scale CIB clustering signal seen by Spitzer/IRAC and AKARI/IRC and continue to diverge out to larger angular scales. This holds true even if the LFs are extrapolated out to faint magnitudes with a steep faint-end slope all the way to z = 8. We also show that removing resolved sources to progressively fainter magnitude limits isolates CIB fluctuations to increasingly higher redshifts. Our empirical approach suggests that known galaxy populations are not responsible for the bulk of the fluctuation signal seen in the measurements and favors a very faint population of highly clustered sources.

  16. Temperature dependence of vibrational frequency fluctuation of N3- in D2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayama, Jumpei; Ishihara, Akane; Banno, Motohiro; Ohta, Kaoru; Saito, Shinji; Tominaga, Keisuke

    2010-07-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of the vibrational frequency fluctuation of the antisymmetric stretching mode of N3- in D2O by three-pulse infrared (IR) photon echo experiments. IR pump-probe measurements were also carried out to investigate the population relaxation and the orientational relaxation of the same band. It was found that the time-correlation function (TCF) of the frequency fluctuation of this mode is well described by a biexponential function with a quasistatic term. The faster decay component has a time constant of about 0.1 ps, and the slower component varies from 1.4 to 1.1 ps in the temperature range from 283 to 353 K. This result indicates that liquid dynamics related to the frequency fluctuation are not highly sensitive to temperature. We discuss the relationship between the temperature dependence of the vibrational frequency fluctuation and that of the molecular motion of the system to investigate the molecular origin of the frequency fluctuation of the solute. We compare the temperature dependence of the frequency fluctuation with that of other dynamics such as dielectric relaxation of water. In contrast to the Debye dielectric relaxation time of D2O, the two time constants of the TCF of the frequency fluctuation do not exhibit strong temperature dependence. We propose a simple theoretical model for the frequency fluctuation in solutions based on perturbation theory and the dipole-dipole interaction between the vibrational mode of the solute and the solvent molecules. This model suggests that the neighboring solvent molecules in the vicinity of the solute play an important role in the frequency fluctuation. We suggest that the picosecond component of the frequency fluctuation results from structural fluctuation of the hydrogen-bonding network in water.

  17. Dipole modulation of cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Shamik; Kothari, Rahul; Jain, Pankaj; Rath, Pranati K. E-mail: rahulko@iitk.ac.in E-mail: pranati@iopb.res.in

    2016-01-01

    We propose a dipole modulation model for the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR) polarization field. We show that the model leads to correlations between l and l+1 multipoles, exactly as in the case of temperature. We obtain results for the case of TE, EE and BB correlations. An anisotropic or inhomogeneous model of primordial power spectrum which leads to such correlations in temperature field also predicts similar correlations in CMBR polarization. We analyze the CMBR temperature and polarization data in order to extract the signal of these correlation between l and l+1 multipoles. Our results for the case of temperature using the latest PLANCK data agree with those obtained by an earlier analysis. A detailed study of the correlation in the polarization data is not possible at present. Hence we restrict ourselves to a preliminary investigation in this case.

  18. Cosmology with the cosmic microwave background temperature-polarization correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couchot, F.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Perdereau, O.; Plaszczynski, S.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Spinelli, M.; Tristram, M.

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature-polarization cross-correlation provides accurate and robust constraints on cosmological parameters. We compare them with the results from temperature or polarization and investigate the impact of foregrounds, cosmic variance, and instrumental noise. This analysis makes use of the Planck high-ℓ HiLLiPOP likelihood based on angular power spectra, which takes into account systematics from the instrument and foreground residuals directly modelled using Planck measurements. The temperature-polarization correlation (TE) spectrum is less contaminated by astrophysical emissions than the temperature power spectrum (TT), allowing constraints that are less sensitive to foreground uncertainties to be derived. For ΛCDM parameters, TE gives very competitive results compared to TT. For basic ΛCDM model extensions (such as AL, ∑mν, or Neff), it is still limited by the instrumental noise level in the polarization maps.

  19. Large-scale opacity fluctuations in the Lyα forest: evidence for QSOs dominating the ionizing UV background at z ∼ 5.5-6?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardin, Jonathan; Puchwein, Ewald; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2017-03-01

    Lyα forest data probing the post-reionization Universe show surprisingly large opacity fluctuations over rather large (≥50 h-1 comoving Mpc) spatial scales. We model these fluctuations using a hybrid approach utilizing the large-volume Millennium simulation to predict the spatial distribution of QSOs combined with smaller scale full hydrodynamical simulation performed with RAMSES and post-processed with the radiative transfer code ATON. We produce realistic mock absorption spectra that account for the contribution of galaxies and QSOs to the ionizing UV background. These improved models confirm our earlier findings that a significant ( ≳ 50 per cent) contribution of ionizing photons from QSOs can explain the large reported opacity fluctuations on large scales. The inferred QSO luminosity function is thereby consistent with recent estimates of the space density of QSOs at this redshift. Our simulations still somewhat struggle, however, to reproduce the very long (110 h-1 comoving Mpc) high-opacity absorption through observed in ULAS J0148+0600, perhaps suggesting an even later end of reionization than assumed in our previously favoured model. Medium-deep/medium area QSO surveys as well as targeted searches for the predicted strong transverse QSO proximity effect would illuminate the origin of the observed large-scale opacity fluctuations. They would allow us to substantiate whether UV fluctuations due to QSO are indeed primarily responsible, or whether significant contributions from other recently proposed mechanisms such as large-scale fluctuations in temperature and mean free path (even in the absence of rare bright sources) are required.

  20. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates. PMID:27487917

  1. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-08-04

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates.

  2. Beam Energy Scan of Specific Heat Through Temperature Fluctuations in Heavy Ion Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sumit; Nandi, Basanta K.; Chatterjee, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rupa; Nayak, Tapan

    2016-01-01

    Temperature fluctuations may have two distinct origins, first, quantum fluctuations that are initial state fluctuations, and second, thermodynamical fluctuations. We discuss a method of extracting the thermodynamic temperature from the mean transverse momentum of pions, by using controllable parameters such as centrality of the system, and range of the transverse momenta. Event-by-event fluctuations in global temperature over a large phase space provide the specific heat of the system. We present Beam Energy Scan of specific heat from data, AMPT and HRG model prediction. Experimental results from NA49, STAR, PHENIX, PHOBOS and ALICE are combined to obtain the specific heat as a function of beam energy. These results are compared to calculations from AMPT event generator, HRG model and lattice calculations, respectively.

  3. How two types of fluctuating temperature affect the growth of Fusarium solani

    Treesearch

    Keith F. Jensen; Phillip E. Reynolds

    1969-01-01

    Growth of six isolates of Fusarium solani on potato dextrose agar was determined with (1) continually changing temperature programs, (2) programs consisting of two alternating constant temperatures, and (3) a constant temperature program. All programs had a mean of 70º F. Growth increased with an increase in temperature fluctuation of 10 or...

  4. Effect of Contraction on Turbulence and Temperature Fluctuations Generated by a Warm Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Robert R., Jr.; Corrsin, Stanley

    1959-01-01

    Hot-wire anemometer measurements were made of several statistical properties of approximately homogeneous and isotropic fields of turbulence and temperature fluctuations generated by a warm grid in a uniform airstream sent through a 4-to-1 contraction. These measurements were made both in the contraction and in the axisymmetric domain farther downstream. In addition to confirming the well-known turbulence anisotropy induced by strain, the data show effects on the skewnesses of both longitudinal velocity fluctuation (which has zero skewness in isotropic turbulence) and its derivative. The concomitant anisotropy in the temperature field accelerates the decay of temperature fluctuations.

  5. Effect of Fluctuations of Temperature During Frozen Storage on Denaturation of Fish Myofibrillar Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Yutaka; Okazaki, Emiko; Wada, Ritsuko

    The fluctuation in frozen storage temperature was set up by moving the minced meat from chub mackerel reversibly from the room of lower temperature to that of higher temperature for 7 hours every day during 180 days. The freeze denaturation of myofibrillar protein was studied in term the first-order rate (KD) of inactivation of myofibrillar Ca-ATPase. The freeze denaturation rate constant of the myofibrillar protein fluctuated between two different temperatures was same as or higher than the KD in case of constant temperature in higher temperature side.

  6. Skewness in CMB temperature fluctuations from curved cosmic (super-)strings

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Sendouda, Yuuiti; Yoo, Chul-Moon; Naruko, Atsushi; Sasaki, Misao; Takahashi, Keitaro E-mail: sendouda@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: keitaro@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp E-mail: misao@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2010-05-01

    We compute the one-point probability distribution function of small-angle cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations due to curved cosmic (super-)strings with a simple model of string network by performing Monte Carlo simulations. Taking into account of the correlation between the curvature and the velocity of string segments, there appear non-Gaussian features, specifically non-Gaussian tails and a skewness, in the one-point pdf. The obtained sample skewness for the conventional field-theoretic cosmic strings is g{sub 1} ≈ −0.14, which is consistent with the result reported by Fraisse et al. We also discuss the dependence of the pdf on the intercommuting probability. We find that the standard deviation of the Gaussian part increases and non-Gaussian features are suppressed as the intercommuting probability decreases. For sufficiently small intercommuting probability, the skewness is given by ∼< (a few) × 10{sup −2}.

  7. REGULATION OF ISOPRENE EMISSION RESPONSES TO RAPID LEAF TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isoprene emission from leaves is temperature dependent and may protect them from damage at high temperatures. We measured the temperature of white oak (Quercus alba L.) leaves at the top of the canopy. The largest changes in leaf temperature were associated with changes in solar ...

  8. REGULATION OF ISOPRENE EMISSION RESPONSES TO RAPID LEAF TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Isoprene emission from leaves is temperature dependent and may protect them from damage at high temperatures. We measured the temperature of white oak (Quercus alba L.) leaves at the top of the canopy. The largest changes in leaf temperature were associated with changes in solar ...

  9. Fluctuations in the high-redshift Lyman-Werner background: close halo pairs as the origin of supermassive black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, Mark; Haiman, Zoltán; Mesinger, Andrei; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2008-12-01

    The earliest generation of stars and black holes must have established an early `Lyman-Werner' background (LWB) at high redshift, prior to the epoch of reionization. Because of the long mean free path of photons with energies hν < 13.6eV, the LWB was nearly uniform. However, some variation in the LWB is expected due to the discrete nature of the sources, and their highly clustered spatial distribution. In this paper, we compute the probability distribution function (PDF) of the LW flux that irradiates dark matter (DM) haloes collapsing at high redshift (z ~ 10). Our model accounts for (i) the clustering of DM haloes, (ii) Poisson fluctuations in the number of corresponding star-forming galaxies and (iii) scatter in the LW luminosity produced by haloes of a given mass (calibrated using local observations). We find that >99 per cent of the DM haloes are illuminated by an LW flux within a factor of 2 of the global mean value. However, a small fraction, ~10-8 to 10-6, of DM haloes with virial temperatures Tvir >~ 104 K have a close luminous neighbour within <~10 kpc, and are exposed to an LW flux exceeding the global mean by a factor of >20, or to J21,LW > 103 (in units of 10-21 erg s-1 Hz-1 sr-1 cm-2). This large LW flux can photodissociate H2 molecules in the gas collapsing due to atomic cooling in these haloes, and prevent its further cooling and fragmentation. Such close halo pairs therefore provide possible sites in which primordial gas clouds collapse directly into massive black holes (MBH ~ 104-6Msolar), and subsequently grow into supermassive (MBH >~ 109Msolar) black holes by z ~ 6.

  10. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Yun, G S; Lee, W; Choi, M J; Kim, J B; Park, H K; Domier, C W; Tobias, B; Liang, T; Kong, X; Luhmann, N C; Donné, A J H

    2010-10-01

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donné et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfvén eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  11. Development of KSTAR ECE imaging system for measurement of temperature fluctuations and edge density fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Yun, G. S.; Lee, W.; Choi, M. J.; Kim, J. B.; Park, H. K.; Domier, C. W.; Tobias, B.; Liang, T.; Kong, X.; Luhmann, N. C. Jr.; Donne, A. J. H.

    2010-10-15

    The ECE imaging (ECEI) diagnostic tested on the TEXTOR tokamak revealed the sawtooth reconnection physics in unprecedented detail, including the first observation of high-field-side crash and collective heat transport [H. K. Park, N. C. Luhmann, Jr., A. J. H. Donneet al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 195003 (2006)]. An improved ECEI system capable of visualizing both high- and low-field sides simultaneously with considerably better spatial coverage has been developed for the KSTAR tokamak in order to capture the full picture of core MHD dynamics. Direct 2D imaging of other MHD phenomena such as tearing modes, edge localized modes, and even Alfven eigenmodes is expected to be feasible. Use of ECE images of the optically thin edge region to recover 2D electron density changes during L/H mode transitions is also envisioned, providing powerful information about the underlying physics. The influence of density fluctuations on optically thin ECE is discussed.

  12. Multifield measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux in a high-temperature toroidal plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic fluctuation-induced particle transport is explored in the high-temperature, high-beta interior of the Madison symmetric torus (MST) reversed-field pinch by performing a multifield measurement of the correlated product of magnetic and density fluctuations associated with global resistive tearing modes. Local density fluctuations are obtained by inverting the line-integrated interferometry data after resolving the mode helicity through correlation techniques. The local magnetic and current density fluctuations are then reconstructed using a parameterized fit of Faraday-effect polarimetry measurements. Reconstructed 2D images of density and current density perturbations in a poloidal cross section exhibit significantly different spatial structure. Combined with their relative phase, the magnetic-fluctuation-induced particle transport flux and its spatial distribution are resolved. The convective magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux profile is measured for both standard and high-performance plasmas in MST with tokamak-like confinement, showing large reduction in the flux during improved confinement.

  13. Cosmic background radiation temperature at 2. 64 millimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, P.; Hegyi, D.J.; Kutner, M.L.; Mandolesi, N. Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY CNR, Istituto di Studio e Tecnologie sulle Radiazzioni Estraterrestri, Bologna )

    1989-11-01

    A precise value for cosmic background radiation (CBR) temperature at 2.64 mm is reported using interstellar CN molecules in absorption in the direction of Zeta Oph. A search for CN emission at 2.64 mm makes it possible to set a strong limit on local excitation sources that could elevate the population of the 2.64 mm rotational states above that expected from the cosmic background radiation. To one standard deviation, observations show that T(loc) is not above 31 mK. A reanalysis of data previously reported has improved the precision of the optical equivalent widths so that this source of uncertainty is now 13.3 mK. Uncertainties in the saturation correction model add to the error budget. The final value for T(CBR) = 2.796(+0.014, -0.039) K. 27 refs.

  14. Measurement of Yields and Fluctuations using Background and Calibration Data from the LUX Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pease, Evan; LUX Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Large Underground Xenon (LUX) detector is a 350-kg liquid xenon (LXe) time-projection chamber designed for the direct detection of weakly-interacting massive particles (WIMPs), a leading dark matter candidate. LUX operates on the 4850-foot level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility in Lead, SD. Monoenergetic electronic recoil (ER) peaks in the WIMP search and calibration data from the first underground science run of the LUX detector have been used to measure ER light and charge yields in LXe between 5.2 keV and 662 keV. The energy resolution of the LUX detector at these energies will also be presented. Recombination fluctuations are observed to follow a linear dependence on the number of ions for the energies in this study, and this dependence is consistent with low-energy measurements made with a tritium beta source in the LUX detector. Using these results and additional measurements of the recoil bands from tritium and D-D neutron calibrations, I will compare recombination fluctuations in LXe response to electronic and nuclear recoils. The presenter is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) program. The SCGSR program is administered by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education for the DOE under contract DE-AC05-06OR23100.

  15. KINETICS OF LEAF TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATION AFFECT ISOPRENE EMISSION FROM RED OAK (QUERCUS RUBRA) LEAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the rate of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) emission from plants is highly temperature-dependent, we investigated the natural fluctuations on leaf temperature and the effects of rapid temperature change on isoprene emission of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) leaves at the to...

  16. KINETICS OF LEAF TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATION AFFECT ISOPRENE EMISSION FROM RED OAK (QUERCUS RUBRA) LEAVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Because the rate of isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene) emission from plants is highly temperature-dependent, we investigated the natural fluctuations on leaf temperature and the effects of rapid temperature change on isoprene emission of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) leaves at the to...

  17. Quantum Dynamics in Noisy Backgrounds: from Sampling to Dissipation and Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, O.; Paula, W. de; Frederico, T.; Hussein, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a quantum system coupled linearly to Gaussian white noise using functional methods. By performing the integration over the noisy field in the evolution operator, we get an equivalent non-Hermitian Hamiltonian, which evolves the quantum state with a dissipative dynamics. We also show that if the integration over the noisy field is done for the time evolution of the density matrix, a gain contribution from the fluctuations can be accessed in addition to the loss one from the non-hermitian Hamiltonian dynamics. We illustrate our study by computing analytically the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian, which we found to be the complex frequency harmonic oscillator, with a known evolution operator. It leads to space and time localisation, a common feature of noisy quantum systems in general applications.

  18. Impact of fluctuating temperatures on development of the koinobiont endoparasitoid Venturia canescens.

    PubMed

    Spanoudis, Christos G; Pappas, Christos S; Delpisi, Argyroula G; Andreadis, Stefanos S; Savopoulou-Soultani, Matilda

    2015-07-01

    The effect of temperature on the biology of Venturia canescens (Gravenhorst) (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) is well understood under constant temperature conditions, but less so under more natural, fluctuating conditions. Herein we studied the influence of fluctuating temperatures on biological parameters of V. canescens. Parasitized fifth-instar larvae of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) were reared individually in incubators at six fluctuating temperature regimes (15-19.5°C with a mean of 17.6°C, 17.5-22.5°C with a mean of 19.8°C, 20-30°C with a mean of 22.7°C, 22.5-27.5°C with a mean of 25°C, 25.5-32.5°C with a mean of 28.3°C and 28.5-33°C with a mean of 30°C) until emergence and death of V. canescens adults. Developmental time from parasitism to adult eclosion, adult longevity and survival were recorded at each fluctuating temperature regime. In principle, developmental time decreased with an increase of the mean temperature of the fluctuating temperature regime. Upper and lower threshold temperatures for total development were estimated at 34.9 and 6.7°C, respectively. Optimum temperature for development and thermal constant were 28.6°C and 526.3 degree days, respectively. Adult longevity was also affected by fluctuating temperature, as it was significantly reduced at the highest mean temperature (7.0 days at 30°C) compared to the lowest one (29.4 days at 17.6°C). Survival was low at all tested fluctuating temperatures, apart from mean fluctuating temperature of 25°C (37%). Understanding the thermal biology of V. canescens under more natural conditions is of critical importance in applied contexts. Thus, predictions of biological responses to fluctuating temperatures may be used in population forecasting models which potentially influence decision-making in IPM programs.

  19. Effects of temperature fluctuations on cuttlebone formation of cuttlefish Sepia esculenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Shuhan; Zhang, Xiumei; Liu, Songlin; Chen, Siqing

    2012-07-01

    The morphological characteristics and the cuttlebone formation of Sepia esculenta exposed to different water temperature fluctuations were investigated under laboratory conditions. Temperature fluctuation cycles (15 cycles, 60 d in total) consisted of the following three regimes of 4 d duration: keeping water temperature in 26°C for 3 d (Group A), 2 d (Group B), 0 d (Group C, control); then keeping water temperature in 16°C for the next 1, 2, 4 d. No significant difference in the survival rate was observed between the control and temperature fluctuation groups ( P >0.05). Lamellar depositions in a temperature fluctuation cycle were 2.45±0.02 for Group A, 2.00±0.02 for Group B, and 1.78±0.02 for Group C ( P< 0.05). The relationship between age and number of lamellas in the cuttlebone of S. esculenta under each water temperature fluctuation could be described as the linear model and the number of lamellas in the cuttlebone did not correspond to actual age. Group A had the highest cuttlebone growth index (CGI), the lowest locular index (LI), and inter-streak distances comparing with those of control group. However, the number of lamellas and LI or CGI showed a quadratic relationship for each temperature fluctuation group. In addition, temperature fluctuations caused the breakage of cuttlebone dark rings, which was considered a thermal mark. The position of the breakage in the dark rings was random. This thermal mark can be used as supplementary information for marking and releasing techniques.

  20. Magnetic fluctuation power near proton temperature anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar wind.

    PubMed

    Bale, S D; Kasper, J C; Howes, G G; Quataert, E; Salem, C; Sundkvist, D

    2009-11-20

    The proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind is known to be constrained by the theoretical thresholds for pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here, we use approximately 1x10;{6} independent measurements of gyroscale magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind to show for the first time that these fluctuations are enhanced along the temperature anisotropy thresholds of the mirror, proton oblique firehose, and ion cyclotron instabilities. In addition, the measured magnetic compressibility is enhanced at high plasma beta (beta_{ parallel} greater, similar1) along the mirror instability threshold but small elsewhere, consistent with expectations of the mirror mode. We also show that the short wavelength magnetic fluctuation power is a strong function of collisionality, which relaxes the temperature anisotropy away from the instability conditions and reduces correspondingly the fluctuation power.

  1. Magnetic Fluctuation Power Near Proton Temperature Anisotropy Instability Thresholds in the Solar Wind

    SciTech Connect

    Bale, S. D.; Kasper, J. C.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Salem, C.; Sundkvist, D.

    2009-11-20

    The proton temperature anisotropy in the solar wind is known to be constrained by the theoretical thresholds for pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities. Here, we use approximately 1x10{sup 6} independent measurements of gyroscale magnetic fluctuations in the solar wind to show for the first time that these fluctuations are enhanced along the temperature anisotropy thresholds of the mirror, proton oblique firehose, and ion cyclotron instabilities. In addition, the measured magnetic compressibility is enhanced at high plasma beta (beta{sub ||} > or approx. 1) along the mirror instability threshold but small elsewhere, consistent with expectations of the mirror mode. We also show that the short wavelength magnetic fluctuation power is a strong function of collisionality, which relaxes the temperature anisotropy away from the instability conditions and reduces correspondingly the fluctuation power.

  2. Systematic measurement of fast neutron background fluctuations in an urban area using a mobile detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyengar, A.; Beach, M.; Newby, R. J.; Fabris, L.; Heilbronn, L. H.; Hayward, J. P.

    2015-02-01

    Neutron background measurements using a mobile trailer-based system were conducted in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA. The 0.5 m2 system, consisting of eight EJ-301 liquid scintillation detectors, was used to collect neutron background measurements in order to better understand the systematic variations in background that depend solely on the street-level measurement position in a downtown area. Data was collected along 5 different streets, and the measurements were found to be repeatable. Using 10-min measurements, the fractional uncertainty in each measured data point was <2%. Compared with fast neutron background count rates measured away from downtown Knoxville, a reduction in background count rates ranging from 10% to 50% was observed in the downtown area, sometimes varying substantially over distances of tens of meters. These reductions are attributed to the net shielding of the cosmic ray neutron flux by adjacent buildings. For reference, the building structure as observed at street level is quantified in part here by a measured angle-of-open-sky metric.

  3. Systematic measurement of fast neutron background fluctuations in an urban area using a mobile detection system

    DOE PAGES

    Iyengar, Anagha; Beach, Matthew; Newby, Robert J.; ...

    2015-11-12

    Neutron background measurements using a mobile trailer-based system were conducted in Knoxville, Tennessee. The 0.5 m2 system consisting of 8 EJ-301 liquid scintillation detectors was used to collect neutron background measurements in order to better understand the systematic background variations that depend solely on the street-level measurement position in a local, downtown area. Data was collected along 5 different streets in the downtown Knoxville area, and the measurements were found to be repeatable. Using 10-min measurements, fractional uncertainty in each measured data point was <2%. Compared with fast neutron background count rates measured away from downtown Knoxville, a reduction inmore » background count rates ranging from 10-50% was observed in the downtown area, sometimes varying substantially over distances of tens of meters. These reductions are attributed to the shielding of adjacent buildings, quantified in part here by the metric angle-of-open-sky. The adjacent buildings may serve to shield cosmic ray neutron flux.« less

  4. Systematic measurement of fast neutron background fluctuations in an urban area using a mobile detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Iyengar, Anagha; Beach, Matthew; Newby, Robert J.; Fabris, Lorenzo; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Hayward, Jason P.

    2015-11-12

    Neutron background measurements using a mobile trailer-based system were conducted in Knoxville, Tennessee. The 0.5 m2 system consisting of 8 EJ-301 liquid scintillation detectors was used to collect neutron background measurements in order to better understand the systematic background variations that depend solely on the street-level measurement position in a local, downtown area. Data was collected along 5 different streets in the downtown Knoxville area, and the measurements were found to be repeatable. Using 10-min measurements, fractional uncertainty in each measured data point was <2%. Compared with fast neutron background count rates measured away from downtown Knoxville, a reduction in background count rates ranging from 10-50% was observed in the downtown area, sometimes varying substantially over distances of tens of meters. These reductions are attributed to the shielding of adjacent buildings, quantified in part here by the metric angle-of-open-sky. The adjacent buildings may serve to shield cosmic ray neutron flux.

  5. Spin fluctuations and high-temperature superconductivity in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plakida, Nikolay M.

    2016-12-01

    To describe the cuprate superconductors, models of strongly correlated electronic systems, such as the Hubbard or t - J models, are commonly employed. To study these models, projected (Hubbard) operators have to be used. Due to the unconventional commutation relations for the Hubbard operators, a specific kinematical interaction of electrons with spin and charge fluctuations emerges. The interaction is induced by the intraband hopping with a coupling parameter of the order of the kinetic energy of electrons W which is much larger than the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction J induced by the interband hopping. This review presents a consistent microscopic theory of spin excitations and superconductivity for cuprates where these interactions are taken into account within the Hubbard operator technique. The low-energy spin excitations are considered for the t-J model, while the electronic properties are studied using the two-subband extended Hubbard model where the intersite Coulomb repulsion V and electron-phonon interaction are taken into account.

  6. A thermodynamic fluctuation relation for temperature and energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velazquez, L.; Curilef, S.

    2009-03-01

    The present work extends the well-known thermodynamic relation C = β2langδE2rang for the canonical ensemble. We start from the general situation of the thermodynamic equilibrium between a large but finite system of interest and a generalized thermostat, which we define in the course of the paper. The resulting identity langδβδErang = 1 + langδE2rang∂2S(E)/∂E2 can account for thermodynamic states with a negative heat capacity C < 0; at the same time, it represents a thermodynamic fluctuation relation that imposes some restrictions on the determination of the microcanonical caloric curve β(E) = ∂S(E)/∂E. Finally, we comment briefly on the implications of the present result for the development of new Monte Carlo methods and an apparent analogy with quantum mechanics.

  7. Temperature fluctuations and their statistics in electron systems out of equilibrium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heikkilä, Tero; Laakso, Matti; Nazarov, Yuli

    2010-03-01

    We study the fluctuations of the electron temperature in a metallic island coupled to reservoirs via resistive contacts and driven out of equilibrium by either a temperature or voltage difference between the reservoirs in the regime in which the electrons are completely decoupled from the lattice phonons. We quantify these fluctuations in the regime beyond the Gaussian approximation and elucidate their dependence on the nature of the electronic contacts.footnotetextTero T. Heikkil"a and Yuli V. Nazarov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 130605 (2009). Besides normal noninteracting contacts, we also study the temperature fluctuations and their effects on other transport properties in single-electron transistors. We find three distinct regimes corresponding to cotunneling, sequential tunneling, and their coexistence. We find that the Fano factor of current fluctuations is enhanced around the crossover from coexistence to sequential tunneling by several orders of magnitude. This is because the SET is very sensitive to temperature fluctuations around this crossover. We also study the statistics of temperature fluctuations in these regimes and find the distribution to be strongly non-Gaussian.

  8. Spectral analysis of temperature and Brunt-Vaisala frequency fluctuations observed by radiosondes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuda, T.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Kato, S.; Fukao, S.; Sato, T.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that vertical wave number spectra of wind velocity and temperture fluctuations in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere are fairly well explained by a saturated gravity wave spectrum. But N(2) (N:Brunt-Vaisala (BV) frequency) spectra seem to be better for testing the scaling of the vertical wave number spectra in layers with different stratifications, beause its energy density is proportional only to the background value of N(2), while that for temperature depends on both the BV frequency and the potential temperature. From temperature profiles observed in June to August 1987 over the MU Observatory, Japan, by using a radiosonde with 30 m height resolution, N(2) spectra are determined in the 2 to 8.5 km (troposphere) and 18.5 to 25 km (lower stratosphere) ranges. Although individual spectra show fairly large day-by-day variability, the slope of the median of 34 spectra agrees reasonably with the theoretical value of -1 in the wave number range of 6 x 10(-4) similar to 3 x 10(-3) (c/m). The ratio of the spectral energy between these two height regions is about equal to the ratio of N(2), consistent with the prediction of saturated gravity wave theory.

  9. Brain temperature fluctuation: a reflection of functional neural activation.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Brown, P Leon; Wise, Roy A

    2002-07-01

    Although it is known that relatively large increases in local brain temperature can occur during behaviour and in response to various novel, stressful and emotionally arousing environmental stimuli, the source of this heat is not clearly established. To clarify this issue, we monitored the temperature in three brain structures (dorsal and ventral striatum, cerebellum) and in arterial blood at the level of the abdominal aorta in freely moving rats exposed to several environmental challenges ranging from traditional stressors to simple sensory stimuli (cage change, tail pinch, exposure to another male rat, a female rat, a mouse or an unexpected sound). We found that brain temperature was consistently higher than arterial blood temperature, and that brain temperature increased prior to, and to a greater extent than, the increase in blood temperature evoked by each test challenge. Thus, the local metabolic consequences of widely correlated neural activity appear to be the primary source of increases in brain temperature and a driving force behind the associated changes in body temperature.

  10. Classical heat transport and spontaneous fluctuations associated with a temperature filament in a magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, Alexander Thomas

    1999-11-01

    We study electron heat transport and spontaneous fluctuations during the DC injection of an electron beam by a 3 mm diameter crystal of LaB 6 at 20 eV and 200 mA, into a magnetized plasma with an ambient magnetic field of 500-1500 G. Thermalization of the beam current and subsequent transport of the electron heat creates a filamentary region about 1 cm wide, on the order of the electron skin depth, c/wpe. This ``temperature filament'' extends along the field about 5 m into the 10 m long, 40 cm wide plasma column, with a peak temperature 5-20 times greater than the 0.2-0.5 eV temperature of the bulk plasma. The plasma density, on the order of 1 × 1012 cm-3, is unperturbed in the filament because the energy of the beam is below the ionization potential of helium. In the temperature filament, under quiescent conditions, we observe simultaneous axial and radial electron heat transport that occurs at the classically predicted rates within the limits of uncertainty in the electron temperature measurement of about 20%. This is based on a comparison of space-time measurements of the filament temperature with the prediction of a computer code developed specifically to model 2-dimensional classical electron heat conduction in the beamheated filament. Langmuir probes were used to measure the temperature profile of the filament, and the spontaneous fluctuations in the filament region. Non-classical or so-called anomalous transport is observed after the onset of fluctuations. Initially these fluctuations are highly coherent with a frequency on the order of 0.1 fci and an m = 1 spiral shape in the x-y plane, having a density fluctuation amplitude, dn/n, of 20% and a magnetic fluctuation amplitude, δB/ B, of.01%. Measurements of the transverse magnetic fluctuation vectors confirm the m = 1 nature of the mode. These fluctuations are identified as drift- Alfven waves. Later in time, a low-frequency fluctuation occurs, on the order of.02 fci, which is confined to the radial center

  11. Growth and survival of Apache Trout under static and fluctuating temperature regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Recsetar, Matthew S.; Bonar, Scott A.; Feuerbacher, Olin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing stream temperatures have important implications for arid-region fishes. Little is known about effects of high water temperatures that fluctuate over extended periods on Apache Trout Oncorhynchus gilae apache, a federally threatened species of southwestern USA streams. We compared survival and growth of juvenile Apache Trout held for 30 d in static temperatures (16, 19, 22, 25, and 28°C) and fluctuating diel temperatures (±3°C from 16, 19, 22 and 25°C midpoints and ±6°C from 19°C and 22°C midpoints). Lethal temperature for 50% (LT50) of the Apache Trout under static temperatures (mean [SD] = 22.8 [0.6]°C) was similar to that of ±3°C diel temperature fluctuations (23.1 [0.1]°C). Mean LT50 for the midpoint of the ±6°C fluctuations could not be calculated because survival in the two treatments (19 ± 6°C and 22 ± 6°C) was not below 50%; however, it probably was also between 22°C and 25°C because the upper limb of a ±6°C fluctuation on a 25°C midpoint is above critical thermal maximum for Apache Trout (28.5–30.4°C). Growth decreased as temperatures approached the LT50. Apache Trout can survive short-term exposure to water temperatures with daily maxima that remain below 25°C and midpoint diel temperatures below 22°C. However, median summer stream temperatures must remain below 19°C for best growth and even lower if daily fluctuations are high (≥12°C).

  12. Effects of daily fluctuating temperatures on the Drosophila-Leptopilina boulardi parasitoid association.

    PubMed

    Delava, Emilie; Fleury, Frédéric; Gibert, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Koinobiont parasitoid insects, which maintain intimate and long-term relationships with their arthropod hosts, constitute an association of ectothermic organisms that is particularly sensitive to temperature variations. Because temperature shows pronounced natural daily fluctuations, we examined if experiments based on a constant temperature range can mask the real effects of the thermal regime on host-parasitoid interactions. The effects of two fluctuating thermal regimes on several developmental parameters of the Drosophila larval parasitoid Leptopilina boulardi were analyzed in this study. Regime 1 included a range of 16-23-16°C and regime 2 included a range of 16-21-26-21-16°C (mean temperature 20.1°C) compared to a 20.1°C constant temperature. Under an average temperature of 20.1°C, which corresponds to a cold condition of L. boulardi development, we showed that the success of parasitism is significantly higher under a fluctuating temperature regime than at constant temperature. A fluctuating regime also correlated with a reduced development time of the parasitoids. In contrast, the thermal regime did not affect the ability of Drosophila to resist parasitoid infestation. Finally, we demonstrated that daily temperature fluctuation prevented the entry into diapause for this species, which is normally observed at a constant temperature of 21°C. Overall, the results reveal that constant temperature experiments can produce misleading results, highlighting the need to study the thermal biology of organisms under fluctuating regimes that reflect natural conditions as closely as possible. This is particularly a major issue in host-parasitoid associations, which constitute a good model to understand the effect of climate warming on interacting species.

  13. On the role of dissipation in structure formation for dilute relativistic gases: the fluctuating static background case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Perciante, A. L.; Méndez, A. R.; Sandoval-Villalbazo, A.

    2017-07-01

    A correction to the Jeans stability criterion due to dissipation is established for the case of dilute high temperature gases. This effect is only relevant in the relativistic scenario and includes additional terms due to a density gradient driven heat flux, a non-vanishing bulk viscosity and the space-time dependent gravitational potential first order fluctuations. The result is obtained by thoroughly analyzing the exponentially growing modes present in the dynamics of density fluctuations in the linearized relativistic Navier-Stokes regime. The corrections to the corresponding Jeans mass and wavenumber are explicitly obtained and are compared to the non-relativistic and non-dissipative values using the transport coefficients obtained in the BGK approximation.

  14. Small-Scale Spatial Fluctuations in the Soft X-Ray Background. Degree awarded by Maryland Univ., 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; White, Nicolas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In order to isolate the diffuse extragalactic component of the soft X-ray background, we have used a combination of ROSAT All-Sky Survey and IRAS 100 micron data to separate the soft X-ray background into five components. We find a Local Hot Bubble similar to that described by Snowden et al (1998). We make a first calculation of the contribution by unresolved Galactic stars to the diffuse background. We constrain the normalization of the Extragalactic Power Law (the contribution of the unresolved extragalactic point sources such as AGN, QSO'S, and normal galaxies) to 9.5 +/- 0.9 keV/(sq cm s sr keV), assuming a power-law index of 1.46. We show that the remaining emission, which is some combination of Galactic halo emission and the putative diffuse extragalactic emission, must be composed of at least two components which we have characterized by thermal spectra. The softer component has log T - 6.08 and a patchy distribution; thus it is most probably part of the Galactic halo. The harder component has log T - 6.46 and is nearly isotropic; some portion may be due to the Galactic halo and some portion may be due to the diffuse extragalactic emission. The maximum upper limit to the strength of the emission by the diffuse extragalactic component is the total of the hard component, approx. 7.4 +/- 1.0 keV/(sq cm s sr keV) in the 3/4 keV band. We have made the first direct measure of the fluctuations due to the diffuse extragalactic emission in the 3/4 keV band. Physical arguments suggest that small angular scale (approx. 10') fluctuations in the Local Hot Bubble or the Galactic halo will have very short dissipation times (about 10(exp 5) years). Therefore, the fluctuation spectrum of the soft X-ray background should measure the distribution of the diffuse extragalactic emission. Using mosaics of deep, overlapping PSPC pointings, we find an autocorrelation function value of approx. 0.0025 for 10' < theta < 20', and a value consistent with zero on larger scales

  15. Survival of Apache Trout eggs and alevins under static and fluctuating temperature regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Recsetar, Matthew S.; Bonar, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Increased stream temperatures due to global climate change, livestock grazing, removal of riparian cover, reduction of stream flow, and urbanization will have important implications for fishes worldwide. Information exists that describes the effects of elevated water temperatures on fish eggs, but less information is available on the effects of fluctuating water temperatures on egg survival, especially those of threatened and endangered species. We tested the posthatch survival of eyed eggs and alevins of Apache Trout Oncorhynchus gilae apache, a threatened salmonid, in static temperatures of 15, 18, 21, 24, and 27°C, and also in treatments with diel fluctuations of ±3°C around those temperatures. The LT50 for posthatch survival of Apache Trout eyed eggs and alevins was 17.1°C for static temperatures treatments and 17.9°C for the midpoints of ±3°C fluctuating temperature treatments. There was no significant difference in survival between static temperatures and fluctuating temperatures that shared the same mean temperature, yet there was a slight difference in LT50s. Upper thermal tolerance of Apache Trout eyed eggs and alevins is much lower than that of fry to adult life stages (22–23°C). Information on thermal tolerance of early life stages (eyed egg and alevin) will be valuable to those restoring streams or investigating thermal tolerances of imperiled fishes.

  16. Interaction of Mean Temperature and Daily Fluctuation Influences Dengue Incidence in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Sifat; Glass, Kathryn; Viennet, Elvina; Harley, David

    2015-01-01

    Local weather influences the transmission of the dengue virus. Most studies analyzing the relationship between dengue and climate are based on relatively coarse aggregate measures such as mean temperature. Here, we include both mean temperature and daily fluctuations in temperature in modelling dengue transmission in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. We used a negative binomial generalized linear model, adjusted for rainfall, anomalies in sea surface temperature (an index for El Niño-Southern Oscillation), population density, the number of dengue cases in the previous month, and the long term temporal trend in dengue incidence. In addition to the significant associations of mean temperature and temperature fluctuation with dengue incidence, we found interaction of mean and temperature fluctuation significantly influences disease transmission at a lag of one month. High mean temperature with low fluctuation increases dengue incidence one month later. Besides temperature, dengue incidence was also influenced by sea surface temperature anomalies in the current and previous month, presumably as a consequence of concomitant anomalies in the annual rainfall cycle. Population density exerted a significant positive influence on dengue incidence indicating increasing risk of dengue in over-populated Dhaka. Understanding these complex relationships between climate, population, and dengue incidence will help inform outbreak prediction and control.

  17. Interaction of Mean Temperature and Daily Fluctuation Influences Dengue Incidence in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Sharmin, Sifat; Glass, Kathryn; Viennet, Elvina; Harley, David

    2015-01-01

    Local weather influences the transmission of the dengue virus. Most studies analyzing the relationship between dengue and climate are based on relatively coarse aggregate measures such as mean temperature. Here, we include both mean temperature and daily fluctuations in temperature in modelling dengue transmission in Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh. We used a negative binomial generalized linear model, adjusted for rainfall, anomalies in sea surface temperature (an index for El Niño-Southern Oscillation), population density, the number of dengue cases in the previous month, and the long term temporal trend in dengue incidence. In addition to the significant associations of mean temperature and temperature fluctuation with dengue incidence, we found interaction of mean and temperature fluctuation significantly influences disease transmission at a lag of one month. High mean temperature with low fluctuation increases dengue incidence one month later. Besides temperature, dengue incidence was also influenced by sea surface temperature anomalies in the current and previous month, presumably as a consequence of concomitant anomalies in the annual rainfall cycle. Population density exerted a significant positive influence on dengue incidence indicating increasing risk of dengue in over-populated Dhaka. Understanding these complex relationships between climate, population, and dengue incidence will help inform outbreak prediction and control. PMID:26161895

  18. Diurnal temperature fluctuations in an artificial small shallow water body.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Adrie F G; Heusinkveld, Bert G; Kraai, Aline; Paaijmans, Krijn P

    2008-03-01

    For aquatic biological processes, diurnal and annual cycles of water temperature are very important to plants as well as to animals and microbes living in the water. An existing one-dimensional model has been extended to simulate the temperature profile within a small water body. A year-round outdoor experiment has been conducted to estimate the model input parameters and to verify the model. Both model simulations and measurements show a strong temperature stratification in the water during daytime. Throughout the night, however, a well-mixed layer starting at the water surface develops. Because the water body is relatively small, it appears that the sediment heat flux has a strong effect on the behaviour of the water temperature throughout the seasons. In spring, the water temperature remains relatively low due to the cold surrounding soil, while in autumn the opposite occurs due to the relatively warm soil. It appears that, in small water bodies, the total amount of incoming long wave radiation is sensitive to the sky view factor. In our experiments, the intensity of precipitation also appears to have a small effect on the stratification of the water temperature.

  19. Inverse heat conduction estimation of inner wall temperature fluctuations under turbulent penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhouchao; Lu, Tao; Liu, Bo

    2017-04-01

    Turbulent penetration can occur when hot and cold fluids mix in a horizontal T-junction pipe at nuclear plants. Caused by the unstable turbulent penetration, temperature fluctuations with large amplitude and high frequency can lead to time-varying wall thermal stress and even thermal fatigue on the inner wall. Numerous cases, however, exist where inner wall temperatures cannot be measured and only outer wall temperature measurements are feasible. Therefore, it is one of the popular research areas in nuclear science and engineering to estimate temperature fluctuations on the inner wall from measurements of outer wall temperatures without damaging the structure of the pipe. In this study, both the one-dimensional (1D) and the two-dimensional (2D) inverse heat conduction problem (IHCP) were solved to estimate the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall. First, numerical models of both the 1D and the 2D direct heat conduction problem (DHCP) were structured in MATLAB, based on the finite difference method with an implicit scheme. Second, both the 1D IHCP and the 2D IHCP were solved by the steepest descent method (SDM), and the DHCP results of temperatures on the outer wall were used to estimate the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall. Third, we compared the temperature fluctuations on the inner wall estimated by the 1D IHCP with those estimated by the 2D IHCP in four cases: (1) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 3°C, (2) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 30°C, (3) when the maximum disturbance of temperature of fluid inside the pipe was 160°C, and (4) when the fluid temperatures inside the pipe were random from 50°C to 210°C.

  20. Clarifying the role of fire heat and daily temperature fluctuations as germination cues for Mediterranean Basin obligate seeders

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Victor M.; Baeza, M. Jaime; Blanes, M. Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims This study aims to determine the role that both direct effects of fire and subsequent daily temperature fluctuations play in the seed bank dynamics of obligate seeders from the Mediterranean Basin. The short yet high soil temperatures experienced due to passage of fire are conflated with the lower, but longer, temperatures experienced by daily fluctuations which occur after removing vegetation. These germination cues are able to break seed dormancy, but it is difficult to assess their specific level of influence because they occur consecutively after summer fires, just before the flush of germination in the wet season (autumn). Methods By applying experimental fires, seed treatments were imposed that combined fire exposure/non-fire exposure with exposure to microhabitats under a gradient of disturbance (i.e. gaps opened by fire, mechanical brushing and intact vegetation). The seeds used were representative of the main families of obligate seeders (Ulex parviflorus, Cistus albidus and Rosmarinus officinalis). Specifically, an assessment was made of (1) the proportion of seeds killed by fire, (2) seedling emergence under field conditions and (3) seeds which remained ungerminated in soil. Key Results For the three species studied, the factors that most influenced seedling emergence and seeds remaining ungerminated were microhabitats with higher temperature fluctuations after fire (gaps opened by fire and brushing treatments). The direct effect of fire decreased the seedling emergence of U. parviflorus and reduced the proportion of seeds of R. officinalis remaining ungerminated. Conclusions The relevance of depleting vegetation (and subsequent daily temperature fluctuation in summer) suggests that studies focusing on lower temperature thresholds for breaking seed dormancy are required. This fact also supports the hypothesis that the seeding capacity in Mediterranean Basin obligate seeders may have evolved as a response to a wide range of

  1. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, Markus; Croell, Arne

    1999-01-01

    A silicon crystal growth experiment has been accomplished using the floating-zone technique under microgravity on a sounding rocket (TEXUS 36). Measurements of temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone due to time dependent thermocapillary convection (Marangoni convection) and an observation of the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously performed during the experiment. Temperature fluctuations of about 0.5 - 0.7 C with a frequency range < 0.5Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuates considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: Growth rates up to 3 to 4mm/min, close to zero mm/min, as well as negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies of temperature fluctuations, microscopic growth rates, and the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well, with main frequencies between 0.1 and 0.3 Hz. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, and the characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies. At a position 3.4mm above the interface and 1.4mm inside the melt, equivalent to the sensor tip position in the experiment, temperature fluctuations up to 1.8 C and frequencies ? 0.25Hz were found in the simulations.

  2. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone on TEXUS36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Schweizer, Markus; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Benz, K. W.; Lichtensteiger, M.

    1999-01-01

    Several earlier (micro)g experiments have shown that time-dependent thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection is the major cause for the formation of dopant striations in floating-zone grown semiconductor crystals, at least in small-scale systems not employing RF heating. To quantify this correlation, a silicon floating-zone experiment was performed on the TEXUS36 flight (February 7, 1 998) in the monoellipsoid mirror furnace TEM02-ELLI. During the experiment, temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone and the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously measured. Temperature fluctuations of 0.5 C - 0.7 C with main frequencies between 0.1 Hz and 0.3 Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuated considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: rates from 4mm/min to negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. The frequencies associated with the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well with those of the temperature fluctuations and microscopic growth rates. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, to evaluate characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies, and to give insight into the instability mechanisms of Maran-goni convection in this configuration. The simulations were in good agreement with the experimental values, showing temperature fluctuations with frequencies f? 0.25 Hz and amplitudes up to 1.8 C at a position equivalent to that of the sensor tip in the experiment.

  3. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweizer, Markus; Croell, Arne

    1999-01-01

    A silicon crystal growth experiment has been accomplished using the floating-zone technique under microgravity on a sounding rocket (TEXUS 36). Measurements of temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone due to time dependent thermocapillary convection (Marangoni convection) and an observation of the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously performed during the experiment. Temperature fluctuations of about 0.5 - 0.7 C with a frequency range < 0.5Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuates considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: Growth rates up to 3 to 4mm/min, close to zero mm/min, as well as negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies of temperature fluctuations, microscopic growth rates, and the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well, with main frequencies between 0.1 and 0.3 Hz. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, and the characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies. At a position 3.4mm above the interface and 1.4mm inside the melt, equivalent to the sensor tip position in the experiment, temperature fluctuations up to 1.8 C and frequencies ? 0.25Hz were found in the simulations.

  4. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone on TEXUS36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Schweizer, Markus; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Benz, K. W.; Lichtensteiger, M.

    1999-01-01

    Several earlier (micro)g experiments have shown that time-dependent thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection is the major cause for the formation of dopant striations in floating-zone grown semiconductor crystals, at least in small-scale systems not employing RF heating. To quantify this correlation, a silicon floating-zone experiment was performed on the TEXUS36 flight (February 7, 1 998) in the monoellipsoid mirror furnace TEM02-ELLI. During the experiment, temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone and the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously measured. Temperature fluctuations of 0.5 C - 0.7 C with main frequencies between 0.1 Hz and 0.3 Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuated considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: rates from 4mm/min to negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. The frequencies associated with the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well with those of the temperature fluctuations and microscopic growth rates. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, to evaluate characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies, and to give insight into the instability mechanisms of Maran-goni convection in this configuration. The simulations were in good agreement with the experimental values, showing temperature fluctuations with frequencies f? 0.25 Hz and amplitudes up to 1.8 C at a position equivalent to that of the sensor tip in the experiment.

