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Sample records for background translocation frequencies

  1. Measurement of background translocation frequencies in individuals with clones

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, Marcelle J.

    1996-08-01

    In the leukemia case the unseparated B and T lymphocytes had a high translocation frequency even after 0.0014, respectively. After purging all clones from the data, the translocation frequencies for Bio 8 and Bio 23 were 0.00750.0014 and 0.0073 metaphases were scored for chromosomal aberrations,, specifically reciprocal translocations, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Metaphase spreads were used from two healthy, unexposed individuals (not exposed to radiation, chemotherapy or radiotherapy) and one early B- precursor acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) patient (metaphase spreads from both separated T lymphocytes and unseparated B and T lymphocytes were scored). All three individuals had an abnormally high translocation frequency. The high translocation frequencies resulted from clonal expansion of specific translocated chromosomes. I show in this thesis that by purging (discounting or removing) clones from the data of unexposed individuals, one can obtain true background translocation frequencies. In two cases, Bio 8 and Bio 23, the measured translocation frequency for chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 was 0.0124 purging all of the clones from the data. This high translocation frequency may be due to a low frequency of some clones and may not be recognized. The separated T lymphocytes had a higher translocation frequency than expected.

  2. Selected translocation of plasmid genes: frequency and regional specificity of translocation of the Tn3 element.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, P J; Cohen, S N

    1977-05-01

    A procedure is described that selects for the insertion of transposable antibiotic resistance elements in a variety of recipient replicons. The selected translocation procedure, which employs a plasmid having a temperature-sensitive defect in replication as a donor of transposable genetic elements, was used to investigate certain characteristics of the translocation process. Our results indicate that translocation of the Tn3 element from plasmid to plasmid occurs at a 10(3)- to 10(4)-times-higher frequency than from plasmid to chromosome. In both cases, continued accumulation of Tn3 on recipient genomes is prevented by development of an apparent equilibrium when only a small fraction of molecules in the recipient population contain Tn3. An alternative method for estimation of translocation frequency has shown that the translocation process is temperature sensitive and that its frequency is unaffected by the presence of host recA mutation. Insertions of Tn3 onto the 65 X 10(6)-dalton R6-5 plasmid in Escherichia coli are clustered on EcoRI fragments 3 (8 of 23 insertions) and 9 (7 of 23 insertions), which contain 12 and 5%, respectively, of the R6-5 genome. The occurrence of multiple insertions of Tn3 within EcoRI fragment 9, which contains the IS1 element and a terminus of the Tn4 element, is consistent with earlier evidence indicating that terminal deoxyribonucleic acid sequences of already present transposable elements may provide recognition sequences for subsequent illegitimate recombinational events.

  3. The effects of translocations on recombination frequency in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    McKim, K S; Howell, A M; Rose, A M

    1988-12-01

    In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, recombination suppression in translocation heterozygotes is severe and extensive. We have examined the meiotic properties of two translocations involving chromosome I, szT1(I;X) and hT1(I;V). No recombination was observed in either of these translocation heterozygotes along the left (let-362-unc-13) 17 map units of chromosome I. Using half-translocations as free duplications, we mapped the breakpoints of szT1 and hT1. The boundaries of crossover suppression coincided with the physical breakpoints. We propose that DNA sequences at the right end of chromosome I facilitate pairing and recombination. We use the data from translocations of other chromosomes to map the location of pairing sites on four other chromosomes. hT1 and szT1 differed markedly in their effect on recombination adjacent to the crossover suppressed region. hT1 had no effect on recombination in the adjacent interval. In contrast, the 0.8 map unit interval immediately adjacent to the szT1(I;X) breakpoint on chromosome I increased to 2.5 map units in translocation heterozygotes. This increase occurs in a chromosomal interval which can be expanded by treatment with radiation. These results are consistent with the suggestion that the szT1(I) breakpoint is in a region of DNA in which meiotic recombination is suppressed relative to the genomic average. We propose that DNA sequences disrupted by the szT1 translocation are responsible for determining the frequency of meiotic recombination in the vicinity of the breakpoint.

  4. Elevated chromosome translocation frequencies in New Zealand nuclear test veterans.

    PubMed

    Wahab, M A; Nickless, E M; Najar-M'kacher, R; Parmentier, C; Podd, J V; Rowland, R E

    2008-01-01

    In 1957/58 the British Government conducted a series of nuclear tests in the mid-Pacific codenamed Operation Grapple, which involved several naval vessels from Britain and New Zealand. Two New Zealand frigates with 551 personnel onboard were stationed at various distances between 20 and 150 nautical miles from ground zero. In the present study we applied the cytomolecular technique mFISH (multicolour fluorescent in situ hybridisation) to investigate a potential link between chromosome abnormalities and possible past radiation exposure in New Zealand nuclear test veterans who participated in Operation Grapple. Compared to age matched controls, the veterans showed significantly higher (P < 0.0001) frequencies of chromosomal abnormalities (275 translocations and 12 dicentrics in 9,360 cells vs. 96 translocations and 1 dicentric in 9,548 cells in the controls), in addition to a significant excess of CCRs (complex chromosomal rearrangements) in the veterans. A Kolmogorov-Smirnoff test showed that the distributions of translocations for the two groups were significantly different.

  5. Translocation frequency of double-stranded DNA through a solid-state nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Nicholas A. W.; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Keyser, Ulrich F.

    2016-02-01

    Solid-state nanopores are single-molecule sensors that measure changes in ionic current as charged polymers such as DNA pass through. Here, we present comprehensive experiments on the length, voltage, and salt dependence of the frequency of double-stranded DNA translocations through conical quartz nanopores with mean opening diameter 15 nm. We observe an entropic barrier-limited, length-dependent translocation frequency at 4M LiCl salt concentration and a drift-dominated, length-independent translocation frequency at 1M KCl salt concentration. These observations are described by a unifying convection-diffusion equation, which includes the contribution of an entropic barrier for polymer entry.

  6. Novel effects of chain flexibility, external force, and background stochasticity on polymer translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Wokyung

    2011-03-01

    The polymer translocation through membranes and the polymer crossing over activation barriers in general, are ubiquitous in cell biology and biotechnological applications. Because they are interconnected flexible systems, polymers in translocation incur entropic barriers but can thermally surmount them with unusual sensitivity to background biases. In the presence of non-equilibrium noises characteristic of living environments, the translocation can speed up much when resonant activation occurs. As a related issue, I will also discuss the problem of polymer surmounting a potential barrier, where the chain flexibility enhances the crossing. Furthermore, when the chain flexibility leads to conformational changes, the crossing rate can be even more dramatically increased. This conformational flexibility and variability enhance the stochastic resonance, where the chain crossing dynamics at an optimal temperature and chain length is maximally coherent and resonant to a minute periodic force. Utilizing the self-organizing behaviors mentioned above, we may learn about bio-molecular machinery of living as well as clever means of manipulating it. Korea Research Foundation.

  7. Stability of the translocation frequency following whole-body irradiation measured in rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucas, J. N.; Hill, F. S.; Burk, C. E.; Cox, A. B.; Straume, T.

    1996-01-01

    Chromosome translocations are persistent indicators of prior exposure to ionizing radiation and the development of 'chromosome painting' to efficiently detect translocations has resulted in a powerful biological dosimetry tool for radiation dose reconstruction. However, the actual stability of the translocation frequency with time after exposure must be measured before it can be used reliably to obtain doses for individuals exposed years or decades previously. Human chromosome painting probes were used here to measure reciprocal translocation frequencies in cells from two tissues of 8 rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) irradiated almost three decades previously. Six of the monkeys were exposed in 1965 to whole-body (fully penetrating) radiation and two were unexposed controls. The primates were irradiated as juveniles to single doses of 0.56, 1.13, 2.00, or 2.25 Gy. Blood lymphocytes (and skin fibroblasts from one individual) were obtained for cytogenetic analysis in 1993, near the end of the animals' lifespans. Results show identical dose-response relationships 28 y after exposure in vivo and immediately after exposure in vitro. Because chromosome aberrations are induced with identical frequencies in vivo and in vitro, these results demonstrate that the translocation frequencies induced in 1965 have not changed significantly during the almost three decades since exposure. Finally, our emerging biodosimetry data for individual radiation workers are now confirming the utility of reciprocal translocations measured by FISH in radiation dose reconstruction.

  8. Analysis of chromosome translocation frequency after a single CT scan in adults

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Yu; Miura, Tomisato; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A.; Ujiie, Risa; Kurosu, Yumiko; Kato, Nagisa; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Kawamura, Fumihiko; Ohba, Takashi; Inamasu, Tomoko; Shishido, Fumio; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuei; Yokouchi, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Kenya; Ishida, Takashi; Muto, Satoshi; Ohsugi, Jun; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Kamiya, Kenji; Sakai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported an increase in dicentric chromosome (DIC) formation after a single computed tomography (CT) scan (5.78–60.27 mSv: mean 24.24 mSv) and we recommended analysis of 2000 metaphase cells stained with Giemsa and centromere-FISH for dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) in cases of low-dose radiation exposure. In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of chromosome translocations using stored Carnoy's-fixed lymphocyte specimens from the previous study; these specimens were from 12 patients who were subject to chromosome painting of Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 were analyzed in ∼5000 cells, which is equivalent to the whole-genome analysis of almost 2000 cells. The frequency of chromosome translocation was higher than the number of DICs formed, both before and after CT scanning. The frequency of chromosome translocations tended to be higher, but not significantly higher, in patients with a treatment history compared with patients without such a history. However, in contrast to the results for DIC formation, the frequency of translocations detected before and after the CT scan did not differ significantly. Therefore, analysis of chromosome translocation may not be a suitable assay for detecting chromosome aberrations in cases of low-dose radiation exposure from a CT scan. A significant increase in the frequency of chromosome translocations was not likely to be detected due to the high baseline before the CT scan; the high and variable frequency of translocations was probably due to multiple confounding factors in adults. PMID:26874116

  9. Analysis of chromosome translocation frequency after a single CT scan in adults.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yu; Miura, Tomisato; Yoshida, Mitsuaki A; Ujiie, Risa; Kurosu, Yumiko; Kato, Nagisa; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Tsuyama, Naohiro; Kawamura, Fumihiko; Ohba, Takashi; Inamasu, Tomoko; Shishido, Fumio; Noji, Hideyoshi; Ogawa, Kazuei; Yokouchi, Hiroshi; Kanazawa, Kenya; Ishida, Takashi; Muto, Satoshi; Ohsugi, Jun; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Kamiya, Kenji; Sakai, Akira

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported an increase in dicentric chromosome (DIC) formation after a single computed tomography (CT) scan (5.78-60.27 mSv: mean 24.24 mSv) and we recommended analysis of 2000 metaphase cells stained with Giemsa and centromere-FISH for dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) in cases of low-dose radiation exposure. In the present study, we analyzed the frequency of chromosome translocations using stored Carnoy's-fixed lymphocyte specimens from the previous study; these specimens were from 12 patients who were subject to chromosome painting of Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4. Chromosomes 1, 2 and 4 were analyzed in ∼5000 cells, which is equivalent to the whole-genome analysis of almost 2000 cells. The frequency of chromosome translocation was higher than the number of DICs formed, both before and after CT scanning. The frequency of chromosome translocations tended to be higher, but not significantly higher, in patients with a treatment history compared with patients without such a history. However, in contrast to the results for DIC formation, the frequency of translocations detected before and after the CT scan did not differ significantly. Therefore, analysis of chromosome translocation may not be a suitable assay for detecting chromosome aberrations in cases of low-dose radiation exposure from a CT scan. A significant increase in the frequency of chromosome translocations was not likely to be detected due to the high baseline before the CT scan; the high and variable frequency of translocations was probably due to multiple confounding factors in adults.

  10. Retrospective biodosimetry using translocation frequency in a stable cell of occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Min Su; Lee, Jin Kyung; Bae, Keum Seok; Han, Eun-Ae; Jang, Seong Jae; Ha, Wi-Ho; Lee, Seung-Sook; Barquinero, Joan Francesc; Kim, Wan Tae

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of hematological malignancies were reported in an industrial radiography company over a year, which were reasonably suspected of being consequences of prolonged exposure to ionizing radiation because of the higher incidence than expected in the general population. We analyzed chromosomal aberrations in the peripheral blood lymphocytes from the other workers who had been working under similar circumstances as the patients in the company. Among the subjects tested, 10 workers who belonged to the highest band were followed up periodically for 1.5 years since the first analysis. The aim of this study was to clarify pertinence of translocation analysis to an industrial set-up where chronic exposure was commonly expected. To be a useful tool for a retrospective biodosimetry, the aberrations need to be persistent for a decade or longer. Therefore we calculated the decline rates and half-lives of frequency for both a reciprocal translocation and a dicentric chromosome and compared them. In this study, while the frequency of reciprocal translocations was maintained at the initial level, dicentric chromosomes were decreased to 46.9% (31.0–76.5) of the initial frequency over the follow-up period. Our results support the long-term stability of reciprocal translocation through the cell cycle and validate the usefulness of translocation analysis as a retrospective biodosimetry for cases of occupational exposure. PMID:25922373

  11. A biophysical model for estimating the frequency of radiation-induced mutations resulting from chromosomal translocations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Honglu; Durante, Marco

    Gene mutations can be induced by radiation as a result of chromosomal translocations. A biophysical model is developed to estimate the frequency of this type of mutation induced by low-LET radiation. Mutations resulting from translocations are assumed to be formed by misrejoining of two DNA double strand breaks (DSB), one within the gene and one on a different chromosome. The chromosome containing the gene is assumed to occupy a spherical territory and does not overlap spatially with other chromosomes. Misrejoining between two DSB can occur only if the two DSB are closer than an interaction distance at the time of their induction. Applying the model to mutations of the hprt gene induced in G0 human lymphocyte cells by low-LET radiation, it is calculated that mutations resulting from translocations account for about 14% of the total mutations. The value of the interaction distance is determined to be 0.6 μm by comparing with the observed frequency of translocations in the X-chromosome.

  12. Frequency Modulated Translocational Oscillations of Nrf2 Mediate the Antioxidant Response Element Cytoprotective Transcriptional Response

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Mingzhan; Momiji, Hiroshi; Rabbani, Naila; Barker, Guy; Bretschneider, Till; Shmygol, Anatoly; Rand, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Stress responsive signaling coordinated by nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) provides an adaptive response for protection of cells against toxic insults, oxidative stress and metabolic dysfunction. Nrf2 regulates a battery of protective genes by binding to regulatory antioxidant response elements (AREs). The aim of this study was to examine how Nrf2 signals cell stress status and regulates transcription to maintain homeostasis. Results: In live cell microscopy we observed that Nrf2 undergoes autonomous translocational frequency-modulated oscillations between cytoplasm and nucleus. Oscillations occurred in quiescence and when cells were stimulated at physiological levels of activators, they decrease in period and amplitude and then evoke a cytoprotective transcriptional response. We propose a mechanism whereby oscillations are produced by negative feedback involving successive de-phosphorylation and phosphorylation steps. Nrf2 was inactivated in the nucleus and reactivated on return to the cytoplasm. Increased frequency of Nrf2 on return to the cytoplasm with increased reactivation or refresh-rate under stress conditions activated the transcriptional response mediating cytoprotective effects. The serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PGAM5, member of the Nrf2 interactome, was a key regulatory component. Innovation: We found that Nrf2 is activated in cells without change in total cellular Nrf2 protein concentration. Regulation of ARE-linked protective gene transcription occurs rather through translocational oscillations of Nrf2. We discovered cytoplasmic refresh rate of Nrf2 is important in maintaining and regulating the transcriptional response and links stress challenge to increased cytoplasmic surveillance. We found silencing and inhibition of PGAM5 provides potent activation of Nrf2. Conclusion: Frequency modulated translocational oscillations of Nrf2 mediate the ARE-linked cytoprotective transcriptional response. Antioxid. Redox

  13. A space-frequency analysis of MEG background processes.

    PubMed

    Bijma, Fetsje; de Munck, Jan C

    2008-11-15

    In MEG source localization the estimated source parameters will be more reliable when the spatiotemporal covariance of the noise and background activity is taken into account. Since this covariance is in general too large to estimate based on the data and to invert efficiently, different parametrizations have been proposed in the literature. These models can be seen as special cases of the general decomposition of the covariance into a sum of Kronecker products of spatial matrices X(n) and temporal matrices T(n) (Van Loan, 2000). In this study we investigate the assumption of the matrices T(n) being Toeplitz. If so, the covariance matrix in the space-frequency domain will have an approximate block-diagonal structure, facilitating inversion, which is a prerequisite for source localization. In this study we address the question whether the Toeplitz approximation is valid for data sets obtained in visual evoked field, auditory evoked field, somatosensory evoked field experiments and data sets containing spontaneous activity. It turns out that on average 87% is in the block-diagonal of the sample covariance, which is close to the values obtained for real Toeplitz matrices T(n). This implies that the space-frequency domain is very interesting for source localization since the major part of the entire covariance can be incorporated in that domain straightforwardly. Finally, the two major processes in the background activity are characterized in terms of their spatial and frequency patterns, yielding a focal and a non-focal pattern in 8 of 10 data sets analyzed in this study. The focal pattern represents the alpha frequency at parieto-occipital areas, whereas the non-focal pattern is more widespread both in space and in frequency.

  14. Reciprocal translocations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 26, describes reciprocal translocations of chromosomes: their occurrence, breakpoints, and multiple rearrangements. In addition, phenotypes of balanced and unbalanced translocation carriers and fetal death are discussed. Examples of translocation families are given. Meiosis and genetic risk in translocation carriers is presented. Finally, sperm chromosomes in meiotic segregation analysis is mentioned. 39 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Frequency-dependent effects of background noise on subcortical response timing.

    PubMed

    Tierney, A; Parbery-Clark, A; Skoe, E; Kraus, N

    2011-12-01

    The addition of background noise to an auditory signal delays brainstem response timing. This effect has been extensively documented using manual peak selection. Peak picking, however, is impractical for large-scale studies of spectrotemporally complex stimuli, and leaves open the question of whether noise-induced delays are frequency-dependent or occur across the frequency spectrum. Here we use an automated, objective method to examine phase shifts between auditory brainstem responses to a speech sound (/da/) presented with and without background noise. We predicted that shifts in neural response timing would also be reflected in frequency-specific phase shifts. Our results indicate that the addition of background noise causes phase shifts across the subcortical response spectrum (70-1000 Hz). However, this noise-induced delay is not uniform such that some frequency bands show greater shifts than others: low-frequency phase shifts (300-500 Hz) are largest during the response to the consonant-vowel formant transition (/d/), while high-frequency shifts (720-1000 Hz) predominate during the response to the steady-state vowel (/a/). Most importantly, phase shifts occurring in specific frequency bands correlate strongly with shifts in the latencies of the predominant peaks in the auditory brainstem response, while phase shifts in other frequency bands do not. This finding confirms the validity of phase shift detection as an objective measure of timing differences and reveals that this method detects noise-induced shifts in timing that may not be captured by traditional peak latency measurements.

  16. Combined effects of frequency and layer removal on background track characteristics of ECE polycarbonate detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi, Mehdi; Soltani, Zahra; Hakimi, Amir

    2016-02-01

    Polycarbonate track detectors (PCTD) when electrochemically etched (ECE) provide excellent characteristics for registering relatively lower-LET charged particles (e.g. alphas, fast-neutron-induced recoils) for many health physics and ion detection applications.The layer removal method of PCTDs by ethylenediamine (EDA) developed in our laboratory reduces the background track (BGT) density significantly. The frequency of the applied electric field strongly affects the BGT density and diameter and thus affects the minimum detection limit (MDL). In order to study the combined effects of the frequency and layer removal on the BGT density and thus on the MDL, this research was conducted. The BGT density versus the layer thickness removed at frequencies up to 12 kHz decrease rapidly to about 10-20 μm above which they reach a minimum constant level, while the mean BGT diameter verses layer removed at all frequencies are constant with flat responses. On the other hand the BGT density and diameter versus frequency at different layers removed up to ~50 μm increase till 4 kHz above which they reach plateaus. The PCTDs with ~20 μm layer removal at frequencies up 1 to 2 kHz showed the lowest MDL. The results are presented and discussed.

  17. Low-frequency measurements of the CMB (cosmic microwave background) spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Bensadoun, M.; De Amici, G.; Levin, S.; Limon, M.; Smoot, G. ); Sironi, G. . Dipt. di Fisica); Bersanelli, M.; Bonelli, G. )

    1989-10-01

    As part of an extended program to characterize the spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at low frequencies, we have performed multiple measurements from a high-altitude site in California. On average, these measurements suggest a CMB temperature slightly lower than measurements at higher frequencies. Atmospheric conditions and the encroachment of civilization are now significant limitations from our present observing site. In November 1989, we will make new measurements from the South Pole Amnudsen-Scott Station at frequencies 0.82 1.5, 2.5, 3.8, 7.5, and 90 GHz. We discuss recent measurements and indicate improvements from a polar observing site. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Dolphins Adjust Species-Specific Frequency Parameters to Compensate for Increasing Background Noise

    PubMed Central

    Papale, Elena; Gamba, Marco; Perez-Gil, Monica; Martin, Vidal Martel; Giacoma, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    An increase in ocean noise levels could interfere with acoustic communication of marine mammals. In this study we explored the effects of anthropogenic and natural noise on the acoustic properties of a dolphin communication signal, the whistle. A towed array with four elements was used to record environmental background noise and whistles of short-beaked common-, Atlantic spotted- and striped-dolphins in the Canaries archipelago. Four frequency parameters were measured from each whistle, while Sound Pressure Levels (SPL) of the background noise were measured at the central frequencies of seven one-third octave bands, from 5 to 20 kHz. Results show that dolphins increase the whistles’ frequency parameters with lower variability in the presence of anthropogenic noise, and increase the end frequency of their whistles when confronted with increasing natural noise. This study provides the first evidence that the synergy among SPLs has a role in shaping the whistles' structure of these three species, with respect to both natural and anthropogenic noise. PMID:25853825

  19. Dolphins adjust species-specific frequency parameters to compensate for increasing background noise.

    PubMed

    Papale, Elena; Gamba, Marco; Perez-Gil, Monica; Martin, Vidal Martel; Giacoma, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    An increase in ocean noise levels could interfere with acoustic communication of marine mammals. In this study we explored the effects of anthropogenic and natural noise on the acoustic properties of a dolphin communication signal, the whistle. A towed array with four elements was used to record environmental background noise and whistles of short-beaked common-, Atlantic spotted- and striped-dolphins in the Canaries archipelago. Four frequency parameters were measured from each whistle, while Sound Pressure Levels (SPL) of the background noise were measured at the central frequencies of seven one-third octave bands, from 5 to 20 kHz. Results show that dolphins increase the whistles' frequency parameters with lower variability in the presence of anthropogenic noise, and increase the end frequency of their whistles when confronted with increasing natural noise. This study provides the first evidence that the synergy among SPLs has a role in shaping the whistles' structure of these three species, with respect to both natural and anthropogenic noise.

  20. Sensitivity to a frequency-dependent circular polarization in an isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Tristan L.; Caldwell, Robert

    2017-02-01

    We calculate the sensitivity to a circular polarization of an isotropic stochastic gravitational wave background (ISGWB) as a function of frequency for ground- and space-based interferometers and observations of the cosmic microwave background. The origin of a circularly polarized ISGWB may be due to exotic primordial physics (i.e., parity violation in the early universe) and may be strongly frequency dependent. We present calculations within a coherent framework which clarifies the basic requirements for sensitivity to circular polarization, in distinction from previous work which focused on each of these techniques separately. We find that the addition of an interferometer with the sensitivity of the Einstein Telescope in the southern hemisphere improves the sensitivity of the ground-based network to circular polarization by about a factor of two. The sensitivity curves presented in this paper make clear that the wide range in frequencies of current and planned observations (10-18 Hz ≲f ≲100 Hz ) will be critical to determining the physics that underlies any positive detection of circular polarization in the ISGWB. We also identify a desert in circular polarization sensitivity for frequencies between 10-15 Hz ≲f ≲10-3 Hz , given the inability for pulsar timing arrays and indirect-detection methods to distinguish the gravitational wave polarization.

  1. Multi-frequency survey of background radiations of the Universe. The "Cosmological Gene" project. First results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parijskij, Yu. N.; Mingaliev, M. G.; Nizhel'Skii, N. A.; Bursov, N. N.; Berlin, A. B.; Grechkin, A. A.; Zharov, V. I.; Zhekanis, G. V.; Majorova, E. K.; Semenova, T. A.; Stolyarov, V. A.; Tsybulev, P. G.; Kratov, D. V.; Udovitskii, R. Yu.; Khaikin, V. B.

    2011-10-01

    The results of the first stage of the "Cosmological Gene" project of the Russian Academy of Sciences are reported. These results consist in the accumulation of multi-frequency data in 31 frequency channels in the wavelength interval 1-55 cm with maximum achievable statistical sensitivity limited by the noise of background radio sources at all wavelengths exceeding 1.38 cm. The survey region is determined by constraints 00 h < RA < 24 h and 40°30' < DEC < 42°30'. The scientific goals of the project are refined in view of recent proposals to use cosmological background radiation data for the development of a unified physical theory. Experimental data obtained with the RATAN-600 radio telescope are used to refine the contribution of the main "screens" located between the observer and the formation epoch of cosmic background radiation ( z = 1100). Experimental data for synchrotron radiation and free-free noise on scales that are of interest for the anisotropy of cosmic microwave background are reported as well as the contribution of these noise components in millimeter-wave experiments to be performed in the nearest years. The role of dipole radio emission of fullerene-type dust nanostructures is shown to be small. The most precise estimates of the role of background radio sources with inverted spectra are given and these sources are shown to create no serious interference in experiments. The average spectral indices of the weakest sources of the NVSS and FIRST catalogs are estimated. The "saturation" data for all wavelengths allowed a constraint to be imposed on the Sunyaev-Zeldovich noise (the SZ noise) at all wavelengths, and made it possible to obtain independent estimates of the average sky temperature from sources, substantially weaker than those listed in the NVSS catalog. These estimates are inconsistent with the existence of powerful extragalactic synchrotron background associated with radio sources. Appreciable "quadrupole" anisotropy in is detected in the

  2. TALEN-Induced Translocations in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Piganeau, Marion; Renouf, Benjamin; Ghezraoui, Hind; Brunet, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Induction of chromosomal translocations in human cells is of a great interest to study tumorigenesis and genome instability. Here, we explain in detail a method to induce translocations using the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs). We describe how to detect translocation formation by PCR, calculate translocation frequency by 96-well PCR screen, and analyze breakpoint junctions. When inducing cancer translocations, it is also possible to detect the fusion gene by FISH analysis or western blot.

  3. Towards a High Temporal Frequency Grass Canopy Thermal IR Model for Background Signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Jerrell R., Jr.; Smith, James A.; Koenig, George G.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present our first results towards understanding high temporal frequency thermal infrared response from a dense plant canopy and compare the application of our model, driven both by slowly varying, time-averaged meteorological conditions and by high frequency measurements of local and within canopy profiles of relative humidity and wind speed, to high frequency thermal infrared observations. Previously, we have employed three-dimensional ray tracing to compute the intercepted and scattered radiation fluxes and for final scene rendering. For the turbulent fluxes, we employed simple resistance models for latent and sensible heat with one-dimensional profiles of relative humidity and wind speed. Our modeling approach has proven successful in capturing the directional and diurnal variation in background thermal infrared signatures. We hypothesize that at these scales, where the model is typically driven by time-averaged, local meteorological conditions, the primary source of thermal variance arises from the spatial distribution of sunlit and shaded foliage elements within the canopy and the associated radiative interactions. In recent experiments, we have begun to focus on the high temporal frequency response of plant canopies in the thermal infrared at 1 second to 5 minute intervals. At these scales, we hypothesize turbulent mixing plays a more dominant role. Our results indicate that in the high frequency domain, the vertical profile of temperature change is tightly coupled to the within canopy wind speed In the results reported here, the canopy cools from the top down with increased wind velocities and heats from the bottom up at low wind velocities. .

  4. A measurement of the low frequency spectrum of the cosmic microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, S.M.

    1987-04-01

    As part of a larger effort to measure the spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation (CBR) at low frequencies, the intensity of the CBR has been measured at a frequency of 1.410 GHz. The measurement was made by comparing the power received from the sky with the power received from a specially designed cooled calibration target with known properties. Sources of radiation other than the CBR were then identified and subtracted to calculate the antenna temperature of the CBR at 1.410 GHz. The instrument used to measure the CBR was a total-power microwave radiometer with a 25 MHz bandwidth centered at 1.410 GHz. The radiometer had a noise temperature of 80 K, and sufficient data were taken that radiometer noise did not contribute significantly to the total measurement error. The sources of error were predominantly systematic in nature, and the largest error was due to uncertainty in the reflection characteristics of the cold-load calibrator. Identification and subtraction of signals from the Galaxy (0.7 K) and the Earth's atmosphere (0.8 K) were also significant parts of the data reduction and error analysis. The brightness temperature of the Cosmic Background Radiation at 1.410 GHz is 222. +- 0.55 Kelvin. The spectrum of the CBR, as determined by this measurement and other published results, is consistent with a blackbody spectrum of temperature 2.741 +- 0.016. Constraints on the amount by which the CBR spectrum deviates from Planck spectrum are used to place limits on energy releases early in the history of the universe. 55 refs., 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  5. Haplotypic Background of a Private Allele at High Frequency in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Kari B.; Jakobsson, Mattias; Crawford, Michael H.; Schurr, Theodore G.; Boca, Simina M.; Conrad, Donald F.; Tito, Raul Y.; Osipova, Ludmilla P.; Tarskaia, Larissa A.; Zhadanov, Sergey I.; Wall, Jeffrey D.; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Malhi, Ripan S.; Smith, David G.; Rosenberg, Noah A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, the observation of a high-frequency private allele, the 9-repeat allele at microsatellite D9S1120, in all sampled Native American and Western Beringian populations has been interpreted as evidence that all modern Native Americans descend primarily from a single founding population. However, this inference assumed that all copies of the 9-repeat allele were identical by descent and that the geographic distribution of this allele had not been influenced by natural selection. To investigate whether these assumptions are satisfied, we genotyped 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms across ∼500 kilobases (kb) around D9S1120 in 21 Native American and Western Beringian populations and 54 other worldwide populations. All chromosomes with the 9-repeat allele share the same haplotypic background in the vicinity of D9S1120, suggesting that all sampled copies of the 9-repeat allele are identical by descent. Ninety-one percent of these chromosomes share the same 76.26 kb haplotype, which we call the “American Modal Haplotype” (AMH). Three observations lead us to conclude that the high frequency and widespread distribution of the 9-repeat allele are unlikely to be the result of positive selection: 1) aside from its association with the 9-repeat allele, the AMH does not have a high frequency in the Americas, 2) the AMH is not unusually long for its frequency compared with other haplotypes in the Americas, and 3) in Latin American mestizo populations, the proportion of Native American ancestry at D9S1120 is not unusual compared with that observed at other genomewide microsatellites. Using a new method for estimating the time to the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of all sampled copies of an allele on the basis of an estimate of the length of the genealogy descended from the MRCA, we calculate the mean time to the MRCA of the 9-repeat allele to be between 7,325 and 39,900 years, depending on the demographic model used. The results support the hypothesis that all

  6. Efficient Induction of Wheat-Agropyron cristatum 6P Translocation Lines and GISH Detection

    PubMed Central

    Song, Liqiang; Jiang, Lili; Han, Haiming; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Lihui; Liu, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    The narrow genetic background restricts wheat yield and quality improvement. The wild relatives of wheat are the huge gene pools for wheat improvement and can broaden its genetic basis. Production of wheat-alien translocation lines can transfer alien genes to wheat. So it is important to develop an efficient method to induce wheat-alien chromosome translocation. Agropyroncristatum (P genome) carries many potential genes beneficial to disease resistance, stress tolerance and high yield. Chromosome 6P possesses the desirable genes exhibiting good agronomic traits, such as high grain number per spike, powdery mildew resistance and stress tolerance. In this study, the wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition was used as bridge material to produce wheat-A. cristatum translocation lines induced by 60Co-γirradiation. The results of genomic in situ hybridization showed that 216 plants contained alien chromosome translocation among 571 self-pollinated progenies. The frequency of translocation was 37.83%, much higher than previous reports. Moreover, various alien translocation types were identified. The analysis of M2 showed that 62.5% of intergeneric translocation lines grew normally without losing the translocated chromosomes. The paper reported a high efficient technical method for inducing alien translocation between wheat and Agropyroncristatum. Additionally, these translocation lines will be valuable for not only basic research on genetic balance, interaction and expression of different chromosome segments of wheat and alien species, but also wheat breeding programs to utilize superior agronomic traits and good compensation effect from alien chromosomes. PMID:23874966

  7. Efficient induction of Wheat-agropyron cristatum 6P translocation lines and GISH detection.

    PubMed

    Song, Liqiang; Jiang, Lili; Han, Haiming; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Lihui; Liu, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    The narrow genetic background restricts wheat yield and quality improvement. The wild relatives of wheat are the huge gene pools for wheat improvement and can broaden its genetic basis. Production of wheat-alien translocation lines can transfer alien genes to wheat. So it is important to develop an efficient method to induce wheat-alien chromosome translocation. Agropyroncristatum (P genome) carries many potential genes beneficial to disease resistance, stress tolerance and high yield. Chromosome 6P possesses the desirable genes exhibiting good agronomic traits, such as high grain number per spike, powdery mildew resistance and stress tolerance. In this study, the wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition was used as bridge material to produce wheat-A. cristatum translocation lines induced by (60)Co-γirradiation. The results of genomic in situ hybridization showed that 216 plants contained alien chromosome translocation among 571 self-pollinated progenies. The frequency of translocation was 37.83%, much higher than previous reports. Moreover, various alien translocation types were identified. The analysis of M2 showed that 62.5% of intergeneric translocation lines grew normally without losing the translocated chromosomes. The paper reported a high efficient technical method for inducing alien translocation between wheat and Agropyroncristatum. Additionally, these translocation lines will be valuable for not only basic research on genetic balance, interaction and expression of different chromosome segments of wheat and alien species, but also wheat breeding programs to utilize superior agronomic traits and good compensation effect from alien chromosomes.

  8. Cryocooled terahertz photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance in 1.5–4 THz frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Makoto; Hiromoto, Norihisa

    2015-10-15

    We describe a 4-K-cryocooled dual-band terahertz (THz) photoconductive detector system with background-limited performance. The detector system comprises two THz photoconductive detectors covering a response in a wide frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz, low noise amplifiers, optical low-pass filters to eliminate input radiation of higher frequencies, and a mechanical 4 K Gifford-McMahon refrigerator that provides practical and convenient operation without a liquid He container. The electrical and optical performances of the THz detector system were evaluated at a detector temperature of 4 K under 300 K background radiation. We proved that the detector system can achieve background-limited noise-equivalent-power on the order of 10{sup −14} W/Hz{sup 1/2} in the frequency range from 1.5 to 4 THz even if the vibration noise of the mechanical refrigerator is present.

  9. An evaluation of the frequency shift caused by collisions with background gas in the primary frequency standard NPL-CsF2.

    PubMed

    Szymaniec, Krzysztof; Lea, Stephen; Liu, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Collisions between cold cesium atoms and background gas atoms at ambient temperature reduce the cold atom signal in a fountain clock and at the same time produce a shift in the measured clock frequency. We evaluate the shift in the NPL-CsF2 cesium fountain primary frequency standard based on measurements of the fractional loss of cold atoms from the atomic cloud during the interrogation time combined with a model by Gibble that quantifies the relationship between the loss and the frequency shift.

  10. Robertsonian translocations

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 27, describes the occurrence of Robertsonian translocations (RTs), which refer to the recombination of whole chromosome arms, in both monocentric and dicentric chromosomes. The nonrandom participation of acrocentric chromosomes in RTs is documented by various methods, including unbiased ascertainment and ascertainment through trisomy, infertility, unspecified mental retardation, and Prader-Willi syndrome. Causes of nonrandom participation of chromosomes in RTs is presented, as are the following topics: segregation in carriers of RTs and segregation in sperm cells of RT carriers, interchromosomal effects and conclusions. 48 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Adapting the buccal micronucleus cytome assay for use in wild birds: age and sex affect background frequency in pigeons.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, G L; Somers, C M

    2012-03-01

    Micronucleus (MN) formation has been used extensively as a biomarker of damage from genotoxic exposures. The Buccal MN Cytome (BMCyt) assay provides a noninvasive means of quantifying MN frequency in humans, but it has not been developed for use in wildlife. We adapted the BMCyt assay for use in wild birds, with a focus on feral pigeons (Columba livia) as a potential indicator species. Five of six urban bird species sampled using oral cavity swabs produced sufficient buccal cells for the BMCyt assay. The body size of species sampled ranged almost 100-fold (~60 to 5,000 g), but was a not major factor influencing the number of buccal cells collected. Pigeon cells were stained and scored following published BMCyt assay protocols for humans, but with a modified fixation approach using heat and methanol. Pigeons had the same common nuclear abnormalities reported in human studies, and a similar background MN formation frequency of 0.88 MN/1,000 cells. Adult pigeons had on average a threefold higher rate of MN formation than juveniles, and males had a 1.4- to 2.2-fold higher frequency than females. Domestic and feral pigeons did not differ in overall MN frequency. Our results indicate that the BMCyt assay can be used on wild birds, and could provide a means of assessing environmental genotoxicity in pigeons, a useful indicator species. However, bird age and sex are important factors affecting background MN frequency, and thereby the design of environmental studies.

  12. Low Frequency Measurement of the Spectrum of the Cosmic Background Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Smoot, G. F.; De Amici, G.; Friedman, S. D.; Witebsky, C.; Mandolesi, N.; Partridge, R. B.; Sironi, G.; Danese, L.; De Zotti, G.

    1983-06-01

    We have made measurements of the cosmic background radiation spectrum at 5 wavelengths (0.33, 0.9, 3, 6.3, and 12 cm) using radiometers with wavelength-scaled corrugated horn antennas having very low sidelobes. A single large-mouth (0.7 m diameter) liquid-helium-cooled absolute reference load was used for all five radiometers. The results of the observations are consistent with previous measurements and represent a significant improvement in accuracy.

  13. Spectroscopic measurement of high-frequency electric fields in the interaction of explosive debris plasma with magnetized background plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, A. S. Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Niemann, C.

    2014-12-15

    The collision-less transfer of momentum and energy from explosive debris plasma to magnetized background plasma is a salient feature of various astrophysical and space environments. While much theoretical and computational work has investigated collision-less coupling mechanisms and relevant parameters, an experimental validation of the results demands the measurement of the complex, collective electric fields associated with debris-background plasma interaction. Emission spectroscopy offers a non-interfering diagnostic of electric fields via the Stark effect. A unique experiment at the University of California, Los Angeles, that combines the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and the Phoenix laser facility has investigated the marginally super-Alfvénic, quasi-perpendicular expansion of a laser-produced carbon (C) debris plasma through a preformed, magnetized helium (He) background plasma via emission spectroscopy. Spectral profiles of the He II 468.6 nm line measured at the maximum extent of the diamagnetic cavity are observed to intensify, broaden, and develop equally spaced modulations in response to the explosive C debris, indicative of an energetic electron population and strong oscillatory electric fields. The profiles are analyzed via time-dependent Stark effect models corresponding to single-mode and multi-mode monochromatic (single frequency) electric fields, yielding temporally resolved magnitudes and frequencies. The proximity of the measured frequencies to the expected electron plasma frequency suggests the development of the electron beam-plasma instability, and a simple saturation model demonstrates that the measured magnitudes are feasible provided that a sufficiently fast electron population is generated during C debris–He background interaction. Potential sources of the fast electrons, which likely correspond to collision-less coupling mechanisms, are briefly considered.

  14. Frequency multiplexed superconducting quantum interference device readout of large bolometer arrays for cosmic microwave background measurements.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, M A; Lueker, M; Aird, K A; Bender, A N; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H-M; Clarke, J; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; Flanigan, D I; de Haan, T; George, E M; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Hrubes, J D; Johnson, B R; Joseph, J; Keisler, R; Kennedy, J; Kermish, Z; Lanting, T M; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Luong-Van, D; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Montroy, T E; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Richards, P L; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Schwan, D; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Vu, C; Westbrook, B; Williamson, R

    2012-07-01

    A technological milestone for experiments employing transition edge sensor bolometers operating at sub-Kelvin temperature is the deployment of detector arrays with 100s-1000s of bolometers. One key technology for such arrays is readout multiplexing: the ability to read out many sensors simultaneously on the same set of wires. This paper describes a frequency-domain multiplexed readout system which has been developed for and deployed on the APEX-SZ and South Pole Telescope millimeter wavelength receivers. In this system, the detector array is divided into modules of seven detectors, and each bolometer within the module is biased with a unique ∼MHz sinusoidal carrier such that the individual bolometer signals are well separated in frequency space. The currents from all bolometers in a module are summed together and pre-amplified with superconducting quantum interference devices operating at 4 K. Room temperature electronics demodulate the carriers to recover the bolometer signals, which are digitized separately and stored to disk. This readout system contributes little noise relative to the detectors themselves, is remarkably insensitive to unwanted microphonic excitations, and provides a technology pathway to multiplexing larger numbers of sensors.

  15. Whole blood thallium determination by GFAAS with high-frequency modulation polarization Zeeman effect background correction.

    PubMed

    Solovyev, Nikolay D; Ivanenko, Natalya B; Ivanenko, Anatoly A

    2011-10-01

    A new technique of blood thallium direct determination based on graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with Zeeman background absorption correction system was designed. The developed technique does not require sample digestion. Sample treatment includes only a fivefold per volume dilution of blood sample with 0.1% (m/v) Triton X-100. L'vov integrated platform was modified with 400 μg of Rh. Matrix modifier (200 μg NH(4)NO(3) and 160 μg Pd(NO(3))(2)) was suggested for coping chloride and blood organic matter interferences. Standard reference material (Clincheck® Plasma Control for trace elements) analysis was used for validation. Additional validation was performed by analyzing spiked blood samples in the whole dynamic range. The dynamic range was 2-50 μg/L. Precision (RSD) was found <12%. Blood thallium limit of detection was 0.2 μg/L.

  16. Major Existence of Very Low Frequency Earthquakes in Background Seismicity Along Subduction Zone of South-western Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.

    2003-12-01

    distributed in island arc side. The very low frequency earthquakes occur in outer area of seismic generation zone. The other zone is coincided with extended zone generating low frequency seismic events. Very low frequency earthquake occurs intermittently in limited area. Frequently, activity increases for some days and swarm type activity generates occasionally. To evaluate integrated seismicity for anomalous events, same class magnitude, greater than 3.0, events occurred in same and surrounding area are picked up from JMA earthquake catalogue. The analysis shows that seismicity of very low frequency earthquakes is comparative with one of normal earthquakes in background activity. We concluded that very low frequency earthquake is one of factors playing seismically important role.

  17. Polarimeter Arrays with Comprehensive Frequency Coverage for the Next Generation of Precision Microwave Background Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austermann, Jason Edward; Beall, James; Becker, Dan; Cho, Hsiao-Mei; Duff, Shannon; gao, jiansong; Hilton, Gene; Hubmayr, Johannes; Irwin, Kent; li, dale; McKenney, Christopher; Ullom, Joel; van lanen, jeffrey; Vissers, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Spectral resolution at (sub-)millimeter wavelengths is now understood to be crucially important in precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Recent results from the Planck and BICEP/KECK experiments have established that measurements of the CMB polarization signal is limited, in part, by polarized foreground emission. In particular, polarized emission from galactic dust has been found to dominate and obscure potential signals of cosmic inflation, even in regions of the sky specifically identified as having relatively low galactic emission. Current and future experiments aim to address foreground contamination by conducting high-sensitivity observations with broad spectral coverage that will allow for differentiation within the measured signal between foreground sources of polarization and that of the CMB, which each have distinct spectral characteristics. To efficiently achieve these goals within a limited focal plane area, NIST-Boulder has developed multi-band TES-based polarimeters that simultaneously measure multiple spectral bands in each of two orthogonal polarizations. This acts to both increase pixel sensitivity through an increased total bandwidth, as well as providing broad spectral information for differentiation of emission sources. Here, we describe recent achievements and ongoing efforts at NIST-Boulder in the development of millimeter and sub-millimeter detector and focal plane technologies for future experiments, including the stage-IV CMB experiment, CMB-S4. NIST-Boulder provides critical cryogenic components to a large number of current and in-development CMB experiments. Recent milestones include the fielding of the first broadband multi-chroic mm-wave polarimeters in the ACTPol experiment, multi-band array fabrication on large-format 150 mm wafers, and development of matching 150 mm silicon platelet feedhorn arrays. We also review several related development efforts in detector, optical coupling, and readout technologies

  18. Effect of selective suppression of spatial frequency domain noise on visual detection of a sample object in an inhomogeneous background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; McDonald, J. Scott; Brennan, Patrick C.; Bourne, Roger M.

    2012-02-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of selective suppression of spatial frequency (SF) domain Gaussian white noise on visibility of a sample object in inhomogeneous backgrounds. SF-specific variation in signal-to-noise ratio due to selective signal averaging in the SF domain is a consequence of some of MRI acquisition methods. This study models the potential effect on visibility of an object in a complex image. A single disc was randomly positioned in 25 of 50 synthetic clustered lumpy background images. Neutral, low mid and high frequency suppressed Gaussian white noise was added in the frequency domain to simulate SF-weighted MRI signal averaging. Twelve readers performed visual searching and localization tasks on ordered sets. Subjects were asked to detect and locate discs and to rank confidence level. Sensitivity, specificity and ROC analyses were performed. Readers achieved significantly higher ROC AUC - Azscores - (p<0.001) and case-based sensitivity (p<0.001) and target-based sensitivity (p<0.001) with images in which low SF noise was suppressed. Also, significant higher cased-based sensitivity (p=0.005), target-based sensitivity (p=0.022) and Az-values (p=0.01) were scored under mid SF noise filtration. No significant differences were observed when images with SF-neutral noise suppression were compared with high SF noise suppression. In conclusion, increase of low and also mid SF signal signal-to-noise ratio significantly improves human performance in visual detection of simple targets in inhomogeneous backgrounds and suggests that a low SF bias in MRI signal averaging may enhance diagnostic quality.

  19. Frequency filtering to suppress background noise in fingerprint evidence: quantifying the fidelity of digitally enhanced fingerprint images.

    PubMed

    Speir, Jacqueline A; Hietpas, Jack

    2014-09-01

    Fingerprint evidence can benefit in image quality if transformed using digital image processing techniques. This is especially true when considering prints that cannot be easily lifted (such as those deposited on porous paper substrates), or when the mechanism of lifting does not effectively reduce background interferences. In these instances, frequency filtering is one type of mathematical transformation that can serve to increase image clarity and the ability to extract minutiae relevant to pairwise comparisons. To quantify the impact of frequency filtering on image quality, high quality and low quality (noisy) prints were collected. The high quality prints served as exemplars that were compared to the low quality prints both pre- and post-filtering. The resulting pairwise match scores indicate that: (1) frequency filtering has a low probability of creating false positive associations, (2) 90% of the post-filtered images result in a normalized gain in match score, (3) frequency filtering doubled the probability of obtaining match scores greater than 30% (for the automated algorithm employed in this study), and (4) filtering can double the probability of obtaining 10 or more matching minutiae when comparing same source prints. Overall, the research indicates a reasonable and quantifiable payoff in increased clarity, matching minutiae and pairwise similarity for post-filtered images when compared to known-match exemplars.

  20. High Frequency Propagation modeling in a disturbed background ionosphere: Results from the Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, D. R.; Groves, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) launched two sounding rockets in the Kwajalein Atoll, Marshall Islands, in May 2013 known as the Metal Oxide Space Cloud (MOSC) experiment to study the interactions of artificial ionization and the background plasma. The rockets released samarium metal vapor in the lower F-region of the ionosphere that ionized forming a plasma cloud. A host of diagnostic instruments were used to probe and characterize the cloud including the ALTAIR incoherent scatter radar, multiple GPS and optical instruments, satellite radio beacons, and a dedicated network of high frequency (HF) radio links. Data from ALTAIR incoherent scatter radar and HF radio links have been analyzed to understand the impacts of the artificial ionization on radio wave propagation. During the first release the ionosphere was disturbed, rising rapidly and spread F formed within minutes after the release. To address the disturbed conditions present during the first release, we have developed a new method of assimilating oblique ionosonde data to generate the background ionosphere that can have numerous applications for HF systems. The link budget analysis of the received signals from the HF transmitters explains the missing low frequencies in the received signals along the great circle path. Observations and modeling confirm that the small amounts of ionized material injected in the lower-F region resulted in significant changes to the natural propagation environment.

  1. Spectroscopic Measurement of High-Frequency Electric Fields in the Interaction of Explosive Debris Plasma with Ambient, Magnetized Background Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarenko, Anton; Schaeffer, Derek; Everson, Erik; Clark, Eric; Vincena, Stephen; van Compernolle, Bart; Tripathi, Shreekrishna; Constantin, Carmen; Niemann, Chris

    2014-10-01

    The explosive expansion of dense, high-beta debris plasma into relatively tenuous, magnetized background plasma is relevant to a wide variety of astrophysical and space environments. Electric fields play a fundamental role in the coupling of momentum and energy from debris to background, and emission spectroscopy provides a powerful diagnostic for assessing electric fields via the Stark effect. A recent experiment utilizing a unique experimental platform at UCLA that combines the Large Plasma Device and the Raptor laser facility has investigated the super-Alfvénic, quasi-perpendicular expansion of a laser-produced carbon (C) debris plasma through a preformed, ambient, magnetized helium (He) background plasma via emission spectroscopy. Spectral profiles of the He II 468.6 nm line have been analyzed via single-mode and multi-mode time-dependent Stark broadening models for hydrogen-like ions, yielding large magnitude (~100 kV/cm), high-frequency (~100 GHz) electric fields. The measurements suggest the development of an electron beam-plasma instability, and a simple instability saturation model demonstrates that the measured electric field magnitudes are feasible under the experimental conditions.

  2. IL-21 and probiotic therapy improve Th17 frequencies, microbial translocation, and microbiome in ARV-treated, SIV-infected macaques.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A M; Klase, Z A; DiNapoli, S R; Vujkovic-Cvijin, I; Carmack, K; Perkins, M R; Calantone, N; Vinton, C L; Riddick, N E; Gallagher, J; Klatt, N R; McCune, J M; Estes, J D; Paiardini, M; Brenchley, J M

    2016-03-01

    Increased mortality in antiretroviral (ARV)-treated, HIV-infected individuals has been attributed to persistent immune dysfunction, in part due to abnormalities at the gastrointestinal barrier. In particular, the poor reconstitution of gastrointestinal Th17 cells correlates with residual translocation of dysbiotic, immunostimulatory microflora across a compromised intestinal epithelial barrier. We have previously demonstrated that oral probiotics promote increased intestinal CD4(+) T-cell reconstitution during ARV treatment in a non-human primate model of HIV infection; however, essential mucosal T-cell subsets, such as Th17 cells, had limited recovery. Here, we sought to promote Th17 cell recovery by administering interleukin (IL)-21 to a limited number of ARV-treated, probiotic-supplemented, Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV)-infected pigtailed macaques. We demonstrate that probiotic and IL-21 supplementation of ARVs are associated with enhanced polyfunctional Th17 expansion and reduced markers of microbial translocation and dysbiosis as compared with infected controls receiving ARVs alone. Importantly, treatment resulted in fewer morbidities compared with controls, and was independent of increased immune activation or loss of viral suppression. We propose that combining ARVs with therapeutics aimed at restoring intestinal stasis may significantly improve disease prognosis of ARV-treated, HIV-infected individuals.

  3. Long-distance translocations to create a second millerbird population and reduce extinction risk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holly Freifeld,; Sheldon Plentovich,; Chris Farmer,; Charles Kohley,; Peter Luscomb,; Work, Thierry M.; Daniel Tsukayama,; George Wallace,; Mark MacDonald,; Sheila Conant,

    2016-01-01

    Translocation is a conservation tool used with increasing frequency to create additional populations of threatened species. In addition to following established general guidelines for translocations, detailed planning to account for unique circumstances and intensive post-release monitoring to document outcomes and guide management are essential components of these projects. Recent translocation of the critically endangered Nihoa millerbird (Acrocephalus familiaris kingi) provides an example of this planning and monitoring. The Nihoa millerbird is a passerine bird endemic to Nihoa Island in the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. The closely related, ecologically similar Laysan millerbird (Acrocephalus familiaris familiaris) went extinct on Laysan Island in the early 20th century when the island was denuded by introduced rabbits. To reduce extinction risk, we translocated 50 adult Nihoa millerbirds more than 1000 km by sea to Laysan, which has recovered substantially in the past century and has ample habitat and a rich prey-base for millerbirds. Following five years of intensive background research and planning, including development of husbandry techniques, fundraising, and regulatory compliance, translocations occurred in 2011 and 2012. Of 11 females in each cohort, 8 (2011 cohort) and 11 (2012 cohort) produced at least one brood of fledglings during their first year on Laysan. At the conclusion of monitoring in September 2014, 37 of the translocated birds were known to survive, and the population was estimated at 164 birds. The reintroduction of millerbirds to Laysan represents a milestone in the island's ongoing restoration.

  4. Background rhythm frequency and theta power of quantitative EEG analysis: predictive biomarkers for cognitive impairment post-cerebral infarcts.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Zang, Da-Wei; Jin, Yan-Yu; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Ni, Hong-Yan; Yin, Jian-Zhong; Ji, Dong-Xu

    2015-04-01

    In clinical settings, cerebral infarct is a common disease of older adults, which usually increases the risk of cognitive impairment. This study aims to assess the quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) as a predictive biomarker for the development of cognitive impairment, post-cerebral infarcts, in subjects from the Department of Neurology. They underwent biennial EEG recording. Cerebral infarct subjects, with follow-up cognitive evaluation, were analyzed for qEEG measures of background rhythm frequency (BRF) and relative δ, θ, α, and β band power. The relationship between cognitive impairment and qEEG, and other possible predictors, was assessed by Cox regression. The results showed that the risk hazard of developing cognitive impairment was 14 times higher for those with low BRF than for those with high BRF (P < .001). Hazard ratio (HR) was also significant for more than median θ band power (HR = 5, P = .002) compared with less than median θ band power. The HRs for δ, α, and β bands were equal to the baseline demographic, and clinical characteristics were not significantly different. In conclusion, qEEG measures of BRF, and relative power in θ band, are potential predictive biomarkers for cognitive impairment in patients with cerebral infarcts. These biomarkers might be valuable in early prediction of cognitive impairment in patients with cerebral infarcts.

  5. OutLyzer: software for extracting low-allele-frequency tumor mutations from sequencing background noise in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Etienne; Goardon, Nicolas; Brault, Baptiste; Rousselin, Antoine; Paimparay, Germain; Legros, Angelina; Fouillet, Robin; Bruet, Olivia; Tranchant, Aurore; Domin, Florian; San, Chankannira; Quesnelle, Céline; Frebourg, Thierry; Ricou, Agathe; Krieger, Sophie; Vaur, Dominique; Castera, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Highlighting tumoral mutations is a key step in oncology for personalizing care. Considering the genetic heterogeneity in a tumor, software used for detecting mutations should clearly distinguish real tumor events of interest that could be predictive markers for personalized medicine from false positives. OutLyzer is a new variant-caller designed for the specific and sensitive detection of mutations for research and diagnostic purposes. It is based on statistic and local evaluation of sequencing background noise to highlight potential true positive variants. 130 previously genotyped patients were sequenced after enrichment by capturing the exons of 22 genes. Sequencing data were analyzed by HaplotypeCaller, LofreqStar, Varscan2 and OutLyzer. OutLyzer had the best sensitivity and specificity with a fixed limit of detection for all tools of 1% for SNVs and 2% for Indels. OutLyzer is a useful tool for detecting mutations of interest in tumors including low allele-frequency mutations, and could be adopted in standard practice for delivering targeted therapies in cancer treatment. PMID:27825131

  6. Production and identification of wheat - Agropyron cristatum (1.4P) alien translocation lines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Hua; Luan, Yang; Wang, Jing-Chang; Wang, Xiao-Guang; Su, Jun-Ji; Zhang, Jin-Peng; Yang, Xin-Ming; Gao, Ai-Nong; Li, Li-Hui

    2010-06-01

    The P genome of Agropyron Gaertn., a wild relative of wheat, contains an abundance of desirable genes that can be utilized as genetic resources to improve wheat. In this study, wheat - Aegilops cylindrica Host gametocidal chromosome 2C addition lines were crossed with wheat - Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. disomic addition line accession II-21 with alien recombinant chromosome (1.4)P. We successfully induced wheat - A. cristatum alien chromosomal translocations for the first time. The frequency of translocation in the progeny was 3.75%, which was detected by molecular markers and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH). The translocation chromosomes were identified by dual-color GISH /fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The P genomic DNA was used as probe to detect the (1.4)P chromosome fragment, and pHvG39, pAs1, or pSc119.2 repeated sequences were used as probes to identify wheat translocated chromosomes. The results showed that six types of translocations were identified in the three wheat - A. cristatum alien translocation lines, including the whole arm or terminal portion of a (1.4)P chromosome. The (1.4)P chromosome fragments were translocated to wheat chromosomes 1B, 2B, 5B, and 3D. The breakpoints were located at the centromeres of 1B and 2B, the pericentric locations of 5BS, and the terminals of 5BL and 3DS. In addition, we obtained 12 addition-deletion lines that contained alien A. cristatum chromosome (1.4)P in wheat background. All of these wheat - A. cristatum alien translocation lines and addition-deletion lines would be valuable for identifying A. cristatum chromosome (1.4)P-related genes and providing genetic resources and new germplasm accessions for the genetic improvement of wheat. The specific molecular markers of A. cristatum (1.4)P chromosome have been developed and used to track the (1.4)P chromatin.

  7. Mode of ATM-dependent suppression of chromosome translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We addressed how ATM suppresses frequency of chromosome translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses translocation frequency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ATM and DNA-PKcs function in a common pathway to suppress translocation. -- Abstract: It is well documented that deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein leads to elevated frequency of chromosome translocation, however, it remains poorly understood how ATM suppresses translocation frequency. In the present study, we addressed the mechanism of ATM-dependent suppression of translocation frequency. To know frequency of translocation events in a whole genome at once, we performed centromere/telomere FISH and scored dicentric chromosomes, because dicentric and translocation occur with equal frequency and by identical mechanism. By centromere/telomere FISH analysis, we confirmed that chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATM causes 2 to 2.5-fold increase in dicentric frequency at first mitosis after 2 Gy of gamma-irradiation in G0/G1. The FISH analysis revealed that ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses dicentric frequency, since RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 elevated dicentric frequency by 1.5-fold. We found ATM also suppresses dicentric occurrence independently of its checkpoint role, as ATM inhibitor showed additional effect on dicentric frequency in the context of p53 depletion and Chk1/2 inactivation. Epistasis analysis using chemical inhibitors revealed that ATM kinase functions in the same pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to suppress dicentric frequency. From the results in the present study, we conclude that ATM minimizes translocation frequency through its commitment to G1 checkpoint and DNA double-strand break repair pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-PKcs.

  8. Translocation of a polymer chain driven by a dichotomous noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiasconaro, Alessandro; José Mazo, Juan; Falo, Fernando

    2011-11-01

    We consider the translocation of a one-dimensional polymer through a pore channel helped by a motor driven by a dichotomous noise with time exponential correlation. We are interested in the study of the translocation time, mean velocity and stall force of the system as a function of the mean driving frequency. We find a monotonic translocation time, in contrast with the mean velocity which shows a pronounced maximum at a given frequency. Interestingly, the stall force shows a nonmonotonic behavior with the presence of a minimum. The influence of the spring elastic constant on the mean translocation times and velocities is also presented.

  9. Physiology in conservation translocations

    PubMed Central

    Tarszisz, Esther; Dickman, Christopher R.; Munn, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation translocations aim to restore species to their indigenous ranges, protect populations from threats and/or reinstate ecosystem functions. They are particularly important for the conservation and management of rare and threatened species. Despite tremendous efforts and advancement in recent years, animal conservation translocations generally have variable success, and the reasons for this are often uncertain. We suggest that when little is known about the physiology and wellbeing of individuals either before or after release, it will be difficult to determine their likelihood of survival, and this could limit advancements in the science of translocations for conservation. In this regard, we argue that physiology offers novel approaches that could substantially improve translocations and associated practices. As a discipline, it is apparent that physiology may be undervalued, perhaps because of the invasive nature of some physiological measurement techniques (e.g. sampling body fluids, surgical implantation). We examined 232 publications that dealt with translocations of terrestrial vertebrates and aquatic mammals and, defining ‘success’ as high or low, determined how many of these studies explicitly incorporated physiological aspects into their protocols and monitoring. From this review, it is apparent that physiological evaluation before and after animal releases could progress and improve translocation/reintroduction successes. We propose a suite of physiological measures, in addition to animal health indices, for assisting conservation translocations over the short term and also for longer term post-release monitoring. Perhaps most importantly, we argue that the incorporation of physiological assessments of animals at all stages of translocation can have important welfare implications by helping to reduce the total number of animals used. Physiological indicators can also help to refine conservation translocation methods. These approaches fall

  10. Investigation of Radio Frequency Discharges and Langmuir Probe Diagnostic Methods in a Fast Flowing Electronegative Background Gas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    the equations 1.43, 1.44, and 1.45, can be solved using a Runge - Kutta or other standard numerical techniques with the results of the solution to the...INVESTIGATION OF RADIO FREQUENCY DISCHARGES AND LANGMUIR PROBE DIAGNOSTIC METHODS IN A FAST FLOWING...AFIT/DS/ENP/DSP-04J INVESTIGATION OF RADIO FREQUENCY DISCHARGES AND LANGMUIR PROBE DIAGNOSTIC METHODS IN A FAST FLOWING ELECTRONEGATIVE

  11. Effect of the genetic background on recombination frequency in the cn-vg region of the second chromosome of natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Hofmanová, J

    1975-01-01

    Newly established test stocks made it possible to follow the effect of three different defined genetic backgrounds (first and third chromosomes) on recombination frequency in the cn-vg region of the second chromosomes isolated from four natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster. One background was composed of the chromosomes with inversions obtained from the stock (see article) and another two backgrounds were of the standard type consisting one-half of the original chromosomes from the natural population and one-half of the chromosomes of the stocks Oregon R or Samarkand. Using the analysis of variance significant differences in RF values were found between and within populations and especially between the different backgrounds. Some simple and double interactions between the above factors played a role. The highest RF values were obtained on the background [corrected] with inversions. The effect of the different genetic backgrounds [corrected] by the action of the genetic modifiers of RF. The different genetic backgrounds affected the variations in RF values in individual populations and the different populations reacted differentially to the changed genetic background. The design of the experiment permitted an estimation of the causal compoenents of variance and heritability of RF from the sib analysis. The additive component of variance was present in only two of the populations under test; the respective estimates of heritability were very low.

  12. Peripheral blood lymphocyte micronucleus frequencies in men from areas of Kerala, India, with high vs normal levels of natural background ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Karuppasamy, C V; Ramachandran, E N; Kumar, V Anil; Kumar, P R Vivek; Koya, P K M; Jaikrishan, G; Das, Birajalaxmi

    2016-04-01

    We have measured the frequencies of micronuclei (MN) in adult male individuals living in areas of the Kerala coast, southwest India, with either high (HLNRA, >1.5mGy/year) or normal levels of natural ionizing radiation (NLNRA, ≤1.5mGy/year). Blood samples were obtained from 141 individuals, 94 from HLNRA and 47 from NLNRA, aged 18-72, and were subjected to the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay. An average of 1835 binucleated (BN) cells per individual were scored. The overall frequency of MN (mean±SD) was 11.7±6.7 per 1000 BN cells. The frequencies of MN in the HLNRA (11.7±6.6) and NLNRA (11.6±6.7) were not statistically significantly different (P=0.59). However, a statistically significant (P<0.001) age-dependent increase in MN frequency was observed among individuals from both HLNRA and NLNRA. No natural background radiation dose-dependent increase in MN frequency was seen. MN frequency was not influenced by tobacco smoking or chewing but it was increased among individuals consuming alcohol. Chronic low-dose radiation in the Kerala coast did not have a significant effect on MN frequency among adult men.

  13. X-autosome translocations in amenorrhoea: a report of a three way translocation from Indian population.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Dhanlaxmi L; Kadam, Akshay P; Koppaka, Neeraja T; Dalvi, Rupa C; Chavan, Deepak S; Das, Bibu R; Mandava, Swarna

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomal translocations have been reported in a number of women undergoing cytogenetic studies for amenorrhoea and gonadal dysgenesis. This study was taken up to emphasize the role of X chromosome and to know the frequency of X-autosomal translocations in women with amenorrhoea in Indian population. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out in 1567 subjects referred for amenorrhoea during the period 2002-2012. GTG-banding was performed from peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures to detect the chromosome abnormalities in all the cases. The karyotype results revealed 43.6% cases with chromosomal abnormalities (n = 683 of 1567 cases). The X-autosomal translocations was found in 2.64% (n = 18 of 683 cases). The common chromosomes involved with X were chromosomes 2, 4, 14 and 20. The translocations involved both p and q arms of the X chromosome.The break point "q26" of X was observed in the majority of the cases. Two interesting cases are discussed: one with three way translocation and another with two translocations. A high number of primary amenorrhoea (PA) and secondary amenorrhoea (SA) cases were involved in X-auto translocation which clearly reveals that chromosomal analysis plays an important role in the evaluation of amenorrhoea.

  14. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay: dose-response calibration curve, background frequency in the population and dose estimation.

