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Sample records for backscattered diffraction ebsd

  1. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Characterization of Uranium and Uranium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, Rodney J.; Kelly, Ann Marie; Clarke, Amy J.; Field, Robert D.; Wenk, H. R.

    2012-07-25

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to examine the microstructures of unalloyed uranium, U-6Nb, U-10Mo, and U-0.75Ti. For unalloyed uranium, we used EBSD to examine the effects of various processes on microstructures including casting, rolling and forming, recrystallization, welding, and quasi-static and shock deformation. For U-6Nb we used EBSD to examine the microstructural evolution during shape memory loading. EBSD was used to study chemical homogenization in U-10Mo, and for U-0.75Ti, we used EBSD to study the microstructure and texture evolution during thermal cycling and deformation. The studied uranium alloys have significant microstructural and chemical differences and each of these alloys presents unique preparation challenges. Each of the alloys is prepared by a sequence of mechanical grinding and polishing followed by electropolishing with subtle differences between the alloys. U-6Nb and U-0.75Ti both have martensitic microstructures and both require special care in order to avoid mechanical polishing artifacts. Unalloyed uranium has a tendency to rapidly oxidize when exposed to air and a two-step electropolish is employed, the first step to remove the damaged surface layer resulting from the mechanical preparation and the second step to passivate the surface. All of the alloying additions provide a level of surface passivation and different one and two step electropolishes are employed to create good EBSD surfaces. Because of its low symmetry crystal structure, uranium exhibits complex deformation behavior including operation of multiple deformation twinning modes. EBSD was used to observe and quantify twinning contributions to deformation and to examine the fracture behavior. Figure 1 shows a cross section of two mating fracture surfaces in cast uranium showing the propensity of deformation twinning and intergranular fracture largely between dissimilarly oriented grains. Deformation of U-6Nb in the shape memory regime occurs by the motion

  2. Metallographic preparation of Zn-21Al-2Cu alloy for analysis by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, M G; Martínez-Flores, E E; Torres-Villaseñor, G; Escalera, M Dolores

    2014-08-01

    Samples of Zn-21Al-2Cu alloy (Zinalco) that will be heavily deformed were prepared using five different manual mechanical metallographic methods. Samples were analyzed before tensile testing using the orientation imaging microscopy-electron backscatter diffraction (OIM-EBSD) technique. The effect of type and particle size during the final polishing stages for this material were studied in order to identify a method that produces a flat, damage free surface with a roughness of about 50 nm and clean from oxide layers, thereby producing diffraction patterns with high image quality (IQ) and adequate confidence indexes (CI). Our results show that final polishing with alumina and silica, as was previously suggested by other research groups for alloys that are difficult to prepare or alloys with low melting point, are not suitable for manual metallographic preparation of this alloy. Indexes of IQ and CI can be used to evaluate methods of metallographic preparation of samples studied using the OIM-EBSD technique.

  3. Advanced microstructural analysis of ferrite materials by means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Mücklich, F.

    2010-05-01

    The analysis of the achieved texture is of great importance for the performance of ferrite materials, either bulk or thin films. The recently developed electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique enables a spatially resolved study of the crystallographic orientations by means of recording of Kikuchi patterns. To our knowledge, such a thorough EBSD analysis was not yet performed in any oxidic magnetic material, and only very recently on magnetite thin films by us. A good surface polishing/cleaning is essential for this analysis, as the method requires an undisturbed surface area for a high image quality (IQ). This information is recorded to each measured Kikuchi pattern, together with a parameter describing the quality of indexation. Here, the spatially highly resolved EBSD mappings provide additional information as compared to the standard analysis techniques, which can contribute to an optimization of the growth process. Furthermore, an analysis of the grain aspect ratio is possible which provides further insight to the microstructural dependence of the magnetic properties of ferrites.

  4. Experimental evidence concerning the significant information depth of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD).

    PubMed

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Saager, Stefan; Böbenroth, Andrea; Rüssel, Christian

    2017-02-01

    Experiments concerning the information depth of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are performed on samples featuring an amorphous wedge on a crystalline substrate and a crystalline wedge on an amorphous substrate. The effects of the acceleration voltage and exemplary software settings on the ability to measure through an amorphous layer are presented. Changes in the EBSD-signal could be detected through a ≈142nm thick layer of amorphous Si while orientation measurements could be performed through a ≈116nm thick layer when using a voltage of 30kV. The complexity of the information depth significant to a given EBSD-pattern and the multiple parameters influencing it are discussed. It is suggested that a "core information depth" is significant to high quality patterns while a larger "maximum information depth" becomes relevant when the pattern quality decreases or the sample is inhomogeneous within the information volume, i.e. in the form of partially crystalline materials or crystal layers in the nm scale.

  5. Tackling pseudosymmetry problems in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of perovskite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, Elisabetta; Kaercher, Pamela; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Wheeler, John

    2016-04-01

    Perovskite minerals form an important mineral group that has applications in Earth science and emerging alternative energy technologies, however crystallographic quantification of these minerals with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is not accurate due to pseudosymmetry problems. The silicate perovskite Bridgmanite, (Mg,Fe)SiO3, is understood to be the dominant phase in the Earth's lower mantle. Gaining insight into its physical and rheological properties is therefore vital to understand the dynamics of the Earth's deep interior. Rock deformation experiments on analogue perovskite phases, for example (Ca,Sr)TiO3, combined with quantitative microstructural analyses of the recovered samples by EBSD, yield datasets that can reveal what deformation mechanisms may dominate the flow of perovskite in the lower mantle. Additionally, perovskite structures have important technological applications as new, suitable cathodes for the operation of more efficient and environmentally-friendly solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). In recent years they have also been recognised as a potential substitute for silicon in the next generation of photovoltaic cells for the construction of economic and energy efficient solar panels. EBSD has the potential to be a valuable tool for the study of crystal orientations achieved in perovskite substrates as crystal alignment has a direct control on the properties of these materials. However, perovskite structures currently present us with challenges during the automated indexing of Kikuchi bands in electron backscatter diffraction patterns (EBSPs). Such challenges are represented by the pseudosymmetric character of perovskites, where atoms are subtly displaced (0.005 nm to 0.05 nm) from their higher symmetry positions. In orthorhombic Pbnm perovskites, for example, pseudosymmetry may be evaluated from the c/a unit cell parameter ratio, which is very close to 1. Two main types of distortions from the higher symmetry structure are recognised: a

  6. Structural analysis of multilayer metal nitride films CrN/MoN using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postolnyi, Bogdan; Bondar, Oleksandr; Opielak, Marek; Rogalski, Przemysław; Araújo, João. Pedro

    2016-12-01

    The electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis method was used for studying structure and properties of multilayer nitride CrN/MoN coatings fabricated by cathode arc physical vapour deposition (Arc-PVD). Samples were deposited on steel substrate with different single layer thickness from tens nanometers to 1 micron and with total thickness of coatings up to 8-13 μm. Colour grains mapping, grain size distribution profiles, pole figures and texture analyses were the main research instruments. Studying of obtained coatings was performed on specially prepared polished cross-section samples. The dependence between single layer thickness and grain size of materials, which is also changing through depth profile of the coating, was observed. In addition, it was possible to study phase composition, prevailing crystals orientation, dominant texture and grains growth. Studying of grains size, as well as other indicated parameters, is a very important task because it gives an information about grains interfaces volume, which causes changes in mechanical properties of material. Obtained results were cross-checked by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) where it was possible.

  7. Minimizing and quantifying mis-indexing in electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) determinations of antigorite crystal directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Wallis, Simon R.; Seto, Yusuke; Miyake, Akira; Soda, Yusuke; Uehara, Seiichiro; Matsumoto, Megumi

    2017-02-01

    Antigorite is common in hydrated mantle domains and commonly shows strong alignment either due to deformation or growth in a preferred orientation. The alignment of antigorite imparts a strong anisotropy to the host rock affecting physical properties. A quantitative analysis of how antigorite affects these properties requires a reliable measurement of the crystallographic preferred orientation of antigorite, and EBSD analysis is the most widely used technique. Potential problems include (i) mis-indexing, which can add significant uncertainties to the results; and (ii) sample preparation, which may affect the measured CPO in particular for automated mapping. Combining results derived from X-ray goniometry, EBSD and U-stage techniques with FIB-TEM analysis leads to the following conclusions concerning these two issues. (i) There is a significant issue with mis-indexing a- and b-axes due to rotational similarities about the c-axis. Similar problems may also affect the c-axes measurements but this is less significant than the a- and b-axes when data are filtered using lower MAD values. Filtering using MAD values of <0.7° can significantly change the resulting CPO. (ii) Sample preparation can also affect the measured CPO: sections prepared parallel to the foliation show only minor differences with MAD values of <2.0°. Mis-indexing problems can be minimized by using an MAD value of <0.7° and analysing thin sections cut parallel to the foliation.

  8. Study of ferrous corrosion products on iron archaeological objects by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, Ilanith; Conforto, Egle; Refait, Philippe; Rémazeilles, Céline

    2013-02-01

    The corrosion of iron-based archaeomaterials in anoxic environments leads mainly to Fe(II) compounds, like the hydroxychloride β-Fe2(OH)3Cl, chukanovite Fe2(OH)2CO3 or siderite FeCO3. The understanding of the mechanisms then necessarily implies a thorough investigation of the chemical, mechanical and morphological characteristics of the Fe(II)-based layer that develops between the metal surface and the environment. In the peculiar case of Fe(II) compounds, generally very reactive towards O2, the main concern is to prevent any transformation by air during the analysis. The EBSD technique is adapted on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) where the samples are analysed under vacuum and consequently sheltered from air. Different options offered by EBSD for phase characterisation and microstructural study were tested for the first time on the rust layers of two archaeological iron nails. Results were confronted to those obtained by micro-Raman spectroscopy, which was used as reference method. Magnetite, Fe(II) hydroxychloride β-Fe2(OH)3Cl and siderite were analysed successfully but improvements have to be brought for the study of other compounds such as iron oxyhydroxides and chukanovite. The choice of experimental parameters in our approach as well as the potentialities and limits of the technique for this kind of application are discussed.

  9. EBSD characterization and modeling of columnar dendritic grains growing in the presence of fluid flow[Electron Backscattered Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Takatani, H.; Gandin, C.A.; Rappaz, M.

    2000-02-09

    Columnar dendritic grains of steel growth in the presence of fluid flow (e.g., solidified on turning rolls) have been characterized by Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) technique. It is shown that grains have a random crystallographic orientation at the surfaces of the sheet in contact with the mould. In the middle of the sheet, the grains which have survived the growth selection mechanisms exhibit a (100) texture in which the average dendrite trunk direction is not exactly aligned with the thermal gradient (i.e., the normal to the surfaces of the sheet). It is tilted by about 15{degree} toward the upstream direction. This deviation is examined by simulations of grain structure formation based on a three-dimensional Cellular Automation (CA)-Finite Element (FE) (3D CAFE) model, which has been modified in order to account for fluid flow effects. The modified Ca algorithm includes a growth kinetics of the dendrites which is a function of both the undercooling and fluid flow direction. It is validated by comparing the predicted shape of an individual grain growing under given thermal and fluid flow conditions with an analytical solution. The 3D CAFE predictions of the columnar grains grown in the presence of fluid flow are in good agreement with the experimental EBSB results.

  10. Application of Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to Determine Texture, Microtexture, and Grain Boundary Energies in Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Rohrer, G.S.; Saylor, D.M.; Vedula, V.R.

    1999-05-19

    Crystallographic orientations in alumina (Al203) and magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl204) were obtained using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) patterns. The texture and mesotexture (grain boundary misorientations) were random and no special boundaries were observed. The relative grain boundary energies were determined by thermal groove geometries using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to identify relationships between the grain boundary energies and misorientations.

  11. Strain Determination Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, M.; Graff, A.; Altmann, F.

    2010-11-24

    In the present paper we demonstrate the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for high resolution elastic strain determination. Here, we focus on analysis methods based on determination of small shifts in EBSD pattern with respect to a reference pattern using cross-correlation algorithms. Additionally we highlight the excellent spatial and depth resolution of EBSD and introduce the use of simulated diffraction patterns based on dynamical diffraction theory for sensitivity estimation. Moreover the potential of EBSD for strain analysis of strained thin films with particular emphasis on appropriate target preparation which respect to occurring lattice defects is demonstrated.

  12. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) Analysis and U-Pb Geochronology of the Oldest Lunar Zircon: Constraining Early Lunar Differentiation and Dating Impact-Related Deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Timms, Nick; Nemchin, Alexander; Grange, Marion; Reddy, Steve; Pidgeon, Bob; Geisler, Thorsten; Meyer, Chuck

    2009-01-01

    The evolution of the early moon was dominated by two processes (i) crystallization of the Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) and differentiation of potassium-rare earth element-phosphorous-rich residual magma reservoir referred to as KREEP, and (ii) an intense meteorite bombardment referred to as lunar cataclysm . The exact timing of these processes is disputed, and resolution relies on collection and interpretation of precise age data. This study examines the microstructure and geochronology of zircon from lunar impact breccias collected during the Apollo 17 mission. A large zircon clast within lunar breccia 72215,195 shows sector zoning in optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and Raman mapping, and indicates that it was a relict fragment of a much larger magmatic grain. Sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb analysis of the zircon shows that U and Th concentration correlate with sector zoning, with darkest CL domains corresponding with high-U and Th (approx.150 and approx.100 ppm respectively), and the brightest-CL sectors containing approx.30-50 ppm U and approx.10-20 ppm Th. This indicates that variations in optical CL and Raman properties correspond to differential accumulation of alpha-radiation damage in each sector. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping shows that the quality of electron backscatter patterns (band contrast) varies with sector zoning, with the poorest quality patterns obtained from high-U and Th, dark-CL zones. EBSD mapping also reveals a deformation microstructure that is cryptic in optical, CL and Raman imaging. Two orthogonal sets of straight discrete and gradational low-angle boundaries accommodate approx.12 misorientation across the grain. The deformation bands are parallel to the crystallographic {a}-planes of the zircon, have misorientation axes parallel to the c-axis, and are geometrically consistent with formation by dislocation creep associated with <100>{010} slip. The deformation bands are unlike

  13. Implementing Transmission Electron Backscatter Diffraction for Atom Probe Tomography.

    PubMed

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Prosa, Ty J; Larson, David J

    2016-06-01

    There are advantages to performing transmission electron backscattering diffraction (tEBSD) in conjunction with focused ion beam-based specimen preparation for atom probe tomography (APT). Although tEBSD allows users to identify the position and character of grain boundaries, which can then be combined with APT to provide full chemical and orientation characterization of grain boundaries, tEBSD can also provide imaging information that improves the APT specimen preparation process by insuring proper placement of the targeted grain boundary within an APT specimen. In this report we discuss sample tilt angles, ion beam milling energies, and other considerations to optimize Kikuchi diffraction pattern quality for the APT specimen geometry. Coordinated specimen preparation and analysis of a grain boundary in a Ni-based Inconel 600 alloy is used to illustrate the approach revealing a 50° misorientation and trace element segregation to the grain boundary.

  14. Recent developments in two fundamental aspects of electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mingard, K. P.; Day, A. P.; Quested, P. N.

    2014-03-01

    Two very different aspects of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) are considered in this paper. Firstly, the use of the technique for the measurement of grain size is discussed with particular reference to the development of international standards to help ensure reproducible and repeatable measurements. In particular the lessons learnt for both calibration of the complete SEM-EBSD system and in choice of the correct data acquisition and processing parameters from an international round robin are summarized. Secondly, extending the capability of EBSD through development of new detectors is discussed. New shadow casting methods provide a means to achieve better accuracy in definition of sample-pattern geometry, while increased detail can be obtained by larger cameras and ultimately direct electron detection.

  15. Bragg's Law diffraction simulations for electron backscatter diffraction analysis.

    PubMed

    Kacher, Josh; Landon, Colin; Adams, Brent L; Fullwood, David

    2009-08-01

    In 2006, Angus Wilkinson introduced a cross-correlation-based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) texture analysis system capable of measuring lattice rotations and elastic strains to high resolution. A variation of the cross-correlation method is introduced using Bragg's Law-based simulated EBSD patterns as strain free reference patterns that facilitates the use of the cross-correlation method with polycrystalline materials. The lattice state is found by comparing simulated patterns to collected patterns at a number of regions on the pattern using the cross-correlation function and calculating the deformation from the measured shifts of each region. A new pattern can be simulated at the deformed state, and the process can be iterated a number of times to converge on the absolute lattice state. By analyzing an iteratively rotated single crystal silicon sample and recovering the rotation, this method is shown to have an angular resolution of approximately 0.04 degrees and an elastic strain resolution of approximately 7e-4. As an example of applications, elastic strain and curvature measurements are used to estimate the dislocation density in a single grain of a compressed polycrystalline Mg-based AZ91 alloy.

  16. Present State of Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Prospective Developments

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarzer, R A; Field, D P; Adams, B L; Kumar, M; Schwartz, A J

    2008-10-24

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), when employed as an additional characterization technique to a scanning electron microscope (SEM), enables individual grain orientations, local texture, point-to-point orientation correlations, and phase identification and distributions to be determined routinely on the surfaces of bulk polycrystals. The application has experienced rapid acceptance in metallurgical, materials, and geophysical laboratories within the past decade (Schwartz et al. 2000) due to the wide availability of SEMs, the ease of sample preparation from the bulk, the high speed of data acquisition, and the access to complementary information about the microstructure on a submicron scale. From the same specimen area, surface structure and morphology of the microstructure are characterized in great detail by the relief and orientation contrast in secondary and backscatter electron images, element distributions are accessed by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS), or cathodoluminescence analysis, and the orientations of single grains and phases can now be determined, as a complement, by EBSD.

  17. Mapping 180° polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction and dynamical scattering simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, Matthew J.; Fancher, Chris M.; Patala, Srikanth; De Graef, Marc; Dickey, Elizabeth C.

    2016-11-18

    A novel technique, which directly and nondestructively maps polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is described and demonstrated. Through dynamical diffraction simulations and quantitative comparison to experimental EBSD patterns, the absolute orientation of a non-centrosymmetric crystal can be determined. With this information, the polar domains of a material can be mapped. The technique is demonstrated by mapping the non-ferroelastic, or 180°, ferroelectric domains in periodically poled LiNbO3 single crystals. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate the possibility of mapping polarity using this technique in other polar materials system.

  18. Mapping 180° polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction and dynamical scattering simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Burch, Matthew J.; Fancher, Chris M.; Patala, Srikanth; ...

    2016-11-18

    A novel technique, which directly and nondestructively maps polar domains using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is described and demonstrated. Through dynamical diffraction simulations and quantitative comparison to experimental EBSD patterns, the absolute orientation of a non-centrosymmetric crystal can be determined. With this information, the polar domains of a material can be mapped. The technique is demonstrated by mapping the non-ferroelastic, or 180°, ferroelectric domains in periodically poled LiNbO3 single crystals. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate the possibility of mapping polarity using this technique in other polar materials system.

  19. Ultrasonic Characterization of Texture in Rolled Aluminium Correlated with Electron Backscatter Diffraction Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essex, S. D.; Potter, M. D. G.; Dixon, S.

    2007-03-01

    Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) is a microscopic technique that provides detailed crystallographic orientation and microstructural information, allowing for accurate measurement of such properties like average grain size. In order to validate and better understand what information an ultrasonic technique can give us we are correlating the ultrasonic measurements with those from EBSD. It generates an appreciation of the limitations of both techniques, and what each can reasonably deliver. We describe a technique to extrapolate the three independent orientation distribution coefficients (ODCs) for cubic structures W400, W420 and W440 from the Bunge-Euler angle data from EBSD scans. Preliminary EBSD results for thin rolled aluminium sheet are discussed and compared to the ODCs determined on the same sample using an ultrasonic EMAT-EMAT S0 Lamb wave measurement system.

  20. Application of electron backscatter diffraction techniques to quenched and partitioned steels.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Grant; Speer, John; Matlock, David; Michael, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques were used to characterize "hot-rolled" quenched and partitioned microstructures produced via Gleeble thermal simulations representing a hot-strip cooling practice for steel. In particular, EBSD was utilized to positively identify the morphology and location of retained austenite, to qualitatively distinguish martensite from ferrite, and in an attempt to identify transition carbides. Large pools of retained austenite and some thin films were accurately indexed; however, there was some disparity between austenite volume fractions measured by EBSD and those measured by X-ray diffraction. Due to similarities between the crystal structures of martensite and ferrite (body centered tetragonal versus body centered cubic, respectively), martensite could not be distinguished from ferrite by indexing of diffraction patterns; however, martensite could qualitatively be distinguished from ferrite by regions of low image quality based on the very high dislocation density of martensite.

  1. Phase analysis on dual-phase steel using band slope of electron backscatter diffraction pattern.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Man-Been

    2013-08-01

    A quantitative and automated phase analysis of dual-phase (DP) steel using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was attempted. A ferrite-martensite DP microstructure was produced by intercritical annealing and quenching. An EBSD map of the microstructure was obtained and post-processed for phase discrimination. Band slope (BS), which was a measure of pattern quality, exhibited much stronger phase contrast than another conventional one, band contrast. Owing to high sensitivity to lattice defect and little orientation dependence, BS provided handiness in finding a threshold for phase discrimination. Its grain average gave a superior result on the discrimination and volume fraction measurement of the constituent phases in the DP steel.

  2. Assessing Strain Mapping by Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Confocal Raman Microscopy Using Wedge-indented Si

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Lawrence H.; Vaudin, Mark D.; Stranick, Stephan J.; Stan, Gheorghe; Gerbig, Yvonne B.; Osborn, William; Cook, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman microscopy (CRM) for small-scale strain mapping are assessed using the multi-axial strain field surrounding a wedge indentation in Si as a test vehicle. The strain field is modeled using finite element analysis (FEA) that is adapted to the near-indentation surface profile measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The assessment consists of (1) direct experimental comparisons of strain and deformation and (2) comparisons in which the modeled strain field is used as an intermediate step. Direct experimental methods (1) consist of comparisons of surface elevation and gradient measured by AFM and EBSD and of Raman shifts measured and predicted by CRM and EBSD, respectively. Comparisons that utilize the combined FEA-AFM model (2) consist of predictions of distortion, strain, and rotation for comparison with EBSD measurements and predictions of Raman shift for comparison with CRM measurements. For both EBSD and CRM, convolution of measurements in depth-varying strain fields is considered. The interconnected comparisons suggest that EBSD was able to provide an accurate assessment of the wedge indentation deformation field to within the precision of the measurements, approximately 2 × 10−4 in strain. CRM was similarly precise, but was limited in accuracy to several times this value. PMID:26939030

  3. Microstructure Characterization of Magnetic-Pulse-Welded AA 6061-T6 by Electron Backscattered Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuan; Babu, Suresh; Zhang, P; Kenik, Edward A; Daehn, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    The grain boundary crystallographic misorientations of magnetic-pulse-welded (MPW) aluminum alloy (AA) 6061-T6 in linear and tubular configurations were examined using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. A refined structure of heavily deformed grains with higher grain boundary angles was observed in linear welds. Significant spalling was observed away from the joints, in the interior of tubular welds. The results show the complex interaction of shock waves with the materials during this impact welding process.

  4. Large area stress distribution in crystalline materials calculated from lattice deformation identified by electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yongliang; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Xiaopeng; Wu, Yongzhong; Dai, Yuanbin; Tian, Yuan; Huo, Qin

    2014-08-05

    We report a method to obtain the stress of crystalline materials directly from lattice deformation by Hooke's law. The lattice deformation was calculated using the crystallographic orientations obtained from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technology. The stress distribution over a large area was obtained efficiently and accurately using this method. Wurtzite structure gallium nitride (GaN) crystal was used as the example of a hexagonal crystal system. With this method, the stress distribution of a GaN crystal was obtained. Raman spectroscopy was used to verify the stress distribution. The cause of the stress distribution found in the GaN crystal was discussed from theoretical analysis and EBSD data. Other properties related to lattice deformation, such as piezoelectricity, can also be analyzed by this novel approach based on EBSD data.

  5. Application of electron backscatter diffraction for crystallographic characterization of tin whiskers.

    PubMed

    Michael, Joseph R; McKenzie, Bonnie B; Susan, Donald F

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the growth of whiskers or high aspect ratio features on substrates can be aided when the crystallography of the feature is known. This study has evaluated three methods that utilize electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) for the determination of the crystallographic growth direction of an individual whisker. EBSD has traditionally been a technique applied to planar, polished samples, and thus the use of EBSD for out-of-surface features is somewhat more difficult and requires additional steps. One of the methods requires the whiskers to be removed from the substrate resulting in the loss of valuable physical growth relationships between the whisker and the substrate. The other two techniques do not suffer this disadvantage and provide the physical growth information as well as the crystallographic growth directions. The final choice of method depends on the information required. The accuracy and the advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed.

  6. Misorientation mapping for visualization of plastic deformation via electron back-scattered diffraction.

    PubMed

    Brewer, L N; Othon, M A; Young, L M; Angeliu, T M

    2006-02-01

    The ability to map plastic deformation around high strain gradient microstructural features is central in studying phenomena such as fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. A method for the visualization of plastic deformation in electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) data has been developed and is described in this article. This technique is based on mapping the intragrain misorientation in polycrystalline metals. The algorithm maps the scalar misorientation between a local minimum misorientation reference pixel and every other pixel within an individual grain. A map around the corner of a Vickers indentation in 304 stainless steel was used as a test case. Several algorithms for EBSD mapping were then applied to the deformation distributions around air fatigue and stress corrosion cracks in 304 stainless steel. Using this technique, clear visualization of a deformation zone around high strain gradient microstructural features (crack tips, indentations, etc.) is possible with standard EBSD data.

  7. Comparison of quartz crystallographic preferred orientations identified with optical fabric analysis, electron backscatter and neutron diffraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Hunter, N J R; Wilson, C J L; Luzin, V

    2017-02-01

    Three techniques are used to measure crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) in a naturally deformed quartz mylonite: transmitted light cross-polarized microscopy using an automated fabric analyser, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and neutron diffraction. Pole figure densities attributable to crystal-plastic deformation are variably recognizable across the techniques, particularly between fabric analyser and diffraction instruments. Although fabric analyser techniques offer rapid acquisition with minimal sample preparation, difficulties may exist when gathering orientation data parallel with the incident beam. Overall, we have found that EBSD and fabric analyser techniques are best suited for studying CPO distributions at the grain scale, where individual orientations can be linked to their source grain or nearest neighbours. Neutron diffraction serves as the best qualitative and quantitative means of estimating the bulk CPO, due to its three-dimensional data acquisition, greater sample area coverage, and larger sample size. However, a number of sampling methods can be applied to FA and EBSD data to make similar approximations.

  8. Use of electropolishing for enhanced metallic specimen preparation for electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wynick, G.L.; Boehlert, C.J. . E-mail: boehlert@egr.msu.edu

    2005-09-15

    The effects of mechanical polishing with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and colloidal SiO{sub 2} followed by electropolishing were studied for preparation of metal alloy specimens for Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The alloys studied were Inconel 718, a commonly used nickel-based superalloy, and a Ti-Al-Nb alloy (nominally Ti-22Al-28Nb(at.%)). Atomic Force Microscopy was used to measure the surface topography to attempt to correlate nano-scale surface roughness with EBSD pattern quality. The results suggest that mechanically polishing with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} followed by electropolishing for a short time can produce EBSD pattern confidence indices and image quality values that are equal to or better than those produced by mechanically polishing with colloidal SiO{sub 2} alone. The data suggests that surface roughness on the scale considered here has much less effect on EBSD pattern quality than had been previously believed. The data suggests that removing the surface damage is more critical than reduction of topography for EBSD.

  9. Advanced characterization of twins using automated electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, S. I.; Bingert, J. F.; Mason, T. A.; Larson, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes results obtained using an automated, crystallographically-based technique for twin identification. The technique is based on the automated collection of spatially specific orientation measurements by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). The key features of the analysis are identification of potential twin boundaries by their misorientation character, identification of the distinct boundary planes among the symmetrically equivalent candidates, and validation of these boundaries through comparison with the boundary and twin plane traces in the sample cross section. Results on the application of this technique to deformation twins in zirconium are analyzed for the effect of twin type and amount and sense of uniaxial deformation. The accumulation of strain tends to increase the misorientation deviation at least to the degree of the trace deviation compared with recrystallization twins in nickel. In addition to the results on characterizing the twin character, results on extending the twin analysis to automated identification of parent and daughter material for structures exhibiting twin deformation are reported as well.

  10. Effect of microscope parameter and specimen thickness of spatial resolution of transmission electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Z; Kong, M G; Liu, Z W; Lin, C C; Zeng, Y

    2016-10-01

    The spatial resolution of transmission electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) with a standard conventional EBSD detector was evaluated quantitatively based on the calculation of the correlation coefficient of transmission patterns which were acquired across a twin boundary in the sample of austenitic steel. The results showed that the resolution of t-EBSD improved from tens of nanometres to below 10 nm with increasing accelerating voltage and thinning of specimen thickness. High voltage could enhance the penetration depth and reduce the scattering angle. And the thinning of specimen thickness would result in decreasing of the scattering events according to the theory of thermal diffuse scattering (TDS). In addition, the transmission patterns were found to be weak and noisy if the specimen was too thin, because of the decreasing intensity detected by the screen. Consequently, in this work, the best spatial resolution of 7 nm was achieved at 30 kV and 41 nm thickness. Moreover, the specimen thickness range was also discussed using Monte-Carlo simulation. This approach was helpful to account for the differences of measured spatial resolutions, by t-EBSD, of lamellas with different thickness.

  11. Non-marine radiaxial fibrous calcites—examples of speleothems proved by electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuser, R. D.; Richter, D. K.

    2007-02-01

    The occurrence of radiaxial fibrous calcites (RFC) in speleothems is documented for the first time using the new electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method. Up to now, in speleothems these precipitates have only been observed as Mg-containing calcites in close association with aragonite, in caves of the temperate to cool Central European regions with mean annual temperatures between 4 and 16 °C. As the four studied occurrences are located in caves in dolomitic and/or ankeritic host rocks, magnesium is considered to be of particular importance for triggering the formation of radiaxial fibrous (Mg-) calcite.

  12. Characterization of Ferrite in Tempered Martensite of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Using the Electron Backscattered Diffraction Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murty, B. S.

    2011-12-01

    Ferrite was identified and characterized in tempered martensitic modified 9Cr-1Mo steel using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique. Microstructural examination of the as-received modified 9Cr-1Mo steel revealed the presence of polycrystalline grains without lath morphology having low hardness within a predominantly tempered lath martensitic matrix. These grains were identified as the ferrite phase, and subsequent EBSD data analysis confirmed that the image quality (IQ) index of these grains is higher and boundary line length per unit area is lower than those of martensitic matrix. Therefore, it is proposed that characterization of ferrite phase in martensitic matrix can be carried out using microstructural parameters such as IQ index and boundary line length per unit area obtained from EBSD data analysis.

  13. STRAIN CORRELATIONS IN ALLOY 690 MATERIALS USING ELECTRON BACKSCATTER DIFFRACTION AND VICKERS HARDNESS

    SciTech Connect

    Overman, Nicole R.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2014-03-09

    High chromium, nickel-base Alloy 690 exhibits an increased resistance to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environments over lower chromium alloy 600. As a result, Alloy 690 has been used to replace Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing, reactor pressure vessel nozzles and other pressure boundary components. However, recent laboratory crack-growth testing has revealed that heavily cold-worked Alloy 690 materials can become susceptible to SCC. To evaluate reasons for this increased SCC susceptibility, detailed characterizations have been performed on as-received and cold-worked Alloy 690 materials using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and Vickers hardness measurements. Examinations were performed on cross sections of compact tension specimens that were used for SCC crack growth rate testing in simulated PWR primary water. Hardness and the EBSD integrated misorientation density could both be related to the degree of cold work for materials of similar grain size. However, a microstructural dependence was observed for strain correlations using EBSD and hardness which should be considered if this technique is to be used for gaining insight on SCC growth rates

  14. Dark-field imaging based on post-processed electron backscatter diffraction patterns of bulk crystalline materials in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Brodusch, Nicolas; Demers, Hendrix; Gauvin, Raynald

    2015-01-01

    Dark-field (DF) images were acquired in the scanning electron microscope with an offline procedure based on electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns (EBSPs). These EBSD-DF images were generated by selecting a particular reflection on the electron backscatter diffraction pattern and by reporting the intensity of one or several pixels around this point at each pixel of the EBSD-DF image. Unlike previous studies, the diffraction information of the sample is the basis of the final image contrast with a pixel scale resolution at the EBSP providing DF imaging in the scanning electron microscope. The offline facility of this technique permits the selection of any diffraction condition available in the diffraction pattern and displaying the corresponding image. The high number of diffraction-based images available allows a better monitoring of deformation structures compared to electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) which is generally limited to a few images of the same area. This technique was applied to steel and iron specimens and showed its high capability in describing more rigorously the deformation structures around micro-hardness indents. Due to the offline relation between the reference EBSP and the EBSD-DF images, this new technique will undoubtedly greatly improve our knowledge of deformation mechanism and help to improve our understanding of the ECCI contrast mechanisms.

  15. Beam broadening in transmission and conventional EBSD.

    PubMed

    Rice, Katherine P; Chen, Yimeng; Keller, Robert R; Stoykovich, Mark P

    2017-04-01

    Transmission electron backscatter diffraction (t-EBSD) has become a routine technique for crystal orientation mapping when ultrahigh resolution is needed and has demonstrated advantages in the characterization of nanoscale and micron-sized samples (Babinsky et al., 2015). In this work, we use experimental measurements and simulations to compare the resolution of the transmission and conventional reflection EBSD techniques across a range of sample volumes and characterization conditions. Monte Carlo simulations of electron trajectories provide the opportunity to estimate beam size and effective resolution, as well as electron flux, as a function of sample thickness or incident beam energy in t-EBSD. Increasing incident beam energy is shown to negatively impact beam diameter in some cases, and the effect of thinning a sample for conventional EBSD is shown to improve characterization resolution but dramatically decrease the number of high-loss electrons backscattered to the detector. In addition to considering spatial resolution when implementing EBSD techniques, it is found that maintaining a high yield of diffracted electrons to the detector is also of critical importance, which is supported by experimental results. Consequently, this work provides key insights into the nature of electron scattering and probe volume for the practical implementation of both transmission and reflection EBSD techniques.

  16. Quantitative analysis of martensite and bainite microstructures using electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongzhe; Hua, Jiajie; Kong, Mingguang; Zeng, Yi; Liu, Junliang; Liu, Ziwei

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, ultra-high-strength steels with multiphase microstructures containing martensite and bainite were prepared by controlling the cooling rate. A new approach was proposed for quantitatively statistical phase analysis using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) based on the band contrast which correlates to the quality and intensity of the diffraction patterns. This approach takes advantage of the inherently greater lattice imperfections of martensite, such as dislocations and low-angle grain boundaries, relative to that of bainite. These can reduce the intensity and quality of the EBSD patterns of martensite, which decrease the band contrast. Thus, combined with morphological observations, Gaussian two-peak fitting was employed to analyze the band contrast profile and confirm the ranges of band contrast for the two phases. The volume fractions of bainite and martensite in different samples were determined successfully. In addition, the results show that increased cooling rates improve the proportion of martensite and the ratio of martensite to bainite. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:814-819, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Characterization of ultrafine grained Cu-Ni-Si alloys by electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenberger, I.; Kuhn, H. A.; Gholami, M.; Mhaede, M.; Wagner, L.

    2014-08-01

    A combination of rotary swaging and optimized precipitation hardening was applied to generate ultra fine grained (UFG) microstructures in low alloyed high performance Cu-based alloy CuNi3Si1Mg. As a result, ultrafine grained (UFG) microstructures with nanoscopically small Ni2Si-precipitates exhibiting high strength, ductility and electrical conductivity can be obtained. Grain boundary pinning by nano-precipitates enhances the thermal stability. Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) and especially electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) are predestined to characterize the evolving microstructures due to excellent resolution and vast crystallographic information. The following study summarizes the microstructure after different processing steps and points out the consequences for the most important mechanical and physical properties such as strength, ductility and conductivity.

  18. EBSD investigation of SiC for HTR fuel particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helary, D.; Dugne, O.; Bourrat, X.; Jouneau, P. H.; Cellier, F.

    2006-05-01

    Electron back-scattering diffraction (EBSD) can be successfully performed on SiC coatings for HTR fuel particles. EBSD grain maps obtained from thick and thin unirradiated samples are presented, along with pole figures showing textures and a chart showing the distribution of grain aspect ratios. This information is of great interest, and contributes to improving the process parameters and ensuring the reproducibility of coatings.

  19. Electron backscatter diffraction study of hexagonal boron nitride growth on Cu single-crystal substrates.

    PubMed

    Hite, Jennifer K; Robinson, Zachary R; Eddy, Charles R; Feigelson, Boris N

    2015-07-22

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is an important material for the development of new 2D heterostructures. To enable this development, the relationship between crystal growth and the substrate orientation must be explored and understood. In this study, we simultaneously grew h-BN on different orientations of Cu substrates to establish the impact of substrate structure on the growth habit of thin h-BN layers. The substrates studied were a polycrystalline Cu foil, Cu(100), Cu(110), and Cu(111). Fourier transform grazing-incidence infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS) was used to identify h-BN on copper substrates. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to determine the effective thickness of the h-BN. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to measure the morphology of the films and postgrowth crystal structure of the Cu substrates, respectively. Combining the SEM and EBSD images allowed for the correlation between h-BN film coverage and the crystal structure of Cu. It was found that the growth rate was inversely proportional to the surface free energy of the Cu surface, with Cu(111) having the most h-BN surface coverage. The Cu foil predominately crystallized with a (100) surface orientation, and likewise had a film coverage very close to the Cu(100).

  20. Coupling Automated Electron Backscatter Diffraction with Transmission Electron and Atomic Force Microscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, A.J.; Kumar, M.; Bedrossian, P.J.; King, W.E.

    2000-01-26

    Grain boundary network engineering is an emerging field that encompasses the concept that modifications to conventional thermomechanical processing can result in improved properties through the disruption of the random grain boundary network. Various researchers have reported a correlation between the grain boundary character distribution (defined as the fractions of special and random grain boundaries) and dramatic improvements in properties such as corrosion and stress corrosion cracking, creep, etc. While much early work in the field emphasized property improvements, the opportunity now exists to elucidate the underlying materials science of grain boundary network engineering. Recent investigations at LLNL have coupled automated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to elucidate these fundamental mechanisms. This investigation provides evidence that grain boundary network engineering and the formation of annealing twins disrupt the connectivity of the random grain boundary network and is likely responsible for the experimentally observed improvement in properties. This work illustrates that coupling of automated EBSD with other microstructural probes such as TEM and AFM provides data of greater value than any single technique in isolation. The coupled techniques have been applied to aid in understanding the underlying mechanisms of grain boundary network engineering and the corrosion properties of individual boundaries.

  1. Advances in EBSD and EBSD/EDS integration for the characterization of mineralogical samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasse, L.; Goran, D.; Schwager, T.

    2013-12-01

    Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD) is a well-known powerful technique for petrofabric studies using Scanning Electron Microscope. By assessing the quantitative microstructural information, i.e. crystallographic orientation data, it allows a large variety of applications: understanding the deformation mechanisms, seismic properties, metamorphic processes; and more recently, performing phase identification and discrimination when combined with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS). However, it is known that for multiphase mineralogical samples, the information delivered either by EBSD or by EDS alone is not enough to successfully distinguish the present phases. Typical examples for EBSD related indexing issues are phases creating similar patterns; and for EDS technique alone, phases with similar chemical composition like calcite and aragonite, quartz and cristobalite. Recent software and hardware developments have significantly improved the data quality as well as the efficiency/productivity. This presentation aims to reveal the latest development in data processing that has transformed the combination of the two complementary techniques into a powerful tool for characterizing multiphase materials. Through geosciences application examples, we will present the advantages brought by this new approach which uses the quantified EDS results and EBSP to identify the correct phase, reducing the need of data cleaning, and without spending extra time at the SEM. We will also demonstrate how powerful EBSD indexing algorithm can overcome the limitation from sample preparation, with some examples of high hit rate achieved on polyphase mineralogical specimen and even on shock-metamorphosed minerals. Last but not least, recent developments also enable the investigation of nanostructured materials in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) by Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction (TKD). Through some mineralogical applications, we will demonstrate the high spatial resolution

  2. EBSD analysis of MgB2 bulk superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Schmauch, J.; Inoue, K.; Muralidhar, M.; Berger, K.; Noudem, J.

    2016-04-01

    The grain orientation, the texture and the grain boundary misorientations are important parameters for the understanding of the magnetic properties of the bulk MgB2 samples intended for super-magnet applications. Such data can be provided by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis. However, as the grain size (GS) of the MgB2 bulks is preferably in the 100-200 nm range, the common EBSD technique working in reflection operates properly only on highly dense samples. In order to achieve a reasonably good Kikuchi pattern quality on all samples, we apply here the newly developed transmission EBSD (t-EBSD) technique to several bulk MgB2 samples. This method requires the preparation of TEM slices by means of focused ion-beam milling, which are then analyzed within the SEM, operating with a specific sample holder. We present several EBSD mappings of samples prepared with different techniques and at various reaction temperatures.

  3. Quantitative Comparison of Microtexture in Near-Alpha Titanium Measured by Ultrasonic Scattering and Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilchak, Adam L.; Li, Jia; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonic backscattering and attenuation data were collected and processed using recently developed theoretical models to estimate the directionally dependent, volume-averaged size, and morphology of microtextured regions (MTRs) in a near-α Ti-8Al-1Mo-1V bar. The sample was also interrogated with electron backscatter diffraction from which MTR sizes were obtained by either manual segmentation and linear intercept analysis or fitting the spatial autocorrelation of similarly oriented c-axes to the geometrical autocorrelation function used in the scattering model. The results of the ultrasonic inversion were in good agreement with the EBSD measurements for the radial direction but were off by a factor of ~2.45 for the longitudinal direction. Reasons for the discrepancy were discussed and strategies to improve the agreement were made.

  4. Advanced Characterization of Slags and Refractory Bricks Using Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    John Kay; Kurt Eylands

    2007-09-30

    Numerous studies have been conducted to determine changes that occur in slag that cause a rapid change in viscosity, but these studies have been limited by the inability to characterize/identify the phases present in the slag. Rapid freezing of slag in entrained gasifiers and slagging combustion systems can cause a shutdown of the system. The reactions occurring in slag that result in rapid freezing of slags are not well understood. It is believed that electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) can be used to analyze slags and aid in their characterization although its use has not been found in literature. The EBSD technique allows particle-by-particle mineralogy based on diffraction patterns generated by the electron beam when the sample is tilted to a high angle. The diffraction pattern (Kikuchi bands) can only come from crystalline phases, which makes this technique ideally suited to study crystal formation in slags where oftentimes the crystals are very small and a reasonable chemical analysis cannot be made by conventional energy-dispersive spectrometry (EDS) methods in the scanning electron microscope. The ability to have mineralogical data based on the crystalline structure of a phase rather than a chemical analysis by EDS allows much better interpretation of the temperature regimes in which specific phases tend to form. Knowing the type and relative amounts of a phase crystallizing in a slag is critical in predicting the viscosity of a slag at a given temperature. Six slag samples were selected based on the parent coal. Unfortunately, none of the slags appeared to have any crystalline material associated with them. The funding for this project was not adequate for generating more slags from the various coal types. For this reason, sample archives were searched for those containing slags that were not rapidly quenched. A slag from a bituminous coal was found to contain several dendritic crystals (10 {mu}m to 50 {mu}m in size) that formed near the edges of the

  5. A method to correct coordinate distortion in EBSD maps

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.B. Elbrønd, A.; Lin, F.X.

    2014-10-15

    Drift during electron backscatter diffraction mapping leads to coordinate distortions in resulting orientation maps, which affects, in some cases significantly, the accuracy of analysis. A method, thin plate spline, is introduced and tested to correct such coordinate distortions in the maps after the electron backscatter diffraction measurements. The accuracy of the correction as well as theoretical and practical aspects of using the thin plate spline method is discussed in detail. By comparing with other correction methods, it is shown that the thin plate spline method is most efficient to correct different local distortions in the electron backscatter diffraction maps. - Highlights: • A new method is suggested to correct nonlinear spatial distortion in EBSD maps. • The method corrects EBSD maps more precisely than presently available methods. • Errors less than 1–2 pixels are typically obtained. • Direct quantitative analysis of dynamic data are available after this correction.

  6. Scanning electron microscopy and transmitted electron backscatter diffraction examination of asbestos standard reference materials, amphibole particles of differing morphology, and particle phase discrimination from talc ores.

    PubMed

    Bandli, Bryan R; Gunter, Mickey E

    2014-12-01

    Since 1972, when the US Occupational Health and Safety Administration established the first limits on occupational exposure to asbestos fibers, numerous analytical methods employing several microscopy techniques have been developed to identify a group of minerals defined by legislation as asbestos. While transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is implemented in standardized analytical methods, these methods specify the use of selected area electron diffraction. Because of this constraint, the diffraction data a TEM can provide are often underutilized due to challenges associated with collecting and interpreting individual diffraction patterns. It has been shown that transmission electron backscatter diffraction (tEBSD) produces diffraction patterns nearly identical to electron backscatter diffraction, but from smaller crystal domains. This paper explores the utility of tEBSD for characterization of asbestiform particles from reference asbestos materials, a suite of amphibole minerals of varying morphologies to determine if there is a correlation between mineral habit (i.e., crystal form), microscopic particle shape preferred orientation, and mineral specimens from an industrial talc deposit to provide a case study of the utility and limitations of the technique.

  7. Application of Electron Backscatter Diffraction to Phase Identification

    SciTech Connect

    El-Dasher, B S; Deal, A

    2008-07-16

    The identification of crystalline phases in solids requires knowledge of two microstructural properties: crystallographic structure and chemical composition. Traditionally, this has been accomplished using X-ray diffraction techniques where the measured crystallographic information, in combination with separate chemical composition measurements for specimens of unknown pedigrees, is used to deduce the unknown phases. With the latest microstructural analysis tools for scanning electron microscopes, both the crystallography and composition can be determined in a single analysis utilizing electron backscatter diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively. In this chapter, we discuss the approach required to perform these experiments, elucidate the benefits and limitations of this technique, and detail via case studies how composition, crystallography, and diffraction contrast can be used as phase discriminators.

  8. Characterization of bulk superconductors through EBSD methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka, M. R.; Koblischka-Veneva, A.

    2003-10-01

    The application of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique to bulk high- Tc superconductors is presented and reviewed. Due to the ceramic nature and the complex crystallographic unit cells of the perovskite-type high- Tc superconductors, the EBSD analysis is not yet as common as it deserves. We have successfully performed EBSD analysis on a variety of high- Tc compounds and samples including polycrystalline YBCO (pure and doped by alkali metals), melt-textured YBCO, thin and thick films of YBCO; the “green phase” Y 2BaCuO 5, thin film and melt-textured NdBa 2Cu 3O x and Bi-2212 single crystals and tapes. It is shown that the surface preparation of the samples is crucial due to the small information depth (up to 100 nm) of the EBSD technique. High quality Kikuchi patterns are the requirement in order to enable the automated EBSD mapping, which yields phase distributions, individual grain orientations and the misorientation angle distribution. The results can be presented in form of mappings, as charts, and as pole figures. These informations are required for a better understanding of the growth mechanism(s) of bulk high- Tc superconductors intended for applications.

  9. A semiautomated electron backscatter diffraction technique for extracting reliable twin statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henrie, B. L.; Mason, T. A.; Hansen, B. L.

    2004-12-01

    A framework has been developed for extracting reliable twin statistics from a deformed microstructure using crystallographic twin identification techniques with spatially correlated electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) data. The key features of this analysis are the use of the mathematical definition of twin relationships, the inclination of the common K 1 plane at a twin boundary, and the correct identification of the parent orientation in a parent/twin pair. Methods for identifying the parent in a parent/twin pair will be briefly discussed and compared. Twin area fractions are then categorized by operative twin systems, number of active twin variants in each system, and corrected twin widths. These statistics are reported here for α-zirconium samples deformed in quasi-static four-point bend beams and in a 100 m/s Taylor cylinder impact test. Analysis of the statistics also begins to reveal the roles that deformation rate and relative orientation of the boundary conditions to the material’s symmetry axes play in determining the twinning activity that accommodates the imposed boundary conditions. These improved twin statistics can help quantify the deformation processes in materials that deform by twinning as well as serve to provide better validation of proposed models of the deformation processes.

  10. Determination of pattern centre in EBSD using the moving-screen technique.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, D A; Pugh, J L; Richardson, G D; Mooney, L R

    2007-09-01

    The 'moving-screen' or 'pattern magnification' method of calibration for electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was reformulated to develop a high-precision technique requiring no crystallographic knowledge of the specimen and no initial estimates of the calibration parameters. The technique depends upon the accurate displacement of the screen and camera assembly. Corresponding points are selected, interactively, from EBSD patterns. It is suggested that, as an alternative, the selection of points from the Hough transform could lead to a completely automated routine.

  11. Aluminum matrix texture in Al-Al3Ti functionally graded materials analyzed by electron back-scattering diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Yoshimi; Sequeira, Paulo D.; Sato, Hisashi; Inamura, Tomonari; Hosoda, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Al matrix functionally graded materials (FGMs) with oriented Al3Ti platelets were fabricated by a centrifugal solid-particle method. The applied centrifugal forces were 30, 60, and 120G (units of gravity). The orientation and volume fraction gradients of the Al3Ti platelets within the samples were measured. Since a good lattice correspondence was reported for the close-packed directions and the close-packed planes between Al and Al3Ti, the Al matrix in the Al-Al3Ti FGMs fabricated by the centrifugal solid-particle method should have some texture. Al matrix texture was, therefore, analyzed by electron back-scattering diffraction (EBSD). Analysis of the resulting pole figures indicates a preferred orientation along the (200) plane for the Al matrix crystals. Furthermore, increasing the applied centrifugal force enhances the orientation effect. A correlation appears to exist between platelet orientation and the preferred texture of the Al matrix.

  12. Electron back-scattered diffraction and nanoindentation analysis of nanostructured Al tubes processed by multipass tubular-channel angular pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbah, Mohsen; Faraji, Ghader; Bushroa, A. R.

    2016-03-01

    Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of nanostructured 1060 aluminum alloy tubes processed by tubular-channel angular pressing (TCAP) process were investigated using electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nanoindentation analyzes. EBSD scans revealed a homogeneous ultrafine grained microstructure after the third passes of the TCAP process. Apart from that the mean grain sizes of the TCAP processed tubes were refined to 566 nm, 500 nm and 480 nm respectively after the first, second and third passes. The results showed that after the three TCAP passes, the grain boundaries with a high angle comprised 78% of all the boundaries. This is in comparison to the first pass processed sample that includes approximately 20% HAGBs. The TEM inspection afforded an appreciation of the role of very low-angle misorientation boundaries in the process of refining microstructure. Nanoindentation results showed that hardness was the smallest form of an unprocessed sample while the largest form of the processed sample after the three passes of TCAP indicated the highest resistant of the material. In addition, the module of elasticity of the TCAP processed samples was greater from that of the unprocessed sample.

  13. An electron backscatter diffraction investigation of crystallographic orientations of embedded nanoparticles within melt-textured YBCO high temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koblischka-Veneva, A.; Koblischka, M. R.; Babu, N. Hari; Cardwell, D. A.; Shlyk, L.; Krabbes, G.

    2006-07-01

    Microstructures of melt-textured YBCO samples with embedded nanosized particles of Y2BaCuO5 (Y-211) and Y2Ba4CuMOx (M-2411 with M = U,Zr) are analysed by means of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). With the recent developments of the EBSD technique, we can directly measure the crystallographic orientation of the embedded nanoparticles, employing a spatial resolution of about 40 nm. The high image quality of the Kikuchi patterns allows true three-phase (YBCO, Y-211 and M-2411) scans to be performed. The Y-211 particles do not exhibit any preferred orientation, even if their size is considerably reduced, to the 100 nm range. The size reduction reduces the negative influence of the Y-211 particles on the YBCO matrix, however. U-2411 particles, which are formed during the processing stage, do not show any orientation, and with increasing concentration, some texture develops. In contrast to this, embedded Zr-2411 particles are fully oriented in the (001) orientation according to the surrounding superconducting matrix.

  14. Skeletal growth phases of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa shown by scanning electron microscope and electron backscatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouchi, Vincent; Vonlanthen, Pierre; Verrecchia, Eric P.; Crowley, Quentin G.

    2016-04-01

    Lophelia pertusa is a cold-water coral, which may form reefs by the association of multiple coralites within which a polyp lives. Each individual polyp builds an aragonite skeleton by an initial phase of early mineralization (traditionally referred to as centres of calcification) from which aragonite fibres grow in thickening deposits. The skeleton wall features successive optically opaque and translucent bands previously attributed to different regimes of growth as either uniform in crystal orientation (translucent bands) or with a chaotic organization (opaque bands). The processes involved in any organizational changes are still unknown. Microlayers in the coral wall, which represent separate periods of skeletal growth, have been recently identified and described. These growth patterns are readily visible under scanning electron microscope (SEM) after etching in dilute formic acid, but they do not necessarily form continuously visible structures. Here we present high quality SEM images and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps to study aragonite fibre orientation across the wall of L. pertusa. Both microlayers and opaque and translucent bands are compared to the crystallographic orientation of the aragonite fibres. EBSD maps and SEM images indicate that aragonite fibres do not exhibit a chaotic orientation, even in opaque bands. The absence of continuity of microlayers is partially explained by an association of multiple crystallographic preferred orientations of aragonite fibres. In the case of L. pertusa, careful textural characterisation is necessary prior to elemental or isotope analysis in order to select a skeletal transect representing a linear and continuous time period.

  15. Three-dimensional cathodoluminescence imaging and electron backscatter diffraction: tools for studying the genetic nature of diamond inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggers de Vries, D. F.; Drury, M. R.; de Winter, D. A. M.; Bulanova, G. P.; Pearson, D. G.; Davies, G. R.

    2011-04-01

    As a step towards resolving the genesis of inclusions in diamonds, a new technique is presented. This technique combines cathodoluminescence (CL) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) using a focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) instrument with the aim of determining, in detail, the three-dimensional diamond zonation adjacent to a diamond inclusion. EBSD reveals that mineral inclusions in a single diamond have similar crystallographic orientations to the host, within ±0.4°. The chromite inclusions record a systematic change in Mg# and Cr# from core to the rim of the diamond that corresponds with a ~80°C decrease of their formation temperature as established by zinc thermometry. A chromite inclusion, positioned adjacent to a boundary between two major diamond growth zones, is multi-faceted with preferred octahedral and cubic faces. The chromite is surrounded by a volume of non-luminescent diamond (CL halo) that partially obscures any diamond growth structures. The CL halo has apparent crystallographic morphology with symmetrically oriented pointed features. The CL halo is enriched in ~200 ppm Cr and ~80 ppm Fe and is interpreted to have a secondary origin as it overprints a major primary diamond growth structure. The diamond zonation adjacent to the chromite is complex and records both syngenetic and protogenetic features based on current inclusion entrapment models. In this specific case, a syngenetic origin is favoured with the complex form of the inclusion and growth layers indicating changes of growth rates at the diamond-chromite interface. Combined EBSD and 3D-CL imaging appears an extremely useful tool in resolving the ongoing discussion about the timing of inclusion growth and the significance of diamond inclusion studies.

  16. Three-Dimensional EBSD Analysis of YSZ, NiO-YSZ and Ni-Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Saraf, Laxmikant V.

    2012-01-03

    In this report, a method is discussed to perform successive milling on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), NiO-YSZ and Ni-alloy at the intervals of 85 nm 50 nm and 100 nm, respectively using a focused ion beam (FIB) followed by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis on each slice. The EBSD data is then reconstructed to generate 3D volume. The 3D-EBSD band quality data is superimposed on inverse pole figure (IPF) grain orientation analysis to get a correlation with quality of band indexing. For the NiO-YSZ case, grain orientations and band quality factors were matched for grains {approx}250 nm diameters producing a high resolution 3D-EBSD data. For this case, a pore space in 3D volume was visible due to nanocrystalline NiO-YSZ grain network. The advantages of 3D EBSD are discussed in the context of its applications to SOFC research community.

  17. Lattice constant measurement from electron backscatter diffraction patterns.

    PubMed

    Saowadee, N; Agersted, K; Bowen, J R

    2017-02-20

    Kikuchi bands in election backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP) contain information about lattice constants of crystallographic samples that can be extracted via the Bragg equation. An advantage of lattice constant measurement from EBSPs over diffraction (XRD) is the ability to perform local analysis. In this study, lattice constants of cubic STN and cubic YSZ in the pure materials and in co-sintered composites were measured from their EBSPs acquired at 10 kV using a silicon single crystal as a calibration reference. The EBSP distortion was corrected by spherical back projection and Kikuchi band analysis was made using in-house software. The error of the lattice constant measurement was determined to be in the range of 0.09-1.12% compared to values determined by XRD and from literature. The confidence level of the method is indicated by the standard deviation of the measurement, which is approximately 0.04 Å. Studying Kikuchi band size dependence of the measurement precision shows that the measurement error decays with increasing band size (i.e. decreasing lattice constant). However, in practice, the sharpness of wide bands tends to be low due to their low intensity, thus limiting the measurement precision. Possible methods to improve measurement precision are suggested.