  5. The Effect of Channel Geometry and Diurnal Discharge Fluctuations on Modeled Stream Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, E. A.; Lautz, L.; McKenzie, J. M.; Glose, A.; Kelleher, C.

    2016-12-01

    Energy balance models are used to predict stream temperature through both space and time. These models often rely on simplifications, such as assuming constant stream discharge through time. While this simplification is justifiable in many settings, some streams have diurnal discharge fluctuations of up to 50%, which, if ignored, could cause error in modeled stream temperatures. Daily discharge variations occur in proglacial settings or areas experiencing high evapotranspiration, or can be induced anthropogenically in dammed rivers. Fluctuations in discharge result in two important, and competing, impacts on stream energy balances. First, increases in discharge mean greater water volume and thermal mass in the stream channel, thereby reducing the change in temperature resulting from a given heat flux. On the other hand, increases in discharge mean a wider stream, which maximizes heat fluxes that increase linearly with channel width, thereby increasing changes in temperature. We investigated the relative importance of these feedbacks in channels with contrasting width-to-depth ratios under various diurnal discharge fluctuation scenarios using Monte Carlo simulations. We updated the HFLUX stream temperature solver, a 1D finite difference model coded in MATLAB, to allow for fluctuating discharge through time and variable stream geometry with each model simulation. Using Manning's equation and assuming a triangular channel shape, we developed a relationship between discharge and stream dimensions to calculate stream width and model node volumes through time as a function of discharge. Model inputs include initial stream temperatures, climate data, stream discharge, groundwater temperature, stream shading, cloudiness, stream dimensions, and sediment type. Unsurprisingly, large daily amplitude fluctuations cause the largest differences from the observed data. However, these large fluctuations matter most when peak discharge occurs around midday. Additionally, simulations

  6. Effects of temperature fluctuations of IUE data quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. W.; Turnrose, B. E.; Bohlin, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Analysis of IUE calibration lamp images shows that variation in the temperature of the scientific instrument causes shifts in the location of the spectral format with respect to the reseau grid on the detector and in the location of the reseaux themselves. In high dispersion, a camera head amplifier temperature difference of 6C corresponds to a shift of 4 pixels in the spectral format for LWR and 2 pixels for SWP along the dispersion direction. Shifts perpendicular to the disperson (for the same temperature difference) are less than one pixel for both cameras. In low dispersion spectra, the shifts are similar but orthogonal to those described above with the larger motion lying in the direction perpendicular to the dispersion. In both dispersion modes, the observed shifts are apparently independent of wavelength. In high dispersion, the constant pixel shift mimics a constant velocity error.

  7. Fluctuations of conserved charges at finite temperature from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsányi, Szabolcs; Fodor, Zoltán; Katz, Sándor D.; Krieg, Stefan; Ratti, Claudia; Szabó, Kálman

    2012-01-01

    We present the full results of the Wuppertal-Budapest lattice QCD collaboration on flavor diagonal and non-diagonal quark number susceptibilities with 2 + 1 staggered quark flavors, in a temperature range between 125 and 400 MeV. The light and strange quark masses are set to their physical values. Lattices with N t = 6, 8, 10, 12, 16 are used. We perform a continuum extrapolation of all observables under study. A Symanzik improved gauge and a stout-link improved staggered fermion action is utilized. All results are compared to the Hadron Resonance Gas model predictions: good agreement is found in the temperature region below the transition.

  8. Preliminary measurements of velocity, density and total temperature fluctuations in compressible subsonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stainback, P. C.; Johnson, C. B.; Basnett, C. B.

    1983-01-01

    The heat transfer characteristics of a three-wire hot-wire probe operated with a constant temperature anemometer were investigated in the subsonic compressible flow regime. The sensitivity coefficients, with respect to velocity, density and total temperature, were measured and the results were used to calculate the velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations in the test section of the Langley 0.3-m Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel (TCT). These results were extended to give estimates for fluctuations due to vorticity, sound, and entropy. In addition, attempts were made to determine the major source of disturbances in the 0.3-m TCT.

  9. Measurements of temperature and pressure fluctuations in the T prime 2 cryogenic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, A.; Dor, J. B.; Breil, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Cold wire measurement of temperature fluctuations were made in a DERAT T'2 induction powered cryogenic wind tunnel for 2 types of liquid nitrogen injectors. Thermal turbulence measured in the tranquilization chamber depends to a great extent on the injector used; for fine spray of nitrogen drops, this level of turbulence seemed completely acceptable. Fluctuations in static pressure taken from the walls of the vein by Kulite sensors showed that there was no increase in aerodynamic noise during cryogenic gusts.

  10. Influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Man-Chang; Sun, Ke-Wei; Zhang, Yong

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory-scale experiment was carried out to assess the influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste (MOSW). Heating failure was simulated by decreasing temperature suddenly from 55 °C to 20 °C suddenly; 2 h time is needed for temperature decrease and recovery. Under the conditions of 8.0 g/(L·d) and 15 d respectively for MOSW load and retention time, following results were noted: (1) biogas production almost stopped and VFA (volatile fatty acid) accumulated rapidly, accompanied by pH decrease; (2) with low temperature (20 °C) duration of 1, 5, 12 and 24 h, it took 3, 11, 56 and 72 h for the thermophilic anaerobic digestion system to reproduce methane after temperature fluctuation; (3) the longer the low temperature interval lasted, the more the methanogenic bacteria would decay; hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis were all influenced by temperature fluctuation; (4) the thermophilic microorganisms were highly resilient to temperature fluctuation. PMID:16502503

  11. Influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste.

    PubMed

    Wu, Man-chang; Sun, Ke-wei; Zhang, Yong

    2006-03-01

    A laboratory-scale experiment was carried out to assess the influence of temperature fluctuation on thermophilic anaerobic digestion of municipal organic solid waste (MOSW). Heating failure was simulated by decreasing temperature suddenly from 55 degrees C to 20 degrees C suddenly; 2 h time is needed for temperature decrease and recovery. Under the conditions of 8.0 g/(L.d) and 15 d respectively for MOSW load and retention time, following results were noted: (1) biogas production almost stopped and VFA (volatile fatty acid) accumulated rapidly, accompanied by pH decrease; (2) with low temperature (20 degrees C) duration of 1, 5, 12 and 24 h, it took 3, 11, 56 and 72 h for the thermophilic anaerobic digestion system to reproduce methane after temperature fluctuation; (3) the longer the low temperature interval lasted, the more the methanogenic bacteria would decay; hydrolysis, acidification and methanogenesis were all influenced by temperature fluctuation; (4) the thermophilic microorganisms were highly resilient to temperature fluctuation.

  12. Cosmic microwave background: Polarization and temperature anisotropies from symmetric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccigalupi, Carlo

    1999-06-01

    Perturbations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) are generated by primordial inhomogeneities. I consider the case of CMB anisotropies from one single ordered perturbation source, or seed, existing well before decoupling between matter and radiation. Such structures could have been left by high energy symmetries breaking in the early universe. I focus on the cases of spherical and cylindrical symmetry of the seed. I give general analytic expressions for the polarization and temperature linear perturbations, factoring out of the Fourier integral the dependence on the photon propagation direction and on the geometric coordinates describing the seed. I show how the CMB perturbations manifestly reflect the symmetries of their seeds. In particular, polarization is uniquely linked to the shape of the source because of its tensorial nature. CMB anisotropies are obtained with a line of sight integration. They are a function of the position and orientation of the seed along the photons path. This treatment highlights the undulatory properties of the CMB. I show with numerical examples how the polarization and temperature perturbations propagate beyond the size of their seeds, reaching the CMB sound horizon at the time considered. Just like the waves from a pebble thrown in a pond, CMB anisotropy from a seed intersecting the last scattering surface appears as a series of temperature and polarization waves surrounding the seed, extending on the scale of the CMB sound horizon at decoupling, roughly 1 deg in the sky. Each wave is characterized by its own value of the CMB perturbation, with the same mean amplitude of the signal coming from the seed interior; as expected for a linear structure with size L<=H-1 and density contrast δ at decoupling, the temperature anisotropy is δT/T~=δ(L/H-1)2, roughly ten times stronger than the polarization. These waves could allow one to distinguish relics from high energy processes of the early universe from pointlike astrophysical

  13. The effects of fluctuating temperature regimes on the embryonic development of lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis).

    PubMed

    Lim, Michael Y-T; Manzon, Richard G; Somers, Christopher M; Boreham, Douglas R; Wilson, Joanna Y

    2017-08-30

    Fluctuating incubation temperatures may have significant effects on fish embryogenesis; yet most laboratory-based studies use constant temperatures. For species that experience large, natural seasonal temperature changes during embryogenesis, such as lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), seasonal temperature regimes are likely optimal for development. Anthropogenic activities can increase average and/or variability of natural incubation temperatures over large (e.g. through climate change) or smaller (e.g. thermal effluent discharge) geographic scales. To investigate this, we incubated lake whitefish embryos under constant (2, 5, or 8°C) and fluctuating temperature regimes. Fluctuating temperature regimes had a base temperature of 2°C with: 1) seasonal temperature changes that modeled natural declines/inclines; 2) tri-weekly +3°C, 1h temperature spikes; or 3) both seasonal temperature changes and temperature spikes. We compared mortality to hatch, morphometrics, and heart rate at three developmental stages. Mortality rate was similar for embryos incubated at constant 2°C, constant 5°C, or with seasonal temperatures, but was significantly greater at constant 8°C. Embryos incubated constantly at >2°C had reduced body growth and yolk consumption compared to embryos incubated with seasonal temperature changes. When measured at the common base temperature of 2°C, embryos incubated at constant 2°C had lower heart rates than embryos incubated with both seasonal temperature changes and temperature spikes. Our study suggests that incubating lake whitefish embryos with constant temperatures may significantly alter development, growth, and heart rate compared to incubating with seasonal temperature changes, emphasizing the need to include seasonal temperature changes in laboratory-based studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetsim, Fluctuations and Mechanism of High-Temperature Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Takashi; Hase, Izumi; Miyazaki, Mitake; Yamaji, Kunihiko

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the ground state of the two-dimensional d-p model (three-band Hubbard model) by using a variational Monte Carlo method. The superconducting condensation energy is evaluated for the Gutzwiller-BCS wave function. We show that there is a crossover between strongly and weakly correlated regions as the level difference between d and p orbitals increases. The gap function and the condensation energy can be large in the crossover region. This result indicates a possibility of high-temperature superconductivity in the two-dimensional d-p model.

  15. Zero-Temperature Fluctuations in Short-Range Spin Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguin, L.-P.; Newman, C. M.; Stein, D. L.; Wehr, J.

    2016-06-01

    We consider the energy difference restricted to a finite volume for certain pairs of incongruent ground states (if they exist) in the d-dimensional Edwards-Anderson Ising spin glass at zero temperature. We prove that the variance of this quantity with respect to the couplings grows proportionally to the volume in any d ≥ 2. An essential aspect of our result is the use of the excitation metastate. As an illustration of potential applications, we use this result to restrict the possible structure of spin glass ground states in two dimensions.

  16. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Foy, E.; Rowan, G.; Goldstein, D.

    1982-01-01

    The use of probability theory to determine the effects of turbulent fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent combustion systems is briefly reviewed. Results are presented for the effect of species fluctuations in particular. It is found that turbulent fluctuations of species act to reduce the reaction rates, in contrast with the temperature fluctuations previously determined to increase Arrhenius reaction rate constants. For the temperature fluctuations, a criterion is set forth for determining if, in a given region of a turbulent flow field, the temperature can be expected to exhibit ramp like fluctuations. Using the above results, along with results previously obtained, a model is described for testing the effects of turbulent fluctuations of temperature and species on reaction rates in computer programs dealing with turbulent reacting flows. An alternative model which employs three variable probability density functions (temperature and two species) and is currently being formulated is discussed as well.

  17. Parameter constraints from weak-lensing tomography of galaxy shapes and cosmic microwave background fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkel, Philipp M.; Schäfer, Björn Malte

    2017-08-01

    Recently, it has been shown that cross-correlating cosmic microwave background (CMB) lensing and three-dimensional (3D) cosmic shear allows to considerably tighten cosmological parameter constraints. We investigate whether similar improvement can be achieved in a conventional tomographic setup. We present Fisher parameter forecasts for a Euclid-like galaxy survey in combination with different ongoing and forthcoming CMB experiments. In contrast to a fully 3D analysis, we find only marginal improvement. Assuming Planck-like CMB data, we show that including the full covariance of the combined CMB and cosmic shear data improves the dark energy figure of merit (FOM) by only 3 per cent. The marginalized error on the sum of neutrino masses is reduced at the same level. For a next generation CMB satellite mission such as Prism, the predicted improvement of the dark energy FOM amounts to approximately 25 per cent. Furthermore, we show that the small improvement is contrasted by an increased bias in the dark energy parameters when the intrinsic alignment of galaxies is not correctly accounted for in the full covariance matrix.

  18. Spatial Fluctuations in the Diffuse Cosmic X-Ray Background. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafer, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    The bright, essentially isotropic, X-ray sky flux above 2 keV yields information on the universe at large distances. However, a definitive understanding of the origin of the flux is lacking. Some fraction of the total flux is contributed by active galactic nuclei and clusters of galaxies, but less than one percent of the total is contributed by the or approximately 3 keV band resolved sources, which is the band where the sky flux is directly observed. Parametric models of AGN (quasar) luminosity function evolution are examined. Most constraints are by the total sky flux. The acceptability of particular models hinges on assumptions currently not directly testable. The comparison with the Einstein Observatory 1 to keV low flux source counts is hampered by spectral uncertainties. A tentative measurement of a large scale dipole anisotropy is consistent with the velocity and direction derived from the dipole in the microwave background. The impact of the X-ray anisotropy limits for other scales on studies of large-scale structure in the universe is sketched. Models of the origins of the X-ray sky flux are reviewed, and future observational programs outlined.

  19. Interface fluctuations and kinetics of nucleation in helium at ultralow temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuki, Akira

    1995-01-01

    Interface fluctuations and kinetics of nucleating droplets are studied in4He and3He-4He mixtures at ultralow temperatures in the dissipationless regime. We firstly discuss the droplet number density arising as quantum fluctuations and secondly derive the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for a droplet in a metastable fluid. This equation, which is well-known in classical hydrodynamics, governs kinetics of domain growth at very low temperatures. Thirdly, the quantum nucleation rate is shown to be much enhanced by high-frequency acoustic or electric field, however small its amplitude is, when the period of oscillation 2π/ω is shorter than the time τ s of tunnelling through the potential barrier. Fourthly, we examine equilibrium fluctuations of a planar interface which macroscopically separates two phases. The correlation function of the interface displacement is shown to cross over from the classical expression into a newly found quantum expression as the temperature is lowered.

  20. The effect of temperature fluctuations of reaction rate constants in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Antaki, P. J.; Kassar, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Current models of turbulent reacting flows frequently use Arrhenius reaction rate constants obtained from static or laminar flow theory and/or experiments, or from best fits of static, laminar, and turbulent data. By treating the reaction rate constant as a continuous random variable which is temperature-dependent, the present study assesses the effect of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the reaction rate constant. This model requires that a probability density function (PDF) describing the nature of the fluctuations be specified. Three PDFs are examined: the clipped Gaussian, the beta PDF, and the ramp model. All the models indicate that the reaction rate constant is greater in a turbulent flow field than in an equivalent laminar flow. In addition, an amplification ratio, which is the ratio of the turbulent rate constant to the laminar rate constant, is defined and its behavior as a function of the mean temperature fluctuations is described

  1. The effect of temperature fluctuations of reaction rate constants in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Antaki, P. J.; Kassar, G. M.

    1981-01-01

    Current models of turbulent reacting flows frequently use Arrhenius reaction rate constants obtained from static or laminar flow theory and/or experiments, or from best fits of static, laminar, and turbulent data. By treating the reaction rate constant as a continuous random variable which is temperature-dependent, the present study assesses the effect of turbulent temperature fluctuations on the reaction rate constant. This model requires that a probability density function (PDF) describing the nature of the fluctuations be specified. Three PDFs are examined: the clipped Gaussian, the beta PDF, and the ramp model. All the models indicate that the reaction rate constant is greater in a turbulent flow field than in an equivalent laminar flow. In addition, an amplification ratio, which is the ratio of the turbulent rate constant to the laminar rate constant, is defined and its behavior as a function of the mean temperature fluctuations is described

  2. Interface fluctuations and kinetics of nucleation in helium at ultralow temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Onuki, Akira

    1995-01-01

    Interface fluctuations and kinetics of nucleating droplets are studied in {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He-{sup 4}He mixtures at ultralow temperatures in the dissipationless regime. We firstly discuss the droplet number density arising as quantum fluctuations and secondly derive the Rayleigh-Plesset equation for a droplet in a metastable fluid. This equation, which is well-known in classical hydrodynamics, governs kinetics of domain growth at very low temperatures. Thirdly, the quantum nucleation rate is shown to be much enhanced by high-frequency acoustic or electric field, however small its amplitude is, when the period of oscillation 2{pi}/{omega} is shorter than the time {tau}{sub s} of tunnelling through the potential barrier. Fourthly, we examine equilibrium fluctuations of a planar interface which macroscopically separates two phases. The correlation function of the interface displacement is shown to cross over from the classical expression into a newly found quantum expression as the temperature is lowered.

  3. The importance of temperature fluctuations in understanding mosquito population dynamics and malaria risk

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, William A.; Paaijmans, Krijn P.; Thomas, Matthew B.; Bjørnstad, Ottar N.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature is a key environmental driver of Anopheles mosquito population dynamics; understanding its central role is important for these malaria vectors. Mosquito population responses to temperature fluctuations, though important across the life history, are poorly understood at a population level. We used stage-structured, temperature-dependent delay-differential equations to conduct a detailed exploration of the impacts of diurnal and annual temperature fluctuations on mosquito population dynamics. The model allows exploration of temperature-driven temporal changes in adult age structure, giving insights into the population’s capacity to vector malaria parasites. Because of temperature-dependent shifts in age structure, the abundance of potentially infectious mosquitoes varies temporally, and does not necessarily mirror the dynamics of the total adult population. In addition to conducting the first comprehensive theoretical exploration of fluctuating temperatures on mosquito population dynamics, we analysed observed temperatures at four locations in Africa covering a range of environmental conditions. We found both temperature and precipitation are needed to explain the observed malaria season in these locations, enhancing our understanding of the drivers of malaria seasonality and how temporal disease risk may shift in response to temperature changes. This approach, tracking both mosquito abundance and age structure, may be a powerful tool for understanding current and future malaria risk. PMID:28405386

  4. Geographic variation in the flood-induced fluctuating temperature requirement for germination in Setaria parviflora seeds.

    PubMed

    Mollard, F P O; Insausti, P

    2011-07-01

    Our aim was to search for specific seed germinative strategies related to flooding escape in Setaria parviflora, a common species across the Americas. For this purpose, we investigated induction after floods, in relation to fluctuating temperature requirements for germination in seeds from mountain, floodplain and successional grasslands. A laboratory experiment was conducted in which seeds were imbibed or immersed in water at 5°C. Seeds were also buried in flood-prone and upland grasslands and exhumed during the flooding season. Additionally, seeds were buried in flooded or drained grassland mesocosms. Germination of exhumed seeds was assayed at 25°C or at 20°C/30°C in the dark or in the presence of red light pulses. After submergence or soil flooding, a high fraction (>32%) of seeds from the floodplain required fluctuating temperatures to germinate. In contrast, seeds from the mountains showed maximum differences in germination between fluctuating and constant temperature treatment only after imbibition (35%) or in non-flooded soil conditions (40%). The fluctuating temperature requirement was not clearly related to the foregoing conditions in the successional grassland seeds. Maximum germination could also be attained with red light pulses to seeds from mountain and successional grasslands. Results show that the fluctuating temperature requirement might help floodplain seeds to germinate after floods, indicating a unique feature of the dormancy of S. parviflora seeds from floodplains, which suggests an adaptive advantage aimed at postponing emergence during inundation periods. In contrast, the fluctuating temperature required for germination among seeds from mountain and successional grasslands show its importance for gap detection.

  5. Temperature fluctuations and the thermodynamic determination of the cooperativity length in glass forming liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chua, Y. Z.; Zorn, R.; Holderer, O.; Schmelzer, J. W. P.; Schick, C.; Donth, E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to decide which of the two possible thermodynamic expressions for the cooperativity length in glass forming liquids is the correct one. In the derivation of these two expressions, the occurrence of temperature fluctuations in the considered nanoscale subsystems is either included or neglected. Consequently, our analysis gives also an answer to the widely discussed problem whether temperature fluctuations have to be generally accounted for in thermodynamics or not. To this end, the characteristic length-scales at equal times and temperatures for propylene glycol were determined independently from AC calorimetry in both the above specified ways and from quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS), and compared. The result shows that the cooperative length determined from QENS coincides most consistently with the cooperativity length determined from AC calorimetry measurements for the case that the effect of temperature fluctuations is incorporated in the description. This conclusion indicates that—accounting for temperature fluctuations—the characteristic length can be derived by thermodynamic considerations from the specific parameters of the liquid at glass transition and that temperature does fluctuate in small systems.

  6. Temperature fluctuations underneath the ice in Diamond Lake, Hennepin County, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Fischer, Tomas; Mls, Jiří; DěDeček, Petr

    2013-06-01

    Diamond Lake in Minnesota is covered every winter with ice and snow providing a modified thermal insulation between water and air. Autonomous temperature sensors, data loggers, were placed in this lake so that hourly measurements could be obtained from the snow-covered ice and water. The sensors that became frozen measured damped and delayed thermal response from the air-temperature fluctuation. Those sensors that were deeper within the snow-covered ice measured continuous, almost constant, temperature values near freezing. Several of them were within the liquid water and responded with a fluctuation of 24 h periods of amplitudes up to 0.2°C. Our analysis of the vertical temperature profiles suggested that the source of periodic water heating comes from the lake bottom. Because of the absence of daily temperature variations of the snow-covered ice, the influence of the air-temperature fluctuation can be ruled out. We attribute the heating process to the periodic inflow of groundwater to the lake and the cooling to the heat diffusion to the overlying ice cover. The periodic groundwater inflow is interpreted due to solid Earth tides, which cause periodic fluctuations of the groundwater pressure head.

  7. Non-Gaussian spectra in cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Pedro G.; Magueijo, João

    1997-03-01

    Gaussian cosmic microwave background skies are fully specified by the power spectrum. The conventional method of characterizing non-Gaussian skies is to evaluate higher order moments, the n-point functions, and their Fourier transforms. We argue that this method is inefficient, due to the redundancy of information existing in the complete set of moments. In this paper we propose a set of new statistics or non-Gaussian spectra to be extracted out of the angular distribution of the Fourier transform of the temperature anisotropies in the small field limit. These statistics complement the power spectrum and act as localization, shape, and connectedness statistics. They quantify the generic non-Gaussian structure, and may be used in more general image-processing tasks. We concentrate on a subset of these statistics and argue that while they carry no information in Gaussian theories, they may be the best arena for making predictions in some non-Gaussian theories. As examples of applications we consider superposed Gaussian and non-Gaussian signals, such as point sources in Gaussian theories or the realistic Kaiser-Stebbins effect. We show that in these theories non-Gaussianity is only present in a ring in Fourier space, which is best isolated in our formalism. Subtle but strongly non-Gaussian theories are also written down for which only non-Gaussian spectra may reveal non-Gaussianity.

  8. Detection of orbital fluctuations above the structural transition temperature in the iron pnictides and chalcogenides

    SciTech Connect

    Arham, H.Z.; Hunt, C.R.; Park, W.K.; Gillett, J.; Das, S.D.; Sebastian, S.E.; Xu, Z.J.; Lin, Z.W.; Li, Q.; Gu, G.; Thaler, Alexander; Ran, Sheng; Budko, Serguei L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Chung, D.Y.; Kanatzidis, M.G.; Greene, L.H.

    2012-06-18

    We use point-contact spectroscopy (PCS) to probe AEFe2As2 (AE=Ca, Sr, Ba) and Fe1+yTe. For AE=Sr,Ba we detect orbital fluctuations above TS while for AE=Ca these fluctuations start below TS. Co doping preserves the orbital fluctuations while K doping suppresses it. The fluctuations are only seen at those dopings and temperatures where an in-plane resistive anisotropy is known to exist. We predict an in-plane resistive anisotropy of Fe1+yTe above TS. Our data are examined in light of the recent work by Lee and Phillips (arXiv:1110.5917v2). We also study how joule heating in the PCS junctions impacts the spectra. Spectroscopic information is only obtained from those PCS junctions that are free of heating effects while those PCS junctions that are in the thermal regime display bulk resistivity phenomena.

  9. Delay time for fine particle ignition within gas with fluctuating temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derevich, I. V.; Galdina, D. D.

    2017-03-01

    The Pontryagin equation was applied to calculating the average time for the random process escaping the assign interval: this gives the average delay time for waiting of particle ignition moment in a turbulent flow of gas. A direct numerical simulation method was developed for gas temperature fluctuations with assigned autocorrelation function and particle temperature fluctuations due to exothermal chemical reaction. The method was based on numerical solution of a system of stochastic differential equations. Results of direct simulation were validated through comparing with the analytical solution available for particles without exothermal reaction. Analytical calculations and results of direct numerical simulation for the delay time of particle ignition are in agreement.

  10. Fine-scale temperature fluctuation and modulation of Dirofilaria immitis larval development in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Nicholas; Harrington, Laura

    2015-04-15

    We evaluated degree-day predictions of Dirofilaria immitis development (HDU) under constant and fluctuating temperature treatments of equal average daily temperature. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were infected with D. immitis microfilariae and parasite development was recorded at set time points in dissected mosquitoes. Time to L3 development in Malpighian tubules and detection in mosquito heads was shorter for larvae experiencing a daily regime of 19±9°C than larvae at constant 19°C; larval development rate in Malpighian tubules was slower in fluctuating regimes maintained above the 14°C developmental threshold than larvae under constant temperatures. We showed that hourly temperature modeling more accurately predicted D. immitis development to infective L3 stage. Development time differed between fluctuating and constant temperature treatments spanning the 14°C development threshold, implicating a physiological basis for these discrepancies. We conclude that average daily temperature models underestimate L3 development-and consequently dog heartworm transmission risk-at colder temperatures, and spatiotemporal models of D. immitis transmission risk should use hourly temperature data when analyzing high daily temperature ranges spanning 14°C. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fine-scale temperature fluctuation and modulation of Dirofilaria immitis larval development in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Ledesma, Nicholas; Harrington, Laura

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated degree-day predictions of Dirofilaria immitis development (HDU) under constant and fluctuating temperature treatments of equal average daily temperature. Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were infected with D. immitis microfilariae and parasite development was recorded at set time points in dissected mosquitoes. Time to L3 development in Malpighian tubules and detection in mosquito heads was shorter for larvae experiencing a daily regime of 19±9°C than larvae at constant 19°C; larval development rate in Malpighian tubules was slower in fluctuating regimes maintained above the 14°C developmental threshold than larvae under constant temperatures. We showed that hourly temperature modeling more accurately predicted D. immitis development to infective L3 stage. Development time differed between fluctuating and constant temperature treatments spanning the 14°C development threshold, implicating a physiological basis for these discrepancies. We conclude that average daily temperature models underestimate L3 development—and consequently dog heartworm transmission risk—at colder temperatures, and spatio-temporal models of D. immitis transmission risk should use hourly temperature data when analyzing high daily temperature ranges spanning 14°C. PMID:25747489

  12. Effects of fluctuating temperature and food availability on reproduction and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Pearson, Phillip; Dawson, John; Allison, David B; Gohlke, Julia M

    2016-12-15

    Experimental studies on energetics and aging often remove two major factors that in part regulate the energy budget in a normal healthy individual: reproduction and fluctuating environmental conditions that challenge homeostasis. Here we use the cyclical parthenogenetic Daphnia pulex to evaluate the role of a fluctuating thermal environment on both reproduction and lifespan across six food concentrations. We test the hypotheses that (1) caloric restriction extends lifespan; (2) maximal reproduction will come with a cost of shortened lifespan; and (3) at a given food concentration, relative to a metabolically equivalent constant temperature environment a diel fluctuating thermal environment will alter the allocation of energy to reproduction and lifespan to maintain homeostasis. We did not identify a level of food concentration that extended lifespan in response to caloric restriction, and we found no cost of reproduction in terms of lifespan. Rather, the individuals at the highest food levels generally had the highest reproductive output and the longest lifespans, the individuals at the intermediate food level decreased reproduction and maintained lifespan, and the individuals at the three lower food concentrations had a decrease in reproduction and lifespan as would be predicted with increasing levels of starvation. Fluctuating temperature had no effect on lifespan at any food concentration, but delayed time to reproductive maturity and decreased early reproductive output at all food concentrations. This suggests that a fluctuating temperature regimen activates molecular pathways that alter energy allocation. The costs of fluctuating temperature on reproduction were not consistent across the lifespan. Statistical interactions for age of peak reproduction and lifetime fecundity suggest that senescence of the reproductive system may vary between temperature regimens at the different food concentrations.

  13. HST Imagery and Temperature Fluctuations for the PN NGC 6818

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubin, Robert H.; Dufour, Reginald J.; Browning, Matt; Harrington, J. Patrick

    1998-05-01

    We present new HST/WFPC2 imagery for the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 6818. Observations were made in line filters F437N, F487N, F502N, and F656N plus continuum filter F547M. The primary goal was to develop a high spatial resolution ( ~ 0.1'') map of the intrinsic line ratio [O III] 4363/5007 and thereby evaluate the electron temperature (T_e) and the mean-square T_e variation (t(2) ) across the PN. In this process we developed an extinction map from the F487N (Hβ ) and F656N (Hα ) images by comparing the observed line ratios in each pixel to the theoretical ratio and computing a c(Hβ ) map which was used to correct the observed 4363/5007 ratios for reddening. We also adjust for the continuum contribution to the line filter data. We present color-coded pictures of the reddening (c(Hβ )) map, the [O III] T_e map, as well as our determinations of t(2) . The T_e map shows a decline from ~ 14000 K in the inner regions to ~ 11000 K at the outer edge. Such a radial T_e gradient is expected for a high-excitation nebula with a prominent He(++) zone such as NGC 6818. A composite of images taken in 3 filters (F656N, red; F487N, blue; and F502N, [O III] 5007, green) shows a roughly spherical outer envelope as well as a brighter vase-shaped interior ``bubble". There is a prominent orifice to the North and a smaller one to the South, along the major axis, possibly caused by a blow-out from a fast wind. This nebula has an appearance remarkably similar to that of the PN NGC 3918 previously imaged with HST by H. Bond. We note from the continuum images (F547M) two stars in the nebular field that are fainter than the prominent central star; these are roughly 2--4'' N and NE of the central star. Further study is needed to establish whether or not there may be a physical association of either star with the central star. Supported by AURA/STScI grant related to GO-6792.

  14. Seasonal cycle dependence of temperature fluctuations in the atmosphere. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, B.F.

    1994-08-01

    The correlation statistics of meteorological fields have been of interest in weather forecasting for many years and are also of interest in climate studies. A better understanding of the seasonal variation of correlation statistics can be used to determine how the seasonal cycle of temperature fluctuations should be simulated in noise-forced energy balance models. It is shown that the length scale does have a seasonal dependence and will have to be handled through the seasonal modulation of other coefficients in noise-forced energy balance models. The temperature field variance and spatial correlation fluctuations exhibit seasonality with fluctuation amplitudes larger in the winter hemisphere and over land masses. Another factor contributing to seasonal differences is the larger solar heating gradient in the winter.

  15. Study of Turbulent Fluctuations Driven by the Electron Temperature Gradient in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R. E.; Ethier, S.; Hosea, J. C.; Kaye, S. M.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Lee, W. W.; Ryan, P. M.; Smith, D. R.; Wang, W. X.; Wilson, J. R.

    2009-03-26

    Various theories and numerical simulations support the conjecture that the ubiquitous problem of anomalous electron transport in tokamaks may arise from a short-scale turbulence driven by the electron temperature gradient. To check whether this turbulence is present in plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), measurements of turbulent fluctuations were performed with coherent scattering of electromagnetic waves. Results from plasmas heated by high harmonic fast waves (HHFW) show the existence of density fluctuations in the range of wave numbers k⊥ρe=0.1-0.4, corresponding to a turbulence scale length of the order of the collisionless skin depth. Experimental observations and agreement with numerical results from the linear gyro-kinetic GS2 code indicate that the observed turbulence is driven by the electron temperature gradient. These turbulent fluctuations were not observed at the location of an internal transport barrier driven by a negative magnetic shear.

  16. Study of turbulent fluctuations driven by the electron temperature gradient in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R. E.; Ethier, Stephane; Ryan, Philip Michael

    2009-01-01

    Various theories and numerical simulations support the conjecture that the ubiquitous problem of anomalous electron transport in tokamaks may arise from a short-scale turbulence driven by the electron temperature gradient. To check whether this turbulence is present in plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment, measurements of turbulent fluctuations were performed with coherent scattering of electromagnetic waves. Results from plasmas heated by high harmonic fast waves show the existence of density fluctuations in the range of wave numbers k(perpendicular to)rho(e) = 0.1-0.4, corresponding to a turbulence scale length of the order of the collisionless skin depth. Experimental observations and agreement with numerical results from the linear gyro-kinetic GS2 code indicate that the observed turbulence is driven by the electron temperature gradient. These turbulent fluctuations were not observed at the location of an internal transport barrier driven by a negative magnetic shear.

  17. Variable-Temperature Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy of Single-Molecule Fluctuations and Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Duck; Muller, Eric A; Kravtsov, Vasily; Sass, Paul M; Dreyer, Jens; Atkin, Joanna M; Raschke, Markus B

    2016-01-13

    Structure, dynamics, and coupling involving single-molecules determine function in catalytic, electronic or biological systems. While vibrational spectroscopy provides insight into molecular structure, rapid fluctuations blur the molecular trajectory even in single-molecule spectroscopy, analogous to spatial averaging in measuring large ensembles. To gain insight into intramolecular coupling, substrate coupling, and dynamic processes, we use tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) at variable and cryogenic temperatures, to slow and control the motion of a single molecule. We resolve intrinsic line widths of individual normal modes, allowing detailed and quantitative investigation of the vibrational modes. From temperature dependent line narrowing and splitting, we quantify ultrafast vibrational dephasing, intramolecular coupling, and conformational heterogeneity. Through statistical correlation analysis of fluctuations of individual modes, we observe rotational motion and spectral fluctuations of the molecule. This work demonstrates single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy beyond chemical identification, opening the possibility for a complete picture of molecular motion ranging from femtoseconds to minutes.

  18. Cosmic temperature fluctuations from two years of COBE differential microwave radiometers observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A. J.; Wright, E. L.; Gorski, K. M.; Wilkinson, D. T.; Weiss, R.; Smoot, G. F.; Meyer, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    The first two years of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy are analyzed and compared with our previously published first year results. The results are consistent, but the addition of the second year of data increases the precision and accuracy detected CMB temperature fluctuations. The 2 yr 53 GHz data are characterized by rms temperature fluctuations of (delta-T)(sub rms) (7 deg) = 44 +/- 7 micro-K and (delta-T)(sub rms) (10 deg) = 30.5 +/- 2.7 micro-K at 7 deg and 10 deg angular resolution, respectively. The 53 x 90 GHz cross-correlation amplitude at zero lag is C(0)(sup 1/2) = 36 +/- 5 micro-K (68% CL) for the unsmoothed (7 deg resolution) DMR data. We perform a likelihood analysis of the cross-correlation function, with Monte Carlo simulations to infer biases of the method, for a power-law model of initial density fluctuations, P(k) proportional to R(exp n). The Monte Carlo simulations indicate that derived estimates of n are biased by +0.11 +/- 0.01, while the subset of simulations with a low quadrupole (as observed) indicate a bias of +0.31+/- 0.04. Derived values for 68% confidence intervals are given corrected (and not corrected) for our estimated biases. Including the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Q(sub rms-PS) = 14.3(sup + 5.2 sub -3.3) micro-K (12.8(sup + 5.2 sub -3.3) micro-K0 with a spectral index n = 1.42(sup + 0.49 sub -0.55)(n = 1.53(sup + 0.49 sub -0.55). With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.2 +/- 11.5 micro-K (17.4 +/- 1.5 micro-K). The marginal likelihood of n is 1.42 +/- 0.37 (1.53 +/- 0.37). Excluding the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Q(sub rms-PS) = 17.4(sup + 7.5 sub -5.2) micro-K (15.8(sup + 7.5 sub -5.2) micro-K) with a spectral index n = 1.11(sup + 0.60 sub -0.55) (n = 1.22(sup + 0.60 sub -0.55). With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely

  19. Cosmic temperature fluctuations from two years of COBE differential microwave radiometers observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, C. L.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Banday, A. J.; Wright, E. L.; Gorski, K. M.; Wilkinson, D. T.; Weiss, R.; Smoot, G. F.; Meyer, S. S.; Mather, J. C.; Lubin, P.; Loewenstein, K.; Lineweaver, C.; Keegstra, P.; Kaita, E.; Jackson, P. D.; Cheng, E. S.

    1994-12-01

    The first two years of Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Differential Microwave Radiometers (DMR) observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy are analyzed and compared with our previously published first year results. The results are consistent, but the addition of the second year of data increases the precision and accuracy detected CMB temperature fluctuations. The 2 yr 53 GHz data are characterized by rms temperature fluctuations of (delta-T)rms (7 deg) = 44 +/- 7 micro-K and (delta-T)rms (10 deg) = 30.5 +/- 2.7 micro-K at 7 deg and 10 deg angular resolution, respectively. The 53 x 90 GHz cross-correlation amplitude at zero lag is C(0)1/2 = 36 +/- 5 micro-K (68% CL) for the unsmoothed (7 deg resolution) DMR data. We perform a likelihood analysis of the cross-correlation function, with Monte Carlo simulations to infer biases of the method, for a power-law model of initial density fluctuations, P(k) proportional to Rn. The Monte Carlo simulations indicate that derived estimates of n are biased by +0.11 +/- 0.01, while the subset of simulations with a low quadrupole (as observed) indicate a bias of +0.31+/- 0.04. Derived values for 68% confidence intervals are given corrected (and not corrected) for our estimated biases. Including the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Qrms-PS = 14.3+5.2-3.3 micro-K (12.8+5.2-3.3 micro-K0 with a spectral index n = 1.42+0.49-0.55 (n = 1.53+0.49-0.55. With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.2 +/- 11.5 micro-K (17.4 +/- 1.5 micro-K). The marginal likelihood of n is 1.42 +/- 0.37 (1.53 +/- 0.37). Excluding the quadrupole anisotropy, the most likely quadrupole-normalized amplitude is Qrms-PS = 17.4+7.5-5.2 micro-K (15.8+7.5-5.2 micro-K) with a spectral index n = 1.11+0.60-0.55 (n = 1.22+0.60-0.55. With n fixed to 1.0 the most likely amplitude is 18.6 +/- 1.6 micro-K (18.2 +/- 1.6 micro-K). The marginal likelihood of n is 1.11 +/- 0.40 (1.22 +/- 0.40). Our best

  20. Observation of Aharonov-Bohm and Al'tshuler-Aronov-Spivak oscillations in the background of universal conductance fluctuations in silicon nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mtsuko, Davie; Aslan, Tahir; Ncube, Siphephile; Coleman, Christopher; Wamwangi, Daniel; Bhattacharyya, Somnath

    2016-02-01

    Magnetoresistance (MR) oscillations of multiple periodicities are recorded in singly connected silicon nanowires of diameter ≈50 \\text{nm} . At 100 K we observe oscillations of periodicity ≈1.78 \\text{T} and 0.444 T corresponding to h/e and h/4e Aharonov-Bohm (AB) oscillations, whereas at 10 K we record periodicities of 0.98 T, 0.49 T and 0.25 T corresponding to h/e, h/2e (Al'tshuler-Aronov-Spivak (AAS)) and h/4e oscillations. At 2.5 K we find magnetoresistance oscillations with multiple periodicities of 1.3 T, 0.52 T, and 0.325 T corresponding to AB and AAS oscillations. The h/2e and h/4e peaks can be attributed to the interference of time-reversed paths originating from the core orbits that scatter coherently on the surface of the nanowires multiple times. We also observed 20 mT and 60 mT oscillations of small amplitude superimposed on a quasi-periodic background which we attribute to the quantum interference of special surface states associated with skipping orbits that propagate quasi-ballistically. The aperiodic fluctuations in the MR at all temperatures are universal conductance fluctuations (UCF) originating from randomly spaced impurity scattering in the core of the nanowire.

  1. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Schweizer, Markus; Dold, P.; Kaiser, T.; Lichtensteiger, M.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    USA Several microgravity experiments on sounding rockets and the Space Shuttle have shown that time-dependent thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection is the major cause for the formation of dopant striations in floating-zone grown semiconductor crystals, at least in small-scale systems not employing RF heating. To quantify this correlation, a silicon floating-zone experiment was performed during the TEXUS36 flight (February 7, 1998) in the monoellipsoid mirror furnace TEM02-ELLI. During the experiment, temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone and the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously measured. Temperature fluctuations of 0.5 C - 0.7 C with main frequencies between 0.1 Hz and 0.3 Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuated considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: rates from 4 mm/min to negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies associated with the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well with those of the temperature fluctuations and microscopic growth rates. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, to evaluate characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies, and to give insight into the instability mechanisms of Marangoni convection in this configuration. The simulations were in good agreement with the experimental values, showing temperature fluctuations with frequencies ? 0.25 Hz and amplitudes up to 1.8 C at a position equivalent to that of the sensor tip in the experiment.

  2. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone on TEXUS36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Schweizer, Markus; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Lichtensteiger, M.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Several pg experiments on sounding rockets and the Space Shuttle have shown that time-dependent thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection is the major cause for the formation of dopant striations in floating-zone grown semiconductor crystals, at least in small-scale systems not employing RF heating. To quantify this correlation, a silicon floating-zone experiment was performed during the TEXUS36 flight (February 7, 1 998) in the monoellipsoid mirror furnace TEM02-ELLI. During the experiment, temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone and the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously measured. Temperature fluctuations of 0.5 C - 0.7 C with main frequencies between 0.1 Hz and 0.3Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuated considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: rates from 4mm/min to negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies associated with the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well with those of the temperature fluctuations and microscopic growth rates. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, to evaluate characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies, and to give insight into the instability mechanisms of Marangoni convection in this configuration. The simulations were in good agreement with the experimental values, showing temperature fluctuations with frequencies? 0.25 Hz and amplitudes up to 1.8 C at a position equivalent to that of the sensor tip in the experiment.

  3. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone on TEXUS36

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Schweizer, Markus; Dold, P.; Kaiser, Th.; Lichtensteiger, M.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    Several pg experiments on sounding rockets and the Space Shuttle have shown that time-dependent thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection is the major cause for the formation of dopant striations in floating-zone grown semiconductor crystals, at least in small-scale systems not employing RF heating. To quantify this correlation, a silicon floating-zone experiment was performed during the TEXUS36 flight (February 7, 1 998) in the monoellipsoid mirror furnace TEM02-ELLI. During the experiment, temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone and the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously measured. Temperature fluctuations of 0.5 C - 0.7 C with main frequencies between 0.1 Hz and 0.3Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuated considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: rates from 4mm/min to negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies associated with the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well with those of the temperature fluctuations and microscopic growth rates. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, to evaluate characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies, and to give insight into the instability mechanisms of Marangoni convection in this configuration. The simulations were in good agreement with the experimental values, showing temperature fluctuations with frequencies? 0.25 Hz and amplitudes up to 1.8 C at a position equivalent to that of the sensor tip in the experiment.

  4. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations and Microscopic Growth Rates in a Silicon Floating Zone Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, Arne; Schweizer, Markus; Dold, P.; Kaiser, T.; Lichtensteiger, M.; Benz, K. W.

    1999-01-01

    USA Several microgravity experiments on sounding rockets and the Space Shuttle have shown that time-dependent thermocapillary (Marangoni) convection is the major cause for the formation of dopant striations in floating-zone grown semiconductor crystals, at least in small-scale systems not employing RF heating. To quantify this correlation, a silicon floating-zone experiment was performed during the TEXUS36 flight (February 7, 1998) in the monoellipsoid mirror furnace TEM02-ELLI. During the experiment, temperature fluctuations in the silicon melt zone and the microscopic growth rate were simultaneously measured. Temperature fluctuations of 0.5 C - 0.7 C with main frequencies between 0.1 Hz and 0.3 Hz were detectable. The microscopic growth rate fluctuated considerably around the average growth rate of 1 mm/min: rates from 4 mm/min to negative values (backmelting) were observed. Dopant striations are clearly visible in the Sb-doped crystal. They were characterized by Spreading Resistance measurements and Differential Interference Contrast microscopy. The frequencies associated with the dopant inhomogeneities correspond quite well with those of the temperature fluctuations and microscopic growth rates. 3D numerical simulations were performed to predict the optimum position of the temperature sensor, to evaluate characteristic temperature amplitudes and frequencies, and to give insight into the instability mechanisms of Marangoni convection in this configuration. The simulations were in good agreement with the experimental values, showing temperature fluctuations with frequencies ? 0.25 Hz and amplitudes up to 1.8 C at a position equivalent to that of the sensor tip in the experiment.

  5. Large diurnal temperature fluctuations negatively influence Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) life-history traits.

    PubMed

    Carrington, Lauren B; Seifert, Stephanie N; Willits, Neil H; Lambrechts, Louis; Scott, Thomas W

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal variation in dengue virus transmission in northwestern Thailand is inversely related to the magnitude of diurnal temperature fluctuations, although mean temperature does not vary significantly across seasons. We tested the hypothesis that diurnal temperature fluctuations negatively influence epidemiologically important life-history traits of the primary dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (L.), compared with a constant 26 degrees C temperature. A large diurnal temperature range (DTR) (approximately equals 18 degrees C daily swing) extended immature development time (>1 d), lowered larval survival (approximately equals 6%), and reduced adult female reproductive output by 25% 14 d after blood feeding, relative to the constant 26 degreesC temperature. A small DTR (approximately equal 8 degrees C daily swing) led to a negligible or slightly positive effect on the life history traits tested. Our results indicate that there is a negative impact of large DTR on mosquito biology and are consistent with the hypothesis that, in at least some locations, large temperature fluctuations contribute to seasonal reduction in dengue virus transmission.

  6. Effects of rapid temperature fluctuations prior to breeding on reproductive efficiency in replacement gilts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Recently, we determined that rapidly cooling pigs after acute heat stress (HS) resulted in a pathological condition, and because rapid temperature fluctuations are often associated with reduced reproductive success in sows it lends itself to the hypothesis that these conditions may be linked. Study ...

  7. Analytical Comparisons of Tree Ring Data, Greenland Ice Core Temperatures and Temperature Fluctuations of the Sargasso Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, James; Roberts, Jim; Dahiya, Jai

    2012-10-01

    Embedded in various events on Earth are data that allow us to map the temperature of the Earth over many years. In this work we have chosen the temperature fluctuations in the Sargasso sea, the changing patterns in tree ring growth and temperature fluctuations in Greenland ice core samples for comparison with a goal to understanding the patterns in global warming. Signatures have been identified that predate the Industrial Revolution, which had been blamed for much of global warming, that indicate that Earth temperatures have enjoyed numerous intervals of both global warming and global cooling. The intention of this work is not to stir controversy but to make comparisons of scientific data and processes rather than rely on popular opinion or deduction by ``experts'' in climatology to explain global warming.

  8. Fluctuation-induced conductivity of superconductors above the transition temperature - Regularization of the Maki diagram.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, J.; Korenman, V.

    1972-01-01

    The Maki contribution to the conductivity above the superconducting transition temperature is regularized within the framework of the BCS theory. This is achieved through the renormalization of the impurity-scattering vertex by inclusion of the effects of pair fluctuations. The conductivity is evaluated for a thin film. It depends only on the reduced temperature and the normal resistance per square. Fair agreement is found with Al films over a wide temperature range. Agreement is not found with experiments on Bi, Pb, and Ga films, which apparently contain a strong additional pair-breaking effect. The temperature range in which interactions among fluctuations become important in the Maki conductivity is generally larger than that given by the Ginzburg criterion.

  9. Quantum suppression of fluctuations and temperatures of reconstructed A ˜ 30 quasi-projectiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, B. C.; Bonasera, A.; Souliotis, G. A.; Zheng, H.; Cammarata, P. J.; Echeverria, A. J.; Heilborn, L.; Keksis, A. L.; Kohley, Z.; Mabiala, J.; Marini, P.; May, L. W.; McIntosh, A. B.; Richers, C.; Shetty, D. V.; Soisson, S. N.; Tripathi, R.; Wuenschel, S.; Yennello, S. J.