    PubMed

    Rastkhah, E; Zakeri, F; Ghoranneviss, M; Rajabpour, M R; Farshidpour, M R; Mianji, F; Bayat, M

    2016-03-01

    An in vitro study of the dose responses of human peripheral blood lymphocytes was conducted with the aim of creating calibrated dose-response curves for biodosimetry measuring up to 4 Gy (0.25-4 Gy) of gamma radiation. The cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus (CBMN) assay was employed to obtain the frequencies of micronuclei (MN) per binucleated cell in blood samples from 16 healthy donors (eight males and eight females) in two age ranges of 20-34 and 35-50 years. The data were used to construct the calibration curves for men and women in two age groups, separately. An increase in micronuclei yield with the dose in a linear-quadratic way was observed in all groups. To verify the applicability of the constructed calibration curve, MN yields were measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes of two real overexposed subjects and three irradiated samples with unknown dose, and the results were compared with dose values obtained from measuring dicentric chromosomes. The comparison of the results obtained by the two techniques indicated a good agreement between dose estimates. The average baseline frequency of MN for the 130 healthy non-exposed donors (77 men and 55 women, 20-60 years old divided into four age groups) ranged from 6 to 21 micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells. Baseline MN frequencies were higher for women and for the older age group. The results presented in this study point out that the CBMN assay is a reliable, easier and valuable alternative method for biological dosimetry.

  15. International study of factors affecting human chromosome translocations

    PubMed Central

    Sigurdson, Alice J.; Ha, Mina; Hauptmann, Michael; Bhatti, Parveen; Sram, Radim J.; Beskid, Olena; Tawn, E. Janet; Whitehouse, Caroline A.; Lindholm, Carita; Nakano, Mimako; Kodama, Yoshiaki; Nakamura, Nori; Vorobtsova, Irena; Oestreicher, Ursula; Stephan, Günther; Yong, Lee C.; Bauchinger, Manfred; Schmid, Ernst; Chung, Hai Won; Darroudi, Firouz; Roy, Laurence; Voisin, Phillipe; Barquinero, Joan F.; Livingston, Gordon; Blakey, David; Hayata, Isamu; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Chunyan; Bennett, L. Michelle; Littlefield, L. Gayle; Edwards, Alan A.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Tucker, James D.

    2009-01-01

    Chromosome translocations in peripheral blood lymphocytes of normal, healthy humans increase with age, but the effects of gender, race, and cigarette smoking on background translocation yields have not been examined systematically. Further, the shape of the relationship between age and translocation frequency (TF) has not been definitively determined. We collected existing data from sixteen laboratories in North America, Europe, and Asia on TFs measured in peripheral blood lymphocytes by fluorescence in situ hybridization whole chromosome painting among 1933 individuals. In Poisson regression models, age, ranging from newborns (cord blood) to 85 years, was strongly associated with TF and this relationship showed significant upward curvature at older ages vs. a linear relationship (p <0.001). Ever smokers had significantly higher TFs than non-smokers (rate ratio (RR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09–1.30) and smoking modified the effect of age on TFs with a steeper age-related increase among ever smokers compared to non-smokers (p<0.001). TFs did not differ by gender. Interpreting an independent effect of race was difficult owing to laboratory variation. Our study is three times larger than any pooled effort to date, confirming a suspected curvilinear relationship of TF with age. The significant effect of cigarette smoking has not been observed with previous pooled studies of TF in humans. Our data provide stable estimates of background TF by age, gender, race, and smoking status and suggest an acceleration of chromosome damage above age 60 and among those with a history of smoking cigarettes. PMID:18337160

  16. Translocated effectors of Yersinia

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Young, Glenn M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Currently, all known translocated effectors of Yersinia are delivered into host cells by type III secretion systems (T3SSs). Pathogenic Yersinia maintain the plasmid-encoded Ysc T3SS for the specific delivery of the well-studied Yop effectors. New horizons for effector biology have opened with the discovery of the Ysps of Y. enterocolitica Biovar 1B, which are translocated into host cells by the chromosome-endoded Ysa T3SS. The reported arsenal of effectors is likely to expand since genomic analysis has revealed gene-clusters in some Yersinia that code for other T3SSs. These efforts also revealed possible type VI secretion (T6S) systems, which may indicate translocation of effectors occurs by multiple mechanisms. PMID:19185531

  17. Simulations of Polymer Translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vocks, H.

    2008-07-01

    Transport of molecules across membranes is an essential mechanism for life processes. These molecules are often long, and the pores in the membranes are too narrow for the molecules to pass through as a single unit. In such circumstances, the molecules have to squeeze -- i.e., translocate -- themselves through the pores. DNA, RNA and proteins are such naturally occuring long molecules in a variety of biological processes. Understandably, the process of translocation has been an active topic of current research: not only because it is a cornerstone of many biological processes, but also due to its relevance for practical applications. Translocation is a complicated process in living organisms -- the presence of chaperone molecules, pH, chemical potential gradients, and assisting molecular motors strongly influence its dynamics. Consequently, the translocation process has been empirically studied in great variety in biological literature. Study of translocation as a biophysical process is more recent. Herein, the polymer is simplified to a sequentially connected string of N monomers as it passes through a narrow pore on a membrane. The quantities of interest are the typical time scale for the polymer to leave a confining cell (the ``escape of a polymer from a vesicle'' time scale), and the typical time scale the polymer spends in the pore (the ``dwell'' time scale) as a function of N and other parameters like membrane thickness, membrane adsorption, electrochemical potential gradient, etc. Our research is focused on computer simulations of translocation. Since our main interest is in the scaling properties, we use a highly simplified description of the translocation process. The polymer is described as a self-avoiding walk on a lattice, and its dynamics consists of single-monomer jumps from one lattice site to another neighboring one. Since we have a very efficient program to simulate such polymer dynamics, which we decribe in Chapter 2, we can perform long

  18. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M.

    2016-04-01

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  19. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, M

    2016-04-14

    We have studied the occurrence of stochastic resonance when a flexible polymer chain undergoes a single-file translocation through a nano-pore separating two spherical cavities, under a time-periodic external driving force. The translocation of the chain is controlled by a free energy barrier determined by chain length, pore length, pore-polymer interaction, and confinement inside the donor and receiver cavities. The external driving force is characterized by a frequency and amplitude. By combining the Fokker-Planck formalism for polymer translocation and a two-state model for stochastic resonance, we have derived analytical formulas for criteria for emergence of stochastic resonance during polymer translocation. We show that no stochastic resonance is possible if the free energy barrier for polymer translocation is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain exhibits stochastic resonance only in the presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interactions. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  20. Problem-Elephant Translocation: Translocating the Problem and the Elephant?

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Prithiviraj; Leimgruber, Peter; Prasad, Tharaka; Pastorini, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Human-elephant conflict (HEC) threatens the survival of endangered Asian elephants (Elephas maximus). Translocating “problem-elephants” is an important HEC mitigation and elephant conservation strategy across elephant range, with hundreds translocated annually. In the first comprehensive assessment of elephant translocation, we monitored 16 translocations in Sri Lanka with GPS collars. All translocated elephants were released into national parks. Two were killed within the parks where they were released, while all the others left those parks. Translocated elephants showed variable responses: “homers” returned to the capture site, “wanderers” ranged widely, and “settlers” established home ranges in new areas soon after release. Translocation caused wider propagation and intensification of HEC, and increased elephant mortality. We conclude that translocation defeats both HEC mitigation and elephant conservation goals. PMID:23236404

  1. Oncogene Translocations and NHL

    Cancer.gov

    A colloboration with several large population-based cohorts to determine whether the prevalence or level of t14;18 is associated with risk of NHL and to investigate the clonal relationship between translocation-bearing cells and subsequent tumors

  2. Do predisposing and family background characteristics modify or confound the relationship between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression? A study of late adolescent and young adult drinkers.

    PubMed

    Wells, Samantha; Graham, Kathryn; Speechley, Mark; Koval, John J

    2006-04-01

    The present study examined whether predisposing and family background characteristics confounded (common cause/general deviance theory) or modified (conditional/interactive theory) the association between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression. A secondary analysis of the US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth was conducted using a composite sample of drinkers, ages 17 to 21, from the 1994, 1996, and 1998 Young Adult surveys (n=602). No evidence of confounding of the relationship between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression was found. In addition, predisposing characteristics did not modify the association between drinking frequency and alcohol-related aggression. However, family background variables (mother's education and any poverty) were important explanatory variables for alcohol-related aggression among males, whereas recent aggression (fights at school or work) was an important predictor for females. Overall, lack of support for the conditional/interactive and common cause theories of the alcohol and aggression relationship suggests that alcohol has an independent explanatory role in alcohol-related aggression. In addition, the gender differences found in the present study highlight the need for more gender-focussed research on predictors of alcohol-related aggression, especially among adolescents and young adults.

  3. Study of a dual frequency capacitively coupled rf discharge in the background of multi-component plasma and its validation by a simple analytical sheath model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhuyan, Heman; Saikia, Partha; Favre, Mario; Wyndham, Edmundo; Veloso, Felipe

    2016-10-01

    The behavior of a phase-locked dual frequency capacitively coupled rf discharges (2f-CCRF) in the background of multi-component plasma is experimentally studied by rf current-voltage measurements and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The multi-component plasma is produced by adding hydrogen to the argon CCRF discharge. Variation of experimental parameters, like working pressure, low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) rf power indicate significant changes in the electron density and temperature as well as the DC self-bias developed on the power electrode. It is observed that the electron density decreases as the percentage of hydrogen increases in the argon plasma while the electron temperature follows opposite trend. An analytical sheath model for the 2f-CCRF discharge in the background of multi-component plasma is developed and its prediction on the observed variation of DC self-bias is well agreed with the experimental observations. Authors acknowledge Proyecto Puente No P1611 and FONDECYT 3160179.

  4. Two-photon interference using background-free quantum frequency conversion of single photons emitted by an InAs quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Ates, Serkan; Agha, Imad; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Rakher, Matthew T; Badolato, Antonio; Srinivasan, Kartik

    2012-10-05

    We show that quantum frequency conversion (QFC) can overcome the spectral distinguishability common to inhomogeneously broadened solid-state quantum emitters. QFC is implemented by combining single photons from an InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) at 980 nm with a 1550 nm pump laser in a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) waveguide to generate photons at 600 nm with a signal-to-background ratio exceeding 100:1. Photon correlation and two-photon interference measurements confirm that both the single photon character and wave packet interference of individual QD states are preserved during frequency conversion. Finally, we convert two spectrally separate QD transitions to the same wavelength in a single PPLN waveguide and show that the resulting field exhibits nonclassical two-photon interference.

  5. Temperature dependence of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores.

    PubMed

    Verschueren, Daniel V; Jonsson, Magnus P; Dekker, Cees

    2015-06-12

    In order to gain a better physical understanding of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores, we study the temperature dependence of λ-DNA translocations through 10 nm diameter silicon nitride nanopores, both experimentally and theoretically. The measured ionic conductance G, the DNA-induced ionic-conductance blockades [Formula: see text] and the event frequency Γ all increase with increasing temperature while the DNA translocation time τ decreases. G and [Formula: see text] are accurately described when bulk and surface conductances of the nanopore are considered and access resistance is incorporated appropriately. Viscous drag on the untranslocated part of the DNA coil is found to dominate the temperature dependence of the translocation times and the event rate is well described by a balance between diffusion and electrophoretic motion. The good fit between modeled and measured properties of DNA translocations through solid-state nanopores in this first comprehensive temperature study, suggest that our model captures the relevant physics of the process.

  6. Mode of ATM-dependent suppression of chromosome translocation.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-12-09

    It is well documented that deficiency in ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein leads to elevated frequency of chromosome translocation, however, it remains poorly understood how ATM suppresses translocation frequency. In the present study, we addressed the mechanism of ATM-dependent suppression of translocation frequency. To know frequency of translocation events in a whole genome at once, we performed centromere/telomere FISH and scored dicentric chromosomes, because dicentric and translocation occur with equal frequency and by identical mechanism. By centromere/telomere FISH analysis, we confirmed that chemical inhibition or RNAi-mediated knockdown of ATM causes 2 to 2.5-fold increase in dicentric frequency at first mitosis after 2 Gy of gamma-irradiation in G0/G1. The FISH analysis revealed that ATM/p53-dependent G1 checkpoint suppresses dicentric frequency, since RNAi-mediated knockdown of p53 elevated dicentric frequency by 1.5-fold. We found ATM also suppresses dicentric occurrence independently of its checkpoint role, as ATM inhibitor showed additional effect on dicentric frequency in the context of p53 depletion and Chk1/2 inactivation. Epistasis analysis using chemical inhibitors revealed that ATM kinase functions in the same pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to suppress dicentric frequency. From the results in the present study, we conclude that ATM minimizes translocation frequency through its commitment to G1 checkpoint and DNA double-strand break repair pathway that requires kinase activity of DNA-PKcs.

  7. [Changes in the chromatin structure of lymphoid cells under the influence of low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation against the background of inflammatory process].

    PubMed

    Gapeev, A B; Romanova, N A; Chemeris, N K

    2011-01-01

    Using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis technique (comet assay), changes in chromatin structure of peripheral blood leukocytes and peritoneal neutrophils have been studied in mice exposed to low-intensity extremely high-frequency electromagnetic radiation (42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2, 20 min at 1 h after induction of inflammation) against the background of the systemic inflammatory process. It was revealed that the exposure of mice with the developing inflammation leads to a pronounced decrease in the level of DNA damage to peripheral blood leukocytes and peritoneal neutrophils. It is supposed that the changes in the chromatin structure of lymphoid cells have a genoprotective character in the inflammatory process and can underlie the mechanisms of realization of antiinflammatory effects of the electromagnetic radiation.

  8. Mechanisms Underlying Stage-1 TRPL Channel Translocation in Drosophila Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Lieu, Minh-Ha; Vallejos, Maximiliano J.; Michael, Emily; Tsunoda, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Background TRP channels function as key mediators of sensory transduction and other cellular signaling pathways. In Drosophila, TRP and TRPL are the light-activated channels in photoreceptors. While TRP is statically localized in the signaling compartment of the cell (the rhabdomere), TRPL localization is regulated by light. TRPL channels translocate out of the rhabdomere in two distinct stages, returning to the rhabdomere with dark-incubation. Translocation of TRPL channels regulates their availability, and thereby the gain of the signal. Little, however, is known about the mechanisms underlying this trafficking of TRPL channels. Methodology/Principal Findings We first examine the involvement of de novo protein synthesis in TRPL translocation. We feed flies cycloheximide, verify inhibition of protein synthesis, and test for TRPL translocation in photoreceptors. We find that protein synthesis is not involved in either stage of TRPL translocation out of the rhabdomere, but that re-localization to the rhabdomere from stage-1, but not stage-2, depends on protein synthesis. We also characterize an ex vivo eye preparation that is amenable to biochemical and genetic manipulation. We use this preparation to examine mechanisms of stage-1 TRPL translocation. We find that stage-1 translocation is: induced with ATP depletion, unaltered with perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton or inhibition of endocytosis, and slowed with increased membrane sterol content. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that translocation of TRPL out of the rhabdomere is likely due to protein transport, and not degradation/re-synthesis. Re-localization from each stage to the rhabdomere likely involves different strategies. Since TRPL channels can translocate to stage-1 in the absence of ATP, with no major requirement of the cytoskeleton, we suggest that stage-1 translocation involves simple diffusion through the apical membrane, which may be regulated by release of a light-dependent anchor in

  9. Genetic mapping of an ancient translocation in the genus Lens.

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Y; Zamir, D; Ladizinsky, G

    1987-04-01

    Segregation of 18 marker genes was monitored in selfed progeny of a Lens culinaris × L. ervoides hybrid; five linkage groups were mapped, one of which contained a reciprocal translocation break-point that differentiates between the parents. Four markers were found to be linked to the translocation break-point: Aco-1 and Pgm-2 on one side and Gs and Got-2 on the other. The gene pairs on both sides of the translocation are not linked in L. culinaris or in L. orientalis. The L. ervoides gene order was also found in L. odemensis but with significantly reduced map distances. Analysis of monogenic segregations in a number of Lens inter-specific crosses revealed some consistent patterns of deviations from the expected Mendelian ratios. The factors responsible for these unequal segregations, genotypic effects on recombination frequencies, negative interference, and the possible ancient origin of the translocation are discussed.

  10. Acrylamide: induction of heritable translocations in male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shelby, M.D.; Cain, K.T.; Cornett, C.V.; Generoso, W.M.

    1987-01-01

    Acrylamide (AA), known to induce dominant lethals in male rodents, was studied in the mouse heritable translocation test by using intraperitoneal injections on 5 consecutive days. Matings on days 7-10 following the last injection yielded a high frequency of translocation carriers in the F/sub 1/ male population, which demonstrated that acrylamide is an effective inducer of translocations in postmeiotic germ cells. As an inducer of both dominant lethals and heritable translocations in late spermatids and early spermatozoa, AA is similar to alkylating agents such as ethylmethanesulfonate and ethylene oxide. However, AA's chemical structure, the nature of adducts formed with DNA, and its lack of mutagenicity in bacteria suggest a different mechanism as the basis for AA's germ cell mutagenicity.

  11. Within-Range Translocations and Their Consequences in European Larch

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Stefanie; Liepelt, Sascha; Gerber, Sophie; Petit, Rémy J.

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to biological invasions, translocations of individuals within a species range are understudied, due to difficulties in systematically detecting them. This results in limited knowledge about the corresponding processes and uncertainties regarding the status of extant populations. European larch, a forest tree whose fragmented native distribution is restricted to the Alps and to other Central European mountains, has been massively planted for at least 300 years. Here we focus on the genetic characterization of translocations having taken place within its native range. Microsatellite variation at 13 nuclear loci and sequence data of two mitochondrial DNA fragments were analyzed on the basis of a comprehensive range-wide population sample. Two complementary methods (Geneclass and Structure) were used to infer translocation events based on nuclear data whereas mitochondrial data were used for validation of these inferences. Using Geneclass, we found translocation events in a majority of populations. Additional cases of translocation and many instances of admixture were identified using Structure, thanks to the clear-cut ancestral genetic structure detected in this species. In particular, a strong divide between Alpine and Central European populations, also apparent at mitochondrial markers, helped uncover details on translocation events and related processes. Translocations and associated admixture events were found to be heterogeneously distributed across the species range, with a particularly high frequency in Central Europe. Furthermore, translocations frequently involved multiple geographic sources, some of which were over-represented. Our study illustrates the importance of range-wide investigations for tracing translocations back to their origins and for revealing some of their consequences. It provides some first clues for developing suitable conservation and management strategies. PMID:26000791

  12. Multi-frequency polarimetry of the Galactic radio background around 350 MHz. I. A region in Auriga around l = 161 deg, b = 16 deg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverkorn, M.; Katgert, P.; de Bruyn, A. G.

    2003-06-01

    With the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT), multi-frequency polarimetric images were taken of the diffuse radio synchrotron background in a ~ 5 deg times 7 deg region centered on (l,b) = (161 deg ,16 deg ) in the constellation of Auriga. The observations were done simultaneously in 5 frequency bands, from 341 MHz to 375 MHz, and have a resolution of ~ 5.0arcminx5 .0arcmin cosec delta . The polarized intensity P and polarization angle phi show ubiquitous structure on arcminute and degree scales, with polarized brightness temperatures up to about 13 K. On the other hand, no structure at all is observed in total intensity I to an rms limit of 1.3 K, indicating that the structure in the polarized radiation must be due to Faraday rotation and depolarization mostly in the warm component of the nearby Galactic interstellar medium (ISM). Different depolarization processes create structure in polarized intensity P. Beam depolarization creates ``depolarization canals'' of one beam wide, while depth depolarization is thought to be responsible for creating most of the structure on scales larger than a beam width. Rotation measures (RM) can be reliably determined, and are in the range -17 <~ RM <~ 10 rad m-2 with a non-zero average RM0 ~ -3.4 rad m-2. The distribution of RMs on the sky shows both abrupt changes on the scales of the beam and a gradient in the direction of positive Galactic longitude of ~ 1 rad m-2 per degree. The gradient and average RM are consistent with a regular magnetic field of ~ 1 mu G which has a pitch angle of p = -14 deg. There are 13 extragalactic sources in the field for which RMs could be derived, and those have |RM| <~ 13 rad m-2, with an estimated intrinsic source contribution of ~ 3.6 rad m-2. The RMs of the extragalactic sources show a gradient that is about 3 times larger than the gradient in the RMs of the diffuse emission and that is approximately in Galactic latitude. This difference is ascribed to a vastly different effective

  13. Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

  14. Structural insights into ribosome translocation

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Clarence

    2016-01-01

    During protein synthesis, tRNA and mRNA are translocated from the A to P to E sites of the ribosome thus enabling the ribosome to translate one codon of mRNA after the other. Ribosome translocation along mRNA is induced by the universally conserved ribosome GTPase, elongation factor G (EF‐G) in bacteria and elongation factor 2 (EF‐2) in eukaryotes. Recent structural and single‐molecule studies revealed that tRNA and mRNA translocation within the ribosome is accompanied by cyclic forward and reverse rotations between the large and small ribosomal subunits parallel to the plane of the intersubunit interface. In addition, during ribosome translocation, the ‘head’ domain of small ribosomal subunit undergoes forward‐ and back‐swiveling motions relative to the rest of the small ribosomal subunit around the axis that is orthogonal to the axis of intersubunit rotation. tRNA/mRNA translocation is also coupled to the docking of domain IV of EF‐G into the A site of the small ribosomal subunit that converts the thermally driven motions of the ribosome and tRNA into the forward translocation of tRNA/mRNA inside the ribosome. Despite recent and enormous progress made in the understanding of the molecular mechanism of ribosome translocation, the sequence of structural rearrangements of the ribosome, EF‐G and tRNA during translocation is still not fully established and awaits further investigation. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:620–636. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27117863

  15. Downside risk of wildlife translocation.

    PubMed

    Chipman, R; Slate, D; Rupprecht, C; Mendoza, M

    2008-01-01

    Translocation has been used successfully by wildlife professionals to enhance or reintroduce populations of rare or extirpated wildlife, provide hunting or wildlife viewing opportunities, farm wild game, and reduce local human-wildlife conflicts. However, accidental and intentional translocations may have multiple unintended negative consequences, including increased stress and mortality of relocated animals, negative impacts on resident animals at release sites, increased conflicts with human interests, and the spread of diseases. Many wildlife professionals now question the practice of translocation, particularly in light of the need to contain or eliminate high profile, economically important wildlife diseases and because using this technique may jeopardize international wildlife disease management initiatives to control rabies in raccoons, coyotes, and foxes in North America. Incidents have been documented where specific rabies variants (Texas gray fox, canine variant in coyotes, and raccoon) have been moved well beyond their current range as a result of translocation, including the emergence of raccoon rabies in the eastern United States. Here, we review and discuss the substantial challenges of curtailing translocation in the USA, focusing on movement of animals by the public, nuisance wildlife control operators, and wildlife rehabilitators.

  16. Gender-specific frequency of background somatic mutations at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase locus in cord blood T lymphocytes from preterm newborns

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Makoto; Vacek, Pamela M.; Poseno, Tina; Silver, Robert; Finette, Barry A.

    1999-01-01

    Limited information is available regarding the frequency, spectrum, and clinical relevance of somatic mutations in the developing fetus. The goal of this study was to determine somatic mutant frequencies (Mfs) at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) reporter gene in cord blood T lymphocytes from preterm infants to gain insight into in utero mutational events. Mf determinations were made by using the HPRT T cell cloning assay on cord blood samples from 52 preterm infants. Natural logarithm Mfs (lnMfs) from preterm infants were compared with results from our database for full-term infants. Our analysis revealed higher lnMfs in cord blood T lymphocytes from preterm compared with full-term infants (P = 0.008). In addition, preterm females had significantly higher lnMfs compared with full-term females (P < 0.001), whereas preterm males were found to have significantly lower lnMfs than preterm females (P = 0.005). Regression analyses also demonstrate a significant relationship between lnMf and gestational age for preterm females that does not exist for preterm males. These results demonstrate the gender-specific association between Mf and age in humans. PMID:9892677

  17. Suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation.

    PubMed

    Germano, Jennifer M; Bishop, Phillip J

    2009-02-01

    Translocations are important tools in the field of conservation. Despite increased use over the last few decades, the appropriateness of translocations for amphibians and reptiles has been debated widely over the past 20 years. To provide a comprehensive evaluation of the suitability of amphibians and reptiles for translocation, we reviewed the results of amphibian and reptile translocation projects published between 1991 and 2006. The success rate of amphibian and reptile translocations reported over this period was twice that reported in an earlier review in 1991. Success and failure rates were independent of the taxonomic class (Amphibia or Reptilia) released. Reptile translocations driven by human-wildlife conflict mitigation had a higher failure rate than those motivated by conservation, and more recent projects of reptile translocations had unknown outcomes. The outcomes of amphibian translocations were significantly related to the number of animals released, with projects releasing over 1000 individuals being most successful. The most common reported causes of translocation failure were homing and migration of introduced individuals out of release sites and poor habitat. The increased success of amphibian and reptile translocations reviewed in this study compared with the 1991 review is encouraging for future conservation projects. Nevertheless, more preparation, monitoring, reporting of results, and experimental testing of techniques and reintroduction questions need to occur to improve translocations of amphibians and reptiles as a whole.

  18. Time-Variable Geophysical Background Models for High-Frequency Non-Tidal Variability in the Earth's Gravity Field, its Surface Deformation, and its Rotation provided by GFZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobslaw, Henryk; Dill, Robert; Bergmann-Wolf, Inga; Poropat, Lea; Thomas, Maik

    2016-04-01

    Mass variability in atmosphere, oceans, and the terrestrially stored water is reflected in time variations of the Earth's gravity field, its surface deformations, and its rotation that are reliably picked up by geodetic networks and satellite missions since many years. For studies attempting to unveil signatures of solid Earth processes from such observations, its is highly important to remove signals caused by geophysical fluids on or above the surface as accurately as possible. At this poster, we are going to give a summary about the current status of the time-variable geophysical background models suitable for geodetic purposes that are currently processed at GFZ Potsdam. This will include the latest versions of the GRACE AOD1B background model; effective angular momentum functions for atmosphere, oceans, and the continental hydrosphere; as well as surface deformations due to tidal and non-tidal mass loads on the continents and the ocean floor. Latest news and all access details to the datasets are available at http://www.gfz-potsdam.de/en/section/earthsystemmodelling/services.

  19. Nuclear Receptor-Induced Chromosomal Proximity and DNA Breaks Underlie Specific Translocations in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chunru; Yang, Liuqing; Tanasa, Bogdan; Hutt, Kasey; Ju, Bong-gun; Ohgi, Kenny; Zhang, Jie; Rose, Dave; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Glass, Christopher K.; Rosenfeld, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of leukemia/lymphoma and also appear in solid tumors, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. By establishing a cellular model that mimics the relative frequency of authentic translocation events without proliferation selection, we report mechanisms of nuclear receptor-dependent tumor translocations. Intronic binding of liganded-AR first juxtaposes translocation loci by triggering intra- and interchromosomal interactions. AR then promotes site-specific DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) at translocation loci by recruiting two types of enzymatic machinery induced by genotoxic stress and liganded-AR, including Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase (AID) and the LINE-1 repeat-encoded ORF2 endonuclease. These enzymatic machineries synergistically generate site-selective DSBs at juxtaposed translocation loci that are ligated by Non-Homologous Ending Joining (NHEJ) pathway for specific translocations. Our data suggest that the confluence of two parallel pathways initiated by liganded-nuclear receptor and genotoxic stress underlie non-random tumor translocations, which may function in many types of tumors and pathological processes. PMID:19962179

  20. Observations of 1ES 1101-232 with H.E.S.S. and at lower frequencies: A hard spectrum blazar and constraints on the extragalactic background light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pühlhofer, Gerd; Benbow, Wystan; Costamante, Luigi; Sol, Helene; Boisson, Catherine; Emmanoulopoulos, Dimitrios; Wagner, Stefan; Horns, Dieter; Giebels, Berrie

    VHE observations of the distant (z=0.186) blazar 1ES 1101-232 with H.E.S.S. are used to constrain the extragalactic background light (EBL) in the optical to near infrared band. As the EBL traces the galaxy formation history of the universe, galaxy evolution models can therefore be tested with the data. In order to measure the EBL absorption effect on a blazar spectrum, we assume that usual constraints on the hardness of the intrinsic blazar spectrum are not violated. We present an update of the VHE spectrum obtained with H.E.S.S. and the multifrequency data that were taken simultaneously with the H.E.S.S. measurements. The data verify that the broadband characteristics of 1ES 1101-232 are similar to those of other, more nearby blazars, and strengthen the assumptions that were used to derive the EBL upper limit.

  1. Facilitated Translocation of Polypeptides Through A Single Nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Bikwemu, Robert; Wolfe, Aaron J.; Xing, Xiangjun; Movileanu, Liviu

    2011-01-01

    The transport of polypeptides through nanopores is a key process in biology and medical biotechnology. Despite its critical importance, the underlying kinetics of polypeptide translocation through protein nanopores is not yet comprehensively understood. Here, we present a simple two-barrier, one-well kinetic model for the translocation of short positively charged polypeptides through a single transmembrane protein nanopore that is equiped with negatively charged rings, simply called traps. We demonstrate that the presence of these traps within the interior of the nanopore dramatically alters the free energy landscape for the partitioning of the polypeptide into the nanopore interior, as revealed by significant modifications in the activation free energies required for the transitions of the polypeptide from one state to other. Our kinetic model permits the calculation of the relative and absolute exit frequencies of the short cationic polypeptides through either opening of the nanopore. Moreover, this approach enabled quantitative assessment of the kinetics of translocation of the polypeptides through a protein nanopore, which is strongly dependent on several factors, including the nature of the translocating polypeptide, the position of the traps, the strength of the polypeptide-attractive trap interactions and the applied transmembrane voltage. PMID:21339604

  2. Problems with mitigation translocation of herpetofauna.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Brian K; Nowak, Erika M; Kwiatkowski, Matthew A

    2015-02-01

    Mitigation translocation of nuisance animals is a commonly used management practice aimed at resolution of human-animal conflict by removal and release of an individual animal. Long considered a reasonable undertaking, especially by the general public, it is now known that translocated subjects are negatively affected by the practice. Mitigation translocation is typically undertaken with individual adult organisms and has a much lower success rate than the more widely practiced conservation translocation of threatened and endangered species. Nonetheless, the public and many conservation practitioners believe that because population-level conservation translocations have been successful that mitigation translocation can be satisfactorily applied to a wide variety of human-wildlife conflict situations. We reviewed mitigation translocations of reptiles, including our own work with 3 long-lived species (Gila monsters [Heloderma suspectum], Sonoran desert tortoises [Gopherus morafkai], and western diamond-backed rattlesnakes [Crotalus atrox]). Overall, mitigation translocation had a low success rate when judged either by effects on individuals (in all studies reviewed they exhibited increased movement or increased mortality) or by the success of the resolution of the human-animal conflict (translocated individuals often returned to the capture site). Careful planning and identification of knowledge gaps are critical to increasing success rates in mitigation translocations in the face of increasing pressure to find solutions for species threatened by diverse anthropogenic factors, including climate change and exurban and energy development.

  3. Disease dynamics during wildlife translocations: disruptions to the host population and potential consequences for transmission in desert tortoise contact networks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiello, Christina M.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Walde, Andrew D.; Esque, Todd C.; Emblidge, Patrick G.; Sah, Pratha; Bansal, S.; Hudson, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Wildlife managers consider animal translocation a means of increasing the viability of a local population. However, augmentation may disrupt existing resident disease dynamics and initiate an outbreak that would effectively offset any advantages the translocation may have achieved. This paper examines fundamental concepts of disease ecology and identifies the conditions that will increase the likelihood of a disease outbreak following translocation. We highlight the importance of susceptibility to infection, population size and population connectivity – a characteristic likely affected by translocation but not often considered in risk assessments – in estimating outbreak risk due to translocation. We then explore these features in a species of conservation concern often translocated in the presence of infectious disease, the Mojave Desert tortoise, and use data from experimental tortoise translocations to detect changes in population connectivity that may influence pathogen transmission. Preliminary analyses comparing contact networks inferred from spatial data at control and translocation plots and infection simulation results through these networks suggest increased outbreak risk following translocation due to dispersal-driven changes in contact frequency and network structure. We outline future research goals to test these concepts and aid managers in designing effective risk assessment and intervention strategies that will improve translocation success.

  4. Creating cancer translocations in human cells using Cas9 DSBs and nCas9 paired nicks

    PubMed Central

    Renouf, Benjamin; Piganeau, Marion; Ghezraoui, Hind; Jasin, Maria; Brunet, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Recurrent chromosomal translocations are found in numerous of tumor types, often leading to the formation and expression of fusion genes with oncogenic potential. Creating chromosomal translocations at the relevant endogenous loci, rather than just ectopically expressing the fusion genes, opens new possibilities for better characterizing molecular mechanisms driving tumor formation. In this chapter, we describe methods to create cancer translocations in human cells. DSBs or paired nicks generated by either wild-type Cas9 or the Cas9 nickase, respectively, are used to induce translocations at the relevant loci. Using different PCR-based methods, we also explain how to quantify translocation frequency and to analyze breakpoint junctions in the cells of interest. In addition, PCR detection of translocations is used as a very sensitive method to detect off-target effects, which has general utility. PMID:25398344

  5. Creating cancer translocations in human cells using Cas9 DSBs and nCas9 paired nicks.

    PubMed

    Renouf, Benjamin; Piganeau, Marion; Ghezraoui, Hind; Jasin, Maria; Brunet, Erika

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent chromosomal translocations are found in numerous tumor types, often leading to the formation and expression of fusion genes with oncogenic potential. Creating chromosomal translocations at the relevant endogenous loci, rather than ectopically expressing the fusion genes, opens new possibilities for better characterizing molecular mechanisms driving tumor formation. In this chapter, we describe methods to create cancer translocations in human cells. DSBs or paired nicks generated by either wild-type Cas9 or the Cas9 nickase, respectively, are used to induce translocations at the relevant loci. Using different PCR-based methods, we also explain how to quantify translocation frequency and to analyze breakpoint junctions in the cells of interest. In addition, PCR detection of translocations is used as a very sensitive method to detect off-target effects, which has general utility.

  6. Underground statistical measurements of the world-wide magnetic-background level in the millihertz frequency range with the [SQUID]2 magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzo di Borgo, E.; Marfaing, J.; Waysand, G.

    2012-04-01

    The passive ground sensor system [SQUID]2 (SQUID with Shielding QUalified for Ionosphere Detection) is a three-axis cryogenically cooled magnetometer installed within the LSBB (Laboratoire Souterrain à Bas Bruit) in the South-East of France. This permanent operating device is sheltered by a unique underground shielded cell buried under 518m of karstic rock in a low noise environment, leading to a noise level lower than 3 fT/√Hz above 40Hz. Various phenomena, mainly linked to earthquakes contributions, have been identified at the local scale through a magneto-hydrodynamic correlation or at the global ones, resulting from the Earth-ionosphere coupling. As standing waves altering the surface of the Earth, free oscillations of Earth consecutive to earthquake events can also contribute to the magnetic field variation. Because the ionosphere is a complex and nonlinear system affected by a large number of independent parameters, it appears obvious to constrain the number of sources. Investigation of the ULF magnetic pulsations detected by [SQUID]2 over very quiet seismic and ionospheric conditions allows to defined a first experimental baseline of ionosphere magnetic noise [Marfaing et al. 2009]. Here, the analysis is performed to a set of 24 magnetically quiet days in order to establish a statistical baseline for the "global minimal magnetic level" in the site. The mean magnetic spectrum obtained in the millihertz range is characterized by several pulsations of noticeable amplitude above the flicker noise. An attempt of discrimination of the seismogenic contribution has been proposed through the polarization analysis proposed by Hayakawa et al. [2007]. Some frequencies coincide with the Earth's eigenmodes with less than 1% deviation; this includes the possibility of the superposition of several interplaying signals in the spectra of ionospheric or Earth's origin, assumed by the weak turbulence theory. These results provide complementary analysis to validate the

  7. DNA ligase III promotes alternative nonhomologous end-joining during chromosomal translocation formation.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Deniz; Brunet, Erika; Wong, Sunnie Yan-Wai; Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Yankun; McKinnon, Peter J; Lou, Jacqueline; Zhang, Lei; Li, James; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Jasin, Maria

    2011-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4), suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1.

  8. DNA Ligase III Promotes Alternative Nonhomologous End-Joining during Chromosomal Translocation Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sunnie Yan-Wai; Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Yankun; McKinnon, Peter J.; Lou, Jacqueline; Zhang, Lei; Li, James; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Jasin, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4), suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1. PMID:21655080

  9. Translocation (Y;12) in lipoma.

    PubMed

    Liang, Cher-Wei; Mariño-Enríquez, Adrian; Johannessen, Catherine; Hornick, Jason L; Dal Cin, Paola

    2011-01-01

    Lipomas are the most common benign mesenchymal neoplasm in adults, and have been extensively characterized at the cytogenetic level. Chromosomal aberrations have been observed in the majority of lipomas, two-thirds of which involve chromosomal region 12q14.3. To date, structural rearrangements have been reported affecting every chromosome except chromosome Y. Here we report a case of a lipoma that shows a novel apparently balanced translocation involving chromosomes Y and 12. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using a break-apart HMGA2 in-house probe set detected a single signal on the normal chromosome 12 but not on either the derivative chromosome Y or 12, indicating a cryptic loss of 12q14.3, where HMGA2 is mapped. Immunohistochemical studies, however, revealed overexpression of HMGA2 with nuclear expression in the majority of tumor cells, whereas MDM2 and CDK4 were negative. The overexpression of HMGA2 may be caused by a cryptic chromosomal aberration affecting either the cytogenetically unaltered HMGA2 allele or HMGA2 regulators elsewhere. The current case broadens our knowledge about the translocation partners of HMGA2 in lipomas and highlights the biological complexity in regulating HMGA2 expression.

  10. Polymer translocation through nanopore into active bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Mingfeng; Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2016-11-01

    Polymer translocation through nanopores into a crowded environment is of ubiquitous importance in many biological processes. Here we investigate polymer translocation through a nanopore into an active bath of self-propelled particles in two-dimensional space using Langevin dynamics simulations. Interestingly, we find that the mean translocation time <" separators=" τ > can show a bell-shape dependence on the particle activity Fa at a fixed volume fraction ϕ, indicating that the translocation process may become slower for small activity compared to the case of the passive media, and only when the particle activity becomes large enough can the translocation process be accelerated. In addition, we also find that <" separators=" τ > can show a minimum as a function of ϕ if the particle activity is large enough, implying that an intermediate volume fraction of active particles is most favorable for the polymer translocation. Detailed analysis reveals that such nontrivial behaviors result from the two-fold effect of active bath: one that active particles tend to accumulate near the pore, providing an extra pressure hindering the translocation, and the other that they also aggregate along the polymer chain, generating an effective pulling force accelerating the translocation. Such results demonstrate that active bath plays rather subtle roles on the polymer translocation process.

  11. Active Polymer Translocation through Flickering Pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Jack A.; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Golestanian, Ramin

    2011-12-01

    Single file translocation of a homopolymer through an active channel under the presence of a driving force is studied using Langevin dynamics simulation. It is shown that a channel with sticky walls and oscillating width could lead to significantly more efficient translocation as compared to a static channel that has a width equal to the mean width of the oscillating pore. The gain in translocation exhibits a strong dependence on the stickiness of the pore, which could allow the polymer translocation process to be highly selective.

  12. Haloarchaeal Protein Translocation via the Twin Arginine Translocation Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Pohlschroder Mechthild

    2009-02-03

    Protein transport across hydrophobic membranes that partition cellular compartments is essential in all cells. The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway transports proteins across the prokaryotic cytoplasmic membranes. Distinct from the universally conserved Sec pathway, which secretes unfolded proteins, the Tat machinery is unique in that it secretes proteins in a folded conformation, making it an attractive pathway for the transport and secretion of heterologously expressed proteins that are Sec-incompatible. During the past 7 years, the DOE-supported project has focused on the characterization of the diversity of bacterial and archaeal Tat substrates as well as on the characterization of the Tat pathway of a model archaeon, Haloferax volcanii, a member of the haloarchaea. We have demonstrated that H. volcanii uses this pathway to transport most of its secretome.

  13. Phosphorus Compounds in Translocating Phloem

    PubMed Central

    Bieleski, R. L.

    1969-01-01

    Phosphate-32P was introduced into a turnip leaf, and 3 hr later, the vascular bundles were stripped from the petiole and their phosphate ester pattern was studied. The pattern did not alter along their length and was like that of other tissues. Pumpkin leaves were painted with phosphate-32P; and later, the petioles were cut, the sieve tube exudates were collected and their phosphate ester patterns were studied. Exudates collected after 10 min had a high proportion of their 32P present in Pi and nucleoside triphosphates, while exudates collected after long translocation times (4-22 hr) had a lower proportion in these, and a higher proportion in hexose monophosphates and UDP glucose. In general, the ester patterns were like those of other tissues. The results indicate that sieve tubes are metabolically active, and that Pi is the primary form in which phosphorus moves in the phloem. Images PMID:16657091

  14. Tasmanian low frequency Galactic background surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.

    1987-01-01

    The results of LF (2-20-MHz) radio-astronomy observations obtained in Tasmania during solar-minimum winters since 1956 are briefly summarized. The low ionospheric f0F2 values (near 1 MHz) occurring in Tasmania in these periods are noted; the 2000-ft-diameter Llanherne array used for Galactic mapping at 2-20 MHz is described; the techniques employed are discussed; and sample maps are shown.

  15. Wildlife translocation: the conservation implications of pathogen exposure and genetic heterozygosity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A key challenge for conservation biologists is to determine the most appropriate demographic and genetic management strategies for wildlife populations threatened by disease. We explored this topic by examining whether genetic background and previous pathogen exposure influenced survival of translocated animals when captive-bred and free-ranging bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) were used to re-establish a population that had been extirpated in the San Andres Mountains in New Mexico, USA. Results Although the free-ranging source population had significantly higher multi-locus heterozygosity at 30 microsatellite loci than the captive bred animals, neither source population nor genetic background significantly influenced survival or cause of death. The presence of antibodies to a respiratory virus known to cause pneumonia was associated with increased survival, but there was no correlation between genetic heterozygosity and the presence of antibodies to this virus. Conclusions Although genetic theory predicts otherwise, increased heterozygosity was not associated with increased fitness (survival) among translocated animals. While heterosis or genetic rescue effects may occur in F1 and later generations as the two source populations interbreed, we conclude that previous pathogen exposure was a more important marker than genetic heterozygosity for predicting survival of translocated animals. Every wildlife translocation is an experiment, and whenever possible, translocations should be designed and evaluated to test hypotheses that will further improve our understanding of how pathogen exposure and genetic variability influence fitness. PMID:21284886

  16. Alignment of threat, effort, and perceived success in North American conservation translocations.

    PubMed

    Brichieri-Colombi, Typhenn A; Moehrenschlager, Axel

    2016-12-01

    The use of conservation translocations to mitigate human effects on biodiversity is increasing, but how these efforts are allocated remains unclear. Based on a comprehensive literature review and online author survey, we sought to determine the goals of translocation efforts, whether they focus on species and regions with high threat and likelihood of perceived success, and how success might be improved. We systematically searched the ISI Web of Knowledge and Academic Search Complete databases to determine the species and regions of conservation translocations and found 1863 articles on conservation translocations in the United States, Canada, Mexico, Central America, and Caribbean published from 1974 to 2013. We questioned 330 relevant authors to determine the motivation for translocations, how translocations were evaluated, and obstacles encountered. Conservation translocations in North America were geographically widespread (in 21 countries), increased in frequency over time for all animal classes (from 1 in 1974 to 84 in 2013), and included 279 different species. Reintroductions and reinforcements were more common in the United States than in Canada and Mexico, Central America, or the Caribbean, and their prevalence was correlated with the number of species at risk at national and state or provincial levels. Translocated species had a higher threat status at state and provincial levels than globally (International Union for Conservation of Nature Red List categorization), suggesting that translocations may have been motivated by regional priorities rather than global risk. Our survey of authors was consistent with these results; most translocations were requested, supported, or funded by government agencies and downlisting species at national or state or provincial levels was the main goal. Nonetheless, downlisting was the least reported measure of success, whereas survival and reproduction of translocated individuals were the most reported. Reported barriers

  17. Reciprocal translocation of small numbers of inbred individuals rescues immunogenetic diversity.

    PubMed

    Grueber, Catherine E; Sutton, Jolene T; Heber, Sol; Briskie, James V; Jamieson, Ian G; Robertson, Bruce C

    2017-02-18

    Genetic rescue can reduce inbreeding depression and increase fitness of small populations, even when the donor populations are highly inbred. In a recent experiment involving two inbred island populations of the New Zealand South Island robin, Petroica australis, reciprocal translocations improved microsatellite diversity and individual fitness. While microsatellite loci may reflect patterns of genome-wide diversity, they generally do not indicate the specific genetic regions responsible for increased fitness. We tested the effectiveness of this reciprocal translocation for rescuing diversity of two immunogenetic regions: Toll-like receptor (TLR) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. We found that the relatively small number of migrants (seven and ten per island) effectively brought the characteristic TLR gene diversity of each source population into the recipient population. However, when migrants transmitted TLR alleles that were already present at high frequency in the recipient population, it was possible for offspring of mixed heritage to have decreased gene diversity compared to recipient population diversity prior to translocation. In contrast to TLRs, we did not observe substantial changes in MHC allelic diversity following translocation, with limited evidence of a decrease in differentiation, perhaps because most MHC alleles were observed at both sites prior to the translocation. Overall, we conclude that small numbers of migrants may successfully restore the diversity of immunogenetic loci with few alleles, but that translocating larger numbers of animals would provide additional opportunity for the genetic rescue of highly polymorphic immunity regions, such as the MHC, even when the source population is inbred.

  18. Translocation dynamics of a short polymer driven by an oscillating force.

    PubMed

    Pizzolato, Nicola; Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Adorno, Dominique Persano; Spagnolo, Bernardo

    2013-02-07

    We study the translocation dynamics of a short polymer moving in a noisy environment and driven by an oscillating force. The dynamics is numerically investigated by solving a Langevin equation in a two-dimensional domain. We consider a phenomenological cubic potential with a metastable state to model the polymer-pore interaction and the entropic free energy barrier characterizing the translocation process. The mean first translocation time of the center of inertia of polymers shows a nonmonotonic behavior, with a minimum, as a function of the number of the monomers. The dependence of the mean translocation time on the polymer chain length shows a monotonically increasing behavior for high values of the number of monomers. Moreover, the translocation time shows a minimum as a function of the frequency of the oscillating forcing field for all the polymer lengths investigated. This finding represents the evidence of the resonant activation phenomenon in the dynamics of polymer translocation, whose occurrence is maintained for different values of the noise intensity.

  19. Translocation of DNA across bacterial membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Dreiseikelmann, B

    1994-01-01

    DNA translocation across bacterial membranes occurs during the biological processes of infection by bacteriophages, conjugative DNA transfer of plasmids, T-DNA transfer, and genetic transformation. The mechanism of DNA translocation in these systems is not fully understood, but during the last few years extensive data about genes and gene products involved in the translocation processes have accumulated. One reason for the increasing interest in this topic is the discussion about horizontal gene transfer and transkingdom sex. Analyses of genes and gene products involved in DNA transfer suggest that DNA is transferred through a protein channel spanning the bacterial envelope. No common model exists for DNA translocation during phage infection. Perhaps various mechanisms are necessary as a result of the different morphologies of bacteriophages. The DNA translocation processes during conjugation, T-DNA transfer, and transformation are more consistent and may even be compared to the excretion of some proteins. On the basis of analogies and homologies between the proteins involved in DNA translocation and protein secretion, a common basic model for these processes is presented. PMID:7968916

  20. Defining chromosomal translocation risks in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hogenbirk, Marc A.; Heideman, Marinus R.; de Rink, Iris; Velds, Arno; Kerkhoven, Ron M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.; Jacobs, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a hallmark of cancer. Unraveling the molecular mechanism of these rare genetic events requires a clear distinction between correlative and causative risk-determinants, where technical and analytical issues can be excluded. To meet this goal, we performed in-depth analyses of publicly available genome-wide datasets. In contrast to several recent reports, we demonstrate that chromosomal translocation risk is causally unrelated to promoter stalling (Spt5), transcriptional activity, or off-targeting activity of the activation-induced cytidine deaminase. Rather, an open chromatin configuration, which is not promoter-specific, explained the elevated translocation risk of promoter regions. Furthermore, the fact that gene size directly correlates with the translocation risk in mice and human cancers further demonstrated the general irrelevance of promoter-specific activities. Interestingly, a subset of translocations observed in cancer patients likely initiates from double-strand breaks induced by an access-independent process. Together, these unexpected and novel insights are fundamental in understanding the origin of chromosome translocations and, consequently, cancer. PMID:27303044

  1. Ratcheting up protein translocation with anthrax toxin

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Geoffrey K; Brown, Michael J; Krantz, Bryan A

    2012-01-01

    Energy-consuming nanomachines catalyze the directed movement of biopolymers in the cell. They are found both dissolved in the aqueous cytosol as well as embedded in lipid bilayers. Inquiries into the molecular mechanism of nanomachine-catalyzed biopolymer transport have revealed that these machines are equipped with molecular parts, including adjustable clamps, levers, and adaptors, which interact favorably with substrate polypeptides. Biological nanomachines that catalyze protein transport, known as translocases, often require that their substrate proteins unfold before translocation. An unstructured protein chain is likely entropically challenging to bind, push, or pull in a directional manner, especially in a way that produces an unfolding force. A number of ingenious solutions to this problem are now evident in the anthrax toxin system, a model used to study protein translocation. Here we highlight molecular ratchets and current research on anthrax toxin translocation. A picture is emerging of proton-gradient-driven anthrax toxin translocation, and its associated ratchet mechanism likely applies broadly to other systems. We suggest a cyclical thermodynamic order-to-disorder mechanism (akin to a heat-engine cycle) is central to underlying protein translocation: peptide substrates nonspecifically bind to molecular clamps, which possess adjustable affinities; polypeptide substrates compress into helical structures; these clamps undergo proton-gated switching; and the substrate subsequently expands regaining its unfolded state conformational entropy upon translocation. PMID:22374876

  2. Spatial dynamics of chromosome translocations in living cells.

    PubMed

    Roukos, Vassilis; Voss, Ty C; Schmidt, Christine K; Lee, Seungtaek; Wangsa, Darawalee; Misteli, Tom

    2013-08-09

    Chromosome translocations are a hallmark of cancer cells. We have developed an experimental system to visualize the formation of translocations in living cells and apply it to characterize the spatial and dynamic properties of translocation formation. We demonstrate that translocations form within hours of the occurrence of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and that their formation is cell cycle-independent. Translocations form preferentially between prepositioned genome elements, and perturbation of key factors of the DNA repair machinery uncouples DSB pairing from translocation formation. These observations generate a spatiotemporal framework for the formation of translocations in living cells.

  3. Translocation (9;17) a novel translocation in acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Czepulkowski, B; Ireland, R

    1996-01-01

    We report a case of AML, acute myeloid leukaemia, with a novel translocation involving the short arms of chromosomes 9 and 17. The acute myeloid leukaemia was morphologically classified as FAB subtype M2. A prolonged remission was induced with chemotherapy, followed by a relapse which was associated with the finding of the same translocation.

  4. Translocation and Accumulation of Translocate in the Sugar Beet Petiole 1

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, D. R.; Saunders, M. A.; Cataldo, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Accumulation of translocate during steady-state labeling of photosynthate was measured in the source leaf petioles of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. monogerm hybrid). During an 8-hr period, 2.7% of the translocate or 0.38 μg carbon/min was accumulated per cm petiole. Material was stored mainly as sucrose and as compounds insoluble in 80% ethanol. The minimum peak velocity of translocation approached an average of 54 cm/hr as the specific activity of the 14CO2 pulse was progressively increased. The ratio of cross sectional area required for translocation to actual sieve tube area in the petiole was 1.2. A regression analysis of translocation rate versus sieve tube cross sectional area yielded a coefficient of 0.76. The specific mass transfer rate in the petiole was 1.4 g/hr cm2 phloem or 4.8 g/hr cm2 sieve tube. Histoautoradiographic studies indicated that translocation occurs through the area of phloem occupied by sieve tubes and companion cells while storage occurs in these cells plus cambium and phloem parenchyma cells. The ability of the petiole to act as a sink for translocate is consistent with the concept that storage along path tissue serves to buffer sucrose concentration in the translocate during periods of fluctuating assimilation. Images PMID:16657254

  5. Cosmic Background Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidharth, B. G.; Valluri, S. R.

    2015-08-01

    It is shown that a collection of photons with nearly the same frequency exhibits a "condensation" type of phenomenon corresponding to a peak intensity. The observed cosmic background radiation can be explained from this standpoint. We have obtained analogous results by extremization of the occupation number for photons with the use of the Lambert W function. Some of the interesting applications of this function are briefly discussed in the context of graphene which exhibits an interesting two dimensional structure with several characteristic properties and diverse practical applications.

  6. Translocation involving 1p and 17q is a recurrent genetic alteration of human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Savelyeva, L.; Corvi, R.; Schwab, M. )

    1994-08-01

    Human neuroblastoma cells often are monosomic for the distal portion of 1p (1p36). The authors report that the deleted 1p material in cells of neuroblastoma lines is preferentially replaced by material from chromosome 17, resulting from an unbalanced 1;17 translocation. Chromosome 17 often acquires instability, followed by the integration of fragments into various marker chromosomes. As a consequence, 17q material can increase over 17p material. The nonrandom frequency of 1;17 translocations appears to indicate an as-yet-undefined contribution to neuroblastoma development. 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plesa, C.; van Loo, N.; Dekker, C.

    2015-08-01

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate solutions. We show that it has a linear response at typical voltages and can be used to detect DNA translocations through a nanopore. The glutamate anion also acts as a redox-capable thickening agent, with high-viscosity solutions capable of slowing down the DNA translocation process by up to 11 times, with a corresponding 7 time reduction in signal. These results demonstrate that glutamate can replace chloride as the primary anion in nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

  8. DNA nanopore translocation in glutamate solutions.

    PubMed

    Plesa, C; van Loo, N; Dekker, C

    2015-08-28

    Nanopore experiments have traditionally been carried out with chloride-based solutions. Here we introduce silver/silver-glutamate-based electrochemistry as an alternative, and study the viscosity, conductivity, and nanopore translocation characteristics of potassium-, sodium-, and lithium-glutamate solutions. We show that it has a linear response at typical voltages and can be used to detect DNA translocations through a nanopore. The glutamate anion also acts as a redox-capable thickening agent, with high-viscosity solutions capable of slowing down the DNA translocation process by up to 11 times, with a corresponding 7 time reduction in signal. These results demonstrate that glutamate can replace chloride as the primary anion in nanopore resistive pulse sensing.

  9. Stochastic resonance during a polymer translocation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Debasish; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    We study the translocation of a flexible polymer in a confined geometry subjected to a time-periodic external drive to explore stochastic resonance. We describe the equilibrium translocation process in terms of a Fokker-Planck description and use a discrete two-state model to describe the effect of the external driving force on the translocation dynamics. We observe that no stochastic resonance is possible if the associated free-energy barrier is purely entropic in nature. The polymer chain experiences a stochastic resonance effect only in presence of an energy threshold in terms of polymer-pore interaction. Once stochastic resonance is feasible, the chain entropy controls the optimal synchronization conditions significantly.

  10. Sorting by reciprocal translocations via reversals theory.

    PubMed

    Ozery-Flato, Michal; Shamir, Ron

    2007-05-01

    The understanding of genome rearrangements is an important endeavor in comparative genomics. A major computational problem in this field is finding a shortest sequence of genome rearrangements that transforms, or sorts, one genome into another. In this paper we focus on sorting a multi-chromosomal genome by translocations. We reveal new relationships between this problem and the well studied problem of sorting by reversals. Based on these relationships, we develop two new algorithms for sorting by reciprocal translocations, which mimic known algorithms for sorting by reversals: a score-based method building on Bergeron's algorithm, and a recursive procedure similar to the Berman-Hannenhalli method. Though their proofs are more involved, our procedures for reciprocal translocations match the complexities of the original ones for reversals.

  11. Computational analysis of maltose binding protein translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinappi, Mauro; Cecconi, Fabio; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    We propose a computational model for the study of maltose binding protein translocation across α-hemolysin nanopores. The phenomenological approach simplifies both the pore and the polypeptide chain; however it retains the basic structural protein-like properties of the maltose binding protein by promoting the correct formation of its native key interactions. By considering different observables characterising the channel blockade and molecule transport, we verified that MD simulations reproduce qualitatively the behaviour observed in a recent experiment. Simulations reveal that blockade events consist of a capture stage, to some extent related to the unfolding kinetics, and a single file translocation process in the channel. A threshold mechanics underlies the process activation with a critical force depending on the protein denaturation state. Finally, our results support the simple interpretation of translocation via first-passage statistics of a driven diffusion process of a single reaction coordinate.

  12. Polymer translocation through a nanopore: DPD study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kan; Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Neimark, Alexander V

    2013-04-04

    Translocation of a polymer chain through a narrow pore is explored using 3D explicit solvent dissipative particle dynamics simulation. We study the dependence of the translocation dynamics and translocation time τ on the chain length N, driving force magnitude E, and solvent quality. Two types of driving forces are considered: uniform hydrostatic force, which is applied equally to the chain and solvent particles, and uniform electrostatic force, which is applied selectively to the charged particles in the chain and oppositely charged counterions in the solvent. We concluded that the scaling correlations τ ~ E(-ξ) and τ ~ N(β) are valid only for coil-like chains. For globular chains, the exponents ξ and β could not be identified with a reasonable accuracy. While the found value of ξ agrees with published experimental results and does not depend on the driving force type, the exponent β depends on the driving force and solvent quality. This is explained by nonequilibrium effects, as in the systems considered, the time of translocation is comparable with the time of chain relaxation. These effects, manifested in the changes of chain conformation in the process of translocation, were analyzed on the basis of the variation of the gyration radii of cis and trans segments of the chain in normal and lateral directions. A prominent chain expansion was observed for coils and was insignificant for globules. This work demonstrates the feasibility of the 3D dissipative particle dynamics modeling of translocation phenomena and accounting for the electrostatic interactions with explicit counterions, as well as for the solvent quality, in a computationally efficient manner.

  13. What drives the translocation of proteins?

    PubMed Central

    Simon, S M; Peskin, C S; Oster, G F

    1992-01-01

    We propose that protein translocation across membranes is driven by biased random thermal motion. This "Brownian ratchet" mechanism depends on chemical asymmetries between the cis and trans sides of the membrane. Several mechanisms could contribute to rectifying the thermal motion of the protein, such as binding and dissociation of chaperonins to the translocating chain, chain coiling induced by pH and/or ionic gradients, glycosylation, and disulfide bond formation. This helps explain the robustness and promiscuity of these transport systems. Images PMID:1349170

  14. Familial translocation t(9;16).

    PubMed Central

    Dowman, C; Lockwood, D; Allanson, J

    1989-01-01

    We report a female with a deletion of 9p and concomitant duplication of 16q [46,XX,-9,+der(9),t(9;16)(p24;q13)]. Parental chromosome analysis showed a balanced maternal translocation [46,XX,t(9;16)(p24;q13)]. Three other cases of translocations involving chromosomes 9 and 16 have been reported, one of them with identical breakpoints. A review of published reports of deletion 9p and duplication 16q is presented, and a comparison is made with previously described cases. Images PMID:2671373

  15. Protein Translocation across the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Mandon, Elisabet C.; Trueman, Steven F.; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum is a major site of protein biosynthesis in all eukaryotic cells, serving as the entry point for the secretory pathway and as the initial integration site for the majority of cellular integral membrane proteins. The core components of the protein translocation machinery have been identified, and high-resolution structures of the targeting components and the transport channel have been obtained. Research in this area is now focused on obtaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of protein translocation and membrane protein integration. PMID:23251026

  16. Chemical mutagenesis testing in Drosophila. I. Comparison of positive and negative control data for sex-linked recessive lethal mutations and reciprocal translocations in three laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, R.C.; Mason, J.M.; Valencia, R.; Zimmering, S.

    1984-01-01

    As part of the validation phase of the Drosophila melanogaster segment of the National Toxicology Program, a comparison has been made of positive and negative controls for sex-linked recessive lethal mutations and reciprocal translocations from three laboratories. This comparison involves approximately 700,000 spontaneous recessive lethal mutation tests, 70,000 spontaneous translocation tests, and screens for genetic damage induced by N-nitrosodimethylamine and ..beta..-propiolactone. Spontaneous frequencies for lethal mutations and translocations were homogeneous in the laboratories regardless of solvent or broods sampled. Inhomogeneity was observed in induced frequencies among laboratories, but the variation was no greater than that found within a laboratory.

  17. Factors predisposing to adjacent 2 and 3:1 disjunctions: study of 161 human reciprocal translocations.

    PubMed Central

    Jalbert, P; Sele, B

    1979-01-01

    Reciprocal translocations produce imbalances by three types of disjunction which are, in decreasing frequency, adjacent 1, 3:1, and adjacent 2. Adjacent 1 disjunction produces duplication deficiencies of inverse topography to those of adjacent 2. The imbalanced chromosome segments in one of these types are balanced in the other. The disjunction 3:1 produces pure trisomies and monosomies. The following situations predispose to adjacent 2 disjunction: translocations between the long arms of two acrocentric chromosomes or between one of these and that of a No 9 chromosome; centric segments, either short or carrying a heterochromatic zone (9qh); a balanced translocation in the mother. The factors predisposing to the disjunction adjacent 2 operate by selection, or directly on the meiotic configuration. Some of them (shortness of the interstitial segment, shortness of the short arms of translocation chromosomes) act in both these ways. Their influence is probably responsible for the repetitive and exclusive character of this disjunction. The conditions for the occurrence of the 3:1 disjunctions seem less strict than those for adjacent 2, although they should be of the same nature (involvement of acrocentrics or a chromosome 9 in the translocation, maternal origin). Images PMID:395305

  18. Telomerase Deficiency Affects the Formation of Chromosomal Translocations by Homologous Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Damon H.; Bailis, Adam M.

    2008-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex required for the replication and protection of telomeric DNA in eukaryotes. Cells lacking telomerase undergo a progressive loss of telomeric DNA that results in loss of viability and a concomitant increase in genome instability. We have used budding yeast to investigate the relationship between telomerase deficiency and the generation of chromosomal translocations, a common characteristic of cancer cells. Telomerase deficiency increased the rate of formation of spontaneous translocations by homologous recombination involving telomere proximal sequences during crisis. However, telomerase deficiency also decreased the frequency of translocation formation following multiple HO-endonuclease catalyzed DNA double-strand breaks at telomere proximal or distal sequences before, during and after crisis. This decrease correlated with a sequestration of the central homologous recombination factor, Rad52, to telomeres determined by chromatin immuno-precipitation. This suggests that telomerase deficiency results in the sequestration of Rad52 to telomeres, limiting the capacity of the cell to repair double-strand breaks throughout the genome. Increased spontaneous translocation formation in telomerase-deficient yeast cells undergoing crisis is consistent with the increased incidence of cancer in elderly humans, as the majority of our cells lack telomerase. Decreased translocation formation by recombinational repair of double-strand breaks in telomerase-deficient yeast suggests that the reemergence of telomerase expression observed in many human tumors may further stimulate genome rearrangement. Thus, telomerase may exert a substantial effect on global genome stability, which may bear significantly on the appearance and progression of cancer in humans. PMID:18830407

  19. The mystery of chromosomal translocations in cancer.

    PubMed

    Koss, L G

    2007-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations in human cancer may result in products that can be suppressed by targeting drugs. An example is bcr-abl tyrosine kinase in chronic myelogenous leukemia that can be treated with imatinib mesylate. However, the mechanisms of translocations or exchanges of chromosomal segments are virtually unknown. In this summary, chromosomal translocations in human cancer are compared with 'crossing over' of chromosomal segments occurring during the first meiotic division. Several proposed mechanisms of the exchange of DNA between and among chromosomes are discussed. The conditions that appear essential for these events to occur are listed. Among them are proximity of the involved DNA segments, mechanisms of excising the target DNA, its transport to the new location, and integration into the pre-existing chromosome. The conclusion based on extensive review of the literature is that practically nothing is known about the mechanism of 'crossing over' or translocation. Based on prior work on normal human cells, it is suggested that only one of the two autosomes participates in these events that may include loss of heterozygozity, another common abnormality in human cancer.

  20. Familial cryptic translocation in Angelman syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Weyerts, L.K.; Wiley, J.E.; Loud, K.M.

    1994-09-01

    The majority of patients with Angelman syndrome have been shown to have a cytogenetic or molecular deletion on the maternally derived chromosome 15. We report on a case of Angelman syndrome in which this deletion occurs as an unbalanced cryptic translocation involving chromosomes 14 and 15. The proband was diagnosed clinically as having Angelman syndrome. Multiple cytogenetic studies were done without detecting any deletion. When DNA probes (Oncor) specific for the Prader Willi/Angelman locus became available, the patient was restudied and found to be deleted for {open_quotes}region A{close_quotes} (D15S11) but not for {open_quotes}region B{close_quotes} (GABRB3). No other abnormality was detected. The proband`s mother was then studied. The chromosome 15 marker probe and D15S11 were detected on different chromosomes. Using alpha-satellite probes, a cryptic 14;15 translocation was uncovered. This balanced translocation was also found to be carried by the sister of the proband. This case, along with a case presented at the 1993 ASHG meeting, illustrates the need for using acrocentric probes when studying Angelman syndrome patients. The proband was studied using additional probes specific for this region and found to be deleted for SNRPN but not for D15S10. The breakpoint of the translocation in this patient delineates the smallest deletion of the Angelman syndrome region reported to date and therefore may represent the specific gene involved.

  1. Engineering human tumour-associated chromosomal translocations with the RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Torres, R; Martin, M C; Garcia, A; Cigudosa, Juan C; Ramirez, J C; Rodriguez-Perales, S

    2014-06-03

    Cancer-related human chromosomal translocations are generated through the illegitimate joining of two non-homologous chromosomes affected by double-strand breaks (DSB). Effective methodologies to reproduce precise reciprocal tumour-associated chromosomal translocations are required to gain insight into the initiation of leukaemia and sarcomas. Here we present a strategy for generating cancer-related human chromosomal translocations in vitro based on the ability of the RNA-guided CRISPR-Cas9 system to induce DSBs at defined positions. Using this approach we generate human cell lines and primary cells bearing chromosomal translocations resembling those described in acute myeloid leukaemia and Ewing's sarcoma at high frequencies. FISH and molecular analysis at the mRNA and protein levels of the fusion genes involved in these engineered cells reveal the reliability and accuracy of the CRISPR-Cas9 approach, providing a powerful tool for cancer studies.