  18. Twin domain imaging in topological insulator Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 epitaxial thin films by scanning X-ray nanobeam microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Harcuba, Petr; Veselý, Jozef; Lesnik, Andreas; Bauer, Guenther; Springholz, Gunther; Holý, Václav

    2017-01-01

    The twin distribution in topological insulators Bi2Te3 and Bi2Se3 was imaged by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and scanning X-ray diffraction microscopy (SXRM). The crystal orientation at the surface, determined by EBSD, is correlated with the surface topography, which shows triangular pyramidal features with edges oriented in two different orientations rotated in the surface plane by 60°. The bulk crystal orientation is mapped out using SXRM by measuring the diffracted X-ray intensity of an asymmetric Bragg peak using a nano-focused X-ray beam scanned over the sample. By comparing bulk- and surface-sensitive measurements of the same area, buried twin domains not visible on the surface are identified. The lateral twin domain size is found to increase with the film thickness. PMID:28381969

  19. A pseudo-3D approach based on electron backscatter diffraction and backscatter electron imaging to study the character of phase boundaries between Mg and long period stacking ordered phase in a Mg–2Y–Zn alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Afshar, Mehran Zaefferer, Stefan

    2015-03-15

    In Mg–2 at.% Y–1 at.% Zn alloys, the LPSO (Long Period Stacking Ordered) phase is important to improve mechanical properties of the material. The aim of this paper is to present a study on the phase boundary character in these two-phase alloys. Using EBSD pattern analysis it was found that the 24R structure is the dominant LPSO phase structure in the current alloy. The phase boundary character between the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase was investigated using an improved pseudo-3D EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) technique in combination with BSE or SE (backscatter or secondary electron) imaging. A large amount of very low-angle phase boundaries was detected. The (0 0 0 2) plane in the Mg matrix which is parallel to the (0 0 0 24) plane in the LPSO phase was found to be the most frequent plane for these phase boundaries. This plane is supposed to be the habit plane of the eutectic co-solidification of the Mg matrix and the LPSO phase. - Highlights: • It is shown that for the investigated alloy the LPSO phase has mainly 24R crystal structure. • A new method is presented which allows accurate determination of the 5-parameter grain or phase boundary character. • It is found that the low-angle phase boundaries appearing in the alloy all have basal phase boundary planes.

  20. Crystallographic Orientation of Cuttlebone Shield Determined by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cusack, Maggie; Chung, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In common with many cephalopod mollusks, cuttlefish produce an internal biomineral buoyancy device. This cuttlebone is analogous to a surf board in shape and structure, providing rigidity and a means of controlling buoyancy. The cuttlebone is composed of calcium carbonate in the form of aragonite and comprises an upper dorsal shield and a lower lamellar matrix. The lamellar matrix comprises layers of chambers with highly corrugated walls. The dorsal shield comprises bundles of aragonite needles stacked on top of each other. Electron backscatter diffraction analyses of the dorsal shield reveal that the c-axis of aragonite is parallel with the long axis of the needles in the bundles such that any spread in crystallographic orientation is consistent with the spread in orientation of the fibers as they radiate to form the overall structure of the dorsal shield. This arrangement of c-axis coincident with the long axis of the biomineral structure is similar to the arrangement in corals and in contrast to the situation in the molluskan aragonite nacre of brachiopod calcite where the c-axis is perpendicular to the aragonite tablet or calcite fiber, respectively.

  1. Assessment of lattice strain, rotation and dislocation content using electron back-scatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Angus J.

    2011-11-01

    Cross-correlation based analysis methods have been developed for electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) patterns that improve the angular sensitivity to ~10-4 rads. This enables EBSD to be used to study the much smaller misorientations and even local elastic strain fields that are typical in semiconducting materials. Mapping of the lattice rotations and elastic strain variations provides sufficient detail for quantitative analysis of the threading dislocation density through the Nye tensor. The analysis will be briefly described and applications given to GaN and Si/SiGe based systems. Measurements of tilt, twist and elastic strain variations in GaN layers on basal plane sapphire will be reported and compared to results for some epitaxial lateral over grown (ELOG) GaN samples. The effects of misfit interfacial dislocations on the spatial distribution of the full strain and rotation tensors in a partially relaxed SiGe layer will also be shown.

  2. Oriented Nucleation of both Ge-Fresnoite and Benitoite/BaGe4O9 during the Surface Crystallisation of Glass Studied by Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Patschger, Marek; Murdzheva, Steliana; Thieme, Christian; Rüssel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Two glasses of the compositions 2 BaO - TiO2 - 2.75 GeO2 and 2 BaO – TiO2 –3.67 GeO2 (also known as BTG55) are annealed at temperatures from 680 to 970 °C to induce surface crystallization. The resulting samples are analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) including electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Ge-Fresnoite (Ba2TiGe2O8, BTG) is observed at the immediate surface of all samples and oriented nucleation is proven in both compositions. After a very fast kinetic selection, the crystal growth of BTG into the bulk occurs via highly oriented dendrites where the c-axes are oriented perpendicular to the surface. The growth of this oriented layer is finally blocked by dendritc BTG originating from bulk nucleation. The secondary phases BaTiGe3O9 (benitoite) and BaGe4O9 are also identified near the surface by XRD and localized by EBSD which additionally indicates orientation preferences for these phases. This behaviour is in contrast with previous reports from the Ba2TiSi2O8 as well as the Sr2TiSi2O8 systems. PMID:26853738

  3. Determination of the easy axes of small ferromagnetic precipitates in a bulk material by combined magnetic force microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Batista, L; Rabe, U; Hirsekorn, S

    2014-11-01

    A method to determine the magnetic easy axes of micro- and nanoscopic ferromagnetic precipitates embedded in a bulk material is proposed and applied to globular cementite (Fe₃C) embedded in a ferrite matrix. The method combines magnetic force microscopy (MFM) with electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Magnetic domain structures in globular and in lamellar cementite precipitates in unalloyed pearlitic steels were imaged using MFM. The domain structure of the precipitates was analyzed in dependency of their size, shape and crystallographic orientation. It was found that the magnetic moments of the cementite precipitates are highly geared to their crystalline axes. The combined MFM and EBSD studies allow the conclusion that the cementite easy direction of magnetization is the long [010] axis. For fine lamellae cementite the determination of their crystallographic orientations using electron diffraction techniques is very difficult. With the previous knowledge of the behavior of the domain structure in globular cementite, the crystalline orientations of the fine lamellae cementite can be estimated by simply observing the magnetic microstructures and the topographic profiles.

  4. The use of electron backscatter diffraction to measure the elastic strain fields in a misfit dislocation-free InGaAsP/InP heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, L. X.; Guo, D. L.; Ren, F.; Xiao, X. H.; Cai, G. X.; Fu, Q.; Jiang, C. Z.

    2007-12-01

    Elastic strain fields at the interface of the epilayer and buffer layer of the InGaAsP/InP heterostructure were characterized by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technology based on scanning electron microscopy. The InGaAsP/InP heterostructure which contained lattice misfit was under a dislocation-free condition. Image quality (IQ) was used as the strain sensitive parameter. From the image quality map and image quality curve, we observed directly the distribution of the elastic strain fields at the interface along the direction perpendicular to the interface as well as the interface structure between the epilayer and buffer layer by transmission electron microscopy and high resolution transmission microscopy.

  5. Electron backscatter diffraction characterization of plasma immersion ion implantation effects in stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Joel; Short, Ken; Wuhrer, Richard; Phillips, Matthew R.; Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Whittle, Karl R.

    2013-01-01

    In these experiments plasma immersion ion implantation is utilised to simulate some of the radiation effects in a nuclear reactor environment. Scanning electron microscopy using the angular selective backscatter detector has revealed observable changes in crystallographic contrast after irradiation with helium ions. Further studies using electron backscatter diffraction in both plan and cross section view allow us to visualize the extent and depth of damage and observe differences in the behavior of different crystalline phases present in several grades of stainless steel.

  6. Diffraction-controlled backscattering threshold and application to Raman gap

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Harvey A.; Mounaix, Philippe

    2011-04-15

    In most classic analytical models of linear stimulated scatter, light diffraction is omitted, a priori. However, modern laser optic typically includes a variant of the random phase plate [Y. Kato et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 1057 (1984)], resulting in diffraction limited laser intensity fluctuations - or localized speckles - which may result in explosive reflectivity growth as the average laser intensity approaches a critical value [H. A. Rose and D. F. DuBois, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 2883 (1994)]. Among the differences between stimulated Raman scatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scatter is that the SRS scattered light diffracts more strongly than the laser light with increase of electron density. This weakens the tendency of the SRS light to closely follow the most amplified paths, diminishing gain. Let G{sub 0} be the one-dimensional power gain exponent of the stimulated scatter. In this paper we show that differential diffraction gives rise to an increase of G{sub 0} at the SRS physical threshold with increase of electron density up to a drastic disruption of SRS as electron density approaches one fourth of its critical value from below. For three wave interaction lengths not small compared to a speckle length, this is a physically robust Raman gap mechanism.

  7. Investigation of plastic deformation heterogeneities in duplex steel by EBSD

    SciTech Connect

    Wronski, S.; Tarasiuk, J.; Bacroix, B.; Baczmanski, A.; Braham, C.

    2012-11-15

    An EBSD analysis of a duplex steel (austeno-ferritic) deformed in tension up to fracture is presented. The main purpose of the paper is to describe, qualitatively and quantitatively, the differences in the behavior of the two phases during plastic deformation. In order to do so, several topological maps are measured on the deformed state using the electron backscatter diffraction technique. Distributions of grain size, misorientation, image quality factor and texture are then analyzed in detail. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heterogeneities in duplex steel is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The behavior of the two phases during plastic deformation is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IQ factor distribution and misorientation characteristics are examined using EBSD.

  8. Identification of epsilon martensite in a Fe-based shape memory alloy by means of EBSD.

    PubMed

    Verbeken, K; Van Caenegem, N; Raabe, D

    2009-01-01

    Ferrous shape memory alloys (SMAs) are often thought to become a new, important group of SMAs. The shape memory effect in these alloys is based on the reversible, stress-induced martensitic transformation of austenite to epsilon martensite. The identification and quantification of epsilon martensite is crucial when evaluating the shape memory behaviour of this material. Previous work displayed that promising results were obtained when studying the evolution of the amount of epsilon martensite after different processing steps with Electron BackScatter Diffraction (EBSD). The present work will discuss in detail, on the one hand, the challenges and opportunities arising during the identification of epsilon martensite by means of EBSD and, on the other hand, the possible interpretations that might be given to these findings. It will be illustrated that although the specific nature of the austenite to epsilon martensite transformation can still cause some points of discussion, EBSD has a high potential for identifying epsilon martensite.

  9. Need for Standardization of EBSD Measurements for Microstructural Characterization of Thin Film Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Geiss, Roy H.; Read, David T.

    2007-09-26

    Microstructural characterization of metal thin films includes measurement of grain size, crystallographic texture and misorientation angle across grain boundaries. All of these measurements can be made simultaneously by the use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in the scanning electron microscope. The use of EBSD measurements to characterize microstructure requires the collection and analysis of thousands of individual diffraction patterns, and the extraction of statistical quantities of interest from the data set. The results depend on the particular analytical procedures used. Since the grains in interconnect structures are often much smaller than those in bulk materials, the measurement and reporting protocols require adaptation of procedures developed for bulk materials. Here we demonstrate results from a specific procedure for collecting and analyzing EBSD data on electrodeposited copper films. We show that without careful controls, the apparent grain size can vary by a factor of two or more, and the time required to acquire the data can differ by hours. The demonstrated practical advantages of EBSD over previously available techniques and the severe effect of experimental parameters on the results support the need for standardization of the methods used for microstructural characterization by use of EBSD.

  10. Electron backscattering diffraction analysis of an ancient wootz steel blade from central India

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, M.R. Sullivan, A.; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2009-04-15

    The electron backscattering diffraction technique was used to analyse the nature of carbides present in an ancient wootz steel blade. Bulky carbides, pro-eutectoid carbide along the prior austenite grain boundaries and fine spheroidized carbides were detected. Electron backscattering diffraction was employed to understand the texture of these carbides. The orientations of the cementite frequently occur in clusters, which points to a common origin of the members of the cluster. For the bands of coarse cementite, the origin is probably large coarse particles formed during the original cooling of the wootz cake. Pearlite formed earlier in the forging process has led to groups of similarly oriented fine cementite particles. The crystallographic texture of the cementite is sharp whereas that of the ferrite is weak. The sharp cementite textures point to the longevity of the coarse cementite throughout the repeated forging steps and to the influence of existing textured cementite on the nucleation of new cementite during cooling.

  11. EBSD spatial resolution for detecting sigma phase in steels.

    PubMed

    Bordín, S Fernandez; Limandri, S; Ranalli, J M; Castellano, G

    2016-12-01

    The spatial resolution of the electron backscatter diffraction signal is explored by Monte Carlo simulation for the sigma phase in steel at a typical instrumental set-up. In order to estimate the active volume corresponding to the diffracted electrons, the fraction of the backscattered electrons contributing to the diffraction signal was inferred by extrapolating the Kikuchi pattern contrast measured by other authors, as a function of the diffracted electron energy. In the resulting estimation, the contribution of the intrinsic incident beam size and the software capability to deconvolve patterns were included. A strong influence of the beam size on the lateral resolution was observed, resulting in 20nm for the aperture considered. For longitudinal and depth directions the resolutions obtained were 75nm and 16nm, respectively. The reliability of this last result is discussed in terms of the survey of the last large-angle deflection undergone by the backscattered electrons involved in the diffraction process. Bearing in mind the mean transversal resolution found, it was possible to detect small area grains of sigma phase by EBSD measurements, for a stabilized austenitic AISI 347 stainless steel under heat treatments, simulating post welding (40h at 600°C) and aging (284h at 484°C) effects-as usually occurring in nuclear reactor pressure vessels.

  12. Damage Assessment of Heat Resistant Steels through Electron BackScatter Diffraction Strain Analysis under Creep and Creep-Fatigue Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiyama, Kazunari; Kimachi, Hirohisa; Tsuboi, Toshiki; Hagiwara, Hiroyuki; Ogino, Shotaro; Mizutani, Yoshiki

    EBSD(Electron BackScatter Diffraction) analyses were conducted for studying the quantitative microstructural metrics of creep and creep-fatigue damage for austenitic SUS304HTB boiler tube steel and ferritic Mod.9Cr piping steel. KAM(Kernel Average Misorientation) maps and GOS(Grain Orientation Spread) maps were obtained for these samples and the area averaged values KAMave and GOSave were obtained. While the increasing trends of these misorientation metrics were observed for SUS304HTB steel, the decreasing trends were observed for damaged Mod.9Cr steel with extensive recovery of subgrain structure. To establish more universal parameter representing the accumulation of damage to compensate these opposite trends, the EBSD strain parameters were introduced for converting the misorientation changes into the quantities representing accumulated permanent strains during creep and creep-fatigue damage process. As KAM values were dependent on the pixel size (inversely proportional to the observation magnification) and the permanent strain could be expressed as the shear strain which was the product of dislocation density, Burgers vector and dislocation movement distance, two KAM strain parameters MεKAMnet and MεδKAMave were introduced as the sum of product of the noise subtracted KAMnet and the absolute change from initial value δKAMave with dislocation movement distance divided by pixel size. MεδKAMave parameter showed better relationship both with creep strain in creep tests and accumulated creep strain range in creep-fatigue tests. This parameter can be used as the strain-based damage evaluation and detector of final failure.

  13. Ultrasonic Characterization of Effective Elastic Constants and Texture in Aluminium Correlated with Ebsd

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essex, S. D.; Potter, M. D. G.; Dobedoe, R. S.; Dixon, S.

    2008-02-01

    Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) is a microscopic technique that provides detailed crystallographic orientation information for given samples. It enables the quantitative calculation and visualization of important microstructural properties such as grain size, aspect ratio and the average grain orientation of the aggregate, commonly known as the Orientation Distribution Function (ODF). In order to validate an ultrasonic technique to quantitatively describe texture we are correlating ultrasonic velocity measurements with results from EBSD. The velocity variations as a function of angle from the Rolling Direction in sheet samples are dependent on such quantities measurable by the EBSD technique. We describe here a modified technique to extrapolate the three independent Orientation Distribution Coefficients (ODCs) W400, W420 and W440 for cubic structures from the Bunge-Euler angle data determined through EBSD scans as a description of texture within the sample. EBSD results, taken from through-thickness scans to eliminate the errors that arise with surface-to-bulk inhomogeneity, for rolled aluminium sheets are discussed compared to the ODCs obtained using an ultrasonic EMAT-EMAT S0 Lamb wave velocity measurement system.

  14. ARPGE: a computer program to automatically reconstruct the parent grains from electron backscatter diffraction data

    PubMed Central

    Cayron, Cyril

    2007-01-01

    A computer program called ARPGE written in Python uses the theoretical results generated by the computer program GenOVa to automatically reconstruct the parent grains from electron backscatter diffraction data obtained on phase transition materials with or without residual parent phase. The misorientations between daughter grains are identified with operators, the daughter grains are identified with indexed variants, the orientations of the parent grains are determined, and some statistics on the variants and operators are established. Some examples with martensitic transformations in iron and titanium alloys were treated. Variant selection phenomena were revealed. PMID:19461849

  15. Effect of the surface preparation techniques on the EBSD analysis of a friction stir welded AA1100-B{sub 4}C metal matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Amira, S.; Gougeon, P.; Chen, X.-G.

    2011-09-15

    Aluminum based metal matrix composites (MMCs) have been used in various automobile, aerospace and military industries. Yet characterization of the microstructure in these materials remains a challenge. In the present work, the grain structure in the matrix of B{sub 4}C particulate reinforced MMCs and their friction stir welds is characterized by using optical metallography and the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. Optical metallography can partially reveal the grain structure in the matrix of AA1100-16 vol.% B{sub 4}C composite. The EBSD technique has been successfully applied to characterize the grain structure in the AA1100-16 vol.% B{sub 4}C friction stir welds, which provides a powerful tool to follow the microstructural evolution of MMC materials during friction stir welding (FSW). Both mechanical polishing and ion beam polishing are used for the EBSD sample preparation. The effect of the sample preparation on the EBSD data acquisition quality is studied. Some typical examples, such as the identification of grains and subgrains, grain size distribution, deformation fields and the texture components are given. - Highlights: {yields} EBSD has been used to characterize the grain structure of Al-B{sub 4}C MMCs. {yields} Mechanical and ion beam polishing are compared for EBSD sample preparation of MMCs. {yields} EBSD shows great advantages over optical microscopy for microtexture analysis of MMCs.

  16. Effect of cold deformation on the recrystallization behavior of FePd alloy at the ordering temperature using electron backscatter diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hung-Pin; Chen, Yen-Chun; Chen, Delphic; Kuo, Jui-Chao

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the evolution of the recrystallization texture and microstructure was investigated after annealing of 50% and 90% cold-rolled FePd alloy at 530 °C. The FePd alloy was produced by vacuum arc melting in an atmosphere of 97% Ar and 3% H{sub 2}. The specimens were cold rolled to achieve 50% and 90% reduction in thickness. Electron backscatter diffraction measurements were performed on the rolling direction–normal direction section. With increased deformation from 50% to 90%, recrystallized texture transition occurs. For the 50% cold-rolled alloy, the preferred orientation is (0 1 0) [11 0 1], which is close to the cubic orientation after 400 h of annealing. For the 90% cold-rolled alloy, the orientation changes to (0 5 4) [22–4 5] after 16 h of annealing. - Highlights: • Texture and microstructure in cold-rolled FePd alloy was investigated during annealing using EBSD. • The recrystallized texture of 50% cold-rolled FePd is (0 1 0) [11 0 1] at 530 °C for 400 hours. • The recrystallized texture of 90% cold-rolled FePd is changed to (0 5 4) [22–4 5] at 530 °C after 16 hours.

  17. Backscattering from a statistically rough 2-D surface: Diffraction corrections to geometrical optics cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuks, Iosif M.

    2007-12-01

    Diffraction corrections (up to terms ˜1/k2) to the geometric optics backscattering cross sections from a statistically rough 2-D perfectly conducting surface were derived for TE- and TM-polarized electromagnetic waves based on the high-frequency asymptotic expansions of electric and magnetic fields at the surface obtained by Fuks (2004). It was shown that at steep incident angles, where the specular reflections play the main part in scattering, diffraction results can be interpreted as scattering by a fictitious surface, the roughness of which is gentler that the real surface at HH polarization and steeper at VV polarization. The HH/VV polarization ratio (dB), being positive at steep incident angles, gradually decreases as the incident angle increases, and it becomes negative for moderate incident angles.

  18. Evaluation of macrozone dimensions by ultrasound and EBSD techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Moreau, Andre; Toubal, Lotfi; Bocher, Philippe; Humbert, Michel; Uta, Elena; Gey, Nathalie

    2013-01-15

    Titanium alloys are known to have texture heterogeneities, i.e. regions much larger than the grain dimensions, where the local orientation distribution of the grains differs from one region to the next. The electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) technique is the method of choice to characterize these macro regions, which are called macrozones. Qualitatively, the images obtained by EBSD show that these macrozones may be larger or smaller, elongated or equiaxed. However, often no well-defined boundaries are observed between the macrozones and it is very hard to obtain objective and quantitative estimates of the macrozone dimensions from these data. In the present work, we present a novel, non-destructive ultrasonic technique that provides objective and quantitative characteristic dimensions of the macrozones. The obtained dimensions are based on the spatial autocorrelation function of fluctuations in the sound velocity. Thus, a pragmatic definition of macrozone dimensions naturally arises from the ultrasonic measurement. This paper has three objectives: 1) to disclose the novel, non-destructive ultrasonic technique to measure macrozone dimensions, 2) to propose a quantitative and objective definition of macrozone dimensions adapted to and arising from the ultrasonic measurement, and which is also applicable to the orientation data obtained by EBSD, and 3) to compare the macrozone dimensions obtained using the two techniques on two samples of the near-alpha titanium alloy IMI834. In addition, it was observed that macrozones may present a semi-periodical arrangement. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discloses a novel, ultrasonic NDT technique to measure macrozone dimensions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proposes a quantitative and objective definition of macrozone dimensions Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compares macrozone dimensions obtained using EBSD and ultrasonics on 2 Ti samples Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Observes that macrozones may have a semi

  19. Cryogenic EBSD reveals structure of directionally solidified ice–polymer composite

    SciTech Connect

    Donius, Amalie E.; Obbard, Rachel W.; Burger, Joan N.; Hunger, Philipp M.; Baker, Ian; Doherty, Roger D.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.

    2014-07-01

    Despite considerable research efforts on directionally solidified or freeze-cast materials in recent years, little fundamental knowledge has been gained that links model with experiment. In this contribution, the cryogenic characterization of directionally solidified polymer solutions illustrates, how powerful cryo-scanning electron microscopy combined with electron backscatter diffraction is for the structural characterization of ice–polymer composite materials. Under controlled sublimation, the freeze-cast polymer scaffold structure is revealed and imaged with secondary electrons. Electron backscatter diffraction fabric analysis shows that the ice crystals, which template the polymer scaffold and create the lamellar structure, have a-axes oriented parallel to the direction of solidification and the c-axes perpendicular to it. These results indicate the great potential of both cryo-scanning electron microscopy and cryo-electron backscatter diffraction in gaining fundamental knowledge of structure–property–processing correlations. - Highlights: • Cryo-SEM of freeze-cast polymer solution reveals an ice-templated structure. • Cryo-EBSD reveals the ice crystal a-axis to parallel the solidification direction. • The honeycomb-like polymer phase favors columnar ridges only on one side. • Combining cryo-SEM with EBSD links solidification theory with experiment.

  20. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tiantian; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-01-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270–1480 MPa. PMID:27279765

  1. Crack nucleation using combined crystal plasticity modelling, high-resolution digital image correlation and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction in a superalloy containing non-metallic inclusions under fatigue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tiantian; Jiang, Jun; Britton, Ben; Shollock, Barbara; Dunne, Fionn

    2016-05-01

    A crystal plasticity finite-element model, which explicitly and directly represents the complex microstructures of a non-metallic agglomerate inclusion within polycrystal nickel alloy, has been developed to study the mechanistic basis of fatigue crack nucleation. The methodology is to use the crystal plasticity model in conjunction with direct measurement at the microscale using high (angular) resolution-electron backscatter diffraction (HR-EBSD) and high (spatial) resolution-digital image correlation (HR-DIC) strain measurement techniques. Experimentally, this sample has been subjected to heat treatment leading to the establishment of residual (elastic) strains local to the agglomerate and subsequently loaded under conditions of low cyclic fatigue. The full thermal and mechanical loading history was reproduced within the model. HR-EBSD and HR-DIC elastic and total strain measurements demonstrate qualitative and quantitative agreement with crystal plasticity results. Crack nucleation by interfacial decohesion at the nickel matrix/agglomerate inclusion boundaries is observed experimentally, and systematic modelling studies enable the mechanistic basis of the nucleation to be established. A number of fatigue crack nucleation indicators are also assessed against the experimental results. Decohesion was found to be driven by interface tensile normal stress alone, and the interfacial strength was determined to be in the range of 1270-1480 MPa.

  2. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Inconel 718 Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Chou, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the crystallographic texture of an Inconel 718 part fabricated by selective laser melting was investigated. The front surface (X-Z plane) microstructure is characterized by the columnar grains growing along the build direction, and the width of columnar grains is in the range of about 75-150 µm, with the bottom layers having narrower grains as a result of a higher cooling rate. In addition to equiaxed grains, the top surface (X-Y plane) has a feature of patch patterns resulting from the laser scanning strategy. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction results, there appears only weak crystallographic texture in both the X-Z plane and the X-Y plane of the part. From the grain boundary map, the microstructures are composed of high-angle boundaries with a larger fraction of subgrain boundaries.

  3. Adaptive characterization of recrystallization kinetics in IF steel by electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Kyu; Park, Won-Woong; Lee, Ho Won; Kang, Seong-Hoon; Im, Yong-Taek

    2013-12-01

    In this study, a rigorous methodology for quantifying recrystallization kinetics by electron backscatter diffraction is proposed in order to reduce errors associated with the operator's skill. An adaptive criterion to determine adjustable grain orientation spread depending on the recrystallization stage is proposed to better identify the recrystallized grains in the partially recrystallized microstructure. The proposed method was applied in characterizing the microstructure evolution during annealing of interstitial-free steel cold rolled to low and high true strain levels of 0.7 and 1.6, respectively. The recrystallization kinetics determined by the proposed method was found to be consistent with the standard method of Vickers microhardness. The application of the proposed method to the overall recrystallization stages showed that it can be used for the rigorous characterization of progressive microstructure evolution, especially for the severely deformed material.

  4. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Inconel 718 Parts Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Chou, Kevin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the crystallographic texture of an Inconel 718 part fabricated by selective laser melting was investigated. The front surface (X-Z plane) microstructure is characterized by the columnar grains growing along the build direction, and the width of columnar grains is in the range of about 75-150 µm, with the bottom layers having narrower grains as a result of a higher cooling rate. In addition to equiaxed grains, the top surface (X-Y plane) has a feature of patch patterns resulting from the laser scanning strategy. Based on the electron backscatter diffraction results, there appears only weak crystallographic texture in both the X-Z plane and the X-Y plane of the part. From the grain boundary map, the microstructures are composed of high-angle boundaries with a larger fraction of subgrain boundaries.

  5. Fabric analysis of Allende matrix using EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, Lauren E.; Bland, Phil A.; Prior, Dave J.; Russell, Sara S.

    Fabric analysis of the interstitial matrix material in primitive meteorites offers a novel window on asteroid formation and evolution. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) has allowed fabrics in these fine-grained materials to be visualized in detail for the first time. Our data reveal that Allende, a CV3 chondrite, possesses a uniform, planar, short-axis alignment fabric that is pervasive on a broad scale and is probably the result of deformational shortening related to impact or gravitational compaction. Interference between this matrix fabric and the larger, more rigid components, such as dark inclusions (DIs) and calcium-aluminium-rich inclusions (CAIs), has lead to the development of locally oriented and intensified matrix fabrics. In addition, DIs possess fabrics that are conformable with the broader matrix fabric. These results suggest that DIs were in situ prior to the deformational shortening event responsible for these fabrics, thus providing an argument against dark inclusions being fragments from another lithified part of the asteroid (Kojima and Tomeoka 1996; Fruland et al. 1978). Moreover, both DIs and Allende matrix are highly porous (˜25%) (Corrigan et al. 1997). Mobilizing a highly porous DI during impact-induced brecciation without imposing a fabric and incorporating it into a highly porous matrix without significantly compacting these materials is improbable. We favor a model that involves Allende DIs, CAIs, and matrix accreting together and experiencing the same deformation events.

  6. EBSD and Nanoindentation-Correlated Study of Delamination Fracture in Al-Li Alloy 2090

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayon, Wesley A.; Crooks, Roy E.; Domack, Marcia S.; Wagner, John A.; Elmustafa, A. A.

    2008-01-01

    Al-Li alloys offer attractive combinations of high strength and low density. However, a tendency for delamination fracture has limited their use. A better understanding of the delamination mechanisms may identify methods to control delaminations through processing modifications. A combination of new techniques has been used to evaluate delamination fracture in Al-Li alloys. Both high quality electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) information and valid nanoindentation measurements were obtained from fractured test specimens. Correlations were drawn between nano-scale hardness variations and local texture along delaminating boundaries. Intriguing findings were observed for delamination fracture through the combined analysis of grain orientation, Taylor factor, and kernel average misorientation.

  7. In situ electron backscatter diffraction investigation of recrystallization in a copper wire.

    PubMed

    Brisset, François; Helbert, Anne-Laure; Baudin, Thierry

    2013-08-01

    The microstructural evolution of a cold drawn copper wire (reduction area of 38%) during primary recrystallization and grain growth was observed in situ by electron backscatter diffraction. Two thermal treatments were performed, and successive scans were acquired on samples undergoing heating from ambient temperature to a steady state of 200°C or 215°C. During a third in situ annealing, the temperature was continuously increased up to 600°C. Nuclei were observed to grow at the expense of the deformed microstructure. This growth was enhanced by the high stored energy difference between the nuclei and their neighbors (driving energy in recrystallization) and by the presence of high-angle grain boundaries of high mobility. In the early stages of growth, the nuclei twin and the newly created orientations continue to grow to the detriment of the strained copper. At high temperatures, the disappearance of some twins was evidenced by the migration of the incoherent twin boundaries. Thermal grooving of grain boundaries is observed at these high temperatures and affects the high mobile boundaries but tends to preserve the twin boundaries of lower energy. Thus, grooving may contribute to the twin vanishing.

  8. Characterization of dual-phase steel microstructure by combined submicrometer EBSD and EPMA carbon measurements.

    PubMed

    Pinard, Philippe T; Schwedt, Alexander; Ramazani, Ali; Prahl, Ulrich; Richter, Silvia

    2013-08-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) measurements are combined to characterize an industrial produced dual-phase steel containing some bainite fraction. High-resolution carbon mappings acquired on a field emission electron microprobe are utilized to validate and improve the identification of the constituents (ferrite, martensite, and bainite) performed by EBSD using the image quality and kernel average misorientation. The combination eliminates the ambiguity between the identification of bainite and transformation-induced dislocation zones, encountered if only the kernel average misorientation is considered. The detection of carbon in high misorientation regions confirms the presence of bainite. These results are corroborated by secondary electron images after nital etching. Limitations of this combined method due to differences between the spatial resolution of EBSD and EPMA are assessed. Moreover, a quantification procedure adapted to carbon analysis is presented and used to measure the carbon concentration in martensite and bainite on a submicrometer scale. From measurements on reference materials, this method gives an accuracy of 0.02 wt% C and a precision better than 0.05 wt% C despite unavoidable effects of hydrocarbon contamination.

  9. Calculation of Elastic Anisotropy Using Emats Validated by Ebsd in Rolled Aluminium Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essex, S. D.; Potter, M. D. G.; Dixon, S.

    2009-03-01

    Determining the Orientation Distribution Function (ODF) accurately and quickly in a non-destructive manner has many benefits and applications within industry. The ODF is essentially a quantitative description of the existence of anisotropy, or texture, within a metal sheet. The anisotropy can be seen experimentally by the variation in Lamb wave velocities in the plane of the sheet as a function of angle to the Rolling Direction. The anisotropy can be quantitatively described by the Orientation Distribution Coefficients (ODCs) W400, W420 and W440. Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) is a technique performed in a SEM. It infers the crystallographic directions of crystals near-surface, and can be applied to a number of samples. It enables the accurate quantitative and qualitative description of microstructural properties such as grain size. By manipulating the Bunge-Euler angle data given by the EBSD technique, here we describe a method to extrapolate the effective elastic constants for Aluminium sheet, and go on to generate a method to predict a Lamb wave velocity profile as a function of angle in a directly comparable format to that measured using a commercially available EMAT-EMAT S0 Lamb wave velocity measurement system. Results show a very good correlation between the predicted velocity trace from EBSD compared to that measured ultrasonically, and hence the respective ODCs, except in the cases where surface to bulk texture inhomogeneity exist.

  10. Comparison of grain to grain orientation and stiffness mapping by spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy and EBSD.

    PubMed

    Mark, A F; Li, W; Sharples, S; Withers, P J

    2017-03-15

    Our aim was to establish the capability of spatially resolved acoustic spectroscopy (SRAS) to map grain orientations and the anisotropy in stiffness at the sub-mm to micron scale by comparing the method with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) undertaken within a scanning electron microscope. In the former the grain orientations are deduced by measuring the spatial variation in elastic modulus; conversely, in EBSD the elastic anisotropy is deduced from direct measurements of the crystal orientations. The two test-cases comprise mapping the fusion zones for large TIG and MMA welds in thick power plant austenitic and ferritic steels, respectively; these are technologically important because, among other things, elastic anisotropy can cause ultrasonic weld inspection methods to become inaccurate because it causes bending in the paths of sound waves. The spatial resolution of SRAS is not as good as that for EBSD (∼100 μm vs. ∼a few nm), nor is the angular resolution (∼1.5° vs. ∼0.5°). However the method can be applied to much larger areas (currently on the order of 300 mm square), is much faster (∼5 times), is cheaper and easier to perform, and it could be undertaken on the manufacturing floor. Given these advantages, particularly to industrial users, and the on-going improvements to the method, SRAS has the potential to become a standard method for orientation mapping, particularly in cases where the elastic anisotropy is important over macroscopic/component length scales.

  11. The (3 × 2) β -SiC(001) surface reconstruction investigated by photoelectron diffraction in the backscattering regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, E. G.; Dunham, D.; Tejeda, A.; Soukiassian, P.; Rotenberg, E.; Denlinger, J. D.

    2006-03-01

    The atomic positions of the (3× 2) reconstruction of the cubic polytype of SiC(001) are determined by using photoelectron diffraction in the backscattering regime. The comparison of multiple scattering spherical wave calculations with experimental data favours a modified version of the two-adlayer asymmetric dimer model. The atomic positions in the reconstructed layers are obtained from an R-factor refinement analysis. Atoms in the outermost layer form asymmetric dimers with a corrugation of (0.25 ± 0.10) Å. The second layer is also dimerized and originates rows of long and short dimers.

  12. Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction Analysis of an Austenitic Stainless Steel Subjected to Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment and Plasma Nitriding.

    PubMed

    Proust, Gwénaëlle; Retraint, Delphine; Chemkhi, Mahdi; Roos, Arjen; Demangel, Clemence

    2015-08-01

    Austenitic 316L stainless steel can be used for orthopedic implants due to its biocompatibility and high corrosion resistance. Its range of applications in this field could be broadened by improving its wear and friction properties. Surface properties can be modified through surface hardening treatments. The effects of such treatments on the microstructure of the alloy were investigated here. Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) is a surface treatment that enhances mechanical properties of the material surface by creating a thin nanocrystalline layer. After SMAT, some specimens underwent a plasma nitriding process to further enhance their surface properties. Using electron backscatter diffraction, transmission Kikuchi diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, the microstructural evolution of the stainless steel after these different surface treatments was characterized. Microstructural features investigated include thickness of the nanocrystalline layer, size of the grains within the nanocrystalline layer, and depth of diffusion of nitrogen atoms within the material.

  13. Inversion of calcite twin data for stress (2) : EBSD as a tool for data measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parlangeau, Camille; Lacombe, Olivier; Brisset, Francois; Kohler, Eric; Daniel, Jean-Marc; Schueller, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    Inversion of calcite twin data are known to be a powerful tool to reconstruct the past state(s) of stress in carbonate rocks of the crust, especially in fold-and-thrust belts and sedimentary basins. Twin data measurements have been for long carried out optically using a Universal-Stage. This data collection is time-consuming and suffers from limitations and bias related to measurements of twin planes oblique at low angle or parallel to the thin section, or the unambiguous evaluation of the twinned/untwinned character of collected twin data. EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) is a well-known technique applied to characterize textures and microstructures of metals or deformed fine-grained rocks. The challenge is to define a strategy for measuring calcite-twin orientations that should be fast, without any loss of information, and which must reconcile (1) the need for a large amount of calcite twin data (3 mutually perpendicular thin sections and at least 30 crystals per thin section), (2) the spacing between EBSD spots, that should take into account (3) the small width of twin lamellae within grains deformed at low pressure and temperature and (4) the large size (usually several hundreds of microns) of twinned calcite grains used for stress analysis. To date, these multiple requirements preclude any (classical) automatic twin data acquisition but instead imply a preliminary definition of the areas of the thin section to be scanned by the EBSD spots, including grain boundaries, because the stress inversion technique requires to know for each grain the orientations of the C axis and of the 3 potential e twin planes. In order to reconcile a perfectly polished surface as required by EBSD and the recognition of grain boundaries, we adopted the double etching technique (Herwegh, 2000) to first reveal grain and twin boundaries. Then, with a SEM and a very fine coating sample, the section is scanned using secondary electrons bin; each spot of interest is visually defined

  14. Novel Techniques for Examining Detailed Microstructure of Two-phase Lower Mantle Mineral Analogs with SEM and EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, P. M.; Mariani, E.; Dawson, K.

    2015-12-01

    We examined deformation microstructures of an analog two-phase system of the lower mantle using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). Halite (NaCl) and neighborite (NaMgF3) were used as analogs to lower mantle minerals ferropericlase (Mg,Fe)O and bridgmanite MgSiO3, respectively, and deformed to 30% strain at 4 GPa in the D-DIA. We have adapted techniques previously used for EBSD preparation of halite (NaCl) (e.g. Pennock et al. 2002, Journal of Microscopy, v205; Staiger et al. 2010, Materials Characterization, v61) to prepare halite and neighborite for EBSD. Because halite is soft and hydrophilic, it is tricky to prepare for high quality EBSD. On the other hand, neighborite is much harder than halite (with a bulk modulus 5 times that of halite) and requires high quality polishing for longer and through various polishing-medium sizes. EBSD maps were obtained by polishing with very fine colloidal alumina, followed by etching or a final polish in a precision ion polishing system (PIPS). Distribution of phases, grain size and shape, and crystallographic preferred orientation were examined to determine which phase controls the deformation and which deformation mechanisms dominate. Preliminary results show the softer halite is likely interconnected at just 25 volume % or less and controls the deformation through a mechanism that does not promote development of crystallographic preferred orientation. This suggests that periclase may control deformation in the lower mantle resulting in a weaker, more viscous lower mantle and may help to explain why the bulk of the lower mantle is mostly isotropic.

  15. Comparison between magnetic force microscopy and electron back-scatter diffraction for ferrite quantification in type 321 stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Warren, A D; Harniman, R L; Collins, A M; Davis, S A; Younes, C M; Flewitt, P E J; Scott, T B

    2015-01-01

    Several analytical techniques that are currently available can be used to determine the spatial distribution and amount of austenite, ferrite and precipitate phases in steels. The application of magnetic force microscopy, in particular, to study the local microstructure of stainless steels is beneficial due to the selectivity of this technique for detection of ferromagnetic phases. In the comparison of Magnetic Force Microscopy and Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction for the morphological mapping and quantification of ferrite, the degree of sub-surface measurement has been found to be critical. Through the use of surface shielding, it has been possible to show that Magnetic Force Microscopy has a measurement depth of 105-140 nm. A comparison of the two techniques together with the depth of measurement capabilities are discussed.

  16. Suppression of backscattered diffraction from sub-wavelength 'moth-eye' arrays.

    PubMed

    Stavroulakis, Petros I; Boden, Stuart A; Johnson, Thomas; Bagnall, Darren M

    2013-01-14

    The eyes and wings of some species of moth are covered with arrays of nanoscale features that dramatically reduce reflection of light. There have been multiple examples where this approach has been adapted for use in antireflection and antiglare technologies with the fabrication of artificial moth-eye surfaces. In this work, the suppression of iridescence caused by the diffraction of light from such artificial regular moth-eye arrays at high angles of incidence is achieved with the use of a new tiled domain design, inspired by the arrangement of features on natural moth-eye surfaces. This bio-mimetic pillar architecture contains high optical rotational symmetry and can achieve high levels of diffraction order power reduction. For example, a tiled design fabricated in silicon and consisting of domains with 9 different orientations of the traditional hexagonal array exhibited a ~96% reduction in the intensity of the -1 diffraction order. It is suggested natural moth-eye surfaces have evolved a tiled domain structure as it confers efficient antireflection whilst avoiding problems with high angle diffraction. This combination of antireflection and stealth properties increases chances of survival by reducing the risk of the insect being spotted by a predator. Furthermore, the tiled domain design could lead to more effective artificial moth-eye arrays for antiglare and stealth applications.

  17. EBSD Investigation of Cu-Sn IMC Microstructural Evolution in Cu/Sn-Ag/Cu Microbumps During Isothermal Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S. J.; Hsu, L. H.; Wang, N. K.; Ho, C. E.

    2014-01-01

    The microstructural evolution of Cu/Sn-Ag (~5 μm)/Cu Cu-bump-on-line (CuBOL) joints during isothermal annealing at 180°C was examined using a field-emission scanning electron microscope equipped with an electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) system. Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn were the two key intermetallic compound (IMC) species that appeared in the CuBOL joints. After annealing for 24 h (= t), the solder had completely converted to Cu-Sn IMCs, forming an "IMC" joint with Cu/Cu3Sn/Cu6Sn5/Cu3Sn/Cu structure. EBSD analyses indicated that the preferred orientation of the hexagonal Cu6Sn5 (η) was , while the preferred orientation was (100) for the monoclinic Cu6Sn5 structure (η'). Upon increasing t to 72 h, Cu6Sn5 entirely transformed into Cu3Sn, and the IMC joint became Cu/Cu3Sn/Cu accordingly. Interestingly, the grain size and crystallographic orientation of Cu3Sn displayed location dependence. Detailed EBSD analyses in combination with transmission electron microscopy on Cu3Sn were performed in the present study. This research offers better understanding of crystallographic details, including crystal structure, grain size, and orientation, for Cu6Sn5 and Cu3Sn in CuBOL joints after various annealing times.

  18. Use of EBSD Data in Numerical Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, R; Wiland, H

    2000-01-14

    Experimentation, theory and modeling have all played vital roles in defining what is known about microstructural evolution and the effects of microstructure on material properties. Recently, technology has become an enabling factor, allowing significant advances to be made on several fronts. Experimental evidence of crystallographic slip and the basic theory of crystal plasticity were established in the early 20th Century, and the theory and models evolved incrementally over the next 60 years. (Asaro provides a comprehensive review of the mechanisms and basic plasticity models.) During this time modeling was primarily concerned with the average response of polycrystalline aggregates. While some detailed finite element modeling (FEM) with crystal plasticity constitutive relations was done in the early 1980s, such simulations over taxed the capabilities of the available computer hardware. Advances in computer capability led to a flurry of activity in finite element modeling in the next 10 years, increasing understanding of microstructure evolution and pushing the limits of theories and material characterization. Automated Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) has produced a similar revolution in material characterization. The data collected is extensive and many questions about the evolution of microstructure and its role in determining mechanic properties can now be addressed. It is also now possible to obtain sufficient information about lattice orientations on a fine enough scale to allow detailed quantitative comparisons of experiments and newly emerging large scale numerical simulations. The insight gained from the coupling of EBSD and FEM studies will provide impetus for further development of microstructure models and theories of microstructure evolution. Early studies connecting EBSD data to finite element models used manual measurements to define initial orientations for the simulation. In one study, manual measurements of the deformed structure were also

  19. Fluvial suspended sediment characteristics by high-resolution, surrogate metrics of turbidity, laser-diffraction, acoustic backscatter, and acoustic attenuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landers, Mark Newton

    Sedimentation is a primary and growing environmental, engineering, and agricultural issue around the world. However, collection of the data needed to develop solutions to sedimentation issues has declined by about three-fourths since 1983. Suspended-sediment surrogates have the potential to obtain sediment data using methods that are more accurate, of higher spatial and temporal resolution, and with less manually intensive, costly, and hazardous methods. The improved quality of sediment data from high-resolution surrogates may inform improved understanding and solutions to sedimentation problems. The field experiments for this research include physical samples of suspended sediment collected concurrently with surrogate metrics from instruments including 1.2, 1.5, and 3.0 megahertz frequency acoustic doppler current profilers, a nephelometric turbidity sensor, and a laser-diffraction particle size analyzer. This comprehensive data set was collected over five storms in 2009 and 2010 at Yellow River near Atlanta, Georgia. Fluvial suspended sediment characteristics in this study can be determined by high-resolution surrogate parameters of turbidity, laser-diffraction and acoustics with model errors 33% to 49% lower than traditional methods using streamflow alone. Hysteresis in sediment-turbidity relations for single storm events was observed and quantitatively related to PSD changes of less than 10 microns in the fine silt to clay size range. Suspended sediment particle size detection (PSD) is significantly correlated with ratios of measured acoustic attenuation at different frequencies; however the data do not fit the theoretical relations. Using both relative acoustic backscatter (RB) and acoustic attenuation as explanatory variables results in a significantly improved model of suspended sediment compared with traditional sonar equations using only RB. High resolution PSD data from laser diffraction provide uniquely valuable information; however the size detection

  20. Metallographic Preparation of Space Shuttle Reaction Control System Thruster Electron Beam Welds for Electron Backscatter Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, James

    2011-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Reaction Control System (RCS) thruster failed during a firing test at the NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF), Las Cruces, New Mexico. The firing test was being conducted to investigate a previous electrical malfunction. A number of cracks were found associated with the fuel closure plate/injector assembly (Fig 1). The firing test failure generated a flight constraint to the launch of STS-133. A team comprised of several NASA centers and other research institutes was assembled to investigate and determine the root cause of the failure. The JSC Materials Evaluation Laboratory was asked to compare and characterize the outboard circumferential electron beam (EB) weld between the fuel closure plate (Titanium 6Al-4V) and the injector (Niobium C-103 alloy) of four different RCS thrusters, including the failed RCS thruster. Several metallographic challenges in grinding/polishing, and particularly in etching were encountered because of the differences in hardness, ductility, and chemical resistance between the two alloys and the bimetallic weld. Segments from each thruster were sectioned from the outboard weld. The segments were hot-compression mounted using a conductive, carbon-filled epoxy. A grinding/polishing procedure for titanium alloys was used [1]. This procedure worked well on the titanium; but a thin, disturbed layer was visible on the niobium surface by means of polarized light. Once polished, each sample was micrographed using bright field, differential interference contrast optical microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) using a backscatter electron (BSE) detector. No typical weld anomalies were observed in any of the cross sections. However, areas of large atomic contrast were clearly visible in the weld nugget, particularly along fusion line interfaces between the titanium and the niobium. This prompted the need to better understand the chemistry and microstructure of the weld (Fig 2). Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS

  1. Measurement of InAsBi mole fraction and InBi lattice constant using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalindar, A. J.; Webster, P. T.; Wilkens, B. J.; Alford, T. L.; Johnson, S. R.

    2016-10-01

    Several 1 μm thick, nearly lattice-matched InAsBi layers grown on GaSb are examined using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and X-ray diffraction. Random Rutherford backscattering measurements indicate that the average Bi mole fraction ranges from 0.0503 to 0.0645 for the sample set, and ion-channeling measurements indicate that the Bi atoms are substitutional. The X-ray diffraction measurements show a diffraction sideband near the main (004) diffraction peak, indicating that the Bi mole fraction is not laterally uniform in the layer. The average out-of-plane tetragonal distortion is determined by modeling the main and sideband diffraction peaks, from which the average unstrained lattice constant of each sample is determined. By comparing the Bi mole fraction measured by random Rutherford backscattering with the InAsBi lattice constant for the sample set, the lattice constant of zinc blende InBi is determined to be 6.6107 Å.

  2. Identifying deformation mechanisms in the NEEM ice core using EBSD measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuiper, Ernst-Jan; Weikusat, Ilka; Drury, Martyn R.; Pennock, Gill M.; de Winter, Matthijs D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Deformation of ice in continental sized ice sheets determines the flow behavior of ice towards the sea. Basal dislocation glide is assumed to be the dominant deformation mechanism in the creep deformation of natural ice, but non-basal glide is active as well. Knowledge of what types of deformation mechanisms are active in polar ice is critical in predicting the response of ice sheets in future warmer climates and its contribution to sea level rise, because the activity of deformation mechanisms depends critically on deformation conditions (such as temperature) as well as on the material properties (such as grain size). One of the methods to study the deformation mechanisms in natural materials is Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD). We obtained ca. 50 EBSD maps of five different depths from a Greenlandic ice core (NEEM). The step size varied between 8 and 25 micron depending on the size of the deformation features. The size of the maps varied from 2000 to 10000 grid point. Indexing rates were up to 95%, partially by saving and reanalyzing the EBSP patterns. With this method we can characterize subgrain boundaries and determine the lattice rotation configurations of each individual subgrain. Combining these observations with arrangement/geometry of subgrain boundaries the dislocation types can be determined, which form these boundaries. Three main types of subgrain boundaries have been recognized in Antarctic (EDML) ice core¹². Here, we present the first results obtained from EBSD measurements performed on the NEEM ice core samples from the last glacial period, focusing on the relevance of dislocation activity of the possible slip systems. Preliminary results show that all three subgrain types, recognized in the EDML core, occur in the NEEM samples. In addition to the classical boundaries made up of basal dislocations, subgrain boundaries made of non-basal dislocations are also common. ¹Weikusat, I.; de Winter, D. A. M.; Pennock, G. M.; Hayles, M

  3. Characterization of Sputtered CdTe Thin Films with Electron Backscatter Diffraction and Correlation with Device Performance.

    PubMed

    Nowell, Matthew M; Scarpulla, Michael A; Paudel, Naba R; Wieland, Kristopher A; Compaan, Alvin D; Liu, Xiangxin

    2015-08-01

    The performance of polycrystalline CdTe photovoltaic thin films is expected to depend on the grain boundary density and corresponding grain size of the film microstructure. However, the electrical performance of grain boundaries within these films is not well understood, and can be beneficial, harmful, or neutral in terms of film performance. Electron backscatter diffraction has been used to characterize the grain size, grain boundary structure, and crystallographic texture of sputtered CdTe at varying deposition pressures before and after CdCl2 treatment in order to correlate performance with microstructure. Weak fiber textures were observed in the as-deposited films, with (111) textures present at lower deposition pressures and (110) textures observed at higher deposition pressures. The CdCl2-treated samples exhibited significant grain recrystallization with a high fraction of twin boundaries. Good correlation of solar cell efficiency was observed with twin-corrected grain size while poor correlation was found if the twin boundaries were considered as grain boundaries in the grain size determination. This implies that the twin boundaries are neutral with respect to recombination and carrier transport.

  4. Insights to Meteorites and Impact Processes provided by Advanced EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasse, Laurie; Berlin, Jana; Goran, Daniel; Tagle, Roald; Hamers, Maartje; Assis Fernandes, Vera; Deutsch, Alexander; Schulte, Peter; Salge, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a powerful analytical technique for assessing the petrographic texture of rocks and the crystallographic orientation of minerals therein using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Innovations in EBSD technology include colour-coded forescattered electron (FSE) images, high resolution and highly sensitive EBSD detectors, together with advanced EDS integration. It allows to accurately identify and discriminate different phases, and to investigate microstructures related to shock metamorphism. As an example, shocked carbonates and shocked quartz reveal a complex thermal history during post-shock cooling. (A) EBSD studies of calcite ejecta particles from the Chicxulub impact event, at the K-Pg boundary of El Guayal, Mexico (~520 km SW of the Chicxulub crater centre) display various microstructures [1] and spherulitic calcite ejecta particles reveal a fibre texture of elongated crystals with a preferred orientation. This indicates the presence of carbonate melts which were ejected at T>1240°C and P>40 bar from upper target lithologies and crystallized at cooling rates of ~100´s °C/s [2]. The calcite particles of El Guayal and the K/Pg boundary of La Lajilla (~1000 km W of the crater centre) show distinct microstructures represented by unoriented, equiaxed crystals with random orientation distribution. It documents recrystallization upon impact induced thermal stress at T>550°C during prolonged atmospheric transport. (B) Combined EBSD, FSE and cathodoluminescence (CL) studies of semi-amorphous shocked quartz of Chicxulub, Ries and Popigai impactites, reveal various microstructures. Colour-coded FSE imaging reveal recrystallized/deformed bands in Ries and Popigai samples indicative of planar deformation features. EBSD studies of Popigai allow to distinguish twinned Qz, α-Qz and α-cristobalite along the transition zone between shocked gneiss clast and impact melt. Recrystallized Qz grains are associated with amorphous SiO2

  5. EBSD Characterization of Dendrites in Synthetic and Natural Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, J. E.; Tiley, J.; Shiveley, A.; Knox, S.; Viswanathan, G.

    2011-12-01

    Arborescent crystals in igneous rocks are associated with extreme crystallization environments: the protoplanary disk (chondrules), Earth's ultramafic Archean mantle (komatiite), and terrestrial submarine-erupted lavas (pillow basalts), although the role of morphological instabilities in more mundane settings such as magma reservoirs of modern oceanic islands is increasingly appreciated (see Welsch et al., V16). Fundamentals of dendrite formation are presumably well understood: branching morphologies belie crystal growth conditions in which the driving force for solidification produces a kinetic roughening transition, transforming an atomically smooth crystal-liquid interface into a rough, adhesive interface capable of extremely rapid advancement. However, not since photomicrograhic advances made possible close observations of snow crystals (Nakaya 1936), has there been a more promising set of analytical tools to characterize dendrites in natural and synthetic materials in pursuit of new insights. We are investigating clinopyroxene (cpx) in the quenched top of Fe-rich tholeiitic lava (Munro Township, Northeast Ontario; Fig. 1) and a synthetic basalt of similar character (Hammer 2006) with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), 3D reconstruction of optical serial sections, and TEM. Here we report intriguing phenomena observed with EBSD common to both samples. Severe thinning of dendrite trunks and repeated tip splitting destroys the self-similarity associated with classical dendrites and instead presages 'seaweed' morphology. Split tips manifest incremental trajectory deflections, producing gently arched trunks (Fig. 1A) as well as tightly curved (r<10 um) trunks. Crystals progressively rotate clockwise about cpx <010>, producing distinctive misorientation maps and pole figures (Fig. 1C). Parallel branches exhibit similar rotational trajectories, carving parallel arcs in the <010> pole figure. The high incidence of side branching and tip splitting is consistent

  6. Electron backscatter diffraction study of deformation and recrystallization textures of individual phases in a cross-rolled duplex steel

    SciTech Connect

    Zaid, Md; Bhattacharjee, P.P.

    2014-10-15

    The evolution of microstructure and texture during cross-rolling and annealing was investigated by electron backscatter diffraction in a ferritic–austenitic duplex stainless steel. For this purpose an alloy with nearly equal volume fraction of the two phases was deformed by multi-pass cross-rolling process up to 90% reduction in thickness. The rolling and transverse directions were mutually interchanged in each pass by rotating the sample by 90° around the normal direction. In order to avoid deformation induced phase transformation and dynamic strain aging, the rolling was carried out at an optimized temperature of 898 K (625 °C) at the warm-deformation range. The microstructure after cross warm-rolling revealed a lamellar structure with alternate arrangement of the bands of two phases. Strong brass and rotated brass components were observed in austenite in the steel after processing by cross warm-rolling. The ferrite in the cross warm-rolling processed steel showed remarkably strong RD-fiber (RD//< 011 >) component (001)< 011 >. The development of texture in the two phases after processing by cross warm-rolling could be explained by the stability of the texture components. During isothermal annealing of the 90% cross warm-rolling processed material the lamellar morphology was retained before collapse of the lamellar structure to the mutual interpenetration of the phase bands. Ferrite showed recovery resulting in annealing texture similar to the deformation texture. In contrast, the austenite showed primary recrystallization without preferential orientation selection leading to the retention of deformation texture. The evolution of deformation and annealing texture in the two phases of the steel was independent of one another. - Highlights: • Effect of cross warm-rolling on texture formation is studied in duplex steel. • Brass texture in austenite and (001)<110 > in ferrite are developed. • Ferrite shows recovery during annealing retaining the (001

  7. An investigation into the use of electron back scattered diffraction to measure recrystallized fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Black, M.P.; Higginson, R.L. . Dept. of Engineering Materials)

    1999-06-18

    The Electron Back-Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) technique is in its infancy and is a highly promising area of development. Use of EBSD has been predominantly for the determination of crystallographic textures. Other applications have also been considered, which include: crystal structure determination, phase determination, grain boundary studies and both elastic and plastic deformation measurement. Although it has been acknowledged that an important use of the EBSD could be in the measurement of recrystallization and its kinetics there are a number of inherent problems with such measurements using EBSD. These problems include the ability of the system to index deformed microstructures even those on a fine scale, the difficulties of analyzing patterns in the region of grain boundaries and the problems of sample preparation which is critical in the quality of the diffraction patterns obtained. The aim of the present study is to determine whether it is possible to measure the volume fraction recrystallized using EBSP of partially recrystallized stainless steel. This has been done by investigation of the quality of matching between the observed and calculated diffraction patterns, and the quality of the observed patterns measured in terms of their contrast. The material used was stainless steel 316L.

  8. Analysis of EBSD Grain Size Measurements Using Microstructure Simulations and a Customizable Pattern Matching Library for Grain Perimeter Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutinho, Y. A.; Rooney, S. C. K.; Payton, E. J.