    2014-02-01

    Suppression of multiplicity fluctuations has been observed for three light fermions (protons, tritons and 3He) in the multifragmentation of reconstructed hot quasi-projectiles produced in collisions of 32S (45 MeV/nucleon) with 112Sn. This suppression, predicted by recent calculations, is attributed to Pauli blocking and has also been observed in experiments with trapped Fermi gases. Experimental results on nuclear temperature and density employing a quantal approach based on momentum and multiplicity fluctuations are also presented. The extracted temperatures show a noticeable reduction when compared to a similarly derived classical method. This reduction in temperature is in agreement with previous predictions indicating that classically derived methods overpredict nuclear temperature as they do not take into account the Fermi motion of the nucleons. The present results underline the role of quantum statistics in nuclear disassembly and suggest the need for proper quantum treatment when dealing with the thermodynamic properties of fragmenting heavy ions.

  10. The relation between isolated tree brightness temperature and grass background brightness temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krusinger, A. E.

    1983-08-01

    This study involves thermal infrared measurement for the determination of the diurnal and seasonal aspects of the relations between isolated evergreen tress and a cut grass background and between a large truck brightness temperature and cut grass, uncut grass, and bare soil backgrounds. Seasonal changes in the tree brightness temperature-background brightness temperature contrast ranged from 4 to 5 C in February and March to 1 to 2 C in July. At night, the thermal contrast between trees and background was found to vary inversely with long wave incoming radiation, which is a measure of cloudiness. A study of the change in the thermal contrast during the night showed that, during clear weather, the contrast was at a peak a few hours after sundown and decreased the rest of the night. In overcast conditions, a reduced contrast peak occurred at sundown and very gradually diminished through the night. Isothermal conditions were found to occur in the early mornings, and the time of these occurrences changed seasonally, in a systematic manner.

  11. Prediction of growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens in milk during storage under fluctuating temperature.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao; Shavezipur, Mohammad; Yousef, Ahmed; Maleky, Farnaz

    2016-03-01

    Accurate prediction of growth of undesirable organisms (e.g., Pseudomonas fluorescens) in perishable foods (e.g., milk), held under sub-ideal storage conditions, can help ensure the quality and safety of these foods at the point of consumption. In this investigation, we inoculated sterile milk with P. fluorescens (~10(3) cfu/mL) and monitored inoculum growth behavior at constant and fluctuating storage temperatures. Three storage temperatures, 4 °C, 15 °C and 29 °C, were selected to simulate proper refrigeration conditions (4 °C) and temperature abuse, respectively. To simulate temperature fluctuation, milk held at 4 °C was subjected to temperature shifts to 15 °C or 29 °C for 4 to 6h. A modified logistic model was used to obtain the best-fit curve for the microbial growth under constant storage temperature. The specific growth rates at 4 °C, 15 °C, and 29 °C, obtained from experimental data, were 0.056 ± 0.00, 0.17 ± 0.05, and 0.46 ± 0.02 h(-1), respectively, and the lag time values were 29.5 ± 4.2, 12.7 ± 4.4, and 2.8 ± 0.3h, respectively. A model predicting bacterial growth under different temperature fluctuations was obtained using the growth parameters extracted from constant temperature experiments. Growth behavior predicted by the fluctuating temperature model and that obtained experimentally were in good agreement. Lag time exhibited a larger variation compared with specific growth rate, suggesting that it depends not only on growth temperature but also on the sample population and temperature gradient. Additionally, experimental data showed that changing the temperature during the lag phase induced an additional lag time before growth; however, no significant lag time was observed under the temperature fluctuation during the exponential phase. The results of this study provide information for precise shelf-life determination and reduction of food waste, particularly for milk and milk-containing food products.

  12. The effects of fluctuating culture temperature on stress tolerance and antioxidase expression in Esteya vermicola.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-bo; Pang, Wen-xing; Yv, Xiao-na; Li, Jing-jie; Zhang, Yong-an; Sung, Chang-keun

    2015-02-01

    The endoparasitic nematophagous fungus, Esteya vermicola, has shown great potential as a biological control agent against the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. Fluctuating culture temperatures can affect fungal yields and fungal tolerance to desiccation, UV radiation, H2O2, and heat stress, as well as antioxidase expression. To explore these effects, E. vermicola cultured under five temperature ranges, 26°C, 15-26°C, 26-35°C, 20-30°C, and 15-35°C, were compared. The cultures grown at lower temperatures showed better growth, stronger tolerance to desiccation, UV, and H2O2 stresses, and increased catalase expression, However, these cultures also showed weaker heat stress tolerance and lower superoxide dismutase expression than the higher-temperature cultures. In particular, the E. vermicola cultured at 20-30°C, i.e., fluctuating in a narrow range around the optimal temperature, showed the best performance. Therefore, for production in practical applications, this narrowly fluctuating, moderate temperature appears to be optimal for yield and stress tolerance in E. vermicola.

  13. Evidence for large temperature fluctuations in quasar accretion disks from spectral variability

    SciTech Connect

    Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Agol, Eric; Dexter, Jason

    2014-03-10

    The well-known bluer-when-brighter trend observed in quasar variability is a signature of the complex processes in the accretion disk and can be a probe of the quasar variability mechanism. Using a sample of 604 variable quasars with repeat spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-I/II (SDSS), we construct difference spectra to investigate the physical causes of this bluer-when-brighter trend. The continuum of our composite difference spectrum is well fit by a power law, with a spectral index in excellent agreement with previous results. We measure the spectral variability relative to the underlying spectra of the quasars, which is independent of any extinction, and compare to model predictions. We show that our SDSS spectral variability results cannot be produced by global accretion rate fluctuations in a thin disk alone. However, we find that a simple model of an inhomogeneous disk with localized temperature fluctuations will produce power-law spectral variability over optical wavelengths. We show that the inhomogeneous disk will provide good fits to our observed spectral variability if the disk has large temperature fluctuations in many independently varying zones, in excellent agreement with independent constraints from quasar microlensing disk sizes, their strong UV spectral continuum, and single-band variability amplitudes. Our results provide an independent constraint on quasar variability models and add to the mounting evidence that quasar accretion disks have large localized temperature fluctuations.

  14. Gaussian fluctuations in the two-dimensional BCS-BEC crossover: finite temperature properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bighin, G.; Salasnich, L.

    2016-02-01

    The role of fluctuations is enhanced in lower dimensionality systems: in a two dimensions off- diagonal long-range order is destroyed by the fluctuations at any finite temperature, drastically modifying the critical properties with respect to the three-dimensional counterpart. Recently two-dimensional systems of interacting fermions have been the subject of Montecarlo studies and experimental investigations, in particular an ultracold gas of attractive fermions with a widely tunable interaction due to a Feshbach resonance has been realized and the Berezinskii- Kosterlitz-Thouless transition has been observed. The present work deals with the theoretical description of an ultracold Fermi gas: we discuss the role of Gaussian fluctuations of the order parameter in the equation of state, in particular we take into account the first sound velocity, showing that the inclusion of order parameter fluctuations is needed in order to get the correct composite-boson limit in the strong-coupling regime. The theory is also compared with experimental data. Finally we focus on the superfluid density in the weak-coupling, intermediate and strong-coupling regimes at finite temperature, through which the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless critical temperature is obtained.

  15. A large temperature fluctuation may trigger an epidemic erythromelalgia outbreak in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yonghui; Lin, Hualiang; Lv, Xiaojuan; Xiao, Jianpeng; Zeng, Weilin; Gu, Yuzhou; Rutherford, Shannon; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun

    2015-03-30

    Although erythromelalgia (EM) has been documented in the literature for almost 150 years, it is still poorly understood. To overcome this limitation, we examined the spatial distribution of epidemic EM, and explored the association between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks in China. We searched all peer-reviewed literature on primary epidemic EM outbreaks in China. A two-stage model was used to characterize the relationship between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks. We observed that epidemic EM outbreaks were reported from 13 provinces during 1960-2014 and they mainly occurred between February and March in southern China. The majority of EM cases were middle school students, with a higher incidence rate in female and resident students. The major clinical characteristics of EM cases included burning, sharp, tingling and/or stinging pain in toes, soles and/or dorsum of feet, fever, erythema and swelling. A large "V"-shaped fluctuation of daily average temperature (TM) observed during the epidemic EM outbreaks was significantly associated with the number of daily EM cases (β = 1.22, 95%CI: 0.66 ~ 1.79), which indicated that this "V"-shaped fluctuation of TM probably triggered the epidemic EM outbreaks.

  16. A large temperature fluctuation may trigger an epidemic erythromelalgia outbreak in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yonghui; Lin, Hualiang; Lv, Xiaojuan; Xiao, Jianpeng; Zeng, Weilin; Gu, Yuzhou; Rutherford, Shannon; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun

    2015-03-01

    Although erythromelalgia (EM) has been documented in the literature for almost 150 years, it is still poorly understood. To overcome this limitation, we examined the spatial distribution of epidemic EM, and explored the association between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks in China. We searched all peer-reviewed literature on primary epidemic EM outbreaks in China. A two-stage model was used to characterize the relationship between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks. We observed that epidemic EM outbreaks were reported from 13 provinces during 1960-2014 and they mainly occurred between February and March in southern China. The majority of EM cases were middle school students, with a higher incidence rate in female and resident students. The major clinical characteristics of EM cases included burning, sharp, tingling and/or stinging pain in toes, soles and/or dorsum of feet, fever, erythema and swelling. A large ``V''-shaped fluctuation of daily average temperature (TM) observed during the epidemic EM outbreaks was significantly associated with the number of daily EM cases (β = 1.22, 95%CI: 0.66 ~ 1.79), which indicated that this ``V''-shaped fluctuation of TM probably triggered the epidemic EM outbreaks.

  17. A large temperature fluctuation may trigger an epidemic erythromelalgia outbreak in China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Yonghui; Lin, Hualiang; Lv, Xiaojuan; Xiao, Jianpeng; Zeng, Weilin; Gu, Yuzhou; Rutherford, Shannon; Tong, Shilu; Ma, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    Although erythromelalgia (EM) has been documented in the literature for almost 150 years, it is still poorly understood. To overcome this limitation, we examined the spatial distribution of epidemic EM, and explored the association between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks in China. We searched all peer-reviewed literature on primary epidemic EM outbreaks in China. A two-stage model was used to characterize the relationship between temperature fluctuation and epidemic EM outbreaks. We observed that epidemic EM outbreaks were reported from 13 provinces during 1960–2014 and they mainly occurred between February and March in southern China. The majority of EM cases were middle school students, with a higher incidence rate in female and resident students. The major clinical characteristics of EM cases included burning, sharp, tingling and/or stinging pain in toes, soles and/or dorsum of feet, fever, erythema and swelling. A large “V”-shaped fluctuation of daily average temperature (TM) observed during the epidemic EM outbreaks was significantly associated with the number of daily EM cases (β = 1.22, 95%CI: 0.66 ~ 1.79), which indicated that this “V”-shaped fluctuation of TM probably triggered the epidemic EM outbreaks. PMID:25820221

  18. Lagrangian temperature and vertical velocity fluctuations due to gravity waves in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podglajen, Aurélien; Hertzog, Albert; Plougonven, Riwal; Legras, Bernard

    2016-04-01

    Wave-induced Lagrangian fluctuations of temperature and vertical velocity in the lower stratosphere are quantified using measurements from superpressure balloons (SPBs). Observations recorded every minute along SPB flights allow the whole gravity wave spectrum to be described and provide unprecedented information on both the intrinsic frequency spectrum and the probability distribution function of wave fluctuations. The data set has been collected during two campaigns coordinated by the French Space Agency in 2010, involving 19 balloons over Antarctica and 3 in the deep tropics. In both regions, the vertical velocity distributions depart significantly from a Gaussian behavior. Knowledge on such wave fluctuations is essential for modeling microphysical processes along Lagrangian trajectories. We propose a new simple parameterization that reproduces both the non-Gaussian distribution of vertical velocities (or heating/cooling rates) and their observed intrinsic frequency spectrum.

  19. Simultaneous Microwave Imaging System for Density and Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    H. Park; E. Mazzucato; T. Munsat; C.W. Domier; M. Johnson; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; J. Wang; Z. Xia; I.G.J. Classen; A.J.H. Donne; M.J. van de Pol

    2004-05-07

    Diagnostic systems for fluctuation measurements in plasmas have, of necessity, evolved from simple 1-D systems to multi-dimensional systems due to the complexity of the MHD and turbulence physics of plasmas illustrated by advanced numerical simulations. Using the recent significant advancements in millimeter wave imaging technology, Microwave Imaging Reflectometry (MIR) and Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI), simultaneously measuring density and temperature fluctuations, are developed for TEXTOR. The MIR system was installed on TEXTOR and the first experiment was performed in September, 2003. Subsequent MIR campaigns have yielded poloidally resolved spectra and assessments of poloidal velocity. The new 2-D ECE Imaging system (with a total of 128 channels), installed on TEXTOR in December, 2003, successfully captured a true 2-D images of Te fluctuations of m=1 oscillation (''sawteeth'') near the q {approx} 1 surface for the first time.

  20. The Remarkable Similarity Between the Scaling of Kurtosis with Squared Skewness for TORPEX Density Fluctuations and Sea-surface Temperature Fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    John A. Krommes

    2008-02-28

    The striking similarity between the statistics of plasma density fluctuations in the TORPEX device [B. Labit et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 255002 (2007)] and sea-surface temperature fluctuations [Po Sura and P. D. Sardeshmukh, J. Phys. Oceanogr. 38, 638 (2007)] (SS) is discussed. A nonlinear Langevin theory due to SS is generalized to include linear wave propagation. An interpretation of the nonlinear Langevin equation based on statistical closure theory is proposed.

  1. Occupation number and fluctuations in the finite-temperature Bose-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Plimak, L.I.; Fleischhauer, M.; Olsen, M.K.

    2004-07-01

    We study the occupation numbers and number fluctuations of ultracold atoms in deep optical lattices for finite-temperatures within the Bose-Hubbard model. Simple analytical expressions for the mean occupation number and number fluctuations are obtained in the weak-hopping regime using an interpolation between results from different perturbation approaches in the Mott-insulator and superfluid phases. With this approach the magnitude of number fluctuations under a wide range of experimental conditions can be estimated and the properties of the finite-temperature phase diagram can be studied. These analytical results are compared to exact one-dimensional numerical calculations using a finite temperature variant of the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method and found to have a high degree of accuracy. We find very good agreement, also in the crossover 'thermal' region. We also analyze the influence of finite temperature on the behavior of the system in the vicinity of the zero-temperature phase transition, in one, two, and three dimensions.

  2. Upper temperature tolerance of loach minnow under acute, chronic, and fluctuating thermal regimes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Widmer, A.M.; Carveth, C.J.; Bonar, Scott A.; Simms, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    We used four methods to estimate the upper lethal temperature of loach minnow Rhinichthys cobitis: the lethal thermal method (LTM), chronic lethal method (CLM), acclimated chronic exposure (ACE) method with static temperatures, and ACE method with diel temperature fluctuations. The upper lethal temperature of this species ranged between 32??C and 38??C, depending on the method and exposure time; however, temperatures as low as 28??C resulted in slowed growth compared with the control groups. In LTM trials, we increased temperatures 0.3??C/min and death occurred at 36.8 ?? 0.2??C (mean ?? SE) for fish (37-19 mm total length) acclimated to 30??C and at 36.4 ?? 0.07??C for fish acclimated to 25??C. In CLM trials, temperatures were increased more slowly (1??C/d), allowing fish to acclimate. Mean temperature at death was 33.4 ?? 0.1??C for fish 25-35 mm and 32.9 ?? 0.4??C for fish 45-50 mm. In the ACE experiment with static temperatures, we exposed fish for 30 d to four constant temperatures. No fish (20-40 mm) survived beyond 30 d at 32??C and the 30-d temperature lethal to 50% of the test animals was 30.6??C. Growth at static 28??C and 30??C was slower than growth at 25??C, suggesting that fish were stressed at sublethal temperatures. In ACE trials with diel temperature fluctuations of 4,6, and 10??C and a 32??C peak temperature, over 80% of fish (20-40 mm) survived 30 d. Although brief exposures to 32??C were not lethal, the growth of fish in the three fluctuating-temperature treatments was significantly less than the growth at the ambient temperature (25-29??C). To minimize thermal stress and buffer against temperature spikes, we recommend that loach minnow habitat be managed to avoid water temperatures above 28??C. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  3. Temperature increase and fluctuation induce phytoplankton biodiversity loss - Evidence from a multi-seasonal mesocosm experiment.

    PubMed

    Rasconi, Serena; Winter, Katharina; Kainz, Martin J

    2017-05-01

    Global climate change scenarios predict lake water temperatures to increase up to 4°C and extreme weather events, including heat waves and large temperature fluctuations, to occur more frequently. Such changes may result in a reorganization of the plankton community structure, causing shifts in diversity and structure toward a community dominated by fewer species that are more adapted to endure warmer and irregular temperature conditions. We designed a long-term (8 months) mesocosm experiment to explore how ambient water temperature (C: control), induced increased temperature (T: +4°C), and temperature fluctuations (F: ±4°C relative to T) change phytoplankton phenology, taxonomical diversity, and community structure, and how such changes affected zooplankton abundance and composition. Synthesis. Our results show that T and F relative to C significantly decreased phytoplankton diversity. Moreover, there was a clear effect of the temperature treatments (T and F) on phytoplankton size structure that resulted in a significantly lower growth of large species (i.e., large Chlorophyta) compared to C. Decreased diversity and evenness in the T and F treatments pushed the community toward the dominance of only a few phytoplankton taxa (mainly Cyanobacteria and Chlorophyta) that are better adapted to endure warmer and more irregular temperature conditions. The observed shift toward Cyanobacteria dominance may affect trophic energy transfer along the aquatic food web.

  4. Effects of fluctuating temperature on mortality, stress, and energy reserves of juvenile coho salmon

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.E.; Gharrett, J.A.; Carls, M.G.; Rice, S.D.; Moles, A.; Korn, S.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of fluctuating diel temperature cycles on survival, growth, plasma cortisol and glucose concentrations, liver weight, and liver glycogen of juvenile coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch were determined. Temperature cycles (10-13/sup 0/, 9-15/sup 0/, 8-17/sup 0/, and 6.5-20/sup 0/C) were selected to stimulate observed temperatures in clear-cuts of southeastern Alaska. Different levels of feeding, including starvation, were used in each of the tests. LT50s (peak temperature within a cycle producing 50% mortality) were 28/sup 0/C for age-0 fish (350 mg) and 26/sup 0/ for age-II fish (22-g presmolts). Cyclic temperatures for 40 d, averaging 11/sup 0/C daily, did not influence growth of age-0 fish on any food ration as compared to controls held at a constant 11/sup 0/C. Plasma cortisol and glucose concentrations were significantly greater in fish maintained for 20 d in the 6.5-20/sup 0/C cycle but not different in fish in 10-13/sup 0/ and 9-15/sup 0/ cycles or a constant 11/sup 0/C. These elevated concentrations may be indicators of long-term stress. Plasma cortisol concentrations were lower in starved fish than in fed fish at all temperature regimes; however, fluctuating temperature did not enhance starvation effects on cortisol levels. Diel temperature cycles did not affect liver weights or liver glycogen concentrations.

  5. Correlated adiabatic and isocurvature cosmic microwave background fluctuations in the wake of the results from the wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe.

    PubMed

    Väliviita, Jussi; Muhonen, Vesa

    2003-09-26

    In general correlated models, in addition to the usual adiabatic component with a spectral index n(ad1) there is another adiabatic component with a spectral index n(ad2) generated by entropy perturbation during inflation. We extend the analysis of a correlated mixture of adiabatic and isocurvature cosmic microwave background fluctuations of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) group, who set the two adiabatic spectral indices equal. Allowing n(ad1) and n(ad2) to vary independently we find that the WMAP data favor models where the two adiabatic components have opposite spectral tilts. Using the WMAP data only, the 2sigma upper bound for the isocurvature fraction f(iso) of the initial power spectrum at k(0)=0.05 Mpc(-1) increases somewhat, e.g., from 0.76 of n(ad2)=n(ad1) models to 0.84 with a prior n(iso)<1.84 for the isocurvature spectral index.

  6. Cold wire constant voltage anemometry to measure temperature fluctuations and its application in a thermoacoustic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleve, Sarah; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2017-04-01

    The knowledge of temperature fluctuations is essential for most thermoacoustic systems. In the present paper, cold wire constant-voltage anemometry (CVA) to measure temperature fluctuations is presented. Corrections for the thermal inertia and for the end losses of the wire are applied during the post-processing. The correction for the thermal inertia of the cold wire is achieved by applying a time dependent thermal lag as proposed originally for a constant-current anemometry (CCA) system. This thermal lag is measured in parallel by a hot wire. The thermal end losses of the wires to their supports are also considered and approximate corrections are proposed. The procedure for the cold wire CVA is validated in the acoustic field of an acoustic resonator with wires of different lengths. A comparison between a CVA and a CCA measurement also confirms the CVA measurement. Furthermore, the proposed measurement procedure is applied close to the stack of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Supposing a two-dimensional flow, the simultaneous measurement of velocity and temperature fluctuations is possible. This allows a detailed examination of the acoustic field close to the stack, including the study of the correlation between temperature and velocity.

  7. Cold wire constant voltage anemometry to measure temperature fluctuations and its application in a thermoacoustic system.

    PubMed

    Cleve, Sarah; Jondeau, Emmanuel; Blanc-Benon, Philippe; Comte-Bellot, Geneviève

    2017-04-01

    The knowledge of temperature fluctuations is essential for most thermoacoustic systems. In the present paper, cold wire constant-voltage anemometry (CVA) to measure temperature fluctuations is presented. Corrections for the thermal inertia and for the end losses of the wire are applied during the post-processing. The correction for the thermal inertia of the cold wire is achieved by applying a time dependent thermal lag as proposed originally for a constant-current anemometry (CCA) system. This thermal lag is measured in parallel by a hot wire. The thermal end losses of the wires to their supports are also considered and approximate corrections are proposed. The procedure for the cold wire CVA is validated in the acoustic field of an acoustic resonator with wires of different lengths. A comparison between a CVA and a CCA measurement also confirms the CVA measurement. Furthermore, the proposed measurement procedure is applied close to the stack of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. Supposing a two-dimensional flow, the simultaneous measurement of velocity and temperature fluctuations is possible. This allows a detailed examination of the acoustic field close to the stack, including the study of the correlation between temperature and velocity.

  8. Concentration fluctuations in miscible polymer blends: Influence of temperature and chain rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Dudowicz, Jacek; Freed, Karl F.; Douglas, Jack F.

    2014-05-21

    In contrast to binary mixtures of small molecule fluids, homogeneous polymer blends exhibit relatively large concentration fluctuations that can strongly affect the transport properties of these complex fluids over wide ranges of temperatures and compositions. The spatial scale and intensity of these compositional fluctuations are studied by applying Kirkwood-Buff theory to model blends of linear semiflexible polymer chains with upper critical solution temperatures. The requisite quantities for determining the Kirkwood-Buff integrals are generated from the lattice cluster theory for the thermodynamics of the blend and from the generalization of the random phase approximation to compressible polymer mixtures. We explore how the scale and intensity of composition fluctuations in binary blends vary with the reduced temperature τ ≡ (T − T{sub c})/T (where T{sub c} is the critical temperature) and with the asymmetry in the rigidities of the components. Knowledge of these variations is crucial for understanding the dynamics of materials fabricated from polymer blends, and evidence supporting these expectations is briefly discussed.

  9. Temperature reconstruction from the length fluctuations of small glaciers in the eastern Alps (northeastern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecchetto, Stefano; Serandrei-Barbero, Rossana; Donnici, Sandra

    2017-07-01

    In this study, a linear model computing the air temperature fluctuations from the measured glacier snout fluctuations has been applied, for the first time, to three small glaciers in the western Tauern Alps (eastern Alps) in the period 1929-2011. The considered glaciers, with areas between 0.2 and 1.3 km^2, are characterized by relevant time variations of their morphology, length and slope. The model requires the knowledge of two parameters: the glacier climate sensitivity C_s and the glacier response time τ, both depending on the glacier morphological characteristics and on the precipitation. Applied to the glaciers assuming C_s and τ as in the original formulation, it underestimates the temperature increase of {≈ } 1.8°C derived over the whole period from the in situ data. Given the characteristics of these small glaciers, these parameters have been recalibrated by means of a non-linear least-square regression using an independent set of glaciers. Their mean value is of about 210 m/K and 3.8 years respectively. With the recalibrated values of the new glacier climate sensitivity C^*_s and response time τ ^*, the temperature fluctuations derived by the model reproduce well those obtained from the observed temperatures computed over the hydrological year, with linear correlations between 0.8 and 0.9. The increase of the modeled mean temperature over the whole period fits in with that derived from observed temperature. Considering that the length fluctuations of these small glaciers affect significantly their slope and length, we tested the impact in the model of a time dependent formulation of C_s and τ: the results indicate slight improvements both in the values of the correlation between the reconstructed and the observed temperature fluctuations and in the global temperature increase. Given the above value of climate sensitivity, the large retreat of the small alpine glaciers threatens their survival within a few decades, but the morphological changes in

  10. Temperature reconstruction from the length fluctuations of small glaciers in the eastern Alps (northeastern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zecchetto, Stefano; Serandrei-Barbero, Rossana; Donnici, Sandra

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a linear model computing the air temperature fluctuations from the measured glacier snout fluctuations has been applied, for the first time, to three small glaciers in the western Tauern Alps (eastern Alps) in the period 1929-2011. The considered glaciers, with areas between 0.2 and 1.3 km^2 , are characterized by relevant time variations of their morphology, length and slope. The model requires the knowledge of two parameters: the glacier climate sensitivity C_s and the glacier response time τ both depending on the glacier morphological characteristics and on the precipitation. Applied to the glaciers assuming C_s and τ as in the original formulation, it underestimates the temperature increase of {≈ } 1.8°C derived over the whole period from the in situ data. Given the characteristics of these small glaciers, these parameters have been recalibrated by means of a non-linear least-square regression using an independent set of glaciers. Their mean value is of about 210 m/K and 3.8 years respectively. With the recalibrated values of the new glacier climate sensitivity C^*_s and response time τ ^* , the temperature fluctuations derived by the model reproduce well those obtained from the observed temperatures computed over the hydrological year, with linear correlations between 0.8 and 0.9. The increase of the modeled mean temperature over the whole period fits in with that derived from observed temperature. Considering that the length fluctuations of these small glaciers affect significantly their slope and length, we tested the impact in the model of a time dependent formulation of C_s and τ : the results indicate slight improvements both in the values of the correlation between the reconstructed and the observed temperature fluctuations and in the global temperature increase. Given the above value of climate sensitivity, the large retreat of the small alpine glaciers threatens their survival within a few decades, but the morphological changes in

  11. Survival of rapidly fluctuating natural low winter temperatures by High Arctic soil invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Convey, Peter; Abbandonato, Holly; Bergan, Frode; Beumer, Larissa Teresa; Biersma, Elisabeth Machteld; Bråthen, Vegard Sandøy; D'Imperio, Ludovica; Jensen, Christina Kjellerup; Nilsen, Solveig; Paquin, Karolina; Stenkewitz, Ute; Svoen, Mildrid Elvik; Winkler, Judith; Müller, Eike; Coulson, Stephen James

    2015-12-01

    The extreme polar environment creates challenges for its resident invertebrate communities and the stress tolerance of some of these animals has been examined over many years. However, although it is well appreciated that standard air temperature records often fail to describe accurately conditions experienced at microhabitat level, few studies have explicitly set out to link field conditions experienced by natural multispecies communities with the more detailed laboratory ecophysiological studies of a small number of 'representative' species. This is particularly the case during winter, when snow cover may insulate terrestrial habitats from extreme air temperature fluctuations. Further, climate projections suggest large changes in precipitation will occur in the polar regions, with the greatest changes expected during the winter period and, hence, implications for the insulation of overwintering microhabitats. To assess survival of natural High Arctic soil invertebrate communities contained in soil and vegetation cores to natural winter temperature variations, the overwintering temperatures they experienced were manipulated by deploying cores in locations with varying snow accumulation: No Snow, Shallow Snow (30 cm) and Deep Snow (120 cm). Air temperatures during the winter period fluctuated frequently between +3 and -24 °C, and the No Snow soil temperatures reflected this variation closely, with the extreme minimum being slightly lower. Under 30 cm of snow, soil temperatures varied less and did not decrease below -12 °C. Those under deep snow were even more stable and did not decline below -2 °C. Despite these striking differences in winter thermal regimes, there were no clear differences in survival of the invertebrate fauna between treatments, including oribatid, prostigmatid and mesostigmatid mites, Araneae, Collembola, Nematocera larvae or Coleoptera. This indicates widespread tolerance, previously undocumented for the Araneae, Nematocera or Coleoptera, of

  12. Local burst model of CMB temperature fluctuations: scattering in primordial hydrogen lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovich, V. K.; Grachev, S. I.

    2015-10-01

    The propagation of an instantaneous burst of isotropic radiation from the time of its onset at some redshift z 0 to the time of its detection at the present epoch (at z = 0) is considered within the framework of a flat Universe. Thomson scattering by free electrons and scattering in primordial hydrogen lines (H α, H β, P α, and P β) are believed to be the sources of opacity, with the single-scattering albedo in the lines being calculated by taking into account the deexcitation of the upper levels of the transitions being considered under the action of background blackbody radiation. The profiles of these lines in the burst spectrum at the present epoch have been constructed for various z0 at various distances from the burst center. To a first approximation, these profiles do not depend on the burst radiation spectrum and intensity. It is shown that the lines are purely absorption ones at a sufficiently large distance, but an emission component can appear with decreasing distance, which strengthens as the distance decreases, while the absorption component weakens. The absorption depth in the combined profile can reach 2 ×10-4 for the H α and H β lines and 7 × 10-6 for the P α and P β lines. In this case, the relative amplitude of the temperature fluctuations lies within the range 10-7-10-9. The calculations have been performed for bursts with different characteristic initial sizes. At the same z 0, the hydrogen line profiles essentially coincide for sizes smaller than some value, and the contrast of the lines decreases with increasing burst size for greater ones.

  13. Response of New zealand mudsnails Potamopyrgus antipodarum to freezing and near freezing fluctuating water temperatures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.; James, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    We explored the resilience of the invasive New Zealand mudsnail Potamopyrgus antipodarum to fluctuating winter freezing and near-freezing temperature cycles in laboratory tests. Our goal was to provide data to confirm field observations of mortality and presumed mortality in stream habitats with fluctuating freezing to near-freezing temperatures. We tested individuals from 2 locations with distinctly different thermal regimes and population densities. One location had low snail densities and water temperatures with strong diel and seasonal water variation. The other location had high snail densities and nearly constant water temperatures. Groups of individuals from both locations were tested in each of 3 laboratory-created diel thermal cycles around nominal temperatures of 0, 2, or 4°C. Mortality occurred in cycles around 0°C in both populations, and little to no mortality occurred at temperatures >0°C. Individuals from both sources held in diel 0°C cycles for 72 h showed 100% mortality. Our findings support observations from published field studies that survival was limited in infested habitats subject to freezing temperatures.

  14. Gas Temperature Measurements of Fluctuating Coal - MHD Plasmas Using Modified Line Reversal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkleman, Bradley Carl

    The technique of modified line reversal is investigated and developed to allow accurate measurements on fluctuating coal fired magnetohydrodynamic plasmas and flows. Generalized modified line reversal equations applicable to any geometry and optical system are developed and presented. The generalized equations are specialized to the two most common optical systems, focussed and collimated, employed for modified line reversal measurements. Approximations introduced by specializing to the specific optical systems are investigated. Vignetting of the optical system images is shown to introduce large biases in the temperature measurement for certain optical configurations commonly applied. It is shown that symmetric optical systems are unacceptable for line reversal measurements. The errors introduced by non-simultaneous measurement of the required line reversal parameters due to rapidly fluctuating plasma characteristics are characterized. Line reversal signal and temperature measurements made on a coal fired MHD plasma are used to quantify the error in the temperature measurement due to non-simultaneous sampling of the measured line reversal parameters. A simple modified line reversal system based on interference filters and photodiodes that employs spatial separation to obtain the required line reversal parameters is described. Gas temperatures measured with devices using both the spatial and temporal separation techniques are compared. Modified line reversal temperature measurements are compared to theoretically predicted temperatures as well as CARS and high velocity thermocouple temperature measurements.

  15. Does incubation temperature fluctuation influence hatchling phenotypes in reptiles? A test using parthenogenetic geckos.

    PubMed

    Andrewartha, Sarah J; Mitchell, Nicola J; Frappell, Peter B

    2010-01-01

    Many lineages of parthenogenetic organisms have persisted through significant environmental change despite the constraints imposed by their fixed genotype and limited evolutionary potential. The ability of parthenogens to occur sympatrically with sexual relatives may in part be due to phenotypic plasticity in their responses to their environment, especially with respect to incubation temperature--a maternally selected trait. Here we measured the incubation temperatures selected by two lineages of triploid parthenogenic geckos in the Heteronotia binoei complex by allowing them to deposit clutches along a thermal gradient. The average nest temperature selected was 28.4 degrees C, with no significant differences between parthenogenic races or individual clones. To investigate the effect of nest-temperature variability on physiological and morphological traits, we incubated eggs from different races at one of four incubation regimes (32 degrees +/- 0 degrees, +/- 3 degrees , +/- 5 degrees , or +/- 9 degrees C). Embryos incubated at constant 32 degrees C developed faster than embryos reared under increasing extremes of diel temperature fluctuation (+/- 3 degrees , +/- 5 degrees C), and incubation at 32 degrees +/- 9 degrees C was unsuccessful. Incubation regime had no effect on the body size, preferred substrate temperature, or mass-specific .V(O2) of hatchlings. However, parthenogenic race had a significant effect on egg mass, tail length, snout-to-vent length, total length, and .V(O2) . We conclude that developmental traits are strongly influenced by clonal genotypes in this parthenogenic complex but are well buffered against fluctuations in incubation temperature.

  16. Antibiotic translocation through membrane channels: temperature-dependent ion current fluctuation for catching the fast events.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R; Chimerel, Catalin; Mach, Tivadar; Winterhalter, Mathias

    2009-10-01

    Temperature-dependent facilitated permeation of antibiotics through membrane channels was investigated. Here we reconstituted single OmpF trimers from the outer membrane of Escherichia coli (E. coli) into a planar lipid bilayer. The penetration of ampicillin through OmpF causes fluctuation in the ion current, and analysis of the fluctuations at different temperatures allows us to determine the mode of permeation. The residence time of the drug inside the channel decays strongly with temperature, reaching the resolution limit of the instrument at 30 degrees C. The number of events increases exponentially with temperature up to 30 degrees C and then gradually decreases as temperature increases. At room temperature, we observe about 25 events per second per monomer of the trimeric channel and an extrapolation to 37 degrees C gives roughly 50 events. The activation energy for ampicillin translocation through OmpF is estimated to be around 13 kT. Temperature-dependent study gives new insights into the faster translocation of small substrates through biological nanopores.

  17. Temperature fluctuations and infrared emission from dust particles in a hot gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of temperature fluctuations in very small dust particles caused by electronic collisions with an ambient hot gas, is calculated. The dust-temperature distribution differs strongly from that derived on the basis of equilibrium heating models, peaking at lower temperatures in the stochastically heated case. The resulting infrared spectrum is broadened at short wavelengths, giving much more emission than expected from equilibrium calculations, and at long wavelengths exhibits a lower color temperature. Dust-temperature fluctuations are thus expected to play an important role in determining the infrared spectrum of dusty, X-ray-emitting plasmas. A power-law distribution of grain radii extended to very small grain sizes will have a distinct infrared spectrum characterized by an infrared excess at the Wien side of the spectrum. This excess emission represents a high-temperature component in the spectrum, resulting from the stochastic heating of very small dust particles. Its magnitude depends on the grain-size distribution and the temperature and density of the ambient hot gas. This excess emission may be observed by IRAS in supernova remnants and rich clusters of galaxies.

  18. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated electron cyclotron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freethy, S. J.; Conway, G. D.; Classen, I.; Creely, A. J.; Happel, T.; Köhn, A.; Vanovac, B.; White, A. E.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent temperature fluctuations are measured on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using pairs of closely spaced, narrow-band heterodyne radiometer channels and a standard correlation technique. The pre-detection spacing and bandwidth of the radiometer channel pairs is chosen such that they are physically separated less than a turbulent correlation length, but do not overlap. The radiometer has 4 fixed filter frequency channels and two tunable filter channels for added flexibility in the measurement position. Relative temperature fluctuation amplitudes are observed in a helium plasma to be δT/T = (0.76 ± 0.02)%, (0.67 ± 0.02)%, and (0.59 ± 0.03)% at normalised toroidal flux radius of ρtor = 0.82, 0.75, and 0.68, respectively.

  19. Finding new superconductors: the spin-fluctuation gateway to high Tc and possible room temperature superconductivity.

    PubMed

    Pines, David

    2013-10-24

    We propose an experiment-based strategy for finding new high transition temperature superconductors that is based on the well-established spin fluctuation magnetic gateway to superconductivity in which the attractive quasiparticle interaction needed for superconductivity comes from their coupling to dynamical spin fluctuations originating in the proximity of the material to an antiferromagnetic state. We show how lessons learned by combining the results of almost three decades of intensive experimental and theoretical study of the cuprates with those found in the decade-long study of a strikingly similar family of unconventional heavy electron superconductors, the 115 materials, can prove helpful in carrying out that search. We conclude that, since Tc in these materials scales approximately with the strength of the interaction, J, between the nearest neighbor local moments in their parent antiferromagnetic state, there may not be a magnetic ceiling that would prevent one from discovering a room temperature superconductor.

  20. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated electron cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect

    Freethy, S. J.; Conway, G. D.; Happel, T.; Köhn, A.; Classen, I.; Vanovac, B.; Creely, A. J.; White, A. E.

    2016-11-15

    Turbulent temperature fluctuations are measured on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using pairs of closely spaced, narrow-band heterodyne radiometer channels and a standard correlation technique. The pre-detection spacing and bandwidth of the radiometer channel pairs is chosen such that they are physically separated less than a turbulent correlation length, but do not overlap. The radiometer has 4 fixed filter frequency channels and two tunable filter channels for added flexibility in the measurement position. Relative temperature fluctuation amplitudes are observed in a helium plasma to be δT/T = (0.76 ± 0.02)%, (0.67 ± 0.02)%, and (0.59 ± 0.03)% at normalised toroidal flux radius of ρ{sub tor} = 0.82, 0.75, and 0.68, respectively.

  1. Measurements of density, temperature, and their fluctuations in turbulent supersonic flow using UV laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, Douglas G.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1992-01-01

    Nonintrusive measurements of density, temperature, and their turbulent fluctuation levels were obtained in the boundary layer of an unseeded, Mach 2 wind tunnel flow. The spectroscopic technique that was used to make the measurements is based on the combination of laser-induced oxygen fluorescence and Raman scattering by oxygen and nitrogen from the same laser pulse. Results from this demonstration experiment are compared with previous measurements obtained in the same facility using conventional probes and an earlier spectroscopic technique. Densities and temperatures measured with the current technique agree with the previous surveys to within 3 percent and 2 percent, respectively. The fluctuation amplitudes for both variables agree with the measurements obtained using the earlier spectroscopic technique and show evidence of an unsteady, weak shock wave that perturbs the boundary layer.

  2. Measurements of temperature, density, pressure, and their fluctuations in supersonic turbulence using laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.; Logan, P.

    1987-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence method has been developed that provides simultaneous measurements of temperature, density, and their fluctuations owing to turbulence in unheated compressible flows. Pressure and its fluctuations are also deduced using the equation of state. Fluorescence is induced in nitric oxide that has been seeded into a nitrogen flow in concentrations of 100 ppm. Measurements are obtained from each laser pulse, with a spatial resolution of 1 mm and a temporal resolution of 125 ns. The method was applied to a supersonic, turbulent, boundary-layer flow with a free-stream Mach number of 2. For stream conditions in the range from 150-300 K and 0.3-1 atm, temperature is measured with an uncertainty of approximately 1 percent rms, while density and pressure uncertainties are approximately 2 percent rms.

  3. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated electron cyclotron emission.

    PubMed

    Freethy, S J; Conway, G D; Classen, I; Creely, A J; Happel, T; Köhn, A; Vanovac, B; White, A E

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent temperature fluctuations are measured on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using pairs of closely spaced, narrow-band heterodyne radiometer channels and a standard correlation technique. The pre-detection spacing and bandwidth of the radiometer channel pairs is chosen such that they are physically separated less than a turbulent correlation length, but do not overlap. The radiometer has 4 fixed filter frequency channels and two tunable filter channels for added flexibility in the measurement position. Relative temperature fluctuation amplitudes are observed in a helium plasma to be δT/T = (0.76 ± 0.02)%, (0.67 ± 0.02)%, and (0.59 ± 0.03)% at normalised toroidal flux radius of ρtor = 0.82, 0.75, and 0.68, respectively.

  4. Fluctuation of Electron Temperature due to Global Alfvén Eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amagishi, Yoshimitsu; Hishida, Takanori; Kobayashi, Motoshi; Tsushima, Akira

    2003-06-01

    Two kinds of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes were observed in a cylindrical magnetized plasma produced by a magneto-plasma-dynamic (MPD) arcjet plasma source. Each mode belongs to the "Compressional Alfvén Wave (CAW)" with the azimuthal mode number of m = 1 and the "Global Alfvén Eigenmode (GAE)" with m = 0, respectively. We found that the latter was responsible for the fluctuation of electron temperature.

  5. Measurement of turbulent electron temperature fluctuations on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak using correlated Electron Cyclotron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freethy, S.; Conway, G. D.; Classen, I.; Creely, A. J.; Happel, T.; Vanovac, B.; White, A. E.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-10-01

    First measurements of core (r/a < 0.95) turbulent electron temperature fluctuations made on the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak using a Correlation Electron Cyclotron Emission (CECE) technique are presented. Validation of gyro-kinetic models against measurements of the underlying turbulent micro-structure are essential for developing predictive capabilities for future devices. In tokamak plasmas, turbulent temperature fluctuations are sufficiently broadband ( 0.5 MHz) and low-amplitude ( 1%) that conventional radiometer techniques are fundamentally unable to detect them and a correlation technique is required to further extract the signals. An application of the spectral decorrelation method had been designed and built for AUG. This CECE radiometer shares an optical path with a reflectometer and is sensitive to wavenumbers perpendicular to the magnetic field k⊥ up to 0.76 cm-1 . An upgrade to the focusing mirror will increase this range to k⊥ up to 1.4 cm-1. Measurements in Helium plasmas have been made at three radial locations simultaneously, providing a profile of the temperature fluctuation amplitude in the outer core of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heated heated L-mode plasmas. New results and future plans will be presented. This work is supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-SC0006419.

  6. Discriminating low frequency components from long range persistent fluctuations in daily atmospheric temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanfredi, M.; Simoniello, T.; Cuomo, V.; Macchiato, M.

    2009-07-01

    This study originated from recent results reported in literature, which support the existence of long-range (power-law) persistence in atmospheric temperature fluctuations on monthly and inter-annual scales. We investigated the results of Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) carried out on twenty-two historical daily time series recorded in Europe in order to evaluate the reliability of such findings in depth. More detailed inspections emphasized systematic deviations from power-law and high statistical confidence for functional form misspecification. Rigorous analyses did not support scale-free correlation as an operative concept for Climate modelling, as instead suggested in literature. In order to understand the physical implications of our results better, we designed a bivariate Markov process, parameterised on the basis of the atmospheric observational data by introducing a slow dummy variable. The time series generated by this model, analysed both in time and frequency domains, tallied with the real ones very well. They accounted for both the deceptive scaling found in literature and the correlation details enhanced by our analysis. Our results seem to evidence the presence of slow fluctuations from another climatic sub-system such as ocean, which inflates temperature variance up to several months. They advise more precise re-analyses of temperature time series before suggesting dynamical paradigms useful for Climate modelling and for the assessment of Climate Change.

  7. Discriminating low frequency components from long range persistent fluctuations in daily atmospheric temperature variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanfredi, M.; Simoniello, T.; Cuomo, V.; Macchiato, M.

    2009-02-01

    This study originated from recent results reported in literature, which support the existence of long-range (power-law) persistence in atmospheric temperature fluctuations on monthly and inter-annual scales. We investigated the results of Detrended Fluctuation Analysis (DFA) carried out on twenty-two historical daily time series recorded in Europe in order to evaluate the reliability of such findings in depth. More detailed inspections emphasized systematic deviations from power-law and high statistical confidence for functional form misspecification. Rigorous analyses did not support scale-free correlation as an operative concept for Climate modelling, as instead suggested in literature. In order to understand the physical implications of our results better, we designed a bivariate Markov process, parameterised on the basis of the atmospheric observational data by introducing a slow dummy variable. The time series generated by this model, analysed both in time and frequency domains, tallied with the real ones very well. They accounted for both the deceptive scaling found in literature and the correlation details enhanced by our analysis. Our results seem to evidence the presence of slow fluctuations from another climatic sub-system such as ocean, which inflates temperature variance up to several months. They advise more precise re-analyses of temperature time series before suggesting dynamical paradigms useful for Climate modelling and for the assessment of Climate Change.

  8. Thermal fluctuations of haemoglobin from different species: adaptation to temperature via conformational dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, A. M.; Garvey, C. J.; Bocahut, A.; Sacquin-Mora, S.; Digel, I.; Schneider, G. J.; Natali, F.; Artmann, G. M.; Zaccai, G.

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamic stability, configurational motions and internal forces of haemoglobin (Hb) of three endotherms (platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus; domestic chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus and human, Homo sapiens) and an ectotherm (salt water crocodile, Crocodylus porosus) were investigated using circular dichroism, incoherent elastic neutron scattering and coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results from Hb solutions revealed a direct correlation between protein resilience, melting temperature and average body temperature of the different species on the 0.1 ns time scale. Molecular forces appeared to be adapted to permit conformational fluctuations with a root mean square displacement close to 1.2 Å at the corresponding average body temperature of the endotherms. Strong forces within crocodile Hb maintain the amplitudes of motion within a narrow limit over the entire temperature range in which the animal lives. In fully hydrated powder samples of human and chicken, Hb mean square displacements and effective force constants on the 1 ns time scale showed no differences over the whole temperature range from 10 to 300 K, in contrast to the solution case. A complementary result of the study, therefore, is that one hydration layer is not sufficient to activate all conformational fluctuations of Hb in the pico- to nanosecond time scale which might be relevant for biological function. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations permitted to explore residue-specific effects. They indicated that temperature sensing of human and chicken Hb occurs mainly at residues lining internal cavities in the β-subunits. PMID:22696485

  9. Thermal fluctuations of haemoglobin from different species: adaptation to temperature via conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Stadler, A M; Garvey, C J; Bocahut, A; Sacquin-Mora, S; Digel, I; Schneider, G J; Natali, F; Artmann, G M; Zaccai, G

    2012-11-07

    Thermodynamic stability, configurational motions and internal forces of haemoglobin (Hb) of three endotherms (platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus; domestic chicken, Gallus gallus domesticus and human, Homo sapiens) and an ectotherm (salt water crocodile, Crocodylus porosus) were investigated using circular dichroism, incoherent elastic neutron scattering and coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results from Hb solutions revealed a direct correlation between protein resilience, melting temperature and average body temperature of the different species on the 0.1 ns time scale. Molecular forces appeared to be adapted to permit conformational fluctuations with a root mean square displacement close to 1.2 Å at the corresponding average body temperature of the endotherms. Strong forces within crocodile Hb maintain the amplitudes of motion within a narrow limit over the entire temperature range in which the animal lives. In fully hydrated powder samples of human and chicken, Hb mean square displacements and effective force constants on the 1 ns time scale showed no differences over the whole temperature range from 10 to 300 K, in contrast to the solution case. A complementary result of the study, therefore, is that one hydration layer is not sufficient to activate all conformational fluctuations of Hb in the pico- to nanosecond time scale which might be relevant for biological function. Coarse-grained Brownian dynamics simulations permitted to explore residue-specific effects. They indicated that temperature sensing of human and chicken Hb occurs mainly at residues lining internal cavities in the β-subunits.