  2. Impaired DNA replication prompts deletions within palindromic sequences, but does not induce translocations in human cells.

    PubMed

    Kurahashi, Hiroki; Inagaki, Hidehito; Kato, Takema; Hosoba, Eriko; Kogo, Hiroshi; Ohye, Tamae; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Bolor, Hasbaira; Tong, Maoqing; Emanuel, Beverly S

    2009-09-15

    Palindromic regions are unstable and susceptible to deletion in prokaryotes and eukaryotes possibly due to stalled or slow replication. In the human genome, they also appear to become partially or completely deleted, while two palindromic AT-rich repeats (PATRR) contribute to known recurrent constitutional translocations. To explore the mechanism that causes the development of palindrome instabilities in humans, we compared the incidence of de novo translocations and deletions at PATRRs in human cells. Using a highly sensitive PCR assay that can detect single molecules, de novo deletions were detected neither in human somatic cells nor in sperm. However, deletions were detected at low frequency in cultured cell lines. Inhibition of DNA replication by administration of siRNA against the DNA polymerase alpha 1 (POLA1) gene or introduction of POLA inhibitors increased the frequency. This is in contrast to PATRR-mediated translocations that were never detected in similar conditions but were observed frequently in human sperm samples. Further deletions were found to take place during both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis. Our data suggest that stalled or slow replication induces deletions within PATRRs, but that other mechanisms might contribute to PATRR-mediated recurrent translocations in humans.

  3. Tailoring particle translocation via dielectrophoresis in pore channels

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shoji; Tsutsui, Makusu; Theodore, Hu; Yuhui, He; Arima, Akihide; Tsuji, Tetsuro; Doi, Kentaro; Kawano, Satoyuki; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2016-01-01

    Understanding and controlling electrophoretic motions of nanoscopic objects in fluidic channels are a central challenge in developing nanopore technology for molecular analyses. Although progress has been made in slowing the translocation velocity to meet the requirement for electrical detections of analytes via picoampere current measurements, there exists no method useful for regulating particle flows in the transverse directions. Here, we report the use of dielectrophoresis to manipulate the single-particle passage through a solid-state pore. We created a trap field by applying AC voltage between electrodes embedded in a low-aspect-ratio micropore. We demonstrated a traffic control of particles to go through center or near side surface via the voltage frequency. We also found enhanced capture efficiency along with faster escaping speed of particles by virtue of the AC-mediated electroosmosis. This method is compatible with nanopore sensing and would be widely applied for reducing off-axis effects to achieve single-molecule identification. PMID:27527126

  4. Tailoring particle translocation via dielectrophoresis in pore channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shoji; Tsutsui, Makusu; Theodore, Hu; Yuhui, He; Arima, Akihide; Tsuji, Tetsuro; Doi, Kentaro; Kawano, Satoyuki; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2016-08-01

    Understanding and controlling electrophoretic motions of nanoscopic objects in fluidic channels are a central challenge in developing nanopore technology for molecular analyses. Although progress has been made in slowing the translocation velocity to meet the requirement for electrical detections of analytes via picoampere current measurements, there exists no method useful for regulating particle flows in the transverse directions. Here, we report the use of dielectrophoresis to manipulate the single-particle passage through a solid-state pore. We created a trap field by applying AC voltage between electrodes embedded in a low-aspect-ratio micropore. We demonstrated a traffic control of particles to go through center or near side surface via the voltage frequency. We also found enhanced capture efficiency along with faster escaping speed of particles by virtue of the AC-mediated electroosmosis. This method is compatible with nanopore sensing and would be widely applied for reducing off-axis effects to achieve single-molecule identification.

  5. Non-random occurrence of Robertsonian translocations in the house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus): is it related to quantitative variation in the minor satellite?

    PubMed

    Cazaux, Benoîte; Catalan, Josette; Claude, Julien; Britton-Davidian, Janice

    2014-01-01

    The house mouse, Mus musculus domesticus, shows extraordinary chromosomal diversity driven by fixation of Robertsonian (Rb) translocations. The high frequency of this rearrangement, which involves the centromeric regions, has been ascribed to the architecture of the satellite sequence (high quantity and homogeneity). This promotes centromere-related translocations through unequal recombination and gene conversion. A characteristic feature of Rb variation in this subspecies is the non-random contribution of different chromosomes to the translocation frequency, which, in turn, depends on the chromosome size. Here, the association between satellite quantity and Rb frequency was tested by PRINS of the minor satellite which is the sequence involved in the translocation breakpoints. Five chromosomes with different translocation frequencies were selected and analyzed among wild house mice from 8 European localities. Using a relative quantitative measurement per chromosome, the analysis detected a large variability in signal size most of which was observed between individuals and/or localities. The chromosomes differed significantly in the quantity of the minor satellite, but these differences were not correlated with their translocation frequency. However, the data uncovered a marginally significant correlation between the quantity of the minor satellite and chromosome size. The implications of these results on the evolution of the chromosomal architecture in the house mouse are discussed.

  6. Post-release dispersal in animal translocations: social attraction and the "vacuum effect".

    PubMed

    Mihoub, Jean-Baptiste; Robert, Alexandre; Le Gouar, Pascaline; Sarrazin, François

    2011-01-01

    Animal translocations are human-induced colonizations that can represent opportunities to contribute to the knowledge on the behavioral and demographic processes involved in the establishment of animal populations. Habitat selection behaviors, such as social cueing, have strong implications on dispersal and affect the establishment success of translocations. Using modeling simulations with a two-population network model (a translocated population and a remnant population), we investigated the consequences of four habitat selection strategies on post-translocation establishment probabilities in short- and long-lived species. Two dispersal strategies using social cues (conspecific attraction and habitat copying) were compared to random and quality-based strategies. We measured the sensitivity of local extinctions to dispersal strategies, life cycles, release frequencies, remnant population and release group sizes, the proportion of breeders and the connectivity between populations. Our results indicate that social behaviors can compromise establishment as a result of post-release dispersal, particularly in long-lived species. This behavioral mechanism, the "vacuum effect", arises from increased emigration in populations that are small relative to neighboring populations, reducing their rate of population growth. The vacuum effect can drive small remnant populations to extinction when a translocated group is large. In addition, the magnitude of the vacuum effect varies non-linearly with connectivity. The vacuum effect represents a novel form of the behaviorally mediated Allee effect that can cause unexpected establishment failures or population extinctions in response to social cueing. Accounting for establishment probabilities as a conditional step to the persistence of populations would improve the accuracy of predicting the fates of translocated or natural (meta)populations.

  7. Translocation in the nonpolytrichaceous moss grimmia laevigata

    SciTech Connect

    Alpert, P. )

    1989-10-01

    A superficially rhizomatous habit suggested that the moss Grimmia laevigata might function as a clonal, rhizomatous plant and translocate photoassimilates to below ground organs, even though the species is outside the order Polytrichales, which includes the only mosses known to posses sieve cells. Labelling with {sup 14}CO{sub 2} indicated that at least 10% of newly assimilated carbon was translocated out of leafy shoot portions within 26 hr. Of this carbon, approximately 75% was apparently moved into leafless, basal shoot portions and 25% into below ground stems. Infrared gas analysis of net CO{sup 2} flux was used to check that labelling gave a realistic measure of photosynthesis. Physiological integration and clonal spread may account for the unusual ability of this moss to colonize extremely xeric microsites.

  8. Simulation of polymer translocation through protein channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumar, M.; Kong, C. Y.

    2006-04-01

    A modeling algorithm is presented to compute simultaneously polymer conformations and ionic current, as single polymer molecules undergo translocation through protein channels. The method is based on a combination of Langevin dynamics for coarse-grained models of polymers and the Poisson-Nernst-Planck formalism for ionic current. For the illustrative example of ssDNA passing through the -hemolysin pore, vivid details of conformational fluctuations of the polymer inside the vestibule and -barrel compartments of the protein pore, and their consequent effects on the translocation time and extent of blocked ionic current are presented. In addition to yielding insights into several experimentally reported puzzles, our simulations offer experimental strategies to sequence polymers more efficiently.

  9. Facial Translocation Approach to the Cranial Base

    PubMed Central

    Arriaga, Moises A.; Janecka, Ivo P.

    1991-01-01

    Surgical exposure of the nasopharyngeal region of the cranial base is difficult because of its proximity to key anatomic structures. Our laboratory study outlines the anatomic basis for a new approach to this complex topography. Dissections were performed on eight cadaver halves and two fresh specimens injected with intravascular silicone rubber compound. By utilizing facial soft tissue translocation combined with craniofacial osteotomies; a wide surgical field can be obtained at the skull base. The accessible surgical field extends from the contralateral custachian tube to the ipsilateral geniculate ganglion, including the nasopharyax; clivus, sphonoid, and cavernous sinuses, the entire infratemporal fossa, and superior orbital fissure. The facial translocation approach offers previously unavailable wide and direct exposure, with a potential for immediate reconstruction, of this complex region of the cranial base. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:17170817

  10. Stepwise nucleosome translocation by RSC remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Harada, Bryan T; Hwang, William L; Deindl, Sebastian; Chatterjee, Nilanjana; Bartholomew, Blaine; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2016-02-19

    The SWI/SNF-family remodelers regulate chromatin structure by coupling the free energy from ATP hydrolysis to the repositioning and restructuring of nucleosomes, but how the ATPase activity of these enzymes drives the motion of DNA across the nucleosome remains unclear. Here, we used single-molecule FRET to monitor the remodeling of mononucleosomes by the yeast SWI/SNF remodeler, RSC. We observed that RSC primarily translocates DNA around the nucleosome without substantial displacement of the H2A-H2B dimer. At the sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the DNA moves largely along or near its canonical wrapping path. The translocation of DNA occurs in a stepwise manner, and at both sites where DNA enters and exits the nucleosome, the step size distributions exhibit a peak at approximately 1-2 bp. These results suggest that the movement of DNA across the nucleosome is likely coupled directly to DNA translocation by the ATPase at its binding site inside the nucleosome.

  11. A novel selection system for chromosome translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tennyson, Rachel B; Ebran, Nathalie; Herrera, Anissa E; Lindsley, Janet E

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are common genetic abnormalities found in both leukemias and solid tumors. While much has been learned about the effects of specific translocations on cell proliferation, much less is known about what causes these chromosome rearrangements. This article describes the development and use of a system that genetically selects for rare translocation events using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A translocation YAC was created that contains the breakpoint cluster region from the human MLL gene, a gene frequently involved in translocations in leukemia patients, flanked by positive and negative selection markers. A translocation between the YAC and a yeast chromosome, whose breakpoint falls within the MLL DNA, physically separates the markers and forms the basis for the selection. When RAD52 is deleted, essentially all of the selected and screened cells contain simple translocations. The detectable translocation rates are the same in haploids and diploids, although the mechanisms involved and true translocation rates may be distinct. A unique double-strand break induced within the MLL sequences increases the number of detectable translocation events 100- to 1000-fold. This novel system provides a tractable assay for answering basic mechanistic questions about the development of chromosomal translocations. PMID:11973293

  12. Financial costs of large carnivore translocations--accounting for conservation.

    PubMed

    Weise, Florian J; Stratford, Ken J; van Vuuren, Rudolf J

    2014-01-01

    Human-carnivore conflict continues to present a major conservation challenge around the world. Translocation of large carnivores is widely implemented but remains strongly debated, in part because of a lack of cost transparency. We report detailed translocation costs for three large carnivore species in Namibia and across different translocation scenarios. We consider the effect of various parameters and factors on costs and translocation success. Total translocation cost for 30 individuals in 22 events was $80,681 (US Dollars). Median translocation cost per individual was $2,393, and $2,669 per event. Median cost per cheetah was $2,760 (n = 23), and $2,108 per leopard (n = 6). One hyaena was translocated at a cost of $1,672. Tracking technology was the single biggest cost element (56%), followed by captive holding and feeding. Soft releases, prolonged captivity and orphaned individuals also increased case-specific costs. A substantial proportion (65.4%) of the total translocation cost was successfully recovered from public interest groups. Less than half the translocations were confirmed successes (44.4%, 3 unknown) with a strong species bias. Four leopards (66.7%) were successfully translocated but only eight of the 20 cheetahs (40.0%) with known outcome met these strict criteria. None of the five habituated cheetahs was translocated successfully, nor was the hyaena. We introduce the concept of Individual Conservation Cost (ICC) and define it as the cost of one successfully translocated individual adjusted by costs of unsuccessful events of the same species. The median ICC for cheetah was $6,898 and $3,140 for leopard. Translocations are costly, but we demonstrate that they are not inherently more expensive than other strategies currently employed in non-lethal carnivore conflict management. We conclude that translocation should be one available option for conserving large carnivores, but needs to be critically evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

  13. Financial Costs of Large Carnivore Translocations – Accounting for Conservation

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Florian J.; Stratford, Ken J.; van Vuuren, Rudolf J.

    2014-01-01

    Human-carnivore conflict continues to present a major conservation challenge around the world. Translocation of large carnivores is widely implemented but remains strongly debated, in part because of a lack of cost transparency. We report detailed translocation costs for three large carnivore species in Namibia and across different translocation scenarios. We consider the effect of various parameters and factors on costs and translocation success. Total translocation cost for 30 individuals in 22 events was $80,681 (US Dollars). Median translocation cost per individual was $2,393, and $2,669 per event. Median cost per cheetah was $2,760 (n = 23), and $2,108 per leopard (n = 6). One hyaena was translocated at a cost of $1,672. Tracking technology was the single biggest cost element (56%), followed by captive holding and feeding. Soft releases, prolonged captivity and orphaned individuals also increased case-specific costs. A substantial proportion (65.4%) of the total translocation cost was successfully recovered from public interest groups. Less than half the translocations were confirmed successes (44.4%, 3 unknown) with a strong species bias. Four leopards (66.7%) were successfully translocated but only eight of the 20 cheetahs (40.0%) with known outcome met these strict criteria. None of the five habituated cheetahs was translocated successfully, nor was the hyaena. We introduce the concept of Individual Conservation Cost (ICC) and define it as the cost of one successfully translocated individual adjusted by costs of unsuccessful events of the same species. The median ICC for cheetah was $6,898 and $3,140 for leopard. Translocations are costly, but we demonstrate that they are not inherently more expensive than other strategies currently employed in non-lethal carnivore conflict management. We conclude that translocation should be one available option for conserving large carnivores, but needs to be critically evaluated on a case-by-case basis. PMID

  14. The invariant phenylalanine of precursor proteins discloses the importance of Omp85 for protein translocation into cyanelles

    PubMed Central

    Wunder, Tobias; Martin, Roman; Löffelhardt, Wolfgang; Schleiff, Enrico; Steiner, Jürgen M

    2007-01-01

    Background Today it is widely accepted that plastids are of cyanobacterial origin. During their evolutionary integration into the metabolic and regulatory networks of the host cell the engulfed cyanobacteria lost their independency. This process was paralleled by a massive gene transfer from symbiont to the host nucleus challenging the development of a retrograde protein translocation system to ensure plastid functionality. Such a system includes specific targeting signals of the proteins needed for the function of the plastid and membrane-bound machineries performing the transfer of these proteins across the envelope membranes. At present, most information on protein translocation is obtained by the analysis of land plants. However, the analysis of protein import into the primitive plastids of glaucocystophyte algae, revealed distinct features placing this system as a tool to understand the evolutionary development of translocation systems. Here, bacterial outer membrane proteins of the Omp85 family have recently been discussed as evolutionary seeds for the development of translocation systems. Results To further explore the initial mode of protein translocation, the observed phenylalanine dependence for protein translocation into glaucophyte plastids was pursued in detail. We document that indeed the phenylalanine has an impact on both, lipid binding and binding to proteoliposomes hosting an Omp85 homologue. Comparison to established import experiments, however, unveiled a major importance of the phenylalanine for recognition by Omp85. This finding is placed into the context of the evolutionary development of the plastid translocon. Conclusion The phenylalanine in the N-terminal domain signs as a prerequisite for protein translocation across the outer membrane assisted by a "primitive" translocon. This amino acid appears to be optimized for specifically targeting the Omp85 protein without enforcing aggregation on the membrane surface. The phenylalanine has

  15. Guanine-nucleotide exchange on ribosome-bound elongation factor G initiates the translocation of tRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zavialov, Andrey V; Hauryliuk, Vasili V; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2005-01-01

    Background During the translation of mRNA into polypeptide, elongation factor G (EF-G) catalyzes the translocation of peptidyl-tRNA from the A site to the P site of the ribosome. According to the 'classical' model, EF-G in the GTP-bound form promotes translocation, while hydrolysis of the bound GTP promotes dissociation of the factor from the post-translocation ribosome. According to a more recent model, EF-G operates like a 'motor protein' and drives translocation of the peptidyl-tRNA after GTP hydrolysis. In both the classical and motor protein models, GDP-to-GTP exchange is assumed to occur spontaneously on 'free' EF-G even in the absence of a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF). Results We have made a number of findings that challenge both models. First, free EF-G in the cell is likely to be in the GDP-bound form. Second, the ribosome acts as the GEF for EF-G. Third, after guanine-nucleotide exchange, EF-G in the GTP-bound form moves the tRNA2-mRNA complex to an intermediate translocation state in which the mRNA is partially translocated. Fourth, subsequent accommodation of the tRNA2-mRNA complex in the post-translocation state requires GTP hydrolysis. Conclusion These results, in conjunction with previously published cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the ribosome in various functional states, suggest a novel mechanism for translocation of tRNAs on the ribosome by EF-G. Our observations suggest that the ribosome is a universal guanosine-nucleotide exchange factor for EF-G as previously shown for the class-II peptide-release factor 3. PMID:15985150

  16. The relationship of fibroblast translocations to cell morphology and stress fibre density.

    PubMed

    Lewis, L; Verna, J M; Levinstone, D; Sher, S; Marek, L; Bell, E

    1982-02-01

    Translocation of human fibroblasts in culture was studied using techniques of time-lapse cinemicrography, indirect immunofluorescence, and computer analysis. An inverse relationship between the velocity of cells during the last hour of life and the density of stress fibers seen by immune staining was demonstrated. Translocating cells generally assumed one of two interconvertible morphologies: a triangular tailed shape or tailed fibroblast (TF), and a tailless form that resembled a half-moon, which we call a half-moon fibroblast (HMF). The tail of TFs formed only on regions of substrate that had been previously traversed by cells. The half-moon morphology developed either on previously used or on virgin substrate. Cells adopted the HMF rather than the TF morphology with a four-fold greater frequency. HMFs translocated slightly faster than TFs. The foregoing observation suggest that the fibroblast tail is not an organelle essential for translocation. Since our technique allowed us to distinguish between cells which were cycling and those which had left cycle, we compared their velocities and found them to be similar. Also the average velocities of cells of different population-doubling levels (10th, 30th, 40th) were approximately equal.

  17. Determination of RNA orientation during translocation through a biological nanopore.

    PubMed

    Butler, Tom Z; Gundlach, Jens H; Troll, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    We investigate single-molecule electrophoretic translocation of A(50), C(50), A(25)C(50), and C(50)A(25) RNA molecules through the alpha-hemolysin transmembrane protein pore. We observe pronounced bilevel current blockages during translocation of A(25)C(50) and C(50)A(25) molecules. The two current levels observed during these bilevel blockages are very similar to the characteristic current levels observed during A(50) and C(50) translocation. From the temporal ordering of the two levels within the bilevel current blockages, we infer whether individual A(25)C(50) and C(50)A(25) molecules pass through the pore in a 3'-->5' or 5'-->3' orientation. Correlation between the level of current obstruction and the inferred A(25)C(50) or C(50)A(25) orientation indicates that 3'-->5' translocation of a poly C segment causes a significantly deeper current obstruction than 5'-->3' translocation. Our analysis also suggests that the 3' ends of C(50) and A(25)C(50) RNA molecules are more likely to initiate translocation than the 5' ends. Orientation dependent differences in a smaller current blockage that immediately precedes many translocation events suggest that this blockage also contains information about RNA orientation during translocation. These findings emphasize that the directionality of polynucleotide molecules is an important factor in translocation and demonstrate how structure within ionic current signals can give new insights into the translocation process.

  18. DNA damage-induced translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus regulates cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Proteins are able to react in response to distinct stress stimuli by alteration of their subcellular distribution. The stress-responsive protein S100A11 belongs to the family of multifunctional S100 proteins which have been implicated in several key biological processes. Previously, we have shown that S100A11 is directly involved in DNA repair processes at damaged chromatin in the nucleus. To gain further insight into the underlying mechanism subcellular trafficking of S100A11 in response to DNA damage was analyzed. Results We show that DNA damage induces a nucleolin-mediated translocation of S100A11 from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. This translocation is impeded by inhibition of the phosphorylation activity of PKCα. Translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus correlates with an increased cellular p21 protein level. Depletion of nucleolin by siRNA severely impairs translocation of S100A11 into the nucleus resulting in a decreased p21 protein level. Additionally, cells lacking nucleolin showed a reduced colony forming capacity. Conclusions These observations suggest that regulation of the subcellular distribution of S100A11 plays an important role in the DNA damage response and p21-mediated cell cycle control. PMID:21167017

  19. The regulation of ammonium translocation in plants.

    PubMed

    Schjoerring, J K; Husted, S; Mäck, G; Mattsson, M

    2002-04-01

    Much controversy exists about whether or not NH(+)(4) is translocated in the xylem from roots to shoots. In this paper it is shown that such translocation can indeed take place, but that interference from other metabolites such as amino acids and amines may give rise to large uncertainties about the magnitude of xylem NH(+)(4) concentrations. Elimination of interference requires sample stabilization by, for instance, formic acid or methanol. Subsequent quantification of NH(+)(4) should be done by the OPA-fluorometric method at neutral pH with 2-mercaptoethanol as the reducing agent since this method is sensitive and reliable. Colorimetric methods based on the Berthelot reaction should never be used, as they are prone to give erroneous results. Significant concentrations of NH(+)(4), exceeding 1 mM, were measured in both xylem sap and leaf apoplastic solution of oilseed rape and tomato plants growing with NO(-)(3) as the sole N source. When NO(-)(3) was replaced by NH(+)(4), xylem sap NH(+)(4) concentrations increased with increasing external concentrations and with time of exposure to NH(+)(4). Up to 11% of the translocated N was constituted by NH(+)(4). Glutamine synthetase (GS) incorporates NH(+)(4) into glutamine, but root GS activity and expression were repressed when high levels of NH(+)(4) were supplied. Ammonium concentrations measured in xylem sap sampled just above the stem base were highly correlated with NH(+)(4) concentrations in apoplastic solution from the leaves. Young leaves tended to have higher apoplastic NH(+)(4) concentrations than older non-senescing leaves. The flux of NH(+)(4) (concentration multiplied by transpirational water flow) increased with temperature despite a decline in xylem NH(+)(4) concentration. Retrieval of leaf apoplastic NH(+)(4) involves both high and low affinity transporters in the plasma membrane of mesophyll cells. Current knowledge about these transporters and their regulation is discussed.

  20. Iron uptake and translocation by macrocystis pyrifera

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, S.L.

    1981-10-01

    Parameters of iron uptake have been determined for blade tissue of Macrocystis pyrifera (L.) C. Ag. These include the effects of iron concentration, light, various inhibitors, and blade type. All experiments were conducted in the defined artificial seawater Aquil. Iron uptake is light independent, energy dependent, and dependent on the reduction from Fe/sup 3+/ to Fe/sup 2+/. Iron is concentrated in the sieve tube exudate; exudate analysis revealed the presence of other micronutrients. Iron and other micronutrient translocation is discussed.

  1. Microbial Translocation Across the GI Tract*

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, Jason M.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    The lumen of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to an enormous quantity of different bacterial species, our microbiota, that thrive in an often symbiotic relationship with the host. Given that the healthy host must regulate contact between the microbiota and its immune system to avoid overwhelming systemic immune activation, humans have evolved several mechanisms to attenuate systemic microbial translocation (MT) and its consequences. However, several diseases are associated with the failure of one or more of these mechanisms, with consequent immune activation and deleterious effects on health. Here, we discuss the mechanisms underlying MT, diseases associated with MT, and therapeutic interventions that aim to decrease it. PMID:22224779

  2. Microdeletion syndromes, balanced translocations, and gene mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Schinzel, A

    1988-01-01

    High resolution prometaphase chromosome banding has allowed the detection of discrete chromosome aberrations which escaped earlier metaphase examinations. Consistent tiny deletions have been detected in some well established malformation syndromes: an interstitial deletion in 15q11/12 in the majority of patients with the Prader-Willi syndrome and in a minority of patients with the Angelman (happy puppet) syndrome; a terminal deletion of 17p13.3 in most patients examined with the Miller-Dieker syndrome; an interstitial deletion of 8q23.3/24.1 in a large majority of patients with the Giedion-Langer syndrome; an interstitial deletion of 11p13 in virtually all patients with the WAGR (Wilms' tumour-aniridia-gonadoblastoma-retardation) syndrome; and an interstitial deletion in 22q11 in about one third of patients with the DiGeorge sequence. In addition, a combination of chromosome prometaphase banding and DNA marker studies has allowed the localisation of the genes for retinoblastoma and for Wilms' tumour and the clarification of both the autosomal recessive nature of the mutation and the possible somatic mutations by which the normal allele can be lost in retina and kidney cells. After a number of X linked genes had been mapped, discrete deletions in the X chromosome were detected by prometaphase banding with specific attention paid to the sites of the gene(s) in males who had from one to up to four different X linked disorders plus mental retardation. Furthermore, the detection of balanced translocations in probands with disorders caused by autosomal dominant or X linked genes has allowed a better insight into the localisation of these genes. In some females with X linked disorders, balanced X; autosomal translocations have allowed the localisation of X linked genes at the breakpoint on the X chromosome. Balanced autosome; autosome translocations segregating with autosomal dominant conditions have provided some clues to the gene location of these conditions. In two

  3. Extragalactic Backgrounds after Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dore, Olivier

    offers a direct probe of the relation between light and matter. We will also revisit long-standing questions such as the nature of the extragalactic gamma-ray background and the active galactic nuclei contribution to the CIB. The astrophysical implications of our program are quite unique and far-reaching. As such, this proposal is essential to NASA objectives. Cross-cutting among different frequencies, we will be able to analyze in a synergic way a huge amount of data from current NASA surveys and projects, and we will directly address three of the seven key questions identified in the Astro2010 report ``New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics'' : What is the fossil record of galaxy assembly from the first stars to present?, What are the connections between dark and luminous matter? How do cosmic structures form and evolve?

  4. Geographic Translocation of Bats: Known and Potential Problems

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    Natural, accidental, and intentional translocation of bats, both intra- and intercontinentally, has been documented. Some bats have been translocated while incubating infectious diseases, including rabies or related lyssavirus infections; others have escaped confinement en route to or at their destinations, while others have been released deliberately. Known events and potential consequences of bat translocation are reviewed, including a proposed solution to the attendant problems. PMID:12533276

  5. Translocation as a species conservation tool: Status and strategy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, B.; Scott, J.M.; Carpenter, J.W.; Reed, C.

    1989-01-01

    Surveys of recent (1973 to 1986) intentional releases of native birds and mammals to the wild in Australia, Canada, Hawaii, New Zealand, and the United States, were conducted to document current activities, identify factors associated with success, and suggest guidelines for enhancing future work. Nearly 700 translocations were conducted each year. Native game species constituted percent of translocations and were more successful (86 percent) than were translocations of threatened, endangered, or sensitive species (46 percent). Knowledge of habitat quality, location of release area within the species range, number of animals released, program length, and reproductive traits, allowed currect classification of 81 percent of observed translocations as successful or not.

  6. Chromosome translocations measured by fluorescence in-situ hybridization: A promising biomarker

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, J.N.; Straume, T.

    1995-10-01

    A biomarker for exposure and risk assessment would be most useful if it employs an endpoint that is highly quantitative, is stable with time, and is relevant to human risk. Recent advances in chromosome staining using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) facilitate fast and reliable measurement of reciprocal translocations, a kind of DNA damage linked to both prior exposure and risk. In contrast to other biomarkers available, the frequency of reciprocal translocations in individuals exposed to whole-body radiation is stable with time post exposure, has a rather small inter-individual variability, and can be measured accurately at the low levels. Here, the authors discuss results from their studies demonstrating that chromosome painting can be used to reconstruct radiation dose for workers exposed within the dose limits, for individuals exposed a long time ago, and even for those who have been diagnosed with leukemia but not yet undergone therapy.

  7. Background sources at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Toner, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Important sources of background for PEP experiments are studied. Background particles originate from high-energy electrons and positrons which have been lost from stable orbits, ..gamma..-rays emitted by the primary beams through bremsstrahlung in the residual gas, and synchrotron radiation x-rays. The effect of these processes on the beam lifetime are calculated and estimates of background rates at the interaction region are given. Recommendations for the PEP design, aimed at minimizing background are presented. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. DAX-1 Expression in Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcomas: Another Immunohistochemical Marker Useful in the Diagnosis of Translocation Positive Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Virgone, Calogero; Lalli, Enzo; Bisogno, Gianni; Lazzari, Elena; Roma, Josep; Zin, Angelica; Poli, Elena; Cecchetto, Giovanni; Dall’Igna, Patrizia; Alaggio, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of DAX-1 in a series of pediatric rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) with known translocation and compare it to Ap2β, known to be selectively expressed in ARMS. Design We revised a series of 71 alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas (ARMS), enrolled in the Italian Protocols RMS 79 and 96, and 23 embryonal rhabdomyosarcomas (ERMS) as controls. Before investigating Ap2β and DAX-1, ARMS were reviewed and reclassified as 48 ARMS and 23 non-ARMS. Results Translocation positive ARMS showed a characteristic Ap2β/DAX-1+ staining pattern in 78% of cases, while 76% of classic ERMS were negative for both. Ap2β alone was positive in 3.9% of RMS lacking translocation, whereas DAX-1 alone was positive in 25.4%. Conversely, 9% and 6% of translocation positive ARMS were positive only for DAX-1 or Ap2β, respectively. The 23 non-ARMS shared the same phenotype as ERMS but had a higher frequency of DAX-1 expression. Conclusions DAX-1 is less specific than Ap2β, however it is a sensitive marker for translocation positive ARMS and can be helpful in their diagnosis if used in combination with Ap2β. PMID:26168243

  9. Reciprocal translocations in grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.): pattern of transmission, detection of multiple interchanges and their independence.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Dibyendu

    2010-01-01

    Grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) is a diploid crop having 2n = 14 chromosomes. Four different plant types, heterozygous for reciprocal translocation (RT), RT-1, RT-2, RT-3, and RT-4 showing pollen semisterility, were isolated in induced mutant population of three varieties of grass pea. Transmission rate of these 4 translocations was studied in advanced selfed and intercrossed progenies, whereas multiple chromosomal interchanges were detected by the pattern of chromosomal ring formation at meiosis I in the F(1) progeny of RTxRT. RT transmitted at an average of 48.89% in selfed progeny and along with normal plants, RT and translocation homozygotes produced some trisomic plants in the segregation progeny. RT-3 showing maximum frequency (68.20%) of zig-zag or alternate chromosome orientation exhibited highest transmission (55.20%). Presence of a ring of 6 or 2 rings of 4 chromosomes in F(1) double heterozygotes obtained from RTxRT suggested involvement of one common chromosome in translocations of RT-1, RT-2, and RT-4 but a different one in common between RT-2 and RT-3. No common chromosome, however, was shared by RT-3 and RT-4. Thus, 5 out of 7 chromosomes are involved in the present RTs, and one of the translocated chromosomes in RT-1 line was always associated with nucleolar organizing region.

  10. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: from translocation to targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Noujaim, Jonathan; Thway, Khin; Fisher, Cyril; Jones, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP), the most common dermal sarcoma, is a low-grade, slow growing fibroblastic malignant neoplasm that most frequently affects middle aged adults and is characterized by a high local recurrence rate and a low propensity for metastasis. Wide surgical resection or Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) are the preferred approaches for localized disease, while radiation therapy is warranted for inoperable disease or for cases with positive margins where re-excision is not possible. DFSP is generally regarded as refractory to conventional chemotherapy. Treatment options for systemic disease were limited until the discovery of a unique translocation, t(17;22)(q22;q13) (COL1A1;PDGFB) found in a majority of cases. In recent years, imatinib, a PDGFβR, ABL and KIT inhibitor, has revolutionized systemic therapy in DFSP. In this review, we summarize the epidemiological, clinical, histological and genetic characteristics of DFSP and update the readers on its current management. PMID:26779374

  11. Adsorption-driven translocation of polymer chain into nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Neimark, Alexander V.

    2012-06-01

    The polymer translocation into nanopores is generally facilitated by external driving forces, such as electric or hydrodynamic fields, to compensate for entropic restrictions imposed by the confinement. We investigate the dynamics of translocation driven by polymer adsorption to the confining walls that is relevant to chromatographic separation of macromolecules. By using the self-consistent field theory, we study the passage of a chain trough a small opening from cis to trans compartments of spherical shape with adsorption potential applied in the trans compartment. The chain transfer is modeled as the Fokker-Plank diffusion along the free energy landscape of the translocation pass represented as a sum of the free energies of cis and trans parts of the chain tethered to the pore opening. We investigate how the chain length, the size of trans compartment, the magnitude of adsorption potential, and the extent of excluded volume interactions affect the translocation time and its distribution. Interplay of these factors brings about a variety of different translocation regimes. We show that excluded volume interactions within a certain range of adsorption potentials can cause a local minimum on the free energy landscape, which is absent for ideal chains. The adsorption potential always leads to the decrease of the free energy barrier, increasing the probability of successful translocation. However, the translocation time depends non-monotonically of the magnitude of adsorption potential. Our calculations predict the existence of the critical magnitude of adsorption potential, which separates favorable and unfavorable regimes of translocation.

  12. Background removal procedure for rapid scan EPR.

    PubMed

    Tseitlin, Mark; Czechowski, Tomasz; Quine, Richard W; Eaton, Sandra S; Eaton, Gareth R

    2009-01-01

    In rapid scan EPR the changing magnetic field creates a background signal with components at the scan frequency and its harmonics. The amplitude of the background signal increases with scan width and is more significant for weak EPR signals such as are obtained in the presence of magnetic field gradients. A procedure for distinguishing this background from the EPR signal is proposed, mathematically described, and tested for various experimental conditions.

  13. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-05-14

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA.

  14. Range-wide success of red-cockaded woodpecker translocations.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, John W; Costa, Ralph

    2004-12-31

    Edwards, John W.; Costa, Ralph. 2004. Range-wide success of red-cockaded woodpecker translocations. In: Red-cockaded woodpecker; Road to Recovery. Proceedings of the 4th Red-cockaded woodpecker Symposium. Ralph Costa and Susan J. Daniels, eds. Savannah, Georgia. January, 2003. Chapter 6. Translocation. Pp 307-311. Abstract: Red-cockaded woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) have declined range-wide during the past century, suffering from habitat loss and the effects of fire exclusion in older southern pine forests. Red-cockaded woodpecker translocations are a potentially important tool in conservation efforts to reestablish red-cockaded woodpeckers in areas from which they have been extirpated. Currently, translocations are critical in ongoing efforts to save and restore the many existing small populations. We examined the effects of demographic and environmental factors on the range-wide success of translocations between 1989 and 1995.

  15. Micro-evolution in grasshoppers mediated by polymorphic Robertsonian translocations.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Pablo C

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on grasshoppers that are polymorphic for Robertsonian translocations because in these organisms the clarity of meiotic figures allows the study of both chiasma distribution and the orientation of trivalents and multivalents in metaphase I. Only five species of such grasshoppers were found in the literature, and all of them were from the New World: Oedaleonotus enigma (Scudder) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), Leptysma argentina Bruner, Dichroplus pratensis Bruner, Sinipta dalmani Stål, and Cornops aquaticum Bruner. A general feature of these species (except O. enigma) is that fusion carriers suffer a marked reduction of proximal and interstitial (with respect to the centromere) chiasma frequency; this fact, along with the reduction in the number of linkage groups with the consequent loss of independent segregation, produces a marked decrease of recombination in fusion carriers. This reduction in recombination has led to the conclusion that Robertsonian polymorphic grasshopper species share some properties with inversion polymorphic species of Drosophila, such as the central-marginal pattern (marginal populations are monomorphic, central populations are highly polymorphic). This pattern might be present in D. pratensis, which is certainly the most complex Robertsonian polymorphism system in the present study. However, L. argentina and C. aquaticum do not display this pattern. This issue is open to further research. Since C. aquaticum is soon to be released in South Africa as a biological control, the latitudinal pattern found in South America may repeat there. This experiment's outcome is open and deserves to be followed.

  16. Micro-Evolution in Grasshoppers Mediated by Polymorphic Robertsonian Translocations

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Pablo C.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on grasshoppers that are polymorphic for Robertsonian translocations because in these organisms the clarity of meiotic figures allows the study of both chiasma distribution and the orientation of trivalents and multivalents in metaphase I. Only five species of such grasshoppers were found in the literature, and all of them were from the New World: Oedaleonotus enigma (Scudder) (Orthoptera: Acrididae), Leptysma argentina Bruner, Dichroplus pratensis Bruner, Sinipta dalmani Stål, and Cornops aquaticum Bruner. A general feature of these species (except O. enigma) is that fusion carriers suffer a marked reduction of proximal and interstitial (with respect to the centromere) chiasma frequency; this fact, along with the reduction in the number of linkage groups with the consequent loss of independent segregation, produces a marked decrease of recombination in fusion carriers. This reduction in recombination has led to the conclusion that Robertsonian polymorphic grasshopper species share some properties with inversion polymorphic species of Drosophila, such as the central-marginal pattern (marginal populations are monomorphic, central populations are highly polymorphic). This pattern might be present in D. pratensis, which is certainly the most complex Robertsonian polymorphism system in the present study. However, L. argentina and C. aquaticum do not display this pattern. This issue is open to further research. Since C. aquaticum is soon to be released in South Africa as a biological control, the latitudinal pattern found in South America may repeat there. This experiment's outcome is open and deserves to be followed. PMID:23909914

  17. Translocations of amphibians: Proven management method or experimental technique

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seigel, Richard A.; Dodd, C. Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    In an otherwise excellent review of metapopulation dynamics in amphibians, Marsh and Trenham (2001) make the following provocative statements (emphasis added): If isolation effects occur primarily in highly disturbed habitats, species translocations may be necessary to promote local and regional population persistence. Because most amphibians lack parental care, they areprime candidates for egg and larval translocations. Indeed, translocations have already proven successful for several species of amphibians. Where populations are severely isolated, translocations into extinct subpopulations may be the best strategy to promote regional population persistence. We take issue with these statements for a number of reasons. First, the authors fail to cite much of the relevant literature on species translocations in general and for amphibians in particular. Second, to those unfamiliar with current research in amphibian conservation biology, these comments might suggest that translocations are a proven management method. This is not the case, at least in most instances where translocations have been evaluated for an appropriate period of time. Finally, the authors fail to point out some of the negative aspects of species translocation as a management method. We realize that Marsh and Trenham's paper was not concerned primarily with translocations. However, because Marsh and Trenham (2001) made specific recommendations for conservation planners and managers (many of whom are not herpetologists or may not be familiar with the pertinent literature on amphibians), we believe that it is essential to point out that not all amphibian biologists are as comfortable with translocations as these authors appear to be. We especially urge caution about advocating potentially unproven techniques without a thorough review of available options.

  18. Minimizing the cost of translocation failure with decision-tree models that predict species' behavioral response in translocation sites.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Mehregan; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Bull, C Michael

    2015-08-01

    The high number of failures is one reason why translocation is often not recommended. Considering how behavior changes during translocations may improve translocation success. To derive decision-tree models for species' translocation, we used data on the short-term responses of an endangered Australian skink in 5 simulated translocations with different release conditions. We used 4 different decision-tree algorithms (decision tree, decision-tree parallel, decision stump, and random forest) with 4 different criteria (gain ratio, information gain, gini index, and accuracy) to investigate how environmental and behavioral parameters may affect the success of a translocation. We assumed behavioral changes that increased dispersal away from a release site would reduce translocation success. The trees became more complex when we included all behavioral parameters as attributes, but these trees yielded more detailed information about why and how dispersal occurred. According to these complex trees, there were positive associations between some behavioral parameters, such as fight and dispersal, that showed there was a higher chance, for example, of dispersal among lizards that fought than among those that did not fight. Decision trees based on parameters related to release conditions were easier to understand and could be used by managers to make translocation decisions under different circumstances.

  19. Effect of occupational exposure to multiple pesticides on translocation yield and chromosomal aberrations in lymphocytes of plant workers.

    PubMed

    Zeljezic, Davor; Vrdoljak, Ana Lucic; Lucas, Joe N; Lasan, Ruzica; Fucic, Aleksandra; Kopjar, Nevenka; Katic, Jelena; Mladinic, Marin; Radic, Bozica

    2009-08-15

    Employees handling pesticides are simultaneously exposed to different active substances. Occurring multiple chemical exposures may pose a higher risk than it could be deduced from studies evaluating the effect of a single substance. This study comprised 32 pesticide plantworkers exposed to carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, metalaxyl, and dodine and an equal number of control subjects. Groups were matched by age (43.8 +/- 10.16 vs 41.8 +/- 7.42, respectively), sex (14 females; 18 males), and smoking (11 smokers; 21 nonsmokers). Chromosome aberration and translocation frequencies were determined using a standard aberration assay and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) by applying painting probes for chromosomes 1, 2, and 4. Although significant, an observed increase in chromatid breaks (5.2 +/- 2.49) compared to controls (2.1 +/- 0.87), p(PostHoc) = 0.000001 is biologically irrelevant. Genomic frequency of translocations was also significantly elevated (exposed 0.0165 +/- 0.0070; control 0.0051 +/- 0.0023, P(PostHoc) = 0.000004). The distribution of translocations among chromosomes 1, 2, and 4 did not differ from control subjects. It corresponded to the distribution of DNA content among selected chromosomes indicating randomness of DNA damage. A good translocation yield correlation within years spent in pesticide production indicates that multiple pesticide exposure may pose a risk to genome integrity. However, for more accurate health risk assessments, the use of probes for some other groups of chromosomes should be considered.

  20. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  1. Palindrome-Mediated Translocations in Humans: A New Mechanistic Model for Gross Chromosomal Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Hidehito; Kato, Takema; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Ouchi, Yuya; Ohye, Tamae; Kurahashi, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Palindromic DNA sequences, which can form secondary structures, are widely distributed in the human genome. Although the nature of the secondary structure—single-stranded “hairpin” or double-stranded “cruciform”—has been extensively investigated in vitro, the existence of such unusual non-B DNA in vivo remains controversial. Here, we review palindrome-mediated gross chromosomal rearrangements possibly induced by non-B DNA in humans. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing have not yet overcome the difficulty of palindromic sequence analysis. However, a dozen palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR) sequences have been identified at the breakpoints of recurrent or non-recurrent chromosomal translocations in humans. The breakages always occur at the center of the palindrome. Analyses of polymorphisms within the palindromes indicate that the symmetry and length of the palindrome affect the frequency of the de novo occurrence of these palindrome-mediated translocations, suggesting the involvement of non-B DNA. Indeed, experiments using a plasmid-based model system showed that the formation of non-B DNA is likely the key to palindrome-mediated genomic rearrangements. Some evidence implies a new mechanism that cruciform DNAs may come close together first in nucleus and illegitimately joined. Analysis of PATRR-mediated translocations in humans will provide further understanding of gross chromosomal rearrangements in many organisms. PMID:27462347

  2. Does translocation influence physiological stress in the desert tortoise?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, K.K.; Nussear, K.E.; Esque, T.C.; Barber, A.M.; Vittum, K.M.; Medica, P.A.; Tracy, C.R.; Hunter, K.W.

    2012-01-01

    Wildlife translocation is increasingly used to mitigate disturbances to animals or habitat due to human activities, yet little is known about the extent to which translocating animals causes stress. To understand the relationship between physiological stress and translocation, we conducted a multiyear study (2007–2009) using a population of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) near Fort Irwin, California. Blood samples were collected from adult tortoises in three treatment groups (resident, translocated and control) for 1 year prior to and 2 years after translocation. Samples were analyzed by radioimmunoassay for plasma total corticosterone (CORT), a glucocorticoid hormone commonly associated with stress responses in reptiles. CORT values were analyzed in relation to potential covariates (animal sex, date, behavior, treatment, handling time, air temperature, home-range size, precipitation and annual plant production) among seasons and years. CORT values in males were higher than in females, and values for both varied monthly throughout the activity season and among years. Year and sex were strong predictors of CORT, and translocation explained little in terms of CORT. Based on these results, we conclude that translocation does not elicit a physiological stress response in desert tortoises.

  3. Forced Translocation of Polymer through Nanopore: Deterministic Model and Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanqian; Panyukov, Sergey; Liao, Qi; Rubinstein, Michael

    2012-02-01

    We propose a new theoretical model of forced translocation of a polymer chain through a nanopore. We assume that DNA translocation at high fields proceeds too fast for the chain to relax, and thus the chain unravels loop by loop in an almost deterministic way. So the distribution of translocation times of a given monomer is controlled by the initial conformation of the chain (the distribution of its loops). Our model predicts the translocation time of each monomer as an explicit function of initial polymer conformation. We refer to this concept as ``fingerprinting''. The width of the translocation time distribution is determined by the loop distribution in initial conformation as well as by the thermal fluctuations of the polymer chain during the translocation process. We show that the conformational broadening δt of translocation times of m-th monomer δtm^1.5 is stronger than the thermal broadening δtm^1.25 The predictions of our deterministic model were verified by extensive molecular dynamics simulations

  4. Kinetic Mechanism of DNA Translocation by the RSC Molecular Motor

    PubMed Central

    Eastlund, Allen; Malik, Shuja Shafi; Fischer, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    ATP-dependent nucleosome repositioning by chromatin remodeling enzymes requires the translocation of these enzymes along the nucleosomal DNA. Using a fluorescence stopped-flow assay we monitored DNA translocation by a minimal RSC motor and through global analysis of these time courses we have determined that this motor has a macroscopic translocation rate of 2.9 bp/s with a step size of 1.24 bp. From the complementary quantitative analysis of the associated time courses of ATP consumption during DNA translocation we have determined that this motor has an efficiency of 3.0 ATP/bp, which is slightly less that the efficiency observed for several genetically related DNA helicases and which likely results from random pausing by the motor during translocation. Nevertheless, this motor is able to exert enough force during translocation to displace streptavidin from biotinylated DNA. Taken together these results are the necessary first step for quantifying both the role of DNA translocation in nucleosome repositioning by RSC and the efficiency at which RSC couples ATP binding and hydrolysis to nucleosome repositioning. PMID:23399434

  5. Effects of calcium on rhizotoxicity and the accumulation and translocation of copper by grapevines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Yi; Lee, Yung-I; Chen, Bo-Ching; Juang, Kai-Wei

    2013-12-01

    We assessed the effects of background concentrations of calcium (Ca) in solution on rhizotoxicity of copper (Cu) in and the accumulation and translocation of Cu by the grapevine, Vitis vinifera L. var. Kyoho. Grapevine cuttings in a hydroponic system were exposed to Cu-spiked solutions (0, 1, 2.5, 5, 10, and 25 μM) with two Ca backgrounds (0.5 and 5 mM) for 15 days. We found that when Cu exposure exceeded 5 μM, no new white roots were generated from the cuttings. When exposed to a Cu concentration of 25 μM, the lateral roots were sparse, appeared dark and exhibited malformed terminal swellings. The morphological phenomena of root response to an increase in Cu levels were relatively pronounced at a background concentration of 5 mM Ca; epidermal cell walls thickened, cortical cells remained intact and root terminal swelling was enhanced with Cu exposure. A 5 mM Ca background concentration enhanced the reduction in relative root elongation, but alleviated the reduction in relative root dry weight with increased Cu exposure. Moreover, there was a prominent increase in root Cu concentrations with increased Cu exposure, but the increases in leaf Cu concentrations were much less. The Cu profile of Cu exposure in a 5 mM Ca background concentration appeared higher in root, but lower in leaf than the Cu profile in a 0.5 mM Ca background; therefore, increase of Ca background concentrations would enhance Cu to be accumulated by root, but not translocated into the leaf.

  6. Titanium dioxide nanoparticle impact and translocation through ex vivo, in vivo and in vitro gut epithelia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background TiO2 particles are commonly used as dietary supplements and may contain up to 36% of nano-sized particles (TiO2-NPs). Still impact and translocation of NPs through the gut epithelium is poorly documented. Results We show that, in vivo and ex vivo, agglomerates of TiO2-NPs cross both the regular ileum epithelium and the follicle-associated epithelium (FAE) and alter the paracellular permeability of the ileum and colon epithelia. In vitro, they accumulate in M-cells and mucus-secreting cells, much less in enterocytes. They do not cause overt cytotoxicity or apoptosis. They translocate through a model of FAE only, but induce tight junctions remodeling in the regular ileum epithelium, which is a sign of integrity alteration and suggests paracellular passage of NPs. Finally we prove that TiO2-NPs do not dissolve when sequestered up to 24 h in gut cells. Conclusions Taken together these data prove that TiO2-NPs would possibly translocate through both the regular epithelium lining the ileum and through Peyer’s patches, would induce epithelium impairment, and would persist in gut cells where they would possibly induce chronic damage. PMID:24666995

  7. The 2NS Translocation from Aegilops ventricosa Confers Resistance to the Triticum Pathotype of Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, C.D.; Peterson, G.L.; Bockus, W.W.; Kankanala, P.; Dubcovsky, J.; Jordan, K.W.; Akhunov, E.; Chumley, F.; Baldelomar, F.D.; Valent, B.

    2016-01-01

    Wheat blast is a serious disease caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae (Triticum pathotype) (MoT). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of the 2NS translocation from Aegilops ventricosa (Zhuk.) Chennav on wheat head and leaf blast resistance. Disease phenotyping experiments were conducted in growth chamber, greenhouse, and field environments. Among 418 cultivars of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), those with 2NS had 50.4 to 72.3% less head blast than those without 2NS when inoculated with an older MoT isolate under growth chamber conditions. When inoculated with recently collected isolates, cultivars with 2NS had 64.0 to 80.5% less head blast. Under greenhouse conditions when lines were inoculated with an older MoT isolate, those with 2NS had a significant head blast reduction. With newer isolates, not all lines with 2NS showed a significant reduction in head blast, suggesting that the genetic background and/or environment may influence the expression of any resistance conferred by 2NS. However, when near-isogenic lines (NILs) with and without 2NS were planted in the field, there was strong evidence that 2NS conferred resistance to head blast. Results from foliar inoculations suggest that the resistance to head infection that is imparted by the 2NS translocation does not confer resistance to foliar disease. In conclusion, the 2NS translocation was associated with significant reductions in head blast in both spring and winter wheat. PMID:27814405

  8. Intestinal Bacteria Composition and Translocation of Bacteria in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vrakas, Spyros; Mountzouris, Konstantinos C.; Michalopoulos, George; Karamanolis, George; Papatheodoridis, George; Tzathas, Charalampos

    2017-01-01

    Background Live commensal intestinal bacteria are present in the peripheral blood where they can induce inflammation. Objective To evaluate the intestinal bacteria composition and translocation of bacteria in IBD. Methods Both blood and tissue biopsy samples were collected from adult patients with active/inactive Crohn’s disease (CD), active/inactive ulcerative colitis (UC) and healthy individuals. Most of the patients were newly diagnosed and none of them received antibiotics. Using a reverse transcription–quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) method, we determined the composition of microbiota. NOD2/CARD15 genotyping was also studied. Results Total bacterial DNA concentration was increased in tissue and blood samples of IBD patients compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, the active IBD cases had higher total bacterial DNA concentration levels compared to the inactive cases. Three species characterized dysbiosis in IBD, namely an increase of Bacteroides spp in active and inactive IBD samples, and a decrease in Clostridium leptum group (IV), and Faecalibacterium prausnitzi in both active and inactive IBD patients. No significant association between bacterial translocation and NOD2/CARD15 mutations was found. Conclusions The composition of the microbiota in IBD patients differs from that of healthy controls. The high rate of bacterial DNA in the blood samples indicates translocation in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:28099495

  9. Translocation of threatened plants as a conservation measure in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Ren, Hai; Liu, Qiang; Wen, XiangYing; Maunder, Michael; Gao, JiangYun

    2015-12-01

    We assessed the current status of plant conservation translocation efforts in China, a topic poorly reported in recent scientific literature. We identified 222 conservation translocation cases involving 154 species, of these 87 were Chinese endemic species and 101 (78%) were listed as threatened on the Chinese Species Red List. We categorized the life form of each species and, when possible, determined for each case the translocation type, propagule source, propagule type, and survival and reproductive parameters. A surprisingly large proportion (26%) of the conservation translocations in China were conservation introductions, largely implemented in response to large-scale habitat destruction caused by the Three-Gorge Dam and another hydropower project. Documentation and management of the translocations varied greatly. Less than half the cases had plant survival records. Statistical analyses showed that survival percentages were significantly correlated with plant life form and the type of planting materials. Thirty percent of the cases had records on whether or not individuals flowered or fruited. Results of information theoretic model selection indicated that plant life form, translocation type, propagule type, propagule source, and time since planting significantly influenced the likelihood of flowering and fruiting on the project level. We suggest that the scientific-based application of species conservation translocations should be promoted as part of a commitment to species recovery management. In addition, we recommend that the common practice of within and out of range introductions in nature reserves to be regulated more carefully due to its potential ecological risks. We recommend the establishment of a national office and database to coordinate conservation translocations in China. Our review effort is timely considering the need for a comprehensive national guideline for the newly announced nation-wide conservation program on species with extremely

  10. Can hunting of translocated nuisance Canada geese reduce local conflicts?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holevinski, R.A.; Malecki, R.A.; Curtis, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    Resident Canada geese (Branta canadensis) nest or reside in the temperate latitudes of North America. In past years, translocation-the capture and subsequent release of geese at distant locations-has been used to establish resident goose populations and to reduce nuisance problems. However, with new special hunting seasons designed to target resident Canada geese, we can now evaluate translocation as a management tool when hunting is allowed at release sites. We selected 2 study sites, representative of urban and suburban locations with nuisance resident geese, in central and western New York, USA. In June 2003, we translocated 80 neck-banded adult geese, 14 radiomarked adult females, and 83 juveniles 150 km east and southwest from urban and suburban problem sites in western New York to state-owned Wildlife Management Areas. At these same capture sites, we used 151 neck-banded adult geese, 12 radiomarked females, and 100 juveniles as controls to compare dispersal movements and harvest vulnerability to translocated geese. All observations (n = 45) of translocated radiomarked geese were <20 km from release sites, in areas where hunting was permitted. Only 25 of 538 observations (4.6%) of radiomarked geese at control sites were in areas open to hunting. The remainder of observations occurred at nonhunting locations within 10 km of control sites. More translocated adult geese (23.8%) were harvested than control geese (6.6%; ??2 = 72.98, P = 0.0009). More translocated juvenile geese were harvested (22.9%) than juvenile controls (5.0%; ??2 = 72.30, P = 0.0005). Only 7 (8.8%) translocated adult geese returned to the original capture sites during Canada goose hunting seasons. Translocation of adult and juvenile geese in family groups may alleviate nuisance problems at conflict sites through increased harvest, reducing the number of birds returning in subsequent years.

  11. [Mechanisms of bacteria translocation in generalized chronic parodontitis].

    PubMed

    Bukharin, O V; Usviatsov, B Ia; Doroshina, N B; Kushkinbaeva, D R; Khlopko, Iu A

    2011-01-01

    Peculiarities of behavior reactions of bacteria-symbionts created conditions for the selection of translocators-strains. In microsymbiocenosis of parodontal pockets, from which translocation of bacteria into the blood was observed, the number of signals from intermicrobial communication, inhibiting the expression of the factors of colonization, virulence and persistence, was decreasing. Meanwhile, the number of signals on the increase of the expression of the factors given was increased. In 75% of cases strains-translocators were leaders; they gave more often signals on the inhibition of the growth of other strains-symbionts.

  12. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  13. The Athena Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Luigi; Lotti, Simone; Macculi, Claudio; Molendi, Silvano; Eraerds, Tanja; Laurent, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Estimating, reducing and controlling the residual particle background is fundamental for achieving the objectives of several science topics of Athena, in particular those connected with background dominated observations of faint and/or diffuse sources. This requires assessing the particle environment in L2, propagating the various particle components throughout the mirror, spacecraft, and instruments via proper modelling and simulations of various physical processes, implementing design and h/w measures at instrument and mission level to reduce the un-rejected background and identifying proper calibration methods to control the background variations. Likewise, an adequate knowledge of the XRB, made of components that may vary spatially or temporally, is required as well. Here we will review the present status of the background knowledge, and summarize the activities on-going within Athena at various levels.

  14. Control of protein function through optochemical translocation.

    PubMed

    Engelke, Hanna; Chou, Chungjung; Uprety, Rajendra; Jess, Phillip; Deiters, Alexander

    2014-10-17

    Controlled manipulation of proteins and their function is important in almost all biological disciplines. Here, we demonstrate control of protein activity with light. We present two different applications-light-triggered transcription and light-triggered protease cleavage-both based on the same concept of protein mislocation, followed by optochemically triggered translocation to an active cellular compartment. In our approach, we genetically encode a photocaged lysine into the nuclear localization signal (NLS) of the transcription factor SATB1. This blocks nuclear import of the protein until illumination induces caging group removal and release of the protein into the nucleus. In the first application, prepending this NLS to the transcription factor FOXO3 allows us to optochemically switch on its transcription activity. The second application uses the developed light-activated NLS to control nuclear import of TEV protease and subsequent cleavage of nuclear proteins containing TEV cleavage sites. The small size of the light-controlled NLS (only 20 amino acids) minimizes impact of its insertion on protein function and promises a general approach to a wide range of optochemical applications. Since the light-activated NLS is genetically encoded and optically triggered, it will prove useful to address a variety of problems requiring spatial and temporal control of protein function, for example, in stem-cell, developmental, and cancer biology.

  15. Microbiome and bacterial translocation in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Such, José; Francés, Rubén

    2016-12-01

    Qualitative and quantitative changes in gut microbiota play a very important role in cirrhosis. Humans harbour around 100 quintillion gut bacteria, thus representing around 10 times more microbial cells than eukaryotic ones. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest surface area in the body and it is subject to constant exposure to these living microorganisms. The existing symbiosis, proven by the lack of proinflammatory response against commensal bacteria, implies the presence of clearly defined communication lines that contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis of the host. Therefore, alterations of gut flora seem to play a role in the pathogenesis and progress of multiple liver and gastrointestinal diseases. This has made its selective modification into an area of high therapeutic interest. Bacterial translocation is defined as the migration of bacteria or bacterial products from the intestines to the mesenteric lymph nodes. It follows that alteration in gut microbiota have shown importance, at least to some extent, in the pathogenesis of several complications arising from terminal liver disease, such as hepatic encephalopathy, portal hypertension and spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. This review sums up, firstly, how liver disease can alter the common composition of gut microbiota, and secondly, how this alteration contributes to the development of complications in cirrhosis.

  16. Multiscale model of platelet translocation and collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weiwei; Mody, Nipa A.; King, Michael R.

    2013-07-01

    The tethering of platelets on the injured vessel surface mediated by glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα) - Von Willebrand factor (vWF) bonds, as well as the interaction between flowing platelets and adherent platelets, are two key events that take place immediately following blood vessel injury. This early-stage platelet deposition and accumulation triggers the initiation of hemostasis, a self-defensive mechanism to prevent the body from excessive blood loss. To understand and predict this complex process, one must integrate experimentally determined information on the mechanics and biochemical kinetics of participating receptors over very small time frames (1-1000 μs) and length scales (10-100 nm), to collective phenomena occurring over seconds and tens of microns. In the present study, a unique three dimensional multiscale computational model, Platelet Adhesive Dynamics (PAD), was applied to elucidate the unique physics of (i) a non-spherical, disk-shaped platelet interacting and tethering onto the damaged vessel wall followed by (ii) collisional interactions between a flowing platelet with a downstream adherent platelet. By analyzing numerous simulations under different physiological conditions, we conclude that the platelet's unique spheroid-shape provides heterogeneous, orientation-dependent translocation (rolling) behavior which enhances cell-wall interactions. We also conclude that platelet-platelet near field interactions are critical for cell-cell communication during the initiation of microthrombi. The PAD model described here helps to identify the physical factors that control the initial stages of platelet capture during this process.

  17. Particle uptake and translocation across epithelial membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, N W; Jenkins, P G; Howard, K A; Smith, M W; Lavelle, E C; Holland, J; Davis, S S

    1996-01-01

    Oral delivery of drugs and vaccines has many advantages over other routes of administration. For example, for vaccination, enteric delivery may result in the induction of a mucosal immune response against pathogens which colonise and invade the mucosa. However, the oral delivery of peptide or protein drugs or antigens is beset with problems, such as gastrointestinal breakdown of labile molecules, low level of macromolecular absorption and, for vaccines, the poor immune response usually elicited by orally administered soluble antigens. Investigations are therefore in progress to develop means of increasing intestinal absorption and decreasing digestion of orally administered molecules. Molecules can be incorporated into biodegradable microparticles to reduce the effect of gut secretions and to enable the absorption of bioactive agents in an unaltered form. The uptake of microparticulates through the gut wall is accepted as a true biological phenomenon but the mechanism and route of uptake have not been established. Furthermore, in general, only small numbers of microparticles are translocated across epithelial membranes, possibly making these systems inappropriate for drug or vaccine delivery. This paper reviews particle uptake across the gastrointestinal tract and describes studies carried out to determine whether a humoral response can be elicited following oral administration of an antigen associated with biodegradable poly(DL lactide-coglycolide) microparticles. The use of lipid delivery vehicles to enhance microparticle uptake and the selective transport of microspheres across M cells is also described. PMID:8982821

  18. The cortical thickness phenotype of individuals with DISC1 translocation resembles schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Orla M.; Bois, Catherine; Thomson, Pippa; Romaniuk, Liana; Whitcher, Brandon; Williams, Steven C.R.; Turkheimer, Federico E.; Stefansson, Hreinn; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Mehta, Mitul A.; Lawrie, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene locus was originally identified in a Scottish pedigree with a high incidence of psychiatric disorders that is associated with a balanced t(1;11)(q42.1;q14.3) chromosomal translocation. Here, we investigated whether members of this family carrying the t(1;11)(q42.1;q14.3) translocation have a common brain-related phenotype and whether this phenotype is similar to that observed in schizophrenia (SCZ), using multivariate pattern recognition techniques. METHODS. We measured cortical thickness, cortical surface area, subcortical volumes, and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in healthy controls (HC) (n = 24), patients diagnosed with SCZ (n = 24), patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder (BP) (n = 19), and members of the original Scottish family (n = 30) who were either carriers (T+) or noncarriers (T–) of the DISC1 translocation. Binary classification models were developed to assess the differences and similarities across groups. RESULTS. Based on cortical thickness, 72% of the T– group were assigned to the HC group, 83% of the T+ group were assigned to the SCZ group, and 45% of the BP group were classified as belonging to the SCZ group, suggesting high specificity of this measurement in predicting brain-related phenotypes. Shared brain-related phenotypes between SCZ and T+ individuals were found for cortical thickness only. Finally, a classification accuracy of 73% was achieved when directly comparing the pattern of cortical thickness of T+ and T– individuals. CONCLUSION. Together, the results of this study suggest that the DISC1 translocation may increase the risk of psychiatric disorders in this pedigree by affecting neurostructural phenotypes such as cortical thickness. FUNDING. This work was supported by the National Health Service Research Scotland, the Scottish Translational Medicine Research Collaboration, the Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research

  19. Translocation of signalling proteins to the plasma membrane revealed by a new bioluminescent procedure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Activation by extracellular ligands of G protein-coupled (GPCRs) and tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs), results in the generation of second messengers that in turn control specific cell functions. Further, modulation/amplification or inhibition of the initial signalling events, depend on the recruitment onto the plasma membrane of soluble protein effectors. High throughput methodologies to monitor quantitatively second messenger production, have been developed over the last years and are largely used to screen chemical libraries for drug development. On the contrary, no such high throughput methods are yet available for the other aspect of GPCRs regulation, i.e. protein translocation to the plasma membrane, despite the enormous interest of this phenomenon for the modulation of receptor downstream functions. Indeed, to date, the experimental procedures available are either inadequate or complex and expensive. Results Here we describe the development of a novel conceptual approach to the study of cytosolic proteins translocation to the inner surface of the plasma membrane. The basis of the technique consists in: i) generating chimeras between the protein of interests and the calcium (Ca2+)-sensitive, luminescent photo-protein, aequorin and ii) taking advantage of the large Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+] difference between bulk cytosolic and the sub-plasma membrane rim. Conclusion This approach, that keeps unaffected the translocation properties of the signalling protein, can in principle be applied to any protein that, upon activation, moves from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. Thus, not only the modulation of GPCRs and RTKs can be investigated in this way, but that of all other proteins that can be recruited to the plasma membrane also independently of receptor activation. Moreover, its automated version, which can provide information about the kinetics and concentration-dependence of the process, is also applicable to high throughput screening of drugs

  20. The cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic neutrino background is expected to consist of relic neutrinos from the big bang, of neutrinos produced during nuclear burning in stars, of neutrinos released by gravitational stellar collapse, and of neutrinos produced by cosmic ray interactions with matter and radiation in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. Formation of baryonic dark matter in the early universe, matter-antimatter annihilation in a baryonic symmetric universe, and dark matter annihilation could have also contributed significantly to the cosmic neutrino background. The purpose of this paper is to review the properties of these cosmic neutrino backgrounds, the indirect evidence for their existence, and the prospects for their detection.

  1. Background Underground at WIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esch, Ernst-Ingo; Hime, A.; Bowles, T. J.

    2001-04-01

    Recent interest to establish a dedicated underground laboratory in the United States prompted an experimental program at to quantify the enviromental backgrounds underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. An outline of this program is provided along with recent experimental data on the cosmic ray muon flux at the 650 meter level of WIPP. The implications of the cosmic ray muon and fast neutron background at WIPP will be discussed in the context of new generation, low background experiments envisioned in the future.