    2017-03-01

    Grain size data from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) maps are often reported as the mean of the circle equivalent diameters of the measured grain areas. Circle equivalent diameters are not directly comparable to the lineal intercept measurements more historically common for grain size characterization in analog optical microscopy. While the value of mean lineal intercept is the same in 2D and 3D for a given probe direction, the mean 2D circle equivalent section diameter is not directly related to any 3D property. Estimation of mean lineal intercept from circle equivalent diameter is usually carried out by again assuming feature circularity, despite the obvious corners that are inherent to grains from the requirements of space filling. A direct conversion between section areas and lineal intercepts can be performed if the grain perimeters are known. In the present work, a novel pattern matching library approach is investigated for measurement of grain perimeters using simulated 2D EBSD maps. The results are compared to alternative approaches for perimeter measurement and assessed with respect to spatial resolution, grain size distribution parameters, and relevant ASTM and ISO measurement standards. The benefits and drawbacks of each approach are discussed. Empirical estimators for conversion between lineal intercept, circle equivalent diameter, and ASTM grain size number are presented.

  9. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth.

  10. EBSD analysis of the Shergottite Meteorites: New developments within the technique and their implication on what we know about the preferred orientation of Martian minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, N.; Benedix, G. K.; Bland, P.; Berlin, J.; Salge, T.; Goran, D.

    2011-12-01

    What we know about the geology and mineralogy of the Martian surface has been characterised by both the use of remote sensing techniques and the analysis of Martian meteorites. Various techniques are employed to conduct these analyses including crystallographic, geochemical and spectral measurements, all of which enable us to infer a geological history for these rocks. Several references have been made to the potential for preferred orientation of crystals within the Shergottites [1] and their implication for the cooling history of the respective magmas on Mars [2]. We have already shown that a preferred orientation of the two pyroxenes, augite and pigeonite, can be seen in the Zagami meteorite using electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis [3]. However, when compared to previous modal studies of the same meteorites [4], it becomes apparent that the current EBSD datasets for Martian meteorites are incomplete. Indexing of some minerals can be hampered by the lack of available matches within library databases for EBSD, or become difficult to resolve between minerals where crystallographic differences between similar minerals fall below the technical limitations of the instrument [3]. Recent advances in EBSD technologies combined with the simultaneous acquisition of energy-dispersive spectra (EDS) however now allow us to determine a more comprehensive set of analyses in a much shorter period of time, fully resolving even similar minerals where areas have been left with no indexing previously [5]. Preliminary investigations suggest that the new technology can successfully index >90% of the sample. The most recent EBSD analyses potentially reveals previously unseen fabrics in the meteorites alongside the EDS hyper-spectral imaging helping to resolve any unknown or questionable phases within them. In this study we will present new data from an investigation using EDS alongside EBSD analysis on 2 Shergottite meteorites, SAU 005 and Zagami, to further resolve

  11. Identifying Planar Deformation Features Using EBSD and FIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickersgill, A. E.; Lee, M. R.

    2015-09-01

    Planar deformation features in quartz grains from the Gow Lake impact structure have been successfully identified and indexed using electron backscatter diffraction in combination with focused ion beam milling.

  12. Characterization of Amorphous Oxide Nano-Thick Layers on 316L Stainless Steel by Electron Channeling Contrast Imaging and Electron Backscatter Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Dorri, Mahrokh; Turgeon, Stéphane; Brodusch, Nicolas; Cloutier, Maxime; Chevallier, Pascale; Gauvin, Raynald; Mantovani, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Characterization of the topmost surface of biomaterials is crucial to understanding their properties and interactions with the local environment. In this study, the oxide layer microstructure of plasma-modified 316L stainless steel (SS316L) samples was analyzed by a combination of electron backscatter diffraction and electron channeling contrast imaging using low-energy incident electrons. Both techniques allowed clear identification of a nano-thick amorphous oxide layer, on top of the polycrystalline substrate, for the plasma-modified samples. A methodology was developed using Monte Carlo simulations combined with the experimental results to estimate thickness of the amorphous layer for different surface conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy depth profiles were used to validate these estimations.

  13. Electron backscatter diffraction analysis of gold nanoparticles on Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}

    SciTech Connect

    Bochmann, A.; Teichert, S.; Katzer, C.; Schmidl, F.

    2015-06-07

    It has been shown recently that the incorporation of gold nanoparticles into Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ} enhances the superconducting properties of this material in a significant way. Previous XRD and TEM investigations suggest different crystallographic relations of the gold nanoparticles with respect to the epitaxial Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7−δ}. Here, detailed investigations of the crystal orientations for a large ensemble of gold nanoparticles with electron backscatter diffraction are reported. The average size of the gold nanoparticles is in the range of 60 nm–80 nm. We identified five different types of heteroepitaxial relationships between the gold nanoparticles and the superconductor film, resulting in complex pole figures. The observed different types of crystallographic orientations are discussed based on good lattice matching and the formation of low energy interfaces.

  14. Calcite sealing in a fractured geothermal reservoir: Insights from combined EBSD and chemistry mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, David D.; Lister, Aaron; Prior, Dave J.

    2016-09-01

    Fractures play an important role as fluid flow pathways in geothermal resources hosted in indurated greywacke basement of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, including the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Over time, the permeability of such geothermal reservoirs can be degraded by fracture sealing as minerals deposit out of transported geothermal fluids. Calcite is one such fracture sealing mineral. This study, for the first time, utilises combined data from electron backscatter diffraction and chemical mapping to characterise calcite vein fill morphologies, and gain insight into the mechanisms of calcite fracture sealing in the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Two calcite sealing mechanisms are identified 1) asymmetrical syntaxial growth of calcite, inferred by the presence of single, twinned, calcite crystals spanning the entire fracture width, and 2) 3D, interlocking growth of bladed vein calcite into free space as determined from chemical and crystallographic orientation mapping. This study also identifies other potential uses of combined EBSD and chemical mapping to understand geothermal field evolution including, potentially informing on levels of fluid supersaturation from the study of calcite lattice distortion, and providing information on a reservoir's history of stress, strain, and deformation through investigation of calcite crystal deformation and twinning patterns.

  15. Phase Transformation Study in Nb-Mo Microalloyed Steels Using Dilatometry and EBSD Quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isasti, Nerea; Jorge-Badiola, Denis; Taheri, Mitra L.; Uranga, Pello

    2013-08-01

    A complete microstructural characterization and phase transformation analysis has been performed for several Nb and Nb-Mo microalloyed low-carbon steels using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and dilatometry tests. Compression thermomechanical schedules were designed resulting in the undeformed and deformed austenite structures before final transformation. The effects of microalloying additions and accumulated deformation were analyzed after CCT diagram development and microstructural quantification. The resulting microstructures ranged from polygonal ferrite and pearlite at slow cooling ranges, to a combination of quasipolygonal ferrite and granular ferrite for intermediate cooling rates, and finally, to bainitic ferrite with martensite for fast cooling rates. The addition of Mo promotes a shift in the CCT diagrams to lower transformation start temperatures. When the amount of Nb is increased, CCT diagrams show little variations for transformations from the undeformed austenite and higher initial transformation temperatures in the transformations from the deformed austenite. This different behavior is due to the effect of niobium on strain accumulation in austenite and its subsequent acceleration of transformation kinetics. This article shows the complex interactions between chemical composition, deformation, and the phases formed, as well as their effect on microstructural unit sizes and homogeneity.

  16. Matrix grain characterisation by electron backscattering diffraction of powder metallurgy aluminum matrix composites reinforced with MoSi{sub 2} intermetallic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Corrochano, J. Hidalgo, P.; Lieblich, M.; Ibanez, J.

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: Six extruded PM AA6061/MoSi{sub 2}/15p were processed with and without ball milling {yields} EBSD was used to characterise matrix grain size and grain orientation. {yields} Ball milling decreases matrix grain size to submicrometric level. {yields} Ball milling produces a more equiaxed microstructure and larger misorientation. {yields} Increasing milling time produces matrix texture randomization.

  17. User-independent EBSD parameters to study the progress of recovery and recrystallization in Cu-Zn alloy during in situ heating.

    PubMed

    Sharma, N K; Shekhar, S

    2016-12-01

    Microstructural evolution of cold-rolled Cu-5%Zn alloy during in situ heating inside field-emission scanning electron microscope was utilized to obtain user-independent parameters in order to trace the progress of static recovery and recrystallization. Electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD)-based orientation imaging microscopy was used to obtain micrographs at various stages of in situ heating. It is shown that unlike the pre-existing methods, additional EBSD-based parameter can be used to trace the progress of recovery and recrystallization, which is not dependent on user input and hence less prone to error. True strain of 0.3 was imposed during cold rolling of alloy sample. Rolled sample was subjected to in situ heating from room temperature to 500°C (∼0.58 Tm) with soaking time of 10 min, at each of the intermediate temperatures viz. 100, 200, 300, 400 and 450°C. After reaching 500°C, the sample was kept at this temperature for a maximum duration of around 15 h. The sample showed clear signs of recovery for temperature up to 450°C, and at 500°C, recrystallization started to take place. Recrystallization kinetics was moderate, and full recrystallization was achieved in approximately 120 min. We found that EBSD parameter, namely, band contrast intensity can be used as an extra handle to map out the progress of recrystallization occurring in the sample. By contrast, mean angular deviation can be used to understand the evolution of recovery in samples. The parameters mentioned in the current study, unlike other pre-existing methods, can also be used for mapping local microstructural transformations due to recovery and recrystallization. We discuss the benefits and limitations in using these additional handles in understanding the changes taking place in the material during in situ heating.

  18. Strain analysis in quartzites with negative magnetic susceptibility using AMS and EBSD data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendraprasad Renjith, A.; Mamtani, Manish A.

    2016-04-01

    This study is being done with the objective of trying to understand whether the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) data can provide information about strain in quartzites with negative magnetic susceptibility. For this, nine quartzite samples have been collected from Rengali Province (located in the eastern part of India) with bulk magnetic susceptibility between -13.6 x 10-6 SI units and -3.06 x 10-6 SI units. Since these rocks did not show any visible foliation or lineation, AMS analysis was performed using KLY-4S Kappabridge and the orientation of three principal axes of the AMS ellipsoid (K1>K2>K3) were determined. Thin sections were prepared parallel to the K1K3 plane of the AMS ellipsoid (plane parallel to lineation and perpendicular to foliation), which is equivalent to the XZ plane of the strain ellipsoid. SEM based electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis, shape preferred orientation (SPO) analysis and strain analysis were carried out in these sections. Recently, Renjith et al. (2016) used the same samples to establish that the AMS in quartzites gives information about the SPO and not the CPO. To further evaluate the robustness of AMS in strain analysis, the authors have integrated the degree of magnetic anisotropy (Pj - a measure of the eccentricity of AMS ellipsoid; Tarling and Hrouda, 1993) with the intensity of SPO (κ ; Piazolo and Passchier, 2002), and the strain (E - calculated using AMOCADO; Gerik and Kruhl, 2009) from the same samples from Rengali. EBSD data were used as the basis for the above calculations. Whilst the orientation of long axis of quartz grains from EBSD statistical data was used to calculate κ , the grain boundary map generated from EBSD analysis was used as the basis to determine strain (E). It is found that the sample with minimum Pj also has a minimum κ and E, and vice-versa. Hence it is concluded that one-to-one correlation exists between the degree of magnetic anisotropy, strain and intensity of SPO in

  19. Subgrain boundary analyses in deformed orthopyroxene by TEM/STEM with EBSD-FIB sample preparation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Toshihiro; Raimbourg, Hugues; Kumamoto, Akihito; Fujii, Eiko; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-12-01

    High-resolution structure analyses using electron beam techniques have been performed for the investigation of subgrain boundaries (SGBs) in deformed orthopyroxene (Opx) in mylonite from Hidaka Metamorphic Belt, Hokkaido, Japan, to understand ductile deformation mechanism of silicate minerals in shear zones. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analysis of Opx porphyroclasts in the mylonitic rock indicated that the crystal orientation inside the Opx crystals gradually changes by rotation about the b-axis by SGBs and crystal folding. In order to observe the SGBs along the b-axis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or scanning TEM (STEM), the following sample preparation protocol was adopted. First, petrographic thin sections were slightly etched with hydrofluoric acid to identify SGBs in SEM. The Opx crystals whose b-axes were oriented close to the normal of the surface were identified by EBSD, and the areas containing SGBs were picked and thinned for (S) TEM analysis with a focused ion beam instrument with micro-sampling system. High-resolution TEM imaging of the SGBs in Opx revealed various boundary structures from a periodic array of dissociated (100) [001] edge dislocations to partially or completely incoherent crystals, depending on the misorientation angle. Atomic-resolution STEM imaging clearly confirmed the formation of clinopyroxene (Cpx) structure between the dissociated partial dislocations. Moreover, X-ray microanalysis in STEM revealed that the Cpx contains a considerable amount of calcium replacing iron. Such chemical inhomogeneity may limit glide motion of the dislocation and eventually the plastic deformation of the Opx porphyroclasts at a low temperature. Chemical profiles across the high-angle incoherent SGB also showed an enrichment of the latter in calcium at the boundary, suggesting that SGBs are an efficient diffusion pathway of calcium out of host Opx grain during cooling.

  20. Localisation of shear in ice by recrystallisation on kinks and grain boundary networks: new EBSD data in old experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prior, D. J.; Golding, N.; Durham, W. B.; Seidemann, M.; Diebold, S.; De Bresser, J. H. P.

    2015-12-01

    Relatively high stress (>1MPa), low temperature (<258K) ice creep experiments, to significant strain, have been possible some decades, using a gas confining pressure to prevent sample failure. Imaging the microstructures that result from these experiments has been problematic, primarily because of the fine size of some or all of the grains. We have now developed protocols to enable electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) in of fine-grained water ice with a very high (>95%) success rate and have quantified the microstructures of >50 confined medium experiments. The indium jackets of many confined media experiments have an irregular rumpled surface after deformation. The "rumples" have wavelengths and amplitudes larger than the starting grain size. EBSD maps show anastomosing traces along which fine recrystallised grains are developed. The traces follow some of the original grain boundaries - the scale of connectivity of the network of recrystallized grains is on the scale of several grains (or larger) and broadly corresponds to the wavelength of the rumples on the jacket. In some samples the original grains are kinked and recrystallized grains occur along kink traces. In samples where such recrystallisation is well-developed, these bands contribute of the anastomosing network. Recrystallised grain size describes a broad piezometer relationship that is consistent with much coarser recrystallized grain sizes from higher temperature, lower stress unconfined experiments. We suggest that the dynamic recrystallisation process is a mechanism that enables localization and weakening in ice. The high stress confined media experiments give some insight into processes that may occur in terrestrial ice sheets and cannot be accessed at natural conditions. Some preliminary modeling shows that a dynamic recrystallisation process is consistent with the magnitude of weakening on ice-stream margins in Antarctica.

  1. On capturing the grain-scale elastic and plastic anisotropy of alpha-Ti with spherical nanoindentation and electron back-scattered diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Weaver, Jordan S.; Priddy, Matthew W.; McDowell, David L.; ...

    2016-09-01

    Here, spherical nanoindentation combined with electron back-scattered diffraction has been employed to characterize the grain-scale elastic and plastic anisotropy of single crystal alpha-Ti of two different compositions (in two different titanium alloys). Data analyses protocols needed to reliably extract the desired properties of interest are extended and demonstrated in this paper. Specifically, the grain-scale mechanical response is extracted in the form of indentation stress-strain curves for commercially pure (CP-Ti) alpha-Ti and alloyed (Ti-64) titanium from measurements on polycrystalline samples. The results are compared with responses of single crystals and nanoindentation tests (hardness and modulus) from the literature, and the measuredmore » indentation moduli are validated using crystal-elastic finite element simulations. The results obtained in this study show that (i) it is possible to characterize reliably the elastic and plastic anisotropy of alpha-Ti (hcp) of varying alloying contents with spherical nanoindentation stress-strain curves, (ii) the indentation modulus of alpha-Ti-64 is 5–10% less than CP-Ti, and (iii) the indentation yield strength of alpha-Ti-64 is 50–80% higher than CP-Ti.« less

  2. On capturing the grain-scale elastic and plastic anisotropy of alpha-Ti with spherical nanoindentation and electron back-scattered diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, Jordan S.; Priddy, Matthew W.; McDowell, David L.; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2016-09-01

    Here, spherical nanoindentation combined with electron back-scattered diffraction has been employed to characterize the grain-scale elastic and plastic anisotropy of single crystal alpha-Ti of two different compositions (in two different titanium alloys). Data analyses protocols needed to reliably extract the desired properties of interest are extended and demonstrated in this paper. Specifically, the grain-scale mechanical response is extracted in the form of indentation stress-strain curves for commercially pure (CP-Ti) alpha-Ti and alloyed (Ti-64) titanium from measurements on polycrystalline samples. The results are compared with responses of single crystals and nanoindentation tests (hardness and modulus) from the literature, and the measured indentation moduli are validated using crystal-elastic finite element simulations. The results obtained in this study show that (i) it is possible to characterize reliably the elastic and plastic anisotropy of alpha-Ti (hcp) of varying alloying contents with spherical nanoindentation stress-strain curves, (ii) the indentation modulus of alpha-Ti-64 is 5–10% less than CP-Ti, and (iii) the indentation yield strength of alpha-Ti-64 is 50–80% higher than CP-Ti.

  3. Effect of Welding Heat Input on Microstructure and Texture of Inconel 625 Weld Overlay Studied Using the Electron Backscatter Diffraction Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joon-Suk; Lee, Hae-Woo

    2016-12-01

    The grain size and the texture of three specimens prepared at different heat inputs were determined using optical microscopy and the electron backscatter diffraction method of scanning electron microscopy. Each specimen was equally divided into fusion line zone (FLZ), columnar dendrite zone (CDZ), and surface zone (SZ), according to the location of the weld. Fine dendrites were observed in the FLZ, coarse dendrites in the CDZ, and dendrites grew perpendicular to the FLZ and CDZ. As the heat input increased, the melted zone in the vicinity of the FLZ widened due to the higher Fe content. A lower image quality value was observed for the FLZ compared to the other zones. The results of grain size measurement in each zone showed that the grain size of the SZ became larger as the heat input increased. From the inverse pole figure (IPF) map in the normal direction (ND) and the rolling direction (RD), as the heat input increased, a specific orientation was formed. However, a dominant [001] direction was observed in the RD IPF map.

  4. Influence of Surface Preparation on Scanning Kelvin Probe Microscopy and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Cross Sections of CdTe/CdS Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Moutinho, H. R.; Dhere, R. G.; Jiang, C. S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.

    2011-06-01

    In this work we investigated different methods to prepare cross sections of CdTe/CdS solar cells for EBSD and SKPM analyses. We observed that procedures used to prepare surfaces for EBSD are not suitable to prepare cross sections, and we were able to develop a process using polishing and ion-beam milling. This process resulted in very good results and allowed us to reveal important aspects of the cross section of the CdTe film. For SKPM, polishing and a light ion-beam milling resulted in cross sections that provided good data. We were able to observe the depletion region on the CdTe film and the p-n junction as well as the interdiffusion layer between CdTe and CdS. However, preparing good-quality cross sections for SKPM is not a reproducible process, and artifacts are often observed.

  5. Microstructural of analysis by EBSD during deformation and annealing of ice Ih

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainprice, D.; Hidas, K.; Tommasi, A.; Chauve, T.; Barou, F.; Montagnat, M.

    2015-12-01

    Static recrystallization and grain growth take place during high-temperature annealing following deformation at lower temperature, and they reorganize grain and subgrain boundaries to produce entirely new, strain-free grains. These processes influence the microstructure and mechanical behavior of the material by reducing the level of long-range internal stress field. The non-linear flow law of ice Ih makes it an ideal analogue to model rock deformation, thus analyses of recrystallized ice textures contribute to understanding mechanisms which control the nucleation and grain growth deep in the Earth's interior. Water ice microstructures allow for the study of grain-scale processes including nucleation, grain growth, recovery and recrystallization. On the other hand, these mechanisms directly influence the behavior of terrestrial ice systems (e.g., glaciers and ice sheets) in response to deformation. Therefore, their understanding may help us to improve climatic signal interpretation and predictions, that are mostly based on ice dynamics. However, at present there are no data by which recovery, and strain energy-driven grain boundary migration rates in ice can be estimated. Here we present the results of annealing experiments of pre-deformed polycrystalline water ice together with microstructural analyses by means of Automatic Ice Texture Analyzer (AITA) and high-resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) crystal orientation maps. We performed constant load uniaxial compression creep experiments at -7°C on columnar samples, composed of mm-sized polycrystals, to attain 4% deformation and we applied post-deformational heat treatment at -5°C. We carried out a series of AITA and EBSD maps in representative time steps up to 25 hours of total annealing in order to study the microstructural evolution. In this contribution, we evaluate the stored energy distribution and the rate of grain boundary migration during post-dynamic and static recrystallization, that

  6. Characterization of Geometrically Necessary Dislocation Content with EBSD-Based Continuum Dislocation Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggles, Timothy J.

    Modeling of plasticity is often hampered by the difficulty in accurately characterizing dislocation density on the microscale for real samples. It is particularly difficult to resolve measured dislocation content onto individual dislocation systems at the length scales most commonly of interest in plasticity studies. Traditionally, dislocation content is analyzed at the continuum level using the Nye tensor and the fundamental relation of continuum dislocation theory to interpret information measured by diffraction techniques, typically EBSD or High Resolution EBSD. In this work the established Nye-Kroner method for resolving measured geometrically necessary dislocation content onto individual slip systems is assessed and extended. Two new methods are also presented to relieve the ambiguity of the Nye-Kroner method. One of these methods uses modified classical dislocation equations to bypass the Nye-Kroner relation, and the other estimates the bulk dislocation density via the entry-wise one-norm of the Nye tensor. These methods are validated via a novel simulation of distortion fields around continuum fields of dislocation density based on classical lattice mechanics and then applied to actual HR-EBSD scans of a micro-indented single crystals of nickel and tantalum. Finally, a detailed analysis of the effect of the spacing between points in an EBSD scan (which is related to the step size of the numerical derivatives used in EBSD dislocation microscopy) on geometrically necessary dislocation measurements is conducted.

  7. Investigation of fatigue crack initiation facets in Ti-6Al-4V using focused ion beam milling and electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Everaerts, J; Verlinden, B; Wevers, M

    2017-03-15

    In the very high cycle fatigue regime, internal crack initiation can occur in Ti-6Al-4V because of the formation of facets, which are α grains that have fractured in a transcrystalline and planar manner. Because this crack initiation phase occupies most of the fatigue life, it is essential to understand which mechanisms lead to facet formation. Fatigue tests have been performed on drawn and heat-treated Ti-6Al-4V wires, and the facets at internal crack initiation sites have been analysed in detail in terms of their appearance, their spatial orientation and their crystallographic orientation. The facets were not smooth, but showed surface markings at the nanoscale. In nearly all cases, these markings followed a linear pattern. One anomalous facet, in a sample with the largest grain size, contained a fan-shaped pattern. The facets were at relatively steep angles, mostly between 50° and 70°. Cross-sections of the fracture surfaces have been made by focused ion beam milling and were used to measure the crystallographic orientation of facets by electron backscatter diffraction. Most facet planes coincided with a prismatic lattice plane, and the linear markings were parallel to the prismatic slip direction, which is a strong indication that prismatic slip and slip band formation led to crack initiation. However, the anomalous facet had a near-basal orientation, which points to a possible cleavage mechanism. The cross-sections also exposed secondary cracks, which had formed on prismatic lattice planes, and in some cases early stage facet formation and short crack growth phenomena. The latter observations show that facets can extend through more than one grain, and that there is crack coalescence between facets. The fact that drawn wires have a specific crystallographic texture has led to a different facet formation behaviour compared to what has been suggested in the literature.

  8. Thermally-induced amphibole reaction rim development: EBSD insights into microlite orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, Sarah; Lavallée, Yan; Larsen, Jessica; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2014-05-01

    Amphibole is an important mineral present in many calc-alkaline volcanic deposits. A hydrous phase, volcanic amphibole is only stable at pressures greater than 100 MPa (approx. 4 km), temperature less than ~860-870 oC, and in melts containing at least 4 wt % H2O. When removed from their thermal and barometric stability field, amphiboles decompose to form aggregate rims of anhydrous minerals. The thickness, texture, and mineralogy of these rims are thought to be reflective of the process driving amphibole disequilibrium (e.g. heating, decompression, etc). However, significant overlap in rim thicknesses and microlite textures means that distinguishing between processes it not simple. This study employed backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to examine both experimental heating-indced amphibole reaction rims and natural amphibole reaction rim from Augustine Volcano. We collected crystal orientation maps of amphibole reaction rims to investigate if different types of disequilibrium produce different patterns of microlite orientation. We identified two types of reaction rim: Type 1- reaction rim microlites are generally oriented at random and share little or no systematic relationship with the crystallographic orientation of the host amphibole, and; Type 2- reaction rim microlites exhibit a topotactic relationship with the host amphibole (they share the same crystallographic orientation). Experimentally produced heating reaction rims are without exception Type 2. However the natural reaction rims are evenly distributed between Types 1 and 2. Further experimental data on decompression induced reaction rim formation is needed to investigate if Type 1 reaction rims resemble the breakdown of amphibole due to decompression. If so, reaction rim microlite orientation could provide a clear method for distinguishing between heating and decompression processes in amphibole bearing magmas.

  9. EBSD imaging of orientation relationships and variant groupings in different martensitic alloys and Widmanstätten iron meteorites

    SciTech Connect

    Cayron, Cyril

    2014-08-15

    An automatic method to colorize and quantify the classical Pitsch, Kurdjumov–Sachs, Greninger–Troiano and Nishiyama–Wasserman orientation relationships in the electron backscatter diffraction maps of martensitic/bainitic steels is detailed. Automatic analysis of variant grouping is also presented. The method was applied to low and high carbon steels, and to iron–nickel Widmanstätten meteorites. Many results of recent literature are confirmed. In low carbon steels the individual laths exhibit continuous orientation gradients between the classical orientation relationships, and the laths tend to be grouped by close-packed plane (morphological) packets. A crystallographic scenario describing the formation of the packets is proposed on the base of the one-step model. When the carbon content increases, the orientation spreading is reduced; and martensite tends to form plate groups and burst configurations. In iron–nickel meteorites, the centimeter long Widmanstätten laths do not exhibit continuous orientation gradients but are constituted of subgrains with uniform orientation relationship; the kamacite grains in the plessite regions are grouped into Bain zones, probably due to a recrystallization during the slow cooling of the meteorites. - Highlights: • Analysis of different low and high carbon steels and Widmanstätten meteorites • Automatic color mapping of the classical orientation relationships in EBSD maps • Quantification of variant pairing and grouping tendencies • Crystallographic scenario for the formation of morphological packets.

  10. Characterization by EBSD of dislocations and disclinations in olivine: implications for the rheology of olivine-rich aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordier, P.; Demouchy, S. A.; Beausir, B.; Taupin, V.; Fressengeas, C.

    2013-12-01

    The rheology of olivine-rich rocks remains poorly understood. Only intracrystalline deformation mechanisms involving dislocations are quite well known. In orthorhombic olivine only two slip directions, [100] and [001] can be activated. Most characterizations performed so far involve transmission electron microscopy studies at high magnifications or, at a larger scale, optical or scanning electron microscopy on decorated samples. In the latter case, no detailed characterization of the defects could be done. Orientation maps obtained from high-resolution electron backscattered diffraction allow recovering components of the lattice curvature tensor which in turn allow determination of components of the dislocation density tensor. The geometrically necessary dislocation content can thus be imaged. Recently Beausir & Fressengeas (2013) have shown that with this technique, components of the disclination density tensor could also be determined. Several examples have been provided in metallic alloys. In this study we show that olivine aggregates (both experimentally and naturally deformed) contain pervasive evidence of disclinations dipoles at grain boundaries. The implications on the plastic behavior of olivine rocks are discussed based on a numerical model of the response to an applied shear stress of a grain boundary made of disclinations. Beausir, B. & Fressengeas, C., Disclination densities from EBSD orientation mapping. International Journal of Solids and Structures 50 (1), 137-146 (2013).

  11. EBSD analysis of (10–12) twinning activity in Mg–3Al–1Zn alloy during compression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingshu; Deng, Liping; Guo, Ning; Xu, Zeren; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-15

    The (10–12) twinning activity of Mg–3Al–1Zn magnesium alloy during uniaxial compression at room temperature has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results indicated that the twinning activity was closely related with two angles: one was the angle between the c-axis and the compression direction and the other was the angle between the a-axis and the titling direction in the basal plane for a given relation between the c-axis and the compression direction. These two parameters can be used to explain which twinning variant will operate under the given strain path. For the grains containing a single (10–12) twinning variant, the (10–12) twinning variant occurred in a wide range of Schmid factor values (0 < Schmid factor < 0.5) and the Schmid factor rank of 1 or 2 was the most commonly observed. By contrast, for the grains containing two (10–12) twinning variants, the (10–12) twinning activity exhibited a stronger orientation dependence and the combinations of Schmid factor ranks 1–3 and 1–2 were the most commonly observed. - Highlights: • Twinning activity of AZ31 magnesium alloy was investigated by EBSD. • (10–12) twinning shows a strong orientation dependence. • Two angles can be used to explain which twin variant will operate.

  12. Analysis of dynamic recrystallization of ice from EBSD orientation mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Chauve, Thomas; Barou, Fabrice; Tommasi, Andrea; Beausir, Benoît; Fressengeas, Claude

    2015-12-01

    We present high resolution observations of microstructure and texture evolution during dynamic recrystallization (DRX) of ice polycrystals deformed in the laboratory at high temperature (≈0.98Tm). Ice possesses a significant viscoplastic anisotropy that induces strong strain heterogeneities, which result in an early occurrence of DRX mechanisms. It is therefore a model material to explore these mechanisms. High resolution c-axis measurements at sample scale by optical techniques and full crystallographic orientation measurements by cryo- Electron Back Scattering Diffraction (EBSD) provide a solid database for analyzing the relative impact of the macroscopic imposed stress versus the local and internal stress field on DRX mechanisms. Analysis of misorientation gradients in the EBSD data highlights a heterogeneous dislocation distribution, which is quantified by the Nye tensor estimation. Joint analyses of the dislocation density maps and microstructural observations highlight spatial correlation between high dislocation density sites and the onset of nucleation taking place by grain-boundary bulging, subgrain rotation or by the formation of kink-bands.

  13. Precession electron diffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy: phase, orientation and strain mapping at the nanometer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    Precession electron diffraction is a technique used in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) to collect electron diffraction patterns while precessing the beam in a cone around the optic axis of the microscope. Electrons are strongly scattered by matter, resulting in dynamical diffraction effects and complex intensity distributions. Precession diffraction produces patterns that are nearly kinematical and lack the complicated intensity distributions of dynamical scattering. These patterns are readily indexed by computer, which allows for the structural characterization of the sample at each pixel. This technique is analogous to electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), but with higher spatial resolution. Like EBSD, precession diffraction is used to make phase and orientation maps in polycrystalline aggregates and deformed crystals. The technique also provides quantitative strain mapping at the nanometer scale for characterization of defects and coherent interfaces. This technique is especially useful for characterizing nano-scale intergrowths that are produced in high-pressure experiments and in naturally shocked samples. We are using this technique on our aberration corrects JEOL ARM200F STEM. Examples of experimentally and naturally transformed olivine will be presented.

  14. The Weighted Burgers Vector: a new quantity for constraining dislocation densities and types using electron backscatter diffraction on 2D sections through crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, J; Mariani, E; Piazolo, S; Prior, D J; Trimby, P; Drury, M R

    2009-03-01

    The Weighted Burgers Vector (WBV) is defined here as the sum, over all types of dislocations, of [(density of intersections of dislocation lines with a map) x (Burgers vector)]. Here we show that it can be calculated, for any crystal system, solely from orientation gradients in a map view, unlike the full dislocation density tensor, which requires gradients in the third dimension. No assumption is made about gradients in the third dimension and they may be non-zero. The only assumption involved is that elastic strains are small so the lattice distortion is entirely due to dislocations. Orientation gradients can be estimated from gridded orientation measurements obtained by EBSD mapping, so the WBV can be calculated as a vector field on an EBSD map. The magnitude of the WBV gives a lower bound on the magnitude of the dislocation density tensor when that magnitude is defined in a coordinate invariant way. The direction of the WBV can constrain the types of Burgers vectors of geometrically necessary dislocations present in the microstructure, most clearly when it is broken down in terms of lattice vectors. The WBV has three advantages over other measures of local lattice distortion: it is a vector and hence carries more information than a scalar quantity, it has an explicit mathematical link to the individual Burgers vectors of dislocations and, since it is derived via tensor calculus, it is not dependent on the map coordinate system. If a sub-grain wall is included in the WBV calculation, the magnitude of the WBV becomes dependent on the step size but its direction still carries information on the Burgers vectors in the wall. The net Burgers vector content of dislocations intersecting an area of a map can be simply calculated by an integration round the edge of that area, a method which is fast and complements point-by-point WBV calculations.

  15. Evaluation of suspended sediment concentrations, sediment fluxes and sediment depositions along a reservoir by using laser diffraction and acoustic backscatter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizano, Laura; Haun, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Costa Rica was investigated where huge depositions have been recorded since the reservoir was built. The SSC's were measured with a LISST-SL (Laser In-Situ Scattering and Transmissometry instrument) which is based on the laser diffraction method and measures simultaneously the SSC as well as the particle size distribution. The measured SSC's were subsequently used to calculate the sediment fluxes within the transects, based on the intensity of backscattered sound from an acoustic measurement device. The total amount of deposited sediments could be calculated from the sediment fluxes, obtained by moving ADCP measurements (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) along chosen transects and so an image of the amount of settled sediments could be drawn. The results of this study show the advantage of using two highly sophisticated measurement devices in parallel to receive accurate numbers for sediment fluxes within reservoirs, which can in addition be used in further studies to develop management strategies to reduce sediment depositions.

  16. Exploring transmission Kikuchi diffraction using a Timepix detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vespucci, S.; Winkelmann, A.; Mingard, K.; Maneuski, D.; O'Shea, V.; Trager-Cowan, C.

    2017-02-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) is a well-established scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based technique [1]. It allows the non-destructive mapping of the crystal structure, texture, crystal phase and strain with a spatial resolution of tens of nanometers. Conventionally this is performed by placing an electron sensitive screen, typically consisting of a phosphor screen combined with a charge coupled device (CCD) camera, in front of a specimen, usually tilted 70° to the normal of the exciting electron beam. Recently, a number of authors have shown that a significant increase in spatial resolution is achievable when Kikuchi diffraction patterns are acquired in transmission geometry; that is when diffraction patterns are generated by electrons transmitted through an electron-transparent, usually thinned, specimen. The resolution of this technique, called transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD), has been demonstrated to be better than 10 nm [2,3]. We have recently demonstrated the advantages of a direct electron detector, Timepix [4,5], for the acquisition of standard EBSD patterns [5]. In this article we will discuss the advantages of Timepix to perform TKD and for acquiring spot diffraction patterns and more generally for acquiring scanning transmission electron microscopy micrographs in the SEM. Particularly relevant for TKD, is its very compact size, which allows much more flexibility in the positioning of the detector in the SEM chamber. We will furthermore show recent results using Timepix as a virtual forward scatter detector, and will illustrate the information derivable on producing images through processing of data acquired from different areas of the detector. We will show results from samples ranging from gold nanoparticles to nitride semiconductor nanorods.

  17. An EBSD study of texture development and hybrid deformation mechanisms in fine grained calcite aggregates deformed in direct shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeder, X.; Trullenque, G.; Drury, M. R.; de Bresser, J.

    2007-12-01

    Understanding of texture development and its relation to grain size sensitive (GSS) deformation mechanism is of great importance since the rheological behavior of rocks varies substantially depending on which deformation mechanisms are controlling. Recent studies on naturally and experimentally deformed calcite and olivine aggregates have demonstrated that even fine grained materials that are expected to deform by grain size sensitive (GSS) mechanisms, develop a weak but distinct LPO (texture) at high strain. To investigate this behavior we conducted new deformation experiments on Solnhofen limestone in direct shear. This study is part of a wider investigation on large strain deformation in different deformation modes from G. Trullenque, in collaboration with D.L. Kohlstedt (Minneapolis, USA), R. Heilbronner and H. Stuenitz (Basel, Switzerland) and the Utrecht group. The samples have been deformed to high strain both in the conditions of the transition between the GSS and GSI creep regime and in the GSS creep regime. We used Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) to determine the texture strength of the samples, the distribution of misorientation axes and the grain size distributions. The results show an oblique shape preferred orientation at 35° to 40° to the shear plane and a moderate LPO. The c-axis preferred orientation shows a girdle with one main maximum at a high angle to the shear plane, displaced towards the shortening direction of the imposed shear. The a-axes present a weak girdle perpendicular to the c-axis. Grain growth occurred during high deformation. The misorientation angle distribution has a main peak at low angle. This is due to the progressive subgrain formation and rotation which occurred mainly in the larger grains. Subgrain rotation with misorientations up to 10° occured but most boundaries are low angle (< 5°). This shows the formation of new high angle boundaries and grain size reduction. The formation of subgrains and subgrain

  18. Advances in EBSD Technology: A Powerful Method for the Analysis of Impactites and Meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasse, L.; Goran, D.; Schwager, T.; Berlin, J.; Salge, T.

    2012-09-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction is an analytical technique for assessing the petrographic texture of a rock and the crystallographic orientation of minerals. Recent advances in software and hardware can help to understand impact and shock processes.

  19. Hyperspectral Imaging at the Micro- and Nanoscale using Energy-dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) with Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) and EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salge, T.; Goran, D.

    2010-12-01

    SDD systems have become state of the art technology in the field of EDS. The main characteristic of the SDDs is their extremely high pulse load capacity of up to 750,000 counts per second at good energy resolution (<123 eV Mn-Kα, <46 eV C-Kα at 100,000 counts per seconds). These properties in conjunction with electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique and modern data processing allows not only high speed mapping but also hyperspectral analysis. Here, a database is created that contains an EDS spectrum and/or EBSD pattern for each pixel of the SEM image setting the stage for innovative analysis options: The Maximum Pixel Spectrum function [1] synthesizes a spectrum out of the EDS database, consisting of the highest count level found in each spectrum channel. Here, (trace) elements which occur in only one pixel can be detected qualitatively. Areas of similar EDS composition can be made visible with Autophase, a spectroscopic phase detection system. In cases where the crystallographic phase assessment by EBSD is problematic due to pattern similarity, the EDS signal can be used as additional information for phase separation. This paper presents geoscience applications with the QUANTAX system with EDS SDD and EBSD detector using the options described above: (1) Drill core analysis of a Chicxulub impact ejecta sequence from the K/Pg boundary at ODP leg 207 [2] using fast, high resolution element maps. (2) Detection of monazite in granite by the Maximum Pixel Spectrum function. (3) Distribution of elements with overlapping peaks by deconvolution at the example of rare earth elements in zoned monazite. (4) Spectroscopic phase analysis of a sulfate-carbonate-dominated impact matrix at borehole UNAM-7 from the Chicxulub impact crater [3]. (5) EBSD studies with examples of iron meteorites and impact-induced, recrystallized carbonate melts [4]. In addition, continuing technological advances require the elemental analysis of increasingly smaller structures in many

  20. Infrared backscattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohren, Craig F.; Nevitt, Timothy J.; Singham, Shermila Brito

    1989-01-01

    All particles in the atmosphere are not spherical. Moreover, the scattering properties of randomly oriented nonspherical particles are not equivalent to those of spherical particles no matter how the term equivalent is defined. This is especially true for scattering in the backward direction and at the infrared wavelengths at which some atmospheric particles have strong absorption bands. Thus calculations based on Mie theory of infrared backscattering by dry or insoluble atmospheric particles are suspect. To support this assertion, it was noted that peaks in laboratory-measured infrared backscattering spectra show appreciable shifts compared with those calculated using Mie theory. One example is ammonium sulfate. Some success was had in modeling backscattering spectra of ammonium sulfate particles using a simple statistical theory called the continuous distribution of ellipsoids (CDE) theory. In this theory, the scattering properties of an ensemble are calculated. Recently a modified version of this theory was applied to measured spectra of scattering by kaolin particles. The particles were platelike, so the probability distribution of ellipsoidal shapes was chosen to reflect this. As with ammonium sulfate, the wavelength of measured peak backscattering is shifted longward of that predicted by Mie theory.

  1. EBSD analysis of eclogitized rocks form the Marun-Keu complex, Polar Urals, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, P.; Leech, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    The transitions from amphibolite, gabbro, and quartzofeldspathic gneiss to eclogite in the high-pressure Marun-Keu complex in the Polar Urals, Russia, make this complex a good candidate for using mineral chemistries and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) to study the interplay between metamorphism and deformation and more broadly understand the orogenic evolution of eclogites in high-pressure subduction zone complexes. The Marun-Keu complex results from the deep crustal processes during the Uralian Orogeny formed by collision of the east European platform with Siberian-Kazakhian terranes in the Devonian to Triassic. Eclogite-facies rocks containing garnet, omphacite, and rutile occur in the central and southern part of the complex and the blueschist-facies and low-T eclogitization are found in the north part of the complex. Based on Glodny et al. (2004), Rb/Sr protolith ages for the gabbros are about 500 Ma which is near the crystallization age from U-Pb zircon data and the eclogite-facies metamorphism was occurred about 355 Ma. Field and microscopic observation of the rocks from the Marun-Keu complex show a sharp contact between the host rocks (gabbro and amphibolite) and the eclogite-facies rocks. This study will mainly focus on the chemistry and different microstructures of the minerals in the samples PU-62, J12, J26 and PU-34 which are showing the transition of the host rocks to the eclogite. Samples PU-62 and J-26 including garnets, omphacite and quartz, show the complete transformation from the gabbro to eclogite and the corona textures and replaced minerals in these two samples indicate incomplete reactions (Molina et al., 2002). Samples J12 and PU-34 - boudins in a quartz/white mica vein- are showing the transitions between the amphibolites and eclogites. There is a sharp contact between the amphibolite core and the eclogite rim in these samples. The major minerals in the eclogite rim are omphacite, garnet, phengite and quartz and the transitional part

  2. EBSD investigation of the effect of the solidification rate on the nucleation behavior of eutectic components in a hypoeutectic Al-Si-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen Sadrossadat, S.; Johansson, Sten; Peng, Ru Lin

    2012-06-01

    This article represents a study of the influence of the solidification rate on the crystallographic orientation of eutectic components with respect to the primary α-Al in the tested hypoeutectic alloy. Electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) patterns were produced from the Al-Si cast specimens that were solidified with different cooling rates and prepared via ion etch polishing as a complementary method after mechanical polishing. The results indicated a strong orientation relationship between the primary α-Al and eutectic Al phase at all cooling rates. It was also found that the silicon eutectic flakes were heterogeneously nucleated in the interdendritic eutectic liquid. The increase of the cooling rate from 2 to 80 mm/min was found to be effective in lowering the intensity of the relationship between the primary α-Al and eutectic Al phases, and changing the misorientation angle clustering between the primary α-Al and eutectic Si phases in the interval from 41-60° to lower angle intervals.

  3. Electromagnetic backscattering by corner reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, C. A.; Griesser, T.

    1986-01-01

    The Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD), which supplements Geometric Optics (GO), and the Physical Theory of Diffraction (PTD), which supplements Physical Optics (PO), are used to predict the backscatter cross sections of dihedral corner reflectors which have right, obtuse, or acute included angles. These theories allow individual backscattering mechanisms of the dihedral corner reflectors to be identified and provide good agreement with experimental results in the azimuthal plane. The advantages and disadvantages of the geometrical and physical theories are discussed in terms of their accuracy, usefulness, and complexity. Numerous comparisons of analytical results with experimental data are presented. While physical optics alone is more accurate and more useful than geometrical optics alone, the combination of geometrical optics and geometrical diffraction seems to out perform physical optics and physical diffraction when compared with experimental data, especially for acute angle dihedral corner reflectors.

  4. Interface and growth-mode characterization of Ce/Fe and CeH≊2/Fe multilayers by x-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klose, F.; Steins, M.; Kacsich, T.; Felsch, W.

    1993-07-01

    The detailed structural characterization of ion beam sputtered Ce/Fe and CeH≊2/Fe multilayers offers the possibility for a better understanding of their magnetic properties. In the case of the Ce/Fe multilayers the extension of the interface, as one of the most important features, is determined to 5-7 Å by means of Monte Carlo simulations of the small-angle x-ray scattering diagrams. Below a critical thickness of ≊24 Å Fe grows in an amorphous structure. Here the interface extension is enhanced. In contrast all CeH≊2/Fe multilayers show nearly abrupt interfaces. X-ray scattering experiments at higher angles in reflection and transmission mode provide information about the crystal structure, the texture, and the lateral dimensions of the grains in the samples. Depths profiles of the multilayers are generated by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, which confirm the well-ordered periodic structures. Surprisingly indications of an island-like growth mode of the Fe layers onto the Ce and CeH≊2 layers could be resolved by using this procedure.

  5. Visco-plasticity of polycrystalline olivine at high pressure and 900°C: fresh outcomes from high resolution EBSD and electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demouchy, S. A.; Mussi, A.; Barou, F.; Tommasi, A.; Cordier, P.

    2013-12-01

    The rheology of olivine-rich rocks at lithospheric temperatures (<1000°C) remains poorly constrained, in contrast to the extensive experimental dataset on creep of olivine single crystals and aggregates at high temperature (T > 1200°C). Consequently, we have performed tri-axial compression experiments (in a Paterson's press) on two fine-grained polycrystalline olivine (San Carlos olivine) specimens at 900°C, under a confining pressure of 300 MPa. Two dense samples were deformed at constant strain rates of 1.0 × 10-5 s-1 and 3.4 × 10-5 s-1. Mechanical curves show continuous hardening, with a decrease of hardening rate with increasing strain. Both samples failed just before 10% of finite strain and yield final differential stresses of 930 and 1076 MPa. Recovered samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). High resolution EBSD maps (step size 0.15 and 0.2 microns) permit to quantify accurately the microstructure (grain size, shape, aspect ratio, and angle distribution of the grain ellipse relative to the compression axis). Weak crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) developed in the deformed olivine aggregates, where [010] axes are mostly parallel to the compression axis; [100] and [001] axes are more dispersed, but tend to be oriented at high angle to the compression axis. Misorientations across grain boundaries and sub-grain boundaries were analyzed as well, evidencing common subgrain boundaries parallel to (100) and rotations dominantly around [001], that is an ';ideal' tilt boundary of the [100](010) system. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy, involving electron tomography of dislocations has identified dislocations with [100] and [001] Burgers vectors gliding on multiple planes, evidence for cross-slip, and dislocation entanglements. These data permit to better constrain the active deformation mechanisms and slip systems involved in the

  6. Relationships Between the Phase Transformation Kinetics, Texture Evolution, and Microstructure Development in a 304L Stainless Steel Under Biaxial Loading Conditions: Synchrotron X-ray and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Studies

    DOE PAGES

    Cakmak, Ercan; Choo, Hahn; Kang, Jun-Yun; ...

    2015-02-11

    Here we report that the relationships between the martensitic phase transformation kinetics, texture evolution, and the microstructure development in the parent austenite phase were studied for a 304L stainless steel that exhibits the transformation-induced plasticity effect under biaxial loading conditions at ambient temperature. The applied loading paths included: pure torsion, simultaneous biaxial torsion/tension, simultaneous biaxial torsion/compression, and stepwise loading of tension followed by torsion (i.e., first loading by uniaxial tension and then by pure torsion in sequence). Synchrotron X-ray and electron backscatter diffraction techniques were used to measure the evolution of the phase fractions, textures, and microstructures as a functionmore » of the applied strains. The influence of loading character and path on the changes in martensitic phase transformation kinetics is discussed in the context of (1) texture-transformation relationship and the preferred transformation of grains belonging to certain texture components over the others, (2) effects of axial strains on shear band evolutions, and (3) volume changes associated with martensitic transformation.« less

  7. Relationships Between the Phase Transformation Kinetics, Texture Evolution, and Microstructure Development in a 304L Stainless Steel Under Biaxial Loading Conditions: Synchrotron X-ray and Electron Backscatter Diffraction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak, Ercan; Choo, Hahn; Kang, Jun-Yun; Ren, Yang

    2015-02-11

    Here we report that the relationships between the martensitic phase transformation kinetics, texture evolution, and the microstructure development in the parent austenite phase were studied for a 304L stainless steel that exhibits the transformation-induced plasticity effect under biaxial loading conditions at ambient temperature. The applied loading paths included: pure torsion, simultaneous biaxial torsion/tension, simultaneous biaxial torsion/compression, and stepwise loading of tension followed by torsion (i.e., first loading by uniaxial tension and then by pure torsion in sequence). Synchrotron X-ray and electron backscatter diffraction techniques were used to measure the evolution of the phase fractions, textures, and microstructures as a function of the applied strains. The influence of loading character and path on the changes in martensitic phase transformation kinetics is discussed in the context of (1) texture-transformation relationship and the preferred transformation of grains belonging to certain texture components over the others, (2) effects of axial strains on shear band evolutions, and (3) volume changes associated with martensitic transformation.

  8. EBSD characterization of pre-Cambrian deformations in conglomerate pebbles (Sierra de la Demanda, Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puelles, Pablo; Ábalos, Benito; Fernández-Armas, Sergio

    2010-05-01

    Diffraction (EBSD) technique. The identification of quartz c-axis point maxima or girdles and their geometrical relationships with respect to -axis arrangements and pebble foliation traces enabled us to identify the operation of basal and prism- and occasionally prism-[c] intracrystalline slip systems. This points to upper-greenschists and amphibolite facies syn-metamorphic deformations. By contrast, black chert and sandstone pebbles and matrix quartz aggregates lack any LPO. The source area of the conglomerates was likely a pre-Cambrian basement that contained penetratively deformed low- to medium-grade metamorphic rocks. Radiometric dating of this metamorphism has not been accomplished so far though it is known that inherited Precambrian sources in the Iberian Peninsula relate notably to Neoproterozoic (Pan-African and Cadomian) orogens, and to a lesser extent to Paleoproterozoic (1.8-2.1 Ga) or Neoarchean (2.4-2.8 Ga) ones. Neoproterozoic (Cadomian) metamorphism of this grade has only been recognized in SW Iberia. If the fabrics here studied were Cadomian, they might be related to the arc-related igneous suites that have been detected or inferred in other realms of the northern Iberian Massif.

  9. Characterization of the multilayered shell of a limpet, Lottia kogamogai (Mollusca: Patellogastropoda), using SEM-EBSD and FIB-TEM techniques.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michio; Kameda, Jun; Sasaki, Takenori; Saruwatari, Kazuko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Kogure, Toshihiro

    2010-08-01

    The microstructure and its crystallographic aspect of the shell of a limpet, Lottiakogamogai, have been investigated, as the first step to clarify the mechanism of shell formation in limpet. The shell consists of five distinct layers stacked along the shell thickness direction. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with the focused ion beam (FIB) sample preparation technique was primarily adopted, as well as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD). The five layers were termed as M+3, M+2, M+1, M, M-1 from the outside to the inside in previous works, where M means myostracum. The outmost M+3 layer consists of calcite with a "mosaic" structure; granular submicron sub-grains with small-angle grain boundaries often accompanying dislocation arrays. M+2 layer consists of flat prismatic aragonite crystals with a leaf-like cross section, stacked obliquely to the shell surface. It looks that the prismatic crystals are surrounded by organic sheets, forming a compartment structure. M+1 and M-1 layers adopt a crossed lamellar structure consisting of aragonite flat prisms with rectangular cross section. M layer has a prismatic structure of aragonite perpendicular to the shell surface and with irregular shaped cross sections. Distinct organic sheets were not observed between the crystals in M+1, M and M-1 layers. The {110} twins are common in all aragonite M+2, M+1, M and M-1 layers, with the twin boundaries parallel to the prisms. These results for the microstructure of each layer should be considered in the discussion of the formation mechanism of the limpet shell structure.

  10. Three-dimensional EBSD characterization of thermo-mechanical fatigue crack morphology in compacted graphite iron

    SciTech Connect

    Pirgazi, Hadi; Ghodrat, Sepideh; Kestens, Leo A.I.

    2014-04-01

    In cylinder heads made of compacted graphitic iron (CGI), heating and cooling cycles can lead to localized cracking due to thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF). To meticulously characterize the complex crack path morphology of CGI under TMF condition, in relation to microstructural features and to find out how and by which mechanisms the cracks predominantly develop, three-dimensional electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) was employed. Based on the precise quantitative microstructural analysis, it is found that graphite particles not only play a crucial role in the crack initiation, but also are of primary significance for crack propagation, i.e. crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles. Furthermore, the density of graphite particles on the fracture plane is more than double as high as in any other arbitrary plane of the structure. The obtained results did not indicate a particular crystallographic preference of fracture plane, i.e. the crystal plane parallel to the fracture plane was nearly of random orientation. - Highlights: • Crystallographic features of a thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) crack were studied. • Wide-field 3D EBSD is used to characterize the TMF crack morphology. • Data processing was applied on a large length scale of the order of millimeters. • Graphite density in the fracture plane is much higher than any other random plane. • It is revealed that crack growth is enhanced by the presence of graphite particles.

  11. EBSD and TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Teague, Melissa C.; Gorman, Brian P.; Miller, Brandon D.; King, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and studying the irradiation behavior of high burn-up oxide fuel is critical to licensing of future fast breeder reactors. Advancements in experimental techniques and equipment are allowing for new insights into previously irradiated samples. In this work dual column focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscope (SEM) was utilized to prepared transmission electron microscope samples from mixed oxide fuel with a burn-up of 6.7% FIMA. Utilizing the FIB/SEM for preparation resulted in samples with a dose rate of <0.5 mRem/h compared to approximately 1.1 R/h for a traditionally prepared TEM sample. The TEM analysis showed that the sample taken from the cooler rim region of the fuel pellet had approximately 2.5x higher dislocation density than that of the sample taken from the mid-radius due to the lower irradiation temperature of the rim. The dual column FIB/SEM was additionally used to prepared and serially slice approximately 25 um cubes. High quality electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) were collected from the face at each step, showing, for the first time, the ability to obtain EBSD data from high activity irradiated fuel.

  12. Meso-scale anisotropic hydrogen segregation near grain-boundaries in polycrystalline nickel characterized by EBSD/SIMS

    SciTech Connect

    Oudriss, A.; Le Guernic, Solenne; Wang, Zhaoying; Osman Hock, B.; Bouhattate, Jamaa; Conforto, E.; Zhu, Zihua; Li, Dongsheng; Feaugas, Xavier

    2016-02-15

    To study anisotropic hydrogen segregation and diffusion in nickel polycrystalline, Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) are integrated to investigate hydrogen distribution around grain boundaries. Hydrogen distribution in pre-charged samples were correlated with grain boundary character by integrating high-resolution grain microstructure from EBSD inverse pole figure map and low-resolution hydrogen concentration profile map from SIMS. This multimodal imaging instrumentation shows that grain boundaries in nickel can be categorized into two families based on behavior of hydrogen distribution crossing grain boundary: the first one includes random grain boundaries with fast hydrogen diffusivity, showing a sharp gap for hydrogen concentration profile cross the grain boundaries. The second family are special Σ3n grain boundaries with low hydrogen diffusivity, showing a smooth gradient of hydrogen concentration cross the grain boundary. Heterogeneous hydrogen distributions due to grain boundary family revealed by SIMS/EBSD on mesoscale further validate the recent hydrogen permeation data and anisotropic ab-initio calculations in nanoscale. The results highlight the fact that grain boundaries character impacts hydrogen distribution significantly.

  13. Interference phenomena at backscattering by ice crystals of irregular shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konoshonkin, Alexander V.; Kustova, Natalia V.; Borovoi, Anatoli G.

    2015-11-01

    It is shown that light backscattering by hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds is formed by both diffraction and interference phenomena. Diffraction determines the angular width of the backscattering peak and interference produces the interference rings inside the peak. By use of a simplest model for distortion of the pristine hexagonal shape, we show that the shape distortion leads to both oscillations of the scattering (Mueller) matrix within the backscattering peak and to a strong increase of the depolarization, color, and lidar ratios needed for interpretation of lidar signals.

  14. Interference phenomena at backscattering by ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Kustova, Natalia; Konoshonkin, Alexander

    2015-09-21

    It is shown that light backscattering by hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds is formed within the physical-optics approximation by both diffraction and interference phenomena. Diffraction determines the angular width of the backscattering peak and interference produces the interference rings inside the peak. By use of a simple model for distortion of the pristine hexagonal shape, we show that the shape distortion leads to both oscillations of the scattering (Mueller) matrix within the backscattering peak and to a strong increase of the depolarization, color, and lidar ratios needed for interpretation of lidar signals.

  15. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    PubMed Central

    Xu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation. PMID:26937296

  16. Dynamic coherent backscattering mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Zeylikovich, I.; Xu, M.

    2016-02-15

    The phase of multiply scattered light has recently attracted considerable interest. Coherent backscattering is a striking phenomenon of multiple scattered light in which the coherence of light survives multiple scattering in a random medium and is observable in the direction space as an enhancement of the intensity of backscattered light within a cone around the retroreflection direction. Reciprocity also leads to enhancement of backscattering light in the spatial space. The random medium behaves as a reciprocity mirror which robustly converts a diverging incident beam into a converging backscattering one focusing at a conjugate spot in space. Here we first analyze theoretically this coherent backscattering mirror (CBM) phenomenon and then demonstrate the capability of CBM compensating and correcting both static and dynamic phase distortions occurring along the optical path. CBM may offer novel approaches for high speed dynamic phase corrections in optical systems and find applications in sensing and navigation.