  10. Modelling growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Gougouli, Maria; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2010-06-15

    The growth of Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger, isolated from yogurt production environment, was investigated on malt extract agar with pH=4.2 and a(w)=0.997, simulating yogurt, at isothermal conditions ranging from -1.3 to 35 degrees C and from 5 to 42.3 degrees C, respectively. The growth rate (mu) and (apparent) lag time (lambda) of the mycelium growth were modelled as a function of temperature using a Cardinal Model with Inflection (CMI). The results showed that the CMI can describe successfully the effect of temperature on fungal growth within the entire biokinetic range for both isolates. The estimated values of the CMI for mu were T(min)=-5.74 degrees C, T(max)=30.97 degrees C, T(opt)=22.08 degrees C and mu(opt)=0.221 mm/h for P. expansum and T(min)=10.13 degrees C, T(max)=43.13 degrees C, T(opt)=31.44 degrees C, and mu(opt)=0.840 mm/h for A. niger. The cardinal values for lambda were very close to the respective values for mu indicating similar temperature dependence of the growth rate and the lag time of the mycelium growth. The developed models were further validated under fluctuating temperature conditions using various dynamic temperature scenarios. The time-temperature conditions studied included single temperature shifts before or after the end of the lag time and continuous periodic temperature fluctuations. The prediction of growth at changing temperature was based on the assumption that after a temperature shift the growth rate is adopted instantaneously to the new temperature, while the lag time was predicted using a cumulative lag approach. The results showed that when the temperature shifts occurred before the end of the lag, they did not cause any significant additional lag and the observed total lag was very close to the cumulative lag predicted by the model. In experiments with temperature shifts after the end of the lag time, accurate predictions were obtained when the temperature profile included temperatures which were inside the

  11. Rapid fluctuations of the air and surface temperature in the city of Bucharest (Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheval, Sorin; Dumitrescu, Alexandru; Hustiu, Mihaita-Cristinel

    2016-04-01

    Urban areas derive significant changes of the ambient temperature generating specific challenges for society and infrastructure. Extreme temperature events, heat and cold waves affect the human comfort, increase the health risk, and require specific building regulations and emergency preparedness, strongly related to the magnitude and frequency of the thermal hazards. Rapid changes of the temperature put a particular stress for the urban settlements, and the topic has been approached constantly in the scientific literature. Due to its geographical position in a plain area with a temperate climate and noticeable continental influence, the city of Bucharest (Romania) deals with high seasonal and daily temperature variations. However, rapid fluctuations also occur at sub-daily scale caused by cold or warm air advections or by very local effects (e.g. radiative heat exchange, local precipitation). For example, in the area of Bucharest, the cold fronts of the warm season may trigger temperature decreasing up to 10-15 centigrades / hour, while warm advections lead to increasing of 1-2 centigrades / hour. This study focuses on the hourly and sub-hourly temperature variations over the period November 2014 - February 2016, using air temperature data collected from urban sensors and meteorological stations of the national network, and land surface temperature data obtained from satellite remote sensing. The analysis returns different statistics, such as magnitude, intensity, frequency, simultaneous occurrence and areal coverage of the rapid temperature fluctuations. Furthermore, the generating factors for each case study are assessed, and the results are used to define some preliminary patterns and enhance the urban temperature forecast at fine scale. The study was funded by the Romanian Programme Partnership in Priority Domains, PN - II - PCCA - 2013 - 4 - 0509 - Reducing UHI effects to improve urban comfort and balance energy consumption in Bucharest (REDBHI).

  12. A predictive model relating daily fluctuations in summer temperatures and mortality rates.

    PubMed

    Fouillet, Anne; Rey, Grégoire; Jougla, Eric; Frayssinet, Philippe; Bessemoulin, Pierre; Hémon, Denis

    2007-06-19

    In the context of climate change, an efficient alert system to prevent the risk associated with summer heat is necessary. The authors' objective was to describe the temperature-mortality relationship in France over a 29-year period and to define and validate a combination of temperature factors enabling optimum prediction of the daily fluctuations in summer mortality. The study addressed the daily mortality rates of subjects aged over 55 years, in France as a whole, from 1975 to 2003. The daily minimum and maximum temperatures consisted in the average values recorded by 97 meteorological stations. For each day, a cumulative variable for the maximum temperature over the preceding 10 days was defined. The mortality rate was modelled using a Poisson regression with over-dispersion and a first-order autoregressive structure and with control for long-term and within-summer seasonal trends. The lag effects of temperature were accounted for by including the preceding 5 days. A "backward" method was used to select the most significant climatic variables. The predictive performance of the model was assessed by comparing the observed and predicted daily mortality rates on a validation period (summer 2003), which was distinct from the calibration period (1975-2002) used to estimate the model. The temperature indicators explained 76% of the total over-dispersion. The greater part of the daily fluctuations in mortality was explained by the interaction between minimum and maximum temperatures, for a day t and the day preceding it. The prediction of mortality during extreme events was greatly improved by including the cumulative variables for maximum temperature, in interaction with the maximum temperatures. The correlation between the observed and estimated mortality ratios was 0.88 in the final model. Although France is a large country with geographic heterogeneity in both mortality and temperatures, a strong correlation between the daily fluctuations in mortality and the

  13. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    PubMed Central

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-01-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events. PMID:26627576

  14. Thermal analysis of optical reference cavities for low sensitivity to environmental temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Yanyi; Hang, Chao; Bi, Zhiyi; Ma, Longsheng

    2015-02-23

    The temperature stability of optical reference cavities is significant in state-of-the-art ultra-stable narrow-linewidth laser systems. In this paper, the thermal time constant and thermal sensitivity of reference cavities are analyzed when reference cavities respond to environmental perturbations via heat transfer of thermal conduction and thermal radiation separately. The analysis as well as simulation results indicate that a reference cavity enclosed in multiple layers of thermal shields with larger mass, higher thermal capacity and lower emissivity is found to have a larger thermal time constant and thus a smaller sensitivity to environmental temperature perturbations. The design of thermal shields for reference cavities may vary according to experimentally achievable temperature stability and the coefficient of thermal expansion of reference cavities. A temperature fluctuation-induced length instability of reference cavities as low as 6 × 10(-16) on a day timescale can be achieved if a two-layer thermal shield is inserted between a cavity with the coefficient of thermal expansion of 1 × 10(-10) /K and an outer vacuum chamber with temperature fluctuation amplitude of 1 mK and period of 24 hours.

  15. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-12-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events.

  16. Molecular Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of High Frequency Temperature Fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.

    2005-01-01

    A novel technique for measurement of high frequency temperature fluctuations in unseeded gas flows using molecular Rayleigh scattering is investigated. The spectrum of laser light scattered from molecules in a gas flow is resolved using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The width of the spectral peak is broadened by thermal motion of the molecules and hence is related to gas temperature. The interference fringe pattern containing spectral information is divided into four concentric regions using a series of mirrors angled with respect to one another. Light from each of these regions is directed towards photomultiplier tubes and sampled at 10 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows measurement of gas temperature. Independently monitoring the total scattered intensity provides a measure of gas density. This technique also has the potential to simultaneously measure a single component of flow velocity by monitoring the spectral peak location. Measurements of gas temperature and density are demonstrated using a low speed heated air jet surrounded by an unheated air co-flow. Mean values of temperature and density are shown for radial scans across the jet flow at a fixed axial distance from the jet exit plane. Power spectra of temperature and density fluctuations at several locations in the jet are also shown. The instantaneous measurements have fairly high uncertainty; however, long data records provide highly accurate statistically quantities, which include power spectra. Mean temperatures are compared with thermocouple measurements as well as the temperatures derived from independent density measurements. The accuracy for mean temperature measurements was +/- 7 K.

  17. Making cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization maps with MADAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Poutanen, T.; Sirviö, A.-S.

    2010-02-01

    MADAM is a CMB map-making code, designed to make temperature and polarization maps of time-ordered data of total power experiments like Planck. The algorithm is based on the destriping technique, but it also makes use of known noise properties in the form of a noise prior. The method in its early form was presented in an earlier work by Keihänen et al. (2005, MNRAS, 360, 390). In this paper we present an update of the method, extended to non-averaged data, and include polarization. In this method the baseline length is a freely adjustable parameter, and destriping can be performed at a different map resolution than that of the final maps. We show results obtained with simulated data. This study is related to Planck LFI activities.

  18. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-15

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R − R{sub 0})/a, R{sub 0} = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of k{sub θ} < 2.4 cm{sup −1}. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  19. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm(-1). The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  20. Quasi-optical design for systems to diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qifo; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Zhou, Tianfu; Ti, Ang; Hu, Liqun

    2016-11-01

    A system to simultaneously diagnose the electron temperature and density fluctuations is proposed for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak device. This system includes a common quasi-optical antenna, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) system that is used to measure the electron temperature fluctuations and a Doppler backscattering (DBS) system that is used to measure the electron density fluctuations. The frequency range of the proposed CECE system is 108-120 GHz, and this corresponds to a radial coverage of normalized radius ((R - R0)/a, R0 = 1850 mm, a = 450 mm) from 0.2 to 0.67 for the plasma operation with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.26 T. This paper focuses on the design of the quasi-optical antenna and aims at optimizing the poloidal resolution for different frequency bands. An optimum result gives the beam radius for the CECE system of 13-15 mm and this corresponds to a wave number range of kθ < 2.4 cm-1. The beam radius is 20-30 mm for V band (50-75 GHz) and 15-20 mm for W band (75-110 GHz).

  1. Picosecond fluctuating protein energy landscape mapped by pressure temperature molecular dynamics simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhold, Lars; Smith, Jeremy C; Kitao, Akio; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2007-10-01

    Microscopic statistical pressure fluctuations can, in principle, lead to corresponding fluctuations in the shape of a protein energy landscape. To examine this, nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme are performed covering a range of temperatures and pressures. The well known dynamical transition with temperature is found to be pressure-independent, indicating that the effective energy barriers separating conformational substates are not significantly influenced by pressure. In contrast, vibrations within substates stiffen with pressure, due to increased curvature of the local harmonic potential in which the atoms vibrate. The application of pressure is also shown to selectively increase the damping of the anharmonic, low-frequency collective modes in the protein, leaving the more local modes relatively unaffected. The critical damping frequency, i.e., the frequency at which energy is most efficiently dissipated, increases linearly with pressure. The results suggest that an invariant description of protein energy landscapes should be subsumed by a fluctuating picture and that this may have repercussions in, for example, mechanisms of energy dissipation accompanying functional, structural, and chemical relaxation.

  2. Picosecond fluctuating protein energy landscape mapped by pressure–temperature molecular dynamics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Meinhold, Lars; Smith, Jeremy C.; Kitao, Akio; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2007-01-01

    Microscopic statistical pressure fluctuations can, in principle, lead to corresponding fluctuations in the shape of a protein energy landscape. To examine this, nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme are performed covering a range of temperatures and pressures. The well known dynamical transition with temperature is found to be pressure-independent, indicating that the effective energy barriers separating conformational substates are not significantly influenced by pressure. In contrast, vibrations within substates stiffen with pressure, due to increased curvature of the local harmonic potential in which the atoms vibrate. The application of pressure is also shown to selectively increase the damping of the anharmonic, low-frequency collective modes in the protein, leaving the more local modes relatively unaffected. The critical damping frequency, i.e., the frequency at which energy is most efficiently dissipated, increases linearly with pressure. The results suggest that an invariant description of protein energy landscapes should be subsumed by a fluctuating picture and that this may have repercussions in, for example, mechanisms of energy dissipation accompanying functional, structural, and chemical relaxation. PMID:17956984

  3. Picosecond fluctuating protein energy landscape mapped by pressure temperature molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Meinhold, Lars; Smith, Jeremy C; Kitao, Akio; Zewail, Ahmed H

    2007-10-30

    Microscopic statistical pressure fluctuations can, in principle, lead to corresponding fluctuations in the shape of a protein energy landscape. To examine this, nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme are performed covering a range of temperatures and pressures. The well known dynamical transition with temperature is found to be pressure-independent, indicating that the effective energy barriers separating conformational substates are not significantly influenced by pressure. In contrast, vibrations within substates stiffen with pressure, due to increased curvature of the local harmonic potential in which the atoms vibrate. The application of pressure is also shown to selectively increase the damping of the anharmonic, low-frequency collective modes in the protein, leaving the more local modes relatively unaffected. The critical damping frequency, i.e., the frequency at which energy is most efficiently dissipated, increases linearly with pressure. The results suggest that an invariant description of protein energy landscapes should be subsumed by a fluctuating picture and that this may have repercussions in, for example, mechanisms of energy dissipation accompanying functional, structural, and chemical relaxation.

  4. Picosecond Fluctuating Protein Energy Landscape Mapped by Pressure-Temperature Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhold, Lars; Smith, Jeremy C; Kitao, Akio; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2007-08-01

    Microscopic statistical pressure fluctuations can, in principle, lead to corresponding fluctuations in the shape of a protein energy landscape. To examine this, nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme are performed covering a range of temperatures and pressures. The well known dynamical transition with temperature is found to be pressure-independent, indicating that the effective energy barriers separating conformational substates are not significantly influenced by pressure. In contrast, vibrations within substates stiffen with pressure, due to increased curvature of the local harmonic potential in which the atoms vibrate. The application of pressure is also shown to selectively increase the damping of the anharmonic, low-frequency collective modes in the protein, leaving the more local modes relatively unaffected. The critical damping frequency, i.e., the frequency at which energy is most efficiently dissipated, increases linearly with pressure. The results suggest that an invariant description of protein energy landscapes should be subsumed by a fluctuating picture and that this may have repercussions in, for example, mechanisms of energy dissipation accompanying functional, structural, and chemical relaxation.

  5. Investigation of Temperature Fluctuations Caused by Steam-Water Two-Phase Flow in Pressurizer Spray Piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyoshi, Koji; Nakamura, Akira; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Oumaya, Toru

    In a PWR plant, a steam-water two-phase flow may possibly exist in the pressurizer spray pipe under a normal operating condition since the flow rate of the spray water is not sufficient to fill the horizontal section of the pipe completely. Initiation of high cycle fatigue cracks is suspected to occur under such thermally stratified two phase flow conditions due to cyclic thermal stress fluctuations caused by oscillations of the water surface. Such oscillations cannot be detected by the measurement of temperature on outer surface of the pipe. In order to clarify the flow and thermal conditions in the pressurizer spray pipe and assess their impact on the pipe structure, an experiment was conducted for a steam-water flow at a low flow rate using a mock-up pressurizer spray pipe. The maximum temperature fluctuation of about 0.2 times of the steam-water temperature difference was observed at the inner wall around water surface in the test section. Visualization tests were conducted to investigate the temperature fluctuation phenomena. It was shown that the fluid temperature fluctuations were not caused by the waves on the water surface, but were caused by liquid temperature fluctuations in water layer below the interface. The influence of small amount of non-condensable gas dissolved in the reactor coolant on the liquid temperature fluctuation phenomena was investigated by injecting air into the experimental loop. The air injection attenuated the liquid temperature fluctuations in the water layer since the condensation was suppressed by the non- condensable gas. It is not expected that wall temperature fluctuation in the actual PWR plant may exceed the temperature equivalent to the fatigue limit stress amplitude when it is assumed to be proportional to the steam-water temperature difference.

  6. Ultrafast spectroscopy diagnostic to measure localized ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Schoenbeck, N.; Smith, D.; Winz, G.; Yan, Z.

    2010-10-15

    A dual-channel high-efficiency, high-throughput custom spectroscopic system has been designed and implemented at DIII-D to measure localized ion thermal fluctuations associated with drift wave turbulence. A large-area prism-coupled transmission grating and high-throughput collection optics are employed to observe C VI emission centered near {lambda}=529 nm. The diagnostic achieves 0.25 nm resolution over a 2.0 nm spectral band via eight discrete spectral channels. A turbulence-relevant time resolution of 1 {mu}s is achieved using cooled high-speed avalanche photodiodes and ultralow-noise preamplifiers. The system sensitivity is designed to provide measurements of normalized ion temperature fluctuations on the order of {delta}T{sub i}/T{sub i}{<=}1%.

  7. Spatio-statistical analysis of temperature fluctuation using Mann-Kendall and Sen's slope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atta-ur-Rahman; Dawood, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    This article deals with the spatio-statistical analysis of temperature trend using Mann-Kendall trend model (MKTM) and Sen's slope estimator (SSE) in the eastern Hindu Kush, north Pakistan. The climate change has a strong relationship with the trend in temperature and resultant changes in rainfall pattern and river discharge. In the present study, temperature is selected as a meteorological parameter for trend analysis and slope magnitude. In order to achieve objectives of the study, temperature data was collected from Pakistan Meteorological Department for all the seven meteorological stations that falls in the eastern Hindu Kush region. The temperature data were analysed and simulated using MKTM, whereas for the determination of temperature trend and slope magnitude SSE method have been applied to exhibit the type of fluctuations. The analysis reveals that a positive (increasing) trend in mean maximum temperature has been detected for Chitral, Dir and Saidu Sharif met stations, whereas, negative (decreasing) trend in mean minimum temperature has been recorded for met station Saidu Sharif and Timergara. The analysis further reveals that the concern variation in temperature trend and slope magnitude is attributed to climate change phenomenon in the region.

  8. Rayleigh Scattering Diagnostic for Measurement of Temperature, Velocity, and Density Fluctuation Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mielke, Amy F.; Elam, Kristie A.; Sung, Chih-Jen; Panda, Jayanta

    2006-01-01

    A molecular Rayleigh scattering technique is developed to measure dynamic gas temperature, velocity, and density in unseeded turbulent flows at sampling rates up to 10 kHz. A high power CW laser beam is focused at a point in a heated air jet plume and Rayleigh scattered light is collected and spectrally resolved. The spectrum of the light, which contains information about the temperature, velocity, and density of the flow, is analyzed using a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The circular interference fringe pattern is divided into four concentric regions and sampled at 1 and 10 kHz using photon counting electronics. Monitoring the relative change in intensity within each region allows for measurement of gas temperature and velocity. Independently monitoring the total scattered light intensity provides a measure of gas density. Power spectral density calculations of temperature, velocity, and density fluctuations, as well as mean and fluctuating quantities are demonstrated for various radial locations in the jet flow at a fixed axial distance from the jet exit plane. Results are compared with constant current anemometry and pitot probe measurements at the same locations.

  9. Movement of Five Nematode Species through Sand Subjected to Natural Temperature Gradient Fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    Temperature gradient fluctuations that occur naturally as a result of heating and cooling of the soil surface were reproduced within 15-cm-d, 15-cm-long acrylic tubes filled with moist sand. Sunny and rainy periods during the late summer in eastern Texas were simulated. Five ecologically different nematode species were adapted to fluctuating temperatures for 20-36 hours at a simulated depth of 12.5 cm before being injected simultaneously into the centers of tubes at that depth. When heat waves were propagated horizontally to eliminate gravitational effects, the movement of Ditylenchus phyllobius, Steinernema glaseri, and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora relative to the thermal surface was rapid and largely random. However, Rotylenchulus reniformis moved away from and Meloidogyne incognita moved toward the thermal surface. When heat waves were propagated upward or downward, responses to temperature were the same as when propagated horizontally, irrespective of gravity. The initial direction of movement 1.5 hours after introduction to 20-era-long tubes at five depths at five intervals within a 24-hour cycle indicated that M. incognita moved away from and R. reniformis moved toward the temperature to which last exposed. Differences in movement of the five species tested relative to gravity appeared related to body length, with the smallest nematodes moving downward and the largest moving upward. PMID:19279868

  10. Quasi-linear theory of electron density and temperature fluctuations with application to MHD generators and MPD arc thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in electron density and temperature coupled through Ohm's law are studied for an ionizable medium. The nonlinear effects are considered in the limit of a third order quasi-linear treatment. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined and effective transport properties are determined. A comparison is made to previously considered second order theory. The effect of third order terms indicates the possibility of fluctuations existing in regions predicted stable by previous analysis.

  11. Quasi-linear theory of electron density and temperature fluctuations with application to MHD generators and MPD arc thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in electron density and temperature coupled through Ohm's law are studied for an ionizable medium. The nonlinear effects are considered in the limit of a third order quasi-linear treatment. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined and effective transport properties are determined. A comparison is made to previously considered second order theory. The effect of third order terms indicates the possibility of fluctuations existing in regions predicted stable by previous analysis.

  12. Quasi-linear theory of electron density and temperature fluctuations with application to MHD generators and MPD arc thrusters.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    Fluctuations in electron density and temperature coupled through Ohm's law are studied for an ionizable medium. The nonlinear effects are considered in the limit of a third order quasi-linear treatment. Equations are derived for the amplitude of the fluctuation. Conditions under which a steady state can exist in the presence of the fluctuation are examined and effective transport properties are determined. A comparison is made to previously considered second order theory. The effect of third order terms indicates the possibility of fluctuations existing in regions predicted stable by previous analysis.

  13. Nest temperature fluctuations in a cavity nester, the southern ground-hornbill.

    PubMed

    Combrink, L; Combrink, H J; Botha, A J; Downs, C T

    2017-05-01

    Southern ground-hornbills Bucorvus leadbeateri inhabit savanna and bushveld regions of South Africa. They nest in the austral summer, which coincides with the wet season and hottest daytime temperatures in the region. They are secondary cavity nesters and typically nest in large cavities in trees, cliffs and earth banks, but readily use artificial nest boxes. Southern ground-hornbills are listed as Endangered in South Africa, with reintroductions into suitable areas highlighted as a viable conservation intervention for the species. Nest microclimate, and the possible implications this may have for the breeding biology of southern ground-hornbills, have never been investigated. We used temperature dataloggers to record nest cavity temperature and ambient temperature for one artificial and 11 natural southern ground-hornbill tree cavity nests combined, spanning two breeding seasons. Mean hourly nest temperature, as well as mean minimum and mean maximum nest temperature, differed significantly between southern ground-hornbill nests in both breeding seasons. Mean nest temperature also differed significantly from mean ambient temperature for both seasons. Natural nest cavities provided a buffer against the ambient temperature fluctuations. The artificial nest provided little insulation against temperature extremes, being warmer and cooler than the maximum and minimum local ambient temperatures, respectively. Nest cavity temperature was not found to have an influence on the breeding success of the southern ground-hornbill groups investigated in this study. These results have potentially important implications for southern ground-hornbill conservation and artificial nest design, as they suggest that the birds can tolerate greater nest cavity temperature extremes than previously thought. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Diurnal temperature fluctuation effects on potatoes grown with 12 hr photoperiods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, S. M.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Cao, W.

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to characterize the growth responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to diurnal temperature fluctuations. Potato plants of two cultivars, Norland and Denali, were grown for 90 days under 12 hr photoperiod in walk-in growth rooms at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. The alternating temperature was 22 C light/14 C dark and compared to a constant 18 C as control. At all temperature regimes vapor pressure deficit was maintained at 0.62 kPa (70% relative humidity [correction of humdidity] at 18 C). Plant height, plant dry weight, tuber dry weight, and harvest index were overall greater under the warm light/cool dark alternating temperatures than under the constant temperature. The differences between temperature treatments were greater for Denali than for Norland. Alternating temperatures increased Denali tuber weights by 25%, but no significant increase was found with Norland. Also the total plant weight was increased over 20% with Denali, but increased with Norland in only one of the two replications of the experiment. This study documents that alternating temperatures are a benefit to some cultivars but may not be of benefit to all cultivars.

  15. Diurnal temperature fluctuation effects on potatoes grown with 12 hr photoperiods.

    PubMed

    Bennett, S M; Tibbitts, T W; Cao, W

    1991-02-01

    This study was designed to characterize the growth responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to diurnal temperature fluctuations. Potato plants of two cultivars, Norland and Denali, were grown for 90 days under 12 hr photoperiod in walk-in growth rooms at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. The alternating temperature was 22 C light/14 C dark and compared to a constant 18 C as control. At all temperature regimes vapor pressure deficit was maintained at 0.62 kPa (70% relative humidity [correction of humdidity] at 18 C). Plant height, plant dry weight, tuber dry weight, and harvest index were overall greater under the warm light/cool dark alternating temperatures than under the constant temperature. The differences between temperature treatments were greater for Denali than for Norland. Alternating temperatures increased Denali tuber weights by 25%, but no significant increase was found with Norland. Also the total plant weight was increased over 20% with Denali, but increased with Norland in only one of the two replications of the experiment. This study documents that alternating temperatures are a benefit to some cultivars but may not be of benefit to all cultivars.

  16. Diurnal temperature fluctuation effects on potatoes grown with 12 hr photoperiods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, S. M.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Cao, W.

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to characterize the growth responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to diurnal temperature fluctuations. Potato plants of two cultivars, Norland and Denali, were grown for 90 days under 12 hr photoperiod in walk-in growth rooms at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. The alternating temperature was 22 C light/14 C dark and compared to a constant 18 C as control. At all temperature regimes vapor pressure deficit was maintained at 0.62 kPa (70% relative humidity [correction of humdidity] at 18 C). Plant height, plant dry weight, tuber dry weight, and harvest index were overall greater under the warm light/cool dark alternating temperatures than under the constant temperature. The differences between temperature treatments were greater for Denali than for Norland. Alternating temperatures increased Denali tuber weights by 25%, but no significant increase was found with Norland. Also the total plant weight was increased over 20% with Denali, but increased with Norland in only one of the two replications of the experiment. This study documents that alternating temperatures are a benefit to some cultivars but may not be of benefit to all cultivars.

  17. [Responses of Chinese pine tree ring in Shenyang suburb (Fu Mausoleum) to global temperature fluctuation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Ju; He, Xing-Yuan; Chen, Wei; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Chun-Tao; Fu, Yin-Dong; Tian, Wei; Liu, Tie-Hong

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, the correlations between the variations of Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) tree ring width in Shenyang suburb (Fu Mausoleum) and the local temperature variables, Global Surface Air Temperature Anomaly (GSATA) from 1880 to 2004, Global Land-Ocean Temperature (GLOTI) from 1880 to 2004 and North Hemisphere Temperature Anomaly (NHTA) from 1880 to 2004 were studied. Some close correlations were detected, and the local temperature variables, GSATA, GLOTI and NHTA had some similar influences on the Chinese pine tree ring width. The air temperature in last winter (December and January) and in spring (April and May) affected the growth of Chinese pine significantly (P < 0.05). There existed a 3-8-year periodicity of the variation of Chinese pine tree ring width and the GSATA, GLOTI and NHTA, and the 19.3-year and 23.2-year quasi-periodicity of the variation of Chinese pine tree ring width corresponded with the 20.8-year quasi-periodicity of GSATA, GLOTI and NHTA. This study suggested that the Chinese pine tree ring width in Shenyang Fu Mausoleum had positive correlations with global-scale temperature fluctuation, and the temperature increase in the past had a positive effect on the Chinese pine growth.

  18. Phenotypic responses of hatchlings to constant versus fluctuating incubation temperatures in the multi-banded krait, Bungarus multicintus (Elapidae).

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiang; Gao, Jian-Fang; Han, Jun

    2007-04-01

    Most studies on egg incubation in reptiles have relied on constant temperature incubation in the laboratory rather than on simulations of thermal regimes in natural nests. The thermal effects on embryos in constant-temperature studies often do not realistically reflect what occurs in nature. Recent studies have increasingly recognized the importance of simulating natural nest temperatures rather than applying constant-temperature regimes. We incubated Bungarus multicintus eggs under three constant and one fluctuating-temperature regimes to evaluate the effects of constant versus fluctuating incubation temperatures on hatching success and hatchling phenotypes. Hatching success did not differ among the four treatments, and incubation temperature did not affect the sexual phenotype of hatchlings. Incubation length decreased as incubation temperature increased, but eggs incubated at fluctuating temperatures did not differ from eggs incubated at constant temperatures with approximately the same mean in incubation length. Of the hatchling phenotypes examined, residual yolk, fat bodies and locomotor performance were more likely affected by incubation temperature. The maximal locomotor speed was fastest in the fluctuating-temperature and 30 degrees C treatments and slowest in the 24 degrees C treatment, with the 27 degrees C treatment in between. The maximal locomotor length was longest in the fluctuating-temperature treatment and shortest in the 24 degrees C and 27 degrees C treatments, with the 30 degrees C treatment in between. Our results show that fluctuating incubation temperatures do not influence hatching success and hatchling size and morphology any differently than constant temperatures with approximately the same mean, but have a positive effect on locomotor performance of hatchlings.

  19. Ultrafast dynamics of fluctuations in high-temperature superconductors far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Perfetti, L; Sciolla, B; Biroli, G; van der Beek, C J; Piovera, C; Wolf, M; Kampfrath, T

    2015-02-13

    Despite extensive work on high-temperature superconductors, the critical behavior of an incipient condensate has so far been studied exclusively under equilibrium conditions. Here, we excite Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+δ) with a femtosecond laser pulse and monitor the subsequent nonequilibrium dynamics of the midinfrared conductivity. Our data allow us to discriminate temperature regimes where superconductivity is either coherent, fluctuating or vanishingly small. Above the transition temperature T(c), we make the striking observation that the relaxation to equilibrium exhibits power-law dynamics and scaling behavior, both for optimally and underdoped superconductors. Our findings can in part be modeled using time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory, and they provide strong indication of universality in systems far from equilibrium.

  20. Simultaneous measurement of core electron temperature and density fluctuations during electron cyclotron heating on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Carter, T. A.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Staebler, G. M.; Burrell, K. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.

    2010-02-15

    New measurements show that long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) electron temperature fluctuations can play an important role in determining electron thermal transport in low-confinement mode (L-mode) tokamak plasmas. In neutral beam-heated L-mode tokamak plasmas, electron thermal transport and the amplitude of long-wavelength electron temperature fluctuations both increase in cases where local electron cyclotron heating (ECH) is used to modify the plasma profiles. In contrast, the amplitude of simultaneously measured long-wavelength density fluctuations does not significantly increase. Linear stability analysis indicates that the ratio of the trapped electron mode (TEM) to ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode growth rates increases in the cases with ECH. The increased importance of the TEM drive relative to the ITG mode drive in the cases with ECH may be associated with the increases in electron thermal transport and electron temperature fluctuations.

  1. Metabolic Adjustments to Short-Term Diurnal Temperature Fluctuation in the Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Callaghan, Neal Ingraham; Tunnah, Louise; Currie, Suzanne; MacCormack, Tyson James

    In rainbow trout, warmer temperatures increase metabolic rate, which can be energetically stressful. Diel fluctuations in water temperatures are common in rivers, raising the question of whether fish experience metabolic preconditioning with repeated heat stress. In this study, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum, 1792) were subjected to three temperature treatments consisting of either a constant exposure to 16°C, a single exposure to 24°C, or three cycles between 16° and 24°C. Metabolic responses were investigated, including patterns of regulation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and its substrates, key metabolic enzymes, and several relevant metabolites. In liver and, to a lesser extent, in heart, patterns of signal transduction suggest an increasingly anabolic phenotype with successive heat cycles. Inhibition of Raptor in the heart suggests lowered gross protein synthesis after multiple heat cycles. Fish also showed recovery of glycogen stores and lipid synthesis after multiple thermal cycles, while they maintained baseline plasma glucose levels. The animals showed no evidence of hypoxemia, and our results suggest rainbow trout exposed to repeated thermal cycles were not at risk of metabolic substrate depletion. Collectively, our data indicate that, when exposed to fluctuating but noncritical thermal cycles, rainbow trout may adopt a new metabolic phenotype to sequester readily accessible metabolic substrates in the liver in preparation for more severe or sustained thermal exposures.

  2. Determination of humidity and temperature fluctuations based on MOZAIC data and parametrisation of persistent contrail coverage for general circulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gierens, K. M.; Schumann, U.; Smit, H. G. J.; Helten, M.; Zängl, G.

    1997-08-01

    Humidity and temperature fluctuations at pressure levels between 166 and 290 hPa on the grid scale of general circulation models for a region covered by the routes of airliners, mainly over the Atlantic, have been determined by evaluation of the data obtained with almost 2000 flights within the MOZAIC programme. It is found that the distributions of the fluctuations cannot be modelled by Gaussian distributions, because large fluctuations appear with a relatively high frequency. Lorentz distributions were used for the analytical representation of the fluctuation distributions. From these a joint probability distribution has been derived for simultaneous temperature and humidity fluctuations. This function together with the criteria for the formation and persistence of contrails are used to derive the maximum possible fractional coverage of persistent contrails in a grid cell of a GCM. This can be employed in a statistical formulation of contrail appearance in a climate model.

  3. Quantum principle of sensing gravitational waves: From the zero-point fluctuations to the cosmological stochastic background of spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiñones, Diego A.; Oniga, Teodora; Varcoe, Benjamin T. H.; Wang, Charles H.-T.

    2017-08-01

    We carry out a theoretical investigation on the collective dynamics of an ensemble of correlated atoms, subject to both vacuum fluctuations of spacetime and stochastic gravitational waves. A general approach is taken with the derivation of a quantum master equation capable of describing arbitrary confined nonrelativistic matter systems in an open quantum gravitational environment. It enables us to relate the spectral function for gravitational waves and the distribution function for quantum gravitational fluctuations and to indeed introduce a new spectral function for the zero-point fluctuations of spacetime. The formulation is applied to two-level identical bosonic atoms in an off-resonant high-Q cavity that effectively inhibits undesirable electromagnetic delays, leading to a gravitational transition mechanism through certain quadrupole moment operators. The overall relaxation rate before reaching equilibrium is found to generally scale collectively with the number N of atoms. However, we are also able to identify certain states of which the decay and excitation rates with stochastic gravitational waves and vacuum spacetime fluctuations amplify more significantly with a factor of N2. Using such favorable states as a means of measuring both conventional stochastic gravitational waves and novel zero-point spacetime fluctuations, we determine the theoretical lower bounds for the respective spectral functions. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings on future observations of gravitational waves of a wider spectral window than currently accessible. Especially, the possible sensing of the zero-point fluctuations of spacetime could provide an opportunity to generate initial evidence and further guidance of quantum gravity.

  4. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. These peculiar electronic mechanisms are in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  5. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    DOE PAGES

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. These peculiar electronic mechanisms are in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  6. Feasibility of measuring temperature and density fluctuations in air using laser-induced O2 fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.; Lemon, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A tunable line-narrowed ArF laser can selectively excite several rotation al lines of the Schumann-Runge band system of O2 in air. The resulting ultraviolet fluorescence can be monitored at 90 deg to the laser beam axis, permitting space and time resolved observation of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulence. Experiments and calculations show that + or - 1 K, + or - 1 percent density, 1 cu mm spatial, and 1 microsecond temporal resolution can be achieved simultaneously under some conditions.

  7. The influence of temperature fluctuations on hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örlü, Ramis; Malizia, Fabio; Cimarelli, Andrea; Schlatter, Philipp; Talamelli, Alessandro

    2014-07-01

    There are no measurement techniques for turbulent flows capable of reaching the versatility of hot-wire probes and their frequency response. Nevertheless, the issue of their spatial resolution is still a matter of debate when it comes to high Reynolds number near-wall turbulence. Another, so far unattended, issue is the effect of temperature fluctuations—as they are, e.g. encountered in non-isothermal flows—on the low and higher-order moments in wall-bounded turbulent flows obtained through hot-wire anemometry. The present investigation is dedicated to document, understand, and ultimately correct these effects. For this purpose, the response of a hot-wire is simulated through the use of velocity and temperature data from a turbulent channel flow generated by means of direct numerical simulations. Results show that ignoring the effect of temperature fluctuations, caused by temperature gradients along the wall-normal direction, introduces—despite a local mean temperature compensation of the velocity reading—significant errors. The results serve as a note of caution for hot-wire measurements in wall-bounded turbulence, and also where temperature gradients are more prevalent, such as heat transfer measurements or high Mach number flows. A simple correction scheme involving only mean temperature quantities (besides the streamwise velocity information) is finally proposed that leads to a substantial bias error reduction.

  8. Toxin production and growth of pathogens subjected to temperature fluctuations simulating consumer handling of cold cuts.

    PubMed

    Røssvoll, Elin; Rønning, Helene Thorsen; Granum, Per Einar; Møretrø, Trond; Hjerpekjøn, Marianne Røine; Langsrud, Solveig

    2014-08-18

    It is crucial for the quality and safety of ready-to-eat (RTE) foods to maintain the cold chain from production to consumption. The effect of temperature abuse related to daily meals and elevated refrigerator temperatures on the growth and toxin production of Bacillus cereus, Bacillus weihenstephanensis and Staphylococcus aureus and the growth of Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica was studied. A case study with temperature loggings in the domestic environment during Easter and Christmas holidays was performed to select relevant time and temperature courses. A model for bacterial surface growth on food using nutrient agar plates exposed to variations in temperatures was used to simulate food stored at different temperatures and exposed to room temperature for short periods of time. The results were compared with predicted growth using the modeling tool ComBase Predictor. The consumers exposed their cold cuts to room temperatures as high as 26.5°C with an average duration of meals was 47 min daily for breakfast/brunch during the vacations. Short (≤ 2 h) daily intervals at 25°C nearly halved the time the different pathogens needed to reach levels corresponding to the levels associated with human infection or intoxication, compared with the controls continuously stored at refrigerator temperature. Although the temperature fluctuations affected growth of both B. weihenstephanensis and S. aureus, toxin production was only detected at much higher cell concentrations than what has been associated with human intoxications. Therefore, growth of L. monocytogenes and Y. enterocolitica was found to be the limiting factor for safety. In combination with data on temperature abuse in the domestic environment, modeling programs such as ComBase Predictor can be efficient tools to predict growth of some pathogens but will not predict toxin production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Measurements of core electron temperature and density fluctuations in DIII-D and comparison to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Schmitz, L.; Peebles, W. A.; Carter, T. A.; Doyle, E. J.; Rhodes, T. L.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.; Holland, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Austin, M. E.; Burrell, K. H.; Candy, J.; DeBoo, J. C.; Prater, R.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.; Makowski, M. A.

    2008-05-15

    For the first time, profiles (0.3<{rho}<0.9) of electron temperature and density fluctuations in a tokamak have been measured simultaneously and the results compared to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations. Electron temperature and density fluctuations measured in neutral beam-heated, sawtooth-free low confinement mode (L-mode) plasmas in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] are found to be similar in frequency and normalized amplitude, with amplitude increasing with radius. The measured radial profile of two fluctuation fields allows for a new and rigorous comparison with gyrokinetic results. Nonlinear gyrokinetic flux-tube simulations predict that electron temperature and density fluctuations have similar normalized amplitudes in L-mode. At {rho}=0.5, simulation results match experimental heat diffusivities and density fluctuation amplitude, but overestimate electron temperature fluctuation amplitude and particle diffusivity. In contrast, simulations at {rho}=0.75 do not match either the experimentally derived transport properties or the measured fluctuation levels.

  10. Electron Temperature Fluctuations Associated with the Weakly Coherent Mode in the Edge of I-mode Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.; Phillips, P.; Whyte, D. G.; Hubbard, A. E.; Sung, C.; Hughes, J. W.; Dominguez, A.; Terry, J.; Cziegler, I.

    2012-03-01

    New measurements of electron temperature fluctuations associated with the weakly coherent mode (WCM) during improved mode, or I-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod are presented in this poster [A. E. White, et al. Nuclear Fusion, 51, 113005 (2011)]. The measurements are made with a 32-channel, high-resolution profile ECE radiometer. The WCM electron temperature fluctuations are localized to a 1 cm region inside the last closed flux surface. The WCM electron temperature fluctuation level is measured in several different I-mode discharges and is in the range 1-2%, which is up to an order of magnitude smaller than the WCM density fluctuation level. The WCM edge fluctuations observed in I-mode are believed to play a role in increasing particle transport but not energy transport in the edge of I-mode plasmas. The large difference between normalized density and electron temperature fluctuation amplitudes provides new evidence that the WCM fluctuations can separately affect energy and particle transport.

  11. Electron temperature fluctuations associated with the weakly coherent mode in the edge of I-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.; Phillips, P.; Whyte, D. G.; Hubbard, A. E.; Sung, C.; Hughes, J. W.; Dominguez, A.; Terry, J.; Cziegler, I.

    2011-11-01

    New measurements of electron temperature fluctuations associated with the weakly coherent mode (WCM) during improved mode, or I-mode plasmas (Whyte et al 2010 Nucl. Fusion. 50 105005) at Alcator C-Mod (Marmar et al 2007 Fusion. Sci. Technol. 51 3261) are presented in this paper. The measurements are made with a 32-channel, high-resolution profile electron cyclotron emission radiometer. The WCM electron temperature fluctuations are localized to a 1 cm region inside the last closed flux surface. The WCM electron temperature fluctuation level is measured in several different I-mode discharges and is in the range 1%<\\tilde T_e/T_e<2% , which is an order of magnitude smaller than the WCM density fluctuation level. The WCM edge fluctuations observed in I-mode are believed to play a role in increasing particle transport but not energy transport in the edge of I-mode plasmas. The large difference between normalized density and electron temperature fluctuation amplitudes provides new evidence that the WCM fluctuations can separately affect energy and particle transport.

  12. Daily temperature fluctuations unpredictably influence developmental rate and morphology at a critical early larval stage in a frog

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Environmental temperature has profound consequences for early amphibian development and many field and laboratory studies have examined this. Most laboratory studies that have characterized the influence of temperature on development in amphibians have failed to incorporate the realities of diel temperature fluctuations (DTF), which can be considerable for pond-breeding amphibians. Results We evaluated the effects of different ecologically relevant ranges of DTF compared with effects of constant temperatures on development of embryos and larvae of the Korean fire-bellied toad (Bombina orientalis). We constructed thermal reaction norms for developmental stage, snout- vent length, and tail length by fitting a Gompertz-Gaussian function to measurements taken from embryos after 66 hours of development in 12 different constant temperature environments between 14°C and 36°C. We used these reaction norms as null models to test the hypothesis that developmental effects of DTF are more than the sum of average constant temperature effects over the distribution of temperatures experienced. We predicted from these models that growth and differentiation would be positively correlated with average temperature at low levels of DTF but not at higher levels of DTF. We tested our prediction in the laboratory by rearing B. orientalis embryos at three average temperatures (20°C, 24°C, and 28°C) and four levels of thermal variation (0°C, 6°C, 13°C, and 20°C). Several of the observed responses to DTF were significantly different from both predictions of the model and from responses in constant temperature treatments at the same average temperatures. At an average temperature of 24°C, only the highest level of DTF affected differentiation and growth rates, but at both cooler and warmer average temperatures, moderate DTF was enough to slow developmental and tail growth rates. Conclusions These results demonstrate that both the magnitude of DTF range and thermal

  13. A stage structured mosquito model incorporating effects of precipitation and daily temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Tang, Sanyi; Cheke, Robert A

    2016-12-21

    An outbreak of dengue fever in Guangdong province in 2014 was the most serious outbreak ever recorded in China. Given the known positive correlation between the abundance of mosquitoes and the number of dengue fever cases, a stage structured mosquito model was developed to investigate the cause of the large abundance of mosquitoes in 2014 and its implications for outbreaks of the disease. Data on the Breteau index (number of containers positive for larvae per 100 premises investigated), temperature and precipitation were used for model fitting. The egg laying rate, the development rate and the mortality rates of immatures and adults were obtained from the estimated parameters. Moreover, effects of daily fluctuations of temperature on these parameters were obtained and the effects of temperature and precipitation were analyzed by simulations. Our results indicated that the abundance of mosquitoes depended not only on the total annual precipitation but also on the distribution of the precipitation. The daily mean temperature had a nonlinear relationship with the abundance of mosquitoes, and large diurnal temperature differences can reduce the abundance of mosquitoes. In addition, effects of increasing precipitation and temperature were interdependent. Our findings suggest that the large abundance of mosquitoes in 2014 was mainly caused by the distribution of the precipitation. In the perspective of mosquito control, our results reveal that it is better to clear water early and spray insecticide between April and August in case of limited resources.

  14. Statistics of velocity and temperature fluctuations in two-dimensional Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Huang, Yong-Xiang; Jiang, Nan; Liu, Yu-Lu; Lu, Zhi-Ming; Qiu, Xiang; Zhou, Quan

    2017-08-01

    We investigate fluctuations of the velocity and temperature fields in two-dimensional (2D) Rayleigh-Bénard (RB) convection by means of direct numerical simulations (DNS) over the Rayleigh number range 106≤Ra≤1010 and for a fixed Prandtl number Pr=5.3 and aspect ratio Γ =1 . Our results show that there exists a counter-gradient turbulent transport of energy from fluctuations to the mean flow both locally and globally, implying that the Reynolds stress is one of the driving mechanisms of the large-scale circulation in 2D turbulent RB convection besides the buoyancy of thermal plumes. We also find that the viscous boundary layer (BL) thicknesses near the horizontal conducting plates and near the vertical sidewalls, δu and δv, are almost the same for a given Ra, and they scale with the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers as ˜Ra-0.26±0.03 and ˜Re-0.43±0.04 . Furthermore, the thermal BL thickness δθ defined based on the root-mean-square (rms) temperature profiles is found to agree with Prandtl-Blasius predictions from the scaling point of view. In addition, the probability density functions of turbulent energy ɛu' and thermal ɛθ' dissipation rates, calculated, respectively, within the viscous and thermal BLs, are found to be always non-log-normal and obey approximately a Bramwell-Holdsworth-Pinton distribution first introduced to characterize rare fluctuations in a confined turbulent flow and critical phenomena.

  15. Thermodynamic Critical Field and Superconducting Fluctuation of Vortices for High Temperature Cuprate Superconductor: La-214

    SciTech Connect

    Finnemore, Douglas K.

    2001-01-01

    Thermodynamics has been studied systematically for the high temperature cuprate superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4-δ, La-214, in the entire superconductive region from strongly underdoped to strongly overdoped regimes. Magnetization studies with H $\\parallel$ c have been made in order to investigate the changes in free energy of the system as the number of carriers is reduced. Above the superconducting transition temperature, the normal-state magnetization exhibits a two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic behavior. Below Tc, magnetization data are thermodynamically reversible over large portions of the H-T plane, so the free energy is well defined in these regions. As the Sr concentration is varied over the wide range from 0.060 (strongly underdoped) to 0.234 (strongly overdoped), the free energy change goes through a maximum at the optimum doped in a manner similar to the Tc0 vs. x curve. The density of states, N(0), remains nearly constant in the overdoped and optimum doped regimes, taking a broad maximum around x = 0.188, and then drops abruptly towards zero in the underdoped regime. The La2-xSrxCuO4 (La-214) system displays the fluctuating vortex behavior with the characteristic of either 2D or 3D fluctuations as indicated by clearly identifiable crossing points T* close to Tc. The dimensional character of the fluctuations depends on both applied magnetic fields and the density of charge carriers. The dimensional crossover from 2D to 3D occurs in the strongly underdoped regime when the c-axis coherence distance ξc becomes comparable to the spacing between adjacent CuO2 layers s at sufficiently high magnetic field near Hc2.

  16. Circadian fluctuation in heat production of young calves at different ambient temperatures in relation to posture.

    PubMed

    Schrama, J W; Noordhuizen, J P; Arieli, A; Brandsma, H A; van der Linden, J M; Verstegen, M W

    1994-03-01

    Circadian fluctuations in the effect of ambient temperature (Ta) on heat production (Htot) and its relation to posture were investigated in young calves in this study. Twenty-three 6-d-old Holstein-Friesian male calves were assigned to one of four Ta treatments: 5, 9, 13, or 18 degrees C. Heat production was measured per calf continuously every 9 min by indirect calorimetry for 5 d. The posture during these 9-min periods was derived from physical activity measurements by Doppler-radar meters. Heat production varied within a day; it was highest when calves were drinking (milk or water). The influence of Ta on Htot was larger for the light (including feeding periods) than for the dark phase of the day, being related to the larger Ta effect during the feeding periods. Lower critical temperatures (LCT) were 14.1, 15.2, and 16.8 degrees C and extra thermal heat productions below LCT (ETH) were 8.48, 8.28, and 11.55 kJ.kg-.75.d-1.C degrees-1 for the dark, the light (excluding feeding periods), and the feeding phase during the day, respectively. Time spent standing was not affected by Ta but varied during the day (24-h period). Averaged over Ta, 51% of the within day variation in Htot was accounted for by the calf's posture. Correction of Htot for the time spent standing reduced the difference in both ETH and LCT between phases of the day. The present study demonstrates that circadian fluctuations exist in the thermal requirements of young calves. Part of these fluctuations are related to within-day variation in time spent standing.

  17. Air temperature drives 140 years of fluctuations at a major Greenlandic tidewater glacier.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, James M.; Mair, Douglas WF; Nick, Faezeh M.; Rea, Brice R.; Nienow, Peter W.