  2. DNA-graphene interactions during translocation through nanogaps

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hiral N.; Carroll, Ian; Lopez, Rodolfo; Sankararaman, Sandeep; Etienne, Charles; Kodigala, Subba Ramaiah; Paul, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    We study how double-stranded DNA translocates through graphene nanogaps. Nanogaps are fabricated with a novel capillary-force induced graphene nanogap formation technique. DNA translocation signatures for nanogaps are qualitatively different from those obtained with circular nanopores, owing to the distinct shape of the gaps discussed here. Translocation time and conductance values vary by ∼ 100%, which we suggest are caused by local gap width variations. We also observe exponentially relaxing current traces. We suggest that slow relaxation of the graphene membrane following DNA translocation may be responsible. We conclude that DNA-graphene interactions are important, and need to be considered for graphene-nanogap based devices. This work further opens up new avenues for direct read of single molecule activitities, and possibly sequencing. PMID:28158244

  3. DNA translocations through solid-state plasmonic nanopores.

    PubMed

    Nicoli, Francesca; Verschueren, Daniel; Klein, Misha; Dekker, Cees; Jonsson, Magnus P

    2014-12-10

    Nanopores enable label-free detection and analysis of single biomolecules. Here, we investigate DNA translocations through a novel type of plasmonic nanopore based on a gold bowtie nanoantenna with a solid-state nanopore at the plasmonic hot spot. Plasmonic excitation of the nanopore is found to influence both the sensor signal (nanopore ionic conductance blockade during DNA translocation) and the process that captures DNA into the nanopore, without affecting the duration time of the translocations. Most striking is a strong plasmon-induced enhancement of the rate of DNA translocation events in lithium chloride (LiCl, already 10-fold enhancement at a few mW of laser power). This provides a means to utilize the excellent spatiotemporal resolution of DNA interrogations with nanopores in LiCl buffers, which is known to suffer from low event rates. We propose a mechanism based on plasmon-induced local heating and thermophoresis as explanation of our observations.

  4. Translocation of an Incompressible Vesicle through a Pore

    PubMed Central

    Shojaei, Hamid R.; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-01-01

    We have derived the free energy landscape for the translocation of a single vesicle through a narrow pore by accounting for bending and stretching of the vesicle, and the deformation of the vesicle by the pore. Emergence of a free energy barrier for translocation is a general result, and the magnitude of the barrier is calculated in terms of the various material parameters. The extent of the reduction in the barrier by the presence of an external constant force is calculated. Using the Fokker–Planck formalism, we have calculated the average translocation time corresponding to the various free energy landscapes representing different parameter sets. The dependencies of the average translocation time on the strength of the external force, vesicle size, bending and stretching moduli of the vesicle, and radius and length of the pore are derived, and the computed results are discussed. PMID:27089012

  5. Notification: Background Investigation Services

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OA-FY15-0029, February 26, 2015. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) plans to begin field work for our audit of background investigation services.

  6. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J. F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Ritz, S.; Mizuno, T.

    2007-07-12

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  7. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J.F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Mizuno, T.; Ritz, S.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-17

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  8. Slowing DNA Translocation in a Nanofluidic Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yifan; Yobas, Levent

    2016-04-26

    Here, we present an experimental demonstration of slowing DNA translocation across a nanochannel by modulating the channel surface charge through an externally applied gate bias. The experiments were performed on a nanofluidic field-effect transistor, which is a monolithic integrated platform featuring a 50 nm-diameter in-plane alumina nanocapillary whose entire length is surrounded by a gate electrode. The field-effect transistor behavior was validated on the gating of ionic conductance and protein transport. The gating of DNA translocation was subsequently studied by measuring discrete current dips associated with single λ-DNA translocation events under a source-to-drain bias of 1 V. The translocation speeds under various gate bias conditions were extracted by fitting event histograms of the measured translocation time to the first passage time distributions obtained from a simple 1D biased diffusion model. A positive gate bias was observed to slow the translocation of single λ-DNA chains markedly; the translocation speed was reduced by an order of magnitude from 18.4 mm/s obtained under a floating gate down to 1.33 mm/s under a positive gate bias of 9 V. Therefore, a dynamic and flexible regulation of the DNA translocation speed, which is vital for single-molecule sequencing, can be achieved on this device by simply tuning the gate bias. The device is realized in a conventional semiconductor microfabrication process without the requirement of advanced lithography, and can be potentially further developed into a compact electronic single-molecule sequencer.

  9. A Comparison of Disease Risk Analysis Tools for Conservation Translocations.

    PubMed

    Dalziel, Antonia Eleanor; Sainsbury, Anthony W; McInnes, Kate; Jakob-Hoff, Richard; Ewen, John G

    2017-03-01

    Conservation translocations are increasingly used to manage threatened species and restore ecosystems. Translocations increase the risk of disease outbreaks in the translocated and recipient populations. Qualitative disease risk analyses have been used as a means of assessing the magnitude of any effect of disease and the probability of the disease occurring associated with a translocation. Currently multiple alternative qualitative disease risk analysis packages are available to practitioners. Here we compare the ease of use, expertise required, transparency, and results from, three different qualitative disease risk analyses using a translocation of the endangered New Zealand passerine, the hihi (Notiomystis cincta), as a model. We show that the three methods use fundamentally different approaches to define hazards. Different methods are used to produce estimations of the risk from disease, and the estimations are different for the same hazards. Transparency of the process varies between methods from no referencing, or explanations of evidence to justify decisions, through to full documentation of resources, decisions and assumptions made. Evidence to support decisions on estimation of risk from disease is important, to enable knowledge acquired in the future, for example, from translocation outcome, to be used to improve the risk estimation for future translocations. Information documenting each disease risk analysis differs along with variation in emphasis of the questions asked within each package. The expertise required to commence a disease risk analysis varies and an action flow chart tailored for the non-wildlife health specialist are included in one method but completion of the disease risk analysis requires wildlife health specialists with epidemiological and pathological knowledge in all three methods. We show that disease risk analysis package choice may play a greater role in the overall risk estimation of the effect of disease on animal populations

  10. Elongation factor G initiates translocation through a power stroke.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunlai; Cui, Xiaonan; Beausang, John F; Zhang, Haibo; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2016-07-05

    During the translocation step of prokaryotic protein synthesis, elongation factor G (EF-G), a guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase), binds to the ribosomal PRE-translocation (PRE) complex and facilitates movement of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) and messenger RNA (mRNA) by one codon. Energy liberated by EF-G's GTPase activity is necessary for EF-G to catalyze rapid and precise translocation. Whether this energy is used mainly to drive movements of the tRNAs and mRNA or to foster EF-G dissociation from the ribosome after translocation has been a long-lasting debate. Free EF-G, not bound to the ribosome, adopts quite different structures in its GTP and GDP forms. Structures of EF-G on the ribosome have been visualized at various intermediate steps along the translocation pathway, using antibiotics and nonhydolyzable GTP analogs to block translocation and to prolong the dwell time of EF-G on the ribosome. However, the structural dynamics of EF-G bound to the ribosome have not yet been described during normal, uninhibited translocation. Here, we report the rotational motions of EF-G domains during normal translocation detected by single-molecule polarized total internal reflection fluorescence (polTIRF) microscopy. Our study shows that EF-G has a small (∼10°) global rotational motion relative to the ribosome after GTP hydrolysis that exerts a force to unlock the ribosome. This is followed by a larger rotation within domain III of EF-G before its dissociation from the ribosome.

  11. Survival of mountain quail translocated from two distinct source populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troy, Ronald J.; Coates, Peter S.; Connelly, John W.; Gillette, Gifford; Delehanty, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Translocation of mountain quail (Oreortyx pictus) to restore viable populations to their former range has become a common practice. Because differences in post-release vital rates between animals from multiple source populations has not been well studied, wildlife and land managers may arbitrarily choose the source population or base the source population on immediate availability when planning translocation projects. Similarly, an understanding of the optimal proportion of individuals from different age and sex classes for translocation would benefit translocation planning. During 2006 and 2007, we captured and translocated 125 mountain quail from 2 ecologically distinct areas: 38 from southern California and 87 from southwestern Oregon. We released mountain quail in the Bennett Hills of south-central Idaho. We radio-marked and monitored a subsample of 58 quail and used them for a 2-part survival analysis. Cumulative survival probability was 0.23 ± 0.05 (SE) at 150 days post-release. We first examined an a priori hypothesis (model) that survival varied between the 2 distinct source populations. We found that source population did not explain variation in survival. This result suggests that wildlife managers have flexibility in selecting source populations for mountain quail translocation efforts. In a post hoc examination, we pooled the quail across source populations and evaluated differences in survival probabilities between sex and age classes. The most parsimonious model indicated that adult male survival was substantially less than survival rates of other mountain quail age and sex classes (i.e., interaction between sex and age). This result suggests that translocation success could benefit by translocating yearling males rather than adult males, perhaps because adult male breeding behavior results in vulnerability to predators

  12. Carbon translocation in zooanthaellae-coelenterate symbioses

    SciTech Connect

    Battey, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    When host and algal triglycerides synthesized in the symbiotic sea anemone Condylactis gigantea during light and dark incubations in /sup 14/C-bicarbonate and /sup 14/C-acetate were deacylated, more then 80% of the radioactivity was found in the fatty acid moiety. In contrast, triglycerides isolated from zooxanthellae and host incubated in /sup 14/C-glycerol in the dark were found to have more then 95% of their radioactivity in the glycerol moiety. During /sup 14/C-glycerol incubations in the light, radioactivity in the fatty acid moiety of zooxanthellae triglyceride fatty acid moiety stayed below 5% during /sup 14/C-glycerol incubations in the light. These results show neither the zooxanthellae nor host can rapidly convert glycerol to fatty acid. Radioactivity from /sup 14/C-glycerol that does eventually appear in host lipid may have been respired to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ then photosynthetically fixed by the zooxanthellae and synthesized into lipid fatty acid. The isolated zooxanthellae of C. gigantea contained 3.62 +/- 0.33 mM glycerol, which was 26x the 0.141 +/- 0.02 mM found in the coelenterate tissue. Aposymbiotic coelenterate tissue contained 0.169 +/- 0.05 mM glycerol. The metabolic inhibitors, sodium cyanide, aminooxyacetic acid and cerulenin were used to try and uncouple the production of glycerol by the zooxanthellae from its utilization by the coelenterate host. 10/sup -5/ M NaCN increased the ratio of cross photosynthesis to respiration in both intact tentacles and isolated zooxanthellae, increased translocation from 17.7 +/- 3.5% of total fixed carbon in controls to 43.5 +/- 5.79%, and doubled the amount of photosynthetically fixed carbon accumulating in the coelenterate host over that in controls.

  13. Improvement of the agronomic traits of a wheat-barley centric fusion by introgressing the 3HS.3BL translocation into a modern wheat cultivar.

    PubMed

    Türkösi, Edina; Farkas, András; Aranyi, Nikolett Réka; Hoffmann, Borbála; Tóth, Viola; Molnár-Láng, Márta

    2014-11-01

    The 3HS.3BL spontaneous Robertsonian translocation obtained from the progenies of wheat-barley (Chinese Spring × Betzes) hybrids backcrossed with wheat line Mv9kr1 was transferred into the modern Martonvásár wheat cultivar Mv Bodri. The translocation was identified with molecular cytogenetic methods. The inheritance of the translocation was traced using genomic in situ hybridization. Fluorescence in situ hybridization using barley subtelomeric (HvT01) and centromere-specific [(AGGGAG)4] repetitive DNA probes confirmed that the complete barley chromosome arm was involved in the Robertsonian translocation. The wheat-specific repetitive DNA probes identified the presence of the whole wheat genome, except the short arm of the 3B chromosome. Genotypes homozygous for the centric fusion were selected, after which morphological analysis was performed on the plants and the yield components were measured in the field during two consecutive vegetative seasons. The introgression of the 3HS.3BL translocation into the modern wheat cultivar Mv Bodri significantly reduced the plant height due to the incorporation of the dwarfing allele RhtD1b. The presence of the 3HS.3BL translocation in the Mv9kr1 and Mv Bodri wheat background improved tillering and seeds per plant productivity in field experiments carried out in Martonvásár and Keszthely, Hungary.

  14. Enteric bacterial translocation after intraperitoneal implantation of rubber drain pieces.

    PubMed

    Guo, W; Andersson, R; Ljungh, A; Wang, X D; Bengmark, S

    1993-05-01

    To study the kinetics and mechanisms of bacterial translocation from the gut after intraperitoneal (IP) implantation of prosthetic materials, different sizes of rubber drain pieces were intraperitoneally implanted in the rat, followed by evaluation of ileal mucosal permeability after 2 days and of the occurrence of bacterial translocation and gut oxygen extraction at various time points. Enteric bacteria translocated to mesenteric lymph nodes and disseminated to systemic organs (liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys), the portal vein, and inferior vena cava 2, 4, and 6 h after IP implantation of rubber drain pieces with 10-, 7-, and 3-cm2 areas, respectively, and subsequently to the IP rubber drain piece and the peritoneal cavity on the 2nd postoperative day. The incidence of translocation correlated with the size of the implanted material and time after implantation. The gut oxygen extraction increased significantly after IP implantation of 7- and 10-cm2 rubber drain pieces. The ileal mucosal permeability was enhanced in the groups implanted with 7- and 10-cm2 drain pieces. Thus, bacterial translocation occurs already in the early period after IP implantation of rubber drain and increased with time. The increased gut oxygen extraction implies that the gut is susceptible to IP inflammatory stimulation, and the enhanced ileal permeability suggests that the integrity of the gastrointestinal tract is compromised, which might facilitate bacterial translocation.

  15. Millisecond dynamics of RNA polymerase II translocation at atomic resolution

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniel-Adriano; Weiss, Dahlia R.; Pardo Avila, Fátima; Da, Lin-Tai; Levitt, Michael; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xuhui

    2014-01-01

    Transcription is a central step in gene expression, in which the DNA template is processively read by RNA polymerase II (Pol II), synthesizing a complementary messenger RNA transcript. At each cycle, Pol II moves exactly one register along the DNA, a process known as translocation. Although X-ray crystal structures have greatly enhanced our understanding of the transcription process, the underlying molecular mechanisms of translocation remain unclear. Here we use sophisticated simulation techniques to observe Pol II translocation on a millisecond timescale and at atomistic resolution. We observe multiple cycles of forward and backward translocation and identify two previously unidentified intermediate states. We show that the bridge helix (BH) plays a key role accelerating the translocation of both the RNA:DNA hybrid and transition nucleotide by directly interacting with them. The conserved BH residues, Thr831 and Tyr836, mediate these interactions. To date, this study delivers the most detailed picture of the mechanism of Pol II translocation at atomic level. PMID:24753580

  16. DNA translocation through protein and synthetic nano pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2007-03-01

    DNA translocation through narrow protein channels is recognized as an important process in biology. Recently it has attracted lot of attention in the biophysical community following several experiments on DNA translocation through protein nano-pores, and more recently, through synthetic silicon nano-pores. A fundamental understanding is needed for various biological processes, e.g., entry and exit of a DNA in and out of a cell, efficient separation methods for macromolecules, and, possibly fast DNA sequencing. In this talk I will be presenting results for the DNA translocation using a coarse-grained model for an idealized DNA as well as the pore. I will consider several scenarios for the DNA translocation. First, I will show scaling of translocation time of a homopolymer as it escapes from the trans side to the cis side of an idealized thin membrane. Then I will consider DNA dynamics subject to a driving force inside the pore. Next, I will consider heteropolymer threading through a nano-pore. Specifically we will consider both highly ordered and completely random sequences of the chain and relate specific sequences to the distribution of the translocation time and the residence time inside the pore. These studies also will include effects due to different environment on either side of the pore, specific DNA-pore interactions located at selective sites, etc.. I will discuss relevance of these simulation results to recent experiments and theoretical models. A. Milchev, K. Binder, and Aniket Bhattacharya, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 6042 (2004).

  17. Surface modification of graphene nanopores for protein translocation

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Y. P.; Tiwari, P. B.; Krishnakumar, P.; Vlassiouk, I.; Li, W.Z.; Wang, X.W.; Darici, Y.; Lindsay, S.M.; Wang, H. D.; Smirnov, S.; He, J.

    2014-01-01

    Studies of DNA translocation through graphene nanopores have revealed their potential for DNA sequencing. Here we report a study of protein translocation through chemically modified graphene nanopores. A transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to cut nanopores with diameters between 5-20 nm in multilayer graphene prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). After oxygen plasma treatment, the dependence of the measured ionic current on salt concentration and pH was consistent with a small surface charge induced by the formation of carboxyl groups. While translocation of gold nanoparticles (10 nm) was readily detected through such treated pores of a larger diameter, translocation of protein ferritin was not observed either for oxygen plasma treated pores, or for pores modified with mercaptohexadecanoic acid. Ferritin translocation events were reliably observed after the pores were modified with the phospholipid-PEG (DPPE-PEG750) amphiphile. The ion current signature of translocation events was complex, suggesting that a series of interactions between the protein and pore occur during the process. PMID:24231385

  18. Atomic structure of anthrax protective antigen pore elucidates toxin translocation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jiansen; Pentelute, Bradley L; Collier, R John; Zhou, Z Hong

    2015-05-28

    Anthrax toxin, comprising protective antigen, lethal factor, and oedema factor, is the major virulence factor of Bacillus anthracis, an agent that causes high mortality in humans and animals. Protective antigen forms oligomeric prepores that undergo conversion to membrane-spanning pores by endosomal acidification, and these pores translocate the enzymes lethal factor and oedema factor into the cytosol of target cells. Protective antigen is not only a vaccine component and therapeutic target for anthrax infections but also an excellent model system for understanding the mechanism of protein translocation. On the basis of biochemical and electrophysiological results, researchers have proposed that a phi (Φ)-clamp composed of phenylalanine (Phe)427 residues of protective antigen catalyses protein translocation via a charge-state-dependent Brownian ratchet. Although atomic structures of protective antigen prepores are available, how protective antigen senses low pH, converts to active pore, and translocates lethal factor and oedema factor are not well defined without an atomic model of its pore. Here, by cryo-electron microscopy with direct electron counting, we determine the protective antigen pore structure at 2.9-Å resolution. The structure reveals the long-sought-after catalytic Φ-clamp and the membrane-spanning translocation channel, and supports the Brownian ratchet model for protein translocation. Comparisons of four structures reveal conformational changes in prepore to pore conversion that support a multi-step mechanism by which low pH is sensed and the membrane-spanning channel is formed.

  19. Translocation of the Palila, an endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fancy, S.G.

    1997-01-01

    The Palila Loxioides bailleui is an endangered Hawaiian honeycreeper that is restricted to high-elevation dry woodlands on Mauna Kea volcano, Hawaii. Palila are absent or occur in small numbers throughout most of their historic range because of habitat loss, predation and avian disease. The Paula's habitat is regenerating as a result of feral ungulate control, but the species is likely to be slow in recolonizing former ranges because of strong site tenacity. In March 1993, we translocated 35 Palila to Kanakaleonui on the eastern slope of Mauna Kea to determine whether we could speed recovery by releasing adult birds in new areas where predators were controlled. At least two pairs of translocated Palila successfully nested at the release site during their first breeding season, and two other pairs constructed nests. The density of Palila at Kanakaleonui in the three years following the translocation was higher than that before translocation. Approximately half of the translocated birds remained at the release site for 2-6 weeks and then homed back to their capture site, >20 km away. Translocations of adult birds and release of captive-reared juvenile Palila, in combination with additional habitat restoration, may be an effective management tool for speeding the recovery of this species.

  20. Two New B-10 Translocations Involved in the Control of Nondisjunction of the B Chromosome in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bor-Yaw

    1979-01-01

    A B-A translocation, TB-10(18), has been established involving breakpoints in the proximal region of the long arm of chromosome 10 and the minute short arm of the maize B chromosome. TB-10(18) differs in its nondisjunctional behavior at the second microspore division from TB-10(19), which has a breakpoint in the same region of 10 but in the heterochromatic region of the long arm of B, in the following ways: (1) Nondisjunction of the B10 chromosome of the TB-10(18) translocation occurs in the absence of the reciprocal element (10B), albeit at low frequency. (2) Presence of 10B increases the frequency of B10 nondisjunction but not to the level found for TB-10(19) and certain other translocations. (3) The frequency of B10 nondisjunction varies among closely related sublines both when 10B is present and when it is absent. It is inferred that the B10 of TB-10(18) carries all the components of B necessary for nondisjunction but that expression is weak in the absence of 10B, suggesting the existence in the B chromosome short arm of a factor influencing efficient nondisjunction. PMID:17248936

  1. Relations between Light Level, Sucrose Concentration, and Translocation of Carbon 11 in Zea mays Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Troughton, John H.; Currie, B. G.; Chang, F. H.

    1977-01-01

    The mechanism of carbon transport in Zea mays leaves was investigated using carbon 11 which is a short lived (half-life 20.4 min) positronemitting isotope. The gamma radiation produced on annihilation allows in vivo or nondestructive measurement of the isotope and the short half-life allows many measurements of translocation to be made on the same leaf within the same day. Carbon 11 produced by the 10B (d,n)11C nuclear reaction was converted to 11CO2, fed to a leaf as a short pulse, and assimilated during photosynthesis. The progress of the radioactive pulse along the leaf in the phloem was monitored in several positions simultaneously with counters. The counters were NaI crystals with photomultipliers and the output was amplified, passed to single channel analyzers, and the counts accumulated for 20 seconds every 30 seconds. Corrections were made for the half-life and background radiation by computer, and the results were displayed on a high speed plotter. Information derived from the corrected data included the speed of translocation, the shape of the radioactive carbon pulse, and the influence of light and distance along the leaf on these parameters. The plants were kept under controlled environment conditions during all measurements. A speed was derived from the time displacement of the midpoint of the front of the pulse, measured at two positions along the leaf. This was an apparent mean speed of translocation because it averaged a variation in speed with distance, variation in speed between or within sieve tubes, and it averaged the mean speed of all of the particles in the pulse. A wide range of speeds of translocation from 0.25 to 11 cm min−1 was observed but most of the variability was due to the variation in light available to the leaf. For example, the speed of translocation was proportional to the light level on either the whole plant or individual leaf. Shading of the leaf established that the light effect was not localized in either the feeding area

  2. Using survival analysis to study translocation success in the Gila topminnow (Poeciliopsis occidentalis).

    PubMed

    Sheller, Frances J; Fagan, William F; Unmack, Peter J

    2006-10-01

    Translocation, the intentional release of captive-propagated and/or wild-caught animals into the wild in an attempt to establish, reestablish, or augment a population, is a commonly used approach to species conservation. Despite the frequent mention of translocation as an aid in threatened or endangered species recovery plans, translocations have resulted in the establishment of few sustainable populations. To improve the effectiveness of translocation efforts, it is essential to identify and adopt features that contribute to successful translocations. This study analyzed 148 translocations of the endangered Gila topminnow (Poeciliopsis occidentalis) to identify various factors that have significantly influenced translocation success. We quantified success as the "persistence time" of translocated populations and used survival analysis to interpret the role of several factors. The following factors affected persistence times of translocated populations: season in which the fish were translocated, habitat type of the translocation site, and genetic origin of the fish stocked. In general, factors associated with stocking, the population stocked, and the site of translocation can significantly affect the persistence of translocated populations and thus increase the probability of translocation success. For Gila topminnow, future translocations should be undertaken in late summer or fall (not early summer), should occur into ponds (not streams, wells, or tanks), and should generally utilize individuals from genetic lineages other than Monkey Spring. For other species, a key lesson emerging from this work is that life history attributes for each translocated species need to be considered carefully.

  3. Diagnostic X-ray examinations and increased chromosome translocations: evidence from three studies.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Parveen; Yong, Lee C; Doody, Michele M; Preston, Dale L; Kampa, Diane M; Ramsey, Marilyn J; Ward, Elizabeth M; Edwards, Alan A; Ron, Elaine; Tucker, James D; Sigurdson, Alice J

    2010-11-01

    Controversy regarding potential health risks from increased use of medical diagnostic radiologic examinations has come to public attention. We evaluated whether chromosome damage, specifically translocations, which are a potentially intermediate biomarker for cancer risk, was increased after exposure to diagnostic X-rays, with particular interest in the ionizing radiation dose-response below the level of approximately 50 mGy. Chromosome translocation frequency data from three separately conducted occupational studies of ionizing radiation were pooled together. Studies 1 and 2 included 79 and 150 medical radiologic technologists, respectively, and study 3 included 83 airline pilots and 50 university faculty members (total = 155 women and 207 men; mean age = 62 years, range 34-90). Information on personal history of radiographic examinations was collected from a detailed questionnaire. We computed a cumulative red bone marrow (RBM) dose score based on the numbers and types of X-ray examinations reported with 1 unit approximating 1 mGy. Poisson regression analyses were adjusted for age and laboratory method. Mean RBM dose scores were 49, 42, and 11 for Studies 1-3, respectively (overall mean = 33.5, range 0-303). Translocation frequencies significantly increased with increasing dose score (P < 0.001). Restricting the analysis to the lowest dose scores of under 50 did not materially change these results. We conclude that chromosome damage is associated with low levels of radiation exposure from diagnostic X-ray examinations, including dose scores of approximately 50 and lower, suggesting the possibility of long-term adverse health effects.

  4. Conflict bear translocation: investigating population genetics and fate of bear translocation in Dachigam National Park, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    PubMed

    Mukesh; Sharma, Lalit Kumar; Charoo, Samina Amin; Sathyakumar, Sambandam

    2015-01-01

    The Asiatic black bear population in Dachigam landscape, Jammu and Kashmir is well recognized as one of the highest density bear populations in India. Increasing incidences of bear-human interactions and the resultant retaliatory killings by locals have become a serious threat to the survivorship of black bears in the Dachigam landscape. The Department of Wildlife Protection in Jammu and Kashmir has been translocating bears involved in conflicts, henceforth 'conflict bears' from different sites in Dachigam landscape to Dachigam National Park as a flagship activity to mitigate conflicts. We undertook this study to investigate the population genetics and the fate of bear translocation in Dachigam National Park. We identified 109 unique genotypes in an area of ca. 650 km2 and observed bear population under panmixia that showed sound genetic variability. Molecular tracking of translocated bears revealed that mostly bears (7 out of 11 bears) returned to their capture sites, possibly due to homing instincts or habituation to the high quality food available in agricultural croplands and orchards, while only four bears remained in Dachigam National Park after translocation. Results indicated that translocation success was most likely to be season dependent as bears translocated during spring and late autumn returned to their capture sites, perhaps due to the scarcity of food inside Dachigam National Park while bears translocated in summer remained in Dachigam National Park due to availability of surplus food resources. Thus, the current management practices of translocating conflict bears, without taking into account spatio-temporal variability of food resources in Dachigam landscape seemed to be ineffective in mitigating conflicts on a long-term basis. However, the study highlighted the importance of molecular tracking of bears to understand their movement patterns and socio-biology in tough terrains like Dachigam landscape.

  5. Conflict Bear Translocation: Investigating Population Genetics and Fate of Bear Translocation in Dachigam National Park, Jammu and Kashmir, India

    PubMed Central

    Mukesh; Sharma, Lalit Kumar; Charoo, Samina Amin; Sathyakumar, Sambandam

    2015-01-01

    The Asiatic black bear population in Dachigam landscape, Jammu and Kashmir is well recognized as one of the highest density bear populations in India. Increasing incidences of bear-human interactions and the resultant retaliatory killings by locals have become a serious threat to the survivorship of black bears in the Dachigam landscape. The Department of Wildlife Protection in Jammu and Kashmir has been translocating bears involved in conflicts, henceforth ‘conflict bears’ from different sites in Dachigam landscape to Dachigam National Park as a flagship activity to mitigate conflicts. We undertook this study to investigate the population genetics and the fate of bear translocation in Dachigam National Park. We identified 109 unique genotypes in an area of ca. 650 km2 and observed bear population under panmixia that showed sound genetic variability. Molecular tracking of translocated bears revealed that mostly bears (7 out of 11 bears) returned to their capture sites, possibly due to homing instincts or habituation to the high quality food available in agricultural croplands and orchards, while only four bears remained in Dachigam National Park after translocation. Results indicated that translocation success was most likely to be season dependent as bears translocated during spring and late autumn returned to their capture sites, perhaps due to the scarcity of food inside Dachigam National Park while bears translocated in summer remained in Dachigam National Park due to availability of surplus food resources. Thus, the current management practices of translocating conflict bears, without taking into account spatio-temporal variability of food resources in Dachigam landscape seemed to be ineffective in mitigating conflicts on a long-term basis. However, the study highlighted the importance of molecular tracking of bears to understand their movement patterns and socio-biology in tough terrains like Dachigam landscape. PMID:26267280

  6. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  7. Computer simulation of viral-assembly and translocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalik, Jyoti Prakash

    We investigated four different problems using coarse grained computational models : self-assembly of single stranded (ss) DNA virus, ejection dynamics of double stranded(ds) DNA from phages, translocation of ssDNA through MspA protein pore, and segmental dynamics of a polymer translocating through a synthetic nanopore. In the first part of the project, we investigated the self-assembly of a virus with and without its genome. A coarse-grained model was proposed for the viral subunit proteins and its genome (ssDNA). Langevin dynamics simulation, and replica exchange method were used to determine the kinetics and energetics of the self-assembly process, respectively. The self-assembly follows a nucleation-growth kind of mechanism. The ssDNA plays a crucial role in the self-assembly by acting as a template and enhancing the local concentration of the subunits. The presence of the genome does not changes the mechanism of the self-assembly but it reduces the nucleation time and enhances the growth rate by almost an order of magnitude. The second part of the project involves the investigation of the dynamics of the ejection of dsDNA from phages. A coarse-grained model was used for the phage and dsDNA. Langevin dynamics simulation was used to investigate the kinetics of the ejection. The ejection is a stochastic process and a slow intermediate rate kinetics was observed for most ejection trajectories. We discovered that the jamming of the DNA at the pore mouth at high packing fraction and for a disordered system is the reason for the intermediate slow kinetics. The third part of the project involves translocation of ssDNA through MspA protein pore. MspA protein pore has the potential for genome sequencing because of its ability to clearly distinguish the four different nucleotides based on their blockade current, but it is a challenge to use this pore for any practical application because of the very fast traslocation time. We resolved the state of DNA translocation

  8. High-speed detection of DNA translocation in nanopipettes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraccari, Raquel L.; Ciccarella, Pietro; Bahrami, Azadeh; Carminati, Marco; Ferrari, Giorgio; Albrecht, Tim

    2016-03-01

    We present a high-speed electrical detection scheme based on a custom-designed CMOS amplifier which allows the analysis of DNA translocation in glass nanopipettes on a microsecond timescale. Translocation of different DNA lengths in KCl electrolyte provides a scaling factor of the DNA translocation time equal to p = 1.22, which is different from values observed previously with nanopipettes in LiCl electrolyte or with nanopores. Based on a theoretical model involving electrophoresis, hydrodynamics and surface friction, we show that the experimentally observed range of p-values may be the result of, or at least be affected by DNA adsorption and friction between the DNA and the substrate surface.We present a high-speed electrical detection scheme based on a custom-designed CMOS amplifier which allows the analysis of DNA translocation in glass nanopipettes on a microsecond timescale. Translocation of different DNA lengths in KCl electrolyte provides a scaling factor of the DNA translocation time equal to p = 1.22, which is different from values observed previously with nanopipettes in LiCl electrolyte or with nanopores. Based on a theoretical model involving electrophoresis, hydrodynamics and surface friction, we show that the experimentally observed range of p-values may be the result of, or at least be affected by DNA adsorption and friction between the DNA and the substrate surface. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Gel electrophoresis confirming lengths and purity of DNA samples, comparison between Axopatch 200B and custom-built setup, comprehensive low-noise amplifier characterization, representative I-V curves of nanopipettes used, typical scatter plots of τ vs. peak amplitude for the four LDNA's used, table of most probable τ values, a comparison between different fitting models for the DNA translocation time distribution, further details on the stochastic numerical simulation of the scaling statistics and the derivation of the extended

  9. Refinement of background environmental monitoring measurements using meteorological frequency distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, P.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Since the Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program's inception in 1969, the direct radiation monitoring network around the Oyster Creek nuclear generating station has incorporated both monthly and quarterly thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD). In 1988, the environmental controls department of GPU Nuclear decided to eliminate the monthly TLD network for scientific and economic reasons. The most obvious scientific basis on which to designate TLD stations is by meteorology. It would be the plume path that dictates off-site direct radiation contribution from the plant and not simply distance from the site. Through meteorological and statistical analysis of existing TLD results, the appropriate basis for designating TLD stations has been accomplished that will provide the most accurate and comprehensive data on environmental measurement of releases from Oyster Creek.

  10. On tune deafness (dysmelodia): frequency, development, genetics and musical background.

    PubMed

    Kalmus, H; Fry, D B

    1980-05-01

    With the aid of the Distorted Tunes Test a group of British adults could be established whose melodic aptitude was below a certain level and whom we called tune deaf. They are only a fraction of those popularly called tone deaf. The Distorted Tunes Test is only slightly correlated with pitch discrimination, short term tonal memory or number memory. In children ability to pass the Distorted Tunes Test develops at greatly varying speeds and to a varying degree, reaching stability in adolescence. Tune deafness has a familial distribution and segregates in a way suggesting an autosomal dominant trait with imperfect penetrance. Some degree of positive assortative mating has been established. Some people, unfamiliar with the British melodies which form the basis of the test, pass it. This indicates the existence of a partly innate and partly acquired competence to judge what is acceptable and what is not, within the tradition of Western popular or classical music. This seems to indicate the existence of some deep structure of tonality, comparable with Chomsky's deep language structure. Asians who have not been much exposed to this kind of music find the task very difficult.

  11. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  12. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  13. China: Background Notes Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reams, Joanne Reppert

    Concise background information on the People's Republic of China is provided. The publication begins with a profile of the country, outlining the people, geography, economy, and membership in international organizations. The bulk of the document then discusses in more detail China's people, geography, history, government, education, economy, and…

  14. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Douglas; Ross, Donna; Grant, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Too often, students enter our classrooms with insufficient knowledge of physical science. As a result, they have a difficult time understanding content in texts, lectures, and laboratory activities. This lack of background knowledge can have an impact on their ability to ask questions and wonder--both key components of inquiry. In this article,…

  15. Lost in translocation: the functions of the 18-kD translocator protein.

    PubMed

    Gut, Philipp; Zweckstetter, Markus; Banati, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Research spanning nearly four decades has assigned to the translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) a critical role, among others, in the mitochondrial import of cholesterol, the subsequent steps of (neuro)steroid production, and systemic endocrine regulation, with implications for the pathophysiology of immune, inflammatory, neurodegenerative, and psychiatric as well as neoplastic diseases. Recent knockout studies in mice unexpectedly report normal or latent phenotypes, raising doubts about the protein's role in steroidogenesis and other previously postulated functions and challenging the validity of earlier data on the selectivity of TSPO-binding drugs. Here we provide a synthesis of the current debate from a structural and molecular biology perspective, discuss the limits of inference in loss-of-function (gene knockout) studies, and suggest new functions of TSPO.

  16. Evaluating Stress Physiology and Parasite Infection Parameters in the Translocation of Critically Endangered Woylies (Bettongia penicillata).

    PubMed

    Hing, Stephanie; Northover, Amy S; Narayan, Edward J; Wayne, Adrian F; Jones, Krista L; Keatley, Sarah; Thompson, R C Andrew; Godfrey, Stephanie S

    2017-03-01

    Translocation can be stressful for wildlife. Stress may be important in fauna translocation because it has been suggested that it can exacerbate the impact of infectious disease on translocated wildlife. However, few studies explore this hypothesis by measuring stress physiology and infection indices in parallel during wildlife translocations. We analysed faecal cortisol metabolite (FCM) concentration and endoparasite parameters (nematodes, coccidians and haemoparasites) in a critically endangered marsupial, the woylie (Bettongia penicillata), 1-3 months prior to translocation, at translocation, and 6 months later. FCM for both translocated and resident woylies was significantly higher after translocation compared to before or at translocation. In addition, body condition decreased with increasing FCM after translocation. These patterns in host condition and physiology may be indicative of translocation stress or stress associated with factors independent of the translocation. Parasite factors also influenced FCM in translocated woylies. When haemoparasites were detected, there was a significant negative relationship between strongyle egg count and FCM. This may reflect the influence of glucocorticoids on the immune response to micro- and macro-parasites. Our results indicate that host physiology and infection patterns can change significantly during translocation, but further investigation is required to determine how these patterns influence translocation success.

  17. A somatic origin of homologous Robertsonian translocations and isochromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W.P.; Bernasconi, F.; Schinzel, A.A. ); Basaran, S.; Yueksel-Apak, M. ); Neri, G. ); Serville, F. ); Balicek, P.; Haluza, R. ); Farah, L.M.S. )

    1994-02-01

    One t(14q 14q), three t(15q 15q), two t(21q21q), and two t(22q22q) nonmosaic, apparently balanced, de novo Robertsonian translocation cases were investigated with polymorphic markers to establish the origin of the translocated chromosomes. Four cases had results indicative of an isochromosome: one t(14q14q) case with mild mental retardation and maternal uniparental disomy (UPD) for chromosome 14, one t(15q15q) case with the Prader-Willi syndrome and UPD(15), a phenotypically normal carrier of t(22q22q) with maternal UPD(22), and a phenotypically normal t(21q21q) case of paternal UPD(21). All UPD cases showed complete homozygosity throughout the involved chromosome, which is supportive of a postmeiotic origin. In the remaining four cases, maternal and paternal inheritance of the involved chromosome was found, which unambiguously implies a somatic origin. One t(15q15q) female had a child with a ring chromosome 15, which was also of probable postmeiotic origin as recombination between grandparental haplotypes had occurred prior to ring formation. UPD might be expected to result from de novo Robertsonian translocations of meiotic origin; however, all de novo homologous translocation cases, so far reported, with UPD of chromosomes 14, 15, 21, or 22 have been isochromosomes. These data provide the first direct evidence that nonmosaic Robertsonian translocations, as well as isochromosomes, are commonly the result of a mitotic exchange. 75 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  18. Type 3 Secretion Translocators Spontaneously Assemble a Hexadecameric Transmembrane Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Romano, Fabian B.; Tang, Yuzhou; Rossi, Kyle C.; Monopoli, Kathryn R.; Ross, Jennifer L.; Heuck, Alejandro P.

    2016-01-01

    A type 3 secretion system is used by many bacterial pathogens to inject proteins into eukaryotic cells. Pathogens insert a translocon complex into the target eukaryotic membrane by secreting two proteins known as translocators. How these translocators form a translocon in the lipid bilayer and why both proteins are required remains elusive. Pseudomonas aeruginosa translocators PopB and PopD insert pores into membranes forming homo- or hetero-complexes of undetermined stoichiometry. Single-molecule fluorescence photobleaching experiments revealed that PopD formed mostly hexameric structures in membranes, whereas PopB displayed a bi-modal distribution with 6 and 12 subunits peaks. However, individually the proteins are not functional for effector translocation. We have found that when added together, the translocators formed distinct hetero-complexes containing 8 PopB and 8 PopD molecules. Thus, the interaction between PopB and PopD guide the assembly of a unique hetero-oligomer in membranes. PMID:26786106

  19. Electrostatics of polymer translocation events in electrolyte solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-07-01

    We develop an analytical theory that accounts for the image and surface charge interactions between a charged dielectric membrane and a DNA molecule translocating through the membrane. Translocation events through neutral carbon-based membranes are driven by a competition between the repulsive DNA-image-charge interactions and the attractive coupling between the DNA segments on the trans and the cis sides of the membrane. The latter effect is induced by the reduction of the coupling by the dielectric membrane. In strong salt solutions where the repulsive image-charge effects dominate the attractive trans-cis coupling, the DNA molecule encounters a translocation barrier of ≈10 kBT. In dilute electrolytes, the trans-cis coupling takes over image-charge forces and the membrane becomes a metastable attraction point that can trap translocating polymers over long time intervals. This mechanism can be used in translocation experiments in order to control DNA motion by tuning the salt concentration of the solution.

  20. Sulfur dioxide inhibition of translocation in bean plants

    SciTech Connect

    Teh, K.H.; Swanson, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Exposure of the source leaf of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Black Valentine) for 2 hours to 2.9 microliters per liter SO/sub 2/ inhibited the net photosynthetic rate an average of 75% and, simultaneously, the translocation rate an average of 45%. Calculations indicated that the experimentally determined translocation rates from SO/sub 2/-stressed leaves were lower than were the rates expected on the basis of the observed reductions in photosynthesis. It is inferred that, under SO/sub 2/ stress, the phloem-loading system becomes a major limiting step in controlling the translocation rate. Following removal of SO/sub 2/, photosynthesis recovered quite rapidly (to about 60% of its preexposure rate within 2 hours), but the translocation rate failed to increase during this time interval. This delayed response of translocation to removal of SO/sub 2/ does not appear to be due to an injury effect of SO/sub 2/ inasmuch as a similar effect was obtained by exposing the source leaf to a short (2-hour) interval of dark.

  1. Proton translocation in cytochrome-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Brookman, J J; Downie, J A; Gibson, F; Cox, G B; Rosenberg, H

    1979-01-01

    Cytochrome-deficient cells of a strain of Escherichia coli lacking 5-amino-levulinate synthetase have been used to study proton translocation associated with the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) dehydrogenase region of the electron transport chain. Menadione was used as electron acceptor, and mannitol was used as the substrate for the generation of intracellular NADH. The effects of iron deficiency on NADH- and D-lactate-menadione reductase activities were studied in iron-deficient cells of a mutant strain unable to synthesize the iron chelator enterochelin; both activities were reduced. The NADH- menadione reductase activity in cytochrome-deficient cells was associated with proton translocation and could be coupled to the uptake of proline. However proton translocation associated with the NADH-menadione reductase activity was prevented by a mutation in an unc gene. It was concluded that there is no proton translocation associated with the NADH-dehydrogenase region of the electron transport chain in E. coli and that the proton translocation obtained with mannitol as substrate is due to the activity of membrane-bound adenosine triphosphatase. PMID:154508

  2. Botulinum neurotoxin devoid of receptor binding domain translocates active protease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Audrey; Mushrush, Darren J; Lacy, D Borden; Montal, Mauricio

    2008-12-01

    Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) causes flaccid paralysis by disabling synaptic exocytosis. Intoxication requires the tri-modular protein to undergo conformational changes in response to pH and redox gradients across endosomes, leading to the formation of a protein-conducting channel. The approximately 50 kDa light chain (LC) protease is translocated into the cytosol by the approximately 100 kDa heavy chain (HC), which consists of two modules: the N-terminal translocation domain (TD) and the C-terminal Receptor Binding Domain (RBD). Here we exploited the BoNT modular design to identify the minimal requirements for channel activity and LC translocation in neurons. Using the combined detection of substrate proteolysis and single-channel currents, we showed that a di-modular protein consisting only of LC and TD was sufficient to translocate active protease into the cytosol of target cells. The RBD is dispensable for cell entry, channel activity, or LC translocation; however, it determined a pH threshold for channel formation. These findings indicate that, in addition to its individual functions, each module acts as a chaperone for the others, working in concert to achieve productive intoxication.

  3. Nonabsorbable Antibiotics Reduce Bacterial and Endotoxin Translocation in Hepatectomised Rats

    PubMed Central

    Kakkos, S. K.; Kirkilesis, J.; Scopa, C. D.; Arvaniti, A.; Alexandrides, T.

    1997-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that septic complications, occurring after major hepatectomies, may be caused by gram negative bacteria, translocating from the gut. We investigated in rats, the effect of extended hepatectomy on the structure and morphology of the intestinal mucosa as well as on the translocation of intestinal bacteria and endotoxins. We also examined the effect of nonabsorbable antibiotics on reducing the intestinal flora and consequently the phenomenon of translocation by administering neomycin sulphate and cefazoline. Hepatectomy was found to increase translocation, while administration of nonabsorbable antibiotics decreased it significantly. In addition, hepatectomy increased the aerobic cecal bacterial population, which normalised in the group receiving antibiotics. Among the histological parameters evaluated, villus height demonstrated a significant reduction after hepatectomy, while the number of villi per cm and the number of mitoses per crypt, remained unchanged. Our results indicate that administration of nonabsorbable antibiotics presents a positive effect on bacterial and endotoxin translocation after extended hepatectomy, and this may be related to reduction of colonic bacterial load as an intraluminal effect of antibiotics. PMID:9298382

  4. Understanding publication bias in reintroduction biology by assessing translocations of New Zealand's herpetofauna.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kimberly A; Bell, Trent P; Germano, Jennifer M

    2014-08-01

    The intentional translocation of animals is an important tool for species conservation and ecosystem restoration, but reported success rates are low, particularly for threatened and endangered species. Publication bias further distorts success rates because the results of successful translocations may be more likely to be published than failed translocations. We conducted the first comprehensive review of all published and unpublished translocations of herpetofauna in New Zealand to assess publication bias. Of 74 translocations of 29 species in 25 years, 35 have been reported in the published literature, and the outcomes of 12 have been published. Using a traditional definition of success, publication bias resulted in a gross overestimate of translocation success rates (41.7% and 8.1% for published and all translocations, respectively), but bias against failed translocations was minimal (8.3% and 6.8%, respectively). Publication bias against translocations with uncertain outcomes, the vast majority of projects, was also strong (50.0% and 85.1% for published and all translocations, respectively). Recent translocations were less likely to be published than older translocations. The reasons behind translocations were related to publication. A greater percentage of translocations for conservation and research were published (63.3% and 40.0%, respectively) than translocations for mitigation during land development (10.0%). Translocations conducted in collaboration with a university were more frequently published (82.7% and 24.4%, respectively). To account for some of this publication bias, we reassessed the outcome of each translocation using a standardized definition of success, which takes into consideration the species' life history and the time since release. Our standardized definition of translocation success provided a more accurate summary of success rates and allows for a more rigorous evaluation of the causes of translocation success and failure in large

  5. Eld's deer translocated to human-inhabited areas become nocturnal.

    PubMed

    Pan, Duo; Teng, Liwei; Cui, Fangjie; Zeng, Zhigao; Bravery, Benjamin D; Zhang, Qiong; Song, Yanling

    2011-02-01

    As human populations expand and nonhuman animals decline, understanding the interactions between people and wildlife is essential. For endangered species, appreciating the effect of human disturbance can be important for their conservation. However, a human disturbance angle is often absent from ecological research, despite growing evidence of the negative impact of nonfatal human interference. Here, we monitored Hainan Eld's deer living within a reserve and translocated animals living amongst villagers. We show that translocated deer deviated from a crepuscular activity pattern and became increas-. ingly nocturnal, and most active when villagers were not. It appears that translocated deer adapted over time to human disturbance and this pattern is similar to that of other species during periods of hunting. People do not pose an actual threat to Eld's deer, but their presence triggered a response akin to predator avoidance and may be interfering with broader aspects of their biology and conservation.

  6. Probing nanoparticle translocation across the permeable endothelium in experimental atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongtae; Lobatto, Mark E; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Lee Chung, Bomy; Mieszawska, Aneta J; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L; Fay, Francois; Senders, Max L; Calcagno, Claudia; Becraft, Jacob; Tun Saung, May; Gordon, Ronald E; Stroes, Erik S G; Ma, Mingming; Farokhzad, Omid C; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M; Langer, Robert

    2014-01-21

    Therapeutic and diagnostic nanomaterials are being intensely studied for several diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the exact mechanism by which nanomedicines accumulate at targeted sites remains a topic of investigation, especially in the context of atherosclerotic disease. Models to accurately predict transvascular permeation of nanomedicines are needed to aid in design optimization. Here we show that an endothelialized microchip with controllable permeability can be used to probe nanoparticle translocation across an endothelial cell layer. To validate our in vitro model, we studied nanoparticle translocation in an in vivo rabbit model of atherosclerosis using a variety of preclinical and clinical imaging methods. Our results reveal that the translocation of lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles across the atherosclerotic endothelium is dependent on microvascular permeability. These results were mimicked with our microfluidic chip, demonstrating the potential utility of the model system.

  7. Probing nanoparticle translocation across the permeable endothelium in experimental atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, YongTae; Lobatto, Mark E.; Kawahara, Tomohiro; Lee Chung, Bomy; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Sanchez-Gaytan, Brenda L.; Fay, Francois; Senders, Max L.; Calcagno, Claudia; Becraft, Jacob; Tun Saung, May; Gordon, Ronald E.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Ma, Mingming; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Langer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic and diagnostic nanomaterials are being intensely studied for several diseases, including cancer and atherosclerosis. However, the exact mechanism by which nanomedicines accumulate at targeted sites remains a topic of investigation, especially in the context of atherosclerotic disease. Models to accurately predict transvascular permeation of nanomedicines are needed to aid in design optimization. Here we show that an endothelialized microchip with controllable permeability can be used to probe nanoparticle translocation across an endothelial cell layer. To validate our in vitro model, we studied nanoparticle translocation in an in vivo rabbit model of atherosclerosis using a variety of preclinical and clinical imaging methods. Our results reveal that the translocation of lipid–polymer hybrid nanoparticles across the atherosclerotic endothelium is dependent on microvascular permeability. These results were mimicked with our microfluidic chip, demonstrating the potential utility of the model system. PMID:24395808

  8. Flow-induced polymer translocation through narrow and patterned channels.

    PubMed

    Nikoubashman, Arash; Likos, Christos N

    2010-08-21

    We consider linear and branched polymers driven through narrow and patterned channels by imposing a Poiseuille flow on the ambient solvent. We establish, by means of scaling arguments, that the translocation probability of dendrimers through the pore is independent of the number of monomers and that it takes place above a viscosity-dependent critical external current. When the channel walls are smooth, the translocation times of linear and branched polymers with the same monomer number are very similar. However, for walls that are decorated with attractive patches, dramatic differences show up: whereas a dendrimer successively docks at the patches and "walks" from one to the next, being carried away by the solvent flow, linear chains spread themselves along the channel wall without achieving translocation within simulation times. Our findings are relevant for, e.g., drug delivery through dendritic carrier molecules in capillary arterioles.

  9. Crystallographic snapshot of cellulose synthesis and membrane translocation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Jacob L.W.; Strumillo, Joanna; Zimmer, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Cellulose, the most abundant biological macromolecule, is an extracellular, linear polymer of glucose molecules. It represents an essential component of plant cell walls but is also found in algae and bacteria. In bacteria, cellulose production frequently correlates with the formation of biofilms, a sessile, multicellular growth form. Cellulose synthesis and transport across the inner bacterial membrane is mediated by a complex of the multi-spanning catalytic BcsA subunit and the membrane-anchored, periplasmic BcsB protein. Here we present the crystal structure of a complex of BcsA and BcsB from Rhodobacter sphaeroides containing a translocating polysaccharide. The structure of the BcsA-B translocation intermediate reveals the architecture of the cellulose synthase, demonstrates how BcsA forms a cellulose-conducting channel, and suggests a model for the coupling of cellulose synthesis and translocation in which the nascent polysaccharide is extended by one glucose molecule at a time. PMID:23222542

  10. Uptake and translocation of hexachlorobenzene: Oilpumpkin and sunflower

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-01

    The uptake of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and its translocation to seeds were studied with oil pumpkin and sunflower plants. Open air pot experiments were conducted with soil treated with different amounts of HCB. 14C-labelled HCB was used in solution culture experiments with young plants to investigate the distribution of HCB within the plants. During the experiments the contaminant was taken up by the root system of pumkin plant and translocated intensity to the reproductive organs. Autoradiographic pictures of crossections of stems and young fruits confirm this. Such translocation mechanism was not found in sunflower. Nevertheless it can be assumed that under field conditions the uptake of vaporized HCB from contamination soil by foliage and fruits of oil pumpkin is the main pathway of contamination.

  11. The G1138A mutation rate in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene is increased in cells carrying the t (4; 14) translocation.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P L; Grewal, R P

    2009-04-22

    Spontaneous mutations are a common phenomenon, occurring in both germ-line and somatic genomes. They may have deleterious consequences including the development of genetic disorders or, when occurring in somatic tissues, may participate in the process of carcinogenesis. Similar to many mutational hotspots, the G1138A mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene occurs at a CpG site. In germ-line tissues, the G1138A mutation results in achondroplasia and has one of the highest spontaneous mutation rates in the human genome. Although not at the G1138A site, there are increased rates of other somatic mutations in the FGFR3 gene that have been reported in multiple myeloma cases associated with a translocation, t (4; 14). The chromosome-4 break points in this translocation are clustered in a 70-kb region centromeric to the FGFR3 gene. We hypothesized that this translocation may impact the mutation rate at the G1138A site. We employed a semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based assay to measure the frequency of this mutation in multiple myeloma cell lines carrying t (4; 14) translocation. Analysis of these cell lines varied from no change to a 10-fold increase in the mutation frequency compared with normal controls. In general, there was an increase in the G1138A mutational frequency suggesting that chromosomal rearrangement can affect the stability of the CpG hotspots.

  12. Spontaneous modification of the oxoglutarate translocator in vivo.

    PubMed

    Duyckaerts, C; Sluse-Goffart, C M; Sluse, F E; Gosselin-Rey, C; Liébecq, C

    1984-07-16

    In studying the oxoglutarate translocator of rat-heart mitochondria over many years, we have observed an unexpected decrease in its efficiency. It has been divided by 2.48 +/- 0.07, (S.E.M.) for the exchange of external oxoglutarate for internal malate at 2 degrees C when the internal-malate concentration is 4 mM and is accompanied by an increase in its concentration (multiplied by 1.61 +/- 0.02, S.E.M.). The affinity of the external sites of the translocator for the external oxoglutarate is unchanged as well as the binding and kinetic cooperativities of the external oxoglutarate. This shows that the external side of the translocator has not been modified and suggests that its central part has not been modified either. The apparent Michaelis constant of the internal malate is increased (multiplied by 1.74 +/- 0.23, S.E.M.) suggesting that the translocator has been modified on its matricial side. Some control experiments show that a change in the diet of the rats, despite its effect on the fatty-acid content of the mitoplasts, is probably not responsible for the observed modification. As it is nevertheless very likely that changes of the oxoglutarate translocator have occurred in vivo, it is proposed that the observed modification has a genetic origin. The existence of two antagonist changes which are not directly related suggests that one of them is a response of the organism against the other; thus the oxoglutarate translocator may play a regulatory rôle in certain physiological conditions.

  13. Environmental Background Measurement Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-15

    harmonic frequencies. In an effort to be quantity to use in studying this phenomena. In Fig. objective , the spacing of these reference lines has been 9b...waves, mesoseale eddies, and other phenomena. A current objective of considerable importance to both the Naval and the research communities is to...WAVENUMBER(CP) SLANT WAvENUMERCPM) 70 "t: UPWARD 70kNz DOWN WARID 3%1"ENERGY PROPAGATION a 01ENERGY PROPAGATION4 _jTP 06 F1 0 T1083 F1 I ~jj 03 0n0 ..) Cj

  14. Exercise-induced translocation of protein kinase C and production of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid in rat skeletal muscle in vivo. Relationship to changes in glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Cleland, P J; Appleby, G J; Rattigan, S; Clark, M G

    1989-10-25

    Contraction-induced translocation of protein kinase C (Richter E.A., Cleland, P.J.F., Rattigan, S., and Clark, M.G. (1987) FEBS Lett. 217, 232-236) implies a role for this enzyme in muscle contraction or the associated metabolic adjustments. In the present study, this role is further examined particularly in relation to changes in glucose transport. Electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve of the anesthetized rat in vivo led to a time-dependent translocation of protein kinase C and a 2-fold increase in the concentrations of both diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. Maximum values for the latter were reached at 2 min and preceded the maximum translocation of protein kinase C (10 min). Stimulation of muscles in vitro increased the rate of glucose transport, but this required 20 min to reach maximum. There was no reversal of translocation or decrease in the concentrations of diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid even after 30 min of rest following a 5-min period of stimulation in vivo. Translocation was not influenced by variations in applied load at maximal fiber recruitment but was dependent on the frequency of nontetanic stimuli, reaching a maximum at 4 Hz. The relationship between protein kinase C and glucose transport was also explored by varying the number of tetanic stimuli. Whereas only one train of stimuli (200 ms, 100 Hz) was required for maximal effects on protein kinase C, diacylglycerol, and phosphatidic acid, more than 35 trains of stimuli were required to activate glucose transport. It is concluded that the production of diacylglycerol and the translocation of protein kinase C may be causally related. However, if the translocated protein kinase C is involved in the activation of glucose transport during muscle contractions, an accumulated exposure to Ca2+, resulting from multiple contractions, would appear to be necessary.

  15. Gate effects on DNA translocation through silicon dioxide nanopore.

    PubMed

    Yen, Pei-chun; Wang, Chung-hsuan; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chou, Y C

    2012-03-01

    The effects of gate voltage on the translocation of DNA molecules through a nanopore are studied. A twenty-fold increase in the translocation time is observed with a positive gate voltage applied, without changing too much of the ionic current. The amplitude of the current blockage by the DNA molecules was reduced by roughly the same factor. At the same time, the number of the blocking events decreases significantly. The applied gate voltage also modulates the scatter plot of the amplitude of the current blockage against the dwell time. The observations are consistent with the recent theoretical results.

  16. Habitat drives dispersal and survival of translocated juvenile desert tortoises

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nafus, Melia G.; Esque, Todd; Averill-Murray, Roy C.; Nussear, Kenneth E.; Swaisgood, Ronald R.

    2017-01-01

    5.Synthesis and applications. Resource managers using translocations as a conservation tool should prioritize acquiring data linking habitat to fitness. In particular, for species that depend on avoiding detection, refuges such as burrows and habitat that improved concealment had notable ability to improve survival and dispersal. Our study on juvenile Mojave desert tortoises showed that refuge availability or the distributions of habitat appropriate for concealment are important considerations for identifying translocation sites for species highly dependent on crypsis, camouflage, or other forms of habitat matching.

  17. RADIAL MOVEMENT OF C14-TRANSLOCATES FROM SQUASH PHLOEM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    stem, and hypocotyl were examined after 1-minute exposures of the primary leaf blade to C(14)O2. C(14)-Translocates were transported in the phloem ...from the mature leaf simultaneously toward the root and young organs of the upper plant. Rapid movement of the C(14)-front in the phloem was not due to...gaseous diffusion of C(14)O2. Radial movement of C14-translocates occurred along the entire length of the phloem , ultimately supplying C(14) to every

  18. Ultraviolet Background Radiation (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-03-01

    5.4 Apollo-Soyuz 3 5 5.5 Evidence for Scattering From Dust ? 3 8 5.6 More Evidence For Scattering From Dust ? 4 0 5.7 More Observations 4 2...Emission from cold interstellar dust . This has been observed by IRAS as the 100 u.m cosmic cirrus (64). The existence of such dust at moderate and... DUST 4 6 CONCLUSIONS 4 7 6.1 Spectral Structure in the Diffuse 4 7 Ultraviolet Background 6.2 Is There Light Scattered From Dust ? 4 7 6.3

  19. Changes in gut bacterial populations and their translocation into liver and ascites in alcoholic liver cirrhotics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The liver is the first line of defence against continuously occurring influx of microbial-derived products and bacteria from the gut. Intestinal bacteria have been implicated in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Escape of intestinal bacteria into the ascites is involved in the pathogenesis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, which is a common complication of liver cirrhosis. The association between faecal bacterial populations and alcoholic liver cirrhosis has not been resolved. Methods Relative ratios of major commensal bacterial communities (Bacteroides spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Clostridium leptum group, Enterobactericaea and Lactobacillus spp.) were determined in faecal samples from post mortem examinations performed on 42 males, including cirrhotic alcoholics (n = 13), non-cirrhotic alcoholics (n = 15), non-alcoholic controls (n = 14) and in 7 healthy male volunteers using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Translocation of bacteria into liver in the autopsy cases and into the ascites of 12 volunteers with liver cirrhosis was also studied with RT-qPCR. CD14 immunostaining was performed for the autopsy liver samples. Results Relative ratios of faecal bacteria in autopsy controls were comparable to those of healthy volunteers. Cirrhotics had in median 27 times more bacterial DNA of Enterobactericaea in faeces compared to the healthy volunteers (p = 0.011). Enterobactericaea were also the most common bacteria translocated into cirrhotic liver, although there were no statistically significant differences between the study groups. Of the ascites samples from the volunteers with liver cirrhosis, 50% contained bacterial DNA from Enterobactericaea, Clostridium leptum group or Lactobacillus spp.. The total bacterial DNA in autopsy liver was associated with the percentage of CD14 expression (p = 0.045). CD14 expression percentage in cirrhotics was significantly higher than in the autopsy controls (p = 0

  20. The Extragalactic Radio Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Fixsen, D. J.; Levin, S. M.; Limon, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Seiffert, M.; Singal, J.; Villela, T.; Wollack, E.; Wuensche, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    The existence of an isotropic component of the high-latitude radio sky has been recognized for nearly fifty years, but has typically been assumed to be Galactic in origin. We use recent radio observations to test whether the observed high-latitude component could originate within either an extended Galactic halo or a more local "bubble" structure. The lack of significant polarization from the isotropic component, combined with the lack of significant correlation with the Galactic far-infrared emission, rule out an origin within the Galaxy. We conclude that an extragalactic origin is the only viable alternative for the bulk of the isotropic high-latitude emission. The extragalactic component is 2-3 times brighter than local (Galactic) emission towards the Galactic poles and is consistent with a power law in frequency with amplitude T(sub r) = 24.1 plus or minus 2.1 K and spectral index beta = -2.599 plus or minus 0.036 evaluated at reference frequency 310 MHz.

  1. The Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  2. Homozygosity for a Robertsonian Translocation (13q;14q) in a Phenotypically Normal 44, XX Female with a History of Recurrent Abortion and a Normal Pregnancy Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Miryounesi, Mohammad; Diantpour, Mehdi; Motevaseli, Elahe; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Robertsonian translocations are structural chromosomal abnormalities caused by fusion of two acrocentric chromosomes. In carriers of such translocations, different modes of segregations would result in the formation of either balanced (alternate segregation mode) or unbalanced (adjacent 1, adjacent 2, and 3:1 segregation modes) gametes. In addition, there is an increased risk for imprinting disorders in their offspring. Although it has been estimated that 1/1000 healthy persons carry a Robertsonian translocation, homozygosity for this type of structural chromosomal abnormality has been reported rarely. Most of reported cases are phenotypically normal but experience adverse pregnancy outcomes. Case Presentation: In this paper, a report was made on a normal female with a history of 4 consecutive first trimester fetal losses and a normal son referred to Center for Comprehensive Genetics Services, Tehran, Iran, in summer 2015. Cytogenetic analyses of proband and her infant showed 44, XX, der(13;14) (q10;q10)x2 and 45, XY, der(13;14)(q10;q10), respectively. Parents of proband have been shown to have 45, XY, der(13q;14q) and 45, XX, der(13q;14q) karyotypes, respectively. Conclusion: The present report was in agreement with the few reports of homozygosity for Robertsonian translocation which demonstrated normal phenotypes for such persons and possibility of giving birth to phenotypically normal heterozygote carriers of Robertsonian translocations. PMID:27478773

  3. Construction and Uses of New Compound B-A-A Maize Chromosome Translocations

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, William F.; Auger, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    Maize B-A translocations result from reciprocal interchanges between a supernumerary B chromosome and an arm of an essential A chromosome. Because of the frequent nondisjunction of the B centromere at the second pollen mitosis, B-A translocations have been used to locate genes to chromosome arms and to study the dosage effects of specific A segments. Compound B-A translocations (B-A-A translocations) are created by bringing together a simple B-A translocation with an A-A translocation in which breakpoints in the A-A and B-A translocations are in the same arm. Recombination in the region of shared homology of these A chromosome segments creates a B-A-A translocation. Success in creating and testing for a new B-A-A translocation requires that the B-A translocation be proximal to the A-A translocation and that the A-A translocation be proximal to the tester locus. The breakpoints of most of the A-A translocations have been cytologically defined by earlier investigators. Previous investigators have produced 16 B-A-A translocations and one B-A-A-A translocation, which collectively define 35 A chromosome breakpoints. We have enlarged this group by creating 64 new B-A-A translocations. We present a summary of the total of 81 B-A-A translocations showing their distribution among the chromosome arms and the 163 cytologically defined chromosome segments delimited by them. We also illustrate the method of construction of these B-A-A stocks and their uses. PMID:17057247

  4. Translocation as a conservation tool for Agassiz's desert tortoises: survivorship, reproduction, and movements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nussear, K.E.; Tracy, C.R.; Medica, P.A.; Wilson, D.S.; Marlow, R.W.; Corn, P.S.

    2012-01-01

    We translocated 120 Agassiz's desert tortoises to 5 sites in Nevada and Utah to evaluate the effects of translocation on tortoise survivorship, reproduction, and habitat use. Translocation sites included several elevations, and extended to sites with vegetation assemblages not typically associated with desert tortoises in order to explore the possibility of moving animals to upper elevation areas. We measured survivorship, reproduction, and movements of translocated and resident animals at each site. Survivorship was not significantly different between translocated and resident animals within and among sites, and survivorship was greater overall during non-drought years. The number of eggs produced by tortoises was similar for translocated and resident females, but differed among sites. Animals translocated to atypical habitat generally moved until they reached vegetation communities more typical of desert tortoise habitat. Even within typical tortoise habitat, tortoises tended to move greater distances in the first year after translocation than did residents, but their movements in the second or third year after translocation were indistinguishable from those of resident tortoises. Our data show that tortoises translocated into typical Mojave desert scrub habitats perform well; however, the large first-year movements of translocated tortoises have important management implications. Projects that employ translocations must consider how much area will be needed to contain translocated tortoises and whether roads need fencing to prevent the loss of animals.

