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Sample records for bacteremia

  1. Bacteremia in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masashi; Satoh, Nobuhiko; Nakamura, Motonobu; Horita, Shoko; Seki, George; Moriya, Kyoji

    2016-01-01

    Infection is a common complication and is the second leading cause of death in hemodialysis patients. The risk of bacteremia in hemodialysis patients is 26-fold higher than in the general population, and 1/2-3/4 of the causative organisms of bacteremia in hemodialysis patients are Gram-positive bacteria. The ratio of resistant bacteria in hemodialysis patients compared to the general population is unclear. Several reports have indicated that hemodialysis patients have a higher risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. The most common site of infection causing bacteremia is internal prostheses; the use of a hemodialysis catheter is the most important risk factor for bacteremia. Although antibiotic lock of hemodialysis catheters and topical antibiotic ointment can reduce catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI), their use should be limited to necessary cases because of the emergence of resistant organisms. Systemic antibiotic administration and catheter removal is recommended for treating CRBSI, although a study indicated the advantages of antibiotic lock and guidewire exchange of catheters over systemic antibiotic therapy. An infection control bundle recommended by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention succeeded in reducing bacteremia in hemodialysis patients with either a catheter or arteriovenous fistula. Appropriate infection control can reduce bacteremia in hemodialysis patients. PMID:27872830

  2. Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Allan Garlik

    2003-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is still associated with a high mortality, and knowledge on risk factors and the clinical and the therapeutic aspects of SAB is still limited. This thesis focuses on the clinical aspects of SAB and its metastatic infections. In a study of all patients with bacteremia in Copenhagen County October 1992 through April 1993 (study I) we emphasized previous findings, that S. aureus is one of the most frequent pathogens in bacteremia, and in a case control study also in Copenhagen County 1994-95 (study II) we demonstrated, that not only an inserted central venous catheter and nasal S. aureus carriage but also hyponatremia and anemia are important risk factors for hospital-acquired SAB (study II). Studies on the treatment of SAB have pointed out, that the eradication of a primary is important, but there are only limited clinical studies dealing with antibiotic treatment. By logistic regression analysis, we were able to demonstrate that focus eradication is essential, but also that treatment with dicloxacillin 1 g x 4 or 2 g x 3 are superior to 1 g x 3 (studie III), indicating that the time for serum concentration above the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) for the bacteria plays a role in the outcome of SAB treatment. S. aureus osteomyelitis secondary to SAB is frequently observed. No other countries, however, have a centralized registration, which make it possible to evaluate a large number of these patients. Since 1960, The Staphylococcal Laboratory, Statens Serum Institut in Copenhagen, has registrated selected clinical informations from nearly all patients with positive blood cultures of S. aureus. Based on this registration, we were able to show an increased number of S. aureus osteomyelitis among older patients and a decreased number of S. aureus osteomyelitis of femur and tibia among younger infants in the period 1980-90 (study IV). By reviewing the records of a large number of patients with vertebral S. aureus

  3. Bacteremia Caused by Kerstersia gyiorum

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cecelia; Manninen, Katja; Touchberry, Joanne; Greene, Shermalyn R.; Holland, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Kerstersia spp. are an unusual cause of human infections. We report the first known case of bacteremia and sepsis due to Kerstersia gyiorum, in a patient with chronic lower-extremity ulcers, and we review the literature on this uncommon pathogen. PMID:25809974

  4. Actinomyces turicensis Bacteremia Secondary to Pyometra.

    PubMed

    Hagiya, Hideharu; Ogawa, Hiroko; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kimura, Kosuke; Hasegawa, Kan; Otsuka, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    We herein present a rare case of Actinomyces turicensis bacteremia that was caused by pyometra. The patient was successfully treated with transvaginal drainage and antibiotic therapy. A literature review in MEDLINE showed that there have been only 8 previously reported cases of A. turicensis bacteremia. This infection frequently occurs in patients with visceral abscesses, and blood culture examinations usually reveal a polymicrobial pattern. However, the prognosis of such patients has been reported to generally be benign. Due to difficulties in performing bacterial identification and the wide-spectrum clinical pictures associated with this bacteremia, no comprehensive understanding of the clinical features of each Actinomyces species has yet been established.

  5. Bacteremia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Co-Director of Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Hospital ; Carla Carvalho, MD, MPH, Surgical Critical Care Fellow, Stanford University Hospital NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: ...

  6. Antibiotic therapy for Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Hung, C C; Chang, S C; Chen, Y C; Hsieh, W C; Luh, K T

    1995-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes has been recognized as an important pathogen in immunocompromised patients, but it has been rarely reported in Taiwan. We reviewed 13 cases of L. monocytogenes bacteremia at National Taiwan University Hospital over a 12-year period. All of the patients had underlying diseases. Fever was the most common presenting symptom, and neurologic signs were found in 6 patients. Most of the patients received penicillin G, ampicillin or piperacillin with an aminoglycoside. Corticosteroids were used in 9 of 13 patients. The overall mortality directly due to L. monocytogenes bacteremia was 31%. However, patients treated with cephalosporins or oxacillin had higher mortality than those treated with penicillin G, ampicillin or piperacillin (p = 0.05). Given the increasing number of immunosuppressed patients in Taiwan, it is likely that more cases will be encountered. Physicians in Taiwan should be aware of L. monocytogenes bacteremia and its treatment.

  7. [Bacteremia and meningitis caused by Yersinia spp].

    PubMed

    Robert, J; Moreno, A; Martínez, J A; Almela, M; Jiménez de Anta, M T; Soriano, E

    2000-07-01

    Yersinia spp infection in human people are increasing attention last thirty years. We have reviewed the bacteremia in our hospital last five years. Three episodes were Yersinia spp bacteremia. Presence of disease or predisponent therapy were present in most of episodes. All patients were more than seventy years old. The septic metastasis were present in all the cases: one with meningitis, other with liver abscess and one with septic arthritis. We have documented a good clinical evolution, though the mortality in different reports is around 50%. The election therapy for all episodes were cephalosporins, and in two cases we added quinolones.

  8. Association of Burn Mortality and Bacteremia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    of Table 1.-Principal Species in Groups bacteremia due to some member of each group. Such Group organisms (%) - 1 Providencia stuartii (23) 100- 203...have died with what ap- dencia stuartii . In the succeeding five years, during which peared to be lethal staphylococcal infection; this study silver

  9. Fatal Case of Listeria innocua Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Perrin, Monique; Bemer, Michel; Delamare, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Listeria innocua is widespread in the environment and in food. This species has to date never been described in association with human disease. We report a case of fatal bacteremia caused by L. innocua in a 62-year-old patient. PMID:14605191

  10. Fatal case of Listeria innocua bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Monique; Bemer, Michel; Delamare, Catherine

    2003-11-01

    Listeria innocua is widespread in the environment and in food. This species has to date never been described in association with human disease. We report a case of fatal bacteremia caused by L. innocua in a 62-year-old patient.

  11. Bacteremia following dental implant surgery: Preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Tayfun; Öksüz, Lütfiye; Gürler, Nezahat

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aims of this study were to investigate the incidence of bacteremia, bacteriology and antibiotic susceptibility against to causative bacteria associated with dental implant installation. Study Design: 30 generally healthy patients were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 30 minutes after dental implant installation and 24 hours after dental implant surgery. Blood samples were cultured in a BACTEC system. The isolated bacteria were identified using conventional methods. Antimicrobial sensitivity tests were performed by disc diffusion. Results: No bacteria were isolated at the baseline and 24 hours after surgery, whereas the prevalence of bacteremia at 30 minutes after dental implant installation was 23%. The isolated bacteria species were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Eubacterium spp., Corynebacterium spp. and Streptococcus viridans. The Staphylococcus epidermidis, which was isolated in three patients, was found to be resistant to penicillin which is first choice of many clinicians. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that installation of dental implants can produce bacteremia. Within the limitations of this study, it can be speculated that the resistance of antibiotics may compromise the routine prophylaxis against infective endocarditis. Therefore use of blood cultures and antibiograms may be suggested in risky patients. The outcome of the present study should be verified using a larger patient group with varying conditions. Key words: Dental implant, bacteremia, infective endocarditis, antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:22157668

  12. Pasteurella multocida Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Parekh, Jai; Townley, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 61-year-old Caucasian gentleman who presented with a one-day history of fever, chills, and altered mental status. His symptoms were initially thought to be secondary to cellulitis. Blood cultures grew Pasteurella multocida, a rare pathogen to cause bacteremia. Our patient was treated with ciprofloxacin for two weeks and made a complete and uneventful recovery. Our patient's uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease put him at a higher risk for developing serious P. multocida infection. The patient's dog licking the wounds on his legs was considered as the possible source of infection. As P. multicoda bacteremia is rare, but severe with a high mortality rate, it is imperative to have a high index of suspicion for this infection especially in the vulnerable immunocompromised population. PMID:27847521

  13. Helicobacter Pylori Bacteremia: An Unusual Finding

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Concetta; Mancin, Annalisa; Calabrò, Maria; Daleno, Cristina; Ferrario, Antonella; Renzulli, Raffaella; Scuderi, Cristina; Casari, Erminia

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of Helicobacter pylori transient bacteremia in a woman with ulcerated antral gastric cancer. The patient was hospitalized for laparoscopy and subtotal gastrectomy. After surgery she developed fever (39°C) and was empirically treated with levofloxacin. Blood cultures, collected and sent immediately to Laboratory, were positive for a spiral Gram-negative bacterium. This isolate was identified as H. pylori and the specific susceptibility test was performed. One day after the fever was decreased but antibiotic treatment with levofloxacin was continued and it was maintained until discharge. In summary, H. pylori transient bacteremia may occur as a rare complication after stomach surgery. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the potential role of Helicobacter pylori presence in blood.

  14. Corynebacterium jeikeium bacteremia in a hemodialyzed patient.

    PubMed

    Ifantidou, Athina M; Diamantidis, Michael D; Tseliki, Georgia; Angelou, Argiri S; Christidou, Photini; Papa, Anna; Pentilas, Demetrius

    2010-09-01

    Corynebacterium jeikeium, frequently encountered in clinical specimens, is part of the normal skin flora. Nevertheless, a few cases of C. jeikeium bacteremia followed by severe clinical manifestations have been reported. C. jeikeium has been reported to cause endocarditis, septicemia, meningitis, pneumonia and osteomyelitis, along with soft tissue and trauma infections. Herein we describe a case of C. jeikeium bacteremia in Greece. The isolation of a coryneform bacterium from a clinical specimen should not immediately be considered a superinfection by the skin flora. Clinical and laboratory investigations are essential in order to evaluate such cases before applying appropriate treatment. On the other hand, the association of coryneform bacteria and disease should be critically investigated, with a thorough identification of the strain, ideally beyond the classical methods, at a specialized center.

  15. [Shigella bacteremia. Report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Pérez Trallero, E; López Lopategui, C; Fernández Pérez, F

    1981-03-10

    Shigella bacteremia is very uncommon, although it is known to occur in Shigella infection. Three cases of Shigella flexneri bacteremia are reported, two of them diagnosed at the Residencia Ntra. Sra. de Aránzazu of San Sebastián, and another at the Ciudad Sanitaria Francisco Franco of Barcelona. In spite of the frequency of Shigella infections in Spain, no cases of Shigella bacteriemia had been heretofore reported from our country. One of the patients was an alcoholic woman who died in coma and renal failure. The other two cases were children who had an uneventful recovery. Stool cultures were positive for Shigella flexneri in two of the three patients. In the third the bacillus could not be isolated from the stools in spite of three consecutive cultures.

  16. [Daptomycin therapy in patients with bacteremia].

    PubMed

    Llinares, Pedro; Iribarren, José Antonio

    2012-02-01

    Community-acquired bacteremias assciated with healthcare and, especially, those of nosocomial origin, are mainly caused by Gram-positive microorganisms. Notable among this group are Staphylococcus spp, with an incidence of methicillin resistance of approximately 30% in S. aureus and of 70% in coagulase-negative staphylococcus, which is higher in patients admitted to intensive care units. Vancomycin has been the most widely used antibiotic in these situations but its toxicity, especially in the kidney, and reports of failure when used for the treatment of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and with a vancomycin MIC > 1 mg/L have led to the search for other treatments. Daptomycin is a new lipopeptide antibiotic that has been shown to be not inferior to vancomycin in a pivotal clinical trial in patients with bacteremia and right endocarditis due to S. aureus. Recent guidelines and consensus documents place daptomycin as an ideal alternative in these situations, indicating its use in MRSA bacteremia with a vancomycin MIC > 1 mg/L, as well as in patients whose renal dysfunction excludes the use of vancomycin therapy. Evidence of worse prognosis in MRSA bacteremia when empirical treatment is inappropriate has led to the recommendation of daptomycin as the first-choice drug in critically ill patients with suspected Gram-positive bacteremic infection and renal dysfunction and/or in hospitals where there is a high prevalence of MRSA with a MIC > 1 mg/L. The recommended dose in severely ill patients should be higher than 6 mg/kg/day.

  17. [Isolation of Bordetella trematum from bacteremia].

    PubMed

    Halim, Ilham; Ihbibane, Fatima; Belabbes, Houria; Zerouali, Khalid; El Mdaghri, Naima

    2014-01-01

    The species Bordetella trematum was first described in 1996. Currently only eleven cases were published. We describe the first case of Bordetella trematum issued from bacteremia with a patient who has severe burns in Morocco. The identification was not possible by conventional microbiological methods where the resort to 16S ARNr sequencing. The use of molecular methods, including sequencing of the 16S ARNr, is currently an essential complementary tool to identify microbiological pathogens.

  18. E. coli bacteremia in comparison to K. pneumoniae bacteremia: influence of pathogen species and ESBL production on 7-day mortality.

    PubMed

    Leistner, R; Bloch, A; Gastmeier, P; Schwab, F

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated prolonged length of hospital stay in cases of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive K. pneumoniae bacteremia compared to bacteremia cases due to E. coli (ESBL-positive and -negative) and ESBL-negative K. pneumoniae. The overall mortality was significantly higher in bacteremia cases resulting from ESBL-positive pathogens but also in K. pneumoniae cases disregarding ESBL-production. In order to examine whether pathogen species rather than multidrug resistance might affect mortality risk, we reanalyzed our dataset that includes 1.851 cases of bacteremia.

  19. Achromobacter xylosoxidans Bacteremia and Cellulitis: A Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Dai, Julia; Huen, Auris O; Kestenbaum, Lori A; Sarezky, Margaret D; Coughlin, Carrie C; Yan, Albert C

    2015-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is a rare, opportunistic infection most commonly encountered in immunocompromised patients during hospitalization. Primary uncomplicated bacteremia, catheter-associated infections, and pneumonia have been reported as the most common clinical presentations; skin and soft tissue infections from A. xylosoxidans are rare. We describe a case of A. xylosoxidans presenting as cellulitis and bacteremia in an immunocompromised patient.

  20. Bacteremia with an Unusual Pathogen: Mycobacterium neoaurum

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Munthir

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium neoaurum (M. neoaurum) is an infrequently encountered cause of infection in humans. It is a member of the rapidly growing mycobacteria family. It predominately afflicts those with a compromised immune status and a chronically indwelling vascular access. Isolation of this organism is challenging yet the advent of 16s ribosomal sequencing paved the way for more sensitive detection. No treatment guidelines are available and treatment largely depends on the experience of the treating physician and nature of the isolate. We report a case of M. neoaurum bacteremia in an immune competent host, with a chronically placed peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line). PMID:27807489

  1. Postpartum Ovarian Vein Thrombophlebitis with Staphylococcal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Parino, Eduardo; Mulinaris, Eric; Saccomano, Edgardo; Gallo, Juan Cruz; Kohan, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old female patient presented with fever and right flank pain ten days after uncomplicated vaginal delivery. CT examination revealed right ovarian vein thrombosis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated from blood cultures. No other source of bacteremia was found. Antibiotic therapy and anticoagulation with enoxaparin were instituted. Fourteen days after admission, she was discharged in good condition. Although a very uncommon complication after spontaneous vaginal delivery, septic ovarian vein thrombophlebitis should be suspected in cases of persistent puerperal fever when other diagnostic possibilities have been excluded. PMID:26221549

  2. Bacteremia by Dermabacter hominis, a Rare Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Garcés, José Luis; Oteo, Jesús; García, Guadalupe; Aracil, Belén; Alós, Juan Ignacio; Funke, Guido

    2001-01-01

    Dermabacter hominis is a gram-positive, catalase-positive, glucose-fermenting rod, which, as it grows forms small greyish-white colonies with a characteristic pungent odor. Previously known as coryneform Centers for Disease Control and Prevention groups 3 and 5, it was catalogued as D. hominis in 1994. Various strains isolated in blood cultures, abscesses, or wounds in the 1970s were retrospectively characterized in referral centers as D. hominis. In this report we describe two patients with severe underlying pathology who developed bacteremias by D. hominis within the context of their clinical pictures. PMID:11376092

  3. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in a preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    Hilliard, Nicholaus J; Schelonka, Robert L; Waites, Ken B

    2003-07-01

    Bacillus cereus is an uncommon but potentially serious bacterial pathogen causing infections of the bloodstream, lungs, and central nervous system of preterm neonates. A case of bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a 19-day-old preterm neonate who was successfully treated with vancomycin, tobramycin, meropenem, and clindamycin is described. Implications for the diagnostic laboratory and clinicians when Bacillus species are detected in normally sterile sites are discussed, and the small numbers of infant infections proven to be due to this organism that have been described previously are reviewed.

  4. Clinical characteristics and significance of Streptococcus salivarius bacteremia and Streptococcus bovis bacteremia: a prospective 16-year study.

    PubMed

    Corredoira, J C; Alonso, M P; García, J F; Casariego, E; Coira, A; Rodriguez, A; Pita, J; Louzao, C; Pombo, B; López, M J; Varela, J

    2005-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of Streptococcus salivarius isolates recovered from blood cultures and compare them with isolates of Streptococcus bovis biotypes I and II. Seventeen of the 52 (32%) S. salivarius isolates recovered were considered clinically significant, compared with 62 of the 64 (97%) S. bovis isolates (p<0.0001). Bacteremia caused by S. salivarius occurred mostly in patients who showed relevant disruption of the mucous membranes and/or serious underlying diseases. Patients with S. salivarius bacteremia were younger than those with S. bovis bacteremia (57 vs. 67 years; p<0.01). Patients with S. salivarius bacteremia and patients with S. bovis II bacteremia had similar rates of endocarditis, colon tumors, and non-colon cancer. On the other hand, when compared with S. bovis I bacteremia, S. salivarius bacteremia was associated with lower rates of endocarditis (18% vs. 74%, respectively) (p<0.01) and colon tumors (0% vs. 57%, respectively) (p<0.005) and higher rates of non-colon cancer (53% vs. 9.5%, respectively) (p<0.01). Bacteremia caused by S. bovis II had a hepatobiliary origin in 50% of the patients, while, in contrast, that due to S. salivarius or S. bovis I was less frequently associated with a hepatobiliary origin (12% and 5%, respectively) (p<0.00001). The rate of penicillin resistance was 31% among S. salivarius isolates and 0% among S. bovis isolates (p<0.0001). In conclusion, the clinical characteristics of S. salivarius bacteremia and S. bovis II bacteremia are similar, and the isolation of S. salivarius in blood should not be systematically regarded as contamination.

  5. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacteremia: a challenging diagnosis!

    PubMed

    Micaelo, Maïté; Rasmy, Pascal; Amara, Marlène; Lambert, Juliette; Coutard, Aymeric; Pangon, Béatrice

    2016-10-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, a Gram-positive bacillus, is reported to cause for cutaneous infections and endocarditis. We report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia without severe clinical illness. The patient, a 74-year-old man, is suffering from a chronic lymphoid leukemia (LLC). Following a trauma, the patient developed a bruise on the left inch. Because the site of shock seemed clinically infected, oral amoxicilline-acid clavulanic (AAC) treatment was started after withdrawn 1 set of blood cultures. These blood culture specimens yielded a Gram-positive bacillus identified as E. rhusiopathiae by mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF (Microflex Brüker). The strain was sensitive to beta-lactam, fluoroquinolones and macrolides, resistant to vancomycin (natural resistance), and amikacin but sensitive to gentamicin. After 5 days of treatment by AAC, the patient became apyretic. One year after this episode, we reported no further symptoms of infection, or endocarditis. The natural resistance of E. rhusiopathiae in glycopeptides underlines the importance of a microbiological diagnosis. Indeed, vancomycine can be the treatment of first intention in Gram-positive bacillus bacteremia. The identification of bacteria using mass spectrometry is available the same day of the blood culture positivity and allows to prescribe the most adapted antibiotic treatment for the patient.

  6. Lack of association between FOXO1 polymorphisms and bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jing; Wang, Xiong; Zhu, Yaowu; Lu, Yanjun; Sun, Ziyong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that FOXO1, one critical gene related to the human immune system, probable is closely to the human infection. In the present study we aimed to investigate genetic association of FOXO1 with bacteremia in Han Chinese. 188 patients with bacteremia diagnosed with blood culture and 250 healthy blood donors without signs of infection were studied, two tagging SNPs of FOXO1 (rs9532571, rs3751436) were selected and genotyped using predesigned TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. The results showed that the allele frequency of rs9532571 and rs3751436 in FOXO1 was not associated with an increased risk of bacteremia (P=0.762, OR=1.05, 95% CI 0.77-1.43; P=0.059, OR=1.34, 95% CI 0.99-1.81 respectively), the genotype distribution of these two SNPs was also not significantly different between bacteremia patients and control groups (P=0.9; P=0.16). Haplotypes in this block were not significantly associated with bacteremia risk. Conclusion: the association between FOXO1 genetic polymorphism and bacteremia has not been observed in the study, maybe a larger sample population and more SNPs in the FOXO1 need to reveal the role in bacteremia in the future. PMID:26629162

  7. Bacteremia due to Providencia stuartii: review of 49 episodes.

    PubMed

    Woods, T D; Watanakunakorn, C

    1996-02-01

    We reviewed cases of Providencia stuartii bacteremia at a large community teaching hospital during a 12-year period (1981 to 1992). None of the infections were hospital-acquired. Of the 49 patients, 47 (96%) came from a nursing home, and 45 (92%) had a long-term indwelling Foley catheter. The urinary tract was definitely proven to be the source of bacteremia in 35 patients (71%) and was the probable source in another 5 patients (11%). Polymicrobial bacteremia occurred in 25 patients (51%). The overall mortality rate during hospitalization was 25%.

  8. Group G Streptococcus bacteremia in recurrent cellulitis.

    PubMed

    di Meo, Nicola; Stinco, Giuseppe; Gubertini, Nicoletta; Patriarca, Maria Martina; Trevisan, Giusto

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, group G Streptococcus has been reported with increasing frequency as the cause of a variety of human infections. Underlying host factors such as immunosuppression, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis may be predisposing conditions leading to infection. Toxic involvement and post-streptococcal sequalae, once believed to be exclusive to infections caused by group A Streptococcus, are now known to occur following acute group G Streptococcus and group C Streptococcus infections. We report on a case of group G Streptococcus bacteremia and recurrent cellulitis with toxic involvement. Patient blood cultures were always negative for β-hemolytic Streptococci in all the recurrences, except during the last one. Antibiotic therapy based on antibiogram quickly resolved the infection. A regimen of intramuscular injection of 1.2 million units of benzathine penicillin every 15 days for one year prevented recurrences of cellulitis.

  9. Enterococcus hirae Bacteremia Associated with Acute Pancreatitis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V.; De Aguirre, Manuel; Divito, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Enterococcus hirae has rarely been reported in humans but is not uncommon in mammals and birds. We describe a case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia associated with acute pancreatitis, acute cholecystitis, and septic shock responsive to antibiotic therapy and supportive critical care management. Unique aspects of this case of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia are its association with acute pancreatitis and its geographical origin. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Enterococcus hirae bacteremia occurring in a patient in the United States. Although human infection with this organism appears to be rare, all cases reported to date describe bacteremia associated with severe and life-threatening illness. Thus, physicians need to be cognizant of the clinical significance of this heretofore little recognized pathogen. PMID:26417465

  10. Staphylococcus saprophyticus bacteremia after ESWL in an immunocompetent woman.

    PubMed

    Hofmans, M; Boel, A; Van Vaerenbergh, K; De Beenhouwer, H

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a well-known cause of uncomplicated urinary tract infections, especially in young and sexually active women. Presence in blood cultures is rare and often attributed to contamination. When bacteremia is significant, it occurs mostly in patients with hematologic malignancies and is predominantly catheter-related. However, we describe a case of significant bacteremia with S. saprophyticus associated with urinary tract infection after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of an ureterolithiasis in an otherwise healthy patient.

  11. Clinical Risk Factors for Infective Endocarditis in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Chapagain, Bikash; Joshi, Astha; Brennessel, Debra J.

    2017-01-01

    Crucial to the management of staphylococcal bacteremia is an accurate evaluation of associated endocarditis, which has both therapeutic and prognostic implications. Because the clinical presentation of endocarditis can be nonspecific, the judicious use of echocardiography is important in distinguishing patients at high risk of developing endocarditis. In the presence of high-risk clinical features, an early transesophageal echocardiogram is warranted without prior transthoracic echocardiography. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical risk factors for staphylococcal infective endocarditis that might warrant earlier transesophageal echocardiography and to describe the incidence of endocarditis in cases of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. A retrospective case-control study was conducted by means of chart review of 91 patients consecutively admitted to a community hospital from January 2009 through January 2013. Clinical risk factors of patients with staphylococcal bacteremia were compared with risk factors of patients who had definite diagnoses of infective endocarditis. There were 69 patients with bacteremia alone (76%) and 22 patients with endocarditis (24%), as verified by echocardiography. Univariate analysis showed that diabetes mellitus (P=0.024), the presence of an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator/pacemaker (P=0.006) or a prosthetic heart valve (P=0.003), and recent hospitalization (P=0.048) were significantly associated with developing infective endocarditis in patients with S. aureus bacteremia. The incidence of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus bacteremia was similar in the bacteremia and infective-endocarditis groups (P=0.437). In conclusion, identified high-risk clinical factors in the presence of bacteremia can suggest infective endocarditis. Early evaluation with transesophageal echocardiography might well be warranted. PMID:28265207

  12. Staphylococcus epidermidis as a cause of bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Kleinschmidt, Sharon; Huygens, Flavia; Faoagali, Joan; Rathnayake, Irani U; Hafner, Louise M

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is a biofilm-producing commensal organism found ubiquitously on human skin and mucous membranes, as well as on animals and in the environment. Biofilm formation enables this organism to evade the host immune system. Colonization of percutaneous devices or implanted medical devices allows bacteria access to the bloodstream. Isolation of this organism from blood cultures may represent either contamination during the blood collection procedure or true bacteremia. S. epidermidis bloodstream infections may be indolent compared with other bacteria. Isolation of S. epidermidis from a blood culture may present a management quandary for clinicians. Over-treatment may lead to patient harm and increases in healthcare costs. There are numerous reports indicating the difficulty of predicting clinical infection in patients with positive blood cultures with this organism. No reliable phenotypic or genotypic algorithms currently exist to predict the pathogenicity of a S. epidermidis bloodstream infection. This review will discuss the latest advances in identification methods, global population structure, pathogenicity, biofilm formation, antimicrobial resistance and clinical significance of the detection of S. epidermidis in blood cultures. Previous studies that have attempted to discriminate between invasive and contaminating strains of S. epidermidis in blood cultures will be analyzed.

  13. Predictors of Mortality in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Slade O.; Vaska, Vikram L.; Espedido, Björn A.; Paterson, David L.; Gosbell, Iain B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an important infection with an incidence rate ranging from 20 to 50 cases/100,000 population per year. Between 10% and 30% of these patients will die from SAB. Comparatively, this accounts for a greater number of deaths than for AIDS, tuberculosis, and viral hepatitis combined. Multiple factors influence outcomes for SAB patients. The most consistent predictor of mortality is age, with older patients being twice as likely to die. Except for the presence of comorbidities, the impacts of other host factors, including gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and immune status, are unclear. Pathogen-host interactions, especially the presence of shock and the source of SAB, are strong predictors of outcomes. Although antibiotic resistance may be associated with increased mortality, questions remain as to whether this reflects pathogen-specific factors or poorer responses to antibiotic therapy, namely, vancomycin. Optimal management relies on starting appropriate antibiotics in a timely fashion, resulting in improved outcomes for certain patient subgroups. The roles of surgery and infectious disease consultations require further study. Although the rate of mortality from SAB is declining, it remains high. Future international collaborative studies are required to tease out the relative contributions of various factors to mortality, which would enable the optimization of SAB management and patient outcomes. PMID:22491776

  14. Elizabethkingia anophelis bacteremia is associated with clinically significant infections and high mortality.

    PubMed

    Lau, Susanna K P; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Foo, Chuen-Hing; Curreem, Shirly O T; Lo, George Chi-Shing; Teng, Jade L L; Chen, Jonathan H K; Ng, Ricky H Y; Wu, Alan K L; Cheung, Ingrid Y Y; Chau, Sandy K Y; Lung, David C; Lee, Rodney A; Tse, Cindy W S; Fung, Kitty S C; Que, Tak-Lun; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-05-17

    Unlike Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, the clinical importance of E. anophelis is poorly understood. We determined the clinical and molecular epidemiology of bacteremia caused by Elizabethkingia-like species from five regional hospitals in Hong Kong. Among 45 episodes of Elizabethkingia-like bacteremia, 21 were caused by Elizabethkingia, including 17 E. anophelis, three E. meningoseptica and one E. miricola; while 24 were caused by other diverse genera/species, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Of the 17 cases of E. anophelis bacteremia, 15 (88%) were clinically significant. The most common diagnosis was pneumonia (n = 5), followed by catheter-related bacteremia (n = 4), neonatal meningitis (n = 3), nosocomial bacteremia (n = 2) and neutropenic fever (n = 1). E. anophelis bacteremia was commonly associated with complications and carried 23.5% mortality. In contrast, of the 24 episodes of bacteremia due to non-Elizabethkingia species, 16 (67%) were clinically insignificant. Compared to non-Elizabethkingia bacteremia, Elizabethkingia bacteremia was associated with more clinically significant infections (P < 0.01) and positive cultures from other sites (P < 0.01), less polymicrobial bacteremia (P < 0.01), and higher complication (P < 0.05) and mortality (P < 0.05) rates. Elizabethkingia bacteremia is predominantly caused by E. anophelis instead of E. meningoseptica. Elizabethkingia bacteremia, especially due to E. anophelis, carries significant morbidity and mortality, and should be considered clinically significant unless proven otherwise.

  15. Colorectal Cancer Associated with Streptococcus anginosus Bacteremia and Liver Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Masood, Umair; Sharma, Anuj; Lowe, Dhruv; Khan, Rashad; Manocha, Divey

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is part of the normal flora of the human gastrointestinal tract. Their ability to cause abscesses is very unique and sets them apart from the rest of the streptococci groups. While an association of group D streptococcus bacteremia and endocarditis with colorectal carcinoma is well established, S. anginosus infections are rarely implicated with colonic malignancy. We present a case of a 62-year-old male who presented to the hospital with fatigue and generalized abdominal pain. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed multiple liver abscesses and rectal thickening. Blood cultures were found to grow S. anginosus bacteria. Colonoscopy revealed a rectal mass which was later confirmed to be rectal adenocarcinoma. This case presents an association between S. anginosus bacteremia and presence of colorectal cancer which has been highlighted in only a few case reports in literature. This should prompt clinicians to screen for colorectal cancer in patients with S. anginosus bacteremia. PMID:28100999

  16. Late, Late-Onset Group B Streptococcus Cellulitis With Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Yokouchi, Yukako; Katsumori, Hiroshi; Koike, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Group B streptococcus (GBS) infection remains a leading cause of serious neonatal and early infantile infection. As the infection often presents with nonspecific symptoms, and is associated with underlying bacteremia, prompt investigation and treatment is required. We report a case of late, late-onset GBS infection with bacteremia in a 94-day-old boy experiencing cellulitis of the left hand. Although late-onset disease or late, late-onset disease has been reported to be common among infants with underlying conditions such as premature birth, immunocompromised status, trauma, or among those using medical devices, no such underlying medical condition predisposed this infant to invasive GBS infection. Recent reports including the present case underscore the risk of GBS infection among previously healthy infants beyond the neonatal period. Thus, clinicians should especially be aware of unusual presentations of GBS invasive disease with bacteremia.

  17. Bacillus cereus bacteremia in an adult with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Funada, H; Uotani, C; Machi, T; Matsuda, T; Nonomura, A

    1988-03-01

    Bacillus cereus, which used to be considered non-pathogenic, was isolated from the blood of a patient with acute leukemia who was receiving intensive chemotherapy. Fatal bacteremia developed with a clinical syndrome of acute gastroenteritis, followed by both meningoencephalitis with subarachnoid hemorrhage and multiple liver abscesses probably caused by infective vasculitis. Surveillance stool cultures revealed colonization with the organism prior to the onset of diarrhea, and repetitive blood cultures were found to be positive. Thus, this case suggested some new important clinicopathologic features of true B. cereus bacteremia complicating acute leukemia.

  18. Shewanella-Related Bacteremia and Fournier's Gangrene: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tommy Hing-cheung; Cheng, Naomi Hua-yin; Ho, Roy Tsz-chung; Chan, Helen Shuk-ying; Lam, Kwok-wai; Xavier, Jimenez; Wu, Tak-chiu

    2016-01-01

    Shewanella algae and Shewanella putrefaciens have been implicated for causing serious infections in humans, including disseminated infection. We report the possible first case of Shewanella-related Fournier's gangrene and bacteremia caused in a 65-year-old Chinese male with nephrotic syndrome. He was successfully managed by surgical debridement and antibiotic therapy. PMID:27704006

  19. Helicobacter cinaedi septic arthritis and bacteremia in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Lasry, S; Simon, J; Marais, A; Pouchot, J; Vinceneux, P; Boussougant, Y

    2000-07-01

    We report on the first case of documented Helicobacter cinaedi septic arthritis in an immunocompetent heterosexual young man. The patient presented no identified risk factor except for contact with animals that have been incriminated as a possible source of infection, particularly for these patients. Despite prolonged bacteremia, the response to long-term therapy with ciprofloxacin and rifampin was excellent.

  20. Bacteremia caused by viridans streptococci in 71 children.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudreau, C.; Delage, G.; Rousseau, D.; Cantor, E. D.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the hospital records of 71 patients from whose blood viridans streptococci were isolated showed that in 13 cases the patient's illness was definitely related to the bacteremia: 4 patients had endocarditis, 3 had pneumonia, 2 had peritonitis and 1 each had meningitis, a scalp wound infection, sinusitis and otitis media. The bacteremia may have contributed to the two deaths among these 13 patients. In 45 cases the viridans streptococci may have contributed to the patient's illness: 15 patients had an infection of the lower respiratory tract and 7 an infection of the upper respiratory tract, 8 were neonates with suspected septicemia, 3 had soft tissue infections, 3 had leukemia and sepsis, and 9 had miscellaneous infections; the bacteremia was unrelated to the two deaths in this group. In another 13 cases the viridans streptococci could not be related to the patient's illness. The species most frequently isolated were Streptococcus mitis, S. sanguis II and S. MG-intermedius. The outcome of the bacteremia was generally good, even among the 11 patients not treated with antibiotics. When viridans streptococci are cultured from a single blood sample, further samples of blood and, if feasible, specimens from the associated focus of infection should be obtained for culture; further blood cultures are especially important in cases of suspected endocarditis. PMID:7332884

  1. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Bacteremia, Finland, 1995–2004

    PubMed Central

    Vähäkuopus, Susanna; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Vuento, Risto; Syrjänen, Jaana

    2010-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective population-based study of 140 episodes of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis bacteremia occurring in Finland during 1995–2004. Rare emm types were associated with more severe disease and increased mortality rates. Skin and soft tissue infections were more frequent clinical signs among cases caused by common emm types. PMID:20409380

  2. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Bacteremia, Finland, 1995-2004.

    PubMed

    Rantala, Sari; Vahakuopus, Susanna; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Vuento, Risto; Syrjanen, Jaana

    2010-05-01

    We conducted a retrospective population-based study of 140 episodes of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis bacteremia occurring in Finland during 1995-2004. Rare emm types were associated with more severe disease and increased mortality rates. Skin and soft tissue infections were more frequent clinical signs among cases caused by common emm types.

  3. Capnocytophaga cynodegmi Cellulitis, Bacteremia, and Pneumonitis in a Diabetic Man

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Podila S.; Mohanty, Smruti

    2001-01-01

    Capnocytophaga cynodegmi (formerly “DF-2 like organism”), a commensal organism of the canine oral cavity, is a capnophilic, gram-negative, facultative bacillus. C. cynodegmi has rarely been encountered in human diseases. We report the first known case of cellulitis, bacteremia, and pneumonitis caused by C. cynodegmi in a diabetic man from central India following a dog bite. PMID:11326042

  4. Bacillus cereus bacteremia outbreak due to contaminated hospital linens.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, T; Hayashi, S; Morisawa, Y; Sakihama, T; Yoshimura, A; Hirai, Y

    2011-02-01

    We describe an outbreak of Bacillus cereus bacteremia that occurred at Jichi Medical University Hospital in 2006. This study aimed to identify the source of this outbreak and to implement appropriate control measures. We reviewed the charts of patients with blood cultures positive for B. cereus, and investigated B. cereus contamination within the hospital environment. Genetic relationships among B. cereus isolates were analyzed. Eleven patients developed B. cereus bacteremia between January and August 2006. The hospital linens and the washing machine were highly contaminated with B. cereus, which was also isolated from the intravenous fluid. All of the contaminated linens were autoclaved, the washing machine was cleaned with a detergent, and hand hygiene was promoted among the hospital staff. The number of patients per month that developed new B. cereus bacteremia rapidly decreased after implementing these measures. The source of this outbreak was B. cereus contamination of hospital linens, and B. cereus was transmitted from the linens to patients via catheter infection. Our findings demonstrated that bacterial contamination of hospital linens can cause nosocomial bacteremia. Thus, blood cultures that are positive for B. cereus should not be regarded as false positives in the clinical setting.

  5. Bacteremia Caused by Comamonas kerstersii in a Patient with Diverticulosis

    PubMed Central

    Opota, Onya; Ney, Barbara; Zanetti, Giorgio; Jaton, Katia; Prod'hom, Guy

    2014-01-01

    We report for the first time a case of bacteremia caused by Comamonas kerstersii in a 65-year-old patient with sign of diverticulosis. In addition, we review the isolation of Comamonas sp. and related organisms in our hospital over 25 years. PMID:24371242

  6. Intractable Bacillus cereus bacteremia in a preterm neonate.

    PubMed

    John, Anna B; Razak, Eissa A S A; Razak, Emad E M H; Al-Naqeeb, Niran; Dhar, Rita

    2007-04-01

    Although often regarded as a contaminant, Bacillus spp. have been implicated in serious systemic infections. The incidence of such infections is low with only a few cases reported in the literature. We describe the clinical course of early-onset Bacillus cereus bacteremia in a preterm neonate who was successfully treated with vancomycin.

  7. Bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Southern, P M; Kutscher, A E

    1987-06-01

    We report two cases of bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea. One was a 2.5-yr-old boy with otitis media and pneumonia, who responded to treatment with amoxicillin. The other was a 47-yr-old man with underlying ethanol abuse who developed severe polymicrobial sepsis due to apparent intraabdominal disease. This man died despite extensive antimicrobial therapy.

  8. Prevalence and detection of mixed-population enterococcal bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, Ana María; Andreacchio, Kathleen A; Edelstein, Paul H

    2014-07-01

    Mixed-population (heterogeneous) enterococcal bacteremia (MEB) is rarely reported. Based on one occasion in which Vitek2 missed a vancomycin-resistant subpopulation isolated from a patient, we developed a simple method to detect this subpopulation and determined MEB frequency. The four patients presented here had either Enterococcus faecium or Enterococcus faecalis bacteremia caused by both vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE). No prior common antibiotic therapy was observed, and bacteremia resolved with daptomycin, gentamicin, and/or linezolid treatment. In two cases, VRE presence was missed by Vitek2. To detect the VRE subpopulation, tryptic soy broth was inoculated from positive blood cultures and a saline suspension was inoculated to a vancomycin (6-μg/ml) (V6) plate. Two isolates from each patient were studied further. Relatedness was assessed by multilocus sequence typing, fitness was evaluated by growth curve and competition assays, and vanA presence was determined by PCR. MEB represented ∼5% of all enterococcal bacteremias. All VRE subpopulations grew on V6 plates but were missed in two instances by Vitek2. VRE and VSE isolates from each patient were closely related and did not differ in overall fitness. All four VRE isolates and 2/4 VSE isolates were vanA positive. MEBs occur regardless of prior antimicrobial therapy, are relatively common in our hospital, and are important to detect. As far as we know, this study is the first to report heterogeneous E. faecalis bacteremia. There is a simple method to detect VRE subpopulations that may be missed by Vitek2.

  9. Bacteremia in Children Hospitalized with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pardo-Seco, Jacobo; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Justicia-Grande, Antonio; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Pinnock, Elli; Salas, Antonio; Fink, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of bacteremia is considered low in children with acute bronchiolitis. However the rate of occult bacteremia in infants with RSV infection is not well established. The aim was to determine the actual rate and predictive factors of bacteremia in children admitted to hospital due to confirmed RSV acute respiratory illness (ARI), using both conventional culture and molecular techniques. Methods A prospective multicenter study (GENDRES-network) was conducted between 2011–2013 in children under the age of two admitted to hospital because of an ARI. Among those RSV-positive, bacterial presence in blood was assessed using PCR for Meningococcus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus, in addition to conventional cultures. Results 66 children with positive RSV respiratory illness were included. In 10.6% patients, bacterial presence was detected: H. influenzae (n = 4) and S. pneumoniae (n = 2). In those patients with bacteremia, there was a previous suspicion of bacterial superinfection and had received empirical antibiotic treatment 6 out of 7 (85.7%) patients. There were significant differences in terms of severity between children with positive bacterial PCR and those with negative results: PICU admission (100% vs. 50%, P-value = 0.015); respiratory support necessity (100% vs. 18.6%, P-value < 0.001); Wood-Downes score (mean = 8.7 vs. 4.8 points, P-value < 0.001); GENVIP scale (mean = 17 vs. 10.1, P-value < 0.001); and length of hospitalization (mean = 12.1 vs. 7.5 days, P-value = 0.007). Conclusion Bacteremia is not frequent in infants hospitalized with RSV respiratory infection, however, it should be considered in the most severe cases. PMID:26872131

  10. Clinical and microbiological features of Providencia bacteremia: experience at a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hee Kyoung; Kim, Young Keun; Kim, Hyo Youl; Park, Jeong Eun

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Providencia species frequently colonize urinary catheters and cause urinary tract infections (UTIs); however, bacteremia is uncommon and not well understood. We investigated the clinical features of Providencia bacteremia and the antibiotic susceptibility of Providencia species. Methods We identified cases of Providencia bacteremia from May 2001 to April 2013 at a tertiary care hospital. The medical records of pertinent patients were reviewed. Results Fourteen cases of Providencia bacteremia occurred; the incidence rate was 0.41 per 10,000 admissions. The median age of the patients was 64.5 years. Eleven cases (78.6%) were nosocomial infections and nine cases (64.3%) were polymicrobial bacteremia. The most common underlying conditions were cerebrovascular/neurologic disease (n = 10) and an indwelling urinary catheter (n = 10, 71.4%). A UTI was the most common source of bacteremia (n = 5, 35.7%). The overall mortality rate was 29% (n = 4); in each case, death occurred within 4 days of the onset of bacteremia. Primary bacteremia was more fatal than other types of bacteremia (mortality rate, 75% [3/4] vs. 10% [1/10], p = 0.041). The underlying disease severity, Acute Physiologic and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores, and Pitt bacteremia scores were significantly higher in nonsurvivors (p = 0.016, p =0.004, and p = 0.002, respectively). Susceptibility to cefepime, imipenem, and piperacillin/tazobactam was noted in 100%, 86%, and 86% of the isolates, respectively. Conclusions Providencia bacteremia occurred frequently in elderly patients with cerebrovascular or neurologic disease. Although Providencia bacteremia is uncommon, it can be rapidly fatal and polymicrobial. These characteristics suggest that the selection of appropriate antibiotic therapy could be complicated in Providencia bacteremia. PMID:25750564

  11. Rhodococcus Bacteremia in Cancer Patients Is Mostly Catheter Related and Associated with Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Al Akhrass, Fadi; Al Wohoush, Iba; Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Reitzel, Ruth; Jiang, Ying; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Hachem, Ray; Raad, Issam

    2012-01-01

    Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94%) central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%). Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated. PMID:22427914

  12. In situ management of confirmed central venous catheter-related bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Flynn, P M; Shenep, J L; Stokes, D C; Barrett, F F

    1987-08-01

    Thirty-one patients with suspected central venous catheter-related bacteremia were evaluated with comparative quantitative cultures of central venous and peripheral blood specimens. Using criteria developed from studies in bacteremic animals, 19 patients were confirmed to have catheter-related bacteremia. Antibiotic therapy was administered through the catheter (in situ therapy) in 17 of those patients to evaluate the feasibility of treating patients with true central venous catheter-related bacteremias without catheter removal. Bacteremia was successfully eradicated in 11 of 17 patients (65%), allowing 7 patients to retain their catheter a median of 157 days. This study validates the use of comparative quantitative blood cultures in the diagnosis of catheter-related bacteremia and indicates that in situ therapy is a rational alternative to catheter removal in patients with catheter-related bacteremia.

  13. Elizabethkingia anophelis bacteremia is associated with clinically significant infections and high mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Foo, Chuen-Hing; Curreem, Shirly O. T.; Lo, George Chi-Shing; Teng, Jade L. L.; Chen, Jonathan H. K.; Ng, Ricky H. Y.; Wu, Alan K. L.; Cheung, Ingrid Y. Y.; Chau, Sandy K. Y.; Lung, David C.; Lee, Rodney A.; Tse, Cindy W. S.; Fung, Kitty S. C.; Que, Tak-Lun; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Unlike Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, the clinical importance of E. anophelis is poorly understood. We determined the clinical and molecular epidemiology of bacteremia caused by Elizabethkingia-like species from five regional hospitals in Hong Kong. Among 45 episodes of Elizabethkingia-like bacteremia, 21 were caused by Elizabethkingia, including 17 E. anophelis, three E. meningoseptica and one E. miricola; while 24 were caused by other diverse genera/species, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Of the 17 cases of E. anophelis bacteremia, 15 (88%) were clinically significant. The most common diagnosis was pneumonia (n = 5), followed by catheter-related bacteremia (n = 4), neonatal meningitis (n = 3), nosocomial bacteremia (n = 2) and neutropenic fever (n = 1). E. anophelis bacteremia was commonly associated with complications and carried 23.5% mortality. In contrast, of the 24 episodes of bacteremia due to non-Elizabethkingia species, 16 (67%) were clinically insignificant. Compared to non-Elizabethkingia bacteremia, Elizabethkingia bacteremia was associated with more clinically significant infections (P < 0.01) and positive cultures from other sites (P < 0.01), less polymicrobial bacteremia (P < 0.01), and higher complication (P < 0.05) and mortality (P < 0.05) rates. Elizabethkingia bacteremia is predominantly caused by E. anophelis instead of E. meningoseptica. Elizabethkingia bacteremia, especially due to E. anophelis, carries significant morbidity and mortality, and should be considered clinically significant unless proven otherwise. PMID:27185741

  14. Gastrointestinal Dissemination and Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus following Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Kernbauer, Elisabeth; Maurer, Katie; Torres, Victor J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations that alter virulence and antibiotic susceptibility arise and persist during Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. However, an experimental system demonstrating transmission following bacteremia has been lacking, and thus implications of within-host adaptation for between-host transmission are unknown. We report that S. aureus disseminates to the gastrointestinal tract of mice following intravenous injection and readily transmits to cohoused naive mice. Both intestinal dissemination and transmission were linked to the production of virulence factors based on gene deletion studies of the sae and agr two-component systems. Furthermore, antimicrobial selection for antibiotic-resistant S. aureus displaced susceptible S. aureus from the intestine of infected hosts, which led to the preferential transmission and dominance of antibiotic-resistant bacteria among cohoused untreated mice. These findings establish an animal model to investigate gastrointestinal dissemination and transmission of S. aureus and suggest that adaptation during the course of systemic infection has implications beyond the level of a single host. PMID:25385792

  15. Pyelonephritis with bacteremia caused by Listeria monocytogenes: A case report.

    PubMed

    Uno, Shunsuke; Hase, Ryota; Toguchi, Akihiro; Otsuka, Yoshihito; Hosokawa, Naoto

    2017-02-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a well-known cause of meningitis, colitis, and bacteremia; however, obstructive pyelonephritis caused by L. monocytogenes has never been reported. We herein report on a 90-year-old Japanese woman with obstructive pyelonephritis and bacteremia due to uterus carcinoma invading the ureter. She was admitted to our hospital complaining of fever and chills, and her physical examination revealed left costovertebral angle tenderness. Computed tomography showed hydronephrosis and complete ureteral obstruction due to tumor invasion. Blood and urine cultures upon nephrostomy revealed the growth of L. monocytogenes. We treated the patient with two weeks of intravenous ampicillin and an additional one-week treatment of oral sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. This case shows the importance to recognize L. monocytogenes as a potential causative agent of urinary tract infection.

  16. Enterococcus spp. in a single blood culture: bacteremia or contamination?

    PubMed

    Khatib, R; Labalo, V; Sharma, M; Johnson, L B; Riederer, K

    2017-03-01

    We retrospectively evaluated adult cases with Enterococcus spp. in 1 blood culture (BC) (1/1/2010-12/31/2015; n=294) and stratified them into bacteremia or contamination. Contamination frequency was similar in community versus hospital-onset, E. faecalis versus E. faecium, and number of BC drawn per day. Contamination predictors were vancomycin-resistance, ampicillin-resistance, commensal organism copresence, and nonurinary/abdominal sources.

  17. Persistent staphylococcal bacteremia in an intravenous drug abuser.

    PubMed

    Barg, N L; Supena, R B; Fekety, R

    1986-02-01

    A patient with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia received vancomycin (MIC = 0.8 microgram/ml, MBC = 15 micrograms/ml) and heparin simultaneously through the same intravenous line to treat a septic deep venous thrombosis. Bacteremia persisted for 7 days. Bacteremia terminated when the simultaneous infusion of heparin and vancomycin through the same line was stopped. This suggested that an interaction between vancomycin and heparin may have occurred, which resulted in a reduction in vancomycin activity. To test for such an interaction, mixtures of heparin and vancomycin in various concentrations were made and tested for antimicrobial activity against the organisms in the patient. A precipitate formed at the concentrations achieved in the intravenous lines, and when the vancomycin concentrations were measured by bioassay, a 50 to 60% reduction in activity was noted. In contrast, when these solutions were prepared and mixed at microgram concentrations, a precipitate was no longer observed, and antimicrobial activity was not reduced. Heparin appeared to interact unfavorably with vancomycin at the concentrations in the intravenous lines when these drugs were administered simultaneously to patients. This may be the cause of poor therapeutic responses to vancomycin in some patients, especially those infected with tolerant organisms.

  18. A Case of Helicobacter cinaedi Bacteremia in an Asplenic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Kyung; Cho, Eun-Jung; Sung, Heungsup; An, Dongheui; Park, Sook-Ja; Nam, Gi-Byoung

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi is an enterohepatic species. It can cause bacteremia, gastroenteritis, and cellulitis, particularly in immunocompromised individuals, such as those with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, malignancy, or alcoholism. There are no previous reports of H. cinaedi infection in Korea. A 71-yr-old man was admitted to the emergency room because of dyspnea on November 9, 2011. He had undergone splenectomy 3 yr ago because of immune hemolytic anemia. Chest plain radiography revealed bilateral pleural effusion. He developed fever on hospital day (HD) 21. Three sets of blood cultures were taken, and gram-negative spiral bacilli were detected in all aerobic vials. The isolate grew in tiny colonies on chocolate agar after 3-day incubation under microaerophilic conditions. This organism tested positive for catalase and oxidase, and negative for urease. The 16S rRNA gene sequence of this isolate exhibited 99.8% homology with the published sequence of H. cinaedi CCUG 18818T (GenBank accession no. ABQT01000054) and 98.5% homology with the sequence of Helicobacter bilis Hb1T (GenBank accession no. U18766). The patient was empirically treated with piperacillin/tazobactam and levofloxacin, and discharged with improvement on HD 31. To our knowledge, this is the first report of H. cinaedi bacteremia in an asplenic patient. Asplenia appears to be a risk factor for H. cinaedi bacteremia. PMID:23130344

  19. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones. PMID:27533890

  20. Persistent Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in 3 Persons Who Inject Drugs, San Diego, California, USA.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Gabrielle; Campbell, Wesley; Jenks, Jeffrey; Beesley, Cari; Katsivas, Theodoros; Hoffmaster, Alex; Mehta, Sanjay R; Reed, Sharon

    2016-09-01

    Bacillus cereus is typically considered a blood culture contaminant; however, its presence in blood cultures can indicate true bacteremia. We report 4 episodes of B. cereus bacteremia in 3 persons who inject drugs. Multilocus sequence typing showed that the temporally associated infections were caused by unrelated clones.

  1. Tree-structured survival analysis of patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia: A multicenter observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Young Kyung; Kim, Hyun Ah; Ryu, Seong Yeol; Lee, Eun Jung; Lee, Mi Suk; Kim, Jieun; Park, Seong Yeon; Yang, Kyung Sook; Kim, Shin Woo

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to construct a prediction algorithm, which is readily applicable in the clinical setting, to determine the mortality rate for patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia. A multicenter observational cohort study was performed retrospectively in seven university-affiliated hospitals in Korea from March 2012 to February 2015. In total, 264 adult patients with monomicrobial P. aeruginosa bacteremia were included in the analyses. Among the predictors independently associated with 30-day mortality in the Cox regression model, Pitt bacteremia score >2 and high-risk source of bacteremia were identified as critical nodes in the tree-structured survival analysis. Particularly, the empirical combination therapy was not associated with any survival benefit in the Cox regression model compared to the empirical monotherapy. This study suggests that determining the infection source and evaluating the clinical severity are critical to predict the clinical outcome in patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia.

  2. Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia in a hematology unit: molecular epidemiology and analysis of clinical course.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jin-Hong; Lee, Dong-Gun; Choi, Su Mi; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Shin, Wan-Shik; Kim, Myungshin; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Min, Woo-Sung; Kim, Chun-Choo

    2005-04-01

    An increase in vancomycin-resistant enterococcal (VRE) bacteremia in hemato-oncological patients (n=19) in our institution from 2000 through 2001 led us to analyze the molecular epidemiologic patterns and clinical features unique to our cases. The pulsed field gel electrophoresis of the isolates revealed that the bacteremia was not originated from a single clone but rather showed endemic pattern of diverse clones with small clusters. A different DNA pattern of blood and stool isolates from one patient suggested exogenous rather than endogenous route of infection. Enterococcus faecium carrying vanA gene was the causative pathogen in all cases. Patients with VRE bacteremia showed similar clinical courses compared with those with vancomycin-susceptible enterococcal (VSE) bacteremia. Vancomycin resistance did not seem to be a poor prognostic factor because of similar mortality (5/8, 62.5%) noted in VSE bacteremia. Initial disease severity and neutropenic status may be major determinants of prognosis in patients with VRE bacteraemia.

  3. Bacterial adherence to vascular grafts after in vitro bacteremia

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenman, J.E.; Pearce, W.H.; Kempczinski, R.F.

    1985-06-01

    All currently used arterial prosthetics have a greater susceptibility to infection following bacteremia than does autogenous tissue. This experiment compares quantitative bacterial adherence to various prosthetic materials after bacteremia carried out in a tightly controlled and quantitative fashion. Ten centimeters long, 4 mm i.d. Dacron, umbilical vein (HUV), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts, as well as PTFE grafts with a running suture line at the midportion were tested. Each graft was interposed into a pulsatile perfusion system modified from a Waters MOX 100 TM renal transplant pump. Indium-111-labeled Staphylococcus aureus were added to heparinized canine blood to give a mean concentration of 4.7 X 10(6) bacteria/cc. This infected blood was recirculated through each graft for 30 min at a rate of 125 cc/m, 100 Torr (sys), 60 beats/min. The gamma counts/graft were used to calculate the number of bacteria/cm2 of graft surface. After nine experiments, a mean of 9.63 X 10(5) bacteria/cm2 were adherent to the Dacron, 1.04 X 10(5) bacteria/cm2 to the HUV, and 2.15 X 10(4) bacteria/cm2 to the PTFE. These differences were all significant at the 0.05 level. The addition of a suture line increased bacterial adherence to the PTFE graft by 50%. These results suggest that PTFE is the vascular graft material of choice when a prosthetic graft must be implanted despite a high risk of subsequent clinical bacteremia. An in vitro, pulsatile perfusion model gave accurate and reproducible results, and appears well suited for further studies of bacterial, or platelet adherence to grafts, as well as the biomechanics of vascular conduits.

  4. Anaerobic Bacteremia: Impact of Inappropriate Therapy on Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yangsoon; Park, Yongjung; Kim, Myungsook; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background Investigation on incidence and mortality of anaerobic bacteremia (AB) is clinically relevant in spite of its infrequent occurrence and not often explored, which report varies according to period and institutions. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the incidence and risk factors related to mortality and assess clinical outcomes of AB in current aspect. Materials and Methods Characteristics of AB patients and anaerobic bacteria from blood culture at a university hospital in 2012 were reviewed retrospectively. The correlation between risk factors and 28-day patient mortality was analyzed. Results A total of 70 non-duplicated anaerobic bacteria were isolated from blood of 70 bacteremia patients in 2012. The history of cardiovascular disease as host's risk factor was statistically significant (P = 0.0344) in univariate and multivariate analysis. Although the inappropriate therapy was not statistically significant in univariate and multivariate analysis, the survival rate of bacteremia was significantly worse in patients who had inappropriate therapy compared with those underwent appropriate therapy (hazard ratio, 5.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.7–6.9; P = 0.004). The most frequently isolated organism was Bacteroides fragilis (32 isolates, 46%), followed by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (10, 14%), and non-perfringens Clostridium (7, 10%). Conclusion The incidence of AB in 2012 was 2.3% (number of AB patients per 100 positive blood culture patients) and the mortality rate in patients with clinically significant AB was 21.4%. In addition, AB was frequently noted in patients having malignancy and the survival rate of AB was significantly worse in patients who received inappropriate therapy compared with those underwent appropriate therapy. PMID:27433379

  5. Clinical and Therapeutic Implications of Aeromonas Bacteremia: 14 Years Nation-Wide Experiences in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Dong Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background To elucidate the clinical presentation, antimicrobial susceptibility, and prognostic factors of monomicrobial Aeromonas bacteremia in order to determine the most effective optimal therapy. Materials and Methods We reviewed the medical records of Aeromonas bacteremia patients for the period January 2000 to December 2013 in a retrospective multi-center study. Results A total of 336 patient records were reviewed, with 242 having community-acquired bacteremia. The major clinical infections were of the hepatobiliary tract (50.6%) and peritonitis (18.5%), followed by primary bacteremia (17.9%). The infections usually occurred in patients with malignancy (42.3%), hepatic cirrhosis (39.3%), or diabetes mellitus (25.6%). High antimicrobial-resistance rates (15.5% for ceftriaxone, 15.5% for piperacillin/tazobactam) were noted. However, resistance to carbapenem and amikacin was only 9.8% and 3.0%, respectively. Aeromonas hydrophila (58.9%) was the most common pathogen, followed by Aeromonas caviae (30.4%). The severity of A. caviae bacteremia cases were less than that of A. hydrophila or Aeromonas veronii bacteremia (P <0.05). A. hydrophila showed higher antimicrobial resistance than did other Aeromonas species (P <0.05). Patients with hospital-acquired bacteremia were more likely to have severely abnormal laboratory findings and relatively high antimicrobial-resistance rates. Mortality was associated with metastatic cancer, shock, delayed use of appropriate antimicrobial agents, increased prothrombin time, and increased creatinine level (P <0.05). Conclusions Aeromonas species should be considered one of the causative agents of bacteremia in patients with intra-abdominal infections or malignancies. Although ceftriaxone-resistant Aeromonas bacteremia was not statistically related to mortality in this study, it was associated with severe clinical manifestations and laboratory abnormalities. Appropriate antibiotics, including carbapenem, should be administered early

  6. Mycobacterium abscessus complex bacteremia due to prostatitis after prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Hua; Lin, Jesun; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Chen, Yu-Min

    2016-10-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old man, who developed Mycobacterium abscessus complex (M. abscessus complex) bacteremia and prostatitis after prostate biopsy. The patient was successfully treated with amikacin with imipenem-cilastatin with clarithromycin. Infections caused by M. abscessus complex have been increasingly described as a complication associated with many invasive procedures. Invasive procedures might have contributed to the occurrence of the M. abscessus complex. Although M. abscessus complex infection is difficult to diagnose and treat, we should pay more attention to this kind of infection, and the correct treatment strategy will be achieved by physicians.