  17. EBSD observations of dynamic recrystallization mechanisms in ice.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montagnat, Maurine; Chauve, Thomas; Barou, Fabrice; Beausir, Benoît; Fressengeas, Claude; Tommasi, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) strongly affects the evolution of microstructure (grain size and shape) and texture (crystal preferred orientation) in materials during deformation at high temperature. Since texturing leads to anisotropic physical properties, predicting the effect of DRX in metals is essential for industrial applications, in rocks for interpreting geophysical data and modeling geodynamic flows, or in ice for predicting ice sheet flow and climate evolution. Owing to its high viscoplastic anisotropy, ice has long been considered as a "model material". This happens to be particularly true in the case of the understanding of the fundamental of DRX mechanisms as they occur under a relatively easily controlled environment. Creep compression experiments were performed on polycrystalline ice samples in the laboratory in order to observe the evolution of the fabrics and microstructures during DRX. During the tests, performed at temperatures of -5°C and -7°C, under 0.8 MPa compressive stress, dynamic recrystallization was initiated after 1% macroscopic strain and could be followed up to 18% strain on separated samples. Fabrics and microstructures were analysed post-mortem using an Automatic Ice Texture Analyser (AITA, Russell-Head and Wilson 2001) and EBSD measurements with the Crystal Probe of Géosciences Montpellier. Both techniques enable high resolution observations, both in space and orientation (5 to 50 microns, EBSD: 0.7° - AITA: 3°), which is new for DRX observations in ice. While AITA provides only the c-axis orientations, EBSD provides full orientations (c- and a-axes). In particular, we could access to an estimate of a relative dislocation density (from the Nye tensor obtained with EBSD) and its evolution with strain. Fabric evolution with strain is very similar to what was measured by Jacka and Maccagnan (1984) with a strong strengthening toward a few maxima for c- and a-axes. The c-axes maxima are oriented about 30° from the compression

  18. A Coupled EBSD/EDS Method to Determine the Primary- and Secondary-Alpha Textures in Titanium Alloys With Duplex Microstructures (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    primary and secondary alpha in micrographs and thus to correlate microstructural features and texture data [3- 6 ]. For instance, Germain, et al. [3, 4 ...Following electropolishing , the sample was mounted 7/3/2007 6 on the tilting stage inside an XL30 field-emission-gun scanning-electron-microscope (FEG...AFRL-RX-WP-TP-2008-4338 A COUPLED EBSD/EDS METHOD TO DETERMINE THE PRIMARY–AND SECONDARY–ALPHA TEXTURES IN TITANIUM ALLOYS WITH DUPLEX

  19. EBSD and EDX analyses of a multiphase glass-ceramic obtained by crystallizing an yttrium aluminosilicate glass.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Ashkan; Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Rüssel, Christian

    2013-09-11

    A glass with the mol % composition 23.82 Y2O3·39.82 Al2O3·28.50 SiO2·2.91AlF3·4.95 ZrO2 doped with 2 mol % CeF3 is crystallized at 1250 °C for 20 h. The crystallized samples are studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), the SEM-based methods EBSD and EDX, as well as fluorescence microscopy. Six crystalline phases are detected in the residual glass including alumina, YAG, Y-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and three different yttrium silicates of the composition Y2Si2O7. Chemistry-assisted indexing (ChI) is successfully applied to separate YAG and YSZ in EBSD-scans. YAG displays polygon as well as dendritic growth. Some crystals show both mechanisms at opposite ends, indicating that the growth mechanism is influenced by the chemistry of the surrounding glass matrix.

  20. NOAA backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    In the past year, NOAA has measured and analyzed another year's worth of backscatter over Boulder, CO. The average profile was computed from 80 satellite observations of backscatter spread throughout the year, using NOAA's CO2 coherent lidar operating at a wavelength of 10.59 microns. The seasonal averages show a familiar trend (highest backscattering in spring, perhaps due to Asian dust or biomass burning, and lowest backscattering in fall). The 1990 average profile was not significantly different from the 1988 or 1989 profiles, except that it displays a slight increase in the upper troposphere, perhaps due to the Redoubt Volcano. The NOAA's backscatter processing program (BETA) was refined to enable the calculation of gaseous absorption effects based on rawinsonde measurements, as well as using atmospheric models. NOAA participated in two intercomparisons of aerosol measuring instruments near Boulder, called FRLAB (Front Range Lidar, Aircraft, and Balloon Experiment). Considerable effort was also put into developing a multiagency science proposal to NASA headquarters to work with both JPL and NASA-Marshall to produce an airborne Doppler lidar facility for the DC-8.

  1. Backscattering measurements of micron-sized spherical particles.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Brendan M; Heinson, Yuli W; Maughan, Justin B; Chakrabarti, Amitabha; Sorensen, Christopher M

    2016-04-20

    An apparatus was designed and assembled to measure scattered light in the range of 180°±6° where enhanced backscattering, the cause of a glory, occurs. The apparatus was calibrated and tested using Fraunhofer circular aperture diffraction, angle of incidence correction, and a diffuse reflector. Theory indicates that backscattering is strongly dependent on particle size, refractive index, and shape. Experimental measurements from polystyrene latex spheres of two sizes and water droplets showed good agreement with Mie theory, but also indicated the extreme sensitivity of the backscattering to particle parameters. The results presented should have use in the fields of particle scattering, particle metrology, and LIDAR.

  2. SEM-EBSD based Realistic Modeling and Crystallographic Homogenization FE Analyses of LDH Formability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Nakamachi, Eiji; Ngoc Tam, Nguyen; Nakamura, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Morimoto, Hideo

    2007-05-17

    Homogenization algorithm is introduced to the elastic/crystalline viscoplastic finite element (FE) procedure to develop multi-scale analysis code to predict the formability of sheet metal in macro scale, and simultaneously the crystal texture and hardening evolutions in micro scale. The isotropic and kinematical hardening lows are employed in the crystalline plasticity constitutive equation. For the multi-scale structure, two scales are considered. One is a microscopic polycrystal structure and the other a macroscopic elastic plastic continuum. We measure crystal morphologies by using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), and define a three dimensional representative volume element (RVE) of micro ploycrystal structure, which satisfy the periodicity condition of crystal orientation distribution. Since nonlinear multi-scale FE analysis requires large computation time, development of parallel computing technique is needed. To realize the parallel analysis on PC cluster system, the dynamic explicit FE formulations are employed. Applying the domain partitioning technique to FE mesh of macro continuum, homogenized stresses based on micro crystal structures are computed in parallel without solving simultaneous linear equation. The parallel FEM code is applied to simulate the limit dome height (LDH) test problem and hemispherical cup deep drawing problem of aluminum alloy AL6022, mild steel DQSK, high strength steel HSLA, and dual phase steel DP600 sheet metals. The localized distribution of thickness strain and the texture evolution are obtained.

  3. GLOBE backscatter - Climatologies and mission results. [Global Backscatter Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    The Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) goals require intensive study of the global climatology of atmospheric aerosol backscatter at IR wavelengths. Airborne and ground-based lidars have been developed to measure atmospheric backscatter profiles at CO2 laser wavelengths. Descriptions of the calibration techniques and selected measurement results are presented.

  4. THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.

    SciTech Connect

    VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

    2004-10-16

    Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

  5. Application of combined EBSD and 3D-SEM technique on crystallographic facet analysis of steel at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Mohseni, P; Solberg, J K; Karlsen, M; Akselsen, O M; Ostby, E

    2013-07-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction has been increasingly used to identify the crystallographic planes and orientation of cleavage facets with respect to the rolling direction in fracture surfaces. The crystallographic indices of cleavage planes can be determined either directly from the fracture surface or indirectly from metallographic sections perpendicular to the plane of the fracture surface. A combination of electron backscatter diffraction and 3D scanning electron microscopy imaging technique has been modified to determine crystallographic facet orientations. The main purpose of this work has been to identify the macroscopic crystallographic orientations of cleavage facets in the fracture surfaces of weld heat affected zones in a well-known steel fractured at low temperatures. The material used for the work was an American Petroleum Institute (API) X80 grade steel developed for applications at low temperatures, and typical heat affected zone microstructures were obtained by carrying out weld thermal simulation. The fracture toughness was measured at different temperatures (0°C, -30°C, -60°C and -90°C) by using Crack Tip Opening Displacement testing. Fracture surfaces and changes in microstructure were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy. Crystallographic orientations were identified by electron backscatter diffraction, indirectly from a polished section perpendicular to the major fracture surface of the samples. Computer assisted 3D imaging was used to measure the angles between the cleavage facets and the adjacent polished surface, and then these angles were combined with electron backscatter diffraction measurements to determine the macroscopic crystallographic planes of the facets. The crystallographic indices of the macroscopic cleavage facet planes were identified to be {100}, {110}, {211} and {310} at all temperatures.

  6. An EBSD investigation of cryogenically-rolled Cu–30%Zn brass

    SciTech Connect

    Konkova, T.; Mironov, S.; Korznikov, A.; Korznikova, G.; Myshlyaev, M.M.; Semiatin, S.L.

    2015-03-15

    Electron backscatter diffraction was used to study grain structure development in heavily cryogenically-rolled Cu–30%Zn brass. The produced microstructure was found to be very inhomogeneous. At a relatively coarse scale, it consisted of texture bands having crystallographic orientations close to the α- and γ-fibers. The texture bands contained internal structure comprising shear bands, mechanical twins, and low-angle boundaries. Such features were more pronounced within the γ-fiber, and this resulted in a heterogeneous ultrafine grain structure. The cryogenic rolling was concluded to be not straightforward for production of nanocrystalline grain structure in Cu–30%Zn brass. - Highlights: • Cryogenic rolling produced an inhomogeneous ultrafine-grained microstructure. • Grain refinement was mainly related with twinning and shear banding. • Grain refinement preferentially occurred in (111) fiber texture.

  7. Aerosol backscatter studies supporting LAWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry

    1989-01-01

    Optimized Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS) algorithm for low backscatter conditions was developed. The algorithm converts backscatter intensity measurements from focused continuous-wave (CW) airborne Doppler lidar into backscatter coefficients. The performance of optimized algorithm under marginal backscatter signal conditions was evaluated. The 10.6 micron CO2 aerosol backscatter climatologies were statistically analyzed. Climatologies reveal clean background aerosol mode near 10(exp -10)/kg/sq m/sr (mixing ratio units) through middle and upper troposhere, convective mode associated with planetary boundary layer convective activity, and stratospheric mode associated with volcanically-generated aerosols. Properties of clean background mode are critical to design and simulation studies of Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), a MSFC facility Instrument on the Earth Observing System (Eos). Previous intercomparisons suggested correlation between aerosol backscatter at CO2 wavelength and water vapor. Field measurements of backscatter profiles with MSFC ground-based Doppler lidar system (GBDLS) were initiated in late FY-88 to coincide with independent program of local rawinsonde releases and overflights by Multi-spectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS), a multi-channel infrared radiometer capable of measuring horizontal and vertical moisture distributions. Design and performance simulation studies for LAWS would benefit from the existence of a relationship between backscatter and water vapor.

  8. Backscattering of agglomerate particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubko, Evgenij; Ovcharenko, Andrey; Bondarenko, Sergey; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Scotto, Cathy S.; Merritt, Charles; Hart, Matthew B.; Eversole, Jay D.; Videen, Gorden W.

    2004-12-01

    We examine how aggregation affects the light-scattering signatures, especially the polarization in the near-backward-scattering direction. We use the discrete dipole approximation (DDA) to study the backscatter of agglomerate particles consisting of oblong monomers. We examine the effects of monomer number and packing structure on the resulting negative polarization branch at small phase angle. We find large a dependence on the orientation of the monomers within the agglomerate and a smaller dependence on the number of monomers, suggesting that the mechanism producing the negative polarization minimum depends strongly on the interactions between the individual monomers. We also examine experimental measurements of substrates composed of biological cells. We find that the light-scattering signatures in the backward direction are not only different for different spore species, but for spores that have been prepared using different methodologies. These signatures are reproducible in different substrates composed of the spores from the same batches.

  9. Advancing FIB assisted 3D EBSD using a static sample setup.

    PubMed

    Guyon, Julien; Gey, Nathalie; Goran, Daniel; Chalal, Smail; Pérez-Willard, Fabián

    2016-02-01

    A new setup for automatic 3D EBSD data collection in static mode has been developed using a conventional FIB-SEM system. This setup requires no stage or sample movements between the FIB milling and EBSD mapping. Its capabilities were tested experimentally on a coherent twin boundary of an INCONEL sample. Our result demonstrates that this static setup holds many advantages in terms of data throughput and quality as compared with other ones requiring stage/sample movements. The most important advantages are the better slice alignment and an improved orientation precision in 3D space, both being prerequisite for a reliable grain boundary characterization.

  10. EBSDinterp 1.0: A MATLAB® Program to Perform Microstructurally Constrained Interpolation of EBSD Data.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Mark A

    2015-08-01

    EBSDinterp is a graphic user interface (GUI)-based MATLAB® program to perform microstructurally constrained interpolation of nonindexed electron backscatter diffraction data points. The area available for interpolation is restricted using variations in pattern quality or band contrast (BC). Areas of low BC are not available for interpolation, and therefore cannot be erroneously filled by adjacent grains "growing" into them. Points with the most indexed neighbors are interpolated first and the required number of neighbors is reduced with each successive round until a minimum number of neighbors is reached. Further iterations allow more data points to be filled by reducing the BC threshold. This method ensures that the best quality points (those with high BC and most neighbors) are interpolated first, and that the interpolation is restricted to grain interiors before adjacent grains are grown together to produce a complete microstructure. The algorithm is implemented through a GUI, taking advantage of MATLAB®'s parallel processing toolbox to perform the interpolations rapidly so that a variety of parameters can be tested to ensure that the final microstructures are robust and artifact-free. The software is freely available through the CSIRO Data Access Portal (doi:10.4225/08/5510090C6E620) as both a compiled Windows executable and as source code.

  11. Investigation of nucleation processes during dynamic recrystallization of ice using cryo-EBSD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauve, T.; Montagnat, M.; Barou, F.; Hidas, K.; Tommasi, A.; Mainprice, D.

    2017-02-01

    Nucleation mechanisms occurring during dynamic recrystallization play a crucial role in the evolution of microstructures and textures during high temperature deformation. In polycrystalline ice, the strong viscoplastic anisotropy induces high strain heterogeneities between grains which control the recrystallization mechanisms. Here, we study the nucleation mechanisms occurring during creep tests performed on polycrystalline columnar ice at high temperature and stress (T=-5°C;σ=0.5 MPa) by post-mortem analyses of deformation microstructures using cryogenic electron backscatter diffraction. The columnar geometry of the samples enables discrimination of the nuclei from the initial grains. Various nucleation mechanisms are deduced from the analysis of the nuclei relations with the dislocation sub-structures within grains and at grain boundaries. Tilt sub-grain boundaries and kink bands are the main structures responsible for development of polygonization and mosaic sub-structures. Nucleation by bulging at serrated grain boundaries is also an efficient nucleation mechanism near the grain boundaries where strain incompatibilities are high. Observation of nuclei with orientations not related to the `parent' ones suggests the possibility of `spontaneous' nucleation driven by the relaxation of the dislocation-related internal stress field. The complexity of the nucleation mechanisms observed here emphasizes the impact of stress and strain heterogeneities on dynamic recrystallization mechanisms. This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  12. Investigation of nucleation processes during dynamic recrystallization of ice using cryo-EBSD.

    PubMed

    Chauve, T; Montagnat, M; Barou, F; Hidas, K; Tommasi, A; Mainprice, D

    2017-02-13

    Nucleation mechanisms occurring during dynamic recrystallization play a crucial role in the evolution of microstructures and textures during high temperature deformation. In polycrystalline ice, the strong viscoplastic anisotropy induces high strain heterogeneities between grains which control the recrystallization mechanisms. Here, we study the nucleation mechanisms occurring during creep tests performed on polycrystalline columnar ice at high temperature and stress (T=-5°C;σ=0.5 MPa) by post-mortem analyses of deformation microstructures using cryogenic electron backscatter diffraction. The columnar geometry of the samples enables discrimination of the nuclei from the initial grains. Various nucleation mechanisms are deduced from the analysis of the nuclei relations with the dislocation sub-structures within grains and at grain boundaries. Tilt sub-grain boundaries and kink bands are the main structures responsible for development of polygonization and mosaic sub-structures. Nucleation by bulging at serrated grain boundaries is also an efficient nucleation mechanism near the grain boundaries where strain incompatibilities are high. Observation of nuclei with orientations not related to the 'parent' ones suggests the possibility of 'spontaneous' nucleation driven by the relaxation of the dislocation-related internal stress field. The complexity of the nucleation mechanisms observed here emphasizes the impact of stress and strain heterogeneities on dynamic recrystallization mechanisms.This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'.

  13. 3D Backscatter Imaging System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D. Clark (Inventor); Whitaker, Ross (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Systems and methods for imaging an object using backscattered radiation are described. The imaging system comprises both a radiation source for irradiating an object that is rotationally movable about the object, and a detector for detecting backscattered radiation from the object that can be disposed on substantially the same side of the object as the source and which can be rotationally movable about the object. The detector can be separated into multiple detector segments with each segment having a single line of sight projection through the object and so detects radiation along that line of sight. Thus, each detector segment can isolate the desired component of the backscattered radiation. By moving independently of each other about the object, the source and detector can collect multiple images of the object at different angles of rotation and generate a three dimensional reconstruction of the object. Other embodiments are described.

  14. Photoelectron backscattering in vacuum phototubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubsandorzhiev, B. K.; Vasiliev, R. V.; Vyatchin, Y. E.; Shaibonov, B. A. J.

    2006-11-01

    In this article we describe results of studies of a photoelectron backscattering effect in vacuum phototubes: classical photomultipliers (PMT) and hybrid phototubes (PH). Late pulses occurring in PMTs are attributed to the photoelectron backscattering and distinguished from pulses due to an anode glow effect. The late pulses are measured in a number of PMTs and HPs with various photocathode sizes covering 1 50 cm range and different types of the first dynode materials and construction designs. It is shown that the late pulses are a generic feature of all vacuum photodetectors—PMTs and PHs—and they do not deteriorate dramatically amplitude and timing responses of vacuum phototubes.

  15. Effect of the cortex on ultrasonic backscatter measurements of cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeister, Brent K; Holt, Andrew P; Kaste, Sue C

    2011-10-07

    Ultrasonic backscatter techniques offer a promising new approach for detecting changes in bone caused by osteoporosis. However, several challenges impede clinical implementation of backscatter techniques. This study examines how the dense outer surface of bone (the cortex) affects backscatter measurements of interior regions of porous (cancellous) bone tissue. Fifty-two specimens of bone were prepared from 13 human femoral heads so that the same region of cancellous bone could be ultrasonically interrogated through the cortex or along directions that avoided the cortex. Backscatter signals were analyzed over a frequency range of 0.8-3.0 MHz to determine two ultrasonic parameters: apparent integrated backscatter (AIB) and frequency slope of apparent backscatter (FSAB). The term 'apparent' means that the parameters are sensitive to the frequency-dependent effects of diffraction and attenuation. Significant (p < 0.001) changes in AIB and FSAB indicated that measurements through the cortex decreased the apparent backscattered power and increased the frequency dependence of the power. However, the cortex did not affect the correlation of AIB and FSAB with the x-ray bone mineral density of the specimens. This suggests that results from many previous in vitro backscatter studies of specimens of purely cancellous bone may be extrapolated with greater confidence to in vivo conditions.

  16. Investigation of SIBM driven recrystallization in alpha Zirconium based on EBSD data and Monte Carlo modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedrychowski, M.; Bacroix, B.; Salman, O. U.; Tarasiuk, J.; Wronski, S.

    2015-08-01

    The work focuses on the influence of moderate plastic deformation on subsequent partial recrystallization of hexagonal zirconium (Zr702). In the considered case, strain induced boundary migration (SIBM) is assumed to be the dominating recrystallization mechanism. This hypothesis is analyzed and tested in detail using experimental EBSD-OIM data and Monte Carlo computer simulations. An EBSD investigation is performed on zirconium samples, which were channel-die compressed in two perpendicular directions: normal direction (ND) and transverse direction (TD) of the initial material sheet. The maximal applied strain was below 17%. Then, samples were briefly annealed in order to achieve a partly recrystallized state. Obtained EBSD data were analyzed in terms of texture evolution associated with a microstructural characterization, including: kernel average misorientation (KAM), grain orientation spread (GOS), twinning, grain size distributions, description of grain boundary regions. In parallel, Monte Carlo Potts model combined with experimental microstructures was employed in order to verify two main recrystallization scenarios: SIBM driven growth from deformed sub-grains and classical growth of recrystallization nuclei. It is concluded that simulation results provided by the SIBM model are in a good agreement with experimental data in terms of texture as well as microstructural evolution.

  17. Diffraction studies for microcellular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, M. F.

    The introduction of Global System for Mobility (GSM) systems, with the use of microcells, has shifted the emphasis in mobile radio propagation modeling towards deterministic models. These models will become more and more relevant with the development of 3-dimensional building databases for most large cities. Ultimately 3-dimensional methods are needed in order to model combined diffraction effects around the sides and over the top of a building, and also to account for backscattering from nearby buildings. However an accurate 2-dimensional model can be very useful for assessment of multiple diffraction effects in a vertical plane. Renewed interest in accurate diffraction models has led to further developments of parabolic equation techniques. In this paper, we present 2-dimensional results obtained with a wide-angle PE code, and some examples of current 3D capabilities. The methods are immediately applicable to the planning of microcellular networks.

  18. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited).

    PubMed

    Moody, J D; Datte, P; Krauter, K; Bond, E; Michel, P A; Glenzer, S H; Divol, L; Niemann, C; Suter, L; Meezan, N; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, R; London, R; Kilkenny, J; Wallace, R; Kline, J L; Knittel, K; Frieders, G; Golick, B; Ross, G; Widmann, K; Jackson, J; Vernon, S; Clancy, T

    2010-10-01

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of ∼15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie.

  19. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, T.G. Jr.

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  20. Backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    McRae, Jr., Thomas G.

    1985-01-01

    A video imaging system for detecting hazardous gas leaks. Visual displays of invisible gas clouds are produced by radiation augmentation of the field of view of an imaging device by radiation corresponding to an absorption line of the gas to be detected. The field of view of an imager is irradiated by a laser. The imager receives both backscattered laser light and background radiation. When a detectable gas is present, the backscattered laser light is highly attenuated, producing a region of contrast or shadow on the image. A flying spot imaging system is utilized to synchronously irradiate and scan the area to lower laser power requirements. The imager signal is processed to produce a video display.

  1. Higher order diffractions from a circular disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsland, Diane P.; Balanis, Constantine A.; Brumley, Stephen A.

    1987-01-01

    The backscattering from a circular disk is analyzed using the geometrical theory of diffraction. First-, second-, and third-order diffractions are included in the hard polarization analysis, while first-, second-, and third-order slope diffractions are included for soft polarization. Improvements in the prediction of the monostatic radar cross section over previous works are noted. For hard polarization, an excellent agreement is exhibited between experimental and theoretical results, while a very good agreement is noted for soft polarization. To further improve the soft polarization results for wide angles, a model for the creeping wave or circulating current on the edge of the disk is obtained and used to find an additional component of the backscattered field. The addition of this component significantly improves the results for wide angles, leading to excellent agreement for soft polarization also. An axial-caustic correction method using equivalent currents is also included in the analysis.

  2. Dislocation Content Measured Via 3D HR-EBSD Near a Grain Boundary in an AlCu Oligocrystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruggles, Timothy; Hochhalter, Jacob; Homer, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between dislocations and grain boundaries are poorly understood and crucial to mesoscale plasticity modeling. Much of our understanding of dislocation-grain boundary interaction comes from atomistic simulations and TEM studies, both of which are extremely limited in scale. High angular resolution EBSD-based continuum dislocation microscopy provides a way of measuring dislocation activity at length scales and accuracies relevant to crystal plasticity, but it is limited as a two-dimensional technique, meaning the character of the grain boundary and the complete dislocation activity is difficult to recover. However, the commercialization of plasma FIB dual-beam microscopes have made 3D EBSD studies all the more feasible. The objective of this work is to apply high angular resolution cross correlation EBSD to a 3D EBSD data set collected by serial sectioning in a FIB to characterize dislocation interaction with a grain boundary. Three dimensional high angular resolution cross correlation EBSD analysis was applied to an AlCu oligocrystal to measure dislocation densities around a grain boundary. Distortion derivatives associated with the plasma FIB serial sectioning were higher than expected, possibly due to geometric uncertainty between layers. Future work will focus on mitigating the geometric uncertainty and examining more regions of interest along the grain boundary to glean information on dislocation-grain boundary interaction.

  3. EBSD coupled to SEM in situ annealing for assessing recrystallization and grain growth mechanisms in pure tantalum.

    PubMed

    Kerisit, C; Logé, R E; Jacomet, S; Llorca, V; Bozzolo, N

    2013-06-01

    An in situ annealing stage has been developed in-house and integrated in the chamber of a Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with an Electron BackScattered Diffraction system. Based on the Joule effect, this device can reach the temperature of 1200°C at heating rates up to 100°C/s, avoiding microstructural evolutions during heating. A high-purity tantalum deformed sample has been annealed at variable temperature in the range 750°C-1030°C, and classical mechanisms of microstructural evolutions such as recrystallization and grain coarsening phenomena have been observed. Quantitative measurements of grain growth rates provide an estimate of the mean grain boundary mobility, which is consistent with the value estimated from physical parameters reported for that material. In situ annealing therefore appears to be suited for complementing bulk measurements at relatively high temperatures, in the context of recrystallization and grain growth in such a single-phase material.

  4. Sub-structure characterization of experimentally and naturally deformed ice using cryo-EBSD.

    PubMed

    Piazolo, S; Montagnat, M; Blackford, J R

    2008-06-01

    In this work, we present first results of high-resolution EBSD for ice with a spatial resolution down to 0.25 microm. The study highlights the potential of EBSD to significantly increase our understanding of deformation and annealing processes associated with the build-up of internal stresses due to strain incompatibility between grains. Two polycrystalline samples were analyzed: a natural sample of polar ice from the Vostok ice core (Antarctica) and an experimentally deformed sample of laboratory grown columnar ice. In summary, we observe the following: (1) inhomogeneous deformation through the grains is translated into lattice distortions that are concentrated mainly at grain boundaries and triple junctions (natural and experimental sample), (2) these distortions may be continuous (natural and experimental sample) or may form distinct tilt boundaries and sub-grains of 10-50 microm size (experimental sample). These form mainly by rearrangement of basal edge dislocations into low-energy configurations (i.e. tilt boundaries) in various prism planes. Continuous lattice distortions originate from screw or mixed edge and screw dislocations lying in the basal plane.

  5. Documenting Self Organization in Quartz: A combined EBSD and Laser Mass Spectrometer Investigation of Brazilian Agate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenk, H.; Grimsich, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    In this project two Brazilian agates were selected for study based upon their complex and variable crystallographic textures. In standard optical microscopy the samples show a variety of repeated oscillatory structures which develop in a regular fashion from rim-to-core as the agate crystallized. The patterns are thought to represent a cyclic form of self organization. The much work has been done, the mechanisms that control this system remain poorly understood. EBSD mapping of these structures offers significant new insight into the growth textures and crystallographic growth orientations. Historically, these structures have been categorized by relative c-axis orientation, representing alternating length fast (LF) and length slow (LS) domains. Detailed rim-to-core EBSD texture analysis shows oscillatory structures develop in pairs of preferred growth orientations. Our samples show a progression from LF (110) dominated growth, developing into LF-LS (110)-(011) oscillation and then to LS-LS (011)-(001) oscillation. The LS-LS oscillations are essentially invisible in polarized light, but dramatic and clear in EBSD scans. Each oscillation period lasts 10-20 cycles and individual cycles are on the order of 70-100 microns. Classic 'chevron' (twisted fiber) extinction bands follow and are uniquely characterized by a mixture of LF-LF (100)-(110) growth orientations. Chemical information linked to these crystallographic structures was obtained using laser ablation mass spectrometry. A continuous laser transect across the agate from rim-to-core provides spatially resolved trace element analysis at ppb sensitivity. 50 elements were analyzed. Preliminary results show well defined and in-phase oscillations of Al, Na and K in the areas that have oscillatory growth (both LF-LS (110)-(011) and LS-LS (011)-(001) oscillations), and not in other areas. Al concentrations are much lower and show no oscillatory behavior in later large macro-Qtz grains near the agate interior. One

  6. Beta Backscatter Measures the Hardness of Rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrissey, E. T.; Roje, F. N.

    1986-01-01

    Nondestructive testing method determines hardness, on Shore scale, of room-temperature-vulcanizing silicone rubber. Measures backscattered beta particles; backscattered radiation count directly proportional to Shore hardness. Test set calibrated with specimen, Shore hardness known from mechanical durometer test. Specimen of unknown hardness tested, and radiation count recorded. Count compared with known sample to find Shore hardness of unknown.

  7. Discovering New Minerals at Micron to Nanoscales: A SEM-EBSD-EPMA Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C.

    2014-12-01

    With high-resolution analytical field emission scanning electron microscope and electron probe microanalyzer, we are now capable to characterize Earth and planetary materials easier and faster down to nanoscales. Nanofeatures (such as inclusions, exsolution, zonation, coatings, pores) in minerals and rocks are being discovered. Nanominerals and nanoparticles are being revealed. New minerals and new materials are being identified. During our ongoing nanomineralogy investigation since 2006, more than twenty five new minerals have been discovered at micron to nanoscales. Fifteen of them are from the Allende meteorite, including new refractory minerals like allendeite, hexamolybdenum, tistarite, panguite and kangite, which are among the first solids formed in our solar system. Each of the new extraterrestrial minerals reveals distinctive forming environments, providing insights into nebula or parent-body processes. Presented here are a few nanomineralogy projects demonstrating how to find and characterize new minerals with an integrated SEM-EBSD-EPMA approach.

  8. Fundamentals of Acoustic Backscatter Imagery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-20

    pressure, I,, of 1 /iPa, corresponds to 0.67 x 10- 8 Wim2. Assuming spherical spreading, the one meter distance reference frame, and the definition of dB (Eq...then be approximated by an infinite series Fundamentals ofAcoustic Backscatter Imagery 11 W(r) = Wm (r) + X Fjsc (r) j=O where "tic(r) is the incident...f( x ,y, Z)Iz=h(xy) = 0 f( x , y, z)I z=h( x ,y)= f( x , y, Z) I z o + h di+ h 2 d2f +zz z= The function ftx,y,z) can represent, for example, the stress

  9. Mobile spectrometer measures radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gogineni, S.; Moore, R. K.; Onstott, R. G.; Kim, Y. S.; Bushnell, D.

    1984-01-01

    The present article is concerned with a helicopter-borne spectrometer (Heloscat), which has been developed to permit high-quality scattering measurements from a mobile platform at remote sites. The term 'spectrometer' referes to a class of scatterometers. The term 'scatterometer' is employed to denote a specialized radar for measuring scattering coefficients as a function of angle. A spectrometer, on the other hand, is a scatterometer which can measure backscatter at several frequencies. The Heloscat system is discussed, taking into account two antennas, RF hardware, and an externally mounted pendulum for angle encoding. A dual-antenna configuration is used for cross-polarized measurements, while a single-antenna system is used for like-polarized measurements. Attention is also given to oscillator characteristics, efficient data handling, and aspects of calibration.

  10. [Backscattering spectrum analysis of nonspheroid soot particle].

    PubMed

    Xing, Jian; Sun, Xiao-gang; Yuan, Gui-bin; Qi, Xu; Tang, Hong

    2010-08-01

    In the process of measuring soot concentration and grain diameter, the backscattering spectrum of soot particle model was calculated to ascertain and analyze main effective factor of backscattering intensity. In the present paper, ellipsoid, column and generalized Chebyshev, three nonspheroid models, were selected according to micrograph of practical soot particle, which aims to simulate practical soot particle with equivalent diameter of about 1 microm. T-matrix method was used to calculate backscattering spectrum of the three nonspheriod models, and the main effective factor curves of intensity were obtained, too. Both numerical computer simulations and experimental results illustrate that nonspheroid particle backscattering intensity is stronger than that of spheroid particle in the visible/infrared spectrum band, especially for generalized Chebyshev model, whose backscattering intensity can be even 3.5 times higher than that of forward scattering. Meanwhile, the absorbency non-spheroid particle (complex refractive index m = 1.57 - 0.56i) backscattering intensity is stronger than that of non-absorbency nonspheriod particle (complex refractive index m = 1.57 - 0.001i). Furthermore, with the increase in particle equivalent radius, the light source wavelength also needs to be increase to obtain more light intensity information. The backscattering light spectrum information provides a reasonable basis for selecting light source and measure angle.

  11. Photoelectron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadley, Charles S.

    1987-01-01

    The use of core-level photoelectron diffraction for structural studies of surfaces and epitaxial overlayers is discussed. Photoelectron diffraction is found to provide several direct and rather unique types of structural information, including the sites and positions of adsorbed atoms; the orientations of small molecules or fragments bound to surfaces; the orientations, layer thicknesses, vertical lattice constants, and degrees of short-range order of epitaxial or partially-epitaxial overlayers; and the presence of short-range spin order in magnetic materials. Specific systems considered are the reaction of oxygen with Ni(001), the growth of epitaxial Cu on Ni(001), the well-defined test case S on Ni(001), and short-range spin order in the antiferromagnet KMnF3. A rather straightforward single scattering cluster (SSC) model also proves capable of quantitatively describing such data, particularly for near-surface species and with corrections for spherical-wave scattering effects and correlated vibrational motion. Promising new directions in such studies also include measurements with high angular resolution and the expanded use of synchrotron radiation.

  12. Photon diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodge, John

    2009-11-01

    In current light models, a particle-like model of light is inconsistent with diffraction observations. A model of light is proposed wherein photon inferences are combined with the cosmological scalar potential model (SPM). That the photon is a surface with zero surface area in the travel direction is inferred from the Michelson-Morley experiment. That the photons in slits are mathematically treated as a linear antenna array (LAA) is inferred from the comparison of the transmission grating interference pattern and the single slit diffraction pattern. That photons induce a LAA wave into the plenum is inferred from the fractal model. Similarly, the component of the photon (the hod) is treated as a single antenna radiating a potential wave into the plenum. That photons are guided by action on the surface of the hod is inferred from the SPM. The plenum potential waves are a real field (not complex) that forms valleys, consistent with the pilot waves of the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics. Therefore, the Afshar experiment result is explained, supports Bohm, and falsifies Copenhagen. The papers may be viewed at http://web.citcom.net/˜scjh/.

  13. Cyclone diagnostics. [rainfall estimation, backscatter, and lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A GOES IR rainfall estimation algorithm was completed and verified. The technique was applied to the South Pacific convergent zone. The NASA earth observation mission series is discussed briefly. Backscatter was investigated using 10.6 micron coherent lidar.

  14. C-band backscattering from corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.; Biehl, L. L.

    1991-01-01

    A frequency-modulatad continuous-wave C-band (4.8 GHz) scatterometer was mounted on an aerial lift truck, and backscatter coefficients of corn (Zea mays L.) were acquired as functions of polarizations, view angles, and row directions. As phytomass and green-leaf area index increased, the backscatter also increased. Near anthesis, when the canopies were fully developed, the major scattering elements were located in the upper 1 m of the 2.8 m tall canopy and little backscatter was measured below that level for view angles of 30 deg or greater. C-band backscatter data could provide information to monitor tillage operations at small view zenith angles and vegetation at large view zenith angles.

  15. Coherent microwave backscatter of natural snowpacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linlor, W. I.; Angelakos, D. J.; Clapp, F. D.; Smith, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The backscatter of natural snowpacks was measured using a swept-frequency system operating from 5.8 to 8.0 GHz. Snow layering produced sequences of maxima and minima in backscatter intensity, with typical peak-to-valley ratios of 15 db. Wetness produced in the upper portion of the snowpack by solar heat input enhanced the effect of layering. The layer response persisted for incidence exhibits predominantly coherent properties. Frequency modulation of the incident signal masked the layer response by averaging the unmodulated response over the bandwidth represented by the modulation. Further changes in backscatter were attributed to changes in wetness in the surface regions of the snowpack; for a fixed frequency of 13.5 GHz and incidence angle of 39 deg, the backscatter decreased typically 15 db between 11 A.M. and noon, and returned to approximately its initial level of overnight.

  16. EBSD analysis of tungsten-filament carburization during the hot-wire CVD of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Oliphant, Clive J; Arendse, Christopher J; Camagu, Sigqibo T; Swart, Hendrik

    2014-02-01

    Filament condition during hot-wire chemical vapor deposition conditions of multi-walled carbon nanotubes is a major concern for a stable deposition process. We report on the novel application of electron backscatter diffraction to characterize the carburization of tungsten filaments. During the synthesis, the W-filaments transform to W2C and WC. W-carbide growth followed a parabolic behavior corresponding to the diffusion of C as the rate-determining step. The grain size of W, W2C, and WC increases with longer exposure time and increasing filament temperature. The grain size of the recrystallizing W-core and W2C phase grows from the perimeter inwardly and this phenomenon is enhanced at filament temperatures in excess of 1,400°C. Cracks appear at filament temperatures >1,600°C, accompanied by a reduction in the filament operational lifetime. The increase of the W2C and recrystallized W-core grain size from the perimeter inwardly is ascribed to a thermal gradient within the filament, which in turn influences the hardness measurements and crack formation.

  17. Lidar backscattering measurements of background stratospheric aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remsberg, E. E.; Northam, G. B.; Butler, C. F.

    1979-01-01

    A comparative lidar-dustsonde experiment was conducted in San Angelo, Texas, in May 1974 in order to estimate the uncertainties in stratospheric-aerosol backscatter for the NASA Langley 48-inch lidar system. The lidar calibration and data-analysis procedures are discussed. Results from the Texas experiment indicate random and systematic uncertainties of 35 and 63 percent, respectively, in backscatter from a background stratospheric-aerosol layer at 20 km.

  18. Multispectral Backscattering: A Fractal-Structure Probe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    discussed in more details below in Sec.D. 2.1 Orientation-Averaged T - Matrix Code In principle, for the case of rigid aggregate of homogeneous spheres, the...reliable approximation up to the largest values of x attainable by T - matrix code with our computers. 3 Backscattering Coefficient The backscattering...basic T - matrix code may be found at http://www.giss.nasa.gov crmim/, and original DDA code comes from http://www.astro.princeton.edu

  19. Backscatter correction factor for megavoltage photon beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Yida; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: For routine clinical dosimetry of photon beams, it is often necessary to know the minimum thickness of backscatter phantom material to ensure that full backscatter condition exists. Methods: In case of insufficient backscatter thickness, one can determine the backscatter correction factor, BCF(s,d,t), defined as the ratio of absorbed dose measured on the central-axis of a phantom with backscatter thickness of t to that with full backscatter for square field size s and forward depth d. Measurements were performed in SAD geometry for 6 and 15 MV photon beams using a 0.125 cc thimble chamber for field sizes between 10 x 10 and 30 x 30 cm at depths between d{sub max} (1.5 cm for 6 MV and 3 cm for 15 MV) and 20 cm. Results: A convolution method was used to calculate BCF using Monte-Carlo simulated point-spread kernels generated for clinical photon beams for energies between Co-60 and 24 MV. The convolution calculation agrees with the experimental measurements to within 0.8% with the same physical trend. The value of BCF deviates more from 1 for lower energies and larger field sizes. According to our convolution calculation, the minimum BCF occurs at forward depth d{sub max} and 40 x 40 cm field size, 0.970 for 6 MV and 0.983 for 15 MV. Conclusions: The authors concluded that backscatter thickness is 6.0 cm for 6 MV and 4.0 cm for 15 MV for field size up to 10 x 10 cm when BCF = 0.998. If 4 cm backscatter thickness is used, BCF is 0.997 and 0.983 for field size of 10 x 10 and 40 x 40 cm for 6 MV, and is 0.998 and 0.990 for 10 x 10 and 40 x 40 cm for 15 MV, respectively.

  20. Optical analysis of nanoparticles via enhanced backscattering facilitated by 3-D photonic nanojets.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Chen, Zhigang; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2005-01-24

    We report the phenomenon of ultra-enhanced backscattering of visible light by nanoparticles facilitated by the 3-D photonic nanojet - a sub-diffraction light beam appearing at the shadow side of a plane-waveilluminated dielectric microsphere. Our rigorous numerical simulations show that backscattering intensity of nanoparticles can be enhanced up to eight orders of magnitude when locating in the nanojet. As a result, the enhanced backscattering from a nanoparticle with diameter on the order of 10 nm is well above the background signal generated by the dielectric microsphere itself. We also report that nanojet-enhanced backscattering is extremely sensitive to the size of the nanoparticle, permitting in principle resolving sub-nanometer size differences using visible light. Finally, we show how the position of a nanoparticle could be determined with subdiffractional accuracy by recording the angular distribution of the backscattered light. These properties of photonic nanojets promise to make this phenomenon a useful tool for optically detecting, differentiating, and sorting nanoparticles.

  1. Optical analysis of nanoparticles via enhanced backscattering facilitated by 3-D photonic nanojets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xu; Chen, Zhigang; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2005-01-01

    We report the phenomenon of ultra-enhanced backscattering of visible light by nanoparticles facilitated by the 3-D photonic nanojet a sub-diffraction light beam appearing at the shadow side of a plane-waveilluminated dielectric microsphere. Our rigorous numerical simulations show that backscattering intensity of nanoparticles can be enhanced up to eight orders of magnitude when locating in the nanojet. As a result, the enhanced backscattering from a nanoparticle with diameter on the order of 10 nm is well above the background signal generated by the dielectric microsphere itself. We also report that nanojet-enhanced backscattering is extremely sensitive to the size of the nanoparticle, permitting in principle resolving sub-nanometer size differences using visible light. Finally, we show how the position of a nanoparticle could be determined with subdiffractional accuracy by recording the angular distribution of the backscattered light. These properties of photonic nanojets promise to make this phenomenon a useful tool for optically detecting, differentiating, and sorting nanoparticles.

  2. GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) Pacific survey mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Arnold, James E.; Williams, Steven F.

    1991-01-01

    NASA conducted the GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) Survey Mission over the near coastal and remote Pacific Ocean during 6 to 30 Nov. 1989 (GLOBE 1) and 13 May to 5 Jun. 1990 (GLOBE 2). These missions studied the optical, physical, and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosols. Particular emphasis was given to the magnitude and spatial variability of aerosol backscatter coefficients at mid-infrared wavelengths, and to the remote middle and upper troposphere, where these aerosol properties are poorly understood. Survey instruments were selected to provide either direct beta measurements at the key wavelengths, empirical links with long term or global scale aerosol climatologies, or aerosol microphysics data required to model any of these quantities. The survey deployment included both long distance 6 to 8 hour transit flights and detailed 4 to 6 hour local flights. Several general features were observed from preliminary Survey data analyses. Validation and intercomparison results have shown good agreement, usually better than a factor of two. Atmospheric aerosols frequently exhibited a three layer vertical structure, with (1) high and fairly uniform backscatter in the shallow cloud capped marine boundary layer; (2) moderate and highly variable backscatter in a deeper overlaying cloud pumped layer; and (3) low, regionally uniform, but seasonally and latitudinally variable backscatter in the middle and upper troposphere. The survey missions represent two isolated snapshots of a small portion of the global aerosol system. Consequently, Survey results can best be understood by synthesizing them with the more comprehensive GLOBE data base, which is being compiled at NASA-Marshall.

  3. Low magnification EBSD mapping of texture distribution in a fine-grained matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Joseph; Mariani, Elisabetta; Wheeler, John

    2016-04-01

    The study of texture (CPO) in rocks is often restricted to individual phases within a given sample or specific area of said sample. Large scale EBSD mapping of the matrix of a greenschist facies albite mylonite has shown that an overall significant CPO within albite grains is strongly domainal, and each domain has a unique CPO that is independent of both common slip systems in plagioclase and the specimen geometry (i.e. foliation and lineation). Observational evidence suggests the metamorphic breakdown of plagioclase to albite (Ab) plus a Ca-bearing phase (clinozoisite, Cz) has produced a two phase mixture in which each phase has a contrasting solubility. New grains of albite are thought to nucleate epitaxially from original plagioclase as a reaction front passes through parent grains. A pseudomorphic region of Ab plus Cz after an original plagioclase crystal, protected from intense deformation by enclosure in a cm-scale augite clast, gives insight into pre-deformation daughter grain distributions. The albite in the region inherits a strong CPO and 180° misorientation peak from a relict twin pattern due to epitaxial growth while clinozoisite is randomly distributed and oriented (despite some grains nucleating from the plagioclase parent twin boundary). In the deformed matrix, daughter Ab is seen to be the more mobile phase, having undergone obvious dissolution, transport and reprecipitation into fractures and pressure shadows, whereas Cz grains are relatively insoluble and rotate into parallelism with the foliation, forming bands that anastamose around Cpx porphyroclasts. Despite this modification, albite in the matrix retains significant CPOs that comprise distinct domains with sharp boundaries. A 180° misorientation peak thought to be a signature of twinning inherited from parent plagioclase is also observed in each domain. Why a CPO should be preserved under these conditions (contrary to our traditional understanding that CPOs are a signature of dislocation

  4. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. But, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction, it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Though the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.

  5. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    DOE PAGES

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. But, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction,more » it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Though the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.« less

  6. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in employing lasers in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. However, in identifying the source of the backscatter reduction, it is difficult to disentangle the rotating polarization from the frequency separation based approach used to engineer the beam's polarization. Although the backscatter reduction arises similarly to other approaches that employ frequency separation, in the case here, the intensity remains constant in time.

  7. SAR backscatter from coniferous forest gaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, John L.; Davis, Frank W.

    1992-01-01

    A study is in progress comparing Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) backscatter from coniferous forest plots containing gaps to backscatter from adjacent gap-free plots. Issues discussed are how do gaps in the range of 400 to 1600 sq m (approximately 4-14 pixels at intermediate incidence angles) affect forest backscatter statistics and what incidence angles, wavelengths, and polarizations are most sensitive to forest gaps. In order to visualize the slant-range imaging of forest and gaps, a simple conceptual model is used. This strictly qualitative model has led us to hypothesize that forest radar returns at short wavelengths (eg., C-band) and large incidence angles (e.g., 50 deg) should be most affected by the presence of gaps, whereas returns at long wavelengths and small angles should be least affected. Preliminary analysis of 1989 AIRSAR data from forest near Mt. Shasta supports the hypothesis. Current forest backscatter models such as MIMICS and Santa Barbara Discontinuous Canopy Backscatter Model have in several cases correctly predicted backscatter from forest stands based on inputs of measured or estimated forest parameters. These models do not, however, predict within-stand SAR scene texture, or 'intrinsic scene variability' as Ulaby et al. has referred to it. For instance, the Santa Barbara model, which may be the most spatially coupled of the existing models, is not truly spatial. Tree locations within a simulated pixel are distributed according to a Poisson process, as they are in many natural forests, but tree size is unrelated to location, which is not the case in nature. Furthermore, since pixels of a simulated stand are generated independently in the Santa Barbara model, spatial processes larger than one pixel are not modeled. Using a different approach, Oliver modeled scene texture based on an hypothetical forest geometry. His simulated scenes do not agree well with SAR data, perhaps due to the simple geometric model used. Insofar as texture

  8. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter: Estero Bay, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hartwell, Stephen R.; Finlayson, David P.; Dartnell, Peter; Johnson, Samuel Y.

    2013-01-01

    Between July 30 and August 9, 2012, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center (PCMSC), acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data from Estero Bay, San Luis Obispo, California, under PCMSC Field Activity ID S-05-12-SC. The survey was done using the R/V Parke Snavely outfitted with a multibeam sonar for swath mapping and highly accurate position and orientation equipment for georeferencing. This report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  9. Multibeam Sonar Backscatter Data Acquisition and Processing: Guidelines and Recommendations from the GEOHAB Backscatter Working Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffron, E.; Lurton, X.; Lamarche, G.; Brown, C.; Lucieer, V.; Rice, G.; Schimel, A.; Weber, T.

    2015-12-01

    Backscatter data acquired with multibeam sonars are now commonly used for the remote geological interpretation of the seabed. The systems hardware, software, and processing methods and tools have grown in numbers and improved over the years, yet many issues linger: there are no standard procedures for acquisition, poor or absent calibration, limited understanding and documentation of processing methods, etc. A workshop organized at the GeoHab (a community of geoscientists and biologists around the topic of marine habitat mapping) annual meeting in 2013 was dedicated to seafloor backscatter data from multibeam sonars and concluded that there was an overwhelming need for better coherence and agreement on the topics of acquisition, processing and interpretation of data. The GeoHab Backscatter Working Group (BSWG) was subsequently created with the purpose of documenting and synthetizing the state-of-the-art in sensors and techniques available today and proposing methods for best practice in the acquisition and processing of backscatter data. Two years later, the resulting document "Backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars: Guidelines and Recommendations" was completed1. The document provides: An introduction to backscatter measurements by seafloor-mapping sonars; A background on the physical principles of sonar backscatter; A discussion on users' needs from a wide spectrum of community end-users; A review on backscatter measurement; An analysis of best practices in data acquisition; A review of data processing principles with details on present software implementation; and finally A synthesis and key recommendations. This presentation reviews the BSWG mandate, structure, and development of this document. It details the various chapter contents, its recommendations to sonar manufacturers, operators, data processing software developers and end-users and its implication for the marine geology community. 1: Downloadable at https://www.niwa.co.nz/coasts-and-oceans/research-projects/backscatter-measurement-guidelines

  10. Fingerprinting ordered diffractions in multiply diffracted waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meles, Giovanni Angelo; Curtis, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    We show how to `fingerprint' individual diffractors inside an acoustic medium using interrogative wave energy from arrays of sources and receivers. For any recorded multiply diffracted wave observed between any source and any receiver, the set of such fingerprints is sufficient information to identify all diffractors involved in the corresponding diffraction path, and the sequential order in which diffractors are encountered. The method herein thus decomposes complex, multiply diffracted wavefields into constituent, single-diffraction interactions.

  11. Combined nano-SIMS/AFM/EBSD analysis and atom probe tomography, of carbon distribution in austenite/ε-martensite high-Mn steels.

    PubMed

    Seol, Jae-Bok; Lee, B-H; Choi, P; Lee, S-G; Park, C-G

    2013-09-01

    We introduce a new experimental approach for the identification of the atomistic position of interstitial carbon in a high-Mn binary alloy consisting of austenite and ε-martensite. Using combined nano-beam secondary ion mass spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction analyses, we clearly observe carbon partitioning to austenite. Nano-beam secondary ion mass spectroscopy and atom probe tomography studies also reveal carbon trapping at crystal imperfections as identified by transmission electron microscopy. Three main trapping sites can be distinguished: phase boundaries between austenite and ε-martensite, stacking faults in austenite, and prior austenite grain boundaries. Our findings suggest that segregation and/or partitioning of carbon can contribute to the austenite-to-martensite transformation of the investigated alloy.

  12. Snowcover influence on backscattering from terrain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Abdelrazik, M.; Stiles, W. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of snowcover on the microwave backscattering from terrain in the 8-35 GHz region are examined through the analysis of experimental data and by application of a semiempirical model. The model accounts for surface backscattering contributions by the snow-air and snow-soil interfaces, and for volume backscattering contributions by the snow layer. Through comparisons of backscattering data for different terrain surfaces measured both with and without snowcover, the masking effects of snow are evaluated as a function of snow water equivalent and liquid water content. The results indicate that with dry snowcover it is not possible to discriminate between different types of ground surface (concrete, asphalt, grass, and bare ground) if the snow water equivalent is greater than about 20 cm (or a depth greater than 60 cm for a snow density of 0.3 g/cu cm). For the same density, however, if the snow is wet, a depth of 10 cm is sufficient to mask the underlying surface.

  13. Window flaw detection by backscatter lighting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, L. K.; Minton, F. R.

    1978-01-01

    Portable fiber-optic probe detects tiny flaws in transparent materials. Probe transmits light through surface to illuminate interior of material by backscattering off its edges. Light-sensitive contact paper records scratch pattern. Technique can be used for rapid visual checks. Flexible fiber optics are safely used in explosive or flammable areas; they present no hazard of breakage or contamination in controlled environments.

  14. Visualization of x-ray backscatter data

    SciTech Connect

    Greenawald, E.C.; Ham, Y.S.; Poranski, C.F. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    Of the several processes which occur when x-rays interact with matter, Compton scattering is dominant in the range of energies commonly used in industrial radiography. The Compton interaction between an x-ray photon and a free or outer shell electron causes the electron to recoil and the photon to be propagated in a new direction with a reduced energy. Regardless of the incident beam energy, some photons are always scattered in the backwards direction. The potential for determining material properties by the detection of x-ray backscatter has been recognized for years. Although work in this area has been eclipsed by the rapid development of computerized tomography (CT), a variety of industrial backscatter imaging techniques and applications have been demonstrated. Backscatter inspection is unique among x-ray methods in its applicability with access to only one side of the object. The authors are currently developing the application of x-ray backscatter tomography (XBT) to the inspection of steel-reinforced rubber sonar domes on US Navy vessels. In this paper, the authors discuss the visualization methods they use to interpret the XBT data. They present images which illustrate the capability of XBT as applied to sonar domes and a variety of other materials and objects. They also demonstrate and discuss the use of several data visualization software products.

  15. Laser Forward and Backscattering in Particulate Media,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    puissance jdoit Itre beaucoup plus petite qua l’unitG. Tor T ~ ~ ITI GRa vTT TPS’~ UNCLASSIFIED TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF SYMBOLS...ktnown effects of the mltiple-scattering phenomenon, in parti- cular its greater influence on the backscatter than on the transmission measurements

  16. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  17. Laissez-Faire : Fully Asymmetric Backscatter Communication

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Pan; Zhang, Pengyu; Ganesan, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Backscatter provides dual-benefits of energy harvesting and low-power communication, making it attractive to a broad class of wireless sensors. But the design of a protocol that enables extremely power-efficient radios for harvesting-based sensors as well as high-rate data transfer for data-rich sensors presents a conundrum. In this paper, we present a new fully asymmetric backscatter communication protocol where nodes blindly transmit data as and when they sense. This model enables fully flexible node designs, from extraordinarily power-efficient backscatter radios that consume barely a few micro-watts to high-throughput radios that can stream at hundreds of Kbps while consuming a paltry tens of micro-watts. The challenge, however, lies in decoding concurrent streams at the reader, which we achieve using a novel combination of time-domain separation of interleaved signal edges, and phase-domain separation of colliding transmissions. We provide an implementation of our protocol, LF-Backscatter, and show that it can achieve an order of magnitude or more improvement in throughput, latency and power over state-of-art alternatives. PMID:28286885

  18. Electromagnetic backscattering from one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface II: Electromagnetic backscattering model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xie; William, Perrie; Shang-Zhuo, Zhao; He, Fang; Wen-Jin, Yu; Yi-Jun, He

    2016-07-01

    Sea surface current has a significant influence on electromagnetic (EM) backscattering signals and may constitute a dominant synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging mechanism. An effective EM backscattering model for a one-dimensional drifting fractal sea surface is presented in this paper. This model is used to simulate EM backscattering signals from the drifting sea surface. Numerical results show that ocean currents have a significant influence on EM backscattering signals from the sea surface. The normalized radar cross section (NRCS) discrepancies between the model for a coupled wave-current fractal sea surface and the model for an uncoupled fractal sea surface increase with the increase of incidence angle, as well as with increasing ocean currents. Ocean currents that are parallel to the direction of the wave can weaken the EM backscattering signal intensity, while the EM backscattering signal is intensified by ocean currents propagating oppositely to the wave direction. The model presented in this paper can be used to study the SAR imaging mechanism for a drifting sea surface. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41276187), the Global Change Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB953901), the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, China, the Program for the Innovation Research and Entrepreneurship Team in Jiangsu Province, China, the Canadian Program on Energy Research and Development, and the Canadian World Class Tanker Safety Service Program.

  19. Fast in-situ annealing stage coupled with EBSD: A suitable tool to observe quick recrystallization mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Bozzolo, N. Jacomet, S.; Loge, R.E.

    2012-08-15

    A heating stage has been developed to perform in-situ annealing in a SEM equipped with an EBSD system in order to study recrystallization mechanisms. High temperature treatments could then be performed inside the SEM, up to 1180 Degree-Sign C and with high heating and cooling rates ({approx} 100 Degree-Sign C s{sup -1}). Samples were cooled down to room temperature to perform EBSD orientation mapping in between successive short-duration heat treatments. Microstructure evolution snapshots obtained this way allow gaining an insight into recrystallization mechanisms. The interest of such experiments is shown for two examples: static recrystallization of cold deformed pure tantalum and post-dynamic evolution of hot-deformed Zircaloy4. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heating stage for in-SEM annealing at high temperature (up to 1200 Degree-Sign C). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High heating and cooling rates (100 Degree-Sign C s{sup -1}), no temperature overshoot. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential observation of very fast recrystallization mechanisms.

  20. EBSD studies of microstructure and texture in Ni-Ti-Co shape memory strip and ribbon.

    PubMed

    Goryczka, T

    2010-03-01

    The electron back scattered diffraction method was applied for carrying out detailed surface studies of the ternary Ni-Ti-Co alloy produced using melt-spinning and twin roll casting techniques. The samples were studied in the as-cast state without grinding or polishing. It was found that in the melt-spun ribbon apart from fine narrow columnar grains, that extended along the ribbon thickness, wider columnar grains parallel to the ribbon surface were also observed. These grains were textured along the {100}011 orientation. The twin roll cast strip revealed more complex and inhomogeneous morphology of its surface. Mainly, the axes of the grains were oriented along two textural components: 100 for the fine grains and {100}011 for the columnar grains parallel to the surface. In addition to the results obtained from the X-ray diffraction, the electron back scattered diffraction technique revealed the 111 fibre texture in the sample.