    2014-05-01

    The primary controls on the fluctuations of tidewater glaciers are currently poorly understood. Both oceanic and atmospheric forcing mechanisms have been invoked to explain observed changes. Numerical modelling simulations have previously utilised only relatively short observational records for calibration and validation. Hence the longer term climatic controls on tidewater glacier stability are not well known. Herein we apply a 1-D numerical flow-band model with a crevasse water depth calving criterion (Nick et al., 2010) to Kangiata Nunaata Sermia (KNS), SW Greenland. We force the model using air and sea surface temperature records for the period 1871-2012. Model sensitivity to climate forcing was determined by varying climatic tuning coefficients using a Monte Carlo approach. The output from 1500 model runs was compared against observations of terminus position and glacier geometry from the last 140 years. The results of best-fit model runs were then used to evaluate the relative sensitivity of KNS to changes in atmospheric or oceanic forcing. Our results show that all best-fit model runs have tuning coefficients associated with strong atmospheric forcing, but do not all require strong oceanic forcing. This suggests that changes in air temperature are the primary driver of the terminus fluctuations of KNS from 1866-2012, and may be the principal climatic control on glacier stability for similar tidewater glaciers in Greenland.

  18. How to detect fluctuating stripes in the high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kivelson, S. A.; Bindloss, I. P.; Fradkin, E.; Oganesyan, V.; Tranquada, J. M.; Kapitulnik, A.; Howald, C.

    2003-10-01

    This article discusses fluctuating order in a quantum disordered phase proximate to a quantum critical point, with particular emphasis on fluctuating stripe order. Optimal strategies are derived for extracting information concerning such local order from experiments, with emphasis on neutron scattering and scanning tunneling microscopy. These ideas are tested by application to two model systems—an exactly solvable one-dimensional (1D) electron gas with an impurity, and a weakly interacting 2D electron gas. Experiments on the cuprate high-temperature superconductors which can be analyzed using these strategies are extensively reviewed. The authors adduce evidence that stripe correlations are widespread in the cuprates. They compare and contrast the advantages of two limiting perspectives on the high-temperature superconductor: weak coupling, in which correlation effects are treated as a perturbation on an underlying metallic (although renormalized) Fermi-liquid state, and strong coupling, in which the magnetism is associated with well-defined localized spins, and stripes are viewed as a form of micro phase separation. The authors present quantitative indicators that the latter view better accounts for the observed stripe phenomena in the cuprates.

  19. Note: Demonstration of an external-cavity diode laser system immune to current and temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Miao, Xinyu; Yin, Longfei; Zhuang, Wei; Luo, Bin; Dang, Anhong; Chen, Jingbiao; Guo, Hong

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate an external-cavity laser system using an anti-reflection coated laser diode as gain medium with about 60 nm fluorescence spectrum, and a Rb Faraday anomalous dispersion optical filter (FADOF) as frequency-selecting element with a transmission bandwidth of 1.3 GHz. With 6.4% optical feedback, a single stable longitudinal mode is obtained with a linewidth of 69 kHz. The wavelength of this laser is operating within the center of the highest transmission peak of FADOF over a diode current range from 55 mA to 142 mA and a diode temperature range from 15 °C to 35 °C, thus it is immune to the fluctuations of current and temperature.

  20. Measurement of temperature and density fluctuations in turbulence using an ultraviolet laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Noninvasive measurement of density and temperature fluctuations in turbulent air flow was examined. The approach used fluorescence of oxygen molecules which are selectively excited by a tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser beam. The strength of the fluorescence signal and its dependence on laser wavelength vary with the density and temperature of the air in the laser beam. Because fluorescence can be detected at 90 degrees from the beam propagation direction, spatial resolution in three dimensions, rather than path-integrated measurements can be achieved. With spatial resolutions of the order of a millimeter and at supersonic air velocities it is necessary to perform each measurement in a time of the order of a microsecond; this is possible by by using laser pulses of ten nanosecond duration. In this method atmospheric O2 is excited by the emission of a tunable ArF excimer laser, and the fluorescence, which spans the 210 to 420 range, is detected by an ultraviolet phototube.

  1. Temperature fluctuations in a changing climate: an ensemble-based experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Vincze, Miklós; Borcia, Ion Dan; Harlander, Uwe

    2017-03-21

    There is an ongoing debate in the literature about whether the present global warming is increasing local and global temperature variability. The central methodological issues of this debate relate to the proper treatment of normalised temperature anomalies and trends in the studied time series which may be difficult to separate from time-evolving fluctuations. Some argue that temperature variability is indeed increasing globally, whereas others conclude it is decreasing or remains practically unchanged. Meanwhile, a consensus appears to emerge that local variability in certain regions (e.g. Western Europe and North America) has indeed been increasing in the past 40 years. Here we investigate the nature of connections between external forcing and climate variability conceptually by using a laboratory-scale minimal model of mid-latitude atmospheric thermal convection subject to continuously decreasing 'equator-to-pole' temperature contrast ΔT, mimicking climate change. The analysis of temperature records from an ensemble of experimental runs ('realisations') all driven by identical time-dependent external forcing reveals that the collective variability of the ensemble and that of individual realisations may be markedly different - a property to be considered when interpreting climate records.

  2. Growth and lipid accumulation in three Chlorella strains from different regions in response to diurnal temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weinan; Zou, Shanmei; He, Meilin; Fei, Cong; Luo, Wei; Zheng, Shiyan; Chen, Bo; Wang, Changhai

    2016-02-01

    It was economically feasible to screen strains adaptive to wide temperature fluctuation for outdoor cultivation without temperature control. In this research, three Chlorella strains from arctic glacier, desert soil and temperate native lake were isolated and identified. The growth, biochemical composition, lipid content and fatty acid composition of each strain cultured under the mode of diurnal temperature fluctuations were compared. All the three Chlorella strains showed desirable abilities of accumulating lipid under diurnal temperature fluctuations and their fatty acid profiles were suitable for biodiesel production, although the growth and biochemical composition were seemed to be region-specific. The highest lipid content was at 51.83±2.49% DW, 42.80±2.97% DW and 36.13±2.27% DW under different temperature fluctuation of 11 °C, 25 °C, 7 °C, respectively. The results indicated that the three Chlorella strains could be promising biodiesel feedstock for outdoor cultivation by the cultural mode of diurnal temperature fluctuations.

  3. Modelling spoilage of fresh turbot and evaluation of a time-temperature integrator (TTI) label under fluctuating temperature.

    PubMed

    Nuin, Maider; Alfaro, Begoña; Cruz, Ziortza; Argarate, Nerea; George, Susie; Le Marc, Yvan; Olley, June; Pin, Carmen

    2008-10-31

    Kinetic models were developed to predict the microbial spoilage and the sensory quality of fresh fish and to evaluate the efficiency of a commercial time-temperature integrator (TTI) label, Fresh Check(R), to monitor shelf life. Farmed turbot (Psetta maxima) samples were packaged in PVC film and stored at 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees C. Microbial growth and sensory attributes were monitored at regular time intervals. The response of the Fresh Check device was measured at the same temperatures during the storage period. The sensory perception was quantified according to a global sensory indicator obtained by principal component analysis as well as to the Quality Index Method, QIM, as described by Rahman and Olley [Rahman, H.A., Olley, J., 1984. Assessment of sensory techniques for quality assessment of Australian fish. CSIRO Tasmanian Regional Laboratory. Occasional paper n. 8. Available from the Australian Maritime College library. Newnham. Tasmania]. Both methods were found equally valid to monitor the loss of sensory quality. The maximum specific growth rate of spoilage bacteria, the rate of change of the sensory indicators and the rate of change of the colour measurements of the TTI label were modelled as a function of temperature. The temperature had a similar effect on the bacteria, sensory and Fresh Check kinetics. At the time of sensory rejection, the bacterial load was ca. 10(5)-10(6) cfu/g. The end of shelf life indicated by the Fresh Check label was close to the sensory rejection time. The performance of the models was validated under fluctuating temperature conditions by comparing the predicted and measured values for all microbial, sensory and TTI responses. The models have been implemented in a Visual Basic add-in for Excel called "Fish Shelf Life Prediction (FSLP)". This program predicts sensory acceptability and growth of spoilage bacteria in fish and the response of the TTI at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions. The program is freely

  4. Optical measurements of fluctuating temperatures in a supersonic turbulent flow using one- and two-photon, laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique has been developed that provides a practical means of nonintrusively measuring the instantaneous temperatures in low-temperature turbulent flows. The capabilities of the method are reviewed, and its application to a simple, two-dimensional, turbulent boundary-layer flow at Mach 2 is reported. Measurements of the average temperature distribution through the boundary layer and the magnitudes of temperature fluctuations about their average values are presented.

  5. Optical measurements of fluctuating temperatures in a supersonic turbulent flow using one- and two-photon, laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A laser-induced fluorescence technique was developed that provides a practical means of nonintrusively measuring the instantaneous temperatures in low-temperature turbulent flows. The capabilities of the method are reviewed, and its application to a simple, two-dimensional, turbulent boundary-layer flow at Mach 2 is reported. Measurements of the average temperature distribution through the boundary layer and the magnitudes of temperature fluctuations about their average values are presented.

  6. Considerations on the mechanisms and transition temperatures of superconductivity induced by electronic fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Varma, C M

    2012-05-01

    An overview of the momentum and frequency dependence of effective electron-electron interactions which favor electronic instability to a superconducting state in the angular-momentum channel ℓ and the properties of the interactions which determine the magnitude of the temperature T(c) of the instability is provided. Interactions induced through exchange of electronic fluctuations of spin density, charge density or current density are considered. Special attention is paid to the role of quantum-critical fluctuations (QCFs) including pairing due to their virtual exchange as well as de-pairing due to inelastic scattering. Additional insight is gained by reviewing empirical data and theory specific to superfluidity in liquid He(3), superconductivity in some of the heavy-fermion compounds, in cuprates, in pncitides and the valence skipping compound. The physical basis for the following observation is provided: the ratio of the maximum T(c) to the typical phonon frequency in phonon induced s-wave superconductivity is O(10(-1)); the ratio of p-wave T(c) to the renormalized Fermi energy in liquid He(3), a very strongly correlated Fermi liquid near its melting pressure, is only O(10(-3)); in the cuprates and the heavy fermions where d-wave superconductivity occurs in a region governed by QCFs, this ratio rises to O(10(-2)). These discussions also suggest factors important for obtaining higher T(c). Experiments and theoretical investigations are suggested to clarify the many unresolved issues.

  7. Effect of Diurnal Fluctuating versus Constant Temperatures on Germination of 445 Species from the Eastern Tibet Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun; Baskin, Jerry M.; Baskin, Carol C.; Bu, Haiyan; Du, Guozhen; Ma, Miaojun

    2013-01-01

    Germination response to fluctuating temperatures is a mechanism by which seeds detect gaps in vegetation canopies and depth of burial in soil, and it is very important for plants. Thus, studies on the effect of fluctuating temperature on germination at the community level are valuable for understanding community structure and biodiversity maintenance. We determined the effects of two alternating temperatures (5/25°C and 10/20°C) and one constant temperature (15°C) on seed germination of 445 species in a grassland community on the eastern Tibet Plateau. Seed mass was determined for each species, and data on habitat, type of life cycle, altitudinal distribution and functional group (graminoids or forbs) were obtained from the literature. Taking all species into account, alternating temperatures increased germination percentages regardless of amplitude. Overall, species growing in disturbed ground showed a significant germination response to temperature fluctuation, but those living in Alpine/subalpine meadow, forest margin /scrub, marshland and dry sunny slope habitats did not. Species distributed only at high elevations (>2000m) did not show a significant germination response to temperature fluctuation, whereas those occurring at both high and low elevations had a significant positive response. Germination of annuals/biennials was significantly promoted by 5/25°C, but not by 10/20°C, whereas germination of perennials was significantly promoted by both 5/25°C and 10/20°C. Small-seeded species were more likely than large-seeded species to respond positively to fluctuating temperatures. Germination of forbs had a positive response to temperature fluctuation, but germination of graminoids did not. Regeneration ability by seeds for about 36% of the species studied in the grassland can be increased by temperature fluctuation. The differential response among species to alternating vs. constant temperatures helps maintain community structure and biodiversity. A

  8. Fluctuations in central and peripheral temperatures induced by intravenous nicotine: central and peripheral contributions

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jeremy; Kiyatkin, Eugene A.

    2011-01-01

    Nicotine (NIC) is a highly addictive substance that interacts with different subtypes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous systems. While the direct action of NIC on central neurons appears to be essential for its reinforcing properties, the role of peripheral actions of this drug remains a matter of controversy. In this study, we examined changes in locomotor activity and temperature fluctuations in the brain (nucleus accumbens and ventral tegmental area), temporal muscle, and skin induced by intravenous (iv) NIC at low human-relevant doses (10 and 30 μg/kg) in freely moving rats. These effects were compared to those induced by social interaction, an arousing procedure that induces behavioral activation and temperature responses via pure neural mechanism procedure, and iv injections of a peripherally acting NIC analogue, NIC pyrrolidine methiodide (NIC-PM) used at equimolar doses. We found that NIC at 30 μg/kg induces a modest locomotor activation, rapid and strong decrease in skin temperature, and weak increases in brain and muscle temperature. While these effects were qualitatively similar to those induced by social interaction, they were much weaker and showed a tendency to increase with repeated drug administrations. In contrast, NIC-PM did not affect locomotion and induced much weaker than NIC increases in brain and muscle temperatures and decreases in skin temperature; these effects showed a tendency to be weaker with repeated drug administrations. Our data indicate that NIC's actions in the brain are essential to induce locomotor activation and brain and body hyperthermic responses. However, rapid peripheral action of NIC on sensory afferents could be an important factor in triggering its central effects, contributing to neural and physiological activation following repeated drug use. PMID:21295014

  9. Temperature dependence of the DNA double helix at the nanoscale: structure, elasticity, and fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Sam; Jost, Daniel; Theodorakopoulos, Nikos; Peyrard, Michel; Lavery, Richard; Everaers, Ralf

    2013-10-15

    Biological organisms exist over a broad temperature range of -15°C to +120°C, where many molecular processes involving DNA depend on the nanoscale properties of the double helix. Here, we present results of extensive molecular dynamics simulations of DNA oligomers at different temperatures. We show that internal basepair conformations are strongly temperature-dependent, particularly in the stretch and opening degrees of freedom whose harmonic fluctuations can be considered the initial steps of the DNA melting pathway. The basepair step elasticity contains a weaker, but detectable, entropic contribution in the roll, tilt, and rise degrees of freedom. To extend the validity of our results to the temperature interval beyond the standard melting transition relevant to extremophiles, we estimate the effects of superhelical stress on the stability of the basepair steps, as computed from the Benham model. We predict that although the average twist decreases with temperature in vitro, the stabilizing external torque in vivo results in an increase of ∼1°/bp (or a superhelical density of Δσ ≃ +0.03) in the interval 0-100°C. In the final step, we show that the experimentally observed apparent bending persistence length of torsionally unconstrained DNA can be calculated from a hybrid model that accounts for the softening of the double helix and the presence of transient denaturation bubbles. Although the latter dominate the behavior close to the melting transition, the inclusion of helix softening is important around standard physiological temperatures. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement of Turbulent Pressure and Temperature Fluctuations in a Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povinelli, Louis (Technical Monitor); LaGraff, John E.; Bramanti, Cristina; Pldfield, Martin; Passaro, Andrea; Biagioni, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    The report summarizes the results of the redesign efforts directed towards the gas-turbine combustor rapid-injector flow diagnostic probe developed under sponsorship of NASA-GRC and earlier reported in NASA-CR-2003-212540. Lessons learned during the theoretical development, developmental testing and field-testing in the previous phase of this research were applied to redesign of both the probe sensing elements and of the rapid injection device. This redesigned probe (referred to herein as Turboprobe) has been fabricated and is ready, along with the new rapid injector, for field-testing. The probe is now designed to capture both time-resolved and mean total temperatures, total pressures and, indirectly, one component of turbulent fluctuations.

  11. Pressure dependence of critical temperature of bulk FeSe from spin fluctuation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschfeld, Peter; Kreisel, Andreas; Wang, Yan; Tomic, Milan; Jeschke, Harald; Jacko, Anthony; Valenti, Roser; Maier, Thomas; Scalapino, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The critical temperature of the 8K superconductor FeSe is extremely sensitive to pressure, rising to a maximum of 40K at about 10GPa. We test the ability of the current generation of fluctuation exchange pairing theories to account for this effect, by downfolding the density functional theory electronic structure for each pressure to a tight binding model. The Fermi surface found in such a procedure is then used with fixed Hubbard parameters to determine the pairing strength using the random phase approximation for the spin singlet pairing vertex. We find that the evolution of the Fermi surface captured by such an approach is alone not sufficient to explain the observed pressure dependence, and discuss alternative approaches. PJH, YW, AK were supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236, the financial support of MT, HJ, and RV from the DFG Schwerpunktprogramm 1458 is kindly acknowledged.

  12. Steady state RANS simulations of temperature fluctuations in single phase turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Kickhofel, J.; Fokken, J.; Kapulla, R.; Prasser, H. M.

    2012-07-01

    Single phase turbulent mixing in nuclear power plant circuits where a strong temperature gradient is present is known to precipitate pipe failure due to thermal fatigue. Experiments in a square mixing channel offer the opportunity to study the phenomenon under simple and easily reproducible boundary conditions. Measurements of this kind have been performed extensively at the Paul Scherrer Inst. in Switzerland with a high density of instrumentation in the Generic Mixing Experiment (GEMIX). As a fundamental mixing phenomena study closely related to the thermal fatigue problem, the experimental results from GEMIX are valuable for the validation of CFD codes striving to accurately simulate both the temperature and velocity fields in single phase turbulent mixing. In the experiments two iso-kinetic streams meet at a shallow angle of 3 degrees and mix in a straight channel of square cross-section under various degrees of density, temperature, and viscosity stratification over a range of Reynolds numbers ranging from 5*10{sup 3} to 1*10{sup 5}. Conductivity measurements, using wire-mesh and wall sensors, as well as optical measurements, using particle image velocimetry, were conducted with high temporal and spatial resolutions (up to 2.5 kHz and 1 mm in the case of the wire mesh sensor) in the mixing zone, downstream of a splitter plate. The present paper communicates the results of RANS modeling of selected GEMIX tests. Steady-state CFD calculations using a RANS turbulence model represent an inexpensive method for analyzing large and complex components in commercial nuclear reactors, such as the downcomer and reactor pressure vessel heads. Crucial to real world applicability, however, is the ability to model turbulent heat fluctuations in the flow; the Turbulent Heat Flux Transport model developed by ANSYS CFX is capable, by implementation of a transport equation for turbulent heat fluxes, of readily modeling these values. Furthermore, the closure of the turbulent heat

  13. Information entropy of activation process: Application for low-temperature fluctuations of a myoglobin molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    Activation process for unimolecular reaction has been considered by means of radiation theory. The formulae of information entropy of activation have been derived for the Boltzmann-Arrhenius model and the activation process model (APM). The physical meaning of this entropy has been determined. It is a measure of conversion of thermal radiation energy to mechanical energy that moves atoms in a molecule during elementary activation act. It is also a measure of uncertainty of this energy conversion. The uncertainty is due to unevenness of distribution function representing the activation process. It has been shown that Arrhenius dependence is caused by the entropy change. Efficiency comparison of the two models under consideration for low-temperature fluctuations of a myoglobin molecule structure shows that the APM should be favored over the Boltzmann-Arrhenius one.

  14. Damage Evolution in Al Wire Bonds Subjected to a Junction Temperature Fluctuation of 30 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agyakwa, Pearl A.; Yang, Li; Arjmand, Elaheh; Evans, Paul; Corfield, Martin R.; Johnson, C. Mark

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasonically bonded heavy Al wires subjected to a small junction temperature fluctuation under power cycling from 40°C to 70°C were investigated using a non-destructive three-dimensional (3-D) x-ray tomography evaluation approach. The occurrence of irreversible deformation of the microstructure and wear-out under such conditions were demonstrated. The observed microstructures consist of interfacial and inter-granular cracks concentrated in zones of stress intensity, i.e., near heels and emanating from interface precracks. Interfacial voids were also observed within the bond interior. Degradation rates of `first' and `stitch' bonds are compared and contrasted. A correlative microscopy study combining perspectives from optical microscopy with the x-ray tomography results clarifies the damage observed. An estimation of lifetime is made from the results and discussed in the light of existing predictions.

  15. The effects of eggshell temperature fluctuations during incubation on welfare status and gait score of broilers.

    PubMed

    Ipek, A; Sozcu, A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of different eggshell temperatures (EST); low (33.3 to 36.7°C), control (37.8 to 38.2°C), and high (38.9 to 40.0°C) during 10 to 18 days of incubation on welfare status including foot pad dermatitis (FPD), hock dermatitis (HD) and feathering status, and gait score in broilers. Score 2, 4, and 5 of FPD were found to be similar among the treatment groups, whereas a score of 3 was found to be higher in the control and high EST groups (27.7% and 29.2%) compred to the low EST group (16.9%). The eggshell temperature fluctuations were significantly affected the incidence of HD, whereas broiler sex did not. All of the broilers in the high EST group had HD with various scores, while a percentage of 21.1% and 6.9% of broilers had the score 1 of HD in the low and control EST groups, respectively. Feathering status showed a difference between body parts including wing, neck, back, and vent and also a general mean score of broilers from low EST treatment had the highest score for feathering. A higher incidence of gait score was observed in broilers from the control EST treatment than low and high EST groups. This can be attributed to a higher live weight of broilers from the control EST group. On the other hand, the incidence of a gait score of 3 and 4 was found for broilers from control and high EST treatment groups. Male and female broilers from the high EST group had the higher gait score. In conclusion, gait score and welfare status of broilers were affected by fluctuations in EST between 10 and 18 days of incubation.

  16. Morning Martian Atmospheric Temperature Gradients and Fluctuations Observed by Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalov, John D.; Haberle, R. M.; Murphy, J. R.; Seiff, A.; Wilson, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the most prominent atmospheric temperature fluctuations observed during Martian mornings by Mars Pathfinder and have concluded, based on comparisons with wind directions, that they appear to be a result of atmospheric heating associated with the Lander spacecraft. Also, we have examined the morning surface layer temperature lapse rates, which are found to decrease as autumn approaches at the Pathfinder location, and which have mean (and median) values as large as 7.3 K/m in the earlier portions of the Pathfinder landed mission. It is plausible that brief isolated periods with gradients twice as steep are associated with atmospheric heating adjacent to Lander air bag material. In addition, we have calculated the gradient with height of the structure function obtained with Mars Pathfinder, for Mars' atmospheric temperatures measured within about 1.3 m from the surface, assuming a power law dependence, and have found that these gradients superficially resemble those reported for the upper region of the terrestrial stable boundary layer.

  17. Binary homogeneous nucleation: Temperature and relative humidity fluctuations and non-linearity

    SciTech Connect

    Easter, R.C.; Peters, L.K.

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses binary homogeneous nucleation involving H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and water vapor is thought to be the primary mechanism for new particle formation in the marine boundary layer. Temperature, relative humidity, and partial pressure of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor are the most important parameters in fixing the binary homogeneous nucleation rate in the H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 2}O system. The combination of thermodynamic calculations and laboratory experiments indicates that this rate varies roughly as the tenth power of the saturation ratio of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor. Furthermore, the vapor pressure of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} is a function of temperature, and similar dependencies of the binary homogeneous nucleation rate on relative humidity can be noted as well. These factors thus introduce strong non-linearities into the system, and fluctuations of temperature, relative humidity, and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor concentrations about mean values may strongly influence the nucleation rate measured in the atmosphere.

  18. Measurement of Turbulent Pressure and Temperature Fluctuations in a Gas Turbine Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Passaro, Andrea; LaGraff, John E.; Oldfield, Martin L. G.; Biagioni, Leonardo; Moss, Roger W.; Battelle, Ryan T.; Povinelli, Louis A. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The present research concerns the development of high-frequency pressure and temperature probes and related instrumentation capable of performing spectral characterization of unsteady pressure and temperature fluctuations over the 0.05 20 kHz range, at the exit of a gas turbine combustor operating at conditions close to nominal ones for large power generation turbomachinery. The probes used a transient technique pioneered at Oxford University; in order to withstand exposure to the harsh environment the probes were fitted on a rapid injection and cooling system jointly developed by Centrospazio CPR and Syracuse University. The experimental runs were performed on a large industrial test rig being operated by ENEL Produzione. The achieved results clearly show the satisfactory performance provided by this diagnostic tool, even though the poor location of the injection port prevented the tests from yielding more insight of the core flow turbulence characteristics. The pressure and temperature probes survived several dozen injections in the combustor hot jet, while consistently providing the intended high frequency performance. The apparatus was kept connected to the combustor during long duration firings, operating as an unobtrusive, self contained, piggy-back experiment: high frequency flow samplings were remotely recorded at selected moments corresponding to different combustor operating conditions.

  19. Measurement of event background fluctuations for charged particle jet reconstruction in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt {{{s_{text{NN}}}}} = {2}{.76} {text{TeV}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B.; Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Adare, A. M.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agocs, A. G.; Agostinelli, A.; Aguilar Salazar, S.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad Masoodi, A.; Ahn, S. U.; Akindinov, A.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Almaráz Aviña, E.; Alt, T.; Altini, V.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arbor, N.; Arcelli, S.; Arend, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Äystö, J.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Bán, J.; Baral, R. C.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bergmann, C.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Boccioli, M.; Bock, N.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Bose, S.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Boyer, B.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broz, M.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Bugaiev, K.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Caballero Orduna, D.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carlin Filho, N.; Carminati, F.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Casanova Díaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castillo Hernandez, J. F.; Casula, E. A. R.; Catanescu, V.; Cavicchioli, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Chojnacki, M.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Coccetti, F.; Coffin, J.-P.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Constantin, P.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortese, P.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Cotallo, M. E.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Alaniz, E.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Danu, A.; Das, K.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Azevedo Moregula, A.; de Barros, G. O. V.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; Delagrange, H.; Del Castillo Sanchez, E.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; De Marco, N.; Dénes, E.; De Pasquale, S.; Deppman, A.; Erasmo, G. D.; de Rooij, R.; Di Bari, D.; Dietel, T.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Driga, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Dutta Majumdar, A. K.; Dutta Majumdar, M. R.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engel, H.; Erdal, H. A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Fearick, R.; Fedunov, A.; Fehlker, D.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feofilov, G.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Ferretti, R.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Fini, R.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garishvili, I.; Gerhard, J.; Germain, M.; Geuna, C.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Gianotti, P.; Girard, M. R.; Giubellino, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez, R.; Ferreiro, E. G.; González-Trueba, L. H.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Goswami, A.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grajcarek, R.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, S.; Grigoryan, A.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerra Gutierrez, C.; Guerzoni, B.; Guilbaud, M.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Gutbrod, H.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Han, B. H.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harmanova, Z.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Hasegan, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Heckel, S. T.; Heide, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K. F.; Hicks, B.; Hille, P. T.; Hippolyte, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hori, Y.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Huang, M.; Huber, S.; Humanic, T. J.; Hwang, D. S.; Ichou, R.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Inaba, M.; Incani, E.; Innocenti, G. M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, V.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanytskyi, O.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jancurová, L.; Jang, H. J.; Jangal, S.; Janik, R.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jirden, L.; Jones, P. G.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Jusko, A.; Kaidalov, A. B.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kaliňák, P.; Kalisky, M.; Kalliokoski, T.; Kalweit, A.; Kanaki, K.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Khan, P.; Khan, M. M.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, M.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kim, B.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Koch, K.; Köhler, M. K.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Konevskikh, A.; Korneev, A.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Kral, J.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Krawutschke, T.; Krelina, M.; Kretz, M.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Krus, M.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, V.; Kushpil, S.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Ladrón de Guevara, P.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; La Rocca, P.; Lazzeroni, C.; Lea, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefèvre, F.; Lehnert, J.; Leistam, L.; Lenhardt, M.; Lenti, V.; León, H.; León Monzón, I.; León Vargas, H.; Lévai, P.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, L.; Loenne, P. I.; Loggins, V. R.; Loginov, V.; Lohn, S.; Lohner, D.; Loizides, C.; Loo, K. K.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, X.-G.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luo, J.; Luparello, G.; Luquin, L.; Luzzi, C.; Ma, K.; Ma, R.; Madagodahettige-Don, D. M.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Maire, A.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manceau, L.; Mangotra, L.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Martashvili, I.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez Davalos, A.; Martínez García, G.; Martynov, Y.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Massacrier, L.; Mastromarco, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Matyja, A.; Mayani, D.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Miake, Y.; Michalon, A.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Miskowiec, D.; Mitu, C.; Mlynarz, J.; Mohanty, B.; Mohanty, A. K.; Molnar, L.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Montes, E.; Moon, T.; Morando, M.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moretto, S.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Muhuri, S.; Müller, H.; Munhoz, M. G.; Musa, L.; Musso, A.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Nattrass, C.; Naumov, N. P.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nedosekin, A.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Niida, T.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B. S.; Nilsson, M. S.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A.; Nyatha, A.; Nygaard, C.; Nystrand, J.; Ochirov, A.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Oh, S. K.; Oleniacz, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Ortona, G.; Oskarsson, A.; Ostrowski, P.; Otterlund, I.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pachr, M.; Padilla, F.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Painke, F.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S. K.; Pal, S.; Palaha, A.; Palmeri, A.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Park, W. J.; Passfeld, A.; Pastirčák, B.; Patalakha, D. I.; Paticchio, V.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perales, M.; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, E.; Peresunko, D.; Pérez Lara, C. E.; Perez Lezama, E.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petran, M.; Petris, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Pitz, N.; Piuz, F.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Ploskon, M.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Pop, A.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puchagin, S.; Puddu, G.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, V.; Putiš, M.; Putschke, J.; Quercigh, E.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Radomski, S.; Räihä, T. S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Ramírez Reyes, A.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Read, K. F.; Real, J. S.; Redlich, K.; Reichelt, P.; Reicher, M.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Rettig, F.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, P.; Roy, C.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakai, S.; Sakata, D.; Salgado, C. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanchez Castro, X.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sano, S.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sarkamo, J.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schreiner, S.; Schuchmann, S.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, P. A.; Scott, R.; Segato, G.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senyukov, S.; Seo, J.; Serci, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabetai, A.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharma, N.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siciliano, M.; Sicking, E.; Siddhanta, S.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singha, S.; Sinha, T.; Sinha, B. C.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Skjerdal, K.; Smakal, R.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Søgaard, C.; Soltz, R.; Son, H.; Song, M.; Song, J.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sputowska, I.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stan, I.; Stefanek, G.; Stefanini, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Steinpreis, M.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stocco, D.; Stolpovskiy, M.; Strabykin, K.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Subieta Vásquez, M. A.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sukhorukov, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Susa, T.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Tagridis, C.; Takahashi, J.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terrevoli, C.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tieulent, R.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Toia, A.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Traczyk, T.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ulery, J.; Ullaland, K.; Ulrich, J.; Uras, A.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Vajzer, M.; Vala, M.; Valencia Palomo, L.; Vallero, S.; van der Kolk, N.; Vande Vyvre, P.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vargas, A.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vechernin, V.; Veldhoen, M.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Vernekohl, D. C.; Vernet, R.; Verweij, M.; Vickovic, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, Y.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vodopyanov, A.; Voloshin, S.; Voloshin, K.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vranic, D.; Øvrebekk, G.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Vyushin, A.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, V.; Wan, R.; Wang, Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, D.; Wang, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilde, M.; Wilk, G.; Wilk, A.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Xaplanteris Karampatsos, L.; Yang, H.; Yang, S.; Yasnopolskiy, S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J.; Yu, W.; Yuan, X.; Yushmanov, I.; Zach, C.; Zampolli, C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zelnicek, P.; Zgura, I. S.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, F.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zynovyev, M.

    2012-03-01

    The effect of event background fluctuations on charged particle jet reconstruction in Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt {{{s_{text{NN}}}}} = {2}{.76} {text{TeV}} has been measured with the ALICE experiment. The main sources of non-statistical fluctuations are characterized based purely on experimental data with an unbiased method, as well as by using single high p t particles and simulated jets embedded into real Pb-Pb events and reconstructed with the anti- k t jet finder. The influence of a low transverse momentum cut-off on particles used in the jet reconstruction is quantified by varying the minimum track p t between 0.15 GeV/ c and 2 GeV/ c. For embedded jets reconstructed from charged particles with p t > 0 .15 GeV/ c, the uncertainty in the reconstructed jet transverse momentum due to the heavy-ion background is measured to be 11.3 GeV/ c (standard deviation) for the 10% most central Pb-Pb collisions, slightly larger than the value of 11.0 GeV/ c measured using the unbiased method. For a higher particle transverse momentum threshold of 2 GeV/ c, which will generate a stronger bias towards hard fragmentation in the jet finding process, the standard deviation of the fluctuations in the reconstructed jet transverse momentum is reduced to 4.8-5.0 GeV/ c for the 10% most central events. A non-Gaussian tail of the momentum uncertainty is observed and its impact on the reconstructed jet spectrum is evaluated for varying particle momentum thresholds, by folding the measured fluctuations with steeply falling spectra.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Cross-correlating Cosmic IR and X-ray Background Fluctuations: Evidence of Significant Black Hole Populations Among the CIB Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cappelluti, N.; Kashlinsky, A.; Arendt, R. G.; Comastri, A.; Fazio, G. G.; Finoguenov, A.; Hasinger, G.; Mather, J. C.; Miyaji, T; Moseley, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand the nature of the sources producing the recently uncovered cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations, we study cross-correlations between the fluctuations in the source-subtracted CIB from Spitzer/IRAC data and the unresolved cosmic X-ray background from deep Chandra observations. Our study uses data from the EGS/AEGIS field, where both data sets cover an approx = 8' x 45' region of the sky. Our measurement is the cross-power spectrum between the IR and X-ray data. The cross-power signal between the IRAC maps at 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron and the Chandra [0.5-2] keV data has been detected, at angular scales approx >20'', with an overall significance of approx = 3.8 sigma and approx. = 5.6 sigma, respectively. At the same time we find no evidence of significant cross-correlations at the harder Chandra bands. The cross-correlation signal is produced by individual IR sources with 3.6 micron and 4.5 micron magnitudes m(sub AB) approx. > 25-26 and [0.5-2] keV X-ray fluxes << 7 × 10(exp -177 erg sq. cm/ s. We determine that at least 15%-25% of the large scale power of the CIB fluctuations is correlated with the spatial power spectrum of the X-ray fluctuations. If this correlation is attributed to emission from accretion processes at both IR and X-ray wavelengths, this implies a much higher fraction of accreting black holes than among the known populations. We discuss the various possible origins for the cross-power signal and show that neither local foregrounds nor the known remaining normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei can reproduce the measurements. These observational results are an important new constraint on theoretical modeling of the near-IR CIB fluctuations. local foregrounds, nor the known remaining normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) can reproduce the measurements. These observational results are an important new constraint on theoretical modeling of the near-IR CIB fluctuations

  1. Amplitude-frequency fluctuations of the seasonal cycle, temperature anomalies, and long-range persistence of climate records.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, A; Carbone, V

    2010-12-01

    The presence of long-term persistence of climate records on scales from 2 to 15 yr has been reported in the literature, even if the universality of this result is controversial. In the present paper results from monthly temperature records measured for about 250 yr in Prague and Milan are reported. Because of the nonlinear and nonstationary character of temperature time series the seasonal contribution has been identified through the empirical mode decomposition. We find that the seasonal component of the climate records is characterized by some time scales showing both amplitude and phase fluctuations. By using a more suitable definition of temperature anomalies, and thus excluding persistence effects due to seasonal oscillations and trends, the occurrence of long-term persistence has been investigated through the detrended fluctuation analysis. Our results indicate persistence on scales from 3 to 10 yr with similar values for the detrended fluctuation analysis indices.

  2. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Lensing of CMB Temperature and Polarization Derived from Cosmic Infrared Background Cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Engelen, Alexander; Sherwin, Blake D.; Sehgal, Neelima; Addison, Graeme E.; Allison, Rupert; Battaglia, Nick; de Bernardis, Francesco; Bond, J. Richard; Calabrese, Erminia; Coughlin, Kevin; Crichton, Devin; Datta, Rahul; Devlin, Mark J.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dünner, Rolando; Gallardo, Patricio; Grace, Emily; Gralla, Megan; Hajian, Amir; Hasselfield, Matthew; Henderson, Shawn; Hill, J. Colin; Hilton, Matt; Hincks, Adam D.; Hlozek, Renée; Huffenberger, Kevin M.; Hughes, John P.; Koopman, Brian; Kosowsky, Arthur; Louis, Thibaut; Lungu, Marius; Madhavacheril, Mathew; Maurin, Loïc; McMahon, Jeff; Moodley, Kavilan; Munson, Charles; Naess, Sigurd; Nati, Federico; Newburgh, Laura; Niemack, Michael D.; Nolta, Michael R.; Page, Lyman A.; Pappas, Christine; Partridge, Bruce; Schmitt, Benjamin L.; Sievers, Jonathan L.; Simon, Sara; Spergel, David N.; Staggs, Suzanne T.; Switzer, Eric R.; Ward, Jonathan T.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2015-07-01

    We present a measurement of the gravitational lensing of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature and polarization fields obtained by cross-correlating the reconstructed convergence signal from the first season of Atacama Cosmology Telescope Polarimeter data at 146 GHz with Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) fluctuations measured using the Planck satellite. Using an effective overlap area of 92.7 square degrees, we detect gravitational lensing of the CMB polarization by large-scale structure at a statistical significance of 4.5σ . Combining both CMB temperature and polarization data gives a lensing detection at 9.1σ significance. A B-mode polarization lensing signal is present with a significance of 3.2σ . We also present the first measurement of CMB lensing-CIB correlation at small scales corresponding to l\\gt 2000. Null tests and systematic checks show that our results are not significantly biased by astrophysical or instrumental systematic effects, including Galactic dust. Fitting our measurements to the best-fit lensing-CIB cross-power spectrum measured in Planck data, scaled by an amplitude A, gives A={1.02}-0.08+0.12(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.), consistent with the Planck results.

  3. Similar metabolic rate-temperature relationships after acclimation at constant and fluctuating temperatures in caterpillars of a sub-Antarctic moth.

    PubMed

    Chown, Steven L; Haupt, Tanya M; Sinclair, Brent J

    2016-02-01

    Temperature compensation in whole-animal metabolic rate is one of the responses thought, controversially, to characterize insects from low temperature environments. Temperature compensation may either involve a change in absolute values of metabolic rates or a change in the slope of the metabolic rate - temperature relationship. Moreover, assessments of compensation may be complicated by animal responses to fluctuating temperatures. Here we examined whole animal metabolic rates, at 0 °C, 5 °C, 10 °C and 15 °C, in caterpillars of the sub-Antarctic moth, Pringleophaga marioni Viette (Tineidae), following one week acclimations to 5 °C, 10 °C and 15 °C, and fluctuating temperatures of 0-10 °C, 5-15 °C, and 10-20 °C. Over the short term, temperature compensation was found following acclimation to 5 °C, but the effect size was small (3-14%). By comparison with caterpillars of 13 other lepidopteran species, no effect of temperature compensation was present, with the relationship between metabolic rate and temperature having a Q10 of 2 among species, and no effect of latitude on temperature-corrected metabolic rate. Fluctuating temperature acclimations for the most part had little effect compared with constant temperatures of the same mean value. Nonetheless, fluctuating temperatures of 5-15 °C resulted in lower metabolic rates at all test temperatures compared with constant 10 °C acclimation, in keeping with expectations from the literature. Absence of significant responses, or those of large effect, in metabolic rates in response to acclimation, may be a consequence of the unpredictable temperature variation over the short-term on sub-Antarctic Marion Island, to which P. marioni is endemic.

  4. Development of a Technique for Measuring Local Electric Field Fluctuations in High Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, M. G.; Bakken, M. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Rhodes, A. T.; Winz, G. R.

    2016-10-01

    A novel diagnostic for measuring local electric field fluctuations in high temperature plasmas is being developed. It employs high-speed measurements of the spectral separation and/or line intensities of the motional Stark effect (MSE) Hα multiplet emitted from a low divergence, 80 keV diagnostic neutral beam. A spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS) coupled to a 500 kHz CMOS camera provides the high resolution ( 0.025 nm) and throughput (<=0.1 cm2str) required for the measurement. The Fizeau fringe pattern produced by the SHS provides the Fourier transform of the input spectrum. Line broadening due to the large collection lens at the tokamak can be compensated by phase correcting the resulting fringe pattern. Based on simple tokamak turbulence scalings, Ẽ /EMSE 10-3 is expected for the core plasma in present experiments. To observe these low fluctuation levels, cross-correlation between adjacent spatial points and/or simultaneously measured ñ will be employed to suppress photon noise that is comparable to the turbulent signal. The SHS Littrow wavenumber and grating constant can be chosen to reduce the number of detectors needed to resolve changes in the input spectrum. This allows multi-spatial point measurements using 4-6 discrete photodiodes each, with no loss in sensitivity to Ẽ /EMSE . To validate this diagnostic concept, the diagnostic neutral beam will be fired into a magnetized target plasma (B <=0.5 T) comparable to a tokamak edge, with Ẽ applied parallel or perpendicular to EMSE via biased electrodes. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-89ER53296.

  5. Effects of fluctuating moisture and temperature regimes on the persistence of quiescent conidia of Isaria fumosorosea.

    PubMed

    Bouamama, N; Vidal, C; Fargues, J

    2010-10-01

    Conidia of Isaria fumosorosea were submitted to three regimes of temperature and moisture to simulate microclimatic conditions which prevail in temperate (43% RH and 28 degrees C to 98% RH and 15 degrees C), subtropical (75% RH and 35 degrees C to 98% RH and 25 degrees C), and arid areas (13% RH and 40 degrees C to 33% RH and 15 degrees C) with daily fluctuating cycles. Germination, conidial viability, and virulence to Spodoptera frugiperda larvae were less affected after 20 days exposure under temperate cycling conditions than under arid and subtropical conditions. Exposure of conidia for 20 days to constant nocturnal simulated conditions of any tested regime weakly affected conidial persistence, whereas diurnal conditions exerted the most detrimental effects of high temperatures. However, when tested at both 45 degrees C and 50 degrees C at 33% RH for 160 h, the persistence of I. fumosorosea conidia was relatively higher than expected. These results emphasize that climatic conditions prevailing in environments and ecological fitness of fungal isolates have to be taken into account for assessing microbial control strategies.

  6. A high speed data acquisition and analysis system for transonic velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1988-01-01

    The high speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. The data acquisition and data reduction process has been combined within DDAS. DDAS receives input from hot wires and anemometers, amplifies and filters the signals with computer controlled modules, and converts the analog signals to digital with real-time simultaneous digitization followed by digital recording on disk or tape. Automatic acquisition (either from a computer link to an existing wind tunnel acquisition system, or from data acquisition facilities within DDAS) collects necessary calibration and environment data. The generation of hot wire sensitivities is done in DDAS, as is the application of sensitivities to the hot wire data to generate turbulence quantities. The presentation of the raw and processed data, in terms of root mean square values of velocity, density and temperature, and the processing of the spectral data is accomplished on demand in near-real-time- with DDAS. A comprehensive description of the interface to the DDAS and of the internal mechanisms will be prosented. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAS will be provided.

  7. Metabolic responses of chick embryos to short-term temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Lourens, A; van den Brand, H; Heetkamp, M J W; Meijerhof, R; Kemp, B

    2006-06-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study embryonic metabolic responses to short-term temperature fluctuations in order to explore the possibilities of using embryonic metabolic responses as a tool to control the incubation process. In the first experiment, eggshell temperature (ET) in the control group was kept constant at 37.8 degrees C, and embryos in the experimental group were exposed to varying ET within the range of 36.8 to 38.8 degrees C using ET steps of 0.2 degrees C and time steps of 3 h. This was repeated in 3 periods between 6.5 and 9.5 d, 10.5 and 13.5 d, and 14.5 and 17.5 d. In the studied ET range, heat production (HP) increased linearly at 4.9% per 1 degrees C ET. In the second experiment, a standard machine temperature (MT) was used for the control group, and eggs in the experimental group were exposed to low (MT - 0.3 degrees C) or high (MT + 0.3 degrees C) temperatures for 1 h of time at d 8, 9, and 11 to 16. When MT was decreased, CO2 production initially increased at 0.5% and decreased thereafter. When MT was increased, CO2 production initially decreased at 0.4% and increased thereafter. It was concluded that embryonic HP responded linearly with short-term ET changes in the studied ET range of 36.8 to 38.8 degrees C. Changes in CO2 concentration due to short-term MT changes could not be explained by embryonic HP only. It can be speculated that blood flow through the chorio-allantoic membrane changes with MT, affecting heat transfer and diffusion of CO2. A second, delayed response to MT changes was in accordance with the findings in Experiment 1. Within the studied temperature range it will be difficult to use embryonic metabolic responses as a tool to control the incubation process. Because HP is linearly related to ET as in the studied temperature range, other factors such as O2 availability or CO2 release may limit embryo development at higher ET. At this moment, research on the effects of gas exchange at different temperatures on embryo

  8. The absolute temperature of the sky and the temperature of the cosmic background radiation at 600 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Sironi, G.; Limon, M.; Marcellino, G.; Bonelli, G.; Bersanelli, M. CNR, Istituto di Fisica Cosmica e Tecnologie Relative, Milan )

    1990-07-01

    The absolute temperature of the sky at delta = 46.5 deg has been measured at 600 MHz (50 cm wavelength) using a differential radiometer and a cold calibrator at liquid helium temperature. To separate the cosmic background radiation (CBR) from the remaining components of the sky temperature, observations at other frequencies, now under way, are necessary. A preliminary estimate of the CBR temperature at 600 MHz made using data of T(sky) at 600 MHz and maps of the sky at 408 MHz already in the literature gives T(cbr) = (3.0 + or - 1.2) K, in good agreement with previous measurements at nearby frequencies. 45 refs.

  9. Comparison of three approaches to model grapevine organogenesis in conditions of fluctuating temperature, solar radiation and soil water content

    PubMed Central

    Pallas, B.; Loi, C.; Christophe, A.; Cournède, P. H.; Lecoeur, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims There is increasing interest in the development of plant growth models representing the complex system of interactions between the different determinants of plant development. These approaches are particularly relevant for grapevine organogenesis, which is a highly plastic process dependent on temperature, solar radiation, soil water deficit and trophic competition. Methods The extent to which three plant growth models were able to deal with the observed plasticity of axis organogenesis was assessed. In the first model, axis organogenesis was dependent solely on temperature, through thermal time. In the second model, axis organogenesis was modelled through functional relationships linking meristem activity and trophic competition. In the last model, the rate of phytomer appearence on each axis was modelled as a function of both the trophic status of the plant and the direct effect of soil water content on potential meristem activity. Key Results The model including relationships between trophic competition and meristem behaviour involved a decrease in the root mean squared error (RMSE) for the simulations of organogenesis by a factor nine compared with the thermal time-based model. Compared with the model in which axis organogenesis was driven only by trophic competition, the implementation of relationships between water deficit and meristem behaviour improved organogenesis simulation results, resulting in a three times divided RMSE. The resulting model can be seen as a first attempt to build a comprehensive complete plant growth model simulating the development of the whole plant in fluctuating conditions of temperature, solar radiation and soil water content. Conclusions We propose a new hypothesis concerning the effects of the different determinants of axis organogenesis. The rate of phytomer appearance according to thermal time was strongly affected by the plant trophic status and soil water deficit. Futhermore, the decrease in meristem

  10. Structural instability and phase co-existence driven non-Gaussian resistance fluctuations in metal nanowires at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bid, Aveek; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    We report a detailed experimental study of the resistance fluctuations measured at low temperatures in high quality metal nanowires ranging in diameter from 15-200 nm. The wires exhibit co-existing face-centered-cubic and 4H hcp phases of varying degrees as determined from the x-ray diffraction data. We observe the appearance of a large non-Gaussian noise for nanowires of diameter smaller than 50 nm over a certain temperature range around ≈30 K. The diameter range ˜30 nm, where the noise has maxima coincides with the maximum volume fraction of the co-existing 4H hcp phase thus establishing a strong link between the fluctuation and the phase co-existence. The resistance fluctuation in the same temperature range also shows a deviation of 1/f behavior at low frequency with appearance of single frequency Lorentzian type contribution in the spectral power density. The fluctuations are thermally activated with an activation energy {E}{{a}}˜ 35 meV, which is of same order as the activation energy of creation of stacking fault in FCC metals that leads to the co-existing crystallographic phases. Combining the results of crystallographic studies of the nanowires and analysis of the resistance fluctuations we could establish the correlation between the appearance of the large resistance noise and the onset of phase co-existence in these nanowires.