  7. A Case of Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis Caused by Listeria monocytogenes Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Importance. Infections can cause leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Observations. We report the case of a patient with a left ventricular assist device who presented with acute kidney injury and biopsy proven leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Blood cultures grew Listeria monocytogenes. The patient's rash improved with treatment of the underlying Listeria infection. Conclusion. Clinicians should be aware that there are a number of broad categories of disease associated with the histologic finding of vasculitis, including infection. It is important to keep in mind the risk factors of a particular patient when formulating a differential diagnosis. This is the first reported case of Listeria bacteremia causing leukocytoclastic vasculitis. PMID:27313916

  8. Pediatric bacteremia caused by Chromobacterium haemolyticum/Chromobacterium aquaticum.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Nicole; Mortensen, Joel E; Robinette, Eric; Powell, Eleanor A

    2016-09-01

    We present a case of pediatric bacteremia caused by Chromobacterium haemolyticum, a β-hemolytic, non-pigmented, Gram-negative bacilli recovered from a blood culture and initially identified as Chromobacterium violaceum using phenotypic and proteomic methods. 16S rRNA sequencing of the patient isolated demonstrated a high degree of sequence homology with the type strain of C. haemolyticum. The patient recovered following treatment with meropenem, gentamicin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. This case highlights the potential misidentification of C. haemolyticum as non-pigmented C. violaceum due to limitations of the currently available identification methodologies.

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Bacteremia Among Acutely Febrile Children in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Pavlinac, Patricia B; Naulikha, Jaqueline M; John-Stewart, Grace C; Onchiri, Frankline M; Okumu, Albert O; Sitati, Ruth R; Cranmer, Lisa M; Lokken, Erica M; Singa, Benson O; Walson, Judd L

    2015-11-01

    In children, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) frequently disseminates systemically, presenting with nonspecific signs including fever. We determined prevalence of M. tuberculosis bacteremia among febrile children presenting to hospitals in Nyanza, Kenya (a region with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and M. tuberculosis prevalence). Between March 2013 and February 2014, we enrolled children aged 6 months to 5 years presenting with fever (axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C) and no recent antibiotic use. Blood samples were collected for bacterial and mycobacterial culture using standard methods. Among 148 children enrolled, median age was 3.1 years (interquartile range: 1.8-4.1 years); 10.3% of children were living with a household member diagnosed with M. tuberculosis in the last year. Seventeen percent of children were stunted (height-for-age z-score < -2), 18.6% wasted (weight-for-height z-score < -2), 2.7% were HIV-infected, and 14.2% were HIV-exposed uninfected. Seventeen children (11.5%) had one or more signs of tuberculosis (TB). All children had a Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination scar. Among 134 viable blood cultures, none (95% confidence interval: 0-2.7%) had Mycobacterium isolated. Despite exposure to household TB contacts, HIV exposure, and malnutrition, M. tuberculosis bacteremia was not detected in this pediatric febrile cohort, a finding consistent with other pediatric studies.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Bacteremia among Acutely Febrile Children in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Pavlinac, Patricia B.; Naulikha, Jaqueline M.; John-Stewart, Grace C.; Onchiri, Frankline M.; Okumu, Albert O.; Sitati, Ruth R.; Cranmer, Lisa M.; Lokken, Erica M.; Singa, Benson O.; Walson, Judd L.

    2015-01-01

    In children, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) frequently disseminates systemically, presenting with nonspecific signs including fever. We determined prevalence of M. tuberculosis bacteremia among febrile children presenting to hospitals in Nyanza, Kenya (a region with high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and M. tuberculosis prevalence). Between March 2013 and February 2014, we enrolled children aged 6 months to 5 years presenting with fever (axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C) and no recent antibiotic use. Blood samples were collected for bacterial and mycobacterial culture using standard methods. Among 148 children enrolled, median age was 3.1 years (interquartile range: 1.8–4.1 years); 10.3% of children were living with a household member diagnosed with M. tuberculosis in the last year. Seventeen percent of children were stunted (height-for-age z-score < −2), 18.6% wasted (weight-for-height z-score < −2), 2.7% were HIV-infected, and 14.2% were HIV-exposed uninfected. Seventeen children (11.5%) had one or more signs of tuberculosis (TB). All children had a Bacille Calmette-Guerin vaccination scar. Among 134 viable blood cultures, none (95% confidence interval: 0–2.7%) had Mycobacterium isolated. Despite exposure to household TB contacts, HIV exposure, and malnutrition, M. tuberculosis bacteremia was not detected in this pediatric febrile cohort, a finding consistent with other pediatric studies. PMID:26324730

  11. Clinical correlates of bacteremia in a Veterans Administration extended care facility.

    PubMed

    Rudman, D; Hontanosas, A; Cohen, Z; Mattson, D E

    1988-08-01

    Little is known about bacteremia in long-term care facilities. We have conducted a retrospective study during a 12-month period analyzing the clinical correlates of bacteremia in 533 chronically institutionalized, predominantly male patients, with an average age of 69 years. Thirty-four men had forty-two bacteremic illnesses during this period. The incidence rate was 0.30 episodes per 1000 patient care days, and the mortality rate was 21%. The urinary tract was the most frequently identified tissue source (56%), followed by respiratory tract (7%) and skin (7%). Providencia stuartii was the most common gram-negative organism, while Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and enterococcus were the frequent gram-positive microbes. Gram-negative bacteremia accounted for 63% of the episodes (15% mortality rate), and gram-positive bacteremia accounted for 27% (18% mortality rate); 10% of the bacteremias were polymicrobial (25% mortality rate). Most of the isolated organisms were sensitive to available antimicrobial agents. The leading risk factor for bacteremia was an indwelling urinary catheter (odds ratio 39, 95% confidence limits 16 to 97). Patients with urinary catheters at the beginning of the study constituted only 5% of the population, but accounted for 40% of the gram-negative bacteremias during the year of observation.

  12. Salmonella Bacteremia Among Children in Central and Northwest Nigeria, 2008–2015

    PubMed Central

    Obaro, Stephen K.; Hassan-Hanga, Fatimah; Olateju, Eyinade K.; Umoru, Dominic; Lawson, Lovett; Olanipekun, Grace; Ibrahim, Sadeeq; Munir, Huda; Ihesiolor, Gabriel; Maduekwe, Augustine; Ohiaeri, Chinatu; Adetola, Anthony; Shetima, Denis; Jibir, Binta W.; Nakaura, Hafsat; Kocmich, Nicholas; Ajose, Therasa; Idiong, David; Masokano, Kabir; Ifabiyi, Adeyemi; Ihebuzor, Nnenna; Chen, Baojiang; Meza, Jane; Akindele, Adebayo; Rezac-Elgohary, Amy; Olaosebikan, Rasaq; Suwaid, Salman; Gambo, Mahmoud; Alter, Roxanne; Davies, Herbert D.; Fey, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Etiologic agents of childhood bacteremia remain poorly defined in Nigeria. The absence of such data promotes indiscriminate use of antibiotics and delays implementation of appropriate preventive strategies. Methods. We established diagnostic laboratories for bacteremia surveillance at regional sites in central and northwest Nigeria. Acutely ill children aged <5 years with clinically suspected bacteremia were evaluated at rural and urban clinical facilities in the Federal Capital Territory, central region and in Kano, northwest Nigeria. Blood was cultured using the automated Bactec incubator system. Results. Between September 2008 and April 2015, we screened 10 133 children. Clinically significant bacteremia was detected in 609 of 4051 (15%) in the northwest and 457 of 6082 (7.5%) in the central region. Across both regions, Salmonella species account for 24%–59.8% of bacteremias and are the commonest cause of childhood bacteremia, with a predominance of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. The prevalence of resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and cotrimoxazole was 38.11%, with regional differences in susceptibility to different antibiotics but high prevalence of resistance to readily available oral antibiotics. Conclusions. Salmonella Typhi is the leading cause of childhood bacteremia in central Nigeria. Expanded surveillance is planned to define the dynamics of transmission. The high prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains calls for improvement in environmental sanitation in the long term and vaccination in the short term. PMID:26449948

  13. Persistence in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: incidence, characteristics of patients and outcome.

    PubMed

    Khatib, Riad; Johnson, Leonard B; Fakih, Mohamad G; Riederer, Kathleen; Khosrovaneh, Amir; Shamse Tabriz, M; Sharma, Mamta; Saeed, Sajjad

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia often persists. The reasons for persistence and its outcome are poorly defined. We conducted a prospective-observational study among 245 consecutive S. aureus (MRSA: n=125; MSSA: n=120) bacteremias (>or=1 positive blood cultures (BC)) among 234 adults (18-103-y-old; median=59 y) hospitalized during 1 January 2002-31 December 2002 at a 600-bed teaching hospital. Measurements included bacteremia duration, complication-rate (metastatic infection, relapse or attributable mortality) and outcome. Bacteremia duration was measured based on follow-up BC among 193 patients and estimated based on symptoms resolution in the rest. Measured (1-59 d; median=2) and estimated (median=1 d) duration correlated (r=0.885) though positive follow-up BC was often detected without fever (57/105 patients, 54.3%). Persistence (defined as bacteremia for >or=3 d) was noted in 84 cases (38.4%). Complication-rate increased steadily with bacteremia duration (6.6%, 24.0% and 37.7% in bacteremia for 1-2, 3 and >or=4 d, respectively; p=0.05). Cox regression analysis revealed that bacteremia duration correlated positively with endovascular sources (p=0.006), vancomycin treatment (p=0.016), cardiovascular prosthesis (p=0.025), metastatic infections (p=0.025) and diabetes (p=0.038). It is concluded that persistent bacteremia is a feature of S. aureus infection, irrespective of oxacillin susceptibility, associated with worse outcome. Risk factors include endovascular sources, cardiovascular prosthesis, metastatic infections, vancomycin treatment and diabetes. Patients at risk may benefit from novel treatment strategies.

  14. Risk Factors for Bacteremia in Patients With Urinary Catheter-Associated Bacteriuria

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Laurie J.; Liu, Jianfang; Harris, Anthony D.; Larson, Elaine L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Catheter-associated bacteriuria is complicated by secondary bacteremia in 0.4% to 4.0% of cases. The directly attributable mortality rate is 12.7% Objective To identify risk factors for bacteremia associated with catheter-associated bacteriuria. Methods Data were acquired from a large electronic clinical and administrative database of consecutive adult inpatient admissions to 2 acute care hospitals during a 7-year period. Data on patients with catheter-associated bacteriuria and bacteremia were compared with data on control patients with catheter-associated bacteriuria and no bacteremia, matched for date of admission plus or minus 30 days. Urine and blood cultures positive for the same pathogen within 7 days were used to define catheter-associated bacteriuria and bacteremia. Multivariable conditional logistic regression was used to determine independent risk factors for bacteremia. Results The sample consisted of 158 cases and 474 controls. Independent predictors of bacteremia were male sex (odds ratio, 2.76), treatment with immunosuppressants (odds ratio, 1.68), urinary tract procedure (odds ratio, 2.70), and catheter that remained in place after bacteriuria developed (odds ratio, 2.75). Patients with enterococcal bacteriuria were half as likely to become bacteremic as were patients with other urinary pathogens (odds ratio, 0.46). Odds of secondary bacteremia increased 2% per additional day of hospital stay (95% CI, 1.01-1.04) and decreased 1% with each additional year of age (95% CI, 0.97-0.99). Conclusions The results add new information about increased risk for bacteremia among patients with catheters remaining in place after catheter-associated bacteriuria and confirm evidence for previously identified risk factors. PMID:27965229

  15. Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in solid organ transplant recipients with bacteremias.

    PubMed

    Wan, Q Q; Ye, Q F; Yuan, H

    2015-03-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) remain as life-threatening complications and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria can cause serious bacteremias in these recipients. Reviews have aimed to investigate MDR Gram-negative bacteremias; however, they were lacking in SOT recipients in the past. To better understand the characteristics of bacteremias due to MDR Gram-negative bacteria, optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies, and improve the outcomes of SOT recipients, this review summarize the epidemiology, clinical and laboratory characteristics, and explores the mechanisms, prevention, and treatment of MDR Gram-negative bacteria.

  16. Acute Hemolysis with Renal Failure due to Clostridium Bacteremia in a Patient with AML

    PubMed Central

    Medrano-Juarez, R. M.; Sotello, D.; D'Cuhna, L.; Payne, J. D.

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of acute hemolytic anemia, renal failure, and Clostridium perfringens bacteremia in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. The high fatality of C. perfringens bacteremia requires that clinicians recognize and rapidly treat patients at risk for this infection. Although other hemolytic processes are in the differential diagnosis of these events, the presence of high fever, chills, and rapidly positive blood cultures may help narrow the diagnosis. Most cases of C. perfringens bacteremia have a concomitant coinfection, which makes broad spectrum empiric therapy essential. There is a high mortality rate of C. perfringens infections associated with leukemia. PMID:27774325

  17. Staphylococcus saprophyticus Bacteremia originating from Urinary Tract Infections: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jaehyung; Lee, Anna; Hong, Jeongmin; Jo, Won-Yong; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Sunjoo; Bae, In-Gyu

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common pathogen of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in young females. However, S. saprophyticus bacteremia originating from UTI is very rare and has not been reported in Korea. We report a case of S. saprophyticus bacteremia from UTI in a 60-year-old female with a urinary stone treated successfully with intravenous ciprofloxacin, and review the cases of S. saprophyticus bacteremia reported in the literature. Thus, the microorganism may cause invasive infection and should be considered when S. saprophyticus is isolated from blood cultures in patients with UTI.

  18. Staphylococcus saprophyticus Bacteremia originating from Urinary Tract Infections: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anna; Hong, Jeongmin; Jo, Won-yong; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Sunjoo

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a common pathogen of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in young females. However, S. saprophyticus bacteremia originating from UTI is very rare and has not been reported in Korea. We report a case of S. saprophyticus bacteremia from UTI in a 60-year-old female with a urinary stone treated successfully with intravenous ciprofloxacin, and review the cases of S. saprophyticus bacteremia reported in the literature. Thus, the microorganism may cause invasive infection and should be considered when S. saprophyticus is isolated from blood cultures in patients with UTI. PMID:27433385

  19. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and hemolytic anemia in a patient with hemoglobin SC disease.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G M; Barrera, E; Martin, R R

    1980-08-01

    A patient with hemoglobin SC disease and cholelithiasis was found to have Bacillus cereus bacteremia. Hemolytic anemia developed, for which common causes of hemolysis were excluded, suggesting a relationship with the bacteremia. Following in vitro incubation, type O erythrocytes were hemolyzed by the culture, but not by a bacteria-free filtrate. This case confirms the association between sickle cell disorders and cholelithiasis with B cereus infections. In addition, it provides evidence for in vivo hemolysis with B cereus bacteremia, an organism not previously associated with hemolytic anemia.

  20. Bacteremia by Streptobacillus moniliformis: first case described in Spain.

    PubMed

    Torres, L; López, A I; Escobar, S; Marne, C; Marco, M L; Pérez, M; Verhaegen, J

    2003-04-01

    Described here is the case of an 87-year-old man who developed fever, chills and discomfort caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis. This pathogen is one of the causes of rat-bite fever, an uncommon bacterial illness transmitted through a bite or scratch from a rodent or the ingestion of food or water contaminated with rat faeces. Cases of rat-bite fever are rarely reported in Spain. The patient reported no history of rat bite or rodent contact, and the only known risk factor was contact with a dog and a cat that were kept as pets. Streptobacillus moniliformis was isolated in two sets of blood cultures. This case represents what is believed to be the first report of bacteremia due to Streptobacillus moniliformis in Spain.

  1. Acute Transverse Myelitis Associated with Salmonella Bacteremia: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Richert, Mary E.; Hosier, Hillary; Weltz, Adam S.; Wise, Eric S.; Joshi, Manjari; Diaz, Jose J.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 28 Final Diagnosis: Acute transverse myelitis Symptoms: Ascending paralysis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Rare disease Background: Acute transverse myelitis (ATM) is an uncommon and often overlooked complication of certain bacterial and viral infections that can have a rapid onset and result in severe neurological deficits. Case Report: This case report describes a previously healthy 28-year-old woman who presented to the trauma center after developing acute paralysis and paresthesias of all four extremities within the span of hours. The initial presumptive diagnosis was spinal cord contusion due to a fall versus an unknown mechanism of trauma, but eventual laboratory studies revealed Salmonella bacteremia, indicating a probable diagnosis of parainfectious ATM. Conclusions: This case illustrates the importance of considering the diagnosis of parainfectious ATM in patients presenting with acute paralysis with incomplete or unobtainable medical histories. PMID:27928148

  2. Fulminant ulcerative colitis complicated by treatment-refractory bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Krease, Michael; Stroup, Jeff; Som, Mousumi

    2016-01-01

    Severe ulcerative colitis is defined by more than six bloody stools daily and evidence of toxicity, demonstrated by fever, tachycardia, anemia, or an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Fulminant disease represents a subset of severe disease with signs and symptoms suggestive of increased toxicity. Treatment of severe colitis includes intravenous corticosteroid administration, with consideration of intravenous infliximab 5 mg/kg. Failure to show improvement after 3 to 5 days is an indication for colectomy or treatment with intravenous cyclosporine. We report a 23-year-old Hispanic woman with decompensated cirrhosis presenting with new-onset fulminant ulcerative colitis and resulting polymicrobial bacteremia, requiring colectomy for infection source control and colitis treatment. PMID:27695178

  3. Antibiotic lock for treatment of tunneled hemodialysis catheter bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Maya, Ivan D

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-related bacteremia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among catheter-dependent hemodialysis patients. Microorganism biofilm matrix formation in the catheter is the pathogenic process of this entity. Administration of systemic antibiotics and removal of the offending catheter is the most logical treatment. This article discusses an alternative option, instillation of an antibiotic-lock solution into the lumen of the catheter plus systemic antibiotic therapy. Recent studies suggest that this strategy could treat the infection and salvage the catheter, thus avoiding the need for further interventional procedures including but not limited to the removal of the catheter, placement of a temporary catheter, and finally placement of a new permanent catheter. The implementation of this effective approach will reduce morbidity and possibly reduce the cost and interventions associated with it.

  4. Neonatal Mortality in Puppies Due to Bacteremia by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Ana I.; Falsen, Enevold; Simarro, Isabel; Rollan, Eduardo; Collins, Matthew D.; Domínguez, Lucas; Fernandez-Garayzabal, Jose F.

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of bacteremia in puppies caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae. Identification was achieved by phenotypic and molecular genetic methods. This is the first report of the recovery of S. dysgalactiae subsp. dysgalactiae from dogs. PMID:16455943

  5. Bacteremia Due to Arthrobacter creatinolyticus in an Elderly Diabetic Man with Acute Cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kei; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Nagamatsu, Maki; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Mawatari, Momoko; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Tamura, Saeko; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Ohmagari, Norio

    2017-03-24

    An 87-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetic mellitus presented with fever, bedsores, and elevated hepatobiliary enzyme levels. He was diagnosed with bacteremia with acute cholangitis due to Arthrobacter species, which are Gram-positive, aerobic, catalase-positive, coryneform bacteria belonging to the family Microbacteriaceae. Doripenem and subsequencial sulbactam/ampicillin treatment were used for the acute cholangitis, and the bacteremia was treated with a 2-week course of vancomycin. The bacteremia was misidentified by the phenotyping assay (API Coryne test), but was identified as Arthrobacter creatinolyticus by 16S rRNA and matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a human case of A. creatinolyticus bacteremia.

  6. [Analysis of 117 episodes of enterococcal bacteremia: Study of epidemiology, microbiology and antimicrobial susceptibility].

    PubMed

    Manassero, Norma Carolina; Navarro, Mercedes; Rocchi, Marta; di Bella, Horacio; Gasparotto, Ana M; Ocaña Carrizo, A Valeria; Novillo, Federico; Furiasse, Daniela; Monterisi, Aída

    Enterococcal bacteremia has acquired considerable importance in recent years, mainly due to an increased number of cases that occur during hospital admission. We describe the episodes of enterococcal bacteremia in adult patients recorded at our hospital. Between January 2000 and December 2013, 117 episodes were analyzed. Sixty one percent (61%) of the patients were male and 39% female. The mean age was 68. Predisposing factors were present in 91% of patients. The primary source of infection was intraabdominal. Enterococcus faecalis was responsible for 65% of the cases; E. faecium for 28%; and other species for 7%. Thirty four percent (34%) of cases were polymicrobial bacteremia. All E. faecalis isolates were susceptible to ampicillin and vancomycin. Eighty eight percent (88%) of E. faecium were resistant to ampicillin and 54% to vancomycin and teicoplanin. In our hospital, Enterococcus is the sixth pathogen causing nosocomial bacteremia, with high incidence of ampicillin and vancomycin-resistant E. faecium.

  7. Nosocomial bacteremia and catheter infection by Bacillus cereus in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Hernaiz, C; Picardo, A; Alos, J I; Gomez-Garces, J L

    2003-09-01

    We present a case of Bacillus cereus bacteremia and catheter infection in an immunocompetent patient subjected to abdominal surgery, who recovered following central catheter removal and treatment with piperacillin/tazobactam.

  8. Bacteremia due to Bacteroides fragilis after elective appendectomy in renal transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Fisher, M C; Baluarte, H J; Long, S S

    1981-05-01

    Bacteremia caused by Bacteroides fragilis occurred in four of 75 children after renal transplantation, and B. fragilis was the most common cause of postoperative bacteremia. Bacteroides bacteremia was significantly associated with performance of elective appendectomy at the time of transplantation (P less than 0.01) and with profound lymphocytopenia (P = 0.01). No patient received antibiotics at the time of surgery or prior to the first positive blood culture, yet B. fragilis was the single organism isolated from blood and abscesses in these patients. A role for lymphocytes in containment of B. fragilis has not been suggested previously, although unexplained occurrence of bacteroides bacteremia in immunocompromised patients has occasionally been reported. Lymphocytes themselves may be important in this host-bacterium interaction, or lymphocytopenia may be the marker for a more generalized deficiency in host defenses.

  9. Etiology of Bacteremia in Young Infants in Six Countries

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, Gary L.; Carlin, John B.; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Yeboah-Antwi, Kojo; Saha, Samir K.; Ray, Pallab; Narang, Anil; Mazzi, Eduardo; Kumar, Praveen; Kapil, Arti; Jeena, Prakash M.; Deorari, Ashok; Chowdury, A.K. Azad; Bartos, Andrés; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A.; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Adhikari, Miriam; Addo-Yobo, Emmanuel; Weber, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neonatal illness is a leading cause of death worldwide; sepsis is one of the main contributors. The etiologies of community-acquired neonatal bacteremia in developing countries have not been well characterized. Methods: Infants <2 months of age brought with illness to selected health facilities in Bangladesh, Bolivia, Ghana, India, Pakistan and South Africa were evaluated, and blood cultures taken if they were considered ill enough to be admitted to hospital. Organisms were isolated using standard culture techniques. Results: Eight thousand eight hundred and eighty-nine infants were recruited, including 3177 0–6 days of age and 5712 7–59 days of age; 10.7% (947/8889) had a blood culture performed. Of those requiring hospital management, 782 (54%) had blood cultures performed. Probable or definite pathogens were identified in 10.6% including 10.4% of newborns 0–6 days of age (44/424) and 10.9% of infants 7–59 days of age (39/358). Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated species (36/83, 43.4%) followed by various species of Gram-negative bacilli (39/83, 46.9%; Acinetobacter spp., Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. were the most common organisms). Resistance to second and third generation cephalosporins was present in more than half of isolates and 44% of the Gram-negative isolates were gentamicin-resistant. Mortality rates were similar in hospitalized infants with positive (5/71, 7.0%) and negative blood cultures (42/557, 7.5%). Conclusions: This large study of young infants aged 0–59 days demonstrated a broad array of Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens responsible for community-acquired bacteremia and substantial levels of antimicrobial resistance. The role of S. aureus as a pathogen is unclear and merits further investigation. PMID:25389919

  10. Shigella sonnei Bacteremia Presenting with Profound Hepatic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Rettew, Andrew; Shaikh, Bilal; Abdulkareem, Abdullateef

    2017-01-01

    Worldwide, Shigellosis is a significant public health issue, associated with nearly one million deaths annually. About half a million cases of Shigella infection are reported annually in the United States. Shigella bacteremia is uncommon and generally seen in children and immunocompromised adults. We present a case of a Shigella sonnei bacteremia with marked hepatic derangement in a 27-year-old previously healthy homosexual male with history of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, who presented to the emergency room with a 4-day history of loose watery stool, abdominal cramps, nausea and vomiting, and yellow skin of 2-day duration. He reports similar diarrhea illness in two close contacts in preceding days. On examination, he was fully oriented but dehydrated, icteric, and febrile. Laboratory data revealed WBC of 2200/μL, elevated AST and ALT (201 IU/L, 73 IU/L resp.), normal alkaline phosphatase, elevated total and direct bilirubin of 8.2 mg/dL and 4.4 mg/dL, albumin of 3.2 g/dL, INR of 2.9, prothrombin time of 31.7, and platelet of 96,000/μL. Workup for infectious, autoimmune and medication-induced hepatitis, Wilson's disease, and hemochromatosis was negative. Abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography of the abdomen showed hepatic steatosis and right-sided colitis. Stool and blood cultures were positive for Shigella sonnei. He was treated with ciprofloxacin with improvement in liver function. Follow-up blood test 4 months later was within normal limits. PMID:28326205

  11. Molecular epidemiological characteristics of Klebsiella pneumoniae associated with bacteremia among patients with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Ito, Ryota; Shindo, Yuichiro; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Ando, Masahiko; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Kimura, Kouji; Yagi, Tetsuya; Hasegawa, Yoshinori; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2015-03-01

    Some important virulence factors have been elucidated in Klebsiella pneumoniae infections. We investigated the relationship between virulence factors and multilocus sequence types (STs) and assessed the risk factors for bacteremia in patients with pneumonia due to K. pneumoniae. From April 2004 through April 2012, a total of 120 K. pneumoniae isolates from patients with pneumonia (23 with bacteremia and 97 without bacteremia) were collected from 10 medical institutions in Japan. Additionally, 10 strains of K. pneumoniae serotype K2 that were isolated >30 years ago were included in this study. These isolates were characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and the characteristics of their virulence factors, such as hypermucoviscosity phenotype and RmpA and aerobactin production between patients with and without bacteremia, were examined. MLST analysis was performed on the 120 isolates from patients with pneumonia, and some sequence type groups were defined as genetic lineages (GLs). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia (21.7%) than in those without bacteremia (7.2%). The majority of the strains with serotype K2 were classified into GL14 or GL65, and rmpA and the gene for aerobactin were present in all GL65-K2 strains but absent in all GL14-K2 strains. In a multivariate analysis, the independent risk factors for bacteremia included GL65 (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 9.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.81 to 49.31), as well as neoplastic disease (AOR, 9.94; 95% CI, 2.61 to 37.92), immunosuppression (AOR, 17.85; 95% CI, 1.49 to 214.17), and hypoalbuminemia (AOR, 4.76; 95% CI, 1.29 to 17.61). GL65 was more prevalent among patients with bacteremia and was associated with the virulence factors of K. pneumoniae.

  12. Risk factor analysis for long-term tunneled dialysis catheter-related bacteremias.

    PubMed

    Jean, G; Charra, B; Chazot, C; Vanel, T; Terrat, J C; Hurot, J M; Laurent, G

    2002-07-01

    Infection, mainly related to vascular access, is one of the main causes of morbidity and a preventable cause of death in hemodialysis patients. From January 1994 to April 1998 we conducted a prospective study to assess the incidence and risk factors of catheter-related bacteremia. One hundred and twenty-nine tunneled dual-lumen hemodialysis catheters were inserted percutaneously into the internal jugular vein in 89 patients. Bacteremia (n = 56) occurred at least once with 37 (29%) of the catheters (an incidence of 1.1/1,000 catheter-days); local infection (n = 45, 1/1,000 catheter-days) was associated with bacteremia in 18 cases. Death in 1 case was directly related to Staphylococcus aureus (SA) septic shock, and septicemia contributed to deaths in 2 additional cases. Catheters were removed in 48% of the bacteremic episodes. Treatment comprised intravenous double antimicrobial therapy for 15-20 days. Bacteriological data of bacteremia showed 55% involvement of SA. Nasal carriage of SA was observed in 35% of the patients with catheters. Bacteremic catheters were more frequently observed in patients with diabetes mellitus (p = 0.03), peripheral atherosclerosis (p = 0.001), a previous history of bacteremia (p = 0.05), nasal carriage of SA (p = 0.0001), longer catheter survival time (p = 0.001), higher total intravenous iron dose (p = 0.001), more frequent urokinase catheter infusion (p < 0.01), and local infection (p < 0.001) compared with non-bacteremic catheters. Monovariate survival analysis showed that significant initial risk factors for bacteremia were nasal carriage of SA (p = 0.00001), previous bacteremia (p = 0.0001), peripheral atherosclerosis (p = 0.005), and diabetes (p = 0.04). This study confirms the relatively high incidence of bacteremia with tunneled double-lumen silicone catheters and its potential complications. Possible preventive actions are discussed according to the risk factors.

  13. Two cases with bacteremia suspected to be due to relatively rare Pseudomonas (Flavimonas) oryzihabitans.

    PubMed

    Nei, Takahito; Sonobe, Kazunari; Onodera, Asaka; Itabashi, Toshikazu; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Maeda, Miho; Saito, Ryoichi

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas oryzihabitans (formerly Flavimonas oryzihabitans) is a glucose non-fermentative, Gram-negative bacillus which is rarely isolated from human specimens. When isolated, it is on very rare occasion as a causative pathogen of catheter-related bloodstream infection in an immunocompromised patient. Herein, we describe two hematological malignancy patients suspected to have P. oryzihabitans bacteremia. We also review cases with bacteremia due to this pathogen and its microbiological characteristics.

  14. Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire localized by gallium scan

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbaum, G.S.; Calubiran, O.; Cunha, B.A. )

    1990-05-01

    A young woman with a history of sick sinus syndrome and placement of a permanent pacemaker 6 months before admission had fever and Haemophilus parainfluenzae bacteremia. A gallium scan localized the infection to the site of the pacemaker wire. Echocardiograms were negative for any vegetations. The patient responded to cefotaxime and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy. We believe that this is the first case of H. parainfluenzae bacteremia associated with a pacemaker wire and localized by gallium scan.

  15. [Bacteremia caused by Capnocytophaga sp: presentation of 2 cases, one with endocarditis. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Roig, P P; López, M M; Martín, C; Zorraquino, A; Sánchez, B; Navarro, V; Merino, J

    1996-04-01

    Capnocytophaga sp. is a gram-negative bacilli, scarcely documented as the cause of bacteremias. Two cases of bacteremia caused by Capnocytophaga sp, one of them with endocarditis, are reported here. A review of previous published cases is also presented. One of the patients was immunocompromised, because of chemotherapy, the other, suffered from a rheumatic-cardiopathy which was complicated with endocarditis. Both patients developed an alteration of the oral mucosa. Antibiotic therapy proved to be effective with two patients.

  16. Bacteremia following scaling and root planing: A clinico-microbiological study

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Alka S.; Vhanmane, Priyanka B.; Savitha, B.; Chawla, Ruhee L.; Bagde, Hiroj S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bacteremia frequently occurs after treatment procedures such as extractions, scaling, root planing, periodontal surgery. There is currently significant interest in the possibility that bacteremia with oral bacteria may play role in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. There are well-conducted studies that have determined the frequency of passage of periodontal microorganisms to the bloodstream after periodontal treatment. There is scarce information related to the incidence of periodontopathic microorganisms during bacteremia induced by this procedure. Aim: The aim of this study was to establish the frequency of passage of periodontopathic microorganisms in peripheric blood after scaling and root planing in patients with periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Forty subjects with chronic periodontitis were included in the study. Blood samples were drawn from each patient at following intervals pre-treatment i.e., before SRP (P1), immediately after SRP (P2), and 30 minutes after SRP (P3). Following SRP, blood samples were analyzed for following microorganisms: Porphyromonasgingivalis, Tannerella. forysthus, Eikenellanella. corrodens, Campylobacter species, Micromonas. micros, and Prevotella. intermedia. Statistical Analysis Used: Chi-square test. Results: Bacteremia was found in 70% (28/40) immediately after SRP and after 30 min, it was reduced to 25% (10/40) and 7.5% (3/40) presented bacteremia before SRP. Conclusions: It was concluded that bacteremia frequently occurs immediately after SRP with P. gingivalis showing the highest frequency in blood. PMID:24554880

  17. Bacteremia in a general hospital. A prospective study of 102 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Jepsen, O B; Korner, B

    1975-01-01

    A prospective clinical-bacteriological study of 102 consecutive cases of confirmed bacteremia at a Copenhagen City general hospital was carried out during 5 months of 1973 with special concern given to focus of infection and acquisition of microorganisms. Valid positive cultures were obtained from 7.2 patients per 1000 admissions. 50 of the 102 bacteremias were by all probability acquired in the hospital, mainly due to transurethral manipulations or intravenous lines. Pneumonia and hepatobiliary infections accounted for most of the non-hospital acquired bacteremias. 26/102 patients died in relation to the bacteremia. Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus caused more than half of the infections. Bacteremia caused by proteus, klebsiella, enterobacter species of staphylococci was in most cases nosocomial and carried the highest mortality, i.e. 40%, verus 15% when other organisms were responsible. It is concluded that nosocomial bacteremia is a frequent and life-endangering complication which is often preceded by certain diagnostic or therapeutic procedures, not invariably linked to severe underlying diseases. Consequently, attempts to reduce bacteremic episodes should include surveillance of ecological factors and certain hospital procedures.

  18. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Sanne; de Vogel, Corné P.; van Belkum, Alex; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P) or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect. PMID:26060995

  19. Evaluation of bacteremias in a Turkish university hospital: 3-year outcomes.

    PubMed

    Demirdal, Tuna; Demirturk, Nese; Cetinkaya, Zafer; Tufan, Gulnihal

    2007-01-01

    In this retrospective study, the investigators examined blood cultures from patients that had been diagnosed with bacteremias over a 3-y period. The study was conduced at Kocatepe University Hospital (Middle Anatolia, Turkey). Blood samples that arrived at the university's microbiology laboratory between 2002 and 2005 were evaluated retrospectively. These samples were classified as contamination, false positivity, community-acquired bacteremia (CAB), or hospital-acquired bacteremia (HAB). Patient age and sex, foci of bacteremia, present comorbidities, predisposing factors, pathogens, and mortality rates were evaluated. A total of 1783 blood cultures that had been drawn from 1441 patients during this 3-y period were examined retrospectively. Of 354 positive isolates, 61 (17.2%) were CABs and 293 (82.8%) were HABs. In HABs, the most commonly isolated microorganisms were Staphylococcus aureus (37.5%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (29.7%), and Escherichia coli (10.2%); in CABs, the most commonly isolated microorganisms were S aureus (29.5%), Brucella spp (26.2%), and E coli (24.6%). Crude mortality rates were determined to be 15.2% for HABs and 12.7% for CABs. This study yielded data on the most common foci of bacteremia, microbiologic factors, and the epidemiology associated with HABs and CABs. It is hoped that these data will enhance empirical antibiotic therapeutic approaches, thereby preventing delays in treatment and decreasing mortality rates associated with bacteremias.

  20. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Sanne; de Vogel, Corné P; van Belkum, Alex; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P) or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect.

  1. Helicobacter cinaedi bacteremia in four renal transplant patients: clinical features and an important suggestion regarding the route of infection.

    PubMed

    Imafuku, A; Araoka, H; Tanaka, K; Marui, Y; Sawa, N; Ubara, Y; Takaichi, K; Ishii, Y; Tomikawa, S

    2016-02-01

    Helicobacter cinaedi can cause bacteremia mainly in immunocompromised patients. We present the clinical characteristics of H. cinaedi bacteremia in 4 renal transplant patients. Interestingly, all cases showed triggers of bacterial translocation: 2 cases developed after colonic perforation caused by diverticulitis, 1 case developed post cholecystectomy, and the remaining patient had chronic diarrhea. Accordingly, bacterial translocation caused by severe gastrointestinal complication could be a cause of H. cinaedi bacteremia.

  2. Comparative Study of Plasma Endotoxin with Procalcitonin Levels in Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Cui, Yun-Liang; Lin, Zhao-Fen; Chen, De-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both procalcitonin (PCT) and plasma endotoxin levels cannot be solely used for a definite diagnosis of bacteremia or sepsis, and there has been few study comparing the values of the two biomarkers for the diagnosis of bacteremia. The aim of this study was to identify bacteria causing bacteremia and evaluate the role of the two biomarkers in the diagnosis of bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Methods: The medical records of 420 patients in ICU were retrospectively reviewed. Patients (n = 241) who met the inclusion criteria were subjected to blood culture (BC) for the analysis of the endotoxin or PCT levels. The exclusion criteria included the presence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus and/or AIDS, neutropenia without sepsis, pregnancy, treatment with immunosuppressive therapies, or blood diseases such as hematological tumors. Patients’ BC episodes were divided into BC negative, Gram-negative (GN) bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi groups. The PCT and plasma endotoxin levels were compared in the different groups. Results: A total of 241 patients with 505 episodes of BC were analyzed. The GN bacteria group showed higher levels of PCT and endotoxin than the BC negative, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi groups. GN bacteremia was more prevalent than Gram-positive bacteremia. The GN bacteremia caused by non-Enterobacteriaceae infection presented higher endotoxin level than that by Enterobacteriaceae, but no significant difference in PCT levels was observed between the two groups. The plasma endotoxin significantly differed among different groups and was bacterial species dependent. Conclusions: Plasma endotoxin was more related to GN than to Gram-positive bacteremia, and that endotoxin level was species dependent, but PCT level remained relatively more stable within the GN bacteria caused bacteremia. Both GN and positive bacteria caused bacteremia in the ICU patients in different regions of China. And PCT is a more valuable

  3. Clinical and Microbiological Characteristics of Eggerthella lenta Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Tai, A. Y.; Kotsanas, D.; Francis, M. J.; Roberts, S. A.; Ballard, S. A.; Junckerstorff, R. K.; Korman, T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Eggerthella lenta is an emerging pathogen that has been underrecognized due to historical difficulties with phenotypic identification. Until now, its pathogenicity, antimicrobial susceptibility profile, and optimal treatment have been poorly characterized. In this article, we report the largest cohort of patients with E. lenta bacteremia to date and describe in detail their clinical features, microbiologic characteristics, treatment, and outcomes. We identified 33 patients; the median age was 68 years, and there was no gender predominance. Twenty-seven patients (82%) had serious intra-abdominal pathology, often requiring a medical procedure. Of those who received antibiotics (28/33, 85%), the median duration of treatment was 21.5 days. Mortality from all causes was 6% at 7 days, 12% at 30 days, and 33% at 1 year. Of 26 isolates available for further testing, all were identified as E. lenta by both commercially available matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems, and none were found to harbor a vanA or vanB gene. Of 23 isolates which underwent susceptibility testing, all were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefoxitin, metronidazole, piperacillin-tazobactam, ertapenem, and meropenem, 91% were susceptible to clindamycin, 74% were susceptible to moxifloxacin, and 39% were susceptible to penicillin. PMID:25520446

  4. Are there standardized cutoff values for neutrophil-lymphocyte ratios in bacteremia or sepsis?

    PubMed

    Gürol, Gölnül; Çiftci, İhsan Hakki; Terizi, Huseyin Agah; Atasoy, Ali Rıza; Ozbek, Ahmet; Köroğlu, Mehmet

    2015-04-01

    Bacteremia and sepsis are common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with incorrect or delayed diagnoses being associated with increased mortality. New tests or markers that allow a more rapid and less costly detection of bacteremia and sepsis have been investigated. The aim of this study was to clarify the cutoff value of the neutrophillymphocyte ratio (NLR) according to procalcitonin (PCT) level in the decision-making processes for bacteremia and sepsis. In addition, other white blood cell subgroup parameters, which are assessed in all hospitals, for bacteremia and sepsis were explored. This retrospective study included 1,468 patients with suspected bacteremia and sepsis. Patients were grouped according to the following PCT criteria: levels <0.05 ng/ml (healthy group), 0.05-0.5 ng/ml (local infection group), 0.5-2 ng/ml (systemic infection group), 2-10 ng/ml (sepsis group), and >10 ng/ml (sepsis shock group). One important finding of this study, which will serve as a baseline to measure future progress, is the presence of many gaps in the information on pathogens that constitute a major health risk. In addition, clinical decisions are generally not coordinated, compromising the ability to assess and monitor a situation. This report represents the first study to determine the limits of the use of NLR in the diagnosis of infection or sepsis using a cutoff value of <5 when sufficient exclusion criteria are used.

  5. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin P Predicts Bacteremia in Hospitalized Patients Colonized With Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Calderwood, Michael S.; Desjardins, Christopher A.; Sakoulas, George; Nicol, Robert; DuBois, Andrea; Delaney, Mary L.; Kleinman, Ken; Cosimi, Lisa A.; Feldgarden, Michael; Onderdonk, Andrew B.; Birren, Bruce W.; Platt, Richard; Huang, Susan S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization predicts later infection, with both host and pathogen determinants of invasive disease. Methods. This nested case-control study evaluates predictors of MRSA bacteremia in an 8–intensive care unit (ICU) prospective adult cohort from 1 September 2003 through 30 April 2005 with active MRSA surveillance and collection of ICU, post-ICU, and readmission MRSA isolates. We selected MRSA carriers who did (cases) and those who did not (controls) develop MRSA bacteremia. Generating assembled genome sequences, we evaluated 30 MRSA genes potentially associated with virulence and invasion. Using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression, we assessed the association of these genes with MRSA bacteremia, controlling for host risk factors. Results. We collected 1578 MRSA isolates from 520 patients. We analyzed host and pathogen factors for 33 cases and 121 controls. Predictors of MRSA bacteremia included a diagnosis of cancer, presence of a central venous catheter, hyperglycemia (glucose level, >200 mg/dL), and infection with a MRSA strain carrying the gene for staphylococcal enterotoxin P (sep). Receipt of an anti-MRSA medication had a significant protective effect. Conclusions. In an analysis controlling for host factors, colonization with MRSA carrying sep increased the risk of MRSA bacteremia. Identification of risk-adjusted genetic determinants of virulence may help to improve prediction of invasive disease and suggest new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24041793

  6. Appropriate empirical antibiotic use and 30-d mortality in cirrhotic patients with bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun; Jang, Ki Jun; Jang, Won; Park, Sang Hoon; Park, Ji Young; Jeon, Tae Joo; Oh, Tae Hoon; Shin, Won Chang; Choi, Won-Choong; Sinn, Dong Hyun

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To analyze whether prompt and appropriate empirical antibiotic (AEA) use is associated with mortality in cirrhotic patients with bacteremia. METHODS: A total of 102 episodes of bacteremia in 72 patients with cirrhosis were analyzed. AEA was defined as a using or starting an antibiotic appropriate to the isolated pathogen at the time of bacteremia. The primary endpoint was 30-d mortality. RESULTS: The mortality rate at 30 d was 30.4% (31/102 episodes). Use of AEA was associated with better survival at 30 d (76.5% vs 46.9%, P = 0.05), and inappropriate empirical antibiotic (IEA) use was an independent factor associated with increased mortality (OR = 3.24; 95%CI: 1.50-7.00; P = 0.003, adjusted for age, sex, Child-Pugh Class, gastrointestinal bleeding, presence of septic shock). IEA use was more frequent when the isolated pathogen was a multiresistant pathogen, and when infection was healthcare-related or hospital-acquired. CONCLUSION: AEA use was associated with increased survival of cirrhotic patients who developed bacteremia. Strategies for AEA use, tailored according to the local epidemiological patterns, are needed to improve survival of cirrhotic patients with bacteremia. PMID:25834324

  7. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of bacteremia caused by Eggerthella, Paraeggerthella, and Eubacterium species at a university hospital in Taiwan from 2001 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Huang, Yu-Tsung; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Wang, Wei-Jie; Lee, Shih-Wei; Lee, Li-Na; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-06-01

    We describe 16 patients with bacteremia caused by Eggerthella lenta (n = 7), Paraeggerthella hongkongensis (n = 3), Eubacterium limosum (n = 4), Eubacterium callanderi (n = 1), and concomitant Eubacterium limosum/Eggerthella lenta (n = 1). Nine (56%) patients had polymicrobial bacteremia. The overall 60-day mortality rate was 19%, and all deaths occurred in patients with E. lenta bacteremia.

  8. Comparative Prevalence of Virulence Factors in Escherichia coli Causing Urinary Tract Infection in Male Infants with and without Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Houdouin, Véronique; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Mahjoub-Messai, Farah; Bingen, Edouard

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolates causing urinary tract infection in 83 male infants younger than 90 days with and without bacteremia were compared for phylogenetic groups and the presence of 10 virulence factors. Our result suggest that the absence of both hemolysin and antigen K1 may be used as a negative predictive factor for bacteremia. PMID:16517919

  9. Comparison of the clinical and microbiologic characteristics of patients with Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter aerogenes bacteremia: a prospective observation study.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun Hee; Park, Ki-Ho; Jang, Eun-Young; Lee, Eun Jung; Chong, Yong Pil; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kim, Sung-Han; Lee, Sang-Oh; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Mi-Na; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Choi, Sang-Ho

    2010-04-01

    We compared the characteristics and outcomes of 172 Enterobacter cloacae bacteremia and 67 Enterobacter aerogenes bacteremia (EAB) cases. Antimicrobial resistance rates to E. cloacae were higher than those to E. aerogenes. However, EAB more frequently presented as septic shock and was associated with poorer outcomes.

  10. Dynamic Computational Model of Symptomatic Bacteremia to Inform Bacterial Separation Treatment Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Sinead E.; Bell, Charleson S.; Cover, Timothy L.; Giorgio, Todd D.

    2016-01-01

    The rise of multi-drug resistance has decreased the effectiveness of antibiotics, which has led to increased mortality rates associated with symptomatic bacteremia, or bacterial sepsis. To combat decreasing antibiotic effectiveness, extracorporeal bacterial separation approaches have been proposed to capture and separate bacteria from blood. However, bacteremia is dynamic and involves host-pathogen interactions across various anatomical sites. We developed a mathematical model that quantitatively describes the kinetics of pathogenesis and progression of symptomatic bacteremia under various conditions, including bacterial separation therapy, to better understand disease mechanisms and quantitatively assess the biological impact of bacterial separation therapy. Model validity was tested against experimental data from published studies. This is the first multi-compartment model of symptomatic bacteremia in mammals that includes extracorporeal bacterial separation and antibiotic treatment, separately and in combination. The addition of an extracorporeal bacterial separation circuit reduced the predicted time of total bacteria clearance from the blood of an immunocompromised rodent by 49%, compared to antibiotic treatment alone. Implementation of bacterial separation therapy resulted in predicted multi-drug resistant bacterial clearance from the blood of a human in 97% less time than antibiotic treatment alone. The model also proposes a quantitative correlation between time-dependent bacterial load among tissues and bacteremia severity, analogous to the well-known ‘area under the curve’ for characterization of drug efficacy. The engineering-based mathematical model developed may be useful for informing the design of extracorporeal bacterial separation devices. This work enables the quantitative identification of the characteristics required of an extracorporeal bacteria separation device to provide biological benefit. These devices will potentially decrease the

  11. Importance of Molecular Methods to Determine Whether a Probiotic is the Source of Lactobacillus Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Aroutcheva, Alla; Auclair, Julie; Frappier, Martin; Millette, Mathieu; Lolans, Karen; de Montigny, Danielle; Carrière, Serge; Sokalski, Stephen; Trick, William E; Weinstein, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    There has been an increasing interest in the use of probiotic products for the prevention of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Bio-K+(®) is a commercial probiotic product comprising three strains of lactobacilli--Lactobacillus acidophilus CL1285(®), Lact. casei LBC80R(®) and Lact. rhamnosus CLR2(®)--that have been applied to prevent CDI. Generally considered as safe, lactobacilli have potential to cause bacteremia, endocarditis and other infections. The source of Lactobacillus bacteremia can be normal human flora or lactobacilli-containing probiotic. The aim of this study was to assess whether probiotic lactobacilli caused bacteremia and to show the value of molecular identification and typing techniques to determine probiotic and patient strain relatedness. We report an episode of Lactobacillus bacteremia in a 69-year-old man admitted to a hospital with severe congestive heart failure. During his hospitalization, he required long-term antibiotic therapy. Additionally, the patient received Bio-K+(®) probiotic as part of a quality improvement project to prevent CDI. Subsequently, Lactobacillus bacteremia occurred. Two independent blinded laboratory evaluations, using pulse field gel electrophoresis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and DNA fingerprint analysis (rep-PCR), were performed to determine whether the recovered Lact. acidophilus originated from the probiotic product. Ultimately, the patient strain was identified as Lact. casei and both laboratories found no genetic relation between the patient's strain and any of the probiotic lactobacilli. This clinical case of lactobacillus bacteremia in the setting of probiotic exposure demonstrates the value of using discriminatory molecular methods to clearly determine whether there were a link between the patient's isolate and the probiotic strains.

  12. Bacteremia in nursing home patients. Prevalence among patients presenting to an emergency department.

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, D.; Svendsen, A.; Marrie, T.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure the prevalence of bacteremia and any correlation between signs and symptoms, risk factors, and laboratory data in elderly patients. DESIGN: Prospective analysis. All patients were contacted by the study nurse at 48 hours and 7 days after study entry. SETTING: Adult tertiary care hospital with an emergency department managing 48,000 visits yearly in a metropolitan area of 250,000. PARTICIPANTS: Members of the study population referred to the emergency department for medical or surgical problems. Of 113 nursing home patients, blood culture results were available for 111. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Blood cultures were obtained by standard protocol. Demographic and medical information was collected from the medical record. Three groups of patients were compared with respect to symptoms, risk factors, laboratory data, and outcome. RESULTS: Group 1 (n = 86) had two sets of negative blood cultures. Group 2 (n = 10) had true-positive cultures. Group 3 (n = 15) had false-positive cultures of Staphylococcus epidermidis. The prevalence of bacteremia was 9.8% in the study population. No risk factors were predictive of bacteremia. Great variation in signs and symptoms were noted in all three groups, none correlating with bacteremia. Although seven of the 10 patients with positive cultures were febrile, this association did not reach statistical significance. All groups had high admission (> 50%) and mortality (20% to 37%) rates. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of bacteremia in the nursing home population presenting to the emergency department was 9.8%. The symptoms and signs of bacteremia in this population were variable and nonspecific. The high rate of false-positive cultures in this setting is of concern. PMID:9512835

  13. Red blood cell distribution width is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with gram-negative bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Ku, Nam Su; Kim, Hye-Won; Oh, Hyung Jung; Kim, Yong Chan; Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Oh, Dong Hyun; Ahn, Jin Young; Kim, Sun Bean; Jeong, Su Jin; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Chang Oh; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung; Choi, Jun Yong

    2012-08-01

    Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is known to be a predictor of severe morbidity and mortality in some chronic diseases such as congestive heart failure. However, to our knowledge, little is known about RDW as a predictor of mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia, a major nosocomial cause of intra-abdominal infections, urinary tract infections, and primary bacteremia. Therefore, we investigated whether RDW is an independent predictor of mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Clinical characteristics, laboratory parameters, and outcomes of 161 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia from November 2010 to March 2011 diagnosed at Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, were retrospectively analyzed. The main outcome measure was 28-day all-cause mortality. The 28-day mortality rate was significantly higher in the increased RDW group compared with the normal RDW group (P < 0.001). According to multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis, RDW levels at the onset of bacteremia (per 1% increase, P = 0.036), the Charlson index (per 1-point increase, P < 0.001), and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (per 1-point increase, P = 0.001) were independent risk factors for 28-day mortality. Moreover, the nonsurvivor group had significantly higher RDW levels 72 h after the onset of bacteremia than did the survivor group (P = 0.001). In addition, the area under the curve of RDW at the onset of bacteremia, the 72-h RDW, and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score for 28-day mortality were 0.764 (P = 0.001), 0.802 (P < 0.001), and 0.703 (P = 0.008), respectively. Red blood cell distribution width at the onset of bacteremia was an independent predictor of mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Also, 72-h RDW could be a predictor for all-cause mortality in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

  14. Megalocytic interstitial nephritis following acute pyelonephritis with Escherichia coli bacteremia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hee Jin; Yoo, Kwai Han; Kim, In Young; Lee, Seulkee; Jang, Hye Ryoun; Kwon, Ghee Young

    2015-01-01

    Megalocytic interstitial nephritis is a rare form of kidney disease caused by chronic inflammation. We report a case of megalocytic interstitial nephritis occurring in a 45-yrold woman who presented with oliguric acute kidney injury and acute pyelonephritis accompanied by Escherichia coli bacteremia. Her renal function was not recovered despite adequate duration of susceptible antibiotic treatment, accompanied by negative conversion of bacteremia and bacteriuria. Kidney biopsy revealed an infiltration of numerous histiocytes without Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. The patient's renal function was markedly improved after short-term treatment with high-dose steroid.

  15. Acute Pyelonephritis with Bacteremia Caused by Enterococcus hirae: A Rare Infection in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pãosinho, Ana; Azevedo, Telma; Alves, João V.; Costa, Isabel A.; Carvalho, Gustavo; Peres, Susana R.; Baptista, Teresa; Borges, Fernando; Mansinho, Kamal

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci are one of the usual residents of the microflora in humans. In the last decade this genus has been reported as the third most common cause of bacteremia. We present the case of a 78-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room because of nausea, lipothymia, and weakness. She was diagnosed with a pyelonephritis with bacteremia, with the isolation in blood and urine cultures of Escherichia coli and Enterococcus hirae. This last microorganism is a rarely isolated pathogen in humans. Currently it is estimated to represent 1–3% of all enterococcal species isolated in clinical practice. PMID:27127665

  16. Myocardial abscess and bacteremia complicating Mycobacterium fortuitum pacemaker infection: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Al Soub, Hussam; Al Maslamani, Mona; Al Khuwaiter, Jameela; El Deeb, Yasser; Abu Khattab, Mohammed

    2009-11-01

    A case of pacemaker infection complicated by bacteremia and myocardial abscess caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum is reported and 9 other cases of pacemaker infection associated with rapidly growing mycobacteria are reviewed. Most cases developed within 6 months from implantation suggesting nosocomial acquisition. Wound discharge, fever, and pain at generator site were the most common presenting features. At presentation they had a median duration of symptoms of 34 days. Concomitant bacteremia was present in half of the cases. Antibiotics therapy and removal of the pacemaker system were needed to achieve cure in the majority of cases. Clarithromycin and fluoroquinolones were the most commonly used antibiotics.

  17. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia

    PubMed Central

    Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia. PMID:27195164

  18. Successful Treatment of Bacillus cereus Bacteremia in a Patient with Propionic Acidemia.

    PubMed

    Aygun, Fatma Deniz; Aygun, Fatih; Cam, Halit

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious, life-threatening, systemic infections in immunocompromised patients. The ability of microorganism to form biofilm on biomedical devices can be responsible for catheter-related bloodstream infections. Other manifestations of severe disease are meningitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and surgical and traumatic wound infections. The most common feature in true bacteremia caused by Bacillus is the presence of an intravascular catheter. Herein, we report a case of catheter-related bacteremia caused by B. cereus in a patient with propionic acidemia.

  19. Leukemia and risk of recurrent Escherichia coli bacteremia: genotyping implicates E. coli translocation from the colon to the bloodstream.

    PubMed

    Samet, A; Sledzińska, A; Krawczyk, B; Hellmann, A; Nowicki, S; Kur, J; Nowicki, B

    2013-11-01

    In patients with leukemia, the portal(s) and reasons for the persistence of an Escherichia coli recurrent bacteremia remain unclear. Adult Hematology Clinic (AHC) databases at the State Clinical Hospital in Gdańsk were reviewed to evaluate the frequency of E. coli bacteremia between 2002 and 2005. Blood and bowel E. coli strains were obtained and the genetic relatedness of the strains was analyzed. The rate of E. coli bacteremia per 1,000 admissions at the AHC was higher (85.0) than in the other clinics of the hospital (2.9), p < 0.001. A higher mortality was observed in patients with a history of E. coli versus non-E. coli bacteremia [30/95 (31 %) vs. 53/430 (12 %), p < 0.001]; 72.8 % of patients with leukemia had an unknown source of bacteremia. In 2005, 6 out of 25 (24 %) patients with leukemia had ≥2 episodes of E. coli-positive blood cultures. These gastrointestinal E. coli isolates were replaced within 3-8 weeks with a new E. coli H genotype. A recurrent episode of bacteremia was usually caused by an infection with a transient E. coli H genotype identical to that found in the subject's bowel. Consistent with the definition of bowel/blood translocation, the bowel appeared to be a portal for E. coli in these subjects and, hence, a clear source for their recurring bacteremia.

  20. Risk Factors for Nosocomial Bacteremia Secondary to Urinary Catheter-Associated Bacteriuria: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Conway, Laurie J; Carter, Eileen J; Larson, Elaine L

    2015-01-01

    A systematic appraisal of evidence suggests that male patients in hospital may be at higher risk for bacteremia following urinary catheter-associated bacteriuria than females. Other risk factors include immunosuppressant medication, red blood cell transfusion, neutropenia, malignancy, and liver disease.

  1. Four Cases of Bacteremia Caused by Oscillibacter ruminantium, a Newly Described Species

    PubMed Central

    Arpi, Magnus; Klein, Kasper; Justesen, Ulrik S.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Oscillibacter has been known since 2007, but no association to human infection has been reported. Here, we present four cases of Oscillibacter ruminantium bacteremia from hospitals across Denmark from 2001 to 2010. Correct identification is now possible, as the 16S rRNA gene sequence was recently made publicly available. PMID:24501034

  2. Group B Streptococcus Serotype III Sequence Type 283 Bacteremia Associated with Consumption of Raw Fish, Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yijun; Foo, Kelly; Koh, Han Fang; Tow, Charlene; Zhang, Yiwen; Ang, Li Wei; Cui, Lin; Badaruddin, Hishamuddin; Ooi, Peng Lim; Lin, Raymond Tzer Pin; Cutter, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective study of 40 case-patients and 58 controls as part of a nationwide investigation of a group B Streptococcus outbreak in Singapore in 2015. Eating a Chinese-style raw fish dish (yusheng) was a major risk factor for bacteremia, particularly caused by serotype III sequence type 283. PMID:27767904

  3. Minocycline-EDTA Lock Solution Prevents Catheter-Related Bacteremia in Hemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Marcelo Mazza; Chula, Domingos Candiota; Riella, Miguel Carlos

    2011-01-01

    There is growing concern about the development of antibacterial resistance with the use of antibiotics in catheter lock solutions. The use of an antibiotic that is not usually used to treat other serious infections may be an alternative that may reduce the clinical impact should resistance develop. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare a solution of minocycline and EDTA with the conventional unfractionated heparin for the prevention of catheter-related bacteremia in hemodialysis patients during a period of 90 d. The study included 204 incident catheters (27.8% tunneled); 14 catheters were excluded because of early dysfunction and 3 because of protocol violations. We observed catheter-related bacteremia in 19 patients in the heparin group (4.3 per 1000 catheter-days) and in 5 patients in the minocycline-EDTA group (1.1 per 1000 catheter-days; P = 0.005). We did not detect a significant difference in the rate of catheter removal for dysfunction. Catheter-related bacteremia-free survival was significantly higher in the minocycline-EDTA group than in the heparin group (P = 0.005). In conclusion, a minocycline-EDTA catheter lock solution is effective in the prevention of catheter-related bacteremia in hemodialysis patients. PMID:21852579

  4. Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia strains to different skin-derived antimicrobial proteins.

    PubMed

    Köten, Bente; Becker, Karsten; Podschun, Rainer; von Eiff, Christof; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Harder, Jürgen; Gläser, Regine

    2012-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen causing cutaneous infections to life-threatening bacteremia. These infections are often caused by strains derived from the own microflora suggesting that a disturbed epidermal barrier may promote invasion of S. aureus. Antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMP) such as human beta-defensin-3 and RNase 7 contribute to control the colonization of S. aureus on the skin surface. This leads to the hypothesis that strains with a decreased susceptibility toward skin-derived AMP may better overcome the innate cutaneous defence barrier increasing the possibility of invading into the blood stream. To address this hypothesis we determined whether S. aureus strains from bacteremia patients are less susceptible to various skin-derived AMP than strains from healthy carriers. No differences in the AMP-killing activity against bacteremia-derived S. aureus and control strains were detected suggesting that the onset of S. aureus bacteremia is not based on the varying susceptibilities against skin-derived AMP.

  5. Nonspecific Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Bacteremia in a Patient with Subclinical Alcoholic Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Kichloo, Asim Ahmed; Hallac, Alexander; Mousavi, Ben; Hirekhan, Omkar

    2013-01-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, a pleomorphic gram-positive bacillus, is found widely in nature or as a commensal pathogen. It infects domestic animals such as swine, which may be the major reservoir of the organism. E. rhusiopathiae is primarily an occupational illness; 89% of the cases are linked to high-risk epidemiological situations. Humans that are infected by this bacillus typically present with one or a combination of the following symptoms: localized skin lesion (erysipeloid), diffuse cutaneous eruptions with systemic symptoms, or bacteremia, which is often followed by endocarditis. We report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia that was present without severe clinical illness such as endocarditis, arthritis, or skin lesions. The patient was a 64-year-old male with a complicated past medical history including subclinical alcoholic liver disease. Penicillin-G therapy completely resolved the patients bacteremia. The case presented has exceptional clinical merit due to 2 key factors: the patient does not fit the occupational demographic typically affected by this bacterium, and the patient presented with subclinical septicemia, which has a high correlation with fatal endocarditis. This case brings a new prospective to E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia.