  1. Spectra of Particulate Backscattering in Natural Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Howard, R.; Lewis, Marlon R.; McLean, Scott D.; Twardowski, Michael S.; Freeman, Scott A.; Voss, Kenneth J.; Boynton, Chris G.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperspectral profiles of downwelling irradiance and upwelling radiance in natural waters (oligotrophic and mesotrophic) are combined with inverse radiative transfer to obtain high resolution spectra of the absorption coefficient (a) and the backscattering coefficient (bb) of the water and its constituents. The absorption coefficient at the mesotrophic station clearly shows spectral absorption features attributable to several phytoplankton pigments (Chlorophyll a, b, c, and Carotenoids). The backscattering shows only weak spectral features and can be well represented by a power-law variation with wavelength (lambda): b(sub b) approx. Lambda(sup -n), where n is a constant between 0.4 and 1.0. However, the weak spectral features in b(sub b), suggest that it is depressed in spectral regions of strong particle absorption. The applicability of the present inverse radiative transfer algorithm, which omits the influence of Raman scattering, is limited to lambda < 490 nm in oligotrophic waters and lambda < 575 nm in mesotrophic waters.

  2. Aerosol backscatter lidar calibration and data interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.; Menzies, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    A treatment of the various factors involved in lidar data acquisition and analysis is presented. This treatment highlights sources of fundamental, systematic, modeling, and calibration errors that may affect the accurate interpretation and calibration of lidar aerosol backscatter data. The discussion primarily pertains to ground based, pulsed CO2 lidars that probe the troposphere and are calibrated using large, hard calibration targets. However, a large part of the analysis is relevant to other types of lidar systems such as lidars operating at other wavelengths; continuous wave (CW) lidars; lidars operating in other regions of the atmosphere; lidars measuring nonaerosol elastic or inelastic backscatter; airborne or Earth-orbiting lidar platforms; and lidars employing combinations of the above characteristics.

  3. Microwave backscattering from an anisotropic soybean canopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, R. H.; Saatchi, S.; Levine, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Electromagnetic backscattering from a soybean canopy is modeled in the L band region of the spectrum. Mature soybean plants are taken as an ensemble of leaves and stems which are represented by lossy dielectric disks and rods respectively. Field data indicated that leaves and stems are not distributed uniformly in the azimuth coordinate. The plant has a tendency to grow out into the area between the rows. The effects on backscattered radar waves was computed by the distorted Born approximation. Results for look directions along the rows and perpendicular to the rows show that only a modest difference occurs in the L band frequency range. The use of another nonuniform distribution, different from those observed experimentally, results in a significant effect due to vegetation asymmetry.

  4. Backscattering power spectrum for randomly moving vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiankang, J.; Zhongzhi, Z.; Zhong, S.

    1986-08-01

    The vegetation backscattering power spectrum in the presence of winds is derived. The physical process of the action of stems and leaves of the vegetation is analyzed. A statistical distribution of the random velocity of stems and leaves is obtained, and the vegetation backscattering power spectral density which is dependent on the wind speed and direction as well as the incident wave parameters is given. In the case of uniform notion of vegetation in the direction of winds, the results provide a good interpretation of Fishbein's empirical model. The determination of the values of the equivalent parameters in the spectrum is discussed, and comparisons are made between the derived spectrum and measured published spectra with satisfactory consistence.

  5. Connecting forest ecosystem and microwave backscatter models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasischke, Eric S.; Christensen, Norman L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is outlined to connect data obtained from active microwave remote sensing systems with forest ecosystem models. The hierarchy of forest ecosystem models is discussed, and the levels at which microwave remote sensing data can be used as inputs are identified. In addition, techniques to utilize forest ecosystem models to assist in the validation of theoretical microwave backscatter models are identified. Several examples to illustrate these connecting processes are presented.

  6. Backscatter Correction Algorithm for TBI Treatment Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Nieto, B.; Sanchez-Doblado, F.; Arrans, R.; Terron, J.A.; Errazquin, L.

    2015-01-15

    The accuracy requirements in target dose delivery is, according to ICRU, ±5%. This is so not only in standard radiotherapy but also in total body irradiation (TBI). Physical dosimetry plays an important role in achieving this recommended level. The semi-infinite phantoms, customarily used for dosimetry purposes, give scatter conditions different to those of the finite thickness of the patient. So dose calculated in patient’s points close to beam exit surface may be overestimated. It is then necessary to quantify the backscatter factor in order to decrease the uncertainty in this dose calculation. The backward scatter has been well studied at standard distances. The present work intends to evaluate the backscatter phenomenon under our particular TBI treatment conditions. As a consequence of this study, a semi-empirical expression has been derived to calculate (within 0.3% uncertainty) the backscatter factor. This factor depends lineally on the depth and exponentially on the underlying tissue. Differences found in the qualitative behavior with respect to standard distances are due to scatter in the bunker wall close to the measurement point.

  7. Modeling strategies of ultrasound backscattering by blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, Cloutier; David, Savery; Isabelle, Fontaine; Beng Ghee, Teh

    2002-05-01

    Tissue characterization using ultrasound (US) scattering can allow the identification of relevant cellular biophysical information noninvasively. The characterization of the level of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation is one of the proposed applications. Different modeling strategies have been investigated by our group to better understand the mechanisms of US backscattering by blood, and to propose relevant measurable indices of aggregation. It could be hypothesized from these studies that the microstructure formed by RBC clusters is a main determinant of US backscattered power. The structure factor, which is related to the Fourier transform of the microscopic density function of RBCs, is described and used to explain the scattering behavior for different spatial arrangements of nonaggregated and aggregated RBCs. The microscopic density function was described by the Percus-Yevick approximation (nonaggregated RBCs), and for aggregated RBCs, by the Poisson distribution, the Neyman-Scott point process, and very recently by a flow-dependent rheological model. These statistical and microrheological models allowed the study of US backscattered power as a function of the hematocrit, scatterers' size, insonification frequency, and level of RBC aggregation. Experimental results available from the literature were used to validate the different approaches. [Work supported by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (MOP-36467), HSFQ, FCAR, and FRSQ.

  8. Backscatter and attenuation characterization of ventricular myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Allyson Ann

    2009-12-01

    This Dissertation presents quantitative ultrasonic measurements of the myocardium in fetal hearts and adult human hearts with the goal of studying the physics of sound waves incident upon anisotropic and inhomogeneous materials. Ultrasound has been used as a clinical tool to assess heart structure and function for several decades. The clinical usefulness of this noninvasive approach has grown with our understanding of the physical mechanisms underlying the interaction of ultrasonic waves with the myocardium. In this Dissertation, integrated backscatter and attenuation analyses were performed on midgestational fetal hearts to assess potential differences in the left and right ventricular myocardium. The hearts were interrogated using a 50 MHz transducer that enabled finer spatial resolution than could be achieved at more typical clinical frequencies. Ultrasonic data analyses demonstrated different patterns and relative levels of backscatter and attenuation from the myocardium of the left ventricle and the right ventricle. Ultrasonic data of adult human hearts were acquired with a clinical imaging system and quantified by their magnitude and time delay of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter. The results were analyzing using Bayes Classification and ROC analysis to quantify potential advantages of using a combination of two features of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter over using only one or the other feature to distinguish between groups of subjects. When the subjects were classified based on hemoglobin A1c, the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and the ratio of triglyceride to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, differences in the magnitude and normalized time delay of cyclic variation of myocardial backscatter were observed. The cyclic variation results also suggested a trend toward a larger area under the ROC curve when information from magnitude and time delay of cyclic variation is combined using Bayes classification than when

  9. Determination of elastic strain fields and geometrically necessary dislocation distributions near nanoindents using electron back scatter diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Angus J.; Randman, David

    2010-03-01

    The deformation around a 500-nm deep Berkovich indent in a large grained Fe sample has been studied using high resolution electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD). EBSD patterns were obtained in a two-dimensional map around the indent on the free surface. A cross-correlation-based analysis of small shifts in many sub-regions of the EBSD patterns was used to determine the variation of elastic strain and lattice rotations across the map at a sensitivity of ∼±10-4. Elastic strains were smaller than lattice rotations, with radial strains found to be compressive and hoop strains tensile as expected. Several analyses based on Nye's dislocation tensor were used to estimate the distribution of geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) around the indent. The results obtained using different assumed dislocation geometries, optimisation routines and different contributions from the measured lattice rotation and strain fields are compared. Our favoured approach is to seek a combination of GND types which support the six measurable (of a possible nine) gradients of the lattice rotations after correction for the 10 measurable elastic strain gradients, and minimise the total GND line energy using an L1 optimisation method. A lower bound estimate for the noise on the GND density determination is ∼±1012 m-2 for a 200-nm step size, and near the indent densities as high as 1015 m-2 were measured. For comparison, a Hough-based analysis of the EBSD patterns has a much higher noise level of ∼±1014m-2 for the GND density.

  10. Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) Results: Aerosol Backscatter Global Distribution and Wavelength Dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) was initiated by NASA in 1986 as an interagency and international research effort to characterize tropospheric backscatter properties. The primary objective of the program is to develop realistic aerosol backscatter inputs for design and simulation studies for NASA's prospective Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS). To achieve this, GLOBE incorporates several different types of aerosol sensors, which operate from a variety of sensor platforms, covering a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and measure a diverse set of aerosol physical, chemical, and optical properties. The results of this analysis have provided important new information on the life cycles and physicochemical properties of global scale tropospheric aerosol systems. In addition, GLOBE analytical methods will be useful for the Earth Observing System (EOS) and other studies that involve the assimilation of large, complex atmospheric aerosol databases.

  11. An Efficient Image Recovery Algorithm for Diffraction Tomography Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Michael Y.

    1993-01-01

    A diffraction tomography system has potential application in ultrasonic medical imaging area. It is capable of achieving imagery with the ultimate resolution of one quarter the wavelength by collecting ultrasonic backscattering data from a circular array of sensors and reconstructing the object reflectivity using a digital image recovery algorithm performed by a computer. One advantage of such a system is that is allows a relatively lower frequency wave to penetrate more deeply into the object and still achieve imagery with a reasonable resolution. An efficient image recovery algorithm for the diffraction tomography system was originally developed for processing a wide beam spaceborne SAR data...

  12. Rayleigh backscattering from the fundamental mode in step-index multimode optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Bisyarin, M A; Kotov, O I; Hartog, A H; Liokumovich, L B; Ushakov, N A

    2017-01-10

    The Rayleigh backscattering produced by an incident fundamental mode in a multimode step-index optical fiber was analyzed using a recently developed diffraction technique. The complete set of backward propagating modes, both radial and azimuthal, was determined and regarded. For this type of fiber, normalized mode functions were constructed in an explicit form, thus providing a unified power scale to characterize the relationships between various excited modes. The dependencies of the mode excitation efficiencies on the technical parameters of the fiber and the frequency of the launched radiation were studied. A comparison of the mode excitation efficiencies was performed with those in the fiber with quadratic refractive index profiles.

  13. Atmospheric Backscatter Model Development for CO Sub 2 Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Kent, G.; Yue, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    The results of investigations into the problems of modeling atmospheric backscatter from aerosols, in the lowest 20 km of the atmosphere, at CO2 wavelengths are presented, along with a summary of the relevant aerosol characteristics and their variability, and a discussion of the measurement techniques and errors involved. The different methods of calculating the aerosol backscattering function, both from measured aerosol characteristics and from optical measurements made at other wavelengths, are discussed in detail, and limits are placed on the accuracy of these methods. The effects of changing atmospheric humidity and temperature on the backscatter are analyzed and related to the actual atmosphere. Finally, the results of modeling CO2 backscatter in the atmosphere are presented and the variation with height and geographic location discussed, and limits placed on the magnitude of the backscattering function. Conclusions regarding modeling techniques and modeled atmospheric backscatter values are presented in tabular form.

  14. Mudrocks examined by backscattered electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pye, K.; Krinsley, D.

    1983-01-01

    A method of studying mudrocks is developed using backscattered electrons (BSE) in scanning electron microscopy. Commercially available detectors are utilized to mix the BSE and secondary electron signals in order to obtain the optimum image for a particular material. Thin sections or polished rock chip surfaces are examined with BSE which provides both the atomic number contrast and topographic contrast. This technique provides very detailed information about the form and composition of individual grains in the mudrock thin sections and can be used in studies of the source, mode of deposition, diagenesis, and tectonic deformational history of mudrocks.

  15. Elementary polarization properties in the backscattering configuration.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Oriol; Garcia-Caurel, Enric; Ossikovski, Razvigor

    2014-10-15

    In the normal incidence backscattering configuration, a polarimetric measurement always preserves the reciprocal symmetry. For a reciprocal Jones matrix, the number of elementary polarization properties is reduced from six to four. In this work, the physical interpretation of these properties is examined and they are compared with the equivalent polarization properties in transmission. It is found that, with the exception of natural optical activity, a polarimetric backreflection experiment can essentially provide the same type of information about the anisotropy of a medium as a transmission analysis, although transmission and backreflection information comes in a completely different form. Experimental examples are provided to illustrate the discussion.

  16. Determination of Backscattering Sources in Various Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Zoughi, R.; Wu, L. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of this research are to identify the primary contributors to 10 GHz radar backscatter from various natural and man-made surfaces and objects, and to use this information in developing new and better models for the scatter. When the true sources are known for the scattering that leads to variation in intensity on radar images, the images (and sets of them) may be interpreted more meaningfully in terms of the variation of parameters of interest for science or application. For example, better interpretation of vegetation images may be possible for yield forecasting and stress detection.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Radar Backscatter from Sea Ice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    predicts that the depolarized backscattering coefficient is zero. Moreover, there is no distinction in this model between vertical and horizontal... Backscattering Cross-Section of First-Year Ice at 13 GHz. 38 angles except vertical incidence, mainly due to the 3rewster angle effect. The depolarized ...theories to properly explain the polarization dependence of the backscatter from sea ice. Because depolarization is a secondary effect for the surface

  18. Independent measurement of extinction and backscatter profiles in cirrus clouds by using a combined Raman elastic-backscatter lidar.

    PubMed

    Ansmann, A; Wandinger, U; Riebesell, M; Weitkamp, C; Michaelis, W

    1992-11-20

    Height profiles of the extinction and the backscatter coefficients in cirrus clouds are determined independently from elastic- and inelastic- (Raman) backscatter signals. An extended error analysis is given. Examples covering the measured range of extinction-to-backscatter ratios (lidar ratios) in ice clouds are presented. Lidar ratios between 5 and 15 sr are usually found. A strong variation between 2 and 20 sr can be observed within one cloud profile. Particle extinction coefficients determined from inelastic-backscatter signals and from elastic-backscatter signals by using the Klett method are compared. The Klett solution of the extinction profile can be highly erroneous if the lidar ratio varies along the measuring range. On the other hand, simple backscatter lidars can provide reliable information about the cloud optical depth and the mean cloud lidar ratio.

  19. Multiscale Interactions and Backscatter in Premixed Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlington, Peter; Towery, Colin; O'Brien, Jeffrey; Poludnenko, Alexei; Urzay, Javier; Ihme, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Multiscale interactions and energy transfer between turbulence and flames are fundamental to understanding and modeling premixed turbulent reacting flows. To investigate such flows, direct numerical simulations of statistically planar turbulent premixed flames have been performed, and the dynamics of kinetic energy transfer are examined in both spectral and physical spaces. In the spectral analysis, two-dimensional kinetic energy spectra and triadic interactions are computed through the flame brush. It is found that there is suppression of turbulent small-scale motions in the combustion products, along with backscatter of energy for a range of scales near the thermal laminar flame width. In the physical-space analysis, a differential filter is applied to examine the transfer of kinetic energy between subgrid and resolved scales in the context of large eddy simulations. Subgrid-scale backscatter of kinetic energy driven by combustion is found to prevail over forward scatter throughout the flame brush. The spectral- and physical-space analyses thus both suggest an enhancement of reverse-cascade phenomena in the flame brush, which is possibly driven by accumulation of kinetic energy in the scales where combustion-induced heat release is preferentially deployed.

  20. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    1998-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  1. Compton backscattered collmated X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Ronald D.; Huang, Zhirong

    2000-01-01

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications.

  2. Radar backscatter properties of milo and soybeans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.; Metzler, T.

    1975-01-01

    The radar backscatter from fields of milo and soybeans was measured with a ground based radar as a function of frequency (8-18 GHz), polarization (HH and VV) and angle of incidence (0 deg-70 deg) during the summer of 1974. Supporting ground truth was gathered contemporaneously with the backscatter data. At nadir sigma deg of milo correlated highly, r = 0.96, with soil moisture in the milo field at 8.6 GHz but decreased to a value of r = 0.78 at a frequency of 17.0 GHz. Correlation studies of the variations of sigma deg with soil moisture in the soybean fields were not possible due to a lack of a meaningful soil moisture dynamic range. At the larger angles of incidence, however, sigma deg of soybeans did appear to be dependent on precipitation. It is suggested this phenomenon was caused by the rain altering plant geometry. In general sigma deg of both milo and soybeans had a relatively small dynamic range at the higher angles of incidence and showed no significant dependence on the measured crop parameters.

  3. Compton backscattered collimated x-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, R.D.; Huang, Z.

    1998-10-20

    A high-intensity, inexpensive and collimated x-ray source is disclosed for applications such as x-ray lithography is disclosed. An intense pulse from a high power laser, stored in a high-finesse resonator, repetitively collides nearly head-on with and Compton backscatters off a bunched electron beam, having relatively low energy and circulating in a compact storage ring. Both the laser and the electron beams are tightly focused and matched at the interaction region inside the optical resonator. The laser-electron interaction not only gives rise to x-rays at the desired wavelength, but also cools and stabilizes the electrons against intrabeam scattering and Coulomb repulsion with each other in the storage ring. This cooling provides a compact, intense bunch of electrons suitable for many applications. In particular, a sufficient amount of x-rays can be generated by this device to make it an excellent and flexible Compton backscattered x-ray (CBX) source for high throughput x-ray lithography and many other applications. 4 figs.

  4. Three-Dimensional Characterization of Microstructure by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-28

    2003. Reconstruction of Berea sandstone and pore-scale modelling of wettability effects. J. Petrol. Sci. Eng. 39:177–99 31. Sundararaghavan V...high-pressure die-cast magnesium alloy. Mater. Sci. Eng. A 427:92–98 66. Lewis AC, Bingert JF, Rowenhorst DJ, Gupta A, Geltmacher AB , Spanos G. 2006...Geltmacher AB . 2006. Image-based modeling of the response of ex- perimental 3D microstructures to mechanical loading. Scripta Mater. 55:81–85 68. Lieberman

  5. Optical backscatter characteristics of Arctic polar stratospheric clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kent, G. S.; Schaffner, S. K.; Poole, L. R.; Mccormick, M. P.; Hunt, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Airborne lidar measurements have been made of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition in January-February 1989. These show the existence of a systematic relationship between the backscatter depolarization ratio and the (aerosol + molecular)/molecular backscatter ratio. The data are consistent with a two population PSC particle model.

  6. Fading characteristics of panchromatic radar backscatter from selected agricultural targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, T. F.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1973-01-01

    An experiment was performed to empirically determine the fading characteristics of backscattered radar signals from four agricultural targets at 9 GHz. After a short review of the statistics of Rayleigh fading backscatter, the data processing method and results of the data are analyzed. Comparison with theory shows adequate agreement with the experimental results, provided of course, the targets are modeled in a correct manner.

  7. Harmonic generation of ion waves due to Brillouin backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K.; Kruer, W.L.; Haines, M.G.

    1985-05-22

    We report results of simulations of stimulated Brillouin backscatter in which we see the second spatial harmonic of the ion density fluctuation and compare with linear, fluid theory. We also describe examples of the competition between Raman and Brillouin backscatter. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Relating P-band AIRSAR backscatter to forest stand parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yong; Melack, John M.; Davis, Frank W.; Kasischke, Eric S.; Christensen, Norman L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    As part of research on forest ecosystems, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and collaborating research teams have conducted multi-season airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) experiments in three forest ecosystems including temperate pine forest (Duke, Forest, North Carolina), boreal forest (Bonanza Creek Experimental Forest, Alaska), and northern mixed hardwood-conifer forest (Michigan Biological Station, Michigan). The major research goals were to improve understanding of the relationships between radar backscatter and phenological variables (e.g. stand density, tree size, etc.), to improve radar backscatter models of tree canopy properties, and to develop a radar-based scheme for monitoring forest phenological changes. In September 1989, AIRSAR backscatter data were acquired over the Duke Forest. As the aboveground biomass of the loblolly pine forest stands at Duke Forest increased, the SAR backscatter at C-, L-, and P-bands increased and saturated at different biomass levels for the C-band, L-band, and P-band data. We only use the P-band backscatter data and ground measurements here to study the relationships between the backscatter and stand density, the backscatter and mean trunk dbh (diameter at breast height) of trees in the stands, and the backscatter and stand basal area.

  9. Robustness of Cantor diffractals.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rupesh; Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Banerjee, Varsha; Senthilkumaran, Paramasivam

    2013-04-08

    Diffractals are electromagnetic waves diffracted by a fractal aperture. In an earlier paper, we reported an important property of Cantor diffractals, that of redundancy [R. Verma et. al., Opt. Express 20, 8250 (2012)]. In this paper, we report another important property, that of robustness. The question we address is: How much disorder in the Cantor grating can be accommodated by diffractals to continue to yield faithfully its fractal dimension and generator? This answer is of consequence in a number of physical problems involving fractal architecture.

  10. EBSD-Assisted Slip Trace Analysis During In Situ SEM Mechanical Testing: Application to Unravel Grain Size Effects on Plasticity of Pure Mg Polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Jiménez, C. M.; Molina-Aldareguia, J. M.; Pérez-Prado, M. T.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to highlight the unique capabilities of electron backscattered diffraction-assisted trace analysis during in situ SEM mechanical testing of metals in order to get a better understanding of plasticity at the microscale. The technique allows for the direct observation of different deformation mechanisms, such as slip and twinning activity, at the microscale. Moreover, and contrary to other methods, it can provide statistically sound evidence of the role of the local microstructure, such as the local texture and grain boundary network, on the activation of the different deformation modes. The power of the technique is demonstrated by reviewing recent work that has been key to solving several remaining controversies regarding the role of grain size, strain rate and temperature on the plasticity of Mg polycrystals. In particular, it was found that, with decreasing grain size, at room temperature, a clear transition from non-basal- to basal-slip-dominated flow takes place under tension and a transition from twinning to basal slip takes place under compression. On the other hand, a similar transition from twinning to basal slip takes place with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate. The emergence of basal slip as a dominant mechanism is shown to be due to increasing levels of connectivity between favorably oriented grains, which facilitate slip transfer across grain boundaries.

  11. A method for removing arm backscatter from EPID images

    SciTech Connect

    King, Brian W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for removing the support arm backscatter from images acquired using current Varian electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs).Methods: The effect of arm backscatter on EPID images was modeled using a kernel convolution method. The parameters of the model were optimized by comparing on-arm images to off-arm images. The model was used to develop a method to remove the effect of backscatter from measured EPID images. The performance of the backscatter removal method was tested by comparing backscatter corrected on-arm images to measured off-arm images for 17 rectangular fields of different sizes and locations on the imager. The method was also tested using on- and off-arm images from 42 intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) fields.Results: Images generated by the backscatter removal method gave consistently better agreement with off-arm images than images without backscatter correction. For the 17 rectangular fields studied, the root mean square difference of in-plane profiles compared to off-arm profiles was reduced from 1.19% (standard deviation 0.59%) on average without backscatter removal to 0.38% (standard deviation 0.18%) when using the backscatter removal method. When comparing to the off-arm images from the 42 IMRT fields, the mean {gamma} and percentage of pixels with {gamma} < 1 were improved by the backscatter removal method in all but one of the images studied. The mean {gamma} value (1%, 1 mm) for the IMRT fields studied was reduced from 0.80 to 0.57 by using the backscatter removal method, while the mean {gamma} pass rate was increased from 72.2% to 84.6%.Conclusions: A backscatter removal method has been developed to estimate the image acquired by the EPID without any arm backscatter from an image acquired in the presence of arm backscatter. The method has been shown to produce consistently reliable results for a wide range of field sizes and jaw configurations.

  12. Rutherford backscattering analysis of contaminants in PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, D. E.; Pfeffer, R. L.; Sadler, G. D.

    1997-05-01

    Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) was used to understand the sorption and desorption of organic contaminants in the polymer Poly(ethylene terephthalate), or PET. Samples were exposed to a range of organics to simulate contamination of PET that can take place in the post-consumer waste stream. From RBS analysis, concentration depth profiles were shown to vary from a monolayer regime surface layer to a saturation level, depending on the contaminant. Heat treatments were also applied to contaminated polymer to simulate thermal processing steps in the recycling of PET. Heating caused a dramatic decrease in contaminants and in some cases a complete removal of contamination was achieved to the limit of RBS detectability.

  13. Reducing parametric backscattering by polarization rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Ido; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    When a laser passes through underdense plasmas, Raman and Brillouin Backscattering can reflect a substantial portion of the incident laser energy. This is a major loss mechanism, for example, in inertial confinement fusion. However, by slow rotation of the incident linear polarization, the overall reflectivity can be reduced significantly. Particle in cell simulations show that, for parameters similar to those of indirect drive fusion experiments, polarization rotation reduces the reflectivity by a factor of 5. A general, fluid-model based, analytical estimation for the reflectivity reduction agrees with simulations. This work was supported by NNSA Grant No. DE- NA0002948, AFOSR Grant No. FA9550-15-1-0391, and DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  14. A dynamic localization model with stochastic backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carati, Daniele; Ghosal, Sandip

    1994-01-01

    The modeling of subgrid scales in large-eddy simulation (LES) has been rationalized by the introduction of the dynamic localization procedure. This method allows one to compute rather than prescribe the unknown coefficients in the subgrid-scale model. Formally, the LES equations are supposed to be obtained by applying to the Navier-Stokes equations a 'grid filter' operation. Though the subgrid stress itself is unknown, an identity between subgrid stresses generated by different filters has been derived. Although preliminary tests of the Dynamic Localization Model (DLM) with k-equation have been satisfactory, the use of a negative eddy viscosity to describe backscatter is probably a crude representation of the physics of reverse transfer of energy. Indeed, the model is fully deterministic. Knowing the filtered velocity field and the subgrid-scale energy, the subgrid stress is automatically determined. We know that the LES equations cannot be fully deterministic since the small scales are not resolved. This stems from an important distinction between equilibrium hydrodynamics and turbulence. In equilibrium hydrodynamics, the molecular motions are also not resolved. However, there is a clear separation of scale between these unresolved motions and the relevant hydrodynamic scales. The result of molecular motions can then be separated into an average effect (the molecular viscosity) and some fluctuations. Due to the large number of molecules present in a box with size of the order of the hydrodynamic scale, the ratio between fluctuations and the average effect should be very small (as a result of the 'law of large numbers'). For that reason, the hydrodynamic balance equations are usually purely deterministic. In turbulence, however, there is no clear separation of scale between small and large eddies. In that case, the fluctuations around a deterministic eddy viscosity term could be significant. An eddy noise would then appear through a stochastic term in the subgrid

  15. Crystallography of magnetite plaquettes and their significance as asymmetric catalysts for the synthesis of chiral organics in carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-10-01

    We have previously observed the magnetite plaquettes in carbonaceous chondrites using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, examined the crystal orientation of the polished surfaces of magnetite plaquettes in CI Orgueil using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis, and concluded that these magnetite plaquettes are likely naturally asymmetric materials [1]. In this study, we expanded our EBSD observation to other magnetite plaquettes in Orgueil, and further examined the internal structure of these remarkable crystals with the use of X-ray computed microtomography.

  16. Crystallography of Magnetite Plaquettes and their Significance as Asymmetric Catalysts for the Synthesis of Chiral Organics in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously observed the magnetite plaquettes in carbonaceous chondrites using scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging, examined the crystal orientation of the polished surfaces of magnetite plaquettes in CI Orgueil using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis, and concluded that these magnetite plaquettes are likely naturally asymmetric materials. In this study, we expanded our EBSD observation to other magnetite plaquettes in Orgueil, and further examined the internal structure of these remarkable crystals with the use of X-ray computed microtomography.

  17. Electron back scattered diffraction characterization of Sm(CoFeCuZr)z magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonamine, T.; Fukuhara, M.; Archanjo, B. S.; Missell, F. P.

    2011-04-01

    In permanent magnets based on the Sm2Co17 phase, the high coercivity depends on the presence of a complex microstructure, consisting of a Sm2(Co,Fe)17 cell phase, a cell boundary phase Sm(Co,Cu)5, and a Zr-rich platelet or lamellae phase. The aim of this work is to use electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) in order to identify the different phases present in the isotropic magnets produced from cast alloys with the composition of Sm(CobalFe0.2Cu0.1Zrx)8, where x = 0, 0.02, or 0.06, and correlate them with the different phases observed in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Due to the combination of careful surface preparation and high resolution microscopy, it was possible to observe the cellular structure characteristic of the 2:17 magnets in the SEM images. Until now, only transmission electron microscopy (TEM) had been used. Composition maps, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and EBSD measurements were used for doing the phase identification.

  18. Electron back scattered diffraction characterization of Sm(CoFeCuZr){sub z} magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Yonamine, T.; Fukuhara, M.; Archanjo, B. S.; Missell, F. P.

    2011-04-01

    In permanent magnets based on the Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} phase, the high coercivity depends on the presence of a complex microstructure, consisting of a Sm{sub 2}(Co,Fe){sub 17} cell phase, a cell boundary phase Sm(Co,Cu){sub 5}, and a Zr-rich platelet or lamellae phase. The aim of this work is to use electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) in order to identify the different phases present in the isotropic magnets produced from cast alloys with the composition of Sm(Co{sub bal}Fe{sub 0.2}Cu{sub 0.1}Zr{sub x}){sub 8}, where x = 0, 0.02, or 0.06, and correlate them with the different phases observed in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. Due to the combination of careful surface preparation and high resolution microscopy, it was possible to observe the cellular structure characteristic of the 2:17 magnets in the SEM images. Until now, only transmission electron microscopy (TEM) had been used. Composition maps, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and EBSD measurements were used for doing the phase identification.

  19. Diffraction Results from CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, Konstantin

    2012-04-01

    We present final results by the CDF II collaboration on diffractive W and Z production, report on the status of ongoing analyses on diffractive dijet production and on rapidity gaps between jets, and briefly summarize results obtained on exclusive production pointing to their relevance to calibrating theoretical models used to predict exclusive Higgs-boson production at the LHC.

  20. Phononic crystal diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moiseyenko, Rayisa P.; Herbison, Sarah; Declercq, Nico F.; Laude, Vincent

    2012-02-01

    When a phononic crystal is interrogated by an external source of acoustic waves, there is necessarily a phenomenon of diffraction occurring on the external enclosing surfaces. Indeed, these external surfaces are periodic and the resulting acoustic diffraction grating has a periodicity that depends on the orientation of the phononic crystal. This work presents a combined experimental and theoretical study on the diffraction of bulk ultrasonic waves on the external surfaces of a 2D phononic crystal that consists of a triangular lattice of steel rods in a water matrix. The results of transmission experiments are compared with theoretical band structures obtained with the finite-element method. Angular spectrograms (showing frequency as a function of angle) determined from diffraction experiments are then compared with finite-element simulations of diffraction occurring on the surfaces of the crystal. The experimental results show that the diffraction that occurs on its external surfaces is highly frequency-dependent and has a definite relation with the Bloch modes of the phononic crystal. In particular, a strong influence of the presence of bandgaps and deaf bands on the diffraction efficiency is found. This observation opens perspectives for the design of efficient phononic crystal diffraction gratings.

  1. A new EBSD based methodology for the quantitative characterisation of microstructures formed by displacive fcc-bcc transformations.

    PubMed

    Zachrisson, J; Börjesson, J; Karlsson, L

    2013-02-01

    This work is concerned with a new methodology that can be used to quantify the degree to which grains in the microstructure are aligned in the form of packets. The methodology is based on a crystallographic definition of the term packet which is used to deduce the theoretically ideal misorientations of intra-packet grain boundaries. A misorientation distribution obtained from extensive EBSD mapping can thus be split into intra- and inter-packet misorientations and the corresponding fractions can be determined by integration. The theoretical framework of the methodology is explained and a step-by-step description of the procedure is given. Results from a trace analysis are provided to justify the assumptions made regarding habit plane and examples are included showing how the grain boundary network can be split into two separate parts, one for lath boundaries and the other for packet boundaries. Moreover, example weld metal microstructures along with the corresponding misorientation distributions as well as quantitative values of the microstructures are presented.

  2. Radial Reflection diffraction tomorgraphy

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K

    2013-11-19

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  3. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  4. X-ray backscatter imaging of nuclear materials

    DOEpatents

    Chapman, Jeffrey Allen; Gunning, John E; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Ott, Larry J; Shedlock, Daniel

    2014-09-30

    The energy of an X-ray beam and critical depth are selected to detect structural discontinuities in a material having an atomic number Z of 57 or greater. The critical depth is selected by adjusting the geometry of a collimator that blocks backscattered radiation so that backscattered X-ray originating from a depth less than the critical depth is not detected. Structures of Lanthanides and Actinides, including nuclear fuel rod materials, can be inspected for structural discontinuities such as gaps, cracks, and chipping employing the backscattered X-ray.

  5. Asymptotic high frequency analysis of the electromagnetic backscattering from an inlet model consisting of piecewise linearly tapered sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altintas, A.; Pathak, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Electromagnetic backscattering from an open ended three dimensional inlet model is analyzed and computed patterns are compared with results of experimental measurements. The model is comprised of two sections. The first section consists of a linearly tapered waveguide with a rectangular opening at one end and the other end is connected to the second section which is a uniform rectangular waveguide with a planar perfectly conducting termination. The model is electrically large so that many propagating modes are excited. The method of analysis contains conventional aperture integration and modal techniques combined with high frequency techniques, which employ concepts such as modal rays, geometrical theory of diffraction and equivalent currents. For the cases considered, it is shown that only a few of the many propagating modes contribute appreciably to the backscattered field. These modes are selected according to their modal ray angle directions.

  6. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, Michael D.; Britten, Jerald A.; Nguyen, Hoang T.; Boyd, Robert; Shore, Bruce W.

    1999-01-01

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described.

  7. Multilayer dielectric diffraction gratings

    DOEpatents

    Perry, M.D.; Britten, J.A.; Nguyen, H.T.; Boyd, R.; Shore, B.W.

    1999-05-25

    The design and fabrication of dielectric grating structures with high diffraction efficiency used in reflection or transmission is described. By forming a multilayer structure of alternating index dielectric materials and placing a grating structure on top of the multilayer, a diffraction grating of adjustable efficiency, and variable optical bandwidth can be obtained. Diffraction efficiency into the first order in reflection varying between 1 and 98 percent has been achieved by controlling the design of the multilayer and the depth, shape, and material comprising the grooves of the grating structure. Methods for fabricating these gratings without the use of ion etching techniques are described. 7 figs.

  8. Photonic nanojet enhancement of backscattering of light by nanoparticles: a potential novel visible-light ultramicroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhigang; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2004-04-01

    We report what we believe to be the first evidence of localized nanoscale photonic jets generated at the shadow-side surfaces of micronscale, circular dielectric cylinders illuminated by a plane wave. These photonic nanojets have waists smaller than the diffraction limit and propagate over several optical wavelengths without significant diffraction. We have found that such nanojets can enhance the backscattering of visible light by nanometer-scale dielectric particles located within the nanojets by several orders of magnitude. Not involving evanescent fields and not requiring mechanical scanning, photonic nanojets may provide a new means to detect and image nanoparticles of size well below the diffraction limit. This could yield a potential novel ultramicroscopy technique using visible light for detecting proteins, viral particles, and even single molecules; and monitoring molecular synthesis and aggregation processes of importance in many areas of biology, chemistry, material sciences, and tissue engineering.

  9. Photonic nanojet enhancement of backscattering of light by nanoparticles: a potential novel visible-light ultramicroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhigang; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2004-04-05

    We report what we believe to be the first evidence of localized nanoscale photonic jets generated at the shadow-side surfaces of micronscale, circular dielectric cylinders illuminated by a plane wave. These photonic nanojets have waists smaller than the diffraction limit and propagate over several optical wavelengths without significant diffraction. We have found that such nanojets can enhance the backscattering of visible light by nanometer-scale dielectric particles located within the nanojets by several orders of magnitude. Not involving evanescent fields and not requiring mechanical scanning, photonic nanojets may provide a new means to detect and image nanoparticles of size well below the diffraction limit. This could yield a potential novel ultramicroscopy technique using visible light for detecting proteins, viral particles, and even single molecules; and monitoring molecular synthesis and aggregation processes of importance in many areas of biology, chemistry, material sciences, and tissue engineering.

  10. X-Ray Backscatter Machine Support Frame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, Brooke

    2010-01-01

    This summer at Kennedy Space Center, I spent 10 weeks as an intern working at the Prototype Development Lab. During this time I learned about the design and machining done here at NASA. I became familiar with the process from where a design begins in Pro/Engineer and finishes at the hands of the machinists. As an intern I was given various small jobs to do and then one project of my own. My personal project was a job for the Applied Physics Lab; in their work they use an X-Ray Backscatter machine. Previously it was resting atop a temporary frame that limited the use of the machine. My job was to design a frame for the machine to rest upon that would allow a full range of sample sizes. The frame was required to support the machine and provide a strain relief for the cords attached to the machine as it moved in the x and y directions. Calculations also had to be done to be sure the design would be able to withstand any loads or outside sources of stress. After the calculations proved the design to be ready to withstand the requirements, the parts were ordered or fabricated, as required. This helped me understand the full process of jobs sent to the Prototype Development Lab.

  11. Portable fluorescence meter with reference backscattering channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornilin, Dmitriy V.; Grishanov, Vladimir N.; Zakharov, Valery P.; Burkov, Dmitriy S.

    2016-09-01

    Methods based on fluorescence and backscattering are intensively used for determination of the advanced glycation end products (AGE) concentration in the biological tissues. There are strong correlation between the AGE concentration and the severity of such diseases like diabetes, coronary heart disease and renal failure. This fact can be used for diagnostic purposes in medical applications. Only few investigations in this area can be useful for development of portable and affordable in vivo AGE meter because the most of them are oriented on using spectrometers. In this study we describe the design and the results of tests on volunteers of portable fluorescence meter based on two photodiodes. One channel of such fluorimeter is used for measurement of the autofluorescence (AF) intensity, another one - for the intensity of elastically scattered radiation, which can be used as a reference. This reference channel is proposed for normalization of the skin autofluorescence signal to the human skin photo type. The fluorimeter, that was developed is relatively compact and does not contain any expensive optical and electronic components. The experimental results prove that proposed tool can be used for the AGE estimation in human skin.

  12. Fraunhofer Diffraction and Polarization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortin, E.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an experiment for the intermediate undergraduate optics laboratory designed to illustrate simultaneously some aspects of the phenomena of diffraction; interference, coherence, apodization, the Fresnel-Arago law; as well as of the interrelations between these concepts. (HM)

  13. Diffraction with CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Antonio Vilela

    2011-07-15

    The observation of diffraction at LHC with the CMS detector at {radical}(s) = 900 and 2360 GeV is presented, along with a comparison of the data with the predictions of the PYTHIA and PHOJET generators.

  14. Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, G. J.; Quiney, H. M.; Dhal, B. B.; Tran, C. Q.; Nugent, K. A.; Peele, A. G.; Paterson, D.; Jonge, M. D. de

    2006-07-14

    We present an x-ray coherent diffractive imaging experiment utilizing a nonplanar incident wave and demonstrate success by reconstructing a nonperiodic gold sample at 24 nm resolution. Favorable effects of the curved beam illumination are identified.

  15. Reflective diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Lamartine, Bruce C.

    2003-06-24

    Reflective diffraction grating. A focused ion beam (FIB) micromilling apparatus is used to store color images in a durable medium by milling away portions of the surface of the medium to produce a reflective diffraction grating with blazed pits. The images are retrieved by exposing the surface of the grating to polychromatic light from a particular incident bearing and observing the light reflected by the surface from specified reception bearing.

  16. Anomalous diffraction approximation limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Videen, Gorden; Chýlek, Petr

    It has been reported in a recent article [Liu, C., Jonas, P.R., Saunders, C.P.R., 1996. Accuracy of the anomalous diffraction approximation to light scattering by column-like ice crystals. Atmos. Res., 41, pp. 63-69] that the anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) accuracy does not depend on particle refractive index, but instead is dependent on the particle size parameter. Since this is at odds with previous research, we thought these results warranted further discussion.

  17. Diffraction as tunneling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nussenzveig, H. M.; Wiscombe, W. J.

    1987-01-01

    A new approximation to the short-wavelength scattering amplitude from an impenetrable sphere is presented. It is uniform in the scattering angle and it is more accurate than previously known approximations (including Fock's theory of diffraction) by up to several orders of magnitude. It remains valid in the transition to long-wavelength scattering. It leads to a new physical picture of diffraction, as tunneling through an inertial barrier.

  18. Analysis of the backscatter spectrum in an ionospheric modification experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, H.

    1973-01-01

    Predictions of the backscatter spectrum are compared, including effects of ionospheric inhomogeneity with experimental observations of incoherent backscatter from an artificially heated region. Calculations show that the strongest backscatter echo received is not, in fact, from the reflection level, but from a region some distance below (about 0.5 km for an experiment carried out at Arecibo), where the pump wave from a HF transmitter approximately 100 kW) is below the threshold for parametric amplification. By taking the standing wave pattern of the pump into account, asymmetry is explained of the up-shifted and down-shifted plasma lines in the backscatter spectrum, and the several peaks typically observed in the region of the spectrum near the HF transmitter frequency.

  19. Objective backscattering properties measurements at 2.52 terahertz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qi; Zhou, Yi; Li, Qian; Fan, Chang-Kun; Zhao, Yong-Peng; Chen, De-Ying

    2016-10-01

    We present a system to measure objective backscattering properties at 2.52 terahertz (THz). The optical setup combining 90° off-axis parabolic mirrors with 15° off-axis parabolic mirror decreases the size of the system and then realizes its compact structure. The calibration object, a conducting sphere with a diameter of 50 mm, was introduced to eliminate the influence of the instability of THz radiation and the background noise on measurement results. The lock-in amplifier was adopted to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and then make it possible to observe delicate backscattering behaviors on the surface of the object. Backscattering properties of four scale models were measured in this paper. Experimental results indicate that the maximal error of our system is less than 1 dB, paving the way for practical measurements of objective backscattering properties at THz frequencies.

  20. Power coupling characteristics between FBG and back-scattering signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianzhi; Zhao, Desheng; Hou, Yuemin; Sun, Baochen

    2017-03-01

    The property and compatibility between fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and back-scattering signals are investigated by employing optical time domain reflectometry. We compare the power spectrums of spontaneous Brillouin scattering (SpBS), simultaneous Brillouin scattering (SBS) and Rayleigh scattering (RS), and coupling mechanism between FBG and back-scattering signal is explored. Experimental results show that the region of FBG contributes to the backscatter power and causes the desired reflection, and the power peak of FBG in SBS power spectrum is the sharpest among back-scattering light power spectrums and broadens with the decrease of spatial resolution. Moreover, the FBG-based method is used to find the location of temperature or stain event for scatter-based distributed sensors.

  1. Coherent backscattering of light with nonlinear atomic scatterers

    SciTech Connect

    Wellens, T.; Gremaud, B.; Delande, D.; Miniatura, C.

    2006-01-15

    We study coherent backscattering of a monochromatic laser by a dilute gas of cold two-level atoms in the weakly nonlinear regime. The nonlinear response of the atoms results in a modification of both the average field propagation (nonlinear refractive index) and the scattering events. Using a perturbative approach, the nonlinear effects arise from inelastic two-photon scattering processes. We present a detailed diagrammatic derivation of the elastic and inelastic components of the backscattering signal for both scalar and vectorial photons. In particular, we show that the coherent backscattering phenomenon originates in some cases from the interference between three different scattering amplitudes. This is in marked contrast with the linear regime where it is due to the interference between two different scattering amplitudes. In particular we show that, if elastically scattered photons are filtered out from the photodetection signal, the nonlinear backscattering enhancement factor exceeds the linear barrier of 2, consistently with a three-amplitude interference effect.

  2. Aerosol measurement program strategy for global aerosol backscatter model development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowdle, David A.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose was to propose a balanced program of aerosol backscatter research leading to the development of a global model of aerosol backscatter. Such a model is needed for feasibility studies and systems simulation studies for NASA's prospective satellite-based Doppler lidar wind measurement system. Systems of this kind measure the Doppler shift in the backscatter return from small atmospheric aerosol wind tracers (of order 1 micrometer diameter). The accuracy of the derived local wind estimates and the degree of global wind coverage for such a system are limited by the local availability and by the global scale distribution of natural aerosol particles. The discussions here refer primarily to backscatter model requirements at CO2 wavelengths, which have been selected for most of the Doppler lidar systems studies to date. Model requirements for other potential wavelengths would be similar.

  3. Preliminary Lidar Experiment to Study the Backscatter Amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razenkov, Igor A.; Banakh, Victor A.

    2016-06-01

    Long-term continuous measurements for detection relative backscatter amplification on a horizontal path of 2 km long are performed by using a specific micro pulse lidar. The laser beam path is limited by a solid obstacle. The lidar is located next to an ultrasonic anemometer that measures 3D wind velocity and temperature; the laser spot on the obstacle is observed by using a telephoto lens. The results showed that the backscatter amplification has a clear diurnal variation. Moreover, the backscatter amplification was completely absent in the morning and evening under neutral stratification in the atmospheric surface layer. At night and in the daytime there was a significant increase of the backscatter amplification coefficient.

  4. Coherent backscattering of light in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenova, E. V. Kuz'min, V. L.; Romanov, V. P.

    2009-03-15

    Multiple light scattering by director fluctuations in nematic liquid crystals is considered. A uniform director orientation is assumed to be specified by an applied magnetic field. The coherent backscattering effect, which consists in the presence of a sharp light backscattering peak, is studied. The Bethe-Salpeter equation is used to calculate the multiple scattering intensity taking into account the contributions of ladder and cyclic diagrams. An analytical expression for the angular and polarization dependences of the coherent backscattering intensity is obtained in terms of the diffusion approximation. The calculation and experimental results are compared. The developed theory is shown to qualitatively describe the elliptical shape of the backscattering cone, to explain the absence of a coherent contribution for crossed polarizations, and to calculate the relative peak height.

  5. Terrain-analysis procedures for modeling radar backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, G. G.; Berlin, G. L.; Pike, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    Procedures developed to obtain both raw measured and surface roughness statistics for radar backscatter modeling are described. A comprehensive and highly flexible software package for terrain analysis is introduced.

  6. BASIS: A New Backscattering Spectrometer at the SNS

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Zamponi, Michaela M; Hammons, Stephanie E; Keener, Wylie S; Hagen, Mark E; Herwig, Kenneth W

    2008-01-01

    A new spectrometer named BASIS has recently entered the general user program at the Spallation Neutron Source. BASIS is an acronym for Backscattering Silicon Spectrometer. While there are several operational reactor-based spectrometers that utilize backscattering reflection from silicon single crystals, such as IN10 and IN16 [1] at the ILL, France; HFBS [2] at the NCNR, USA; and SPHERES [3] at the FRM-II, JCNS, Germany, BASIS is the first silicon backscattering spectrometer built on a spallation neutron source. Conceptually, it is similar to previously built time-of-flight backscattering spectrometers that utilize reflections from pyrolytic graphite or mica, such as IRIS [4] and OSIRIS [5] at the ISIS, UK; LAM-80 [6] at the KENS, Japan; or MARS [7] at the SINQ, Switzerland.

  7. Automatic scaling of HF swept-frequency backscatter ionograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Huan; Hu, Yaogai; Jiang, Chunhua; Zhou, Chen; Zhao, Zhengyu

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes a method for automatically scaling HF swept-frequency backscatter ionograms, which can be applied to a low-power oblique backscatter sounding system. Based on the information of vertical echo in the ionogram, propagation mode is recognized from the amplitude differences between E layer and F layer echoes. Points on the leading edge are extracted by using minimum group path delay theory. The spurious points are removed by using residual analysis. A multiple linear polynomial was adopted to fit the extracted leading edge points. Smooth fitting curves can then be obtained. Automatic scaling results from 362 ionograms show that the proposed method can efficiently recognize propagation modes and extract leading edge curves by taking full advantages of echo characteristics and echo amplitudes in the ionograms. This novel method can be applied into real-time backscatter ionogram scaling, which facilitates the extensive usage of oblique backscatter soundings.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of laser backscatter from sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koerber, B. W.; Phillips, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation study of laser backscatter from sea water has been carried out to provide data required to assess the feasibility of measuring inherent optical propagation properties of sea water from an aircraft. The possibility was examined of deriving such information from the backscatter component of the return signals measured by the WRELADS laser airborne depth sounder system. Computations were made for various water turbidity conditions and for different fields of view of the WRELADS receiver. Using a simple model fitted to the computed backscatter data, it was shown that values of the scattering data absorption coefficients can be derived from the initial amplitude and the decay rate of the backscatter envelope.

  9. Simulation of coherent backscattering of light in nematic liquid crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Aksenova, E. V. Kokorin, D. I. Romanov, V. P.

    2012-08-15

    Multiple scattering of light by the fluctuations of the director in a nematic liquid crystal (NLC) aligned by a magnetic field is considered. A peak of coherent backscattering is calculated by numerical simulation. Since the indicatrix of single scattering for a liquid crystal (LC) is known exactly, the calculations are carried out without any simplifying assumptions on the parameters of the liquid crystal. Multiple scattering is simulated as a random walk of photons in the medium. A peak of coherent backscattering in such a medium is very narrow; therefore, the so-called semianalytical method is applied. The parameters of the backscattering peak obtained by numerical simulation are compared with the available experimental data and with the results of analytical approximations. It turns out that the experimental data are in good agreement with the results of simulation. The results of numerical simulation adequately describe the anisotropy and the width of the backscattering peak.

  10. Directional ultrasonic backscattering in polycrystals with elongated grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobkis, O. I.; Yang, L.; Li, J.; Rokhlin, S. I.

    2012-05-01

    An analytical solution for a three dimensional integral representation of the backscattering (BS) coefficient in polycrystals with elongated grains is obtained. The theory was applied to evaluation of experimental data in Ti alloy with duplex microstructure, which consists of micro-textured regions (MTR) and smaller crystallites. Experiment shows that for microstructure characterization there is significant advantage in using the directional ratios of backscattering coefficients instead their absolute values for data analysis.

  11. E and F Layer H.F. Volume Backscatter Reflectivities.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    operations were scheduled for two twenty-four hour runs each week. Three backscatter ionograms , one on boresight and one to east and west of boresight...were made each hour. The ionograms covered 6 to 26 MNlz in freq., and 1000 to 4000 km in range which is the full operating range of the radar. The three... ionograms required about four minutes to complete. ,These were followed by a series of fixed frequency backscatter surroundings to examine the signal

  12. Subgrid-scale backscatter in transitional and turbulent flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piomelli, Ugo; Cabot, William H.; Moin, Parviz; Lee, Sangsan

    1990-01-01

    Most subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulations are absolutely dissipative (that is, they remove energy from the large scales at each point in the physical space). The actual SGS stresses, however, may transfer energy to the large scales (backscatter) at a given location. Direct numerical simulations of turbulent channel flow and compressible isotropic turbulence are used to study the backscatter phenomena. In all flows considered roughly 50 percent of the grid points were experiencing backscatter when a Fourier cutoff filter was used. The backscatter fraction was less with a Gaussian filter, and intermediate with a box filter in physical space. Moreover, the backscatter and forward scatter contributions to the SGS dissipation were comparable, and each was often much larger than the total SGS dissipation. The SGS dissipation (normalized by total dissipation) increased with filter width almost independently of filter type and Reynolds number. The amount of backscatter showed an increasing trend with Reynolds numbers. In the near-wall region of the channel, events characterized by strong Reynolds shear stress correlated fairly well with areas of high SGS dissipation (both forward and backward). In compressible isotropic turbulence similar results were obtained, independent of fluctuation Mach number.

  13. Leaky Rayleigh wave ultrasonic backscattering enhancements: Experimental tests of theory for tilted solid cylinders and cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gipson, Karen

    Backscattering enhancements due to acoustic wave coupling into leaky Rayleigh waves on solid elastic cubes and cylinders submerged in water are investigated. A quantitative ray description of the launching and propagation of the leaky Rayleigh waves is verified to be useful. Leaky Rayleigh waves are launched on the surface of an elastic object if the acoustic wavevector's projection along the surface matches the wavevector associated with leaky Rayleigh wave propagation. Once launched, leaky Rayleigh waves on the surface of an elastic object will be partially reflected at the object's truncations, and under certain conditions the reflection process may result in a reversal of the leaky wavevector on the surface so that the leaky radiation is oriented in the backscattering direction. Furthermore, the radiated wavefront can have a vanishing Gaussian curvature which produces a far-field caustic. The leaky wave pressure on the surface of the scatterer is approximated by convolving the incident pressure with an appropriate function describing the response of the surface to a localized pressure input, and the method of images is used to approximate the reflection processes. The resulting reflected pressure field on or near the target's surface is then propagated to the far field using the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral. Tone burst experiments confirm that this approach provides reasonable predictions for a variety of cases including the retroreflection of leaky waves around a comer on the face of a cube, the retroreflection of meridional leaky waves along the length of a cylinder, and the retroreflection of leaky waves launched diagonally across the flat face of a cylinder. The frequency dependence of these mechanisms for backscattering from a cylinder was also investigated using a pressure source capable of producing an impulsive pressure, and the observed time returns for end-reflected helical waves agree with theoretical predictions. For the high frequencies

  14. TCR backscattering characterization for microwave remote sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccio, Giovanni; Gennarelli, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    A Trihedral Corner Reflector (TCR) is formed by three mutually orthogonal metal plates of various shapes and is a very important scattering structure since it exhibits a high monostatic Radar Cross Section (RCS) over a wide angular range. Moreover it is a handy passive device with low manufacturing costs and robust geometric construction, the maintenance of its efficiency is not difficult and expensive, and it can be used in all weather conditions (i.e., fog, rain, smoke, and dusty environment). These characteristics make it suitable as reference target and radar enhancement device for satellite- and ground-based microwave remote sensing techniques. For instance, TCRs have been recently employed to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the backscattered signal in the case of urban ground deformation monitoring [1] and dynamic survey of civil infrastructures without natural corners as the Musmeci bridge in Basilicata, Italy [2]. The region of interest for the calculation of TCR's monostatic RCS is here confined to the first quadrant containing the boresight direction. The backscattering term is presented in closed form by evaluating the far-field scattering integral involving the contributions related to the direct illumination and the internal bouncing mechanisms. The Geometrical Optics (GO) laws allow one to determine the field incident on each TCR plate and the patch (integration domain) illuminated by it, thus enabling the use of a Physical Optics (PO) approximation for the corresponding surface current densities to consider for integration on each patch. Accordingly, five contributions are associated to each TCR plate: one contribution is due to the direct illumination of the whole internal surface; two contributions originate by the impinging rays that are simply reflected by the other two internal surfaces; and two contributions are related to the impinging rays that undergo two internal reflections. It is useful to note that the six contributions due to the

  15. Diffraction light analysis method for a diffraction grating imaging lens.

    PubMed

    Ando, Takamasa; Korenaga, Tsuguhiro; Suzuki, Masa-aki; Tanida, Jun

    2014-04-10

    We have developed a new method to analyze the amount and distribution of diffraction light for a diffraction grating lens. We have found that diffraction light includes each-order diffraction light and striped diffraction light. In this paper, we describe characteristics of striped diffraction light and suggest a way to analyze diffraction light. Our analysis method, which considers the structure of diffraction grating steps, can simulate the aberrations of an optical system, each-order diffraction light, and striped diffraction light simultaneously with high accuracy. A comparison between the simulation and experimental results is presented, and we also show how our analysis method can be used to optimize a diffraction grating lens with low flare light.

  16. Multipath analysis diffraction calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statham, Richard B.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes extensions of the Kirchhoff diffraction equation to higher edge terms and discusses their suitability to model diffraction multipath effects of a small satellite structure. When receiving signals, at a satellite, from the Global Positioning System (GPS), reflected signals from the satellite structure result in multipath errors in the determination of the satellite position. Multipath error can be caused by diffraction of the reflected signals and a method of calculating this diffraction is required when using a facet model of the satellite. Several aspects of the Kirchhoff equation are discussed and numerical examples, in the near and far fields, are shown. The vector form of the extended Kirchhoff equation, by adding the Larmor-Tedone and Kottler edge terms, is given as a mathematical model in an appendix. The Kirchhoff equation was investigated as being easily implemented and of good accuracy in the basic form, especially in phase determination. The basic Kirchhoff can be extended for higher accuracy if desired. A brief discussion of the method of moments and the geometric theory of diffraction is included, but seems to offer no clear advantage in implementation over the Kirchhoff for facet models.

  17. Eigenfunction analysis of stochastic backscatter for aberration correction in medical ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varslot, Trond; Mo, Eirik; Krogstad, Harald; Angelsen, Bjørn

    2004-05-01

    A filter for aberration correction in medical ultrasound imaging is presented. The filter is optimal in the sense of maximizing the expected energy in a modified beamformer output of the received acoustic backscatter. The situation considered is frequently found in applications when imaging organs through a body wall: aberration is introduced in a layer close to the transducer, and acoustic backscatter from a scattering region behind the body wall is measured at the transducer surface. The scattering region consists of scatterers randomly distributed with very short correlation length compared to the acoustic wave length of the transmit pulse. The scatterer distribution is therefore assumed to be δ-correlated. Theoretical considerations imply that maximizing the expected energy in a modified beamformer output signal naturally leads to eigenfunctions of a Fredholm integral operator, where the associated kernel function is a spatial correlation function of the received stochastic signal. Aberration characterization and aberration correction have been studied for simulated data constructed to mimic aberration introduced by the abdominal wall. The results compare well with what is obtained using a diffraction limited time-reversal filter based on simulated point source data.