  5. Congenital nystagmus cosegregating with a balanced 7;15 translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Patton, M A; Jeffery, S; Lee, N; Hogg, C

    1993-01-01

    We report a family in which autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus cosegregates with a balanced 7;15 translocation. Ophthalmic investigation showed predominantly horizontal nystagmus with a small rotatory component and no significant loss of visual function. This finding suggests a possible localisation for autosomal dominant congenital nystagmus (McKusick 164100). Images PMID:8326501

  6. Characterization of Novel Molecular Mechanisms Favoring Rac1 Membrane Translocation.

    PubMed

    Castro-Castro, Antonio; Muriel, Olivia; Del Pozo, Miguel A; Bustelo, Xosé R

    2016-01-01

    The Rac1 GTPase plays key roles in cytoskeletal organization, cell motility and a variety of physiological and disease-linked responses. Wild type Rac1 signaling entails dissociation of the GTPase from cytosolic Rac1-Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) complexes, translocation to membranes, activation by exchange factors, effector binding, and activation of downstream signaling cascades. Out of those steps, membrane translocation is the less understood. Using transfections of a expression cDNA library in cells expressing a Rac1 bioreporter, we previously identified a cytoskeletal feedback loop nucleated by the F-actin binding protein coronin 1A (Coro1A) that promotes Rac1 translocation to the plasma membrane by facilitating the Pak-dependent dissociation of Rac1-Rho GDI complexes. This screening identified other potential regulators of this process, including WDR26, basigin, and TMEM8A. Here, we show that WDR26 promotes Rac1 translocation following a Coro1A-like and Coro1A-dependent mechanism. By contrast, basigin and TMEM8A stabilize Rac1 at the plasma membrane by inhibiting the internalization of caveolin-rich membrane subdomains. This latter pathway is F-actin-dependent but Coro1A-, Pak- and Rho GDI-independent.

  7. Coupling translocation with nucleic acid unwinding by NS3 helicase.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin; Cheng, Wei; Bustamante, Carlos; Oster, George

    2010-12-03

    We present a semiquantitative model for translocation and unwinding activities of monomeric nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase. The model is based on structural, biochemical, and single-molecule measurements. The model predicts that the NS3 helicase actively unwinds duplex by reducing more than 50% the free energy that stabilizes base pairing/stacking. The unwinding activity slows the movement of the helicase in a sequence-dependent manner, lowering the average unwinding efficiency to less than 1 bp per ATP cycle. When bound with ATP, the NS3 helicase can display significant translocational diffusion. This increases displacement fluctuations of the helicase, decreases the average unwinding efficiency, and enhances the sequence dependence. Also, interactions between the helicase and the duplex stabilize the helicase at the junction, facilitating the helicase's unwinding activity while preventing it from dissociating. In the presence of translocational diffusion during active unwinding, the dissociation rate of the helicase also exhibits sequence dependence. Based on unwinding velocity fluctuations measured from single-molecule experiments, we estimate the diffusion rate to be on the order of 10 s(-1). The generic features of coupling single-stranded nucleic acid translocation with duplex unwinding presented in this work may apply generally to a class of helicases.

  8. DNA Translocation and Unzipping through a Nanopore: Some Geometrical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Muzard, J.; Martinho, M.; Mathé, J.; Bockelmann, U.; Viasnoff, V.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract This article explores the role of some geometrical factors on the electrophoretically driven translocations of macromolecules through nanopores. In the case of asymmetric pores, we show how the entry requirements and the direction of translocation can modify the information content of the blocked ionic current as well as the transduction of the electrophoretic drive into a mechanical force. To address these effects we studied the translocation of single-stranded DNA through an asymmetric α-hemolysin pore. Depending on the direction of the translocation, we measure the capacity of the pore to discriminate between both DNA orientations. By unzipping DNA hairpins from both sides of the pores we show that the presence of single strand or double strand in the pore can be discriminated based on ionic current levels. We also show that the transduction of the electrophoretic drive into a denaturing mechanical force depends on the local geometry of the pore entrance. Eventually we discuss the application of this work to the measurement of energy barriers for DNA unzipping as well as for protein binding and unfolding. PMID:20483325

  9. 3D view of chromosomes, DNA damage, and translocations.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michal; Hakim, Ofir

    2014-04-01

    The cell nucleus is a busy and organized organelle. In this megalopolis made of billions of nucleotides, protein factors find their target loci to exert nuclear functions such as transcription and replication. Remarkably, despite the lack of internal membrane barrier, the interlinked and tightly regulated nuclear processes occur in spatially organized fashion. These processes can lead to double-strand breaks (DSBs) that compromise the integrity of the genome. Moreover, in some cells like lymphocytes, DNA damage is also targeted within the context of immunoglobulin gene recombination. If not repaired correctly, DSBs can cause chromosomal rearrangements, including translocations which are etiological in numerous tumors. Therefore, the chromosomal locations of DSBs, as well as their spatial positioning, are important contributors to formation of chromosomal translocations at specific genomic loci. To obtain a mechanistic understanding of chromosomal translocations these parameters should be accounted for in a global and integrative fashion. In this review we will discuss recent findings addressing how genome architecture, DNA damage, and repair contribute to the genesis of chromosomal translocations.

  10. 40 CFR 798.5460 - Rodent heritable translocation assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Rodent heritable translocation assays. 798.5460 Section 798.5460 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...) Species. The mouse is the species generally used, and is recommended. (ii) Age. Healthy sexually...

  11. Characterization of Novel Molecular Mechanisms Favoring Rac1 Membrane Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Castro, Antonio; Muriel, Olivia; del Pozo, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    The Rac1 GTPase plays key roles in cytoskeletal organization, cell motility and a variety of physiological and disease-linked responses. Wild type Rac1 signaling entails dissociation of the GTPase from cytosolic Rac1-Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) complexes, translocation to membranes, activation by exchange factors, effector binding, and activation of downstream signaling cascades. Out of those steps, membrane translocation is the less understood. Using transfections of a expression cDNA library in cells expressing a Rac1 bioreporter, we previously identified a cytoskeletal feedback loop nucleated by the F-actin binding protein coronin 1A (Coro1A) that promotes Rac1 translocation to the plasma membrane by facilitating the Pak-dependent dissociation of Rac1-Rho GDI complexes. This screening identified other potential regulators of this process, including WDR26, basigin, and TMEM8A. Here, we show that WDR26 promotes Rac1 translocation following a Coro1A-like and Coro1A-dependent mechanism. By contrast, basigin and TMEM8A stabilize Rac1 at the plasma membrane by inhibiting the internalization of caveolin-rich membrane subdomains. This latter pathway is F-actin-dependent but Coro1A-, Pak- and Rho GDI-independent. PMID:27835684

  12. Microbial Translocation and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Manner, Ingjerd W.; Pedersen, Karin K.; Haissman, Judith M.; Kvale, Dag; Nielsen, Susanne D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The widespread access to antiretroviral treatment during the past decades has transformed HIV infection from a lethal disease to a chronic condition, in which the relative burden of non-AIDS-related chronic disorders such as cardiovascular disease, malignancy, renal, liver, and bone disease has increased. The adjusted relative risk for myocardial infarction is reported to be around 2-fold compared to that of the general population, which over time is likely to translate into increased absolute risk in an aging population. Thus, delineating potentially HIV-specific pathogenetic mechanisms is crucial in order to tailor novel strategies for prophylaxis and treatment. This review will focus on advances in the field that possibly link HIV-induced alterations of the gut mucosa and consequent microbial translocation to cardiometabolic risk factors in HIV infection. Recent work suggests that markers of microbial translocation are closely associated with several cardiovascular risk factors such as dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hypertension, coagulation abnormalities, endothelial dysfunction, and carotid atherosclerosis. Future studies should investigate whether associations between microbial translocation and cardiovascular risk factors will translate into increased risk of acute events, and whether strategies to target gut microbiota and microbial translocation might reduce such a risk. PMID:24521167

  13. Gravitational wave background from binary systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rosado, Pablo A.

    2011-10-15

    Basic aspects of the background of gravitational waves and its mathematical characterization are reviewed. The spectral energy density parameter {Omega}(f), commonly used as a quantifier of the background, is derived for an ensemble of many identical sources emitting at different times and locations. For such an ensemble, {Omega}(f) is generalized to account for the duration of the signals and of the observation, so that one can distinguish the resolvable and unresolvable parts of the background. The unresolvable part, often called confusion noise or stochastic background, is made by signals that cannot be either individually identified or subtracted out of the data. To account for the resolvability of the background, the overlap function is introduced. This function is a generalization of the duty cycle, which has been commonly used in the literature, in some cases leading to incorrect results. The spectra produced by binary systems (stellar binaries and massive black hole binaries) are presented over the frequencies of all existing and planned detectors. A semi-analytical formula for {Omega}(f) is derived in the case of stellar binaries (containing white dwarfs, neutron stars or stellar-mass black holes). Besides a realistic expectation of the level of background, upper and lower limits are given, to account for the uncertainties in some astrophysical parameters such as binary coalescence rates. One interesting result concerns all current and planned ground-based detectors (including the Einstein Telescope). In their frequency range, the background of binaries is resolvable and only sporadically present. In other words, there is no stochastic background of binaries for ground-based detectors.

  14. Jumping translocations in myeloid malignancies associated with treatment resistance and poor survival

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, David; DiNardo, Courtney D.; Tang, Guilin; Cortes, Jorge E.; Verstovek, Srdan; Jabbour, Elias; Ravandi, Farhad; Kantarjian, Hagop; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background Jumping translocations (JT) are uncommon cytogenetic abnormalities involving non-reciprocal translocations of a single donor chromosome onto two or more chromosomes. The clinical characteristics and prognosis of JTs in patients with myeloid malignancies are not well described. Materials and Methods We searched our cytogenetic database from 2003 to 2014 to identify cases of myeloid malignancies associated with a JT. These cases were cross-referenced with our clinical databases to determine patient characteristics, response to treatment and overall survival. Results We identified 10 patients with myeloid malignancies and a JT: 4 cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with MDS-related changes, 4 cases of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 2 cases of post-polycythemia myelofibrosis. The donor segment was derived from chromosome 1 in every case. The acquisition of a JT was a late ocurrence, with a median time to JT development of 24.9 months (range 0-248 months) from diagnosis. The overall response to treatment was poor, with no patients achieving a response to conventional chemotherapy or hypomethylating agents. The median overall survival for the group was 9 months (95% CI 2.5-15.5) after identification of a JT. Conclusion The acquisition of a JT in patients with myeloid malignancies appears to be a late event and is associated with myelodysplasia. In our series, this was associated with a poor prognosis with patients having a poor response to treatment, disease transformation to AML and short overall survival. PMID:26141213

  15. Trabectedin Followed by Irinotecan Can Stabilize Disease in Advanced Translocation-Positive Sarcomas with Acceptable Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    von Klot-Heydenfeldt, F.; Jabar, S.; Ranft, A.; Rossig, C.; Dirksen, U.; Van den Brande, J.; D'Incalci, M.; von Luettichau, I.; Grohar, P. J.; Berdel, W. E.; Burdach, St.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preclinical data indicate that trabectedin followed by irinotecan has strong synergistic effects on Ewing sarcoma. This is presumably due to hypersensitization of the tumor cells to the camptothecin as an effect of trabectedin in addition to synergistic suppression of EWS-FLI1 downstream targets. A strong effect was also reported in a human rhabdomyosarcoma xenograft. Procedure. Twelve patients with end-stage refractory translocation-positive sarcomas were treated with trabectedin followed by irinotecan within a compassionate use program. Eight patients had Ewing sarcoma and four patients had other translocation-positive sarcomas. Results. Three-month survival rate was 0.75 after the start of this therapy. One patient achieved a partial response according to RECIST criteria, five had stable disease, and the remaining six progressed through therapy. The majority of patients experienced significant hematological toxicity (grades 3 and 4). Reversible liver toxicity and diarrhea also occurred. Conclusions. Our experience with the combination of trabectedin followed with irinotecan in patients with advanced sarcomas showed promising results in controlling refractory solid tumors. While the hematological toxicity was significant, it was reversible. Quality of life during therapy was maintained. These observations encourage a larger clinical trial. PMID:27843394

  16. Frequency Combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    Much of modern research in the field of atomic, molecular, and optical science relies on lasers, which were invented some 50 years ago and perfected in five decades of intense research and development. Today, lasers and photonic technologies impact most fields of science and they have become indispensible in our daily lives. Laser frequency combs were conceived a decade ago as tools for the precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. Through the development of optical frequency comb techniques, technique a setup of the size 1 ×1 m2, good for precision measurements of any frequency, and even commercially available, has replaced the elaborate previous frequency-chain schemes for optical frequency measurements, which only worked for selected frequencies. A true revolution in optical frequency measurements has occurred, paving the way for the creation of all-optical clocks clock with a precision that might approach 10-18. A decade later, frequency combs are now common equipment in all frequency metrology-oriented laboratories. They are also becoming enabling tools for an increasing number of applications, from the calibration of astronomical spectrographs to molecular spectroscopy. This chapter first describes the principle of an optical frequency comb synthesizer. Some of the key technologies to generate such a frequency comb are then presented. Finally, a non-exhaustive overview of the growing applications is given.

  17. Evidence that the beta-catenin nuclear translocation assay allows for measuring presenilin 1 dysfunction.

    PubMed Central

    Van Gassen, G.; De Jonghe, C.; Nishimura, M.; Yu, G.; Kuhn, S.; St George-Hyslop, P.; Van Broeckhoven, C.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mutations in the presenilin (PSEN) genes are responsible for the majority of early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) cases. PSEN1 is a component of a high molecular weight, endoplasmic reticulum, membrane-bound protein complex, including beta-catenin. Pathogenic PSEN1 mutations were demonstrated to have an effect on beta-catenin and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta(GSK-3beta), two members of the wingless Wnt pathway. The nuclear translocation and the stability of beta-catenin, and the interaction between GSK3beta and PSEN1 were influenced. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Stably transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells overexpressing wild-type (wt) and mutant (mt) PSEN1, treated with and without LiCl, were used to isolate cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. By Western blot analysis, endogenous beta-catenin levels were examined. By analyzing cytosolic fractions of PSEN1, transfected and nontransfected HEK 293 cells, and total brain extracts of AD patients and controls, we evaluated the effect of PSEN1 overexpression on beta-catenin stability. Finally, we analyzed the effect of pathogenic PSEN1 mutations on the interaction between PSEN1 and GSK3beta by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. RESULTS: We report reduced nuclear translocation of beta-catenin in cells stably expressing I143T, G384A, and T113-114ins PSEN1. The G384A PSEN1 mutation showed a similar pronounced effect on nuclear translocation of beta-catenin, as reported for processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) into amyloid beta(Abeta). Overexpression of PSEN1 and the presence of pathogenic mutations in PSEN1 had no significant effect on the stability of beta-catenin. Nonspecific binding of overexpressed PSEN1 to endogenous GSK3beta was observed when GSK3beta was immunoprecipitated. Immunoprecipitation of PSEN1 in cells overexpressing PSEN1 and in native cells, however, did not result in co-immunoprecipitation of endogenous GSK3beta. CONCLUSION: Our results further establish the nuclear

  18. Dietary nitrite improves insulin signaling through GLUT4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hong; Torregrossa, Ashley C; Potts, Amy; Pierini, Dan; Aranke, Mayank; Garg, Harsha K; Bryan, Nathan S

    2014-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 is a syndrome of disordered metabolism with inappropriate hyperglycemia owing to a reduction in the biological effectiveness of insulin. Type 2 diabetes is associated with an impaired nitric oxide (NO) pathway that probably serves as the key link between metabolic disorders and cardiovascular disease. Insulin-mediated translocation of GLUT4 involves the PI3K/Akt kinase signal cascade that results in activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). eNOS is dysfunctional during diabetes. We hypothesize that loss of eNOS-derived NO terminates the signaling cascade and therefore cannot activate GLUT4 translocation and that dietary nitrite may repair this pathway. In this study, we administered 50mg/L sodium nitrite to db/db diabetic mice for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks treatment, the db/db mice experienced less weight gain, improved fasting glucose levels, and reduced insulin levels. Cell culture experiments using CHO-HIRc-myc-GLUT4eGFP cell lines stably expressing insulin receptor and myc-GLUT4eGFP protein, as well as L6 skeletal muscle cells stably expressing rat GLUT4 with a Myc epitope (L6-GLUT4myc), showed that NO, nitrite, and GSNO stimulate GLUT4 translocation independent of insulin, which is inhibited by NEM. Collectively our data suggest that nitrite improves insulin signaling through restoration of NO-dependent nitrosation of GLUT4 signaling translocation. These data suggest that NO-mediated nitrosation of GLUT4 by nitrite or other nitrosating agents is necessary and sufficient for GLUT4 translocation in target tissue. Description of this pathway may justify a high-nitrate/nitrite diet along with the glycemic index to provide a safe and nutritional regimen for the management and treatment of diabetes.

  19. Cold-inhibited phloem translocation in sugar beet

    SciTech Connect

    Grusak, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental studies were undertaken on a simplified single source leaf-single sink leaf, or single source leaf-double sink leaf sugar beet system to investigate the responsive nature of the long-distance phloem translocation system to localized cooling perturbations on the source leaf petiole. Experiments were performed by using a steady state (/sup 14/C)-labelling system for the source leaf, and translocation into the sink leaf (leaves) was monitored with a Geiger-Mueller system. A specially designed Peltier apparatus enabled cooling of the source petiole to 1/sup 0/C (or other desired temperatures) at various positions on the petiole, over different lengths, and at different rates of cooling. Initial experiment were designed to test the predictions of a mathematical recovery model of translocation inhibited by cold. The results did not support the mathematical model, but did suggest that vascular anastomoses may be involved in the recovery response. Selective petiolar incision/excision experiments showed that anastomoses were capable of re-establishing translocation following a disruption of flow. Studies with two monitored sink levels suggested that the inhibition to slow-coolings was not due to reduced translocation through the cooled source petiole region, but rather, was due to a repartitioning of flow among the terminal sinks (sink leaves and hypocotyl/crown region above the heat-girdled root). This repartitioning occurred via a redirection of flow through the vascular connections in the crown region of the plant, and appeared to be promoted by rapid, physical signals originating from the cooled region of the petiole.

  20. The cosmic background explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Gulkis, G. ); Lubin, P.M. ); Meyer, S.S. ); Silverberg, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Late last year the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched its first satellite dedicated to the study of phenomena related to the origins of the universe. The satellite, called the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), carries three complementary detectors that will make fundamental measurements of the celestial radiation. Part of that radiation is believed to have originated in processes that occurred at the very dawn of the universe. By measuring the remnant radiation at wavelengths from one micrometer to one centimeter across the entire sky, scientists hope to be able to solve many mysteries regarding the origin and evolution of the early universe. Unfortunately, these radiative relics of the early universe are weak and veiled by local astrophysical and terrestrial sources of radiation. The wavelengths of the various cosmic components may also overlap, thereby making the understanding of the diffuse celestial radiation a challenge. Nevertheless, the COBE instruments, with their full-sky coverage, high sensitivity to a wide range of wavelengths and freedom from interference from the earth's atmosphere, will constitute for astrophysicists an observatory of unprecedented sensitivity and scope. The interesting cosmic signals will then be separated from one another and from noncosmic radiation sources by a comprehensive analysis of the data.

  1. Entropic effects in formation of chromosome territories: towards understanding of radiation-induced gene translocation frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudowska-Nowak, Ewa; Ritter, Sylvia; Durante, Marco; Deperas-Standylo, Joanna; Ciesla, Michal

    2012-07-01

    A detailed understanding of structural organization of biological target, such as geometry of an inter-phase chromosome, is an essential prerequisite for gaining deeper insight into relationship between radiation track structure and radiation-induced biological damage [1]. In particular, coupling of biophysical models aimed to describe architecture of chromosomes and their positioning in a cell nucleus [2-4] with models of local distribution of ionizations caused by passing projectiles, are expected to result in more accurate estimates of aberration induction caused by radiation. There is abundant experimental evidence indicating that arrangements of chromosomes in eukaryotic cell nucleus is non-random and has been evolutionary conserved in specific cell types. Moreover, the radial position of a given chromosome territory (CT) within the cell nucleus has been shown to correlate with its size and gene density. Usually it is assumed that chromosomal geometry and positioning result from the action of specific forces acting locally, such as hydrogen bonds, electrostatic, Van der Waals or hydrophobic interactions operating between nucleosomes and within their interiors. However, it is both desirable and instructive to learn to what extend organization of inter-phase chromosomes is affected by nonspecific entropic forces. In this study we report results of a coarse-grained analysis of a chromatin structure modeled by two distinct approaches. In the first method, we adhere to purely statistical analysis of chromatin packing within a chromosome territory. On the basis of the polymer theory, the chromatin fiber of diameter 30nm is approximated by a chain of spheres, each corresponding to about 30 kbp. Random positioning of the center of the domain is repeated for 1000 spherical nuclei. Configuration of the domain is determined by a random packing of a polymer (a string of identical beads) in estimated fraction of space occupied by a chromosome of a given length and mass. The degree of condensation of the chromatin fiber is modeled by changing length of the string: e.g. loosening of the structure is achieved by distributing the chromosome mass into a higher number of smaller beads and tighter configuration corresponds to a lower number of fragments (balls) with a bigger radius. Additionally, for each configuration, a degree of possible overlapping between domains is assumed. This procedure effectively intensifies loosening/tightening of the chromosome structure by changing the radial dimension of the domain while keeping a constant volume of the polymer chain. Such a positioning model is confronted with a minimalistic molecular dynamics model [5] on a similar structure, in which a chain of beads becomes connected by entropic spring energy and subjected to thermal fluctuations. Comparison of both Monte Carlo models allows to discuss variability of possible configurations as observed in static and dynamic models of chromosome territories along with the effect of compaction and relative arrangements of territorial polymer structures. Acknowledgements: Project is operated within the Foundation for Polish Science International Ph.D. Projects Programme co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund covering, under the agreement no. MPD/2009/6, the Jagiellonian University International Ph.D. Studies in Physics of Complex Systems. References: [1] F. Ballarini, M. Biaggi, and A. Ottolenghi, Radiation Protection Dosimetry 99, 175 (2002). [2] M. Nicodemi and A. Prisco, Biophysical Journal 96, 2168 (2009). [3] P. Cook and D. Marenduzzo, Journal of Cell Biology 186, 825 (2009). [4] M. Tark-Dame, R. van Driel, and D. Heermann, Journal of Cell Science 124, 839 (2011). [5] W. Swope, H. Andersen, P. Berens, and K. Wilson, J. Chem. Phys. 76, 637 (1982).

  2. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components that form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.

  3. A gatekeeper chaperone complex directs translocator secretion during Type Three Secretion

    DOE PAGES

    Archuleta, Tara L.; Spiller, Benjamin W.; Kubori, Tomoko

    2014-11-06

    Many Gram-negative bacteria use Type Three Secretion Systems (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into host cells. These protein delivery machines are composed of cytosolic components that recognize substrates and generate the force needed for translocation, the secretion conduit, formed by a needle complex and associated membrane spanning basal body, and translocators that form the pore in the target cell. A defined order of secretion in which needle component proteins are secreted first, followed by translocators, and finally effectors, is necessary for this system to be effective. While the secreted effectors vary significantly between organisms, the ~20 individual protein components thatmore » form the T3SS are conserved in many pathogenic bacteria. One such conserved protein, referred to as either a plug or gatekeeper, is necessary to prevent unregulated effector release and to allow efficient translocator secretion. The mechanism by which translocator secretion is promoted while effector release is inhibited by gatekeepers is unknown. We present the structure of the Chlamydial gatekeeper, CopN, bound to a translocator-specific chaperone. The structure identifies a previously unknown interface between gatekeepers and translocator chaperones and reveals that in the gatekeeper-chaperone complex the canonical translocator-binding groove is free to bind translocators. Thus, structure-based mutagenesis of the homologous complex in Shigella reveals that the gatekeeper-chaperone-translocator complex is essential for translocator secretion and for the ordered secretion of translocators prior to effectors.« less

  4. Driven polymer translocation through a cylindrical nanochannel: interplay between the channel length and the chain length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yong, Huaisong; Wang, Yilin; Yuan, Shichen; Xu, Bi; Luo, Kaifu

    Using analytical techniques and Langevin dynamics simulations, we investigate the dynamics of polymer translocation through a nanochannel embedded in two dimensions under an applied external field. We examine the translocation time for various ratio of the channel length $L$ to the polymer length $N$. For short channels $L\\ll N$, the translocation time $\\tau \\sim N^{1+\

  5. Voltage-driven translocation behaviors of IgG molecule through nanopore arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wang, Bing; Sha, Jingjie; Yang, Yue; Hou, Yaozong; Ni, Zhonghua; Chen, Yunfei

    2013-05-01

    Nanopore-based biosensing has attracted more and more interests in the past years, which is also regarded as an emerging field with major impact on bio-analysis and fundamental understanding of nanoscale interactions down to single-molecule level. In this work, the voltage-driven translocation properties of goat antibody to human immunoglobulin G (IgG) are investigated using nanopore arrays in polycarbonate membranes. Obviously, the background ionic currents are modulated by IgG molecules for their physical place-holding effect. However, the detected ionic currents do `not' continuously decrease as conceived; the currents first decrease, then increase, and finally stabilize with increasing IgG concentration. To understand this phenomenon, a simplified model is suggested, and the calculated results contribute to the understanding of the abnormal phenomenon in the actual ionic current changing tendency.

  6. Background Lamb waves in the Earth's atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Fukao, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Lamb waves of the Earth's atmosphere in the millihertz band have been considered as transient phenomena excited only by large events [e.g. the major volcanic eruption of Krakatoa in 1833, the impact of Siberian meteorite in 1908, the testing of large nuclear tests and the huge earthquakes, Garrett1969]. In a case of the solid Earth, observation of background free oscillations in the millihertz band-now known as Earth's background free oscillations or seismic hum, has been firmly established. Above 5 mHz, their dominant excitation sources are oceanic infragravity waves. At 3.7 and 4.4 mHz an elasto-acoustic resonance between the solid Earth and the atmosphere was observed [Nishida et al., 2000]. These seismic observations show that the contribution of atmospheric disturbances to the seismic hum is dominant below 5 mHz. Such contribution implies background excitations of acoustic-gravity waves in this frequency range. For direct detection of the background acoustic-gravity waves, our group conducted observations using an array of barometers [Nishida et al. 2005]. However, the spatial scale of the array of about 10 km was too small to detect acoustic modes below 10 mHz. Since then, no direct observations of these waves have been reported. In 2011, 337 high-resolution microbarometers were installed on a continental scale at USArray Transportable Array. The large and dense array enables us to detect the background atmospheric waves. Here, we show the first evidence of background Lamb waves in the Earth's atmosphere from 0.2 to 10 mHz, based on the array analysis of microbarometer data from the USArray in 2012. The observations suggest that the excitation sources are atmospheric disturbances in the troposphere. Theoretically, their energy in the troposphere tunnels into the thermosphere at a resonant frequency via thermospheric gravity wave, where the observed amplitudes indeed take a local minimum. The energy leak through the frequency window could partly contribute to

  7. The Interplay Between Host Genetic Variation, Viral Replication, and Microbial Translocation in Untreated HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Molly R.; Bartha, Istvan; Timmer, J. Katherina; Liebner, Julia C.; Wollinsky, David; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Hauser, Christoph; Bernasconi, Enos; Hoffmann, Matthias; Calmy, Alexandra; Battegay, Manuel; Telenti, Amalio; Douek, Daniel C.; Fellay, Jacques; Aubert, V.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H.C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Dollenmaier, G.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C.A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H.H.; Hoffmann, M.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Klimkait, T.; Kouyos, R.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Nicca, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schmid, P.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Yerly, S.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic immune activation, a major determinant of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression, is the result of a complex interplay between viral replication, dysregulation of the immune system, and microbial translocation due to gut mucosal damage. Although human genetic variants influencing HIV load have been identified, it is unknown how much the host genetic background contributes to interindividual differences in other determinants of HIV pathogenesis such as gut damage and microbial translocation. Using samples and data from 717 untreated participants in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study and a genome-wide association study design, we searched for human genetic determinants of plasma levels of intestinal fatty acid–binding protein (I-FABP/FABP2), a marker of gut damage, and of soluble CD14 (sCD14), a marker of lipopolysaccharide bioactivity and microbial translocation. We also assessed the correlations between HIV load, sCD14, and I-FABP. Although we found no genome-wide significant determinant of the tested plasma markers, we observed strong associations between sCD14 and both HIV load and I-FABP, shedding new light on the relationships between processes that drive progression of untreated HIV infection. PMID:25701868

  8. Integrable Background Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderbank, David M. J.

    2014-03-01

    This work has its origins in an attempt to describe systematically the integrable geometries and gauge theories in dimensions one to four related to twistor theory. In each such dimension, there is a nondegenerate integrable geometric structure, governed by a nonlinear integrable differential equation, and each solution of this equation determines a background geometry on which, for any Lie group G, an integrable gauge theory is defined. In four dimensions, the geometry is selfdual conformal geometry and the gauge theory is selfdual Yang-Mills theory, while the lower-dimensional structures are nondegenerate (i.e., non-null) reductions of this. Any solution of the gauge theory on a k-dimensional geometry, such that the gauge group H acts transitively on an ℓ-manifold, determines a (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometry (k+ℓ≤4) fibering over the k-dimensional geometry with H as a structure group. In the case of an ℓ-dimensional group H acting on itself by the regular representation, all (k+ℓ)-dimensional geometries with symmetry group H are locally obtained in this way. This framework unifies and extends known results about dimensional reductions of selfdual conformal geometry and the selfdual Yang-Mills equation, and provides a rich supply of constructive methods. In one dimension, generalized Nahm equations provide a uniform description of four pole isomonodromic deformation problems, and may be related to the {SU}(∞) Toda and dKP equations via a hodograph transformation. In two dimensions, the {Diff}(S^1) Hitchin equation is shown to be equivalent to the hyperCR Einstein-Weyl equation, while the {SDiff}(Σ^2) Hitchin equation leads to a Euclidean analogue of Plebanski's heavenly equations. In three and four dimensions, the constructions of this paper help to organize the huge range of examples of Einstein-Weyl and selfdual spaces in the literature, as well as providing some new ! ones. The nondegenerate reductions have a long ancestry. More ! recently

  9. Molecular analysis of DiGeorge Syndrome-related translocation breakpoints in 22q11.2

    SciTech Connect

    Chieffo, C.; Barnoski, B.L.; Emanuel, B.S.

    1994-09-01

    22q11 demonstrates a high frequency of disease-specific rearrangements. Several of the rearrangements are associated with developmental abnormalities such as DiGeorge Syndrome (DGS), Velocardiofacial Syndrome (VCFS), Cat Eye Syndrome (CES) and Supernumerary der(22)t(11;22) Syndrome. DGS and VCFS involve deletions of 22q11.2 resulting from unbalanced translocations or microdeletions. In contrast, CES and Supernumerary der(22)t(11;22) Syndrome result from duplications of this region via inter- or intra- chromosomal exchange. Although the molecular mechanism giving rise to these rearrangements has yet to be elucidated, the presence of known 22q11 repetitive elements are likely to be involved. GM5878 is a 46,XY,t(10;22) cell line from a balanced translocation carrier father of an unbalanced DGS patient. GM0980 is a cell line from a patient with features of DGS/VCFS with an unbalanced karyotype. Using FISH cosmids, we have localized these translocation breakpoints near pH160b (D22S66) which maps to the center of the DiGeorge chromosomal region (DGCR). To further localize the breakpoint of GM5878, overlapping cosmids spanning this region were used as probes for FISH. Use of additional overlapping cosmids allowed the sublocalization of the breakpoint to a 10kb region. A 4.8 kb BglII fragment predicted to cross the breakpoint was isolated. When this fragment was used as a probe to normal and GM5878 DNA, novel bands were detected in GM5878 DNA digested with EcoRI and BglII. Similar analysis of the GM0980 breakpoint is being pursued. Full molecular characterization of these translocations is in progress using inverse PCR to clone the junctional fragments for sequencing. Detailed analysis of the region may reveal molecular features which make this a rearrangement prone area of the genome and help elucidate its relationship to human cytogenetic disease.

  10. Hydrogen Metabolism in Helicobacter pylori Plays a Role in Gastric Carcinogenesis through Facilitating CagA Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ge; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Benoit, Stéphane L.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Peek, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A known virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori that augments gastric cancer risk is the CagA cytotoxin. A carcinogenic derivative strain, 7.13, that has a greater ability to translocate CagA exhibits much higher hydrogenase activity than its parent noncarcinogenic strain, B128. A Δhyd mutant strain with deletion of hydrogenase genes was ineffective in CagA translocation into human gastric epithelial AGS cells, while no significant attenuation of cell adhesion was observed. The quinone reductase inhibitor 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO) was used to specifically inhibit the H2-utilizing respiratory chain of outer membrane-permeabilized bacterial cells; that level of inhibitor also greatly attenuated CagA translocation into AGS cells, indicating the H2-generated transmembrane potential is a contributor to toxin translocation. The Δhyd strain showed a decreased frequency of DNA transformation, suggesting that H. pylori hydrogenase is also involved in energizing the DNA uptake apparatus. In a gerbil model of infection, the ability of the Δhyd strain to induce inflammation was significantly attenuated (at 12 weeks postinoculation), while all of the gerbils infected with the parent strain (7.13) exhibited a high level of inflammation. Gastric cancer developed in 50% of gerbils infected with the wild-type strain 7.13 but in none of the animals infected with the Δhyd strain. By examining the hydrogenase activities from well-defined clinical H. pylori isolates, we observed that strains isolated from cancer patients (n = 6) have a significantly higher hydrogenase (H2/O2) activity than the strains isolated from gastritis patients (n = 6), further supporting an association between H. pylori hydrogenase activity and gastric carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:27531909

  11. Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykari, Paniez; Starck, Jean-Luc Starck

    2012-03-01

    About 400,000 years after the Big Bang the temperature of the Universe fell to about a few thousand degrees. As a result, the previously free electrons and protons combined and the Universe became neutral. This released a radiation which we now observe as the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The tiny fluctuations* in the temperature and polarization of the CMB carry a wealth of cosmological information. These so-called temperature anisotropies were predicted as the imprints of the initial density perturbations which gave rise to the present large-scale structures such as galaxies and clusters of galaxies. This relation between the present-day Universe and its initial conditions has made the CMB radiation one of the most preferred tools to understand the history of the Universe. The CMB radiation was discovered by radio astronomers Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson in 1965 [72] and earned them the 1978 Nobel Prize. This discovery was in support of the Big Bang theory and ruled out the only other available theory at that time - the steady-state theory. The crucial observations of the CMB radiation were made by the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite [86]- orbited in 1989-1996. COBE made the most accurate measurements of the CMB frequency spectrum and confirmed it as being a black-body to within experimental limits. This made the CMB spectrum the most precisely measured black-body spectrum in nature. The CMB has a thermal black-body spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K: the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9mmwavelength. The results of COBE inspired a series of ground- and balloon-based experiments, which measured CMB anisotropies on smaller scales over the next decade. During the 1990s, the first acoustic peak of the CMB power spectrum (see Figure 5.1) was measured with increasing sensitivity and by 2000 the BOOMERanG experiment [26] reported

  12. Noninvolvement of the X chromosome in radiation-induced chromosome translocations in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, R.; Schwartz, J.L. )

    1994-03-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization procedures were used to examine the influence of chromosome locus on the frequency and type of chromosome aberrations induced by [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays in the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Aberrations involving the X chromosome were compared to those involving the similarly sized autosome chromosome 7. When corrected for DNA content, acentric fragments were induced with equal frequency in the X and 7 chromosomes. Dose-dependent increases in chromosomal interchanges involving chromosome 7 were noted, and the frequencies of balanced translocations and dicentrics produced were approximately equal. Chromosome interchanges involving the X chromosome were rare and showed no apparent dose dependence. Thus, while chromosomes 7 and X are equally sensitive to the induction of chromosome breaks, the X chromosome is much less likely to interact with autosomes than chromosome 7. The noninvolvement of the X chromosome in translocations with autosomes may reflect a more peripheral and separate location for the X chromosome in the mammalian nucleus. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Optimised spectral merge of the background model in seismic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Roy; Zabihi Naeini, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    The inversion of seismic reflection data to absolute impedance generates low-frequency deviations around the true impedance if the frequency content of the background impedance model does not merge seamlessly into the spectrum of the inverted seismic data. We present a systematic method of selecting a background model that minimises the mismatch between the background model and the relative impedance obtained by inverting the seismic data at wells. At each well a set of well-log relative impedances is formed by passing the impedance log through a set of zero-phase high-pass filters. The corresponding background models are constructed by passing the impedance log through the complementary zero-phase low-pass filters and a set of seismic relative impedances is computed by inverting the seismic data using these background models. If the inverted seismic data is to merge perfectly with the background model, it should correspond at the well to the well-log relative impedance. This correspondence is the basis of a procedure for finding the optimum combination of background model and inverted seismic data. It is difficult to predict the low-frequency content of inverted seismic data. These low frequencies are affected by the uncertainties in (1) measuring the low-frequency response of the seismic wavelet and (2) knowing how inversion protects the signal-to-noise ratio at low frequencies. Uncertainty (1) becomes acute for broadband seismic data; the low-frequency phase is especially difficult to estimate. Moreover we show that a mismatch of low-frequency phase is a serious source of inversion artefacts. We also show that relative impedance can estimate the low-frequency phase where a well tie cannot. Consequently we include a low-frequency phase shift, applied to the seismic relative impedances, in the search for the best spectral merge. The background models are specified by a low-cut corner frequency and the phase shifts by a phase intercept at zero frequency. A scan of

  14. Frequency-Shift Hearing Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, Leonard M.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed hearing aid maps spectrum of speech into band of lower frequencies at which ear remains sensitive. By redirecting normal speech frequencies into frequency band from 100 to 1,500 Hz, hearing aid allows people to understand normal conversation, including telephone calls. Principle operation of hearing aid adapted to other uses such as, clearing up noisy telephone or radio communication. In addition, loud-speakers more easily understood in presence of high background noise.

  15. Background Rejection in the ARA Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfendner, Carl

    2017-03-01

    The Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is a radio frequency observatory under construction at the South Pole that is searching for ultrahigh energy neutrinos via the Askaryan effect. Thermal fluctuations currently dominate the trigger-level background for the observatory and anthropogenic sources also introduce a significant source of noise. By taking advantage of the observatory's regular geometry and the expected coincident nature of the RF signals arriving from neutrino-induced events, this background can be filtered efficiently. This contribution will discuss techniques developed for the ARA analyses to reject these thermal signals, to reject anthropogenic backgrounds, and to search for neutrino-induced particle showers in the Antarctic ice. The results of a search for neutrinos from GRBs using the prototype station using some of these techniques will be presented.

  16. The cosmic far-infrared background at high galactic latitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Puget, J. L.; Fazio, G. G.

    1976-01-01

    Far-infrared background fluxes from various cosmic sources are predicted. These fluxes lie near the high frequency side of the blackbody radiation spectrum. These sources could account for a significant fraction of the background radiation at frequencies above 400 GHz which might be misinterpreted as a comptonization distortion of the blackbody radiation. Particular attention is paid to the possible contributions from external galaxies, rich clusters of galaxies and from galactic dust emission.

  17. Molecular dynamics study of DNA translocation through graphene nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiapeng; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Juekuan; Bi, Kedong; Ni, Zhonghua; Li, Deyu; Chen, Yunfei

    2013-06-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation method is used to study the translocation of a single strand DNA through nanopores opened on graphene membranes. Simulation results uncover that the translocation time for four DNA strands (20G, 20A, 20T, and 20C) is proportional to the size of the four DNA bases. However, the change of the ionic current is caused not only by the physical blockade of the DNA, but also induced by the change of the ion distribution once the negatively charged DNA enters the nanopore. An electric double layer will be formed and causes higher cation and lower anion concentration near the DNA strand surface, which makes the ionic current blockade not sensitive to the base size for a single-layer graphene nanopore. Increasing the graphene membrane thickness can enhance the DNA physical blockage effect on ionic current and improve the nanopore sensitivity to the four DNA bases.

  18. Fast DNA translocation through a solid-state nanopore.

    PubMed

    Storm, Arnold J; Storm, Cornelis; Chen, Jianghua; Zandbergen, Henny; Joanny, Jean-François; Dekker, Cees

    2005-07-01

    We report experiments and modeling of translocation of double-strand DNA through a siliconoxide nanopore. Long DNA molecules with different lengths ranging from 6500 to 97000 base pairs have been electrophoretically driven through a 10 nm pore. We observe a power-law caling of the translocation time with the length, with an exponent of 1.27. This nonlinear scaling is strikingly different from the well-studied linear behavior observed in similar experiments performed on protein pores. We present a theoretical model where hydrodynamic drag on the ection of the polymer outside the pore is the dominant force counteracting the electrical driving force. We show that this applies to our experiments, and we derive a power-law scaling with an exponent of 1.22, in good agreement with the data.

  19. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  20. Subcellular distribution and translocation of radionuclides in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gouthu, S.; Weginwar, R.; Arie, Tsutomu; Ambe, Shizuko; Ozaki, Takuo; Enomoto, Shuichi; Ambe, Fumitoshi; Yamaguchi, Isamu

    1999-09-01

    The subcellular distribution of radionuclides in Glycine max Merr. (soybean) and Cucumis sativus L. (cucumber) and translocation of plant absorbed radionuclides with growth in soybean were studied. More than 60% of cellular incorporated Rb{sup {minus}83}, Sr{sup {minus}85}, Mn{sup {minus}54}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, and Se{sup {minus}75} remained in the supernatant fraction; 55% and 20% of Cr{sup {minus}51} was bound to soybean and cucumber cell wall fractions, respectively; 70% or more of Be{sup {minus}7}, Y{sup {minus}88}, and Fe{sup {minus}59} was fixed in the chloroplast fraction; and approx. 10% of Sc{sup {minus}46}, Fe{sup {minus}59}, V{sup {minus}48}, and As were fixed in the mitochondrial fraction. Translocation of nuclides within the soybean plant at different stages of growth has been determined. Vanadium, Y{sup {minus}88}, Be{sup {minus}7}, Se{sup {minus}75}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, Sc{sup {minus}46}, Cr{sup {minus}51}, and Zr{sup {minus}88} were predominantly accumulated in the root. Although the total percentage of plant uptake of Sc{sup {minus}46}, Zr{sup {minus}88}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, Sc{sup {minus}46}, and Cr{sup {minus}51} was high, because of low mobility and translocation to shoot, their accumulation in the fruit fraction was negligible. The translocation of mobile nuclides in plants was demonstrated clearly by Rb{sup {minus}83}, Zn{sup {minus}65}, and Fe{sup {minus}59}. Data on the nuclide fraction mobilized from vegetative parts into edible parts was used to assess the percentage of accumulated radionuclides in plants that may reach humans through beans.

  1. Effect of probiotics on enterocyte bacterial translocation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mattar, A F; Drongowski, R A; Coran, A G; Harmon, C M

    2001-05-01

    Enteral probiotics such as Lactobacillus casei GG (LGG) have been used in the treatment of a variety of intestinal disorders in infants and children, including diarrhea, malabsorption, and Clostridium difficile colitis. We have previously demonstrated that the probiotic bacterium LGG has an inhibitory effect on bacterial translocation (BT) in a neonatal rabbit model. However, this in-vivo model is limited for investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for probiotic inhibition of BT. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of LGG in reducing the rate of Escherichia coli C25 (E. coli C25) translocation using an in-vitro enterocyte cell-culture model. Human colonic carcinoma (Caco-2) enterocytes were seeded in porous filters in the apical chamber of a two-chamber cell-culture system and grown for 14 days to confluence. The monolayers were incubated at 37 degrees C with LGG for 180 min. Non-adherent LGG was washed away prior to a 120-min incubation period with 10(5) CFU E. coli C25. E. coli that had translocated across the enterocyte monolayer were quantified by growing basal-chamber media samples on gram-negative bacteria-specific MacConkey's agar. In order to determine monolayer integrity, transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) was measured across Caco-2 cells treated with LGG and E. coli. Statistical analysis was by ANOVA with P < 0.05 considered significant. LGG inhibited E. coli translocation at all LGG concentrations tested. The TEER ratio was not significantly altered by addition of LGG or E. coli (0.9 +/- 0.03 vs 0.8 +/- 0.05). These results demonstrate that the probiotic bacterium LGG inhibits BT of E. coli C25 in a dose-dependent manner in an in-vitro cell-culture model. This model should be valuable in investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the inhibition of pathological enteral bacteria by probiotic agents.

  2. Kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of lipid translocation in biological membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Frickenhaus, S; Heinrich, R

    1999-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the lipid translocation in cellular bilayer membranes is presented. We focus on an integrative model of active and passive transport processes determining the asymmetrical distribution of the major lipid components between the monolayers. The active translocation of the aminophospholipids phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine is mathematically described by kinetic equations resulting from a realistic ATP-dependent transport mechanism. Concerning the passive transport of the aminophospholipids as well as of phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol, two different approaches are used. The first treatment makes use of thermodynamic flux-force relationships. Relevant forces are transversal concentration differences of the lipids as well as differences in the mechanical states of the monolayers due to lateral compressions. Both forces, originating primarily from the operation of an aminophospholipid translocase, are expressed as functions of the lipid compositions of the two monolayers. In the case of mechanical forces, lipid-specific parameters such as different molecular surface areas and compression force constants are taken into account. Using invariance principles, it is shown how the phenomenological coefficients depend on the total lipid amounts. In a second approach, passive transport is analyzed in terms of kinetic mechanisms of carrier-mediated translocation, where mechanical effects are incorporated into the translocation rate constants. The thermodynamic as well as the kinetic approach are applied to simulate the time-dependent redistribution of the lipid components in human red blood cells. In the thermodynamic model the steady-state asymmetrical lipid distribution of erythrocyte membranes is simulated well under certain parameter restrictions: 1) the time scales of uncoupled passive transbilayer movement must be different among the lipid species; 2) positive cross-couplings of the passive lipid fluxes are

  3. A23187-induced translocation of 5-lipoxygenase in osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study, osteosarcoma cells expressing both 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) and 5 lipoxygenase-activating protein (FLAP) synthesized leukotrienes upon A23187 stimulation (Dixon, R. A. F., R. E. Diehl, E. Opas, E. Rands, P. J. Vickers, J. F. Evans, J. W. Gillard, and D. K. Miller. 1990. Nature (Lond.). 343:282-284). Osteosarcoma cells expressing 5-LO but not expressing FLAP were unable to synthesize leukotrienes. Thus, it was determined that FLAP was required for the cellular synthesis of leukotrienes. To examine the role of FLAP in A23187-induced translocation of 5-LO to a membrane fraction, we have studied the A23187-stimulated translocation of 5-LO in osteosarcoma cells expressing both 5-LO and FLAP, and in osteosarcoma cells expressing 5-LO only. We demonstrate that in cells expressing both 5-LO and FLAP, 5-LO translocates to membranes in response to A23187 stimulation. This 5-LO translocation is inhibited when cells are stimulated in the presence of MK-886. In osteosarcoma cells expressing 5-LO but not expressing FLAP, 5-LO is able to associate with membranes following A23187 stimulation. In contrast to the cells containing both 5-LO and FLAP, MK-886 is unable to prevent 5-LO membrane association in cells transfected with 5-LO alone. Therefore, we have demonstrated that in this cell system, 5-LO membrane association and activation can be separated into at least two distinct steps: (1) calcium-dependent movement of 5-LO to membranes without product formation, which can occur in the absence of FLAP (membrane association), and (2) activation of 5-LO with product formation, which is FLAP dependent and inhibited by MK-886 (enzyme activation). PMID:1469057

  4. Muscular dystrophy in girls with X;autosome translocations.

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Y; Buckle, V; Holt, S; Munro, E; Hunter, D; Craig, I

    1986-01-01

    Twenty known cases of X;autosome translocations with breakpoints at Xp21 associated with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy in girls are reviewed. The variable severity described for different persons may reflect differences in X inactivation or in the nature of the genomic target disrupted. High resolution cytogenetic studies on 12 cases indicate breakpoints on the X chromosome at Xp21.1 or Xp21.2. Translocation chromosomes from several of these cases have been isolated in human/mouse somatic cell hybrids. Molecular heterogeneity in the breakpoint positions has been established by probing DNA from these hybrids with a range of cloned sequences known to be located within, or closely linked to, the Duchenne region. The minimum separation between the most distal and the most proximal breakpoints is 176 kb suggesting that, if a single gene is involved, it must be large. Alternatively, the translocations may affect different genes, or confer alterations to regulatory sequences which operate at a distance. Images PMID:3806636

  5. Controlling polymer translocation and ion transport via charge correlations.

    PubMed

    Buyukdagli, Sahin; Ala-Nissila, T

    2014-11-04

    We develop a correlation-corrected transport theory in order to predict ionic and polymer transport properties of membrane nanopores under physical conditions where mean-field electrostatics breaks down. The experimentally observed low KCl conductivity of open α-hemolysin pores is quantitatively explained by the presence of surface polarization effects. Upon the penetration of a DNA molecule into the pore, these polarization forces combined with the electroneutrality of DNA sets a lower boundary for the ionic current, explaining the weak salt dependence of blocked pore conductivities at dilute ion concentrations. The addition of multivalent counterions to the solution results in the reversal of the polymer charge and the direction of the electroosmotic flow. With trivalent spermidine or quadrivalent spermine molecules, the charge inversion is strong enough to stop the translocation of the polymer and to reverse its motion. This mechanism can be used efficiently in translocation experiments in order to improve the accuracy of DNA sequencing by minimizing the translocation velocity of the polymer.

  6. Dieldrin uptake and translocation in plants growing in hydroponic medium.

    PubMed

    Murano, Hirotatsu; Otani, Takashi; Seike, Nobuyasu; Sakai, Mizuki

    2010-01-01

    It has been known that the Cucurbitaceae family takes up a large amount of persistent organic pollutants from soils and that the translocation of those compounds in cucurbits is higher than those in non-cucurbits. To understand the persistent organic pollutant uptake mechanisms of plant species, we compared the dieldrin absorption and transportation potentials of several plants in hydroponic medium. Sorghum (Sorghum vulgare Moench), sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), soybean (Glycine max), komatsuna (Brassica rapa var. peruviridis), white-flowered gourd (Lagenaria siceraria var. hispida), cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), and zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) were grown in a dieldrin-added hydroponic medium for 10 d, and then the amount of dieldrin in their shoots and roots was measured. All of the roots contained dieldrin, whereas only the cucurbits (white-flowered gourd, cucumber, and zucchini) contained considerable amounts of dieldrin in their shoots. The dieldrin uptake to the roots depended on the concentration of the n-hexane soluble components in the roots, regardless of whether the dieldrin in the roots was translocated to shoots or not. The dieldrin uptake from the solution to the roots was thought to be due to a passive response, such as adsorption on the roots. The translocation of dieldrin from the roots to the shoots was probably through the xylems. The amounts of dieldrin in the shoots per transpiration rates were higher for cucurbits than for non-cucurbits. It seems likely that cucurbits have uptake mechanisms for hydrophobic organic chemicals.

  7. Compositions and methods for detecting gene rearrangements and translocations

    DOEpatents

    Rowley, Janet D.; Diaz, Manuel O.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a series of nucleic acid probes for use in diagnosing and monitoring certain types of leukemia using, e.g., Southern and Northern blot analyses and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These probes detect rearrangements, such as translocations involving chromosome band 11q23 with other chromosomes bands, including 4q21, 6q27, 9p22, 19p13.3, in both dividing leukemic cells and interphase nuclei. The breakpoints in all such translocations are clustered within an 8.3 kb BamHI genomic region of the MLL gene. A novel 0.7 kb BamH1 cDNA fragment derived from this gene detects rearrangements on Southern blot analysis with a single BamHI restriction digest in all patients with the common 11q23 translocations and in patients with other 11q23 anomalies. Northern blot analyses are presented demonstrating that the MLL gene has multiple transcripts and that transcript size differentiates leukemic cells from normal cells. Also disclosed are MLL fusion proteins, MLL protein domains and anti-MLL antibodies.

  8. Flow-induced translocation of star polymers through a nanopore.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingming; Duan, Xiaozheng; Shi, Tongfei

    2016-03-21

    We study the flow-induced translocation of the star polymers through a nanopore using a hybrid simulation method that incorporates a lattice-Boltzmann approach for the fluid into a molecular dynamics model for the polymer. Our simulation demonstrates the existence of an optimal forward arm number of the star polymers captured by the nanopore, and illustrates its significance in determining the critical velocity flux of the star polymer translocation through the nanopore. Importantly, we find that the critical velocity flux of the star polymers is independent of the arm polymerization degree, but exhibits a linear dependence on the arm number. Based on previous scaling arguments and our simulation results, we conclude a linear dependence of the critical velocity flux on the arm number of the star polymers, which can successfully describe the dynamics of the star polymer translocation. Our simulation results rationalize the experimental results for the dependence of the critical velocity flux on the arm polymerization degree and the arm number of the star polymers, which provide new insights for the characterization and the purification of the star polymers.

  9. Mechanism of Inhibition of Translocation by Localized Chilling 1

    PubMed Central

    Giaquinta, R. T.; Geiger, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    Arrhenius plots of translocation velocity as a function of petiole temperature show a marked increase in temperature dependence below 10 C in bean (a chilling-sensitive species) but not in sugar beet (chilling-resistant). The increased temperature dependence below 10 C was not observed for cytoplasmic streaming or oxygen uptake in bean. Bean petioles were served to release pressure in order to determine whether sieve tubes are obstructed in cold-treated petioles. The resulting pressure release caused serious displacement of the crystalline protein bodies in the sieve tubes of petioles at 25 C, but in those locally cooled to 0 C for 30 minutes little displacement occurred, indicating obstruction in the latter. An ultrastructural study of sieve tubes in tissue frozen rapidly in situ and dehydrated by freeze substitution revealed that treatment at 0 C for 30 minutes caused structural alteration and displacement of the cytoplasmic material lining the sieve tube wall resulting in occlusion of sieve plates. The sieve plates of the control petioles at 25 C were generally clear of obstructions. The results indicate that inhibition of translocation by chilling in chilling-sensitive plants results from physical blockage of sieve plates rather than from direct inhibition of a metabolic process which drives translocation. Images PMID:16658332

  10. Polymer translocation through nano-pores in vibrating thin membranes

    PubMed Central

    Menais, Timothée; Mossa, Stefano; Buhot, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    Polymer translocation is a promising strategy for the next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. The use of biological and synthetic nano-pores, however, still suffers from serious drawbacks. In particular, the width of the membrane layer can accommodate several bases at the same time, making difficult accurate sequencing applications. More recently, the use of graphene membranes has paved the way to new sequencing capabilities, with the possibility to measure transverse currents, among other advances. The reduced thickness of these new membranes poses new questions on the effect of deformability and vibrations of the membrane on the translocation process, two features which are not taken into account in the well established theoretical frameworks. Here, we make a first step forward in this direction. We report numerical simulation work on a model system simple enough to allow gathering significant insight on the effect of these features on the average translocation time, with appropriate statistical significance. We have found that the interplay between thermal fluctuations and the deformability properties of the nano-pore play a crucial role in determining the process. We conclude by discussing new directions for further work. PMID:27934936

  11. Growth factor deprivation induces cytosolic translocation of SIRT1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Chengbo; Xing, Da; Wu, Shengnan; Huang, Lei

    2010-02-01

    Sirtuin type 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylases, plays a critical role in cellular senescence, aging and longevity. In general, SIRT1 is localized in nucleus and is believed as a nuclear protein. Though overexpression of SIRT1 delays senescence, SIRT1-protein levels decline naturally in thymus and heart during aging. In the present studies, we investigated the subcellular localization of SIRT1 in response to growth factor deprivation in African green monkey SV40-transformed kidney fibroblast cells (COS-7). Using SIRT1-EGFP fluorescence reporter, we found that SIRT1 localized to nucleus in physiological conditions. We devised a model enabling cell senescence via growth factor deprivation, and we found that SIRT1 partially translocated to cytosol under the treatment, suggesting a reduced level of SIRT1's activity. We found PI3K/Akt pathway was involved in the inhibition of SIRT1's cytosolic translocation, because inhibition of these kinases significantly decreased the amount of SIRT1 maintained in nucleus. Taken together, we demonstrated that growth factor deprivation induces cytosolic translocation of SIRT1, which suggesting a possible connection between cytoplasm-localized SIRT1 and the aging process.

  12. Polymer translocation through nano-pores in vibrating thin membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menais, Timothée; Mossa, Stefano; Buhot, Arnaud

    2016-12-01

    Polymer translocation is a promising strategy for the next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. The use of biological and synthetic nano-pores, however, still suffers from serious drawbacks. In particular, the width of the membrane layer can accommodate several bases at the same time, making difficult accurate sequencing applications. More recently, the use of graphene membranes has paved the way to new sequencing capabilities, with the possibility to measure transverse currents, among other advances. The reduced thickness of these new membranes poses new questions on the effect of deformability and vibrations of the membrane on the translocation process, two features which are not taken into account in the well established theoretical frameworks. Here, we make a first step forward in this direction. We report numerical simulation work on a model system simple enough to allow gathering significant insight on the effect of these features on the average translocation time, with appropriate statistical significance. We have found that the interplay between thermal fluctuations and the deformability properties of the nano-pore play a crucial role in determining the process. We conclude by discussing new directions for further work.

  13. Black bears in Arkansas: Characteristics of a successful translocation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kimberly G.; Clark, Joseph D.

    1994-01-01

    In 1958, the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission began translocating black bears (Ursus americanus) from Minnesota to the Interior Highlands (Ozark and Ouachita mountains) of Arkansas where bears had been extirpated early in this century. This project continued for 11 years with little public imput, during which time an estimated 254 bears were released. We estimate there are now >2,500 bears in the Interior Highlands of Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma, making it one of the most successful translocations of a Carnivora. Factors that contributed to the success include use of wild-captured animals, elimination of major factors associated with extirpation, release into prime habitats within the former range, multiple release sites, release of 20–40 animals/year for eight years, and release of mostly males prior to release of mostly females. Studies on two allopatric populations demonstrate that they are now diverging in some demographic characteristics, including litter size, cub survivorship, and adult sex-ratio. Translocation of black bears to the Interior Highlands is successful in terms of numbers of animals, but it will not be truly successful until people accept black bears as part of the regional fauna. To that end, those associated with management and research of bears in Arkansas are now focussing on public education and control of nuisance bears.

  14. Dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Generoso, W.M.

    1983-01-01

    Chromosome aberrations are a major component of radiation or chemically induced genetic damage in mammalian germ cells. The types of aberration produced are dependent upon the mutagen used and the germ-cell stage treated. For example, in male meiotic and postmeiotic germ cells certain alkylating chemicals induce both dominant-lethal mutations and heritable translocations while others induce primarily dominant-lethal mutations. Production of these two endpoints appears to be determined by the stability of alkylation products with the chromosomes. If the reaction products are intact in the male chromosomes at the time of sperm entry, they may be repaired in fertilized eggs. If repair is not effected and the alkylation products persist to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication, they lead to chromatid-type aberrations and eventually to dominant-lethality. The production of heritable translocations, on the other hand, requires a transformation of unstable alkylation products into suitable intermediate lesions. The process by which these lesions are converted into chromosome exchange within the male genome takes place after sperm enters the egg but prior to the time of pronuclear chromosome replication (i.e., chromosome-type). Thus, dominant-lethal mutations result from both chromatid- and chromosome-type aberrations while heritable translocations result primarily from the latter type. DNA target sites associated with the production of these two endpoints are discussed.

  15. Adenoid cystic carcinoma: emerging role of translocations and gene fusions

    PubMed Central

    Wysocki, Piotr T.; Izumchenko, Evgeny; Meir, Juliet; Ha, Patrick K.; Sidransky, David; Brait, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC), the second most common salivary gland malignancy, is notorious for poor prognosis, which reflects the propensity of ACC to progress to clinically advanced metastatic disease. Due to high long-term mortality and lack of effective systemic treatment, the slow-growing but aggressive ACC poses a particular challenge in head and neck oncology. Despite the advancements in cancer genomics, up until recently relatively few genetic alterations critical to the ACC development have been recognized. Although the specific chromosomal translocations resulting in MYB-NFIB fusions provide insight into the ACC pathogenesis and represent attractive diagnostic and therapeutic targets, their clinical significance is unclear, and a substantial subset of ACCs do not harbor the MYB-NFIB translocation. Strategies based on detection of newly described genetic events (such as MYB activating super-enhancer translocations and alterations affecting another member of MYB transcription factor family-MYBL1) offer new hope for improved risk assessment, therapeutic intervention and tumor surveillance. However, the impact of these approaches is still limited by an incomplete understanding of the ACC biology, and the manner by which these alterations initiate and drive ACC remains to be delineated. This manuscript summarizes the current status of gene fusions and other driver genetic alterations in ACC pathogenesis and discusses new therapeutic strategies stemming from the current research. PMID:27533466

  16. Single Nanoparticle Translocation Through Chemically Modified Solid Nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shengwei; Wang, Lei; Liu, Hang; Wu, Hongwen; Liu, Quanjun

    2016-02-01

    The nanopore sensor as a high-throughput and low-cost technology can detect single nanoparticle in solution. In the present study, the silicon nitride nanopores were fabricated by focused Ga ion beam (FIB), and the surface was functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane to change its surface charge density. The positively charged nanopore surface attracted negatively charged nanoparticles when they were in the vicinity of the nanopore. And, nanoparticle translocation speed was slowed down to obtain a clear and deterministic signal. Compared with previous studied small nanoparticles, the electrophoretic translocation of negatively charged polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (diameter ~100 nm) was investigated in solution using the Coulter counter principle in which the time-dependent nanopore current was recorded as the nanoparticles were driven across the nanopore. A linear dependence was found between current drop and biased voltage. An exponentially decaying function ( t d ~ e -v/v0 ) was found between the duration time and biased voltage. The interaction between the amine-functionalized nanopore wall and PS microspheres was discussed while translating PS microspheres. We explored also translocations of PS microspheres through amine-functionalized solid-state nanopores by varying the solution pH (5.4, 7.0, and 10.0) with 0.02 M potassium chloride (KCl). Surface functionalization showed to provide a useful step to fine-tune the surface property, which can selectively transport molecules or particles. This approach is likely to be applied to gene sequencing.

  17. Growth hormone reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irradiated rats.

    PubMed

    Gómez-de-Segura, I A; Prieto, I; Grande, A G; García, P; Guerra, A; Mendez, J; De Miguel, E

    1998-01-01

    Growth hormone stimulates the growth of intestinal mucosa and may reduce the severity of injury caused by radiation. Male Wistar rats underwent abdominal irradiation (12 Gy) and were treated with either human growth hormone (hGH) or saline, and sacrificed at day 4 or 7 post-irradiation. Bacterial translocation, and the ileal mucosal thickness, proliferation, and disaccharidase activity were assessed. Mortality was 65% in irradiated animals, whereas hGH caused a decrement (29%, p < 0.05). Bacterial translocation was also reduced by hGH (p < 0.05). Treating irradiated rats with hGH prevented body weight loss (p < 0.05). Mucosal thickness increased faster in irradiated hGH-treated animals. The proliferative index showed an increment in hGH-treated animals (p < 0.05). Giving hGH to irradiated rats prevented decrease in sucrose activity, and increment in lactase activity. In conclusion, giving hGH to irradiated rats promotes the adaptative process of the intestine and acute radiation-related negative effects, including mortality, bacterial translocation, and weight loss.

  18. Chromosomal translocations in human cells are generated by canonical nonhomologous end-joining

    PubMed Central

    Ghezraoui, Hind; Piganeau, Marion; Renouf, Benjamin; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Sallmyr, Annahita; Ruis, Brian; Oh, Sehyun; Tomkinson, Alan; Hendrickson, Eric A.; Giovannangeli, Carine; Jasin, Maria; Brunet, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Summary Breakpoint junctions of the chromosomal translocations that occur in human cancers display hallmarks of nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). In mouse cells, translocations are suppressed by canonical NHEJ (c-NHEJ) components, which include DNA ligase IV (LIG4), and instead arise from alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ). Here we used designer nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9) to introduce DSBs on two chromosomes to study translocation joining mechanisms in human cells. Remarkably, translocations were altered in cells deficient for LIG4 or its interacting protein XRCC4. Translocation junctions had significantly longer deletions and more microhomology, indicative of alt-NHEJ. Thus, unlike mouse cells, translocations in human cells are generated by c-NHEJ. Human cancer translocations induced by paired Cas9 nicks also showed a dependence on c-NHEJ, despite having distinct joining characteristics. These results demonstrate an unexpected and striking species-specific difference for common genomic rearrangements associated with tumorigenesis. PMID:25201414

  19. Chromosomal translocations in human cells are generated by canonical nonhomologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    Ghezraoui, Hind; Piganeau, Marion; Renouf, Benjamin; Renaud, Jean-Baptiste; Sallmyr, Annahita; Ruis, Brian; Oh, Sehyun; Tomkinson, Alan E; Hendrickson, Eric A; Giovannangeli, Carine; Jasin, Maria; Brunet, Erika

    2014-09-18

    Breakpoint junctions of the chromosomal translocations that occur in human cancers display hallmarks of nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). In mouse cells, translocations are suppressed by canonical NHEJ (c-NHEJ) components, which include DNA ligase IV (LIG4), and instead arise from alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ). Here we used designer nucleases (ZFNs, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9) to introduce DSBs on two chromosomes to study translocation joining mechanisms in human cells. Remarkably, translocations were altered in cells deficient for LIG4 or its interacting protein XRCC4. Translocation junctions had significantly longer deletions and more microhomology, indicative of alt-NHEJ. Thus, unlike mouse cells, translocations in human cells are generated by c-NHEJ. Human cancer translocations induced by paired Cas9 nicks also showed a dependence on c-NHEJ, despite having distinct joining characteristics. These results demonstrate an unexpected and striking species-specific difference for common genomic rearrangements associated with tumorigenesis.

  20. Unbalanced translocation in a mother and her son in one of two 5;10 translocation families

    SciTech Connect

    John, C.K.; Barber, I.; Collinson, M.N.