  6. Bacteremia Caused by Microbacterium binotii in a Patient with Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Sarah N.; Starlin, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Microbacterium species are non-spore-forming, Gram-positive rods rarely associated with human disease. In this report, we describe the first case of bacteremia caused by Microbacterium binotii in a patient with sickle cell anemia. The utility of using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis along with phenotypic methods for identification is shown. PMID:24197889

  7. Bacteremia after Endoscopic Submucosal Excavation for Treating the Gastric Muscular Layer Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guohua; Zeng, Sheng; Chen, Youxiang; Zhou, Xiaojiang; Lv, Nonghua

    2015-01-01

    Background. The bacteremia is reported as being infrequent and transient in gastric EMR and ESD for treating gastric mucosa lesions or superficial gastric neoplastic lesion. There was no report of it being investigated in ESD for treating gastric muscular layer tumors (endoscopic submucosal excavation, ESE). This study aimed to determine the frequency of bacteremia in gastric ESE. Patients and Methods. A prospective study, in 122 consecutive patients who underwent gastric ESE for treating gastric muscular layer tumors, investigated the frequency of bacteremia before and 15 minutes after the procedure. Results. The median time for the total ESE procedure was 29 min (range from 8 to 62 min). The mean size of the biggest diameter of each resected specimen was 10 ± 2.7 mm (range from 5 mm to 30 mm). Blood cultures obtained before ESE were positive in 0% (0/122) of cases. Blood cultures obtained 15 min after ESE were positive in 2.5% (3/122) of cases. Six blood samples contained Staphylococcus with coagulase negative, which was considered contaminant. No signs of sepsis were seen in all patients. Conclusions. The frequency of bacteremia after gastric ESE was low. ESE for treating gastric lesions is thought to have a low risk of infectious complications; therefore, prophylactic administration of antibiotics may not be warranted. PMID:26060492

  8. Predicting abscesses in adults with community-onset monomicrobial Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia: microorganisms matters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chung-Hsun; Lee, Ching-Chi; Hsieh, Chih-Chia; Hong, Ming-Yuan; Chi, Chih-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Enterobacteriaceae is a leading pathogen of community-onset bacteremia. This study aims to establish a predictive scoring algorithm to identify adults with community-onset Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia who are at risk for abscesses. Of the total 1262 adults, 152 (12.0%) with abscess occurrence were noted. The 6 risk factors significantly associated with abscess occurrence-liver cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, thrombocytopenia and high C-reactive protein (>100 mg/L) at bacteremic onset, delayed defervescence, and bacteremia-causing Klebsiella pneumoniae-were each assigned +1 point to form the scoring algorithm. In contrast, the elderly, fatal comorbidity (McCabe classification), and bacteremia-causing Escherichia coli were each assigned -1 point, owing to their negative associations with abscess occurrence. Using the proposed scoring algorithm, a cut-off value of +1 yielded a high sensitivity (85.5%) and an acceptable specificity (60.4%). Although the proposed predictive model needs further validation, this simple scoring algorithm may be useful for the early identification of abscesses by clinicians.

  9. Catheter-Related Bacteremia Due to Kocuria kristinae in a Patient with Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Basaglia, G.; Carretto, E.; Barbarini, D.; Moras, L.; Scalone, S.; Marone, P.; De Paoli, P.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the first case of a catheter-related recurrent bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae, a gram-positive microorganism belonging to the family Micrococcaceae, in a 51-year-old woman with ovarian cancer. This unusual pathogen may cause opportunistic infections in patients with severe underlying diseases. PMID:11773142

  10. Cluster of Bacillus species bacteremia cases in neonates during a hospital construction project.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Judith R; Hulten, Kristina; Baker, Carol J

    2011-10-01

    We report an outbreak of Bacillus bacteremia among premature infants during a construction project. Our investigation revealed potential environmental sources. After replacement of air filters, cleaning of the unit, emphasis on hand hygiene, and relocation of the loading dock for linen and supply delivery, no further cases were detected.

  11. Bordetella trematum bacteremia in an infant: a cause to look for.

    PubMed

    Saksena, R; Manchanda, V; Mittal, M

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella trematum spp. nov. has been isolated from wounds, ear infections and diabetic ulcers. We report a case of a 7-month-old infant with fever, vomiting and abnormal body movements with bacteremia caused by this novel species. The infant responded to fluoroquinolone and macrolide combination therapy.

  12. Outcomes of Bacteremia in Burn Patients Involved in Combat Operations Overseas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    TX and University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine, Knoxville, TN (Rasnake). Correspondence address: MAJ Clinton K Murray, Infectious...Providencia stuartii, Yersinia kristensenii, and Salmonella spp. Overall, burn patients with bacteremia had higher TBSA and ISS, and were more likely

  13. Bacteremia Caused by a Novel Isolate Resembling Leptotrichia Species in a Neutropenic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Jean Baldus; Clarridge, Jill; Schuster, Mindy S.; Waddington, Michael; Osborne, Janet; Nachamkin, Irving

    1999-01-01

    We report a case of Leptotrichia species bacteremia in a patient undergoing treatment for acute myelogenous leukemia. Like previously reported Leptotrichia species, this is a gram-variable, pleomorphic rod that is catalase negative and utilizes glucose and sucrose. However, it is more fastidious than previously reported isolates of Leptotrichia and may represent a novel species. PMID:10325382

  14. First case report of bacteremia due to 'Campylobacter-like organism 3'.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Itaru; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Nakagami, Yoshihiro; Tachibana, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    A case of bacteremia caused by a rare Helicobacter species, Campylobacter-like organism 3 (CLO-3), in a 75-year-old man with prostate cancer and an indwelling urethral catheter for urinary retention, is reported. Oral levofloxacin (500mg per day) was effective, although the results of antimicrobial susceptibility testing were unknown. Non-film-like, small, clear colonies were isolated on blood agar after 72h of microaerobic incubation at 37°C. Biochemical testing indicated that the isolates were catalase-positive, negative for nitrate reduction and urease activity, and positive for indoxyl acetate hydrolysis. The isolate was identified as CLO-3 by sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA and hsp60 genes. Although CLO-3 is known to cause enterocolitis, bacteremia due to CLO-3 has not been described. There have been an increasing number of reports of bacteremia caused by Helicobacter cinaedi and Helicobacter fennelliae, which were first reported as CLO-1 and CLO-2, and CLO-3 may represent another emerging cause of Helicobacter-induced bacteremia.

  15. Vibrio furnissii: an Unusual Cause of Bacteremia and Skin Lesions after Ingestion of Seafood▿†

    PubMed Central

    Derber, Catherine; Coudron, Philip; Tarr, Cheryl; Gladney, Lori; Turnsek, Maryann; Shankaran, Shivanjali; Wong, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio furnissii in the blood is rarely reported, which may explain why clinical features of bloodstream infections with this organism have not been described. We describe a patient who developed skin lesions and V. furnissii bacteremia and was successfully treated with fluoroquinolones. V. furnissii may be a serious pathogen in patients with underlying comorbidities who are exposed to seafood. PMID:21450956

  16. [Bacillus cereus bacteremia in Crohn's disease with multiple ileal stricture on maintenance azathioprine therapy].

    PubMed

    Hizawa, Kazuoki; Nagata, Yuko; Taniguchi, Masahiko; Nakamori, Mari; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Iida, Mitsuo

    2009-01-01

    We describe a case of 36-year-old Japanese man with Crohn's disease, complicated by Bacillus cereus bacteremia on maintenance azathioprine therapy. Although anti-microbial agents were ineffective, the patient became well immediately after a partial resection of the ileum with multiple severe stenosis.

  17. Bacillus cereus meningitis and bacteremia associated with an Ommaya reservoir in a patient with lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Garcia, I; Fainstein, V; McLaughlin, P

    1984-07-01

    After placement of an Ommaya reservoir, meningitis and bacteremia due to Bacillus cereus occurred in a patient with stage IV lymphoblastic lymphoma and meningeal involvement. Bacillus species have been implicated as meningeal pathogens after lumbar punctures. These organisms have become an important cause of severe infection, especially in immunologically compromised patients.

  18. Nonspecific Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae Bacteremia in a Patient with Subclinical Alcoholic Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kichloo, Asim Ahmed; Mousavi, Ben; Hirekhan, Omkar

    2013-01-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae, a pleomorphic gram-positive bacillus, is found widely in nature or as a commensal pathogen. It infects domestic animals such as swine, which may be the major reservoir of the organism. E. rhusiopathiae is primarily an occupational illness; 89% of the cases are linked to high-risk epidemiological situations. Humans that are infected by this bacillus typically present with one or a combination of the following symptoms: localized skin lesion (erysipeloid), diffuse cutaneous eruptions with systemic symptoms, or bacteremia, which is often followed by endocarditis. We report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia that was present without severe clinical illness such as endocarditis, arthritis, or skin lesions. The patient was a 64-year-old male with a complicated past medical history including subclinical alcoholic liver disease. Penicillin-G therapy completely resolved the patients bacteremia. The case presented has exceptional clinical merit due to 2 key factors: the patient does not fit the occupational demographic typically affected by this bacterium, and the patient presented with subclinical septicemia, which has a high correlation with fatal endocarditis. This case brings a new prospective to E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia. PMID:23819078

  19. Risk Factors for Nosocomial Bacteremia Secondary to Urinary Catheter-Associated Bacteriuria: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Laurie J.; Carter, Eileen J.; Larson, Elaine L.

    2015-01-01

    A systematic appraisal of evidence suggests that male patients in hospital may be at higher risk for bacteremia following urinary catheter-associated bacteriuria than females. Other risk factors include immunosuppressant medication, red blood cell transfusion, neutropenia, malignancy, and liver disease. PMID:26402994

  20. Meningitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria cinerea following a Percutaneous Rhizotomy of the Trigeminal Ganglion.

    PubMed

    von Kietzell, M; Richter, H; Bruderer, T; Goldenberger, D; Emonet, S; Strahm, C

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea is a human commensal. The first known case of meningitis and bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea following percutaneous glycerol instillation of the trigeminal ganglion is reported. Conventional phenotypic methods and complete 16S RNA gene sequencing accurately identified the pathogen. Difficulties in differentiation from pathogenic neisseriae are discussed.

  1. Meningitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria cinerea following a Percutaneous Rhizotomy of the Trigeminal Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Richter, H.; Bruderer, T.; Goldenberger, D.; Emonet, S.; Strahm, C.

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea is a human commensal. The first known case of meningitis and bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea following percutaneous glycerol instillation of the trigeminal ganglion is reported. Conventional phenotypic methods and complete 16S RNA gene sequencing accurately identified the pathogen. Difficulties in differentiation from pathogenic neisseriae are discussed. PMID:26511743

  2. Bartonella henselae bacteremia in a mother and son potentially associated with tick exposure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Bartonella henselae is a zoonotic, alpha Proteobacterium, historically associated with cat scratch disease (CSD), but more recently associated with persistent bacteremia, fever of unknown origin, arthritic and neurological disorders, and bacillary angiomatosis, and peliosis hepatis in immunocompromised patients. A family from the Netherlands contacted our laboratory requesting to be included in a research study (NCSU-IRB#1960), designed to characterize Bartonella spp. bacteremia in people with extensive arthropod or animal exposure. All four family members had been exposed to tick bites in Zeeland, southwestern Netherlands. The mother and son were exhibiting symptoms including fatigue, headaches, memory loss, disorientation, peripheral neuropathic pain, striae (son only), and loss of coordination, whereas the father and daughter were healthy. Methods Each family member was tested for serological evidence of Bartonella exposure using B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotypes I-III, B. henselae and B. koehlerae indirect fluorescent antibody assays and for bacteremia using the BAPGM enrichment blood culture platform. Results The mother was seroreactive to multiple Bartonella spp. antigens and bacteremia was confirmed by PCR amplification of B. henselae DNA from blood, and from a BAPGM blood agar plate subculture isolate. The son was not seroreactive to any Bartonella sp. antigen, but B. henselae DNA was amplified from several blood and serum samples, from BAPGM enrichment blood culture, and from a cutaneous striae biopsy. The father and daughter were seronegative to all Bartonella spp. antigens, and negative for Bartonella DNA amplification. Conclusions Historically, persistent B. henselae bacteremia was not thought to occur in immunocompetent humans. To our knowledge, this study provides preliminary evidence supporting the possibility of persistent B. henselae bacteremia in immunocompetent persons from Europe. Cat or flea contact was considered an unlikely

  3. Bacteremia due to extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacter cloacae: role of carbapenem therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Chi; Lee, Nan-Yao; Yan, Jing-Jou; Lee, Hsin-Chun; Chen, Po-Lin; Chang, Chia-Ming; Wu, Chi-Jung; Ko, Nai-Ying; Wang, Li-Rong; Chi, Chih-Hsien; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2010-09-01

    Enterobacter cloacae is an important nosocomial pathogen. However, few studies specifically dealing with the clinical characteristics and outcome of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. cloacae infections have been published. During an 8-year period in a medical center, of 610 E. cloacae bacteremic isolates, 138 (22.6%) with ESBL genes were designated the ESBL group, and 120 (19.6%) cefotaxime-nonsusceptible isolates without the ESBL phenotype and genes were designated the control group. Of the former group of isolates, 133 (96.3%) carried the bla(SHV-12) gene, 3 (2.1%) had bla(CTX-M3), and 2 (1.4%) had both the bla(SHV-12) and bla(CTX-M3) genes. After patients under the age of 18 years were excluded, there were 206 adults with E. cloacae bacteremia, and these consisted of 121 patients in the ESBL group and 85 in the control group. More episodes of hospital-onset and polymicrobial bacteremia, increased severity of illness, more cases of bacteremia onset in intensive care units (ICUs), and longer stays in the hospital and ICU after bacteremia onset were noted in the ESBL group. However, the crude and sepsis-related mortality rates in two groups were similar. Of the ESBL group, the in-hospital sepsis-related mortality rate of patients definitively treated by a carbapenem was lower than that of those treated by noncarbapenem beta-lactams (5/53, or 9.4%, versus 13/44, or 29.5%; P = 0.01) though the difference was not significant in the hierarchical multivariate analysis (P = 0.46). Among 62 patients with follow-up blood cultures within 14 days of bacteremia onset, breakthrough bacteremia was more common in those treated by a noncarbapenem beta-lactam agent than in those treated by a carbapenem (18/31, or 58.0%, versus 3/31, or 9.6%; P < 0.001). Thus, carbapenem therapy for ESBL-producing E. cloacae that cause bacteremia may provide therapeutic benefits.

  4. Cost Attributable to Nosocomial Bacteremia. Analysis According to Microorganism and Antimicrobial Sensitivity in a University Hospital in Barcelona

    PubMed Central

    Riu, Marta; Chiarello, Pietro; Terradas, Roser; Sala, Maria; Garcia-Alzorriz, Enric; Castells, Xavier; Grau, Santiago; Cots, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Aim To calculate the incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia caused by the most common organisms, classified by their antimicrobial susceptibility. Methods We selected patients who developed nosocomial bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These microorganisms were analyzed because of their high prevalence and they frequently present multidrug resistance. A control group consisted of patients classified within the same all-patient refined-diagnosis related group without bacteremia. Our hospital has an established cost accounting system (full-costing) that uses activity-based criteria to analyze cost distribution. A logistic regression model was fitted to estimate the probability of developing bacteremia for each admission (propensity score) and was used for propensity score matching adjustment. Subsequently, the propensity score was included in an econometric model to adjust the incremental cost of patients who developed bacteremia, as well as differences in this cost, depending on whether the microorganism was multidrug-resistant or multidrug-sensitive. Results A total of 571 admissions with bacteremia matched the inclusion criteria and 82,022 were included in the control group. The mean cost was € 25,891 for admissions with bacteremia and € 6,750 for those without bacteremia. The mean incremental cost was estimated at € 15,151 (CI, € 11,570 to € 18,733). Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bacteremia had the highest mean incremental cost, € 44,709 (CI, € 34,559 to € 54,859). Antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had the lowest mean incremental cost, € 10,481 (CI, € 8,752 to € 12,210). Despite their lower cost, episodes of antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had a major impact due to their high frequency. Conclusions Adjustment of hospital cost according to the organism causing bacteremia and antibiotic sensitivity could improve

  5. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing bacteremia at a major hospital in southern Mississippi.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Dhritiman; Batte, Justin L; Brown, Stephanie N; Crosby, Angela G; Marcos, Luis A; Elasri, Mohamed O

    2015-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the predominant cause of bacteremia worldwide. We assessed the molecular epidemiology and antibiotic resistance of methicillin-resistant S aureus isolates causing bacteremia in southern Mississippi. Diverse genetic backgrounds in terms of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and multilocus sequence typing types of methicillin-resistant S aureus were identified as causing bacteremia in Mississippi. A strong association of Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes with elevated vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration is one of the important findings of our study.

  6. National Automated Surveillance of Hospital-Acquired Bacteremia in Denmark Using a Computer Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Sophie; Nielsen, Jens; Voldstedlund, Marianne; Kristensen, Brian; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Ellermann-Eriksen, Svend; Engberg, Jørgen H; Møller, Jens K; Østergaard, Christian; Mølbak, Kåre

    2017-03-09

    BACKGROUND In 2015, Denmark launched an automated surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections, the Hospital-Acquired Infections Database (HAIBA). OBJECTIVE To describe the algorithm used in HAIBA, to determine its concordance with point prevalence surveys (PPSs), and to present trends for hospital-acquired bacteremia SETTING Private and public hospitals in Denmark METHODS A hospital-acquired bacteremia case was defined as at least 1 positive blood culture with at least 1 pathogen (bacterium or fungus) taken between 48 hours after admission and 48 hours after discharge, using the Danish Microbiology Database and the Danish National Patient Registry. PPSs performed in 2012 and 2013 were used for comparison. RESULTS National trends showed an increase in HA bacteremia cases between 2010 and 2014. Incidence was higher for men than women (9.6 vs 5.4 per 10,000 risk days) and was highest for those aged 61-80 years (9.5 per 10,000 risk days). The median daily prevalence was 3.1% (range, 2.1%-4.7%). Regional incidence varied from 6.1 to 8.1 per 10,000 risk days. The microorganisms identified were typical for HA bacteremia. Comparison of HAIBA with PPS showed a sensitivity of 36% and a specificity of 99%. HAIBA was less sensitive for patients in hematology departments and intensive care units. Excluding these departments improved the sensitivity of HAIBA to 44%. CONCLUSIONS Although the estimated sensitivity of HAIBA compared with PPS is low, a PPS is not a gold standard. Given the many advantages of automated surveillance, HAIBA allows monitoring of HA bacteremia across the healthcare system, supports prioritizing preventive measures, and holds promise for evaluating interventions. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;1-8.

  7. Computed tomography findings associated with bacteremia in adult patients with a urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, T Y; Kim, H R; Hwang, K E; Lee, J-M; Cho, J H; Lee, J H

    2016-11-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) has rapidly increased recently at acute stage, but the CT findings associated with bacteremia in UTI patients are unknown. 189 UTI patients were enrolled who underwent a CT scan within 24 h after hospital admission. We classified CT findings into eight types: a focal or multifocal wedge-shaped area of hypoperfusion, enlarged kidneys, perinephric fat stranding, ureteritis or pyelitis, complicated renal cyst, renal papillary necrosis, hydronephrosis, and renal and perirenal abscess. A retrospective analysis was conducted to evaluate the CT findings associated with bacteremia. The mean age of these patients was 60 ± 17.2 years, and 93.1 % were women. Concurrent bacteremia was noted in 40.2 % of the patients. Abnormal CT findings were noted in 96.3 % of the patients and 62.4 % had two or more abnormal findings. The most frequent abnormal CT finding was a focal or multifocal wedge-shaped area of hypoperfusion (77.2 %), followed by perinephric fat stranding (29.1 %). Perinephric fat stranding, hydronephrosis, and the presence of two or more abnormal CT findings were significantly associated with bacteremia in patients with community-acquired UTI. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, age [odds ratio (OR) 1.03; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.009-1.062], two or more abnormal CT findings (OR 3.163; 95 % CI 1.334-7.498), and hydronephrosis (OR 13.160; 95 % CI 1.048-165.282) were significantly associated with bacteremia. Physicians should be aware that appropriate early management is necessary to prevent fatality in patients with these CT findings.

  8. A randomized Phase 2 trial of telavancin versus standard therapy in patients with uncomplicated Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: the ASSURE study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is a common infection associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Telavancin is a bactericidal lipoglycopeptide active against Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). We conducted a randomized, double-blind, Phase 2 trial in patients with uncomplicated S. aureus bacteremia. Methods Patients were randomized to either telavancin or standard therapy (vancomycin or anti-staphylococcal penicillin) for 14 days. Continuation criteria were set to avoid complicated S. aureus bacteremia. The primary end point was clinical cure at 84 days. Results In total, 60 patients were randomized and 58 received ≥1 study medication dose (all-treated), 31 patients fulfilled inclusion/exclusion and continuation criteria (all-treated target [ATT]) (telavancin 15, standard therapy 16), and 17 patients were clinically evaluable (CE) (telavancin 8, standard therapy 9). Mean age (ATT) was 60 years. Intravenous catheters were the most common source of S. aureus bacteremia and ~50% of patients had MRSA. A similar proportion of CE patients were cured in the telavancin (88%) and standard therapy (89%) groups. All patients with MRSA bacteremia were cured and one patient with MSSA bacteremia failed study treatment in each group. Although adverse events (AEs) were more common in the telavancin ATT group (90% vs. 72%), AEs leading to drug discontinuation were similar (7%) in both treatment arms. Potentially clinically significant increases in serum creatinine (≥1.5 mg/dl and at least 50% greater than baseline) were more common in the telavancin group (20% vs. 7%). Conclusions This study suggests that telavancin may have utility for treatment of uncomplicated S. aureus bacteremia; additional studies are warranted. (Telavancin for Treatment of Uncomplicated Staphylococcus Aureus Bacteremia (ASSURE); NCT00062647). PMID:24884578

  9. Comparative Study of Bacteremias Caused by Enterococcus spp. with and without High-Level Resistance to Gentamicin

    PubMed Central

    Caballero-Granado, Francisco Javier; Cisneros, J. M.; Luque, R.; Torres-Tortosa, M.; Gamboa, F.; Díez, F.; Villanueva, J. L.; Pérez-Cano, R.; Pasquau, J.; Merino, D.; Menchero, A.; Mora, D.; López-Ruz, M. A.; Vergara, A.; Infecciosas, for the Grupo Andaluz Para El Estudio De Las Enfermedades

    1998-01-01

    A prospective, multicenter study was carried out over a period of 10 months. All patients with clinically significant bacteremia caused by Enterococcus spp. were included. The epidemiological, microbiological, clinical, and prognostic features and the relationship of these features to the presence of high-level resistance to gentamicin (HLRG) were studied. Ninety-three patients with enterococcal bacteremia were included, and 31 of these cases were caused by HLRG (33%). The multivariate analysis selected chronic renal failure, intensive care unit stay, previous use of antimicrobial agents, and Enterococcus faecalis species as the independent risk factors that influenced the development of HLRG. The strains with HLRG showed lower levels of susceptibility to penicillin and ciprofloxacin. Clinical features (except for chronic renal failure) were similar in both groups of patients. HLRG did not influence the prognosis for patients with enterococcal bacteremia in terms of either the crude mortality rate (29% for patients with bacteremia caused by enterococci with HLRG and 28% for patients not infected with strains with HLRG) or the hospital stay after the acquisition of enterococcal bacteremia. Hemodynamic compromise, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, and mechanical ventilation were revealed in the multivariate analysis to be the independent risk factors for mortality. Prolonged hospitalization was associated with the nosocomial acquisition of bacteremia and polymicrobial infections. PMID:9466769

  10. Catheter-related bacteremia from femoral and central internal jugular venous access.

    PubMed

    Lorente, L; Jiménez, A; García, C; Galván, R; Castedo, J; Martín, M M; Mora, M L

    2008-09-01

    The objective of this prospective observational study was to determine the influence of femoral and central internal jugular venous catheters on the incidence of catheter-related bacteremia (CRB). We included patients admitted to a 12-bed polyvalent medico-surgical intensive care unit over 4 years who received one or more femoral or central internal jugular venous catheters. We diagnosed 16 cases of CRB in 208 femoral catheters and 22 in 515 central internal jugular venous catheters. We found a higher incidence of CRB with femoral (9.52 per 1,000 catheter days) than with central internal jugular venous access (4.83 per 1,000 catheter days; risk ratio = 1.93; 95% confidence interval: 1.03-3.73; P = 0.04). Central internal jugular venous access could be considered a safer route of venous access than femoral access in minimizing the risk of central venous catheter-related bacteremia.

  11. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia in a child with acute myeloid leukemia: successful treatment with daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Büyükcam, Ayşe; Karadağ Öncel, Eda; Özsürekçi, Yasemin; Cengiz, Ali B; Kuşkonmaz, Barış; Sancak, Banu

    2016-12-01

    Multiple-drug-resistant enterococcal infections canbe a serious problem in pediatric patients particularly concomitance with severe underlying diseases and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. The treatment options in children are limited compared with adults. We report a 3-year old-boy with acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-M7 and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus bacteremia successfully treated with daptomycin. Daptomycin may be an alternative therapy for VRE infections in children; more studies are needed for extended usage.

  12. Gemella Species Bacteremia and Stroke in an Elderly Patient with Respiratory Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gollol-Raju, Narasimha Swamy

    2017-01-01

    Gemella species are part of normal human flora. They are rarely associated with infections. As opportunistic pathogens, they can cause life-threatening infection in individuals with risk factors. We present an unusual case of an elderly patient, with no predisposing risk factors, who presented with respiratory tract infection and Gemella species bacteremia and suffered a stroke in the absence of features of endocarditis. PMID:28115939

  13. Transseptal suturing technique in septoplasty: impact on bacteremia and nosocomial colonization.

    PubMed

    Ismi, Onur; Ozcan, Cengiz; Vayısoğlu, Yusuf; Öztürk, Candan; Tek, Sebahat Aslan; Görür, Kemal

    2017-02-20

    Although effects of Merocel(®) nasal packs and silicone splints on nasal flora alterations and bacteremia formation after septoplasty were assessed before, the effect of transseptal suturing technique has not been studied yet. The objective of this study is to compare nasal flora alterations and bacteremia occurrence rates between Merocel packs, silicone splints, and transseptal suturing technique in septoplasty. Ninety patients were divided into three groups randomly: Merocel packing (Group M), silicone splint (Group S), and transseptal suturing without packing (Group T). Group M and S received prophylactic antibiotics and antibiotic pomade application to packs, whereas neither antibiotic prophylaxis nor topical pomade was applied to Group T. Preoperative, after pack removal and 1 month after pack removal nasal swab cultures and preoperative, immediately after surgery and 24 h after surgery blood cultures were taken from all patients. Group M increased Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) colonization (p = 0.003) and decreased normal flora colonization (p = 0.038), whereas Group S and T did not affect MSSA or normal flora colonization (p > 0.05). Antibiotic prophylaxis did not affect MSSA colonization (p = 0.14), whereas decreased normal flora colonization (p = 0.029). Transseptal suturing did not prevent bacteremia formation. Postoperative increasing of MSSA colonization in nasal cavity for septoplasty patients can be prevented by using transseptal suturing technique or silicone splints instead of Merocel packing, rather than applying prophylactic antibiotic treatment. Using transseptal suturing does not prevent bacteremia formation during septal surgery. These findings should be kept in mind to prevent postoperative life-threatening infective complications of septoplasty especially in immunosuppressive patients and patients with cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Infectious Spondylitis with Bacteremia Caused by Roseomonas mucosa in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyong-Young; Hur, Jaehyung; Jo, Wonyong; Hong, Jeongmin; Cho, Oh-Hyun; Kang, Dong Ho; Kim, Sunjoo

    2015-01-01

    Roseomonas are a gram-negative bacteria species that have been isolated from environmental sources. Human Roseomonas infections typically occur in immunocompromised patients, most commonly as catheter-related bloodstream infections. However, Roseomonas infections are rarely reported in immunocompetent hosts. We report what we believe to be the first case in Korea of infectious spondylitis with bacteremia due to Roseomonas mucosa in an immunocompetent patient who had undergone vertebroplasty for compression fractures of his thoracic and lumbar spine. PMID:26483995

  15. Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Bacteremia Complicating Pregnancy in the Third Trimester

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Krunal; Gittens-Williams, Lisa; Apuzzio, Joseph J.; Martimucci, Kristina; Williams, Shauna F.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi (S. Typhi) is an anaerobic gram-negative enteric rod that causes infection when contaminated food or water is ingested and may cause illness in pregnancy. Case. This is a patient who presented at 31 weeks' gestation with abdominal pain and fever and was diagnosed with S. Typhi bacteremia. Conclusion. S. Typhi should be considered in febrile patients with recent travel presenting with abdominal discomfort with or without elevated liver enzymes. PMID:28203469

  16. Hospital-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Legionella pneumophila in an immunocompromised patient.

    PubMed

    Lai, C-C; Tan, C-K; Chou, C-H; Hsu, H-L; Huang, Y-T; Liao, C-H; Hsueh, P-R

    2010-04-01

    The Legionella species is an important cause of communityand hospital-acquired pneumonia. Bacteremic pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila is rarely reported. We describe the first reported case of hospital-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by L. pneumophila from Taiwan in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura who received steroid treatment. The patient was successfully treated with ceftazidime and clindamycin initially, followed by ciprofloxacin for 14 days. The blood isolate was further confirmed by 16S rDNA sequence analysis.

  17. Disseminated Gonococcal Infection Presenting as Bacteremia and Liver Abscesses in a Healthy Adult

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Jongkyu; Yang, John Jeongseok

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we describe a bacteremia caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae that presented as liver abscesses. The patient had no risk factors for disseminated gonococcal infection. Periodic fever, skin rashes, and papules were present and the results of an abdominal computed tomography scan indicated the presence of small liver abscesses. The results of blood culture and 16S rRNA sequencing of the bacterial isolates confirmed the presence of N. gonorrhoeae. The patient improved with antibiotic therapy. PMID:25844265

  18. Cefazolin and Ertapenem, a Synergistic Combination Used To Clear Persistent Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Joshua; Yim, Juwon; Singh, Niedita B.; Kumaraswamy, Monika; Quach, Diana T.; Rybak, Michael J.; Pogliano, Joseph; Nizet, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Ertapenem and cefazolin were used in combination to successfully clear refractory methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia. In addition, recent work has demonstrated activity of combination therapy with beta-lactams from different classes against methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The ertapenem-plus-cefazolin combination was evaluated for synergy in vitro and in vivo in a murine skin infection model using an index MSSA bloodstream isolate from a patient in whom persistent bacteremia was cleared with this combination and against a cadre of well-described research strains and clinical strains of MSSA and MRSA. Against the index MSSA bloodstream isolate, ertapenem and cefazolin showed synergy using both checkerboard (fractional inhibitory concentration [FIC] index = 0.375) and time-kill assays. Using a disk diffusion ertapenem potentiation assay, the MSSA isolate showed a cefazolin disk zone increased from 34 to 40 mm. In vitro pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling at clinically relevant drug concentrations demonstrated bactericidal activity (>3 log10-CFU/ml reduction) of the combination but bacteriostatic activity of ether drug alone at 48 h. A disk diffusion potentiation assay showed that ertapenem increased the cefazolin zone of inhibition by >3 mm for 34/35 (97%) MSSA and 10/15 (67%) MRSA strains. A murine skin infection model of MSSA showed enhanced activity of cefazolin plus ertapenem compared to monotherapy with these agents. After successful use in clearance of MSSA bacteremia, the combination of ertapenem and cefazolin showed synergy against MSSA in vitro and in vivo. This combination may warrant consideration for future clinical study in MSSA bacteremia. PMID:27572414

  19. Campylobacter fetus Bacteremia in a Healthy Patient Returning from a Trip to the Ecuadorian Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Chávez, A C; Barrera, S; Leon, A; Trueba, G

    2016-12-27

    Campylobacter fetus is an opportunistic pathogen which causes bacteremia and other invasive infections in immunocompromised patients who have been exposed to livestock or ingested animal products (uncooked meat or unpasteurized milk). The present report describes a C. fetus infection in a healthy adult (immunocompetent) who returned from a visit to the Ecuadorian Amazonia and who did not report exposure to the typical sources of infection.

  20. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is more associated with bacteremia in elderly patients with suspected sepsis in emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Hsien-Ling; Han, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chun-Fu; Tzeng, I-Shaing; Hsieh, Tsung-Han; Wu, Chin-Chieh; Kuan, Jen-Tse; Chen, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early diagnosis of bacteremia for patients with suspected sepsis is 1 way to improve prognosis of sepsis. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) has long been utilized as a screening tool to detect bacteremia by front-line healthcare providers. The value of SIRS to predict bacteremia in elderly patients (≥65 years) with suspected sepsis has not yet been examined in emergency departments (EDs). We aimed to evaluate the performance of SIRS components in predicting bacteremia among elderly patients in EDs. We retrospectively evaluated patients with suspected sepsis and 2 sets of blood culture collected within 4 hours after admitting to ED in a tertiary teaching hospital between 2010 and 2012. Patients were categorized into 3-year age groups: young (18–64 years), young-old (65–74 years), and old patients (≥75 years). Vital signs and Glasgow Coma Scale with verbal response obtained at the triage, comorbidities, sites of infection, blood cultures, and laboratory results were retrieved via the electronic medical records. A total of 20,192 patients were included in our study. Among them, 9862 (48.9%) were the elderly patients (young-old and old patients), 2656 (13.2%) developed bacteremia. Among patients with bacteremia, we found the elderly patients had higher SIRS performance (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.90–3.03 in the young-old and aOR: 2.66, 95% CI: 2.19–3.23 in the old). Fever at the triage was most predictive of bacteremia, especially in the elderly patients (aOR: 2.19, 95% CI: 1.81–2.65 in the young-old and aOR: 2.27, 95% CI: 1.95–2.63 in the old), and tachypnea was not predictive of bacteremia among the elderly patients (all P > 0.2). The performance of SIRS to predict bacteremia was more suitable for elderly patients in EDs observed in this study. The elderly patients presented with more fever and less tachypnea when they had bacteremia. PMID:27930596

  1. Severe Sepsis due to Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia of Urinary Origin: A Case Report and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Michael A.; McManus, Kathleen A.; Wispelwey, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is an uncommon yet serious clinical syndrome that typically arises from a gastrointestinal source. However, clinicians should consider nongastrointestinal sources as well. We present a rare case of C. perfringens bacteremia of urinary origin that required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. A 61-year-old male presented with acute nausea and vomiting, altered mental status, and chronic diarrhea. His physical exam revealed right costovertebral tenderness and his laboratory work-up revealed acute renal failure. Percutaneous blood cultures grew C. perfringens. Cross-sectional imaging revealed a right-sided ureteral stone with hydronephrosis, which required nephrostomy placement. On placement of the nephrostomy tube, purulent drainage was identified and Gram stain of the drainage revealed Gram-variable rods. A urinary source of C. perfringens was clinically supported. Although it is not a common presentation, nongastrointestinal sources such as a urinary source should be considered in C. perfringens bacteremia because failure to recognize a nongastrointestinal source can delay appropriate treatment, which may include surgical intervention. PMID:26998370

  2. Beta Lactamase Producing Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia in an Elderly Man with Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rashmi; Duncalf, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is associated with adverse outcomes. Known risk factors include chronic kidney disease, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal disease. We present a 74-year-old man admitted with confusion, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Exam revealed tachycardia, hypotension, lethargy, distended abdomen, and cold extremities. He required intubation and aggressive resuscitation for septic shock. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, and elevated lipase. CT scan of abdomen revealed acute pancreatitis and small bowel ileus. He was started on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Initial blood cultures were positive for C. perfringens on day five. Metronidazole and clindamycin were added to the regimen. Repeat CT (day 7) revealed pancreatic necrosis. The patient developed profound circulatory shock requiring multiple vasopressors, renal failure requiring dialysis, and bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Hemodynamic instability precluded surgical intervention and he succumbed to multiorgan failure. Interestingly, our isolate was beta lactamase producing. We review the epidemiology, risk factors, presentation, and management of C. perfringens bacteremia. This case indicates a need for high clinical suspicion for clostridial sepsis and that extended spectrum beta lactam antibiotic coverage may be inadequate and should be supplemented with use of clindamycin or metronidazole if culture is positive, until sensitivities are known. PMID:26904307

  3. Characteristics of bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yoko; Hitomi, Shigemi; Oishi, Tsuyoshi; Kondo, Tsukasa; Ebihara, Tsugio; Funayama, Yasunori; Kawakami, Yasushi

    2013-10-01

    Although Proteus mirabilis is a common human pathogen, bacteremia caused by the organism, especially strains producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), has rarely been investigated. We examined 64 cases of P. mirabilis bacteremia identified in the Minami Ibaraki Area, Japan, between 2001 and 2010 and compared the characteristics of cases with ESBL-producing and ESBL-non-producing strains (13 and 51 cases, respectively). All ESBL-producing strains with the gene encoding the CTX-M-2-group were genetically nonidentical. Isolation of ESBL-producing strains was significantly associated with onset in a hospital (p = 0.030), receiving hemodialysis (p = 0.0050), and previous antibiotic use within 1 month (p = 0.036; especially penicillin and/or cephalosporin (p = 0.010) and fluoroquinolone (p = 0.0069)). Isolation was also associated with inappropriate antibiotic therapy on the 1st and 4th days (p = 0.011 and 0.032, respectively) but not with mortality on the 30th day. These findings indicate that, for P. mirabilis bacteremia, isolation of ESBL-producing strains causes delay of initiating appropriate antimicrobial therapy but may not be associated with mortality.

  4. PBP-2 Negative Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus schleiferi Bacteremia from a Prostate Abscess: An Unusual Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Chandni; Villanueva, Daphne-Dominique; Lalani, Ishan; Eng, Margaret; Kang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. schleiferi is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus which has been described as a pathogen responsible for various nosocomial infections including bacteremia, brain abscess, and infection of intravenous pacemakers. Recently, such bacteria have been described to be found typically on skin and mucosal surfaces. It is also believed to be a part of the preaxillary human flora and more frequently found in men. It is very similar in its pathogenicity with Staphylococcus aureus group and expresses a fibronectin binding protein. Literature on this pathogen reveals that it commonly causes otitis among dogs because of its location in the auditory meatus of canines. Also, it has strong association with pyoderma in dogs. The prime concern with this organism is the antibiotic resistance and relapse even after appropriate treatment. Very rarely, if any, cases have been reported about prostatic abscess (PA) with this microbe. Our patient had a history of recurrent UTIs and subsequent PA resulting in S. schleiferi bacteremia in contrast to gram negative bacteremia commonly associated with UTI. This organism was found to be resistant to methicillin, in spite of being negative for PBP2, which is a rare phenomenon and needs further studies. PMID:27092283

  5. Evaluating Children with Otitis Media for Bacteremia or Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yawman, Daniel; Mahar, Patrick; Blumkin, Aaron; Conners, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Background. It is unclear if clinicians evaluate for concurrent bacteremia or UTI in young patients diagnosed with acute otitis media (AOM). Objectives. To describe how often, and under which circumstances, emergency providers investigate for bacteremia or UTI in 2–36 month olds with AOM. Methods. Cases of AOM were analyzed from the 2001–2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)-Emergency Department dataset. Results. AOM was diagnosed in 17% of the 10,847 recorded visits of 2–36 month olds. Of these visits, laboratory testing included: CBC: 7%, Blood culture: 4%, urinalysis or urine culture: 5%, and any of these tests: 9%. Rates of testing for 2–6 month olds with temperature ≥ 38.0 (CBC: 13%, blood culture: 9%, urinalysis or urine culture: 7%, any of the tests: 14%) were not significantly different from testing of patients aged 6–12 months, or 12–36 months (all P > .1). Patients with temperature of ≥39.0 were more likely to have all tests, with the exception of urine investigation, than patients with temperature between 38.0 and 38.9. Conclusions. 17% of 2–36 month old patients seen in the emergency department are diagnosed with AOM. Investigating for bacteremia or UTI in these patients is not routine, even in febrile infants. PMID:20827307

  6. Evaluating children with otitis media for bacteremia or urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Yawman, Daniel; Mahar, Patrick; Blumkin, Aaron; Conners, Gregory

    2010-01-01

    Background. It is unclear if clinicians evaluate for concurrent bacteremia or UTI in young patients diagnosed with acute otitis media (AOM). Objectives. To describe how often, and under which circumstances, emergency providers investigate for bacteremia or UTI in 2-36 month olds with AOM. Methods. Cases of AOM were analyzed from the 2001-2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS)-Emergency Department dataset. Results. AOM was diagnosed in 17% of the 10,847 recorded visits of 2-36 month olds. Of these visits, laboratory testing included: CBC: 7%, Blood culture: 4%, urinalysis or urine culture: 5%, and any of these tests: 9%. Rates of testing for 2-6 month olds with temperature ≥ 38.0 (CBC: 13%, blood culture: 9%, urinalysis or urine culture: 7%, any of the tests: 14%) were not significantly different from testing of patients aged 6-12 months, or 12-36 months (all P > .1). Patients with temperature of ≥39.0 were more likely to have all tests, with the exception of urine investigation, than patients with temperature between 38.0 and 38.9. Conclusions. 17% of 2-36 month old patients seen in the emergency department are diagnosed with AOM. Investigating for bacteremia or UTI in these patients is not routine, even in febrile infants.

  7. Immunoproteomic to Analysis the Pathogenicity Factors in Leukopenia Caused by Klebsiella Pneumonia Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiyan; Cheng, Zhongle; Song, Wen; Wu, Wenyong; Zhou, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Incidences of leukopenia caused by bacteremia have increased significantly and it is associated with prolonged hospital stay and increased cost. Immunoproteomic is a promising method to identify pathogenicity factors of different diseases. In the present study, we used immunoproteomic to analysis the pathogenicity factors in leukopenia caused by Klebsiella Pneumonia bacteremia. Approximately 40 protein spots localized in the 4 to 7 pI range were detected on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels, and 6 differentially expressed protein spots between 10 and 170 kDa were identified. Pathogenicity factors including S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, pyruvate dehydrogenase, glutathione synthetase, UDP-galactose-4-epimerase, acetate kinase A and elongation factor tu (EF-Tu). In validation of the pathogenicity factor, we used western blotting to show that Klebsiella pneumonia had higher (EF-Tu) expression when they accompanied by leukopenia rather than leukocytosis. Thus, we report 6 pathogenicity factors of leukopenia caused by Klebsiella pneumonia bacteremia, including 5 housekeeping enzymes and EF-Tu. We suggest EF-Tu could be a potential pathogenicity factor for leukopenia caused by Klebsiella pneumonia. PMID:25330314

  8. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and multiple brain abscesses during acute lymphoblastic leukemia induction therapy.

    PubMed

    Hansford, Jordan R; Phillips, Marianne; Cole, Catherine; Francis, Joshua; Blyth, Christopher C; Gottardo, Nicholas G

    2014-04-01

    Bacillus cereus can cause serious infections in immunosuppressed patients. This population may be susceptible to B. cereus pneumonia, bacteremia, cellulitis, and rarely cerebral abscess. Here we report an 8-year-old boy undergoing induction therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed multifocal B. cereus cerebral abscesses, highlighting the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscesses. A review of the literature over the past 25 years identified another 11 cases (3 children and 8 adults) of B. cereus cerebral abscess in patients undergoing cancer therapy. B. cereus cerebral abscesses were associated with a high mortality rate (42%) and significant morbidity. Notably, B. cereus bacteremia with concomitant cerebral abscess was associated with induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia in both children and adults (10 of 12 case reports). Our case report and review of the literature highlights the propensity for B. cereus to develop cerebral abscess(es). Therefore, early consideration for neuroimaging should be given for any neutropenic cancer patient identified with B. cereus bacteremia, in particular those with acute leukemia during induction therapy.

  9. Clinical characteristics of bacteremia caused by Helicobacter cinaedi and time required for blood cultures to become positive.

    PubMed

    Araoka, Hideki; Baba, Masaru; Kimura, Muneyoshi; Abe, Masahiro; Inagawa, Hiroko; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the clinical characteristics of patients with Helicobacter cinaedi bacteremia and the time required for blood cultures to become positive. The medical records of all patients with H. cinaedi bacteremia at Toranomon Hospital and Toranomon Hospital Kajigaya between March 2009 and March 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Sixty-three patients, 34 men and 29 women with a median age of 67 years (range, 37 to 88 years), were diagnosed with H. cinaedi bacteremia. A total of 51,272 sets of blood cultures were obtained during the study period, of which 5,769 sets of blood cultures were positive for some organism and 126 sets were H. cinaedi positive. The time required for blood cultures to become positive for H. cinaedi was ≤5 days in 69 sets (55%) and >5 days in 57 sets (45%). Most patients had an underlying disease, including chronic kidney disease (21 cases), solid tumor (19 cases), hematological malignancy (13 cases), diabetes mellitus (8 cases), chronic liver disease (6 cases), and postorthopedic surgery (3 cases). Only 1 patient had no apparent underlying disease. The clinical symptoms included cellulitis in 24 cases, colitis in 7 cases, and fever only in 27 cases, including 7 cases of febrile neutropenia. The 30-day mortality rate of H. cinaedi bacteremia was 6.3%. In conclusion, most cases of H. cinaedi bacteremia occurred in immunocompromised patients. We might have overlooked nearly half of the H. cinaedi bacteremia cases if the duration of monitored blood culture samples had been within 5 days. Therefore, when clinicians suspect H. cinaedi bacteremia, the observation period for blood cultures should be extended.

  10. Development and Validation of a Clinical Prediction Rule for Bacteremia among Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients in Outpatient Settings

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Sho; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Kawarazaki, Hiroo; Nomura, Atsushi; Uchida, Daisuke; Imaizumi, Takahiro; Furusho, Masahide; Nishiwaki, Hiroki; Fukuma, Shingo; Shibagaki, Yugo; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2017-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, no reliable clinical prediction rule (CPR) for identifying bacteremia in hemodialysis (HD) patients has been established. The aim of this study was to develop a CPR for bacteremia in maintenance HD patients visiting the outpatient department. Methods This multicenter cohort study involved consecutive maintenance HD patients who visited the outpatient clinic or emergency room of seven Japanese institutions between August 2011 and July 2013. The outcome measure was bacteremia diagnosed based on the results of blood cultures. The candidate predictors for bacteremia were extracted through a literature review. A CPR for bacteremia was developed using a coefficient-based multivariable logistic regression scoring method, and calibration was performed. The test performance was then assessed for the CPR. Results Of 507 patients eligible for the study, we analyzed the 293 with a complete dataset for candidate predictors. Of these 293 patients, 48 (16.4%) were diagnosed with bacteremia. At the conclusion of the deviation process, body temperature ≥ 38.3°C, heart rate ≥ 125 /min, C-reactive protein ≥ 10 mg/dL, alkaline phosphatase >360 IU/L, and no prior antibiotics use within the past week were retained and scored. The CPR had a good fit for the model on calibration. The AUC of the CPR was 0.76, and for score CPR ≥ 2, the sensitivity and specificity were 89.6% and 51.4%, respectively. Conclusions We established a simple CPR for bacteremia in maintenance HD patients using routinely obtained clinical information in an outpatient setting. This model may facilitate more appropriate clinical decision making. PMID:28081211

  11. Increased Incidence of Urolithiasis and Bacteremia During Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii Coinfection Due to Synergistic Induction of Urease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Chelsie E.; Smith, Sara N.; Yep, Alejandra; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CaUTIs) are the most common hospital-acquired infections worldwide and are frequently polymicrobial. The urease-positive species Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii are two of the leading causes of CaUTIs and commonly co-colonize catheters. These species can also cause urolithiasis and bacteremia. However, the impact of coinfection on these complications has never been addressed experimentally. Methods. A mouse model of ascending UTI was utilized to determine the impact of coinfection on colonization, urolithiasis, and bacteremia. Mice were infected with P. mirabilis or a urease mutant, P. stuartii, or a combination of these organisms. In vitro experiments were conducted to assess growth dynamics and impact of co-culture on urease activity. Results. Coinfection resulted in a bacterial load similar to monospecies infection but with increased incidence of urolithiasis and bacteremia. These complications were urease-dependent as they were not observed during coinfection with a P. mirabilis urease mutant. Furthermore, total urease activity was increased during co-culture. Conclusions. We conclude that P. mirabilis and P. stuartii coinfection promotes urolithiasis and bacteremia in a urease-dependent manner, at least in part through synergistic induction of urease activity. These data provide a possible explanation for the high incidence of bacteremia resulting from polymicrobial CaUTI. PMID:24280366

  12. Time to positivity of blood culture association with clinical presentation, prognosis and ESBL-production in Escherichia coli bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, R; Viñas-Castillo, L; Lepe-Jiménez, J A; García-Cabrera, E; Cisneros-Herreros, J M

    2012-09-01

    The time to positivity (TTP) of blood cultures has been associated with increased mortality in bacteremia caused by several microorganisms. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between TTP and prognosis, clinical presentation and extended spectrum B-lactamase (ESBL)-production in patients with Escherichia coli bacteremia. This is a retrospective observational study involving 226 adult patients with E. coli bacteremia. Data collected included underlying diseases, clinical presentation, prognosis factors, TTP, ESBL-production and outcome. Thirty-one (14%) patients had severe sepsis and 29 (13%) septic shock at presentation. Thirty-three (14%) strains were ESBL-producers. Thirty-nine (17%) patients died during admission and 17 (7.5%) within 48 hours. The median TTP was 8.3 hours (range, 0.42–76.5). It was significantly shorter in patients with septic shock (6.23 h, range 1.12–47.29 h vs. 8.51 h, range 0.42–76.50 h; p = 0.018). Rapid growth of E. coli, Pitt index >1.5, non-urinary source and Charlson score >2 were selected as independent risk factors of in-hospital mortality by the multivariate analysis. ESBL-production was not associated with modifications in TTP. Lower TTP is an independent risk factor for septic shock and poor outcome in episodes of E. coli bacteremia. The TTP in E. coli bacteremia is not significantly modified by ESBL-production.

  13. Polymorphism in a lincRNA Associates with a Doubled Risk of Pneumococcal Bacteremia in Kenyan Children.

    PubMed

    Rautanen, Anna; Pirinen, Matti; Mills, Tara C; Rockett, Kirk A; Strange, Amy; Ndungu, Anne W; Naranbhai, Vivek; Gilchrist, James J; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Band, Gavin; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Edkins, Sarah; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Pearson, Richard D; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Macharia, Alex W; Uyoga, Sophie; Ndila, Carolyne; Mturi, Neema; Njuguna, Patricia; Mohammed, Shebe; Berkley, James A; Mwangi, Isaiah; Mwarumba, Salim; Kitsao, Barnes S; Lowe, Brett S; Morpeth, Susan C; Khandwalla, Iqbal; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A; Casas, Juan P; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S; Mathew, Christopher G; Palmer, Colin N A; Plomin, Robert; Sawcer, Stephen J; Trembath, Richard C; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Wood, Nicholas W; Deloukas, Panos; Peltonen, Leena; Williams, Thomas N; Scott, J Anthony G; Chapman, Stephen J; Donnelly, Peter; Hill, Adrian V S; Spencer, Chris C A

    2016-06-02

    Bacteremia (bacterial bloodstream infection) is a major cause of illness and death in sub-Saharan Africa but little is known about the role of human genetics in susceptibility. We conducted a genome-wide association study of bacteremia susceptibility in more than 5,000 Kenyan children as part of the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 (WTCCC2). Both the blood-culture-proven bacteremia case subjects and healthy infants as controls were recruited from Kilifi, on the east coast of Kenya. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of bacteremia in Kilifi and was thus the focus of this study. We identified an association between polymorphisms in a long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) gene (AC011288.2) and pneumococcal bacteremia and replicated the results in the same population (p combined = 1.69 × 10(-9); OR = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.84-3.31). The susceptibility allele is African specific, derived rather than ancestral, and occurs at low frequency (2.7% in control subjects and 6.4% in case subjects). Our further studies showed AC011288.2 expression only in neutrophils, a cell type that is known to play a major role in pneumococcal clearance. Identification of this novel association will further focus research on the role of lincRNAs in human infectious disease.

  14. Whole-Genome Sequences of the Archetypal K1 Escherichia coli Neonatal Isolate RS218 and Contemporary Neonatal Bacteremia Clinical Isolates SCB11, SCB12, and SCB15.

    PubMed

    Day, Michael W; Jackson, Lydgia A; Akins, Darrin R; Dyer, David W; Chavez-Bueno, Susana

    2015-02-26

    Neonatal bacteremia Escherichia coli strains commonly belong to the K1 capsular type. Their ability to cause invasive neonatal disease appears to be determined by other virulence factors that have yet to be identified. We report here the genome sequences of four E. coli neonatal bacteremia isolates, including that of the archetypal strain RS218.

  15. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase G894T (GLU298ASP) polymorphism is associated with hypotension in patients with E. coli bacteremia but not in bacteremia caused by a gram-positive organism.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Reetta; Hurme, Mikko; Laine, Janne; Eklund, Carita; Vuento, Risto; Aittoniemi, Janne; Huhtala, Heini; Syrjänen, Jaana

    2009-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) as a vasoactive substance is a crucial element in the pathogenesis of sepsis. Endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) is, in turn, a key regulator of vascular NO production. The eNOS gene polymorphism at position 894 (G>T, Glu298Asp) resulting in T allele has been studied in the context of vascular diseases, but its role in sepsis has not yet been explored. We here studied the effect of eNOS Glu298Asp polymorphism on the clinical course of the disease in patients with bacteremia. The study comprised 147 patients with bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, beta-hemolytic streptococci, or Escherichia coli. Laboratory findings and clinical data were registered on admission and during 6 consecutive days. The polymorphism of eNOS gene, G894T, was genotyped. Carriage of the T allele was associated with low MAP (P = 0.004) and high Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (P = 0.001) in patients with E. coli bacteremia. The effect on blood pressure was most prominent in the early stage of the disease (MAP on admission = 52 mmHg in T-allele carriers vs. 91 mmHg in noncarriers; P < 0.001). However, the same was not detected in bacteremia caused by a gram-positive organism (S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, or beta-hemolytic streptococci). The Glu298Asp polymorphism had no effect on case fatality in any pathogen. Carriage of the T allele of the eNOS gene is a risk factor for hypotension in patients with E. coli bacteremia but not in bacteremia caused by a gram-positive organism.

  16. Evaluation of six risk factors for the development of bacteremia in children with cancer and febrile neutropenia

    PubMed Central

    Asturias, E.J.; Corral, J.E.; Quezada, J.

    2010-01-01

    Febrile neutropenia is a well-known entity in children with cancer, being responsible for the high risk for infection that characterizes this population. For this reason, cancer patients are hospitalized so that they can receive prophylactic care. Risk factors have been used to classify patients at a high risk for developing bacteremia. The present study evaluates whether those risk factors (C-reactive protein, hypotension, leukemia as the cancer type, thrombocytopenia, recent chemotherapy, and acute malnutrition) apply to patients at the Unidad Nacional de Oncología Pediátrica. We evaluated 102 episodes in 88 patients, in whom risk factors and blood cultures were tested. We observed no statistical relationship between the six risk factors and bacteremia. There was also no relationship between bacteremia and the simultaneous presence of two, three, or more risk factors. A significant relationship of C-reactive protein and platelet count with other outcome factors was observed. PMID:20404980

  17. Oral shedding of Bartonella in cats: correlation with bacteremia and seropositivity.

    PubMed

    Namekata, David Y; Kasten, Rickie W; Boman, Dawn A; Straub, Mary H; Siperstein-Cook, Laurie; Couvelaire, Karen; Chomel, Bruno B

    2010-12-15

    Cats are the main reservoirs of zoonotic Bartonella henselae, B. clarridgeiae and B. koehlerae, transmitted among cats by cat fleas. No study has investigated the presence of Bartonella in the saliva of bacteremic and non-bacteremic cats to correlate it to the level of bacteremia and the presence or absence of oral lesions. Shelter cats from northern California (n=130) and Michigan (n=50) were tested for Bartonella bacteremia by blood culture, presence of Bartonella antibodies and Bartonella DNA in oral swabs. Bacteremia was detected in 45 (25%) cats, mainly from northern California (n=40), which were highly flea infested and were 4 times more likely to be bacteremic than the non-flea-infested cats from Michigan. Overall, 69 (38.3%) cats had Bartonella PCR positive oral swabs. Bacteremic cats were almost 3 times (P=0.003) more likely to have PCR positive oral swabs (59%, 26/44) than non-bacteremic cats (32.5%, 44/135). However, there was no correlation between cats being bacteremic and having oral lesions. Antibody prevalences for B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae were 30% and 42.8%. B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae seropositive cats were almost 4 times (P=0.0001) and 3 times (P=0.003) more likely to have oral lesions than seronegative cats. Despite a higher prevalence (odds ratio=1.73; 95% confidence interval=0.88-3.38) of oral lesions in cats with oral swabs testing PCR positive, no statistical association could be demonstrated in this cat population.

  18. Evaluating antibiotic stewardship programs in patients with bacteremia using administrative data: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Boel, J; Søgaard, M; Andreasen, V; Jarløv, J O; Arpi, M

    2015-07-01

    When introducing new antibiotic guidelines for empirical treatment of bacteremia, it is imperative to evaluate the performance of the new guideline. We examined the utility of administrative data to evaluate the effect of new antibiotic guidelines and the prognostic impact of appropriate empirical treatment. We categorized 2,008 adult patients diagnosed with bacteremia between 2010 and 2012 according to whether they received cephalosporins or fluoroquinolones (old regimen) or not (new regimen). We used administrative data to extract individual level data on mortality, readmission, and appropriateness of treatment, and computed adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 30-day mortality and post-discharge readmission by regimen and appropriateness of treatment. In total, 945 (47.1%) were treated by the old regimen and 1,063 (52.9%) by the new. The median length of stay (8 days) did not differ by regimen and neither did the proportion of those receiving appropriate empirical treatment (84.1% vs. 85.5%). However, fewer patients with the new regimen were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU; 3.8% vs. 12.0%) and they had lower 30-day mortality (16.4% vs. 23.4%). The adjusted 30-day mortality HR for appropriate versus inappropriate treatment was 0.79 (95% CI 0.62-1.01) and 0.83 (95% CI 0.66-1.05) for the new versus the old regimen. The HR for 30-day readmission for appropriate versus inappropriate treatment was 0.91 (95% CI 0.73-1.13) and 1.05 (95% CI 0.87-1.25) for the new versus the old regimen. This study demonstrates that administrative data can be useful for evaluating the effect and quality of new bacteremia treatment guidelines.

  19. Number of positive blood cultures, biofilm formation, and adhesin genes in differentiating true coagulase-negative staphylococci bacteremia from contamination.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou-Olivgeri, I; Giormezis, N; Papadimitriou-Olivgeris, M; Zotou, A; Kolonitsiou, F; Koutsileou, K; Fligou, F; Marangos, M; Anastassiou, E D; Spiliopoulou, I

    2016-01-01

    The significance of the number of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS)-positive blood cultures remains obscure in regards to determining true bacteremia versus contamination. The goal of this study was to determine the predictors of real CNS bloodstream infection among intensive care unit (ICU) patients. ICU patients with at least one CNS-positive blood culture were identified from the microbiology database. Biofilm formation was tested by glass tube and microtiter plate assay. mecA gene, ica operon genes (icaA, icaB, icaD), and adhesin genes (aap, bap, atlE, fbe, fnbA) were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). CNS were recovered from 120 septic episodes, 20 of which were true CNS bacteremias, whereas from the remaining 100 episodes, the isolated CNS were characterized as contaminants. The number of positive blood cultures was significantly associated with true CNS bacteremia. Nineteen true bacteremic Staphylococcus epidermidis strains were compared to 38 contaminants. Biofilm synthesis was documented in 37 isolates associated with the presence of the ica operon (p = 0.048). There were 39, 26, 38, 21, and 10 strains positive for the presence of atlE, bap, fbe, aap, and fnbA genes, respectively. Rifampicin resistance, absence of severe sepsis, number of S. epidermidis-positive blood cultures, and absence of the bap gene were independently associated with true S. epidermidis bacteremia as compared to contaminant strains. The number of positive blood cultures is associated with true CNS bacteremia. The presence of adhesin genes may play a role in differentiating true infection from contamination, whereas absence of the bap gene is associated with true S. epidermidis bacteremia.

  20. Epidemiology of bacteremia episodes in a single center: increase in Gram-negative isolates, antibiotics resistance, and patient age.