  18. Robust diffraction correction method for high-frequency ultrasonic tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Balasundar

    2001-05-01

    The computation of quantitative ultrasonic parameters such as the attenuation or backscatter coefficient requires compensation for diffraction effects. In this work a simple and accurate diffraction correction method for skin characterization requiring only a single focal zone is developed. The advantage of this method is that the transducer need not be mechanically repositioned to collect data from several focal zones, thereby reducing the time of imaging and preventing motion artifacts. Data were first collected under controlled conditions from skin of volunteers using a high-frequency system (center frequency=33 MHz, BW=28 MHz) at 19 focal zones through axial translation. Using these data, mean backscatter power spectra were computed as a function of the distance between the transducer and the tissue, which then served as empirical diffraction correction curves for subsequent data. The method was demonstrated on patients patch-tested for contact dermatitis. The computed attenuation coefficient slope was significantly (p<0.05) lower at the affected site (0.13+/-0.02 dB/mm/MHz) compared to nearby normal skin (0.2+/-0.05 dB/mm/MHz). The mean backscatter level was also significantly lower at the affected site (6.7+/-2.1 in arbitrary units) compared to normal skin (11.3+/-3.2). These results show diffraction corrected ultrasonic parameters can differentiate normal from affected skin tissues.

  19. Robust diffraction correction method for high-frequency ultrasonic tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Balasundar

    2004-05-01

    The computation of quantitative ultrasonic parameters such as the attenuation or backscatter coefficient requires compensation for diffraction effects. In this work a simple and accurate diffraction correction method for skin characterization requiring only a single focal zone is developed. The advantage of this method is that the transducer need not be mechanically repositioned to collect data from several focal zones, thereby reducing the time of imaging and preventing motion artifacts. Data were first collected under controlled conditions from skin of volunteers using a high-frequency system (center frequency=33 MHz, BW=28 MHz) at 19 focal zones through axial translation. Using these data, mean backscatter power spectra were computed as a function of the distance between the transducer and the tissue, which then served as empirical diffraction correction curves for subsequent data. The method was demonstrated on patients patch-tested for contact dermatitis. The computed attenuation coefficient slope was significantly (p<0.05) lower at the affected site (0.13+/-0.02 dB/mm/MHz) compared to nearby normal skin (0.2+/-0.05 dB/mm/MHz). The mean backscatter level was also significantly lower at the affected site (6.7+/-2.1 in arbitrary units) compared to normal skin (11.3+/-3.2). These results show diffraction corrected ultrasonic parameters can differentiate normal from affected skin tissues.

  20. Experimental Program to Elucidate and Control Stimulated Brillouin and Raman Backscattering in Long-Scale Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Wilke, M.D.

    1998-10-19

    Laser-plasma instability is a serious concern for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where laser beams illuminate the interior of a cavity (called a hohlraum) to produce X-rays to drive the implosion of a fusion capsule. Stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscattering (SRS and SBS) could result in unacceptably high laser reflectivities. Unfortunately, it is impossible at present to fully simulate these processes realistically. The authors experimental program aims to understand these instabilities by pursuing a dual strategy. (1) They use a gas-filled hohlraum design, which best approaches ignition-hohlraum conditions, on the Nova laser to identify important non linear trends. (2) They are shifting towards more fundamental experiments with a nearly diffraction-limited interaction laser beam illuminating extremely well characterized plasmas on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos to probe the relevant fundamental processes.

  1. Lead foil in dental X-ray film: Backscattering rejection or image intensifier?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Delben, G. J.; Godoi, W. C.; Swinka-Filho, V.

    2014-11-01

    Dental X-ray films are still largely used due to sterilization issues, simplicity and, mainly, economic reasons. These films almost always are double coated (double emulsion) and have a lead foil in contact with the film for X-ray backscattering rejection. Herein we explore the use of the lead foil as an image intensifier. In these studies, spatial resolution was investigated when images were acquired on the dental X-ray films with and without the lead foil. Also, the lead foil was subjected to atomic analysis (fluorescent measurements) and structure analysis (X-ray diffraction). We determined that the use of the lead foil reduces the exposure time, however, does not affect the spatial resolution on the acquired images. This suggests that the fluorescent radiation spread is smaller than the grain sizes of the dental X-ray films.

  2. Single molecule diffraction.

    PubMed

    Spence, J C H; Doak, R B

    2004-05-14

    For solving the atomic structure of organic molecules such as small proteins which are difficult to crystallize, the use of a jet of doped liquid helium droplets traversing a continuous high energy electron beam is proposed as a means of obtaining electron diffraction patterns (serial crystallography). Organic molecules (such as small proteins) within the droplet (and within a vitreous ice jacket) may be aligned by use of a polarized laser beam. Iterative methods for solving the phase problem are indicated. Comparisons with a related plan for pulsed x-ray diffraction from single proteins in a molecular beam are provided.

  3. Biopolymer holographic diffraction gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savić Šević, Svetlana; Pantelić, Dejan

    2008-03-01

    Surface-relief diffraction gratings are holographically recorded in dextran sensitized with ammonium dichromate (DCD). DCD was exposed with single-frequency 200 mW diode pumped ND-YAG laser, at 532 nm. The diffraction grating profiles were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that different surface profiles could be obtained. Gratings with 330 lines/mm spatial frequencies were made. Existence of higher harmonics in Fourier Transform of non-sinusoidal profiles shows that DCD is capable of recording spatial frequencies up to 1320 lines/mm (four times fundamental frequency). The measured maximum relief depth of the DCD grating is 402 nm.

  4. Criteria of backscattering in chiral one-way photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chang, Shu-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Optical isolators are important devices in photonic circuits. To reduce the unwanted reflection in a robust manner, several setups have been realized using nonreciprocal schemes. In this study, we show that the propagating modes in a strongly-guided chiral photonic crystal (no breaking of the reciprocity) are not backscattering-immune even though they are indeed insensitive to many types of scatters. Without the protection from the nonreciprocity, the backscattering occurs under certain circumstances. We present a perturbative method to calculate the backscattering of chiral photonic crystals in the presence of chiral/achiral scatters. The model is, essentially, a simplified analogy to the first-order Born approximation. Under reasonable assumptions based on the behaviors of chiral photonic modes, we obtained the expression of reflection coefficients which provides criteria for the prominent backscattering in such chiral structures. Numerical examinations using the finite-element method were also performed and the results agree well with the theoretical prediction. From both our theory and numerical calculations, we find that the amount of backscattering critically depends on the symmetry of scatter cross sections. Strong reflection takes place when the azimuthal Fourier components of scatter cross sections have an order l of 2. Chiral scatters without these Fourier components would not efficiently reflect the chiral photonic modes. In addition, for these chiral propagating modes, disturbances at the most significant parts of field profiles do not necessarily result in the most effective backscattering. The observation also reveals what types of scatters or defects should be avoided in one-way applications of chiral structures in order to minimize the backscattering.

  5. Coherent Backscattering in Los Albedo Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R. M.; Hapke, B. W.; Hale, A. S.; Smythe, W. D.; Piatek, J.

    2002-09-01

    The opposition effect [1] observed in phase curves of materials in the lab and on planetary surfaces is attributed to two processes: 'shadow hiding opposition effect' (SHOE) and 'coherent backscattering opposition effect' (CBOE) [2,3,4]. The relative contributions of SHOE and CBOE are studied by measuring reflectance phase curves in circularly polarized light. If single scattering predominates, the circular polarization ratio (CPR) decreases with decreasing phase angle. If multiple scattering predominates, the CPR strongly increases. We observed this increase in CPR in highly reflective media [5,6,7]. In low reflectance media most of the returned signal is singly scattered and CPR is not expected to sharply increase. We have found that most such materials indeed exhibit only a slight CPR increase. However, lunar soils show a strong CPR increase [8]. Recently we encountered another interesting counter example in Boron Carbide-a material with albedo even lower than the Moon's. We find a significant CPR increase, a result inconsistent with the conventional interpretation of CBOE [8]. This suggests that albedo alone is not the principal regulator of CBOE. This CBOE may be due to multiple scattering within individual particles [10]. Unusual particle shapes may facilitate this process. Understanding this behavior contributes to the development of models that can retrieve textural properties from remote sensing data. Work performed at JPL/PITT under NASA PG&G grants. 1.Geherels, T. Astrophys. J, 123, 331-338, 1956. 2. Hapke, B. Icarus, 67, 246-280, 1986. 3. Shkuratov, Yu. SA-A.J., 27, 581-583, 1983. 4. Hapke, B. Icarus, 88, 407-417, 1990. 5. Nelson, R., et al. Icarus 131, 223-230, 1998. 6. Nelson, R., et al Icarus, 147, 545-558, 2000. 7. Nelson, R., et al. Planet. Space Sci, 2002. 8. Hapke B. et al. Science, 260, 509-511. 9. Mishchenko, M.I. Earth, Moon and Planets, 58, 127-144, 1992. 10. Hapke, B. Icarus, 157, 534-537, 2002

  6. The diffracted distribution of classical trajectories and interference between electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guo-Peng; Zhang, Yan-Hui; Cai, Xiang-Ji; Xu, Xiu-Lan; Kang, Li-Sha

    2016-10-01

    We use a semiclassical approximation to study the escape of electrons through a circular mesostructure with the diffractive effect at the entrance lead taken into consideration. We find that the fluctuating shapes of the escape probability manifests a good agreement with the diffracted distributions of the incident angles for different transverse modes, and show that several classical trajectories with certain lengths have prominent contributions on the escape probability. In addition, we define the coherence factor to investigate the interference between electrons for different transverse modes and we find that it is the coherent backscattering that is responsible for the prominent interference. Moreover, we find there is a good correspondence between the distribution of classical trajectories and the time-reversed path.

  7. Diffract, then destroy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Philip

    2016-09-01

    A new implementation of X-ray diffraction using free-electron lasers can take snapshots of biological molecules that are inaccessible via X-ray crystallography. As Philip Ball reports, the technique can even be used to create stop-motion films of dynamic molecular processes

  8. DIFFRACTION FROM MODEL CRYSTALS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although calculating X-ray diffraction patterns from atomic coordinates of a crystal structure is a widely available capability, calculation from non-periodic arrays of atoms has not been widely applied to cellulose. Non-periodic arrays result from modeling studies that, even though started with at...

  9. Calculating cellulose diffraction patterns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although powder diffraction of cellulose is a common experiment, the patterns are not widely understood. The theory is mathematical, there are numerous different crystal forms, and the conventions are not standardized. Experience with IR spectroscopy is not directly transferable. An awful error, tha...

  10. Inclusive diffraction at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Favart, Laurent

    2011-07-15

    Results are reported on recent measurements, performed by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations, of the cross section of the diffractive deep-inelastic process ep{yields}eXp using different experimental methods. In particular, first results using the Very Forward Proton Spectrometer of H1 are discussed.

  11. Determination of the uniformity of uranium fission deposits using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and alpha-particle scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasson, O. A.; Schrack, R. A.

    1989-10-01

    The uniformity of the areal density of uranium deposits used in neutron induced fission cross-section measurements has been measured using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry of 1-MeV He + ions as well as by scanning the natural α-particle decay of the uranium. The measurements used the 3-MV positive-ion accelerator at the National Institute of Standards and Technology along with a versatile scattering chamber with numerous ports, five-axis goniometer, target ladder, and solid state detector. The variation in areal density of a 265- μg/cm 3 UO 2 deposit with a diameter of 89 mm was measured using the 1-MeV He + beam. The results are in excellent agreement with those obtained from α-particle activity measurements. However, the Rutherford backscattering data provide better definition of the uniformity near the edge of the deposits. Our experience indicates that the backscatter technique is useful for measuring variations of 1% in areal densities but is less sensitive to the absolute areal density. The stoichiometry of the deposit was additionally measured with X-ray diffraction.

  12. Modeling multi-frequency diurnal backscatter from a walnut orchard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Kyle C.; Dobson, Myron C.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1991-01-01

    The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering Model (MIMICS) is used to model scatterometer data that were obtained during the August 1987 EOS (Earth Observing System) synergism study. During this experiment, truck-based scatterometers were used to measure radar backscatter from a walnut orchard in Fresno County, California. Multipolarized L- and X-band data were recorded for orchard plots for which dielectric and evapotranspiration characteristics were monitored. MIMICS is used to model a multiangle data set in which a single orchard plot was observed at varying impedance angles and a series of diurnal measurements in which backscatter from this same plot was measured continuously over several 24-h periods. MIMICS accounts for variations in canopy backscatter driven by changes in canopy state that occur diurnally as well as on longer time scales. L-band backscatter is dependent not only on properties of the vegetation but also on properties of the underlying soil surface. The behavior of the X-band backscatter is dominated by properties of the tree crowns.

  13. Advances in direct and diffraction methods for surface structural determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, S. Y.

    1999-08-01

    I describe recent advances in low-energy electron diffraction holography and photoelectron diffraction holography. These are direct methods for determining the surface structure. I show that for LEED and PD spectra taken in an energy and angular mesh, the relative phase between the reference wave and the scattered wave has a known geometric form if the spectra are always taken from within a small angular cone in the near backscattering direction. By using data in the backscattering small cone at each direction of interest, a simple algorithm is developed to invert the spectra and extract object atomic positions with no input of calculated dynamic factors. I also describe the use of a convergent iterative method of PD and LEED. The computation time of this method scales as N2, where N is the dimension of the propagator matrix, rather than N3 as in conventional Gaussian substitutional methods. Both the Rehr-Albers separable-propagator cluster approach and the slab-type non-separable approach can be cast in the new iterative form. With substantial savings in computational time and no loss in numerical accuracy, this method is very useful in applications of multiple scattering theory, particularly for systems involving either very large unit cells (>300 atoms) or where no long-range order is present.

  14. MicroDiffraction in the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Goehner, R.P.; Michael, J.R.; Schlienger, M.E.

    1997-12-31

    The identification of crystallographic phases in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) has been limited by the lack of a simple way to obtain electron diffraction data of an unknown while observing the micro structure of the specimen. With the development of Charge Coupled Device (CCD) based detectors, backscattered electron Kikuchi patterns (BEKP), alternately referred to as electron backscattered diffraction patterns (EBSP), can be easily collected. Previously, BEKP has been limited to crystallographic orientation studies due to the poor pattern quality collected with video rate detector systems. With CCD detectors, a typical BEKP can now be acquired from a micron or sub-micron-sized crystal using an exposure time of 1-10 seconds with an accelerating voltage of 10-40 kV and a beam current as low as 0.1 nA. Crystallographic phase analysis using BEKP is unique in that the properly equipped SEM permits high magnification images, BEKP`s, and elemental information to be collected from bulk specimens. BEKP in the SEM has numerous advantages over other electron microscopy crystallographic techniques. The large angular view ( 70 degrees) provided by BEKP and the lack of difficult specimen preparation are distinct advantages of the technique. No sample preparation beyond what is commonly used for SEM specimens is required for BEKP.

  15. Laser light backscatter from intermediate and high Z plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, R. L.; Constantin, C.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Froula, D. H.; Glenzer, S. H.; Suter, L. J.; Niemann, C.

    2006-09-01

    In experiments at the Omega Laser Facility [J. M. Soures et al., Fusion Technol. 30, 492 (1996)], stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) from gasbags filled with krypton and xenon gases was ten times lower than from CO2-filled gasbags with similar electron densities. The SBS backscatter was a 1%-5% for both 527 and 351nm interaction beams at an intensity of ˜1015W /cm2. The SRS backscatter was less than 1%. The 351nm interaction beam is below the threshold for filamentation and the SBS occurs in the density plateau between the blast waves. Inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of the incident and SBS light account for the lower reflectivity from krypton than from CO2. The 527nm interaction beam filaments in the blowoff plasma before the beam propagates through the blast wave, where it is strongly absorbed. Thus, most of the 527nm SBS occurs in the flowing plasma outside the blast waves.

  16. Calculations of radar backscattering coefficient of vegetation-covered soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Schmugge, T. J.; Jackson, T. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A model for simulating the measured backscattering coefficient of vegetation-covered soil surfaces includes both coherent and incoherent components of the backscattered radar pulses from a rough sil surface. The effect of vegetation canopy scattering is also incorporated into the model by making the radar pulse subject to two-way attenuation and volume scattering when it passes through the vegetation layer. Model results agree well with the measured angular distributions of the radar backscattering coefficient for HH polarization at the 1.6 GHz and 4.75 GHz frequencies over grass-covered fields. It was found that the coherent scattering component is very important at angles near nadir, while the vegetation volume scattering is dominant at incident angles 30 degrees.

  17. Effects of optical backscattering on silicon photonic hybrid laser performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacradouni, V.; Klein, J.; Pond, J.

    2016-04-01

    We present numerical results on the effect of backscattering at the junctions of double bus ring resonators in a Vernier ring hybrid laser design. The structure is comprised off a pair of III-V gain media evanescently coupled to a silicon on insulator racetrack comprised of a pair of double bus ring resonators coupled together through straight and flared waveguide sections. We show how the small backscattering at the ring resonator junctions has the effect of splitting and shifting the resonances off the clockwise and counter clockwise propagating modes thereby modifying the feedback spectrum from the ideal case. We then simulate results such as light current (LI) curves, relative intensity noise (RIN) and laser spectrum, and compare the laser performance including backscattering effects with the ideal case.

  18. Backscatter and attenuation properties of mammalian brain tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijekularatne, Pushpani Vihara

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a common category of brain injuries, which contributes to a substantial number of deaths and permanent disability all over the world. Ultrasound technology plays a major role in tissue characterization due to its low cost and portability that could be used to bridge a wide gap in the TBI diagnostic process. This research addresses the ultrasonic properties of mammalian brain tissues focusing on backscatter and attenuation. Orientation dependence and spatial averaging of data were analyzed using the same method resulting from insertion of tissue sample between a transducer and a reference reflector. Apparent backscatter transfer function (ABTF) at 1 to 10 MHz, attenuation coefficient and backscatter coefficient (BSC) at 1 to 5 MHz frequency ranges were measured on ovine brain tissue samples. The resulting ABTF was a monotonically decreasing function of frequency and the attenuation coefficient and BSC generally were increasing functions of frequency, results consistent with other soft tissues such as liver, blood and heart.

  19. Investigation of phonon coherence and backscattering using silicon nanomeshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaeho; Lee, Woochul; Wehmeyer, Geoff; Dhuey, Scott; Olynick, Deirdre L.; Cabrini, Stefano; Dames, Chris; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Yang, Peidong

    2017-01-01

    Phonons can display both wave-like and particle-like behaviour during thermal transport. While thermal transport in silicon nanomeshes has been previously interpreted by phonon wave effects due to interference with periodic structures, as well as phonon particle effects including backscattering, the dominant mechanism responsible for thermal conductivity reductions below classical predictions still remains unclear. Here we isolate the wave-related coherence effects by comparing periodic and aperiodic nanomeshes, and quantify the backscattering effect by comparing variable-pitch nanomeshes. We measure identical (within 6% uncertainty) thermal conductivities for periodic and aperiodic nanomeshes of the same average pitch, and reduced thermal conductivities for nanomeshes with smaller pitches. Ray tracing simulations support the measurement results. We conclude phonon coherence is unimportant for thermal transport in silicon nanomeshes with periodicities of 100 nm and higher and temperatures above 14 K, and phonon backscattering, as manifested in the classical size effect, is responsible for the thermal conductivity reduction.

  20. Bruce Thompson: Adventures and advances in ultrasonic backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margetan, Frank J.

    2012-05-01

    Over the course of his professional career Dr. R. Bruce Thompson published several hundred articles on non-destructive evaluation, the majority dealing with topics in ultrasonics. One longtime research interest of Dr. Thompson, with applications both to microstructure characterization and defect detection, was backscattered grain noise in metals. Over a 20 year period he led a revolving team of staff members and graduate students investigating various aspects of ultrasonic backscatter. As a member of that team I had the privilege of working along side Dr. Thompson for many years, serving as a sort of Dr. Watson to Bruce's Sherlock Holmes. This article discusses Dr. Thompson's general approaches to modeling backscatter, the research topics he chose to explore to systematically elucidate a better understanding of the phenomena, and the many contributions to the field achieved under his leadership. The backscatter work began in earnest around 1990, motivated by a need to improve inspections of aircraft engine components. At that time Dr. Thompson launched two research efforts. The first led to the heuristic Independent Scatterer Model which could be used to estimate the average grain noise level that would be seen in any given ultrasonic inspection. There the contribution from the microstructure was contained in a measureable parameter known as the Figure-of-Merit or FOM. The second research effort, spearheaded by Dr. Jim Rose, led to a formal relationship between FOM and details of the metal microstructure. The combination of the Independent Scattering Model and Rose's formalism provided a powerful tool for investigating backscatter in metals. In this article model developments are briefly reviewed and several illustrative applications are discussed. These include: the determination of grain size and shape from ultrasonic backscatter; grain noise variability in engine-titanium billets and forgings; and the design of ultrasonic inspection systems to improve defect

  1. Broadband enhanced backscattering spectroscopy of strongly scattering media.

    PubMed

    Muskens, O L; Lagendijk, A

    2008-01-21

    We report on a new experimental method for enhanced backscattering spectroscopy (EBS) of strongly scattering media over a bandwidth from 530-1000 nm. The instrument consists of a supercontinuum light source and an angle-dependent detection system using a fiber-coupled grating spectrometer. Using a combination of two setups, the backscattered intensity is obtained over a large angular range and using circularly polarized light. We present broadband EBS of a TiO(2) powder and of a strongly scattering porous GaP layer. In combination with theoretical model fits, the EBS system yields the optical transport mean free path over the available spectral window.

  2. Light backscattering efficiency and related properties of some phytoplankters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yu-Hwan; Bricaud, Annick; Morel, André

    1992-11-01

    By using a set-up that combines an integrating sphere with a spectroradiometer LI-1800 UW, the backscattering properties of nine different phytoplankters grown in culture have been determined experimentally for the wavelengths domain ν = 400 up to 850 nm. Simultaneously, the absorption and attenuation properties, as well as the size distribution function, have been measured. This set of measurements allowed the spectral values of refractive index, and subsequently the volume scattering functions (VSF) of the cells, to be derived, by operating a scattering model previously developed for spherical and homogeneous cells. The backscattering properties, measured within a restricted angular domain (approximately between 132 and 174°), have been compared to theoretical predictions. Although there appear some discrepancies between experimental and predicted values (probably due to experimental errors as well as deviations of actual cells from computational hypotheses), the overall agreement is good; in particular the observed interspecific variations of backscattering values, as well as the backscattering spectral variation typical of each species, are well accounted for by theory. Using the computed VSF, the measured backscattering properties can be converted (assuming spherical and homogeneous cells) into efficiency factors for backscattering ( overlineQbb) . Thhe spectral behavior of overlineQbb appears to be radically different from that for total scattering overlineQb. For small cells, overlineQ (λ) is practically constant over the spectrum, whereas overlineQb(λ) varies approximately according to a power law (λ -2). As the cell size increases, overlineQbb conversely, becomes increasingly featured, whilst overlineQb becomes spectrally flat. The chlorophyll-specific backscattering coefficients ( b b∗ appear highly variable and span nearly two orders of magnitude. The chlorophyll-specific absorption and scattering coefficients, a ∗ and b ∗, are mainly ruled by

  3. Target reflectance measurements for calibration of lidar atmospheric backscatter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, M. J.; Menzies, R. T.; Haner, D. A.; Oppenheim, U. P.; Flamant, P. H.

    1983-01-01

    Wavelength and angular dependence of reflectances and depolarization in the 9-11 micron region are reported for four standard targets: flowers of sulfur, flame-sprayed aluminum, 20-grit sandblasted aluminum, and 400-grit silicon carbon sandpaper. Measurements are presented and compared using a CW CO2 grating-tunable laser in a laboratory backscatter apparatus, an integrating sphere, and a coherent pulsed TEA-CO2 lidar system operating in the 9-11 micron region. Reflectance theory related to the use of hard targets to calibrate lidar atmospheric backscatter data is discussed.

  4. Coherent Effects in Microwave Backscattering Models for Forest Canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan; McDonald, Kyle

    1995-01-01

    In modeling forest canopies, several scattering mechanisms are taken into account: 1) volume scattering, 2) surface-volume interaction, and 3) surface scattering from forest floor. Depending on the structural and dielectric characteristics of forest canopies, the relative contribution of each mechanism in the total backscatter signal of an imaging radar can vary. In this paper, two commonly used first order discrete scattering models, Distorted Born Approximation (DBA) and Radiative Transfer (RT) are used to simulate the backscattered power received by polarimetric radars at P-, L-, and C-bands over coniferous and deciduous forests. The difference between the two models resides on the coherent effect in the surface-volume interaction terms.

  5. Floc Growth and Changes in ADV Acoustic Backscatter Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouhnia, M.; Keyvani, A.; Strom, K.

    2013-12-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to examine the effect of mud floc growth on the acoustic back-scatter signal recorded by a Nortek Vector acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV). Several studies have shown that calibration equations can be developed to link the backscatter strength with average suspended sediment concentration (SSC) when the sediment particle size distribution remains constant. However, when mud is present, the process of flocculation can alter the suspended particle size distribution. Past studies have shown that it is still unclear as to the degree of dependence of the calibration equation on changes in floc size. Part of the ambiguity lies in the fact that flocs can be porous and rather loosely packed and therefore might not scatter to the same extent as a grain of sand. In addition, direct, detailed measurements of floc size have not accompanied experiments examining the dependence of ADV backscatter and suspended sediment concentration. In this research, a set of laboratory experiments is used to test how floc growth affects the backscatter strength. The laboratory data is examined in light of an analytic model that was developed based on scatter theory to account for changes in both SSC and the floc properties of size and density. For the experiments, a turbulent suspension was created in a tank with a rotating paddle. Fixed concentrations of a mixture of kaolinite and montmorillonite were added to the tank in a step-wise manner. For each step, the flocs were allowed to grow to their equilibrium size before breaking the flocs with high turbulent mixing, adding more sediment, and then returning the mixing rate to a range suitable for the re-growth of flocs. During each floc growth phase, data was simultaneously collected at the same elevation in the tank using a floc camera to capture the changes in floc size, a Nortek Vector ADV for the acoustic backscatter, and a Campbell Scientific OBS 3+ for optical backscatter. Physical samples of the

  6. Recovering an electromagnetic obstacle by a few phaseless backscattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingzhi; Liu, Hongyu; Wang, Yuliang

    2017-03-01

    We consider the electromagnetic scattering from a convex polyhedral PEC or PMC obstacle due to a time-harmonic incident plane wave. It is shown that the modulus of the far-field pattern in the backscattering aperture possesses a certain local maximum behavior. Using the local maximum indicating phenomena, one can determine the exterior unit normal directions, as well as the face areas, of the front faces of the obstacle. Then we propose a recovery scheme of reconstructing the obstacle by phaseless backscattering measurements. This work significantly extends our recent study in Li and Liu (2014 preprint) from two dimensions and acoustic scattering to the more challenging three dimensions and electromagnetic scattering.

  7. Light Backscattering Polarization Patterns from Turbid Media: Theory and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovic, Milun J.; Kattawar, George W.; Mehrubeoglu, Mehrube; Cameron, Brent D.; Wang, Lihong V.; Rastegar, Sohi; Coté, Gerard L.

    1999-05-01

    We present both experimental measurements and Monte-Carlo-based simulations of the diffusely backscattered intensity patterns that arise from illuminating a turbid medium with a polarized laser beam. It is rigorously shown that, because of axial symmetry of the system, only seven elements of the effective backscattering Mueller matrix are independent. A new numerical method that allows simultaneous calculation of all 16 elements of the two-dimensional Mueller matrix is used. To validate our method we compared calculations to measurements from a turbid medium that consisted of polystyrene spheres of different sizes and concentrations in deionized water. The experimental and numerical results are in excellent agreement.

  8. Light backscattering polarization patterns from turbid media: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Raković, M J; Kattawar, G W; Mehrubeoğlu, M B; Cameron, B D; Wang, L V; Rastegar, S; Coté, G L

    1999-05-20

    We present both experimental measurements and Monte-Carlo-based simulations of the diffusely backscattered intensity patterns that arise from illuminating a turbid medium with a polarized laser beam. It is rigorously shown that, because of axial symmetry of the system, only seven elements of the effective backscattering Mueller matrix are independent. A new numerical method that allows simultaneous calculation of all 16 elements of the two-dimensional Mueller matrix is used. To validate our method we compared calculations to measurements from a turbid medium that consisted of polystyrene spheres of different sizes and concentrations in deionized water. The experimental and numerical results are in excellent agreement.

  9. Thresholds of Raman backscatter: effects of collisions and Landau damping

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K.; Kruer, W.L.

    1983-11-03

    We present 1.5 dimensional simulations and theory of the threshold of Raman backscatter for a variety of density profiles, background temperatures and collision frequencies, nu/sub ei/. The simulations show Raman backscatter of approx. 4 x 10/sup -4/ at intensities approx. 30 times below the del n threshold which we suggest is due to light scattering off of noise electron plasma waves. The absorption drops significantly and the threshold rises as the Landau damping ..omega../sub i/ and/or nu/sub ei/ approach the growth rate ..gamma../sub 0/. Many experiments are already in the collisional regime.

  10. X-ray backscatter imaging for aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shedlock, Daniel; Edwards, Talion; Toh, Chin

    2011-06-23

    Scatter x-ray imaging (SXI) is a real time, digital, x-ray backscatter imaging technique that allows radiographs to be taken from one side of an object. This x-ray backscatter imaging technique offers many advantages over conventional transmission radiography that include single-sided access and extremely low radiation fields compared to conventional open source industrial radiography. Examples of some applications include the detection of corrosion, foreign object debris, water intrusion, cracking, impact damage and leak detection in a variety of material such as aluminum, composites, honeycomb structures, and titanium.

  11. SINGLE CRYSTAL NEUTRON DIFFRACTION.

    SciTech Connect

    KOETZLE,T.F.

    2001-03-13

    Single-crystal neutron diffraction measures the elastic Bragg reflection intensities from crystals of a material, the structure of which is the subject of investigation. A single crystal is placed in a beam of neutrons produced at a nuclear reactor or at a proton accelerator-based spallation source. Single-crystal diffraction measurements are commonly made at thermal neutron beam energies, which correspond to neutron wavelengths in the neighborhood of 1 Angstrom. For high-resolution studies requiring shorter wavelengths (ca. 0.3-0.8 Angstroms), a pulsed spallation source or a high-temperature moderator (a ''hot source'') at a reactor may be used. When complex structures with large unit-cell repeats are under investigation, as is the case in structural biology, a cryogenic-temperature moderator (a ''cold source'') may be employed to obtain longer neutron wavelengths (ca. 4-10 Angstroms). A single-crystal neutron diffraction analysis will determine the crystal structure of the material, typically including its unit cell and space group, the positions of the atomic nuclei and their mean-square displacements, and relevant site occupancies. Because the neutron possesses a magnetic moment, the magnetic structure of the material can be determined as well, from the magnetic contribution to the Bragg intensities. This latter aspect falls beyond the scope of the present unit; for information on magnetic scattering of neutrons see Unit 14.3. Instruments for single-crystal diffraction (single-crystal diffractometers or SCDs) are generally available at the major neutron scattering center facilities. Beam time on many of these instruments is available through a proposal mechanism. A listing of neutron SCD instruments and their corresponding facility contacts is included in an appendix accompanying this unit.

  12. Central Diffraction in ALICE

    SciTech Connect

    Schicker, R.

    2011-07-15

    The ALICE experiment consists of a central barrel in the pseudorapidity range -0.9<{eta}<0.9 and of additional detectors covering about 3 units of pseudorapidity on either side of the central barrel. Such a geometry allows the tagging of single and double gap events. The status of the analysis of such diffractive events in proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 7 TeV is presented.

  13. Diffraction before destruction

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Henry N.; Caleman, Carl; Timneanu, Nicusor

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free-electron lasers have opened up the possibility of structure determination of protein crystals at room temperature, free of radiation damage. The femtosecond-duration pulses of these sources enable diffraction signals to be collected from samples at doses of 1000 MGy or higher. The sample is vaporized by the intense pulse, but not before the scattering that gives rise to the diffraction pattern takes place. Consequently, only a single flash diffraction pattern can be recorded from a crystal, giving rise to the method of serial crystallography where tens of thousands of patterns are collected from individual crystals that flow across the beam and the patterns are indexed and aggregated into a set of structure factors. The high-dose tolerance and the many-crystal averaging approach allow data to be collected from much smaller crystals than have been examined at synchrotron radiation facilities, even from radiation-sensitive samples. Here, we review the interaction of intense femtosecond X-ray pulses with materials and discuss the implications for structure determination. We identify various dose regimes and conclude that the strongest achievable signals for a given sample are attained at the highest possible dose rates, from highest possible pulse intensities. PMID:24914146

  14. Polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    King, A.; Reischig, P.; Adrien, J.; Peetermans, S.; Ludwig, W.

    2014-11-15

    This tutorial review introduces the use of polychromatic radiation for 3D grain mapping using X-ray diffraction contrast tomography. The objective is to produce a 3D map of the grain shapes and orientations within a bulk, millimeter-sized polycrystalline sample. The use of polychromatic radiation enables the standard synchrotron X-ray technique to be applied in a wider range of contexts: 1) Using laboratory X-ray sources allows a much wider application of the diffraction contrast tomography technique. 2) Neutron sources allow large samples, or samples containing high Z elements to be studied. 3) Applied to synchrotron sources, smaller samples may be treated, or faster measurements may be possible. Challenges and particularities in the data acquisition and processing, and the limitations of the different variants, are discussed. - Highlights: • We present a tutorial review of polychromatic diffraction contrast tomography techniques. • The use of polychromatic radiation allows the standard synchrotron DCT technique to be extended to a range of other sources. • The characteristics and limitations of all variants of the techniques are derived, discussed and compared. • Examples using laboratory X-ray and cold neutron radiation are presented. • Suggestions for the future development of these techniques are presented.

  15. Spherical-wave effects in photoelectron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagurton, M.; Bullock, E. L.; Saiki, R.; Kaduwela, A.; Brundle, C. R.; Fadley, C. S.; Rehr, J. J.

    1986-02-01

    The influence of spherical-wave (SW) effects on the analysis of photoelectron diffraction (PD) data is considered by comparing full SW single-scattering calculations with similar calculations based upon the plane-wave (PW) approximation and a new approximation for including SW effects (SW(1)) due to Rehr, Albers, Natoli, and Stern, as well as with experimental data involving both scanned-energy and scanned-angle measurements. In general, SW effects are found to be much more important in forward scattering and to explain prior empirical adjustments of PW x-ray PD scattering amplitudes at higher energies of >~500 eV. The more easily used SW(1) approximation is also seen to allow very well for SW effects. Not all PD data are expected to be equally sensitive to SW corrections. For example, scanned-energy data for S/Ni(001) emphasizing backscattering events are about equally well described by the PW and SW models, whereas higher-energy azimuthal-scan data for O/Ni(001) in which forward scattering is dominant require SW corrections to describe some, but not all, directions of emission quantitatively.

  16. Simulation of Neutron Backscattering applied to organic material detection

    SciTech Connect

    Forero, N. C.; Cruz, A. H.; Cristancho, F.

    2007-10-26

    The Neutron Backscattering technique is tested when performing the task of localizing hydrogenated explosives hidden in soil. Detector system, landmine, soil and neutron source are simulated with Geant4 in order to obtain the number of neutrons detected when several parameters like mine composition, relative position mine-source and soil moisture are varied.0.

  17. Modeling and Measuring Acoustic Backscatter from Fish Aggregations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-30

    of the abundance, spatial distribution, schooling behaviour and acoustic backscatter of the Namibian pilchard. Cruise Report 99-4, Dr. Fridtjof ... Nansen . 103 pp. Rudstam, L, Horne, J., Fleischer, G. Report from the Great Lakes Acoustic Workshop III: Translation of acoustic data to fish abundance

  18. Backscattering enhancement from a conducting surface with isotropic roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knotts, M. E.; O'Donnell, K. A.

    1993-05-01

    Measurements are presented of the angular distribution of scattered intensity associated with backscattering enhancement from a conducting surface with two-dimensional roughness. For a linearly polarized incident wave, the diffusely scattered intensity is found to be significantly polarization-dependent.

  19. A relationship between ultrasonic integrated backscatter and myocardial contractile function.

    PubMed Central

    Wickline, S A; Thomas, L J; Miller, J G; Sobel, B E; Perez, J E

    1985-01-01

    We have shown previously that the physiologic, mechanical cardiac cycle is associated with a parallel, cardiac cycle-dependent variation of integrated backscatter (IB). However, the mechanisms responsible are not known. The mathematical and physiological considerations explored in the present study suggest that the relationship between backscatter and myocardial contractile function reflects cyclic alterations in myofibrillar elastic parameters, with the juxtaposition of intracellular and extracellular elastic elements that have different intrinsic acoustic impedances providing an appropriately sized scattering interface at the cellular level. Cardiac cycle-dependent changes in the degree of local acoustic impedance mismatch therefore may elicit concomitant changes in backscatter. Because acoustic impedance is determined partly by elastic modulus, changes in local elastic moduli resulting from the non-Hookian behavior of myocardial elastic elements exposed to stretch may alter the extent of impedance mismatch. When cardiac cell mechanical behavior is represented by a three-component Maxwell-type model of muscle mechanics, the systolic decrease in IB that we have observed experimentally is predicted. Our prior observations of regional intramural differences in IB and the dependence of IB on global contractile function are accounted for as well. When the model is tested experimentally by assessing its ability to predict the regional and global behavior of backscatter in response to passive left ventricular distention, good concordance is observed. Images PMID:3908482

  20. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter: Elwha River Delta, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finlayson, David P.; Miller, Ian M.; Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    The surveys were conducted using the R/V Parke Snavely outfitted with an interferometric sidescan sonar for swath mapping and real-time kinematic navigation equipment for accurate shallow water operations. This report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata.

  1. Simultaneous 2D Doppler backscattering from edge turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David; Brunner, Kai; Freethy, Simon; Huang, Billy; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Vann, Roddy

    2015-11-01

    The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) diagnostic (previously at MAST and now at NSTX-U) actively probes the plasma edge using a wide (80 degree beam width) and broadband (10-34.5 GHz) beam. It digitizes the phase and amplitude of the Doppler backscattered signal using a receiving array of eight antennas which can be focused in any direction post shot to an angular range of 6-24 degree FWHM. This allows Doppler BackScattering (DBS) experiments to be conducted in every direction within the field of view simultaneously. This capability is unique to SAMI and is a novel way of conducting DBS experiments. SAMI has measured the magnetic pitch angle in the edge for the first time using a backscattering diagnostic. This is possible with simultaneous 2D DBS because the maximum backscattered power is perpendicular to the turbulence and turbulence is elongated along the magnetic field. SAMI has also studied the effect of NBI and the L-H transition on turbulent velocity, and turbulence suppression in the edge during H-mode. Initial results from all of these studies will be presented. This work is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council Grants EP/K504178 and EP/H016732.

  2. Method and Apparatus for Computed Imaging Backscatter Radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shedlock, Daniel (Inventor); Meng, Christopher (Inventor); Sabri, Nissia (Inventor); Dugan, Edward T. (Inventor); Jacobs, Alan M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Systems and methods of x-ray backscatter radiography are provided. A single-sided, non-destructive imaging technique utilizing x-ray radiation to image subsurface features is disclosed, capable of scanning a region using a fan beam aperture and gathering data using rotational motion.

  3. Alpha particle backscattering measurements used for chemical analysis of surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, J. H.

    1967-01-01

    Alpha particle backscattering performs a chemical analysis of surfaces. The apparatus uses a curium source and a semiconductor detector to determine the energy spectrum of the particles. This in turn determines the chemical composition of the surface after calibration to known samples.

  4. Diffraction of a Laser Beam.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jodoin, Ronald E.

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the effect of the nonuniform irradiance across a laser beam on diffraction of the beam, specifically the Fraunhofer diffraction of a laser beam with a Gaussian irradiance profile as it passes through a circular aperture. (GA)

  5. Diffractive Alvarez lens

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Ian M.; Dixit, Sham N.; Summers, Leslie J.; Thompson, Charles A.; Avicola, Kenneth; Wilhelmsen, Julia

    2000-01-01

    A diffractive Alvarez lens is demonstrated that consists of two separate phase plates, each having complementary 16-level surface-relief profiles that contain cubic phase delays. Translation of these two components in the plane of the phase plates is shown to produce a variable astigmatic focus. Both spherical and cylindrical phase profiles are demonstrated with good accuracy, and the discrete surface-relief features are shown to cause less than {lambda}/10 wave-front aberration in the transmitted wave front over a 40 mmx80 mm region. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  6. Transurethral Ultrasound Diffraction Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    transmitter. These are then 7 Fourier transformed into the frequency domain data. The clock rate is 33 MHz, and the FFT is performed after 1536 time...B. Yazgan and O.K. Ersoy, Multistage parallel algorithm for diffraction tomography, Applied Optica , vol. 34, pp, 1426-1431, 1995. [9] J. Wiskin, D.T...J1k0a2. Note that Eq. 34 reflects the well-known fact that in the Born approxi- mation the Fourier frequencies of the object are confined within a

  7. Diffraction-Based Optical Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sperno, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for controllably redirecting a light beam, having a central wavelength lambda, from a first light-receiving site to a second light-receiving site. A diffraction grating is attached to or part of a piezoelectric substrate, which is connected to one or two controllable voltage difference sources. When a substrate voltage difference is changed and the diffraction grating length in each of one or two directions is thereby changed, at least one of the diffraction angle, the diffraction order and the central wavelength is controllably changed. A diffracted light beam component, having a given wavelength, diffraction angle and diffraction order, that is initially received at a first light receiving site (e.g., a detector or optical fiber) is thereby controllably shifted or altered and can be received at a second light receiving site. A polynomially stepped, chirped grating is used in one embodiment. In another embodiment, an incident light beam, having at least one of first and second wavelengths, lambda1 and lambda2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide a first diffracted beam. The first diffracted beam is received and diffracted at a second diffraction grating to produce a second diffracted beam. The second diffracted beam is received at a light-sensitive transducer, having at least first and second spaced apart light detector elements that are positioned so that, when the incident light beam has wavelength lambda1 or lambda2 (lambda1 not equal to lambda2), the second diffracted beam is received at the first element or at the second element, respectively; change in a selected physical parameter at the second grating can also be sensed or measured. A sequence of spaced apart light detector elements can be positioned along a linear or curvilinear segment with equal or unequal spacing.

  8. Electron diffraction from cylindrical nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, L.C. )

    1994-09-01

    Electron diffraction intensities from cylindrical objects can be conveniently analyzed using Bessel functions. Analytic formulas and geometry of the diffraction patterns from cylindrical carbon nanotubes are presented in general forms in terms of structural parameters, such as the pitch angle and the radius of a tubule. As an example the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern from a graphitic tubule of structure [18,2] has been simulated to illustrate the characteristics of such diffraction patterns. The validity of the projection approximation is also discussed.

  9. Design the diffractive optical element with large diffraction angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Hui; Yin, Shaoyun; Zheng, Guoxing; Deng, Qiling; Shi, Lifang; Du, Chunlei

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a quite effective method is proposed for designing the diffractive optical element (DOE) to generate a pattern with large diffraction angle. Through analyze the difference between the non-paraxial Rayleigh Sommerfeld integral and the paraxial Fraunhofer diffraction integral, we modify the desired output intensity distribution with coordinate transformation and intensity adjustment. Then the paraxial Fraunhofer diffraction integral can be used to design the DOE, which adopts the fast-Fourier-transform (FFT) algorithm to accelerate the computation. To verify our method, the simulation and the experiments are taken. And the result shows that our method can effectively rectify the pillow distortion and can achieve the exact diffraction angle.

  10. Aberrations of diffracted wave fields. II. Diffraction gratings.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, V N

    2000-12-01

    The Rayleigh-Sommerfeld theory is applied to diffraction of a spherical wave by a grating. The grating equation is obtained from the aberration-free diffraction pattern, and its aberrations are shown to be the same as the conventional aberrations obtained by using Fermat's principle. These aberrations are shown to be not associated with the diffraction process. Moreover, it is shown that the irradiance distribution of a certain diffraction order is the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the grating aperture as a whole aberrated by the aberration of that order.

  11. Calculation of the effects of ice on the backscatter of a ground plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lambert, K. M.; Peters, L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Described is a technique for examining the effect of a rough ice layer on the backscatter of a ground plane. The technique is applied to the special case of a rough ice layer that is periodic in space. By assuming that the roughness is periodic, the backscatter of the ground plane can be found from the backscatter of a single period. Backscatter calculations are presented for a single period in which the thickness of the ice layer has a Gaussian shape.

  12. Diffractive physics results at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Michele Gallinaro

    2003-12-18

    Forward detectors are described together with the first physics results from Run II. Using new data and dedicated diffractive triggers, a measurement of single diffractive dijet production rate, with particular focus on the diffractive structure function of the antiproton, is discussed. Upper limits on the exclusive dijet and {chi}{sub c}{sup 0} production cross sections are also presented.

  13. Spectral diffraction efficiency characterization of broadband diffractive optical elements.

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Junoh; Cruz-Cabrera, Alvaro Augusto; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Diffractive optical elements, with their thin profile and unique dispersion properties, have been studied and utilized in a number of optical systems, often yielding smaller and lighter systems. Despite the interest in and study of diffractive elements, the application has been limited to narrow spectral bands. This is due to the etch depths, which are optimized for optical path differences of only a single wavelength, consequently leading to rapid decline in efficiency as the working wavelength shifts away from the design wavelength. Various broadband diffractive design methodologies have recently been developed that improve spectral diffraction efficiency and expand the working bandwidth of diffractive elements. We have developed diffraction efficiency models and utilized the models to design, fabricate, and test two such extended bandwidth diffractive designs.

  14. Multiwavelength Comparison of Modeled and Measured Remote Tropospheric Aerosol Backscatter Over Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutten, D. R.; Pueschel, R. F.; Srivastava, V.; Clarke, A. D.; Rothermel, J.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Menzies, R. T.

    1996-01-01

    Aerosol concentrations and size distributions in the middle and upper troposphere over the remote Pacific Ocean were measured with a forward scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) on the NASA DC-8 aircraft during NASA's Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) in May-June 1990. The FSSP size channels were recalibrated based on refractive index estimates from flight-level aerosol volatility measurements with a collocated laser optical particle counter (LOPC). The recalibrated FSSP size distributions were averaged over 100-s intervals, fitted with lo-normal distributions and used to calculate aerosol backscatter coefficients at selected wavelengths. The FSSP-derived backscatter estimates were averaged over 300-s intervals to reduce large random fluctuations. The smoothed FSSP aerosol backscatter coefficients were then compared with LOPC-derived backscatter values and with backscatter measured at or near flight level from four lidar systems operating at 0.53, 1.06, 9.11, 9.25, and 10.59 micrometers. Agreement between FSSP-derived and lidar-measured backscatter was generally best at flight level in homogeneous aerosol fields and at high backscatter values. FSSP data often underestimated low backscatter values especially at the longer wavelengths due to poor counting statistics for larger particles (greater than 0.8 micrometers diameter) that usually dominate aerosol backscatter at these wavelengths. FSSP data also underestimated backscatter at shorter wavelengths when particles smaller than the FSSP lower cutoff diameter (0.35 micrometers) made significant contributions to the total backscatter.

  15. 3D Visualization of Radar Backscattering Diagrams Based on OpenGL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhulina, Yulia V.

    2004-12-01

    A digital method of calculating the radar backscattering diagrams is presented. The method uses a digital model of an arbitrary scattering object in the 3D graphics package "OpenGL" and calculates the backscattered signal in the physical optics approximation. The backscattering diagram is constructed by means of rotating the object model around the radar-target line.

  16. Diffraction and Unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, I. M.

    I begin with a tribute to V.N. Gribov and then come to a particular problem which would be of interest for him. His first paper on reggeology was devoted to elastic scatterings of hadrons. Here, using the unitarity relation in combination with experimental data about the elastic scattering in the diffraction cone, I show how the shape and the darkness of the interaction region of colliding protons change with the increase of their energies. In particular, the collisions become fully absorptive at small impact parameters at LHC energies that results in some special features of inelastic processes as well. The possible evolution with increasing energy of the shape from the dark core at the LHC to the fully transparent one at higher energies is discussed. It implies that the terminology of the black disk would be replaced by the black torus.

  17. Diffraction and unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dremin, I. M.

    2016-10-01

    I begin with a tribute to V.N. Gribov and then come to a particular problem which would be of interest for him. His first paper on reggeology was devoted to elastic scatterings of hadrons. Here, using the unitarity relation in combination with experimental data about the elastic scattering in the diffraction cone, I show how the shape and the darkness of the interaction region of colliding protons change with the increase of their energies. In particular, the collisions become fully absorptive at small impact parameters at LHC energies that results in some special features of inelastic processes as well. The possible evolution with increasing energy of the shape from the dark core at the LHC to the fully transparent one at higher energies is discussed. It implies that the terminology of the black disk would be replaced by the black torus.

  18. Birefringent coherent diffraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpov, Dmitry; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Rich, Hannah; Kryuchkov, Yuriy; Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, E.

    2016-10-01

    Directional dependence of the index of refraction contains a wealth of information about anisotropic optical properties in semiconducting and insulating materials. Here we present a novel high-resolution lens-less technique that uses birefringence as a contrast mechanism to map the index of refraction and dielectric permittivity in optically anisotropic materials. We applied this approach successfully to a liquid crystal polymer film using polarized light from helium neon laser. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of emergent brilliant X-ray sources. Applications of this novel imaging technique are in disruptive technologies, including novel electronic devices, in which both charge and spin carry information as in multiferroic materials and photonic materials such as light modulators and optical storage.

  19. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, G.E.

    1996-08-29

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of {lambda}/1000 where {lambda} is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about {lambda}/50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms. 8 figs.

  20. Phase shifting diffraction interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    1996-01-01

    An interferometer which has the capability of measuring optical elements and systems with an accuracy of .lambda./1000 where .lambda. is the wavelength of visible light. Whereas current interferometers employ a reference surface, which inherently limits the accuracy of the measurement to about .lambda./50, this interferometer uses an essentially perfect spherical reference wavefront generated by the fundamental process of diffraction. This interferometer is adjustable to give unity fringe visibility, which maximizes the signal-to-noise, and has the means to introduce a controlled prescribed relative phase shift between the reference wavefront and the wavefront from the optics under test, which permits analysis of the interference fringe pattern using standard phase extraction algorithms.

  1. Multilayer diffraction grating

    SciTech Connect

    Barbee, T.W., Jr.

    1988-10-18

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at x-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages. 2 figs.

  2. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, T.W. Jr.

    1990-04-10

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages. 2 figs.

  3. Multilayer diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Barbee, Jr., Troy W.

    1990-01-01

    This invention is for a reflection diffraction grating that functions at X-ray to VUV wavelengths and at normal angles of incidence. The novel grating is comprised of a laminar grating of period D with flat-topped grating bars. A multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures, of period d and comprised of alternating flat layers of two different materials, are disposed on the tops of the grating bars of the laminar grating. In another embodiment of the grating, a second multiplicity of layered synthetic microstructures are also disposed on the flat faces, of the base of the grating, between the bars. D is in the approximate range from 3,000 to 50,000 Angstroms, but d is in the approximate range from 10 to 400 Angstroms. The laminar grating and the layered microstructures cooperatively interact to provide many novel and beneficial instrumentational advantages.

  4. Dichroic coherent diffractive imaging.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Ashish; Mohanty, Jyoti; Dietze, Sebastian H; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Shipton, Erik; Fullerton, Eric E; Kim, Sang Soo; McNulty, Ian

    2011-08-16

    Understanding electronic structure at the nanoscale is crucial to untangling fundamental physics puzzles such as phase separation and emergent behavior in complex magnetic oxides. Probes with the ability to see beyond surfaces on nanometer length and subpicosecond time scales can greatly enhance our understanding of these systems and will undoubtedly impact development of future information technologies. Polarized X-rays are an appealing choice of probe due to their penetrating power, elemental and magnetic specificity, and high spatial resolution. The resolution of traditional X-ray microscopes is limited by the nanometer precision required to fabricate X-ray optics. Here we present a novel approach to lensless imaging of an extended magnetic nanostructure, in which a scanned series of dichroic coherent diffraction patterns is recorded and numerically inverted to map its magnetic domain configuration. Unlike holographic methods, it does not require a reference wave or precision optics. In addition, it enables the imaging of samples with arbitrarily large spatial dimensions, at a spatial resolution limited solely by the coherent X-ray flux, wavelength, and stability of the sample with respect to the beam. It can readily be extended to nonmagnetic systems that exhibit circular or linear dichroism. We demonstrate this approach by imaging ferrimagnetic labyrinthine domains in a Gd/Fe multilayer with perpendicular anisotropy and follow the evolution of the domain structure through part of its magnetization hysteresis loop. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of the new generation of phenomenally brilliant X-ray sources.

  5. Retrieval of ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient from space-borne CALIOP lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaomei; Hu, Yongxiang; Pelon, Jacques; Trepte, Charles; Liu, Katie; Rodier, Sharon; Zeng, Shan; Lucker, Patricia; Verhappen, Ron; Wilson, Jamie; Audouy, Claude; Ferrier, Christophe; Haouchine, Said; Hunt, Bill; Getzewich, Brian

    2016-12-12

    A new approach has been proposed to determine ocean subsurface particulate backscattering coefficient bbp from CALIOP 30° off-nadir lidar measurements. The new method also provides estimates of the particle volume scattering function at the 180° scattering angle. The CALIOP based layer-integrated lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficients are compared with the results obtained from MODIS ocean color measurements. The comparison analysis shows that ocean subsurface lidar backscatter and particulate backscattering coefficient bbp can be accurately obtained from CALIOP lidar measurements, thereby supporting the use of space-borne lidar measurements for ocean subsurface studies.

  6. Diffraction-based optical correlator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spremo, Stevan M. (Inventor); Fuhr, Peter L. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for wavelength-based processing of a light beam. A light beam, produced at a chemical or physical reaction site and having at least first and second wavelengths, ?1 and ?2, is received and diffracted at a first diffraction grating to provide first and second diffracted beams, which are received and analyzed in terms of wavelength and/or time at two spaced apart light detectors. In a second embodiment, light from first and second sources is diffracted and compared in terms of wavelength and/or time to determine if the two beams arise from the same source. In a third embodiment, a light beam is split and diffracted and passed through first and second environments to study differential effects. In a fourth embodiment, diffracted light beam components, having first and second wavelengths, are received sequentially at a reaction site to determine whether a specified reaction is promoted, based on order of receipt of the beams. In a fifth embodiment, a cylindrically shaped diffraction grating (uniform or chirped) is rotated and translated to provide a sequence of diffracted beams with different wavelengths. In a sixth embodiment, incident light, representing one or more symbols, is successively diffracted from first and second diffraction gratings and is received at different light detectors, depending upon the wavelengths present in the incident light.

  7. A simple backscattering microscope for fast tracking of biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sowa, Yoshiyuki; Steel, Bradley C.; Berry, Richard M.

    2010-11-01

    Recent developments in techniques for observing single molecules under light microscopes have helped reveal the mechanisms by which molecular machines work. A wide range of markers can be used to detect molecules, from single fluorophores to micron sized markers, depending on the research interest. Here, we present a new and simple objective-type backscattering microscope to track gold nanoparticles with nanometer and microsecond resolution. The total noise of our system in a 55 kHz bandwidth is ˜0.6 nm per axis, sufficient to measure molecular movement. We found our backscattering microscopy to be useful not only for in vitro but also for in vivo experiments because of lower background scattering from cells than in conventional dark-field microscopy. We demonstrate the application of this technique to measuring the motion of a biological rotary molecular motor, the bacterial flagellar motor, in live Escherichia coli cells.

  8. Corrosion detection in aircraft by X-ray backscatter methods

    PubMed

    Dunn; Yacout

    2000-10-01

    A limited-scan backscatter technique for detecting hidden corrosion and other flaws in aircraft has been demonstrated. Both simulation and experimental results indicate that as little as 5% material loss at depths up to 0.508 cm (0.200 in.) and 10% material loss at depths up to 0.635 cm (0.250 in.) beneath aircraft skin surfaces can be realiably detected. The technology involves analysis of backscattered photon data to yield a figure-of-merit whose value as a function of position indicates with high probability of detection whether or not flaws--such as corrosion, disbonding, macro-cracks, or voids--exist within scanned samples.

  9. Side-looking sonar backscatter response at dual frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, William B. F.; Flood, Roger D.

    1996-12-01

    Dual-frequency side-looking sonars have the potential to be used as remote sensing tools to characterize subaqueous terrains. In one case study of the carbonate-ooze-coated Blake Plateau off-shore of Georgia, U.S.A., the difference in acoustic attenuation for 50 and 20 mm wavelengths (30 and 72 kHz frequency) permits the discrimination of sub-bottom scatterers from seabed surface textural features to reveal patchy regions where a buried hard ground had been pock-marked by karst-like depressions. In a second study of the Upper Hudson River in New York, U.S.A., related to environmental contaminates, the backscatter response at 15 and 3 mm acoustic wavelengths (100 and 500 kHz frequency) serves as a useful proxy for sediment grain size with coarser detritus distinguished from finer sediments. Sand and gravel regions inferred from the backscatter were confirmed by ground truth sampling.

  10. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  11. Airborne backscatter lidar measurements at three wavelengths during ELITE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, H. G.; Wirth, Martin; Moerl, P.; Renger, Wolfgang

    1995-09-01

    The German Aerospace Establishment (DLR) operates an airborne backscatter lidar based on a Nh:YAG laser which is flashlamp-pumped at 10 Hz. It works on the wavelengths 1064, 532, and 354 nm. It is mounted downward-looking on the research aircraft Falcon 20, flying at about 12 km altitude at speeds of 200 m/s. We present airborne measurements correlated with the orbit tracks of the shuttle-borne LITE-instrument (lidar in-space technology experiment). The emphasis in data evalution is on the comparison between the airborne and the shuttle- borne lidars. First results show excellent agreement between the two instruments even on details of cirrus clouds. The results comprise cloud geometrical and optical depths, as well as profiles of aerosol backscattering coefficients at three wavelengths.