  11. Structural instability and phase co-existence driven non-Gaussian resistance fluctuations in metal nanowires at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Bid, Aveek; Raychaudhuri, A K

    2016-11-11

    We report a detailed experimental study of the resistance fluctuations measured at low temperatures in high quality metal nanowires ranging in diameter from 15-200 nm. The wires exhibit co-existing face-centered-cubic and 4H hcp phases of varying degrees as determined from the x-ray diffraction data. We observe the appearance of a large non-Gaussian noise for nanowires of diameter smaller than 50 nm over a certain temperature range around ≈30 K. The diameter range ∼30 nm, where the noise has maxima coincides with the maximum volume fraction of the co-existing 4H hcp phase thus establishing a strong link between the fluctuation and the phase co-existence. The resistance fluctuation in the same temperature range also shows a deviation of [Formula: see text] behavior at low frequency with appearance of single frequency Lorentzian type contribution in the spectral power density. The fluctuations are thermally activated with an activation energy [Formula: see text] meV, which is of same order as the activation energy of creation of stacking fault in FCC metals that leads to the co-existing crystallographic phases. Combining the results of crystallographic studies of the nanowires and analysis of the resistance fluctuations we could establish the correlation between the appearance of the large resistance noise and the onset of phase co-existence in these nanowires.

  12. CROSS-CORRELATING COSMIC INFRARED AND X-RAY BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS: EVIDENCE OF SIGNIFICANT BLACK HOLE POPULATIONS AMONG THE CIB SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Cappelluti, N.; Comastri, A.; Kashlinsky, A.; Mather, J. C.; Moseley, S. H.; Arendt, R. G.; Finoguenov, A.; Fazio, G. G.; Hasinger, G.; Miyaji, T.

    2013-05-20

    In order to understand the nature of the sources producing the recently uncovered cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations, we study cross-correlations between the fluctuations in the source-subtracted CIB from Spitzer/IRAC data and the unresolved cosmic X-ray background from deep Chandra observations. Our study uses data from the EGS/AEGIS field, where both data sets cover an {approx_equal} 8' Multiplication-Sign 45' region of the sky. Our measurement is the cross-power spectrum between the IR and X-ray data. The cross-power signal between the IRAC maps at 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m and the Chandra [0.5-2] keV data has been detected, at angular scales {approx}> 20'', with an overall significance of {approx_equal} 3.8{sigma} and {approx_equal} 5.6{sigma}, respectively. At the same time we find no evidence of significant cross-correlations at the harder Chandra bands. The cross-correlation signal is produced by individual IR sources with 3.6 {mu}m and 4.5 {mu}m magnitudes m{sub AB} {approx}> 25-26 and [0.5-2] keV X-ray fluxes <<7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -17} erg cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}. We determine that at least 15%-25% of the large scale power of the CIB fluctuations is correlated with the spatial power spectrum of the X-ray fluctuations. If this correlation is attributed to emission from accretion processes at both IR and X-ray wavelengths, this implies a much higher fraction of accreting black holes than among the known populations. We discuss the various possible origins for the cross-power signal and show that neither local foregrounds nor the known remaining normal galaxies and active galactic nuclei can reproduce the measurements. These observational results are an important new constraint on theoretical modeling of the near-IR CIB fluctuations.

  13. Physiological Fluctuations in Brain Temperature as a Factor Affecting Electrochemical Evaluations of Extracellular Glutamate and Glucose in Behavioral Experiments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The rate of any chemical reaction or process occurring in the brain depends on temperature. While it is commonly believed that brain temperature is a stable, tightly regulated homeostatic parameter, it fluctuates within 1–4 °C following exposure to salient arousing stimuli and neuroactive drugs, and during different behaviors. These temperature fluctuations should affect neural activity and neural functions, but the extent of this influence on neurochemical measurements in brain tissue of freely moving animals remains unclear. In this Review, we present the results of amperometric evaluations of extracellular glutamate and glucose in awake, behaving rats and discuss how naturally occurring fluctuations in brain temperature affect these measurements. While this temperature contribution appears to be insignificant for glucose because its extracellular concentrations are large, it is a serious factor for electrochemical evaluations of glutamate, which is present in brain tissue at much lower levels, showing smaller phasic fluctuations. We further discuss experimental strategies for controlling the nonspecific chemical and physical contributions to electrochemical currents detected by enzyme-based biosensors to provide greater selectivity and reliability of neurochemical measurements in behaving animals. PMID:23448428

  14. Physiological fluctuations in brain temperature as a factor affecting electrochemical evaluations of extracellular glutamate and glucose in behavioral experiments.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Lenoir, Magalie

    2013-05-15

    The rate of any chemical reaction or process occurring in the brain depends on temperature. While it is commonly believed that brain temperature is a stable, tightly regulated homeostatic parameter, it fluctuates within 1-4 °C following exposure to salient arousing stimuli and neuroactive drugs, and during different behaviors. These temperature fluctuations should affect neural activity and neural functions, but the extent of this influence on neurochemical measurements in brain tissue of freely moving animals remains unclear. In this Review, we present the results of amperometric evaluations of extracellular glutamate and glucose in awake, behaving rats and discuss how naturally occurring fluctuations in brain temperature affect these measurements. While this temperature contribution appears to be insignificant for glucose because its extracellular concentrations are large, it is a serious factor for electrochemical evaluations of glutamate, which is present in brain tissue at much lower levels, showing smaller phasic fluctuations. We further discuss experimental strategies for controlling the nonspecific chemical and physical contributions to electrochemical currents detected by enzyme-based biosensors to provide greater selectivity and reliability of neurochemical measurements in behaving animals.

  15. Simulated Seasonal Photoperiods and Fluctuating Temperatures Have Limited Effects on Blood Feeding and Life History in Aedes triseriatus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Westby, K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic factors change seasonally and impact life history in temperate-zone ectotherms. Temperature and photoperiod are factors that change in predictable ways. Most studies testing for effects of temperature on vectors use constant temperatures and ignore potential correlated effects of photoperiod. In two experiments, we tested for effects of larval rearing environments creating ecologically relevant temperatures and photoperiods simulating early and late season conditions (June and August), or constant temperatures (cool and warm) with the June or August photoperiods, respectively. We determined effects on survivorship, development, size, and a composite performance index in a temperate-zone population of Aedes triseriatus (Say). We followed cohorts of resulting females, all held under the same environmental conditions, to assess carry-over effects of rearing conditions for larvae on longevity, blood feeding, and egg production. Larval survivorship was affected by treatment in one experiment. Development time was greater in the June and cool treatments, but the constant and fluctuating temperatures did not differ. Significantly larger mosquitoes were produced in fluctuating versus constant temperature treatments. There were no significant treatment effects on the composite performance index. Adult female longevity was lower after rearing at constant versus fluctuating temperature, but there was no difference between June and August, nor did size affect longevity. There was no effect of treatments on blood feeding and a limited effect on egg production. We conclude that seasonal temperatures and photoperiods during development have limited effects on this population of A. triseriatus and find little evidence of strong effects of fluctuating versus constant temperatures. PMID:26336255

  16. Finite-temperature and finite-time scaling of the directed polymer free energy with respect to its geometrical fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Agoritsas, Elisabeth; Bustingorry, Sebastian; Lecomte, Vivien; Schehr, Grégory; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2012-09-01

    We study the fluctuations of the directed polymer in 1+1 dimensions in a Gaussian random environment with a finite correlation length ξ and at finite temperature. We address the correspondence between the geometrical transverse fluctuations of the directed polymer, described by its roughness, and the fluctuations of its free energy, characterized by its two-point correlator. Analytical arguments are provided in favor of a generic scaling law between those quantities, at finite time, nonvanishing ξ, and explicit temperature dependence. Numerical results are in good agreement both for simulations on the discrete directed polymer and on a continuous directed polymer (with short-range correlated disorder). Applications to recent experiments on liquid crystals are discussed.

  17. Local atom-number fluctuations in quantum gases at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Klawunn, M.; Recati, A.; Stringari, S.; Pitaevskii, L. P.

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the number fluctuations in small cells of quantum gases pointing out important deviations from the thermodynamic limit fixed by the isothermal compressibility. Both quantum and thermal fluctuations in weakly as well as highly compressible fluids are considered. For the two-dimensional (2D) superfluid Bose gas we find a significant quenching of fluctuations with respect to the thermodynamic limit, in agreement with recent experimental findings. An enhancement of the thermal fluctuations is instead predicted for the 2D dipolar superfluid Bose gas, which becomes dramatic when the size of the sample cell is of the order of the wavelength of the rotonic excitation induced by the interaction.

  18. Measurement of the fluctuating temperature field in a heated swirling jet with BOS tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Henning M.; Oberleithner, Kilian; Paschereit, C. Oliver; Sieber, Moritz

    2017-07-01

    This work investigates the potential of background-oriented schlieren tomography (3D-BOS) for the temperature field reconstruction in a non-isothermal swirling jet undergoing vortex breakdown. The evaluation includes a quantitative comparison of the mean and phase-averaged temperature field with thermocouple and fast-response resistance thermometer as well as a qualitative comparison between the temperature field and the flow field obtained from particle image velocimetry (PIV). Compared to other temperature-measuring techniques, 3D-BOS enables non-invasive capturing of the entire three-dimensional temperature field. In contrast to previous 3D-BOS applications, the present investigation makes use of the special character of the flow, which provides a global instability that leads to a rotational symmetry of the jet. Additionally, the rotational motion of the jet is used to obtain a tomographic reconstruction from a single camera. The quality of 3D-BOS results with respect to the physical setup as well as the numerical procedure is analyzed and discussed. Furthermore, a new approach for the treatment of thin occluding objects in the field of view is presented.

  19. The role of spatial scale and background climate in the latitudinal temperature response to deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; de Noblet-Ducoudré, N.; Davin, E. L.; Zeng, N.; Motesharrei, S.; Li, S. C.; Kalnay, E.

    2015-10-01

    Previous modeling and empirical studies have shown that the biophysical impact of deforestation is to warm the tropics and cool the extra-tropics. In this study, we use an earth system model to investigate how deforestation at various spatial scales affects ground temperature, with an emphasis on the latitudinal temperature response and its underlying mechanisms. Results show that the latitudinal pattern of temperature response depends non-linearly on the spatial extent of deforestation and the fraction of vegetation change. Compared with regional deforestation, temperature change in global deforestation is greatly amplified in temperate and boreal regions, but is dampened in tropical regions. Incremental forest removal leads to increasingly larger cooling in temperate and boreal regions, while the temperature increase saturates in tropical regions. The latitudinal and spatial patterns of the temperature response are driven by two processes with competing temperature effects: decreases in absorbed shortwave radiation due to increased albedo and decreases in evapotranspiration. These changes in the surface energy balance reflect the importance of the background climate on modifying the deforestation impact. Shortwave radiation and precipitation have an intrinsic geographical distribution that constrains the effects of biophysical changes and therefore leads to temperature changes that are spatially varying. For example, wet (dry) climate favors larger (smaller) evapotranspiration change, thus warming (cooling) is more likely to occur. Further analysis on the contribution of individual biophysical factors (albedo, roughness, and evapotranspiration efficiency) reveals that the latitudinal signature embodied in the temperature change probably result from the background climate conditions rather than the initial biophysical perturbation.

  20. The cosmic microwave background radiation temperature at a redshift of 2.34.

    PubMed

    Srianand, R; Petitjean, P; Ledoux, C

    The existence of the cosmic microwave background radiation is a fundamental prediction of hot Big Bang cosmology, and its temperature should increase with increasing redshift. At the present time (redshift z = 0), the temperature has been determined with high precision to be T(CMBR)(0) = 2.726 +/- 0.010 K. In principle, the background temperature can be determined using measurements of the relative populations of atomic fine-structure levels, which are excited by the background radiation. But all previous measurements have achieved only upper limits, thus still formally permitting the radiation temperature to be constant with increasing redshift. Here we report the detection of absorption lines from the first and second fine-structure levels of neutral carbon atoms in an isolated cloud of gas at z = 2.3371. We also detected absorption due to several rotational transitions of molecular hydrogen, and fine-structure lines of singly ionized carbon. These constraints enable us to determine that the background radiation was indeed warmer in the past: we find that T(CMBR)(z = 2.3371) is between 6.0 and 14 K. This is in accord with the temperature of 9.1 K predicted by hot Big Bang cosmology.

  1. The Effect of Moisture Source Temperature Fluctuations on Seasonal Patterns of Precipitation Isotopes within the United States.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vachon, R. W.; White, J. W.; Welker, J.

    2005-12-01

    Numerous studies have highlighted significantly decreased slopes between water isotopes and surface temperatures in coastal regions. Similar patterns have been determined from seasonal data within the United States Network for Isotopes in Precipitation (USNIP) dataset. The causes for these findings are not obvious; but it is becoming increasingly clear that such isotopic signals are linked to climatological data other than surface temperatures, such as moisture source conditions. Seasonal fluctuations of moisture source temperatures can define the specific humidity within an air mass and thus adjust the amount of moisture wrung as it is transported to a given temperature. This dynamic can skew observed relationships between seasonal isotopes and surface temperatures. In this study, a number of theoretical experiments, using the Rayleigh Model, were conducted to examine how various seasonal source temperature amplitudes can modify seasonal isotope-temperature slopes. Realistic seasonal moisture source conditions were then applied to the Rayleigh Model to explore the role of source conditions in driving the observed patterns of isotope-temperature slopes in the US. It is concluded that moisture source temperatures from geographically stationary locations within the Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, would contribute significantly to observed isotope-temperature slopes, however do not explain the patterns completely. A more complete explanation of the patterns could come from the geographic migration of moisture sources, but wind vector maps leave this problem unresolved. Alternatively, a seasonally fluctuating relationship between surface temperatures and the average height of condensation could bring resolution to the inconsistencies.

  2. Atomic configuration and properties of austenitic steels at finite temperature: Effect of longitudinal spin fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruban, A. V.; Dehghani, M.

    2016-09-01

    High-temperature atomic configurations of fcc Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with alloy composition close to austenitic steel are studied in statistical thermodynamic simulations with effective interactions obtained in ab initio calculations. The latter are done taking longitudinal spin fluctuations (LSF) into consideration within a quasiclassical phenomenological model. It is demonstrated that the magnetic state affects greatly the alloy properties, and in particular, it is shown that the LSF substantially modify the bonding and interatomic interactions of fcc Fe-Cr-Ni alloys even at ambient conditions. The calculated atomic short-range order is in reasonable agreement with existing experimental data for Fe0.56Cr0.21Ni0.23 , which has strong preference for the (001)-type ordering between Ni and Cr atoms. A similar ordering tendency is found for the Fe0.75Cr0.17Ni0.08 alloy composition, which approximately corresponds to the widely used 304 and 316 austenitic steel grades.

  3. Electron temperature fluctuations changes associated with ELM suppression by RMP in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, C.; Wang, G.; Rhodes, T.; Peebles, W.

    2015-11-01

    New results in this presentation show an increase in broadband electron temperature fluctuations (T~e) during ELM suppression by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMP). This measurement is obtained via correlation ECE (CECE) near the top of the pedestal (ρ ~ 0.9 - 0.96). This T~e increase is significant, (>40%), and occurs after the ELM suppression but not between ELMS. This may imply an increase in thermal transport facilitated by the increased T~e levels. Considering that the changes in gradient scale length during ELMs with RMP are complicated, it is possible that the mechanism responsible for changing T~e is different compared to previously observed changes in ñe [G. R. McKee et al NF 2013]. This possibility, and the nature of the T~e , will be studied through profile analysis and linear gyrokinetic analysis using TGLF [J. E. Kinsey et al PoP 2008]. In addition, the relation between the T~e and an observed low frequency coherent mode will be investigated. Work supported by the US DOE under DE-FG02-08ER54984 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  4. New measurements of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 3. 3 millimeter wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.; Smoot, G.; De amici, G.; Friedman, S.D.

    1986-11-01

    The results of measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm are reported, and the instrument, system operation, and data analysis procedures are described in detail. A CBR brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1 sigma uncertainty of + or - 0.12 K is obtained. The results are compared with measurements by other authors, and the cold-load antenna temperature and atmospheric model used in the study are discussed in appendices. 32 references.

  5. Supersonic helium beam diagnostic for fluctuation measurements of electron temperature and density at the Tokamak TEXTOR.

    PubMed

    Kruezi, U; Stoschus, H; Schweer, B; Sergienko, G; Samm, U

    2012-06-01

    A supersonic helium beam diagnostic, based on the line-ratio technique for high resolution electron density and temperature measurements in the plasma edge (r/a > 0.9) was designed, built, and optimised at TEXTOR (Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research). The supersonic injection system, based on the Campargue skimmer-nozzle concept, was developed and optimised in order to provide both a high neutral helium beam density of n(0) = 1.5 × 10(18) m(-3) and a low beam divergence of ±1° simultaneously, achieving a poloidal resolution of Δ(poloidal) = 9 mm. The setup utilises a newly developed dead volume free piezo valve for operation in a high magnetic field environment of up to 2 T with a maximum repetition rate of 80 Hz. Gas injections are realised for a duration of 120 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz (duty cycle 1/3). In combination with a high sensitivity detection system, consisting of three 32 multi-channel photomultipliers (PMTs), measurements of edge electron temperature and density with a radial resolution of Δ(radial) = 2 mm and a maximum temporal resolution of Δt ≃ 2 μs (470 kHz) are possible for the first time. The diagnostic setup at TEXTOR is presented. The newly developed injection system and its theoretical bases are discussed. The applicability of the stationary collisional-radiative model as basis of the line-ratio technique is shown. Finally, an example of a fluctuation analysis demonstrating the unique high temporal and spatial resolution capabilities of this new diagnostic is presented.

  6. Supersonic helium beam diagnostic for fluctuation measurements of electron temperature and density at the Tokamak TEXTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Kruezi, U.; Stoschus, H.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U.

    2012-06-15

    A supersonic helium beam diagnostic, based on the line-ratio technique for high resolution electron density and temperature measurements in the plasma edge (r/a > 0.9) was designed, built, and optimised at TEXTOR (Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research). The supersonic injection system, based on the Campargue skimmer-nozzle concept, was developed and optimised in order to provide both a high neutral helium beam density of n{sub 0}= 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} m{sup -3} and a low beam divergence of {+-}1 Degree-Sign simultaneously, achieving a poloidal resolution of {Delta}{sub poloidal}= 9 mm. The setup utilises a newly developed dead volume free piezo valve for operation in a high magnetic field environment of up to 2 T with a maximum repetition rate of 80 Hz. Gas injections are realised for a duration of 120 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz (duty cycle 1/3). In combination with a high sensitivity detection system, consisting of three 32 multi-channel photomultipliers (PMTs), measurements of edge electron temperature and density with a radial resolution of {Delta}{sub radial}= 2 mm and a maximum temporal resolution of {Delta}t Asymptotically-Equal-To 2 {mu}s (470 kHz) are possible for the first time. The diagnostic setup at TEXTOR is presented. The newly developed injection system and its theoretical bases are discussed. The applicability of the stationary collisional-radiative model as basis of the line-ratio technique is shown. Finally, an example of a fluctuation analysis demonstrating the unique high temporal and spatial resolution capabilities of this new diagnostic is presented.

  7. Supersonic helium beam diagnostic for fluctuation measurements of electron temperature and density at the Tokamak TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruezi, U.; Stoschus, H.; Schweer, B.; Sergienko, G.; Samm, U.

    2012-06-01

    A supersonic helium beam diagnostic, based on the line-ratio technique for high resolution electron density and temperature measurements in the plasma edge (r/a > 0.9) was designed, built, and optimised at TEXTOR (Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research). The supersonic injection system, based on the Campargue skimmer-nozzle concept, was developed and optimised in order to provide both a high neutral helium beam density of n0 = 1.5 × 1018 m-3 and a low beam divergence of ±1° simultaneously, achieving a poloidal resolution of Δpoloidal = 9 mm. The setup utilises a newly developed dead volume free piezo valve for operation in a high magnetic field environment of up to 2 T with a maximum repetition rate of 80 Hz. Gas injections are realised for a duration of 120 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz (duty cycle 1/3). In combination with a high sensitivity detection system, consisting of three 32 multi-channel photomultipliers (PMTs), measurements of edge electron temperature and density with a radial resolution of Δradial = 2 mm and a maximum temporal resolution of Δt ≃ 2 μs (470 kHz) are possible for the first time. The diagnostic setup at TEXTOR is presented. The newly developed injection system and its theoretical bases are discussed. The applicability of the stationary collisional-radiative model as basis of the line-ratio technique is shown. Finally, an example of a fluctuation analysis demonstrating the unique high temporal and spatial resolution capabilities of this new diagnostic is presented.

  8. Quark number fluctuations at finite temperature and finite chemical potential via the Dyson-Schwinger equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xian-yin; Qin, Si-xue; Liu, Yu-xin

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the quark number fluctuations up to the fourth order in the matter composed of two light flavor quarks with isospin symmetry and at finite temperature and finite chemical potential using the Dyson-Schwinger equation approach of QCD. In order to solve the quark gap equation, we approximate the dressed quark-gluon vertex with the bare one and adopt both the Maris-Tandy model and the infrared constant (Qin-Chang) model for the dressed gluon propagator. Our results indicate that the second, third, and fourth order fluctuations of net quark number all diverge at the critical endpoint (CEP). Around the CEP, the second order fluctuation possesses obvious pump while the third and fourth order ones exhibit distinct wiggles between positive and negative. For the Maris-Tandy model and the Qin-Chang model, we give the pseudocritical temperature at zero quark chemical potential as Tc=146 MeV and 150 MeV, and locate the CEP at (μEq,TE)=(120,124) MeV and (124,129) MeV, respectively. In addition, our results manifest that the fluctuations are insensitive to the details of the model, but the location of the CEP shifts to low chemical potential and high temperature as the confinement length scale increases.

  9. Fundamental study of FC-72 pool boiling surface temperature fluctuations and bubble behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Alison R.

    A heater designed to monitor surface temperature fluctuations during pool boiling experiments while the bubbles were simultaneously being observed has been fabricated and tested. The heat source was a transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) layer commercially deposited on a fused quartz substrate. Four copper-nickel thin film thermocouples (TFTCs) on the heater surface measured the surface temperature, while a thin layer of sapphire or fused silica provided electrical insulation between the TFTCs and the ITO. The TFTCs were micro-fabricated using the liftoff process to deposit the nickel and copper metal films. The TFTC elements were 50 mum wide and overlapped to form a 25 mum by 25 mum junction. TFTC voltages were recorded by a DAQ at a sampling rate of 50 kHz. A high-speed CCD camera recorded bubble images from below the heater at 2000 frames/second. A trigger sent to the camera by the DAQ synchronized the bubble images and the surface temperature data. As the bubbles and their contact rings grew over the TFTC junction, correlations between bubble behavior and surface temperature changes were demonstrated. On the heaters with fused silica insulation layers, 1--2°C temperature drops on the order of 1 ms occurred as the contact ring moved over the TFTC junction during bubble growth and as the contact ring moved back over the TFTC junction during bubble departure. These temperature drops during bubble growth and departure were due to microlayer evaporation and liquid rewetting the heated surface, respectively. Microlayer evaporation was not distinguished as the primary method of heat removal from the surface. Heaters with sapphire insulation layers did not display the measurable temperature drops observed with the fused silica heaters. The large thermal diffusivity of the sapphire compared to the fused silica was determined as the reason for the absence of these temperature drops. These findings were confirmed by a comparison of temperature drops in a 2-D simulation of

  10. Chromatin integrity of ram spermatozoa. Relationships to annual fluctuations of scrotal surface temperature and temperature-humidity index.

    PubMed

    Malama, E; Bollwein, H; Taitzoglou, I A; Theodosiou, T; Boscos, C M; Kiossis, E

    2013-09-15

    The objective of the present study was to explore the potential relationships of ovine sperm chromatin integrity, quantified using the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA), to the heat load of the scrotum and the discomfort felt by the animals because of fluctuations of microclimatic factors at different time periods before ejaculation. Ejaculates were collected once per week from five Chios rams and four East Friesian rams for 12 months and stored in liquid nitrogen. Frozen-thawed semen samples were analyzed using the SCSA, to determine the DNA fragmentation index (DFI) and the percentage of cells outside the main sperm population (%DFI) in each one of the samples. Scrotal surface temperature (SST) of each ram was measured using an infrared thermometer on a daily basis. Ambient air temperature and relative humidity were recorded at hourly intervals throughout the experimental period and temperature-humidity index (THI) was used to assess the discomfort felt by the rams. Mean values of SST (SST mean) and THI (THI mean) were computed for eight different time periods (up to 61 days) preceding each ejaculation day (Day 0). A linear mixed-effect model analysis was performed to describe the relation of SCSA parameters to collection month, SST mean, and THI mean of different time periods before ejaculation. The results of the statistical analysis revealed a relation of %DFI to the SST mean of the last 12 days preceding ejaculation, namely the period that resembled the phase of epididymal maturation. On the contrary, the variation of DFI was most adequately described by the linear mixed-effect model applied for Days 54 to 48 before ejaculation, which resembled the phase of spermatogonial mitoses. The effect of collection month was significant for DFI and %DFI, with semen samples collected in September and February exhibiting the lowest DFI values; a less profound seasonal pattern was detected for %DFI. The effect of THI mean on DFI and %DFI was proven nonsignificant in

  11. Ultra-fast charge exchange spectroscopy for turbulent ion temperature fluctuation measurements on the DIII-D tokamak (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.

    2012-10-15

    A novel two-channel, high throughput, high efficiency spectrometer system has been developed to measure impurity ion temperature and toroidal velocity fluctuations associated with long-wavelength turbulence and other plasma instabilities. The spectrometer observes the emission of the n= 8-7 hydrogenic transition of C{sup +5} ions ({lambda}{sub air}= 529.06 nm) resulting from charge exchange reactions between deuterium heating beams and intrinsic carbon. Novel features include a large, prism-coupled high-dispersion, volume-phase-holographic transmission grating and high-quantum efficiency, high-gain, low-noise avalanche photodiode detectors that sample emission at 1 MHz. This new diagnostic offers an order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity compared to earlier ion thermal turbulence measurements. Increased sensitivity is crucial for obtaining enough photon statistics from plasmas with much less impurity content. The irreducible noise floor set by photon statistics sets the ultimate sensitivity to plasma fluctuations. Based on the measured photon flux levels for the entire spectral line, photon noise levels for T(tilde sign){sub i}/T{sub i} and V(tilde sign){sub i}/V{sub i} of {approx}1% are expected, while statistical averaging over long data records enables reduction in the detectable plasma fluctuation levels to values less than that. Broadband ion temperature fluctuations are observed to near 200 kHz in an L-mode discharge. Cross-correlation with the local beam emission spectroscopy measurements demonstrates a strong coupling of the density and temperature fields, and enables the cross-phase measurements between density and ion temperature fluctuations.

  12. Probing environment fluctuations by two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of molecular systems at temperatures below 5 K

    SciTech Connect

    Rancova, Olga; Abramavicius, Darius; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2015-06-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy at cryogenic and room temperatures reveals excitation energy relaxation and transport, as well as vibrational dynamics, in molecular systems. These phenomena are related to the spectral densities of nuclear degrees of freedom, which are directly accessible by means of hole burning and fluorescence line narrowing approaches at low temperatures (few K). The 2D spectroscopy, in principle, should reveal more details about the fluctuating environment than the 1D approaches due to peak extension into extra dimension. By studying the spectral line shapes of a dimeric aggregate at low temperature, we demonstrate that 2D spectra have the potential to reveal the fluctuation spectral densities for different electronic states, the interstate correlation of static disorder and, finally, the time scales of spectral diffusion with high resolution.

  13. Heat synch: inter- and independence of body-temperature fluctuations and brain-state alternations in urethane-anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Whitten, Tara A; Martz, Laura J; Guico, Anthony; Gervais, Nicole; Dickson, Clayton T

    2009-09-01

    During sleep, warm-blooded animals exhibit cyclic alternations between rapid-eye-movement (REM) and nonrapid-eye-movement (non-REM) states, characterized by distinct patterns of brain activity apparent in electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings coupled with corresponding changes in physiological measures, including body temperature. Recently we have shown that urethane-anesthetized rats display cyclic alternations between an activated state and a deactivated state that are highly similar in both EEG and physiological characteristics to REM and non-REM sleep states, respectively. Here, using intracranial local field potential recordings from urethane-anesthetized rats, we show that brain-state alternations were correlated to core temperature fluctuations induced using a feedback-controlled heating system. Activated (REM-like) states predominated during the rising phase of the temperature cycle, whereas deactivated (non-REM-like) states predominated during the falling phase. Brain-state alternations persisted following the elimination of core temperature fluctuations by the use of a constant heating protocol, but the timing and rhythmicity of state alternations were altered. In contrast, thermal fluctuations applied to the ventral surface (and especially the scrotum) of rats in the absence or independently of core temperature fluctuations appeared to induce brain-state alternations. Heating brought about activated patterns, whereas cooling produced deactivated patterns. This shows that although alternations of sleeplike brain states under urethane anesthesia can be independent of imposed temperature variations, they can also be entrained through the activation of peripheral thermoreceptors. Overall, these results imply that brain state and bodily metabolism are highly related during unconsciousness and that the brain mechanisms underlying sleep cycling and thermoregulation likely represent independent, yet coupled oscillators.

  14. Estrous cycle fluctuations in sex and ingestive behavior are accentuated by exercise or cold ambient temperatures.

    PubMed

    Abdulhay, Amir; Benton, Noah A; Klingerman, Candice M; Krishnamoorthy, Kaila; Brozek, Jeremy M; Schneider, Jill E

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". In female Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus), low circulating levels of ovarian steroids are associated with increased food hoarding and decreased sexual motivation, but these effects are exaggerated in food-restricted females. To determine whether cold ambient temperature has the same effects as food restriction, groups of hamsters were fed ad libitum while they were housed at either 5 °C or 22 °C, and then tested for behavior for 90 min on each day of the estrous cycle. In females housed at 22 °C, high levels of sexual motivation and low levels of food hoarding were seen every day of the estrous cycle. In females housed at 5 °C, high levels of sexual motivation were restricted to the periovulatory day. On the three nonestrous days, these females showed high levels of food hoarding, but not food intake. A separate cohort of females were provided with access to running wheels and housed at 22 °C. They showed high levels of sexual motivation restricted to the periovulatory day, similar to the pattern of sexual motivation seen in cold-housed females. Unlike cold-housed females, those with running wheels showed low levels of food hoarding and high levels of food intake. Food restriction, cold housing, and access to wheels had no significant effect on plasma estradiol or progesterone concentrations, but significantly decreased plasma leptin concentrations. All three energetic challenges unmask estrous cycle fluctuations in sexual motivation that are obscured in laboratory conditions, i.e., isolation in a small cage with an overabundance of food.

  15. The role of spatial scale and background climate in the latitudinal temperature response to deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan; De Noblet-Ducoudré, Nathalie; Davin, Edouard L.; Motesharrei, Safa; Zeng, Ning; Li, Shuangcheng; Kalnay, Eugenia

    2016-03-01

    Previous modeling and empirical studies have shown that the biophysical impact of deforestation is to warm the tropics and cool the extratropics. In this study, we use an earth system model of intermediate complexity to investigate how deforestation on various spatial scales affects ground temperature, with an emphasis on the latitudinal temperature response and its underlying mechanisms. Results show that the latitudinal pattern of temperature response depends nonlinearly on the spatial extent of deforestation and the fraction of vegetation change. Compared with regional deforestation, temperature change in global deforestation is greatly amplified in temperate and boreal regions but is dampened in tropical regions. Incremental forest removal leads to increasingly larger cooling in temperate and boreal regions, while the temperature increase saturates in tropical regions. The latitudinal and spatial patterns of the temperature response are driven by two processes with competing temperature effects: decrease in absorbed shortwave radiation due to increased albedo and decrease in evapotranspiration. These changes in the surface energy balance reflect the importance of the background climate in modifying the deforestation impact. Shortwave radiation and precipitation have an intrinsic geographical distribution that constrains the effects of biophysical changes and therefore leads to temperature changes that are spatially varying. For example, wet (dry) climate favors larger (smaller) evapotranspiration change; thus, warming (cooling) is more likely to occur. Our analysis reveals that the latitudinal temperature change largely results from the climate conditions in which deforestation occurs and is less influenced by the magnitude of individual biophysical changes such as albedo, roughness, and evapotranspiration efficiency.

  16. Obtaining phase velocity of turbulent boundary layer pressure fluctuations at high subsonic Mach number from wind tunnel data affected by strong background noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxter, Stefan; Brouwer, Jens; Sesterhenn, Jörn; Spehr, Carsten

    2017-08-01

    Boundary layer measurements at high subsonic Mach number are evaluated in order to obtain the dominant phase velocities of boundary layer pressure fluctuations. The measurements were performed in a transonic wind tunnel which had a very strong background noise. The phase velocity was taken from phase inclination and from the convective peak in one- and two-dimensional wavenumber spectra. An approach was introduced to remove the acoustic noise from the data by applying a method based on CLEAN-SC on the two-dimensional spectra, thereby increasing the frequency range where information about the boundary layer was retrievable. A comparison with prediction models showed some discrepancies in the low-frequency range. Therefore, pressure data from a DNS calculation was used to substantiate the results of the analysis in this frequency range. Using the measured data, the DNS results and a review of the models used for comparison it was found that the phase velocity decreases at low frequencies.

  17. Fluid-inclusion evidence for past temperature fluctuations in the Kilauea East Rift Zone geothermal area, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, K.E.; Keith, T.E.C.; Trusdell, F.A.

    1995-01-01

    Heating and freezing data were obtained for fluid inclusions in hydrothermal quartz, calcite, and anhydrite from several depths in three scientific observation holes drilled along the lower East Rift Zone of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Comparison of measured drill-hole temperatures with fluid-inclusion homogenization-temperature (Th) data indicates that only about 15% of the fluid inclusions could have formed under the present thermal conditions. The majority of fluid inclusions studied must have formed during one or more times in the past when temperatures fluctuated in response to the emplacement of nearby dikes and their subsequent cooling. -from Authors

  18. The role of spatial scale and background climate in the latitudinal temperature response to deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; De Noblet-Decoudre, N.; Davin, E.; Zeng, N.; Motesharrei, S.; Li, S.; Kalnay, E.; Guo, S.

    2015-12-01

    Previous modeling and observational studies have shown that the biophysical impact of deforestation is warming in the tropics and cooling in extra-tropics. In this study, we performed experiments with an earth system model to investigate how deforestation at various spatial scales affects ground temperature, with emphasis on the latitudinal temperature response and the underlining mechanisms. Results show that the latitudinal pattern of temperature response non-linearly depends on the spatial extent of deforestation and the fraction of vegetation change. Compared with regional deforestation, temperature change in global deforestation is greatly amplified in temperate and boreal regions, but is dampened in tropical region. Incremental forest removal fraction leads to increasingly larger cooling under higher removal fraction in temperate and boreal regions, while the temperature increase saturates in tropical region. The latitudinal and spatial patterns of the temperature response are mainly determined by two processes with competing temperature effects, i.e., decreases in absorbed shortwave radiation and in evapotranspiration (ET). These changes in surface energy balance reflect the important role of background climate on modifying the deforestation impact, because shortwave radiation and precipitation have intrinsic geographical distribution, which constrain the effects of biophysical changes and therefore lead to spatially varying temperature change. For example, wet (dry) climate favors larger (smaller) ET change, thus warming (cooling) is more likely to occur. Further analysis on the contribution of individual biophysical factor (albedo, roughness, and evapotranspiration efficiency) reveals that the latitudinal signature embodied in the temperature change likely arises from background climate conditions rather than from the initial biophysical perturbation.

  19. Measurement of electron temperature fluctuations using a tunable correlation electron cyclotron emission system on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, N. T.; Sung, C.; White, A. E.

    2014-11-15

    A tunable correlation electron cyclotron (CECE) system was recently installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak to provide local, quantitative measurement of electron temperature fluctuations in the tokamak core. This system represents a significant upgrade from the original CECE system, expanding the measurement capabilities from 4 to 8 total channels, including 2 remotely tunable YIG filters (6–18 GHz; 200 MHz bandwidth). Additional upgrades were made to the optical system to provide enhanced poloidal resolution and allow for measurement of turbulent fluctuations below k{sub θ}ρ{sub s} < 0.3. These expanded capabilities allow for single shot measurement of partial temperature fluctuation profiles in the region ρ = 0.7 − 0.9 (square root of normalized toroidal flux) in a wide variety of plasma conditions. These measurements are currently being used to provide stringent tests of the gyrokinetic model in ongoing model validation efforts. Details of the hardware upgrades, turbulent fluctuation measurements, and ongoing comparisons with simulations are presented.

  20. Superconducting transition temperatures and coherence length in non-s-wave pairing materials correlated with spin-fluctuation mediated interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angilella, G. G.; March, N. H.; Pucci, R.

    2002-03-01

    Following earlier work on electron or hole liquids flowing through assemblies with magnetic fluctuations, we have recently exposed a marked correlation of the superconducting temperature Tc, for non-s-wave pairing materials, with coherence length ξ and effective mass m*. The very recent study of Abanov et al. [Europhys. Lett. 54, 488 (2001)] and the prior investigation of Monthoux and Lonzarich [Phys. Rev. B 59, 14 598 (1999)] have each focused on the concept of a spin-fluctuation temperature Tsf, which again is intimately related to Tc. For the d-wave pairing via antiferromagnetic spin fluctuations in the cuprates, these studies are brought into close contact with our own work, and the result is that kBTsf~ħ2/m*ξ2. This demonstrates that ξ is also determined by such antiferromagnetic spin-fluctuation mediated pair interaction. The coherence length in units of the lattice spacing is then essentially given in the cuprates as the square root of the ratio of two characteristic energies, namely, the kinetic energy of localization of a charge carrier of mass m* in a specified magnetic correlation length to the hopping energy. The quasi-two-dimensional ruthenate Sr2RuO4, with Tc~1.3 K, has p-wave spin-triplet pairing and so is also briefly discussed here.

  1. Changes in core electron temperature fluctuations across the ohmic energy confinement transition in Alcator C-Mod plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Howard, N. T.; Oi, C. Y.; Rice, J. E.; Gao, C.; Ennever, P.; Porkolab, M.; Parra, F.; Mikkelsen, D.; Ernst, D.; Walk, J.; Hughes, J. W.; Irby, J.; Kasten, C.; Hubbard, A. E.; Greenwald, M. J.; the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2013-08-01

    The first measurements of long wavelength (kyρs < 0.3) electron temperature fluctuations in Alcator C-Mod made with a new correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic support a long-standing hypothesis regarding the confinement transition from linear ohmic confinement (LOC) to saturated ohmic confinement (SOC). Electron temperature fluctuations decrease significantly (∼40%) crossing from LOC to SOC, consistent with a change from trapped electron mode (TEM) turbulence domination to ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence as the density is increased. Linear stability analysis performed with the GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) shows that TEMs are dominant for long wavelength turbulence in the LOC regime and ITG modes are dominant in the SOC regime at the radial location (ρ ∼ 0.8) where the changes in electron temperature fluctuations are measured. In contrast, deeper in the core (ρ < 0.8), linear stability analysis indicates that ITG modes remain dominant across the LOC/SOC transition. This radial variation suggests that the robust global changes in confinement of energy and momentum occurring across the LOC/SOC transition are correlated to local changes in the dominant turbulent mode near the edge.

  2. Bacterial responses to fluctuations and extremes in temperature and brine salinity at the surface of Arctic winter sea ice.

    PubMed

    Ewert, Marcela; Deming, Jody W

    2014-08-01

    Wintertime measurements near Barrow, Alaska, showed that bacteria near the surface of first-year sea ice and in overlying saline snow experience more extreme temperatures and salinities, and wider fluctuations in both parameters, than bacteria deeper in the ice. To examine impacts of such conditions on bacterial survival, two Arctic isolates with different environmental tolerances were subjected to winter-freezing conditions, with and without the presence of organic solutes involved in osmoprotection: proline, choline, or glycine betaine. Obligate psychrophile Colwellia psychrerythraea strain 34H suffered cell losses under all treatments, with maximal loss after 15-day exposure to temperatures fluctuating between -7 and -25 °C. Osmoprotectants significantly reduced the losses, implying that salinity rather than temperature extremes presents the greater stress for this organism. In contrast, psychrotolerant Psychrobacter sp. strain 7E underwent miniaturization and fragmentation under both fluctuating and stable-freezing conditions, with cell numbers increasing in most cases, implying a different survival strategy that may include enhanced dispersal. Thus, the composition and abundance of the bacterial community that survives in winter sea ice may depend on the extent to which overlying snow buffers against extreme temperature and salinity conditions and on the availability of solutes that mitigate osmotic shock, especially during melting.

  3. New Measurements of the Cosmic Background Radiation Temperature at3.3 mm Wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.; Smoot, G.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S.D.

    1986-02-01

    We have measured the temperature of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm wavelength in 1982, 1983, and 1984 as part of a larger project to determine the CBR temperature at five wavelengths from 12 cm to 3.3 mm (Smoot et al. 1985). The 3.3-mm measurements yield a brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1{sigma} uncertainty of 20.12 K. This paper describes the instrument, the measurement techniques, and the data-analysis procedures used. Our result is in good agreement with recent measurements at comparable wavelengths by Meyer and Jura (1985) and by Peterson, Richards, and Timusk (1985), but it disagrees with the temperatures reported by Woody and Richards (1981).

  4. A spatial length scale analysis of turbulent temperature and velocity fluctuations within and above an orchard canopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Y.S.; Miller, D.R.; Anderson, D.E.; Cionco, R.M.; Lin, J.D.

    1992-01-01

    Turbulent flow within and above an almond orchard was measured with three-dimensional wind sensors and fine-wire thermocouple sensors arranged in a horizontal array. The data showed organized turbulent structures as indicated by coherent asymmetric ramp patterns in the time series traces across the sensor array. Space-time correlation analysis indicated that velocity and temperature fluctuations were significantly correlated over a transverse distance more than 4m. Integral length scales of velocity and temperature fluctuations were substantially greater in unstable conditions than those in stable conditions. The coherence spectral analysis indicated that Davenport's geometric similarity hypothesis was satisfied in the lower frequency region. From the geometric similarity hypothesis, the spatial extents of large ramp structures were also estimated with the coherence functions.

  5. Quantitative comparison of electron temperature fluctuations to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Greenwald, M.; Holland, C.; Howard, N. T.; Churchill, R.; Theiler, C.

    2016-04-01

    Long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations (kyρs < 0.3) are measured in the outer core region (r/a > 0.8) of Ohmic L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [E. S. Marmar et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104014 (2009)] with a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic. The relative amplitude and frequency spectrum of the fluctuations are compared quantitatively with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] in two different confinement regimes: linear Ohmic confinement (LOC) regime and saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) regime. When comparing experiment with nonlinear simulations, it is found that local, electrostatic ion-scale simulations (kyρs ≲ 1.7) performed at r/a ˜ 0.85 reproduce the experimental ion heat flux levels, electron temperature fluctuation levels, and frequency spectra within experimental error bars. In contrast, the electron heat flux is robustly under-predicted and cannot be recovered by using scans of the simulation inputs within error bars or by using global simulations. If both the ion heat flux and the measured temperature fluctuations are attributed predominantly to long-wavelength turbulence, then under-prediction of electron heat flux strongly suggests that electron scale turbulence is important for transport in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges. In addition, no evidence is found from linear or nonlinear simulations for a clear transition from trapped electron mode to ion temperature gradient turbulence across the LOC/SOC transition, and also there is no evidence in these Ohmic L-mode plasmas of the "Transport Shortfall" [C. Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 052301 (2009)].

  6. Quantitative comparison of electron temperature fluctuations to nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, C.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Howard, N. T.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Churchill, R.; Holland, C.; Theiler, C.

    2016-04-15

    Long wavelength turbulent electron temperature fluctuations (k{sub y}ρ{sub s} < 0.3) are measured in the outer core region (r/a > 0.8) of Ohmic L-mode plasmas at Alcator C-Mod [E. S. Marmar et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104014 (2009)] with a correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic. The relative amplitude and frequency spectrum of the fluctuations are compared quantitatively with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations using the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] in two different confinement regimes: linear Ohmic confinement (LOC) regime and saturated Ohmic confinement (SOC) regime. When comparing experiment with nonlinear simulations, it is found that local, electrostatic ion-scale simulations (k{sub y}ρ{sub s} ≲ 1.7) performed at r/a ∼ 0.85 reproduce the experimental ion heat flux levels, electron temperature fluctuation levels, and frequency spectra within experimental error bars. In contrast, the electron heat flux is robustly under-predicted and cannot be recovered by using scans of the simulation inputs within error bars or by using global simulations. If both the ion heat flux and the measured temperature fluctuations are attributed predominantly to long-wavelength turbulence, then under-prediction of electron heat flux strongly suggests that electron scale turbulence is important for transport in C-Mod Ohmic L-mode discharges. In addition, no evidence is found from linear or nonlinear simulations for a clear transition from trapped electron mode to ion temperature gradient turbulence across the LOC/SOC transition, and also there is no evidence in these Ohmic L-mode plasmas of the “Transport Shortfall” [C. Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 052301 (2009)].

  7. Short-Scale Turbulent Fluctuations Driven by the Electron-Temperature Gradient in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzucato, E.; Smith, D. R.; Bell, R. E.; Kaye, S.; Davis, W.; Hosea, J.; LeBlanc, B; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C.; Yuh, H.; Lee, W.; Park, H.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements with coherent scattering of electromagnetic waves in plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment indicate the existence of turbulent fluctuations in the range of wave numbers k?e 0:1 0:4, corresponding to a turbulence scale length nearly equal to the collisionless skin depth. Experimental observations and agreement with numerical results from a linear gyrokinetic stability code support the conjecture that the observed turbulence is driven by the electron-temperature gradient.

  8. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  9. Interferometric fiber-optic gyroscope performance owing to temperature-induced index fluctuations in the fiber: effect on bias modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, Sverre; Bløtekjær, Kjell

    1995-06-01

    An analysis of the noise floor owing to temperature-induced index fluctuations in the fiber of a dynamically biased interferometric fiber-optic gyroscope is presented. A comparison with shot noise indicates that, for a harmonic bias modulation, thermal noise in the fiber dominates for fiber lengths longer than \\similar 1 - 2km when practical source power levels are considered. The noise can be reduced or eliminated by the proper choice of modulation frequency or waveform.

  10. A high speed data acquisition system for the analysis of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations at transonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.; Jones, Gregory S.; Stainback, P. Calvin

    1988-01-01

    The use of a high-speed Dynamic Data Acquisition System (DDAS) to measure simultaneously velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations is described. The DDAS is used to automate the acquisition of hot-wire calibration data. The data acquisition, data handling, and data reporting techiques used by DDAS are described. Sample data are used to compare results obtained with the DDAS with those obtained from the FM tape and post-test digitization method.

  11. Feasibility study of SiGHT: a novel ultra low background photosensor for low temperature operation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Y.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; ...

    2017-02-27

    Rare event search experiments, such as those searching for dark matter and observations of neutrinoless double beta decay, require ultra low levels of radioactive background for unmistakable identification. In order to reduce the radioactive background of detectors used in these types of event searches, low background photosensors are required, as the physical size of these detectors become increasing larger, and hence the number of such photosensors used also increases rapidly. Considering that most dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments are turning towards using noble liquids as the target choice, liquid xenon and liquid argon for instance, photosensors thatmore » can work well at cryogenic temperatures are required, 165 K and 87 K for liquid xenon and liquid argon, respectively. The Silicon Geiger Hybrid Tube (SiGHT) is a novel photosensor designed specifically for use in ultra low background experiments operating at cryogenic temperatures. It is based on the proven photocathode plus silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) hybrid technology and consists of very few other, but also ultra radio-pure, materials like fused silica and silicon for the SiPM. Lastly, the introduction of the SiGHT concept, as well as a feasibility study for its production, is reported in this article.« less

  12. Feasibility study of SiGHT: a novel ultra low background photosensor for low temperature operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Fan, A.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Guan, M. Y.; Korga, G.; Pantic, E.; Razeto, A.; Renshaw, A.; Rossi, B.; Suvorov, Y.; Wang, H.; Yang, C. G.

    2017-02-01

    Rare event search experiments, such as those searching for dark matter and observations of neutrinoless double beta decay, require ultra low levels of radioactive background for unmistakable identification. In order to reduce the radioactive background of detectors used in these types of event searches, low background photosensors are required, as the physical size of these detectors become increasing larger, and hence the number of such photosensors used also increases rapidly. Considering that most dark matter and neutrinoless double beta decay experiments are turning towards using noble liquids as the target choice, liquid xenon and liquid argon for instance, photosensors that can work well at cryogenic temperatures are required, 165 K and 87 K for liquid xenon and liquid argon, respectively. The Silicon Geiger Hybrid Tube (SiGHT) is a novel photosensor designed specifically for use in ultra low background experiments operating at cryogenic temperatures. It is based on the proven photocathode plus silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) hybrid technology and consists of very few other, but also ultra radio-pure, materials like fused silica and silicon for the SiPM. The introduction of the SiGHT concept, as well as a feasibility study for its production, is reported in this paper.