    PubMed

    Marchaim, D; Zaidenstein, R; Lazarovitch, T; Karpuch, Y; Ziv, T; Weinberger, M

    2008-11-01

    Increased resistance among isolates causing bacteremia constitutes a major challenge to medical practitioners and institutions. Variability between institutes is substantial, and requires the individual analysis of local trends. An eight-year (1997-2004) surveillance study of episodes of bacteremia was conducted in an 850-bed university hospital in central Israel. Trends of incidence, resistance, age, and mortality were analyzed. We studied 6,096 patient-unique episodes of bacteremia, of which, 2,722 (45.3%) were nosocomial and 523 (9.2%) involved children less than 18 years of age. The overall incidence of bacteremia episodes has increased over the study years by 39% and the patient mean age by 7.5 years. Gram-negative organisms accounted for 72% of hospital-acquired cases and 69% of community-acquired cases. There was a substantial increase in the incidence of nosocomial episodes, predominantly due to Gram-negative isolates, mainly Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Increased resistance to broad-spectrum antibiotics was noted among Gram-negative organisms, including quinolones (in K. pneumoniae), imipenem (A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa), piperacillin-tazobactam (K. pneumoniae), and amikacin (A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa). Increased resistance to oxacillin among coagulase-negative staphylococci was also noted. The all-cause mortality rates showed a significant rise. The patient age, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, and hospital acquisition were independently associated with mortality. We describe an increase in the incidence and resistance of Gram-negative organisms causing bacteremia and concomitant ageing of the patients with bacteremia. Similar patterns have been reported from other localities, and are of real concern.

  1. Hemipelvic osteomyelitis in a hemodialysis patient associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Patzkowski, Jeanne C; Hurst, Frank P; Neff, Robert T; Abbott, Kevin C

    2008-01-01

    Proper management of infected tunneled-cuffed catheters (TCC) is essential in order to avoid catastrophic consequences for the patient. Hematogenous dissemination of infection can result in serious secondary infections, including infective endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and epidural abscess. Pelvic osteomyelitis is an extremely rare condition in adults with no reported cases of infection localized to more than one pelvic bone at a time. We present a case of a hemodialysis patient who developed osteomyelitis of the entire right hemipelvis due to MRSA bacteremia after repeated attempts at TCC salvage. PMID:21694913

  2. Characterization of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from captive wild felids with bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Vania M; Osugui, Lika; Setzer, Ariela P; Lopez, Rodrigo P G; Pestana de Castro, Antonio F; Irino, Kinue; Catão-Dias, José L

    2012-09-01

    Diseases caused by extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) in wild felids are rarely reported. Although urinary tract infections are infrequently reported in domestic cats, such infections when present are commonly caused by ExPEC. The present work characterized ExPEC strains isolated from 2 adult felines, a snow leopard (Panthera uncia) and a black leopard (Panthera pardus melas), that died from secondary bacteremia associated with urinary tract infections. Isolates from both animals were classified into the B2 phylogenetic group and expressed virulence genotypes that allowed them to cause severe disease. In addition, strains from the black leopard showed multidrug resistance.

  3. Autochthonous epidemic typhus associated with Bartonella quintana bacteremia in a homeless person.

    PubMed

    Badiaga, Sékéné; Brouqui, Philippe; Raoult, Didier

    2005-05-01

    Trench fever, a louse-borne disease caused by Bartonella quintana, is reemerging in homeless persons. Epidemic typhus is another life-threatening louse-borne disease caused by Rickettsia prowazekii and known to occur in conditions of war, famine, refugee camps, cold weather, poverty, or lapses in public health. We report the first case of seroconversion to R. prowazekii in a homeless person of Marseilles, France. This was associated with B. quintana bacteremia. Although no outbreaks of typhus have been notified yet in the homeless population, this disease is likely to reemerge in such situation.

  4. A dangerous hobby? Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacteremia most probably acquired from freshwater aquarium fish handling.

    PubMed

    Asimaki, E; Nolte, O; Overesch, G; Strahm, C

    2016-11-21

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive rod that occurs widely in nature and is best known in veterinary medicine for causing swine erysipelas. In humans, infections are rare and mainly considered as occupationally acquired zoonosis. A case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia most likely associated with home freshwater aquarium handling is reported. The route of transmission was probably a cut with the dorsal fin of a dead pet fish. A short review of clinical presentations, therapeutic considerations and pitfalls of E. rhusiopathiae infections in humans is presented.

  5. Vancomycin-resistant Aureobacterium species cellulitis and bacteremia in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, F S; Arnold, K E; Sweat, H; Winton, E F; Funke, G

    1996-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with acute myelogenous leukemia and concomitant porphyria cutanea tarda was admitted to the hospital for consolidation chemotherapy of his leukemia. During his hospitalization, he developed cellulitis of the left hand and persistent bacteremia with a yellow-pigmented, nonfermenting coryneform bacterium that was identified as Aureobacterium sp. The portal of entry for the Aureobacterium infection was probably through the skin lesions due to porphyria cutanea tarda. The infection developed while the patient was receiving vancomycin prophylaxis, and the vancomycin MIC for the isolate was 32 micrograms/ml. PMID:8818896

  6. The First Case Report of Acute Cholangitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria subflava

    PubMed Central

    Uwamino, Yoshifumi; Sugita, Kayoko; Iwasaki, Eisuke; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Tomoyasu; Hasegawa, Naoki; Iwata, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    We herein report a case of acute cholangitis and bacteremia caused by a commensal Neisseria species, Neisseria subflava, in an 82-year-old man with cholangiocarcinoma. Emergency endoscopic nasobiliary drainage and cefoperazone/sulbactam therapy were effective. Gram negative coccobacilli were isolated from both blood and bile cultures on 5% sheep blood agar. The isolate was identified as N. subflava biovar perflava by mass spectrometry, a sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA, and biochemical testing. Although biliary infections due to commensal Neisseria are extremely rare, this case demonstrates the possibility of its occurrence in patients undergoing bile duct treatment. PMID:28090057

  7. O antigens of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris strains isolated from patients with bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Larsson, P

    1980-10-01

    During the period of 1971 to 1979, 172 Proteus mirabilis and 17 Proteus vulgaris strains were collected from blood cultures. Of these strains, 144 could be grouped into 25 O antigens. The most common antigens were O3, O23, O10, O30, and O24, which represented 46.1% of all strains. The O antigen distribution of strains isolated from blood cultures did not differ significantly from that of fecal and urinary strains. No particular O antigen could thus be defined as a virulence factor in bacteremia.

  8. Campylobacter fetus bacteremia with purulent pleurisy in a young adult with primary hypogammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Keiko; Miyashita, Tomoko; Nakamura, Tomoyuki; Shirano, Michinori; Nakamura, Tadahiro; Kameda, Kazuaki; Nishijima, Masayoshi; Imanishi, Masahiro; Yang, Xi; Kanegane, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    A 24-year-old man presented with fever and pleural effusion predominantly containing lymphocytes. Cultures of the pleural effusion and blood revealed Campylobacter fetus, and laboratory studies showed a low serum level of immunoglobulin. The patient was diagnosed with C. fetus pleuritis, bacteremia and primary hypogammaglobulinemia, and subsequent treatment with meropenem and immunoglobulin improved his condition. Although the underlying cause of the primary hypogammaglobulinemia remains unclear, the patient's status improved under immunoglobulin replacement therapy. C. fetus pleuritis is a rare infectious disease usually observed in immunocompromised hosts. We herein describe the first report of C. fetus pleuritis in a young adult with primary hypogammaglobulinemia.

  9. Bordetella holmesii bacteremia cases in the United States, April 2010-January 2011.

    PubMed

    Tartof, Sara Y; Gounder, Prabhu; Weiss, Don; Lee, Lillian; Cassiday, Pamela K; Clark, Thomas A; Briere, Elizabeth C

    2014-01-01

    We describe the first report of temporally related cases of Bordetella holmesii bacteremia. Demographic and clinical data were collected through chart abstraction and case-patient interviews. Twenty-two cases were identified from 6 states. Symptom onset dates ranged from April 2010 to January 2011. Median age of patients was 17.1 years and 64% had functional or anatomic asplenia. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles of a sample of isolates were identical. These cases occurred during a peak in pertussis outbreaks with documented cases of B. holmesii/Bordetella pertussis respiratory coinfection; whether there is a link between B. holmesii respiratory and bloodstream infection is unknown.

  10. Oral streptococcal bacteremia in hospitalized patients: taxonomic identification and clinical characterization.

    PubMed

    Kitten, Todd; Munro, Cindy L; Zollar, Nicai Q; Lee, Sehmi P; Patel, Resham D

    2012-03-01

    Oral streptococci have been associated with systemic diseases, including infective endocarditis and neutropenic bacteremia. We analyzed 58 recent oral streptococcal bloodstream isolates, and we obtained clinical and demographic data for source patients. The sodA gene was found to be a better target than the 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer for DNA sequence-based species identification. Together, Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus oralis were significantly more likely than the 12 combined remaining species to be isolated from neutropenic patients.

  11. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Goel, Noopur; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients.

  12. A cluster of Bacillus cereus bacteremia cases among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Benusic, Michael A; Press, Natasha M; Hoang, Linda Mn; Romney, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus cereus is a ubiquitous spore-forming organism that is infrequently implicated in extraintestinal infections. The authors report three cases of B cereus bacteremia among injection drug users presenting within one month to an urban tertiary care hospital. Treatment with intravenous vancomycin was successful in all three cases. While temporal association suggested an outbreak, molecular studies of patient isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis did not suggest a common source. A review of the association of B cereus infections with heroin use and treatment of this pathogen is provided.

  13. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients. PMID:27433362

  14. A Case of O1 Vibrio Cholera Bacteremia and Primary Peritonitis in a Patient With Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Hussain; Shorman, Mahmoud; Bseiso, Bahaa; Al-Salem, Ahmed H.

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae are Gram-negative bacteria that are differentiated into O1/O139 and non-O1/non-O139 serogroups depending on their ability to agglutinate with specific antiserum. In contrast to non-O1/non-0139 Vibrio cholerae, which are more prone to invade the bloodstream, Vibrio cholerae O1 is rarely the cause of bacteremia. We report a case of O1 Vibrio cholera bacteremia and primary peritonitis in a patient with liver cirrhosis. The literature on the subject is also reviewed. PMID:27990208

  15. Host Fate is Rapidly Determined by Innate Effector-Microbial Interactions During Acinetobacter baumannii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Bruhn, Kevin W.; Pantapalangkoor, Paul; Nielsen, Travis; Tan, Brandon; Junus, Justin; Hujer, Kristine M.; Wright, Meredith S.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Adams, Mark D.; Chen, Wangxue; Spellberg, Brad

    2015-01-01

    Background. Acinetobacter baumannii is one of the most antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Defining mechanisms driving pathogenesis is critical to enable new therapeutic approaches. Methods. We studied virulence differences across a diverse panel of A. baumannii clinical isolates during murine bacteremia to elucidate host-microbe interactions that drive outcome. Results. We identified hypervirulent strains that were lethal at low intravenous inocula and achieved very high early, and persistent, blood bacterial densities. Virulent strains were nonlethal at low inocula but lethal at 2.5-fold higher inocula. Finally, relatively avirulent (hypovirulent) strains were nonlethal at 20-fold higher inocula and were efficiently cleared by early time points. In vivo virulence correlated with in vitro resistance to complement and macrophage uptake. Depletion of complement, macrophages, and neutrophils each independently increased bacterial density of the hypovirulent strain but insufficiently to change lethality. However, disruption of all 3 effector mechanisms enabled early bacterial densities similar to hypervirulent strains, rendering infection 100% fatal. Conclusions. The lethality of A. baumannii strains depends on distinct stages. Strains resistant to early innate effectors are able to establish very high early bacterial blood density, and subsequent sustained bacteremia leads to Toll-like receptor 4–mediated hyperinflammation and lethality. These results have important implications for translational efforts to develop therapies that modulate host-microbe interactions. PMID:25378635

  16. [Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of microorganisms causing bacteremia and fungemia in pediatric oncology patients].

    PubMed

    Cheguirián, M L; Carvajal, L R; Ledesma, E M; Enrico, M C; Reale, A L; Culasso, C; Bertoni, L

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of our research was to know the frequency of microorganisms causing bacteremia and/or fungemia in oncology patients from Hospital de Niños de Córdoba, as well as to describe the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of bacteria isolated from January 2006 to April 2007. A total of 59 bacteremia and fungemia cases in 44 patients were studied. From the total number of isolations, 45.8% were gram-negative bacilli, 35.6% were gram-positive cocci, and 18.6% were yeasts. The global distribution of the most prevalent microorganisms was the following: Klebsiella spp. 15.3%; Staphylococcus aureus and Candida parapsilosis 11.9%; coagulase-negative staphylococci 10.2%; Escherichia coli 8.5%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 6.8%. More than 40% (41.2%) of enterobacteria showed an extended-spectrum beta-lactamase phenotype, and 20.0% of non-fermenting gram-negative bacilli were multi-resistant to tested antibiotics, while 38.5% of Staphylococcus spp. were methicillin-resistant. In conclusion, the most prevalent microorganisms were gram-negative bacilli, and within this group, enterobacteria evidenced a higher percentage of resistance to tested antibiotics.

  17. Prophylactic effect of human lactoferrin against Streptococcus mutans bacteremia in lactoferrin knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Senthil Kumar; Fine, Daniel H; Velliyagounder, Kabilan

    2014-09-01

    Streptococcus mutans is the primary agent of dental caries, which is often detected in transient bacteremia. Lactoferrin is a multifunctional glycoprotein showing antibacterial activities against several Streptococcus species. We reported here the prophylactic effect of human lactoferrin (hLF) in a lactoferrin knockout mouse (LFKO-/-) bacteremic model. The hLF treatment significantly cleared S. mutans from the blood and organs of bacteremic mice when compared to the non-hLF treated mice. Further, analysis of serum cytokines, spleen and liver cytokine mRNA levels revealed that hLF prophylaxis modulates their release differently when compared to the non-hLF treated group. C-reactive protein level (P = 0.003) also decreased following hLF prophylaxis in S. mutans induced bacteremic mice. Additional quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that hLF prophylaxis significantly decreased the expression level of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, MPO and iNOS in spleen and liver. These results suggested that the hLF protects the host against S. mutans-induced experimental bacteremia.

  18. Capnocytophaga canimorsus bacteremia presenting with acute cholecystitis after a dog bite.

    PubMed

    Nishioka, Hiroaki; Kozuki, Tomohiro; Kamei, Hiroki

    2015-03-01

    Capnocytophaga canimorsus is part of normal gingival flora of dogs and cats. The organism can cause septicemia, meningitis, and endocarditis in humans after contact with dogs or cats. In spite of the frequency of gastrointestinal symptoms in C. canimorsus infection patients, specific gastrointestinal disease or clinical images have not been reported. We report a case of C. canimorsus bacteremia presenting with acute cholecystitis in elderly woman. She suffered from general fatigue and right upper abdominal pain. She had leukocytosis and abnormal liver function tests. She showed abnormal findings of the gallbladder by abdominal computed tomography and ultrasonography. She was diagnosed with acute cholecystitis without gallstones and was administered with antibiotics. C. canimorsus was isolated from blood cultures. A history of an insignificant wound secondary to a dog bite was elicited. She recovered completely with antibiotic treatment. This case revealed that C. canimorsus bacteremia can be presented with acute cholecystitis, suggesting that C. canimorsus could cause cholecystitis. And this cholecystitis can be treated with antibiotics without operation. Physicians seeing patients with acute cholecysitis should ask questions regarding animal contact.

  19. [Non-O1, non-O139 Vibrio cholerae bacteremia in a chronic hemodialysis patient].

    PubMed

    Zárate, Mariela S; Giannico, Marina; Colombrero, Cecilia; Smayevsky, Jorgelina

    2011-01-01

    Non-O1, and non-O139 Vibrio cholerae is an infrequent cause of bacteremia. There are no reports of such bacteremia in chronic hemodialysis patients. This work describes the case of a chronic hemodialysis patient that had an episode of septicemia associated with dialysis. Blood cultures were obtained and treatment was begun with vancomycin and ceftazidime. After 6.5 hours of incubation in the Bact/Alert system there is evidence of gram-negative curved bacilli that were identified as Vibrio cholerae by conventional biochemical tests, API 20 NE and the VITEK 2 system. This microorganism was sent to the reference laboratory for evaluation of serogroup and virulence factors and was identified as belonging to the non-O1 and non-O139 serogroup. The cholera toxin, colonization factor and heat-stable toxin were not detected. The isolate was susceptible to ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline, ceftazidime and cefotaxime by the disk diffusion method and the VITEK 2 system. The patient received intravenous ceftazidime for a 14 day- period and had a favorable outcome.

  20. Streptococcus intermedius Bacteremia and Liver Abscess following a Routine Dental Cleaning.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Lachara V; Perez-Colon, Elimarys

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria. This group is part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts; however, they have been known to cause a variety of purulent infections including meningitis, endocarditis, and abscesses, even in immunocompetent hosts. In particular, S. intermedius has been associated with the development of liver and brain abscesses. There have been several case reports of S. intermedius liver abscesses with active periodontal infection. To our knowledge, however, there has not been a case following a routine dental procedure. In fact, the development of liver abscesses secondary to dental procedures is very rare in general, and there are only a few case reports in the literature describing this in relation to any pathogen. We present a rare case of S. intermedius bacteremia and liver abscess following a dental cleaning. This case serves to further emphasize that even routine dental procedures can place a patient at risk of the development of bacteremia and liver abscesses. For this reason, the clinician must be sure to perform a detailed history and careful examination. Timely diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscesses is vital, as they are typically fatal if left untreated.

  1. Streptococcus intermedius Bacteremia and Liver Abscess following a Routine Dental Cleaning

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Lachara V.; Perez-Colon, Elimarys

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria. This group is part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts; however, they have been known to cause a variety of purulent infections including meningitis, endocarditis, and abscesses, even in immunocompetent hosts. In particular, S. intermedius has been associated with the development of liver and brain abscesses. There have been several case reports of S. intermedius liver abscesses with active periodontal infection. To our knowledge, however, there has not been a case following a routine dental procedure. In fact, the development of liver abscesses secondary to dental procedures is very rare in general, and there are only a few case reports in the literature describing this in relation to any pathogen. We present a rare case of S. intermedius bacteremia and liver abscess following a dental cleaning. This case serves to further emphasize that even routine dental procedures can place a patient at risk of the development of bacteremia and liver abscesses. For this reason, the clinician must be sure to perform a detailed history and careful examination. Timely diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscesses is vital, as they are typically fatal if left untreated. PMID:25197585

  2. Human case of bacteremia caused by Streptococcus canis sequence type 9 harboring the scm gene.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Daisuke; Abe, Yoshihiko; Sakai, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Takahide; Takahashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus canis (Sc) is a zoonotic pathogen that is transferred mainly from companion animals to humans. One of the major virulence factors in Sc is the M-like protein encoded by the scm gene, which is involved in anti-phagocytic activities, as well as the recruitment of plasminogen to the bacterial surface in cooperation with enolase, and the consequent enhancement of bacterial transmigration and survival. This is the first reported human case of uncomplicated bacteremia following a dog bite, caused by Streptococcus canis harboring the scm gene. The similarity of the 16S rRNA from the infecting species to that of the Sc type strain, as well as the amplification of the species-specific cfg gene, encoding a co-hemolysin, was used to confirm the species identity. Furthermore, the isolate was confirmed as sequence type 9. The partial scm gene sequence harbored by the isolate was closely related to those of other two Sc strains. While this isolate did not possess the erm(A), erm(B), or mef(A), macrolide/lincosamide resistance genes, it was not susceptible to azithromycin: its susceptibility was intermediate. Even though human Sc bacteremia is rare, clinicians should be aware of this microorganism, as well as Pasteurella sp., Prevotella sp., and Capnocytophaga sp., when examining and treating patients with fever who maintain close contact with companion animals.

  3. Clinical Reasoning of Infectious Diseases Physicians Behind the Use or Nonuse of Transesophageal Echocardiography in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Young, Heather; Knepper, Bryan C.; Price, Connie S.; Heard, Susan

    2016-01-01

    In this prospective cohort with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) was performed in 24% of cases. Consulting Infectious Diseases physicians most frequently cited low suspicion for endocarditis due to rapid clearance of blood cultures and the presence of a secondary focus requiring an extended treatment duration as reasons for foregoing TEE. PMID:27833929

  4. Francisella philomiragia Bacteremia in a Patient with Acute Respiratory Insufficiency and Acute-on-Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Romney M.; Mattison, H. Reid; Miles, Jessica E.; Simpson, Edward R.; Corbett, Ian J.; Schmitt, Bryan H.; May, M.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella philomiragia is a very uncommon pathogen of humans. Diseases caused by it are protean and have been reported largely in near-drowning victims and those with chronic granulomatous disease. We present a case of F. philomiragia pneumonia with peripheral edema and bacteremia in a renal transplant patient and review the diverse reports of F. philomiragia infections. PMID:26400786

  5. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia with Bacteremia Caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or Herbaspirillum huttiense in an Immune-Competent Adult

    PubMed Central

    Kimball, Joanna; Smith, L. Patrick; Salzer, William

    2015-01-01

    Herbaspirillum spp. are Gram-negative bacteria that inhabit soil and water. Infections caused by these organisms have been reported in immunocompromised hosts. We describe severe community-acquired pneumonia and bacteremia caused by Herbaspirillum aquaticum or H. huttiense in an immunocompetent adult male. PMID:26179298

  6. Bacteremia in a long-term-care facility: a five-year prospective study of 163 consecutive episodes.

    PubMed

    Muder, R R; Brennen, C; Wagener, M M; Goetz, A M

    1992-03-01

    The clinical features, microbiological characteristics, and outcomes of 163 episodes of bacteremia occurring at a long-term-care facility were evaluated. The rate of nosocomial bacteremia increased from 0.20 to 0.36 cases/1,000 patient-days from 1985 to 1989; there was a parallel increase in the rate of all nosocomial infections combined. Bacteremia was documented in 6.5% of all hospital-acquired infections. The majority of isolates were gram-negative, and Providencia stuartii was the most common gram-negative species. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent isolate; one-third of S. aureus strains were resistant to methicillin. Bacteremia was polymicrobial in 36 episodes (22%), 14 of which involved an enterococcal species. Portals of entry included the urinary tract (55%), the respiratory tract (11%), and soft tissue (9%). Overall mortality was 21.5%. Death was significantly associated with residence on the intermediate-care unit, the presence of a respiratory infection, a change in mental status, and relatively recent admission. Optimal management of bacterial infection in a long-term-care setting requires the availability of blood culture results. Initial decisions about antibiotic therapy should be made in light of the likelihood of infection with multiresistant organisms and of polymicrobial infection.

  7. Cefepime Therapy for Monomicrobial Enterobacter cloacae Bacteremia: Unfavorable Outcomes in Patients Infected by Cefepime-Susceptible Dose-Dependent Isolates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nan-Yao; Lee, Ching-Chi; Li, Chia-Wen; Li, Ming-Chi; Chen, Po-Lin; Chang, Chia-Ming; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2015-12-01

    A new category of cefepime susceptibility, susceptible dose dependent (SDD), for Enterobacteriaceae, has been suggested to maximize its clinical use. However, clinical evidence supporting such a therapeutic strategy is limited. A retrospective study of 305 adults with monomicrobial Enterobacter cloacae bacteremia at a medical center from 2008 to 2012 was conducted. The patients definitively treated with in vitro active cefepime (cases) were compared with those treated with a carbapenem (controls) to assess therapeutic effectiveness. The 30-day crude mortality rate is the primary endpoint, and clinical prognostic factors are assessed. Of 144 patients receiving definitive cefepime or carbapenem therapy, there were no significant differences in terms of age, sex, comorbidity, source of bacteremia, disease severity, or 30-day mortality (26.4% versus 22.2%; P = 0.7) among those treated with cefepime (n = 72) or a carbapenem (n = 72). In the multivariate analysis, the presence of critical illness, rapidly fatal underlying disease, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers, and cefepime-SDD (cefepime MIC, 4 to 8 μg/ml) isolates was independently associated with 30-day mortality. Moreover, those infected by cefepime-SDD isolates with definitive cefepime therapy had a higher mortality rate than those treated with a carbapenem (5/7 [71.4%], versus 2/11 [18.2%]; P = 0.045). Cefepime is one of the therapeutic alternatives for cefepime-susceptible E. cloacae bacteremia but is inefficient for cases of cefepime-SDD E. cloacae bacteremia compared with carbapenem therapy.

  8. Cefepime Therapy for Monomicrobial Enterobacter cloacae Bacteremia: Unfavorable Outcomes in Patients Infected by Cefepime-Susceptible Dose-Dependent Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nan-Yao; Lee, Ching-Chi; Li, Chia-Wen; Li, Ming-Chi; Chen, Po-Lin; Chang, Chia-Ming

    2015-01-01

    A new category of cefepime susceptibility, susceptible dose dependent (SDD), for Enterobacteriaceae, has been suggested to maximize its clinical use. However, clinical evidence supporting such a therapeutic strategy is limited. A retrospective study of 305 adults with monomicrobial Enterobacter cloacae bacteremia at a medical center from 2008 to 2012 was conducted. The patients definitively treated with in vitro active cefepime (cases) were compared with those treated with a carbapenem (controls) to assess therapeutic effectiveness. The 30-day crude mortality rate is the primary endpoint, and clinical prognostic factors are assessed. Of 144 patients receiving definitive cefepime or carbapenem therapy, there were no significant differences in terms of age, sex, comorbidity, source of bacteremia, disease severity, or 30-day mortality (26.4% versus 22.2%; P = 0.7) among those treated with cefepime (n = 72) or a carbapenem (n = 72). In the multivariate analysis, the presence of critical illness, rapidly fatal underlying disease, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers, and cefepime-SDD (cefepime MIC, 4 to 8 μg/ml) isolates was independently associated with 30-day mortality. Moreover, those infected by cefepime-SDD isolates with definitive cefepime therapy had a higher mortality rate than those treated with a carbapenem (5/7 [71.4%], versus 2/11 [18.2%]; P = 0.045). Cefepime is one of the therapeutic alternatives for cefepime-susceptible E. cloacae bacteremia but is inefficient for cases of cefepime-SDD E. cloacae bacteremia compared with carbapenem therapy. PMID:26416853

  9. Bacteremia Caused by Kocuria kristinae from Egypt: Are There More? A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bassiouny, Dina M.; Matar, Yomna

    2016-01-01

    Kocuria kristinae is opportunistic Gram-positive cocci from the family Micrococcaceae. It is usually considered part of the normal flora that rarely is isolated from clinical specimens. Here, we report a case of Kocuria kristinae bacteremia; to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report from Egypt. PMID:27872773

  10. Diarrhea, bacteremia and multiorgan dysfunction due to an extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli strain with enteropathogenic E. coli genes.

    PubMed

    Kessler, Robert; Nisa, Shahista; Hazen, Tracy H; Horneman, Amy; Amoroso, Anthony; Rasko, David A; Donnenberg, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    A 55-year-old man with well-controlled HIV had severe diarrhea for 3 weeks and developed multiorgan dysfunction and bacteremia due to Escherichia coli. The genome of the patient's isolate had features characteristic of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli and genes distantly related to those defining enteropathogenic E. coli.

  11. Presence of the KPC carbapenemase gene in Enterobacteriaceae causing bacteremia, and the correlation with in vitro carbapenem susceptibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During six months, we obtained Enterobacteriaceae isolates from patients with Gram-negative bacteremia at a 1250-bed teaching hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, and compared carbapenem susceptibility with the presence of blaKPC, a transferable carbapenemase gene. Three (1.2%) out of 243 isolates were ...

  12. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains That Establish Bacteremia in the Infant Rat Model of Invasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    VanWagoner, Timothy M.; Seale, Thomas W.; Mussa, Huda J.; Cole, Brett K.; Whitby, Paul W.; Stull, Terrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of invasive disease. The infant rat is the accepted model of invasive H. influenzae disease. Here, we report the genome sequences of six nontypeable H. influenzae strains that establish bacteremia in the infant rat. PMID:26404588

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Catabacter hongkongensis Type Strain HKU16T, Isolated from a Patient with Bacteremia and Intestinal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Jade L. L.; Huang, Yi; Curreem, Shirly O. T.; Tsui, Stephen K. W.

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Catabacter hongkongensis, a catalase-positive bacterium which causes bacteremia with high mortality. The 3.2-Mb genome contains 3,161 protein coding sequences, including putative catalase and motility-related proteins, and antibiotic resistance genes, which could be important for its virulence and adaptation to diverse environments. PMID:25999561

  14. Is 2 weeks of antibiotic therapy enough to treat elderly patients with nontyphoid Salmonella bacteremia? A case report of fatal endovascular infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Lin; Tsai, Liang-Miin; Kan, Chung-Dann; Ko, Wen-Chien

    2014-08-01

    Nontyphoid Salmonella (NTS) can cause invasive diseases in the elderly. Notably, the most feared complication of NTS bacteremia is endovascular infection. The risk factors for infected aortic aneurysm include old age and atherosclerosis. Extended use of antimicrobial therapy (> 2 weeks) for NTS bacteremia should be considered for those who demonstrate the risk factors for endovascular infection, even when a metastatic focus is clinically elusive. Herein, we report the case of a 75-year-old patient with diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic kidney disease, and myocardial infarction who died of an infected aortic aneurysm despite 3 weeks of antibiotic therapy that was administered to treat the initial NTS bacteremia.

  15. Impact of Initial Vancomycin Trough Concentration on Clinical and Microbiological Outcomes of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in Children

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It is important to use vancomycin in a proper manner to ensure optimal drug exposure. Despite extensive use of vancomycin in children, studies on its optimal trough concentration (Ctrough) in the pediatric population remained rare. This retrospective study included children < 18 years old with culture-confirmed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia who were hospitalized in our institute from January 2010 to April 2014. Clinical characteristics, initial vancomycin dose, Ctrough and clinical/microbiological outcomes were retrospectively collected from medical records. Forty-six MRSA bacteremia cases occurring to the patients with a mean age of 22.0 ± 46.9 months were included and all of them were healthcare-associated. Severe diseases requiring intensive care unit (ICU) stay, mechanical ventilation and/or resulting in death were observed in 57.8% (26/45); all-cause 30-day fatality was 11.1% (5/45). An initial Ctrough ≥ 15 μg/mL was achieved in only 4 (8.7%) cases with an average vancomycin dosage of 40.6 ± 7.9 mg/kg/day. Persistent bacteremia at 48 hours after initiation of vancomycin was observed more frequently in children with initial Ctrough < 10 μg/mL than in those with Ctrough ≥ 10 μg/mL (P = 0.032). However, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of 30-day mortality and recurrent bacteremia (P = 0.899, and P = 0.754, respectively). Although initial Ctrough may be a useful parameter for minimizing early microbiological failure, it does not predict 30-day fatality or recurrence in pediatric MRSA bacteremia. Further prospective data on vancomycin dosing are needed to find the optimal drug exposure and clarify its impact on clinical outcomes in pediatric populations. PMID:27914127

  16. Persistent Staphylococcus aureus isolates from two independent cases of bacteremia display increased bacterial fitness and novel immune evasion phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Richards, R L; Haigh, R D; Pascoe, B; Sheppard, S K; Price, F; Jenkins, D; Rajakumar, K; Morrissey, J A

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia cases are complicated by bacterial persistence and treatment failure despite the confirmed in vitro susceptibility of the infecting strain to administered antibiotics. A high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia cases are classified as persistent and are associated with poorer patient outcomes. It is still unclear how S. aureus evades the host immune system and resists antibiotic treatment for the prolonged duration of a persistent infection. In this study, the genetic changes and associated phenotypic traits specific to S. aureus persistent bacteremia were identified by comparing temporally dispersed isolates from persistent infections (persistent isolates) originating from two independent persistent S. aureus bacteremia cases with the initial infection isolates and with three resolved S. aureus bacteremia isolates from the same genetic background. Several novel traits were associated specifically with both independent sets of persistent S. aureus isolates compared to both the initial isolates and the isolates from resolved infections (resolved isolates). These traits included (i) increased growth under nutrient-poor conditions; (ii) increased tolerance of iron toxicity; (iii) higher expression of cell surface proteins involved in immune evasion and stress responses; and (iv) attenuated virulence in a Galleria mellonella larva infection model that was not associated with small-colony variation or metabolic dormancy such as had been seen previously. Whole-genome sequence analysis identified different single nucleotide mutations within the mprF genes of all the isolates with the adaptive persistence traits from both independent cases. Overall, our data indicate a novel role for MprF function during development of S. aureus persistence by increasing bacterial fitness and immune evasion.

  17. Clinical, Microbiological, and Genetic Characteristics of Heteroresistant Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in a Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Di Gregorio, Sabrina; Perazzi, Beatriz; Ordoñez, Andrea Martinez; De Gregorio, Stella; Foccoli, Monica; Lasala, María Beatriz; García, Susana; Vay, Carlos; Famiglietti, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of vancomycin intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) and heterogeneous VISA (hVISA) is of major concern worldwide. Our objective was to investigate the prevalence, phenotypic and molecular features of hVISA strains isolated from bacteremic patients and to determine the clinical significance of the hVISA phenotype in patients with bacteremia. A total of 104 S. aureus blood isolates were collected from a teaching hospital of Argentina between August 2009 and November 2010. No VISA isolate was recovered, and 3 out of 92 patients (3.3%) were infected with hVISA, 2 of them methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (4.5% of MRSA). Macro Etest and prediffusion method detected 3/3 and 2/3 hVISA respectively. Considering the type of bacteremia, the three cases were distributed as follows: two patients had suffered multiple episodes of bacteremia (both hVISA strains recovered in the second episode), while only one patient had suffered a single episode of bacteremia with hVISA infection. MRSA bloodstream isolates exhibiting the hVISA phenotype were related to HA-MRSA Cordobes clone (ST5-SCCmec I-spa t149) and MRSA Argentinean pediatric clone (ST100-SCCmec IVNV-spa t002), but not to CA-MRSA-ST30-SCCmec IV-spa t019 clone that was one of the most frequent in our country. Although still relatively infrequent in our hospital, hVISA strains were significantly associated with multiple episodes of bacteremia (p=0.037) and genetically unrelated. PMID:25535825

  18. Persistent Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Two Independent Cases of Bacteremia Display Increased Bacterial Fitness and Novel Immune Evasion Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, R. L.; Haigh, R. D.; Pascoe, B.; Sheppard, S. K.; Price, F.; Jenkins, D.; Rajakumar, K.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia cases are complicated by bacterial persistence and treatment failure despite the confirmed in vitro susceptibility of the infecting strain to administered antibiotics. A high incidence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia cases are classified as persistent and are associated with poorer patient outcomes. It is still unclear how S. aureus evades the host immune system and resists antibiotic treatment for the prolonged duration of a persistent infection. In this study, the genetic changes and associated phenotypic traits specific to S. aureus persistent bacteremia were identified by comparing temporally dispersed isolates from persistent infections (persistent isolates) originating from two independent persistent S. aureus bacteremia cases with the initial infection isolates and with three resolved S. aureus bacteremia isolates from the same genetic background. Several novel traits were associated specifically with both independent sets of persistent S. aureus isolates compared to both the initial isolates and the isolates from resolved infections (resolved isolates). These traits included (i) increased growth under nutrient-poor conditions; (ii) increased tolerance of iron toxicity; (iii) higher expression of cell surface proteins involved in immune evasion and stress responses; and (iv) attenuated virulence in a Galleria mellonella larva infection model that was not associated with small-colony variation or metabolic dormancy such as had been seen previously. Whole-genome sequence analysis identified different single nucleotide mutations within the mprF genes of all the isolates with the adaptive persistence traits from both independent cases. Overall, our data indicate a novel role for MprF function during development of S. aureus persistence by increasing bacterial fitness and immune evasion. PMID:26056388

  19. A Lethal Case of Sphingomonas paucimobilis Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hardjo Lugito, Nata Pratama; Cucunawangsih; Kurniawan, Andree

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis is a yellow-pigmented, glucose nonfermenting, aerobic, Gram negative bacillus of low pathogenicity. This organism was found in the implantation of indwelling catheters, sterile intravenous fluid, or contaminated hospital environment such as tap and distilled water, nebulizer, ventilator, and hemodialysis device. A 55-year-old female was hospitalized for diabetic foot ulcer in the presence of multiple comorbidities: diabetes mellitus, colonic tuberculosis, end-stage renal disease, and indwelling catheters for central venous catheter and hemodialysis. The patient passed away on the 44th day of admission due to septic shock. The organism found on blood culture on the 29th day of admission was multidrug resistant S. paucimobilis. Severe infection and septic shock due to S. paucimobilis have been reported particularly in immunocompromised patients, but there has been only one reported case of death in a premature neonate with septic shock. This is the first reported lethal case of S. paucimobilis bacteremia in an adult patient. PMID:27088020

  20. Bacteremia and malaria in Tanzanian children hospitalized for acute febrile illness.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Ingrid S; Heltshe, Sonya L; Smith, Arnold L; Chibwana, Jerome; Fried, Michal W; Duffy, Patrick E

    2015-04-01

    We recorded the reason for presentation to a rural hospital in an area endemic for malaria in 909 children between January 2006 and March 2009. Blood smears were examined for Plasmodium falciparum parasites, and blood spots dried on filter paper were prepared for 464 children. A PCR assay utilizing the stored blood spots was developed for Streptococcus pneumoniae (lytA) and Haemophilus influenzae (pal). Malaria was present in 299 children whose blood was tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); 19 had lytA and 15 had pal. The overall prevalence of lytA was 25 of the 464 children, while that of pal was 18 children. Fever was present in 369 children of whom 19 had lytA DNA while 11 had pal DNA detected. Of the 95 afebrile children, six had lytA and seven pal. We conclude that there are no clinical features that distinguish malaria alone from bacteremia alone or the presence of both infections.

  1. Polyclonal outbreak of bacteremia caused by Burkholderia cepacia complex and the presumptive role of ultrasound gel.

    PubMed

    Nannini, Esteban C; Ponessa, Adriana; Muratori, Rosa; Marchiaro, Patricia; Ballerini, Viviana; Flynn, Luis; Limansky, Adriana S

    2015-01-01

    A nosocomial polyclonal outbreak associated to bacteremia caused by different Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) species and clones is reported. Molecular characterization identified Burkholderia stabilis, Burkholderia contaminans, and Burkholderia ambifaria among BCC isolates obtained from patients in neonatal and adult intensive care units. BCC was also isolated from an intrinsically contaminated ultrasound gel, which constituted the presumptive BCC source. Prior BCC outbreak related to contaminated ultrasound gels have been described in the setting of transrectal prostate biopsy. Outbreak caused strains and/or clones of BCC have been reported, probably because BCC are commonly found in the natural environment; most BCC species are biofilm producers, and different species may contaminate an environmental source. The finding of multiple species or clones during the analysis of nosocomial BCC cases might not be enough to reject an outbreak from a common source.

  2. An outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia bacteremia in hemodialysis patients: an epidemiologic and molecular study.

    PubMed

    Kaitwatcharachai, C; Silpapojakul, K; Jitsurong, S; Kalnauwakul, S

    2000-07-01

    The risk of blood stream infections increases in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis. Outbreaks of infection are usually caused by contamination of the water supply, water treatment, distribution system, or dialyzer reprocessing. We report an outbreak of subclavian catheter-related Burkholderia cepacia bacteremia in nine patients undergoing hemodialysis. Using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis, the bacterial isolates were clonally identical to Burkholderia cepacia isolated from residue of the diluted chlorhexidine-cetrimide solution used to disinfect the transfer forceps. These forceps were used to pick up cotton balls and gauze for dressing the subclavian catheter. Antibiotic therapy failed to cure the infections, and all patients required catheter removal. Pathology showed numerous bacilli embedded in the biofilm on the inner surface of the removed catheters. In conclusion, our study showed that contaminated chlorhexidine-cetrimide solution was the source of a bacteremic outbreak in nine patients who developed catheter-related Burkholderia cepacia infection.

  3. Bacillus cereus fatal bacteremia and apparent association with nosocomial transmission in an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Carretto, E; Barbarini, D; Poletti, F; Marzani, F C; Emmi, V; Marone, P

    2000-01-01

    Bacillus cereus has sometimes been implicated in food poisoning and in opportunistic infections of seriously ill patients. This report describes an unusual case of persistent bacteremia and multiple organ failure associated with B. cereus in a patient admitted to our institution for lung cancer. The patient was undergoing treatment with an antimicrobial agent (imipenem) that was shown to be effective against the micro-organism in vitro. No portal of entry for the strain was detected. After treatment with vancomycin, also shown to be effective in vitro, no clinical improvement was noted and the patient died. Molecular studies showed that the same strain caused an episode of pseudobacteremia in another patient admitted to the same ICU room.

  4. Meningitis and bacteremia due to Bacillus cereus. A case report and a review of Bacillus infections.

    PubMed

    Siegman-Igra, Y; Lavochkin, J; Schwartz, D; Konforti, N

    1983-06-01

    A patient with meningitis and bacteremia due to Bacillus cereus is described. The patient had transsphenoidal hypophysectomy for chromophobe adenoma, complicated by rhinorrhea, which was corrected by subarachnoid drainage. Three weeks after removal of the drain, the patient presented with meningitis and died the following day. The causative organism was identified as B. cereus. The literature on Bacillus infections is reviewed with special attention to severe infections. A modified classification is proposed, dividing infections into superficial, closed-space and systemic ones. Sixty-one previously reported cases of systemic Bacillus infections are reviewed according to type of infection (endocarditis, meningitis or pulmonary infection), and the underlying conditions, ways of acquiring the infection, clinical picture and mortality are discussed.

  5. Bacteremia due to Acinetobacter ursingii in infants: Reports of two cases.

    PubMed

    Yakut, Nurhayat; Kepenekli, Eda Kadayifci; Karaaslan, Ayse; Atici, Serkan; Akkoc, Gulsen; Demir, Sevliya Ocal; Soysal, Ahmet; Bakir, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter ursingii is an aerobic, gram-negative, opportunistic microorganism which is rarely isolated among Acinetobacter species. We present two immunocompetent infants who developed bacteremia due to A. ursingii. The first patient is a two -month- old boy who had been hospitalized in pediatric surgery unit for suspected tracheo-esophageal fistula because of recurrent aspiration pneumonia unresponsive to antibiotic therapy. The second patient is a fourteen -month- old boy with prolonged vomiting and diarrhea. A. ursingii was isolated from their blood cultures. They were successfully treated with ampicillin-sulbactam. Although A. ursingii has recently been isolated from a clinical specimen; reports of infection with A. ursingii in children are rare. A. ursingii should be kept in mind as an opportunistic microorganism in children.

  6. The first cases of human bacteremia caused by Acinetobacter seifertii in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kishii, Kozue; Kikuchi, Ken; Tomida, Junko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Atsushi; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Moriya, Kyoji

    2016-05-01

    Acinetobacter seifertii, a novel species of Acinetobacter, was first reported in 2015. A. seifertii strains were isolated from human clinical specimens (blood, respiratory tract, and ulcer) and hospital environments. Here, we report the first cases of bacteremia caused by A. seifertii in patients with catheter-related bloodstream infection in Japan. The patients favorably recovered, without any complications, after removal of the peripheral intravenous catheters and administration of antibiotics. The pathogens were initially identified as Acinetobacter baumannii, using phenotypic methods and the MicroScan Walkaway System; however, rpoB gene sequence analysis indicated 99.54% similarity to A. seifertii. Moreover, antimicrobial susceptibility testing revealed that one of the strains was not susceptible to gentamicin and ceftazidime. Our report shows that Acinetobacter species other than A. baumannii can also cause nosocomial infections and that accurate methods for the identification of causative agents should be developed.

  7. Bacteremia caused by a rare pathogen – Chromobacterium violaceum: a case report from Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Narayan Prasad; Bhetwal, Anjeela; Ghimire, Sumitra; Maharjan, Anjila; Shakya, Shreena; Satyal, Deepa; Pandit, Roshan; Khanal, Puspa Raj

    2016-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a gram negative saprophytic bacterium, prevalent in tropical and subtropical climates. Infections caused by C. violaceum are very uncommon, yet it can cause severe systemic infections with higher mortality when entered into the bloodstream through open wound. A case of symptomatic bacteremia in a woman caused by C. violaceum was identified recently at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Nepal. Timely diagnosis by microbiological methods and rapid administration of antimicrobials led to a successful treatment of this life-threatening infection in this case. From this experience, we suggest to include this bacterium in the differential diagnosis of sepsis, especially when abraded skin is exposed to soil or stagnant water in tropical areas. The precise antimicrobial selection and timely administration should be considered when this infection is suspected. PMID:27980433

  8. Bacteremia caused by a rare pathogen - Chromobacterium violaceum: a case report from Nepal.

    PubMed

    Parajuli, Narayan Prasad; Bhetwal, Anjeela; Ghimire, Sumitra; Maharjan, Anjila; Shakya, Shreena; Satyal, Deepa; Pandit, Roshan; Khanal, Puspa Raj

    2016-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a gram negative saprophytic bacterium, prevalent in tropical and subtropical climates. Infections caused by C. violaceum are very uncommon, yet it can cause severe systemic infections with higher mortality when entered into the bloodstream through open wound. A case of symptomatic bacteremia in a woman caused by C. violaceum was identified recently at a tertiary care teaching hospital in Nepal. Timely diagnosis by microbiological methods and rapid administration of antimicrobials led to a successful treatment of this life-threatening infection in this case. From this experience, we suggest to include this bacterium in the differential diagnosis of sepsis, especially when abraded skin is exposed to soil or stagnant water in tropical areas. The precise antimicrobial selection and timely administration should be considered when this infection is suspected.

  9. The Novel Immunotherapeutic Oligodeoxynucleotide IMT504 Protects Neutropenic Animals from Fatal Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteremia and Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chahin, Abdullah; Zorzopulos, Jorge; Jobes, David V.; Migdady, Yazan; Yamamoto, Michelle; Parejo, Nicholas; Palardy, John E.; Horn, David L.

    2014-01-01

    IMT504 is a novel immunomodulatory oligonucleotide that has shown immunotherapeutic properties in early preclinical and clinical studies. IMT504 was tested in a neutropenic rat model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia and sepsis. This animal system recapitulates many of the pathological processes found in neutropenic patients with Gram-negative, bacterial infections. The research was conducted in the setting of an academic research laboratory. The test subjects were Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were rendered neutropenic by administration of cyclophosphamide, colonized with P. aeruginosa by oral feeding, and then randomized to receive IMT504 over a range of doses and treatment regimens representing early and late therapeutic interventions. IMT504 immunotherapy conferred a significant survival advantage over the 12-day study period compared with the results seen with placebo-treated animals when the therapy was administered at the onset of neutropenia and even in the absence of antibiotics and after the onset of fever and systemic infection. Notably, even late salvage IMT504 monotherapy was highly effective (13/14 surviving rats with IMT504 therapy versus 2/14 controls, P = <0.001). Moreover, late salvage IMT504 monotherapy was as effective as antibiotic therapy (13/14 surviving rats versus 21/21 rats, P = 0.88). In addition, no antagonism or loss of therapeutic efficacy was noted with combination therapy of IMT504 plus antibiotics. IMT504 immunotherapy provides a remarkable survival advantage in bacteremia and sepsis in neutropenic animals and deserves further study as a new treatment option in patients with, or at risk for, severe Gram-negative bacterial infections and sepsis. PMID:25512413

  10. Impact of virulence genes on sepsis severity and survival in Escherichia coli bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Rillo, Marta; Fernández-Romero, Natalia; Francisco, Carolina Navarro-San; Díez-Sebastián, Jesús; Romero-Gómez, Maria Pilar; Fernández, Francisco Arnalich; López, Jose Ramon Arribas; Mingorance, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are a frequent cause of bacteremia and sepsis, but the role of ExPEC genetic virulence factors (VFs) in sepsis development and outcome is ill-defined. Prospective study including 120 adult patients with E. coli bacteremia to investigate the impact of bacterial and host factors on sepsis severity and mortality. Patients' clinical and demographic data were registered. Phylogenetic background of E. coli isolates was analyzed by SNP pyrosequencing and VFs by PCR. The E. coli isolates presented an epidemic population structure with 6 dominant clones making up to half of the isolates. VF gene profiles were highly diverse. Multivariate analysis for sepsis severity showed that the presence of cnf and blaTEM genes increased the risk of severe illness by 6.75 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.79–24.71) and 2.59 (95% CI 1.04–6.43) times respectively, while each point in the Pitt score increased the risk by 1.34 (95% CI 1.02–1.76) times. Multivariate analysis for mortality showed that active chemotherapy (OR 17.87, 95% CI 3.35–95.45), McCabe-Jackson Index (OR for rapidly fatal category 120.15, 95% CI 4.19–3446.23), Pitt index (OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.25–2.56) and presence of fyuA gene (OR 8.05, 95% CI 1.37–47.12) were associated to increased mortality while the presence of P fimbriae genes had a protective role (OR 0.094, 95%IC 0.018–0.494). Bacteremic E. coli had a high diversity of genetic backgrounds and VF gene profiles. Bacterial VFs and host determinants had an impact on disease evolution and mortality. PMID:25654604

  11. First Korean Case of Robinsoniella peoriensis Bacteremia in a Patient with Aspiration Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Yongbum; Kim, Taek Soo; Kim, Hong Bin; Song, Junghan; Kim, Eui Chong

    2012-01-01

    Robinsoniella peoriensis has recently been identified as a Gram-positive, spore-forming, anaerobic rod originally recovered from swine manure storage pits. To date, 6 cases of R. peoriensis infection have been reported, including 2 cases of bacteremia, 1 of abdominal fluid collection, and 3 of wound infection. In the present study, we report a 76-yr-old man with R. peoriensis bacteremia who developed aspiration pneumonia. Gram staining of a purified colony revealed Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria. Biochemical identification using API 20 A (bioMérieux, France) indicated presence of Clostridium spp. We performed both 500-bp and full-gene sequencing of 16S rRNA of the isolate. The sequence was analyzed with MicroSeq ID 16S rRNA Library v2.0 (Applied Biosystems, USA), GenBank Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank), and EzTaxon database v2.1 (http://www.eztaxon.org). The 500-bp 16S rRNA sequence of the blood culture isolate showed 99.16-99.79% similarity with R. peoriensis and the full-gene 16S rRNA sequence showed 98.87-99.50% similarity with R. peoriensis. The organism was confirmed as R. peoriensis by using all of the mentioned databases except for MicroSeq, which did not include the RNA sequence of this bacterium. This case suggests that identification of R. peoriensis might be challenging in clinical laboratories with no access to molecular methods, as certain commercial identification systems may not identify, or may misidentify, this organism. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the isolation of R. peoriensis in Korea. PMID:22950075

  12. Correlation of American Burn Association Sepsis Criteria With the Presence of Bacteremia in Burned Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    criteria’s correlation with bacteremia because bacteremia is not associated with inherent issues of diagnosis as occurs with pneumonia or soft tissue...wound infection and pneumonia ) because of its relative fidelity as a diagnosis. METHODS A retrospective electronic medical records review was...14 Streptococcus spp. 6 Enterococcus spp. 4 Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus 3 Other 2 Mixed (Gram-positive and Gram-negative) 5 Candida spp

  13. Bacteremia as a Cause of Fever in Ambulatory, HIV-Infected Mozambican Adults: Results and Policy Implications from a Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Troy D.; Silva, Wilson P.; Buene, Manuel; Morais, Luís; Valverde, Emilio; Vermund, Sten H.; Brentlinger, Paula E.

    2013-01-01

    Fever is typically treated empirically in rural Mozambique. We examined the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of bacterial pathogens isolated from blood-culture specimens, and clinical characteristics of ambulatory HIV-infected febrile patients with and without bacteremia. This analysis was nested within a larger prospective observational study to evaluate the performance of new Mozambican guidelines for fever and anemia in HIV-infected adults (clinical trial registration NCT01681914, www.clinicaltrials.gov); the guidelines were designed to be used by non-physician clinicians who attended ambulatory HIV-infected patients in very resource-constrained peripheral health units. In 2012 (April-September), we recruited 258 HIV-infected adults with documented fever or history of recent fever in three sites within Zambézia Province, Mozambique. Although febrile patients were routinely tested for malaria, blood culture capacity was unavailable in Zambézia prior to study initiation. We confirmed bacteremia in 39 (15.1%) of 258 patients. The predominant organisms were non-typhoid Salmonella, nearly all resistant to multiple first-line antibiotics (ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole). Features most associated with bacteremia included higher temperature, lower CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, lower hemoglobin, and headache. Introduction of blood cultures allowed us to: 1) confirm bacteremia in a substantial proportion of patients; 2) tailor specific antimicrobial therapy for confirmed bacteremia based on known susceptibilities; 3) make informed choices of presumptive antibiotics for patients with suspected bacteremia; and 4) construct a preliminary clinical profile to help clinicians determine who would most likely benefit from presumptive bacteremia treatment. Our findings demonstrate that in resource-limited settings, there is urgent need to expand local microbiologic capacity to better identify and treat cases of bacteremia in HIV

  14. The Impact of Reporting a Prior Penicillin Allergy on the Treatment of Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Erica S.; Huang, Mingshu; Kuhlen, James L.; Ware, Winston A.; Parker, Robert A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia is a morbid infection with mortality benefit from receipt of parenteral β-lactam therapy. A substantial portion of MSSA bacteremia patients report penicillin allergy, but infrequently have true allergy. Objective To determine the frequency and predictors of optimal and adequate therapy in patients with MSSA bacteremia. Design Retrospective cohort. Participants Adult inpatients with MSSA bacteremia, January 2009 through October 2013. Main Measures The primary measure was a trial of optimal therapy (OT), defined as ≥3 inpatient days or discharge on any first-line agents (nafcillin, oxacillin, cefazolin, or penicillin G, if susceptible). The secondary measure was completion of adequate therapy (AT), defined as ≥10 inpatient days or discharge on an agent appropriate for MSSA bacteremia. Data were electronically gathered with key variables manually validated through chart review. Log-binomial regression models were used to determine the frequency and predictors of outcomes. Key Results Of 456 patients, 346 (76%) received a trial of OT. Patients reporting penicillin allergy (13%) were less likely to receive OT trial than those without penicillin allergy (47% vs. 80%, p <0.001). Adjusting for other factors, penicillin allergy was the largest negative predictor of OT trial (RR 0.64 [0.49, 0.83]). Infectious Disease (ID) consultation was the largest positive predictor of OT trial across all patients (RR 1.34 [1.14, 1.57]). Allergy/Immunology consultation was the single most important predictor of OT trial among patients reporting penicillin allergy (RR 2.33 [1.44, 3.77]). Of 440 patients, 391 (89%) completed AT, with ID consultation the largest positive predictor of the outcome (RR 1.28 [1.15, 1.43]). Conclusions Nearly 25% of patients with MSSA bacteremia did not receive OT trial and about 10% did not receive AT completion. Reported penicillin allergy reduced, and ID consult increased, the

  15. Comparative study of bacteremias caused by Enterococcus spp. with and without high-level resistance to gentamicin. The Grupo Andaluz para el estudio de las Enfermedades Infecciosas.

    PubMed

    Caballero-Granado, F J; Cisneros, J M; Luque, R; Torres-Tortosa, M; Gamboa, F; Díez, F; Villanueva, J L; Pérez-Cano, R; Pasquau, J; Merino, D; Menchero, A; Mora, D; López-Ruz, M A; Vergara, A

    1998-02-01

    A prospective, multicenter study was carried out over a period of 10 months. All patients with clinically significant bacteremia caused by Enterococcus spp. were included. The epidemiological, microbiological, clinical, and prognostic features and the relationship of these features to the presence of high-level resistance to gentamicin (HLRG) were studied. Ninety-three patients with enterococcal bacteremia were included, and 31 of these cases were caused by HLRG (33%). The multivariate analysis selected chronic renal failure, intensive care unit stay, previous use of antimicrobial agents, and Enterococcus faecalis species as the independent risk factors that influenced the development of HLRG. The strains with HLRG showed lower levels of susceptibility to penicillin and ciprofloxacin. Clinical features (except for chronic renal failure) were similar in both groups of patients. HLRG did not influence the prognosis for patients with enterococcal bacteremia in terms of either the crude mortality rate (29% for patients with bacteremia caused by enterococci with HLRG and 28% for patients not infected with strains with HLRG) or the hospital stay after the acquisition of enterococcal bacteremia. Hemodynamic compromise, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, and mechanical ventilation were revealed in the multivariate analysis to be the independent risk factors for mortality. Prolonged hospitalization was associated with the nosocomial acquisition of bacteremia and polymicrobial infections.

  16. USA300 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and the Risk of Severe Sepsis: Is USA300 MRSA Associated with More Severe Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Kreisel, Kristen M.; Stine, O. Colin; Johnson, J. Kristie; Perencevich, Eli N.; Shardell, Michelle D.; Lesse, Alan J.; Gordin, Fred M.; Climo, Michael W.; Roghmann, Mary-Claire

    2011-01-01

    Objective USA300 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is increasing as a cause of severe community-associated bacteremic infections. We assessed severe sepsis in response to infection in patients with USA300 MRSA compared to non-USA300 MRSA bacteremia. Methods A cohort study was conducted from 1997–2008 comparing sepsis in response to infection in 271 patients with MRSA bacteremia from four VA hospitals. Results Sixty-seven (25%) patients with MRSA bacteremia were USA300 MRSA; 204 (75%) were non-USA300 MRSA. The proportion of MRSA bacteremia caused by USA300 MRSA increased over time (χ2 p<0.0001). Adjusting for age and nosocomial infection, patients with USA300 MRSA bacteremia were more likely to have severe sepsis or septic shock in response to infection than patients with non-USA300 MRSA bacteremia (adjusted Relative Risk=1.82; 95% CI: 1.16–2.87; p=0.01). Conclusions This suggests that patients with USA300 MRSA are more likely to develop severe sepsis in response to their infection, which could be due to host or bacterial differences. PMID:21558047

  17. Detection of gram-negative bacteremia by limulus amebocyte lysate assay: evaluation in a rat model of peritonitis.

    PubMed

    du Moulin, G C; Lynch, S E; Hedley-Whyte, J; Broitman, S A

    1985-01-01

    A spectrophotometric Limulus amebocyte lysate assay using lysis filtration and centrifugation has been developed for the detection of gram-negative bacteria in blood. The assay is directed at detection of endotoxin in viable and nonviable bacteria present in the blood-stream and not detection of free endotoxin in plasma. The assay was evaluated in a model of peritonitis in which rats were challenged with an inoculum consisting of sterilized human feces, barium sulfate, and one of eight species of bacteria. This assay was able to detect gram-negative bacteremia due to Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, Proteus mirabilis, and Klebsiella pneumoniae in the rat model when compared with sham-inoculated uninfected rats. The assay failed to detect bacteremia due to Bacteroides fragilis or Staphylococcus aureus, nor was there a significant rise in absorbance when a pellet containing sterilized feces was implanted in the rat.

  18. Catheter-related bacteremia due to Kocuria rosea in a patient undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Altuntas, Fevzi; Yildiz, Orhan; Eser, Bülent; Gündogan, Kürsat; Sumerkan, Bulent; Çetin, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    Background Micrococcus species may cause intracranial abscesses, meningitis, pneumonia, and septic arthritis in immunosuppressed or immunocompetent hosts. In addition, strains identified as Micrococcus spp. have been reported recently in infections associated with indwelling intravenous lines, continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis fluids, ventricular shunts and prosthetic valves. Case presentation We report on the first case of a catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria rosea, a gram-positive microorganism belonging to the family Micrococcaceae, in a 39-year-old man undergoing peripheral blood stem cell transplantation due to relapsed Hodgkin disease. This uncommon pathogen may cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. Conclusions This report presents a case of Kocuria rosea catheter related bacteremia after stem cell transplantation successfully treated with vancomycin and by catheter removal. PMID:15615593

  19. Risk factors for bacteremia with uropathogen not cultured from urine in adults with febrile urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    van Nieuwkoop, Cees; Bonten, Tobias N; Wout, Jan W Van't; Becker, Martin J; Groeneveld, Geert H; Jansen, Casper L; van der Vorm, Eric R; Ijzerman, Ed P; Rothbarth, Philip H; Termeer-Veringa, Etel M; Kuijper, Ed J; van Dissel, Jaap T

    2010-06-01

    In a prospective study involving 642 patients with febrile urinary tract infection (UTI), we found antimicrobial pretreatment (odds ratio [OR], 3.3), an indwelling urinary catheter (OR, 2.8), and malignancy (OR, 2.7) to be independent risk factors for bacteremia with a uropathogen that was not cultured or recognized in the urine. Although the diagnostic value of blood cultures has been questioned in UTI, we advocate performing blood cultures for patients with these risk factors.

  20. Clarithromycin-ciprofloxacin-amikacin for therapy of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare bacteremia in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    de Lalla, F; Maserati, R; Scarpellini, P; Marone, P; Nicolin, R; Caccamo, F; Rigoli, R

    1992-01-01

    A combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin for the treatment of Mycobacterium avium-Mycobacterium intracellulare bacteremia was evaluated in 12 AIDS patients. Mycobacteremia cleared in all patients by 2 to 8 weeks of treatment, and symptoms resolved. Four patients died; all had negative blood cultures until death, and disseminated M. avium-M. intracellulare complex infection was not considered the primary cause of death. PMID:1387303

  1. Rapid detection of blaOXA in carbapenem-susceptible Acinetobacter radioresistens bacteremia leading to unnecessary antimicrobial administration.