  12. Stimulated brillouin backscatter of a short-pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkel, D.E.; Williams, E.A.; Berger, R.L.

    1994-11-03

    Stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBBS) from a short-pulse laser, where the pulse length is short compared to the plasma length, is found to be qualitatively different than in the long pulse regime, where the pulse length is long compared to the plasma length. We find that after an initial transient of order the laser pulse length transit time, the instability reaches a steady state in the variables x{prime} = x {minus} V{sub g}t, t{prime} = t, where V{sub g} is the pulse group velocity. In contrast, SBBS in a long pulse can be absolutely unstable and grows indefinitely, or until nonlinearities intervene. We find that the motion of the laser pulse induces Doppler related effects that substantially modify the backscattered spectrum at higher intensities, where the instability is strongly coupled (i.e. , has a growth rate large compared to the ion acoustic frequency).

  13. Depolarization of light backscattered by randomly oriented nonspherical particles.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, M I; Hovenier, J W

    1995-06-15

    We derive theoretically and validate numerically general relationships for the elements of the backscattering matrix and for the linear, delta(L), and circular, delta(C), backscattering depolarization ratios for nonspherical particles in random orientation. For the practically important case of randomly oriented particles with a plane of symmetry or particles and their mirror particles occurring in equal numbers and in random orientation, delta(C) = 2delta(L)/(1 - delta(L)). Extensive T-matrix computations for randomly oriented spheroids demonstrate that, although both delta(L) and delta(C) are indicators of particle nonsphericity, they cannot be considered a universal measure of the departure of particle shape from that of a sphere and have no simple dependence on particle size and refractive index.

  14. Bathymetry and Acoustic Backscatter: Northern Santa Barbara Channel, Southern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dartnell, Pete; Finlayson, David; Conrad, Jamie; Cochrane, Guy; Johnson, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In the summer of 2008, as part of the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP) the U.S. Geological Survey, Coastal and Marine Geology mapped a nearshore region of the northern Santa Barbara Channel in Southern California (fig 1). The CSMP is a cooperative partnership between Federal and State agencies, Universities, and Industry to create a comprehensive coastal/marine geologic and habitat basemap series to support the Marine Life Protection Act (MLPA) inititive. The program is supported by the California Ocean Protection Council and the California Coastal Conservancy. The 2008 mapping collected high resolution bathymetry and acoustic backscatter data using a bathymetric side scan system within State waters from about the 10-m isobath out over 3-nautical miles. This Open-File Report provides these data in a number of different formats, as well as a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and FGDC metadata.

  15. A simulation algorithm for ultrasound liver backscattered signals.

    PubMed

    Zatari, D; Botros, N; Dunn, F

    1995-11-01

    In this study, we present a simulation algorithm for the backscattered ultrasound signal from liver tissue. The algorithm simulates backscattered signals from normal liver and three different liver abnormalities. The performance of the algorithm has been tested by statistically comparing the simulated signals with corresponding signals obtained from a previous in vivo study. To verify that the simulated signals can be classified correctly we have applied a classification technique based on an artificial neural network. The acoustic features extracted from the spectrum over a 2.5 MHz bandwidth are the attenuation coefficient and the change of speed of sound with frequency (dispersion). Our results show that the algorithm performs satisfactorily. Further testing of the algorithm is conducted by the use of a data acquisition and analysis system designed by the authors, where several simulated signals are stored in memory chips and classified according to their abnormalities.

  16. Lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio of the ocean.

    PubMed

    Churnside, James H; Sullivan, James M; Twardowski, Michael S

    2014-07-28

    Bio-optical models are used to develop a model of the lidar extinction-to-backscatter ratio applicable to oceanographic lidar. The model is based on chlorophyll concentration, and is expected to be valid for Case 1 waters. The limiting cases of narrow- and wide-beam lidars are presented and compared with estimates based on in situ optical measurements. Lidar measurements are also compared with the model using in situ or satellite estimates of chlorophyll concentration. A modified lidar ratio is defined, in which the properties of pure sea water are removed. This modified ratio is shown to be nearly constant for wide-beam lidar operating in low-chlorophyll waters, so accurate inversion to derive extinction and backscattering is possible under these conditions. This ratio can also be used for lidar calibration.

  17. Stimulated Raman backscattering of laser radiation in deep plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalmykov, S. Yu.; Shvets, G.

    2004-10-01

    Stimulated Raman backscattering (RBS) of intense laser radiation confined by a single-mode plasma channel with a radial variation of plasma frequency greater than a homogeneous-plasma RBS bandwidth is characterized by a strong transverse localization of resonantly driven electron plasma waves (EPW). The EPW localization reduces the peak growth rate of RBS and increases the amplification bandwidth. The continuum of nonbound modes of backscattered radiation shrinks the transverse field profile in a channel and increases the RBS growth rate. Solution of the initial-value problem shows that an electromagnetic pulse amplified by the RBS in the single-mode deep plasma channel has a group velocity higher than in the case of homogeneous-plasma Raman amplification. Implications to the design of a RBS pulse compressor in a plasma channel are discussed.

  18. Effects of vegetation canopy on the radar backscattering coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mo, T.; Blanchard, B. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Airborne L- and C-band scatterometer data, taken over both vegetation-covered and bare fields, were systematically analyzed and theoretically reproduced, using a recently developed model for calculating radar backscattering coefficients of rough soil surfaces. The results show that the model can reproduce the observed angular variations of radar backscattering coefficient quite well via a least-squares fit method. Best fits to the data provide estimates of the statistical properties of the surface roughness, which is characterized by two parameters: the standard deviation of surface height, and the surface correlation length. In addition, the processes of vegetation attenuation and volume scattering require two canopy parameters, the canopy optical thickness and a volume scattering factor. Canopy parameter values for individual vegetation types, including alfalfa, milo and corn, were also determined from the best-fit results. The uncertainties in the scatterometer data were also explored.

  19. Porosity estimation of alumina samples based on resonant backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhles Gerami, F.; Kakuee, O.; Mohammadi, S.

    2016-04-01

    In this work, columnar porous alumina samples were investigated using the 16O(α,α)16O resonance scattering at 3.045 MeV. If the incident energy is slightly above the resonance energy, a resonance peak appears in the energy spectra of the backscattered ions. The position and width of this peak for non-porous samples are mainly determined by the experimental setup, whilst for porous materials, the peak position shifts towards higher energies under certain conditions. This effect can be explained by the lower amount of material which the ions encounter along the backscattered trajectories. The energy shift of the resonance peak towards higher energies was revealed experimentally and discussed theoretically. The estimated porosities of the samples based on this energy shift were compared with those evaluated from the graphical analysis of the images obtained by field emission scanning electron microscopy.

  20. The effects of changes in loblolly pine biomass and soil moisture on ERS-1 SAR backscatter

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Melack, J.M.; Davis, F.W. . Center for Remote Sensing and Environmental Optics); Kasischke, E.S.; Christensen, N.L. Jr. . School of the Environment)

    1994-07-01

    For young loblolly pine stands at Duke Forest (North Carolina, USA), when the ground was wet, the observed ERS-1 SAR backscatter from short-grass fields of 0.05 kg/m[sup 2] biomass was [ge] the backscatter from the stands, and there was no significant correlation between the backscatter and biomass. Under dry soil conditions, the backscatter increased about 2--3 dB as the biomass increased from 0.05 kg/m[sup 2] to about 0.5--1.5 kg/m[sup 2], and the backscatter may be saturated near a 0.5--1.5 kg/m[sup 2] biomass level. The correlation coefficient between the backscatter and biomass was r[sup 2] = 0.46. When the Santa Barbara microwave canopy backscatter model was applied to simulate the ERS-1 SAR backscatter from the stands over dry ground, modeled and observed backscatter had similar trends with increasing biomass. For these stands, sensitivity analyses using the model showed that as the surface-soil moisture increased, the major contributor to the total backscatter was changed from canopy volume scattering to surface backscatter between 0.4 kg/m[sup 2] and about 1 kg/m[sup 2]. Signal saturating at low standing biomass and high sensitivity to soil moisture conditions limit the value of a short-wave (C-band) and steep local incidence angle (23[degree]) microwave sensor such as the ERS-1 SAR for forest monitoring.

  1. Comparison of Modeled Backscatter using Measured Aerosol Microphysics with Focused CW Lidar Data over Pacific

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Vandana; Clarke, Antony D.; Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1997-01-01

    During NASA's GLObal Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE) II flight mission over the Pacific Ocean in May-June 1990, extensive aerosol backscatter data sets from two continuous wave, focused CO2 Doppler lidars and an aerosol microphysics data set from a laser optical particle counter (LOPC) were obtained. Changes in aerosol loading in various air masses with associated changes in chemical composition, from sulfuric acid and sulfates to dustlike crustal material, significantly affected aerosol backscatter, causing variation of about 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Some of the significant backscatter features encountered in different air masses were the low backscatter in subtropical air with even lower values in the tropics near the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), highly variable backscatter in the ITCZ, mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode, and high backscatter in an Asian dust plume off the Japanese coast. Differences in aerosol composition and backscatter for northern and southern hemisphere also were observed. Using the LOPC measurements of physical and chemical aerosol properties, we determined the complex refractive index from three different aerosol mixture models to calculate backscatter. These values provided a well-defined envelope of modeled backscatter for various atmospheric conditions, giving good agreement with the lidar data over a horizontal sampling of approximately 18000 km in the mid-troposphere.

  2. Multiple scattering wavelength dependent backscattering of kaolin dust in the IR: Measurements and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-David, Avishai

    1992-01-01

    Knowing the optical properties of aerosol dust is important for designing electro-optical systems and for modeling the effect on propagation of light in the atmosphere. As CO2 lidar technology becomes more advanced and is used for multiwavelength measurements, information on the wavelength dependent backscattering of aerosol dust particles is required. The volume backscattering coefficient of aerosols in the IR is relatively small. Thus, only a few field measurements of backscattering, usually at only a few wavelengths, are reported in the literature. We present spectral field measurements of backscattering of kaolin dust in the 9-11 micron wavelength range. As the quantity of dust increases, multiple scattering contributes more to the measured backscattered signal. The measurements show the effect of the dust quantity of the spectral backscatter measurements. A simple analytical two stream radiative transfer model is applied to confirm the measurements and to give insight to the multiple scattering spectra of backscattering.

  3. Measurement of magnetic field using Rayleigh backscattering in optical fibres

    SciTech Connect

    Wuilpart, M.; Caucheteur, C.; Goussarov, A.; Aerssens, M.; Massaut, V.; Megret, P.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate the use of optical reflectometry in optical fibres for the measurement of magnetic field. The dedicated application concerns the measurement of plasma current in the fusion reactor. The measurement is based on the rotation of the polarization state of the Rayleigh backscattered signal when an optical pulse is launched in the fibre. Particular care has been undertaken to evaluate the impact of linear birefringence on the measurement performance. (authors)

  4. Anderson Mobility Gap Probed by Dynamic Coherent Backscattering.

    PubMed

    Cobus, L A; Skipetrov, S E; Aubry, A; van Tiggelen, B A; Derode, A; Page, J H

    2016-05-13

    We use dynamic coherent backscattering to study one of the Anderson mobility gaps in the vibrational spectrum of strongly disordered three-dimensional mesoglasses. Comparison of experimental results with the self-consistent theory of localization allows us to estimate the localization (correlation) length as a function of frequency in a wide spectral range covering bands of diffuse transport and a mobility gap delimited by two mobility edges. The results are corroborated by transmission measurements on one of our samples.

  5. Reduced Brillouin backscatter in CO2 laser-target interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, A.; Offenberger, A. A.; Karttunen, S. J.

    1981-02-01

    A substantially reduced Brillouin reflection has been found for CO2 laser-irradiated high-density gas targets. In contrast to the high reflectivity (60%) previously observed for underdense hydrogen plasma, total backscatter (stimulated plus specular) is found to peak at 30% for incident intensity 5 times 10 to the twelfth W per square centimeter and decrease thereafter to 18% at 10 to the thirteenth W per square centimeter. The ponderomotive effects are postulated to account for these observations.

  6. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOEpatents

    Loo, Billy W.; Goulding, Frederick S.

    1991-01-01

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons Compton backscattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to monimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering.

  7. Method and apparatus for measuring lung density by Compton backscattering

    DOEpatents

    Loo, B.W.; Goulding, F.S.

    1988-03-11

    The density of the lung of a patient suffering from pulmonary edema is monitored by irradiating the lung by a single collimated beam of monochromatic photons and measuring the energies of photons compton back-scattered from the lung by a single high-resolution, high-purity germanium detector. A compact system geometry and a unique data extraction scheme are utilized to minimize systematic errors due to the presence of the chestwall and multiple scattering. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Acoustic Coherent Backscatter Enhancement from Aggregations of Point Scatterers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    acoustic multiple scattering from two- and now three-dimensional aggregations of omni-directional point scatterers to determine the parametric realms in...given by the sum in (1), N is the number of scatterers , gn is the scattering coefficient of the nth scatterer , ψn(rn) is the field incident on the nth...SUBTITLE Acoustic Coherent Backscatter Enhancement from Aggregations of Point Scatterers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  9. Acoustic Coherent Backscatter Enhancement from Aggregations of Point Scatterers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Figure 2 for a cubical aggregation with a five- wavelength edge, 256 to 1024 Monte - Carlo trials, = 3.5, and four different average scatterer spacings...ensemble average over Monte - Carlo trials. The central peak at ϕ = 0 for k0s = 3.2 and 2.5 is produced by coherent backscattering enhancement...were placed in a cubical aggregation with 5 wavelength edges. The ensemble average was computed from 256 to 1024 Monte - Carlo trials. The acoustic

  10. Surface effects on the microwave backscatter and emission of snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Stiles, W. H.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements were performed with active and passive microwave sensors for both dry and wet snow conditions. A layer of Rayleigh scatterers with irregular surface boundaries is found to be a reasonable model for interpreting passive and active measurements in X- and Ku-bands. It was found that roughness had a significant effect on both backscatter and emission from wet snow; however, only a small effect was noted for dry snow.

  11. Backscatter LIDAR signal simulation applied to spacecraft LIDAR instrument design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fochesatto, J.; Ristori, P.; Flamant, P.; Machado, M. E.; Singh, U.; Quel, E.

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of the scientific cooperation between the CEILAP laboratory (Argentina) and IPSL Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (France), devoted to the development of LIDAR techniques for Atmospheric sciences, a new area of scientific research, involving LIDARs, is starting in Argentine space technology. This new research area is under consideration at CEILAP in a joint effort with CONAE, the Argentine space agency, responsible for the development of future space missions. The LIDAR technique is necessary to improve our knowledge of meteorological, dynamic, and radiative processes in the South American region, for the whole troposphere and the lower stratosphere. To study this future mission, a simple model for the prediction of backscatter LIDAR signal from a spacecraft platform has been used to determine dimensions and detection characteristics of the space borne LIDAR instrument. The backscatter signal was retrieved from a modeled atmosphere considering its molecular density profile and taking into account different aerosols and clouds conditions. Signal-to-noise consideration, within the interval of possible dimension of the instrument parameters, allows us to constrain the telescope receiving area and to derive maximum range achievable, integration time and the final spatial and temporal resolutions of backscatter profiles.

  12. Visibility related to backscatter at 1.54 micron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, T. L.; Larson, D. R.

    1986-01-01

    The lidar process was shown to have the necessary potential to fulfill the need for a remote measurement of visibility. Visibility can be inferred from a lidar return optical extinction. The wavelength 1.54 micron was chosen, being near the visible wavelength region and having a high eye safety threshol, 200,000 times higher than 1.06 micron; 1.54 is the erbium laser wavelength. This research utilized 105 measured height profiles of natural droplet size distributions data, taken in clouds, fog, and haze. These profiles were examined to determine the completeness of the droplet counting data. It was found that the particle spectrometer data were incomplete in the very light ford and haze so this portion of the data was eliminated. Utilizing the Mie theory, these droplet size distribution profiles were converted to backscatter at 1.54 micron and extinction in the visible region, 0.55 micron. Using Koschmeider's relationship, the extinction profiles were converted to visibility. The visibility and backscatter profiles were compared to develop a relationship between visibility and backscatter at 1.54 micron.

  13. Experimental findings in 180{degree} backscattering enhancement from solids

    SciTech Connect

    Ellmer, H.; Fischer, W.; Klose, A.; Semrad, D.

    1997-02-01

    We use a backscattering assembly developed recently to investigate the enhanced backscattering from polycrystalline materials near 180{degree}. The nominal scattering angle can be continuously varied between exactly 180.0{degree} and 178.5{degree}. It is shown that the stochastic model of flux peaking, though its predictions are surprisingly consistent with experimental results, either does not apply to real measurements or does only take account of a negligible fraction of the effect, which cannot be documented by experiment. The energy loss of He projectiles along correlated inward and outward trajectories turns out to be the same as in any random direction. To get the enhancement factor unaffected from detector resolution we measured the integrated backscattering yield from a number of targets with different thickness and deduced the yield by two different methods. For 400 keV He projectiles scattered from partly oxidized Ta a maximum enhancement factor of 2.8 is found. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Laser transmission-backscattering through inhomogeneous cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Ou, Szu-Cheng; Takano, Yoshihide; Liou, Kuo-Nan; Lefevre, Randy J; Johnson, Michael W

    2002-09-20

    We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) model for inhomogeneous cirrus clouds in plane-parallel and spherical geometries for the analysis of the transmission and backscattering of high-energy laser beams. The 2D extinction-coefficient and mean effective ice-crystal size fields for cirrus clouds can be determined from a combination of the remote sensing of cirrus clouds by use of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on board National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellites and the vertical profiling of ice-crystal size distributions available from limited measurements. We demonstrate that satellite remote sensing of the position and the composition of high cirrus can be incorporated directly in the computer model developed for the transmission and backscattering of high-energy laser beams in realistic atmospheres. The results of laser direct transmission, forward scattering, and backscattering are analyzed carefully with respect to aircraft height, cirrus cloud optical depth, and ice-crystal size and orientation. Uncertainty in laser transmission that is due to errors in the retrieved ice-crystal size is negligible. But uncertainty of the order of 2% can be produced if the retrieved optical depth has errors of +/-0.05. With both the aircraft and the target near the cloud top, the direct transmission decreases, owing to the propagation of the laser beam through the curved portion of the cloud top. This effect becomes more pronounced as the horizontal distance between the aircraft and the target increases.

  15. Dependence of radar backscatter on coniferous forest biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, M.C.; Ulaby, F.T. ); LeToan, T.; Beaudoin, A. ); Kasischke, E.S. ); Christensen, N. )

    1992-03-01

    This paper discusses two independent experimental efforts which have examined the dependence of radar backscatter on aboveground biomass of mono specie conifer forests using polarimetric airborne SAR data at P-, L- and C-bands. Plantations of maritime pines near Landes, France range in age from 8 to 46 years with aboveground biomass between 5 and 105 tons/ha. Loblolly pine stands established on abandoned agricultural fields near Duke, NC range in age from 4 to 90 years and extend the range of aboveground biomass to 560 tons/ha for the older stands. These two experimental forests are largely complementary with respect to biomass. Radar backscatter is found to increase approximately linearly with increasing biomass until it saturates at a biomass level that depends on the radar frequency. The biomass saturation level is about 200 tons/ha at P-band and 100 tons/ha at L-band, and the C-band backscattering coefficient shows much less sensitivity to total aboveground biomass.

  16. Measuring Ultrasonic Backscatter in the Presence of Nonlinear Propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiles, Timothy; Guerrero, Quinton

    2011-11-01

    A goal of medical ultrasound is the formation of quantitative ultrasound images in which contrast is determined by acoustic or physical properties of tissue rather than relative echo amplitude. Such images could greatly enhance early detection of many diseases, including breast cancer and liver cirrhosis. Accurate determination of the ultrasonic backscatter coefficient from patients remains a difficult task. One reason for this difficulty is the inherent nonlinear propagation of ultrasound at high intensities used for medical imaging. The backscatter coefficient from several tissue-mimicking samples were measured using the planar reflector method. In this method, the power spectrum from a sample is compared to the power spectrum of an optically flat sample of quartz. The results should be independent of incident pressure amplitude. Results demonstrate that backscatter coefficients can vary by more than an order of magnitude when ultrasound pressure varies from 0.1 MPa to 1.5 MPa at 5.0 MHz. A new method that incorporates nonlinear propagation is proposed to explain these discrepancies.

  17. Investigation of phonon coherence and backscattering using silicon nanomeshes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaeho; Lee, Woochul; Wehmeyer, Geoff; Dhuey, Scott; Olynick, Deirdre L.; Cabrini, Stefano; Dames, Chris; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Yang, Peidong

    2017-01-01

    Phonons can display both wave-like and particle-like behaviour during thermal transport. While thermal transport in silicon nanomeshes has been previously interpreted by phonon wave effects due to interference with periodic structures, as well as phonon particle effects including backscattering, the dominant mechanism responsible for thermal conductivity reductions below classical predictions still remains unclear. Here we isolate the wave-related coherence effects by comparing periodic and aperiodic nanomeshes, and quantify the backscattering effect by comparing variable-pitch nanomeshes. We measure identical (within 6% uncertainty) thermal conductivities for periodic and aperiodic nanomeshes of the same average pitch, and reduced thermal conductivities for nanomeshes with smaller pitches. Ray tracing simulations support the measurement results. We conclude phonon coherence is unimportant for thermal transport in silicon nanomeshes with periodicities of 100 nm and higher and temperatures above 14 K, and phonon backscattering, as manifested in the classical size effect, is responsible for the thermal conductivity reduction. PMID:28051081

  18. Coherent and incoherent ultrasound backscatter from cell aggregates.

    PubMed

    de Monchy, Romain; Destrempes, François; Saha, Ratan K; Cloutier, Guy; Franceschini, Emilie

    2016-09-01

    The effective medium theory (EMT) was recently developed to model the ultrasound backscatter from aggregating red blood cells [Franceschini, Metzger, and Cloutier, IEEE Trans. Ultrason. Ferroelectr. Freq. Control 58, 2668-2679 (2011)]. The EMT assumes that aggregates can be treated as homogeneous effective scatterers, which have effective properties determined by the aggregate compactness and the acoustical characteristics of the cells and the surrounding medium. In this study, the EMT is further developed to decompose the differential backscattering cross section of a single cell aggregate into coherent and incoherent components. The coherent component corresponds to the squared norm of the average scattering amplitude from the effective scatterer, and the incoherent component considers the variance of the scattering amplitude (i.e., the mean squared norm of the fluctuation of the scattering amplitude around its mean) within the effective scatterer. A theoretical expression for the incoherent component based on the structure factor is proposed and compared with another formulation based on the Gaussian direct correlation function. This theoretical improvement is assessed using computer simulations of ultrasound backscatter from aggregating cells. The consideration of the incoherent component based on the structure factor allows us to approximate the simulations satisfactorily for a product of the wavenumber times the aggregate radius krag around 2.

  19. Excitation of phonons in medium-energy electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M. A. Vicente; Ascolani, H.; Zampieri, G.

    1996-03-01

    The ``elastic'' backscattering of electrons from crystalline surfaces presents two regimes: a low-energy regime, in which the characteristic low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) pattern is observed, and a medium-energy regime, in which the diffraction pattern is similar to those observed in x-ray photoemission diffraction (XPD) and Auger electron diffraction (AED) experiments. We present a model for the electron scattering which, including the vibrational degrees of freedom of the crystal, contains both regimes and explains the passage from one regime to the other. Our model is based on a separation of the electron and atomic motions (adiabatic approximation) and on a cluster-type formulation of the multiple scattering of the electron. The inelastic scattering events (excitation and/or absorption of phonons) are treated as coherent processes and no break of the phase relation between the incident and the exit paths of the electron is assumed. The LEED and the medium-energy electron diffraction regimes appear naturally in this model as the limit cases of completely elastic scattering and of inelastic scattering with excitation and/or absorption of multiple phonons. Intensity patterns calculated with this model are in very good agreement with recent experiments of electron scattering on Cu(001) at low and medium energies. We show that there is a correspondence between the type of intensity pattern and the mean number of phonons excited and/or absorbed during the scattering: a LEED-like pattern is observed when this mean number is less than 2, LEED-like and XPD/AED-like features coexist when this number is 3-4, and a XPD/AED-like pattern is observed when this number is greater than 5-6.

  20. Diffractive parameric colors.

    PubMed

    Orava, Joni; Heikkila, Noora; Jaaskelainen, Timo; Parkkinen, Jussi

    2008-12-01

    A method of producing inkless parameric color pairs is studied. In this method, colors are formed additively using diffraction gratings with differing grating periods as primary colors. Gratings with different grating periods reflect different spectral radiance peaks of a fluorescent lamp to the desired viewing angle, according to the grating equation. Four spectral peaks of a 4000 K fluorescent lamp--red, green, cyan, and blue-are used as the primary colors. The colors are mixed additively by fixing the relative areas of different grating periods inside a pixel. With four primary colors it is possible to mix certain colors with different triplets of primary colors. Thus, it is theoretically possible to produce metameric colors. In this study, three parameric color pairs are fabricated using electron beam lithography, electroplating, and hot embossing. The radiance spectra of the color pairs are measured by spectroradiometer from hot-embossed plastic samples. The CIELAB DeltaE(ab) and CIEDE2000 color differences between radiance spectra of the color pairs are calculated. The CIEDE2000 color differences of color pairs are between 2.6 and 7.2 units in reference viewing conditions. The effects of viewing angle and different light sources are also evaluated. It is found that both the viewing angle and the light source have very strong influences on the color differences of the color pairs.

  1. Diffraction at HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Garlea, Vasile O; Hubbard, Camden R; Wang, Xun-Li

    2008-01-01

    Of the planned suite of powder and single-crystal diffractometers for the HFIR, only two are currently operating, the Neutron Residual Stress Mapping Facility (NRSF2) diffractometer, and the Wide Angle Neutron Diffractometer (WAND). The NSRF2 was recently upgraded and is available to external users via the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program for studies of stress, texture and phase mapping. The WAND is a flat-cone geometry diffractometer equipped with a curve 1-D PSD, suitable for high intensity powder diffraction (e.g., kinetics, high pressure) and diffuse scattering studies of single-crystals. A rebuild of the old HFIR powder diffractometer, originally located at HB-4 station is now underway, and is expected to begin commissioning by summer 2008. This instrument has a Debye-Scherrer geometry, with a detector bank consisting of 44 3He tubes each with 6' Soller collimators. A four-circle single-crystal diffractometer is located at the HB-3A station, and is slowly being brought back to life after the long hiatus connected to the reactor upgrade. A Letter of Intent to build a quasi-Laue diffractometer, called IMAGINE, in the HFIR Cold Guide Hall has been presented to and endorsed by the Neutron Scattering Science Advisory Committee.

  2. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, Antonio J.; Butler, Michael A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Senturia, Stephen D.

    1998-01-01

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers).

  3. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M. E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok E-mail: aloksharan@email.com

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  4. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar; Allam, Srinivasa Rao; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.; Sharan, Alok

    2014-10-01

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  5. Diffractive Measurements at the LHC: Elastic and Inelastic Soft Diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Orava, Risto

    2011-07-15

    A short review of four topics was presented: (1) Photon bremsstrahlung in elastic proton-proton scattering, (2) Low mass Single Diffraction (SD), (3) Low mass Central Exclusive Diffraction (CED), and (4) Event classification of the pp interactions at the LHC. This article summarizes topic (1).

  6. Tolerance analysis on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for harmonic diffractive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Mao

    2016-10-01

    In this dissertation, the mathematical model of effect of manufacturing errors including microstructure relative height error and relative width error on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements (HDEs) is set up. According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the HDEs, the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the microstructure height and periodic width errors in fabrication process is presented in this paper. Furthermore, the effect of manufacturing errors on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements is studied, and diffraction efficiency change is analyzed as the relative microstructure height-error in the same and in the opposite sign as well as relative width-error in the same and in the opposite sign. Example including infrared wavelength with materials GE has been discussed in this paper. Two kinds of manufacturing errors applied in 3.7 4.3um middle infrared and 8.7-11.5um far infrared optical system which results in diffraction efficiency and PIDE of HDEs are studied. The analysis results can be used for manufacturing error control in micro-structure height and periodic width. Results can be used for HDEs processing.

  7. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  8. Inelastic diffraction at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshin, S. M.; Tyurin, N. E.

    2017-03-01

    The relativistic scattering was one of the scientific fields where Academician V.G. Kadyshevsky has made an important and highly cited contribution [1]. In this paper we discuss the high-energy dependencies of diffractive and non-diffractive inelastic cross-sections in view of the recent LHC data which reveal a presence of the reflective scattering mode.

  9. Ptychographic Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, D. J.; Williams, G. J.; Nugent, K. A.; Abbey, B.; Pfeifer, M. A.; Clark, J. N.; Peele, A. G.; Jonge, M. D. de; McNulty, I.

    2009-12-15

    This paper reports improved reconstruction of complex wave fields from extended objects. The combination of ptychography with Fresnel diffractive imaging results in better reconstructions with fewer iterations required to convergence than either method considered separately. The method is applied to retrieve the projected thickness of a gold microstructure and comparative results using ptychography and Fresnel diffractive imaging are presented.

  10. Cross-Correlation for Automated Stitching of Two-Dimensional Multi-Tile Electron Backscatter Diffraction Data (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    270 350x 650 (25, 26) 2 20 Ni-15Al- 5Cr+C,B,Zr 187 x 187 500x 44 ( 4 , 11) 0.5 40 A. Coarse grain, single phase α- titanium The coarse grained... titanium alloy serves as an instructive example because, as evident in Figure 4 (a), only one triple point and one grain boundary appear in the search...wpafb.af.mil Figure 4 . Crystal orientation maps for the first (left) and second (current) tiles of (a) coarse grained α- Titanium , (b) a 2x2 array of a

  11. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of Joints Between AISI 316L Austenitic/UNS S32750 Dual-Phase Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanian, Morteza; Mohammadnezhad, Mahyar; Amini, Mahdi; Zabolian, Azam; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2015-08-01

    Stainless steels are among the most economical and highly practicable materials widely used in industrial areas due to their mechanical and corrosion resistances. In this study, a dissimilar weld joint consisting of an AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel (ASS) and a UNS S32750 dual-phase stainless steel was obtained under optimized welding conditions by gas tungsten arc welding technique using AWS A5.4:ER2594 filler metal. The effect of welding on the evolution of the microstructure, crystallographic texture, and micro-hardness distribution was also studied. The weld metal (WM) was found to be dual-phased; the microstructure is obtained by a fully ferritic solidification mode followed by austenite precipitation at both ferrite boundaries and ferrite grains through solid-state transformation. It is found that welding process can affect the ferrite content and grain growth phenomenon. The strong textures were found in the base metals for both steels. The AISI 316L ASS texture is composed of strong cube component. In the UNS S32750 dual-phase stainless steel, an important difference between the two phases can be seen in the texture evolution. Austenite phase is composed of a major cube component, whereas the ferrite texture mainly contains a major rotated cube component. The texture of the ferrite is stronger than that of austenite. In the WM, Kurdjumov-Sachs crystallographic orientation relationship is found in the solidification microstructure. The analysis of the Kernel average misorientation distribution shows that the residual strain is more concentrated in the austenite phase than in the other phase. The welding resulted in a significant hardness increase in the WM compared to initial ASS.

  12. Sea surface mean square slope from K u -band backscatter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, F. C.; Walton, W. T.; Hines, D. E.; Walter, B. A.; Peng, C. Y.

    1992-07-01

    Near-nadir, quasi-specular backscatter data obtained with a 14-GHz airborne radar altimeter are analyzed in terms of the surface mean square slope (mss) parameter. The raw mss data, derived from a least squares fitting of a ray optical scattering model to the return waveform, show an approximately linear wind speed dependence over the wind speed range of 7-15 m s-1, with a slope of about one half that of the optically determined mss. Further analysis based on a simple two-scale scattering model indicates that, at the higher wind speeds, ˜20% of this apparent slope signal can be attributed to diffraction from waves shorter than the estimated diffraction limit of ˜0.10 m. The present slope data, as well as slope and other data from a variety of sources, are used to draw inferences on the structure of the high wavenumber portion of the wave spectrum. The data support a directionally integrated model height spectrum consisting of wind speed dependent k-5/2 and classical Phillips' k-3 power law subranges in the range of gravity waves, with a transition between the two subranges occurring around 10 times the peak wavenumber, and a Durden and Vesecky wind speed dependent spectrum in the gravity-capillary wave range. With a nominal value of the spectral constant Au = 0.002 in the first k-5/2 subrange, this equilibrium spectrum model predicts a mss wind speed dependence that accords with much of the available data at both microwave and optical frequencies.

  13. Backscattering channel-cut high-resolution monochromator for inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushnir, Vladimir I.; Abbamonte, Peter M.; Macrander, Albert T.; Schwoerer-Boehning, Markus

    1997-12-01

    We report on a design and on some experimental results for the performance of a new high energy resolution monochromator. It is a large channel-cut Si crystal with a 197 mm separation between the two faces designed to operate in a near-backscattering regime. The device was tested as a second monochromator on Sector 3 of the Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source using the Si(777) reflection at a photon energy of 13.84 keV. The same monochromator can be used for other energies with reflections of the type (hhh). Special care has been taken to equalize the temperature of the two faces by employing a Peltier heat pump. A Si(111) double-crystal pre-monochromator designed to withstand the high heat load of the undulator radiation was used upstream on the beamline. The measured throughput efficiency of the Si(777) channel-cut monochromator was less than ideal by a factor of 1.9. Dynamical diffraction theory was used to calculate the throughput of an ideally perfect crystal.

  14. Back-scattering channel-cut high-resolution monochromator for inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnir, V.I.; Abbamonte, P.M.; Macrander, A.T.; Schwoerer-Boehning, M.

    1997-08-01

    We report on a design and on some experimental results for the performance of a new high energy resolution monochromator. It is a large channel-cut Si crystal with a 197 mm separation between the two faces designed to operate in a near-backscattering regime. The device was tested as a second monochromator on Sector 3 of the Synchrotron Radiation Instrumentation Collaborative Access Team (SRI-CAT) at the Advanced Photon Source using the Si(777) reflection at a photon energy of 13.84 keV. The same monochromator can be used for other energies with reflections of the type (hhh). Special care has been taken to equalize the temperature of the two faces by employing a Peltier heat pump. A Si(111) double-crystal pre-monochromator designed to withstand the high heat load of the undulator radiation was used upstream on the beamline. The measured throughput efficiency of the Si(777) channel-cut monochromator was less ideal by a factor of 1.9. Dynamical diffraction theory was used to calculate the throughput of an ideally perfect crystal.

  15. Use of Rutherford backscattering and optical spectroscopy to study boron implantation in cadmium telluride. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, D.N.; Bowman, R.C.; Adams, P.M.; Knudsen, J.F.; Downing, R.G.

    1988-10-03

    The effect of large-dose boron implantation in single-crystal cadmium telluride (CdTe) was investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), with channeling double-crystal x-ray diffraction (DCD), and photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy. Comparisons are made with the results of identical B implantations of silicon and gallium arsenides crystals. Multiple energy implantations were performed at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature with total doses up to 1.5 x 10 W B ions/sq. cm. The implanted B distribution was measured with neutron depth profiling (NDP) and found to agree well with Monte Carlo ion-range calculations. The RBS results showed that the CdTe crystals had not been rendered completely amorphous even for the highest-dose implantation unlike GaAs and Si. Furthermore, the DCD results showed little implantation-induced structure in the rocking curves from the implanted CdTe crystals, in contrast to GaAs. The consequences of annealing at 500 C in an attempt to regrow the crystal structure are also discussed.

  16. Quasi-optical Gaussian beam tracing to evaluate Doppler backscattering conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honoré, C.; Hennequin, P.; Truc, A.; Quéméneur, A.

    2006-09-01

    Microwave beam backscattering near the cut-off layer appears to be the most interesting diagnostic to observe density fluctuation time evolution for a given localization in the plasma and at a defined wave vector. It also provides perpendicular plasma velocity. Scattering only occurs when the Bragg selection rule is fulfilled, i.e. when the scattering wave vector is almost perpendicular to the magnetic field. In order to evaluate these scattering conditions, ray tracing is required. 3D geometry is necessary to evaluate the angle between the magnetic field and the wave vector at the reflection. The ripple effect on the iso-index layer curve cannot be neglected. Scattering localization and wave vector resolution can be approached if single ray tracing is replaced with quasi-optical beam tracing. Optical propagation is still considered in the WKB approximation but the beam is described as multiple connected rays. The beam radial expansion due to diffraction is well described. This approach allows one to compute beam parameters for all data acquisitions (50 triggers per shot) and all shots (40 shots per day) during the following night on a recent personal computer with MatLab©.

  17. Estimation of Mars radar backscatter from measured surface rock populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baron, J.E.; Simpson, R.A.; Tyler, G.L.; Moore, H.J.; Harmon, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Reanalysis of rock population data at the Mars Viking Lander sites has yielded updated values of rock fractional surface coverage (about 0.16 at both sites, including outcrops) and new estimates of rock burial depths and axial ratios. These data are combined with a finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical scattering model to estimate diffuse backscatter due to rocks at both the Lander l (VL1) and Lander 2 (VL2) sites. We consider single scattering from both surface and subsurface objects of various shapes, ranging from an ideal sphere to an accurate digitized model of a terrestrial rock. The FDTD cross-section calculations explicitly account for the size, shape, composition, orientation, and burial state of the scattering object, the incident wave angle and polarization, and the composition of the surface. We calculate depolarized specific cross sections at 12.6 cm wavelength due to lossless rock-like scatterers of about 0.014 at VL1 and 0.023 at VL2, which are comparable to the measured ranges of 0.019-0.032 and 0.012-0.018, respectively. We also discuss the variation of the diffuse cross section as the local angle of incidence, ??i, changes. Numerical calculations for a limited set of rock shapes indicate a marked difference between the angular backscattering behavior of wavelength-scale surface and subsurface rocks: while subsurface rocks scatter approximately as a cosine power law, surface rocks display a complex variation, often with peak backscattering at high incidence angles (??i = 70??-75??). Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Evaluation of a compact sensor for backscattering and absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainusa Bogdan, Alina; Boss, Emmanuel S.

    2011-07-01

    Seawater inherent optical properties (IOPs) are key parameters in a wide range of applications in environmental studies and oceanographic research. In particular, the absorption coefficient (a) is the typical IOP used to obtain the concentration of chlorophyll-a in the water---a critical parameter in biological oceanography studies and the backscattering coefficient (bb) is used as a measure of turbidity. In this study, we test a novel instrument concept designed to obtain both the absorption and backscattering coefficients. The instrument would emit a collimated monochromatic light beam into the water retrieving the backscattered light intensity as a function of distance from the center of illumination. We use Monte Carlo modeling of light propagation to create an inversion algorithm that translates the signal from such an instrument into values of a and bb. Our results, based on simulations spanning the bulk of natural values of seawater IOP combinations, indicate that a 6.2cm diameter instrument with a radial resolution of 1cm would be capable of predicting bb within less than 13.4% relative difference and a within less than 57% relative difference (for 90% of the inverted a values, the relative errors fall below 29.7%). Additionally, these errors could be further reduced by constraining the inversion algorithm with information from concurrent measurements of other IOPs. Such a compact and relatively simple device could have multiple applications for in situ optical measurements, including a and bb retrievals from instrumentation mounted on autonomous underwater vehicles. Furthermore, the same methodology could possibly be used for an out-of-water sensor.

  19. Concentration measurement of yeast suspensions using high frequency ultrasound backscattering.

    PubMed

    Elvira, Luis; Vera, Pedro; Cañadas, Francisco Jesús; Shukla, Shiva Kant; Montero, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes the use of an ultrasound based technique to measure the concentration of yeasts in liquid suspension. This measurement was achieved by the detection and quantification of ultrasonic echoes backscattered by the cells. More specifically, the technique was applied to the detection and quantification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A theoretical approach was proposed to get the average density and sound speed of the yeasts, which were found to be 1116 kg/m(3) and 1679 m/s, respectively. These parameters were needed to model the waves backscattered by each single cell. A pulse-echo arrangement working around 50 MHz, being able to detect echoes from single yeasts was used to characterize experimentally yeast solutions from 10(2) to 10(7)cells/ml. The Non-negative Matrix Factorization denoising technique was applied for data analysis. This technique required a previous learning of the spectral patterns of the echoes reflected from yeasts in solution and the base noise from the liquid medium. Comparison between pulse correlation (without denoising) and theoretical and experimental pattern learning was made to select the best signal processing. A linear relation between ultrasound output and concentration was obtained with correlation coefficient R(2)=0.996 for the experimental learning. Concentrations from 10(4) to 10(7)cells/ml were detected above the base noise. These results show the viability of using the ultrasound backscattering technique to detect yeasts and measure their concentration in liquid cultures, improving the sensitivity obtained using spectrophotometric methods by one order of magnitude.

  20. Quantifying Fish Backscattering using SONAR Instrument and Kirchhoff Ray Mode (KRM) Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manik, Henry M.

    2016-08-01

    Sonar instrument was used to study backscattering from tuna fish. Extraction of target strength, incidence angle, and frequency dependence of the backscattered signal for individual scatterer was important for biological information. For this purpose, acoustic measurement of fish backscatter was conducted in the laboratory. Characteristics and general trends of the target strength of fish with special reference to tuna fish were investigated by using a Kirchhoff Ray Mode (KRM) model. Backscattering strength were calculated for the KRM having typical morphological and physical parameters of actual fish. Those backscattering amplitudes were shown as frequency, body length, backscattering patterns, the density and sound speed dependences, and orientation dependence. These results were compared with experimentally measured target strength data and good agreement was found. Measurement and model showed the target strength from the fish are depend on the presence of swimbladder. Target Strength increase with increasing the frequency and fish length.

  1. The relationship between ultrasonic backscatter and trabecular anisotropic microstructure in cancellous bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chengcheng; Ta, Dean; Fujita, Fuminori; Hachiken, Takuma; Matsukawa, Mami; Mizuno, Katsunori; Wang, Weiqi

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the relationship between ultrasonic backscatter and trabecular microstructure, ultrasonic backscatter measurements were performed on cylindrical bovine cancellous bone samples in vitro. The backscatter signals from different specimen angles were obtained by rotating the specimen at various central frequencies. The backscatter signal varied a lot as the specimen angle changed. The main trabecular alignment (MTA) orientation was estimated by the maximum of signal energy and integrated reflection coefficient, or the minor axis of fitted ellipse for apparent integrated backscatter and the backscattered spectrum centroid frequency versus specimen angle. The degree of anisotropy (DA) was estimated by the eccentricity of the fitted ellipse with highly significant correlations. The MTA orientation and DA value estimation method proposed in this study is useful for ultrasonic cancellous bone assessment.

  2. Relating the microwave backscattering coefficient to leaf area index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.; Allen, C. T.; Eger, G., III; Kanemasu, E.

    1984-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between the microwave backscattering coefficient of a vegetation canopy, sigma (can, 0) and the canopy's leaf area index (LAI). The relationship is established through the development of one model for corn and sorghum and another for wheat. Both models are extensions of the cloud model of Attema and Ulaby (1978). Analysis of experimental data measured at 8.6, 13.0, 17.0, and 35.6 GHz indicates that most of the temporal variations of sigma (can, 0) can be accounted for through variations in green LAI alone, if the latter is greater than 0.5.

  3. Coherent Backscattering in the Cross-Polarized Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mischenko, Michael I.; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the asymptotic behavior of the cross-polarized enhancement factor in the framework of the standard low-packing-density theory of coherent backscattering by discrete random media composed of spherically symmetric particles. It is shown that if the particles are strongly absorbing or if the smallest optical dimension of the particulate medium (i.e., the optical thickness of a plane-parallel slab or the optical diameter of a spherically symmetric volume) approaches zero, then the cross-polarized enhancement factor tends to its upper-limit value 2. This theoretical prediction is illustrated using direct computer solutions of the Maxwell equations for spherical volumes of discrete random medium.

  4. DUNBID, the Delft University neutron backscattering imaging detector.

    PubMed

    Bom, V R; van Eijk, C W E; Ali, M A

    2005-01-01

    In the search for low-metallic land mines, the neutron backscattering technique may be applied if the soil is sufficiently dry. An advantage of this method is the speed of detection: the scanning speed may be made comparable to that of a metal detector. A two-dimensional position sensitive detector is tested to obtain an image of the back scattered thermal neutron radiation. Results of experiments using a radionuclide neutron source are presented. The on-mine to no-mine signal ratio can be improved by the application of a window on the neutron time-of-flight. Results using a pulsed neutron generator are also presented.

  5. Backscatter by azimuthally oriented ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Konoshonkin, Alexander; Wang, Zhenzhu; Borovoi, Anatoli; Kustova, Natalia; Liu, Dong; Xie, Chenbo

    2016-09-05

    The backscattering Mueller matrix has been calculated for the first time for the hexagonal ice columns and plates with both zenith and azimuth preferential orientations. The possibility of a vertically pointing polarization lidar measuring the full Mueller matrix for retrieving the orientation distributions of the crystals is considered. It is shown that the element m44 or, equivalently, the circular depolarization ratio distinguishes between the low and high zenith tilts of the crystals. Then, at their low or high zenith tilts, either the element m22 or m34, respectively, should be measured to retrieve the azimuth tilts.

  6. Backscattering by hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds.

    PubMed

    Borovoi, Anatoli; Konoshonkin, Alexander; Kustova, Natalia

    2013-08-01

    Light backscattering by randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals of cirrus clouds is considered within the framework of the physical-optics approximation. The fine angular structure of all elements of the Mueller matrix in the vicinity of the exact backward direction is first calculated and discussed. In particular, an approximate equation for the differential scattering cross section is obtained. Its simple spectral dependence is discussed. Also, a hollow of the linear depolarization ratio around the exact backward direction inherent to the long hexagonal columns is revealed.

  7. HAB detection based on absorption and backscattering properties of phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hui; Pan, Delu; Bai, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Yan; Zhu, Qiankun

    2011-11-01

    The coastal area of East China Sea (ECS) suffers from the harmful algal blooms (HAB) frequently every year in the warm season. The most common causative phytoplankton algal species of HAB in the ECS in recent years are Prorocentrum donghaiense (dinoflagellates), Karenia mikimotoi (dinoflagellates which could produce hemolytic and ichthyotoxins) and Skeletonema costatum (diatom). The discrimination between the dinoflagellates and diatom HAB through ocean color remote sensing approach can add the knowledge of HAB events in ECS and help to the precaution. A series of in-situ measurement consisted of absorption coefficient, total scattering and particulate backscattering coefficient was conducted in the southern coast of Zhejiang Province in May 2009, and the estuary of Changjiang River in August 2009 and December 2010, which encountered two HAB events and a moderate bloom. The Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) of the bloom waters have significant difference between phytoplankton species in absorption and backscattering properties. The chlorophyll a specific absorption coefficient (a*phy(λ)) for the bloom patches (chlorophyll a concentration >6mg m-3) differ greatly from the adjacent normal seawater, with the a*phy(λ) of bloom water lower than 0.03 m2 mg-1 while the a*phy(λ) of the adjacent normal seawater is much higher (even up to 0.06 m2 mg-1). Meanwhile, the backscattering coefficients at 6 wavebands (420, 442, 470, 510, 590 and 700nm) are also remarkably lower for bloom waters (<0.01 m-1) than the normal seawater (> 0.02 m-1). The backscattering coefficient ratio (Rbp(λ)) is much lower for diatom bloom waters than for dinoflagellates types (0.01079 vs. 0.01227). A discrimination model based on IOPs is established, and several typical dinoflagellates and diatom bloom events including Prorocentrum donghaiense, Karenia mikimotoi and Skeletonema costatum in the ECS are picked out for testing with the MODIS-L2 and L3 ocean color remote sensing products from NASA

  8. Relating the radar backscattering coefficient to leaf-area index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T. (Principal Investigator); Allen, C.; Eger, G.; Kanemasu, E.

    1983-01-01

    The relationship between the radar backscattering coefficient of a vegetation canopy, sigma(0) sub can, and the canopy's leaf area index (LAI) is examined. The relationship is established through the development of a model for corn and sorghum and another for wheat. Both models are extensions of the cloud model of Attema and Ulaby (1978). Analysis of experimental data measured at 8.6, 13.0, 17.0, and 35.6 GHz indicates that most of the temporal variations of sigma(0) sub can can be accounted for through variations in green LAI alone, if the latter is greater than 0.5.

  9. Computed laser backscattering from turbid liquids - Comparison with laboratory results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1982-01-01

    A recently developed semianalytic Monte Carlo radiative transfer model applicable to oceanographic lidar systems (SALMON) has been used to simulate a series of laboratory experiments studying the backscatter of laser light from dispersions of Teflon spheres. Results obtained with SALMON, using best estimates of pertinent optical parameters, compared quite well with experimental data in both a qualitative and quantitative sense, with the largest relative discrepancies being approximately 30%. The results firmly establish the validity of SALMON in studying the performance of real oceanographic lidar systems.

  10. Computed laser backscattering from turbid liquids - Comparison with laboratory results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1982-06-01

    A recently developed semianalytic Monte Carlo radiative transfer model applicable to oceanographic lidar systems (SALMON) has been used to simulate a series of laboratory experiments studying the backscatter of laser light from dispersions of Teflon spheres. Results obtained with SALMON, using best estimates of pertinent optical parameters, compared quite well with experimental data in both a qualitative and quantitative sense, with the largest relative discrepancies being approximately 30%. The results firmly establish the validity of SALMON in studying the performance of real oceanographic lidar systems.

  11. A compton backscattering polarimeter for measuring longitudinal electron polarization

    SciTech Connect

    I. Passchier; Douglas W. Higinbotham; N. Vodinas; N. Papadakis; Kees de Jager; Ricardo Alarcon; T. Bauer; J.F.J. van den Brand; D. Boersma; T. Botto; M. Bouwhuis; H.J. Bulten; L. van Buuren; Rolf Ent; D. Geurts; M. Ferro-Luzzi; M. Harvey; Peter Heimberg; Blaine Norum; H.R. Poolman; M. van der Putte; E. Six; J.J.M. Steijger; D. Szczerba; H. de Vries

    1997-08-01

    Compton backscattering polarimetry provides a fast measurement of the polarization of an electron beam in a storage ring. Since the method is non-destructive, the polarization of the electrons can be monitored during internal target experiments. At NIKHEF a Compton polarimeter has been constructed to measure the polarization of the longitudinally polarized electrons stored in the AmPS ring. First results obtained with the polarimeter, the first Compton polarimeter to measure the polarization of a stored longitudinally polarized electron beam, are presented in this paper.

  12. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

    1985-08-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints.

  13. Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Backscatter from Buried Tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, K; Pao, H

    2006-06-21

    This progress report is submitted under a contract between the Special Project Office of DARPA and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Project Manager at DARPA is Dr. Michael Zatman. Our purpose under this contract is to investigate interactions between electromagnetic waves and a class of buried targets located in multilayered media with rough interfaces. In this report, we investigate three preliminary problems. In each case our specific goal is to understand various aspects of the electromagnetic wave interaction mechanisms with targets in layered media. The first problem, discussed in Section 2, is that of low-frequency electromagnetic backscattering from a tunnel that is cut into a lossy dielectric half-space. In this problem, the interface between the upper (free space) region and the lower (ground) region is smooth. The tunnel is assumed to be a cylindrical free-space region of infinite extent in its axial direction and with a diameter that is small in comparison to the free-space wavelength. Because its diameter is small, the tunnel can be modeled as a buried ''wire'' described by an equivalent impedance per unit length. In Section 3 we extend the analysis to include a statistically rough interface between the air and ground regions. The interface is modeled as a random-phase screen. Such a screen reduces the coherent power in a plane wave that is transmitted through it, scattering some of the total power into an incoherent field. Our analysis of this second problem quantifies the reduction in the coherent power backscattered from the buried tunnel that is caused by the roughness of the air-ground interface. The problem of low-frequency electromagnetic backscattering from two buried tunnels, parallel to each other but at different locations in the ground, is considered in Section 4. In this analysis, we wish to determine the conditions under which the presence of more than one tunnel can be detected via backscattering. Section 5 concludes the report

  14. One-way regular electromagnetic mode immune to backscattering.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiaohua; Hong, Lujun; Zheng, Xiaodong; Shen, Linfang

    2015-05-10

    In this paper, we present a basic model of robust one-way electromagnetic modes at microwave frequencies, which is formed by a semi-infinite gyromagnetic yttrium-iron-garnet with dielectric cladding terminated by a metal plate. It is shown that this system supports not only one-way surface magnetoplasmons (SMPs) but also a one-way regular mode, which is guided by the mechanism of total internal reflection. Like one-way SMPs, the one-way regular mode can be immune to backscattering, and two types of one-way modes together make up a complete dispersion band for the system.

  15. EBSD Study on Grain Boundary and Microtexture Evolutions During Friction Stir Processing of A413 Cast Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanian, Morteza; Mostaan, Hossein; Safari, Mehdi; Szpunar, Jerzy A.

    2016-07-01

    The as-cast Al alloys contain heterogeneous distributions of non-deforming particles due to non-equilibrium solidification effects. Therefore, these alloys have poor tribological and mechanical behaviors. It is well known that using friction stir processing (FSP), very fine microstructure is created in the as-cast Al alloys, while their wear resistance can be improved. In this research work, FSP is used to locally refine a surface layer of the coarse as-cast microstructure of cast A413 Al alloy. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of FSP on microstructure and microtexture evolutions in A413 cast Al alloy. The grain boundary character distribution, grain structure, and microtexture evolutions in as-cast and friction stir processed A413 Al alloy are analyzed by electron back scatter diffraction technique. It is found that with the FSP, the fraction of low ∑boundary such as ∑3, 7, and 9 are increased. The obtained results show that there are no deformation texture components in the structure of friction stir processed samples. However, some of the main recrystallization texture components such as BR and cubeND are formed during FSP which indicate the occurrence of dynamic recrystallization phenomenon due to the severe plastic deformation induced by the rotation of tool.

  16. Preliminary Analysis of Low-Frequency Backscatter Data from the Blake Escarpment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    distr ibtion and strength of acoustic energy backscattered fromot1e Blake Escarpment. The angular variability of backscatter surces on the Blake...data where scattered energy has been transformed to the appropriate scattering surface) are used to estimate the size and distribution of scatterers...In Figure 4 strong backscattered energy centered at 2.4 km range with reflection times less than 1.0 s denote a promontory near the top of the

  17. Comparison of Lidar Backscatter with Particle Distribution and GOES-7 Data in Hurricane Juliette

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; McCaul, Eugene W., Jr.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Atkinson, Robert J.; Pueschel, Rudolf F.; Cutten, Dean R.

    1997-01-01

    Measurements of calibrated backscatter, using two continuous wave Doppler lidars operating at wavelengths 9.1 and 10.6 micrometers were obtained along with cloud particle size distributions in Hurricane Juliette on 21 September 1995 at altitude approximately 11.7 km. Agreement between backscatter from the two lidars and with the cloud particle size distribution is excellent. Features in backscatter and particle number density compare well with concurrent GOES-7 infrared images.

  18. Characterization of polycrystals with elongated duplex microstructure by inversion of ultrasonic backscattering data

    SciTech Connect

    Lobkis, O. I.; Rokhlin, S. I.

    2010-04-19

    In this letter a simple analytical ultrasonic backscattering model is proposed for determination of characteristic microstructural scales in polycrystalline materials with elongated grains. The inversion methodology for microstructural parameters is based on backscattering coefficient ratios measured in different propagation directions. The ultrasonic backscattering measurements were performed on a Ti alloy sample with a duplex microstructure and the model was applied to experimental data inversion to size the material microtexture.

  19. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  20. Arbitrary shape surface Fresnel diffraction.

    PubMed

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Masuda, Nobuyuki; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2012-04-09

    Fresnel diffraction calculation on an arbitrary shape surface is proposed. This method is capable of calculating Fresnel diffraction from a source surface with an arbitrary shape to a planar destination surface. Although such calculation can be readily calculated by the direct integral of a diffraction calculation, the calculation cost is proportional to O(N²) in one dimensional or O(N⁴) in two dimensional cases, where N is the number of sampling points. However, the calculation cost of the proposed method is O(N log N) in one dimensional or O(N² log N) in two dimensional cases using non-uniform fast Fourier transform.

  1. Optical properties of the scales of Morpho rhetenor butterflies: theoretical and experimental investigation of the back-scattering of light in the visible spectrum.

    PubMed Central

    Plattner, L.

    2004-01-01

    A study of the optical properties of the largely periodic microstructure occurring on the wings of the iridescent tropical butterfly Morpho rhetenor and responsible for its structural colouration is reported. An extensive measurement of the back-scattering of visible light from butterfly scales was performed for various angles of incidence. Efficient low-pass filter behaviour was observed for all angles of incidence and polarizations, with near-complete transmission at wavelengths above the threshold of 550 nm. The angular spread of the back-scattered light was found to be organized in lobes with total extinction of the specular reflection for all conditions of incidence. Retro-reflector behaviour was also observed for angles of incidence of 30 degrees and above. Additionally, the role of periodic geometrical features found in the microstructure for the generation of its spectral response was analysed theoretically. Using finite-difference time-domain and near-field to far-field transformation techniques, the back-scattering of visible light by models was computed numerically and the relevance of geometrical features for the production of structural colour and diffraction was demonstrated. PMID:16849152

  2. Effects of soil and canopy characteristics on microwave backscattering of vegetation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daughtry, C. S. T.; Ranson, K. J.

    1991-01-01

    A frequency modulated continuous wave C-band (4.8 GHz) scatterometer was mounted on an aerial lift truck and backscatter coefficients of corn were acquired as functions of polarizations, view angles, and row directions. As phytomass and green leaf area index increased, the backscatter also increased. Near anthesis when the canopies were fully developed, the major scattering elements were located in the upper 1 m of the 2.8 m tall canopy and little backscatter was measured below that level. C-band backscatter data could provide information to monitor vegetation at large view zenith angles.