    1996-03-01

    We present two families with different distal long arm 5;10 translocations. In one family the propositus and his mother inherited the same derived chromosome 10 from the maternal grandfather who has a balanced t(5;10)(q35.3;q26.13). The phenotype of both the affected patients is milder and only partially overlaps with that of previous cases of distal 10q deletion. Other previously reported cases of transmitted imbalance are also remarkable for mild phenotype, occurrence of deletions rather than duplications and a strong bias toward maternal as opposed to paternal transmission. In the second family, the propositus inherited a derived chromosome 10 from his mother who carries a balanced t(5;10)(q35.1;q26.3) translocation; his clinical manifestations are consistent with an emerging phenotype for distal 5q duplications. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. A Survey of Background Noise from Acoustic Frequencies to Optic Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-12-01

    Systelns Division December 1976 C) K I LA-~r NAVAL RESEARCH LABORATORY Washington, D.C. Approved lor public release,. di’dribution unlinmted M. -7...Systems Command (PME 108) DecetibWi- 1976 / Washington, D.C. 20360 13 NUMBER OF PAGES 143 14 MONITORING A5ENCY NAME & AODRESSI’ff different from Controlin~fg...the noise spectrum is noted. Non- Note: Manuscript submitted November 30. 1976 . 1 dependence on wind speed and other evidences indicate that the noise

  2. Poison Domains Block Transit of Translocated Substrates via the Legionella pneumophila Icm/Dot System

    PubMed Central

    Amyot, Whitney M.; deJesus, Dennise

    2013-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila uses the Icm/Dot type 4B secretion system (T4BSS) to deliver translocated protein substrates to the host cell, promoting replication vacuole formation. The conformational state of the translocated substrates within the bacterial cell is unknown, so we sought to determine if folded substrates could be translocated via this system. Fusions of L. pneumophila Icm/Dot-translocated substrates (IDTS) to dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) or ubiquitin (Ub), small proteins known to fold rapidly, resulted in proteins with low translocation efficiencies. The folded moieties did not cause increased aggregation of the IDTS and did not impede interaction with the adaptor protein complex IcmS/IcmW, which is thought to form a soluble complex that promotes translocation. The translocation defect was alleviated with a Ub moiety harboring mutations known to destabilize its structure, indicating that unfolded proteins are preferred substrates. Real-time analysis of translocation, following movement during the first 30 min after bacterial contact with host cells, revealed that the folded moiety caused a kinetic defect in IDTS translocation. Expression of an IDTS fused to a folded moiety interfered with the translocation of other IDTS, consistent with it causing a blockage of the translocation channel. Furthermore, the folded protein fusions also interfered with intracellular growth, consistent with inefficient or impaired translocation of proteins critical for L. pneumophila intracellular growth. These studies indicate that substrates of the Icm/Dot T4SS are translocated to the host cytosol in an unfolded conformation and that folded proteins are stalled within the translocation channel, impairing the function of the secretion system. PMID:23798536

  3. Z > 6 Galaxy Signatures in the Infrared Background and the 21-cm background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, A.

    2006-08-01

    We will discuss the signatures of the high-redshift galaxy formation in the near-infrared background. Ionizing sources at high redshift generically imprint a distinctive Lyman-cutoff feature and a unique spatial anisotropy signature to the IRB, both of which may be detectable in a short rocket flight. We will discuss the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER), a rocket-borne instrument to probe the absolute spectrum and spatial anisotropy of the extragalactic InfraRed Background (IRB) optimized for detection of the integrated spatial anisotropies in the IR background from high-redshift galaxies. We will also discuss the signatures of first galaxies in the low radio frequency 21-cm background from the neutral Hydrogen distribution at z > 6; When combined with arcminute-scale temperature anisotropy and the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, the 21-cm background will allow a determination of inhomogeneous distribution of Lyman-alpha photons from first galaxies. We will discuss these and other possibilities to understand the first galaxy population with IR, 21-cm, and CMB backgrounds.

  4. An Improved Spectral Background Subtraction Method Based on Wavelet Energy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fengkui; Wang, Jian; Wang, Aimin

    2016-12-01

    Most spectral background subtraction methods rely on the difference in frequency response of background compared with characteristic peaks. It is difficult to extract accurately the background components from the spectrum when characteristic peaks and background have overlaps in frequency domain. An improved background estimation algorithm based on iterative wavelet transform (IWT) is presented. The wavelet entropy principle is used to select the best wavelet basis. A criterion based on wavelet energy theory to determine the optimal iteration times is proposed. The case of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy is discussed for illustration. A simulated spectrum with a prior known background and an experimental spectrum are tested. The processing results of the simulated spectrum is compared with non-IWT and it demonstrates the superiority of the IWT. It has great significance to improve the accuracy for spectral analysis.

  5. Absolute calibration and beam background of the Squid Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.M.; Cameron, P.R.; Shea, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    The problem of beam background in Squid Polarimetry is not without residual benefits. The authors may deliberately generate beam background by gently kicking the beam at the spin tune frequency. This signal may be used to accomplish a simple and accurate absolute calibration of the polarimeter. The authors present details of beam background calculations and their application to polarimeter calibration, and suggest a simple proof-of-principle accelerator experiment.

  6. Isolation and analysis of the 21q+ chromosome in the acute myelogenous leukemia 8; 21 translocation: evidence that c-mos is not translocated

    SciTech Connect

    Drabkin, H.A.; Diaz, M.; Bradley, C.M.; Le Beau, M.M.; Rowley, J.D.; Patterson, D.

    1985-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), subgroup M2, is associated with a nonrandom chromosomal translocation, t(8;21)(q22,q22). The oncogene c-mos also has been localized to the q22 band on chromosome 8. There is also evidence that genes on chromosome 21 may be important in the development of leukemia. To determine whether the c-mos oncogene has been translocated in AML-M2 with this translocation and to isolate DNA sequences and genes from these two chromosomes that may be important in malignancy, the authors constructed somatic cell hybrids between a Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO) mutant defective in glycine metabolism and myeloblasts with an 8;21 translocation from a patient with AML. The authors isolated the 21q+ chromosome of this translocation in a somatic cell hybrid and showed that the c-mos oncogene had not been translocated to chromosome 21, ruling out the possibility that translocation of c-mos to chromosome 21 is necessary for development of AML-M2. In addition, there was no detectable rearrangement of the c-mos locus within a 12.4-kilobase region surrounding the gene, indicating that rearrangement of the coding region of the gene itself or alteration of proximal 5' or 3' flanking sequences is not involved. The authors used this hybrid to determine whether specific DNA sequences and biochemical markers from chromosomes 8 and 21 had been translocated in this case.

  7. Isolation and analysis of the 21q+ chromosome in the acute myelogenous leukemia 8;21 translocation: evidence that c-mos is not translocated.

    PubMed

    Drabkin, H A; Diaz, M; Bradley, C M; Le Beau, M M; Rowley, J D; Patterson, D

    1985-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), subgroup M2, is associated with a nonrandom chromosomal translocation, t(8;21)(q22,q22). The oncogene c-mos also has been localized to the q22 band on chromosome 8. There is also evidence that genes on chromosome 21 may be important in the development of leukemia. To determine whether the c-mos oncogene has been translocated in AML-M2 with this translocation and to isolate DNA sequences and genes from these two chromosomes that may be important in malignancy, we constructed somatic cell hybrids between a Chinese hamster ovary cell (CHO) mutant defective in glycine metabolism and myeloblasts with an 8;21 translocation from a patient with AML. We isolated the 21q+ chromosome of this translocation in a somatic cell hybrid and showed that the c-mos oncogene had not been translocated to chromosome 21, ruling out the possibility that translocation of c-mos to chromosome 21 is necessary for development of AML-M2. In addition, there was no detectable rearrangement of the c-mos locus within a 12.4-kilobase region surrounding the gene, indicating that rearrangement of the coding region of the gene itself or alteration of proximal 5' or 3' flanking sequences is not involved. We used this hybrid to determine whether specific DNA sequences and biochemical markers from chromosomes 8 and 21 had been translocated in this case.

  8. Methylation of CpG sites in BCL2 major breakpoint region and the increase of BCL2/JH translocation with aging.

    PubMed

    Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; de Prado, Elena; Ardanaz, Maite; Martin-Arruti, Maialen; Garcia-Orad, Cristina; Guerra, Isabel; Ruiz, Irune; Zabalza, Iñaki; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2015-10-01

    The BCL2 breakage mechanism has been shown to be highly dependent on DNA methylation at the major breakpoint region (MBR) CpG sites. We recently described an increased frequency of BCL2/ JH translocation with aging. It is known that methylation levels change with aging. The present study aimed to determine whether methylation alterations at CpG sites of BCL2 MBR were the cause of increased breakages with aging. We analyzed the methylation levels of three CpG sites on the region by pyrosequencing and studied if methylation levels and/or polymorphisms affecting CpG sites were associated with an increase of translocations. We observed that although the methylation levels of MBR CpG sites were higher in individuals with BCL2/JH translocation, in contrast to our expectations, these levels decreased with the age. Moreover, we show that polymorphisms at those CpG sites leading to absence of methylation seem to be a protective factor for the apparition of translocations.

  9. Antibiotics that bind to the A site of the large ribosomal subunit can induce mRNA translocation.

    PubMed

    Ermolenko, Dmitri N; Cornish, Peter V; Ha, Taekjip; Noller, Harry F

    2013-02-01

    In the absence of elongation factor EF-G, ribosomes undergo spontaneous, thermally driven fluctuation between the pre-translocation (classical) and intermediate (hybrid) states of translocation. These fluctuations do not result in productive mRNA translocation. Extending previous findings that the antibiotic sparsomycin induces translocation, we identify additional peptidyl transferase inhibitors that trigger productive mRNA translocation. We find that antibiotics that bind the peptidyl transferase A site induce mRNA translocation, whereas those that do not occupy the A site fail to induce translocation. Using single-molecule FRET, we show that translocation-inducing antibiotics do not accelerate intersubunit rotation, but act solely by converting the intrinsic, thermally driven dynamics of the ribosome into translocation. Our results support the idea that the ribosome is a Brownian ratchet machine, whose intrinsic dynamics can be rectified into unidirectional translocation by ligand binding.

  10. Fitness costs of neighborhood disruption in translocations of a solitary mammal.

    PubMed

    Shier, Debra M; Swaisgood, Ronald R

    2012-02-01

    Translocation is used to reestablish wild populations of animals, but translocation projects often do not meet their objectives because postrelease mortality of animals is high. One reason for translocation failure is that the behavioral or ecological requirements of released animals are unmet. Maintaining founder-group social relationships during release can affect reestablishment of social species. Solitary territorial species with stable neighbors (restricted dispersal and lifetime occupation of a home range) of the same species may also benefit from the maintenance of these social relationships during translocation. We translocated Stephens' kangaroo rats (Dipodomys stephensi), a solitary species listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, with and without neighboring kangaroo rats. We compared the settlement (establishment of a stable home range) decisions and fitness of kangaroo rats between the 2 treatments. Kangaroo rats translocated with neighbors traveled shorter distances before establishing territories, had higher survival rates, and had significantly higher reproductive success than kangaroo rats translocated without neighbors. Number of offspring was 24-fold higher for kangaroo rats translocated with neighbors than those translocated without neighbors. Differences in behavior following release may partially explain differences in survival between the 2 groups. Immediately following release, animals translocated with neighbors fought less and spent significantly more time foraging and digging burrows than animals translocated without neighbors. Our results indicate that even for solitary species, maintaining relationships among members of a translocated group of animals can influence translocation success. This study is the first empirical demonstration of the fitness consequences of disrupting social relationships among territorial neighbors.

  11. Stable Translocation Intermediates Jam Global Protein Export in Plasmodium falciparum Parasites and Link the PTEX Component EXP2 with Translocation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mesén-Ramírez, Paolo; Reinsch, Ferdinand; Blancke Soares, Alexandra; Bergmann, Bärbel; Ullrich, Ann-Katrin; Tenzer, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Protein export is central for the survival and virulence of intracellular P. falciparum blood stage parasites. To reach the host cell, exported proteins cross the parasite plasma membrane (PPM) and the parasite-enclosing parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM), a process that requires unfolding, suggestive of protein translocation. Components of a proposed translocon at the PVM termed PTEX are essential in this phase of export but translocation activity has not been shown for the complex and questions have been raised about its proposed membrane pore component EXP2 for which no functional data is available in P. falciparum. It is also unclear how PTEX mediates trafficking of both, soluble as well as transmembrane proteins. Taking advantage of conditionally foldable domains, we here dissected the translocation events in the parasite periphery, showing that two successive translocation steps are needed for the export of transmembrane proteins, one at the PPM and one at the PVM. Our data provide evidence that, depending on the length of the C-terminus of the exported substrate, these steps occur by transient interaction of the PPM and PVM translocon, similar to the situation for protein transport across the mitochondrial membranes. Remarkably, we obtained constructs of exported proteins that remained arrested in the process of being translocated across the PVM. This clogged the translocation pore, prevented the export of all types of exported proteins and, as a result, inhibited parasite growth. The substrates stuck in translocation were found in a complex with the proposed PTEX membrane pore component EXP2, suggesting a role of this protein in translocation. These data for the first time provide evidence for EXP2 to be part of a translocating entity, suggesting that PTEX has translocation activity and provide a mechanistic framework for the transport of soluble as well as transmembrane proteins from the parasite boundary into the host cell. PMID:27168322

  12. Discriminability measures for predicting readability of text on textured backgrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharff, L. F.; Hill, A. L.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Several discriminability measures were examined for their ability to predict reading search times for three levels of text contrast and a range of backgrounds (plain, a periodic texture, and four spatial-frequency-filtered textures created from the periodic texture). Search times indicate that these background variations only affect readability when the text contrast is low, and that spatial frequency content of the background affects readability. These results were not well predicted by the single variables of text contrast (Spearman rank correlation = -0.64) and background RMS contrast (0.08), but a global masking index and a spatial-frequency-selective masking index led to better predictions (-0.84 and -0.81, respectively). c2000 Optical Society of America.

  13. Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    An analysis was made of the UF6 fueled gas core reactor as a function of cavity reactor criticality and fluid mechanics tests, investigations of uranium optical emission spectra, and radiant heat transfer power plant studies. Data are also given on nuclear and thermodynamic cycle analysis.

  14. Acute Ethanol Intake Induces NAD(P)H Oxidase Activation and Rhoa Translocation in Resistance Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Simplicio, Janaina A.; Hipólito, Ulisses Vilela; do Vale, Gabriel Tavares; Callera, Glaucia Elena; Pereira, Camila André; Touyz, Rhian M; Tostes, Rita de Cássia; Tirapelli, Carlos R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanism underlying the vascular dysfunction induced by ethanol is not totally understood. Identification of biochemical/molecular mechanisms that could explain such effects is warranted. Objective To investigate whether acute ethanol intake activates the vascular RhoA/Rho kinase pathway in resistance arteries and the role of NAD(P)H oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) on such response. We also evaluated the requirement of p47phox translocation for ethanol-induced NAD(P)H oxidase activation. Methods Male Wistar rats were orally treated with ethanol (1g/kg, p.o. gavage) or water (control). Some rats were treated with vitamin C (250 mg/kg, p.o. gavage, 5 days) before administration of water or ethanol. The mesenteric arterial bed (MAB) was collected 30 min after ethanol administration. Results Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in superoxide anion (O2-) generation and lipoperoxidation in the MAB. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities and the reduced glutathione, nitrate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels were not affected by ethanol. Vitamin C and 4-methylpyrazole prevented the increase on O2- generation induced by ethanol in cultured MAB vascular smooth muscle cells. Ethanol had no effect on phosphorylation levels of protein kinase B (Akt) and eNOS (Ser1177 or Thr495 residues) or MAB vascular reactivity. Vitamin C prevented ethanol-induced increase in the membrane: cytosol fraction ratio of p47phox and RhoA expression in the rat MAB. Conclusion Acute ethanol intake induces activation of the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway by a mechanism that involves ROS generation. In resistance arteries, ethanol activates NAD(P)H oxidase by inducing p47phox translocation by a redox-sensitive mechanism. PMID:27812679

  15. Translocation of Inhaled Ultrafine Manganese Oxide Particles to the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Alison; Gelein, Robert; Silva, Vanessa; Feikert, Tessa; Opanashuk, Lisa; Carter, Janet; Potter, Russell; Maynard, Andrew; Ito, Yasuo; Finkelstein, Jacob; Oberdörster, Günter

    2006-01-01

    Background Studies in monkeys with intranasally instilled gold ultrafine particles (UFPs; < 100 nm) and in rats with inhaled carbon UFPs suggested that solid UFPs deposited in the nose travel along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb. Methods To determine if olfactory translocation occurs for other solid metal UFPs and assess potential health effects, we exposed groups of rats to manganese (Mn) oxide UFPs (30 nm; ~ 500 μg/m3) with either both nostrils patent or the right nostril occluded. We analyzed Mn in lung, liver, olfactory bulb, and other brain regions, and we performed gene and protein analyses. Results After 12 days of exposure with both nostrils patent, Mn concentrations in the olfactory bulb increased 3.5-fold, whereas lung Mn concentrations doubled; there were also increases in striatum, frontal cortex, and cerebellum. Lung lavage analysis showed no indications of lung inflammation, whereas increases in olfactory bulb tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA (~ 8-fold) and protein (~ 30-fold) were found after 11 days of exposure and, to a lesser degree, in other brain regions with increased Mn levels. Macrophage inflammatory protein-2, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and neuronal cell adhesion molecule mRNA were also increased in olfactory bulb. With the right nostril occluded for a 2-day exposure, Mn accumulated only in the left olfactory bulb. Solubilization of the Mn oxide UFPs was < 1.5% per day. Conclusions We conclude that the olfactory neuronal pathway is efficient for translocating inhaled Mn oxide as solid UFPs to the central nervous system and that this can result in inflammatory changes. We suggest that despite differences between human and rodent olfactory systems, this pathway is relevant in humans. PMID:16882521

  16. Simulation studies of DNA translocation through a nanopore (^)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2009-03-01

    The experimental studies of voltage driven translocation of a single stranded DNA through a α-hemolysin pore, have stimulated a lot of activities as the phenomenon is rich in fundamental science involved and its prospective technical applications for detecting DNA/RNA sequences. While it is the attributes of heteropolymer translocation that are the key ingredients for prospective new sequencing methods, these experiments have generated stimulating theoretical and numerical studies directed toward a seemingly much simpler problem of homopolymer translocation through a nanopore. The earlier theoretical work of Muthukumar, Sung and Park, and by Kardar and his collaboartors^2 have been supplemented by more recent theoretical work by Dubbledam et. al and Panja et. al^3. During this talk I will show results from Langevin dynamics simulation carried out on a coarse-garined bead-spring model of DNA-polymer both for the unbiased and driven translocation^4. During the first part of the talk, after a brief review of the current theories of DNA translocation, specifically mentioning the underlying assumptions, I will compare simulation results with those predicted by different theories. Particularly, I will show numerical results for the translocation exponent α defined as <τ>˜N^α and the exponent for the s-coordinate β defined as ˜&βcirc;, and discuss how the numerical values differ as one chooses slightly different pore width and geometry. In the second part of my talk I show how a model attractive nanopore can distinguish the sequence of a heteropolymer^4 and discuss possibility of making a device based on this idea. ^work done in collaboration with Kaifu Luo, Tapio Ala-Nissila, See-chen Yin, Andrey Milchev and Kurt Binder^1J. J. Kasianowiczs, E. Brandin, D. Branton and D. W. Deamer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 93, 13770 (1996).^2W. Sung and P. J. Park, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 783 (1996); M. Muthukumar, J. Chem. Phys. 111, 10371 (1999); J. Chuang, Y. Kantor

  17. Size-Dependent Deposition, Translocation, and Microglial Activation of Inhaled Silver Nanoparticles in the Rodent Nose and Brain

    PubMed Central

    Patchin, Esther Shin; Anderson, Donald S.; Silva, Rona M.; Uyeminami, Dale L.; Scott, Grace M.; Guo, Ting; Van Winkle, Laura S.; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are present in personal, commercial, and industrial products, which are often aerosolized. Current understanding of the deposition, translocation, and health-related impacts of AgNP inhalation is limited. Objectives: We determined a) the deposition and retention of inhaled Ag in the nasal cavity from nose-only exposure; b) the timing for Ag translocation to and retention/clearance in the olfactory bulb (OB); and c) whether the presence of Ag in the OB affects microglial activity. Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed nose-only to citrate-buffered 20- or 110-nm AgNP (C20 or C110, respectively) or citrate buffer alone for 6 hr. The nasal cavity and OB were examined for the presence of Ag and for biological responses up to 56 days post-exposure (8 weeks). Results: The highest nasal Ag deposition was observed on Day 0 for both AgNP sizes. Inhalation of aerosolized C20 resulted in rapid translocation of Ag to the OB and in microglial activation at Days 0, 1, and 7. In contrast, inhalation of C110 resulted in a gradual but progressive transport of Ag to and retention in the OB, with a trend for microglial activation to variably be above control. Conclusions: The results of this study show that after rats experienced a 6-hr inhalation exposure to 20- and 110-nm AgNP at a single point in time, Ag deposition in the nose, the rate of translocation to the brain, and subsequent microglial activation in the OB differed depending on AgNP size and time since exposure. Citation: Patchin ES, Anderson DS, Silva RM, Uyeminami DL, Scott GM, Guo T, Van Winkle LS, Pinkerton KE. 2016. Size-dependent deposition, translocation, and microglial activation of inhaled silver nanoparticles in the rodent nose and brain. Environ Health Perspect 124:1870–1875; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP234 PMID:27152509

  18. Mitochondrial function in Antarctic nototheniids with ND6 translocation.

    PubMed

    Mark, Felix C; Lucassen, Magnus; Strobel, Anneli; Barrera-Oro, Esteban; Koschnick, Nils; Zane, Lorenzo; Patarnello, Tomaso; Pörtner, Hans O; Papetti, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Fish of the suborder Notothenioidei have successfully radiated into the Southern Ocean and today comprise the dominant fish sub-order in Antarctic waters in terms of biomass and species abundance. During evolution in the cold and stable Antarctic climate, the Antarctic lineage of notothenioids developed several unique physiological adaptations, which make them extremely vulnerable to the rapid warming of Antarctic waters currently observed. Only recently, a further phenomenon exclusive to notothenioid fish was reported: the translocation of the mitochondrial gene encoding the NADH Dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6), an indispensable part of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport system.This study investigated the potential physiological consequences of ND6 translocation for the function and thermal sensitivity of the electron transport system in isolated liver mitochondria of the two nototheniid species Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii, with special attention to the contributions of complex I (NADH DH) and complex II (Succinate DH) to oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, enzymatic activities of NADH:Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase and Cytochrome C Oxidase were measured in membrane-enriched tissue extracts.During acute thermal challenge (0-15°C), capacities of mitochondrial respiration and enzymatic function in the liver could only be increased until 9°C. Mitochondrial complex I (NADH Dehydrogenase) was fully functional but displayed a higher thermal sensitivity than the other complexes of the electron transport system, which may specifically result from its unique amino acid composition, revealing a lower degree of stability in notothenioids in general. We interpret the translocation of ND6 as functionally neutral but the change in amino acid sequence as adaptive and supportive of cold stenothermy in Antarctic nototheniids. From these findings, an enhanced sensitivity to ocean warming can be deduced for Antarctic notothenioid fish.

  19. Mitochondrial Function in Antarctic Nototheniids with ND6 Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Felix C.; Lucassen, Magnus; Strobel, Anneli; Barrera-Oro, Esteban; Koschnick, Nils; Zane, Lorenzo; Patarnello, Tomaso; Pörtner, Hans O.; Papetti, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Fish of the suborder Notothenioidei have successfully radiated into the Southern Ocean and today comprise the dominant fish sub-order in Antarctic waters in terms of biomass and species abundance. During evolution in the cold and stable Antarctic climate, the Antarctic lineage of notothenioids developed several unique physiological adaptations, which make them extremely vulnerable to the rapid warming of Antarctic waters currently observed. Only recently, a further phenomenon exclusive to notothenioid fish was reported: the translocation of the mitochondrial gene encoding the NADH Dehydrogenase subunit 6 (ND6), an indispensable part of complex I in the mitochondrial electron transport system. This study investigated the potential physiological consequences of ND6 translocation for the function and thermal sensitivity of the electron transport system in isolated liver mitochondria of the two nototheniid species Notothenia coriiceps and Notothenia rossii, with special attention to the contributions of complex I (NADH DH) and complex II (Succinate DH) to oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, enzymatic activities of NADH∶Cytochrome c Oxidoreductase and Cytochrome C Oxidase were measured in membrane-enriched tissue extracts. During acute thermal challenge (0–15°C), capacities of mitochondrial respiration and enzymatic function in the liver could only be increased until 9°C. Mitochondrial complex I (NADH Dehydrogenase) was fully functional but displayed a higher thermal sensitivity than the other complexes of the electron transport system, which may specifically result from its unique amino acid composition, revealing a lower degree of stability in notothenioids in general. We interpret the translocation of ND6 as functionally neutral but the change in amino acid sequence as adaptive and supportive of cold stenothermy in Antarctic nototheniids. From these findings, an enhanced sensitivity to ocean warming can be deduced for Antarctic notothenioid fish. PMID

  20. Biopersistence and Brain Translocation of Aluminum Adjuvants of Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Gherardi, Romain Kroum; Eidi, Housam; Crépeaux, Guillemette; Authier, François Jerome; Cadusseau, Josette

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum oxyhydroxide (alum) is a crystalline compound widely used as an immunological adjuvant of vaccines. Concerns linked to the use of alum particles emerged following recognition of their causative role in the so-called macrophagic myofasciitis (MMF) lesion detected in patients with myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue/syndrome. MMF revealed an unexpectedly long-lasting biopersistence of alum within immune cells in presumably susceptible individuals, stressing the previous fundamental misconception of its biodisposition. We previously showed that poorly biodegradable aluminum-coated particles injected into muscle are promptly phagocytosed in muscle and the draining lymph nodes, and can disseminate within phagocytic cells throughout the body and slowly accumulate in brain. This strongly suggests that long-term adjuvant biopersistence within phagocytic cells is a prerequisite for slow brain translocation and delayed neurotoxicity. The understanding of basic mechanisms of particle biopersistence and brain translocation represents a major health challenge, since it could help to define susceptibility factors to develop chronic neurotoxic damage. Biopersistence of alum may be linked to its lysosome-destabilizing effect, which is likely due to direct crystal-induced rupture of phagolysosomal membranes. Macrophages that continuously perceive foreign particles in their cytosol will likely reiterate, with variable interindividual efficiency, a dedicated form of autophagy (xenophagy) until they dispose of alien materials. Successful compartmentalization of particles within double membrane autophagosomes and subsequent fusion with repaired and re-acidified lysosomes will expose alum to lysosomal acidic pH, the sole factor that can solubilize alum particles. Brain translocation of alum particles is linked to a Trojan horse mechanism previously described for infectious particles (HIV, HCV), that obeys to CCL2, signaling the major inflammatory monocyte chemoattractant

  1. Cytogenetic and molecular characteristics of 25 Chilean patients with a variant Ph translocation.

    PubMed

    Legues, Maria E; Encina, Andrea; Valenzuela, Mercedes; Palma, Tamara; Undurraga, Maria S

    2011-07-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized by the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph), which results from a balanced translocation between chromosomes 9 and 22, the t(9;22)(q34;q11.2). In 5-10% of the cases, variants of the Ph (vPh) are detected, involving various breakpoints in addition to 9q34 and 22q11.2. Deletions on the der(9) and der(22) can be detected in approximately 10-15% of CML patients. The frequency of a deletion of the der(9) in vPh CML is variable. Most studies have shown high frequencies (30-45%) in this subgroup. We report the cytogenetic evaluation of 25 vPh cases, which represents 6.8% of the CML cases diagnosed at one institution in 20 years. The breakpoints of the partners of the vPh in our patients agree with those reported previously, except for a novel 18q23. We found a low incidence of deletions of the der(9) (10%) and der(22) (5%) in these patients, contrasting with several reports in the literature. This finding may reflect the extensive spectrum of aberrations in vPh, and the possibility that a considerable group of these aberrations may not affect the genetic stability of 5'ABL1 and 3'BCR. Epidemiologic differences may also exist and could explain our results. These differences would require further investigation.

  2. Intercellular carbon nanotube translocation assessed by flow cytometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Marangon, Iris; Boggetto, Nicole; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Venturelli, Enrica; Béoutis, Marie-Lys; Péchoux, Christine; Luciani, Nathalie; Wilhelm, Claire; Bianco, Alberto; Gazeau, Florence

    2012-09-12

    The fate of carbon nanotubes in the organism is still controversial. Here, we propose a statistical high-throughput imaging method to localize and quantify functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes in cells. We give the first experimental evidence of an intercellular translocation of carbon nanotubes. This stress-induced longitudinal transfer of nanomaterials is mediated by cell-released microvesicles known as vectors for intercellular communication. This finding raises new critical issues for nanotoxicology, since carbon nanotubes could be disseminated by circulating extracellular cell-released vesicles and visiting several cells in the course of their passage into the organism.

  3. Seaside transportation—from structure to function of translocation machines

    PubMed Central

    Lithgow, Trevor; Waksman, Gabriel

    2013-01-01

    The EMBO conference ‘From Structure to Function of Translocation Machines' took place in April 2013 in Dubrovnik, Croatia. The meeting brought together a mix of established and aspiring researchers to discuss a wealth of unpublished data and ideas in a lively scientific programme of talks designed to shatter the established dogma. From new ways to envisage known protein transport pathways to a brand new and totally unconventional protein transport system, surprises were part and parcel of this excellent EMBO conference. PMID:23764920

  4. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  5. Genetic background of Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis.

    PubMed

    Saari, M; Vuorre, I; Tiilikainen, A; Algvere, P

    1978-10-01

    We studied the genetic background of 24 patients with Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis (FHC). Each was given a careful eye examination which included family history and serological determination of HLA antigens. Two families each had 2 cases of FHC in the same family; in addition an ancestor in the second family possibly had FHC; in both families one healthy member had simple heterochromia. One patient with FHC had congenital uveal coloboma, one pigmentary retinal dystrophy, and four had cysts of the ciliary body. The frequencies of all HLA antigens in patients with FHC compared well with the frequencies in the controls. In a family in which HLA haplotypes could be derived, the patients with FHC showed different HLA haplotypes. We conclude that FHC has a hereditary basis but its immunological component is not genetically associated with the HLA system.

  6. Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization and Inflation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuss, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) offer a means to explore the universe at a very early epoch. Specifically, if the universe went through a brief period of exponential expansion called inflation as current data suggest, gravitational waves from this period would polarize the CMB in a specific pattern. At GSFC, we are currently working towards two experiments that work in concert to measure this polarization pattern in search of evidence for inflation. The Cosmology Large Angular Scale Surveyor (CLASS) will measure the polarization at frequencies between 40 and 150 GHz from the Atacama Desert in Chile. The Primordial Inflation Polarization Explorer (PIPER) is a balloon-borne experiment that will make similar measurements at frequencies between 200 and 600 GHz.

  7. Salt dependence of DNA translocation dynamics through silicon nanopores detected by ultraviolet excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Shintaro; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Tsukahara, Mutsumi; Esashika, Keiko; Saiki, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    DNA translocation through nanopores was observed using ultraviolet excitation to investigate the effect of salt concentration and counterion species on the translocation speed. The translocation of 9.6-kbp DNA molecules was measured in an aqueous solvent containing KCl, NaCl, or LiCl. An increase in the KCl concentration from 0.5 to 2 M increased the DNA translocation time. Maintaining the salt concentration at 1.0 M but replacing KCl with NaCl or LiCl also increased the translocation time. These results suggest that the effective charge on the DNA changed due to the binding of counterions, decreasing the DNA electrophoretic mobility. Significant correlation was observed between the translocation time and the dwell time in the observation volume (time needed to move out of the observation volume), and a possible explanation for this observation is provided.

  8. Use of chromosome translocations for measuring prior environment exposures in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    Recent advances in cytogenetic methodology are beginning to have a major impact upon our ability to provide assessments of environmental exposure in humans. The advent of fluorescent-based techniques for `painting` whole chromosomes has made the analysis of chromosome translocations rapid, specific, sensitive and routine. Chromosome painting has been used to address a wide variety of scientific questions, resulting in an increased understanding of the biological consequences of adverse environmental exposure. This paper describes the use of chromosome translocations as a biological marker of exposure and effect in humans. The relevance of translocations is discussed, as are the advantages and disadvantages of painting compared to classical cytogenetic methods for translocation evaluation. The factors to consider in the use of translocations as a retrospective indicator of exposure are then described. Several theoretical parameters that are important to the use of translocations are provided, and the paper concludes with a vision for the future of cytogenetic methodology.

  9. Akt phosphorylation is essential for nuclear translocation and retention in NGF-stimulated PC12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Truong Le Xuan Nguyen; Choi, Joung Woo; Lee, Sang Bae; Ye, Keqiang; Woo, Soo-Dong; Lee, Kyung-Hoon; Ahn, Jee-Yin . E-mail: jyahn@med.skku.ac.kr

    2006-10-20

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) elicits Akt translocation into the nucleus, where it phosphorylates nuclear targets. Here, we describe that Akt phosphorylation can promote the nuclear translocation of Akt and is necessary for its nuclear retention. Overexpression of Akt-K179A, T308A, S473A-mutant failed to show either nuclear translocation or nuclear Akt phosphorylation, whereas expression of wild-type counterpart elicited profound Akt phosphorylation and induced nuclear translocation under NGF stimulation. Employing the PI3K inhibitor and a variety of mutants PI3K, we showed that nuclear translocation of Akt was mediated by activation of PI3K, and Akt phosphorylation status in the nucleus required PI3K activity. Thus the activity of PI3K might contribute to the nuclear translocation of Akt, and that Akt phosphorylation is essential for its nuclear retention under NGF stimulation conditions.

  10. Conversion of graded phosphorylation into switch-like nuclear translocation via autoregulatory mechanisms in ERK signalling

    PubMed Central

    Shindo, Yuki; Iwamoto, Kazunari; Mouri, Kazunari; Hibino, Kayo; Tomita, Masaru; Kosako, Hidetaka; Sako, Yasushi; Takahashi, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    The phosphorylation cascade in the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is a versatile reaction network motif that can potentially act as a switch, oscillator or memory. Nevertheless, there is accumulating evidence that the phosphorylation response is mostly linear to extracellular signals in mammalian cells. Here we find that subsequent nuclear translocation gives rise to a switch-like increase in nuclear ERK concentration in response to signal input. The switch-like response disappears in the presence of ERK inhibitor, suggesting the existence of autoregulatory mechanisms for ERK nuclear translocation involved in conversion from a graded to a switch-like response. In vitro reconstruction of ERK nuclear translocation indicates that ERK-mediated phosphorylation of nucleoporins regulates ERK translocation. A mathematical model and knockdown experiments suggest a contribution of nucleoporins to regulation of the ERK nuclear translocation response. Taken together, this study provides evidence that nuclear translocation with autoregulatory mechanisms acts as a switch in ERK signalling. PMID:26786866

  11. Microbial translocation and microbiome dsybiosis in HIV-associated immune activation

    PubMed Central

    Zevin, Alexander S.; McKinnon, Lyle; Burgener, Adam; Klatt, Nichole R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review To describe the mechanisms and consequences of both microbial translocation and microbial dysbiosis in HIV infection. Recent Findings Microbes in HIV are likely playing a large role in contributing to HIV pathogenesis, morbidities and mortality. Two major disruptions to microbial systems in HIV infection include microbial translocation and microbiome dysbiosis. Microbial translocation occurs when the bacteria (or bacterial products) that should be in the lumen of the intestine translocate across the tight epithelial barrier into systemic circulation, where they contribute to inflammation and pathogenesis. This is associated with poorer health outcomes in HIV infected individuals. In addition, microbial populations in the GI tract are also altered after HIV infection, resulting in microbiome dysbiosis, which further exacerbates microbial translocation, epithelial barrier disruption, inflammation, and mucosal immune functioning. Summary Altered microbial regulation in HIV infection can lead to poor health outcomes, and understanding the mechanisms underlying microbial dysbiosis and translocation may result in novel pathways for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26679414

  12. Survival of translocated sharp-tailed grouse: Temporal threshold and age effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mathews, Steven; Coates, Peter S.; Delehanty, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Context: The Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) is a subspecies of conservation concern in the western United States, currently occupying ≤10% of its historic range. Land and management agencies are employing translocation techniques to restore Columbian sharp-tailed grouse (CSTG) populations. However, establishing self-sustaining populations by translocating grouse often is unsuccessful, owing, in part, to low survivorship of translocated grouse following release.Aims: We measured and modelled patterns of CSTG mortality for 150 days following translocation into historic range, to better understand patterns and causes of success or failure in conservation efforts to re-establish grouse populations.Methods: We conducted two independent multi-year translocations and evaluated individual and temporal factors associated with CSTG survival up to 150 days following their release. Both translocations were reintroduction attempts in Nevada, USA, to establish viable populations of CSTG into their historic range.Key results: We observed a clear temporal threshold in survival probability, with CSTG mortality substantially higher during the first 50 days following release than during the subsequent 100 days. Additionally, translocated yearling grouse exhibited higher overall survival (0.669 ± 0.062) than did adults (0.420 ± 0.052) across the 150-day period and higher survival than adults both before and after the 50-day temporal threshold.Conclusions: Translocated CSTG are especially vulnerable to mortality for 50 days following release, whereas translocated yearling grouse are more resistant to mortality than are adult grouse. On the basis of the likelihood of survival, yearling CSTG are better candidates for population restoration through translocation than are adult grouse.Implications: Management actions that ameliorate mortality factors for 50 days following translocation and translocations that employ yearling grouse will

  13. Translocation of C in the sugarcane plant during the day and night.

    PubMed

    Hartt, C E; Kortschak, H P

    1967-01-01

    The time-course of translocation of (14)C from the blades of the sugarcane plant was investigated by analysis and radioactive counting of successive samples punched from a single blade. In 1 experiment, the time-course was studied by determining the specific activity of the carbon dioxide respired by the roots.The rate of translocation, expressed as percentage, was highest immediately after the application of the radioactive carbon dioxide. Morning-made photosynthate translocated a higher percentage during the morning than during the afternoon in 90-minute periods in the light. Afternoon-made photosynthate translocated as well or better than morning-made photosynthate for the first hour in the light.The leaf-disk data and the specific activity of the carbon dioxide respired by the roots corresponded by showing lower rates of translocation by night than by day for several successive days. Also, the translocation of (12)C sucrose was slower at night.The (14)C sucrose translocated by day was made primarily by photosynthesis; the sucrose translocated by night was made primarily by the conversion of other labeled compounds, e.g. organic acids, organic phosphates, and insoluble residue.The radioactive constituent of the residue, which was converted to sucrose, was tentatively identified as a glucose-xylose-glucuronic acid hemicellulose, with most or all of the (14)C in the glucose moiety.Translocation of sucrose may be triggered by different mechanisms during the night than the day. The conversion of insoluble residue to sucrose by increasing the osmotic potential at the source would favor a pressure-flow mechanism for nocturnal translocation; whereas translocation by day is thought to be a process of phototranslocation, a photoactivation of the translocation mechanism.

  14. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  15. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  16. Balanced Autosomal Translocations in Two Women Reporting Recurrent Miscarriage

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Brindha; Samuel, Chandra R

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous abortion or loss of fetus prior to 20 weeks of gestation is observed in 15-20% of clinically recognized pregnancies. Recurrent Miscarriage (RM) is defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses and it affects 1-2% of women. Parental chromosomal rearrangements account for 2-5% of RM. This report describes two couples with a clinical history of RM who were subjected to conventional cytogenetic analysis to ascertain the chromosomal aetiology. Analysis of GTG-banded metaphases obtained from cultured lymphocytes at approximately 500-band resolution revealed balanced translocation in the female spouses as 46,XX,t(8;11)(p11.2;q23.3) in BR27W and 46,XX,t(5;7)(p15.1;q32) pat in BR49W. Both the male partners exhibited 46,XY karyotype. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) analysis was subsequently carried out to confirm the balanced translocation using suitable whole chromosome paint probes. These balanced chromosomal abnormalities in the parents could be responsible for the repeated fetal losses. Hence, karyotype analysis should be a mandatory etiological investigation for couples with RM towards genetic counselling. Disruption of critical genes through these rearrangements could also underlie the pregnancy outcome. PMID:28208880

  17. Translocation of the neonicotinoid seed treatment clothianidin in maize

    PubMed Central

    Krupke, Christian H.

    2017-01-01

    Neonicotinoid seed treatments, typically clothianidin or thiamethoxam, are routinely applied to >80% of maize (corn) seed grown in North America where they are marketed as a targeted pesticide delivery system. Despite this widespread use, the amount of compound translocated into plant tissue from the initial seed treatment to provide protection has not been reported. Our two year field study compared concentrations of clothianidin seed treatments in maize to that of maize without neonicotinoid seed treatments and found neonicotinoids present in root tissues up to 34 days post planting. Plant-bound clothianidin concentrations followed an exponential decay pattern with initially high values followed by a rapid decrease within the first ~20 days post planting. A maximum of 1.34% of the initial seed treatment was successfully recovered from plant tissues in both study years and a maximum of 0.26% was recovered from root tissue. Our findings show neonicotinoid seed treatments may provide protection from some early season secondary maize pests. However, the proportion of the neonicotinoid seed treatment clothianidin translocated into plant tissues throughout the growing season is low overall and this observation may provide a mechanism to explain reports of inconsistent efficacy of this pest management approach and increasing detections of environmental neonicotinoids. PMID:28282441

  18. Translocation of the neonicotinoid seed treatment clothianidin in maize.

    PubMed

    Alford, Adam; Krupke, Christian H

    2017-01-01

    Neonicotinoid seed treatments, typically clothianidin or thiamethoxam, are routinely applied to >80% of maize (corn) seed grown in North America where they are marketed as a targeted pesticide delivery system. Despite this widespread use, the amount of compound translocated into plant tissue from the initial seed treatment to provide protection has not been reported. Our two year field study compared concentrations of clothianidin seed treatments in maize to that of maize without neonicotinoid seed treatments and found neonicotinoids present in root tissues up to 34 days post planting. Plant-bound clothianidin concentrations followed an exponential decay pattern with initially high values followed by a rapid decrease within the first ~20 days post planting. A maximum of 1.34% of the initial seed treatment was successfully recovered from plant tissues in both study years and a maximum of 0.26% was recovered from root tissue. Our findings show neonicotinoid seed treatments may provide protection from some early season secondary maize pests. However, the proportion of the neonicotinoid seed treatment clothianidin translocated into plant tissues throughout the growing season is low overall and this observation may provide a mechanism to explain reports of inconsistent efficacy of this pest management approach and increasing detections of environmental neonicotinoids.

  19. Cardiolipin Prevents Membrane Translocation and Permeabilization by Daptomycin*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, TianHua; Muraih, Jawad K.; Tishbi, Nasim; Herskowitz, Jennifer; Victor, Rachel L.; Silverman, Jared; Uwumarenogie, Stephanie; Taylor, Scott D.; Palmer, Michael; Mintzer, Evan

    2014-01-01

    Daptomycin is an acidic lipopeptide antibiotic that, in the presence of calcium, forms oligomeric pores on membranes containing phosphatidylglycerol. It is clinically used against various Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species. Genetic studies have indicated that an increased content of cardiolipin in the bacterial membrane may contribute to bacterial resistance against the drug. Here, we used a liposome model to demonstrate that cardiolipin directly inhibits membrane permeabilization by daptomycin. When cardiolipin is added at molar fractions of 10 or 20% to membranes containing phosphatidylglycerol, daptomycin no longer forms pores or translocates to the inner membrane leaflet. Under the same conditions, daptomycin continues to form oligomers; however, these oligomers contain only close to four subunits, which is approximately half as many as observed on membranes without cardiolipin. The collective findings lead us to propose that a daptomycin pore consists of two aligned tetramers in opposite leaflets and that cardiolipin prevents the translocation of tetramers to the inner leaflet, thereby forestalling the formation of complete, octameric pores. Our findings suggest a possible mechanism by which cardiolipin may mediate resistance to daptomycin, and they provide new insights into the action mode of this important antibiotic. PMID:24616102

  20. Bacterial translocation: a potential source for infection in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Gianotti, L; Munda, R; Alexander, J W; Tchervenkov, J I; Babcock, G F

    1993-09-01

    Infections from enteric bacteria are a major cause of morbidity and mortality during acute pancreatitis (AP), but the pathways by which these organisms reach distant organs remains speculative. Experiments were conducted to determine if bacterial translocation could be a mechanism for infection during this disease. AP was induced in Lewis rats by i.v. infusion of caerulein (experiment I) or ligation of the head of the pancreas (experiment II). In a third experiment, rats were gavaged with 1 x 10(8) 14C-radiolabeled Escherichia coli and pancreatitis was induced with caerulein. Results in all three experiments showed that AP increased the number of viable bacteria recovered in peritoneal fluid, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, lungs, and pancreas. Radionuclide counting indicated that AP enhanced the gut permeability to 14C E. coli. To estimate the impact of AP on the magnitude of translocation and on the ability of the host to clear bacteria, the nuclide and colony-forming units (CFU) ratios were calculated between animals with and without AP. Blood, peritoneal fluid, and MLN had the highest nuclide ratio. During AP, these tissues may be the principal routes for bacterial spreading from the gut lumen. Peritoneal fluid, pancreas, and lung were the tissues with the highest CFU ratio. Bacterial killing ability of these tissues is likely impaired during AP.

  1. Molecular determinants of nucleolar translocation of RNA helicase A

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Zhe; Kenworthy, Rachael; Green, Christopher; Tang, Hengli

    2007-10-15

    RNA helicase A (RHA) is a member of the DEAH-box family of DNA/RNA helicases involved in multiple cellular processes and the life cycles of many viruses. The subcellular localization of RHA is dynamic despite its steady-state concentration in the nucleoplasm. We have previously shown that it shuttles rapidly between the nucleus and the cytoplasm by virtue of a bidirectional nuclear transport domain (NTD) located in its carboxyl terminus. Here, we investigate the molecular determinants for its translocation within the nucleus and, more specifically, its redistribution from the nucleoplasm to nucleolus or the perinucleolar region. We found that low temperature treatment, transcription inhibition or replication of hepatitis C virus caused the intranuclear redistribution of the protein, suggesting that RHA shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm and becomes trapped in the nucleolus or the perinucleolar region upon blockade of transport to the nucleoplasm. Both the NTD and ATPase activity were essential for RHA's transport to the nucleolus or perinucleolar region. One of the double-stranded RNA binding domains (dsRBD II) was also required for this nucleolar translocation (NoT) phenotype. RNA interference studies revealed that RHA is essential for survival of cultured hepatoma cells and the ATPase activity appears to be important for this critical role.

  2. Translocation of structural P proteins in the phloem.

    PubMed Central

    Golecki, B; Schulz, A; Thompson, G A

    1999-01-01

    Phloem-specific proteins (P proteins) are particularly useful markers to investigate long-distance trafficking of macromolecules in plants. In this study, genus-specific molecular probes were used in combination with intergeneric grafts to reveal the presence of a pool of translocatable P protein subunits. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that Cucurbita spp P proteins PP1 and PP2 are translocated from Cucurbita maxima stocks and accumulate in Cucumis sativus scions. Cucurbita maxima or Cucurbita ficifolia PP1 and PP2 mRNAs were not detected in Cucumis sativus scions by either RNA gel blot analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, indicating that the proteins, rather than transcripts, are translocated. Tissue prints of the Cucumis sativus scion, using antibodies raised against Cucurbita maxima PP1 or PP2, detected both proteins in the fascicular phloem of the stem at points distal to the graft union and in the petiole of a developing leaf, suggesting that the proteins move within the assimilate stream toward sink tissues. Cucurbita maxima PP1 was immunolocalized by light microscopy in sieve elements of the extrafascicular phloem of Cucumis sativus scions, whereas Cucurbita maxima PP2 was detected in both sieve elements and companion cells. PMID:9878637

  3. Novel class of potential therapeutics that target ricin retrograde translocation.

    PubMed

    Redmann, Veronika; Gardner, Thomas; Lau, Zerlina; Morohashi, Keita; Felsenfeld, Dan; Tortorella, Domenico

    2013-12-23

    Ricin toxin, an A-B toxin from Ricinus communis, induces cell death through the inhibition of protein synthesis. The toxin binds to the cell surface via its B chain (RTB) followed by its retrograde trafficking through intracellular compartments to the ER where the A chain (RTA) is transported across the membrane and into the cytosol. Ricin A chain is transported across the ER membrane utilizing cellular proteins involved in the disposal of aberrant ER proteins by a process referred to as retrograde translocation. Given the current lack of therapeutics against ricin intoxication, we developed a high-content screen using an enzymatically attenuated RTA chimera engineered with a carboxy-terminal enhanced green fluorescent protein (RTA(E177Q)egfp) to identify compounds that target RTA retrograde translocation. Stabilizing RTA(E177Q)egfp through the inclusion of proteasome inhibitor produced fluorescent peri-nuclear granules. Quantitative analysis of the fluorescent granules provided the basis to discover compounds from a small chemical library (2080 compounds) with known bioactive properties. Strikingly, the screen found compounds that stabilized RTA molecules within the cell and several compounds limited the ability of wild type RTA to suppress protein synthesis. Collectively, a robust high-content screen was developed to discover novel compounds that stabilize intracellular ricin and limit ricin intoxication.

  4. Aspartic acid substitutions affect proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Mogi, T; Stern, L J; Marti, T; Chao, B H; Khorana, H G

    1988-01-01

    We have substituted each of the aspartic acid residues in bacteriorhodopsin to determine their possible role in proton translocation by this protein. The aspartic acid residues were replaced by asparagines; in addition, Asp-85, -96, -115, and -112 were changed to glutamic acid and Asp-212 was also replaced by alanine. The mutant bacteriorhodopsin genes were expressed in Escherichia coli and the proteins were purified. The mutant proteins all regenerated bacteriorhodopsin-like chromophores when treated with a detergent-phospholipid mixture and retinal. However, the rates of regeneration of the chromophores and their lambda max varied widely. No support was obtained for the external point charge model for the opsin shift. The Asp-85----Asn mutant showed not detectable proton pumping, the Asp-96----Asn and Asp-212----Glu mutants showed less than 10% and the Asp-115----Glu mutant showed approximately equal to 30% of the normal proton pumping. The implications of these findings for possible mechanisms of proton translocation by bacteriorhodopsin are discussed. PMID:3288985

  5. Deconvoluting chain heterogeneity from driven translocation through a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2015-02-01

    We study translocation dynamics of a driven compressible semi-flexible chain consisting of alternate blocks of stiff (S) and flexible (F) segments of size m and n, respectively, for different chain length N in two dimensions (2D). The free parameters in the model are the bending rigidity κb which controls the three-body interaction term, the elastic constant kF in the FENE (bond) potential between successive monomers, as well as the segmental lengths m and n and the repeat unit p (N=m_pn_p) and the solvent viscosity γ. We demonstrate that due to the change in entropic barrier and the inhomogeneous viscous drag on the chain backbone a variety of scenarios are possible, amply manifested in the waiting time distribution of the translocating chain. This information can be deconvoluted to extract the mechanical properties of the chain at various length scales and thus can be used to nanopore based methods to probe bio-molecules, such as DNA, RNA and proteins.

  6. Background events in microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Wargelin, B.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements have been made to assess the characteristics and origins of background events in microchannel plates (MCPs). An overall background rate of about 0.4 events/sq cm persec has been achieved consistently for MCPs that have been baked and scrubbed. The temperature and gain of the MCPs are found to have no significant effect on the background rate. Detection of 1.46-MeV gamma rays from the MCP glass confirms the presence of K-40, with a concentration of 0.0007 percent, in MCP glass. It is shown that beta decay from K-40 is sufficient to cause the background rate and spectrum observed. Anticoincidence measurements indicate the the background rate caused by cosmic ray interactions is small (less than 0.016 events/sq cm per sec).

  7. A G-Protein Subunit Translocation Embedded Network Motif Underlies GPCR Regulation of Calcium Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Lopamudra; Patel, Anilkumar K.; Karunarathne, W.K. Ajith; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Venkatesh, K.V.; Gautam, N.

    2014-01-01

    G-protein βγ subunits translocate reversibly from the plasma membrane to internal membranes on receptor activation. Translocation rates differ depending on the γ subunit type. There is limited understanding of the role of the differential rates of Gβγ translocation in modulating signaling dynamics in a cell. Bifurcation analysis of the calcium oscillatory network structure predicts that the translocation rate of a signaling protein can regulate the damping of system oscillation. Here, we examined whether the Gβγ translocation rate regulates calcium oscillations induced by G-protein-coupled receptor activation. Oscillations in HeLa cells expressing γ subunit types with different translocation rates were imaged and quantitated. The results show that differential Gβγ translocation rates can underlie the diversity in damping characteristics of calcium oscillations among cells. Mathematical modeling shows that a translocation embedded motif regulates damping of G-protein-mediated calcium oscillations consistent with experimental data. The current study indicates that such a motif may act as a tuning mechanism to design oscillations with varying damping patterns by using intracellular translocation of a signaling component. PMID:24988358

  8. Imaging cytosolic translocation of Mycobacteria with two-photon fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Yassel; Zhang, Qi; Rahaman, Arifur; Ouellet, Hugues; Xiao, Chuan; Sun, Jianjun; Li, Chunqiang

    2014-01-01

    Transition from latency to active tuberculosis requires Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) to penetrate the phagosomal membrane and translocate to the cytosol of the host macrophage. Quantitative two-photon fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy is developed to measure cytosolic translocation using Mycobacterium marinum (Mm) as a model organism for Mtb. Macrophages were infected with Mm or non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis (Ms) as a control, then loaded with a FRET substrate. Once translocation occurs, mycobacterium-bearing β-lactamase cleaves the substrate, resulting in decrease of FRET signal. Quantification of this FRET signal change revealed that Mm, but not Ms, is capable of translocating to the cytosol. PMID:25426325

  9. Return to the wild: Translocation as a tool in conservation of the desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Field, K.J.; Tracy, C.R.; Medica, P.A.; Marlow, R.W.; Corn, P.S.

    2007-01-01

    Translocation could be used as a tool in conservation of the threatened Mojave Desert Tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) by moving individuals from harm's way and into areas where they could contribute to conservation of the species. Numerous factors may affect the success of translocations, including the conditions experienced by tortoises in holding facilities while awaiting translocation. The tortoises available for our translocation study had been provided supplemental water during their years spent in a captive holding facility, potentially inducing carelessness in water conservation. In addition to generally investigating the efficacy of translocation, we compared the effects of continuing with the effects of ceasing the holding facility's water supplementation regimen. After exposure to one of the two water regimens, all tortoises were given the opportunity to hydrate immediately prior to release. We examined behavior, body mass, carapace length, movement, and mortality of tortoises for two activity seasons following release to the wild. Water supplementation was correlated with high rates of carapace growth and distant movements by males after release. Lengthy movements following translocation may be problematic for conservation planning, but this should be evaluated in light of the goals and circumstances of each translocation project. Although the mortality rate was 21.4% in 1997, data suggest that drought conditions at the site rather than the translocation itself negatively affected the tortoises. None of the tortoises died during their second season at the site. Our results indicate that translocation should be considered a useful tool in conservation of the Desert Tortoise.

  10. Translocation of a Polymer Chain across a Nanopore: A Brownian Dynamics Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Pu; Smith, Grant D.

    2003-01-01

    We carried out Brownian dynamics simulation studies of the translocation of single polymer chains across a nanosized pore under the driving of an applied field (chemical potential gradient). The translocation process can be either dominated by the entropic barrier resulted from restricted motion of flexible polymer chains or by applied forces (or chemical gradient across the wall), we focused on the latter case in our studies. Calculation of radius of gyrations at the two opposite sides of the wall shows that the polymer chains are not in equilibrium during the translocation process. Despite this fact, our results show that the one-dimensional diffusion and the nucleation model provide an excellent description of the dependence of average translocation time on the chemical potential gradients, the polymer chain length and the solvent viscosity. In good agreement with experimental results and theoretical predictions, the translocation time distribution of our simple model shows strong non-Gaussian characteristics. It is observed that even for this simple tubelike pore geometry, more than one peak of translocation time distribution can be generated for proper pore diameter and applied field strengths. Both repulsive Weeks-Chandler-Anderson and attractive Lennard-Jones polymer-nanopore interaction were studied, attraction facilitates the translocation process by shortening the total translocation time and dramatically improve the capturing of polymer chain. The width of the translocation time distribution was found to decrease with increasing temperature, increasing field strength, and decreasing pore diameter.

  11. Evaluating the Effects of Ivermectin Treatment on Communities of Gastrointestinal Parasites in Translocated Woylies (Bettongia penicillata).

    PubMed

    Northover, Amy S; Godfrey, Stephanie S; Lymbery, Alan J; Morris, Keith; Wayne, Adrian F; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2017-03-01

    Wildlife species are often treated with anti-parasitic drugs prior to translocation, despite the effects of this treatment being relatively unknown. Disruption of normal host-parasite relationships is inevitable during translocation, and targeted anti-parasitic drug treatment may exacerbate this phenomenon with inadvertent impacts on both target and non-target parasite species. Here, we investigate the effects of ivermectin treatment on communities of gastrointestinal parasites in translocated woylies (Bettongia penicillata). Faecal samples were collected at three time points (at the time of translocation, and 1 and 3 months post-translocation) and examined for nematode eggs and coccidian oocysts. Parasite prevalence and (for nematodes) abundance were estimated in both treated and untreated hosts. In our study, a single subcutaneous injection of ivermectin significantly reduced Strongyloides-like egg counts 1 month post-translocation. Strongyle egg counts and coccidia prevalence were not reduced by ivermectin treatment, but were strongly influenced by site. Likewise, month of sampling rather than ivermectin treatment positively influenced body condition in woylies post-translocation. Our results demonstrate the efficacy of ivermectin in temporarily reducing Strongyloides-like nematode abundance in woylies. We also highlight the possibility that translocation-induced changes to host density may influence coinfecting parasite abundance and host body condition post-translocation.

  12. Low background counting at the LBNL low background facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Chan, Y. D.; Hurley, D. L.; Wang, B. S.

    2013-08-08

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to end-users in two unique facilities: locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory space; and a satellite underground station (600 m.w.e) in Oroville, CA. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic and anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via neutron activation analysis for specific applications. A general overview of the facilities, services, and capabilities will be discussed. Recent activities will also be presented, including the recent installation of a 3π muon veto at the surface facility, cosmogenic activation studies of TeO{sub 2} for CUORE, and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout.

  13. Aluminum as a source of background in low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorovits, B.; Abt, I.; Laubenstein, M.; Volynets, O.

    2011-08-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay would be a key to understanding the nature of neutrino masses. The next generation of High Purity Germanium experiments will have to be operated with a background rate of better than 10 -5 counts/(kg y keV) in the region of interest around the Q-value of the decay. Therefore, so far irrelevant sources of background have to be considered. The metalization of the surface of germanium detectors is in general done with aluminum. The background from the decays of 22Na, 26Al, 226Ra and 228Th introduced by this metalization is discussed. It is shown that only a special selection of aluminum can keep these background contributions acceptable.

  14. Biological characterization of adult MYC-translocation-positive mature B-cell lymphomas other than molecular Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Sietse M; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Rosolowski, Maciej; Hasenclever, Dirk; Hummel, Michael; Küppers, Ralf; Lenze, Dido; Ott, German; Pott, Christiane; Richter, Julia; Rosenwald, Andreas; Szczepanowski, Monika; Schwaenen, Carsten; Stein, Harald; Trautmann, Heiko; Wessendorf, Swen; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Spang, Rainer; Kluin, Philip M; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomal translocations affecting the MYC oncogene are the biological hallmark of Burkitt lymphomas but also occur in a subset of other mature B-cell lymphomas. If accompanied by a chromosomal break targeting the BCL2 and/or BCL6 oncogene these MYC translocation-positive (MYC(+)) lymphomas are called double-hit lymphomas, otherwise the term single-hit lymphomas is applied. In order to characterize the biological features of these MYC(+) lymphomas other than Burkitt lymphoma we explored, after exclusion of molecular Burkitt lymphoma as defined by gene expression profiling, the molecular, pathological and clinical aspects of 80 MYC-translocation-positive lymphomas (31 single-hit, 46 double-hit and 3 MYC(+)-lymphomas with unknown BCL6 status). Comparison of single-hit and double-hit lymphomas revealed no difference in MYC partner (IG/non-IG), genomic complexity, MYC expression or gene expression profile. Double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-cell-like gene expression profile and had higher IGH and MYC mutation frequencies. Gene expression profiling revealed 130 differentially expressed genes between BCL6(+)/MYC(+) and BCL2(+)/MYC(+) double-hit lymphomas. BCL2(+)/MYC(+) double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-like gene expression profile. Analysis of all lymphomas according to MYC partner (IG/non-IG) revealed no substantial differences. In this series of lymphomas, in which immunochemotherapy was administered in only a minority of cases, single-hit and double-hit lymphomas had a similar poor outcome in contrast to the outcome of molecular Burkitt lymphoma and lymphomas without the MYC break. Our data suggest that, after excluding molecular Burkitt lymphoma and pediatric cases, MYC(+) lymphomas are biologically quite homogeneous with single-hit and double-hit lymphomas as well as IG-MYC and non-IG-MYC(+) lymphomas sharing various molecular characteristics.

  15. Biological characterization of adult MYC-translocation-positive mature B-cell lymphomas other than molecular Burkitt lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Aukema, Sietse M.; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Rosolowski, Maciej; Hasenclever, Dirk; Hummel, Michael; Küppers, Ralf; Lenze, Dido; Ott, German; Pott, Christiane; Richter, Julia; Rosenwald, Andreas; Szczepanowski, Monika; Schwaenen, Carsten; Stein, Harald; Trautmann, Heiko; Wessendorf, Swen; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Spang, Rainer; Kluin, Philip M.; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations affecting the MYC oncogene are the biological hallmark of Burkitt lymphomas but also occur in a subset of other mature B-cell lymphomas. If accompanied by a chromosomal break targeting the BCL2 and/or BCL6 oncogene these MYC translocation-positive (MYC+) lymphomas are called double-hit lymphomas, otherwise the term single-hit lymphomas is applied. In order to characterize the biological features of these MYC+ lymphomas other than Burkitt lymphoma we explored, after exclusion of molecular Burkitt lymphoma as defined by gene expression profiling, the molecular, pathological and clinical aspects of 80 MYC-translocation-positive lymphomas (31 single-hit, 46 double-hit and 3 MYC+-lymphomas with unknown BCL6 status). Comparison of single-hit and double-hit lymphomas revealed no difference in MYC partner (IG/non-IG), genomic complexity, MYC expression or gene expression profile. Double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-cell-like gene expression profile and had higher IGH and MYC mutation frequencies. Gene expression profiling revealed 130 differentially expressed genes between BCL6+/MYC+ and BCL2+/MYC+ double-hit lymphomas. BCL2+/MYC+ double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-like gene expression profile. Analysis of all lymphomas according to MYC partner (IG/non-IG) revealed no substantial differences. In this series of lymphomas, in which immunochemotherapy was administered in only a minority of cases, single-hit and double-hit lymphomas had a similar poor outcome in contrast to the outcome of molecular Burkitt lymphoma and lymphomas without the MYC break. Our data suggest that, after excluding molecular Burkitt lymphoma and pediatric cases, MYC+ lymphomas are biologically quite homogeneous with single-hit and double-hit lymphomas as well as IG-MYC and non-IG-MYC+ lymphomas sharing various molecular characteristics. PMID:24179151

  16. TFE3-Fusion Variant Analysis Defines Specific Clinicopathologic Associations Among Xp11 Translocation Cancers.

    PubMed

    Argani, Pedram; Zhong, Minghao; Reuter, Victor E; Fallon, John T; Epstein, Jonathan I; Netto, George J; Antonescu, Cristina R

    2016-06-01

    Xp11 translocation cancers include Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma (RCC), Xp11 translocation perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa), and melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancer. In Xp11 translocation cancers, oncogenic activation of TFE3 is driven by the fusion of TFE3 with a number of different gene partners; however, the impact of individual fusion variant on specific clinicopathologic features of Xp11 translocation cancers has not been well defined. In this study, we analyze 60 Xp11 translocation cancers by fluorescence in situ hybridization using custom bacterial artificial chromosome probes to establish their TFE3 fusion gene partner. In 5 cases RNA sequencing was also used to further characterize the fusion transcripts. The 60 Xp11 translocation cancers included 47 Xp11 translocation RCC, 8 Xp11 translocation PEComas, and 5 melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancers. A fusion partner was identified in 53/60 (88%) cases, including 18 SFPQ (PSF), 16 PRCC, 12 ASPSCR1 (ASPL), 6 NONO, and 1 DVL2. We provide the first morphologic description of the NONO-TFE3 RCC, which frequently demonstrates subnuclear vacuoles leading to distinctive suprabasal nuclear palisading. Similar subnuclear vacuolization was also characteristic of SFPQ-TFE3 RCC, creating overlapping features with clear cell papillary RCC. We also describe the first RCC with a DVL2-TFE3 gene fusion, in addition to an extrarenal pigmented PEComa with a NONO-TFE3 gene fusion. Furthermore, among neoplasms with the SFPQ-TFE3, NONO-TFE3, DVL2-TFE3, and ASPL-TFE3 gene fusions, the RCCs are almost always PAX8 positive, cathepsin K negative by immunohistochemistry, whereas the mesenchymal counterparts (Xp11 translocation PEComas, melanotic Xp11 translocation renal cancers, and alveolar soft part sarcoma) are PAX8 negative, cathepsin K positive. These findings support the concept that despite an identical gene fusion, the RCCs are distinct from the corresponding mesenchymal neoplasms, perhaps due to

  17. LMO2-negative Expression Predicts the Presence of MYC Translocations in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Colomo, Luis; Vazquez, Ivonne; Papaleo, Natalia; Espinet, Blanca; Ferrer, Anna; Franco, Catalina; Comerma, Laura; Hernandez, Silvia; Calvo, Xavier; Salar, Antonio; Climent, Fina; Mate, José Luis; Forcada, Pilar; Mozos, Anna; Nonell, Lara; Martinez, Antonio; Carrio, Anna; Costa, Dolors; Dlouhy, Ivan; Salaverria, Itziar; Martin-Subero, Jose Ignacio; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Valera, Alexandra; Campo, Elias

    2017-03-10

    MYC translocation is a defining feature of Burkitt lymphoma (BL), and the new category of high-grade B-cell lymphomas with MYC and BCL2 and/or BCL6 translocations, and occurs in 6% to 15% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs). The low incidence of MYC translocations in DLBCL makes the genetic study of all these lymphomas cumbersome. Strategies based on an initial immunophenotypic screening to select cases with a high probability of carrying the translocation may be useful. LMO2 is a germinal center marker expressed in most lymphomas originated in these cells. Mining gene expression profiling studies, we observed LMO2 downregulation in BL and large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) with MYC translocations, and postulated that LMO2 protein expression could assist to identify such cases. We analyzed LMO2 protein expression in 46 BLs and 284 LBCL. LMO2 was expressed in 1/46 (2%) BL cases, 146/268 (54.5%) DLBCL cases, and 2/16 (12.5%) high-grade B-cell lymphoma cases with MYC and BCL2 and/or BCL6 translocations. All BLs carried MYC translocation (P<0.001), whereas LMO2 was only positive in 6/42 (14%) LBCL with MYC translocation (P<0.001). The relationship between LMO2 negativity and MYC translocation was further analyzed in different subsets of tumors according to CD10 expression and cell of origin. Lack of LMO2 expression was associated with the detection of MYC translocations with high sensitivity (87%), specificity (87%), positive predictive value and negative predictive value (74% and 94%, respectively), and accuracy (87%) in CD10 LBCL. Comparing LMO2 and MYC protein expression, all statistic measures of performance of LMO2 surpassed MYC in CD10 LBCL. These findings suggest that LMO2 loss may be a good predictor for the presence of MYC translocation in CD10 LBCL.