    PubMed

    Brady, Adam C; Lewis, James S; Pfeiffer, Christopher D

    2016-08-01

    Rapid molecular techniques to identify resistant pathogens are revolutionizing antibiotic stewardship; however, it is important to recognize the limitations of these techniques. Herein we describe two cases of bacteremia that were both initially identified by genotypic testing as carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp. and subsequently identified phenotypically as carbapenem-susceptible A. radioresistens. The genotypic results prompted unnecessary broad-spectrum antibiotic use and infection control concerns.

  2. Neither Single nor a Combination of Routine Laboratory Parameters can Discriminate between Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Ratzinger, Franz; Dedeyan, Michel; Rammerstorfer, Matthias; Perkmann, Thomas; Burgmann, Heinz; Makristathis, Athanasios; Dorffner, Georg; Loetsch, Felix; Blacky, Alexander; Ramharter, Michael

    2015-11-02

    Adequate early empiric antibiotic therapy is pivotal for the outcome of patients with bloodstream infections. In clinical practice the use of surrogate laboratory parameters is frequently proposed to predict underlying bacterial pathogens; however there is no clear evidence for this assumption. In this study, we investigated the discriminatory capacity of predictive models consisting of routinely available laboratory parameters to predict the presence of Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteremia. Major machine learning algorithms were screened for their capacity to maximize the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) for discriminating between Gram-positive and Gram-negative cases. Data from 23,765 patients with clinically suspected bacteremia were screened and 1,180 bacteremic patients were included in the study. A relative predominance of Gram-negative bacteremia (54.0%), which was more pronounced in females (59.1%), was observed. The final model achieved 0.675 ROC-AUC resulting in 44.57% sensitivity and 79.75% specificity. Various parameters presented a significant difference between both genders. In gender-specific models, the discriminatory potency was slightly improved. The results of this study do not support the use of surrogate laboratory parameters for predicting classes of causative pathogens. In this patient cohort, gender-specific differences in various laboratory parameters were observed, indicating differences in the host response between genders.

  3. Population-Based Incidence and Etiology of Community-Acquired Neonatal Bacteremia in Mirzapur, Bangladesh: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Darmstadt, Gary L.; Saha, Samir K.; Choi, Yoonjoung; El Arifeen, Shams; Ahmed, Nawshad Uddin; Bari, Sanwarul; Rahman, Syed M.; Mannan, Ishtiaq; Crook, Derrick; Fatima, Kaniz; Winch, Peter J.; Seraji, Habibur Rahman; Begum, Nazma; Rahman, Radwanur; Islam, Maksuda; Rahman, Anisur; Black, Robert E.; Santosham, Mathuram; Sacks, Emma; Baqui, Abdullah H.

    2010-01-01

    Background To devise treatment strategies for neonatal infections, the population-level incidence and antibiotic susceptibility of pathogens must be defined. Methods Surveillance for suspected neonatal sepsis was conducted in Mirzapur, Bangladesh, from February 2004 through November 2006. Community health workers assessed neonates on postnatal days 0, 2, 5, and 8 and referred sick neonates to a hospital, where blood was collected for culture from neonates with suspected sepsis. We estimated the incidence and pattern of community-acquired neonatal bacteremia and determined the antibiotic susceptibility profile of pathogens. Results The incidence rate of community-acquired neonatal bacteremia was 3.0 per 1000 person–neonatal periods. Among the 30 pathogens identified, the most common was Staphylococcus aureus (n = 10); half of all isolates were gram positive. Nine were resistant to ampicillin and gentamicin or to ceftiaxone, and 13 were resistant to cotrimoxazole. Conclusion S. aureus was the most common pathogen to cause community-acquired neonatal bacteremia. Nearly 40% of infections were identified on days 0–3, emphasizing the need to address maternal and environmental sources of infection. The combination of parenteral procaine benzyl penicillin and an aminoglycoside is recommended for the first-line treatment of serious community-acquired neonatal infections in rural Bangladesh, which has a moderate level of neonatal mortality. Additional population-based data are needed to further guide national and global strategies. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00198627. PMID:19671016

  4. [Bacteremia and endocarditis caused by Streptococcus bovis in patients with alcoholic hepatopathy without evidence of colonic pathology].

    PubMed

    Castroagudín, J F; Lorenzo Solar, M; Martínez Rey, C; Brage Varela, A; Torre, J A; González Quintela, A

    1996-09-01

    The association of Streptococcus bovis bacteremia and endocarditis with colonic pathology, mainly neoplastic, is well known. Its relationship with liver disease without evidence of gastrointestinal disease has been rarely described. To analyze the association between S. bovis infection and liver disease, positive blood cultures for this microorganism in hospitalized patients in the Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology Departments from December 1993 until October 1995, have been reviewed. Three cases of S. bovis infection (one bacteremia, two endocarditis) were found. Alcoholic liver disease was diagnosed in all three patients, with associated hepatitis C virus in one of them. Colonic pathology was excluded by colonoscopy and/or barium enema. Other gastrointestinal disorders were excluded by means of gastroscopy, barium gastrointestinal study and abdominal ultrasonography. Antibiotic therapy was based in betalactamics, with associated aminoglycoside in two cases. One patient needed aortic and mitral valve replacement and another one needed orthotopic liver transplantation. No new gastrointestinal pathology emerged in the follow-up (5-23 months). Cases of S. bovis bacteremia and endocarditis should be screened not also for colonic pathology, but also for liver disease, particularly in alcoholics.

  5. Incidence and molecular epidemiology of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremias in patients with acute leukemia: analysis by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fanci, R; Paci, C; Anichini, P; Pecile, P; Marra, G; Casini, C; Nicoletti, P

    2003-10-01

    The incidence and molecular epidemiology of P. aeruginosa bacteremias, were monitored in patients with acute leukemia to define mechanisms of possible nosocomial transmission. From September 1997 to March 2001 febrile episodes were examined and blood isolates of P. aeruginosa were studied employing Pulsed-Field gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). Evaluation of DNA correlation was performed according to Tenover criteria. A total of 309 febrile episodes occurred in 187 patients. Of 139 organisms isolated in 116 bacteremias, 48% were gram negative bacilli (GNB); P. aeruginosa bacteremias were recorded in 34 (51%) of GNB sepsis. Evaluation of DNA correlation showed 2 related in 1997, 7 related in 1998, 10 related in 1999, 6 related in 2000-2001 (mainly closely and possibly related); therefore isolates closely related among themselves were also possibly related with other strains. About 60% of patients with related strains were hospitalized in the same room or in different rooms but became infected in the same period. Our data suggest a horizontal spread among the patients even if other sources were possible. The study assessed the usefulness of PFGE in bacteriological epidemiology.

  6. Multicenter Evaluation of the Clinical Outcomes of Daptomycin with and without Concomitant β-Lactams in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Mild to Moderate Renal Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Amodio-Groton, Maria; Rashid, Mohamad; Lamp, Kenneth C.; Hoffman-Roberts, Holly L.; Sakoulas, George; Yoon, Min J.; Schweitzer, Suzanne; Rastogi, Anjay

    2013-01-01

    Patients with underlying renal disease may be vulnerable to vancomycin-mediated nephrotoxicity and Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia treatment failure. In light of recent data demonstrating the successful use of β-lactam plus daptomycin in very difficult cases of S. aureus bacteremia, we examined safety and clinical outcomes for patients who received daptomycin with or without concomitant β-lactams. We identified 106 patients who received daptomycin for S. aureus bacteremia, had mild or moderate renal insufficiency according to FDA criteria, and enrolled in the Cubicin Outcomes Registry and Experience (CORE), a multicenter registry, from 2005 to 2009. Daptomycin treatment success was 81%. Overall treatment efficacy was slightly enhanced with the addition of a β-lactam (87% versus 78%; P = 0.336), but this trend was most pronounced for bacteremia associated with endocarditis or bone/joint infection or bacteremia from an unknown source (90% versus 57%; P = 0.061). Factors associated with reduced daptomycin efficacy (by logistic regression) were an unknown source of bacteremia (odds ratio [OR] = 7.59; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 37.2), moderate renal impairment (OR = 9.11; 95% CI = 1.46 to 56.8), and prior vancomycin failure (OR = 11.2; 95% CI = 1.95 to 64.5). Two patients experienced an increase in creatine phosphokinase (CPK) that resolved after stopping daptomycin. No patients developed worsening renal insufficiency related to daptomycin. In conclusion, daptomycin appeared to be effective and well tolerated in patients with S. aureus bacteremia and mild to moderate renal insufficiency. Daptomycin treatment efficacy might be enhanced with β-lactam combination therapy in primary endovascular and bone/joint infections. Additional studies will be necessary to confirm these findings. PMID:23254428

  7. Limited role of the receptor for advanced glycation end products during Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; de Vos, Alex F; de Beer, Regina; Florquin, Sandrine; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of sepsis. Sepsis is associated with the release of 'damage-associated molecular patterns' (DAMPs). The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor, abundantly expressed in the lungs, that recognizes several of these DAMPs. Triggering of RAGE leads to activation of the NF-κB pathway and perpetuation of inflammation. Earlier investigations have shown that the absence of RAGE reduces inflammation and bacterial dissemination and increases survival in sepsis caused by S. pneumoniae pneumonia. We hypothesized that the detrimental role of RAGE depends on the level of RAGE expression in the primary organ of infection. By directly injecting S. pneumoniae intravenously, thereby circumventing the extensive RAGE-expressing lung, we here determined whether RAGE contributes to an adverse outcome of bacteremia or whether its role is restricted to primary lung infection. During late-stage infection (48 h), rage(-/-) mice had an attenuated systemic inflammatory response, as reflected by lower plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines, reduced endothelial cell activation (as measured by E-selectin levels) and less neutrophil accumulation in lung tissue. However, RAGE deficiency did not influence bacterial loads or survival in this model. In accordance, plasma markers for cell injury were similar in both mouse strains. These results demonstrate that while RAGE plays a harmful part in S. pneumoniae sepsis originating from the respiratory tract, this receptor has a limited role in the outcome of primary bloodstream infection by this pathogen.

  8. Antimicrobial Drug Resistance Trends of Bacteremia Isolates in a Rural Hospital in Southern Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Mandomando, Inácio; Sigaúque, Betuel; Morais, Luis; Espasa, Mateu; Vallès, Xavier; Sacarlal, Jahit; Macete, Eusébio; Aide, Pedro; Quintò, Llorenç; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Machevo, Sónia; Bassat, Quique; Menéndez, Clara; Ruiz, Joaquim; Roca, Anna; Alonso, Pedro L.

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance in Africa is increasing but insufficiently recognized as a public health problem. However, there are scarce data for antimicrobial resistance trends among bloodstream isolates in sub-Saharan Africa. Antimicrobial drug resistance trends among bacteria isolated from blood of children < 15 years of age admitted to the Manhiça District Hospital in Mozambique during May 2001–April 2006 were monitored by disk diffusion. We documented a linear trend of increasing resistance throughout the study period to chloramphenicol among isolates of Non-typhi Salmonella (P < 0.001), Escherichia coli (P = 0.002), Staphylococcus aureus (P < 0.001), and Haemophilus influenzae (P < 0.001). Increasing resistance to ampicillin was also observed for H. influenzae isolates (P < 0.001). We report trends of increasing resistance among the most frequent etiologies of bacteremia to the most commonly used antibiotics for empirical therapy in this community. Quinolones and third-generation cephalosporines may be needed in the short term to manage community-acquired infections. PMID:20595494

  9. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cornick, Jennifer E.; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R.; Gray, Katherine J.; Kiran, Anmol M.; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Faragher, Brian E.; Everett, Dean B.; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites. PMID:26259813

  10. Neonatal retroauricular cellulitis as an indicator of group B streptococcal bacteremia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The relation between cellulitis and Group B streptococcus infection in newborns and small infants was first reported during the early 1980s and named cellulitis-adenitis syndrome. We report a case of a neonate with cellulitis-adenitis syndrome in an unusual location (retroauricular). Case presentation A 21-day-old Caucasian female infant was brought to the emergency department with fever, irritability and a decreased appetite. Physical examination revealed erythema and painful, mild swelling in the right retroauricular region. The blood count and C-reactive protein level were normal. She was treated with ceftriaxone. The fever and irritability were resolved after 24 hours, and the cellulitis was clearly reduced after two days of hospitalization. Blood culture yielded Group B streptococcus. Conclusion A thorough evaluation must be done, and lumbar punctures for infants with cellulitis must be considered. We emphasize the lack of data about acute phase reactants to predict bacteremia and meningitis and to adjust the duration of parenteral antibiotic therapy to address this syndrome. PMID:20062760

  11. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome.

    PubMed

    Kulohoma, Benard W; Cornick, Jennifer E; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R; Gray, Katherine J; Kiran, Anmol M; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Parkhill, Julian; Faragher, Brian E; Everett, Dean B; Bentley, Stephen D; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-10-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites.

  12. PAD4-deficiency does not affect bacteremia in polymicrobial sepsis and ameliorates endotoxemic shock.

    PubMed

    Martinod, Kimberly; Fuchs, Tobias A; Zitomersky, Naamah L; Wong, Siu Ling; Demers, Melanie; Gallant, Maureen; Wang, Yanming; Wagner, Denisa D

    2015-03-19

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), consisting of nuclear DNA with histones and microbicidal proteins, are expelled from activated neutrophils during sepsis. NETs were shown to trap microbes, but they also fuel cardiovascular, thrombotic, and autoimmune disease. The role of NETs in sepsis, particularly the balance between their antimicrobial and cytotoxic actions, remains unclear. Neutrophils from peptidylarginine deiminase 4-(PAD4(-/-)) deficient mice, which lack the enzyme allowing for chromatin decondensation and NET formation, were evaluated. We found that neutrophil functions involved in bacterial killing, other than NETosis, remained intact. Therefore, we hypothesized that prevention of NET formation might not have devastating consequences in sepsis. To test this, we subjected the PAD4(-/-) mice to mild and severe polymicrobial sepsis produced by cecal ligation and puncture. Surprisingly, under septic conditions, PAD4(-/-) mice did not fare worse than wild-type mice and had comparable survival. In the presence of antibiotics, PAD4-deficiency resulted in slightly accelerated mortality but bacteremia was unaffected. PAD4(-/-) mice were partially protected from lipopolysaccharide-induced shock, suggesting that PAD4/NETs may contribute to the toxic inflammatory and procoagulant host response to endotoxin. We propose that preventing NET formation by PAD4 inhibition in inflammatory or thrombotic diseases is not likely to increase host vulnerability to bacterial infections.

  13. Factors associated with positive blood cultures in outpatients with suspected bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Wildi, K; Tschudin-Sutter, S; Dell-Kuster, S; Frei, R; Bucher, H C; Nüesch, R

    2011-12-01

    Blood cultures are routinely taken in outpatients with fever and suspected bacterial infections. However, in the majority of cases, they are not informative and of limited value for clinical decision making. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate factors associated with positive blood cultures in outpatients presenting to an outpatient clinic and emergency room. This was a case-control study of all outpatients with positive blood cultures from January 1, 2006 to October 31, 2007 and matched control patients with negative blood cultures in the same time period. Microbiology results and medical charts were reviewed to determine factors associated with positive blood cultures. The presence of a systemic inflammation response syndrome (SIRS) (OR 2.7, 95% Cl 1.0-7.2) and increased C-reactive protein (CRP) (OR 1.1 per 10 mg/l, 95% Cl 1.0-1.2) were the most powerful predictive values for the development of positive blood cultures. In positive cases serum albumin was lower (35 mg/l versus 39 mg/l) than in controls. SIRS, increasing CRP and low albumin were associated with positive blood cultures in outpatients. With simple clinical assessment and few laboratory tests indicative of infection, it is possible to define a group at higher risk for bacteremia in outpatients.

  14. PAD4-deficiency does not affect bacteremia in polymicrobial sepsis and ameliorates endotoxemic shock

    PubMed Central

    Martinod, Kimberly; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Zitomersky, Naamah L.; Wong, Siu Ling; Demers, Melanie; Gallant, Maureen; Wang, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), consisting of nuclear DNA with histones and microbicidal proteins, are expelled from activated neutrophils during sepsis. NETs were shown to trap microbes, but they also fuel cardiovascular, thrombotic, and autoimmune disease. The role of NETs in sepsis, particularly the balance between their antimicrobial and cytotoxic actions, remains unclear. Neutrophils from peptidylarginine deiminase 4-(PAD4−/−) deficient mice, which lack the enzyme allowing for chromatin decondensation and NET formation, were evaluated. We found that neutrophil functions involved in bacterial killing, other than NETosis, remained intact. Therefore, we hypothesized that prevention of NET formation might not have devastating consequences in sepsis. To test this, we subjected the PAD4−/− mice to mild and severe polymicrobial sepsis produced by cecal ligation and puncture. Surprisingly, under septic conditions, PAD4−/− mice did not fare worse than wild-type mice and had comparable survival. In the presence of antibiotics, PAD4-deficiency resulted in slightly accelerated mortality but bacteremia was unaffected. PAD4−/− mice were partially protected from lipopolysaccharide-induced shock, suggesting that PAD4/NETs may contribute to the toxic inflammatory and procoagulant host response to endotoxin. We propose that preventing NET formation by PAD4 inhibition in inflammatory or thrombotic diseases is not likely to increase host vulnerability to bacterial infections. PMID:25624317

  15. Helicobacter cinaedi bacteremia with cellulitis after ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation: Case report.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kohei; Obara, Hideaki; Sugita, Kayoko; Shinoda, Masahiro; Kitago, Minoru; Abe, Yuta; Hibi, Taizo; Yagi, Hiroshi; Matsubara, Kentaro; Mori, Takehiko; Takano, Yaoko; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Itano, Osamu; Hasegawa, Naoki; Iwata, Satoshi; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2015-07-07

    Helicobacter cinaedi (H. cinaedi), a Gram-negative spiral-shaped bacterium, is an enterohepatic non-Helicobacter pylori Helicobacter species. We report the first case of H. cinaedi bacteremia with cellulitis after liver transplantation. A 48-year-old male, who had been a dog breeder for 15 years, underwent ABO-incompatible living-donor liver transplantation for hepatitis C virus-induced decompensated cirrhosis using an anti-hepatitis B core antibody-positive graft. The patient was preoperatively administered rituximab and underwent plasma exchange twice to overcome blood type incompatibility. After discharge, he had been doing well with immunosuppression therapy comprising cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid according to the ABO-incompatible protocol of our institution. However, 7 mo after transplantation, he was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of recurrent cellulitis on the left lower extremity, and H. cinaedi was detected by both blood culture and polymerase chain reaction analysis. Antibiotics improved his symptoms, and he was discharged at day 30 after admission. Clinicians should be more aware of H. cinaedi in immunocompromised patients, such as ABO-incompatible transplant recipients.

  16. High frequency of Acinetobacter soli among Acinetobacter isolates causing bacteremia at a tertiary hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Endo, Shiro; Yano, Hisakazu; Kanamori, Hajime; Inomata, Shinya; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Hatta, Masumitsu; Gu, Yoshiaki; Tokuda, Koichi; Kitagawa, Miho; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2014-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is generally the most frequently isolated Acinetobacter species. Sequence analysis techniques allow reliable identification of Acinetobacter isolates at the species level. Forty-eight clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp. were obtained from blood cultures at Tohoku University Hospital. These isolates were identified at the species level by partial sequencing of the RNA polymerase β-subunit (rpoB), 16S rRNA, and gyrB genes. Then further characterization was done by using the PCR for detection of OXA-type β-lactamase gene clusters, metallo-β-lactamases, and carO genes. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing were also performed. The most frequent isolate was Acinetobacter soli (27.1%). Six of the 13 A. soli isolates were carbapenem nonsusceptible, and all of these isolates produced IMP-1. PFGE revealed that the 13 A. soli isolates were divided into 8 clusters. This study demonstrated that A. soli accounted for a high proportion of Acinetobacter isolates causing bacteremia at a Japanese tertiary hospital. Non-A. baumannii species were identified more frequently than A. baumannii and carbapenem-nonsusceptible isolates were found among the non-A. baumannii strains. These results emphasize the importance of performing epidemiological investigations of Acinetobacter species.

  17. Prior colonization is associated with increased risk of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia in cancer patients☆,☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Kleinberg, Michael; Sorkin, John D.; Netzer, Giora; Johnson, Jennifer K.; Shardell, Michelle; Thom, Kerri A.; Harris, Anthony D.; Roghmann, Mary-Claire

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that prior colonization with antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria is associated with increased risk of subsequent antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia among cancer patients. We performed a matched case-control study. Cases were cancer patients with a blood culture positive for antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Controls were cancer patients with a blood culture not positive for antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Prior colonization was defined as any antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in surveillance or non-sterile-site cultures obtained 2–365 days before the bacteremia. Thirty-two (37%) of 86 cases and 27 (8%) of 323 matched controls were previously colonized by any antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Prior colonization was strongly associated with antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia (odds ratio [OR] 7.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.5–14.7) after controlling for recent treatment with piperacillin-tazobactam (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.3–4.8). In these patients with suspected bacteremia, prior cultures may predict increased risk of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteremia. PMID:24582582

  18. [Consensus document for the treatment of bacteremia and endocarditis caused by methicillin-resistent Staphylococcus aureus. Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica].

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Francisco; Aguado, José María; Pascual, Alvaro; Pujol, Miquel; Almirante, Benito; Miró, José María; Cercenado, Emilia; Domínguez, María de Los Angeles; Soriano, Alex; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Vallés, Jordi; Palomar, Mercedes; Tornos, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio

    2009-02-01

    Bacteremia and endocarditis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are prevalent and clinically important. The rise in MRSA bacteremia and endocarditis is related with the increasing use of venous catheters and other vascular procedures. Glycopeptides have been the reference drugs for treating these infections. Unfortunately their activity is not completely satisfactory, particularly against MRSA strains with MICs > 1 microg/mL. The development of new antibiotics, such as linezolid and daptomycin, and the promise of future compounds (dalvabancin, ceftobiprole and telavancin) may change the expectatives in this field.The principal aim of this consensus document was to formulate several recommendations to improve the outcome of MRSA bacteremia and endocarditis, based on the latest reported scientific evidence. This document specifically analyzes the approach for three clinical situations: venous catheter-related bacteremia, persistent bacteremia, and infective endocarditis due to MRSA.

  19. Urethral obstruction of 6 hours or less causes bacteriuria, bacteremia, and pyelonephritis in mice challenged with "nonuropathogenic" Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D E; Russell, R G; Lockatell, C V; Zulty, J C; Warren, J W

    1993-01-01

    Urethral obstruction may be caused by prostatic hypertrophy, urethral stricture, or encrustation of a urethral-catheter lumen. Bacteriuria often complicates these obstructions. The sequelae include fever, acute pyelonephritis, chronic renal inflammation, and death. We hypothesized that even brief obstruction of the urinary tract containing a nonvirulent bacterium would result in these complications. Mice challenged transurethrally with Escherichia coli FN414, which is rapidly eliminated from normal mice without causing bacteriuria, bacteremia, or renal pathology, were subjected to reversible urethral obstruction by coating the urethral meatus with collodion for 1, 3, or 6 h. The majority of mice obstructed for 1 h demonstrated parenchymal renal inflammation 48 h later. At the end of 3 h of obstruction, 9 of 10 mice were bacteremic; some bacteremias were present at 48 h after removal of the obstruction. At that time, more severe renal inflammation was seen in these mice. As little as 6 h of obstruction resulted not only in the acute changes described above but also in chronic renal inflammation and fibrosis in the majority of animals sacrificed 3 and 6 weeks later. Additional studies demonstrated that urethral obstruction enhanced the uropathogenicity of another nonpathogenic E. coli strain (K-12 strain HB101) and caused more severe renal lesions in mice challenged with E. coli CFT073, isolated from a patient with symptoms of pyelonephritis. These findings demonstrate that brief urethral obstruction may (i) induce organisms which are cleared rapidly from the normal urinary tract to cause bacteriuria, bacteremia, and pyelonephritis and (ii) intensify the renal lesions caused by a uropathogen. Images PMID:8335372

  20. Outbreak of long-term intravascular catheter-related bacteremia due to Achromobacter xylosoxidans subspecies xylosoxidans in a hemodialysis unit.

    PubMed

    Tena, D; Carranza, R; Barberá, J R; Valdezate, S; Garrancho, J M; Arranz, M; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    2005-11-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is a rare cause of bacteremia. Over a 2-week period, A. xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans was isolated from blood cultures of four hemodialysis patients with long-term intravascular catheters. A culture from one atomizer that contained diluted 2.5% chlorhexidine, which had been used to disinfect the skin, yielded A. xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans. No further cases were diagnosed once the use of this atomizer was discontinued. Five outbreak-related strains from the four patients and the atomizer were tested by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) under XbaI restriction. The isolates from the first three patients and the atomizer had identical PFGE patterns, confirming the atomizer as the source of the outbreak. The strain isolated from the fourth patient had six more bands than the outbreak strain and was considered possibly related to the outbreak strain. All patients were treated with intravenous levofloxacin. The catheter was removed in only one patient. The three patients in whom the catheter was left in place were also treated with antibiotic lock therapy with levofloxacin. All four patients were cured. This is believed to be the first reported outbreak of central venous catheter-related bacteremia due to A. xylosoxidans and the second reported outbreak with this organism associated with chlorhexidine atomizers. The use of diluted chlorhexidine via atomizers can be dangerous for the care of venous catheters and should be called into question. Patients with long-term intravascular catheter-related bacteremia due to this organism can be treated successfully with systemic antimicrobial therapy in addition to antibiotic lock therapy without catheter removal.

  1. [Elizabethkingia meningosepticum bacteremia in a patient with Bardet-Biedl syndrome and chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Bayrak, Burcu; Fıncanci, Muzaffer; Bınay, Umut Devrim; Çımen, Cansu; Özkantar Ünlügüneş, Gülay Ulkü

    2014-07-01

    Elizabethkingia meningosepticum, a gram-negative opportunistic pathogen may cause life-threatening nosocomial infections especially in newborns and immunosuppressive patients. This bacterium has a peculiar antibiotic resistance profile. It is resistant to most of the antibiotics against gram-negative bacteria and susceptible to antibiotics that are used to treat gram-positive bacteria, such as vancomycin and trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (SXT). For this reason appropriate treatment of E.meningosepticum infections are based on the proper identification of bacteria. In this report, a case of catheter-related E.meningosepticum bacteremia in a patient with chronic renal failure due to Bardet-Biedl syndrome, a genetic disorder characterized by multiorgan dysfunction, was presented. A 25-year-old male patient with Bardet-Biedl syndrome was admitted to the emergency room with the complaints of high fever with shivers that started the day before. The patient had a femoral dialysis catheter. Venous blood samples drawn at the time of administration were cultured immediately. Two days later, blood cultures which yielded positive signals were passaged onto blood and MacConkey agar plates and after incubation at 37°C for 16 hours, wet-raised colonies with clear margin, gray colour and large size similar to gram-negative bacterial colonies were detected on blood agar medium. No growth was observed on MacConkey agar plate at the end of five days. The isolate was found positive for KOH, oxidase, catalase, urease, esculine and MOI (Motility Indole Ornithine) tests, whereas it was citrate negative. Gram staining revealed faintly stained thin gram-negative bacilli. The isolate was identified as E.meningosepticum by Vitek® 2 system (bioMérieux, USA), and confirmed by sequence analysis of 16S RNA gene region amplified with PCR method. The antibiotic susceptibility profile of the strain was detected by the Vitek 2 system, while vancomycin susceptibility was investigated by Kirby

  2. Comparison of a Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic Sequence-Based PCR Method and Clinical and Microbiological Methods for Determining Strain Sources in Cases of Nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Lozano, David; Cisneros, José Miguel; Becerril, Berta; Cuberos, Lucila; Prados, Trinidad; Ortíz-Leyba, Carlos; Cañas, Elías; Pachón, Jerónimo

    2002-01-01

    Using a repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (REP-PCR), we genotypically characterized strains causing nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii infections and analyzed the source of bacteremia in 67 patients from an institution in which infections by this bacterium were endemic. Six different genotypes were found, including 21, 27, 3, 9, 3, and 4 strains. The probable source of bacteremia, according to clinical and/or microbiological criteria, was known in 42 patients (63%): respiratory tract (n = 19), surgical sites (n = 12), intravascular catheters (n = 5), burns (n = 3), and urinary tract (n = 3). The definite source of bacteremia, according to REP-PCR, could be established in 30 (71%) out of the 42 patients with strains from blood and other sites; in these cases clinical and microbiological criteria for the source of bacteremia were thus confirmed. In the remaining 12 patients (29%) the probable source was refuted by the REP-PCR method. The definite sources of bacteremia according to genotype were as follows: respiratory tract in 13 patients (31%), surgical sites in 8 (19%), intravascular catheters in 4 (9%), burns in 3 (7%), and urinary tract in 2 (5%). A comparison of strains from blood cultures and other sites with regard to their REP-PCR and antimicrobial resistance profiles was also made. Taking the REP-PCR as the “gold standard,” the positive predictive value of antibiotype was 77% and the negative predictive value was 42%. In summary, the utility of the diagnosis of the source of nosocomial A. baumannii bacteremia using clinical and/or microbiological criteria, including antibiotyping, is limited, as demonstrated by REP-PCR. PMID:12454154

  3. Natural mutations in a Staphylococcus aureus virulence regulator attenuate cytotoxicity but permit bacteremia and abscess formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudip; Lindemann, Claudia; Young, Bernadette C.; Muller, Julius; Österreich, Babett; Ternette, Nicola; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Paprotka, Kerstin; Reinhardt, Richard; Allen, Elizabeth; Flaxman, Amy; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Rollier, Christine S.; van Diemen, Pauline; Blättner, Sebastian; Remmele, Christian W.; Selle, Martina; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Vogel, Jörg; Ohlsen, Knut; Crook, Derrick W.; Massey, Ruth; Wilson, Daniel J.; Rudel, Thomas; Wyllie, David H.; Fraunholz, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen, which causes severe blood and tissue infections that frequently emerge by autoinfection with asymptomatically carried nose and skin populations. However, recent studies report that bloodstream isolates differ systematically from those found in the nose and skin, exhibiting reduced toxicity toward leukocytes. In two patients, an attenuated toxicity bloodstream infection evolved from an asymptomatically carried high-toxicity nasal strain by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor repressor of surface proteins (rsp). Here, we report that rsp knockout mutants lead to global transcriptional and proteomic reprofiling, and they exhibit the greatest signal in a genome-wide screen for genes influencing S. aureus survival in human cells. This effect is likely to be mediated in part via SSR42, a long-noncoding RNA. We show that rsp controls SSR42 expression, is induced by hydrogen peroxide, and is required for normal cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. Rsp inactivation in laboratory- and bacteremia-derived mutants attenuates toxin production, but up-regulates other immune subversion proteins and reduces lethality during experimental infection. Crucially, inactivation of rsp preserves bacterial dissemination, because it affects neither formation of deep abscesses in mice nor survival in human blood. Thus, we have identified a spontaneously evolving, attenuated-cytotoxicity, nonhemolytic S. aureus phenotype, controlled by a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator/noncoding RNA virulence regulatory system, capable of causing S. aureus bloodstream infections. Such a phenotype could promote deep infection with limited early clinical manifestations, raising concerns that bacterial evolution within the human body may contribute to severe infection. PMID:27185949

  4. Bacteremia due to Citrobacter braakii: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Jun; Uechi, Kohei; Hagihara, Mao; Sakanashi, Daisuke; Kinjo, Takeshi; Haranaga, Shusaku; Fujita, Jiro

    2016-12-01

    Among the Citrobacter genus, the most commonly isolated bacteria from human specimens are Citrobacter freundii and Citrobacter koseri, and previous cases of infection due to Citrobacter braakii have been rarely reported. We present a case of bacteremia due to C. braakii in a 38-year-old woman with cervical cancer. She was admitted to our hospital with complaints of a fever, chills, and nausea. Blood culture results showed gram-negative bacilli identified as C. braakii via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis, although biochemical testing findings were suggestive of C. freundii. Since a rare pathogen was detected in the present case and the results of additional biochemical studies were suggestive of both C. braakii and Citrobacter farmeri, genetic analysis was conducted. Finally, the gram-negative bacilli were confirmed as C. braakii, a member of the C. freundii complex since 1993, by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing analysis. The gastrointestinal tract was considered the portal of entry, because the patient had a rectal fistula and other cultures such as urine and vaginal discharge incubated species other than C. braakii. The patient recovered after receiving treatment with ciprofloxacin for 14 days. The epidemiology and clinical characteristics of C. braakii infection are still unknown because of the limitations in accurate identification by using currently available commercial biochemical testing and previously, only 6 cases of C. braakii infection have been reported. Physicians should focus on this species, because it causes community-acquired infections, although further studies are needed to clarify the clinical characteristics of C. braakii infections.

  5. Natural mutations in a Staphylococcus aureus virulence regulator attenuate cytotoxicity but permit bacteremia and abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Das, Sudip; Lindemann, Claudia; Young, Bernadette C; Muller, Julius; Österreich, Babett; Ternette, Nicola; Winkler, Ann-Cathrin; Paprotka, Kerstin; Reinhardt, Richard; Förstner, Konrad U; Allen, Elizabeth; Flaxman, Amy; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Rollier, Christine S; van Diemen, Pauline; Blättner, Sebastian; Remmele, Christian W; Selle, Martina; Dittrich, Marcus; Müller, Tobias; Vogel, Jörg; Ohlsen, Knut; Crook, Derrick W; Massey, Ruth; Wilson, Daniel J; Rudel, Thomas; Wyllie, David H; Fraunholz, Martin J

    2016-05-31

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen, which causes severe blood and tissue infections that frequently emerge by autoinfection with asymptomatically carried nose and skin populations. However, recent studies report that bloodstream isolates differ systematically from those found in the nose and skin, exhibiting reduced toxicity toward leukocytes. In two patients, an attenuated toxicity bloodstream infection evolved from an asymptomatically carried high-toxicity nasal strain by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding the transcription factor repressor of surface proteins (rsp). Here, we report that rsp knockout mutants lead to global transcriptional and proteomic reprofiling, and they exhibit the greatest signal in a genome-wide screen for genes influencing S. aureus survival in human cells. This effect is likely to be mediated in part via SSR42, a long-noncoding RNA. We show that rsp controls SSR42 expression, is induced by hydrogen peroxide, and is required for normal cytotoxicity and hemolytic activity. Rsp inactivation in laboratory- and bacteremia-derived mutants attenuates toxin production, but up-regulates other immune subversion proteins and reduces lethality during experimental infection. Crucially, inactivation of rsp preserves bacterial dissemination, because it affects neither formation of deep abscesses in mice nor survival in human blood. Thus, we have identified a spontaneously evolving, attenuated-cytotoxicity, nonhemolytic S. aureus phenotype, controlled by a pleiotropic transcriptional regulator/noncoding RNA virulence regulatory system, capable of causing S. aureus bloodstream infections. Such a phenotype could promote deep infection with limited early clinical manifestations, raising concerns that bacterial evolution within the human body may contribute to severe infection.

  6. Predicting Risk of Endovascular Device Infection in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia (PREDICT-SAB)

    PubMed Central

    Sohail, M. Rizwan; Palraj, Bharath Raj; Khalid, Sana; Uslan, Daniel Z.; Al-Saffar, Farah; Friedman, Paul A.; Hayes, David L.; Lohse, Christine M.; Wilson, Walter R.; Steckelberg, James M.; Baddour, Larry M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prompt recognition of underlying cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infection in patients presenting with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) is critical for optimal management of these cases. The goal of this study was to identify clinical predictors of CIED infection in patients presenting with SAB and no signs of pocket infection. Methods and Results All cases of SAB in CIED recipients at Mayo Clinic from 2001 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. We identified 131 patients with CIED who presented with SAB and had no clinical signs of device pocket infection. Forty-five (34%) of these patients had underlying CIED infection based on clinical and/or echocardiographic criteria. The presence of a permanent pacemaker rather than an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (OR 3.90, 95% CI 1.65–9.23), P=0.002), >1 device-related procedure (OR 3.30, 95% CI 1.23–8.86, P=0.018), and duration of SAB ≥4 days (OR 5.54, 95% CI 3.32–13.23, P<0.001) were independently associated with an increased risk of CIED infection in a multivariable model. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) for the multivariable model was 0.79, indicating a good discriminatory capacity to distinguish SAB patients with and without CIED infection. Conclusions Among patients presenting with SAB and no signs of pocket infection, the risk of underlying CIED infection can be calculated based on the type of device, number of device-related procedures, and duration of SAB. We propose that patients without any of these high-risk features have a very low risk of underlying CIED infection and may be monitored closely without immediate device extraction. Prospective studies are needed to validate this risk prediction model. PMID:25504648

  7. Reduced Parasite Burden in Children with Falciparum Malaria and Bacteremia Coinfections: Role of Mediators of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Gregory C.; Mukundan, Harshini; Fenimore, Paul W.; Hengartner, Nicolas W.; McMahon, Benjamin H.; Ong'echa, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteremia and malaria coinfection is a common and life-threatening condition in children residing in sub-Saharan Africa. We previously showed that coinfection with Gram negative (G[−]) enteric Bacilli and Plasmodium falciparum (Pf[+]) was associated with reduced high-density parasitemia (HDP, >10,000 parasites/μL), enhanced respiratory distress, and severe anemia. Since inflammatory mediators are largely unexplored in such coinfections, circulating cytokines were determined in four groups of children (n = 206, aged <3 yrs): healthy; Pf[+] alone; G[−] coinfected; and G[+] coinfected. Staphylococcus aureus and non-Typhi Salmonella were the most frequently isolated G[+] and G[−] organisms, respectively. Coinfected children, particularly those with G[−] pathogens, had lower parasite burden (peripheral and geometric mean parasitemia and HDP). In addition, both coinfected groups had increased IL-4, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IFN-γ, and IFN-α and decreased TNF-α relative to malaria alone. Children with G[−] coinfection had higher IL-1β and IL-1Ra and lower IL-10 than the Pf[+] group and higher IFN-γ than the G[+] group. To determine how the immune response to malaria regulates parasitemia, cytokine production was investigated with a multiple mediation model. Cytokines with the greatest mediational impact on parasitemia were IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, and IFN-γ. Results here suggest that enhanced immune activation, especially in G[−] coinfected children, acts to reduce malaria parasite burden. PMID:27418744

  8. Successful Treatment of Clostridium difficile Bacteremia with Aortic Mycotic Aneurysm in a Patient with Prior Endovascular Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Brauch, Rebecca; Cherabuddi, Kartikeya

    2017-01-01

    The clinical spectrum of Clostridium difficile infection can range from benign gastrointestinal colonization to mild diarrhea and life threatening conditions such as pseudomembranous colitis and toxic megacolon. Extraintestinal manifestations of C. difficile are rare. Here, we report a patient with a history of an endovascular aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) presenting with an endovascular leak complicated by C. difficile bacteremia and a mycotic aneurysm. He was successfully treated with an explant of the EVAR, an aorto-left renal bypass, and aorto-bi-iliac bypass graft placement along with a six-week duration of intravenous vancomycin and oral metronidazole. PMID:28348903

  9. Characterization of the Humoral Immune Response during Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Global Gene Expression by Staphylococcus aureus in Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    den Reijer, Paul Martijn; Lemmens-den Toom, Nicole; Kant, Samantha; Snijders, Susan V.; Boelens, Hélène; Tavakol, Mehri; Verkaik, Nelianne J.; van Belkum, Alex; Verbrugh, Henri A.; van Wamel, Willem J. B.

    2013-01-01

    Attempts to develop an efficient anti-staphylococcal vaccine in humans have so far been unsuccessful. Therefore, more knowledge of the antigens that are expressed by Staphylococcus aureus in human blood and induce an immune response in patients is required. In this study we further characterize the serial levels of IgG and IgA antibodies against 56 staphylococcal antigens in multiple serum samples of 21 patients with a S. aureus bacteremia, compare peak IgG levels between patients and 30 non-infected controls, and analyze the expression of 3626 genes by two genetically distinct isolates in human blood. The serum antibody levels were measured using a bead-based flow cytometry technique (xMAP®, Luminex corporation). Gene expression levels were analyzed using a microarray (BµG@s microarray). The initial levels and time taken to reach peak IgG and IgA antibody levels were heterogeneous in bacteremia patients. The antigen SA0688 was associated with the highest median initial-to-peak antibody fold-increase for IgG (5.05-fold) and the second highest increase for IgA (2.07-fold). Peak IgG levels against 27 antigens, including the antigen SA0688, were significantly elevated in bacteremia patients versus controls (P≤0.05). Expression of diverse genes, including SA0688, was ubiquitously high in both isolates at all time points during incubation in blood. However, only a limited number of genes were specifically up- or downregulated in both isolates when cultured in blood, compared to the start of incubation in blood or during incubation in BHI broth. In conclusion, most staphylococcal antigens tested in this study, including many known virulence factors, do not induce uniform increases in the antibody levels in bacteremia patients. In addition, the expression of these antigens by S. aureus is not significantly altered by incubation in human blood over time. One immunogenic and ubiquitously expressed antigen is the putative iron-regulated ABC transporter SA0688. PMID

  10. Oral antibiotics increase blood neutrophil maturation and reduce bacteremia and necrotizing enterocolitis in the immediate postnatal period of preterm pigs.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Fuglsang, Eva; Jiang, Pingping; Birck, Malene M; Pan, Xiaoyu; Kamal, Shamrulazhar B S; Pors, Susanne E; Gammelgaard, Pernille L; Nielsen, Dennis S; Thymann, Thomas; Levy, Ofer; Frøkiær, Hanne; Sangild, Per T

    2016-01-01

    Immature immunity may predispose preterm neonates to infections and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). Intravenous antibiotics are frequently given to prevent and treat sepsis, while oral antibiotics are seldom used. We hypothesized that oral antibiotics promote maturation of systemic immunity and delay gut bacterial colonization and thereby protect preterm neonates against both NEC and bacteremia in the immediate postnatal period. Preterm pigs were given formula and administered saline (CON) or broad-spectrum antibiotics orally (ORA) or systemically (SYS) for 5 d after birth. Temporal changes in blood parameters and bacterial composition in the intestine, blood and immune organs were analyzed. Newborn preterm pigs had few blood neutrophils and a high frequency of progenitor cells. Neutrophils gradually matured after preterm birth with increasing CD14 and decreasing CD172a expressions. Preterm neutrophil and monocyte TLR2 expression and TLR2-mediated blood cytokine responses were low relative to adults. ORA pigs showed enhanced blood neutrophil maturation with reduced cell size and CD172a expression. Only ORA pigs, but not SYS pigs, were protected from a high density of gut Gram-positive bacteria, high gut permeability, Gram-positive bacteremia and NEC. Neonatal oral antibiotics may benefit mucosal and systemic immunity via delayed gut colonization and enhanced blood neutrophil maturation just after preterm birth.

  11. The Bactec FX Blood Culture System Detects Brucella melitensis Bacteremia in Adult Patients within the Routine 1-Week Incubation Period.

    PubMed

    Sagi, Moshe; Nesher, Lior; Yagupsky, Pablo

    2017-03-01

    The performance of the Bactec FX blood culture system for detecting Brucella bacteremia within the routine 1-week incubation period was assessed in a prospective study conducted in an area in southern Israel in which Brucella melitensis is endemic. Aerobic vials (BD Bactec Plus Aerobic/F medium) inoculated with blood specimens obtained from adult patients with positive Rose-Bengal screening test results were monitored for 4 consecutive weeks, and blind subcultures of negative vials were performed on solid media on days 7 and 28. During a 16-month period, a total of 31 (35.2%) of 88 cultures, obtained from 19 (38.0%) of 50 patients, were positive for Brucella melitensis The blood culture instrument identified 30 (96.8%) of 31 positive vials within 7 days of incubation; the single positive vial that was missed by the automated readings was detected only by the blind subculture performed on day 28. It is concluded that the Bactec FX system is able to detect the vast majority of episodes of Brucella bacteremia within the 1-week incubation protocol instituted in most clinical microbiology laboratories and without the need to perform blind subcultures of negative vials, enabling early diagnosis and saving labor and incubation time and space.

  12. Direct matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry improves appropriateness of antibiotic treatment of bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Vlek, Anne L M; Bonten, Marc J M; Boel, C H Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) allows the identification of microorganisms directly from positive blood culture broths. Use of the MALDI-TOF MS for rapid identification of microorganisms from blood culture broths can reduce the turnaround time to identification and may lead to earlier appropriate treatment of bacteremia. During February and April 2010, direct MALDI-TOF MS was routinely performed on all positive blood cultures. During December 2009 and March 2010 no direct MALDI-TOF MS was used. Information on antibiotic therapy was collected from the hospital and intensive care units' information systems from all positive blood cultures during the study period. In total, 253 episodes of bacteremia were included of which 89 during the intervention period and 164 during the control period. Direct performance of MALDI-TOF MS on positive blood culture broths reduced the time till species identification by 28.8-h and was associated with an 11.3% increase in the proportion of patients receiving appropriate antibiotic treatment 24 hours after blood culture positivity (64.0% in the control period versus 75.3% in the intervention period (p0.01)). Routine implementation of this technique increased the proportion of patients on adequate antimicrobial treatment within 24 hours.

  13. Neutrophil function in gram-negative rod bacteremia. The interaction between phagocytic cells, infecting organisms, and humoral factors.

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R J; Young, L S

    1976-01-01

    To assess the phagocytic and bactericidal function of neutrophils in the acute stages of gram-negative rod bacteremia, cells from 30 nonleukopenic patients were studied in a test system utilizing plasma obtained simultaneously with culture-positive blood, the autologous infecting strain, and two laboratory test strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results were compared to those obtained with normal neutrophils and plasma. Patient and control plasma were simultaneously tested with each source of phagocytic cells to localize any abnormalities. Four patients had a defect against their infecting strain, 33% of the inoculum phagocytized and killed versus 80% by controls. In these cases differences were localized to the patients' plasma, as normal plasma tested with patients' cells reversed the defect. Thus, four patients had impaired opsonization when compared to normal controls, but we also observed that 11 of 30 bacteremic isolates, all Escherichia coli, showed absolute or relative resistance to phagocytosis in the patient and control assay system. No intrinsic granulocyte killing abnormalities were noted. There was poor correlation between results obtained with infecting strains compared to laboratory test organisms. We conclude that in patients without evidence of an inherited neutrophil bactericidal disorder, recurrent infection, or treatment with cytotoxic drugs, intrinsic bactericidal defects are uncommon at the onset of gram-negative bacteremia, and impaired opsonization is the most commonly encountered cause of neutrophil dysfunction. PMID:819460

  14. Persistent bacteremia in rabbit fetuses despite maternal antibiotic therapy in a novel intrauterine-infection model.

    PubMed

    Gras-Le Guen, C; Debillon, T; Toquet, C; Jarry, A; Winer, N; Jacqueline, C; Kergueris, M F; Bingen, E; Roze, J C; Potel, G; Bugnon, D

    2003-07-01

    The effect of optimized maternal therapy by bactericidal agents was evaluated in a reproducible rabbit model of Escherichia coli maternofetal infection simulating human pharmacokinetics. Intravenous antibiotic therapy was begun in the pregnant rabbit 12 h after bacterial intrauterine inoculation, using a computer-controlled pump to simulate human pharmacokinetics of ceftriaxone (1 g/day) associated or not with gentamicin (3 mg/kg of body weight/day). Data were compared for fetal survival, quantitative blood cultures, fetal histology in treated versus untreated groups, and maternal and fetal antibiotic concentrations in plasma in treated animals. Antibiotic therapy led to dramatic improvement in maternal outcome (100% survival versus 100% death in the untreated group in association with maternal septicemia). Fetal survival also improved, with the two-drug combination providing a more potent effect. After 3 days of treatment, 32% of fetuses survived with one-drug therapy and 62% with two-drug therapy (Yates corrected chi(2), P < 0.05). In untreated animals, bacterial counts in blood cultures increased rapidly during the first 24 h up to 8.1 +/- 0.5 log CFU/ml, but remained relatively constant at all times with antibiotic treatment: 4.5 +/- 0.7 log CFU/ml at the start of treatment and 6.2 +/- 0.4 and 5.2 +/- 0.9 log CFU/ml after 72 h for one- and two-drug therapy, respectively (data are means +/- standard deviations). The failure of animals to be cured after 3 days of treatment was not due to an inadequate concentration of ceftriaxone, as the residual level in fetal serum at sacrifice was more than 1000 times the MIC of the microbe. Unexpectedly, inflammation in fetal lung decreased in the treated group after as little as 24 h of antibiotic therapy, despite persistent bacteremia. Although maternal outcome improved and drug concentrations were above the MIC, the treatment did not achieve sterilization of fetuses in utero for this rabbit E. coli maternofetal infection

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Colistin Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae Causing Bacteremia from India—A First Report

    PubMed Central

    Pragasam, Agila K.; Shankar, Chaitra; Veeraraghavan, Balaji; Biswas, Indranil; Nabarro, Laura E. B.; Inbanathan, Francis Y.; George, Biju; Verghese, Santhosh

    2017-01-01

    Colistin has long been a reserve drug used for the treatment of carbapenem resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae. Carbapenem resistance in K. pneumoniae has been increasing and is as high as 44% in India. Although a reserve agent, with rise in rates of resistance to carbapenems, the usage of colistin has increased over the years leading to slow emergence of resistance. Colistin resistance is mainly mediated by the alteration in the LPS of bacterial outer membrane with the addition of L-Ara4-N and PEtN molecules. These alterations are mediated by mutations in several genes involved in lipidA modifications and most commonly mutations in mgrB gene has been reported. Recently there is emergence of plasmid mediated resistance due to mcr-1 and mcr-2 genes which poses a threat for the rapid global spread. This study aims at characterizing eight colistin resistant K. pneumoniae from bacteremia by whole genome sequencing. Eight K. pneumoniae were isolated from blood culture during 2013 and 2014 at the Department of Clinical Microbiology, Christian Medical College, India. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for colistin and polymyxin B by broth-micro dilution method. Whole genome sequencing was performed using Ion Torrent and the genome of all eight isolates was analyzed. The eight isolates were resistant to all the antimicrobials expect tigecycline. MIC of colistin and polymyxin B were ranged from 4 to 1024 μg/ml and 0.5 to 2048 μg/ml respectively. Multiple mutations were observed in the chromosomal genes involved in lipid A modifications. mcr-1 and mcr-2 gene was absent in all the isolates. The most significant were mutations in mgrB gene. Among the eight isolates, four, three and one were belonged to sequence types ST 231, ST14 and ST147 respectively. Seven isolates had blaOXA−48 like, one co-expressed blaNDM−1 and blaOXA−48 like genes leading to carbapenem resistance. Overall, multiple numbers of

  16. Combination Therapy With Lysin CF-301 and Antibiotic Is Superior to Antibiotic Alone for Treating Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus–Induced Murine Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Schuch, Raymond; Lee, Han M.; Schneider, Brent C.; Sauve, Karen L.; Law, Christina; Khan, Babar K.; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Horiuchi, Yuki; Couto, Daniel E.; Raz, Assaf; Fischetti, Vincent A.; Huang, David B.; Nowinski, Robert C.; Wittekind, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Lysins are bacteriophage-derived enzymes that degrade bacterial peptidoglycans. Lysin CF-301 is being developed to treat Staphylococcus aureus because of its potent, specific, and rapid bacteriolytic effects. It also demonstrates activity on drug-resistant strains, has a low resistance profile, eradicates biofilms, and acts synergistically with antibiotics. CF-301 was bacteriolytic against 250 S. aureus strains tested including 120 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates. In time-kill studies with 62 strains, CF-301 reduced S. aureus by 3-log10 within 30 minutes compared to 6–12 hours required by antibiotics. In bacteremia, CF-301 increased survival by reducing blood MRSA 100-fold within 1 hour. Combinations of CF-301 with vancomycin or daptomycin synergized in vitro and increased survival significantly in staphylococcal-induced bacteremia compared to treatment with antibiotics alone (P < .0001). Superiority of CF-301 combinations with antibiotics was confirmed in 26 independent bacteremia studies. Combinations including CF-301 and antibiotics represent an attractive alternative to antibiotic monotherapies currently used to treat S. aureus bacteremia. PMID:24286983

  17. Catheter-Related Bacteremia Caused by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius Refractory to Antibiotic-Lock Therapy in a Hemophilic Child with Dog Exposure▿

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Chia-Yunn; Yang, Yung-Li; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lee, Ping-Ing

    2010-01-01

    We describe a case of catheter-related bacteremia due to Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in a child with dog exposure. The organism was confirmed as S. pseudintermedius based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and positive PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism of the pta gene. PMID:20164279

  18. Impact of the multiplex polymerase chain reaction in culture-positive samples on appropriate antibiotic use in patients with staphylococcal bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Na, Sun Hee; Kim, Chung-Jong; Kim, Moonsuk; Park, Jeong Su; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun; Park, Wan Beom; Bang, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Eu Suk; Park, Sang Won; Park, Kyoung Un; Kim, Nam Joong; Oh, Myoung-Don; Kim, Hong Bin

    2016-04-01

    Rapid identification of the microorganisms in patients with bacteremia may be useful in clinical practice. We evaluated the impact of the multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on appropriate antibiotic use for patients with gram-positive cocci cluster (GPCC) bacteremia. We divided the GPCC bacteremia cases into a pre-PCR group (2010-2011) and a post-PCR group (2012-2013). A total 664 cases were included in the pre-PCR group; and 570, in the post-PCR group. In methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) cases, optimal antibiotics were administered earlier in the post-PCR group (77.4h versus 42.6h, P=0.035). Although the proportions of glycopeptide exposure did not differ (54.7% versus 56.7%, P=0.799), the duration of exposure decreased (69.6h versus 30.7h, P=0.004). In methicillin-resistant S. aureus cases, the time to optimal antibiotics administration did not differ (45.4h versus 43.7h, P=0.275). Multiplex PCR test significantly improved the early initiation of optimal antibiotics in MSSA bacteremia and reduced the unnecessary glycopeptide exposure.

  19. Application of a 16S rRNA PCR-high-resolution melt analysis assay for rapid detection of Salmonella Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Kevin; Yang, Samuel; Won, Helen; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Kecojevic, Alex; Carroll, Karen C; Hardick, Justin; Rothman, Richard E

    2012-03-01

    Current culture and phenotypic protocols for diagnosing Salmonella infections can be time-consuming. Here, we describe the application of a 16S rRNA PCR coupled to high-resolution melt analysis (HRMA) for species and serotype identification within 6 h of blood sample collection from a patient with Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis bacteremia.

  20. Impact of empirical treatment in extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. bacteremia. A multicentric cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to analyze the factors that are associated with the adequacy of empirical antibiotic therapy and its impact in mortality in a large cohort of patients with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) - producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. bacteremia. Methods Cases of ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) bacteremia collected from 2003 through 2008 in 19 hospitals in Spain. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate logistic regression. Results We analyzed 387 cases ESBL-E bloodstream infections. The main sources of bacteremia were urinary tract (55.3%), biliary tract (12.7%), intra-abdominal (8.8%) and unknown origin (9.6%). Among all the 387 episodes, E. coli was isolated from blood cultures in 343 and in 45.71% the ESBL-E was multidrug resistant. Empirical antibiotic treatment was adequate in 48.8% of the cases and the in hospital mortality was 20.9%. In a multivariate analysis adequacy was a risk factor for death [adjusted OR (95% CI): 0.39 (0.31-0.97); P = 0.04], but not in patients without severe sepsis or shock. The class of antibiotic used empirically was not associated with prognosis in adequately treated patients. Conclusion ESBL-E bacteremia has a relatively high mortality that is partly related with a low adequacy of empirical antibiotic treatment. In selected subgroups the relevance of the adequacy of empirical therapy is limited. PMID:23038999

  1. Henoch-Schönlein purpura due to methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia from central venous catheterization.

    PubMed

    Uggeri, Simona; Fabbian, Fabio; Catizone, Luigi

    2008-06-01

    A 69-year-old Caucasian man was admitted to our hospital because of myocardial infarction. A central venous catheter (CVC) for infusive therapy was inserted. After two weeks he developed fever, purpura, and knee arthralgia. Hemoculture yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Subsequently, oliguric renal failure, hematuria, and nephrotic range proteinuria were recorded. Renal biopsy showed mesangial proliferation and crescent formation. In an immunofluorescence study, IgA, IgG, and C3 deposition in the mesangium and along arteriolar walls were observed. A diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura associated with infection caused by CVC was made. After administration of antibiotic and steroid therapy, proteinuria was markedly reduced, renal function improved, and purpura disappeared. The association of HSP with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has frequently been reported in the literature. We present here a case of HSP in association with MSSA bacteremia from central venous catheterization, a finding not reported previously.

  2. Disseminated Mycobacterium interjectum Infection with Bacteremia, Hepatic and Pulmonary Involvement Associated with a Long-Term Catheter Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hata, D. Jane; Reza, Mohammed; Satyanarayana, Raj; Arunthari, Vichaya; Bosch, Wendelyn

    2017-01-01

    We present a 49-year-old female with one year of intermittent fevers, chills, night sweats, and significant weight loss. Liver and lung biopsy showed evidence of a granulomatous process. Blood and liver biopsy cultures yielded growth of presumed Mycobacterium interjectum, thought to be related to a disseminated long-term central venous catheter infection. She successfully received one year of combined antimicrobial therapy after catheter removal without recurrence of disease. M. interjectum has been previously described as a cause of lymphadenitis in healthy children and associated with pulmonary disease in adults, although other localized infections have been reported. This is the first case described of a disseminated M. interjectum infection with bacteremia, hepatic and pulmonary involvement associated with a long-term catheter infection. PMID:28197350

  3. Influence of the bacterial phenotypes on the clinical manifestations in Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia patients: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Togawa, Atsushi; Toh, Hiromi; Onozawa, Kyoko; Yoshimura, Michinobu; Tokushige, Chiemi; Shimono, Nobuyuki; Takata, Tohru; Tamura, Kazuo

    2015-07-01

    Ninety-four episodes of Klebsiella pneumoniae bloodstream infection were identified at a university hospital in Japan. After excluding extended-spectrum beta lactamase-producing strains, 83 blood isolates from these patients were assayed in terms of their bacterial phenotypes such as the mucoid and hypermucoviscosity phenotypes. Bacterial phenotypes were correlated with the patients' clinical manifestations. The hypermucoviscosity phenotype was significantly associated with septic shock at the onset of infections (odds ratio, 15.92; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-468.12), but was not associated with liver abscess formation. Mortality was determined by the presence of septic shock. RmpA gene was associated with the induction of the hypermucoviscosity phenotype. These results reveal unique roles of bacterial phenotypes on the patient's clinical condition in K. pneumoniae bacteremia.

  4. Early bactericidal activity of rifabutin versus that of placebo in treatment of disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex bacteremia in AIDS patients.

    PubMed Central

    Dautzenberg, B; Castellani, P; Pellegrin, J L; Vittecoq, D; Truffot-Pernot, C; Pirotta, N; Sassella, D

    1996-01-01

    Rifabutin, 600 mg/day, was compared with a placebo in the early treatment of culture-proven Mycobacterium avium bacteremia in patients with AIDS. Following 14 days' treatment, bacteriological success, defined as a negative culture or a reduction in the number of CFU of M. avium organisms per milliliter of blood by a factor of > or = 0.5 log from the baseline, was observed in 7 of 10 (70%) evaluable rifabutin patients and in 1 of 13 (8%) evaluable placebo patients (P = 0.002). Rifabutin is active against M. avium as a single agent and can make a significant contribution to combination regimens for the treatment of disseminated M. avium infection in AIDS patients. PMID:8807071

  5. Bacteremia due to Pasteurella dagmatis acquired from a dog bite, with a review of systemic infections and challenges in laboratory identification

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jianhui; Krajden, Sigmund; Kus, Julianne V; Rawte, Prasad; Blondal, John; Downing, Mark; Zurawska, Urszula; Chapman, William

    2015-01-01

    A case of bacteremia in a 74-year-old man, which was caused by Pasteurella dagmatis and complicated by thrombocytopenia, is presented. Microorganism identification was performed by the provincial reference laboratory using traditional biochemical profiling, completmented with both the sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry; antibiotic-susceptibility testing was also performed. After treatment with the appropriate antibiotics, the patient fully recovered. Systemic infections attributed to this organism are rarely reported in the literature. Other reported cases of bacteremia due to P dagmatis are reviewed and compared with the present case. The challenges of relying on standard automatic identification are discussed, with alternative methodologies provided. PMID:26600817

  6. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Bacteremia without Endocarditis: Rapid Identification from Positive Blood Culture by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Principe, Luigi; Bracco, Silvia; Mauri, Carola; Tonolo, Silvia; Pini, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacillus that is infrequently responsible for infections in humans. Three forms have been classified: a localized cutaneous form (erysipeloid) caused by traumatic penetration of E. rhusiopathiae, a generalized cutaneous form and a septicemic form. The latter type of disease has been previously associated with a high incidence of endocarditis. Here we report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia in a 74-year-old man, probably started from an erysipeloid form, in which endocarditis did not develop. This case presents some particular and uncommon features: i) no correlation with animal source; ii) correlation between bacteremia and erysipeloid lesion; iii) absence of endocarditis. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry allowed to obtain a rapid identification (within 4 hours from bottle positivity) of E. rhusiopathiae. Together with direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing, this approach could improve the rate of appropriate therapy for bloodstream infections due to this fastidious pathogen. PMID:27103974

  7. Erysipelothrix Rhusiopathiae Bacteremia without Endocarditis: Rapid Identification from Positive Blood Culture by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Principe, Luigi; Bracco, Silvia; Mauri, Carola; Tonolo, Silvia; Pini, Beatrice; Luzzaro, Francesco

    2016-03-21

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a Gram-positive bacillus that is infrequently responsible for infections in humans. Three forms have been classified: a localized cutaneous form (erysipeloid) caused by traumatic penetration of E. rhusiopathiae, a generalized cutaneous form and a septicemic form. The latter type of disease has been previously associated with a high incidence of endocarditis. Here we report a case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia in a 74-year-old man, probably started from an erysipeloid form, in which endocarditis did not develop. This case presents some particular and uncommon features: i) no correlation with animal source; ii) correlation between bacteremia and erysipeloid lesion; iii) absence of endocarditis. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry allowed to obtain a rapid identification (within 4 hours from bottle positivity) of E. rhusiopathiae. Together with direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing, this approach could improve the rate of appropriate therapy for bloodstream infections due to this fastidious pathogen.