  3. EBSD Study of the Influence of a High Magnetic Field on the Microstructure and Orientation of the Al-Si Eutectic During Directional Solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi; Fautrelle, Yves; Gagnoud, Annie; Ren, Zhongming; Moreau, Rene

    2016-06-01

    The effect of a high magnetic field on the morphology of the Al-Si eutectic was investigated using EBSD technology. The results revealed that the application of the magnetic field modified the morphology of the Al-Si eutectic significantly. Indeed, the magnetic field destroyed the coupled growth of the Al-Si eutectic and caused the formation of the divorced α-Al and Si dendrites at low growth speeds (≤1 μm/s). The magnetic field was also found to refine the eutectic grains and reduce the eutectic spacing at the initial growth stage. Moreover, the magnetic field caused the occurrence of the columnar-to-equiaxed transition of the α-Al phase in the Al-Si eutectic. The abovementioned effects were enhanced as the magnetic field increased. This result should be attributed to the magnetic field restraining the interdiffusion of Si and Al atoms in liquid ahead of the liquid/solid interface and the thermoelectric magnetic force acting on the eutectic lamellae under the magnetic field.

  4. Anisotropic and Heterogeneous Development of Microstructures. Combining Laboratory/Synchrotron X-rays and EBSD on a few SPD Metallic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolmaro, Raúl E.; De Vincentis, Natalia S.; Benatti, Emanuel; Kliauga, Andrea M.; Avalos, Martina C.; Schell, Norbert; Brokmeier, Heinz-Günter

    2014-08-01

    The onset of Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) regime is quite instructive on the possible origins of the nano-microstructures developed in metals and alloys. It is known that grain fragmentation and dislocation accumulation, among other defects, proceed at different paces depending fundamentally on grain orientations and active deformation mechanisms. There have been many attempts to characterize nano-microstructure anisotropy, leading all of them to sometimes contradictory conclusions. Moreover, the characterizations rely on different measurements techniques and pos-processing approaches, which can be observing different manifestations of the same phenomena. On the current presentation we show a few experimental and computer pos-processing and simulation approaches, applied to some SPD/alloy systems. Williamson-Hall and Convolutional Multiple Whole Profile (CMWP) techniques will be applied to peak broadening analysis on experimental results stemming from laboratory Cu Ka X-rays, and synchrotron radiation from LNLS (Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron, Campinas, Brazil) and Petra III line (HEMS station, at DESY, Hamburg, Germany). Taking advantage of the EBSD capability of giving information on orientational and topological characteristics of grain boundaries, microstructures, grain sizes, etc., we also performed investigations on dislocation density and Geometrically Necessary Dislocation Boundaries (GNDB) and their correlation with texture components. Orientation dependent nano-microstructures and domain sizes are shown on the scheme of generalized pole figures and discussions provide some hints on nano-microstructure anisotropy.

  5. Electrically-programmable diffraction grating

    DOEpatents

    Ricco, A.J.; Butler, M.A.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

    1998-05-26

    An electrically-programmable diffraction grating is disclosed. The programmable grating includes a substrate having a plurality of electrodes formed thereon and a moveable grating element above each of the electrodes. The grating elements are electrostatically programmable to form a diffraction grating for diffracting an incident beam of light as it is reflected from the upper surfaces of the grating elements. The programmable diffraction grating, formed by a micromachining process, has applications for optical information processing (e.g. optical correlators and computers), for multiplexing and demultiplexing a plurality of light beams of different wavelengths (e.g. for optical fiber communications), and for forming spectrometers (e.g. correlation and scanning spectrometers). 14 figs.

  6. Femtosecond single-electron diffraction

    PubMed Central

    Lahme, S.; Kealhofer, C.; Krausz, F.; Baum, P.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafast electron diffraction allows the tracking of atomic motion in real time, but space charge effects within dense electron packets are a problem for temporal resolution. Here, we report on time-resolved pump-probe diffraction using femtosecond single-electron pulses that are free from intra-pulse Coulomb interactions over the entire trajectory from the source to the detector. Sufficient average electron current is achieved at repetition rates of hundreds of kHz. Thermal load on the sample is avoided by minimizing the pump-probe area and by maximizing heat diffusion. Time-resolved diffraction from fibrous graphite polycrystals reveals coherent acoustic phonons in a nanometer-thick grain ensemble with a signal-to-noise level comparable to conventional multi-electron experiments. These results demonstrate the feasibility of pump-probe diffraction in the single-electron regime, where simulations indicate compressibility of the pulses down to few-femtosecond and attosecond duration. PMID:26798778

  7. X-Ray Diffraction Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, David F. (Inventor); Bryson, Charles (Inventor); Freund, Friedmann (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An x-ray diffraction apparatus for use in analyzing the x-ray diffraction pattern of a sample is introduced. The apparatus includes a beam source for generating a collimated x-ray beam having one or more discrete x-ray energies, a holder for holding the sample to be analyzed in the path of the beam, and a charge-coupled device having an array of pixels for detecting, in one or more selected photon energy ranges, x-ray diffraction photons produced by irradiating such a sample with said beam. The CCD is coupled to an output unit which receives input information relating to the energies of photons striking each pixel in the CCD, and constructs the diffraction pattern of photons within a selected energy range striking the CCD.

  8. Multiple annular linear diffractive axicons.

    PubMed

    Bialic, Emilie; de la Tocnaye, Jean-Louis de Bougrenet

    2011-04-01

    We propose a chromatic analysis of multiple annular linear diffractive axicons. Large aperture axicons are optical devices providing achromatic nondiffracting beams, with an extended depth of focus, when illuminated by a white light source, due to chromatic foci superimposition. Annular apertures introduce chromatic foci separation, and because chromatic aberrations result in focal segment axial shifts, polychromatic imaging properties are partially lost. We investigate here various design parameters that can be used to achieve color splitting, filtering, and combining using these properties. In order to improve the low-power efficiency of a single annular axicon, we suggest a spatial multiplexing of concentric annular axicons with different sizes and periods we call multiple annular aperture diffractive axicons (MALDAs). These are chosen to maintain focal depths while enabling color imaging with sufficient diffraction efficiency. Illustrations are given for binary phase diffractive axicons, considering technical aspects such as grating design wavelength and phase dependence due to the grating thickness.

  9. Observations of HF backscatter decay rates from HAARP generated FAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, William; Hysell, David

    2016-07-01

    Suitable experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facilities in Gakona, Alaska, create a region of ionospheric Field-Aligned Irregularities (FAI) that produces strong radar backscatter observed by the SuperDARN radar on Kodiak Island, Alaska. Creation of FAI in HF ionospheric modification experiments has been studied by a number of authors who have developed a rich theoretical background. The decay of the irregularities, however, has not been so widely studied yet it has the potential for providing estimates of the parameters of natural irregularity diffusion, which are difficult measure by other means. Hysell, et al. [1996] demonstrated using the decay of radar scatter above the Sura heating facility to estimate irregularity diffusion. A large database of radar backscatter from HAARP generated FAI has been collected over the years. Experiments often cycled the heater power on and off in a way that allowed estimates of the FAI decay rate. The database has been examined to extract decay time estimates and diffusion rates over a range of ionospheric conditions. This presentation will summarize the database and the estimated diffusion rates, and will discuss the potential for targeted experiments for aeronomy measurements. Hysell, D. L., M. C. Kelley, Y. M. Yampolski, V. S. Beley, A. V. Koloskov, P. V. Ponomarenko, and O. F. Tyrnov, HF radar observations of decaying artificial field aligned irregularities, J. Geophys. Res. , 101, 26,981, 1996.

  10. Classification of kidney and liver tissue using ultrasound backscatter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Rivaz, Hassan; Cerrolaza, Juan J.; Jago, James; Safdar, Nabile; Boctor, Emad M.; Linguraru, Marius G.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) tissue characterization provides valuable information for the initialization of automatic segmentation algorithms, and can further provide complementary information for diagnosis of pathologies. US tissue characterization is challenging due to the presence of various types of image artifacts and dependence on the sonographer's skills. One way of overcoming this challenge is by characterizing images based on the distribution of the backscatter data derived from the interaction between US waves and tissue. The goal of this work is to classify liver versus kidney tissue in 3D volumetric US data using the distribution of backscatter US data recovered from end-user displayed Bmode image available in clinical systems. To this end, we first propose the computation of a large set of features based on the homodyned-K distribution of the speckle as well as the correlation coefficients between small patches in 3D images. We then utilize the random forests framework to select the most important features for classification. Experiments on in-vivo 3D US data from nine pediatric patients with hydronephrosis showed an average accuracy of 94% for the classification of liver and kidney tissues showing a good potential of this work to assist in the classification and segmentation of abdominal soft tissue.

  11. Nimbus 7 solar backscatter ultraviolet (SBUV) ozone products user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, Albert J.; Mcpeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Schlesinger, Barry M.; Cebula, Richard P.; Klenk, K. F.; Taylor, Steven L.; Heath, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    Three ozone tape products from the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV) experiment aboard Nimbus 7 were archived at the National Space Science Data Center. The experiment measures the fraction of incoming radiation backscattered by the Earth's atmosphere at 12 wavelengths. In-flight measurements were used to monitor changes in the instrument sensitivity. Total column ozone is derived by comparing the measurements with calculations of what would be measured for different total ozone amounts. The altitude distribution is retrieved using an optimum statistical technique for the inversion. The estimated initial error in the absolute scale for total ozone is 2 percent, with a 3 percent drift over 8 years. The profile error depends on latitude and height, smallest at 3 to 10 mbar; the drift increases with increasing altitude. Three tape products are described. The High Density SBUV (HDSBUV) tape contains the final derived products - the total ozone and the vertical ozone profile - as well as much detailed diagnostic information generated during the retrieval process. The Compressed Ozone (CPOZ) tape contains only that subset of HDSBUV information, including total ozone and ozone profiles, considered most useful for scientific studies. The Zonal Means Tape (ZMT) contains daily, weekly, monthly and quarterly averages of the derived quantities over 10 deg latitude zones.

  12. Almost perfect sequences applied for ionospheric oblique backscattering detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Zhao, Zhengyu; Pu, Tianyao; Huang, Yujie; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2009-10-01

    Pseudorandom sequences are often used in radio systems; however, the nonzero out-of-phase autocorrelation of many binary sequences induces range sidelobes which significantly reduce the echo signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this paper, the use of almost perfect sequences, exhibiting zero out-of-phase autocorrelation except one value in the middle is examined with reference to common m sequences and perfect sequence. The ambiguity functions demonstrate that it is possible to use the almost perfect sequences for ranging without sidelobes and that their Doppler measurement performance is similar to m sequence of the same length. This is an important result for ionospheric oblique backscattering detection where the echoes are superposed and where range sidelobes can submerge the main lobes of weak signals. The 124-bit almost perfect sequence and the 127-bit m sequence are applied to the Wuhan Ionospheric Oblique Backscattering Sounding System for sequence testing. The test results have proven that the almost perfect sequence exhibits a higher echo SNR for the same detection conditions.

  13. Noninvasive fluid flow measurements in microfluidic channels with backscatter interferometry.

    PubMed

    Markov, Dmitry A; Dotson, Stephen; Wood, Scott; Bornhop, Darryl J

    2004-11-01

    The ability to measure fluid velocity within picoliter volumes or on-chip noninvasively, is important toward fully realizing the potential of microfluidics and micrototal analysis systems, particularly in applications such as micro-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or in metering mixing where the flow rate must be quantified. Additionally, these measurements need to be performed directly on moving fluids in a noninvasive fashion. We presented here the proof of principle experiments showing nonintrusive fluid flow measurements can be accomplished on-chip using a pump and probe configuration with backscattering interferometry. The on-chip interferometric backscatter detector (OCIBD) is based on a fiber-coupled HeNe laser that illuminates a portion of an isotropically etched 40 microm radius channel and a position sensitive transducer to measure fringe pattern shifts. An infrared laser with a mechanical shutter is used to heat a section of a flowing volume and the resulting refractive index (RI) change is detected with the OCIBD downstream as a time-dependent RI perturbation. Fluid velocity is quantified as changes in the phase difference between the shutter signal and the OCIBD detected signal in the Fourier domain. The experiments are performed in the range of 3-6 microL/h with 3sigma detection limits determined to be 0.127 nL/s. Additionally, the RI response of the system is calibrated using temperature changes as well as glycerol solutions.

  14. X-band microwave backscattering from ocean waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, P.H.Y.; Barter, J.D.; Beach, K.L.

    1994-01-04

    Backscattering experiments at microwave frequencies were conducted off the west coast of Scotland in the summer of 1991. Using a dual-polarization, 8-frequency X-band coherent scatterometer mounted on the bow of a boat, we measured time-resolved backscattering from ocean waves at a range of grazing angles from 10{degrees} to 70{degrees}. From the grazing-angle-dependent signals and their Doppler spectra, we differentiate Bragg scattering from non-Bragg scattering and resolve ``peak separation`` between the vertical and horizontal polarizations. We observe instances of ``super`` events, i.e., instances when the horizontal polarization return power equals or exceeds the vertical polarization power. We find that ``super`` events occur not only at low grazing angles but at any grazing angle for against-wind viewing directions. Statistics for such occurrences as a function of grazing angle are obtained. We study the coherence properties of scatterers and find strong evidence that at low grazing angles, lifetime-dominated, non-Bragg scattering contributes noticeably to returns of both polarizations, but is dominant in providing returns for the horizontal polarization. We examine ``spiking`` events and find that they can be related to, but need not be limited to, breaking wave events. By comparing the data of against-wind runs with cross-wind and circle runs, we obtain wind-direction dependence of Doppler spectra which further assists in the identification of scattering mechanisms.

  15. Feasibility of using Backscattered Mueller Matrix Images for Bioaerosol Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changhui; Kattawar, George W.

    2006-03-01

    It has been shown that by looking at the backscattered radiance from an object illuminated by a laser beam one could effectively distinguish different morphologies from one another. However, if one wants to obtain all the information possible from elastic scattering either from a single particle or an ensemble of particles then one must use the Mueller matrix which contains all the polarization and radiance information available. In this talk, we will show that if we take advantage of the polarization information of the object, many more images related to the overall morphology as well as the internal structure of the object can be obtained. We will present images of the complete Mueller matrix to show the sensitivity of its sixteen components to both external and internal particle properties. We will also show that by using only one or two elements of this matrix one might be able to distinguish bioaerosols such as anthrax from more benign aerosols. We also show that the backscattering Mueller images contain more information than the forward scattering ones.

  16. Measuring and modeling the backscattering cross section of a leaf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senior, T. B. A.; Sarabandi, K.; Ulaby, F. T.

    1987-01-01

    Leaves are a significant feature of any vegetation canopy, and for remote sensing purposes it is important to develop an effective model for predicting the scattering from a leaf. From measurements of the X band backscattering cross section of a coleus leaf in varying stages of dryness, it is shown that a uniform resistive sheet constitutes such a model for a planar leaf. The scattering is determined by the (complex) resistivity which is, in turn, entirely specified by the gravimetric moisture content of the leaf. Using an available asymptotic expression for the scattering from a rectangular resistive plate which includes, as a special case, a metallic plate whose resistivity is zero, the computed backscattering cross sections for both principal polarizations are found to be in excellent agreement with data measured for rectangular sections of leaves with different moisture contents. If the resistivity is sufficiently large, the asymptotic expressions do not differ significantly from the physical optics ones, and for naturally shaped leaves as well as rectangular sections, the physical optics approximation in conjunction with the resistive sheet model faithfully reproduces the dominant feataures of the scattering patterns under all moisture conditions.

  17. Terrain-analysis procedures for modeling radar backscatter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, Gerald G.; Pike, Richard J.; Berlin, Graydon Lennis

    1978-01-01

    The collection and analysis of detailed information on the surface of natural terrain are important aspects of radar-backscattering modeling. Radar is especially sensitive to surface-relief changes in the millimeter- to-decimeter scale four conventional K-band (~1-cm wavelength) to L-band (~25-cm wavelength) radar systems. Surface roughness statistics that characterize these changes in detail have been generated by a comprehensive set of seven programmed calculations for radar-backscatter modeling from sets of field measurements. The seven programs are 1) formatting of data in readable form for subsequent topographic analysis program; 2) relief analysis; 3) power spectral analysis; 4) power spectrum plots; 5) slope angle between slope reversals; 6) slope angle against slope interval plots; and 7) base length slope angle and curvature. This complete Fortran IV software package, 'Terrain Analysis', is here presented for the first time. It was originally developed a decade ago for investigations of lunar morphology and surface trafficability for the Apollo Lunar Roving Vehicle.

  18. Discriminant classification of different fish-species backscattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiao; Xu, Feng; Liu, Yin; Zhang, Chun

    2012-11-01

    The complex structure of fish and multispecies composition complicate the analysis of acoustic data. Consequently, it is difficult to obtain a highly accurate rate of classification by using current approaches. This paper introduces two discriminating methods: the adaptive segmentation temporal centroid method and the wavelet packet multi-scale information entropy method. To verify and compare these two methods, an ex situ experiment has been performed with three kinds of fish: Crucian carp (Carassius auratus), Yellow-headed catfish (Pelteobagrus fulvidraco) and Bluntnose black bream (Megalobrama amblycephale). The backscattering signals of these fishes are obtained. Then the temporal centroid in the divided sub-segmentation of the backscattering envelope is calculated, and the multi-scale information entropy of the wavelet packet decomposition in different frequency bands is extracted. Finally, three kinds of fish are successfully classified by using a BP neural network. The result shows that the adaptive segmentation temporal centroid method is 4% more accurate than the wavelet packet multi-scale information entropy method.

  19. Radar Backscatter and Coherence Information Supporting High Quality Urban Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, P.; Perski, Z.; Wannemacher, S.

    2004-06-01

    The potential of a synergetic use of different data sources for a high quality mapping of urban features is described in this paper. In the urban application domain, beside the different EO-sensors and products there are a lot of high resolution and high quality GIS- and digital map databases available (e.g. ATKIS in Germany), provided by public authorities but also by private industry. Fusing this ground-based data with remotely sensed information is resulting in high quality thematic datasets. Using ATKIS Geodata, IKONOS multispectral- and ERS-SAR / ENVISAT-ASAR data as input, in the research described we implemented a GIS-based expert system to derive in a first step the degree of sealing in the regions of interest (ROI). Joining the reclassified ATKIS-data with a vegetation index, the backscatter- and the coherence information, the output of the processing chain is a vector data layer dividing the ROI in different classes of sealing. Adding the SAR-/ASAR derived backscatter and coherence data into the spatial analysis results in a partial improvement of the classification process, especially in rural areas.

  20. Assembly for Rutherford backscattering at exactly 180{degree}

    SciTech Connect

    Ellmer, H.; Fischer, W.; Klose, A.; Semrad, D.

    1996-05-01

    We describe a facility which allows us to measure projectiles scattered at an angle arbitrarily near 180{degree}. The backscattered projectiles are deflected in the horizontal plane out of the incoming beam by a combination of electric and magnetic fields. The charged particles, which are spatially dispersed according to their energy, are detected by a cooled 300 mm{sup 2} ion implanted silicon detector. By a judicious choice of the relative strength of both fields we ensure that the essential parts of the spectrum will not be distorted due to an energy dependent percentage of projectiles missing the detector. As the projectiles are also dispersed according to their charge state we are able to distinguish between, e.g., singly and doubly charged He projectiles as they hit the detector at different positions. The detector can be moved in the vertical direction to continuously vary the backscattering angle between 180{degree} and 178.5{degree}. This experimental result shows for the first time the angular range to which the 180{degree} enhancement is confined. Such a device is ideally suited for investigating single crystals by uniaxial channeling blocking. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Investigation of microwave backscatter from the air-sea interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintosh, Robert E.; Carswell, James R.

    1995-01-01

    Monitoring the ocean surface winds and mean ocean surface level is essential for improving our knowledge of the climate. Two instruments that may provide us with this information are satellite-based scatterometers and altimeters. However, these instruments measure the backscatter characteristics of the ocean surface from which other physical parameters, such as the wind speed or ocean surface height, are derived. To improve the algorithms or models that relate the electromagnetic backscatter to the desired physical parameters, the University of Massachusetts (UMass) Microwave Remote Sensing Laboratory (MIRSL) designed and fabricated three airborne scatterometers: a C-band scatterometer (CSCAT), Ku-band scatterometer (KUSCAT) and C/Ku-band scatterometer (EMBR). One or more of these instruments participated in the Electromagnetic Bias experiment (EM Bias), Shelf Edge Exchange Processes experiment (SEEP), Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE), Southern Ocean Wave Experiment (SOWEX), Hurricane Tina research flights, Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE), and Ladir In-space Technology Experiment (LITE). This document describes the three scatterometers, summarizes our measurement campaigns and major contributions to the scientific and engineering communities, lists the publications that resulted, and presents the degrees earned under the support of this NASA grant.

  2. Coherent Effects in Microwave Backscattering Models for Forrest Canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; McDonald, Kyle C.

    1997-01-01

    In modeling forest canopies, several scattering mechanisms are taken into account: (1) volume scattering; (2) surface-volume interaction; and (3) surface scattering from forest floor. Depending on the structural and dielectric characteristics of forest canopies, the relative contribution of each mechanism in the total backscatter signal of an imaging radar can vary. In this paper, two commonly used first-order discrete scattering models, distorted born approximation (DBA) and radiative transfer (RT) are used to simulate the backscattered power received by polarimetric radars at P-, L-, and C-bands over coniferous and deciduous forests. The difference between the two models resides on the coherent effect in the surface-volume interaction terms. To demonstrate this point, the models are first compared based on their underlying theoretical assumptions and then according to simulation results over coniferous and deciduous forests. It is shown that by using the same scattering functions for various components of trees (i.e., leaf, branch, stem), the radiative transfer and distorted Born models are equivalent, except in low frequencies, where surface-volume interaction terms may become important, and the coherent contribution may be significant. In this case, the difference between the two models can reach up to 3 dB in both co-polarized and cross-polarized channels, which can influence the performance of retrieval algorithms.

  3. Backscatter Mossbauer Spectrometer (BaMS) for extraterrestrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agresti, D. G.; Shelfer, T. D.; Pimperl, M. M.; Wills, E. L.; Shen, M. H.; Morris, R. V.

    1993-06-01

    Mossbauer spectroscopy is a nuclear gamma resonance technique particularly well suited to the study of materials that contain iron (Fe-57). It can provide information on the oxidation state of iron as well as the type and proportion of iron-containing mineral species in a sample of interest. Iron Mossbauer spectroscopy (FeMS) has been applied to samples believed to have come from Mars (SNC meteorites) and has been helpful in refining the choice among putative Martian surface materials by suggesting a likely nanophase component of the Martian regolity. FeMS spectrum of a Martial analogue material (Hawaiian palagonite) is shown; it is dominated by ferric-bearing phases and shows evidence of a nanophase component. FeMS has also been applied to lunar materials. It can be used to measure the maturity of lunar surface material and has been proposed as a prospector for lunar ilmenite, an oxygen resource mineral. Several years ago we suggested a backscatter Mossbauer spectrometer (BaMS) for a Mars rover mission. Backscatter design was selected as most appropriate for in-situ application because no sample preparation is required. Since that time, we have continued to develop the BaMS instrument in anticipation that it would eventually find a home on a NASA planetary mission. Gooding proposed BaMS as a geochemistry instrument on MESUR. More recently, an LPI workshop has recommended that BaMS be included in a three-instrument payload on the next (1996?) lunar lander.

  4. Backscattering measuring system for optimization of intravenous laser irradiation dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusina, Tatyana V.; Popov, V. D.; Melnik, Ivan S.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1996-11-01

    Intravenous laser blood irradiation as an effective method of biostimulation and physiotherapy becomes a more popular procedure. Optimal irradiation conditions for each patient are needed to be established individually. A fiber optics feedback system combined with conventional intravenous laser irradiation system was developed to control of irradiation process. The system consists of He-Ne laser, fiber optics probe and signal analyzer. Intravenous blood irradiation was performed in 7 healthy volunteers and 19 patients with different diseases. Measurements in vivo were related to in vitro blood irradiation which was performed in the same conditions with force-circulated venous blood. Comparison of temporal variations of backscattered light during all irradiation procedures has shown a strong discrepancy on optical properties of blood in patients with various health disorders since second procedure. The best cure effect was achieved when intensity of backscattered light was constant during at least five minutes. As a result, the optical irradiation does was considered to be equal 20 minutes' exposure of 3 mW He-Ne laser light at the end of fourth procedure.

  5. Detection of Explosive Devices using X-ray Backscatter Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Anthony A.

    2002-09-01

    It is our goal to develop a coded aperture based X-ray backscatter imaging detector that will provide sufficient speed, contrast and spatial resolution to detect Antipersonnel Landmines and Improvised Explosive Devices (IED). While our final objective is to field a hand-held detector, we have currently constrained ourselves to a design that can be fielded on a small robotic platform. Coded aperture imaging has been used by the observational gamma astronomy community for a number of years. However, it has been the recent advances in the field of medical nuclear imaging which has allowed for the application of the technique to a backscatter scenario. In addition, driven by requirements in medical applications, advances in X-ray detection are continually being made, and detectors are now being produced that are faster, cheaper and lighter than those only a decade ago. With these advances, a coded aperture hand-held imaging system has only recently become a possibility. This paper will begin with an introduction to the technique, identify recent advances which have made this approach possible, present a simulated example case, and conclude with a discussion on future work.

  6. Backscatter Mossbauer Spectrometer (BaMS) for extraterrestrial applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, D. G.; Shelfer, T. D.; Pimperl, M. M.; Wills, E. L.; Shen, M. H.; Morris, R. V.

    1993-01-01

    Mossbauer spectroscopy is a nuclear gamma resonance technique particularly well suited to the study of materials that contain iron (Fe-57). It can provide information on the oxidation state of iron as well as the type and proportion of iron-containing mineral species in a sample of interest. Iron Mossbauer spectroscopy (FeMS) has been applied to samples believed to have come from Mars (SNC meteorites) and has been helpful in refining the choice among putative Martian surface materials by suggesting a likely nanophase component of the Martian regolity. FeMS spectrum of a Martial analogue material (Hawaiian palagonite) is shown; it is dominated by ferric-bearing phases and shows evidence of a nanophase component. FeMS has also been applied to lunar materials. It can be used to measure the maturity of lunar surface material and has been proposed as a prospector for lunar ilmenite, an oxygen resource mineral. Several years ago we suggested a backscatter Mossbauer spectrometer (BaMS) for a Mars rover mission. Backscatter design was selected as most appropriate for in-situ application because no sample preparation is required. Since that time, we have continued to develop the BaMS instrument in anticipation that it would eventually find a home on a NASA planetary mission. Gooding proposed BaMS as a geochemistry instrument on MESUR. More recently, an LPI workshop has recommended that BaMS be included in a three-instrument payload on the next (1996?) lunar lander.

  7. Extinction and backscatter cross sections of biological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. E.; Hahn, D. V.; Carr, A. K.; Limsui, D.; Carter, C. C.; Boggs, N. T.; Jackman, J.

    2008-04-01

    Aerosol backscatter and extinction cross-sections are required to model and evaluate the performance of both active and passive detection systems. A method has been developed that begins with laboratory measurements of thin films and suspensions of biological material to obtain the complex index refraction of the biological material from the UV to the LWIR. Using that result with particle size distribution and shape information as inputs to T-matrix or discrete dipole approximation (DDA) calculations yields the extinction cross-section and backscatter cross section as a function of wavelength. These are important inputs to the lidar equation. In a continuing effort to provide validated optical cross-sections, measurements have been made on a number of high purity biological species in the laboratory as well as measurements of material released at recent field tests. The resulting observed differences between laboratory and field measurements aid in distinguishing between intrinsic and extrinsic effects, which can affect the characteristic signatures of important biological aerosols. A variety of biological and test aerosols are examined, including Bacillus atrophaeus (BG), and Erwina, ovalbumin, silica and polystyrene.

  8. Subgrid-scale backscatter after the shock-turbulence interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livescu, Daniel; Li, Zhaorui

    2017-01-01

    The statistics of the subgrid scales (SGS) are studied in the context of Large Eddy Simulations (LES) of turbulence after the interaction with a nominally normal shock wave. In general, in practical applications, the shock wave width is much smaller than the turbulence scales and the upstream turbulent Mach number is modest. In this case, recent high resolution shock-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) (Ryu and Livescu, J. Fluid Mech., 756, R1, 2014) show that the interaction can be described by the Linear Interaction Approximation (LIA). By using LIA to alleviate the need to resolve the shock wave, DNS post-shock data can be generated at much higher Reynolds numbers than previously possible. Here, such results with Taylor Reynolds number ≈ 180 are used for an analysis of the SGS backscatter properties. In particular, it is shown that the interaction with the shock wave decreases the asymmetry of the SGS dissipation Probability Density Function (PDF) as the shock Mach number increases, with a significant enhancement in size of the regions and magnitude of backscatter.

  9. Control of collective FSBS and backscatter SRS through plasma composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Harvey; Lushnikov, Pavel

    2005-10-01

    Nominal NIF parameters are near the collective forward SBS (FSBS) threshold (P. M. Lushnikov and H. A. Rose, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 255003 (2004), ``L&R''). It will be shown that being on this instability edge can be used as a control lever: a small amount of high Z dopant may lead to qualitative change in FSBS regime at fixed laser intensity, possibly reducing backscatter instability losses (Such results have already been observed, but absent SSD, a key aspect of our theory: R. M. Stevenson et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2709 (2004); L. J. Suter et al., 2738, ib.). Ponderomotive FSBS regimes are determined by the parameter I=F^2( vosc / vosc ve . - ve )^2( ne / ne nc . - nc ) / ( ne / ne nc . - nc ) ν . - ν, with ν the dimensionless ion acoustic damping coefficient and F the optic f/#. Analytical results will be presented which show a decrease of I1pt's threshold value through the addition of high Z dopant to low Z plasma, owing to increased thermal contribution to FSBS. Alternatively, one may raise the threshold by managing the value of νby, e.g., adding He to SiO2. For nominal NIF parameters, a range of He fraction in SiO2 plasma is predicted to suppress backscatter SRS while maintaining control of forward SBS.

  10. Radar Backscatter Saturation with Forest Biomass: Facts and Myths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saatchi, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, climate change policies and scientific research created a widespread interest in quantify the carbon stock and changes of global forests extending from forest patches to national and regional scales. However, because of the large spatial extent of forests, their heterogeneity from structural and species diversity causing meters to kilometer scales variations, their complex dynamics causing landscape scale differences in changes of biomass, and their continues degradation from human activities, the quantification of forest biomass from conventional inventory data alone has become a major challenge. Remote sensing techniques with Lidar and Radar are considered to be the most efficient way of estimating forest biomass at large scales and with uncertainty comparable to estimation from inventory plots. Radar backscatter and interferometric based estimation of forest biomass has been studied extensively and considered as dedicated spaceborne options of monitoring and quantifying forest biomass. However, the literature on the radar-based estimation techniques of biomass has been misleading in defining the sensitivity and lack of sensitivity, so called saturation effect of radar measurements. In this paper, I provide results from a combination of observations and model simulations to demonstrate the physical nature of the loss of sensitivity of radar backscatter to biomass, examine the biophysical that impact the sensitivity, extend the results to other radar measurements including polarimetric and interferometric modes.

  11. Fresnel diffraction by spherical obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.

    1989-01-01

    Lommel functions were used to solve the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction integral for the case of a spherical obstacle. Comparisons were made between Fresnel diffraction theory and Mie scattering theory. Fresnel theory is then compared to experimental data. Experiment and theory typically deviated from one another by less than 10 percent. A unique experimental setup using mercury spheres suspended in a viscous fluid significantly reduced optical noise. The major source of error was due to the Gaussian-shaped laser beam.

  12. Diffraction efficiency analysis for multi-level diffractive optical elements

    SciTech Connect

    Erteza, I.A.

    1995-11-01

    Passive optical components can be broken down into two main groups: Refractive elements and diffractive elements. With recent advances in manufacturing technologies, diffractive optical elements are becoming increasingly more prevalent in optical systems. It is therefore important to be able to understand and model the behavior of these elements. In this report, we present a thorough analysis of a completely general diffractive optical element (DOE). The main goal of the analysis is to understand the diffraction efficiency and power distribution of the various modes affected by the DOE. This is critical to understanding cross talk and power issues when these elements are used in actual systems. As mentioned, the model is based on a completely general scenario for a DOE. This allows the user to specify the details to model a wide variety of diffractive elements. The analysis is implemented straightforwardly in Mathematica. This report includes the development of the analysis, the Mathematica implementation of the model and several examples using the Mathematical analysis tool. It is intended that this tool be a building block for more specialized analyses.

  13. Evaluation of the interface of thin GaN layers on c- and m-plane ZnO substrates by Rutherford backscattering

    SciTech Connect

    Izawa, Y.; Oga, T.; Ida, T.; Kuriyama, K.; Hashimoto, A.; Kotake, H.; Kamijoh, T.

    2011-07-11

    Lattice distortion at the interfaces between thin GaN layers with {approx}400 nm in thickness and ZnO substrates with non-polar m-plane (10-10) and polar c-plane (0001) is studied using Rutherford backscattering/ion channeling techniques. The interface between GaN/m-plane ZnO is aligned clearly to m-axis, indicating no lattice distortion, while between GaN/c-plane ZnO causes the lattice distortion in the GaN layer due to the piezoelectric field. The range of distortion exceeds {approx}90 nm from the interface of GaN/c-plane ZnO. These results are confirmed by x-ray diffraction and reflection high energy electron diffraction studies.

  14. Kinematics of Compton backscattering x-ray source for angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Blumberg, L.N.

    1992-05-01

    Calculations of X-Ray production rates, energy spread, and spectrum of Compton-backscattered photons from a Free Electron Laser on an electron beam in a low energy (136-MeV) compact (8.5-m circumference) storage ring indicate that an X-Ray intensity of 34.6 10{sup 7} X-Ray photons per 0.5-mm {times} 0.5-mm pixel for Coronary Angiography near the 33.169-keV iodine K-absorption edge can be achieved in a 4-msec pulse within a scattering cone of 1-mrad half angle. This intensity, at 10-m from the photon-electron interaction point to the patient is about a factor of 10 larger than presently achieved from a 4.5-T superconducting wiggler source in the NSLS 2.5-GeV storage ring and over an area about 5 times larger. The 2.2-keV energy spread of the Compton-backscattered beam is, however, much larger than the 70-eV spread presently attained form the wiggler source and use of a monochromator. The beam spot at the 10-m interaction point-to-patient distance is 20-mm diameter; larger spots are attainable at larger distances but with a corresponding reduction in X-Ray flux. Such a facility could be an inexpensive clinical alternative to present methods of non-invasive Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA), small enough to be deployed in an urban medical center, and could have other medical, industrial and aerospace applications. Problems with the Compton backscattering source include laser beam heating of the mirror in the FEL oscillator optical cavity, achieving a large enough X-Ray beam spot at the patient, and obtaining radiation damping of the transverse oscillations and longitudinal emittance dilution of the storage ring electron beam resulting from photon-electron collisions without going to higher electron energy where the X-Ray energy spread becomes excessive for DSA. 38 refs.

  15. L-Band SAR Backscatter Prospects for Burn Severity Estimation in Boreal Forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanase, Mihai; Santoro, Maurizio; de la Riva, Juan; Kasischke, Eric; Korets, Michael A.

    2010-12-01

    L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data has been investigated to establish the relationship between backscatter and burn severity in boreal forests. Advanced Land Observation Satellite (ALOS) Phased Array-type L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (PALSAR) dual polarized images were available for the study of the backscattering coefficient at two locations. Statistical analysis was used to assess the average backscatter coefficient as a function of burn severity level after stratifying the data by local incidence angle. Determination coefficients were used to quantify the relationship between radar data and burn severity estimates. The analysis for a given range of local incidence angle showed that HH and HV polarized backscatter decreases with burn severity for both polarizations when images are acquired under dry environmental conditions. For data acquired under wet conditions HH polarized backscatter increased with burn severity. The higher backscatter of the severely burned areas was explained by the enhanced contribution of the ground component due to higher soil moisture content. Backscatter variation between burned and unburned forest was around 2-3 dB at HH polarization and around 3-6 dB at HV polarization. This study indicates that L- band SAR backscatter trend as a function of burn severity is not significantly different when compared to previously studied mediterranean forests.

  16. The relationship between strength of turbulence and backscattering radar power at HF and VHF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hocking, W. K.

    1983-01-01

    The formulae relating turbulence and other atmospheric parameters to backscattered power for radar observations are reviewed. Emphasis is on the case of scatter from turbulent irregularities which have scales corresponding to the range of isotropic, inertial range turbulence. The applicability of this assumption is discussed. A formula is introduced for the mesosphere which relates ionospheric electron densities to backscattered power.

  17. Application of a coherent model in simulating the backscattering coefficient of a mangrove forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirion, L.; Chênerie, I.; Galy, C.

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, a single scattering model is presented for a coherent forest scattering simulation. It is tested on the backscattering coefficient of mangrove forests, which are known to involve large coherent effects. Analysis of branches, leaves and ground contributions is done to understand the backscattering coefficient composition. Finally the sensitivity of the code is investigated.

  18. Identification of major backscattering sources in trees and shrubs at 10 GHz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoughi, R.; Wu, L. K.; Moore, R. K.

    1986-01-01

    A short-range very-fine-resolution FM-CW radar scatterometer has been used to identify the primary contributors to 10-GHz radar backscatter from pine, pin oak, American sycamore and sugar maple trees, and from creeping juniper shrubs. This system provided a range resolution of 11 cm and gave a 16-cm diameter illumination area at the target range of about 4 m. For a pine tree, the needles caused the strongest backscatter as well as the strongest attenuation in the radar signal. Cones, although insignificant contributors to the total backscatter, were more important for backscattering than for attenuation. For the rest of the trees, leaves were the strongest cause of backscattering and attenuation. However, in the absence of leaves, the petioles, small twigs, and branches gave relatively strong backscatter. For American sycamore and sugar maple trees, the fruits did not affect the total backscatter unless they were packed in clusters. For creeping juniper the backscattered energy and attenuation in the radar signal were mainly due to the top two layers of the evergreen scales. The contribution of the tree trunks was not determined.

  19. Compton backscattering of intracavity storage ring free-electron laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dattoli, G.; Giannessi, L.; Torre, A.

    1995-12-31

    We discuss the{gamma}-ray production by Compton backscattering of intracavity storage ring Free-Electron Laser radiation. We use a semi-analytical model which provides the build up of the signal combined with the storage ring damping mechanism and derive simple relations yielding the connection between backscattered. Photons brightness and the intercavity laser equilibrium intensity.

  20. Strain-induced selective growth in 1.5% temper-rolled Fe;1%Si.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Tricia A; Kalu, Peter N; Rollett, Anthony D

    2011-06-01

    Strain-induced selective growth was investigated in a 1.5% temper-rolled Fe∼1%Si alloy using the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique. The EBSD technique was used to quantify the presence of orientation spreads within grains and to show that this particular case of selective growth can be directly related to differences in stored energy as reflected in the geometrically necessary dislocation content. The differences in stored energy were sufficient to give rise to selective growth as evidenced by bi-modal grain sizes.

  1. The Effect of Twins on the Mechanical Behavior of Boron Carbide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    differences, electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) patterns of both B4C types were collected (EDAX-TSL Pegasus XM4 EBSD system ) at 15 kV accelerating...and six hot-pressed U.S. GOVERNMENT WORK NOT PROTECTED BY U.S. COPYRIGHT TOMOKO SANO, Materials Engineer , and CHARLES L. RANDOW, Mechanical Engineer ...Ex = Ey = 482 GPa, Ez = 450 GPa, Gxy = 98 GPa, Gyz = Gzx = 90.5 GPa, mxy = 0.213, myz = mzx = 0.187. These nonunique val- ues were chosen to give a

  2. Time-of-flight detector for heavy ion backscattering spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year laboratory directed research and development project to explore advanced concepts in Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS), undertaken with the goal of extending the sensitivity of this relatively new technique to levels unattainable by any other existing trace element surface analysis. Improvements in sensitivity are required for the application of HIBS to contamination control in the microelectronics industry. Tools with sensitivity approaching 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} are expected to be essential for enabling advanced IC production by the year 2000. During the project the authors developed a new analysis chamber with channeling goniometer and a prototype time-of-flight detector with a demonstrated sensitivity of {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} for Au on Si and {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 10} for Fe, and sufficient mass resolution to separate contributions from Fe and Cu.

  3. Towards a Metric to Estimate Atomic Number from Backscattered Photons

    SciTech Connect

    Walston, S; Dietrich, D; Wurtz, R

    2009-08-17

    An ability to determine the atomic number of a material in a cargo container would be helpful in interdicting smuggled nuclear materials. This paper examines two processes by which high energy photons interact with matter; Compton scattering and pair production. The ratio of the number of photons which originate from the annihilation of positrons resulting from pair production and the number of photons coming from Compton scattering gives a good indication of atomic number. At large angles relative to an incident beam - i.e. backscattered, there is good separation in energy between Compton scattered photons and photons from positron annihilations. This ratio can then be cleanly determined in order to estimate atomic number.

  4. Studies of sidescatter and backscatter from pre-ionized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbst, M. J.; Clayton, C. E.; Peebles, W. A.; Chen, F. F.

    1980-07-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering at 180 deg and sidescatter at 90 deg are observed when CO2 laser light is incident on an arc-preionized, underdense plasma target. Scattering occurs in short spikes, sometimes early in the pulse, sometimes delayed by as much as 700 nsec. This time behavior depends critically on the state of preionization and is explained by the evolution of a laser-driven ionization wave. Using ruby laser interferometry, it is possible to infer the sources of backscatter and sidescatter within this disturbance. In addition, by using a smooth input pulse, it is found that the spikiness of Brillouin scatter is not due solely to mode beating in the input beam.

  5. Backscatter absorption gas imaging systems and light sources therefore

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas Jan; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Sommers, Ricky; Goers, Uta-Barbara; Armstrong, Karla M.

    2006-12-19

    The location of gases that are not visible to the unaided human eye can be determined using tuned light sources that spectroscopically probe the gases and cameras that can provide images corresponding to the absorption of the gases. The present invention is a light source for a backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI) system, and a light source incorporating the light source, that can be used to remotely detect and produce images of "invisible" gases. The inventive light source has a light producing element, an optical amplifier, and an optical parametric oscillator to generate wavelength tunable light in the IR. By using a multi-mode light source and an amplifier that operates using 915 nm pump sources, the power consumption of the light source is reduced to a level that can be operated by batteries for long periods of time. In addition, the light source is tunable over the absorption bands of many hydrocarbons, making it useful for detecting hazardous gases.

  6. Exploratory study on microanalysis of thin films by backscattering techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, J. W.; Nicolet, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    Solid phase epitaxial growth of Si layers was studied by backscattering spectrometry for controllable electrical characteristics. Samples were fabricated by vacuum deposition on a thin layer of Sb before deposition of the amorphous Si layer. Analysis of the resulting SPEG layer showed that Sb was present in the SPEG layer of Si. The characteristic of the SPEG layer against the Si substrate was rectifying. A scanning microprobe picture of a cleaved sample established the presence of a depletion region more than 1 micron below the surface. Hall effect data indicated that the SPEG layer was n-type, with average free carrier concentration of about 10 to the 19th power cm/3 and average electron mobility of about 40 sq cm/Vs. SPEG with Pd silicide or Ni silicide transport layers showed fast initial transient growth regimes with slower growth in the steady state regimes.

  7. Control of light backscattering in blood during intravenous laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, Ivan S.; Popov, V. D.; Rusina, Tatyana V.; Dets, Sergiy M.

    1997-02-01

    One of the most important problems in modern laser medicine is the determination of system response on laser treatment. Reaction of living system is significant during many kinds of laser procedures like surgery, therapy and biostimulation. Our study was aimed to optimize laser exposure using feed-back fiber system for intravenous laser irradiation of blood (ILIB). This system consisted of helium-neon laser (633 nm, 5 mW) with coupled fiber unit, photodetector and PC interface. Photodetector signals produced due to light backscattering were storaged and processed during all blood irradiation procedure. Significant time-dependent variations were observed within 9-15 min after beginning of treatment procedure and were correlated with number of trials, stage and character of disease. The designed feed-back system allows us to register a human blood response on laser irradiation to achieve better cure effect.

  8. Quantitation of Membrane-Ligand Interactions Using Backscattering Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Baksh, Michael M.; Kussrow, Amanda K.; Mileni, Mauro; Finn, M.G.; Bornhop, Darryl J.

    2011-01-01

    Though membrane-associated proteins are ubiquitous within all living organisms and represent the majority of drug targets, a general method for direct, label-free measurement of ligand binding to native membranes has not been reported. Here we show backscattering interferometry (BSI) to be a viable technique for quantifying ligand-receptor binding affinities in a variety of membrane environments. By detecting minute changes in the refractive index of a solution, BSI allows binding interactions of proteins with their ligands to be measured at picomolar concentrations. Equilibrium binding constants in the micromolar to picomolar range were obtained for small- and large-molecule interactions in both synthetic- and cell-derived membranes without the use of labels or supporting substrates. The simple and low-cost hardware, high sensitivity, and label-free nature of BSI should make it readily applicable to the study of many membrane-associated proteins of biochemical and pharmacological interest. PMID:21399645

  9. Pulsed laser linescanner for a backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Reichardt, Thomas A.; Schmitt, Randal L.; Bambha, Ray P.

    2004-02-10

    An active (laser-illuminated) imaging system is described that is suitable for use in backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI). A BAGI imager operates by imaging a scene as it is illuminated with radiation that is absorbed by the gas to be detected. Gases become "visible" in the image when they attenuate the illumination creating a shadow in the image. This disclosure describes a BAGI imager that operates in a linescanned manner using a high repetition rate pulsed laser as its illumination source. The format of this system allows differential imaging, in which the scene is illuminated with light at least 2 wavelengths--one or more absorbed by the gas and one or more not absorbed. The system is designed to accomplish imaging in a manner that is insensitive to motion of the camera, so that it can be held in the hand of an operator or operated from a moving vehicle.

  10. Microwave backscattering and emission model for grass canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Lang, Roger H.; Levine, David M.

    1991-01-01

    A two-layer model is developed that treats the grass canopy as a collection of randomly oriented elliptical dielectric discs over a layer of thatch with underlying soil surface. The distorted Born approximation in conjunction with the Peake formulation is used to calculate the backscattering coefficient and the emissivity from the canopy. Two particular features of this model which are unique for grass canopies are the variation of the canopy structure and the presence of the thatch layer. The basic parameters in the model such as the size and orientation of grass blades, dielectric constant of soil and vegetation, and thickness and water content of the thatch layer have been obtained from ground truth data. To interpret the available experimental observations of grasslands, numerical results from both passive and active models at L-band (1.4 GHz) are generated and various scattering and emission properties of the grass canopies are discussed.

  11. Ocean Raman Scattering in Satellite Backscatter UV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Joiner, Joanna; Gleason, James; Bhartia, Pawan; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ocean Raman scattering significantly contributes to the filling-in of solar Fraunhofer lines measured by satellite backscatter ultraviolet (buy) instruments in the cloudless atmosphere over clear ocean waters. A model accounting for this effect in buy measurements is developed and compared with observations from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GONE). The model extends existing models for ocean Raman scattering to the UV spectral range. Ocean Raman scattering radiance is propagated through the atmosphere using a concept of the Lambert equivalent reflectively and an accurate radiative transfer model for Rayleigh scattering. The model and observations can be used to evaluate laboratory measurements of pure water absorption in the UV. The good agreement between model and observations suggests that buy instruments may be useful for estimating chlorophyll content.

  12. Unusual Radar Backscatter along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Ghent, Rebecca R.; Hawke, B. Ray; Leverington, David W.

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation of the unusual radar backscatter properties along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin is shown. The contents include: 1) Visual and Infrared Observations of Moon; 2) Radar Observations of Moon; 3) Lunar Orbiter Photographs Geologic Setting; 4) 70-cm Radar Data; 5) .70-cm Radar Dark Halo Craters; 6) 3.8-cm Radar Data; 7) 7.5-m Radar Data; 8) 70cm, 3.8 cm and 7.5-m Radar Data; 9) Optical and Infrared Data; 10) Plato Rilles; 11) Isopachs of Crater Ejecta; 12) Plato-like Craters; 13) Observation Summary; 14) Interpretation Matrix; 15) Dark Halo Diameters vs. Crater Size; and 16) Radar Geologic Column.

  13. Snow backscatter in the 1-8 GHz region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulaby, F. T.

    1976-01-01

    The 1-8 GHz microwave active spectrometer system was used to measure the backscatter response of snow covered ground. The scattering coefficient was measured for all linear polarization combinations at angles of incidence between nadir and 70 deg. Ground truth data consisted of soil moisture, soil temperature profile, snow depth, snow temperature profile, and snow water equivalent. The radar sensitivity to snow water equivalent increased in magnitude with increasing frequency and was almost angle independent for angles of incidence higher than 30 deg, particularly at the higher frequencies. In the 50 deg to 70 deg angular range and in the 6 to 8 GHz frequency range, the sensitivity was typically between -0.4 dB/.1 g/sq cm and -0.5 dB/,1 g/sq cm, and the associated linear correlation coefficient had a magnitude of about 0.8.

  14. A C-band backscatter model for lake ice in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakabayashi, H.; Weeks, W. F.; Jeffries, M. O.

    1993-01-01

    ERS-1 SAR imagery of lake ice growing on shallow tundra lakes in northern Alaska shows interesting radar backscatter variations. Based on the analysis of ice cores from these lakes, a multi-layer backscatter model comprised of the following elements has been developed: (1) specular air-ice; ice-water and ice-frozen soil boundaries; (2) an ice layer of variable thickness; (3) ice sub-layers with air inclusions of variable density, size and shape including spheres, prolate spheroids, and cylinders of finite length. Preliminary model results confirm that backscatter is a sensitive function of greater reflectivity than from an ice-frozen soil interface. The model has also been tested using bubble data derived from ice cores in April 1992. The modelled backscatter is compared with backscatter derived from ERS-1 SAR images obtained at the same time as the fieldwork.

  15. Relating multifrequency radar backscattering to forest biomass: Modeling and AIRSAR measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guo-Qing; Ranson, K. Jon

    1992-01-01

    During the last several years, significant efforts in microwave remote sensing were devoted to relating forest parameters to radar backscattering coefficients. These and other studies showed that in most cases, the longer wavelength (i.e. P band) and cross-polarization (HV) backscattering had higher sensitivity and better correlation to forest biomass. This research examines this relationship in a northern forest area through both backscatter modeling and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data analysis. The field measurements were used to estimate stand biomass from forest weight tables. The backscatter model described by Sun et al. was modified to simulate the backscattering coefficients with respect to stand biomass. The average number of trees per square meter or radar resolution cell, and the average tree height or diameter breast height (dbh) in the forest stand are the driving parameters of the model. The rest of the soil surface, orientation, and size distributions of leaves and branches, remain unchanged in the simulations.

  16. Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods as low backscattering albedo contrast agents for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Oldenburg, Amy L; Hansen, Matthew N; Zweifel, Daniel A; Wei, Alexander; Boppart, Stephen A

    2006-07-24

    Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods are demonstrated as low backscattering albedo contrast agents for optical coherence tomography (OCT). We define the backscattering albedo, a', as the ratio of the backscattering to extinction coefficient. Contrast agents which modify a' within the host tissue phantoms are detected with greater sensitivity by the differential OCT measurement of both a' and extinction. Optimum sensitivity is achieved by maximizing the difference between contrast agents and tissue, |a'(ca) - a'(tiss)|. Low backscattering albedo gold nanorods (14x 44 nm; lambda(max) = 780 nm) within a high backscattering albedo tissue phantom with an uncertainty in concentration of 20% (randomized 2+/-0.4% intralipid) were readily detected at 82 ppm (by weight) in a regime where extinction alone could not discriminate nanorods. The estimated threshold of detection was 30 ppm.

  17. Kinetic Enhancement of Raman Backscatter, and Electron Acoustic Thomson Scatter

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, D J; Williams, E A; Langdon, A B; Bers, A

    2006-09-01

    1-D Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell simulations are presented which show kinetic enhancement of stimulated Raman backscatter (SRBS) due to electron trapping in regimes of heavy linear Landau damping. The conventional Raman Langmuir wave is transformed into a set of beam acoustic modes [L. Yin et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 025401 (2006)]. For the first time, a low phase velocity electron acoustic wave (EAW) is seen developing from the self-consistent Raman physics. Backscatter of the pump laser off the EAW fluctuations is reported and referred to as electron acoustic Thomson scatter. This light is similar in wavelength to, although much lower in amplitude than, the reflected light between the pump and SRBS wavelengths observed in single hot spot experiments, and previously interpreted as stimulated electron acoustic scatter [D. S. Montgomery et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 155001 (2001)]. The EAW observed in our simulations is strongest well below the phase-matched frequency for electron acoustic scatter, and therefore the EAW is not produced by it. The beating of different beam acoustic modes is proposed as the EAW excitation mechanism, and is called beam acoustic decay. Supporting evidence for this process, including bispectral analysis, is presented. The linear electrostatic modes, found by projecting the numerical distribution function onto a Gauss-Hermite basis, include beam acoustic modes (some of which are unstable even without parametric coupling to light waves) and a strongly-damped EAW similar to the observed one. This linear EAW results from non-Maxwellian features in the electron distribution, rather than nonlinearity due to electron trapping.

  18. Feasibility of using backscattered muons for archeological imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonal, N.; Preston, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Use of nondestructive methods to accurately locate and characterize underground objects such as rooms and tools found at archeological sites is ideal to preserve these historic sites. High-energy cosmic ray muons are very sensitive to density variation and have been used to image volcanoes and archeological sites such as the Egyptian and Mayan pyramids. Muons are subatomic particles produced in the upper atmosphere that penetrate the earth's crust up to few kilometers. Their absorption rate depends on the density of the materials through which they pass. Measurements of muon flux rate at differing directions provide density variations of the materials between the muon source (cosmic rays and neutrino interactions) and the detector, much like a CAT scan. Currently, muon tomography can resolve features to the sub-meter scale making it useful for this type of work. However, the muon detector must be placed below the target of interest. For imaging volcanoes, the upper portion is imaged when the detector is placed on the earth's surface at the volcano's base. For sites of interest beneath the ground surface, the muon detector would need to be placed below the site in a tunnel or borehole. Placing the detector underground can be costly and may disturb the historical site. We will assess the feasibility of imaging the subsurface using upward traveling muons, to eliminate the current constraint of positioning the detector below the target. This work consists of three parts 1) determine the backscattered flux rate from theory, 2) distinguish backscattered from forward scattered muons at the detector, and 3) validate the theoretical results with field experimentation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. Backscattering and Nonparaxiality Arrest Collapse of Damped Nonlinear Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fibich, G.; Ilan, B.; Tsynkov, S.

    2002-01-01

    The critical nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS) models the propagation of intense laser light in Kerr media. This equation is derived from the more comprehensive nonlinear Helmholtz equation (NLH) by employing the paraxial approximation and neglecting the backscattered waves. It is known that if the input power of the laser beam (i.e., L(sub 2) norm of the initial solution) is sufficiently high, then the NLS model predicts that the beam will self-focus to a point (i.e.. collapse) at a finite propagation distance. Mathematically, this behavior corresponds to the formation of a singularity in the solution of the NLS. A key question which has been open for many years is whether the solution to the NLH, i.e., the 'parent' equation, may nonetheless exist and remain regular everywhere, in particular for those initial conditions (input powers) that lead to blowup in the NLS. In the current study, we address this question by introducing linear damping into both models and subsequently comparing the numerical solutions of the damped NLH (boundary-value problem) with the corresponding solutions of the damped NLS (initial-value problem). Linear damping is introduced in much the same way as done when analyzing the classical constant-coefficient Helmholtz equation using the limiting absorption principle. Numerically, we have found that it provides a very efficient tool for controlling the solutions of both the NLH and NHS. In particular, we have been able to identify initial conditions for which the NLS solution does become singular. whereas the NLH solution still remains regular everywhere. We believe that our finding of a larger domain of existence for the NLH than that for the NLS is accounted for by precisely those mechanisms, that have been neglected when deriving the NLS from the NLH, i.e., nonparaxiality and backscattering.

  20. Modeling low-coherence enhanced backscattering using Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Hariharan; Pradhan, Prabhakar; Kim, Young L; Liu, Yang; Li, Xu; Backman, Vadim

    2006-08-20

    Constructive interference between coherent waves traveling time-reversed paths in a random medium gives rise to the enhancement of light scattering observed in directions close to backscattering. This phenomenon is known as enhanced backscattering (EBS). According to diffusion theory, the angular width of an EBS cone is proportional to the ratio of the wavelength of light lambda to the transport mean-free-path length l(s)* of a random medium. In biological media a large l(s)* approximately 0.5-2 mm > lambda results in an extremely small (approximately 0.001 degrees ) angular width of the EBS cone, making the experimental observation of such narrow peaks difficult. Recently, the feasibility of observing EBS under low spatial coherence illumination (spatial coherence length Lsc < l(s)*) was demonstrated. Low spatial coherence behaves as a spatial filter rejecting longer path lengths and thus resulting in an increase of more than 100 times in the angular width of low coherence EBS (LEBS) cones. However, a conventional diffusion approximation-based model of EBS has not been able to explain such a dramatic increase in LEBS width. We present a photon random walk model of LEBS by using Monte Carlo simulation to elucidate the mechanism accounting for the unprecedented broadening of the LEBS peaks. Typically, the exit angles of the scattered photons are not considered in modeling EBS in the diffusion regime. We show that small exit angles are highly sensitive to low-order scattering, which is crucial for accurate modeling of LEBS. Our results show that the predictions of the model are in excellent agreement with the experimental data.