  13. Mosselbay environmental conditions and sea-surface temperature fluctuations during the Late Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Annette; Andò, Sergio; Frenzel, Peter; Kugel, Martin; Mollenhauer, Gesine; Schefuß, Enno; Zabel, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    our current stage of research, we attribute this to a southward shift of the SHW and a strengthening in Aghulas current speed during this period. Cohen, A.L. and Tyson, P.D., 1995. Sea-surface temperature fluctuations during the Holocene off the south coast of Africa: implications for terrestrial climate and rainfall. The Holocene 5 (3), 304-312.

  14. Interstellar cyanogen and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roth, Katherine C.; Meyer, David M.; Hawkins, Isabel

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of a recently completed effort to determine the amount of CN rotational excitation in five diffuse interstellar clouds for the purpose of accurately measuring the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). In addition, we report a new detection of emission from the strongest hyperfine component of the 2.64 mm CN rotational transition (N = 1-0) in the direction toward HD 21483. We have used this result in combination with existing emission measurements toward our other stars to correct for local excitation effects within diffuse clouds which raise the measured CN rotational temperature above that of the CMBR. After making this correction, we find a weighted mean value of T(CMBR) = 2.729 (+0.023, -0.031) K. This temperature is in excellent agreement with the new COBE measurement of 2.726 +/- 0.010 K (Mather et al., 1993). Our result, which samples the CMBR far from the near-Earth environment, attests to the accuracy of the COBE measurement and reaffirms the cosmic nature of this background radiation. From the observed agreement between our CMBR temperature and the COBE result, we conclude that corrections for local CN excitation based on millimeter emission measurements provide an accurate adjustment to the measured rotational excitation.

  15. Measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 3. 3 mm wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm wavelength (90 GHz) yielded a brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1sigma uncertainty of +/-0.12 K. The observations were made from the Barcroft Laboratory of the White Mountain Research Station, at an altitude of 3800 m, initially on 5 and 6 July 1982 and again on 4, 5 and 6 September 1983, as part of a program to measure the spectrum of the CBR at five wavelengths from 12.0 cm to 3.3 mm. The weighted mean of the temperature measurements at all five wavelengths is 2.72 +/- 0.04 K. The instrument used for the 3.3 mm measurements is a differential, dual-antenna, Dicke-switched, superheterodyne radiometer with an RF bandwidth of 1.9 GHz and a sensitivity of 125 mK/..sqrt..Hz. The radiometer is mounted on bearings, which allow it to rotate. Either antenna can view a large liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load while the other antenna views the zenith. The antenna temperature of the reference load, 2.083 +/- 0.037 K, is added to the measured zenith/cold-load temperature difference to yield the zenith antenna temperature, typically 9 to 12 K. The atmospheric contribution to the zenith temperature is measured by means of zenith scans.

  16. Ultrasonic thermometry simulation in a random fluctuating medium: Evidence of the acoustic signature of a one-percent temperature difference.

    PubMed

    Nagaso, M; Moysan, J; Benjeddou, S; Massacret, N; Ploix, M A; Komatitsch, D; Lhuillier, C

    2016-05-01

    We study the development potential of ultrasonic thermometry in a liquid fluctuating sodium environment similar to that present in a Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor, and thus investigate if and how ultrasonic thermometry could be used to monitor the sodium flow at the outlet of the reactor core. In particular we study if small temperature variations in the sodium flow of e.g. about 1% of the sodium temperature, i.e., about 5°C, can have a reliably-measurable acoustic signature. Since to our knowledge no experimental setups are available for such a study, and considering the practical difficulties of experimentation in sodium, we resort to a numerical technique for full wave propagation called the spectral-element method, which is a highly accurate finite-element method owing to the high-degree basis functions it uses. We obtain clear time-of-flight variations in the case of a small temperature difference of one percent in the case of a static temperature gradient as well as in the presence of a random fluctuation of the temperature field in the turbulent flow. The numerical simulations underline the potential of ultrasonic thermometry in such a context.

  17. Effects of temperature stress and pesticide exposure on fluctuating asymmetry and mortality of Copera annulata (Selys) (Odonata: Zygoptera) larvae.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xiaoli; Zhai, Baoping; Liu, Xiangdong; Wang, Min

    2007-05-01

    Although there have been some investigations into the effects of insecticide on the level of fluctuating asymmetry (FA) of adult damselflies, the cooperative effects of environmental factors on FA of larval damselflies were known little. This paper explored effects of exposure to temperature and pesticide on larval development of the damselfly Copera annulata (Selys). A conventional life history trait (mortality) and developmental instability (estimated by calculating fluctuating asymmetry of bilaterally symmetrical structures) were used to measure stresses in this paper. The results showed that temperature and different concentrations of pesticide produced significant effects only on developmental stability of some characters. The FA values of three traits decreased at lower concentrations, then increased slowly with increased insecticide doses. The FA values of four traits decreased slowly with increased temperatures. However, the interaction between different concentrations of insecticide and temperature was complicated and only produced significant effects on five traits. Insecticide treatment did not significantly affect mortality of the larvae of damselfly. However, mortality was significantly positively associated with temperature. There were significantly negative associations between mortality and the FA values of three traits. These results may be caused by higher mortality and short rearing time although we did not find the significant effects of concentrations on mortality. Therefore, we speculate FA may be induced if larval damselflies were treated during longer term and FA has potential as a more specific bioindicator of stresses if we guarantee enough longer rearing time without higher mortality under stressful environment.

  18. Infrared radiometry-based background-compensated thermometric instrument for noncontact temperature and friction measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Mandelis, A.; Garcia, J.; Eccles, C.

    2001-05-01

    The design and performance of a novel thermometric instrument featuring thermalemission-intensity harmonic modulation, noncontact infrared radiometric detection, and stray background suppression is described. The instrumental principle depends on thermal (blackbody) emission of Planck radiation from a heated surface. It was developed to measure small temperature rises caused by frictional heating. A low-power He-Ne heating laser was used to investigate the sensitivity and estimate a figure-of-merit (FOM) for the instrument. Background compensation leading to signal baseline suppression was partly achieved with a differential mechanical chopper blade, designed to induce destructive interference of infrared radiation superposition from heated and reference spots on a ceramic sample coated with a metallic thin film. Additional background suppression was achieved by lock-in amplifier signal amplitude and phase compensation through an externally superposed wave at the same chopping frequency. The FOM of the noncontact thermometric instrument was 159.9±8.5. The system sensitivity (minimum temperature rise) for the particular thin-film/ceramic material was estimated to be 0.18-0.23 °C.

  19. Correlation Electron Temperature Fluctuation Measurements on Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX Upgrade: Cross Machine Comparisons and Transport Model Validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. E.; Creely, A. J.; Freethy, S.; Cao, N.; Conway, G. D.; Goerler, T.; Happel, T.; Howard, N. T.; Inman, C.; Rice, J. E.; Rodriguez Fernandez, P.; Sung, C.; C-Mod, Alcator; Upgrade, Asdex

    2016-10-01

    Correlation Electron Cyclotron Emission diagnostics have been developed for Alcator C-Mod and ASDEX Upgrade. Measurements of long wavelength (ktheta rhos <0.5) electron temperature fluctuations have been measured in the core plasma (0.5 temperature fluctuations, and the correlation with density fluctuations, which can be measured with coupled radiometer / reflectometer diagnostics, provide valuable constraints on gyrokinetic models. Recent results in transport model validation at both C-Mod and AUG are presented. This work is supported by the US DOE under Grants DE-SC0006419 and DEFC02-99ER54512-CMOD.

  20. Effect of fluctuations on time-averaged multi-line NO-LIF thermometry measurements of the gas-phase temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feroughi, Omid M.; Kronemayer, Helmut; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2015-09-01

    Multi-line NO laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) thermometry enables accurate gas-phase temperature imaging in combustion systems through least-squares fitting of excitation spectra. The required excitation wavelength scan takes several minutes which systematic biases the results in case of temperature fluctuations. In this work, the effect of various types (linear, Gaussian and bimodal) and amplitudes of temperature fluctuations is quantified based on simulated NO-LIF excitation spectra. Temperature fluctuations of less than ±5 % result in a negligible error of less than ±1 % in temperature for all cases. Bimodal temperature distributions have the largest effect on the determined temperature. Symmetric temperature fluctuations around 900 K have a negligible effect. At lower mean temperatures, fluctuations cause a positive bias leading to over-predicted mean temperatures, while at higher temperatures the bias is negative. The results of the theoretical analysis were applied as a guide for interpreting experimental multi-line NO-LIF temperature measurements in a mildly turbulent pilot-plant scale flame reactor dedicated for nanoparticle synthesis.

  1. ON MEASURING THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND TEMPERATURE AT REDSHIFT 0.89

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, M.; Menten, K. M.; Reid, M. J.; Carilli, C. L.

    2013-02-20

    We report on a measurement of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation field, T {sub CMB}, at z = 0.88582 by imaging HC{sub 3}N(3 <- 2) and (5 <- 4) absorption in the foreground galaxy of the gravitationally lens magnified radio source PKS 1830-211 using the Very Long Baseline Array and the phased Very Large Array. Low-resolution imaging of the data yields a value of T {sub rot} = 5.6{sup +2.5} {sub -0.9} K for the rotational temperature, T {sub rot}, which is consistent with the temperature of the cosmic microwave background at the absorber's redshift of 2.73(1 + z) K. However, our high-resolution imaging reveals that the absorption peak position of the foreground gas is offset from the continuum peak position of the synchrotron radiation from PKS 1830-211SW, which indicates that the absorbing cloud is covering only part of the emission from PKS 1830-211, rather than the entire core-jet region. This changes the line-to-continuum ratios, and we find T {sub rot} between 1.1 and 2.5 K, which is lower than the expected value. This shows that previous T {sub rot} measurements could be biased due to unresolved structure.

  2. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livescu, Daniel; Gerashchenko, Sergiy

    2016-11-01

    The growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and, when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. Compared to the Θ = 0 case, the role of Θ < 0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ > 0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of a background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.

  3. The effects of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature uncertainties on cosmological parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, Jan; Wong, Yvonne Y Y E-mail: ywong@mppmu.mpg.de

    2008-03-15

    We estimate the effect of the experimental uncertainty in the measurement of the temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the extraction of cosmological parameters from future CMB surveys. We find that even for an ideal experiment limited only by cosmic variance up to l=2500 for both the temperature and polarization measurements, the projected cosmological parameter errors are remarkably robust against the uncertainty of 1 mK in the firas CMB temperature monopole measurement. The maximum degradation in sensitivity is 20%, for the baryon density estimate, relative to the case in which the monopole is known infinitely well. While this degradation is acceptable, we note that reducing the uncertainty in the current temperature measurement by a factor of five will bring it down to {approx}1%. We also estimate the effect of the uncertainty in the dipole temperature measurement. Assuming the overall calibration of the data to be dominated by the dipole error of 0.2% from firas, the sensitivity degradation is insignificant and does not exceed 10% in any parameter direction.

  4. Interannual variability in temperature and precipitation alone cannot explain Holocene glacier fluctuations in the Southern Alps of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doughty, Alice; Mackintosh, Andrew; Anderson, Brian; Putnam, Aaron; Dadic, Ruzica; Barrell, David; Denton, George; Chinn, Trevor; Schaefer, Joerg

    2016-04-01

    Several glacial modeling studies suggest that interannual climate variability within an unchanged mean climate state can cause large fluctuations in glacier length (~1 km), which would complicate interpretations of moraine records as proxy evidence of past climatic change. We modeled glacier fluctuations forced by stochastic variability in mean annual temperature and total annual precipitation and compared them to the mapped and dated Holocene moraine sequence in the Cameron valley, New Zealand. Using a 2D coupled mass balance - ice flow model, we simulated interannual mass balance, ice volume, and glacier length changes and show that stochastic variability does not cause large advances (>300 m) of the Cameron Glacier. We suggest that the glacier has been responding to shifts in the mean climate, and thus its moraine record is a valuable indicator of past climate.

  5. A real time dynamic data acquisition and processing system for velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clukey, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    The real time Dynamic Data Acquisition and Processing System (DDAPS) is described which provides the capability for the simultaneous measurement of velocity, density, and total temperature fluctuations. The system of hardware and software is described in context of the wind tunnel environment. The DDAPS replaces both a recording mechanism and a separate data processing system. DDAPS receives input from hot wire anemometers. Amplifiers and filters condition the signals with computer controlled modules. The analog signals are simultaneously digitized and digitally recorded on disk. Automatic acquisition collects necessary calibration and environment data. Hot wire sensitivities are generated and applied to the hot wire data to compute fluctuations. The presentation of the raw and processed data is accomplished on demand. The interface to DDAPS is described along with the internal mechanisms of DDAPS. A summary of operations relevant to the use of the DDAPS is also provided.

  6. Measurements of the Cosmic Background Radiation Temperature at 3.3and 9.1 MM

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Smoot, G.F.; Friedman, S.D.

    1983-06-01

    The authors report the results of measurements of the cosmic background radiation temperature at wavelengths of 9.1 and 3.3 mm. The 9.1 mm result, T{sub CBR} = 2.87 {+-} 0.21 K, is in good agreement with previous results and those obtained at longer wavelengths during the same experiment. The 3.3 mm result, T{sub CBR} = 2.4 {+-} 1.0 K, is consistent with previous measurements, but has a large error due to uncertainty in the atmospheric correction.

  7. A measurement of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 7.5 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, S.; Bensadoun, M.; Bersanelli, M.; De Amici, G.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G.

    1992-01-01

    The temperature of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation at a frequency of 7.5 GHz (4 cm wavelength) is measured, obtaining a brightness temperature of T(CMB) = 2.70 +/- 0.08 K (68 percent confidence level). The measurement was made from a site near the geographical South Pole during the austral spring of 1989 and was part of an international collaboration to measure the CMB spectrum at low frequencies with a variety of radiometers from several different sites. This recent result is in agreement with the 1988 measurement at the same frequency, which was made from a different site with significantly different systematic errors. The combined result of the 1988 and 1989 measurements is 2.64 +/- 0.06 K.

  8. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1.47 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensadoun, M.; Bersanelli, M.; De Amici, G.; Kogut, A.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G. F.; Witebsky, C.

    1993-01-01

    We have used a radio-frequency-gain total-power radiometer to measure the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California in 1988 September and from the South Pole in 1989 December. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, T(CMB), is 2.27 +/- 0.25 K (68 percent confidence limit) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 +/- 0.20 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.26 +/- 0.19 K. The correction for Galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source of error. The atmospheric signal is extrapolated from our zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. These results are consistent with our previous measurement at 1.41 GHz and about 2.5 sigma from the 2.74 +/- 0.01 K global average CMB temperature.

  9. Measurement of the cosmic background radiation temperature at 3. 3 mm wavelength

    SciTech Connect

    Witebsky, C.

    1985-05-01

    Measurements of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) at 3.3 mm wavelength (90 GHz) have yielded a brightness temperature of 2.57 K with a 1sigma uncertainty of +-0.12 K. The observations were made from the Barcroft Laboratory of the White Mountain Research Station, at an altitude of 3800 m, initially on 5 and 6 July 1982 and again on 4,5, and 6 September 1983, as part of a program to measure the spectrum of the CBR at five wavelengths from 12.0 cm to 3.3 mm (Smoot, et al. 1985; Smoot, De Amici, Levin, and Witebsky 1985). The weighted mean of the temperature measurements at all five wavelengths is 2.72 +- 0.04 K. 97 refs., 13 figs., 14 tabs.

  10. Characterization of a high-temperature superconducting bearing for use in a cosmic microwave background polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, John R.; Hanany, Shaul; Matsumura, Tomotake; Johnson, Bradley; Jones, Terry

    2005-02-01

    We have previously presented a design for a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarimeter in which a cryogenically cooled half-wave plate rotates by means of a high-temperature superconducting (HTS) bearing. Here, a prototype bearing, consisting of a commercially available ring-shaped permanent magnet and an array of YBCO bulk HTS material, has been constructed. We measured its coefficient of friction and vibrational property as a function of several parameters, including temperature between 15 and 83 K, rotation frequency between 0.3 and 3.5 Hz, levitation distance between 6 and 10 mm and ambient pressure of {\\sim }10^{- 7} Torr. We concluded that the low rotational drag of the HTS bearing would allow rotations for long periods with minimal input power and negligible wear and tear, thus making this technology suitable for a future satellite mission.

  11. Effects of fluctuating moisture and temperature regimes on the infection potential of Beauveria bassiana for Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Fargues, J; Luz, C

    2000-04-01

    The effect of both moisture and temperature on the infective potential of Beauveria bassiana to the Chagas' disease vector, Rhodnius prolixus, was studied under fluctuating regimes. At constant 25 degrees C, contaminated first-instar nymphs exposed to increasing daily periods of initial exposure to 97% RH, followed by transfer to reduced humidity (43, 53, 75, and 86% RH), showed a significant reduction in mortality when the 97% RH exposure time declined from 12 to 8 h per day. The duration of disease incubation depended on the daily 97% RH exposure time. Under fluctuating regimes of both humidity (97% RH versus 75% RH) and temperature (15/28, 20/25, 25/28, and 25/35 degrees C), first-instar mortality was affected by weather conditions, daily 97% RH exposure time (8, 12, and 16 h per day), and number of temperature and humidity fluctuations before transferring tested insects to constant unfavorable conditions. In most cases, at 12/12 h alternating cycles, high and rapid mortality required five cycles. Under these fluctuating regimes, fungus-induced mortality and mortality time were similarly affected in third- and fifth-instar nymphs by the daily 97% RH exposure time. Despite a lower susceptibility of older larval stages, mortality rates in insects exposed for at least 12 h per day at 97% RH remained very high except at 15 degrees C. Moisture and temperature regimes at 12/12 h cycling significantly affected the dose-mortality response in first-instar nymphs. The most favorable conditions consisted of 97%-20 degrees C combined with either 75%-25 degrees C or 43%-25 degrees C. Under less favorable alternating conditions (lower and higher temperatures) the amounts of inoculum required for killing 50% of first-instar nymphs were 10 or 20 times higher. From a vector control standpoint, daily high humidity appears to be the most crucial climatic constraint. B. bassiana has the potential to control R. prolixus populations with applications made during the rainy seasons

  12. Constraining the Redshift Evolution of the Cosmic Microwave Background Blackbody Temperature with PLANCK Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Martino, I.; Génova-Santos, R.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Ebeling, H.; Kashlinsky, A.; Kocevski, D.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2015-08-01

    We constrain the deviation of adiabatic evolution of the universe using the data on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies measured by the Planck satellite and a sample of 481 X-ray selected clusters with spectroscopically measured redshifts. To avoid antenna beam effects, we bring all of the maps to the same resolution. We use a CMB template to subtract the cosmological signal while preserving the Thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) anisotropies; next, we remove galactic foreground emissions around each cluster and we mask out all known point sources. If the CMB blackbody temperature scales with redshift as T{(z)={T}0(1+z)}1-α , we constrain deviations of adiabatic evolution to be α = -0.007 ± 0.013, consistent with the temperature-redshift relation of the standard cosmological model. This result could suffer from a potential bias δα associated with the CMB template. We quantify it to be | δ α | ≤slant 0.02, with the same sign as the measured value of α. Our result is free from those biases associated with using TSZ selected clusters; it represents the best constraint to date of the temperature-redshift relation of the Big Bang model using only CMB data, confirming previous results.

  13. Fast cosmological parameter estimation from microwave background temperature and polarization power spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, Raul; Verde, Licia; Peiris, Hiranya; Kosowsky, Arthur

    2004-07-01

    We improve the algorithm of Kosowsky, Milosavljevic, and Jimenez for computing power spectra of the cosmic microwave background. The present algorithm computes not only the temperature power spectrum but also the E- and B-mode polarization and the temperature-polarization cross power spectra, providing the accuracy required for current cosmological parameter estimation. Both unlensed and lensed (with non-linear evolution) power spectra are provided up to l=3000 for temperature and polarization signals. We refine the optimum set of cosmological parameters for computing the power spectra as perturbations around a fiducial model, leading to an accuracy better than 0.5% for the temperature power spectrum throughout the region of parameter space within the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropic Probe’s first-year 3σ confidence region. This accuracy is comparable to the difference between the widely used CMBFAST code of Seljak and Zaldarriaga and Boltzmann codes. Our algorithm (CMBWARP) makes possible a full exploration of the likelihood region for eight cosmological parameters in about one hour on a laptop computer. We provide the code to compute power spectra as well as the Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm for cosmological parameters estimation at http://www.physics.upenn.edu/˜raulj/CMBwarp.

  14. An Analysis of Recent Measurements of the Temperature of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smoot, G.; Levin, S. M.; Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the results of recent temperature measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). The observations for wavelengths longer than 0.1 cum are well fit by a blackbody spectrum at 2.74{+ or -}0.0w K; however, including the new data of Matsumoto et al. (1987) the result is no longer consistent with a Planckian spectrum. The data are described by a Thomson-distortion parameter u=0.021{+ or -}0.002 and temperature 2.823{+ or -}0.010 K at the 68% confidence level. Fitting the low-frequency data to a Bose-Einstein spectral distortion yields a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.4 x 10{sup -2} on the chemical potential mu{sub 0}. These limits on spectral distortions place restrictions on a number of potentially interesting sources of energy release to the CMBR, including the hot intergalactic medium proposed as the source of the X-ray background.

  15. A measurement of the temperature and polarization anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William C.

    We describe the design and performance of the BOOMERANG experiment, and report on measurements of the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) obtained during the January 2003 flight of BOOMERANG (B2K). To enable these studies, we have developed a bolometric detector which is intrinsically sensitive to linear polarization. The receiver consists of a pair of colocated silicon nitride micromesh absorbers that couple anisotropically to linearly polarized radiation through a corrugated waveguide structure. This system allows simultaneous background limited measurements of the Stokes I and Q parameters over ~30% bandwidths at frequencies from ~60 to 400 GHz. The science results reported here are derived from 195 hours of observation with four 145 GHz Polarization Sensitive Bolometer (PSB) pairs [83]. The data include 75 hours of observations distributed over 1.8% of the sky with an additional 120 hours concentrated on the central portion of the field, itself representing 0.22% of the full sky. The B2K data improve significantly on existing measurements of the CMB temperature power spectrum at angular scales of 500 [Special characters omitted.] [cursive l] [Special characters omitted.] 1100. In addition, we have measured a spectrum of curl-free polarization anisotropies that, in the context of the most simple adiabatic inflationary models, are consistent with the predictions of the currently favored LCDM cosmology.

  16. An Analysis of Recent Measurements of the Temperature of theCosmic Microwave Background Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Smoot, G.; Levin, S.M.; Witebsky, C.; De Amici, G.; Rephaeli, Y.

    1987-07-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the results of recent temperature measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). The observations for wavelengths longer than 0.1 cm are well fit by a blackbody spectrum at 2.74 {+-} 0.02 K; however, including the new data of Matsumoto et al. (1987) the result is no longer consistent with a Planckian spectrum. The data are described by a Thomson-distortion parameter u = 0.021 {+-} 0.002 and temperature 2.823 {+-} 0.010 K at the 68% confidence level. Fitting the low-frequency data to a Bose-Einstein spectral distortion yields a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.4 x 10{sup -2} on the chemical potential {mu}{sub 0}. These limits on spectral distortions place restrictions on a number of potentially interesting sources of energy release to the CMBR, including the hot intergalactic medium proposed as the source of the X-ray background.

  17. MeV-scale reheating temperature and thermalization of the neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, M.; Kohri, K.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    2000-07-01

    The late-time entropy production by massive particle decay induces various cosmological effects in the early epoch and modifies the standard scenario. We investigate the thermalization process of the neutrinos after entropy production by solving the Boltzmann equations numerically. We find that if the large entropy is produced at t~1 sec, the neutrinos are not thermalized very well and do not have the perfect Fermi-Dirac distribution. Then the freeze-out value of the neutron to proton ratio is altered considerably and the produced light elements, especially 4He, are drastically changed. Comparing with the observational light element abundances, we find that TR<~0.7 MeV is excluded at 95 % C.L. We also study the case in which the massive particle has a decay mode into hadrons. Then we find that TR should be a little higher, i.e., TR>~2.5-4 MeV, for the hadronic branching ratio Bh=10-2-1. The possible influence of late-time entropy production on the large scale structure formation and temperature anisotropies of cosmic microwave background is studied. It is expected that the future satellite experiments (MAP and PLANCK) to measure anisotropies of cosmic microwave background radiation temperature will be able to detect the vestige of the late-time entropy production as a modification of the effective number of the neutrino species Neffν.

  18. Effects of rf power on electron density and temperature, neutral temperature, and T{sub e} fluctuations in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Camparo, James; Fathi, Gilda

    2009-05-15

    Atomic clocks that fly on global-navigation satellites such as global positioning system (GPS) and Galileo employ light from low-temperature, inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) for atomic signal generation and detection (i.e., alkali/noble-gas rf-discharge lamps). In this application, the performance of the atomic clock and the capabilities of the navigation system depend sensitively on the stability of the ICP's optical emission. In order to better understand the mechanisms that might lead to instability in these rf-discharge lamps, and hence the satellite atomic clocks, we studied the optical emission from a Rb/Xe ICP as a function of the rf power driving the plasma. Surprisingly, we found that the electron density in the plasma was essentially independent of increases in rf power above its nominal value (i.e., 'rf-power gain') and that the electron temperature was only a slowly varying function of rf-power gain. The primary effect of rf power was to increase the temperature of the neutrals in the plasma, which was manifested by an increase in Rb vapor density. Interestingly, we also found evidence for electron temperature fluctuations (i.e., fluctuations in the plasma's high-energy electron content). The variance of these fluctuations scaled inversely with the plasma's mean electron temperature and was consistent with a simple model that assumed that the total electron density in the discharge was independent of rf power. Taken as a whole, our results indicate that the electrons in alkali/noble-gas ICPs are little affected by slight changes in rf power and that the primary effect of such changes is to heat the plasma's neutral species.

  19. Observations of Diurnal Temperature Fluctuations on the California Inner Shelf during the Point Sal Inner Shelf Experiment (PSIEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freismuth, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    A 43-day field experiment in the summer of 2015 near Pt. Sal, California obtained cross- and alongshore measures of temperature and current throughout the water column in depths ranging from 50 m to 5 m and cross-shore distances of 6 km offshore to the edge of the surf zone around a rocky promontory. Here, analysis is focused on the significant diurnal variability of both the temperature and current observations. The observations presented here differ from those of previous studies in that the diurnal currents are accompanied by a significant temperature fluctuation. Spectra reveal that up to 45% of the total temperature variance is in the diurnal band, and this variance is three times greater than that of the semi-diurnal band. Both the diurnal temperature and currents exhibit intermittent periods of intensification. Within the diurnal band, important forcing processes include (1) the diurnal winds (sea breeze), (2) barotropic tides that advect large scale horizontal temperature gradients, and (3) surface heat flux. These mechanisms are explored to describe both the diurnal temperature and current variability at Pt. Sal.

  20. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerashchenko, S.; Livescu, D.

    2016-07-01

    The growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to the combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous, and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. An analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of large Θ. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and Θ = 0. Compared to Θ = 0 case, the role of Θ < 0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ > 0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. On the other hand, at small perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size, the growth rate for the Θ < 0 case exceeds the infinite domain incompressible constant density result. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.

  1. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    DOE PAGES

    Gerashchenko, Sergiy; Livescu, Daniel

    2016-07-28

    Here we studied the growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to the combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous, and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. Anmore » analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of large Θ. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and Θ=0. Compared to Θ=0 case, the role of Θ<0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ>0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. On the other hand, at small perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size, the growth rate for the Θ<0 case exceeds the infinite domain incompressible constant density result. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.« less

  2. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Gerashchenko, Sergiy; Livescu, Daniel

    2016-07-28

    Here we studied the growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to the combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous, and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. An analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of large Θ. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and Θ=0. Compared to Θ=0 case, the role of Θ<0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ>0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. On the other hand, at small perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size, the growth rate for the Θ<0 case exceeds the infinite domain incompressible constant density result. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.

  3. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Gerashchenko, S.

    2016-07-15

    The growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to the combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous, and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. An analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of large Θ. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and Θ = 0. Compared to Θ = 0 case, the role of Θ < 0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ > 0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. On the other hand, at small perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size, the growth rate for the Θ < 0 case exceeds the infinite domain incompressible constant density result. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.

  4. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Gerashchenko, Sergiy; Livescu, Daniel

    2016-07-28

    Here we studied the growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of a background temperature gradient, Θ, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of Θ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to the combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous, and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, At, and when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. An analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of large Θ. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and Θ=0. Compared to Θ=0 case, the role of Θ<0 (hotter light fluid) is destabilizing and becomes stabilizing when Θ>0 (colder light fluid). The most pronounced effect of Θ ≠ 0 is found at low At and/or at large perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size for all interface types. On the other hand, at small perturbation wavelengths relative to the domain size, the growth rate for the Θ<0 case exceeds the infinite domain incompressible constant density result. The results are applied to two practical examples, using sets of parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion coasting stage and solar corona plumes. The role of viscosity on the growth rate reduction is discussed together with highlighting the range of wavenumbers most affected by viscosity. The viscous effects further increase in the presence of background temperature gradient, when the viscosity is temperature dependent.

  5. The lensing and temperature imprints of voids on the cosmic microwave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Yan-Chuan; Neyrinck, Mark; Mao, Qingqing; Peacock, John A.; Szapudi, Istvan; Berlind, Andreas A.

    2017-04-01

    We have searched for the signature of cosmic voids in the cosmic microwave background (CMB), in both the Planck temperature and lensing-convergence maps; voids should give decrements in both. We use ZOBOV voids from the Data Release 12 Sloan Digital Sky Survey CMASS galaxy sample. We base our analysis on N-body simulations, to avoid a posteriori bias. For the first time, we detect the signature of voids in CMB lensing: the significance is 3.2σ, close to Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) in both amplitude and projected density-profile shape. A temperature dip is also seen, at modest significance (2.3σ), with an amplitude about six times the prediction. This temperature signal is induced mostly by voids with radii between 100 and 150 h-1 Mpc, while the lensing signal is mostly contributed by smaller voids - as expected; lensing relates directly to density, while integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (ISW) depends on gravitational potential. The void abundance in observations and simulations agree as well. We also repeated the analysis excluding lower significance voids: no lensing signal is detected with an upper limit of about twice the ΛCDM prediction. But the mean temperature decrement now becomes non-zero at the 3.7σ level (similar to that found by Granett et al.), with an amplitude about 20 times the prediction. However, the observed dependence of temperature on void size is in poor agreement with simulations, whereas the lensing results are consistent with ΛCDM theory. Thus, the overall tension between theory and observations does not favour non-standard theories of gravity, despite the hints of an enhanced amplitude for the ISW effect from voids.

  6. Synergistic effect of daily temperature fluctuations and matching light-dark cycle enhances population growth and synchronizes oviposition behavior in a soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    Liefting, Maartje; Cosijn, Jarno; Ellers, Jacintha

    2017-01-01

    Some major aspects of insect life, like development time and reproduction, can benefit from fluctuating temperatures rather than a constant temperature regime. The benefit of fluctuating temperature has generally been attributed to the non-linear properties of the relationship of many life history traits with temperature. Daily temperature rise, however, usually coincide with the light phase of the photoperiodic cycle and there could be a benefit in linking daily temperature fluctuations with light and dark phases e.g. to anticipate the change in temperature. Such synergistic effects have primarily been studied in the light of activity patterns and gene expression, but have not yet been shown to extend to population dynamics and aspects of individual fitness like oviposition behavior. We therefore explored possible synergistic effects on life history traits of the springtail Orchesella cincta. We first test the primary effect of ecologically relevant temperature fluctuations of different amplitudes on population growth and total population mass. The slowest population growth was observed in the constant temperature regime treatment and the highest population growth in the regime with high amplitude fluctuations. In a second experiment, population growth and oviposition rhythm were measured under four different regimes; a constant light and temperature regime, thermoperiod only, photoperiod only and thermoperiod and photoperiod aligned as under natural conditions. The regime in which thermoperiod was aligned with photoperiod resulted in a higher population growth than could be realized by either factor alone. Also, significantly fewer eggs were laid in the constant temperature/light regime than in the other three regimes, strongly suggesting that this regime is stressful to O. cincta. Additionally, the fraction of eggs laid at night was highest in the regime with the combined temperature and light cycle. In conclusion, our results show that under these experimental

  7. On the definition of temperature and its fluctuations in small systems.

    PubMed

    Boltachev, Grey Sh; Schmelzer, Jürn W P

    2010-10-07

    An analysis of the limits of applicability of the thermodynamic definition of temperature to small systems is given. It is shown that the classical thermodynamic definition, (dS/dU)=1/T (S being the entropy, U the energy, and T the absolute temperature), is not applicable to small systems. It results in an uncertainty in the definition of temperature of the order O(1/N), where N is the number of particles in the system. An alternative definition of temperature is proposed based on the statistical-mechanical description of ensembles of particles. Applying this definition to perfect gases, a rigorous expression for the distribution of temperatures is obtained valid also for small systems and even in the limit N→1. In contrast to alternative approaches based on the thermodynamic definition of temperature, this distribution retains the thermodynamic equilibrium conditions with respect to temperature (equality of average temperature of the small system and temperature of the thermostat) also for small systems resolving in this way a widely discussed in the past problem between thermodynamics and its statistical-mechanical interpretation. Further, a generalization of this distribution to nonideal systems of interacting particles is developed. The results are applied to an interpretation of recent molecular dynamics simulations of argon condensation. Some further consequences and different possible definitions of temperature for macroscopic systems are discussed briefly as well.

  8. The Cosmic Microwave Background Temperature at 2.64 and 1.32 Millimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, David Michael

    We present very high signal-to-noise (S/N > 2000) observations of the 3874 (ANGSTROM) band of interstellar CN toward (zeta) Oph, (zeta) Per, and (omicron) Per. Our measured equivalent widths for the R(0), R(1), R(2), and P(1) absorption lines toward (zeta) Oph agree with previous photoelectric, but not photographic, findings. In the (zeta) Oph, (zeta) Per, and (omicron) Per lines of sight, the saturation-corrected CN line strengths yield respective excitation temperatures of 2.72 (+OR-) 0.05 K, 2.76 (+OR -) 0.05 K, and 2.78 (+OR-) 0.07 K for the J = 0 (--->) 1 rotational transition at 2.64 mm. The excellent agreement among these temperatures confirms the expectation that the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) is primarily responsible for populating the excited rotational levels of interstellar CN. With small corrections for the local CN excitation due to electron impact, the J = 0 (--->) 1 excitation temperatures toward (zeta) Oph, (zeta) Per, and (omicron) Per are all consistent with a CMB brightness temperature of 2.70 (+OR-) 0.04 K at 2.64 mm. This value represents the most precise determination to date of the CMB intensity at any wavelength. The quality of our spectra has also enabled us to identify a previously undetected telluric feature at 3873.1 (ANGSTROM) which may have confused earlier attempts to measure the (zeta) Oph CN R(2) line strength. the CN J = 1 (--->) 2 excitation temperatures yielded by our unprecedented set of R(2) measurements toward (zeta) Oph, (zeta) Per, and (omicron) Per indicate a CMB temperature of 2.76 (+OR-) 0.02 K at 1.32 mm. Our temperatures at 2.64 mm and 1.32 mm are consistent with a 2.7 K blackbody spectrum for the CMB and do not support the spectral distortions observed near these wavelengths by Woody and Richards (1981). Since these spectral distortions could have been understood in terms of grain-thermalized Population III starlight at large redshifts, our findings severely constrain the extent to which Population

  9. Gravity Wave Variance in LIMS Temperatures. Part I: Variability and Comparison with Background Winds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetzer, Eric J.; Gille, John C.

    1994-09-01

    Small-scale features in temperature data from the Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere satellite experiment are isolated by subtracting profiles of globally mapped temperatures (containing zonal waves 0-6) from inverted temperature profiles. These features are interpreted as internal gravity waves. The preponderance of the variance is associated with the longest wavelengths, corresponding to the lowest frequencies (inertio-gravity waves). The data include approximately 2000 daily soundings between late October 1978 and late May 1979, all longitudes, latitudes from about 65°S to 85°N, and altitudes from the tropopause to the middle mesosphere (pressures from 100 to 0.1 mb). Zonal-mean gravity wave variance is compared with background winds, and variance maps are presented for five one-week periods: early November, early January, early February, late March, and early May. Time-height plots of zonal mean wave variance and background winds in the latitude bands 45°-55°S, 5°S-5°N, and 45°-55°N are also presented. Variance ranges from about 2.0 K2 in the northern late spring lower stratosphere to about 315 K2 in the northern late fall mesosphere. The Northern Hemisphere gravity wave variance field undergoes an approximate twofold increase between fall and early winter, but the maximum remains quasi-stationary; during the same period the mesospheric jet moves by several thousand kilometers. The Northern Hemisphere gravity wave field is strongly distorted by the late January minor warming, and decreases gradually between early March and late May. The tropical gravity wave variance is approximately constant with time below 40 km, but shows an increasingly strong semiannual signal above 40 km. The tropical maximum extends through January and February but is confined in altitude near 60 km. Southern Hemisphere variance decreases toward a broad minimum in January and February, but climbs rapidly after the autumnal equinox. The gravity wave variance fields during

  10. Diagnosis of equilibrium magnetic profiles, current transport, and internal structures in a reversed-field pinch using electron temperature fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke, Eli

    Due to long fast ion confinement times, neutral beam injection (NBI) on the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) yields large fast ion populations with substantial density gradients. Novel application of the unique high-rep-rate (>10 kHz) Thomson scattering diagnostic on MST has enabled characterization of a newly observed beam-driven instability, and detailed measurement of equilibrium changes caused by the fast ion population. While previous work has focused on high-frequency energetic particle modes (EPMs), recent observations indicate that fast ions drive a bursting instability near the plasma rotation frequency under appropriate conditions. The mode chirps strongly, with a frequency of approximately 7 kHz in the plasma reference frame at peak amplitude. Bursts are correlated with EPM activity and core neutral particle analyzer signals drop by 30% during a burst, suggesting that this mode participates in avalanches of the higher frequency EPMs and drives enhanced fast ion transport. Electron temperature fluctuations correlated with this low-frequency mode exhibit a core-peaked structure with a sensitive dependence on the safety factor q. Although this mode has not yet been positively identified, its characteristics and internal structure are suggestive of an internal kink (fishbone) or beta-induced Alfven eigenmode. In addition to driving EPMs, the large fast ion population also modifies the current profile. An increase in on-axis current density driven by NBI is offset by a reduction in the mid-radius, leading to net-zero current drive. This results in a slight flattening of the safety factor profile, observed by precise measurement of the rational surface locations of the dominant tearing modes; these are identified from the phase flip in correlated electron temperature fluctuations recorded by Thomson scattering. For the core n = 6 rational surface, an inward shift of 1.1 +/- 0.6 cm is observed, with an estimated reduction in q0 of 5%. This technique provides a

  11. Quantitative reconstruction of temperature in northern Japan for the last 2000 years and the influential factors to determine climatic fluctuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahata, Hodaka; Hatta, Yoshiki; Ota, Yuki; Yoshida, Akihiro; Habu, Junko

    2016-04-01

    A coastal sedimentary core at St. 5 in Uchiura Bay in northern Japan provided an opportunity to quantitatively estimate terrestrial atmospheric temperatures (AT) using the alkenone proxy because of their strong correlation with summer sea surface temperatures (SSTs) (r2 >0.90). In other words, when we can estimate SST, we can reconstruct AT quantitatively at high time resolution (10-30 years for the last 2K). During the last two millennia, SSTs fluctuated by 4.9 °C before 20 century, reaching two maximum in 1820 AD (22.3°C) and 760 AD (22.0 °C) and two minima around 145 AD (17.4 °C) and 1080 AD (17.4 °C). The SST profile is generally consistent with those obtained from western and central Japan by us (3 sites) and from East Asia by Cook (2013) but shows some differences. Although the MWP (Medieval Warm Period) was not identified in this study because a cold climate prevailed in 990-1100 AD. Particularly low temperatures around 1000-1100 AD can be verified by historical documents from in and around the ancient capital city of Kyoto (Ishii, 2002). The reconstructed SOI (Southern Oscillation Index) data suggest that the equatorial Pacific was predominantly in an El Niño phase in 900-1200 AD. Under modern conditions, during an El Niño episode, the Pacific high is weakened, with reduced atmospheric pressure in the western North Pacific in the vicinity of Japan. This results in an enhanced Okhotsk high, which tends to be accompanied by a cold and cloudy/rainy summer in Japan. A cold climate was definitely observed in 1550-1700 AD, which almost corresponded to the LIA (Little Ice Age). A cold event around 1650 AD can be attributed to big eruptions at Komagatake. This resulted in severe cold type of famine, which is evidenced by historical documents. Because several factors, including external forcing (e.g., solar activity) and internal forcing (e.g., volcanic activity, ENSO, and the Asian monsoon), can affect the climate, we compared SST fluctuations with each of

  12. Warming reduces metabolic rate in marine snails: adaptation to fluctuating high temperatures challenges the metabolic theory of ecology

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, David J.; McQuaid, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    The universal temperature-dependence model (UTD) of the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) proposes that temperature controls mass-scaled, whole-animal resting metabolic rate according to the first principles of physics (Boltzmann kinetics). Controversy surrounds the model's implication of a mechanistic basis for metabolism that excludes the effects of adaptive regulation, and it is unclear how this would apply to organisms that live in fringe environments and typically show considerable metabolic adaptation. We explored thermal scaling of metabolism in a rocky-shore eulittoral-fringe snail (Echinolittorina malaccana) that experiences constrained energy gain and fluctuating high temperatures (between 25°C and approximately 50°C) during prolonged emersion (weeks). In contrast to the prediction of the UTD model, metabolic rate was often negatively related to temperature over a benign range (30–40°C), the relationship depending on (i) the temperature range, (ii) the degree of metabolic depression (related to the quiescent period), and (iii) whether snails were isolated within their shells. Apparent activation energies (E) varied between 0.05 and −0.43 eV, deviating excessively from the UTD's predicted range of between 0.6 and 0.7 eV. The lowering of metabolism when heated should improve energy conservation in a high-temperature environment and challenges both the theory's generality and its mechanistic basis. PMID:20685714

  13. Influence of temperature fluctuations on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in cow manure.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander V; van Bruggen, Ariena H C; van Overbeek, Leo; Termorshuizen, Aad J; Semenov, Alexander M

    2007-06-01

    The effects of four average temperatures (7, 16, 23 and 33 degrees C) and daily oscillations with three amplitudes (0, +/-4, +/-7 degrees C) on the survival of the enteropathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella serovar Typhimurium were investigated in small microcosms. Manure was inoculated with a green fluorescent protein transformed strain of either pathogen at 10(7) cells g(-1) dry weight. Samples were collected immediately after inoculation, and 1 and 2 weeks after inoculation for E. coli O157:H7, and immediately and after 2 and 3 weeks for Salmonella serovar Typhimurium. Population densities were determined by dilution plating and direct counting. In addition, total bacterial CFUs were determined. Growth and survival data were fitted to a modified logistic model. Analysis of the estimated parameter values showed that E. coli O157:H7 survived for shorter periods of time and was more sensitive to competition by the native microbial community than Salmonella serovar Typhimurium. Survival of both pathogens significantly declined with increasing mean temperatures and with increasing amplitude in daily temperature oscillations. The results indicated that responses of enteropathogens to fluctuating temperatures cannot be deduced from temperature relationships determined under constant temperatures.

  14. Warming reduces metabolic rate in marine snails: adaptation to fluctuating high temperatures challenges the metabolic theory of ecology.

    PubMed

    Marshall, David J; McQuaid, Christopher D

    2011-01-22

    The universal temperature-dependence model (UTD) of the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) proposes that temperature controls mass-scaled, whole-animal resting metabolic rate according to the first principles of physics (Boltzmann kinetics). Controversy surrounds the model's implication of a mechanistic basis for metabolism that excludes the effects of adaptive regulation, and it is unclear how this would apply to organisms that live in fringe environments and typically show considerable metabolic adaptation. We explored thermal scaling of metabolism in a rocky-shore eulittoral-fringe snail (Echinolittorina malaccana) that experiences constrained energy gain and fluctuating high temperatures (between 25°C and approximately 50°C) during prolonged emersion (weeks). In contrast to the prediction of the UTD model, metabolic rate was often negatively related to temperature over a benign range (30-40°C), the relationship depending on (i) the temperature range, (ii) the degree of metabolic depression (related to the quiescent period), and (iii) whether snails were isolated within their shells. Apparent activation energies (E) varied between 0.05 and -0.43 eV, deviating excessively from the UTD's predicted range of between 0.6 and 0.7 eV. The lowering of metabolism when heated should improve energy conservation in a high-temperature environment and challenges both the theory's generality and its mechanistic basis.

  15. Effects of long-period solar activity fluctuation on temperature and pressure of the terrestrial atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubashev, B. M.

    1978-01-01

    The present state of research on the influence of solar sunspot activity on tropospheric temperature and pressure is reviewed. The existence of an 11-year temperature cycle of 5 different types is affirmed. A cyclic change in atmospheric pressure, deducing characteristic changes between 11-year cycles is discussed. The existence of 80-year and 5-to-6-year cycles of temperature is established, and physical causes for birth are suggested.

  16. Modeling temperature-mediated fluctuation in colony size in the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta.

    PubMed

    Asano, Erika; Cassill, Deby L

    2012-07-21

    In the social insects, colony size is central to the survival of the queen. Two endogenous factors, worker longevity and queen's daily egg production, are known to determine maximum colony size. A third endogenous factor, duration of worker development from egg to adult, regulates the rate of colony growth. In this paper, we report findings from a simulation quantifying the effects of temperature on colony size in the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta. The monthly average temperature over a six year period for the panhandle of north Florida was interpolated to determine the effects of daily temperature on a queen's egg production, worker developmental time and worker longevity. Additional daily temperatures were simulated: 7°C higher and 7°C lower than daily temperatures for north Florida. As expected, colony size was the largest when annual temperatures were the highest across seasons, ranging from 57,000 to 187,000. Colony size at intermediate daily temperatures ranged from 14,000 to 103,000; small colonies recovered rapidly as temperatures warmed. Colony size at lower daily temperatures ranged from 14,000 to 21,000. Extended worker longevity at lower temperatures compensated for low egg production and longer developmental time. And vice versa, the queen's high rate of egg production and the shorter developmental time compensated for shorter worker longevity at high temperatures. Because the fire ant nest consists of a heat-collecting dome in which to incubate brood during cold weather, and deep chambers in which to cool workers during hot weather, colony size is likely to be higher and more stable than our simulation showed. The extended longevity of workers and queens at low temperatures, and perhaps their ability to hibernate below the permafrost, might explain the ability of ants to colonize habitats worldwide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Novel mechanism for temperature-independent transitions in flexible molecules: role of thermodynamic fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Teslenko, V I; Petrov, E G; Verkhratsky, A; Krishtal, O A

    2010-04-30

    A novel physical mechanism is proposed to explain the temperature-independent transition reactions in molecular systems. The mechanism becomes effective in the case of conformation transitions between quasi-isoenergetic molecular states. It is shown that at room temperatures, stochastic broadening of molecular energy levels predominates the energy of low-frequency vibrations accompanying the transition. This leads to a cancellation of temperature dependence in the stochastically averaged rate constants. As an example, a physical interpretation of temperature-independent onset of P2X{3} receptor desensitization in neuronal membranes is provided.

  18. Single molecule tunneling conductance: The temperature and length dependences controlled by conformational fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. M.

    2006-05-01

    We present a model for a tunnelling conductance of a chain molecule controlled by fluctuations of relative conformations between nearest neighbour units of the chain molecule. The model leads to a simple formula which in one regime reproduces recently reported Arrhenius dependences for alkanedithiols [W. Haiss, H. van Zalinge, D. Bethel, J. Ulstrup, D.J. Schiffrin, R.J. Nichols, Faraday Discuss. 131 (19) (2005)] with an activation energy proportional to the length of the molecule, whereas in other regimes it shows activationless behaviour corresponding to the tunnelling across more rigid molecules. The general formula covers the transition between the two limits, predicting some new dependences that could be interesting to verify experimentally.