  8. Seasonal Variation of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae Bacteremia According to Acquisition and Patient Characteristics: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Gradel, Kim Oren; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, Court; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Østergaard, Christian; Arpi, Magnus; Jensen, Thøger Gorm; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Søgaard, Mette; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Seasonal variation is a characteristic of many infectious diseases, but relatively little is known about determinants thereof. We studied the impact of place of acquisition and patient characteristics on seasonal variation of bacteremia caused by the 3 most common pathogens. DESIGN Seasonal variation analysis. METHODS In 3 Danish health regions (2.3 million total inhabitants), patients with bacteremia were identified from 2000 through 2011 using information from laboratory information systems. Analyses were confined to Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Additional data were obtained from the Danish National Hospital Registry for the construction of admission histories and calculation of the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). Bacteremias were categorized as community acquired, healthcare associated (HCA), and hospital acquired. We defined multiple subgroups by combining the following characteristics: species, acquisition, age group, gender, CCI level, and location of infection. Assuming a sinusoidal model, seasonal variation was assessed by the peak-to-trough (PTT) ratio with a 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS In total, we included 16,006 E. coli, 6,924 S. aureus, and 4,884 S. pneumoniae bacteremia cases. For E. coli, the seasonal variation was highest for community-acquired cases (PTT ratio, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.17-1.32), was diminished for HCA (PTT ratio, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.25), and was missing for hospital-acquired cases. No seasonal variation was observed for S. aureus. S. pneumoniae showed high seasonal variation, which did not differ according to acquisition (overall PTT ratio, 3.42; 95% CI, 3.10-3.83). CONCLUSIONS Seasonal variation was mainly related to the species although the place of acquisition was important for E. coli. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:946-953.

  9. A propensity score analysis shows that empirical treatment with linezolid does not increase the thirty-day mortality rate in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Ternavasio-de la Vega, Hugo-Guillermo; Mateos-Díaz, Ana-María; Martinez, Jose-Antonio; Almela, Manel; Cobos-Trigueros, Nazaret; Morata, Laura; De-la-Calle, Cristina; Sala, Marta; Mensa, Josep; Marcos, Miguel; Soriano, Alex

    2014-12-01

    The role of linezolid in empirical therapy of suspected bacteremia remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of empirical use of linezolid or glycopeptides in addition to other antibiotics on the 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. For this purpose, 1,126 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia in the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona from 2000 to 2012 were included in this study. In order to compare the mortality rates between patients who received linezolid or glycopeptides, the propensity scores on baseline variables were used to balance the treatment groups, and both propensity score matching and propensity-adjusted logistic regression were used to compare the 30-day mortality rates between the groups. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 16.0% during the study period. Sixty-eight patients received empirical treatment with linezolid, and 1,058 received glycopeptides. The propensity score matching included 64 patients in each treatment group. After matching, the mortality rates were 14.1% (9/64) in patients who received glycopeptides and 21.9% (14/64) in those who received linezolid, and a nonsignificant association between empirical linezolid treatment and mortality rate (odds ratio [OR], 1.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69 to 3.82; P = 0.275, McNemar's test) was found. This association remained nonsignificant when variables that remained unbalanced after matching were included in a conditional logistic regression model. Further, the stratified propensity score analysis did not show any significant relationship between empirical linezolid treatment and the mortality rate after adjustment by propensity score quintiles or other variables potentially associated with mortality. In conclusion, the propensity score analysis showed that empirical treatment with linezolid compared with that with glycopeptides was not associated with 30-day mortality rates in patients with Gram-negative bacteremia.

  10. In vitro activity of daptomycin against Staphylococci isolated from bacteremia and community-onset skin and soft tissue infections in France: data from two nationwide studies.

    PubMed

    Gallon, O; Guillet-Caruba, C; Lamy, B; Laurent, F; Doucet-Populaire, F; Decousser, J-W

    2009-10-01

    Staphylococci are a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and bacteremia in France, a country with a high prevalence of oxacillin resistance. We evaluated the in vitro activity of daptomycin compared with reference compounds against 445 Staphylococcus aureus and 53 coagulase-negative Staphylococci (CNS) collected during two large nationwide studies performed in 2006 and 2007. The percentage of oxacillin resistance among S. aureus was 13.6% (SSTIs) and 30.7% (bacteremia). Daptomycin showed lower MIC(90) levels compared to vancomycin, teicoplanin, and linezolid (0.19 mg/L vs. 2, 1.5, and 1 mg/L, respectively), irrespective of oxacillin susceptibility. Amongst the CNS, 64.2% of the isolates originated from clinical bacteremia were resistant to oxacillin and 24.5% to teicoplanin; all but one Staphylococci were susceptible to daptomycin (MIC = 1.5 mg/l). As with linezolid, daptomycin seems to constitute an alternative option to treat some staphylococcal infections in the French context of high oxacillin resistance prevalence and high glycopeptides MIC.

  11. High pentraxin 3 level predicts septic shock and bacteremia at the onset of febrile neutropenia after intensive chemotherapy of hematologic patients

    PubMed Central

    Vänskä, Matti; Koivula, Irma; Hämäläinen, Sari; Pulkki, Kari; Nousiainen, Tapio; Jantunen, Esa; Juutilainen, Auni

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated pentraxin 3 as a marker for complications of neutropenic fever in 100 hematologic patients receiving intensive chemotherapy. Pentraxin 3 and C-reactive protein were measured at fever onset and then daily to day 3. Bacteremia was observed in 19 patients and septic shock in 5 patients (three deaths). In comparison to C-reactive protein, pentraxin 3 achieved its maximum more rapidly. Pentraxin 3 correlated not only with the same day C-reactive protein but also with the next day C-reactive protein. High pentraxin 3 on day 0 was associated with the development of septic shock (P=0.009) and bacteremia (P=0.046). The non-survivors had constantly high pentraxin 3 levels. To conclude, pentraxin 3 is an early predictor of complications in hematologic patients with neutropenic fever. High level of pentraxin 3 predicts septic shock and bacteremia already at the onset of febrile neutropenia. (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00781040.) PMID:21880642

  12. Clinical usefulness of the 2010 clinical and laboratory standards institute revised breakpoints for cephalosporin use in the treatment of bacteremia caused by Escherichia coli or Klebsiella spp.

    PubMed

    Ku, Nam Su; Chung, Hae-Sun; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon; Kim, June Myung; Chong, Yunsop

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the clinical usefulness of the revised 2010 Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoints for Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. Of 2,623 patients with bacteremia caused by E. coli or Klebsiella spp., 573 who had been treated appropriately with cephalosporin based on the CLSI 2009 guidelines were enrolled. There were no differences in the rates of treatment failure or mortality between the appropriately and inappropriately treated groups according to the CLSI 2010 guidelines. Additionally, in the matched case-control analysis, the treatment failure rate was higher in bacteremic patients with extended-spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL-) producing but cephalosporin-susceptible organisms than in those with ESBL-nonproducing isolates when patients with urinary tract infections were excluded (44% and 0%, resp., P = 0.026). In patients with bacteremia caused by E. coli or Klebsiella spp., the revised CLSI 2010 guidelines did not lead to poorer outcomes. However, ESBL production appeared to be associated with poor clinical outcomes in patients with bacteremia from sources other than the urinary tract.

  13. A novel conditional platelet depletion mouse model reveals the importance of platelets in protection against S. aureus bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Wuescher, Leah M.; Takashima, Akira; Worth, Randall G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelets are critical cells for maintaining vascular hemostasis but their activities in other processes are becoming apparent. Specifically, the ability of platelets to recognize and respond to infectious agents is an important area of investigation. To understand the physiological roles of platelets in vivo, most researchers have used antibody-mediated platelet depletion, which has certain limitations. Objective To develop an optimal system to study the contribution of platelets to protection from S. aureus blood infection. Methods Here we describe a novel experimental model of conditional platelet depletion based on the Cre-recombinase cell ablation system. Using this technology, the simian diphtheria toxin receptor was expressed in platelet factor 4 (PF4) positive cells (megakaryocytes and platelets). Results Systemic administration of diphtheria toxin (DT) every 48 hours results in reduced platelet numbers that become undetectable after six days. While platelets are depleted, no other blood cells are affected. Using this newly-developed model, the functional contributions of platelets in protection against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteremia was examined. Platelet-depleted mice succumbed to infection more rapidly than wild-type (WT) mice and contained significantly higher bacterial burden in kidneys, increased serum markers of kidney damage and elevated levels of cytokines indicative of septic shock. Conclusions Here we illustrate a new mouse model for conditional platelet depletion and implicate platelets as important participants of the immune response to bacterial blood infections. PMID:25418277

  14. Prevalence of Bartonella henselae bacteremia, the causative agent of cat scratch disease, in an Australian cat population.

    PubMed

    Branley, J; Wolfson, C; Waters, P; Gottlieb, T; Bradbury, R

    1996-08-01

    In order to determine the prevalence of Bartonella henselae becteremia in an Australian cat population we examined blood cultures on a group of Sydney cats. Cats referred to the Concord Animal Hospital for euthanasia were selected randomly for blood culture and serum sampling. Blood samples were lysed and centrifuged and then cultured for up to five weeks. Suspicious colonies were identified biochemically as probable B. henselae. Selected isolates were confirmed as B. henselae using the polymerase chain reaction. Of the cats accrued throughout Sydney, 27/77 (35%) were culture positive for B. henselae, of these 24/59 (40%) were feral cats and 3/18 (16%) were domestic. Most cats in the study were younger than one year (mean 9.9 months). Our study demonstrates that bacteremia with B. henselae is common in the metropolitan cat population and suggests that it is particularly prevalent among feral animals. By contrast Cat Scratch Disease (CSD) is a relatively uncommon clinical diagnosis in the Australian population. Explanations for this discrepancy may include poor transmission, low bacterial virulence and underdiagnosis. It is possible that feral animals are a greater potential risk source for this infection than domestic cats.

  15. [A case of bacteremia and suppurative vertebral osteomyelitis/discitis due to Shewanella algae occurring after raw-fish consumption].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tsunehiro; Matsumura, Yasufumi

    2009-09-01

    Shewanella algae is an aquatic gram-negative bacterium, rarely recovered from human clinical samples. Case reports of human Shewanella infection are, however, slowly increasing, and a Shewanella infection outbreak was reported at a South Korean hospital. We report the case of an 89-year-old man admitted for back pain and fever after eating raw marine fish. Sulbactam/cefoperazone was started under a tentative diagnosis of gall bladder inflammation with gallstones based on ultrasonographic findings. His persistent back pain, however, necessitated vertebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which showed thoracic vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. Two sets of blood culture on admission yielded a gram-negative bacillus identified as "Shewanella putrefaciens" by automated identification. Ceftriaxone administration for 3 weeks followed by oral levofloxcin for 5 weeks cured the vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis. 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that "S. putrefacien" was, in fact, S. algae-incorrectly detected because semi-automated and automated identification did not include S. algae in their database. It should thus be kept in mind that consuming raw-fish may cause Shewanella bacteremia and osteomyelitis in patients with hepatobiliary disease and that genetic analysis is required to precisely determine the occurrence of Shewanella spp.

  16. Campylobacter fetus infection presenting with bacteremia and cellulitis in a 72-year-old man with an implanted pacemaker: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Campylobacter is an important causative agent of intestinal infections in humans. Bacteremia is detected in less than 1% of patients, mainly in immunocompromised patients and in extreme age groups. Cellulitis is a relatively common manifestation of Campylobacter infection, but concomitant bacteremia is a rare event. Infections of the pacemaker area are caused primarily by staphylococci, followed by fungi, streptococci and Gram-negative rods. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of pacemaker pocket infection and bacteremia caused by Campylobacter fetus. Case presentation A 72-year-old Croatian Caucasian man with myelodysplasia, impaired fasting glucose levels and a recently implanted permanent pacemaker was admitted to hospital after six days of fever, development of red swelling of the pacemaker pocket area and worsening of his general condition. No antibiotic therapy was introduced in the outpatient setting. He denied any recent gastrointestinal disturbances. With the exception of an elevated leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein and blood glucose levels, other laboratory findings were normal. Treatment with vancomycin plus netilmicin was introduced, and a surgical incision with drainage of the pacemaker pocket was performed. The entire pacemaker system was removed and a new one re-implanted after 14 days of antibiotic therapy. Transesophageal echocardiography showed no pathological findings. Three subsequent blood cultures obtained on admission as well as swab culture of the incised pacemaker area revealed Campylobacter fetus; stool and pacemaker lead cultures were negative. According to the microbiological results, antibiotic therapy was changed to ciprofloxacin plus netilmicin. A clinical examination and the results of a laboratory analysis performed after two weeks of therapy were within normal limits. Conclusion Myelodysplasia, impaired fasting glucose levels and older age could be

  17. Phase II, randomized, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of a polyclonal anti-Staphylococcus aureus capsular polysaccharide immune globulin in treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Mark E; Holley, H Preston; Lutz, Jon; Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Woods, Christopher W; Levine, Donald P; Veney, Naomi; Fowler, Vance G

    2007-12-01

    New treatment modalities are needed for the treatment of infections due to multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus capsular polysaccharide immune globulin (Altastaph) is a polyclonal immune globulin preparation that is being developed as adjunctive therapy for persons with S. aureus infections complicated by bacteremia. In a phase II, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 40 subjects with documented S. aureus bacteremia received standard therapy plus either Altastaph at 200 mg/kg of body weight in each of two infusions 24 h apart or placebo. During the 42-day observation period, antibody pharmacokinetics and safety were the primary characteristics studied. Information regarding the resolution of bacteremia and fever was also analyzed. Anti-type-5 and anti-type-8 capsular antibody levels peaked after the second infusion at 550 mug/ml and 419 mug/ml, respectively, and remained above 100 mug/ml at day 28. A total of 316 adverse events were noted in 39 of 40 subjects. Infusion-related adverse events in Altastaph recipients were infrequent and similar to those among recipients of commercial intravenously administered immunoglobulin G products. Five of 21 (23%) subjects in the Altastaph group died, whereas 2 of 18 (11%) subjects in the placebo group died (P = 0.42). Compared to the control patients, the Altastaph recipients had a shorter median time to the resolution of fever (2 days and 7 days, respectively; P = 0.09) and a shorter length of hospital stay (9 days and 14 days, respectively; P = 0.03). However, these findings are exploratory, and there were few differences in the other variables measured. High levels of opsonizing antibodies were maintained for the initial 4 weeks. Although the study was not powered to show efficacy, these preliminary findings and safety profile suggest that Altastaph may be an effective adjunct to antibiotics and warrants further investigation (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT00063089).

  18. Active immunization with an octa-valent Staphylococcus aureus antigen mixture in models of S. aureus bacteremia and skin infection in mice.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Sanne; Koedijk, Dennis G A M; Back, Jaap Willem; Neef, Jolanda; Dreisbach, Annette; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A J M; Buist, Girbe

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic studies with different Staphylococcus aureus isolates have shown that the cell surface-exposed and secreted proteins IsaA, LytM, Nuc, the propeptide of Atl (pro-Atl) and four phenol-soluble modulins α (PSMα) are invariantly produced by this pathogen. Therefore the present study was aimed at investigating whether these proteins can be used for active immunization against S. aureus infection in mouse models of bacteremia and skin infection. To this end, recombinant His-tagged fusions of IsaA, LytM, Nuc and pro-Atl were isolated from Lactococcus lactis or Escherichia coli, while the PSMα1-4 peptides were chemically synthesized. Importantly, patients colonized by S. aureus showed significant immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses against all eight antigens. BALB/cBYJ mice were immunized subcutaneously with a mixture of the antigens at day one (5 μg each), and boosted twice (25 μg of each antigen) with 28 days interval. This resulted in high IgG responses against all antigens although the response against pro-Atl was around one log lower compared to the other antigens. Compared to placebo-immunized mice, immunization with the octa-valent antigen mixture did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in blood, lungs, spleen, liver, and kidneys in a bacteremia model in which the animals were challenged for 14 days with a primary load of 3 × 10(5) CFU. Discomfort scores and animal survival rates over 14 days did not differ between immunized mice and placebo-immunized mice upon bacteremia with S. aureus USA300 (6 × 10(5) CFU). In addition, this immunization did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in mice with skin infection. These results show that the target antigens are immunogenic in both humans and mice, but in the used animal models do not result in protection against S. aureus infection.

  19. Carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam for the treatment of bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsih-Yeh; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Tang, Hung-Jen; Huang, Chi-Chang; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Chu, Fang-Yeh; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-11-01

    This study was intended to delineate the role of carbapenems and piperacillin/tazobactam in treating bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Proteus mirabilis. We performed a multicenter and retrospective study of the patients with ESBL-producing P. mirabilis bacteremia. The outcomes of the patients treated by piperacillin/tazobactam or a carbapenem for at least 48 hours and the MICs of the prescribed drugs for these isolates were analyzed. Forty-seven patients with available clinical data were included. The overall 30-day mortality rate was 29.8%. All available isolates (n = 44) were susceptible to ertapenem, meropenem, and doripenem, and 95.6% were susceptible to piperacillin/tazobactam; however, only 11.4% of the isolates were susceptible to imipenem. Among the 3 patients infected with isolates exhibiting non-susceptibility to imipenem (MIC ≥2 mg/L) who were treated with imipenem, none died within 28 days. The 30-day (14.3% versus 23.1%, P = 0.65) or in-hospital (19.1% versus 30.8%, P = 0.68) mortality rate of 21 patients treated by a carbapenem was lower than that of 13 treated by piperacillin/tazobactam. However, among those treated by piperacillin/tazobactam, the mortality rate of those infected by the isolates with lower piperacillin/tazobactam MICs (≤0.5/4 mg/L) was lower than that of the isolates with MICs of ≥1/4 mg/L (0%, 0/7 versus 60%, 3/5; P = 0.045). ESBL-producing P. mirabilis bacteremia is associated with significant mortality, and carbapenem therapy could be regarded as the drugs of choice. The role of piperacillin/tazobactam, especially for the infections due to the isolates with an MIC ≤0.5/4 mg/L, warrants more clinical studies.

  20. Persistent Bacteremia from Pseudomonas aeruginosa with In Vitro Resistance to the Novel Antibiotics Ceftolozane-Tazobactam and Ceftazidime-Avibactam

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Patricia; Stewart, Cynthia; Miljkovic, Goran; Saul, Zane K.

    2016-01-01

    Ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam are new antimicrobials with activity against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present the first case of persistent P. aeruginosa bacteremia with in vitro resistance to these novel antimicrobials. A 68-year-old man with newly diagnosed follicular lymphoma was admitted to the medical intensive care unit for sepsis and right lower extremity cellulitis. The patient was placed empirically on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Blood cultures from Day 1 of hospitalization grew P. aeruginosa susceptible to piperacillin-tazobactam and cefepime identified using VITEK 2 (Biomerieux, Lenexa, KS). Repeat blood cultures from Day 5 grew P. aeruginosa resistant to all cephalosporins, as well as to meropenem by Day 10. Susceptibility testing performed by measuring minimum inhibitory concentration by E-test (Biomerieux, Lenexa, KS) revealed that blood cultures from Day 10 were resistant to ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam. The Verigene Blood Culture-Gram-Negative (BC-GN) microarray-based assay (Nanosphere, Inc., Northbrook, IL) was used to investigate underlying resistance mechanism in the P. aeruginosa isolate but CTX-M, KPC, NDM, VIM, IMP, and OXA gene were not detected. This case report highlights the well-documented phenomenon of antimicrobial resistance development in P. aeruginosa even during the course of appropriate antibiotic therapy. In the era of increasing multidrug-resistant organisms, routine susceptibility testing of P. aeruginosa to ceftazidime-avibactam and ceftolozane-tazobactam is warranted. Emerging resistance mechanisms to these novel antibiotics need to be further investigated. PMID:27818808

  1. An affinity adsorption media that mimics heparan sulfate proteoglycans for the treatment of drug-resistant bacteremia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrea, Keith R.; Ward, Robert S.

    2016-06-01

    Removal of several drug-resistant bacteria from blood by affinity adsorption onto a heparin-functional media is reported. Heparin is a chemical analogue of heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans, found on transmembrane proteins of endothelial cells. Many blood-borne human pathogens, including bacteria, viruses, parasites, and fungi have been reported to target HS as an initial step in their pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrate the binding and removal of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Extended-Spectrum Betalactamase Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL), and two Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (both CRE Escherichia coli and CRE K. pneumoniae) using 300 μm polyethylene beads surface modified with end-point-attached heparin. Depending on the specific bacteria, the amount removed ranged between 39% (ESBL) and 99.9% (CRE). The total amount of bacteria adsorbed ranged between 2.8 × 105 and 8.6 × 105 colony forming units (CFU) per gram of adsorption media. Based on a polymicrobial challenge which showed no competitive binding, MRSA and CRE apparently utilize different binding sequences on the immobilized heparin ligand. Since the total circulating bacterial load during bacteremia seldom exceeds 5 × 105 CFUs, it appears possible to significantly reduce bacterial concentration in infected patients by multi-pass recirculation of their blood through a small extracorporeal affinity filter containing the heparin-functional adsorption media. This 'dialysis-like therapy' is expected to improve patient outcomes and reduce the cost of care, particularly when there are no anti-infective drugs available to treat the infection.

  2. Increased Age-Dependent Risk of Death Associated With lukF-PV-Positive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Trine A.; Skov, Robert; Petersen, Andreas; Larsen, Anders R.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Panton-Valentine leucocidin is a Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor encoded by lukF-PV and lukS-PV that is infrequent in S aureus bacteremia (SAB), and, therefore, little is known about risk factors and outcome of lukF-PV/lukS-PV-positive SAB. Methods. This report is a register-based nationwide observational cohort study. lukF-PV was detected by polymerase chain reaction. Factors associated with the presence of lukF-PV were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Adjusted 30-day hazard ratios of mortality associated with lukF-PV status were computed by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Results. Of 9490 SAB cases, 129 were lukF-PV-positive (1.4%), representing 14 different clonal complexes. lukF-PV was associated with younger age, absence of comorbidity, and methicillin-resistant S aureus. In unadjusted analysis, mortality associated with lukF-PV-positive SAB was comparable to SAB. However, lukF-PV-positive SAB nonsurvivors were significantly older and had more comorbidity. Consequently, by adjusted analysis, the risk of 30-day mortality was increased by 70% for lukF-PV-positive SAB compared with SAB (hazard ratio, 1.70; 95% confidence interval, 1.20–2.42; P = .003). Conclusions. lukF-PV-positive SAB is rare in Denmark but associated with a significantly increased risk of mortality. Although the risk of lukF-PV-positive SAB was highest in the younger age groups, >80% of deaths associated with lukF-PV-positive SAB occurred in individuals older than 55 years. PMID:27957504

  3. Clinical Characteristics of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Bacteremia: A Regional Report and a Review of a Japanese Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ebara, Hirotaka; Hagiya, Hideharu; Haruki, Yuto; Kondo, Eisei; Otsuka, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    Objective Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an emerging nosocomial pathogen that causes fatal infections in critically ill or immunocompromised patients. S. maltophilia bacteremia (SMB) is a rare condition, and its clinical characteristics in Japanese settings are not well known. Methods The medical charts of patients with SMB were retrospectively reviewed at two medical facilities (Okayama University Hospital and Tsuyama Chuo Hospital) for seven years. The data were analyzed along with those previously reported from other Japanese facilities. Result A total of 181 patients (110 men and 71 women) were evaluated. The major underlying diseases included hematologic malignancy (36.5%), solid organ malignancy (25.4%), and neutropenia (31.5%). The recent use of carbapenem was seen in 56.9% of the cases in total, and more than one-third of the patients in our hospitals were treated with carbapenem at the onset of SMB. Of 28 (63.6%) of 44 cases treated for S. maltophilia, those who did not survive were more likely to have been treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. A multivariate analysis revealed that a higher updated Charlson Comorbidity Index [odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 1.75 (1.11-2.75); p=0.015] and intubation [odds ratio (95% confidence interval), 12.6 (1.62-97.9); p=0.016] were associated with mortality in our cases. Pathogens were often resistant to ceftazidime but susceptible to minocycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and fluoroquinolones. The overall mortality rates within 30 and 90 days were 37.5% and 62.5%, respectively. Conclusion The clinical characteristics of SMB in Japanese cases were similar to those reported from other countries. Clinicians should be aware that breakthrough infection by S. maltophilia may occur during administration of carbapenem. PMID:28090041

  4. Comparative Genome Analysis of the Daptomycin-Resistant Streptococcus anginosus Strain J4206 Associated with Breakthrough Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Maliha; Nguyen, Scott V.; McCullor, Kimberly A.; King, Catherine J.; Jorgensen, James H.; McShan, W. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus anginosus is a member of the normal oral flora that can become a pathogen causing pyogenic infections in humans. The genome of daptomycin-resistant strain J4206, originally isolated from a patient suffering from breakthrough bacteremia and septic shock at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, was determined. The circular genome is 2,001,352 bp long with a GC content of 38.62% and contains multiple mobile genetic elements, including the phage-like chromosomal island SanCI that mediates a mutator phenotype, transposons, and integrative conjugative elements. Daptomycin resistance involves multiple alterations in the cell membrane and cell wall, and unique features were identified in J4206 that may contribute to resistance. A cluster of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) genes for choline metabolism and transport are present that may help neutralize cell surface charges, destabilizing daptomycin binding. Further, unique J4206 genes encoding sortases and LPXTG-target proteins that are involved in cell wall modification were present. The J4206 genome is phylogenetically closely related to the recently reported vancomycin-resistant SA1 strain; however, these genomes differ with SNPs in cardiolipin synthetase, histidine kinase yycG, teichoic acid modification genes, and other genes involved in cell surface modification. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the cell walls of both strains J4206 and SA1 were significantly thicker and more electron dense than daptomycin- and vancomycin-sensitive strain J4211. This comparative genomic study has identified unique genes as well as allelic variants in the J4206 genome that are involved in cell surface modification and thus might contribute to the acquisition of daptomycin resistance. PMID:27678123

  5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumor as entry port for S. intermedius causing bacteremia and multiple liver abscesses. Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Benou, C; Walter, B M; Schlitter, M A; Wilhelm, D; Neu, B; Schmid, R M

    2016-03-01

    We report a case of a previously healthy 52-year-old man who presented with fever and liver lesions suspicious for metastatic disease, which proved subsequently to be abscesses. Further workup revealed a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) in the gastric corpus as entry port to Streptococcus intermedius-associated bacteremia and liver abscesses. After antibiotic treatment and surgical resection of the tumor, the patient recovered well. This unusual case indicates that gastrointestinal stromal tumors can remain undetected until they cause a life threatening infection. A review of recent literature pertaining to GIST and liver abscesses follows.

  6. Diagnosis and treatment of bacteremia and endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus. A clinical guideline from the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC).

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Francesc; Aguado, José María; Almirante, Benito; Bouza, Emilio; Cercenado, Emilia; Domínguez, M Ángeles; Gasch, Oriol; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Miró, José M; Palomar, Mercedes; Pascual, Alvaro; Pericas, Juan M; Pujol, Miquel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Shaw, Evelyn; Soriano, Alex; Vallés, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Both bacteremia and infective endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus are common and severe diseases. The prognosis may darken not infrequently, especially in the presence of intracardiac devices or methicillin-resistance. Indeed, the optimization of the antimicrobial therapy is a key step in the outcome of these infections. The high rates of treatment failure and the increasing interest in the influence of vancomycin susceptibility in the outcome of infections caused by both methicillin-susceptible and -resistant isolates has led to the research of novel therapeutic schemes. Specifically, the interest raised in recent years on the new antimicrobials with activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci has been also extended to infections caused by susceptible strains, which still carry the most important burden of infection. Recent clinical and experimental research has focused in the activity of new combinations of antimicrobials, their indication and role still being debatable. Also, the impact of an appropriate empirical antimicrobial treatment has acquired relevance in recent years. Finally, it is noteworthy the impact of the implementation of a systematic bundle of measures for improving the outcome. The aim of this clinical guideline is to provide an ensemble of recommendations in order to improve the treatment and prognosis of bacteremia and infective endocarditis caused by S. aureus, in accordance to the latest evidence published.

  7. Potential Impact of Rapid Blood Culture Testing for Gram-Positive Bacteremia in Japan with the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Test

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Mari; Iguchi, Shigekazu; Mizutani, Tomonori; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Tega-Ishii, Michiru; Sansaka, Kaori; Negishi, Kenta; Shimada, Kimie; Umemura, Jun; Notake, Shigeyuki; Yanagisawa, Hideji; Yabusaki, Reiko; Araoka, Hideki; Yoneyama, Akiko

    2017-01-01

    Background. Early detection of Gram-positive bacteremia and timely appropriate antimicrobial therapy are required for decreasing patient mortality. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the performance of the Verigene Gram-positive blood culture assay (BC-GP) in two special healthcare settings and determine the potential impact of rapid blood culture testing for Gram-positive bacteremia within the Japanese healthcare delivery system. Furthermore, the study included simulated blood cultures, which included a library of well-characterized methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) isolates reflecting different geographical regions in Japan. Methods. A total 347 BC-GP assays were performed on clinical and simulated blood cultures. BC-GP results were compared to results obtained by reference methods for genus/species identification and detection of resistance genes using molecular and MALDI-TOF MS methodologies. Results. For identification and detection of resistance genes at two clinical sites and simulated blood cultures, overall concordance of BC-GP with reference methods was 327/347 (94%). The time for identification and antimicrobial resistance detection by BC-GP was significantly shorter compared to routine testing especially at the cardiology hospital, which does not offer clinical microbiology services on weekends and holidays. Conclusion. BC-GP generated accurate identification and detection of resistance markers compared with routine laboratory methods for Gram-positive organisms in specialized clinical settings providing more rapid results than current routine testing. PMID:28316631

  8. A synthetic M protein peptide synergizes with a CXC chemokine protease to induce vaccine-mediated protection against virulent streptococcal pyoderma and bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Manisha; Langshaw, Emma; Hartas, Jon; Lam, Alfred; Batzloff, Michael R; Good, Michael F

    2015-06-15

    Infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) are highly prevalent in the tropics, in developing countries, and in the Indigenous populations of developed countries. These infections and their sequelae are responsible for almost 500,000 lives lost prematurely each year. A synthetic peptide vaccine (J8-DT) from the conserved region of the M protein has shown efficacy against disease that follows i.p. inoculation of bacteria. By developing a murine model for infection that closely mimics human skin infection, we show that the vaccine can protect against pyoderma and subsequent bacteremia caused by multiple GAS strains, including strains endemic in Aboriginal communities in the Northern Territory of Australia. However, the vaccine was ineffective against a hypervirulent cluster of virulence responder/sensor mutant GAS strain; this correlated with the strain's ability to degrade CXC chemokines, thereby preventing neutrophil chemotaxis. By combining J8-DT with an inactive form of the streptococcal CXC protease, S. pyogenes cell envelope proteinase, we developed a combination vaccine that is highly effective in blocking CXC chemokine degradation and permits opsonic Abs to kill the bacteria. Mice receiving the combination vaccine were strongly protected against pyoderma and bacteremia, as evidenced by a 100-1000-fold reduction in bacterial burden following challenge. To our knowledge, a vaccine requiring Abs to target two independent virulence factors of an organism is unique.

  9. Experience With Rapid Microarray-Based Diagnostic Technology and Antimicrobial Stewardship for Patients With Gram-Positive Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Neuner, Elizabeth A; Pallotta, Andrea M; Lam, Simon W; Stowe, David; Gordon, Steven M; Procop, Gary W; Richter, Sandra S

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the impact of rapid diagnostic microarray technology and antimicrobial stewardship for patients with Gram-positive blood cultures. DESIGN Retrospective pre-intervention/post-intervention study. SETTING A 1,200-bed academic medical center. PATIENTS Inpatients with blood cultures positive for Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, E. faecium, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, S. anginosus, Streptococcus spp., and Listeria monocytogenes during the 6 months before and after implementation of Verigene Gram-positive blood culture microarray (BC-GP) with an antimicrobial stewardship intervention. METHODS Before the intervention, no rapid diagnostic technology was used or antimicrobial stewardship intervention was undertaken, except for the use of peptide nucleic acid fluorescent in situ hybridization and MRSA agar to identify staphylococcal isolates. After the intervention, all Gram-positive blood cultures underwent BC-GP microarray and the antimicrobial stewardship intervention consisting of real-time notification and pharmacist review. RESULTS In total, 513 patients with bacteremia were included in this study: 280 patients with S. aureus, 150 patients with enterococci, 82 patients with stretococci, and 1 patient with L. monocytogenes. The number of antimicrobial switches was similar in the pre-BC-GP (52%; 155 of 300) and post-BC-GP (50%; 107 of 213) periods. The time to antimicrobial switch was significantly shorter in the post-BC-GP group than in the pre-BC-GP group: 48±41 hours versus 75±46 hours, respectively (P<.001). The most common antimicrobial switch was de-escalation and time to de-escalation, was significantly shorter in the post-BC-GP group than in the pre-BC-GP group: 53±41 hours versus 82±48 hours, respectively (P<.001). There was no difference in mortality or hospital length of stay as a result of the intervention. CONCLUSIONS The combination of a rapid microarray diagnostic test with an antimicrobial

  10. Comparison of ampicillin-sulbactam regimens simulating 1.5- and 3.0-gram doses to humans in treatment of Escherichia coli bacteremia in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lister, P D; Sanders, C C

    1995-01-01

    A mouse model of bacteremia was used to compare the efficacies of 1.5- and 3.0-g intravenous doses of ampicillin-sulbactam. Seven strains of Escherichia coli producing various levels of TEM-1 beta-lactamase were used as the challenge isolates. These strains included six clinical isolates (MICs from 2/1 micrograms/ml [with 2 and 1 microgram/ml being the respective concentrations of ampicillin and sulbactam] to 32/16 micrograms/ml) with similar degrees of virulence in mice and a laboratory genetic transformant (E. coli AFE) which hyperproduces TEM-1 (MIC = 128/64 micrograms/ml). Human pharmacokinetics were simulated by injecting mice subcutaneously twice (1 h apart) with ampicillin-sulbactam at concentrations of 40 mg/kg of body weight (1.5 g) and 80 mg/kg (3.0 g). Against two clinical isolates for which ampicillin-sulbactam MICs were < or = 8/4 micrograms/ml, no difference was observed in either the rate or level of killing between the two doses, and both doses were 100% protective against lethal infection. Against the four clinical isolates for which ampicillin-sulbactam MICs were between 16/8 and 32/16 micrograms/ml, a slight delay in killing was noted with three of the strains. This delay was followed by a rapid 2- to 3-log drop in the level of bacteremia, and both doses of ampicillin-sulbactam were 100% protective against lethal septicemia. With strain AFE, no killing was observed with the 40-mg/kg dose compared with a 2-log killing with the 80-mg/kg dose. This difference in killing correlated with a decreased protective efficacy of the 40-mg/kg dose. These data suggest that the 1.5-g preparation of ampicillin-sulbactam is as effective as the 3.0-g dose in the treatment of experimentally induced E. coli bacteremia, as long as ampicillin-sulbactam MICs are 32/16 micrograms/ml or less. PMID:7785998

  11. [Bacteremia caused by ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella serotype Kentucky: a case report and the review of literature].

    PubMed

    Müderris, Tuba; Ürkmez, Fatma Yekta; Küçüker, Şeref Alp; Sağlam, Muhammet Fethi; Yılmaz, Gül Ruhsar; Güner, Rahmet; Güleşen, Revasiye; Açıkgöz, Ziya Cibali

    2016-10-01

    Salmonella infections can be seen in four clinical types, namely gastroenteritis, bacteremia/sepsis, enteric fever and carriage. These infections can result in uncomplicated diarrhea in most cases, but can lead to invasive disease requiring antimicrobial therapy and can be life-threatening in elderly or immunocomprimised patients. Broad-spectrum cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones are crucial options in the treatment of the invasive infections. Ciprofloxacin resistance is rarely seen in non-typhoid Salmonella enterica isolates, and only in S. Typhimurium, S. Choleraesuis and S. Schwarzengrund. In this report, we aimed to discuss a patient infected with ciprofloxacin-resistant Salmonella Kentucky under the light of data from our country and the world. A 52-year-old male patient wih acute myocardial infarction was hospitalized in intensive care unit of cardiovasculer surgery for left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation for the treatment of left ventricular disfunction. On the seventh day of LVAD and coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), the patient presented high fever and productive cough. His physical examination revealed hyperemia around the insertion point of right jugular central venous catheter (CVC) and a serous discharge from the insertion point of LVAD located just below the inferior edge of sternum. Empiric IV cefoperazone/sulbactam (SCF) therapy was started with the prediagnosis of pneumonia and bloodstream infection. The blood samples taken from peripheral veins and CVC, and swabs taken from LVAD insertion point for culture when the patient was febrile, revealed the growth of bacteria with S type and lactose-negative colonies on EMB and SS media. Biochemical characteristics of the isolate were as follows: lactose fermentation negative, H2S positive, IMVIC (-,+,-,+), urease negative, lysine/ornithine decarboxylase positive and motile. The bacteria was then identified as Salmonella enterica serotype Kentucky (8,20;i;z6) by agglutination tests

  12. Immunoglobulin M-enriched intravenous polyclonal immunoglobulins reduce bacteremia following Klebsiella pneumoniae infection in an acute respiratory distress syndrome rat model.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, R A; van Kaam, A H L C; Haitsma, J J; Verbrugge, S J C; Delreu, F; Lachmann, B

    2004-06-01

    Mechanical ventilation is known to induce bacterial translocation from the lung into the systemic circulation. This study determined the effect of immunoglobulin M (IgM)-enriched polyclonal immunoglobulins on bacteremia due to ventilation-induced translocation in an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) rat model with Klebsiella-induced pneumonia. After whole lung lavage, Sprague-Dawley rats intravenously received either a high dose or a low dose of an immunoglobulin preparation, or an albumin solution as control, followed by an intratracheal injection of a Klebsiella pneumoniae solution. Blood colony-forming units (CFUs) in the treatment groups were significantly lower during the 3-hour ventilation period compared to the control group. The authors conclude that IgM-enriched polyclonal immunoglobulins lead to a reduction of bacteria in blood of surfactant-deficient, ventilated rats infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  13. [From the Mailing List SIN: expected and unexpected professional risks for the nephrologists--reflections from an outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia bacteremia in a hemodialysis unit].

    PubMed

    Bellazzi, R; Ciniselli, F

    2005-01-01

    An outbreak of bacteremia in 20 hemodialysed patients who developed central venous catheter (CVC) infection related to Burkholderia cepacia is reported, introducing medical and professional responsibilities in nephrology units. The cepacia was documented in the blood stream, in the CVC biofilm, in the water supply and in the distribution. This and other confounding factors delayed the identification of the contamination source. Finally, it was isolated, clonally identical to that found in the blood stream, from ammonium chloride solution used to disinfect the skin and distributed in a sterile disposable kit. Burkholderia cepacia was clonally different in blood with respect to water. The possible differing responsibilities in the organizational steps of nephrology activity are discussed.

  14. Interaction between IL-6 and TNF-α genotypes associated with bacteremia in multiple myeloma patients submitted to autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT).

    PubMed

    Trigo, Fernanda M B; Luizon, Marcelo R; Dutra, Hélio S; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Márcio; Simões, Belinda P

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation affects patient׳s vulnerability to infections due to immunological changes related to chemotherapy. Multiple myeloma is characterized by susceptibility to infections, and IL-6 and TNF-α increased levels affect immune response (IR). Polymorphisms in promoter region of cytokine genes may alter expression levels and affect IR. We performed interaction analysis of IL-6 (-174G/C) and TNF-α (-308G/A) polymorphisms with infection susceptibility in 148 patients classified accordingly to infection status and found an interaction when compared groups with and without bacteremia (p=0.0380). The interaction may be more important than single effects for the IR associated with the infection susceptibility in ASCT.

  15. Fatal Outcome in Bacteremia is Characterized by High Plasma Cell Free DNA Concentration and Apoptotic DNA Fragmentation: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Huttunen, Reetta; Kuparinen, Taru; Jylhävä, Juulia; Aittoniemi, Janne; Vuento, Risto; Huhtala, Heini; Laine, Janne; Syrjänen, Jaana; Hurme, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies have shown that apoptosis plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of sepsis. High plasma cell free DNA (cf-DNA) concentrations have been shown to be associated with sepsis outcome. The origin of cf-DNA is unclear. Methods Total plasma cf-DNA was quantified directly in plasma and the amplifiable cf-DNA assessed using quantitative PCR in 132 patients with bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, ß-hemolytic streptococcae or Escherichia coli. The quality of cf-DNA was analyzed with a DNA Chip assay performed on 8 survivors and 8 nonsurvivors. Values were measured on days 1–4 after positive blood culture, on day 5–17 and on recovery. Results The maximum cf-DNA values on days 1–4 (n = 132) were markedly higher in nonsurvivors compared to survivors (2.03 vs 1.26 ug/ml, p<0.001) and the AUCROC in the prediction of case fatality was 0.81 (95% CI 0.69–0.94). cf-DNA at a cut-off level of 1.52 ug/ml showed 83% sensitivity and 79% specificity for fatal disease. High cf-DNA (>1.52 ug/ml) remained an independent risk factor for case fatality in a logistic regression model. Qualitative analysis of cf-DNA showed that cf-DNA displayed a predominating low-molecular-weight cf-DNA band (150–200 bp) in nonsurvivors, corresponding to the size of the apoptotic nucleosomal DNA. cf-DNA concentration showed a significant positive correlation with visually graded apoptotic band intensity (R = 0.822, p<0.001). Conclusions Plasma cf-DNA concentration proved to be a specific independent prognostic biomarker in bacteremia. cf-DNA displayed a predominating low-molecular-weight cf-DNA band in nonsurvivors corresponding to the size of apoptotic nucleosomal DNA. PMID:21747948

  16. A propensity score-matched analysis of the impact of minimum inhibitory concentration on mortality in patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia treated with cefepime or ceftazidime.

    PubMed

    Ratliff, Angharad R; Gentry, Chris A; Williams, Riley J

    2017-04-01

    The United States Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recently elected not to revise ceftazidime and cefepime Pseudomonas aeruginosa minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) susceptibility breakpoints but rather recommended specific dosage regimens to correspond to breakpoints. This study's objective was to examine mortality of low and high MIC P. aeruginosa isolates in bacteremic patients treated with cefepime or ceftazidime. Data were gathered through a Veterans Health Administration national administrative database for veterans with P. aeruginosa blood cultures who received cefepime or ceftazidime. Seventy-four patients in the low MIC (≤2 μg/mL) group and 29 patients in the high (4-8 μg/mL) MIC group were included. Independent baseline variables associated with 30-day all-cause mortality were determined through multivariate analysis to calculate propensity scores and perform matching. All-cause 30-day mortality was not statistically significant between the 2 resultant propensity score-matched groups (17.2% mortality in the low MIC group versus 27.6% in the high MIC group; P=0.34). Data suggested that P. aeruginosa bacteremia episodes where the cephalosporin MIC = 8 μg/mL may have higher mortality, however this may be reflective of higher propensity scores. Our study suggests that it is reasonable to designate a cefepime or ceftazidime MIC ≤8 μg/mL as susceptible for P. aeruginosa bacteremia infections, but potential suboptimal outcomes in episodes for which the P. aeruginosa MIC is 8 μg/mL may need further investigation.

  17. Fingerprint Analysis and Identification of Strains ST309 as a Potential High Risk Clone in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Isolated from Children with Bacteremia in Mexico City

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Delgado, Gabriela; Espinosa, Luis F.; Isselo, Dassaev; Méndez, José L.; Rodriguez, Cristina; Miranda, Guadalupe; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and is associated with nosocomial infections. Its ability to thrive in a broad range of environments is due to a large and diverse genome of which its accessory genome is part. The objective of this study was to characterize P. aeruginosa strains isolated from children who developed bacteremia, using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and in terms of its genomic islands, virulence genes, multilocus sequence type, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Our results showed that P. aeruginosa strains presented the seven virulence genes: toxA, lasB, lecA, algR, plcH, phzA1, and toxR, a type IV pilin alleles (TFP) group I or II. Additionally, we detected a novel pilin and accessory gene, expanding the number of TFP alleles to group VI. All strains presented the PAPI-2 Island and the majority were exoU+ and exoS+ genotype. Ten percent of the strains were multi-drug resistant phenotype, 18% extensively drug-resistant, 68% moderately resistant and only 3% were susceptible to all the antimicrobial tested. The most prevalent acquired β-Lactamase was KPC. We identified a group of ST309 strains, as a potential high risk clone. Our finding also showed that the strains isolated from patients with bacteremia have important virulence factors involved in colonization and dissemination as: a TFP group I or II; the presence of the exoU gene within the PAPI-2 island and the presence of the exoS gene. PMID:28298909

  18. Fingerprint Analysis and Identification of Strains ST309 as a Potential High Risk Clone in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Population Isolated from Children with Bacteremia in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Morales-Espinosa, Rosario; Delgado, Gabriela; Espinosa, Luis F; Isselo, Dassaev; Méndez, José L; Rodriguez, Cristina; Miranda, Guadalupe; Cravioto, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and is associated with nosocomial infections. Its ability to thrive in a broad range of environments is due to a large and diverse genome of which its accessory genome is part. The objective of this study was to characterize P. aeruginosa strains isolated from children who developed bacteremia, using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, and in terms of its genomic islands, virulence genes, multilocus sequence type, and antimicrobial susceptibility. Our results showed that P. aeruginosa strains presented the seven virulence genes: toxA, lasB, lecA, algR, plcH, phzA1, and toxR, a type IV pilin alleles (TFP) group I or II. Additionally, we detected a novel pilin and accessory gene, expanding the number of TFP alleles to group VI. All strains presented the PAPI-2 Island and the majority were exoU+ and exoS+ genotype. Ten percent of the strains were multi-drug resistant phenotype, 18% extensively drug-resistant, 68% moderately resistant and only 3% were susceptible to all the antimicrobial tested. The most prevalent acquired β-Lactamase was KPC. We identified a group of ST309 strains, as a potential high risk clone. Our finding also showed that the strains isolated from patients with bacteremia have important virulence factors involved in colonization and dissemination as: a TFP group I or II; the presence of the exoU gene within the PAPI-2 island and the presence of the exoS gene.

  19. Executive summary of the diagnosis and treatment of bacteremia and endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus. A clinical guideline from the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (SEIMC).

    PubMed

    Gudiol, Francesc; Aguado, José María; Almirante, Benito; Bouza, Emilio; Cercenado, Emilia; Domínguez, M Ángeles; Gasch, Oriol; Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Miró, José M; Palomar, Mercedes; Pascual, Alvaro; Pericas, Juan M; Pujol, Miquel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Shaw, Evelyn; Soriano, Alex; Vallés, Jordi

    2015-11-01

    Bacteremia and infective endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus are common and severe diseases. Optimization of treatment is fundamental in the prognosis of these infections. The high rates of treatment failure and the increasing interest in the influence of vancomycin susceptibility in the outcome of infections caused by both methicillin-susceptible and -resistant isolates have led to research on novel therapeutic schemes. The interest in the new antimicrobials with activity against methicillin-resistant staphylococci has been extended to susceptible strains, which still carry the most important burden of infection. New combinations of antimicrobials have been investigated in experimental and clinical studies, but their role is still being debated. Also, the appropriateness of the initial empirical therapy has acquired relevance in recent years. The aim of this guideline is to update the 2009 guidelines and to provide an ensemble of recommendations in order to improve the treatment of staphylococcal bacteremia and infective endocarditis, in accordance with the latest published evidence.

  20. Preventing Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and sepsis in patients with Staphylococcus aureus colonization of intravascular catheters: a retrospective multicenter study and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hetem, David J; de Ruiter, Susanne C; Buiting, Anton G M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Thijsen, Steven F; Vlaminckx, Bart J M; Wintermans, Robert G F; Bonten, Marc J M; Ekkelenkamp, Miquel B

    2011-07-01

    Two previous studies in tertiary care hospitals identified Staphylococcus aureus colonization of intravascular (IV) catheters as a strong predictor of subsequent S. aureus bacteremia (SAB), even in the absence of clinical signs of systemic infection. Bacteremia was effectively prevented by timely antibiotic therapy. We conducted this study to corroborate the validity of these findings in non-university hospitals.Using the laboratory information management systems of the clinical microbiology departments in 6 Dutch hospitals, we identified patients who had IV catheters from which S. aureus was cultured between January 1, 2003, and December 31, 2008. Patients with demonstrated SAB between 7 days before catheter removal and 24 hours after catheter removal were excluded. We extracted clinical and demographic patient data from the patients' medical records. The primary risk factor was initiation of anti-staphylococcal antibiotic therapy within 24 hours, and the primary endpoint was SAB >24 hours after IV catheter removal. Subsequently, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all observational studies evaluating the effect of antibiotic therapy for S. aureus IV catheter tip colonization.In the current study, 18 of the 192 included patients developed subsequent SAB, which was associated with not receiving antibiotic therapy within 24 hours (odds ratio [OR], 4.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-15.6) and with documented exit-site infection (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.2-9.3). When we combined these results with results of a previous study in a university hospital, a third risk factor was also associated with subsequent SAB, namely corticosteroid therapy (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.3-6.3). We identified 3 other studies, in addition to the present study, in a systematic review. In the meta-analysis of these studies, antibiotic therapy yielded an absolute risk reduction of 13.6% for subsequent SAB. The number needed to treat to prevent 1 episode of SAB was 7.4.We conclude that

  1. Enhanced Diagnosis of Pneumococcal Bacteremia Using Antigen- and Molecular-Based Tools on Blood Specimens in Mali and Thailand: A Prospective Surveillance Study.

    PubMed

    Moïsi, Jennifer C; Moore, Matthew; Carvalho, Maria da Gloria; Sow, Samba O; Siludjai, Duangkamon; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Tapia, Milagritos; Baggett, Henry C

    2016-02-01

    Prior antibiotic use, contamination, limited blood volume, and processing delays reduce yield of blood cultures for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae. We performed immunochromatographic testing (ICT) on broth from incubated blood culture bottles and real-time lytA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on broth and whole blood and compared findings to blood culture in patients with suspected bacteremia. We selected 383 patients in Mali and 586 patients in Thailand based on their blood culture results: 75 and 31 were positive for pneumococcus, 100 and 162 were positive for other pathogens, and 208 and 403 were blood culture negative, respectively. ICT and PCR of blood culture broth were at least 87% sensitive and 97% specific compared with blood culture; whole blood PCR was 75-88% sensitive and 96-100% specific. Pneumococcal yields in children < 5 years of age increased from 2.9% to 10.7% in Mali with > 99% of additional cases detected by whole blood PCR, and from 0.07% to 5.1% in Thailand with two-thirds of additional cases identified by ICT. Compared with blood culture, ICT and lytA PCR on cultured broth were highly sensitive and specific but their ability to improve pneumococcal identification varied by site. Further studies of these tools are needed before widespread implementation.

  2. Oxacilin-resistant Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) bacteremia in a general hospital at São Paulo city, Brasil.

    PubMed

    d'Azevedo, P A; Secchi, C; Antunes, A L S; Sales, T; Silva, F M; Tranchesi, R; Pignatari, A C C

    2008-10-01

    In the last decades, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), especially Staphylococcus epidermidis have become an important cause of bloodstream infections. In addition, rates of methicillin-resistance among CoNS have increased substantially, leading to the use of glicopeptides for therapy. The objective of this study was to evaluate eleven consecutives clinically relevant cases of oxacillin-resistant CoNS bacteremia in a general hospital localized in São Paulo city, Brazil. Five different species were identified by different phenotypic methods, including S. epidermidis (5), S. haemolyticus (3), S. hominis (1), S. warneri (1) and S. cohnii subsp urealyticus (1). A variety of Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis profiles was observed by macrorestriction DNA analysis in S. epidermidis isolates, but two of three S. haemolyticus isolates presented the same profile. These data indicated the heterogeneity of the CoNS isolates, suggesting that horizontal dissemination of these microorganisms in the investigated hospital was not frequent. One S. epidermidis and one S. haemolyticus isolates were resistant to teicoplanin and susceptible to vancomycin. The selective pressure due to the use of teicoplanin in this hospital is relevant.

  3. The Performance of Direct Disk Diffusion for Community Acquired Bacteremia due to Gram-Negative Bacilli and Its Impact on Physician Treatment Decisions.

    PubMed

    Daley, Peter; Comerford, Adam; Umali, Jurgienne; Penney, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Background. Direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing provides faster results than standard microtitre susceptibility. The direct result may impact patient outcome in sepsis if it is accurate and if physicians use the information to promptly and appropriately change antibiotic treatment. Objective. To compare the performance of direct disk diffusion with standard susceptibility and to consider physician decisions in response to these early results, for community acquired bacteremia with Gram-negative Bacilli. Methods. Retrospective observational study of all positive blood cultures with Gram-negative Bacilli, collected over one year. Physician antibiotic treatment decisions were assessed by an infectious diseases physician based on information available to the physician at the time of the decision. Results. 89 bottles growing Gram-negative Bacilli were included in the analysis. Direct disk diffusion agreement with standard susceptibility varied widely. In 47 cases (52.8%), the physician should have changed to a narrower spectrum but did not, in 18 cases (20.2%), the physician correctly narrowed from appropriate broad coverage, and in 8 cases (9.0%), the empiric therapy was correct. Discussion. Because inoculum is not standardized, direct susceptibility results do not agree with standard susceptibility results for all drugs. Physicians do not act on direct susceptibility results. Conclusion. Direct susceptibility should be discontinued in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  4. The Performance of Direct Disk Diffusion for Community Acquired Bacteremia due to Gram-Negative Bacilli and Its Impact on Physician Treatment Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Peter; Comerford, Adam; Umali, Jurgienne; Penney, Carla

    2016-01-01

    Background. Direct disk diffusion susceptibility testing provides faster results than standard microtitre susceptibility. The direct result may impact patient outcome in sepsis if it is accurate and if physicians use the information to promptly and appropriately change antibiotic treatment. Objective. To compare the performance of direct disk diffusion with standard susceptibility and to consider physician decisions in response to these early results, for community acquired bacteremia with Gram-negative Bacilli. Methods. Retrospective observational study of all positive blood cultures with Gram-negative Bacilli, collected over one year. Physician antibiotic treatment decisions were assessed by an infectious diseases physician based on information available to the physician at the time of the decision. Results. 89 bottles growing Gram-negative Bacilli were included in the analysis. Direct disk diffusion agreement with standard susceptibility varied widely. In 47 cases (52.8%), the physician should have changed to a narrower spectrum but did not, in 18 cases (20.2%), the physician correctly narrowed from appropriate broad coverage, and in 8 cases (9.0%), the empiric therapy was correct. Discussion. Because inoculum is not standardized, direct susceptibility results do not agree with standard susceptibility results for all drugs. Physicians do not act on direct susceptibility results. Conclusion. Direct susceptibility should be discontinued in clinical microbiology laboratories. PMID:27366172

  5. The Epidemiologic, Microbiologic and Clinical Picture of Bacteremia among Febrile Infants and Young Children Managed as Outpatients at the Emergency Room, before and after Initiation of the Routine Anti-Pneumococcal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Leibovitz, Eugene; David, Nuphar; Ribitzky-Eisner, Haya; Abo Madegam, Mouner; Abuabed, Said; Chodick, Gabriel; Maimon, Michal; Fruchtman, Yariv

    2016-01-01

    We described the occult bacteremia (OB) and bacteremia with diagnosed focus (BwF) picture among children managed as outpatients at the pediatric emergency room (PER) in southern Israel, before and after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) introduction in a retrospective study enrolling all three- to 36-month-old patients with fever >38.0 °C during 2005–2014. Of 511 (0.82% of all febrile patients) true bacteremias, 230 (45%) were managed as outpatients; 96 of 230 (41.7%) had OB and 134 (3.59%) had BwF. OB and BwF rates were 0.22% and 3.02%, respectively. A significant decrease was noted in OB and BwF rates (p = 0.0008 and p = 0.02, respectively). S. pneumoniae (SP, 37.5%), K. kingae (11.4%) and Brucella spp. (8.7%) were the most common OB pathogens and SP (29.8%), S. viridans (13.4%), and Brucella spp. (12.7%) were the most common in BwF patients. PCV13 serotypes were not found among the serotypes isolated post-PCV13 introduction. During 2010–2014 there was an increase in non-PCV13 serotype isolation (p = 0.005). SP was the main pathogen isolated among patients with pneumonia, acute otitis media (AOM) and periorbital cellulitis (62.5%, 33.3% and 60%, respectively). OB and BwF decreased following the introduction of PCVs and SP was the main pathogen in both conditions. Vaccine-SP serotypes were not isolated in OB after PCV13 introduction and non-vaccine serotypes increased significantly. PMID:27447651

  6. A Nationwide Study of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Bacteremia in Finland Over a 10-Year Period, 1998–2007, With Special Reference to Clinical Characteristics and Antimicrobial Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lauhio, Anneli; Ellström, Patrik; Rautelin, Hilpi

    2011-01-01

    Background. Campylobacter bacteremia is an uncommon condition, usually diagnosed in elderly and immunocompromised patients. Methods. Blood culture isolates and clinical information were collected for patients with diagnoses of Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli bacteremia in Finland from 1998 through 2007. Bacterial species were identified by means of polymerase chain reaction analysis, and minimal inhibitory concentrations for ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, meropenem, and metronidazole were determined with an agar dilution method. Medical records and mortality data within 1 year after the bacteremic episode were reviewed. Results. The study included 76 patients (median age, 46 years), for whom bacterial isolates (C. jejuni in 73, C. coli in 3) and clinical information were available. Most patients (70%) had no significant underlying diseases. The majority (82%) of the isolates were susceptible for all antimicrobial agents tested. However, antimicrobial therapy seemed to have only a limited effect, because no differences could be detected between patients with appropriate empirical antimicrobial treatment and those with delayed appropriate, inappropriate, or no antimicrobial therapy, either in the duration of hospitalization (median, 4 days for both groups) or in attributable mortality. The outcome of the infection was severe in 4 patients infected with C. jejuni; 2 died within 30 days, spondylodiscitis developed in 1, and Guillain-Barré syndrome developed in 1. Conclusions. C. jejuni and C. coli bacteremia occurred mainly in moderately young individuals without severe underlying diseases. The bacterial isolates were predominantly susceptible to antimicrobial agents, and the outcome of the disease was typically good, regardless of appropriate or inappropriate antimicrobial treatment given in the hospital. PMID:21921217

  7. Rapid testing using the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture nucleic acid test in combination with antimicrobial stewardship intervention against Gram-negative bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Bork, Jacqueline T; Leekha, Surbhi; Heil, Emily L; Zhao, LiCheng; Badamas, Rilwan; Johnson, J Kristie

    2015-03-01

    Rapid identification of microorganisms and antimicrobial resistance is paramount for targeted treatment in serious bloodstream infections (BSI). The Verigene Gram-negative blood culture nucleic acid test (BC-GN) is a multiplex, automated molecular diagnostic test for identification of eight Gram-negative (GN) organisms and resistance markers from blood culture with a turnaround time of approximately 2 h. Clinical isolates from adult patients at the University Maryland Medical Center with GN bacteremia from 1 January 2012 to 30 June 2012 were included in this study. Blood culture bottles were spiked with clinical isolates, allowed to incubate, and processed by BC-GN. A diagnostic evaluation was performed. In addition, a theoretical evaluation of time to effective and optimal antibiotic was performed, comparing actual antibiotic administration times from chart review ("control") to theoretical administration times based on BC-GN reporting and antimicrobial stewardship team (AST) review ("intervention"). For organisms detected by the assay, BC-GN correctly identified 95.6% (131/137), with a sensitivity of 97.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.7 to 98.4%) and a specificity of 99.5% (95% CI, 98.8 to 99.8%). CTX-M and OXA resistance determinants were both detected. Allowing 12 h from Gram stain for antibiotic implementation, the intervention group had a significantly shorter duration to both effective (3.3 versus 7.0 h; P < 0.01) and optimal (23.5 versus 41.8 h; P < 0.01) antibiotic therapy. BC-GN with AST intervention can potentially decrease time to both effective and optimal antibiotic therapy in GN BSI.