  18. Analysis of the XRS background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilbourne, Caroline A.; Boyce, K. R.; Brown, G. V.; Cottam, J.; Fujimoto, R.; Furusho, T.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kelley, R. L.; McCammon, D.; Mitsuda, K.

    2005-01-01

    Background counts on the XRS Calorimeter spectrometer of Astro-E2 have several sources, including primary cosmic rays and secondary particles interacting with the pixels and with the silicon structure of the array. After rejecting events coincident between pixels or between a pixel and the anti-coincidence detector behind the calorimeter array, the residual background on the ground in the 0.1 - 10 keV band is 1e-3 counts/s (8e-3 counts/s/sq cm). We will present the details of the ground background events and the rejection criteria required lo remove them while minimizing deadtime. We will also present preliminary analysis of the in-orbit background.

  19. Greater need for background checks.

    PubMed

    Fiesta, J

    1999-11-01

    The push is on for a more uniform system of background checks for health care employees. Studies and crimes against patients have prompted regulation by the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA), state governments, hospitals, and Congress.

  20. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  1. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGES

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; ...

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  2. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  3. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-03-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character.

  4. Mechanism of long-range proton translocation along biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Emile S; Stuchebrukhov, Alexei A

    2013-02-14

    Recent experiments suggest that protons can travel along biological membranes up to tens of micrometers, but the mechanism of transport is unknown. To explain such a long-range proton translocation we describe a model that takes into account the coupled bulk diffusion that accompanies the migration of protons on the surface. We show that protons diffusing at or near the surface before equilibrating with the bulk desorb and re-adsorb at the surface thousands of times, giving rise to a power-law desorption kinetics. As a result, the decay of the surface protons occurs very slowly, allowing for establishing local gradient and local exchange, as was envisioned in the early local models of biological energy transduction.

  5. Translocator protein-mediated pharmacology of cholesterol transport and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Fan, Jinjiang; Campioli, Enrico; Zirkin, Barry; Midzak, Andrew

    2015-06-15

    Steroidogenesis begins with cholesterol transfer into mitochondria through the transduceosome, a complex composed of cytosolic proteins that include steroidogenesis acute regulatory protein (STAR), 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, and the outer mitochondrial membrane proteins Translocator Protein (TSPO) and Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC). TSPO is a drug- and cholesterol-binding protein found at particularly high levels in steroid synthesizing cells. Its aberrant expression has been linked to cancer, neurodegeneration, neuropsychiatric disorders and primary hypogonadism. Brain steroids serve as local regulators of neural development and excitability. Reduced levels of these steroids have been linked to depression, anxiety and neurodegeneration. Reduced serum testosterone is common among subfertile young men and aging men, and is associated with depression, metabolic syndrome and reduced sexual function. Although testosterone-replacement therapy is available, there are undesired side-effects. TSPO drug ligands have been proposed as therapeutic agents to regulate steroid levels in the brain and testis.

  6. Requirements for a conservative protein translocation pathway in chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Vojta, Lea; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina

    2007-06-12

    The chloroplast inner envelope translocon subunit Tic110 is imported via a soluble stromal translocation intermediate. In this study an in-organellar import system is established which allows for an accumulation of this intermediate in order to analyze its requirements for reexport. All results demonstrate that the re-export of Tic110 from the soluble intermediate stage into the inner envelope requires ATP hydrolysis, which cannot be replaced by other NTPs. Furthermore, the molecular chaperone Hsp93 seems prominently involved in the reexport pathway of Tic110, because other stromal intermediates like that of the oxygen evolving complex subunit OE33 (iOE33) en route to the thylakoid lumen interacts preferentially with Hsp70.

  7. Structural framework for DNA translocation via the viral portal protein

    PubMed Central

    Lebedev, Andrey A; Krause, Margret H; Isidro, Anabela L; Vagin, Alexei A; Orlova, Elena V; Turner, Joanne; Dodson, Eleanor J; Tavares, Paulo; Antson, Alfred A

    2007-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages and herpesviruses load their capsids with DNA through a tunnel formed by the portal protein assembly. Here we describe the X-ray structure of the bacteriophage SPP1 portal protein in its isolated 13-subunit form and the pseudoatomic structure of a 12-subunit assembly. The first defines the DNA-interacting segments (tunnel loops) that pack tightly against each other forming the most constricted part of the tunnel; the second shows that the functional dodecameric state must induce variability in the loop positions. Structural observations together with geometrical constraints dictate that in the portal–DNA complex, the loops form an undulating belt that fits and tightly embraces the helical DNA, suggesting that DNA translocation is accompanied by a ‘mexican wave' of positional and conformational changes propagating sequentially along this belt. PMID:17363899

  8. Periodic forces trigger knot untying during translocation of knotted proteins

    PubMed Central

    Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Proteins need to be unfolded when translocated through the pores in mitochondrial and other cellular membranes. Knotted proteins, however, might get stuck during this process, jamming the pore, since the diameter of the pore is smaller than the size of maximally tightened knot. The jamming probability dramatically increases as the magnitude of the driving force exceeds a critical value, Fc. In this numerical study, we show that for deep knots Fc lies below the force range over which molecular import motors operate, which suggest that in these cases the knots will tighten and block the pores. Next, we show how such topological traps might be prevented by using a pulling protocol of a repetitive, on-off character. Such a repetitive pulling is biologically relevant, since the mitochondrial import motor, like other molecular motors transforms chemical energy into directed motions via nucleotide-hydrolysis-mediated conformational changes, which are cyclic in character. PMID:26996878

  9. Translocation of double strand DNA into a biological nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatkaew, Sunita; Mlayeh, Lamia; Leonetti, Marc; Homble, Fabrice

    2009-03-01

    Translocation of double strand DNA across a unique mitochondrial biological nanopore (VDAC) is observed by an electrophysiological method. Characteristics of opened and sub-conductance states of VDAC are studied. When the applied electric potential is beyond ± 20 mV, VDAC transits to a sub-conductance state. Plasmids (circular double strand DNA) with a diameter greater than that of the channel shows the current reduction into the channel during the interaction but the state with zero-current is not observed. On the contrary, the interaction of linear double strand DNA with the channel shows the current reduction along with the zero-current state. These show the passages of linear double strand DNA across the channel and the electrostatic effect due to the surface charges of double strand DNA and channel for circular and linear double strand DNA.

  10. Heterologous protein production using the twin arginine translocation pathway

    DOEpatents

    Pohlschroder, Mechtild; Kissinger, Jessica C; Rose, R. Wesley; Brueser, Thomas; Dilks, Kieran

    2008-11-04

    Provided are means for evaluating and identifying putative substrates of the twin arginine translocation (Tat) secretory pathway in Streptomyces and other bacterial species. Also provided, therefore, are simple ways to express, secrete and purify correctly folded heterologous proteins on a large scale using host microorganisms, such as, Streptomyces and the Tat pathway therein. Many of the thus-produced proteins are of significant therapeutic value in the pharmaceutical and biochemical industries, particularly when they can be secreted from the host in fully-folded active form. Accordingly, there are further provided the heterologous proteins produced by the Tat secretion pathway using the foregoing methods, and the computer algorithm used to identify the Tat signal sequence and putative substrates.

  11. Retro-translocation of mitochondrial intermembrane space proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bragoszewski, Piotr; Wasilewski, Michal; Sakowska, Paulina; Gornicka, Agnieszka; Böttinger, Lena; Qiu, Jian; Wiedemann, Nils; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    The content of mitochondrial proteome is maintained through two highly dynamic processes, the influx of newly synthesized proteins from the cytosol and the protein degradation. Mitochondrial proteins are targeted to the intermembrane space by the mitochondrial intermembrane space assembly pathway that couples their import and oxidative folding. The folding trap was proposed to be a driving mechanism for the mitochondrial accumulation of these proteins. Whether the reverse movement of unfolded proteins to the cytosol occurs across the intact outer membrane is unknown. We found that reduced, conformationally destabilized proteins are released from mitochondria in a size-limited manner. We identified the general import pore protein Tom40 as an escape gate. We propose that the mitochondrial proteome is not only regulated by the import and degradation of proteins but also by their retro-translocation to the external cytosolic location. Thus, protein release is a mechanism that contributes to the mitochondrial proteome surveillance. PMID:26056291

  12. Processivity of nucleic acid unwinding and translocation by helicases.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2016-11-01

    Helicases are a class of enzymes that use the chemical energy of NTP hydrolysis to drive mechanical processes such as translocation and nucleic acid (NA) strand separation. Besides the NA unwinding speed, another important factor for the helicase activity is the NA unwinding processivity. Here, we study the NA unwinding processivity with an analytical model that captures the phenomenology of the NA unwinding process. First, we study the processivity of the non-hexameric helicase that can unwind NA efficiently in the form of a monomer and the processivity of the hexameric helicase that can unwind DNA effectively, providing quantitative explanations of the available single-molecule experimental data. Then, we study the processivity of the non-hexameric helicases, in particular UvrD, in the form of a dimer and compare with that in the form of a monomer. The available single-molecule and some biochemical data showing that while UvrD monomer is a highly processive single-stranded DNA translocase it is inactive in DNA unwinding, whereas other biochemical data showing that UvrD is active in both single-stranded DNA translocation and DNA unwinding in the form of a monomer can be explained quantitatively and consistently. In addition, the recent single-molecule data are also explained quantitatively showing that constraining the 2B subdomain in closed conformation by intramolecular cross-linking can convert Rep monomer with a very poor DNA unwinding activity into a superhelicase that can unwind more than thousands of DNA base pairs processively, even against a large opposing force. Proteins 2016; 84:1590-1605. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Muscle contraction increases carnitine uptake via translocation of OCTN2.

    PubMed

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Sugiura, Tomoko; Kato, Yukio; Takakura, Hisashi; Hanai, Yoshiteru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Masuda, Kazumi

    2012-02-24

    Since carnitine plays an important role in fat oxidation, influx of carnitine could be crucial for muscle metabolism. OCTN2 (SLC22A5), a sodium-dependent solute carrier, is assumed to transport carnitine into skeletal muscle cells. Acute regulation of OCTN2 activity in rat hindlimb muscles was investigated in response to electrically induced contractile activity. The tissue uptake clearance (CL(uptake)) of l-[(3)H]carnitine during muscle contraction was examined in vivo using integration plot analysis. The CL(uptake) of [(14)C]iodoantipyrine (IAP) was also determined as an index of tissue blood flow. To test the hypothesis that increased carnitine uptake involves the translocation of OCTN2, contraction-induced alteration in the subcellular localization of OCTN2 was examined. The CL(uptake) of l-[(3)H]carnitine in the contracting muscles increased 1.4-1.7-fold as compared to that in the contralateral resting muscles (p<0.05). The CL(uptake) of [(14)C]IAP was much higher than that of l-[(3)H]carnitine, but no association between the increase in carnitine uptake and blood flow was obtained. Co-immunostaining of OCTN2 and dystrophin (a muscle plasma membrane marker) showed an increase in OCTN2 signal in the plasma membrane after muscle contraction. Western blotting showed that the level of sarcolemmal OCTN2 was greater in contracting muscles than in resting muscles (p<0.05). The present study showed that muscle contraction facilitated carnitine uptake in skeletal muscles, possibly via the contraction-induced translocation of its specific transporter OCTN2 to the plasma membrane.

  14. Gold nanoparticle aerosols for rodent inhalation and translocation studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möller, Winfried; Gibson, Neil; Geiser, Marianne; Pokhrel, Suman; Wenk, Alexander; Takenaka, Shinji; Schmid, Otmar; Bulgheroni, Antonio; Simonelli, Federica; Kozempel, Jan; Holzwarth, Uwe; Wigge, Christoph; Eigeldinger-Berthou, Sylvie; Mädler, Lutz; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.

    2013-04-01

    The intensive use of nano-sized particles in many different applications necessitates studies on their risk assessment as there are still open questions on their safe handling and utilization. For reliable risk assessment, the interaction of nanoparticles (NP) with biological systems after various routes of exposure needs to be investigated using well-characterized NP. We report here on the generation of gold-NP (Au-NP) aerosols for inhalation studies with the spark ignition technique, and their characterization in terms of chemical composition, physical structure, morphology, and specific surface area, and on interaction with lung tissues and lung cells after 1 h inhalation by mice. The originally generated agglomerated Au-NP were converted into compact spherical Au-NP by thermal annealing at 600 °C, providing particles of similar mass, but different size and specific surface area. Since there are currently no translocation data available on inhaled Au-NP in the 10-50 nm diameter range, the emphasis was to generate NP as small as 20 nm for inhalation in rodents. For anticipated in vivo systemic translocation and dosimetry analyses, radiolabeled Au-NP were created by proton irradiating the gold electrodes of the spark generator, thus forming gamma ray emitting 195Au with 186 days half-life, allowing long-term biokinetic studies. The dissolution rate of 195Au from the NP was below detection limits. The highly concentrated, polydisperse Au-NP aerosol (1-2 × 107 NP/cm3) proved to be constant over several hours in terms of its count median mobility diameter, its geometric standard deviation and number concentration. After collection on filters particles can be re-suspended and used for instillation or ingestion studies.

  15. Biosynthesis and translocation of unsulfated acyltrehaloses in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Belardinelli, Juan Manuel; Larrouy-Maumus, Gérald; Jones, Victoria; Sorio de Carvalho, Luiz Pedro; McNeil, Michael R; Jackson, Mary

    2014-10-03

    A number of species-specific polymethyl-branched fatty acid-containing trehalose esters populate the outer membrane of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Among them, 2,3-diacyltrehaloses (DAT) and penta-acyltrehaloses (PAT) not only play a structural role in the cell envelope but also contribute to the ability of M. tuberculosis to multiply and persist in the infected host, promoting the intracellular survival of the bacterium and modulating host immune responses. The nature of the machinery, topology, and sequential order of the reactions leading to the biosynthesis, assembly, and export of these complex glycolipids to the cell surface are the object of the present study. Our genetic and biochemical evidence corroborates a model wherein the biosynthesis and translocation of DAT and PAT to the periplasmic space are coupled and topologically split across the plasma membrane. The formation of DAT occurs on the cytosolic face of the plasma membrane through the action of PapA3, FadD21, and Pks3/4; that of PAT occurs on the periplasmic face via transesterification reactions between DAT substrates catalyzed by the acyltransferase Chp2 (Rv1184c). The integral membrane transporter MmpL10 is essential for DAT to reach the cell surface, and its presence in the membrane is required for Chp2 to be active. Disruption of mmpL10 or chp2 leads to an important build-up of DAT inside the cells and to the formation of a novel form of unsulfated acyltrehalose esterified with polymethyl-branched fatty acids normally found in sulfolipids that is translocated to the cell surface.

  16. Balanced reciprocal translocation at amniocentesis: cytogenetic detection and implications for genetic counseling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H G; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, H Y; Tian, T; Xu, S B; Liu, R Z

    2016-08-19

    Balanced translocation is a common structural chromosomal rearrangement in humans. Carriers can be phenotypically normal but have an increased risk of pregnancy loss, fetal death, and the transmission of chromosomal abnormalities to their offspring. Existing prenatal screening technologies and diagnostic procedures fail to detect balanced translocation, so genetic counseling for carriers remains a challenge. Here, we report the characteristics of chromosomal reciprocal translocation in 3807 amniocentesis cases. Of the 16 detected cases of fetal reciprocal translocation, 8 cases (50%) showed positive biochemical marker screening; 3 cases (18.75%) were the parental carriers of a chromosomal abnormality; 2 (12.5%) were of advanced maternal age, 2 (12.5%) had a previous history of children with genetic disorders, and 1 case (6.25%) was associated with positive soft markers in obstetric ultrasound. Chromosomes 5 and 19 were the most commonly involved chromosomes in balanced translocations. Of the 13 cases with fetal balanced translocations, 8 (61.5%) were inherited from a paternal chromosome, 3 (23.1%) from a maternal chromosome, and 2 (15.4%) cases were de novo. The incidence of balanced translocation at amniocentesis was 0.42%. Male carriers of reciprocal chromosome translocation appear to have a higher chance of becoming a parent of a child born by normal childbirth than female carriers.

  17. ATM modulates the loading of recombination proteins onto a chromosomal translocation breakpoint hotspot.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiying; Oma, Yukako; Harata, Masahiko; Kono, Kazuteru; Shima, Hiroki; Kinomura, Aiko; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Mizutani, Shuki; Kanaar, Roland; Tashiro, Satoshi

    2010-10-27

    Chromosome translocations induced by DNA damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation and certain chemotherapies, alter genetic information resulting in malignant transformation. Abrogation or loss of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein, a DNA damage signaling regulator, increases the incidence of chromosome translocations. However, how ATM protects cells from chromosome translocations is still unclear. Chromosome translocations involving the MLL gene on 11q23 are the most frequent chromosome abnormalities in secondary leukemias associated with chemotherapy employing etoposide, a topoisomerase II poison. Here we show that ATM deficiency results in the excessive binding of the DNA recombination protein RAD51 at the translocation breakpoint hotspot of 11q23 chromosome translocation after etoposide exposure. Binding of Replication protein A (RPA) and the chromatin remodeler INO80, which facilitate RAD51 loading on damaged DNA, to the hotspot were also increased by ATM deficiency. Thus, in addition to activating DNA damage signaling, ATM may avert chromosome translocations by preventing excessive loading of recombinational repair proteins onto translocation breakpoint hotspots.

  18. Xylem exudate composition and root-to-shoot nickel translocation in Alyssum species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An improved understanding of Ni root-to-shoot translocation mechanism in hyperaccumulators is necessary to increase Ni uptake efficiency for phytoextraction technologies. It is presumed that an important aspect of Ni translocation and storage involves chelation with organic ligands. It has been re...

  19. Translocation of Shiga-toxin producting cells of Escherichia coli in chemically-injected beef subprimals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Relatively little information is available regarding the translocation of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (ECOH) and non-O157:H7 verocytotoxigenic E. coli (STEC) into beef subprimals following chemical tenderization. Purpose: Quantify translocation of ECOH or STEC from the surface into the i...

  20. Langevin dynamics simulations of ds-DNA translocation through synthetic nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrey, Christopher; Muthukumar, M.

    2007-07-01

    We have implemented a coarse-grained model to study voltage-driven as-DNA translocation through nanopores located in synthetic membranes. The simulated trajectory of the DNA through the nanopores was calculated using Langevin dynamics. We present the results based on more than 120 000 individual translocations. We are particularly interested in this work in probing the physical basis of various experimentally observed—yet poorly understood—phenomena. Notably, we observe in our simulations the formation of ds-DNA hairpins, widely suspected to be the basis for quantized blockage. We study the translocation time, a measurable quantity crucially important in polyelectrolyte characterization, as a function of hairpin vertex location along the polymer backbone, finding that this behavior can be tuned to some degree by simulation parameters. We also study the voltage dependence of the tendency of hairpins to serve as the initiators of translocation events. Surprisingly, we find that the resulting probability depends vitally upon whether the events counted are ultimately successful or not. Further details lead us to propose that failed attempts in experimental translocation studies may be more common—and deceptive—than is generally recognized. We find the time taken by successful single file translocations to be directly proportional to the ratio of chain length to the applied voltage. Finally, we address a common yet puzzling phenomenon in translocation experiments: translocation events in which the current through the pore is highly, yet incompletely, blocked. We present the findings that offer a new explanation for such events.

  1. Translocation of closed polymers through a nanopore under an applied external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shao-Chuan; Zhang, Lin-Xi; Xia, A.-Gen; Chen, Hong-Ping; Cheng, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behaviours of the translocations of closed circular polymers and closed knotted polymers through a nanopore, under the driving of an applied field, are studied by three-dimensional Langevin dynamics simulations. The power-law scaling of the translocation time τ with the chain length N and the distribution of translocation time are investigated separately. For closed circular polymers, a crossover scaling of translocation time with chain length is found to be τ simeq Nα, with the exponent α varying from α = 0.71 for relatively short chains to α = 1.29 for longer chains under driving force F = 5. The scaling behaviour for longer chains is in good agreement with experimental results, in which the exponent α = 1.27 for the translocation of double-strand DNA. The distribution of translocation time D(τ) is close to a Gaussian function for duration time τ < τp and follows a falling exponential function for duration time τ > τp. For closed knotted polymers, the scaling exponent α is 1.27 for small field force (F = 5) and 1.38 for large field force (F = 10). The distribution of translocation time D(τ) remarkably features two peaks appearing in the case of large driving force. The interesting result of multiple peaks can conduce to the understanding of the influence of the number of strands of polymers in the pore at the same time on translocation dynamic process and scaling property.

  2. A genomic comparison of homoeologous recombinants of the Lr19 (T4) translocation in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Lr19 translocation continues to provide broad resistance to Puccinia triticina in many parts of the world and can be particularly useful when employed in resistance gene pyramids. Previously, an associated gene for yellow endosperm pigmentation precluded the use of the translocation in many coun...

  3. De Novo nonreciprocal translocation 1;8 confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wiley, J.E.; Stout, C.; Palmer, S.M.

    1995-07-17

    Constitutional nonreciprocal translocations are extremely rare, and even their existence is controversial. We report on a newborn infant with a de novo nonreciprocal translocation between chromosomes 1 and 8 resulting in 1q42.3 deletion syndrome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization with whole chromosome paints confirmed the conventional cytogenetic diagnosis. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Very special relativity as a background field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilderton, Anton

    2016-08-01

    We consider violation of Lorentz invariance in QED induced by a very high frequency background wave. An effective theory is obtained by averaging observables over the rapid field oscillations. This preserves Ward identities and restores translation invariance below the high-frequency scale, but only partial Lorentz invariance: we show that the effective theory is C-invariant SIM(2)-QED in very special relativity. Averaging leads to the nonlocal terms familiar from SIM(2) theories, while the short-distance behavior of the background field fermion propagator generates the infinite number of higher-order vertices of SIM(2)-QED.

  5. A novel TP53-KPNA3 translocation defines a de novo treatment-resistant clone in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kenneth S.; Kwon, Woo Sun; Kim, Jiwoong; Heo, Su Jin; Kim, Hyo Song; Kim, Hyo Ki; Kim, Soo Hee; Lee, Won Suk; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Rha, Sun Young; Hwang, Tae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary bone cancer. It can be cured by aggressive surgery and chemotherapy, but outcomes for metastatic or chemoresistant disease remain dismal. Cancer sequencing studies have shown that the p53 pathway is dysregulated in nearly every case, often by translocation; however, no studies of osteosarcoma evolution or intratumor heterogeneity have been done to date. We studied a patient with chemoresistant, metastatic disease over the course of 3 years. We performed exome sequencing on germline DNA and DNA collected from tumor at three separate time points. We compared variant calls and variant allele frequencies between different samples. We identified subclonal mutations in several different genes in the primary tumor sample and found that one particular subclone dominated subsequent tumor samples at relapse. This clone was marked by a novel TP53-KPNA3 translocation and loss of the opposite-strand wild-type TP53 allele. Future research must focus on the functional significance of such clones and strategies to eliminate them. PMID:27626065

  6. Directed translocation of a flexible polymer through a cone-shaped nano-channel.

    PubMed

    Nikoofard, Narges; Khalilian, Hamidreza; Fazli, Hossein

    2013-08-21

    Translocation of a flexible polymer through a cone-shaped channel is studied, theoretically and using computer simulations. Our simulations show that the shape of the channel causes the polymer translocation to be a driven process. The effective driving force of entropic origin acting on the polymer is calculated as a function of the length and the apex-angle of the channel, theoretically. It is found that the translocation time is a non-monotonic function of the apex-angle of the channel. By increasing the apex-angle from zero, the translocation time shows a minimum and then a maximum. Also, it is found that regardless of the value of the apex-angle, the translocation time is a uniformly decreasing function of the channel length. The results of the theory and the simulation are in good qualitative agreement.

  7. Monitoring translocation of multisubunit RNA polymerase along the DNA with fluorescent base analogues.

    PubMed

    Malinen, Anssi M; Turtola, Matti; Belogurov, Georgiy A

    2015-01-01

    Here we describe a direct fluorescence method that reports real-time occupancies of the pre- and post-translocated state of multisubunit RNA polymerase. In a stopped-flow setup, this method is capable of resolving a single base-pair translocation motion of RNA polymerase in real time. In a conventional spectrofluorometer, this method can be employed for studies of the time-averaged distribution of RNA polymerase on the DNA template. This method utilizes commercially available base analogue fluorophores integrated into template DNA strand in place of natural bases. We describe two template DNA strand designs where translocation of RNA polymerase from a pre-translocation to a post-translocation state results in disruption of stacking interactions of fluorophore with neighboring bases, with a concomitant large increase in fluorescence intensity.

  8. A mobile aviary to enhance translocation success of red-cockaded woodpeckers.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, John W; Mari, Yvett; Smathers, Webb

    2004-12-31

    Edwards, John W., Yvette Mari, and Webb Smathers. 2004. A mobile aviary to enhance translocation success of red-cockaded woodpeckers. In: Red-cockaded woodpecker; Road to Recovery. Proceedings of the 4th Red-cockaded woodpecker Symposium. Ralph Costa and Susan J. Daniels, eds. Savannah, Georgia. January, 2003. Chapter 6. Translocation. Pp 335-336. Abstract: Because translocations of male red-cockaded woodpeckers have been less successful (Costa and Kennedy 1994) and because translocations of females are dependent on the availability of established males, a technique to increase the success of translocations would be an important contribution to conservation efforts. Researchers from the U.S. Forest Service Southern Research Station hypothesized that by maintaining red-cockaded woodpeckers in an aviary prior to release the birds would develop an affinity for, and possibly imprint (Scott and Carpenter 1987) on their surroundings, and that this would increase their likelyhood of remaining in the cluster upon their release.

  9. Cellular distribution of alkaloids and their translocation via phloem and xylem: the importance of compartment pH.

    PubMed

    Nowak, M; Selmar, D

    2016-11-01

    The physico-chemical background of alkaloid allocation within plants is outlined and discussed exemplarily for pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) and nicotine. The trigger for this discourse is the finding that, for example, PAs, which are taken up from the soil, are translocated in the xylem, whereas - when genuinely present in plants - they are allocated as N-oxides via phloem. Special emphasis is put on the impact of different pH values in certain compartments, as this entails significant changes in the relative lipophilic character of alkaloids: tertiary alkaloids diffuse readily through biomembranes, while the corresponding protonated alkaloids are retained in acidic compartments, i.e. vacuoles or xylem. Therefore, this phenomenon, well known as the 'ion trap mechanism', is also relevant for long-distance transport of alkaloids. Any efficient allocation of typical tertiary alkaloids within the phloem can thus be excluded. In contrast, due to their strongly increased hydrophilic properties, alkaloid-N-oxides or quarternary alkaloids cannot diffuse through biomembranes and, consequently, would be retained in the acidic xylem during translocation. The major aim of this paper is to sharpen the mind for the chemical peculiarities of alkaloids and to consider them adequately in forthcoming investigations on allocation of alkaloids.

  10. Recurrent trisomy and Robertsonian translocation of chromosome 14 in murine iPS cell lines.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Shi, Xiaoyun; Rudolph, Cornelia; Yu, Yong; Zhang, Ding; Zhao, Xiaoyu; Mai, Sabine; Wang, Gang; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Shi, Qinghua

    2011-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have greatly provoked people's interest due to their enormous potential of clinical applications. Increasing care is taken with the genetic safety of iPS cells. However, up to now, the chromosomal integrity of murine iPS (miPS) cells has been largely unknown. We have observed recurrent trisomy and/or Robertsonian translocation (Rb) of chromosome 14 in six out of nine independent miPS cell lines from three laboratories by G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and spectral karyotyping (SKY) analyses, while all the miPS cell lines were derived from mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) or neural precursor cells (NPCs) with a normal karyotype. The miPS cells with trisomy and/or Rb of chromosome 14 showed growth advantage over the miPS cells with a normal karyotype. We found a significantly higher frequency of Rbs in the miPS cell lines induced with c-Myc than those without c-Myc. Our findings demonstrate that miPS cell lines have the propensity for chromosomal aberrations and there is an obvious correlation between the extent of chromosomal aberrations in miPS cells and the transcriptional factors used for their reprogramming. Therefore, our study raises awareness of the need for improvements of the induction conditions of miPS cells in order to avoid the chromosomal aberrations and ensure future safe applications.

  11. Detection of the AML translocation (8;21) by two-color fluorescent in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Sacchi, N.; Magnani, I.; Kearney, L.

    1994-09-01

    In the translocation (8;21)(q22;q22) associated with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), part of the long arm of chromosome 8 is reciprocally translocated onto chromosome 21. At the molecular level the translocation results in the fusion of the 5{prime} region of the AML1 gene on chromosome 21 and almost the entire CDR gene (also ETO or MTG8) on chromosome 8. To detection the translocation at the single cell level, we used two probes, a cosmid clone containing the first five exons of AML1 and a P1 clone containing the entire CDR gene. Hybridization of the two probes to the distal and proximal sides of the translocation breakpoint was expected to highlight the derivative 8q-chromosome in an interphase cell. To demonstrate the ability to identify the translocation in interphase cells using two-color FISH, these two probes were hybridized simultaneously to a cell line containing the 8;21 translocation, Kasumi-1. Each probe was detected with a different color so that their relationship in the sample could be determined within the same interphase cell. Simultaneous hybridization of the CDR and AML1 probes to interphase Kasumi-1 cells resulted in one orange and one green hybridization signal randomly located in the cell, from the hybridization to the normal 8 and 21 chromosomes, and one orange-green pair of signals from the close hybridization of the two probes to the fusion gene on the derivative 8q-chromosome, indicating the translocation. The translocation was identified by an abnormal pairing of the two differently colored signals in the same interphase cell. This technique allows for the detection of the translocation in all cells, not just those arrested in metaphase, and also permits the analysis of a small number of cells. Therefore, useful information can still be obtained from samples not suited for RT-PCR analysis and conventional cytogenetic techniques.

  12. Robust background modelling in DIALS

    PubMed Central

    Parkhurst, James M.; Winter, Graeme; Waterman, David G.; Fuentes-Montero, Luis; Gildea, Richard J.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2016-01-01

    A method for estimating the background under each reflection during integration that is robust in the presence of pixel outliers is presented. The method uses a generalized linear model approach that is more appropriate for use with Poisson distributed data than traditional approaches to pixel outlier handling in integration programs. The algorithm is most applicable to data with a very low background level where assumptions of a normal distribution are no longer valid as an approximation to the Poisson distribution. It is shown that traditional methods can result in the systematic underestimation of background values. This then results in the reflection intensities being overestimated and gives rise to a change in the overall distribution of reflection intensities in a dataset such that too few weak reflections appear to be recorded. Statistical tests performed during data reduction may mistakenly attribute this to merohedral twinning in the crystal. Application of the robust generalized linear model algorithm is shown to correct for this bias. PMID:27980508

  13. Background simulations and shielding calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Vitaly A.

    2011-04-01

    Key improvements in the sensitivity of the underground particle astrophysics experiments can only be achieved if the radiation causing background events in detectors is well understood and proper measures are taken to suppress it. The background radiation arising from radioactivity and cosmic-ray muons is discussed here together with the methods of its suppression. Different shielding designs are considered to attenuate gamma-rays and neutrons coming from radioactivity in rock and lab walls. Purity of materials used in detector construction is analysed and the background event rates due to the presence of radioactive isotopes in detector components are discussed. Event rates in detectors caused by muon-induced neutrons with and without active veto systems are presented leading to the requirements for the depth of an underground laboratory and the efficiency of the veto system.

  14. Diversity of hepatocellular carcinoma clones bearing hematopoietic malignancies-related chromosomal translocation.

    PubMed

    Parent, Romain; Plissonnier, Marie-Laure; Bancel, Brigitte; Liao, Wan-Li; Rumin, Sylvie; Asaad, Remal; Till, Marianne; Sanlaville, Damien; Zoulim, Fabien; Trépo, Christian; Marion, Marie-Jeanne

    2014-04-01

    Interpatient heterogeneity of hepatocellular carcinoma has been in-depth addressed. Intrapatient heterogeneity is less known. Four clones were freshly isolated from an Edmondson grade I HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma. Biochemical approaches, functional assays and cytogenetics were used. Albumin inducibility was uncoupled from canonical cytokeratin profiles, suggesting pathological combinations of hepatospecific and biliary markers. Poor differentiation and TGFβ's proproliferative effect on all clones were observed. TGFβ, Interferon α and doxorubicin sensitivity levels were found highly heterogeneous. Progenitor and stem cells markers OV6 and EpCAM were mutually exclusively expressed. All clones were CD44+, while none expressed CD90, CD133, or CD117. Three clones displayed a liver progenitor OV6+ phenotype, and were susceptible to hepatocytic differentiation, among which one fibroblastoid clone displayed intrahepatic parenchymal engraftment capability. A fourth clone, the less motile, displayed a cancer stem cell EpCAM+ phenotype, was essentially β-catenin negative, and was as expected devoid of hepatocytic differentiation capability, yet the most sensitive to doxorubicin treatment. Cytogenetics evidenced in all clones a t(12;22)(p11;q11) translocation found in several myelodysplastic syndromes. All clones, that probably derive from EpCAM+ tumor cells, display aberrant E-cadherin cytosolic localization. Because of their diverse pathophysiolocal features, these freshly isolated, low population doubling-defined, HCC clones may provide novel opportunities to tackle HCC heterogeneity in a single patient background for therapy improvement purposes, especially regarding recently developed targeted strategies.

  15. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  16. Background music and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Angel, Leslie A; Polzella, Donald J; Elvers, Greg C

    2010-06-01

    The present experiment employed standardized test batteries to assess the effects of fast-tempo music on cognitive performance among 56 male and female university students. A linguistic processing task and a spatial processing task were selected from the Criterion Task Set developed to assess verbal and nonverbal performance. Ten excerpts from Mozart's music matched for tempo were selected. Background music increased the speed of spatial processing and the accuracy of linguistic processing. The findings suggest that background music can have predictable effects on cognitive performance.

  17. Generative electronic background music system

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurowski, Lukasz

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  18. Familial dicentric translocation t(13;18)(p13;p11.2) ascertained by recurrent miscarriages.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, A; Perel, I D; Clarke, A J; Saville, T

    1979-01-01

    A dicentric translocation is described involving chromosomes 13 and 18 in which the centromere of chromosome 13 was suppressed. The translocation was ascertained by repeated miscarriages and was found in three generations of phenotypically normal carriers. Images PMID:469891

  19. Low background techniques in CANDLES

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, K. E-mail: nkyohei@u-fukui.ac.jp; Iida, T.; Matsuoka, K.; Nomachi, M.; Umehara, S.; Kishimoto, T.; Chan, W. M.; Kakubata, H.; Li, X.; Maeda, T.; Ohata, T.; Temuge, B.; Tetsuno, K.; Trang, V. T. T.; Uehara, T.; Yoshida, S.; Morishita, K.; Ogawa, I.; Sakamoto, K.; Tamagawa, Y.; and others

    2015-08-17

    CANDLES is a double beta decay experiment using {sup 48}Ca in CaF{sub 2} crystals. The measurement is being performed with prototype detector (CANDLES III) for high sensitive measurement in the future. Recent status of detector improvements and background reduction techniques are described in this paper.

  20. Teaching about Natural Background Radiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-01-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also…

  1. Teacher Pensions: A Background Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Janet S.

    2008-01-01

    Pensions are an important but comparatively unexamined component of human resource policies in education. In an increasingly competitive world where employees are more mobile than ever, pension policies that were designed in the last century may be out of step with the needs of both individuals and schools. This background paper aims to foster…

  2. Ambient background particulate composition, outdoor natural background: interferents/clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterno, Dorothea

    2012-06-01

    It has proven a very difficult task to discriminate an actual BW threat from the natural occurring ambient particulate aerosol, which includes a significant fraction of particles consisting of mixed mineral and biological material. The interferent particles [clutter] (bio and non bio) concentration varies widely both by location, weather and season and diurnally. Naturally occurring background particulates are composed of fungal and bacterial spores both fragments and components, plant fragments and debris, animal fragments and debris, all of which may be associated with inert dust or combustion material. Some or all of which could also be considered to be an interferent to a biological warfare detector and cause these biodector systems to cause False Alarms by non specific BW bio detectors. I will share analysis of current long term background data sets.

  3. Cosmic backgrounds of relic gravitons and their absolute normalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2014-11-01

    Provided the consistency relations are not violated, the recent BICEP2 observations pin down the absolute normalization, the spectral slope and the maximal frequency of the cosmic graviton background produced during inflation. The properly normalized spectra are hereby computed from the lowest frequencies (of the order of the present Hubble rate) up to the highest frequency range in the GHz region. Deviations from the conventional paradigm cannot be excluded and are examined by allowing for different physical possibilities including, in particular, a running of the tensor spectral index, an explicit breaking of the consistency relations and a spike in the high-frequency tail of the spectrum coming either from a post-inflationary phase dominated by a stiff fluid or from the contribution of waterfall fields in a hybrid inflationary context. The direct determinations of the tensor to scalar ratio at low frequencies, if confirmed by the forthcoming observations, will also affect and constrain the high-frequency uncertainties. The limits on the cosmic graviton backgrounds coming from wide-band interferometers (such as LIGO/Virgo, LISA and BBO/DECIGO) together with a more accurate scrutiny of the tensor B-mode polarization at low frequencies will set direct bounds on the post-inflationary evolution and on other unconventional completions of the standard lore.

  4. The cosmic infrared background experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James; Battle, John; Cooray, Asantha; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Keating, Brian; Lange, Andrew; Lee, Dae-Hea; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Pak, Soojong; Renbarger, Tom; Sullivan, Ian; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Watabe, Toyoki

    2006-03-01

    The extragalactic background, based on absolute measurements reported by DIRBE and IRTS at 1.2 and 2.2 μm, exceeds the brightness derived from galaxy counts by up to a factor 5. Furthermore, both DIRBE and the IRTS report fluctuations in the near-infrared sky brightness that appear to have an extra-galactic origin, but are larger than expected from local ( z = 1-3) galaxies. These observations have led to speculation that a new class of high-mass stars or mini-quasars may dominate primordial star formation at high-redshift ( z ˜ 10-20), which, in order to explain the excess in the near-infrared background, must be highly luminous but produce a limited amount of metals and X-ray photons. Regardless of the nature of the sources, if a significant component of the near-infrared background comes from first-light galaxies, theoretical models generically predict a prominent near-infrared spectral feature from the redshifted Lyman cutoff, and a distinctive fluctuation power spectrum. We are developing a rocket-borne instrument (the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment, or CIBER) to search for signatures of primordial galaxy formation in the cosmic near-infrared extra-galactic background. CIBER consists of a wide-field two-color camera, a low-resolution absolute spectrometer, and a high-resolution narrow-band imaging spectrometer. The cameras will search for spatial fluctuations in the background on angular scales from 7″ to 2°, where a first-light galaxy signature is expected to peak, over a range of angular scales poorly covered by previous experiments. CIBER will determine if the fluctuations reported by the IRTS arise from first-light galaxies or have a local origin. In a short rocket flight CIBER has sensitivity to probe fluctuations 100× fainter than IRTS/DIRBE, with sufficient resolution to remove local-galaxy correlations. By jointly observing regions of the sky studied by Spitzer and ASTRO-F, CIBER will build a multi-color view of the near

  5. Ambient Background Particulate Compositiion Outdoor Natural Background: Interferents/Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    the biological warfare detection world), you must conduct long term ( seasonally ) particulate monitoring. Anecdotal short term monitoring attempts...particulates (interferents or clutter) in the lower atmosphere at four locations along a transect in the UK for 2 years. In addition, seasonal , diurnal...CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND 9 2. UK AEROSOL BIODIVERSITY STUDY-2 YEARS, FOUR LOCATIONS. FOUR SEASONS 10 3. DoD SPONSORED ANAL YSIS OF UK

  6. Slow CCL2-dependent translocation of biopersistent particles from muscle to brain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Long-term biodistribution of nanomaterials used in medicine is largely unknown. This is the case for alum, the most widely used vaccine adjuvant, which is a nanocrystalline compound spontaneously forming micron/submicron-sized agglomerates. Although generally well tolerated, alum is occasionally detected within monocyte-lineage cells long after immunization in presumably susceptible individuals with systemic/neurologic manifestations or autoimmune (inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA). Methods On the grounds of preliminary investigations in 252 patients with alum-associated ASIA showing both a selective increase of circulating CCL2, the major monocyte chemoattractant, and a variation in the CCL2 gene, we designed mouse experiments to assess biodistribution of vaccine-derived aluminum and of alum-particle fluorescent surrogates injected in muscle. Aluminum was detected in tissues by Morin stain and particle induced X-ray emission) (PIXE) Both 500 nm fluorescent latex beads and vaccine alum agglomerates-sized nanohybrids (Al-Rho) were used. Results Intramuscular injection of alum-containing vaccine was associated with the appearance of aluminum deposits in distant organs, such as spleen and brain where they were still detected one year after injection. Both fluorescent materials injected into muscle translocated to draining lymph nodes (DLNs) and thereafter were detected associated with phagocytes in blood and spleen. Particles linearly accumulated in the brain up to the six-month endpoint; they were first found in perivascular CD11b+ cells and then in microglia and other neural cells. DLN ablation dramatically reduced the biodistribution. Cerebral translocation was not observed after direct intravenous injection, but significantly increased in mice with chronically altered blood-brain-barrier. Loss/gain-of-function experiments consistently implicated CCL2 in systemic diffusion of Al-Rho particles captured by monocyte-lineage cells and in

  7. Cadmium translocation by contractile roots differs from that in regular, non-contractile roots

    PubMed Central

    Lux, Alexander; Lackovič, Andrej; Van Staden, Johannes; Lišková, Desana; Kohanová, Jana; Martinka, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Contractile roots are known and studied mainly in connection with the process of shrinkage of their basal parts, which acts to pull the shoot of the plant deeper into the ground. Previous studies have shown that the specific structure of these roots results in more intensive water uptake at the base, which is in contrast to regular root types. The purpose of this study was to find out whether the basal parts of contractile roots are also more active in translocation of cadmium to the shoot. Methods Plants of the South African ornamental species Tritonia gladiolaris were cultivated in vitro for 2 months, at which point they possessed well-developed contractile roots. They were then transferred to Petri dishes with horizontally separated compartments of agar containing 50 µmol Cd(NO3)2 in the region of the root base or the root apex. Seedlings of 4-d-old maize (Zea mays) plants, which do not possess contractile roots, were also transferred to similar Petri dishes. The concentrations of Cd in the leaves of the plants were compared after 10 d of cultivation. Anatomical analyses of Tritonia roots were performed using appropriately stained freehand cross-sections. Key Results The process of contraction required specific anatomical adaptation of the root base in Tritonia, with less lignified and less suberized tissues in comparison with the subapical part of the root. These unusual developmental characteristics were accompanied by more intensive translocation of Cd ions from the basal part of contractile roots to the leaves than from the apical–subapical root parts. The opposite effects were seen in the non-contractile roots of maize, with higher uptake and transport by the apical parts of the root and lower uptake and transport by the basal part. Conclusions The specific characteristics of contractile roots may have a significant impact on the uptake of ions, including toxic metals from the soil surface layers. This may be important for plant

  8. The Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, James; Battle, J.; Cooray, A.; Hristov, V.; Kawada, M.; Keating, B.; Lee, D.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Nam, U.; Renbarger, T.; Sullivan, I.; Tsumura, K.; Wada, T.; Zemcov, M.

    2009-01-01

    We are developing the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) to search for signatures of first-light galaxy emission in the extragalactic background. The first generation of stars produce characteristic signatures in the near-infrared extragalactic background, including a redshifted Ly-cutoff feature and a characteristic fluctuation power spectrum, that may be detectable with a specialized instrument. CIBER consists of two wide-field cameras to measure the fluctuation power spectrum, and a low-resolution and a narrow-band spectrometer to measure the absolute background. The cameras will search for fluctuations on angular scales from 7 arcseconds to 2 degrees, where the first-light galaxy spatial power spectrum peaks. The cameras have the necessary combination of sensitivity, wide field of view, spatial resolution, and multiple bands to make a definitive measurement. CIBER will determine if the fluctuations reported by Spitzer arise from first-light galaxies. The cameras observe in a single wide field of view, eliminating systematic errors associated with mosaicing. Two bands are chosen to maximize the first-light signal contrast, at 1.6 um near the expected spectral maximum, and at 1.0 um; the combination is a powerful discriminant against fluctuations arising from local sources. We will observe regions of the sky surveyed by Spitzer and Akari. The low-resolution spectrometer will search for the redshifted Lyman cutoff feature in the 0.7 - 1.8 um spectral region. The narrow-band spectrometer will measure the absolute Zodiacal brightness using the scattered 854.2 nm Ca II Fraunhofer line. The spectrometers will test if reports of a diffuse extragalactic background in the 1 - 2 um band continues into the optical, or is caused by an under estimation of the Zodiacal foreground. We report performance of the assembled and tested instrument as we prepare for a first sounding rocket flight in early 2009. CIBER is funded by the NASA/APRA sub-orbital program.

  9. Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy: Python V Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, K.; Dragovan, M.; Kovac, J.; Halverson, N. W.; Holzapfel, W. L.; Knox, L.; Dodelson, S.; Ganga, K.; Peterson, J. B.; Alvarez, D.; Griffin, G.; Newcomb, M.; Miller, K.; Platt, S. R.; Novak, G.

    1999-05-01

    Observations of the microwave sky using the Python telescope in its fifth season of operation at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica are presented. The system consists of a 0.75 m off-axis telescope instrumented with a HEMT amplifier-based radiometer having continuum sensitivity from 37-45 GHz in two frequency bands. With a 0.91 x 1.02 deg beam the instrument fully sampled 598 deg(2) of sky, including fields measured during the previous four seasons of Python observations. Interpreting the observed fluctuations as anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background, we place constraints on the angular power spectrum of fluctuations in multipole bands up to l ~ 260. The observed spectrum is consistent with both the COBE experiment and previous Python results. There is no significant contamination from known foregrounds. The results show a discernible rise in the angular power spectrum from large (l ~ 40) to small (l ~ 200) angular scales.

  10. Uptake, translocation, and toxicity of gold nanorods in maize

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi Shahmansouri, Nastaran

    Nanomaterials are widely used in many different products, such as electronics, cosmetics, industrial goods, biomedical uses, and other material applications. The heavy emission of nanomaterials into the environment has motived increasing concern regarding the effects on ecosystems, food chains, and, human health. Plants can tolerate a certain amount of natural nanomaterials, but large amounts of ENMs released from a variety of industries could be toxic to plants and possibly threaten the ecosystem. Employing phytoremediation as a contamination treatment method may show promise. However a pre-requisite to successful treatment is a better understanding of the behavior and effects of nanomaterials within plant systems. This study is designed to investigate the uptake, translocation, bioavailability, and toxicity of gold nanorods in maize plants. Maize is an important food and feed crop that can be used to understand the potential hazardous effects of nanoparticle uptake and distribution in the food chain. The findings could be an important contribution to the fields of phytoremediation, agri-nanotechnology, and nanoparticle toxicity on plants. In the first experiment, hydroponically grown maize seedlings were exposed to similar doses of commercial non-coated gold nanorods in three sizes, 10x34 nm, 20x75 nm, and 40x96 nm. The three nanorod species were suspended in solutions at concentrations of 350 mg/l, 5.8 mg/l, and 14 mg/l, respectively. Maize plants were exposed to all three solutions resulting in considerably lower transpiration and wet biomass than control plants. Likewise, dry biomass was reduced, but the effect is less pronounced than that of transpiration and wet biomass. The reduced transpiration and water content, which eventually proved fatal to exposed plants, were most likely a result of toxic effect of gold nanorod, which appeared to physically hinder the root system. TEM images proved that maize plants can uptake gold particles and accumulate them in

  11. Muscle contraction increases carnitine uptake via translocation of OCTN2

    SciTech Connect

    Furuichi, Yasuro; Sugiura, Tomoko; Kato, Yukio; Takakura, Hisashi; Hanai, Yoshiteru; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Masuda, Kazumi

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Muscle contraction augmented carnitine uptake into rat hindlimb muscles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An increase in carnitine uptake was due to an intrinsic clearance, not blood flow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histochemical analysis showed sarcolemmal OCTN2 was emphasized after contraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer OCTN2 protein in sarcolemmal fraction was increased in contracting muscles. -- Abstract: Since carnitine plays an important role in fat oxidation, influx of carnitine could be crucial for muscle metabolism. OCTN2 (SLC22A5), a sodium-dependent solute carrier, is assumed to transport carnitine into skeletal muscle cells. Acute regulation of OCTN2 activity in rat hindlimb muscles was investigated in response to electrically induced contractile activity. The tissue uptake clearance (CL{sub uptake}) of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine during muscle contraction was examined in vivo using integration plot analysis. The CL{sub uptake} of [{sup 14}C]iodoantipyrine (IAP) was also determined as an index of tissue blood flow. To test the hypothesis that increased carnitine uptake involves the translocation of OCTN2, contraction-induced alteration in the subcellular localization of OCTN2 was examined. The CL{sub uptake} of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine in the contracting muscles increased 1.4-1.7-fold as compared to that in the contralateral resting muscles (p < 0.05). The CL{sub uptake} of [{sup 14}C]IAP was much higher than that of L-[{sup 3}H]carnitine, but no association between the increase in carnitine uptake and blood flow was obtained. Co-immunostaining of OCTN2 and dystrophin (a muscle plasma membrane marker) showed an increase in OCTN2 signal in the plasma membrane after muscle contraction. Western blotting showed that the level of sarcolemmal OCTN2 was greater in contracting muscles than in resting muscles (p < 0.05). The present study showed that muscle contraction facilitated carnitine uptake in skeletal muscles, possibly

  12. Meiotic pairing and gene expression disturbance in germ cells from an infertile boar with a balanced reciprocal autosome-autosome translocation.

    PubMed

    Barasc, Harmonie; Congras, Annabelle; Mary, Nicolas; Trouilh, Lidwine; Marquet, Valentine; Ferchaud, Stéphane; Raymond-Letron, Isabelle; Calgaro, Anne; Loustau-Dudez, Anne-Marie; Mouney-Bonnet, Nathalie; Acloque, Hervé; Ducos, Alain; Pinton, Alain

    2016-12-01

    Individuals carrying balanced constitutional reciprocal translocations generally have a normal phenotype, but often present reproductive disorders. The aim of our research was to analyze the meiotic process in an oligoasthenoteratospermic boar carrying an asymmetric reciprocal translocation involving chromosomes 1 and 14. Different multivalent structures (quadrivalent and trivalent plus univalent) were identified during chromosome pairing analysis. Some of these multivalents were characterized by the presence of unpaired autosomal segments with histone γH2AX accumulation sometimes associated with the XY body. Gene expression in spermatocytes was studied by RNA-DNA-FISH and microarray-based testis transcriptome analysis. Our results revealed a decrease in gene expression for chromosomes 1 and 14 and an up-regulated expression of X-chromosome genes for the translocated boar compared with normal individuals. We hypothesized that the observed meiotic arrest and reproductive failure in this boar might be due to silencing of crucial autosomal genes (MSUC) and disturbance of meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI). Further analysis revealed abnormal meiotic recombination (frequency and distribution) and the production of a high rate of unbalanced spermatozoa.

  13. Extensive nonhomologous meiotic synapsis between normal chromosome axes of an rcp(3;6)(p14;q21) translocation in a hairless Mexican boar.

    PubMed

    Villagómez, D A F; Ayala-Valdovinos, M A; Galindo-García, J; Sánchez-Chipres, D R; Mora-Galindo, J; Taylor-Preciado, J J

    2008-01-01

    Due to its low fertility, expressed as small litter size, a Mexican hairless boar was subjected to cytogenetic investigation. Analysis of G-banded mitotic chromosomes revealed a reciprocal chromosome translocation, rcp(3;6) (p14;q21). Synaptonemal complex analysis showed a regular pairing behavior of the translocation chromosome axes, always resulting in a quadrivalent configuration. However, due to extensive nonhomologous pairing between the axes of nonderivative chromosomes 3 and 6, the quadrivalent mostly had an asymmetrical cross-shaped morphology. The nonhomologous pairing occurred not only at mid and late pachytene, but also at the earliest stage of pachytene. It seems that early pachytene heterosynapsis is a common phenomenon in the pairing behavior of pig reciprocal translocations. Therefore, heterosynapsis may reduce apoptosis of germ cells due to partial absence of homologous synapsis during the pairing phase of meiosis. The frequency of spermatocytes showing quadrivalent configurations with unpaired axial segments apparently did not affect germ cell progression in the boar, since fairly normal testicular histology was noticed.

  14. Bovine Lactoferrampin, Human Lactoferricin, and Lactoferrin 1-11 Inhibit Nuclear Translocation of HIV Integrase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Winston Yan; Wong, Jack Ho; Ip, Denis Tsz Ming; Wan, David Chi Cheong; Cheung, Randy Chifai; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate fragments derived from human and bovine lactoferrins for ability to inhibit nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase. It was shown that human lactoferricin, human lactoferrin 1-11, and bovine lactoferrampin reduced nuclear distribution of HIV-1 integrase. Bovine lactoferrampin could inhibit both the activity and nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase. Human lactoferrampin, bovine lactoferricin, and bovine lactoferrin 1-11 had no effect on HIV-1 integrase nuclear translocation. Human lactoferrampin which inhibited the activity of integrase did not prevent its nuclear translocation. Human lactoferricin and lactoferrin 1-11 did not inhibit HIV-1 integrase nuclear translocation despite their ability to attenuate the enzyme activity. The discrepancy between the findings on reduction of HIV-1 activity and inhibition of nuclear translocation of HIV-1 integrase was due to the different mechanisms involved. A similar reasoning can also be applied to the different inhibitory potencies of the milk peptides on different HIV enzymes, i.e., nuclear translocation.

  15. Domain Organization in Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Type E is Unique: Its Implication in Faster Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Kumaran, D.; Eswaramoorthy, S; Furey, W; Navaza, J; Sax, M; Swaminathan, S

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces seven antigenically distinct neurotoxins [C. botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) A-G] sharing a significant sequence homology. Based on sequence and functional similarity, it was believed that their three-dimensional structures will also be similar. Indeed, the crystal structures of BoNTs A and B exhibit similar fold and domain association where the translocation domain is flanked on either side by binding and catalytic domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of BoNT E holotoxin and show that the domain association is different and unique, although the individual domains are similar to those of BoNTs A and B. In BoNT E, both the binding domain and the catalytic domain are on the same side of the translocation domain, and all three have mutual interfaces. This unique association may have an effect on the rate of translocation, with the molecule strategically positioned in the vesicle for quick entry into cytosol. Botulism, the disease caused by BoNT E, sets in faster than any other serotype because of its speedy internalization and translocation, and the present structure offers a credible explanation. We propose that the translocation domain in other BoNTs follows a two-step process to attain translocation-competent conformation as in BoNT E. We also suggest that this translocation-competent conformation in BoNT E is a probable reason for its faster toxic rate compared to BoNT A. However, this needs further experimental elucidation.

  16. Cortical granule translocation is microfilament mediated and linked to meiotic maturation in the sea urchin oocyte.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Gary M; Conner, Sean D; Berg, Linnea

    2002-09-01

    Cortical granules exocytose after the fusion of egg and sperm in most animals, and their contents function in the block to polyspermy by creating an impenetrable extracellular matrix. Cortical granules are synthesized throughout oogenesis and translocate en masse to the cell surface during meiosis where they remain until fertilization. As the mature oocyte is approximately 125 micro m in diameter (Lytechinus variegatus), many of the cortical granules translocate upwards of 60 micro m to reach the cortex within a 4 hour time window. We have investigated the mechanism of this coordinated vesicular translocation event. Although the stimulus to reinitiate meiosis in sea urchin oocytes is not known, we found many different ways to reversibly inhibit germinal vesicle breakdown, and used these findings to discover that meiotic maturation and cortical granule translocation are inseparable. We also learned that cortical granule translocation requires association with microfilaments but not microtubules. It is clear from endocytosis assays that microfilament motors are functional prior to meiosis, even though cortical granules do not use them. However, just after GVBD, cortical granules attach to microfilaments and translocate to the cell surface. This latter conclusion is based on organelle stratification within the oocyte followed by positional quantitation of the cortical granules. We conclude from these studies that maturation promoting factor (MPF) activation stimulates vesicle association with microfilaments, and is a key regulatory step in the coordinated translocation of cortical granules to the egg cortex.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of the Nanopore Translocation Dynamics of Simple Structured Polynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Schink, Severin; Renner, Stephan; Alim, Karen; Arnaut, Vera; Simmel, Friedrich C.; Gerland, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Nanopore translocation experiments are increasingly applied to probe the secondary structures of RNA and DNA molecules. Here, we report two vital steps toward establishing nanopore translocation as a tool for the systematic and quantitative analysis of polynucleotide folding: 1), Using α-hemolysin pores and a diverse set of different DNA hairpins, we demonstrate that backward nanopore force spectroscopy is particularly well suited for quantitative analysis. In contrast to forward translocation from the vestibule side of the pore, backward translocation times do not appear to be significantly affected by pore-DNA interactions. 2), We develop and verify experimentally a versatile mesoscopic theoretical framework for the quantitative analysis of translocation experiments with structured polynucleotides. The underlying model is based on sequence-dependent free energy landscapes constructed using the known thermodynamic parameters for polynucleotide basepairing. This approach limits the adjustable parameters to a small set of sequence-independent parameters. After parameter calibration, the theoretical model predicts the translocation dynamics of new sequences. These predictions can be leveraged to generate a baseline expectation even for more complicated structures where the assumptions underlying the one-dimensional free energy landscape may no longer be satisfied. Taken together, backward translocation through α-hemolysin pores combined with mesoscopic theoretical modeling is a promising approach for label-free single-molecule analysis of DNA and RNA folding. PMID:22225801

  18. Translocation of a semiflexible polymer through a nanopore in the presence of attractive binding particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket

    2015-09-01

    We study the translocation dynamics of a semiflexible polymer through a nanopore from the cis into the trans compartment containing attractive binding particles (BPs) using the Langevin dynamics simulation in two dimensions. The binding particles accelerate the threading process in two ways: (i) reducing the back-sliding of the translocated monomer, and (ii) providing the pulling force toward the translocation direction. We observe that for certain binding strength (ɛc) and concentration (ρ ) of the BPs, the translocation is faster than the ideal ratcheting condition as elucidated by Simon, Peskin, and Oster [M. Simon, C. S. Peskin, and G. F. Oster, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89, 3770 (1992), 10.1073/pnas.89.9.3770]. The asymmetry produced by the BPs at the trans-side leads to similarities of this process to that of a driven translocation with an applied force inside the pore manifested in various physical quantities. Furthermore, we provide an analytic expression for the force experienced by the translocating chain as well as for the scaled mean first passage time (MFPT), for which we observe that for various combinations of N , ɛ , and ρ the scaled MFPT (<τ > /N1.5ρ0.8) collapses onto the same master plot. Based on the analysis of our simulation data, we provide plausible arguments with regard to how the scaling theory of driven translocation can be generalized for such a directed diffusion process by replacing the externally applied force with an effective force.

  19. Detergent disruption of bacterial inner membranes and recovery of protein translocation activity

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, K.; Wickner, W.T. )

    1989-11-01

    Isolation of the integral membrane components of protein translocation requires methods for fractionation and functional reconstitution. The authors treated inner-membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli with mixtures of octyl {beta}-D-glucoside, phospholipids, and an integral membrane carrier protein under conditions that extract most of the membrane proteins into micellar solution. Upon dialysis, proteoliposomes were reconstituted that supported translocation of radiochemically pure ({sup 35}S)pro-OmpA (the precursor of outer membrane protein A). Translocation into these proteoliposomes required ATP hydrolysis and membrane proteins, indicating that the reaction is that of the inner membrane. The suspension of membranes in detergent was separated into supernatant and pellet fractions by ultracentrifugation. After reconstitution, translocation activity was observed in both fractions, but processing by leader peptidase of translocated pro-OmpA to OmpA was not detectable in the reconstituted pellet fraction. Processing activity was restored by addition of pure leader peptidase as long as this enzyme was added before detergent removal, indicating that the translocation activity is not associated with detergent-resistant membrane vesicles. These results show that protein translocation activity can be recovered from detergent-disrupted membrane vesicles, providing a first step towards the goal of isolating the solubilized components.

  20. Direct proof of spontaneous translocation of lipid-covered hydrophobic nanoparticles through a phospholipid bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yachong; Terazzi, Emmanuel; Seemann, Ralf; Fleury, Jean Baptiste; Baulin, Vladimir A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic nanoparticles introduced into living systems may lead to increased toxicity, can activate immune cells, or can be used as nanocarriers for drug or gene delivery. It is generally accepted that small hydrophobic nanoparticles are blocked by lipid bilayers and accumulate in the bilayer core, whereas big nanoparticles can only penetrate cells through slow energy-dependent processes, such as endocytosis, lasting minutes. In contrast to expectations, we demonstrate that lipid-covered hydrophobic nanoparticles may translocate through lipid membranes by direct penetration within milliseconds. We identified the threshold size for translocation: nanoparticles with diameters smaller than 5 nm stay trapped in the bilayer, whereas those with diameters larger than 5 nm insert into the bilayer, opening pores in the bilayer. The direct proof of this size-dependent translocation was provided by an in situ observation of a single event of a nanoparticle quitting the bilayer. This was achieved with a specially designed microfluidic device combining optical fluorescence microscopy with simultaneous electrophysiological measurements. A quantitative analysis of the kinetic pathway of a single nanoparticle translocation event demonstrated that the translocation is irreversible and that the nanoparticle can translocate only once. This newly discovered one-way translocation mechanism provides numerous opportunities for biotechnological applications, ranging from targeted biomaterial elimination and/or delivery to precise and controlled trapping of nanoparticles. PMID:27847863

  1. Synapse formation changes the rules for desensitization of PKC translocation in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Farah, Carole A; Naqib, Faisal; Weatherill, Daniel B; Pack, Christopher C; Sossin, Wayne S

    2015-02-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are activated by translocating from the cytoplasm to the membrane. We have previously shown that serotonin-mediated translocation of PKC to the plasma membrane in Aplysia sensory neurons was subject to desensitization, a decrease in the ability of serotonin to induce translocation after previous application of serotonin. In Aplysia, changes in the strength of the sensory-motor neuron synapse are important for behavioral sensitization and PKC regulates a number of important aspects of this form of synaptic plasticity. We have previously suggested that the desensitization of PKC translocation in Aplysia sensory neurons may partially explain the differences between spaced and massed training, as spaced applications of serotonin, a cellular analog of spaced training, cause greater desensitization of PKC translocation than one massed application of serotonin, a cellular analog of massed training. Our previous studies were performed in isolated sensory neurons. In the present study, we monitored translocation of fluorescently-tagged PKC to the plasma membrane in living sensory neurons that were co-cultured with motor neurons to allow for synapse formation. We show that desensitization now becomes similar during spaced and massed applications of serotonin. We had previously modeled the signaling pathways that govern desensitization in isolated sensory neurons. We now modify this mathematical model to account for the changes observed in desensitization dynamics following synapse formation. Our study shows that synapse formation leads to significant changes in the molecular signaling networks that underlie desensitization of PKC translocation.

  2. Genetic variation in natural and translocated populations of the endangered Delmarva fox squirrel (Sciurus niger cinereus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lance, S.L.; Maldonado, J.E.; Bocetti, C.I.; Pattee, O.H.; Ballou, J.D.; Fleischer, R.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Delmarva fox squirrel, Sciurus niger cinereus, is a federally listed endangered subspecies whose range has been reduced by 90%. In an attempt to increase both population size and range, translocation sites were established beginning in the 1960's by moving squirrels from the natural range to sites outside the current range. Although translocations have served as the primary component of the DFS recovery program, there has been very little post-release examination of the genetics of the translocation sites. In this study, we developed ten microsatellite loci, screened the three polymorphic loci, and sequenced a 330 bp fragment of the mitochondrial control region in order to assess levels of genetic variation in natural and translocated regions of Delmarva fox squirrels and to compare them to Southeastern fox squirrels (S. n. niger). Although we found low levels of microsatellite polymorphism, there were no differences in heterozygosity between natural and translocated regions, or between Delmarva and Southeastern fox squirrels. We found high levels of polymorphism in the mitochondrial control region. Our patterns of haplotype diversity suggest incomplete lineage sorting of the two subspecies. In general, our data suggest that the current levels of genetic variation in the translocated sites are representative of those found in the natural population, and we encourage the continued use of translocations as a major component of Delmarva fox squirrel recovery.