  19. SMALL ANGULAR SCALE MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND TEMPERATURE POWER SPECTRUM FROM QUaD

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R. B.; Culverhouse, T.; Ade, P.; Bowden, M.; Gear, W. K.; Gupta, S.; Orlando, A.; Bock, J.; Leitch, E.; Brown, M. L.; Cahill, G.; Murphy, J. A.; Castro, P. G.; Memari, Y.; Church, S.; Hinderks, J.; Ganga, K.; Melhuish, S. J.

    2009-08-01

    We present measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation temperature anisotropy in the multipole range 2000 < l < 3000 from the QUaD telescope's second and third observing seasons. After masking the brightest point sources our results are consistent with the primary {lambda}CDM expectation alone. We estimate the contribution of residual (un-masked) radio point sources using a model calibrated to our own bright source observations, and a full simulation of the source finding and masking procedure. Including this contribution slightly improves the {chi}{sup 2}. We also fit a standard Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) template to the bandpowers and see no strong evidence of an SZ contribution, which is as expected for {sigma}{sub 8} {approx} 0.8.

  20. Correlations of velocity and temperature fluctuations in the stagnation-point flow of circular cylinder in turbulent flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Chi R.

    1988-01-01

    Boundary layer flow and turbulence transport analyses to study the influence of the free-stream turbulence on the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction around the stagnation point of a circular cylinder in a turbulent flow are presented. The analyses are formulated with the turbulent boundary layer equations, the Reynolds stress transport equations and the k - epsilon two-equation turbulence modeling. The analyses are used to calculate the time-averaged turbulence double correlations, the mean flow properties, the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction with an isotropic turbulence in the freestream. The analytical results are described and compared with the existing experimental measurements. Depending on the free-stream turbulence properties, the turbulence kinetic energy can increase or decrease as the flow moves toward the surface. However, the turbulence kinetic energy induces large Reynolds normal stresses at the boundary layer edge. The Reynolds normal stresses change the boundary layer profiles of the time-averaged double correlations of the velocity and temperature fluctuations, the surface heat transfer rate and the skin friction. The free-stream turbulence dissipation rate can affect the stagnation-point heat transfer rate but the influence of the free-stream temperature fluctuation on the heat transfer rate is insignificant.

  1. Modeling the Lag Period and Exponential Growth of Listeria monocytogenes under Conditions of Fluctuating Temperature and Water Activity Values▿

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Cuevas, Marina; Fernández, Pablo S.; George, Susan; Pin, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic model for the growth of a bacterial population described by Baranyi and Roberts (J. Baranyi and T. A. Roberts, Int. J. Food Microbiol. 23:277-294, 1994) was applied to model the lag period and exponential growth of Listeria monocytogenes under conditions of fluctuating temperature and water activity (aw) values. To model the duration of the lag phase, the dependence of the parameter h0, which quantifies the amount of work done during the lag period, on the previous and current environmental conditions was determined experimentally. This parameter depended not only on the magnitude of the change between the previous and current environmental conditions but also on the current growth conditions. In an exponentially growing population, any change in the environment requiring a certain amount of work to adapt to the new conditions initiated a lag period that lasted until that work was finished. Observations for several scenarios in which exponential growth was halted by a sudden change in the temperature and/or aw were in good agreement with predictions. When a population already in a lag period was subjected to environmental fluctuations, the system was reset with a new lag phase. The work to be done during the new lag phase was estimated to be the workload due to the environmental change plus the unfinished workload from the uncompleted previous lag phase. PMID:20208022

  2. Modeling the lag period and exponential growth of Listeria monocytogenes under conditions of fluctuating temperature and water activity values.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Cuevas, Marina; Fernández, Pablo S; George, Susan; Pin, Carmen

    2010-05-01

    The dynamic model for the growth of a bacterial population described by Baranyi and Roberts (J. Baranyi and T. A. Roberts, Int. J. Food Microbiol. 23:277-294, 1994) was applied to model the lag period and exponential growth of Listeria monocytogenes under conditions of fluctuating temperature and water activity (a(w)) values. To model the duration of the lag phase, the dependence of the parameter h(0), which quantifies the amount of work done during the lag period, on the previous and current environmental conditions was determined experimentally. This parameter depended not only on the magnitude of the change between the previous and current environmental conditions but also on the current growth conditions. In an exponentially growing population, any change in the environment requiring a certain amount of work to adapt to the new conditions initiated a lag period that lasted until that work was finished. Observations for several scenarios in which exponential growth was halted by a sudden change in the temperature and/or a(w) were in good agreement with predictions. When a population already in a lag period was subjected to environmental fluctuations, the system was reset with a new lag phase. The work to be done during the new lag phase was estimated to be the workload due to the environmental change plus the unfinished workload from the uncompleted previous lag phase.

  3. Boundary layer fluctuations and their effects on mean and variance temperature profiles in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin; He, Xiaozhou; Tong, Penger

    2016-12-01

    We report simultaneous measurements of the mean temperature profile θ (z ) and temperature variance profile η (z ) near the lower conducting plate of a specially designed quasi-two-dimensional cell for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection. The measured θ (z ) is found to have a universal scaling form θ (z /δ ) with varying thermal boundary layer (BL) thickness δ , and its functional form agrees well with the recently derived BL equation by Shishkina et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 114302 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.114302]. The measured η (z ) , on the other hand, is found to have a scaling form η (z /δ ) only in the near-wall region with z /δ ≲2 . Based on the experimental findings, we derive a BL equation for η (z /δ ) , which is in good agreement with the experimental results. These BL equations thus provide a common framework for understanding the effect of BL fluctuations.

  4. Soil temperature and moisture fluctuations during and after prescribed fire in mixed-oak forests, USA

    Treesearch

    Louis R. Iverson; Todd F. Hutchinson; Todd F. Hutchinson

    2002-01-01

    Prescribed fires were conducted in March 1999, in mixed-oak forests in Vinton County, Ohio, USA, that had been burned either once in 1996 or annually from 1996 to 1999. During the fires, seven electronic sensors recorded soil temperatures every 2 seconds at a depth of 1 cm. Following the fires, soil temperatures were monitored with 12 sensors on burned and unburned...

  5. Effect of constant and fluctuating temperature on daily melatonin production by eyecups from Rana perezi.

    PubMed

    Valenciano, A I; Alonso-Gómez, A L; Alonso-Bedate, M; Delgado, M J

    1997-04-01

    We analysed the effect of daily temperature cycles in relation to constant temperature on day/night melatonin synthesis in frog eyecups in culture. Eyecups were cultured for 24 h under 12L:12D photoperiod and two thermal regimes, constant temperature (25, 15 and 5 degrees C) and thermoperiod (WL/CD, thermophase coinciding with photophase and cryophase coinciding with scotophase; and CL/WD, cryophase coinciding with photophase and thermophase coinciding with scotophase). A negative correlation between ocular serotonin N-acetyltransferase activity and culture temperature for both diurnal and nocturnal activities has been observed. This effect of increased ocular activity at low temperature is more pronounced than the well-known stimulatory effect of darkness, and it does not depend on the photoperiod phase. The lack of interactions between the phase of photoperiod and culture temperature indicates that the effects of both factors are independent. Night-time temperature is the key factor in determining the amplitude of the melatonin rhythm in the Rana perezi retina. However, daytime temperature can not counteract the inhibitory effect of light on ocular melatonin synthesis.

  6. Comparison of rechargeable versus battery-operated insulin pumps: temperature fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Vereshchetin, Paul; McCann, Thomas W; Ojha, Navdeep; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Levy, Brian L

    2016-01-01

    The role of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pumps) has become increasingly important in diabetes management, and many different types of these systems are currently available. This exploratory study focused on the reported heating issues that lithium-ion battery-powered pumps may have during charging compared with battery-operated pumps. It was found that pump temperature increased by 6.4°C during a long charging cycle of a lithiumion battery-operated pump under ambient temperatures. In an environmental-chamber kept at 35°C, the pump temperature increased by 4.4°C, which indicates that the pump temperature was above that of the recommended safety limit for insulin storage of 37°C. When designing new pumps, and when using currently available rechargeable pumps in warmer climates, the implications of these temperature increases should be taken into consideration. Future studies should also further examine insulin quality after charging.

  7. Comparison of rechargeable versus battery-operated insulin pumps: temperature fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Vereshchetin, Paul; McCann, Thomas W; Ojha, Navdeep; Venugopalan, Ramakrishna; Levy, Brian L

    2016-01-01

    The role of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (insulin pumps) has become increasingly important in diabetes management, and many different types of these systems are currently available. This exploratory study focused on the reported heating issues that lithium-ion battery-powered pumps may have during charging compared with battery-operated pumps. It was found that pump temperature increased by 6.4°C during a long charging cycle of a lithiumion battery-operated pump under ambient temperatures. In an environmental-chamber kept at 35°C, the pump temperature increased by 4.4°C, which indicates that the pump temperature was above that of the recommended safety limit for insulin storage of 37°C. When designing new pumps, and when using currently available rechargeable pumps in warmer climates, the implications of these temperature increases should be taken into consideration. Future studies should also further examine insulin quality after charging. PMID:27789976

  8. Simulations of Large Temperature Fluctuations on the Lee Side of a Mountain due to Interactions between an Orographic Wake and a Cold Air Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson-Connolly, A.; Chow, F. K.; Hoch, S.

    2016-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations are performed with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to aid the understanding of temperature fluctuations observed on the lee slope of Utah's Granite Peak during the Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) project. The observed temperature fluctuations are characterized by a drop in near-surface temperature of several Kelvin followed by partial recovery of temperature within about a half hour. These fluctuations can occur several times in a given night and are accompanied by bursts of turbulent kinetic energy in the otherwise calm nocturnal boundary layer. Dynamical explanations of these large temperature fluctuations focus on the role of upstream blocking in the formation of vertical axis eddies in the orographic wake (Jeglum et al., J. Appl. Meteor. Climatol., submitted). In addition to the orographic wake, a cold air pool must be present for the vertical axis eddies to effect large temperature fluctuations that are distinguishable from other sources of temperature variation. The ability of the model to reproduce this cold air pool is sensitive to the initial state of the soil moisture field and the parameterization of the soil thermal conductivity. Additionally, the model is sensitive to choice in turbulence closure and numerical configurations including resolution, domain size, and the steepness of model topography. With an appropriate setup, the WRF model results show good qualitative agreement with the MATERHORN observation data.

  9. The role of peripheral and central sodium channels in mediating brain temperature fluctuations induced by intravenous cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A.; Brown, P. Leon

    2007-01-01

    While cocaine’s interaction with the dopamine (DA) transporter and subsequent increase in DA transmission are usually considered key factors responsible for its locomotor stimulatory and reinforcing properties, many centrally-mediated physiological and psychoemotional effects of cocaine are resistant to DA receptor blockade, suggesting the importance of other, non-DA mechanisms. To explore the role of cocaine’s interaction with Na+ channels, rats were used to compare locomotor stimulatory and temperature (NAcc, temporal muscle and skin) effects of repeated iv injections of cocaine (1 mg/kg) with those induced by procaine (PRO 5 mg/kg), a short-acting local anesthetic with negligible effect on the DA transporter, and cocaine-methiodide (COC-MET 1.31 mg/kg), a quaternary cocaine derivative that is unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. While PRO, unlike cocaine, did not induce locomotor activation, it mimicked cocaine in its ability to increase brain temperature following the initial injection and to induce biphasic, down-up fluctuations following repeated injections. This similarity suggests that both these effects of cocaine may be driven by its action on Na+ channels, a common action of both drugs. While COC-MET also did not affect locomotor activity, it shared with cocaine and PRO their ability to increase brain temperature but failed to induce temperature decreases after repeated injections. These findings point toward activation of peripheral Na+ channels as the primary mechanism of rapid excitatory effects of cocaine and inhibition of centrally-located Na+ channels as a the primary mechanism for transient inhibitory effects of cocaine. DA receptor blockade (SCH23390 + eticlopride) fully eliminated locomotor stimulatory and temperature-increasing effects of cocaine, but its temperature-decreasing effects remained intact. Surprisingly, DA receptor blockade also altered the temperature fluctuations caused by PRO and COC-MET, suggesting that some of the

  10. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1. 47 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Bensadoun, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 {plus minus} 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 {plus minus} 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is {approximately}2.5 {sigma} ({approximately}l% probability) from the 2.74 {plus minus} 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  11. Measurements of the cosmic microwave background temperature at 1.47 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Bensadoun, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    A radiofrequency-gain total power radiometer measured the intensity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at a frequency of 1.47 GHz (20.4 cm wavelength) from White Mountain, California, in September 1988 and from the South Pole, Antarctica, in December 1989. The CMB thermodynamic temperature, TCMB, is 2.27 {plus_minus} 0.25 K (68% C.L.) measured from White Mountain and 2.26 {plus_minus} 0.21 K from the South Pole site. The combined result is 2.27 {plus_minus} 0.19 K. The correction for galactic emission has been derived from scaled low-frequency maps and constitutes the main source, of error. The atmospheric signal is found by extrapolation from zenith scan measurements at higher frequencies. The result is consistent with previous low-frequency measurements, including a measurement at 1.41 GHz (Levin et al. 1988) made with an earlier version of this instrument. The result is {approximately}2.5 {sigma} ({approximately}l% probability) from the 2.74 {plus_minus} 0.02,K global average CMB temperature.

  12. Why COBE and CN spectroscopy cosmic background radiation temperature measurements differ, and a remedy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Sydney

    2012-04-01

    In 2004, the cosmic background radiation (CBR) temperature Tγ(CN) determined from interstellar CN absorption spectra was found to be 50 ± 20 mK higher than the COBE bolometer measured value. It was proposed that this was due, at least in part, to an error in the evaluation of the rotational components of the oscillator strengths of the rovibronic transitions corresponding to the CN B 2Σ+-X 2Σ+(0 - 0), R(0), R(1) and P(1) lines. Corrections to the standard Hönl-London (HL) rotational line intensity factors used were determined. New data on interstellar CN absorption show that Tγ(CN) is 29 ± 2 mK greater than the latest value of the cosmological CBR temperature, Tγ(COBE) = 2.72548 ± 0.00057 K. These new results and CN fluorescence lifetime data are shown to give similar derived values for improved HL corrections as well as providing further evidence for the intramolecular coupling between the relevant B 2Σ+ state rotational levels and close-lying levels of the A 2Π state which invalidates the standard HL factors. Revised HL factors may be required in future Tγ(CN) measurements, in particular in high-redshift sites, which cannot be studied by bolometric means.

  13. Freezing and thawing of soils under the influence of 300- and 90-year periods of temperature fluctuation

    SciTech Connect

    Romanovsky, V.; Garagula, L.; Seregina, N.

    1992-03-01

    Mathematical modeling of perennial freeze and thaw is used in geocryology to solve both scientific and engineering problems. The surface temperature of a substrate is given as either a constant (stationary problem) or a function with a fixed period of fluctuation (periodic problem). In this paper a numerical permafrost model is developed for the southern Siberia region to study the influence of rhythmic climate change on the dynamics of permafrost. The mathematical model is represented as a two-dimensional heat conduction problem for a moist substrate with the latent heat effect for complex geological structures. This model takes into account a complex periodic temperature change at the soil surface and a stable heat flow at the lower and lateral boundaries for a steady domain. The enthalpy method to arrive at a numerical solution for this problem is used. It has been realized as a fully implicit local one-dimensional finite-difference scheme on an irregular grid. The calculations of the dynamics of temperature fields and permafrost boundaries are discussed to evaluate this scheme for the southern permafrost region of Eastern Siberia. The modeled results show that transects of temperature fields along some profiles (particularly at sites with complex geological structures) contain more information about permafrost dynamics than do ground temperature profiles from isolated boreholes.

  14. Imitating seasonal temperature fluctuations for the H2S corrosion of 304L and 316L austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoodi, A.; Babaiee, M.; Pakshir, M.

    2013-07-01

    Temperature fluctuations are inevitable in sour oil and gas production. In this study, the H2S corrosion of 304L and 316L alloys was investigated at pH 3 and temperatures of 20-60 °C using DC and AC electrochemical techniques. Two-fold increases in the corrosion rates of both alloys were reported with increases in temperature to 60 °C. In the 304L alloy, the surface layer was observed to be 3% rougher and 34% thicker than that of the 316L alloy. The two alloys exhibited different corrosion behaviors in the temperature ranges of 20-40 °C and 40-60 °C. Although the 316L alloy revealed a greater corrosion resistance at the free potential condition, the passivation on the 304L alloy was significantly greater than that of the 316L alloy at 40 °C and 15 ppm H2S. The FeS2 and combined FeS2-MoS2 compounds contributed to the surface layer constituents in the 304L and 316L alloys, respectively. The increase in temperature kinetically provided more favorable conditions for FeS2 than MoS2 formation, i.e. it had a relatively constructive effect on the 304L alloy passivation.

  15. Measuring the Redshift Dependence of The Cosmic Microwave Background Monopole Temperature With Planck Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Martino, I.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Da Silva, A.; Ebling, H.; Kashlinsky, A.; Kocevski, D.; Martins, C. J. A. P.

    2012-01-01

    We study the capability of Planck data to constrain deviations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) blackbody temperature from adiabatic evolution using the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich anisotropy induced by clusters of galaxies. We consider two types of data sets depending on how the cosmological signal is removed: using a CMB template or using the 217 GHz map. We apply two different statistical estimators, based on the ratio of temperature anisotropies at two different frequencies and on a fit to the spectral variation of the cluster signal with frequency. The ratio method is biased if CMB residuals with amplitude approximately 1 microK or larger are present in the data, while residuals are not so critical for the fit method. To test for systematics, we construct a template from clusters drawn from a hydro-simulation included in the pre-launch Planck Sky Model. We demonstrate that, using a proprietary catalog of X-ray-selected clusters with measured redshifts, electron densities, and X-ray temperatures, we can constrain deviations of adiabatic evolution, measured by the parameter a in the redshift scaling T (z) = T0(1 + z)(sup 1-alpha), with an accuracy of sigma(sub alpha) = 0.011 in the most optimal case and with sigma alpha = 0.018 for a less optimal case. These results represent a factor of 2-3 improvement over similar measurements carried out using quasar spectral lines and a factor 6-20 with respect to earlier results using smaller cluster samples.

  16. Thermal biology, population fluctuations and implications of temperature extremes for the management of two globally significant insect pests.

    PubMed

    Nyamukondiwa, Casper; Weldon, Christopher W; Chown, Steven L; le Roux, Peter C; Terblanche, John S

    2013-12-01

    The link between environmental temperature, physiological processes and population fluctuations is a significant aspect of insect pest management. Here, we explore how thermal biology affects the population abundance of two globally significant pest fruit fly species, Ceratitis capitata (medfly) and C. rosa (Natal fruit fly), including irradiated individuals and those expressing a temperature sensitive lethal (tsl) mutation that are used in the sterile insect technique. Results show that upper and lower lethal temperatures are seldom encountered at the field sites, while critical minimum temperatures for activity and lower developmental thresholds are crossed more frequently. Estimates of abundance revealed that C. capitata are active year-round, but abundance declines markedly during winter. Temporal autocorrelation of average fortnightly trap captures and of development time, estimated from an integrated model to calculate available degree days, show similar seasonal lags suggesting that population increases in early spring occur after sufficient degree-days have accumulated. By contrast, population collapses coincide tightly with increasing frequency of low temperature events that fall below critical minimum temperatures for activity. Individuals of C. capitata expressing the tsl mutation show greater critical thermal maxima and greater longevity under field conditions than reference individuals. Taken together, this evidence suggests that low temperatures limit populations in the Western Cape, South Africa and likely do so elsewhere. Increasing temperature extremes and warming climates generally may extend the season over which these species are active, and could increase abundance. The sterile insect technique may prove profitable as climates change given that laboratory-reared tsl flies have an advantage under warmer conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Temperature preference and reproductive fitness of the annual killifish Austrofundulus limnaeus exposed to constant and fluctuating temperatures.

    PubMed

    Podrabsky, Jason E; Clelen, Dustin; Crawshaw, Larry I

    2008-04-01

    Austrofundulus limnaeus thrive in ephemeral ponds that may experience temperatures spanning a range of over 20 degrees C on a daily basis. We hypothesized that A. limnaeus may have mechanisms, either behavioral or physiological, that allow them to support successful reproduction in this environment. To evaluate this hypothesis, we exposed male and female adult A. limnaeus to constant 26 degrees C and cycling 21-37 degrees C acclimation regimes in the laboratory and then determined their temperature preference and reproductive fitness. Temperature preference was determined using a thermal gradient. We demonstrated that A. limnaeus is capable of accurate behavioral thermoregulation, has a final thermal preferendum near 26 degrees C, and exhibits a daily cycle of temperature preference. Exposure to a cycling temperature regime has an acute effect on thermal preference that differs between the sexes. Reproductive capability was negatively affected by the cyclic temperature exposure. These findings suggest that thermal partitioning between males and females may be a natural part of the ecology of A. limnaeus. In addition, it appears that behavioral thermoregulation, or partitioning of reproductive events to the cool parts of the thermoperiod, are likely to be critical to support successful reproduction in natural populations of A. limnaeus.

  18. Physiological responses to fluctuating temperatures are characterized by distinct transcriptional profiles in a solitary bee

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Exposure to stressful, low temperatures during development can result in the accumulation of deleterious physiological effects called chill injury. Metabolic imbalances, disruptions in ion homeostasis, and oxidative stress contribute to the increased mortality of chill-injured insects. Interestingly...

  19. Progress Toward a New Technique for Measuring Local Electric Field Fluctuations in High Temperature Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakken, M. R.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Liben, M. M.; Thompson, D. S.; Winz, G. R.

    2015-11-01

    A new diagnostic measuring local Ez(r,t) fluctuations is being developed at the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment. A novel multiple volume phase holographic grating spectrometer, designed to have high resolution (0.25Å) and high étendue (U = 0.01cm2-ster), measures the line separation of the π components of the Hα motional Stark spectrum of emitted beam light. The spectra are recorded at high frequency (fNy ~ 500kHz) by a high speed CMOS imaging detector. The groove density of the objective grating is varied linearly along its surface to counter geometric Doppler broadening. A low divergence (Ω ~ 0.5o) , 80kV, 2.5A H0 diagnostic neutral beam is being deployed on Pegasus. The beam uses a washer-stack arc ion source to maximize full energy species fraction in the injected neutral beam. Laboratory tests of the ion source demonstrate stable, repeatable plasmas with Te <= 20eV and ne ~ 5x1017m-3, sufficient to sustain a 6mA/cm2 current density at the focal plane for up to 20ms. A three phase resonant converter power supply, with low amplitude (δV/80kV ~ 0.05%), high frequency (frip ~ 280kHz) ripple, is in development to provide the 80kV accelerator power. This research supported by US D.O.E. Grant DE-FG02-89ER53296.

  20. Temperature and precipitation fluctuations in the Czech Republic during the period of instrumental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brázdil, R.; Zahradníček, P.; Pišoft, P.; Štěpánek, P.; Bělínová, M.; Dobrovolný, P.

    2012-04-01

    The history of early meteorological observations using instruments in the Czech Lands is described (the longest temperature series for Prague-Klementinum starts in 1775, precipitation series for Brno in 1803). Using the PRODIGE method, long-term monthly temperature and precipitation series from selected secular stations were homogenized (for 10 and 12 stations, respectively). All the seasonal and annual temperature series for the common period 1882-2010 show a significant positive linear trend with accelerated warming from the 1970s onwards. No significant linear trends were disclosed in the series of seasonal and annual precipitation totals. Correlation coefficients between the Czech series analysed decrease as distances between measuring stations increase. A sharper decrease of correlations for precipitation totals displays much weaker spatial relationships than those for mean temperatures. The highest correlations between all stations appeared in 1921-1950, the lowest in 1891-1920 (temperature) and 1981-2010 (precipitation). Wavelet analysis reveals that very distinct annual cycles, as well as the slightly weaker semi-annual ones, are better expressed for temperature series than for precipitation. Statistically significant cycles longer than one year are temporally unstable and sporadic for precipitation while in the temperature series cycles of 7.4-7.7a (a = year) and 17.9-18.4a were recorded as significant by all stations in 1882-2010 (quasi-biennial cycle of 2.1-2.2a for half the stations). Czech homogenous temperature series correlate best with those of the Northern Hemisphere for annual, spring and summer values (with significant correlation coefficients between 0.60 and 0.70), but this relation is temporally unstable. Circulation indices, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI) and the Central European Zonal Index (CEZI) may explain the greater part of Czech temperature variability, especially from December to March and for the winter; however

  1. Temperature and precipitation fluctuations in the Czech Republic during the period of instrumental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brázdil, Rudolf; Zahradníček, Pavel; Pišoft, Petr; Štěpánek, Petr; Bělínová, Monika; Dobrovolný, Petr

    2012-10-01

    The history of early meteorological observations using instruments in the Czech Lands is described (the longest temperature series for Prague-Klementinum starts in 1775, precipitation series for Brno in 1803). Using the PRODIGE method, long-term monthly temperature and precipitation series from selected secular stations were homogenised (for 10 and 12 stations, respectively). All the seasonal and annual temperature series for the common period 1882-2010 show a significant positive linear trend with accelerated warming from the 1970s onwards. No significant linear trends were disclosed in the series of seasonal and annual precipitation totals. Correlation coefficients between the Czech series analysed decrease as distances between measuring stations increase. A sharper decrease of correlations for precipitation totals displays much weaker spatial relationships than those for mean temperatures. The highest correlations between all stations appeared in 1921-1950, the lowest in 1891-1920 (temperature) and 1981-2010 (precipitation). Wavelet analysis reveals that very distinct annual cycles as well as the slightly weaker semi-annual ones are better expressed for temperature series than for precipitation. Statistically significant cycles longer than 1 year are temporally unstable and sporadic for precipitation, while in the temperature series cycles of 7.4-7.7 and 17.9-18.4 years were recorded as significant by all stations in 1882-2010 (quasi-biennial cycle of 2.1-2.2 years for half the stations). Czech homogenous temperature series correlate best with those of the Northern Hemisphere for annual, spring and summer values (with significant correlation coefficients between 0.60 and 0.70), but this relation is temporally unstable. Circulation indices, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation Index (NAOI) and the Central European Zonal Index (CEZI), may explain the greater part of Czech temperature variability, especially from December to March and for the winter; however

  2. The deal with diel: Temperature fluctuations, asymmetrical warming, and ubiquitous metals contaminants.

    PubMed

    Hallman, Tyler A; Brooks, Marjorie L

    2015-11-01

    Climate projections over the next century include disproportionately warmer nighttime temperatures ("asymmetrical warming"). Cool nighttime temperatures lower metabolic rates of aquatic ectotherms. In contaminated waters, areas with cool nights may provide thermal refugia from high rates of daytime contaminant uptake. We exposed Cope's gray tree frogs (Hyla chrysoscelis), southern leopard frogs (Lithobates sphenocephalus), and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) to five concentrations of a mixture of cadmium, copper, and lead under three to four temperature regimes, representing asymmetrical warming. At concentrations with intermediate toxicosis at test termination (96 h), temperature effects on acute toxicity or escape distance were evident in all study species. Asymmetrical warming (day:night, 22:20 °C; 22:22 °C) doubled or tripled mortality relative to overall cooler temperatures (20:20 °C) or cool nights (22:18 °C). Escape distances were 40-70% shorter under asymmetrical warming. Results suggest potentially grave ecological impacts from unexpected toxicosis under climate change. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Winter hibernation and body temperature fluctuation in the Japanese badger, Meles meles anakuma.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    This study examined seasonal changes in body weight, hibernation period, and body temperature of the Japanese badger (Meles meles anakuma) from 1997 to 2001. Adult badgers showed seasonal changes in body weight. Between mid-December and February, badger activity almost ceased, as the animals remained in their setts most of the time. Adult male badgers were solitary hibernators; adult females hibernated either alone or with their cubs and/or yearlings. The total hibernation period of Japanese badgers ranged from 42 to 80 days, with a mean length of 60.1 days. Japanese badgers did not always spend the winters in the same sett, although they seldom changed setts during hibernation. I equipped a male cub with an intraperitoneally implanted data logger to record its body temperature between November and April, while the cub hibernated with its mother. Over the winter, the body weight of the cub decreased from 5.3 kg to 3.6 kg, a weight loss of 32.1%, and its body temperature ranged from 32.0 to 39.8 degrees C. The mean monthly body temperature was 35.1 degrees C in December, 34.8 degrees C in January, 35.9 degrees C in February, 37.1 degrees C in March, and 37.4 degrees C in April, so the monthly decrease in body temperature of this cub was not great. The results indicate that during hibernation, when body temperature is low, there is likely considerable economy of energy and a reduced demand for adipose reserves.

  4. The effects of constant and diel-fluctuating temperature acclimation on the thermal tolerance, swimming capacity, specific dynamic action and growth performance of juvenile Chinese bream.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jing; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the effects of constant and diel-fluctuating temperature acclimation on the thermal tolerance, swimming capacity, specific dynamic action (SDA) and growth performance of juvenile Chinese bream (Parabramis pekinensis). The critical thermal maxima (CTmax), critical thermal minima (CTmin), lethal thermal maxima (LTmax), lethal thermal minima (LTmin), critical swimming speed (Ucrit) and fast-start escape response after 30 d acclimation to three constant temperatures (15, 20 and 25 °C) and one diel-fluctuating temperature (20±5 °C) were measured. In addition, feeding rate (FR), feeding efficiency (FE) and specific growth rate (SGR) were measured. The diel-fluctuating temperature group showed lower CTmin than the 20 °C group but a similar CTmax, indicating a wider thermal scope. SDA linearly increased with the temperature. Temperature variation between 20 and 25 °C had little effect on either swimming or growth performance. However, fish in the 15 °C group exhibited much poorer swimming and growth performance than those in the 20 °C group. Ucrit decreased slightly under low acclimation temperature due to the pronounced improvement in swimming efficiency under cold temperature. Fish in the diel-fluctuating temperature group fed more but exhibited similar SGR compared to 20 °C group, possibly due in part to an increase in energy expenditure to cope with the temperature fluctuation. The narrower thermal scope and lower CTmax of Chinese bream together with the conservation of CTmax with temperature acclimation, suggests that local water temperature elevations may have more profound effects on Chinese bream than on other fish species in the Three Gorges Reservoir.

  5. Current and Temperature Dependence of Resistance Fluctuations in the Striped Phase of La2-xBaxCuO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, Adam; Perez, Ethel; Mroczek, Marek; Xin, Yizhou; van Harlingen, Dale

    2014-03-01

    The high-temperature superconductor La2-xBaxCuO4 is known for its unusual suppression of Tc at x=1/8, accompanied by the emergence of a charge stripe phase. A dynamic stripe phase with local resistance anisotropy is expected to cause measurable resistance fluctuations in samples with small dimensions. We report measurements of the transport and noise in microscopic wires patterned from thin films of La2-xBaxCuO4 grown by pulsed laser deposition. We observe a sudden change in noise power spectral density at temperatures consistent with the charge ordering temperatures observed in scattering experiments. We present the evolution of resistance noise with temperature and bias current as a characterization of the strongly correlated state near x=1/8 doping. This research was supported by the DOE-DMS under grant DE-FG02-07ER46453, through the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. EP was sponsored by NSF-REU 10-62690.

  6. The effect of Holocene temperature fluctuations on the evolution and ecology of Neotoma (woodrats) in Idaho and northwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, F.A.; Betancourt, J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Animals respond to climatic change by adapting or by altering distributional patterns. How an animal responds is influenced by where it is positioned within its geographic range; the probability of extirpation is increased near range boundaries. Here, we examine the impact of Holocene climatic fluctuations on a small mammalian herbivore, the bushy-tailed woodrat (Neotoma cinerea), at five locations within south central Idaho and northwestern Utah. Previous work demonstrated that woodrats adapt to temperature shifts by altering body size. We focus here on the relationship between body mass, temperature, and location within the geographic range. Body mass is estimated by measuring fossil fecal pellets, a technique validated in earlier work. Overall, we find the predicted phenotypic response to climate change: Animals were larger during cold periods, and smaller during warmer episodes. However, we also identify several time periods when changes in environmental temperature exceeded the adaptive flexibility of N. cinerea. A smaller-bodied species, the desert woodrat (N. lepida) apparently invaded lower elevation sites during the mid-Holocene, despite being behaviorally and physically subordinate to N. cinerea. Analysis of contemporary patterns of body size and thermal tolerances for both woodrat species suggests this was because of the greater heat tolerance of N. lepida. The robust spatial relationship between contemporary body size and ambient temperature is used as a proxy to reconstruct local climate during the Holocene. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  7. A validated model to predict microalgae growth in outdoor pond cultures subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Crowe, Braden J.; Waller, Peter; Chavis, Aaron R.; Hobbs, Samuel J.; Edmundson, Scott J.; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2015-12-11

    Here, a microalgae biomass growth model was developed for screening novel strains for their potential to exhibit high biomass productivities under nutrient-replete conditions in outdoor ponds subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures. Growth is modeled by first estimating the light attenuation by biomass according to a scatter-corrected Beer-Lambert Law, and then calculating the specific growth rate in discretized culture volume slices that receive declining light intensities due to attenuation. The model requires the following experimentally determined strain-specific input parameters: specific growth rate as a function of light intensity and temperature, biomass loss rate in the dark as a function of temperature and average light intensity during the preceding light period, and the scatter-corrected biomass light absorption coefficient. The model was successful in predicting the growth performance and biomass productivity of three different microalgae species (Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis salina, and Picochlorum sp.) in raceway pond cultures (batch and semi-continuous) subjected to diurnal sunlight intensity and water temperature variations. Model predictions were moderately sensitive to minor deviations in input parameters. To increase the predictive power of this and other microalgae biomass growth models, a better understanding of the effects of mixing-induced rapid light dark cycles on photo-inhibition and short-term biomass losses due to dark respiration in the aphotic zone of the pond is needed.

  8. A validated model to predict microalgae growth in outdoor pond cultures subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Crowe, Braden J.; Waller, Peter; ...

    2015-12-11

    Here, a microalgae biomass growth model was developed for screening novel strains for their potential to exhibit high biomass productivities under nutrient-replete conditions in outdoor ponds subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures. Growth is modeled by first estimating the light attenuation by biomass according to a scatter-corrected Beer-Lambert Law, and then calculating the specific growth rate in discretized culture volume slices that receive declining light intensities due to attenuation. The model requires the following experimentally determined strain-specific input parameters: specific growth rate as a function of light intensity and temperature, biomass loss rate in the dark as amore » function of temperature and average light intensity during the preceding light period, and the scatter-corrected biomass light absorption coefficient. The model was successful in predicting the growth performance and biomass productivity of three different microalgae species (Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis salina, and Picochlorum sp.) in raceway pond cultures (batch and semi-continuous) subjected to diurnal sunlight intensity and water temperature variations. Model predictions were moderately sensitive to minor deviations in input parameters. To increase the predictive power of this and other microalgae biomass growth models, a better understanding of the effects of mixing-induced rapid light dark cycles on photo-inhibition and short-term biomass losses due to dark respiration in the aphotic zone of the pond is needed.« less

  9. A validated model to predict microalgae growth in outdoor pond cultures subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures

    DOE PAGES

    Huesemann, Michael H.; Crowe, Braden J.; Waller, Peter; ...

    2015-12-11

    Here, a microalgae biomass growth model was developed for screening novel strains for their potential to exhibit high biomass productivities under nutrient-replete conditions in outdoor ponds subjected to fluctuating light intensities and water temperatures. Growth is modeled by first estimating the light attenuation by biomass according to a scatter-corrected Beer-Lambert Law, and then calculating the specific growth rate in discretized culture volume slices that receive declining light intensities due to attenuation. The model requires the following experimentally determined strain-specific input parameters: specific growth rate as a function of light intensity and temperature, biomass loss rate in the dark as amore » function of temperature and average light intensity during the preceding light period, and the scatter-corrected biomass light absorption coefficient. The model was successful in predicting the growth performance and biomass productivity of three different microalgae species (Chlorella sorokiniana, Nannochloropsis salina, and Picochlorum sp.) in raceway pond cultures (batch and semi-continuous) subjected to diurnal sunlight intensity and water temperature variations. Model predictions were moderately sensitive to minor deviations in input parameters. To increase the predictive power of this and other microalgae biomass growth models, a better understanding of the effects of mixing-induced rapid light dark cycles on photo-inhibition and short-term biomass losses due to dark respiration in the aphotic zone of the pond is needed.« less

  10. The effect of Holocene temperature fluctuations on the evolution and ecology of Neotoma (woodrats) in Idaho and northwestern Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Felisa A.; Betancourt, Julio L.

    2003-03-01

    Animals respond to climatic change by adapting or by altering distributional patterns. How an animal responds is influenced by where it is positioned within its geographic range; the probability of extirpation is increased near range boundaries. Here, we examine the impact of Holocene climatic fluctuations on a small mammalian herbivore, the bushy-tailed woodrat ( Neotoma cinerea), at five locations within south central Idaho and northwestern Utah. Previous work demonstrated that woodrats adapt to temperature shifts by altering body size. We focus here on the relationship between body mass, temperature, and location within the geographic range. Body mass is estimated by measuring fossil fecal pellets, a technique validated in earlier work. Overall, we find the predicted phenotypic response to climate change: animals were larger during cold periods, and smaller during warmer episodes. However, we also identify several time periods when changes in environmental temperature exceeded the adaptive flexibility of N. cinerea. A smaller-bodied species, the desert woodrat ( N. lepida) apparently invaded lower elevation sites during the mid-Holocene, despite being behaviorally and physically subordinate to N. cinerea. Analysis of contemporary patterns of body size and thermal tolerances for both woodrat species suggests this was because of the greater heat tolerance of N. lepida. The robust spatial relationship between contemporary body size and ambient temperature is used as a proxy to reconstruct local climate during the Holocene.

  11. Effects of solar wind ultralow-frequency fluctuations on plasma sheet electron temperature: Regression analysis with support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chih-Ping; Kim, Hee-Jeong; Yue, Chao; Weygand, James M.; Hsu, Tung-Shin; Chu, Xiangning

    2017-04-01

    To investigate whether ultralow-frequency (ULF) fluctuations from 0.5 to 8.3 mHz in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) can affect the plasma sheet electron temperature (Te) near geosynchronous distances, we use a support vector regression machine technique to decouple the effects from different solar wind parameters and their ULF fluctuation power. Te in this region varies from 0.1 to 10 keV with a median of 1.3 keV. We find that when the solar wind ULF power is weak, Te increases with increasing southward IMF Bz and solar wind speed, while it varies weakly with solar wind density. As the ULF power becomes stronger during weak IMF Bz ( 0) or northward IMF, Te becomes significantly enhanced, by a factor of up to 10. We also find that mesoscale disturbances in a time scale of a few to tens of minutes as indicated by AE during substorm expansion and recovery phases are more enhanced when the ULF power is stronger. The effect of ULF powers may be explained by stronger inward radial diffusion resulting from stronger mesoscale disturbances under higher ULF powers, which can bring high-energy plasma sheet electrons further toward geosynchronous distance. This effect of ULF powers is particularly important during weak southward IMF or northward IMF when convection electric drift is weak.

  12. Fiber optic sensor for measurement of pressure fluctuations at high temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuckerwar, Allan J.; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1989-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor, based on the principle of the fiber-optic lever, is described which features small size, extended bandwidth, and capability to operate at high temeratures, as required for measurements in hypersonic flow. The principle of operation, design features peculiar to the intended application, and expected performance at high temperatures are described.

  13. Fluctuation of Arabidopsis seed dormancy with relative humidity and temperature during dry storage

    PubMed Central

    Basbouss-Serhal, Isabelle; Leymarie, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The changes in germination potential of freshly harvested seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana stored in various combinations of temperature and relative humidity were investigated over 63 weeks of storage. Seeds of the wild type Col-0 and of two mutants displaying low and high levels of dormancy, cat2-1 and mtr4-1, respectively, were stored at harvest in 24 different environments including a combination of eight relative humidities, from 1 to 85%, and four temperatures (10, 15, 20, and 25 °C). These mutations did not influence behaviour of seeds during storage. Primary dormant seeds did not germinate in darkness at 25 °C but acquired the potential to germinate at this temperature within 7 weeks when stored in relative humidities close to 50% across all temperatures. Sorption isotherms and Arrhenius plots demonstrated that the seed moisture content of 0.06g H2O/g dry weight was a critical value below which dormancy release was associated with reactions of negative activation energy and above which dormancy release increased with temperature. Longer storage times when relative humidity did not exceed 75–85% led to decreased germination at 25 °C, corresponding to the induction of secondary dormancy. Dormancy release and induction of secondary dormancy in the dry state were associated with induction or repression of key genes related to abscisic acid and gibberellins biosynthesis and signalling pathways. In high relative humidity, prolonged storage of seeds induced ageing and progressive loss of viability, but this was not related to the initial level of dormancy. PMID:26428064

  14. Fluctuation of Arabidopsis seed dormancy with relative humidity and temperature during dry storage.

    PubMed

    Basbouss-Serhal, Isabelle; Leymarie, Juliette; Bailly, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The changes in germination potential of freshly harvested seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana stored in various combinations of temperature and relative humidity were investigated over 63 weeks of storage. Seeds of the wild type Col-0 and of two mutants displaying low and high levels of dormancy, cat2-1 and mtr4-1, respectively, were stored at harvest in 24 different environments including a combination of eight relative humidities, from 1 to 85%, and four temperatures (10, 15, 20, and 25 °C). These mutations did not influence behaviour of seeds during storage. Primary dormant seeds did not germinate in darkness at 25 °C but acquired the potential to germinate at this temperature within 7 weeks when stored in relative humidities close to 50% across all temperatures. Sorption isotherms and Arrhenius plots demonstrated that the seed moisture content of 0.06 g H2O/g dry weight was a critical value below which dormancy release was associated with reactions of negative activation energy and above which dormancy release increased with temperature. Longer storage times when relative humidity did not exceed 75-85% led to decreased germination at 25 °C, corresponding to the induction of secondary dormancy. Dormancy release and induction of secondary dormancy in the dry state were associated with induction or repression of key genes related to abscisic acid and gibberellins biosynthesis and signalling pathways. In high relative humidity, prolonged storage of seeds induced ageing and progressive loss of viability, but this was not related to the initial level of dormancy.

  15. Room-temperature macromolecular crystallography using a micro-patterned silicon chip with minimal background scattering

    PubMed Central

    Roedig, Philip; Duman, Ramona; Sanchez-Weatherby, Juan; Vartiainen, Ismo; Burkhardt, Anja; Warmer, Martin; David, Christian; Wagner, Armin; Meents, Alke

    2016-01-01

    Recent success at X-ray free-electron lasers has led to serial crystallography experiments staging a comeback at synchrotron sources as well. With crystal lifetimes typically in the millisecond range and the latest-generation detector technologies with high framing rates up to 1 kHz, fast sample exchange has become the bottleneck for such experiments. A micro-patterned chip has been developed from single-crystalline silicon, which acts as a sample holder for up to several thousand microcrystals at a very low background level. The crystals can be easily loaded onto the chip and excess mother liquor can be efficiently removed. Dehydration of the crystals is prevented by keeping them in a stream of humidified air during data collection. Further sealing of the sample holder, for example with Kapton, is not required. Room-temperature data collection from insulin crystals loaded onto the chip proves the applicability of the chip for macromolecular crystallography. Subsequent structure refinements reveal no radiation-damage-induced structural changes for insulin crystals up to a dose of 565.6 kGy, even though the total diffraction power of the crystals has on average decreased to 19.1% of its initial value for the same dose. A decay of the diffracting power by half is observed for a dose of D 1/2 = 147.5 ± 19.1 kGy, which is about 1/300 of the dose before crystals show a similar decay at cryogenic temperatures. PMID:27275143

  16. MAXIMA: an experiment to measure temperature anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.T.; Balbi, A.; Borrill, J.; Jaffe, A.H.; Oh, S.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Winant, C.D.; Lee, A.T.; Jaffe, A.H.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P.L.; Smoot, G.F.; Winant, C.D.; Ade, P.; Hristov, V.; Lange, A.E.; Pascale, E.; Balbi, A.; Borrill, J.; Bock, J.; Crill, B.P.; Smoot, G.F.; Bock, J.; Del Castillo, H.; Boscaleri, A.; De Bernardis, P.; Ferreira, P.; Ganga, K.; Hanany, S.; Mauskopf, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Ruhl, J.

    1999-05-01

    We describe the MAXIMA experiment, a balloon-borne measurement designed to map temperature anisotropy in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from l=80 to l=800. The experiment consists of a 1.3 m diameter off-axis Gregorian telescope and a receiver with a 16 element array of bolometers cooled to 100 mK. The frequency bands are centered at 150, 240, and 410 GHz. The 10{sup {prime}} FWHM beam sizes are well matched to the scale of acoustic peaks expected in the angular power spectrum of the CMB. The first flight of the experiment in its full configuration was launched in August 1998. A 122 deg{sup 2} map of the sky was made near the Draco constellation during the 7 hour flight in a region of extremely low galactic dust contamination. This map covers 0.3{percent} of the sky and has 3200 independent beamsize pixels. We describe the MAXIMA instrument and its performance during the recent flight. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Consistent Temperature Coupling with Thermal Fluctuations of Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics and Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ganzenmüller, Georg C.; Hiermaier, Stefan; Steinhauser, Martin O.

    2012-01-01

    We propose a thermodynamically consistent and energy-conserving temperature coupling scheme between the atomistic and the continuum domain. The coupling scheme links the two domains using the DPDE (Dissipative Particle Dynamics at constant Energy) thermostat and is designed to handle strong temperature gradients across the atomistic/continuum domain interface. The fundamentally different definitions of temperature in the continuum and atomistic domain – internal energy and heat capacity versus particle velocity – are accounted for in a straightforward and conceptually intuitive way by the DPDE thermostat. We verify the here-proposed scheme using a fluid, which is simultaneously represented as a continuum using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics, and as an atomistically resolved liquid using Molecular Dynamics. In the case of equilibrium contact between both domains, we show that the correct microscopic equilibrium properties of the atomistic fluid are obtained. As an example of a strong non-equilibrium situation, we consider the propagation of a steady shock-wave from the continuum domain into the atomistic domain, and show that the coupling scheme conserves both energy and shock-wave dynamics. To demonstrate the applicability of our scheme to real systems, we consider shock loading of a phospholipid bilayer immersed in water in a multi-scale simulation, an interesting topic of biological relevance. PMID:23300586

  18. Temperature effect on triacylglycerol species in seed oil from high stearic sunflower lines with different genetic backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Natalia G; Martínez-Force, Enrique; Garcés, Rafael; Aguirrezábal, Luis An; Zambelli, Andrés; Reid, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    This study characterized the influence of temperature during grain filling on the saturated fatty acid distribution in triacylglycerol molecules from high stearic sunflower lines with different genetic backgrounds. Two growth chamber experiments were conducted with day/night temperatures of 16/16, 26/16, 26/26 and 32/26 °C. In all genotypes, independently of the genetic background, higher temperatures increased palmitic and oleic acid and reduced linoleic acid concentrations. Increasing night temperature produced an increase in saturated-unsaturated-saturated species, indicating a more symmetrical distribution of saturated fatty acids. The solid fat index was more affected by temperature during grain filling in lines with high linoleic than high oleic background. Higher variations in symmetry among night temperatures were observed in lines with high oleic background, which are more stable in fatty acid composition. The effect of temperature on triacylglycerol composition is not completely explained by its effect on fatty acid composition. Thus night temperature affects oil properties via its effects on fatty acid synthesis and on the distribution of fatty acids in the triacylglycerol molecules. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Measured temperature fluctuations and Reynolds number in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection with varying roughness size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yichao; Xia, Keqing

    2016-11-01

    We present measurements of the temperature fluctuations σT and of the Reynolds number Re in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in cylindrical cell with pyramid-shaped rough top and bottom plates. To study the effects of roughness size, we varied a roughness parameter λ, defined as a single roughness height h (kept at a constant of 8 mm) over its base width d, from 0.5 to 4.0. Fluorinert Liquid FC-770 was used as the working fluid with the Rayleigh number Ra varying from 4.49 × 109 to 9.94 × 1010 and Prandtl number Pr kept at 23.34. It is found that σT in both cell center and sidewall increases dramatically with λ. The scaling exponent of the normalized σT with respect to Ra increases from -0.16 to -0.09 at cell center and -0.23 to -0.08 near sidewall when λ is increased from 0.5 to 4.0. The Reynolds number Re based on the circulation time of the large-scale circulation (LSC) also increases with λ, suggesting a faster LSC. The scaling exponent of Re with respect to Ra increases from 0.47 to 0.55 with λ increased from 0.5 to 4.0. The study reveals that