  8. Impact of penicillin nonsusceptibility on clinical outcomes of patients with nonmeningeal Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia in the era of the 2008 clinical and laboratory standards institute penicillin breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seong-Ho; Chung, Jin-Won; Sung, Heungsup; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Sung-Han; Lee, Sang-Oh; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Choi, Sang-Ho

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the impact of penicillin nonsusceptibility on clinical outcomes of patients with nonmeningeal Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (SPB), a retrospective cohort study was performed. The characteristics of 39 patients with penicillin-nonsusceptible SPB (PNSPB) were compared to those of a group of age- and sex-matched patients (n = 78) with penicillin-susceptible SPB (PSSPB). Susceptibility to penicillin was redetermined by using the revised Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) penicillin breakpoints in CLSI document M100-S18. Although the PNSPB group tended to have more serious initial manifestations than the PSSPB group, the two groups did not differ significantly in terms of their 30-day mortality rates (30.8% versus 23.1%; P = 0.37) or the duration of hospital stay (median number of days, 14 versus 12; P = 0.89). Broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents, such as extended-spectrum cephalosporins, vancomycin, and carbapenem, were frequently used in both the PNSPB and PSSPB groups. Multivariate analysis revealed that ceftriaxone nonsusceptibility (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 4.88; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07 to 22.27; P = 0.041) was one of the independent risk factors for 30-day mortality. Thus, when the 2008 CLSI penicillin breakpoints are applied and the current clinical practice of using wide-spectrum empirical antimicrobial agents is pursued, fatal outcomes in patients with nonmeningeal SPB that can be attributed to penicillin nonsusceptibility are likely to be rare. Further studies that examine the clinical impact of ceftriaxone nonsusceptibility in nonmningeal SPB may be warranted.

  9. Vancomycin 24-Hour Area under the Curve/Minimum Bactericidal Concentration Ratio as a Novel Predictor of Mortality in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Britt, Nicholas S; Patel, Nimish; Horvat, Rebecca T; Steed, Molly E

    2016-05-01

    While previous studies have examined the association between vancomycin (VAN) exposure and MIC with regard to outcomes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (MRSA-B), none have explored if a relationship exists with the VAN minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). The objective of this study was to evaluate the VAN 24-h area under the curve (AUC24)/MBC ratio as a pharmacodynamic predictor of mortality. This retrospective cohort study included patients treated with VAN for MRSA-B with the primary outcome of 30-day all-cause mortality. Data collected included patient demographics, comorbidities, antimicrobial treatment data, therapeutic drug levels, and laboratory and microbiological data. Vancomycin MICs and MBCs were determined by Etest (MIC only) and broth microdilution (BMD). The vancomycin AUC24 was determined by pharmacokinetic maximum a posteriori probability Bayesian (MAP-Bayesian) analysis. The most significant breakpoint for 30-day mortality was determined by classification and regression tree (CART) analysis. The association between pharmacodynamic parameters (VAN AUC24/MICBMD, VAN AUC24/MICEtest, and AUC24/MBCBMD) and mortality were determined by χ(2) and multivariable Poisson regression. Overall mortality in this cohort (n = 53) was 20.8% (n = 11/53), and all corresponding MRSA blood isolates were VAN susceptible (MIC range, 0.5 to 2 μg/ml; MIC50, 1 μg/ml; MIC90, 1 μg/ml). The CART-derived breakpoints for mortality were 176 (VAN AUC24/MBC) and 334 (VAN AUC24/MICBMD). In multivariable analysis, the association between a VAN AUC24/MBC of ≥176 and survival persisted, but VAN AUC24/MICBMD values (≥334 or ≥400) were not associated with improved mortality. In conclusion, VAN AUC24/MBC was a more important predictor of 30-day mortality than VAN AUC24/MIC for MRSA-B.

  10. Rapid Testing Using the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Nucleic Acid Test in Combination with Antimicrobial Stewardship Intervention against Gram-Negative Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Leekha, Surbhi; Heil, Emily L.; Zhao, LiCheng; Badamas, Rilwan; Johnson, J. Kristie

    2014-01-01

    Rapid identification of microorganisms and antimicrobial resistance is paramount for targeted treatment in serious bloodstream infections (BSI). The Verigene Gram-negative blood culture nucleic acid test (BC-GN) is a multiplex, automated molecular diagnostic test for identification of eight Gram-negative (GN) organisms and resistance markers from blood culture with a turnaround time of approximately 2 h. Clinical isolates from adult patients at the University Maryland Medical Center with GN bacteremia from 1 January 2012 to 30 June 2012 were included in this study. Blood culture bottles were spiked with clinical isolates, allowed to incubate, and processed by BC-GN. A diagnostic evaluation was performed. In addition, a theoretical evaluation of time to effective and optimal antibiotic was performed, comparing actual antibiotic administration times from chart review (“control”) to theoretical administration times based on BC-GN reporting and antimicrobial stewardship team (AST) review (“intervention”). For organisms detected by the assay, BC-GN correctly identified 95.6% (131/137), with a sensitivity of 97.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.7 to 98.4%) and a specificity of 99.5% (95% CI, 98.8 to 99.8%). CTX-M and OXA resistance determinants were both detected. Allowing 12 h from Gram stain for antibiotic implementation, the intervention group had a significantly shorter duration to both effective (3.3 versus 7.0 h; P < 0.01) and optimal (23.5 versus 41.8 h; P < 0.01) antibiotic therapy. BC-GN with AST intervention can potentially decrease time to both effective and optimal antibiotic therapy in GN BSI. PMID:25547353

  11. Vancomycin MIC Does Not Predict 90-Day Mortality, Readmission, or Recurrence in a Prospective Cohort of Adults with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Clemenzi-Allen, Angelo; Gahbauer, Alice; Deck, Daniel; Imp, Brandon; Vittinghoff, Eric; Chambers, Henry F.; Doernberg, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is a tremendous health burden. Previous studies examining the association of vancomycin MIC and outcomes in patients with SAB have been inconclusive. This study evaluated the association between vancomycin MICs and 30- or 90-day mortality in individuals with SAB. This was a prospective cohort study of adults presenting from 2008 to 2013 with a first episode of SAB. Subjects were identified by an infection surveillance system. The main predictor was vancomycin MIC by MicroScan. The primary outcomes were death at 30 and 90 days, and secondary outcomes included recurrence, readmission, or a composite of death, recurrence, and readmission at 30 and 90 days. Covariates included methicillin susceptibility, demographics, illness severity, comorbidities, infectious source, and antibiotic use. Cox proportional-hazards models with propensity score adjustment were used to estimate 30- and 90-day outcomes. Of 429 unique first episodes of SAB, 11 were excluded, leaving 418 individuals for analysis. Eighty-three (19.9%) participants had a vancomycin MIC of 2 μg/ml. In the propensity-adjusted Cox model, a vancomycin MIC of 2 μg/ml compared to <2 μg/ml was not associated with a greater hazard of mortality or composite outcome of mortality, readmission, and recurrence at either 30 days (hazard ratios [HRs] of 0.86 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.41, 1.80] [P = 0.70] and 0.94 [95% CI, 0.55, 1.58] [P = 0.80], respectively) or 90 days (HRs of 0.91 [95% CI, 0.49, 1.69] [P = 0.77] and 0.69 [95% CI, 0.46, 1.04] [P = 0.08], respectively) after SAB diagnosis. In a prospective cohort of patients with SAB, vancomycin MIC was not associated with 30- or 90-day mortality or a composite of mortality, disease recurrence, or hospital readmission. PMID:27324762

  12. Edwardsiella tarda bacteremia. A rare but fatal water- and foodborne infection: Review of the literature and clinical cases from a single centre

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Yuji; Asahata-Tago, Sayaka; Ainoda, Yusuke; Fujita, Takahiro; Kikuchi, Ken

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Edwardsiella tarda bacteremia (ETB) can be a fatal disease in humans. OBJECTIVES: To determine the significant risk factors associated with death caused by ETB, and to examine the geographical, seasonal, environmental and dietary factors of the disease. METHODS: A retrospective, observational, case control study was performed. The PubMed MEDLINE and Japanese Medical Abstract Society (www.jamas.or.jp) databases were searched for ETB case reports and meeting abstracts. In additon, retrospective chart reviews of patients with ETB at the Tokyo Women’s Medical University Hospital (Tokyo, Japan) were conducted to evaluate the risk factors associated with death using multivariate analyses. RESULTS: The literature search yielded 46 publications, comprising 72 cases from the English (n=30), French (n=1), Spanish (n=1) and Japanese (n=14) literature. Five cases at the Tokyo Women’s Medical University Hospital were also included. Of the included 77 cases, the mean age was 61 years and 39% of patients were female; 77.2% of the cases occurred between June and November, and 45.5% were reported in Japan. Dietary factors (raw fish/meat exposure) were reported for 10.4% of patients and 12.9% reported environmental (ie, brackish water) exposure. The overall mortality rate was 44.6%; however, this rate increased to 61.1% for ETB patients with soft tissue infections. Liver cirrhosis was determined to be an independent risk factor associated with death (OR 12.0 [95% CI 2.46 to 58.6]; P=0.00213) using multivariate analyses. DISCUSSION: To our knowledge, the present analysis was the first and largest multi-language review of ETB. Clinical characteristics of ETB resemble those of Aeromonas, typhoid fever and Vibrio vulnificus infections, in addition to sharing similar risk factors. CONCLUSION: ETB should be categorized as a severe food- and waterborne infection, which results in high mortality for patients with liver cirrhosis. PMID:26744588

  13. Prevalence of pneumococcal bacteremia among children <36 months of age presenting with moderate fever to pediatric emergency rooms of the Metropolitan Region (Santiago), Chile.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Rosanna M; Muñoz, Alma E; Levine, Myron M

    2006-01-01

    Blood culture collection from outpatients < age 36 months with high fever (>40 degrees C, rectal) became a standard of ambulatory care in Emergency Rooms (ERs) of the government Children's Hospitals in Chile's Metropolitan Region (MR) in 1999; thereafter, invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence doubled over preceding years' estimates limited to hospitalizations. We studied IPD among children with moderate (>39 degrees C but <40 degrees C, rectal) rather than high fever visiting Pediatric ERs. Recruitment ensued Monday to Friday, 1-5 PM, September 1, 2002 through August 31, 2003. Age <36 months; rectal temperature >39 degrees but <40 degrees C; outpatient management; parental consent for hemoculture were inclusion criteria. Thirteen-thousand five hundred seventy-seven children < age 36 months with moderate and 3,214 children with high fever sought ER care. Of 1,134 moderate fever children seen in ERs during the enrollment, parents of 837 consented (73.8%). During these days and hours, 714 children < age 36 months presented with high fever and 651 (91.2%) had a "routine" blood culture. Pneumococcemia was detected among 0.7% with moderate and 1.2% with high fever (6/837 vs 8/651, p > 0.05). Extrapolating these rates to all ER outpatients < age 36 months with moderate and high fever, we estimate the true burden as 95 and 39 cases, respectively. The burden of pediatric IPD in the MR is currently underestimated because bacteremias among ER outpatients with moderate fever are not detected. If blood cultures were systematically collected from outpatients with moderate fever, recorded pediatric IPD burden would rise >2-fold. However, economic and logistical constraints preclude such a practice.

  14. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Neonatal Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase-Producing Gram-Negative Bacteremia: A 12-Year Case-Control-Control Study of a Referral Center in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Shih-Ming; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Gram-negative bacteremia (GNB) in the neonatal intensive care unit was characterized by comparison with two control groups: a susceptible control group and a general base population group over 2001 to 2012. The influence of ESBL production on mortality was studied in all study subjects and ESBL-GNB isolates were microbiologically characterized. We identified 77 episodes of ESBL-GNB (14.2% of all neonatal late-onset GNB), which were caused by Klebsiella spp. (62.3%), E. coli (20.8%) and Enterobacter spp. (16.9%). Most ESBL-GNB strains were genetically unrelated and the SHV-type ESBLs were the most prevalent (67% of isolates). Comparison with both control groups disclosed previous usage of 3rd generation cephalosporin (odds ratio [OR], 4.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.03–10.97; P < 0.001), and underlying renal disease (OR, 4.07; 95% CI, 1.10–15.08; P = 0.035) as independent risk factors for ESBL-GNB. Inadequate empiric antibiotics, a higher illness severity, higher rates of infectious complications and sepsis-attributable mortality were more frequently seen in neonates with ESBL-GNB than those with non-ESBL GNB (20.8% and 15.6% vs. 9.2% and 7.9%, respectively; P = 0.008 and 0.049, respectively). Neonates with underlying secondary hypertension (OR, 7.22; 95% CI, 2.17–24.06) and infectious complications after bacteremia (OR, 6.66; 95% CI, 1.81–19.31) were identified as independent risk factor for in-hospital mortality. ESBL-GNB accounted for one-seventh of all neonatal gram-negative bacteremia, especially in neonates exposed to broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Neonates with ESBL-GNB bacteremia more frequently received inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy, which were associated with a higher rate of infectious complications and an adverse outcome. PMID:27505270

  15. Comparison of BACTEC MYCO/F LYTIC and WAMPOLE ISOLATOR 10 (lysis-centrifugation) systems for detection of bacteremia, mycobacteremia, and fungemia in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Archibald, L K; McDonald, L C; Addison, R M; McKnight, C; Byrne, T; Dobbie, H; Nwanyanwu, O; Kazembe, P; Reller, L B; Jarvis, W R

    2000-08-01

    In less-developed countries, studies of bloodstream infections (BSI) have been hindered because of the difficulty and costs of culturing blood for bacteria, mycobacteria, and fungi. During two study periods (study period I [1997] and study period II [1998]), we cultured blood from patients in Malawi by using the BACTEC MYCO/F LYTIC (MFL), ISOLATOR 10 (Isolator), Septi-Chek AFB (SC-AFB), and Septi-Chek bacterial (SC-B) systems. During study period I, blood was inoculated at 5 ml into an MFL bottle, 10 ml into an Isolator tube for lysis and centrifugation, and 10 ml into an SC-B bottle. Next, 0.5-ml aliquots of Isolator concentrate were inoculated into an SC-AFB bottle and onto Middlebrook 7H11 agar slants, chocolate agar slants, and Inhibitory Mold Agar (IMA) slants. During study period II, the SC-B and chocolate agar cultures were discontinued. MFL growth was detected by fluorescence caused by shining UV light (lambda = 365 nm) onto the indicator on the bottom of the bottle. During study period I, 251 blood cultures yielded 44 bacterial isolates. For bacteremia, the MFL was similar to the Isolator concentrate on chocolate agar (34 of 44 versus 27 of 44; P, not significant [NS]), but more sensitive than the SC-B bottle (34 of 44 versus 24 of 44; P = 0.05). For both study periods combined, 486 blood cultures yielded 37 mycobacterial and 13 fungal isolates. For mycobacteremia, the sensitivities of the MFL and Isolator concentrate in the SC-AFB bottle were similar (30 of 37 versus 29 of 37; P, NS); the MFL bottle was more sensitive than the concentrate on Middlebrook agar (30 of 37 versus 15 of 37; P = 0.002). For fungemia, the MFL bottle was as sensitive as the SC-B bottle or Isolator concentrate on chocolate agar or IMA slants. We conclude that the MFL bottle, inoculated with just 5 ml of blood and examined under UV light, provides a sensitive and uncomplicated method for comprehensive detection of BSI in less-developed countries.

  16. Alterations of OprD in Carbapenem-Intermediate and -Susceptible Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients with Bacteremia in a Spanish Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Cabot, Gabriel; Rodríguez, Cristina; Roman, Elena; Tubau, Fe; Macia, María D.; Moya, Bartolomé; Zamorano, Laura; Suárez, Cristina; Peña, Carmen; Domínguez, María A.; Moncalián, Gabriel; Oliver, Antonio; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the presence of OprD mutations in 60 strains of metallo-ß-lactamase-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa intermediately susceptible (IS [n = 12]; MIC = 8 μg/ml) or susceptible (S [n = 48]; MICs ≤ 1 to 4 μg/ml) to imipenem and/or meropenem that were isolated from patients with bacteremia in order to evaluate their impact on carbapenem susceptibility profiles. The presence of mutations in oprD was detected by sequencing analysis. OprD expression was assessed by both outer membrane protein (OMP) analysis and real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Fourteen (23%) isolates had an OprD identical to that of PAO1, and OprD modifications were detected in 46 isolates (77%). Isolates were classified as OprD “full-length types” (T1 [n = 40, including both wild-type OprD and variants showing several polymorphisms]) and OprD “deficient types” (T2 [n = 3 for OprD frameshift mutations] and T3 [n = 17 for premature stop codons in oprD]). RT-PCR showed that 5 OprD type T1 isolates presented reduced transcription of oprD (0.1- to 0.4-fold compared to PAO1), while oprD levels increased more than 2-fold over that seen with PAO1 in 4 OprD type T1 isolates. A total of 50% of the isolates belonging to OprD “deficient types” were susceptible to both carbapenems, and 40% were susceptible to meropenem and intermediately susceptible to imipenem. Only one isolate (5%) within this group was intermediately susceptible to both carbapenems, and one (5%) was susceptible to imipenem and intermediately susceptible to meropenem. We concluded that OprD inactivating mutations in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa are not restricted only to carbapenem-resistant isolates but are also found in isolates with imipenem or meropenem MICs of only 0.06 to 4 μg/ml. PMID:22290967

  17. Antimicrobial Activities of Ceftaroline and Comparator Agents against Bacterial Organisms Causing Bacteremia in Patients with Skin and Skin Structure Infections in U.S. Medical Centers, 2008 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Flamm, Robert K.; Mendes, Rodrigo E.; Farrell, David J.; Jones, Ronald N.

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the antimicrobial susceptibility of 1,454 organisms consecutively collected from patients with bacteremia associated with skin and skin structure infections. The most common organisms obtained were Staphylococcus aureus (670 organisms [46.1%]), Escherichia coli (200 organisms [13.8%]), β-hemolytic streptococci (βHS) (138 organisms [9.5%]), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (109 organisms [7.5%]). The susceptibility rates for ceftaroline were 97.9% for S. aureus (95.9% among methicillin-resistant S. aureus [MRSA]), 100.0% for βHS, 86.5% for E. coli, and 89.0% for K. pneumoniae. Ceftaroline and tigecycline provided the best overall coverage. PMID:26856825

  18. Doripenem MICs and ompK36 Porin Genotypes of Sequence Type 258, KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae May Predict Responses to Carbapenem-Colistin Combination Therapy among Patients with Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Shields, Ryan K.; Potoski, Brian A.; Press, Ellen G.; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Clarke, Lloyd G.; Eschenauer, Gregory A.; Clancy, Cornelius J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment failures of a carbapenem-colistin regimen among patients with bacteremia due to sequence type 258 (ST258), KPC-2-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were significantly more likely if both agents were inactive in vitro, as defined by a colistin MIC of >2 μg/ml and the presence of either a major ompK36 porin mutation (guanine and alanine insertions at amino acids 134 and 135 [ins aa 134–135 GD], IS5 promoter insertion [P = 0.007]) or a doripenem MIC of >8 μg/ml (P = 0.01). Major ompK36 mutations among KPC-K. pneumoniae strains are important determinants of carbapenem-colistin responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25534733

  19. [Risk factors and antibiotic use in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in hospitalized patients at Hacettepe University Adult and Oncology Hospitals (2004-2011) and antimicrobial susceptibilities of the isolates: a nested case-control study].

    PubMed

    Atmaca, Ozgür; Zarakolu, Pınar; Karahan, Ceren; Cakır, Banu; Unal, Serhat

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia cases who were followed at the Infectious Diseases Unit of Internal Medicine Department, at Hacettepe University Adult and Oncology Hospitals between January 2004-December 2011. A total of 198 patients, of them 99 had positive MRSA blood cultures (case group), and 99 without MRSA bacteremia (control group) who were selected randomly among patients at the same wards during the same time period, were included in the study. Demographic data, risk factors for MRSA bacteremia and antibiotic use of case (60 male, 39 female; mean age: 59.37 ± 16.96 yrs) and control (60 male, 39 female; mean age: 59.11 ± 17.60 yrs) groups were obtained from the patient files and the hospital data system and were compared. Methicillin susceptibility was determined by the cefoxitin (30 µg, BD, USA) disc diffusion method and confirmed by mecA PCR test. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were also determined by disc diffusion and Etest (BioMerieux, France) methods according to CLSI guidelines. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups according to age, gender, presence of an underlying chronic disease, burn, hemodialysis, malignancy or immunosupression (p> 0.05). The results of the univariate analysis revealed that antibiotic use and parameters most likely to be associated with MRSA bacteremia (obesity, cerebrovascular event, hospitalization history, central/arterial catheter, presence of tracheostomy, invasive/non-invasive mechanical ventilation, use of proton pump inhibitors, H2 receptor blockers, sucralfate, nasogastric or urinary tubes, gastrostomia, total parenteral nutrition, acute organ failure and surgical operation) were found to be statistically higher in the case group (p< 0.05). Median length of hospital stay was also higher in the case group (59 days versus 8 days; p< 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis indicated that obesity (OR= 7.98; p= 0

  20. Pneumonia and bacteremia in a golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae during a translocation program of free-ranging animals in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Marina G; Iovine, Renata O; Torres, Luciana N; Catão-Dias, José L; Pissinatti, Alcides; Kierulff, Maria C M; Carvalho, Vania M

    2015-05-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important emerging pathogen in humans, particularly the invasive hypermucoviscosity (HMV) phenotype. In addition, the organism is an important public health concern because of nosocomial infections and antimicrobial resistance. Nonhuman primates in captivity are susceptible to Klebsiella, particularly when a stress factor is involved. Infections vary depending on the species but can cause significant morbidity and mortality in these animals. The objective of this study was to describe a case of bronchopneumonia and bacteremia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in a free-ranging golden-headed lion tamarin (Leontopithecus chrysomelas) caught and maintained in quarantine during a translocation program for conservation purposes. An adult male, that had showed emaciation and apathy, was clinically examined and, despite being provided supportive therapy, died 2 days after onset of clinical signs. At postmortem examination, generalized bilateral pneumonia and pericarditis were observed. Tissue samples were fixed in 10% formalin for histology, and pulmonary tissues and cardiac blood were collected for microbiologic diagnostic procedures. Bacteria that were shown to be HMV K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae strains were isolated from the pulmonary fluids and cardiac blood in pure cultures. Severe bronchopneumonia was the main pathological finding. The consequences of the confirmed presence of the HMV phenotype of K. pneumoniae subsp. pneumoniae in this wildlife species for human, animal, and ecosystem health should be determined. These results demonstrate the importance of quarantine and potential pathogen screening during wildlife translocation procedures.

  1. Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) associated with Staphylococcus spp. bacteremia, responsive to potassium arsenite 0.5% in a veterinary surgeon and his coworking wife, handling with CFS animal cases.

    PubMed

    Tarello, W

    2001-10-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in human patients remain a controversial and perplexing condition with emerging zoonotic aspects. Recent advances in human medicine seem to indicate a bacterial etiology and the condition has already been described in horses, dogs, cats and birds of prey in association with micrococci-like organisms in the blood. To evaluate the possibility of a chronic bacteremia, a veterinary surgeon (the author) and his coworking wife, both diagnosed with CFS and meeting the CDC working case definition, were submitted to rapid blood cultures and fresh blood smears investigations. Blood cultures proved Staph-positive and micrococci-like organisms in the blood were repeatedly observed in the 3-year period preceding the arsenical therapy, during which several medicaments, including antibiotics, proved unsuccessful. Following treatment with a low dosage arsenical drug (potassium arsenite 0.5%, im., 1 ml/12 h, for 10 days) both patients experienced complete remission. At the post-treatment control made 1 month later, micrococci had disappeared from the blood, and the CD4/CD8 ratio was raising.

  2. [Recommendations for prevention of community-acquired pneumonia with bacteremia as the leading form of invasive pneumococcal infections in the population of people over 50 years of age and risk groups above 19 years of age].

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Piotr; Antczak, Adam; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Skoczyńska, Anna; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Kedziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Bernatowska, Ewa; Stompór, Tomasz; Grodzicki, Tomasz; Gyrczuk, Ewa; Imiela, Jacek; Jedrzejczak, Wiesław; Windak, Adam

    2014-02-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is a main cause of mortality associated with pneumococcal infections. Although, IPD is regarding mainly small children and persons in the age > 65 years, the investigations showed that because of IPD exactly sick persons are burdened with the greatest mortality in the older age, rather than of children. The most frequent form of IPD is community acquired pneumonia (CAP) with the bacteremia. The presence of even a single additional risk factor is increasing the probability of the unfavorable descent of pneumococcal infection. The risk factors for IPD and/or pneumonia with bacteremia apart from the age are among others asthma (> 2 x), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), sarcoidosis (4 x), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (5 x), bronchiectases (2 x), allergic alveolitis (1.9 x) and pneumoconiosis (2 x), type 1 diabetes (4.4 x), type 2 diabetes (1.2 x), autoimmune diseases (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis (4.2 to 14.9 x), kidney failure with the necessity to dialysis (12 x), immunosuppression, cardiovascular disease, alcoholism and cancers. Examinations show that the best method of IPD and CAP preventing are pneumococcal vaccinations. On the market for ages 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is available covering close the 90% of IPD triggering stereotypes. Her role in preventing CAP is uncertain and the immunological answer after vaccination at older persons and after revaccination is weak. Widely discussed disadvantageous effects of growing old of the immunological system show on the benefit from applying the immunization inducing the immunological memory, i.e. of conjugated vaccines which are activating the T-dependent reply and are ensuring the readiness for the effective secondary response. Examinations so far conducted with conjugated 7-valent and 13-valent (PCV13) vaccines at persons in the age > 50 years are confirming these expectations. Also sick persons can take benefits from PCV13 applying back from so-called IPD

  3. Pediatric multicenter evaluation of the Verigene gram-negative blood culture test for rapid detection of inpatient bacteremia involving gram-negative organisms, extended-spectrum beta-lactamases, and carbapenemases.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, K V; Deburger, B; Roundtree, S S; Ventrola, C A; Blecker-Shelly, D L; Mortensen, J E

    2014-07-01

    We evaluated the investigational use only (IUO) version of the rapid Verigene Gram-negative blood culture test (BC-GN), a microarray that detects 9 genus/species targets (Acinetobacter spp., Citrobacter spp., Enterobacter spp., Escherichia coli/Shigella spp., Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia marcescens) and 6 antimicrobial resistance determinants (blaCTX-M, blaKPC, blaNDM, blaVIM, blaIMP, and blaOXA) directly from positive blood cultures. BC-GN was performed on positive BacT/Alert Pediatric FAN and Bactec Peds Plus blood cultures with Gram-negative organisms at two tertiary pediatric centers. Vitek MS (bioMérieux, Durham, NC) was used to assign gold standard organism identification. The Check MDR CT-102 microarray (Check Points B.V., Wageningen, Netherlands) was used as an alternative method for detecting resistance determinants. In total, 104 organisms were isolated from 97 clinical blood cultures. BC-GN correctly detected 26/26 cultures with Acinetobacter spp., P. aeruginosa, and S. marcescens, 5/6 with Citrobacter spp., 13/14 with Enterobacter spp., 23/24 with E. coli, 2/3 with K. oxytoca, 16/17 with K. pneumoniae, and 0/1 with Proteus spp. BC-GN appropriately reported negative BC-GN results in 8/13 blood cultures that grew organisms that were not represented on the microarray but failed to detect targets in 3/5 cultures that grew multiple Gram-negative organisms. BC-GN detected 5/5 and 1/1 clinical blood cultures with blaCTX-M and blaVIM. All 6 results were corroborated by Check MDR CT-102 microarray testing. The Verigene BC-GN test has the potential to expedite therapeutic decision making in pediatric patients with Gram-negative bacteremia. Sensitivity was satisfactory but may be suboptimal in mixed Gram-negative blood cultures.

  4. Characterization of Alpha-Toxin hla Gene Variants, Alpha-Toxin Expression Levels, and Levels of Antibody to Alpha-Toxin in Hemodialysis and Postsurgical Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yuling; Tabor, David E.; Mok, Hoyin; Sellman, Bret R.; Jenkins, Amy; Yu, Li; Jafri, Hasan S.; Rude, Thomas H.; Ruffin, Felicia; Schell, Wiley A.; Park, Lawrence P.; Yan, Qin; Thaden, Joshua T.; Messina, Julia A.; Esser, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-toxin is a major Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor. This study evaluated potential relationships between in vitro alpha-toxin expression of S. aureus bloodstream isolates, anti-alpha-toxin antibody in serum of patients with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB), and clinical outcomes in 100 hemodialysis and 100 postsurgical SAB patients. Isolates underwent spa typing and hla sequencing. Serum anti-alpha-toxin IgG and neutralizing antibody levels were measured by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a red blood cell (RBC)-based hemolysis neutralization assay. Neutralization of alpha-toxin by an anti-alpha-toxin monoclonal antibody (MAb MEDI4893) was tested in an RBC-based lysis assay. Most isolates encoded hla (197/200; 98.5%) and expressed alpha-toxin (173/200; 86.5%). In vitro alpha-toxin levels were inversely associated with survival (cure, 2.19 μg/ml, versus failure, 1.09 μg/ml; P < 0.01). Both neutralizing (hemodialysis, 1.26 IU/ml, versus postsurgical, 0.95; P < 0.05) and IgG (hemodialysis, 1.94 IU/ml, versus postsurgical, 1.27; P < 0.05) antibody levels were higher in the hemodialysis population. Antibody levels were also significantly higher in patients infected with alpha-toxin-expressing S. aureus isolates (P < 0.05). Levels of both neutralizing antibodies and IgG were similar among patients who were cured and those not cured (failures). Sequence analysis of hla revealed 12 distinct hla genotypes, and all genotypic variants were susceptible to a neutralizing monoclonal antibody in clinical development (MEDI4893). These data demonstrate that alpha-toxin is highly conserved in clinical S. aureus isolates. Higher in vitro alpha-toxin levels were associated with a positive clinical outcome. Although patients infected with alpha-toxin-producing S. aureus exhibited higher anti-alpha-toxin antibody levels, these levels were not associated with a better clinical outcome in this study. PMID:25392350

  5. [Antibiotic stewardship and Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia].

    PubMed

    Weis, S; Kimmig, A; Hagel, S; Pletz, M W

    2017-04-04

    Rates of antibiotic resistance are increasing worldwide and impact on the treatment of patients with bacterial infections. A broad and uncritical application in inpatient and outpatient settings as well as in agriculture has been recognized as the main driving force. Antibiotic stewardship (ABS) programs aim at countering this worrisome development using various direct interventions such as infectious disease counseling. Blood stream infections caused by Staphylococcus (S.) aureus are severe infections associated with high mortality rates. ABS interventions such as de-eskalation of the antibiotic regimen or application of narrow-spectrum beta-lactam antibiotics can significantly reduce mortality rates. In this review, we discuss the importance of ABS programs and infectious disease counseling for the treatment of S. aureus blood stream infection.

  6. Brain abscesses during Proteus vulgaris bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Jennifer; Lemaire, Xavier; Legout, Laurence; Ferriby, Didier; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Senneville, Eric

    2011-08-01

    Proteus vulgaris is only rarely the cause of multiple septic metastases. We describe multiple brain abscesses due to P. vulgaris in an immunocompetent patient successfully treated by antibiotic therapy and colonectomy.

  7. Quality of Care Is Improved by Rapid Short Incubation MALDI-ToF Identification from Blood Cultures as Measured by Reduced Length of Stay and Patient Outcomes as Part of a Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Bacteremia in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Delport, Johannes A; Strikwerda, Arend; Armstrong, Amanda; Schaus, David; John, Michael

    2016-01-01

    patients where the empirical therapy was considered to be optimal were similar with respect to length of stay; 13.04 and 10.93 days (p = 0.34). In the 2012 group there was a significant increase in the length of stay in the group needing change in excess of 30 days (p = 0.02) compared to the group where empirical therapy was considered to be optimal, this clearly showed an improvement in the quality of care received after the rapid identification was instituted in 2014. The 2012 group had a four times overall increased sepsis associated mortality risk compared to the 2014 group and when empirical antibiotics needed to be optimized this risk was 7 times compared to the 2014 group. We conclude that rapid identification of bacterial pathogens in pediatric blood cultures with a rapid incubation MALDI-TOF identification protocol plays an important role in improving quality of care as part of a multidisciplinary approach to pediatric bacteremia and sepsis.

  8. [A rare cause of nosocomial bacteremia: Sphingomonas paucimobilis].

    PubMed

    Bulut, Cemal; Yetkin, M Arzu; Koruk, Süda Tekin; Erdinç, F Sebnem; Karakoç, Esra Alp

    2008-10-01

    Sphingomonas paucimobilis, is a yellow-pigmented, aerobic, non-fermentative, non-spore-forming, gram-negative bacillus. Infections by S. paucimobilis which is widely found in nature and hospital environments are rarely serious or life threatening. In this report we present a case of hospital acquired bloodstream infection due to S. paucimobilis. The patient had a history of hydrocephalus diagnosed at sixth months of his birth and had experienced two ventriculoperitoneal shunt surgery. He was hospitalized and been treated for bronchopneumonia. On the 47th day of hospitalization, blood cultures (BACTEC, Becton Dickinson, USA) were taken because of a body temperature of 38.5 degrees C. One of the blood cultures was positive for gram-negative rods. After 48 h of incubation, the sub-cultures on blood agar medium yielded pure growth of a yellow, non-fermentative, gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium. The microorganism was positive for oxidase, and esculin hydrolysis, while negative for urea and nitrate reduction and citrate utilisation. Motility was negative as well. The isolate has been identified as S. paucimobilis by using mini API (bioMerieux, France) system. The antibiotic susceptibility test was also performed with the same system and the strain was found susceptible to ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, cefoperazone, cefepime, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, piperacillin-tazobactam, aztreonam, amikasin and gentamicin. Treatment with intravenous ceftriaxone (2 x 750 mg/day) was initiated. He responded well to the treatment and discharged on the tenth day. This case was reported to emphasize that S. paucimobilis should be kept in mind as a nosocomial infectious agent and the infections should be treated according to the sensitivity test results.

  9. "Candidatus Mycoplasma haemomacaque" and Bartonella quintana bacteremia in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Ricardo G; Mascarelli, Patricia E; Balakrishnan, Nandhakumar; Rohde, Cynthia M; Kelly, Catherine M; Ramaiah, Lila; Leach, Michael W; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2013-05-01

    Here, we report latent infections with Bartonella quintana and a hemotropic Mycoplasma sp. in a research colony of cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis). Sequence alignments, evolutionary analysis, and signature nucleotide sequence motifs of the hemotropic Mycoplasma 16S rRNA and RNase P genes indicate the presence of a novel organism.

  10. Two Cases of Bacteremia Due to Roseomonas mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Kyung; Moon, Jung Suk; Song, Kyung Eun; Lee, Won Kil

    2016-07-01

    Roseomonas is a genus of pink-pigmented nonfermentative bacilli. These slow-growing, gram-negative cocobacilli form pink-colored colonies on sheep blood agar. They differ from other pink-pigmented nonfermenters, including Methylobacterium, in morphology, biochemical characteristics, and DNA sequence. Roseomonas strains are rarely isolated in clinical laboratories; therefore, we report two cases in order to improve our ability to identify these pathogens. We isolated two strains of Roseomonas mucosa from the venous blood cultures of two patients, an 84-yr-old woman with common bile duct obstruction and a 17-yr-old male with acute myeloid leukemia who had an indwelling central-venous catheter for chemotherapy. The isolated strains were confirmed as R. mucosa by 16S rRNA sequencing.

  11. Two Cases of Bacteremia Due to Roseomonas mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu Kyung; Moon, Jung Suk; Song, Kyung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Roseomonas is a genus of pink-pigmented nonfermentative bacilli. These slow-growing, gram-negative cocobacilli form pink-colored colonies on sheep blood agar. They differ from other pink-pigmented nonfermenters, including Methylobacterium, in morphology, biochemical characteristics, and DNA sequence. Roseomonas strains are rarely isolated in clinical laboratories; therefore, we report two cases in order to improve our ability to identify these pathogens. We isolated two strains of Roseomonas mucosa from the venous blood cultures of two patients, an 84-yr-old woman with common bile duct obstruction and a 17-yr-old male with acute myeloid leukemia who had an indwelling central-venous catheter for chemotherapy. The isolated strains were confirmed as R. mucosa by 16S rRNA sequencing. PMID:27139611

  12. First case of neonatal bacteremia due to Dyella genus.

    PubMed

    Hakima, Nesrine; Bidet, Philippe; Lopez, Maureen; Rioualen, Stéphane; Carol, Agnès; Bonacorsi, Stéphane

    2017-02-01

    We describe the first case of sepsis due to a yet unnamed species of Dyella genus associated to gastrointestinal perforation in a premature newborn. The rarity of such environmental bacteria in human infection, their misidentification with classical methods and their antibiotic resistance represent real challenges for both microbiologists and clinicians.

  13. Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a significant cause of health care-associated infections. Vancomycin remains an acceptable treatment option. There has been a welcome increase in the number of agents available for the treatment of MRSA infection. These drugs have certain differentiating attributes and may offer some advantages over vancomycin, but they also have significant limitations. These agents provide some alternative when no other options are available. PMID:28032484

  14. [Cutaneous vasculitis during bacteremia caused by Meningococcus serogroup B].

    PubMed

    García-Patos, V; Barnadas, M A; Domingo, P; Esquius, J; de Moragas, J M

    1992-04-01

    We report a patient with an upper respiratory tract infection who presented outbreaks of erythematosus-purpuric macules and papules (the pathological substrate of which was a leukocytoclastic vasculitis with numerous intravascular thrombi) coinciding with two autolimited febrile episodes. In serial hemocultures B meningococcus was identified oral antibiotic treatment was given achieving a good clinical evolution. Although both episodes could be considered as a meningococcemia without sepsis, they could also correspond to the initial phase of a chronic meningococcemia. The possible etiopathogenesis of the cutaneous lesions is discussed and the therapeutic and prognostic repercussion of an early identification of these forms of meningococcal disease, which are poorly expressed clinically, are highlighted.

  15. Eubacterium callanderi bacteremia: report of the first case.

    PubMed

    Thiolas, Aurélie; Bollet, Claude; Gasmi, Mohammed; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2003-05-01

    Eubacterium callanderi is an environmental anaerobic rod-shaped bacterium first isolated in 1998 from an industrial anaerobic digester. We report on the first clinical isolate of E. callanderi, which was recovered from the blood of a patient with a bladder carcinoma. Identification of the organism was made by cell fatty acid chromatographic analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  16. Rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Folgueira, L; Delgado, R; Palenque, E; Aguado, J M; Noriega, A R

    1996-01-01

    A method based on DNA amplification and hybridization has been used for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in blood samples from 38 hospitalized patients (15 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 23 HIV negative) in whom localized or disseminated forms of tuberculosis were suspected. In 32 of these patients, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was eventually confirmed by conventional bacteriological or histological procedures. M. tuberculosis DNA was detected with the PCR technique in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 of 11 (82%) HIV-infected patients and in 7 of 21 (33%) HIV-negative patients (P < 0.01), while M. tuberculosis blood cultures were positive in 1 of 8 (12.5%) and 1 of 18 (5.5%) patients, respectively. PCR was positive in all cases with disseminated disease in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients and also in the HIV-positive patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Seven samples from patients with documented illness other than tuberculosis and 12 specimens from healthy volunteers, including seven volunteers with a recent positive purified protein derivative test, were used as controls and had a negative PCR. These results suggest that detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may be a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of disseminated and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis, especially in an HIV-positive population. PMID:8904404

  17. Clinical and microbiological features of bacteremia with Streptococcus equi.

    PubMed

    Trell, Kristina; Nilson, Bo; Petersson, Ann-Cathrine; Rasmussen, Magnus

    2017-02-01

    Streptococcus equi (SE) rarely causes human infections. We identified 18 SE isolates from blood cultures. The focus of infection was unknown (n = 5), arthritis (n = 3), catheter-related (n = 2), pneumonia (n = 2), or other (n = 6). There were no fatalities. Several patients had animal contacts but there were no indications of clonal outbreaks.

  18. Fulminating bacteremia and pneumonia due to Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Miller, J M; Hair, J G; Hebert, M; Hebert, L; Roberts, F J; Weyant, R S

    1997-02-01

    We present two cases of rapidly progressing, fatal pneumonia caused by Bacillus cereus. These cases are interesting in that B. cereus, even from blood or sputum specimens, may often be considered a contaminant and receive inadequate attention. Also of interest was the fact that the two patients resided in the same area of the state, were welders by trade, and became ill within a few days of each other, yet there was no epidemiologic link between them.

  19. Fatal Bacillus cereus bacteremia in a patient with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Orrett, F A

    2000-04-01

    This report describes a fatal case of Bacillus cereus septicemia in a patient with uncontrolled diabetes and re-emphasizes the potential seriousness of Bacillus infections in patients with compromised immune function.

  20. Bacillus cereus bacteremia and meningitis in immunocompromised children.

    PubMed

    Gaur, A H; Patrick, C C; McCullers, J A; Flynn, P M; Pearson, T A; Razzouk, B I; Thompson, S J; Shenep, J L

    2001-05-15

    Two cases of Bacillus cereus meningitis in immunocompromised children at our hospital within a 2-month period prompted us to review B. cereus--related invasive disease. We identified 12 patients with B. cereus isolated in blood cultures from September 1988 through August 2000 at our institution. Three of these patients also had B. cereus isolated from CSF specimens; 1 additional patient had possible CNS involvement (33%, group A), whereas 8 patients had no evidence of CNS involvement (67%, group B). Patients in group A were more likely to have neutropenia at the onset of sepsis and were more likely to have an unfavorable outcome. They were also more likely to have received intrathecal chemotherapy in the week before the onset of their illness. Two patients from group A died. One survived with severe sequelae. The fourth patient had mild sequelae at follow-up. No sequelae or deaths occurred among patients in group B. In patients with unfavorable outcomes, the interval from the time of recognition of illness to irreversible damage or death was short, which demonstrates a need for increased awareness, early diagnosis, and more-effective therapy, particularly that which addresses B. cereus toxins.

  1. The first case report of emphysematous pyelonephritis and bacteremia due to Oligella urethralis.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hirotaka; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Hadano, Yoshiro; Hayashi, Kenichi; Nagahara, Chie; Muratani, Tetsuro; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi

    2017-04-01

    Oligella urethralis (O. urethralis) is an organism that rarely causes infections in humans. We report the case of a 90-year-old bedridden woman with progressive dementia who was placed in a long-term-care facility. She was admitted to our hospital due to fever and unconsciousness with pyuria. The abdominal computed tomography showed left pneumatosis and urinary stone. Fluoroquinolones-resistant O. urethralis, which was identified by the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and the 16S rRNA gene sequencing, was isolated form the blood and urine cultures at admission. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of emphysematous pyelonephritis caused by O. urethralis.

  2. Bacteremia in free-ranging Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas, with fibropapillomatosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Wolcott, M.; Morris, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Past studies of free-ranging green turtles Chelonia mydas with fibropapillomatosis (FP) in Hawaii have shown that animals become immunosuppressed with increasing severity of this disease. Additionally, preliminary clinical examination of moribund turtles with FP revealed that some animals were also bacteraemic. We tested the hypothesis that bacteraemia in sea turtles is associated with the severity of FP. We captured free-ranging green turtles from areas in Hawaii where FP is absent, and areas where FP has been endemic since the late 1950s. Each turtle was given an FP severity score ranging from 0 (no tumours) to 3 (severely affected). A fifth category included turtles that were stranded ashore and moribund with FP. We found that the percentage of turtles with bacteraemia increased with the severity of FP, and that the majority of bacteria cultured were Vibrio spp. Turtles with severe FP were more susceptible to bactaeremia, probably in part due to immunosuppression. The pattern of bacteraemia in relation to severity of disease strengthens the hypothesis that immunosuppression is a sequel to FP.

  3. Direct detection and drug-resistance profiling of bacteremias using inertial microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Hou, Han Wei; Bhattacharyya, Roby P; Hung, Deborah T; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-05-21

    Detection of bacteria in bloodstream infections and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns is critical to guide therapeutic decision-making for optimal patient care. Current culture-based assays are too slow (>48 h), leading to excessive up-front use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and/or incorrect antibiotic choices due to resistant bacteria, each with deleterious consequences for patient care and public health. To approach this problem, we describe a method to rapidly isolate bacteria from whole blood using inertial microfluidics and directly determine pathogen identity and antibiotic susceptibility with hybridization-based RNA detection. Using the principle of Dean flow fractionation, bacteria are separated from host blood cells in a label-free separation method with efficient recovery of even low abundance bacteria. Ribosomal RNA detection can then be applied for direct identification of low abundance pathogens (~100 per mL) from blood without culturing or enzymatic amplification. Messenger RNA detection of antibiotic-responsive transcripts after brief drug exposure permits rapid susceptibility determination from bacteria with minimal culturing (~10(5) per mL). This unique coupling of microfluidic cell separation with RNA-based molecular detection techniques represents significant progress towards faster diagnostics (~8 hours) to guide antibiotic therapy.

  4. Non-typhoidal Salmonella group D bacteremia and urosepsis in a patient diagnosed with HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Abuhasna, Said; Al Jundi, Amer; Rahman, Masood Ur; Said, Walaa

    2012-10-01

    Urinary tract infections caused by non-typhoid Salmonella are rare and usually develops in patients with predisposing factors such as immune deficiency or occult urologic problems. This report describes a case where Salmonella Group D was isolated from the blood and urine of a patient with documented human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who developed urosepsis and was successfully treated with antibiotics.

  5. Procession to Pediatric Bacteremia and Sepsis: A Series of Covert Operations and Failures in Diplomacy

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Stacey L.; Seed, Patrick C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and treatment, bacterial sepsis remains a major cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality, particularly among neonates, the critically ill, and the growing immunocompromised patient population. Sepsis is the endpoint of a complex and dynamic series of events in which both host and microbial factors drive the high morbidity and potentially lethal physiological alterations. This article provides a succinct overview of the events that lead to pediatric bloodstream infections (BSI) and sepsis, with a focus on the molecular mechanisms employed by bacteria to subvert host barriers and local immunity to gain access to and persist within the systemic circulation. In the events preceding and during BSI and sepsis, gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens employ a battery of factors for translocation, inhibition of immunity, molecular mimicry, intracellular survival, and nutrient scavenging. Gaps in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of bacterial BSI and sepsis are highlighted as opportunities to identify and develop new therapeutics. PMID:20566606

  6. Corynebacterium striatum Bacteremia Associated with a Catheter-Related Blood Stream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Oishi, Tomohiro; Yamane, Kunikazu; Terada, Kihei

    2017-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman visited our emergency department because of exertional dyspnea due to severe left ventricular functional failure. It progressed to disseminated intravascular coagulation and disturbance of consciousness on day 67 of admission. Gram-positive bacilli were detected from two different blood culture samples on day 67 of admission. An API-Coryne test and sequencing (1~615 bp) of the 16S rRNA gene were performed, and the strain was identified as Corynebacterium striatum. The bacterium was detected from the removed central venous catheter tip too, and the patient was diagnosed with catheter-related bloodstream infection by C. striatum. However, treatment was not effective, and the patient died on day 73 of admission. PMID:28197349

  7. Hookworm enteritis with bacteremia in California sea lion pups on San Miguel Island.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Terry R; DeLong, Robert L; Lyons, Eugene T; Melin, Sharon R

    2007-04-01

    Large breeding populations of California sea lions (Zalophus californianus) are located on San Miguel and San Nicolas Islands in the Southern California Bight. In 2001, there was a substantial increase in pup mortality in late summer and fall. From June 2002 to January 2003, 208 freshly dead pups were examined on San Miguel Island, the most western of the Channel Islands off the coast of southern California. Tissues from 186 of these pups were examined histologically. The primary lesions in 133 (72%) of the pups were an enteritis associated with hookworms and infections in major organs. Emaciation/starvation in 43 pups (26%) was the second most important cause of death.

  8. Draft Genome Sequences of Three Hypervirulent Carbapenem-Resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates from Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Chaitra; Nabarro, Laura E. B.; Devanga Ragupathi, Naveen Kumar; Muthuirulandi Sethuvel, Dhiviya Prabaa; Daniel, Jones Lionel Kumar; Doss C, George Priya

    2016-01-01

    Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae strains have been increasingly reported worldwide, and there is emergence of carbapenem resistance among them. Here, we report the genome sequences of three carbapenem-resistant hypervirulent K. pneumoniae isolates isolated from bacteremic patients at a tertiary-care center in South India. PMID:27932638

  9. Bartonella sp. Bacteremia in Patients with Neurological and Neurocognitive Dysfunction ▿

    PubMed Central

    Breitschwerdt, E. B.; Maggi, R. G.; Nicholson, W. L.; Cherry, N. A.; Woods, C. W.

    2008-01-01

    We detected infection with a Bartonella species (B. henselae or B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii) in blood samples from six immunocompetent patients who presented with a chronic neurological or neurocognitive syndrome including seizures, ataxia, memory loss, and/or tremors. Each of these patients had substantial animal contact or recent arthropod exposure as a potential risk factor for Bartonella infection. Additional studies should be performed to clarify the potential role of Bartonella spp. as a cause of chronic neurological and neurocognitive dysfunction. PMID:18632903

  10. Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacteremia without endocarditis associated with psoas abscess: the first case report in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Upapan, Prasit; Chayakulkeeree, Methee

    2014-03-01

    The authors report a patient with a rare manifestation of invasive septic Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae infection without endocardial involvement. Our patient presented with progressive paraparesis and subacute fever for ten days. He had underlying diabetes mellitus and alcoholic cirrhosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbosacral spine showed a psoas abscess with vertebral osteomyelitis and discitis at level of L23 of the lumbar spine. His blood culture grew E. rhusiopathiae. Transthoracic echocardiography demonstrated normal endocardium. Surgical drainage and debridement with concomitant intravenous antibiotics administration resulted in clinical improvement, including neurological status. MRI showed resolution of the psoas abscess and osteomyelitis. Erysipelothrix infection should be considered as a causative pathogen of musculoskeletal infection in immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of psoas abscess caused by E. rhusiopathiae in Thailand.

  11. Vancomycin resistance, esp, and strain relatedness: a 1-year study of enterococcal bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Harrington, S M; Ross, T L; Gebo, K A; Merz, W G

    2004-12-01

    The prevalence of esp, a gene associated with infection-derived and outbreak strains, in enterococcal blood isolates from 2002 was determined. Fifty-five of 137 (40.1%) Enterococcus faecalis isolates, 30 of 58 (51.7%) E. faecium isolates, 1 of 1 E. raffinosus isolate, 0 of 4 E. gallinarum isolates, and 0 of 1 E. casseliflavus isolate were positive. esp wasn't associated with vancomycin resistance (VR) or clinical service. VR E. faecium isolates were less genetically diverse than vancomycin-susceptible strains. A large cluster of VR isolates, belonging to esp-positive E. faecium, was revealed. These data support the hypothesis that esp and VR may contribute to dissemination of particular clones.

  12. [Role of anaerobic blood culture in the simultaneous blood culture taking for the diagnosis of bacteremia].

    PubMed

    Guajardo-Lara, Claudia Elena; Saldaña-Ramírez, Martha Idalia; Ayala-Gaytán, Juan Jacobo; Valdovinos-Chávez, Salvador Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: la frecuencia de la septicemia va en aumento y su mortalidad es alta; por lo tanto, su detección, la identificación del microorganismo causal y su susceptibilidad son perentorias. Metodos: se revisaron los registros de 4110 botellas de cultivo de sangre obtenida de enero de 2013 a julio de 2014 de pacientes adultos en un hospital privado de tercer nivel. Resultados: se observó crecimiento de microorganismos en 559 cultivos (12.6 %). En 2648 hemocultivos (60 %) inoculados en pares de frascos uno con medio aeróbico y el otro anaeróbico (1324 sets), se detectó crecimiento en 182 frascos a los que les fueron inoculadas las muestras tomadas al mismo tiempo a 135 pacientes (13.7 %). En 86 pares de frascos con las muestras de 54 pacientes (40 %), el crecimiento solamente se dio en el frasco aeróbico (47.5 %); en 24 pares de frascos (13.19 %) tomados a 21 pacientes (15.5 %, p < 0.05), solamente hubo crecimiento en el frasco anaeróbico. En los hemocultivos de 32 de 60 pacientes con crecimiento en ambos frascos (53 %), el crecimiento se detectó primero en el frasco anaeróbico. Conclusiones: los hemocultivos anaeróbicos tienen una utilidad baja para la detección de bacteriemias por anaerobios estrictos; no obstante, en el 15.55 % de los pacientes estuvo presente el riesgo de pasar por alto la presencia de bacteriemia, y en 53 % de los pacientes con hemocultivos positivos, el diagnóstico de bacteriemia pudo establecerse de manera más temprana, lo que permitió anticipar con mejor precisión la toma de decisiones.

  13. [Comparative study of pneumococcal bacteremia in patients with and without HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Roca, V; Pérez-Cecilia, E; Santillana, T; Romero, J; Picazo, J J

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective study of bacteriemias due to S. pneumoniae in adults is performed, from all the cases observed in our hospital during the 1989-1990 period. We compare the clinical characteristics of the disease depending if the affected patients were infected or not by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In the considered period bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae has been diagnosed in 12 patients with HIV infection and 29 without it. Ten of the twelve patients with HIV infection (83.3%) were in Stage IV (CDC) of the disease, staying the rest in a less developed phase of the disease. Age was significantly higher in non-HIV patients (p < 0.001) and a high percentage of patients in this group (75%) showed some disease considered as predisposing to bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae. When a respiratory foci was present, VIH positive individuals showed more frequently bilateral radiologic infiltrates and less frequently pleural effusion. Leucocyte count when diagnosis was done were significantly higher in non-HIV group. Sensibility of isolated S. pneumoniae was similar in the two groups, being the immediate mortality related with bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae higher in the non-HIV group. In our center 29.3% of bacteriemias due to S. pneumoniae are diagnosed in patients with HIV infection. This disease in itself could constitute an added risk factor in the development of bacteriemia due to S. pneumoniae.

  14. Direct detection and drug-resistance profiling of bacteremias using inertial microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Han Wei; Bhattacharyya, Roby P.; Hung, Deborah T.; Han, Jongyoon

    2015-01-01

    Detection of bacteria in bloodstream infections and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns is critical to guide therapeutic decision-making for optimal patient care. Current culture-based assays are too slow (>48 hrs), leading to excessive up-front use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and/or incorrect antibiotic choices due to resistant bacteria, each with deleterious consequences for patient care and public health. To approach this problem, we describe a method to rapidly isolate bacteria from whole blood using inertial microfluidics and directly determine pathogen identity and antibiotic susceptibility with hybridization-based RNA detection. Using the principle of Dean flow fractionation, bacteria are separated from host blood cells in a label-free separation method with efficient recovery of even low abundance bacteria. Ribosomal RNA detection can then be applied for direct identification of low abundance pathogens (~100/mL) from blood without culturing or enzymatic amplification. Messenger RNA detection of antibiotic-responsive transcripts after brief drug exposure permits rapid susceptibility determination from bacteria with minimal culturing (~105/mL). This unique coupling of microfluidic cell separation with RNA-based molecular detection techniques represents significant progress towards faster diagnostics (~8 hours) to guide antibiotic therapy. PMID:25882432

  15. Clearance of Cellulosimicrobium cellulans Bacteremia in a Child without Central Venous Catheter Removal

    PubMed Central

    Rowlinson, Marie-Claire; Bruckner, David A.; Hinnebusch, Claudia; Nielsen, Karin; Deville, Jaime G.

    2006-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans (formerly known as Oerskovia xanthineolytica) rarely causes human infection. Infections have been reported in immunocompromised hosts or in patients with foreign bodies, such as catheters, where treatment has generally involved removal of the foreign body. We report on a case in which the organism was isolated in multiple blood cultures from a 13-year-old male. After initial therapy failed, treatment with vancomycin and rifampin resulted in infection clearance without removal of the central venous catheter. PMID:16825406

  16. Improved method for the detection of catheter colonization and catheter-related bacteremia in newborns.

    PubMed

    Martín-Rabadán, P; Pérez-García, F; Zamora Flores, E; Nisa, E S; Guembe, M; Bouza, E

    2017-04-01

    Accurate diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) is mandatory for hospital infection control. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are widely used in intensive care units, but studies about procedures for detection of colonization are scarce in neonates. We sequentially processed 372 PICCs by 2 methods, first by the standard roll-plate (RP) technique and then by rubbing catheters on a blood agar plate after being longitudinally split (LS). With both techniques, we detected 133 colonized PICCs. Ninety-four events of CRBSI were diagnosed. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for detection of CRBSI were 58.5%, 92.8%, 73.3%, and 86.9%, respectively, for RP technique and 96.8%, 88.5%, 74.0%, and 98.8%, respectively, for LS technique. The LS technique increased the proportion of detected CRBSI by 38.3%. Neonatal PICC tips should be cultured after cutting them open. This technique is simple and sensitive to detect catheter colonization and also to diagnose CRBSI.

  17. Plantar Purpura as the Initial Presentation of Viridians Streptococcal Shock Syndrome Secondary to Streptococcus gordonii Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chen-Yi; Su, Kuan-Jen; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Huang, Shu-Fang; Chin, Hsien-Kuo; Chang, Chin-Wen; Kuo, Wu-Hsien; Ben, Ren-Jy; Yeh, Yen-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Viridians streptococcal shock syndrome is a subtype of toxic shock syndrome. Frequently, the diagnosis is missed initially because the clinical features are nonspecific. However, it is a rapidly progressive disease, manifested by hypotension, rash, palmar desquamation, and acute respiratory distress syndrome within a short period. The disease course is generally fulminant and rarely presents initially as a purpura over the plantar region. We present a case of a 54-year-old female hospital worker diagnosed with viridians streptococcal shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus gordonii. Despite aggressive antibiotic treatment, fluid hydration, and use of inotropes and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, the patient succumbed to the disease. Early diagnosis of the potentially fatal disease followed by a prompt antibiotic regimen and appropriate use of steroids are cornerstones in the management of this disease to reduce the risk of high morbidity and mortality. PMID:27366188

  18. Spondylodiscitis and bacteremia due to Staphylococcus hyicus in an immunocompetent man

    PubMed Central

    Foissac, Maud; Lekaditi, Maria; Loutfi, Bouchra; Ehrhart, Agnès; Dauchy, Frédéric-Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus hyicus is a coagulase-variable Staphylococcus spp. well-known by veterinarians since it is the major agent of a severe cutaneous infection in piglets called exudative epidermitis. In other species the symptoms of infection are quite different. Human cases are uncommon but seem to occur more frequently after repeated contacts with farm animals. Case report We report the case of a 58-year-old man suffering from debilitating subacute lumbar pain, in whom diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis was based on spine MRI and positive microbiological results. A strain of S. hyicus was surprisingly isolated from blood cultures and bone biopsy. Identification was confirmed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS, Bruker, USA), and the patient was successfully cured with a six-week course of anti-staphylococcal antibiotic regimen. Conclusion The prevalence of S. hyicus in human clinical samples is very low, but may be underestimated. This pathogen may enter the bloodstream through a skin injury, and then induce various pyogenic manifestations in people working with farm animals. S. hyicus exfoliative toxins, responsible for dermatological lesions in piglets, seem unable to damage the human epidermis, explaining the absence of cutaneous blisters in the previously reported cases. Precise data about its pathogenicity in humans and the adequate therapy are lacking. PMID:27622163

  19. Simple models do not explain early dynamics of H. influenzae bacteremia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xinxian; Levin, Bruce; Nemenman, Ilya

    2015-03-01

    There is an abundance of largely qualitative information about the physiological and molecular mechanisms of bacterial pathogenesis. However, little is known about population dynamic processes by which bacteria colonize hosts and invade cells and tissues and thereby cause disease. Classic experiment of Moxon and Murphy observed that, when inoculated intranasally with a mixture of equally virulent strains of Haemophilus influenzae type b(Hib), neonatal rats develop a bacteremic infection that often is dominated by only one random competing strain. A common qualitative explanation for this phenomenon is that the bacteria must switch stochastically into a rapidly growing phenotype to start the full-fledged invasion. Then the first bacterium to switch activates the host immune response, which in turn 'shuts the door' in front of the second strain. We implemented this model computationally and analytically, and we conclude that this model cannot explain the data, specifically, the observed dependence of the rate of infections on the inoculum size. New experiments are needed to identify mechanisms underlying the dependence.