  3. Morbidity Profile and Functional Outcome of Modified Facial Translocation Approaches for Skull Base Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kekatpure, Vikram D.; Rajan, Gunesh P.; Patel, Daxesh; Trivedi, Nirav P.; Arun, P.; Iyer, Subramania; Kuriakose, Moni Abraham

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate morbidity associated with facial translocation approaches for skull base and results of various technical modifications. Forty consecutive patients who underwent facial translocation approaches for accessing skull base tumors from July 2005 to June 2010 were included in this study. There were 25 patients who underwent standard facial translocation, 4 patients medial mini, and 11 patients underwent extended facial translocation. Thirteen patients had benign disease and 27 patients had malignant disease. Resection was R0 in 36 and R1 in 4 patients. Most patients had acceptable cosmetic results. None of the patients had problems related to occlusion or speech and swallowing. The commonest complication observed was nasal crusting in 16 patients. Grade 2 trismus and exposure of mini plate was seen in three patients. Two patients developed necrosis of translocated bone. Three patients developed palatal fistula before modification of palatal incision. Facial translocation provides a satisfactory access for adequate clearance of skull base tumors with satisfactory aesthetic and functional results. With modifications of the surgical technique and implementation of new surgical tools, the morbidity of facial translocation approaches will continue to decrease. PMID:22470269

  4. Prediction of nuclear proteins using nuclear translocation signals proposed by probabilistic latent semantic indexing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Identification of subcellular localization in proteins is crucial to elucidate cellular processes and molecular functions in a cell. However, given a tremendous amount of sequence data generated in the post-genomic era, determining protein localization based on biological experiments can be expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, developing prediction systems to analyze uncharacterised proteins efficiently has played an important role in high-throughput protein analyses. In a eukaryotic cell, many essential biological processes take place in the nucleus. Nuclear proteins shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm based on recognition of nuclear translocation signals, including nuclear localization signals (NLSs) and nuclear export signals (NESs). Currently, only a few approaches have been developed specifically to predict nuclear localization using sequence features, such as putative NLSs. However, it has been shown that prediction coverage based on the NLSs is very low. In addition, most existing approaches only attained prediction accuracy and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) around 54%~70% and 0.250~0.380 on independent test set, respectively. Moreover, no predictor can generate sequence motifs to characterize features of potential NESs, in which biological properties are not well understood from existing experimental studies. Results In this study, first we propose PSLNuc (Protein Subcellular Localization prediction for Nucleus) for predicting nuclear localization in proteins. First, for feature representation, a protein is represented by gapped-dipeptides and the feature values are weighted by homology information from a smoothed position-specific scoring matrix. After that, we incorporate probabilistic latent semantic indexing (PLSI) for feature reduction. Finally, the reduced features are used as input for a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. In addition to PSLNuc, we further identify gapped-dipeptide signatures for putative NLSs and NESs

  5. Background Subtraction Based on Three-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Transform.

    PubMed

    Han, Guang; Wang, Jinkuan; Cai, Xi

    2016-03-30

    Background subtraction without a separate training phase has become a critical task, because a sufficiently long and clean training sequence is usually unavailable, and people generally thirst for immediate detection results from the first frame of a video. Without a training phase, we propose a background subtraction method based on three-dimensional (3D) discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Static backgrounds with few variations along the time axis are characterized by intensity temporal consistency in the 3D space-time domain and, hence, correspond to low-frequency components in the 3D frequency domain. Enlightened by this, we eliminate low-frequency components that correspond to static backgrounds using the 3D DWT in order to extract moving objects. Owing to the multiscale analysis property of the 3D DWT, the elimination of low-frequency components in sub-bands of the 3D DWT is equivalent to performing a pyramidal 3D filter. This 3D filter brings advantages to our method in reserving the inner parts of detected objects and reducing the ringing around object boundaries. Moreover, we make use of wavelet shrinkage to remove disturbance of intensity temporal consistency and introduce an adaptive threshold based on the entropy of the histogram to obtain optimal detection results. Experimental results show that our method works effectively in situations lacking training opportunities and outperforms several popular techniques.

  6. Background Subtraction Based on Three-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Transform

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guang; Wang, Jinkuan; Cai, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Background subtraction without a separate training phase has become a critical task, because a sufficiently long and clean training sequence is usually unavailable, and people generally thirst for immediate detection results from the first frame of a video. Without a training phase, we propose a background subtraction method based on three-dimensional (3D) discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Static backgrounds with few variations along the time axis are characterized by intensity temporal consistency in the 3D space-time domain and, hence, correspond to low-frequency components in the 3D frequency domain. Enlightened by this, we eliminate low-frequency components that correspond to static backgrounds using the 3D DWT in order to extract moving objects. Owing to the multiscale analysis property of the 3D DWT, the elimination of low-frequency components in sub-bands of the 3D DWT is equivalent to performing a pyramidal 3D filter. This 3D filter brings advantages to our method in reserving the inner parts of detected objects and reducing the ringing around object boundaries. Moreover, we make use of wavelet shrinkage to remove disturbance of intensity temporal consistency and introduce an adaptive threshold based on the entropy of the histogram to obtain optimal detection results. Experimental results show that our method works effectively in situations lacking training opportunities and outperforms several popular techniques. PMID:27043570

  7. A case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma associated with long-term dialysis showing false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 as Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Michiko; Mitani, Keiko; Fukumura, Yuki; Nagashima, Yoji; Argani, Pedrum; Yao, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Renal carcinomas associated with Xp11.2 translocations/transcription factor 3 (TFE3) gene fusion (Xp11 translocation RCC) are a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma. A middle-aged Japanese man, who had a medical history of dialysis for more than 12 years, had bilateral renal cancers with a background of acquired cystic disease of the kidney and remarkable deposition of calcium oxalate in the tumorous area. The right renal tumor showed papillary architecture of clear cells with diffuse and strong immunoreactivity for TFE3 and focal and weak positivity for cathepsin K, suggesting a possibility of Xp11 translocation RCC. However, RT-PCR failed to detect any type of the reported fusion genes involving TFE3. Thus, the sample was sent for a TFE3 break-apart FISH assay in a renal tumor consultation service, which reported no evidence of TFE3 gene rearrangement. The right renal tumor was finally diagnosed as papillary renal cell carcinoma with cystic change. We report here a case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma in a patient undergoing long-term dialysis, which showed false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 immunostaining. Titration of TFE3 immunohistochemical staining (IHC) should be performed and cross-referenced with the FISH or RT-PCR results to avoid the misinterpretation of TFE3 IHC results.

  8. A Role for Cytoskeletal Elements in the Light-Driven Translocation of Proteins in Rod Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, James J.; Orisme, Wilda; Fellows, Jonathan; McDowell, J. Hugh; Shelamer, Charles L.; Dugger, Donald R.; Clay Smith, W.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE. Light-driven protein translocation is responsible for the dramatic redistribution of some proteins in vertebrate rod photoreceptors. In this study, the involvement of microtubules and microfilaments in the light-driven translocation of arrestin and transducin was investigated. METHODS. Pharmacologic reagents were applied to native and transgenic Xenopus tadpoles, to disrupt the microtubules (thiabendazole) and microfilaments (cytochalasin D and latrunculin B) of the rod photoreceptors. Quantitative confocal imaging was used to assess the impact of these treatments on arrestin and transducin translocation. A series of transgenic tadpoles expressing arrestin truncations were also created to identify portions of arrestin that enable arrestin to translocate. RESULTS. Application of cytochalasin D or latrunculin B to disrupt the microfilament organization selectively slowed only transducin movement from the inner to the outer segments. Perturbation of the microtubule cytoskeleton with thiabendazole slowed the translocation of both arrestin and transducin, but only in moving from the outer to the inner segments. Transgenic Xenopus expressing fusions of green fluorescent protein (GFP) with portions of arrestin implicates the C terminus of arrestin as an important portion of the molecule for promoting translocation. This C-terminal region can be used independently to promote translocation of GFP in response to light. CONCLUSIONS. The results show that disruption of the cytoskeletal network in rod photoreceptors has specific effects on the translocation of arrestin and transducin. These effects suggest that the light-driven translocation of visual proteins at least partially relies on an active motor-driven mechanism for complete movement of arrestin and transducin. PMID:16249472

  9. Production and Identification of Wheat-Agropyron cristatum 2P Translocation Lines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huanhuan; Lv, Mingjie; Song, Liqiang; Zhang, Jinpeng; Gao, Ainong; Li, Lihui; Liu, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 28, PPPP), a wild relative of common wheat, possesses many potentially valuable traits that can be transferred to common wheat through breeding programs. The wheat-A. cristatum disomic addition and translocation lines can be used as bridge materials to introduce alien chromosomal segments to wheat. Wheat-A. cristatum 2P disomic addition line II-9-3 was highly resistant to powdery mildew and leaf rust, which was reported in our previous study. However, some translocation lines induced from II-9-3 have not been reported. In this study, some translocation lines were induced from II-9-3 by 60Co-γ irradiation and gametocidal chromosome 2C and then identified by cytological methods. Forty-nine wheat-A. cristatum translocation lines were obtained and various translcoation types were identified by GISH (genomic in situ hybridization), such as whole-arm, segmental and intercalary translocations. Dual-color FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization) was applied to identify the wheat chromosomes involved in the translocations, and the results showed that A. cristatum 2P chromosome segments were translocated to the different wheat chromosomes, including 1A, 2A, 3A, 4A, 5A, 6A, 7A, 3B, 5B, 7B, 1D, 4D and 6D. Many different types of wheat-A. cristatum alien translocation lines would be valuable for not only identifying and cloning A. cristatum 2P-related genes and understanding the genetics and breeding effects of the translocation between A. cristatum chromosome 2P and wheat chromosomes, but also providing new germplasm resources for the wheat genetic improvement. PMID:26731742

  10. A voltage-gated pore for translocation of tRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Koley, Sandip; Adhya, Samit

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •A tRNA translocating complex was assembled from purified proteins. •The complex translocates tRNA at a membrane potential of ∼60 mV. •Translocation requires Cys and His residues in the Fe–S center of RIC6 subunit. -- Abstract: Very little is known about how nucleic acids are translocated across membranes. The multi-subunit RNA Import Complex (RIC) from mitochondria of the kinetoplastid protozoon Leishmania tropica induces translocation of tRNAs across artificial or natural membranes, but the nature of the translocation pore remains unknown. We show that subunits RIC6 and RIC9 assemble on the membrane in presence of subunit RIC4A to form complex R3. Atomic Force Microscopy of R3 revealed particles with an asymmetric surface groove of ∼20 nm rim diameter and ∼1 nm depth. R3 induced translocation of tRNA into liposomes when the pH of the medium was lowered to ∼6 in the absence of ATP. R3-mediated tRNA translocation could also be induced at neutral pH by a K{sup +} diffusion potential with an optimum of 60–70 mV. Point mutations in the Cys{sub 2}–His{sub 2} Fe-binding motif of RIC6, which is homologous to the respiratory Complex III Fe–S protein, abrogated import induced by low pH but not by K{sup +} diffusion potential. These results indicate that the R3 complex forms a pore that is gated by a proton-generated membrane potential and that the Fe–S binding region of RIC6 has a role in proton translocation. The tRNA import complex of L. tropica thus contains a novel macromolecular channel distinct from the mitochondrial protein import pore that is apparently involved in tRNA import in some species.

  11. Timing of translocation influences birth rate and population dynamics in a forest carnivore

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Facka, Aaron N; Lewis, Jeffrey C.; Happe, Patricia; Jenkins, Kurt J.; Callas, Richard; Powell, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    Timing can be critical for many life history events of organisms. Consequently, the timing of management activities may affect individuals and populations in numerous and unforeseen ways. Translocations of organisms are used to restore or expand populations but the timing of translocations is largely unexplored as a factor influencing population success. We hypothesized that the process of translocation negatively influences reproductive rates of individuals that are moved just before their birthing season and, therefore, the timing of releases could influence translocation success. Prior to reintroducing fishers (Pekania pennanti) into northern California and onto the Olympic Peninsula of Washington, we predicted that female fishers released in November and December (early) would have a higher probability of giving birth to kits the following March or April than females released in January, February, and March (late), just prior to or during the period of blastocyst implantation and gestation. Over four winters (2008–2011), we translocated 56 adult female fishers that could have given birth in the spring immediately after release. Denning rates, an index of birth rate, for females released early were 92% in California and 38% in Washington. In contrast, denning rates for females released late were 40% and 11%, in California and Washington, a net reduction in denning rate of 66% across both sites. To understand how releasing females nearer to parturition could influence population establishment and persistence, we used stochastic population simulations using three-stage Lefkovitch matrices. These simulations showed that translocating female fishers early had long-term positive influences on the mean population size and on quasi-extinction thresholds compared to populations where females were released late. The results from both empirical data and simulations show that the timing of translocation, with respect to life history events, should be considered during

  12. Calcineurin-mediated Bad translocation regulates cyanide-induced neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shou, Yan; Li, Li; Prabhakaran, Krishnan; Borowitz, Joseph L; Isom, Gary E

    2004-01-01

    In cyanide-induced apoptosis, an increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ and generation of reactive oxygen species are initiation stimuli for apoptotic cell death. Previous studies have shown that cyanide-stimulated translocation of Bax (Bcl-associated X protein) to mitochondria is linked with release of cytochrome c and subsequent activation of a caspase cascade [Shou, Li, Prabhakaran, Borowitz and Isom (2003) Toxicol. Sci. 75, 99-107]. In the present study, the relationship of the cyanide-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ to activation of Bad ( Bcl-2/Bcl-X(L)- antagonist, causing cell death) was determined in cortical cells. Bad is a Ca2+-sensitive pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein, which on activation translocates from cytosol to mitochondria to initiate cytochrome c release. In cultured primary cortical cells, cyanide produced a concentration- and time-dependent translocation of Bad from cytosol to mitochondria. Translocation occurred early in the apoptotic response, since mitochondrial Bad was detected within 1 h of cyanide treatment. Mitochondrial levels of the protein continued to increase up to 12 h post-cyanide exposure. Concurrent with Bad translocation, a Ca2+-sensitive increase in cellular calcineurin activity was observed. Increased cytosolic Ca2+ and calcineurin activation stimulated Bad translocation since BAPTA [bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N, N, N', N'-tetra-acetic acid], an intracellular Ca2+ chelator, and cyclosporin A, a calcineurin inhibitor, significantly reduced translocation. BAPTA also blocked release of cytochrome c from mitochondria as well as apoptosis. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporin A or FK506 blocked the apoptotic response, linking calcineurin activation and the subsequent translocation of Bad to cell death. These observations show that by inducing a rapid increase in cytosolic free Ca2+, cyanide can partially initiate the apoptotic cascade through a calcineurin-mediated translocation of Bad to

  13. Efficient coupling of ATP hydrolysis to translocation by RecQ helicase.

    PubMed

    Rad, Behzad; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2012-01-31

    Helicases are ubiquitous enzymes that unwind double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) to reveal single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) during essential processes such as replication, transcription, or repair. The Escherichia coli RecQ protein is a 3' to 5' helicase, which functions in the processes of homologous recombination and replication fork restart. Here, we analyzed the relationship between ATP hydrolysis by RecQ and its translocation on ssDNA. We monitored a single round of RecQ translocation on ssDNA by measuring the rates of inorganic phosphate release during translocation, and the dissociation of RecQ from ssDNA. We find that RecQ translocates with a rate of 16( ± 4) nucleotides/s and moves on average only 36( ± 2) nucleotides before dissociating. Fitting to an n-step kinetic model suggests that the helicase displays a nonuniform translocation mechanism in which it moves approximately five nucleotides rapidly before undergoing a rate-limiting kinetic slow step. Unexpectedly, RecQ requires a length of 34( ± 3) nucleotides to bind and translocate on ssDNA. This large site size suggests that several monomers are required to bind DNA prior to translocation. Energetically, the RecQ helicase couples the hydrolysis of one ATP molecule to the translocation of more than one nucleotide (1.6 ± 0.3). Thus, our data show that RecQ translocates on ssDNA by efficiently coupling the hydrolysis of one ATP molecule into structural alterations that result in movement of approximately two nucleotides, presumably by an inchworm mechanism. These attributes are consistent with the function of RecQ in recombination and replication.

  14. Tourette syndrome in a pedigree with a 7;18 translocation: Identification of a YAC spanning the translocation breakpoint at 18q22.3

    SciTech Connect

    Boghosian-Sell, L.; Overhauser, J.; Comings, D.E.

    1996-11-01

    Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by the presence of multiple, involuntary motor and vocal tics. Associated pathologies include attention deficit disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Extensive linkage analysis based on an autosomal dominant mode of transmission with reduced penetrance has failed to show linkage with polymorphic markers, suggesting either locus heterogeneity or a polygenic origin for Tourette syndrome. An individual diagnosed with Tourette syndrome has been described carrying a constitutional chromosome translocation. Other family members carrying the translocation exhibit features seen in Tourette syndrome including motor tics, vocal tics, and OCD. Since the disruption of specific genes by a chromosomal rearrangement can elicit a particular phenotype, we have undertaken the physical mapping of the 7;18 translocation such that genes mapping at the site of the breakpoint can be identified and evaluated for a possible involvement in Tourette syndrome. Using somatic cell hybrids retaining either the der(7) or the der(18), a more precise localization of the breakpoints on chromosomes 7 and 18 have been determined. Furthermore, physical mapping has identified two YAC clones that span the translocation breakpoint on chromosome 18 as determined by FISH. These YAC clones will be useful for the eventual identification of genes that map to chromosomes 7 and 18 at the site of the translocation. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. WFC3/UVIS Sky Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggett, Sylvia; Anderson, Jay

    2012-06-01

    This report summarizes the on-orbit background levels present in WFC3/UVIS full-frame images. The results are based on nearly all standard readout images taken since the installation of WFC3 on HST in May 2009, with a relatively small number of exclusions e.g. images with obvious anomalous backgrounds (such as extended targets filling the field of view) or those taken with the quad filters (different bandpass in each amp). Comparisons are provided to estimates from the Exposure Time Calculator (ETC). We anticipate these results to be helpful in fine-tuning the level of post-flash required to achieve the optimum balance of charge transfter efficiency (CTE) loss mitigation versus noise penalty. Observers considering the use of post-flash should refer to the White Paper (MacKenty & Smith 2012) on the CTE WWW page (http://www.stsci.edu/hst/wfc3/ins_performance/CTE/).

  16. Bayesian Analysis of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewell, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    There is a wealth of cosmological information encoded in the spatial power spectrum of temperature anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background! Experiments designed to map the microwave sky are returning a flood of data (time streams of instrument response as a beam is swept over the sky) at several different frequencies (from 30 to 900 GHz), all with different resolutions and noise properties. The resulting analysis challenge is to estimate, and quantify our uncertainty in, the spatial power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background given the complexities of "missing data", foreground emission, and complicated instrumental noise. Bayesian formulation of this problem allows consistent treatment of many complexities including complicated instrumental noise and foregrounds, and can be numerically implemented with Gibbs sampling. Gibbs sampling has now been validated as an efficient, statistically exact, and practically useful method for low-resolution (as demonstrated on WMAP 1 and 3 year temperature and polarization data). Continuing development for Planck - the goal is to exploit the unique capabilities of Gibbs sampling to directly propagate uncertainties in both foreground and instrument models to total uncertainty in cosmological parameters.

  17. DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, Karin D.; Chu, Tun-Jen; Pitt, William G.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through said smino groups contained on the surface thereof. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to said target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membrances may be reprobed numerous times.

  18. DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, K.D.; Chu, T.J.; Pitt, W.G.

    1992-05-12

    A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through amino groups contained on the surface. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to the target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membranes may be reprobed numerous times. No Drawings

  19. Using Correlated Photons to Suppress Background Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Deborah; Hockney, George; Dowling, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    A proposed method of suppressing the effect of background noise in an optical communication system would exploit the transmission and reception of correlated photons at the receiver. The method would not afford any advantage in a system in which performance is limited by shot noise. However, if the performance of the system is limited by background noise (e.g., sunlight in the case of a free-space optical communication system or incoherently scattered in-band photons in the case of a fiber-optic communication system), then the proposed method could offer an advantage: the proposed method would make it possible to achieve a signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) significantly greater than that of an otherwise equivalent background- noise-limited optical communication system based on the classical transmission and reception of uncorrelated photons. The figure schematically depicts a classical optical-communication system and a system according to the proposed method. In the classical system, a modulated laser beam is transmitted along an optical path to a receiver, the optics of which include a narrow-band-pass filter that suppresses some of the background noise. A photodetector in the receiver detects the laser-beam and background photons, most or all of which are uncorrelated. In the proposed system, correlated photons would be generated at the transmitter by making a modulated laser beam pass through a nonlinear parametric down-conversion crystal. The sum of frequencies of the correlated photons in each pair would equal the frequency of the incident photon from which they were generated. As in the classical system, the correlated photons would travel along an optical path to a receiver, where they would be band-pass filtered and detected. Unlike in the classical system, the photodetector in the receiver in this system would be one that intrinsically favors the detection of pairs of correlated photons over the detection of uncorrelated photons. Even though there would be no

  20. The Cosmic Background Explorer /COBE/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mather, J. C.

    1982-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite, under study by NASA since 1976, will map the spectrum and the angular distribution of diffuse radiation from the universe over the entire wavelength range from 1 micron to 1.3 cm. It carries three instruments: a set of differential microwave radiometers (DMR) at 23.5, 31.4, 53, and 90GHz, a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer (FIRAS) covering 1 to 100 per cm, and a diffuse infrared background experiment (DIRBE) covering 1 to 300 microns. They will use the ideal space environment, a one year lifetime, and standard instrument techniques to achieve orders of magnitude improvements in sensitivity and accuracy, providing a fundamental data base for cosmology. The instruments are united by common purpose as well as similar environmental and orbital requirements. The data from all three experiments will be analyzed together, to distinguish nearby sources of radiation from the cosmologically interesting diffuse background radiations. Construction is planned to begin in 1982 for a launch in 1988.

  1. Background independence in a background dependent renormalization group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labus, Peter; Morris, Tim R.; Slade, Zöe H.

    2016-07-01

    Within the derivative expansion of conformally reduced gravity, the modified split Ward identities are shown to be compatible with the flow equations if and only if either the anomalous dimension vanishes or the cutoff profile is chosen to have a power-law form. No solutions exist if the Ward identities are incompatible. In the compatible case, a clear reason is found for why Ward identities can still forbid the existence of fixed points; however, for any cutoff profile, a background independent (and parametrization independent) flow equation is uncovered. Finally, expanding in vertices, the combined equations are shown generically to become either overconstrained or highly redundant beyond the six-point level.

  2. Quantifying the role of chaperones in protein translocation by computational modeling

    PubMed Central

    Assenza, Salvatore; De Los Rios, Paolo; Barducci, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp70 plays a central role in the import of cytoplasmic proteins into organelles, driving their translocation by binding them from the organellar interior. Starting from the experimentally-determined structure of the E. coli Hsp70, we computed, by means of molecular simulations, the effective free-energy profile for substrate translocation upon chaperone binding. We then used the resulting free energy to quantitatively characterize the kinetics of the import process, whose comparison with unassisted translocation highlights the essential role played by Hsp70 in importing cytoplasmic proteins. PMID:25988176

  3. Using Qualitative Disease Risk Analysis for Herpetofauna Conservation Translocations Transgressing Ecological and Geographical Barriers.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla Suarez, Mariana; Ewen, John G; Groombridge, Jim J; Beckmann, K; Shotton, J; Masters, N; Hopkins, T; Sainsbury, Anthony W

    2017-03-01

    Through the exploration of disease risk analysis methods employed for four different UK herpetofauna translocations, we illustrate how disease hazards can be identified, and how the risk of disease can be analysed. Where ecological or geographical barriers between source and destination sites exist, parasite populations are likely to differ in identity or strain between the two sites, elevating the risk from disease and increasing the number and category of hazards requiring analysis. Simplification of the translocation pathway through the avoidance of these barriers reduces the risk from disease. The disease risk analysis tool is intended to aid conservation practitioners in decision making relating to disease hazards prior to implementation of a translocation.

  4. Stem-spermatogonial survival and incidence of reciprocal translocations in the. gamma. -irradiated boar

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, B.H.; Martin, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    To assess the effects of ..gamma..-radiation on stem-cell survival and incidence of reciprocal translocations, boar testes were irradiated with 100, 200, or 400 rad. Stem-cell survival was markedly affected by 100 rad (51% of control) and reduced to 34% of control by 400 rad. Production of differentiating spermatogonia renewal was incomplete at 12 weeks. Incidence of translocations peaked at 200 rad and the number occurring at 100 and 400 rad was similar. Kinetics of porcine spermatogonial renewal differs considerably from those of the rodent and, relative to the rodent, this may account for the boar's higher sensitivity to stem-cell killing and lower sensitivity to translocation.

  5. DNA Translocation through Hydrophilic Nanopore in Hexagonal Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi; Hu, Ying; Wang, Hao; Xu, Zhi; Wang, Wenlong; Bai, Xuedong; Shan, Xinyan; Lu, Xinghua

    2013-11-01

    Ultra-thin solid-state nanopore with good wetting property is strongly desired to achieve high spatial resolution for DNA sequencing applications. Atomic thick hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) layer provides a promising two-dimensional material for fabricating solid-state nanopores. Due to its good oxidation resistance, the hydrophilicity of h-BN nanopore device can be significantly improved by UV-Ozone treatment. The contact angle of a KCl-TE droplet on h-BN layer can be reduced from 57° to 26° after the treatment. Abundant DNA translocation events have been observed in such devices, and strong DNA-nanopore interaction has been revealed in pores smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The 1/f noise level is closely related to the area of suspended h-BN layer, and it is significantly reduced in smaller supporting window. The demonstrated performance in h-BN nanopore paves the way towards base discrimination in a single DNA molecule.

  6. PARK7 protein translocating into spermatozoa mitochondria in Chinese asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Zhang, Wen-Jia; Zhao, Xin; Yuan, Ren-Pei; Jiang, Hui; Pu, Xiao-Ping

    2014-09-01

    PARK7 (DJ1) is a multifunctional oxidative stress response protein that protects cells against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial damage. PARK7 defects are known to cause various physiological dysfunctions, including infertility. Asthenozoospermia (AS), i.e. low-motile spermatozoa in the ejaculate, is a common cause of human male infertility. In this study, we found that downregulation of PARK7 resulted in increased levels of lipid peroxide and ROS, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced mitochondrial complex I enzyme activity in the spermatozoa from AS patients. Furthermore, it was observed that PARK7 was translocated into the mitochondria of damaged spermatozoa in AS. Finally, we examined the oxidative state of PARK7 and the results demonstrated the enhancement of oxidation, expressed by increased sulfonic acid residues, the highest form of oxidation, as the sperm motility decreased. Taken together, these results revealed that PARK7 deficiency may increase the oxidative stress damage to spermatozoa. Our present findings open new avenues of therapeutic intervention targeting PARK7 for the treatment of AS.

  7. Absorption and translocation of nitrogen in rhizomes of Leymus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongsheng; Liu, Huajie; Song, Youhong

    2011-03-15

    Leymus chinensis is a dominant species in the Inner Mongolia steppe, northern China. Plant growth in northern China grassland is often limited by low soil nitrogen availability. The objective of this study is to investigate whether rhizomes of Leymus chinensis are involved in the contribution of N uptake. The N concentration, (15)N concentration and (15)N proportion in roots, rhizomes and shoots after 48 h exposure of roots (L(root)) and rhizomes (L(rhizo)) separately and roots and rhizomes together (L(r+r)) to 0.1 mM (15)NH (4)(15)NO(3) solution were measured using root-splitting equipment and stable isotope ((15)N) techniques, respectively. The N content and dry mass were not affected by the labeling treatment. In contrast, the (15)N concentration in shoots, rhizomes and roots was significantly increased by the labeling in rhizomes, indicating that the inorganic nitrogen was absorbed via rhizomes from the solution and can be transported to other tissues, with preference to shoots rather than roots. Meanwhile, the absolute N absorption and translocation among compartments were also calculated. The N absorption via rhizomes was much smaller than via roots; however, the uptake efficiency per surface unit via rhizomes was greater than via roots. The capacity and high efficiency to absorb N nutrient via rhizomes enable plants to use transient nutrient supplies in the top soil surface.

  8. Translocation of Small Interfering RNA and Cholesterol Molecules in Biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalia, Rajiv

    2013-03-01

    This presentation will focus on all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of (1) structural and mechanical barriers to translocation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) across a phospholipid bilayer, and (2) flip-flop dynamics of cholesterol (CHOL) molecules across a phospholipid bilayer. In the first case, we find that the siRNA induces a liquid-to-gel phase transformation. In the gel phase we find large compressive lateral stresses in the hydrocarbon chains of lipid molecules, which present a considerable barrier to siRNA passage across the bilayer. In the second case, we study spontaneous CHOL inter-leaflet transport (flip-flop), the effect of this process on mechanical stresses across the bilayer, and the role of CHOL in inducing molecular order in bilayer leaflets. The simulation was run for 15 microseconds and we found 24 CHOL flip-flop events over that duration. On average, a CHOL molecule migrates across the lipid bilayer in about 73 ns after a flip-flop event is triggered. We have calculated diffusion maps and determined free energy surfaces and flip-flop mechanisms for CHOL molecules. Work supported by NSF-OCI-0749360 and NSF-IOS-125317.

  9. A Translocated Bacterial Protein Protects Vascular Endothelial Cells from Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Michael C; Scheidegger, Florine; Dehio, Michaela; Balmelle-Devaux, Nadège; Schulein, Ralf; Guye, Patrick; Chennakesava, Cuddapah S; Biedermann, Barbara; Dehio, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The modulation of host cell apoptosis by bacterial pathogens is of critical importance for the outcome of the infection process. The capacity of Bartonella henselae and B. quintana to cause vascular tumor formation in immunocompromised patients is linked to the inhibition of vascular endothelial cell (EC) apoptosis. Here, we show that translocation of BepA, a type IV secretion (T4S) substrate, is necessary and sufficient to inhibit EC apoptosis. Ectopic expression in ECs allowed mapping of the anti-apoptotic activity of BepA to the Bep intracellular delivery domain, which, as part of the signal for T4S, is conserved in other T4S substrates. The anti-apoptotic activity appeared to be limited to BepA orthologs of B. henselae and B. quintana and correlated with (i) protein localization to the host cell plasma membrane, (ii) elevated levels of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and (iii) increased expression of cAMP-responsive genes. The pharmacological elevation of cAMP levels protected ECs from apoptosis, indicating that BepA mediates anti-apoptosis by heightening cAMP levels by a plasma membrane–associated mechanism. Finally, we demonstrate that BepA mediates protection of ECs against apoptosis triggered by cytotoxic T lymphocytes, suggesting a physiological context in which the anti-apoptotic activity of BepA contributes to tumor formation in the chronically infected vascular endothelium. PMID:17121462

  10. TRPC6 channel translocation into phagosomal membrane augments phagosomal function

    PubMed Central

    Riazanski, Vladimir; Gabdoulkhakova, Aida G.; Boynton, Lin S.; Eguchi, Raphael R.; Deriy, Ludmila V.; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Loaëc, Nadège; Oumata, Nassima; Galons, Hervé; Brown, Mary E.; Shevchenko, Pavel; Gallan, Alexander J.; Yoo, Sang Gune; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Villereal, Mitchel L.; Beacham, Daniel W.; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Meijer, Laurent; Nelson, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the innate immune system in the lung with attendant bacterial infections contribute to lung tissue damage, respiratory insufficiency, and ultimately death in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Professional phagocytes, including alveolar macrophages (AMs), have specialized pathways that ensure efficient killing of pathogens in phagosomes. Phagosomal acidification facilitates the optimal functioning of degradative enzymes, ultimately contributing to bacterial killing. Generation of low organellar pH is primarily driven by the V-ATPases, proton pumps that use cytoplasmic ATP to load H+ into the organelle. Critical to phagosomal acidification are various channels derived from the plasma membrane, including the anion channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, which shunt the transmembrane potential generated by movement of protons. Here we show that the transient receptor potential canonical-6 (TRPC6) calcium-permeable channel in the AM also functions to shunt the transmembrane potential generated by proton pumping and is capable of restoring microbicidal function to compromised AMs in CF and enhancement of function in non-CF cells. TRPC6 channel activity is enhanced via translocation to the cell surface (and then ultimately to the phagosome during phagocytosis) in response to G-protein signaling activated by the small molecule (R)-roscovitine and its derivatives. These data show that enhancing vesicular insertion of the TRPC6 channel to the plasma membrane may represent a general mechanism for restoring phagosome activity in conditions, where it is lost or impaired. PMID:26604306

  11. A Critical Reassessment of Penetratin Translocation Across Lipid Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Bárány-Wallje, Elsa; Keller, Sandro; Serowy, Steffen; Geibel, Sebastian; Pohl, Peter; Bienert, Michael; Dathe, Margitta

    2005-01-01

    Penetratin is a short, basic cell-penetrating peptide able to induce cellular uptake of a vast variety of large, hydrophilic cargos. We have reassessed the highly controversial issue of direct permeation of the strongly cationic peptide across negatively charged lipid membranes. Confocal laser scanning microscopy on rhodamine-labeled giant vesicles incubated with carboxyfluorescein-labeled penetratin yielded no evidence of transbilayer movement, in contradiction to previously reported results. Confocal fluorescence spectroscopy on black lipid membranes confirmed this finding, which was also not affected by application of a transmembrane electric potential difference. A novel dialysis assay based on tryptophan absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy demonstrated that the permeability of small and large unilamellar vesicles to penetratin is <10−13 m/s. Taken together, the results show that penetratin is not capable of overcoming model membrane systems irrespective of the bilayer curvature or the presence of a transmembrane voltage. Thus, direct translocation across the hydrophobic core of the plasma membrane cannot account for the efficient uptake of penetratin into live cells, which is in accord with recent in vitro studies underlining the importance of endocytosis in the internalization process of cationic cell-penetrating peptides. PMID:16040762

  12. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8+ T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3−/− mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way. PMID:26667202

  13. Influence of concentration polarization on DNA translocation through a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Shengjie; Zhao, Hui

    2016-05-01

    Concentration polarization can be induced by the unique ion-perm selectivity of small nanopores, leading to a salt concentration gradient across nanopores. This concentration gradient can create diffusio-osmosis and induce an electric field, affecting ionic currents on DNA that translocates through a nanopore. Here this influence is theoretically investigated by solving the continuum Poisson-Nernst-Planck model for different salt concentrations, DNA surface charge densities, and pore properties. By implementing the perturbation method, we can explicitly compute the contribution of concentration polarization to the ionic current. The induced electric field by concentration polarization is opposite to the imposed electric field and decreases the migration current, and the induced diffusio-osmosis can decrease the convection current as well. Our studies suggest that the importance of the concentration polarization can be determined by the parameter λ /G where λ is the double-layer thickness and G is the gap size. When λ /G is larger than a critical value, the influence of concentration polarization becomes more prominent. This conclusion is supported by the studies on the dependence of the ionic current on salt concentration and pore properties, showing that the difference between two models with and without accounting for concentration polarization is larger for low salts and small pores, which correspond to larger λ /G .

  14. Translocation of Photosynthates into Vacuoles in Spinach Leaf Protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Asami, Sumio; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Nishimura, Mikio; Akazawa, Takashi

    1985-01-01

    A method was developed for the isolation of vacuoles from the mesophyll protoplasts of spinach leaf, employing the discontinuous Ficoll density gradient centrifugation technique. Isolated vacuole preparations were judged to be free from other organellar fractions based on the assays of marker enzyme activities of individual organelles. Using this isolation method, a time-dependent translocation of 14C-labeled photosynthates into vacuoles was determined. In contrast to a significant transport of 14C organic acids such as malate and citrate within 10 to 15 minutes 14C neutral sugars and amino acids were barely transported into vacuoles during 40 minutes incubation, in spite of the fact that a relatively large amount of these compounds are found in the vacuoles. It was also found that a majority of [14C]sucrose remains in the cytosol, apparently not actively moving into the vacuoles. Overall results appear to suggest that vacuoles are not actively engaged in photosynthetic carbon metabolism in spinach leaf protoplasts. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664172

  15. Mechanisms of metalloregulation of an anion-translocating ATPase.

    PubMed

    Rosen, B P; Bhattacharjee, H; Shi, W

    1995-02-01

    The ars (arsenical resistance) operon cloned from R-factor R773 has five genes that encode two repressor proteins, ArsR and ArsD, and three structural proteins, ArsA, ArsB, and ArsC. The ArsA and ArsB proteins form a membrane-bound pump that functions as an oxyanion-translocating ATPase. The substrates of the pump are the oxyanions arsenite or antimonite. The ArsC protein is an arsenate reductase that reduces arsenate to arsenite, which is subsequently pumped out of the cell. This review deals with the mechanism of transcriptional regulation by the ArsR repressor and allosteric regulation of the ArsA protein, the catalytic subunit of the pump. The chemical nature of the inducer plays an important role in regulation. In solution arsenite or antimonite exist as oxyanions and reacts with the cysteines in proteins. In both transcriptional regulation by the ArsR repressor and allosteric regulation of the ArsA ATPase, the ability of As(III) and Sb(III) to interact with the cysteines of the proteins, involves their action as effector.

  16. Successive site translocating inoculation potentiates DNA/recombinant vaccinia vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yanqin; Wang, Na; Hu, Weiguo; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Jianqing; Wan, Yanmin

    2015-12-15

    DNA vaccines have advantages over traditional vaccine modalities; however the relatively low immunogenicity restrains its translation into clinical use. Further optimizations are needed to get the immunogenicity of DNA vaccine closer to the level required for human use. Here we show that intramuscularly inoculating into a different limb each time significantly improves the immunogenicities of both DNA and recombinant vaccinia vaccines during multiple vaccinations, compared to repeated vaccination on the same limb. We term this strategy successive site translocating inoculation (SSTI). SSTI could work in synergy with genetic adjuvant and DNA prime-recombinant vaccinia boost regimen. By comparing in vivo antigen expression, we found that SSTI avoided the specific inhibition of in vivo antigen expression, which was observed in the limbs being repeatedly inoculated. Employing in vivo T cell depletion and passive IgG transfer, we delineated that the inhibition was not mediated by CD8(+) T cells but by specific antibodies. Finally, by using C3(-/-) mouse model and in vivo NK cells depletion, we identified that specific antibodies negatively regulated the in vivo antigen expression primarily in a complement depended way.

  17. The Mitochondrial Translocator Protein and Arrhythmogenesis in Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Akar, Fadi G.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of multiple cardiovascular disorders, including ischemic heart disease. Although mitochondria are well recognized for their role in energy production and cell death, mechanisms by which they control excitation-contraction coupling, excitability, and arrhythmias are less clear. The translocator protein (TSPO) is an outer mitochondrial membrane protein that is expressed in multiple organ systems. The abundant expression of TSPO in macrophages has been leveraged to image the immune response of the heart to inflammatory processes. More recently, the recognition of TSPO as a regulator of energy-dissipating mitochondrial pathways has extended its utility from a diagnostic marker of inflammation to a therapeutic target influencing diverse pathophysiological processes. Here, we provide an overview of the emerging role of TSPO in ischemic heart disease. We highlight the importance of TSPO in the regenerative process of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced ROS release through its effects on the inner membrane anion channel (IMAC) and the permeability transition pore (PTP). We discuss evidence implicating TSPO in arrhythmogenesis in the settings of acute ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction. PMID:25918579

  18. Recombination suppression in the vicinity of the breakpoints of a balanced 1:11 autosomal translocation associated with schizophrenia and other forms of major mental illness

    SciTech Connect

    He, L.; Blackwood, D.H.R.; Maclean, A.W.

    1994-09-01

    The frequency and extent of pairing failure around human translocations is unknown. We have examined the pattern of recombination around the breakpoints of a balanced autosomal translocation t(1:11)(q43:q21) associated with major mental illness. We have postulated that the association with mental illness in the family has not arisen by chance, but rather that functional disruption of a gene at or near a breakpoint site is responsible. Efforts to isolate the breakpoints for molecular analysis of the region are now at an advanced stage. On the other hand if pairing failure is occurring in the family in the region of the breakpoints, a susceptibility allele for mental illness, acting independently of the translocation, may be located some distance away. DNA was available from seventeen carriers and ten non-translocation carriers, giving a total of thirty-one informative meioses spanning 4 generations. The derivative one and eleven chromosomes were also isolated in somatic cell hybrids and were used to confirm allele phase. We genotyped the pedigree members using nine markers covering 30 cMs on either side of both the chromosome one and eleven breakpoints. No recombinants were found with markers within 3 cMs of either breakpoint. Four markers at an average of 7 cMs respectively on either side of the two breakpoints gave a total of three crossovers from thirty-one meioses versus an expected 9, demonstrating (p<0.05) significant recombination suppression. By contrast, examination of chromosome regions at greater distances from the breakpoints showed recombination rates similar to those expected from CEPH data with no evidence of suppression. We conclude that crossover suppression occurs in this family but is restricted to a region within 7 cMs of the breakpoints.

  19. Quantum frequency bridge: high-accuracy characterization of a nearly-noiseless parametric frequency converter.

    PubMed

    Burenkov, Ivan A; Gerrits, Thomas; Lita, Adriana; Nam, Sae Woo; Krister Shalm, L; Polyakov, Sergey V

    2017-01-23

    We demonstrate an efficient and inherently ultra-low noise frequency conversion via a parametric sum frequency generation. Due to the wide separation between the input and pump frequencies and the low pump frequency relative to the input photons, the upconversion results in only ≈100 background photons per hour. To measure such a low rate, we introduced a dark count reduction algorithm for an optical transition edge sensor.

  20. The frequency and mutation rate of balanced autosomal rearrangements in man estimated from prenatal genetic studies for advanced maternal age.

    PubMed Central

    Van Dyke, D L; Weiss, L; Roberson, J R; Babu, V R

    1983-01-01

    The frequencies of balanced chromosome rearrangements were estimated from three series of advanced maternal-age prenatal genetic studies, and were compared to the frequencies that had been estimated from consecutive newborn surveys. In the maternal-age prenatal studies, the frequencies were: Robertsonian translocations, 0.11%; reciprocal translocations, 0.17%; and inversions, 0.12%. The total frequency of balanced rearrangements in the prenatal genetic studies performed with banding (0.40%, or 1 in 250) was twice that in the consecutive newborn surveys performed without banding (0.19%, or 1 in 526). The difference was limited to inversions and reciprocal translocations; the frequency of Robertsonian translocations was similar in the prenatal series and the newborn surveys. Both familial and de novo rearrangements were more common than anticipated. The de novo cases provided a mutation rate estimate of 4.3 per 10,000 gametes per generation (compared with 1.78 to 2.2 per 10,000 gametes in other surveys). These higher estimates may more reliably approximate the true mutation rate and frequencies of balanced rearrangements in the newborn population than do the newborn surveys. PMID:6837576

  1. ATP depletion induces translocation of STIM1 to puncta and formation of STIM1-ORAI1 clusters: translocation and re-translocation of STIM1 does not require ATP.

    PubMed

    Chvanov, Michael; Walsh, Ciara M; Haynes, Lee P; Voronina, Svetlana G; Lur, Gyorgy; Gerasimenko, Oleg V; Barraclough, Roger; Rudland, Philip S; Petersen, Ole H; Burgoyne, Robert D; Tepikin, Alexei V

    2008-11-01

    Depletion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium store triggers translocation of stromal interacting molecule one (STIM1) to the sub-plasmalemmal region and formation of puncta-structures in which STIM1 interacts and activates calcium channels. ATP depletion induced the formation of STIM1 puncta in PANC1, RAMA37, and HeLa cells. The sequence of events triggered by inhibition of ATP production included a rapid decline of ATP, depletion of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) and a slow calcium leak from the ER followed by formation of STIM1 puncta. STIM1 puncta induced by ATP depletion were co-localized with clusters of ORAI1 channels. STIM1-ORAI1 clusters that developed as a result of ATP depletion were very poor mediators of Ca(2+) influx. Re-translocation of STIM1 from puncta back to the ER was observed during total ATP depletion. We can therefore conclude that STIM1 translocation and re-translocation as well as formation of STIM1-ORAI1 clusters occur in an ATP-independent fashion and under conditions of PI(4,5)P(2) depletion.

  2. The midlatitude North American background aerosol and global aerosol variation.

    PubMed

    Hidy, George M; Blanchard, Charles L

    2005-11-01

    Protocols for the particulate matter (PM) National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS), and the Regional Haze Rule (RHR) give two complementary definitions for "natural" background airborne particle concentrations in the United States. The definition for the NAAQS derives largely from reported annual averages, whereas the definition for the RHR takes into account the frequency of occurrence of a range of visibility conditions estimated using fine particle composition. These definitions are simple, static representations of background or "unmanageable" aerosol conditions in the United States. An accumulation of data from rural-remote sites representing global conditions indicates that the airborne particle concentrations are highly variable. Observational campaigns show weather-related variations, including incidents of regional or intercontinental transport of pollution that influence background aerosol levels over midlatitude North America. Defining a background in North America based on long-term observations relies mainly on the remote-rural IMPROVE network in the United States, with a few additional measurements from Canada. Examination of the frequency of occurrence of mass concentrations and particle components provides insight not only about annual median conditions but also the variability of apparent background conditions. The results of this analysis suggest that a more elaborate approach to defining an unmanageable background could improve the present approach taken for information input into the U.S. regulatory process. An approach interpreting the continental gradients in fine PM (PM2.5) concentrations and composition may be warranted.

  3. Characterization of human chromosomal material exchange with regard to the chromosome translocations using next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Zhang, Jigang; Wang, Yu-Ping; Deng, Hong-Wen; Li, Jian

    2014-10-27

    As an important subtype of structural variations, chromosomal translocation is associated with various diseases, especially cancers, by disrupting gene structures and functions. Traditional methods for identifying translocations are time consuming and have limited resolutions. Recently, a few studies have employed next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology for characterizing chromosomal translocations on human genome, obtaining high-throughput results with high resolutions. However, these studies are mainly focused on mechanism-specific or site-specific translocation mapping. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive genome-wide analysis on the characterization of human chromosomal material exchange with regard to the chromosome translocations. Using NGS data of 1,481 subjects from the 1000 Genomes Project, we identified 15,349,092 translocated DNA fragment pairs, ranging from 65 to 1,886 bp and with an average size of approximately 102 bp. On average, each individual genome carried about 10,364 pairs, covering approximately 0.069% of the genome. We identified 16 translocation hot regions, among which two regions did not contain repetitive fragments. Results of our study overlapped with a majority of previous results, containing approximately 79% of approximately 2,340 translocations characterized in three available translocation databases. In addition, our study identified five novel potential recurrent chromosomal material exchange regions with greater than 20% detection rates. Our results will be helpful for an accurate characterization of translocations in human genomes, and contribute as a resource for future studies of the roles of translocations in human disease etiology and mechanisms.

  4. SIRT1 interacts with and protects glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from nuclear translocation: Implications for cell survival after irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Woo, Seon Rang; Shen, Yan-Nan; Yun, Mi Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Park, Jeong-Eun; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Joon; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2012-08-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 serves to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, preventing GAPDH nuclear translocation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When SIRT1 is depleted, GAPDH translocation occurs even in the absence of stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon irradiation, SIRT1 interacts with GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 prevents irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 presence rather than activity is essential for inhibiting GAPDH translocation. -- Abstract: Upon apoptotic stimulation, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a cytosolic enzyme normally active in glycolysis, translocates into the nucleus and activates an apoptotic cascade therein. In the present work, we show that SIRT1 prevents nuclear translocation of GAPDH via interaction with GAPDH. SIRT1 depletion triggered nuclear translocation of cytosolic GAPDH even in the absence of apoptotic stress. Such translocation was not, however, observed when SIRT1 enzymatic activity was inhibited, indicating that SIRT1 protein per se, rather than the deacetylase activity of the protein, is required to inhibit GAPDH translocation. Upon irradiation, SIRT1 prevented irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH, accompanied by interaction of SIRT1 and GAPDH. Thus, SIRT1 functions to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, protecting the enzyme from nuclear translocation via interaction with these two proteins. This serves as a mechanism whereby SIRT1 regulates cell survival upon induction of apoptotic stress by means that include irradiation.

  5. Teaching about natural background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.; Mustapha, Amidu O.

    2013-07-01

    Ambient gamma dose rates in air were measured at different locations (indoors and outdoors) to demonstrate the ubiquitous nature of natural background radiation in the environment and to show that levels vary from one location to another, depending on the underlying geology. The effect of a lead shield on a gamma radiation field was also demonstrated to emphasize the important role of shielding in radiation protection. The measurements were carried out with a Geiger-Muller (GM)-based dosimeter and a NaI scintillation gamma-ray spectrometer, which are normally available in physics laboratories. Radioactivity in household materials was demonstrated using a gas mantle as an example.

  6. Molecular events during translocation and proofreading extracted from 200 static structures of DNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    DNA polymerases in family B are workhorses of DNA replication that carry out the bulk of the job at a high speed with high accuracy. A polymerase in this family relies on a built-in exonuclease for proofreading. It has not been observed at the atomic resolution how the polymerase advances one nucleotide space on the DNA template strand after a correct nucleotide is incorporated, that is, a process known as translocation. It is even more puzzling how translocation is avoided after the primer strand is excised by the exonuclease and returned back to the polymerase active site once an error occurs. The structural events along the bifurcate pathways of translocation and proofreading have been unwittingly captured by hundreds of structures in Protein Data Bank. This study analyzes all available structures of a representative member in family B and reveals the orchestrated event sequence during translocation and proofreading. PMID:27325739

  7. Wnt signaling induces transcription, spatial proximity, and translocation of fusion gene partners in human hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Ugarte, Giorgia D; Vargas, Macarena F; Medina, Matías A; León, Pablo; Necuñir, David; Elorza, Alvaro A; Gutiérrez, Soraya E; Moon, Randall T; Loyola, Alejandra; De Ferrari, Giancarlo V

    2015-10-08

    Chromosomal translocations are frequently associated with a wide variety of cancers, particularly hematologic malignancies. A recurrent chromosomal abnormality in acute myeloid leukemia is the reciprocal translocation t(8;21) that fuses RUNX1 and ETO genes. We report here that Wnt/β-catenin signaling increases the expression of ETO and RUNX1 genes in human hematopoietic progenitors. We found that β-catenin is rapidly recruited into RNA polymerase II transcription factories (RNAPII-Ser5) and that ETO and RUNX1 genes are brought into close spatial proximity upon Wnt3a induction. Notably, long-term treatment of cells with Wnt3a induces the generation a frequent RUNX1-ETO translocation event. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin signaling induces transcription and translocation of RUNX1 and ETO fusion gene partners, opening a novel window to understand the onset/development of leukemia.

  8. Two pathways regulate cortical granule translocation to prevent polyspermy in mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Cheeseman, Liam P; Boulanger, Jérôme; Bond, Lisa M; Schuh, Melina

    2016-12-19

    An egg must be fertilized by a single sperm only. To prevent polyspermy, the zona pellucida, a structure that surrounds mammalian eggs, becomes impermeable upon fertilization, preventing the entry of further sperm. The structural changes in the zona upon fertilization are driven by the exocytosis of cortical granules. These translocate from the oocyte's centre to the plasma membrane during meiosis. However, very little is known about the mechanism of cortical granule translocation. Here we investigate cortical granule transport and dynamics in live mammalian oocytes by using Rab27a as a marker. We show that two separate mechanisms drive their transport: myosin Va-dependent movement along actin filaments, and an unexpected vesicle hitchhiking mechanism by which cortical granules bind to Rab11a vesicles powered by myosin Vb. Inhibiting cortical granule translocation severely impaired the block to sperm entry, suggesting that translocation defects could contribute to miscarriages that are caused by polyspermy.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of ss-DNA translocation between copper nanoelectrodes incorporating electrode charge dynamics.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christina M; Zhao, Xiongce; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter T

    2008-02-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the translocation of single-stranded (ss)-DNA through the nanoscale gap between the nanoscale electrodes of a proposed genomic sequencing device. Using a fixed gap width between the electrodes and a small sample segment of ss-DNA as initial starting points in this project, the effect of applied electric fields on translocation velocity was studied. To describe the electrostatic interactions of the water, ions, and ss-DNA with the nanoscale electrodes, we applied the electrode charge dynamics (ECD) method. Through the density profile and comparison of translocation velocities to extrapolated experimental data, we found the ECD potential to be a better descriptor of the metal/nonmetal electrostatic interactions compared to the commonly used universal force field (UFF). Translocation velocities obtained using the ECD potential were consistent with simulated bulk data.

  10. SYSTEMIC TRANSLOCATION OF PARTICULATE MATTER-ASSOCIATED METALS FOLLOWING A SINGLE INTRATRACHEAL INSTILLATION IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Respirable ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Direct translocation of PM associated metals from the lungs into systemic circulation may be partly responsible. We measured elemental content of lungs, pla...

  11. Aminocyclopyrachlor absorption, translocation and metabolism in field 1 bindweed (convolulus arvensis)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis L.) is extremely susceptible to aminocyclopyrachlor compared to other weed species. Laboratory studies were conducted to determine if absorption, translocation, and metabolism of aminocyclopyrachlor in field bindweed differs from other, less susceptible species....

  12. Early microbial translocation blockade reduces SIV-mediated inflammation and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Kristoff, Jan; Haret-Richter, George; Ma, Dongzhu; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Xu, Cuiling; Cornell, Elaine; Stock, Jennifer L; He, Tianyu; Mobley, Adam D; Ross, Samantha; Trichel, Anita; Wilson, Cara; Tracy, Russell; Landay, Alan; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona

    2014-06-01

    Damage to the intestinal mucosa results in the translocation of microbes from the intestinal lumen into the circulation. Microbial translocation has been proposed to trigger immune activation, inflammation, and coagulopathy, all of which are key factors that drive HIV disease progression and non-HIV comorbidities; however, direct proof of a causal link is still lacking. Here, we have demonstrated that treatment of acutely SIV-infected pigtailed macaques with the drug sevelamer, which binds microbial lipopolysaccharide in the gut, dramatically reduces immune activation and inflammation and slightly reduces viral replication. Furthermore, sevelamer administration reduced coagulation biomarkers, confirming the contribution of microbial translocation in the development of cardiovascular comorbidities in SIV-infected nonhuman primates. Together, our data suggest that early control of microbial translocation may improve the outcome of HIV infection and limit noninfectious comorbidities associated with AIDS.

  13. Early microbial translocation blockade reduces SIV-mediated inflammation and viral replication

    PubMed Central

    Kristoff, Jan; Haret-Richter, George; Ma, Dongzhu; Ribeiro, Ruy M.; Xu, Cuiling; Cornell, Elaine; Stock, Jennifer L.; He, Tianyu; Mobley, Adam D.; Ross, Samantha; Trichel, Anita; Wilson, Cara; Tracy, Russell; Landay, Alan; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona

    2014-01-01

    Damage to the intestinal mucosa results in the translocation of microbes from the intestinal lumen into the circulation. Microbial translocation has been proposed to trigger immune activation, inflammation, and coagulopathy, all of which are key factors that drive HIV disease progression and non-HIV comorbidities; however, direct proof of a causal link is still lacking. Here, we have demonstrated that treatment of acutely SIV-infected pigtailed macaques with the drug sevelamer, which binds microbial lipopolysaccharide in the gut, dramatically reduces immune activation and inflammation and slightly reduces viral replication. Furthermore, sevelamer administration reduced coagulation biomarkers, confirming the contribution of microbial translocation in the development of cardiovascular comorbidities in SIV-infected nonhuman primates. Together, our data suggest that early control of microbial translocation may improve the outcome of HIV infection and limit noninfectious comorbidities associated with AIDS. PMID:24837437

  14. Kinesin-1 Translocation along Human Breast Cancer Cell Microtubules in Vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shojania Feizabadi, Mitra; Jun, Yonggun

    2015-03-01

    A principle approach to better understand intra-cellular microtubule based transport is to study such it in vitro. Such in vitro examinations have predominantly used microtubules polymerized from bovine brain tubulin, but motor function can also in principle be affected by the specific tubulin isotypes present in different cells. The human breast cancer cells carry different beta tubulin isotype distribution. However, it is entirely unknown whether transport along the microtubules is different in these cells. In this work we have characterized, for the first time, the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along human breast cancer cell microtubules polymerized in vitro. We found that as compared with the translocation along bovine brain microtubules, kinesin-1 shows a fifty percent shorter processive run length and slightly slower velocity under similar experimental conditions. These first time results support the regulatory role of tubulin isotypes in regards to motor protein translocations, and quantify the translocation specifications of kinesin-1 along microtubules of human breast cancer cells.

  15. Two pathways regulate cortical granule translocation to prevent polyspermy in mouse oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Liam P.; Boulanger, Jérôme; Bond, Lisa M.; Schuh, Melina

    2016-01-01

    An egg must be fertilized by a single sperm only. To prevent polyspermy, the zona pellucida, a structure that surrounds mammalian eggs, becomes impermeable upon fertilization, preventing the entry of further sperm. The structural changes in the zona upon fertilization are driven by the exocytosis of cortical granules. These translocate from the oocyte's centre to the plasma membrane during meiosis. However, very little is known about the mechanism of cortical granule translocation. Here we investigate cortical granule transport and dynamics in live mammalian oocytes by using Rab27a as a marker. We show that two separate mechanisms drive their transport: myosin Va-dependent movement along actin filaments, and an unexpected vesicle hitchhiking mechanism by which cortical granules bind to Rab11a vesicles powered by myosin Vb. Inhibiting cortical granule translocation severely impaired the block to sperm entry, suggesting that translocation defects could contribute to miscarriages that are caused by polyspermy. PMID:27991490

  16. Cloning of a balanced translocation breakpoint mapping in the DiGeorge syndrome critical region

    SciTech Connect

    Demczuk, S.; Zucman, J.; Desmaze, C.

    1994-09-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is a developmental defect of thymus, parathyroids and heart, which is associated with microdeletions in chromosomal region 22q11.2. A detailed physical map of the region has been established and a shortest region of overlap based on deletions and unbalanced translocations giving rise to DGS has been derived. Moreover, the breakpoint of a balanced translocation borne by a DGS patient has been localized in that critical region; thereby suggesting that the translocation breakpoint interrupts the or one of the major gene(s) implicated in DGS. We have initiated a chromosome walk by establishing cosmid contigs from probes distally flanking the breakpoint. One contig covers 150 kb of genomic DNA and a second one spans 350 kb in the region and contains the balanced translocation breakpoint. Phylogenetically conserved sequences are being searched for in the vicinity of the breakpoint to be used as probes in order to isolate cDNAs.

  17. Microbial translocation, the innate cytokine response, and HIV-1 disease progression in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Redd, Andrew D.; Dabitao, Djeneba; Bream, Jay H.; Charvat, Blake; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Kiwanuka, Noah; Lutalo, Tom; Kigozi, Godfrey; Tobian, Aaron A. R.; Gamiel, Jordyn; Neal, Jessica D.; Oliver, Amy E.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Sewankambo, Nelson; Reynolds, Steven J.; Wawer, Maria J.; Serwadda, David; Gray, Ronald H.; Quinn, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Reports from the United States have demonstrated that elevated markers of microbial translocation from the gut may be found in chronic and advanced HIV-1 infection and are associated with an increase in immune activation. However, this phenomenon's role in HIV-1 disease in Africa is unknown. This study examined the longitudinal relationship between microbial translocation and circulating inflammatory cytokine responses in a cohort of people with varying rates of HIV-1 disease progression in Rakai, Uganda. Multiple markers for microbial translocation (lipopolysaccharide, endotoxin antibody, and sCD14) did not change significantly during HIV-1 disease progression. Moreover, circulating immunoreactive cytokine levels either decreased or remained virtually unchanged throughout disease progression. These data suggest that microbial translocation and its subsequent inflammatory immune response do not have a causal relationship with HIV-1 disease progression in Africa. PMID:19357303

  18. Crystal Structures of EF-G-Ribosome Complexes Trapped in Intermediate States of Translocation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Donohue, John Paul; Noller, Harry F.

    2013-11-12

    Translocation of messenger and transfer RNA (mRNA and tRNA) through the ribosome is a crucial step in protein synthesis, whose mechanism is not yet understood. The crystal structures of three Thermus ribosome-tRNA-mRNA–EF-G complexes trapped with β,γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate (GDPNP) or fusidic acid reveal conformational changes occurring during intermediate states of translocation, including large-scale rotation of the 30S subunit head and body. In all complexes, the tRNA acceptor ends occupy the 50S subunit E site, while their anticodon stem loops move with the head of the 30S subunit to positions between the P and E sites, forming chimeric intermediate states. Two universally conserved bases of 16S ribosomal RNA that intercalate between bases of the mRNA may act as “pawls” of a translocational ratchet. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of ribosomal translocation.

  19. Involvement of chromosome X in primary cytogenetic change in human neoplasia: nonrandom translocation in synovial sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Turc-Carel, C.; Cin, P.D.; Limon, J.; Rao, U.; Li, F.P.; Corson, J.M.; Zimmerman, R.; Parry, D.M.; Cowan, J.M.; Sandberg, A.A.

    1987-04-01

    A translocation that involves chromosome X (band p11.2) and chromosome 18 (band q11.2) was observed in short-term in vitro cultures of cells from five synovial sarcomas and one malignant fibrous histiocytoma. In four of these tumors, the translocation t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) was reciprocal. The two other tumors had complex translocations: t(X;18;21)(p11.2;q11.2;p13) and t(X;15;18)(p11.2;q23;q11.2). A translocation between chromosomes X and 18 was not detected in other histological types of soft tissue sarcoma. The X;18 rearrangement appears to characterize the synovial sarcoma and is the first description of a primary, nonrandom change in the sex chromosome of a human solid tumor.

  20. High-performance analysis of single interphase cells with custom DNA probes spanning translocation break points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.; Munne, S.; Lersch, Robert A.; Marquez, C.; Wu, J.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Fung, Jingly

    1999-06-01

    The chromatin organization of interphase cell nuclei, albeit an object of intense investigation, is only poorly understood. In the past, this has hampered the cytogenetic analysis of tissues derived from specimens where only few cells were actively proliferating or a significant number of metaphase cells could be obtained by induction of growth. Typical examples of such hard to analyze cell systems are solid tumors, germ cells and, to a certain extent, fetal cells such as amniocytes, blastomeres or cytotrophoblasts. Balanced reciprocal translocations that do not disrupt essential genes and thus do not led to disease symptoms exit in less than one percent of the general population. Since the presence of translocations interferes with homologue pairing in meiosis, many of these individuals experience problems in their reproduction, such as reduced fertility, infertility or a history of spontaneous abortions. The majority of translocation carriers enrolled in our in vitro fertilization (IVF) programs carry simple translocations involving only two autosomes. While most translocations are relatively easy to spot in metaphase cells, the majority of cells biopsied from embryos produced by IVF are in interphase and thus unsuitable for analysis by chromosome banding or FISH-painting. We therefore set out to analyze single interphase cells for presence or absence of specific translocations. Our assay, based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) of breakpoint-spanning DNA probes, detects translocations in interphase by visual microscopic inspection of hybridization domains. Probes are prepared so that they span a breakpoint and cover several hundred kb of DNA adjacent to the breakpoint. On normal chromosomes, such probes label a contiguous stretch of DNA and produce a single hybridization domain per chromosome in interphase cells. The translocation disrupts the hybridization domain and the resulting two fragments appear as physically separated hybridization domains in

  1. Auditory intensity processing: Effect of MRI background noise.

    PubMed

    Angenstein, Nicole; Stadler, Jörg; Brechmann, André

    2016-03-01

    Studies on active auditory intensity discrimination in humans showed equivocal results regarding the lateralization of processing. Whereas experiments with a moderate background found evidence for right lateralized processing of intensity, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies with background scanner noise suggest more left lateralized processing. With the present fMRI study, we compared the task dependent lateralization of intensity processing between a conventional continuous echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence with a loud background scanner noise and a fast low-angle shot (FLASH) sequence with a soft background scanner noise. To determine the lateralization of the processing, we employed the contralateral noise procedure. Linearly frequency modulated (FM) tones were presented monaurally with and without contralateral noise. During both the EPI and the FLASH measurement, the left auditory cortex was more strongly involved than the right auditory cortex while participants categorized the intensity of FM tones. This was shown by a strong effect of the additional contralateral noise on the activity in the left auditory cortex. This means a massive reduction in background scanner noise still leads to a significant left lateralized effect. This suggests that the reversed lateralization in fMRI studies with loud background noise in contrast to studies with softer background cannot be fully explained by the MRI background noise.

  2. Video coding with dynamic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoranjan; Lin, Weisi; Lau, Chiew Tong; Lee, Bu-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Motion estimation (ME) and motion compensation (MC) using variable block size, sub-pixel search, and multiple reference frames (MRFs) are the major reasons for improved coding performance of the H.264 video coding standard over other contemporary coding standards. The concept of MRFs is suitable for repetitive motion, uncovered background, non-integer pixel displacement, lighting change, etc. The requirement of index codes of the reference frames, computational time in ME & MC, and memory buffer for coded frames limits the number of reference frames used in practical applications. In typical video sequences, the previous frame is used as a reference frame with 68-92% of cases. In this article, we propose a new video coding method using a reference frame [i.e., the most common frame in scene (McFIS)] generated by dynamic background modeling. McFIS is more effective in terms of rate-distortion and computational time performance compared to the MRFs techniques. It has also inherent capability of scene change detection (SCD) for adaptive group of picture (GOP) size determination. As a result, we integrate SCD (for GOP determination) with reference frame generation. The experimental results show that the proposed coding scheme outperforms the H.264 video coding with five reference frames and the two relevant state-of-the-art algorithms by 0.5-2.0 dB with less computational time.

  3. Short-Term Space-Use Patterns of Translocated Mojave Desert Tortoise in Southern California

    PubMed Central

    Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Dickson, Brett G.; Zachmann, Luke J.; Hegeman, Ericka E.; Cangelosi, Amanda R.; Jackson, Thomas G.; Scheib, Amanda F.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, renewable energy comprises a larger share of global energy production. Across the western United States, public lands are being developed to support renewable energy production. Where there are conflicts with threatened or endangered species, translocation can be used in an attempt to mitigate negative effects. For the threatened Mojave desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii), we sought to compare habitat- and space-use patterns between short-distance translocated, resident, and control groups. We tested for differences in home range size based on utilization distributions and used linear mixed-effects models to compare space-use intensity, while controlling for demographic and environmental variables. In addition, we examined mean movement distances as well as home range overlap between years and for male and female tortoises in each study group. During the first active season post-translocation, home range size was greater and space-use intensity was lower for translocated tortoises than resident and control groups. These patterns were not present in the second season. In both years, there was no difference in home range size or space-use intensity between control and resident groups. Translocation typically resulted in one active season of questing followed by a second active season characterized by space-use patterns that were indistinguishable from control tortoises. Across both years, the number of times a tortoise was found in a burrow was positively related to greater space-use intensity. Minimizing the time required for translocated tortoises to exhibit patterns similar to non-translocated individuals may have strong implications for conservation by reducing exposure to adverse environmental conditions and pre