  20. Does antibiotic lock therapy prevent catheter-associated bacteremia in hemodialysis?

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Macarena; Madrid, Trinidad

    2015-01-22

    Central venous catheter-related blood stream infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with renal disease treated with hemodialysis. Antibiotic lock solutions can be effective in preventing this complication in patients with hemodialysis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening more than twenty databases, we identified eight systematic reviews including seventeen randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded that antibiotic lock solutions probably decrease catheter-related blood stream infection in hemodialysis patients.

  1. Virulence factors profiles and ESBL production in Escherichia coli causing bacteremia in Peruvian children.

    PubMed

    Palma, Noemí; Gomes, Cláudia; Riveros, Maribel; García, Wilfredo; Martínez-Puchol, Sandra; Ruiz-Roldán, Lidia; Mateu, Judit; García, Coralith; Jacobs, Jan; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2016-09-01

    The presence of 25 virulence genes (VGs), genetic phylogroups, quinolone-resistance and Extended Spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-production was assessed in 65 Escherichia coli isolates from blood cultures in children <5 years in Peru. The most frequent VGs were fimA (89.2%), iutA (83.1%), agn43 (72.3%), iucA (67.7%), and fyuA (49.2%). The isolates belonged to D (47.7%), A (26.1%), B1 (21.5%), and B2 (4.6%) phylogroups. D + B2 isolates presented a high number of fimA, hly, papC, sat, and fyuA genes. Quinolone-susceptible (22 isolates - 33.8%) and ESBL-negative (31 isolates - 47.7%) isolates carried more VGs that their respective counterparts (5.7 vs. 4.7 and 5.3 vs. 4.4 respectively); the frequency of the fyuA, aat, aap, and hly genes significantly differed between quinolone-resistant and quinolone-susceptible isolates. Neonatal sepsis isolates tended to be more quinolone-resistant (P = 0.0697) and ESBL-producers (P = 0.0776). Early-onset neonatal sepsis isolates possessed a high number of VGs (5.2 VGs), especially in neonates of ≤1 day (5.9 VGs).

  2. [Contribution to the early diagnosis of bacteremia: microbial growth detection in liquid culture media by ultrasound].

    PubMed

    Maestre, J R; Montero de Espinosa, F R

    2001-04-01

    Nosocomial infection is an important problem because the number of patients daily affected in big hospitals. A big effort exists to develop techniques able to early detect the micro-organisms which cause the infection. The ultrasound is a mechanical radiology technique widely used in Medicine for diagnosis and therapy. It is also well known that this radiation can be used to control relative changes of several physico-chemical parameters in liquids. As an example, the velocity an attenuation of acoustic waves coming through a liquid can be accurately measured. The developed technique consists of an ultrasonic chamber immersed into a thermostatized water bath with two transducers operating in through-transmission. Different culture bottles were placed in between the transducers to live the ultrasound to come across the sample. Several micro-organisms with controlled concentrations, chosen between the most common in sepsis clinical, were used to inoculate each bottle. In the case of aerobic metabolism, the carbon dioxide gas produced by bacteria introduce elastic changes into the liquid which modify both the propagation velocity and the attenuation of the ultrasound. The continuous monitoring of the time-of-flight and the amplitude of an ultrasonic pulse coming through the sample give us a clear indication of the metabolism process. The signatures observed permits the identification of algorithms to early define the positive cases. The developed technique is faster than other commercial systems. The intrinsically non-invasive characteristic of the ultrasound and the relative cheapness of the technique open new attractive possibilities in microbiological diagnosis.

  3. Bacteremia caused by Rothia mucilaginosa after pneumonia, in a patient with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bayhan, Cihangül; Karadag Oncel, Eda; Cengiz, Ali B; Oksüz, Ayça B; Aydin, Güzide B

    2016-10-01

    Rothia muciloginosa is a member of normal flora and rarely causes invasive disease. Immunosupressed patients have increased risk for severe infection. Here, we report a male patient with relapsed neuroblastoma hospitalized for pneumonia. After clinical improvement, patient's respiratory symptoms worsened again. Rothia muciloginosa was isolated from blood culture. The worsening of respiratory symptoms can be explained by hematogenous spread of bacteria. He was successfully treated with meropenem and vancomycin for 14 days. This rarely seen bacterium is known to have high mortality rates unless treated appropriately and should be considered especially in patients with malignancy due to their immunsupressed situation.

  4. Reduced Parasite Burden in Children with Falciparum Malaria and Bacteremia Coinfections: Role of Mediators of Inflammation

    DOE PAGES

    Davenport, Gregory C.; Hittner, James B.; Otieno, Vincent; ...

    2016-01-01

    Bmore » acteremia and malaria coinfection is a common and life-threatening condition in children residing in sub-Saharan Africa. We previously showed that coinfection with Gram negative (G[−]) entericacilli and Plasmodium falciparum ( Pf [+]) was associated with reduced high-density parasitemia (HDP, >10,000 parasites/ μ L), enhanced respiratory distress, and severe anemia. Since inflammatory mediators are largely unexplored in such coinfections, circulating cytokines were determined in four groups of children ( n = 206 , aged <3 yrs): healthy; Pf [+] alone; G[−] coinfected; and G[+] coinfected. Staphylococcus aureus and non-Typhi Salmonella were the most frequently isolated G[+] and G[−] organisms, respectively. Coinfected children, particularly those with G[−] pathogens, had lower parasite burden (peripheral and geometric mean parasitemia and HDP). In addition, both coinfected groups had increased IL-4, IL-5, IL-7, IL-12, IL-15, IL-17, IFN- γ , and IFN- α and decreased TNF- α relative to malaria alone. Children with G[−] coinfection had higher IL-1 β and IL-1Ra and lower IL-10 than the Pf [+] group and higher IFN- γ than the G[+] group. To determine how the immune response to malaria regulates parasitemia, cytokine production was investigated with a multiple mediation model. Cytokines with the greatest mediational impact on parasitemia were IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, and IFN- γ . Results here suggest that enhanced immune activation, especially in G[−] coinfected children, acts to reduce malaria parasite burden.« less

  5. Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia in an 85-Year-Old Diabetic Man.

    PubMed

    Mirrakhimov, Aibek E; Chandra, Gopika; Voore, Prakruthi; Khan, Maliha; Halytskyy, Oleksandr; Elhassan, Ahmed; Ali, Alaa M

    2014-01-01

    Emphysematous cholecystitis is an uncommon and dangerous complication of acute cholecystitis. Common risk factors for this disease include male gender, old age, presence of diabetes mellitus and cholelithiasis. The disease is best treated with emergent surgery and parenteral antibiotics. We present the case of an 85-year-old nursing home resident who presented to our institution with a 3-day history of gradually worsening abdominal discomfort.

  6. [Two cases of acute myelogenous leukemia with Bacillus cereus bacteremia resulting in fatal intracranial hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Moriyama, Y; Tatekawa, T; Tominaga, N; Teshima, H; Hiraoka, A; Masaoka, T; Yoshinaga, T

    1993-12-01

    This manuscript reports Bacillus cereus sepsis in two cases with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who suffered complications of fatal intracranial hemorrhage during remission induction therapy. The first case was 43-year-old male with AML (M0) receiving first consolidation chemotherapy who developed sudden diarrhea, abdominal pain and spiking fever. Two days later, he died of intracranial hemorrhage. The second case was 15-year-old male with AML (M5b) who was receiving first induction chemotherapy. He developed headache and vomiting following spiking fever and diarrhea. He died of subarachnoid hemorrhage the next day. In both cases, Bacillus cereus was isolated from blood culture. Fatal intracranial hemorrhage due to severe bleeding tendency caused rapid to death in both cases. These bleeding tendencies might have been induced by B. cereus sepsis. In addition, we should not overlook B. cereus as contamination, but rather consider it as a potential pathogen, when isolated from blood culture.

  7. Endogenous endophthalmitis associated with bacillus cereus bacteremia in a cocaine addict.

    PubMed

    Masi, R J

    1978-10-01

    A 22-year-old black female intravenous cocaine addict presented with an endophthalmitis of the right eye. Diagnostic evaluation included an immediate anterior chamber paracentesis and a delayed vitreous aspiration. Although cultures from the involved eye were negative, all 7 blood cultures grew Bacillus cereus suggesting that this organism was the responsible agent of an endogenous endophthalmitis. The patient was treated with appropriate systemic and local antibiotics with resolution of the acute inflammatory signs. However, a phthisical eye has been noted on follow-up examinations.

  8. Comparison of anti-fouling surface coatings for applications in bacteremia diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Anna K; Allison, Sandra; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F

    2013-01-01

    To accurately diagnose microbial infections in blood, it is essential to recover as many microorganisms from a sample as possible. Unfortunately, recovering such microorganisms depends significantly on their adhesion to the surfaces of diagnostic devices. Consequently, we sought to minimize the adhesion of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) to the surface of polypropylene- and acrylic-based bacteria concentration devices. These devices were treated with 11 different coatings having various charges and hydrophobicities. Some coatings promoted bacterial adhesion under centrifugation, whereas others were more likely to prevent it. Experiments were run using a simple buffer system and lysed blood, both inoculated with MSSA. Under both conditions, Hydromer's 7-TS-13 and Aqua65JL were most effective at reducing bacterial adhesion.

  9. Fatal bacteremia by neisseria cinerea in a woman with myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Li, Min; Cao, Huiling; Yang, Xuewen

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea has been rarely found in blood cultures. In this study, we are reporting a case of a Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) patient in whose blood Neisseria cinerea was found and led a fatal consequence. This case will call our attentions to the uncommon pathogens in the pathogenicity of end-stage patients. PMID:26131259

  10. Fatal bacteremia by neisseria cinerea in a woman with myelodysplastic syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaofei; Li, Min; Cao, Huiling; Yang, Xuewen

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea has been rarely found in blood cultures. In this study, we are reporting a case of a Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) patient in whose blood Neisseria cinerea was found and led a fatal consequence. This case will call our attentions to the uncommon pathogens in the pathogenicity of end-stage patients.

  11. The bacteremia of dental origin and its implications in the appearance of bacterial endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Mang-de la Rosa, María R.; Castellanos-Cosano, Lizett; Romero-Perez, María J.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous systemic diseases may affect the oral cavity and vice versa,in particular severe diseases that involve the heart valve. In these cases, additional measures or a modification to our dental treatment need to be taken. We are aware of various diseases that can cause the emergence of bacterial endocarditis (BE), such as; rheumatic fever, valve lesions due to intravenous drug use, Kawasaki disease and valve surgery, among others. Due to its severity when it is not taken into account in dental treatment, we intend to show the evolution of the antimicrobial prophylaxis towards this condition. Furthermore, we intend to publish the current guidelines of institutions and societies which increasingly encourage rational antimicrobial use. In addition, we intend to examine the evidence of the possible origins of this disease during dental treatment and at the same time describe the necessary considerations that need to be taken during dental treatment. Key words:Endocarditis, antibiotic profilaxis, dental treatment. PMID:24121925

  12. Case report: failure under azithromycin treatment in a case of bacteremia due to Salmonella enterica Paratyphi A

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited information is available regarding the clinical efficacy of azithromycin for the treatment of enteric fever due to fluoroquinolone-resistant Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi among travelers returning to their home countries. Case presentation We report a case of a 52-year-old Japanese man who returned from India, who developed a fever of 39°C with no accompanying symptoms 10 days after returning to Japan from a 1-month business trip to Delhi, India. His blood culture results were positive for Salmonella Paratyphi A. He was treated with 14 days of ceftriaxone, after which he remained afebrile for 18 days before his body temperature again rose to 39°C with no apparent symptoms. He was then empirically given 500 mg of azithromycin, but experienced clinical and microbiological failure of azithromycin treatment for enteric fever due to Salmonella Paratyphi A. However, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of azithromycin was not elevated (8 mg/L). He was again given ceftriaxone for 14 days with no signs of recurrence during the follow-up. Conclusion There are limited data available for the treatment of enteric fever using azithromycin in travelers from developed countries who are not immune to the disease, and thus, careful follow-up is necessary. In our case, the low azithromycin dose might have contributed the treatment failure. Additional clinical data are needed to determine the rate of success, MIC, and contributing factors for success and/or failure of azithromycin treatment for both Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi infections. PMID:25041573

  13. Influence of Colistin Dose on Global Cure in Patients with Bacteremia Due to Carbapenem-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Gabrielle A; Bauer, Seth R; Neuner, Elizabeth A; Bass, Stephanie N; Lam, Simon W

    2015-11-02

    The increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) nosocomial infections accounts for increased morbidity and mortality of such infections. Infections with MDR Gram-negative isolates are frequently treated with colistin. Based on recent pharmacokinetic studies, current colistin dosing regimens may result in a prolonged time to therapeutic concentrations, leading to suboptimal and delayed effective treatment. In addition, studies have demonstrated an association between an increased colistin dose and improved clinical outcomes. However, the specific dose at which these outcomes are observed is unknown and warrants further investigation. This retrospective study utilized classification and regression tree (CART) analysis to determine the dose of colistin most predictive of global cure at day 7 of therapy. Patients were assigned to high- and low-dose cohorts based on the CART-established breakpoint. The secondary outcomes included microbiologic outcomes, clinical cure, global cure, lengths of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stays, and 7- and 28-day mortalities. Additionally, safety outcomes focused on the incidence of nephrotoxicity associated with high-dose colistin therapy. The CART-established breakpoint for high-dose colistin was determined to be >4.4 mg/kg of body weight/day, based on ideal body weight. This study evaluated 127 patients; 45 (35%) received high-dose colistin, and 82 (65%) received low-dose colistin. High-dose colistin was associated with day 7 global cure (40% versus 19.5%; P = 0.013) in bivariate and multivariate analyses (odds ratio [OR] = 3.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37 to 8.45; P = 0.008). High-dose colistin therapy was also associated with day 7 clinical cure, microbiologic success, and mortality but not with the development of acute kidney injury. We concluded that high-dose colistin (>4.4 mg/kg/day) is independently associated with day 7 global cure.

  14. Bacteremia Due to a Novel Microbacterium Species in a Patient with Leukemia and Description of Microbacterium paraoxydans sp. nov.

    PubMed Central

    Laffineur, Kim; Avesani, Véronique; Cornu, Guy; Charlier, Jacqueline; Janssens, Michèle; Wauters, Georges; Delmée, Michel

    2003-01-01

    A yellow-pigmented coryneform rod was isolated from the blood of a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who was perfused with a central venous catheter. The culture bottles were positive twice, at a 2-month interval. The isolate was identified as a Microbacterium sp. and studied along with five other similar strains. Phenotypic, chemotaxonomic, and genetic characteristics indicated that they are closely related to Microbacterium oxydans but that they belong to a distinct species, for which the name Microbacterium paraoxydans sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of M. paraoxydans is CF36T = DSM 15019T. The G+C content of its DNA is 69.9 mol%. PMID:12734292

  15. Effect of Continuous and Sequential Therapy Among Veterans Receiving Daptomycin or Linezolid for Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus faecium Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Britt, Nicholas S; Potter, Emily M; Patel, Nimish; Steed, Molly E

    2017-03-06

    Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium bloodstream infections (VREF-BSI) cause significant mortality, highlighting the need to optimize treatment. We compared the effectiveness and safety of daptomycin (DAP) and linezolid (LZD) as continuous or sequential therapy for VREF-BSI in a national, retrospective, propensity score (PS) matched cohort study of hospitalized Veterans Affairs patients (2004-2014). We compared clinical outcomes and adverse events among patients treated with continuous LZD, continuous DAP, or sequential LZD followed by DAP (LZD-DAP). Secondarily, we analyzed the impact of infectious diseases (ID) consultation and source of VREF-BSI. A total of 2,779 patients were included (LZD [n=1,348], DAP [n=1,055], LZD-DAP [n=227]). LZD was associated with increased 30-day mortality versus DAP (risk ratio [RR], 1.11; 95% CI, 1.01-1.22; P=0.042). After PS matching, this relationship persisted (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.02-1.26; P=0.015). LZD-DAP switchers had lower mortality than those remaining on LZD (RR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.03-1.63; P=0.021), suggesting a benefit may still be derived with sequential therapy. LZD-treated patients experienced more adverse events, including ≥ 50% reduction in platelets (RR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.03-1.11; P=0.001). DAP was associated with lower mortality than LZD in patients with endocarditis (RR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.02-1.41; P=0.024); however, there was no statistically significant association between treatment group and mortality with regard to other sources of infection. Therefore, source of infection appears to be important in selection of patients most likely to benefit from DAP.

  16. Tree-Based Models for Predicting Mortality in Gram-Negative Bacteremia: Avoid Putting the CART before the Horse

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, J. Nicholas; Lizza, Bryan D.; McLaughlin, Milena M.; Esterly, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, infectious disease studies employ tree-based approaches, e.g., classification and regression tree modeling, to identify clinical thresholds. We present tree-based-model-derived thresholds along with their measures of uncertainty. We explored individual and pooled clinical cohorts of bacteremic patients to identify modified acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (II) (m-APACHE-II) score mortality thresholds using a tree-based approach. Predictive performance measures for each candidate threshold were calculated. Candidate thresholds were examined according to binary logistic regression probabilities of the primary outcome, correct classification predictive matrices, and receiver operating characteristic curves. Three individual cohorts comprising a total of 235 patients were studied. Within the pooled cohort, the mean (± standard deviation) m-APACHE-II score was 13.6 ± 5.3, with an in-hospital mortality of 16.6%. The probability of death was greater at higher m-APACHE II scores in only one of three cohorts (odds ratio for cohort 1 [OR1] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.99 to 1.34; OR2 = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.94 to 1.16; OR3 = 1.18, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.38) and was greater at higher scores within the pooled cohort (OR4 = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.19). In contrast, tree-based models overcame power constraints and identified m-APACHE-II thresholds for mortality in two of three cohorts (P = 0.02, 0.1, and 0.008) and the pooled cohort (P = 0.001). Predictive performance at each threshold was highly variable among cohorts. The selection of any one predictive threshold value resulted in fixed sensitivity and specificity. Tree-based models increased power and identified threshold values from continuous predictor variables; however, sample size and data distributions influenced the identified thresholds. The provision of predictive matrices or graphical displays of predicted probabilities within infectious disease studies can improve the interpretation of tree-based model-derived thresholds. PMID:26596934

  17. Usefulness of Multiplex Real-Time PCR for Simultaneous Pathogen Detection and Resistance Profiling of Staphylococcal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yousun; Kim, Taek Soo; Min, Young Gi; Hong, Yun Ji; Park, Jeong Su; Hwang, Sang Mee; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Eu Suk; Kim, Hong Bin; Song, Junghan; Kim, Eui-Chong

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are the leading cause of nosocomial blood stream infections. Fast and accurate identification of staphylococci and confirmation of their methicillin resistance are crucial for immediate treatment with effective antibiotics. A multiplex real-time PCR assay that targets mecA, femA specific for S. aureus, femA specific for S. epidermidis, 16S rRNA for universal bacteria, and 16S rRNA specific for staphylococci was developed and evaluated with 290 clinical blood culture samples containing Gram-positive cocci in clusters (GPCC). For the 262 blood cultures identified to the species level with the MicroScan WalkAway system (Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics, USA), the direct real-time PCR assay of positive blood cultures showed very good agreement for the categorization of staphylococci into methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis (MRSE), methicillin-susceptible S. epidermidis (MSSE), methicillin-resistant non-S. epidermidis CoNS (MRCoNS), and methicillin-susceptible non-S. epidermidis CoNS (MSCoNS) (κ = 0.9313). The direct multiplex real-time PCR assay of positive blood cultures containing GPCC can provide essential information at the critical point of infection with a turnaround time of no more than 4 h. Further studies should evaluate the clinical outcome of using this rapid real-time PCR assay in glycopeptide antibiotic therapy in clinical settings. PMID:27403436

  18. Role of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 in pathogenesis of staphylococcal arthritis and in host defense against staphylococcal bacteremia.

    PubMed Central

    Verdrengh, M; Springer, T A; Gutierrez-Ramos, J C; Tarkowski, A

    1996-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily that interacts with two integrins, LFA-1 and Mac-1. These interactions are critical for leukocyte extravasation into inflamed tissue. To assess the role of ICAM-1 expression in the pathogenesis of bacterial infection, homozygously mutant mice lacking the ICAM-1 gene were exposed to Staphylococcus aureus. Within 6 days after inoculation 50% of the animals in the ICAM-1(-/-) group, but none of the controls, had died. Despite the high level of mortality, ICAM-1(-/-) mice developed less frequent and less severe arthritis than their wild-type littermates. In agreement, normal mice inoculated with staphylococci and administered anti-ICAM-1 antibodies exhibited a higher frequency of mortality but less severe arthritis than the controls. Our results indicate that ICAM-1 on the one hand provides protection against systemic disease but on the other hand aggravates the local disease manifestation. PMID:8698512

  19. Outbreak of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia among patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation: association with faulty replacement of handwashing soap.

    PubMed

    Klausner, J D; Zukerman, C; Limaye, A P; Corey, L

    1999-11-01

    Using molecular typing methods, we confirmed an outbreak of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia among bone marrow transplant patients. The likely source was a healthcare worker who may have washed with moisturizer instead of soap between patients. Hospital epidemiologists need to go beyond antibiograms when evaluating outbreaks and be vigilant about all aspects of hand washing.

  20. Superantigens produced by catheter-associated Staphylococcus aureus elicit systemic inflammatory disease in the absence of bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jin-Won; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Karau, Melissa J.; Tilahun, Ashenafi; Khaleghi, Shahryar Rostamkolaei; Chowdhary, Vaidehi R.; David, Chella S.; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2015-01-01

    SAgs, produced by Staphylococcus aureus, play a major role in the pathogenesis of invasive staphylococcal diseases by inducing potent activation of the immune system. However, the role of SAgs, produced by S. aureus, associated with indwelling devices or tissues, are not known. Given the prevalence of device-associated infection with toxigenic S. aureus in clinical settings and the potency of SAgs, we hypothesized that continuous exposure to SAgs produced by catheter-associated S. aureus could have systemic consequences. To investigate these effects, we established a murine in vivo catheter colonization model. One centimeter long intravenous catheters were colonized with a clinical S. aureus isolate producing SAgs or isogenic S. aureus strains, capable or incapable of producing SAg. Catheters were subcutaneously implanted in age-matched HLA-DR3, B6, and AEo mice lacking MHC class II molecules and euthanized 7 d later. There was no evidence of systemic infection. However, in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice, which respond robustly to SSAgs, the SSAg-producing, but not the nonproducing strains, caused a transient increase in serum cytokine levels and a protracted expansion of splenic CD4+ T cells expressing SSAg-reactive TCR Vβ8. Lungs, livers, and kidneys from these mice showed infiltration with CD4+ and CD11b+ cells. These findings were absent in B6 and AEo mice, which are known to respond poorly to SSAgs. Overall, our novel findings suggest that systemic immune activation elicited by SAgs, produced by S. aureus colonizing foreign bodies, could have clinical consequences in humans. PMID:25979434

  1. Species identification of Streptococcus bovis group isolates causing bacteremia: a comparison of two MALDI-TOF MS systems.

    PubMed

    Agergaard, Charlotte N; Knudsen, Elisa; Dargis, Rimtas; Nielsen, Xiaohui C; Christensen, Jens J; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2017-02-20

    This study compared two MALDI-TOF MS systems (Biotyper and VITEK MS) on clinical Streptococcus bovis group isolates (n=66). The VITEK MS gave fewer misidentifications and a higher rate of correct identifications than the Biotyper. Only the identification of S. lutetiensis by the VITEK MS was reliable. Additional optimization of the available system databases is needed.

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Ceftazidime-Avibactam in Two Patients With KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Bacteremia and Renal Impairment.

    PubMed

    Veillette, John J; Truong, James; Forland, Steven C

    2016-11-01

    Limited data exist regarding optimal dosing of ceftazidime/avibactam (C/A) in patients with unique physiology, who were excluded from published clinical trials. Data are also lacking regarding clinical efficacy of C/A in patients with infections due to multidrug-resistant gram-negative pathogens. To expand knowledge in these areas, we present pharmacokinetic data from two patients with Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing K. pneumoniae bloodstream infections, both of whom had renal impairment, and one of whom was morbidly obese. C/A was initiated in both patients at higher doses than those recommended in the package insert. To assess adequacy of dosing at steady state, a trough was drawn before and consecutive levels were drawn after a C/A dose such that half-life and volume of distribution for ceftazidime and avibactam could be calculated using the Sawchuk-Zaske method. Both patients cleared their bloodstream infection without evidence of toxicity. Patient 1 and patient 2 had prolonged half-lives for ceftazidime (22.8 and 14.5 hours, respectively) and avibactam (19.6 and 11.3 hours, respectively). Both patients had volumes of distribution significantly larger than those listed in the package insert: ceftazidime 47.1 L and 24.7 L and avibactam 50.3 L and 38.7 L for patients 1 and 2, respectively. Considering the larger volumes of distribution and levels observed in our patients, recommended doses and intervals may not be sufficient for obese patients with renal failure, especially for those infected with KPC-producing organisms. Additional efficacy and pharmacokinetic data are still needed for this agent to define optimal dosing strategies in patients commonly encountered in clinical practice.

  3. The Repeat-In-Toxin Family Member TosA Mediates Adherence of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli and Survival during Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Patrick D.; Wiles, Travis J.; Engstrom, Michael D.; Prasov, Lev; Mulvey, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is responsible for the majority of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTI) and represents the most common bacterial infection in adults. UPEC utilizes a wide range of virulence factors to colonize the host, including the novel repeat-in-toxin (RTX) protein TosA, which is specifically expressed in the host urinary tract and contributes significantly to the virulence and survival of UPEC. tosA, found in strains within the B2 phylogenetic subgroup of E. coli, serves as a marker for strains that also contain a large number of well-characterized UPEC virulence factors. The presence of tosA in an E. coli isolate predicts successful colonization of the murine model of ascending UTI, regardless of the source of the isolate. Here, a detailed analysis of the function of tosA revealed that this gene is transcriptionally linked to genes encoding a conserved type 1 secretion system similar to other RTX family members. TosA localized to the cell surface and was found to mediate (i) adherence to host cells derived from the upper urinary tract and (ii) survival in disseminated infections and (iii) to enhance lethality during sepsis (as assessed in two different animal models of infection). An experimental vaccine, using purified TosA, protected vaccinated animals against urosepsis. From this work, it was concluded that TosA belongs to a novel group of RTX proteins that mediate adherence and host damage during UTI and urosepsis and could be a novel target for the development of therapeutics to treat ascending UTIs. PMID:22083710

  4. Reidentification of Streptococcus bovis Isolates Causing Bacteremia According to the New Taxonomy Criteria: Still an Issue? ▿

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Beatriz; Morosini, María-Isabel; Loza, Elena; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Navas, Enrique; Cantón, Rafael; del Campo, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    All Streptococcus bovis blood culture isolates recovered from January 2003 to January 2010 (n = 52) at the Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal were reidentified on the basis of their genetic traits using new taxonomic criteria. Initial identification was performed by the semiautomatic Wider system (Fco. Soria-Melguizo, Spain) and the API 20 Strep system (bioMérieux, France). All isolates were reidentified by PCR amplification and sequencing of both the 16S rRNA and sodA genes and by mass spectrometry using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS; Bruker, Germany). Results of 16S rRNA/sodA gene sequencing were as follows: Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus, 14/14 (number of isolates identified by 16S rRNA/number of isolates identified by sodA gene sequencing); Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus, 24/24; Streptococcus spp., 7/0; Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius, 0/2; Streptococcus lutetiensis, 0/5; Leuconostoc mesenteroides, 4/0; and Lactococcus lactis, 3/3. MALDI-TOF MS identified 27 S. gallolyticus isolates but not at the subspecies level, 4 L. mesenteroides isolates, 3 L. lactis isolates, and 6 S. lutetiensis isolates, whereas 12 isolates rendered a nonreliable identification result. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis grouped all S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates into 3 major clusters clearly different from those of the S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus isolates, which, in turn, exhibited no clonal relationship. The percentages of resistance to the tested antimicrobials were 38% for erythromycin, 23% for fosfomycin, 10% for levofloxacin, 6% for tetracycline, and 4% for co-trimoxazole. The most frequent underlying diseases were hepatobiliary disorders (53%), endocarditis (17%), and malignancies (12%). We conclude that sequencing of the sodA gene was the most discriminatory method and that S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus appears to have a higher genetic diversity than S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus. PMID:21752968

  5. Comparative evaluation of Oxoid Signal and BACTEC radiometric blood culture systems for the detection of bacteremia and fungemia

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, M.P.; Mirrett, S.; Reller, L.B.

    1988-05-01

    The Oxoid Signal blood culture system is a newly described, innovative method for visually detecting growth of microorganisms. We did 5,999 paired comparisons of equal volumes (10 ml) of blood in the Oxoid Signal and BACTEC radiometric blood culture systems at two university hospitals that use identical methods of obtaining and processing specimens. Overall, more microorganisms were detected in the BACTEC system (P less than 0.001), in particular, streptococci (P less than 0.01), fungi (P less than 0.001), and nonfermentative gram-negative rods, especially Acinetobacter species (P less than 0.001). Trends favoring the BACTEC system for detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Haemophilus species, and Neisseria species were noted. There were no differences in the yield of staphylococci, members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, and anaerobic bacteria. When both systems detected sepsis, the BACTEC did so earlier (P less than 0.001). This advantage was most notable at 24 h (70% of BACTEC positives detected versus 48% of Oxoid positives). The proportion of positives detected after 48 h, however, was similar (BACTEC, 84%; Oxoid, 78%). Revisions in the Oxoid Signal system itself or in the processing of Oxoid bottles appear to be necessary to improve its performance in detecting certain microorganism groups, especially fungi.

  6. [Increasing trend of antimicrobial drug-resistance in organisms causing bacteremia at a tertiary-care hospital: 1995 to 2000].

    PubMed

    Kato-Maeda, Midori; Bautista-Alavez, Anabertha; Rolón-Montes-de-Oca, Ana Lilia; Ramos-Hinojosa, Ancelmo; Ponce-de-León, Alfredo; Bobadilla-del-Valle, Miriam; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo; Sifuentes-Osornio, José

    2003-01-01

    We described the trends of drug-resistant organisms isolated in blood cultures from patients detected in a teaching hospital from 1995 to 2000. We found an increase in the number of clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter spp, Serratia spp, Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and Enterococcus spp, resistant to antibiotics commonly used to treat infections caused by these organisms. The frequency of gram-negative bacilli resistant to third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones increased during the period of study, and in 2000 more than 20% of the isolates were resistant. In contrast, the frequency of resistance to aminoglycosides and carbapenems was less than 20%. The frequency of resistant staphylococci increased exuberantly fifty fold to quinolones and five fold to oxacillin during the study period, therefore in 2000, 26.1% of S. aureus isolates and 61% of S. epidermidis were resistant to oxacillin. The frequency of resistant enterococci also increased, and in 2000, 50% were resistant to ampicillin, and 37.5% to gentamicin. The increase of drug resistant organisms isolated in blood had a direct impact in the empirical treatment of severely infected patients in our hospital. It is important to continuously supervise antibiotic use, and to adopt more strict control measures to decrease the frequency of infections caused by drug resistant organisms.

  7. Whole-genome sequencing identifies emergence of a quinolone resistance mutation in a case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Pak, Theodore R; Altman, Deena R; Attie, Oliver; Sebra, Robert; Hamula, Camille L; Lewis, Martha; Deikus, Gintaras; Newman, Leah C; Fang, Gang; Hand, Jonathan; Patel, Gopi; Wallach, Fran; Schadt, Eric E; Huprikar, Shirish; van Bakel, Harm; Kasarskis, Andrew; Bashir, Ali

    2015-11-01

    Whole-genome sequences for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia serial isolates from a bacteremic patient before and after development of levofloxacin resistance were assembled de novo and differed by one single-nucleotide variant in smeT, a repressor for multidrug efflux operon smeDEF. Along with sequenced isolates from five contemporaneous cases, they displayed considerable diversity compared against all published complete genomes. Whole-genome sequencing and complete assembly can conclusively identify resistance mechanisms emerging in S. maltophilia strains during clinical therapy.

  8. Whole-Genome Sequencing Identifies Emergence of a Quinolone Resistance Mutation in a Case of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Deena R.; Attie, Oliver; Sebra, Robert; Hamula, Camille L.; Lewis, Martha; Deikus, Gintaras; Newman, Leah C.; Fang, Gang; Hand, Jonathan; Patel, Gopi; Wallach, Fran; Schadt, Eric E.; Huprikar, Shirish; van Bakel, Harm; Bashir, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome sequences for Stenotrophomonas maltophilia serial isolates from a bacteremic patient before and after development of levofloxacin resistance were assembled de novo and differed by one single-nucleotide variant in smeT, a repressor for multidrug efflux operon smeDEF. Along with sequenced isolates from five contemporaneous cases, they displayed considerable diversity compared against all published complete genomes. Whole-genome sequencing and complete assembly can conclusively identify resistance mechanisms emerging in S. maltophilia strains during clinical therapy. PMID:26324280

  9. Comparison of 16S rRNA Gene PCR and BACTEC 9240 for Detection of Neonatal Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, J. A.; Durso, M. B.

    2000-01-01

    Ten percent of infants born in the United States are admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICU) annually. Approximately one-half of these admissions are from term infants (>34 weeks of gestation) at risk for systemic infection. Most of the term infants are not infected but rather have symptoms consistent with other medical conditions that mimic sepsis. The current standard of care for evaluating bacterial sepsis in the newborn is performing blood culturing and providing antibiotic therapy while awaiting the 48-h preliminary result of culture. Implementing a more rapid means of ruling out sepsis in term newborns could result in shorter NICU stays and less antibiotic usage. The purpose of this feasibility study was to compare the utility of PCR to that of conventional culture. To this end, a total of 548 paired blood samples collected from infants admitted to the NICU for suspected sepsis were analyzed for bacterial growth using the BACTEC 9240 instrument and for the bacterial 16S rRNA gene using a PCR assay which included a 5-h preamplification culturing step. The positivity rates by culture and PCR were 25 (4.6%) and 27 (4.9%) positive specimens out of a total of 548 specimens, respectively. The comparison revealed sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 96.0, 99.4, 88.9, and 99.8%, respectively, for PCR. In summary, this PCR-based approach, requiring as little as 9 h of turnaround time and blood volumes as small as 200 μl, correlated well with conventional blood culture results obtained for neonates suspected of having bacterial sepsis. PMID:10878046

  10. Population Structure of Enterococcus faecium Causing Bacteremia in a Spanish University Hospital: Setting the Scene for a Future Increase in Vancomycin Resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Coque, Teresa M.; Willems, Rob J. L.; Fortún, Jesús; Top, Janetta; Diz, Sergio; Loza, Elena; Cantón, Rafael; Baquero, Fernando

    2005-01-01

    Over an 8-year period (1995 to 2002), 86 Enterococcus faecium blood isolates from 84 patients, of which 54 were ampicillin resistant (AREF) and 32 were ampicillin susceptible (ASEF), were studied in a university hospital (1,200 beds; serving a population of 600,000) in Spain, a country characterized by a near-absence of resistance to vancomycin and very high rates of ampicillin resistance among enterococci. Clonal relatedness by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), antibiotic susceptibility, presence of the virulence/epidemicity genes espEfm and hylEfm, and identification of purK alleles were studied. A group of isolates was also analyzed by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and multilocus sequence typing. Medical charts (30 variables collected) were reviewed for 60/84 patients. ASEF showed high clonal diversity (32 PFGE types, 11 purK alleles, 4 AFLP genogroups), did not harbor putative virulence genes, and had no specific association with hospital acquisition. AREF isolates belonged to a clonal complex (CC) of genetically related strains (purK-1, AFLP genogroup C), occasionally harboring putative virulence traits, and were from patients with particular risk factors. Within this CC, previously associated with vancomycin-resistant E. faecium isolates causing outbreaks worldwide (W. L. Homan et al., J. Clin. Microbiol. 40:1963-1971, 2002), a great genetic diversity of antibiotic resistance and virulence/epidemicity profiles was found. Associations between esp and a >7-day hospital stay and between purK-1, hospital location, and nosocomial acquisition were noted (P < 0.001). These findings reflect the importance of local environmental differences in the evolution of this CC, suggesting that the emergence of vancomycin resistance among AREF strains in Spain may be a question of time. PMID:15980338

  11. Effects of vancomycin versus nafcillin in enhancing killing of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus causing bacteremia by human cathelicidin LL-37.

    PubMed

    Le, J; Dam, Q; Schweizer, M; Thienphrapa, W; Nizet, V; Sakoulas, G

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that anti-staphylococcal beta-lactam antibiotics, like nafcillin, render methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) more susceptible to killing by innate host defense peptides (HDPs), such as cathelicidin LL-37. We compared the effects of growth in 1/4 minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of nafcillin or vancomycin on the LL-37 killing of 92 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates. For three randomly selected strains among these, we examined the effects of nafcillin, vancomycin, daptomycin, or linezolid on LL-37 killing and autolysis. Growth in the presence of subinhibitory nafcillin significantly enhanced LL-37 killing of MSSA compared to vancomycin and antibiotic-free controls. Nafcillin also reduced MSSA production of the golden staphylococcal pigment staphyloxanthin in 39 % of pigmented strains vs. 14 % for vancomycin. Among the antibiotics tested, only nafcillin resulted in significantly increased MSSA autolysis. These studies point to additional mechanisms of anti-staphylococcal activity of nafcillin beyond direct bactericidal activity, properties that vancomycin and other antibiotic classes do not exhibit. The ability of nafcillin to enhance sensitivity to innate HDPs may contribute to its superior effectiveness against MSSA, as suggested by studies comparing clinical outcomes to vancomycin treatment.

  12. MALDI-ToF short incubation identification from blood cultures is associated with reduced length of hospitalization and a decrease in bacteremia associated mortality.

    PubMed

    Delport, J A; Strikwerda, A; Armstrong, A; Schaus, D; John, M

    2017-01-20

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of MALDI-ToF identification and rapid short incubation MALDI-Tof identification protocol on patient care compared to conventional identification. By using a retrospective review we assessed the impact of a rapid Bruker MALDI-Tof identification protocol. Overall there was a 16.76-hour reduction in time to identification of the pathogen after the introduction of MALDI-TOF identification in 2013 (P<0.0001) and a further 15-hour reduction (P<9.37 E-05) after implementation of the short incubation MALDI-TOF identification protocol in 2014. Patients received appropriate therapy 20.25 hours earlier (P<0.002) in 2014 compared to the conventional identification group in 2012. Overall length in the patients needing optimization of antibiotic treatment was reduced by 6.87 days (P<0.042). In 2014 outcomes between the patients needing a change in their antibiotic compared to the patients where the empirical therapy was considered to be optimal were similar with respective difference in length of stay being reduced from 4.72 days (P<0.031) to 1.77 days (P<0.71) and an associated reduction in the absolute mortality risk of 3.79%. The all-cause mortality rate was twice as high in the group pre-implementation of the short incubation MALDI-TOF identification with an associated survival benefit in this patient population when 26 patients were treated. Rapid short incubation MALDI-ToF identification of bacterial pathogens in blood cultures is associated with a reduction in length of stay and mortality risk.

  13. Inhalational anthrax (Ames aerosol) in naïve and vaccinated New Zealand rabbits: characterizing the spread of bacteria from lung deposition to bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Gutting, Bradford W; Nichols, Tonya L; Channel, Stephen R; Gearhart, Jeffery M; Andrews, George A; Berger, Alan E; Mackie, Ryan S; Watson, Brent J; Taft, Sarah C; Overheim, Katie A; Sherwood, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    There is a need to better understand inhalational anthrax in relevant animal models. This understanding could aid risk assessment, help define therapeutic windows, and provide a better understanding of disease. The aim here was to characterize and quantify bacterial deposition and dissemination in rabbits following exposure to single high aerosol dose (> 100 LD(50)) of Bacillus anthracis (Ames) spores immediately following exposure through 36 h. The primary goal of collecting the data was to support investigators in developing computational models of inhalational anthrax disease. Rabbits were vaccinated prior to exposure with the human vaccine (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA) or were sham-vaccinated, and were then exposed in pairs (one sham and one AVA) so disease kinetics could be characterized in equally-dosed hosts where one group is fully protected and is able to clear the infection (AVA-vaccinated), while the other is susceptible to disease, in which case the bacteria are able to escape containment and replicate uncontrolled (sham-vaccinated rabbits). Between 4-5% of the presented aerosol dose was retained in the lung of sham- and AVA-vaccinated rabbits as measured by dilution plate analysis of homogenized lung tissue or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. After 6 and 36 h, >80% and >96%, respectively, of the deposited spores were no longer detected in BAL, with no detectable difference between sham- or AVA-vaccinated rabbits. Thereafter, differences between the two groups became noticeable. In sham-vaccinated rabbits the bacteria were detected in the tracheobronchial lymph nodes (TBLN) 12 h post-exposure and in the circulation at 24 h, a time point which was also associated with dramatic increases in vegetative CFU in the lung tissue of some animals. In all sham-vaccinated rabbits, bacteria increased in both TBLN and blood through 36 h at which point in time some rabbits succumbed to disease. In contrast, AVA-vaccinated rabbits showed small numbers of CFU in TBLN between 24 and 36 h post-exposure with small numbers of bacteria in the circulation only at 24 h post-exposure. These results characterize and quantify disease progression in naïve rabbits following aerosol administration of Ames spores which may be useful in a number of different research applications, including developing quantitative models of infection for use in human inhalational anthrax risk assessment.

  14. Integrative “Omic” Analysis of Experimental Bacteremia Identifies a Metabolic Signature That Distinguishes Human Sepsis from Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Raymond J.; Tipper, Jennifer L.; Bruse, Shannon; Baron, Rebecca M.; Tsalik, Ephraim L.; Huntley, James; Rogers, Angela J.; Jaramillo, Richard J.; O'Donnell, Denise; Mega, William M.; Keaton, Mignon; Kensicki, Elizabeth; Gazourian, Lee; Fredenburgh, Laura E.; Massaro, Anthony F.; Otero, Ronny M.; Fowler, Vance G.; Rivers, Emanuel P.; Woods, Chris W.; Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Sopori, Mohan L.; Perrella, Mark A.; Choi, Augustine M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Sepsis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Currently, early diagnosis and the progression of the disease are difficult to make. The integration of metabolomic and transcriptomic data in a primate model of sepsis may provide a novel molecular signature of clinical sepsis. Objectives: To develop a biomarker panel to characterize sepsis in primates and ascertain its relevance to early diagnosis and progression of human sepsis. Methods: Intravenous inoculation of Macaca fascicularis with Escherichia coli produced mild to severe sepsis, lung injury, and death. Plasma samples were obtained before and after 1, 3, and 5 days of E. coli challenge and at the time of killing. At necropsy, blood, lung, kidney, and spleen samples were collected. An integrative analysis of the metabolomic and transcriptomic datasets was performed to identify a panel of sepsis biomarkers. Measurements and Main Results: The extent of E. coli invasion, respiratory distress, lethargy, and mortality was dependent on the bacterial dose. Metabolomic and transcriptomic changes characterized severe infections and death, and indicated impaired mitochondrial, peroxisomal, and liver functions. Analysis of the pulmonary transcriptome and plasma metabolome suggested impaired fatty acid catabolism regulated by peroxisome-proliferator activated receptor signaling. A representative four-metabolite model effectively diagnosed sepsis in primates (area under the curve, 0.966) and in two human sepsis cohorts (area under the curve, 0.78 and 0.82). Conclusions: A model of sepsis based on reciprocal metabolomic and transcriptomic data was developed in primates and validated in two human patient cohorts. It is anticipated that the identified parameters will facilitate early diagnosis and management of sepsis. PMID:25054455

  15. A sporadic outbreak of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteremia in pediatric intensive care unit of a tertiary care hospital in coastal Karnataka, South India.

    PubMed

    Antony, Beena; Cherian, Elizabeth Varkey; Boloor, Rekha; Shenoy, K Varadraj

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (BCC) is a significant opportunistic pathogen in hospitalized and immunocompromised patients, particularly in cystic fibrosis. It is widely distributed in natural habitats such as soil and water and frequently encountered in nosocomial outbreaks due to contaminated disinfectants and medical devices. However reports on outbreaks due to this organism are lacking from the Indian subcontinent. We report here a sporadic outbreak due to BCC which occurred in the pediatric Intensive Care Unit of our institute, the probable source being contaminated distilled water. The isolate from three babies and environmental sources including distilled water were identical and confirmed as BCC. Strict infection control measures were instituted to prevent the spread of infection. This report highlights the potential role of B.cepacia in causing sporadic outbreaks especially in ICUs, associated with water.

  16. Broad-Range PCR Coupled with Electrospray Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Bacteremia and Fungemia in Patients with Neutropenic Fever.

    PubMed

    Desmet, S; Maertens, J; Bueselinck, K; Lagrou, K

    2016-10-01

    Infection is an important complication in patients with hematologic malignancies or solid tumors undergoing intensive cytotoxic chemotherapy. In only 20 to 30% of the febrile neutropenic episodes, an infectious agent is detected by conventional cultures. In this prospective study, the performance of broad-range PCR coupled with electrospray ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) technology was compared to conventional blood cultures (BC) in a consecutive series of samples from high-risk hematology patients. In 74 patients, BC and a whole-blood sample for PCR/ESI-MS (Iridica BAC BSI; Abbott, Carlsbad, CA, USA) were collected at the start of each febrile neutropenic episode and, in case of persistent fever, also at day 5. During 100 different febrile episodes, 105 blood samples were collected and analyzed by PCR/ESI-MS. There was evidence of a bloodstream infection (BSI) in 36/105 cases (34%), based on 14 cases with both PCR/ESI-MS and BC positivity, 17 cases with BC positivity only, and 5 cases with PCR/ESI-MS positivity only. The sensitivity of PCR/ESI-MS was 45%, specificity was 93%, and the negative predictive value was 80% compared to blood culture. PCR/ESI-MS detected definite pathogens (Fusobacterium nucleatum and Streptococcus pneumoniae) missed by BC, whereas it missed both Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms detected by BC. PCR/ESI-MS testing detected additional microorganisms but showed a low sensitivity (45%) compared to BC in neutropenic patients. Our results indicate a lower concordance between BC and PCR/ESI-MS in the neutropenic population than what has been previously reported in other patient groups with normal white blood cell distribution, and a lower sensitivity than other PCR-based methods.

  17. Constructing Unit-Specific Empiric Treatment Guidelines for Catheter-Related and Primary Bacteremia by Determining the Likelihood of Inadequate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Megan E.; Anderson, Deverick J.; Sharpe, Michelle; Chen, Luke F.; Drew, Richard H.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the feasibility of using likelihood of inadequate therapy (LIT), a parameter calculated by using pathogen frequency and in vitro susceptibility for determination of appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy for primary bloodstream infections. Our study demonstrates that LIT may reveal differences in traditional antibiograms. PMID:22418641

  18. Value of surveillance blood culture for early diagnosis of occult bacteremia in patients on corticosteroid therapy following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chizuka, A; Kami, M; Kanda, Y; Murashige, N; Kishi, Y; Hamaki, T; Kim, S-W; Hori, A; Kojima, R; Mori, S-I; Tanosaki, R; Gomi, H; Takaue, Y

    2005-03-01

    Bloodstream infection (BSI) is a significant complication following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). Corticosteroids mask inflammatory responses, delaying the initiation of antibiotics. We reviewed medical records of 69 allo-SCT patients who had been on >0.5 mg/kg prednisolone to investigate the efficacy of weekly surveillance blood cultures. A total of 36 patients (52%) had positive cultures, 25 definitive BSI and 11 probable BSI. Pathogens in definitive BSI were Staphylococcus epidermidis (n=7), S. aureus (n=4), Entrococcus faecalis (n=3), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n=5), Acenitobacter lwoffii (n=4), and others (n=10). The median interval from the initiation of corticosteroids to the first positive cultures was 24 days (range, 1-70). At the first positive cultures, 15 patients with definitive BSI were afebrile. Four of them remained afebrile throughout the period of positive surveillance cultures. Patients with afebrile BSI tended to be older (P=0.063), and had in-dwelling central venous catheters less frequently than febrile patients (P<0.0001). Bloodstream pathogens were directly responsible for death in two patients with afebrile BSI. This study demonstrates that cortisosteroid frequently masks inflammatory reactions in allo-SCT recipients given conrticosteroids, and that surveillance blood culture is only diagnostic clue for 'occult' BSI.

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying SCCmec type II was more frequent than the Brazilian endemic clone as a cause of nosocomial bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Caiaffa-Filho, Helio Hehl; Trindade, Priscila A; Gabriela da Cunha, Paula; Alencar, Cecilia Salete; Prado, Gladys V B; Rossi, Flavia; Levin, Anna S

    2013-08-01

    Fifty consecutive MRSA blood isolates were evaluated: 30(60%) carried SCCmec type II (single PFGE clone; sequence type 5 or ST105); 12 (26%), IV; 5 (10%), III; 3 (6%), I. Brazilian endemic clone, carrying SCCmec type III, has been the main nosocomial clone in Brazil; however, this study showed that a clone carrying type II predominated.

  20. The Comparative Efficacy of 0.12% Chlorhexidine and Amoxicillin to Reduce the Incidence and Magnitude of Bacteremia During Third Molar Extractions: A Prospective, Blind, Randomized Clinical Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-30

    the oral microflora into the vasculature, which may be exacerbated by gingivitis and/or periodontal disease. The gingival sulcus, the dentition , and...sulcus/periodontal pocket microflora, 30% are streptococci primarily of the viridans group (Wilson et al., 2007). The dentition is the only nonshedding...hygiene and dental treatment have enabled the same population to retain more of their dentition . The relationship between systemic diseases and

  1. NADPH Oxidase Deficient Mice Develop Colitis and Bacteremia upon Infection with Normally Avirulent, TTSS-1- and TTSS-2-Deficient Salmonella Typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Slack, Emma Marie Caroline; Müller, Andreas J.; Kremer, Marcus; Van Maele, Laurye; Cayet, Delphine; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Infections, microbe sampling and occasional leakage of commensal microbiota and their products across the intestinal epithelial cell layer represent a permanent challenge to the intestinal immune system. The production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase is thought to be a key element of defense. Patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease are deficient in one of the subunits of NADPH oxidase. They display a high incidence of Crohn’s disease-like intestinal inflammation and are hyper-susceptible to infection with fungi and bacteria, including a 10-fold increased risk of Salmonellosis. It is not completely understood which steps of the infection process are affected by the NADPH oxidase deficiency. We employed a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea to study how NADPH oxidase deficiency (Cybb−/−) affects microbe handling by the large intestinal mucosa. In this animal model, wild type S. Typhimurium causes pronounced enteropathy in wild type mice. In contrast, an avirulent S. Typhimurium mutant (S.Tmavir; invGsseD), which lacks virulence factors boosting trans-epithelial penetration and growth in the lamina propria, cannot cause enteropathy in wild type mice. We found that Cybb−/− mice are efficiently infected by S.Tmavir and develop enteropathy by day 4 post infection. Cell depletion experiments and infections in Cybb−/−Myd88−/− mice indicated that the S.Tmavir-inflicted disease in Cybb−/− mice hinges on CD11c+CX3CR1+ monocytic phagocytes mediating colonization of the cecal lamina propria and on Myd88-dependent proinflammatory immune responses. Interestingly, in mixed bone marrow chimeras a partial reconstitution of Cybb-proficiency in the bone marrow derived compartment was sufficient to ameliorate disease severity. Our data indicate that NADPH oxidase expression is of key importance for restricting the growth of S.Tmavir in the mucosal lamina propria. This provides important insights into microbe handling by the large intestinal mucosa and the role of NADPH oxidase in maintaining microbe-host mutualism at this exposed body surface. PMID:24143212

  2. Inhalation Anthrax (Ames aerosol) in Naive and Vaccinated New Zealand Rabbits: Characterizing the Spread of Bacteria from Lung Deposition to Bacteremia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-28

    Grinberg et al., 2001; Mock and Fouet, 2001; Frazier et al., 2006). In humans, exposure results from contact, ingestion or inhalation of spores lead- ing to...CLEARANCE FROM THE AIRWAYS The number of bacteria in the airways over time was deter- mined by dilution plate analysis of BAL using methods identical ...Henderson et al., 1956; Brachman et al., 1966; Grinberg et al., 2001). However, more recent studies using attenuated strains suggested germination occurred in

  3. NADPH oxidase deficient mice develop colitis and bacteremia upon infection with normally avirulent, TTSS-1- and TTSS-2-deficient Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Felmy, Boas; Songhet, Pascal; Slack, Emma Marie Caroline; Müller, Andreas J; Kremer, Marcus; Van Maele, Laurye; Cayet, Delphine; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Infections, microbe sampling and occasional leakage of commensal microbiota and their products across the intestinal epithelial cell layer represent a permanent challenge to the intestinal immune system. The production of reactive oxygen species by NADPH oxidase is thought to be a key element of defense. Patients suffering from chronic granulomatous disease are deficient in one of the subunits of NADPH oxidase. They display a high incidence of Crohn's disease-like intestinal inflammation and are hyper-susceptible to infection with fungi and bacteria, including a 10-fold increased risk of Salmonellosis. It is not completely understood which steps of the infection process are affected by the NADPH oxidase deficiency. We employed a mouse model for Salmonella diarrhea to study how NADPH oxidase deficiency (Cybb (-/-)) affects microbe handling by the large intestinal mucosa. In this animal model, wild type S. Typhimurium causes pronounced enteropathy in wild type mice. In contrast, an avirulent S. Typhimurium mutant (S.Tm(avir); invGsseD), which lacks virulence factors boosting trans-epithelial penetration and growth in the lamina propria, cannot cause enteropathy in wild type mice. We found that Cybb (-/-) mice are efficiently infected by S.Tm(avir) and develop enteropathy by day 4 post infection. Cell depletion experiments and infections in Cybb (-/-) Myd88 (-/-) mice indicated that the S.Tm(avir)-inflicted disease in Cybb (-/-) mice hinges on CD11c(+)CX3CR1(+) monocytic phagocytes mediating colonization of the cecal lamina propria and on Myd88-dependent proinflammatory immune responses. Interestingly, in mixed bone marrow chimeras a partial reconstitution of Cybb-proficiency in the bone marrow derived compartment was sufficient to ameliorate disease severity. Our data indicate that NADPH oxidase expression is of key importance for restricting the growth of S.Tm(avir) in the mucosal lamina propria. This provides important insights into microbe handling by the large intestinal mucosa and the role of NADPH oxidase in maintaining microbe-host mutualism at this exposed body surface.

  4. Failure of the MicroScan WalkAway system to detect heteroresistance to carbapenems in a patient with Enterobacter aerogenes bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Gordon, N C; Wareham, D W

    2009-09-01

    We report the failure of the automated MicroScan WalkAway system to detect carbapenem heteroresistance in Enterobacter aerogenes. Carbapenem resistance has become an increasing concern in recent years, and robust surveillance is required to prevent dissemination of resistant strains. Reliance on automated systems may delay the detection of emerging resistance.

  5. Pneumococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... the bloodstream (bacteremia) Joint infection (arthritis) Ear infection (otitis media) Infection of the sinus membranes (sinusitis) Eye infection ( ... breathing; for bacteremia, fever and less energy; for ear infections, fever and ear pain; and for sinustitis, fever ...

  6. Multiple Renal Abscesses due to ESBL Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli Causing Acute Pyelonephritis and Bacteremia: A Case Report with a Good Outcome (No Drainage Required)

    PubMed Central

    Qurash, Musaad; Saleh, Asem; Ali, Rasha

    2016-01-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae urinary tract infections are challenging infections with increased mortality, morbidity, and failure of therapy. A 44-year-old Saudi male diabetic patient was seen at the ER of IMC Hospital with features of acute pyelonephritis: fever, burning urine, and left flank pain for three days. He was treated for cystitis at the Endocrine Clinic two weeks prior to his ER visit with nitrofurantoin and levofloxacin orally according to urine culture and sensitivity result. The patient was admitted, received IV meropenem, and continued to be febrile for three days. His urine and blood culture at ER grew the same ESBL-producing E. coli as in his urine culture from the Endocrine Clinic. His abdomen CT scan showed two left renal abscesses at the upper and middle poles. His temperature resolved on the fourth day of IV therapy. Intravenous meropenem was continued for 4 weeks after inserting PICC line and the patient was followed up by home healthcare. He was feeling better with occasional left flank pain and repeated abdomen CT scan showed complete resolution of both renal abscesses. PMID:28018690

  7. Enterococcal meningitis in association with Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sukhwani, Kalpesh S; Bansal, Nitin; Soni, Mamta; Ramamurthy, Anand; Gopalakrishnan, Ram

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Strongyloidiasis can cause hyperinfection or disseminated infection in an immunocompromised host, and is an important factor linked to enterococcal bacteremia and meningitis. Case reports We report two cases highlighting the importance of suspecting Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome in patients with enterococcal meningitis. Conclusion Our cases highlight the importance of suspecting Strongyloides hyperinfection syndrome in cases of community acquired enterococcal bacteremia and meningitis. PMID:28331839

  8. Impact of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections in Severely Burned Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    versus nosocomial Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia: clinical features, treatment outcomes, and clinical implication of antimicrobial resistance. J...Impact of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Infections in Severely Burned Patients Jason W Bennett, MD, MSPH, Janelle...Significantly higher mortality has been demonstrated in patients who suffer severe burns com- plicated by Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia. The specific

  9. Characterization and comparison of invasive Corynebacterium diphtheriae isolates from France and Poland.

    PubMed

    Farfour, E; Badell, E; Zasada, A; Hotzel, H; Tomaso, H; Guillot, S; Guiso, N

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae, the agent of diphtheria, is rarely responsible for bacteremia. However, high numbers of bacteremia have been reported in countries with extensive immunization coverage. Here, we used molecular and phenotypic tools to characterize and compare 42 invasive isolates collected in France (including New Caledonia) and Poland over a 23-year period.

  10. A Fatal Bloodstream Infection by Staphylococcus pettenkoferi in an Intensive Care Unit Patient

    PubMed Central

    Mammina, Caterina; Bonura, Celestino; Verde, Maria Stella; Fasciana, Teresa; Palma, Daniela Maria

    2011-01-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci are increasingly recognized as leading pathogens in bacteremia, with incidence peaking in intensive care units. Interpretation of blood cultures that are positive for CoNS is often doubtful. We describe a fatal case of bacteremia by a newly recognized species of CoNS, Staphylococcus pettenkoferi, in an ICU patient. PMID:24826324

  11. Clinical significance of Staphylococcus saprophyticus identified on blood culture in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang-Ho; Woo, Jun Hee; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Kim, Nam Joong; Kim, Mi-Na; Kim, Yang Soo; Ryu, Jiso

    2006-11-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a well-known cause of acute uncomplicated urinary tract infection in young women. However, the clinical significance of this organism isolated from blood culture has not been determined. We assessed the clinical significance and characteristics of S. saprophyticus identified on blood culture. A total of 24 patients were identified, and 7 patients (29.2%) were considered to have clinically significant bacteremia. Of the 7 patients with clinically significant bacteremia, hematologic malignancy was the most common underlying illness (5 patients), and tunneled-central venous catheter was the most common portal of entry (4 patients). In no case did S. saprophyticus bacteremia originate from the urinary tract. One patient died during hospitalization. However, the death was not directly related to bacteremia. In conclusion, our data suggest that bacteremia caused by S. saprophyticus is most commonly associated with tunneled-central venous catheter in patients with hematologic malignancies and may be associated with a lower risk of mortality.

  12. [Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with bacteriemia. Guidelines of the Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica].

    PubMed

    Cisneros-Herreros, José Miguel; Cobo-Reinoso, Javier; Pujol-Rojo, Miquel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Salavert-Lletí, Miguel

    2007-02-01

    Bacteremia is a complex clinical syndrome in constant transformation that is an important, growing cause of morbidity and mortality. Even though there is a great deal of specific information about bacteremia, few comprehensive reviews integrate this information with a practical AIM. The main objective of these Guidelines, which target hospital physicians, is to improve the clinical care provided to patients with bacteremia by integrating blood culture results with clinical data, and optimizing the use of diagnostic procedures and antimicrobial testing. The document is structured into sections that cover the epidemiology and etiology of bacteremia, stratified according to the various patient populations, and the diagnostic work-up, therapy, and follow-up of patients with bacteremia. Diagnostic and therapeutic decisions are presented as recommendations based on the grade of available scientific evidence.

  13. Blood culture of the canine patient.

    PubMed

    Hirsh, D C; Jang, S S; Biberstein, E L

    1984-01-15

    Blood for bacteriologic culture was obtained from 581 sick dogs. Of these, 134 (23%) were considered to have bacteremia. The conditions most frequently associated with bacteremia were malignant neoplasms and infections of the skeletal, cardiovascular, and urogenital systems. The most frequently isolated bacteria were members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and coagulase-positive staphylococci, in sum accounting for more than 50% of the 150 isolates. Most of the dogs with bacteremia had high proportions of immature neutrophils, segmented neutrophils, and monocytes in blood. Dogs with bacteremia and osteomyelitis due to staphylococci had normal hemograms. Blood from dogs with bacteremia due to gram-negative bacteria was more likely to have a high proportion of immature and segmented neutrophil leukocytes than was blood from dogs with bacteremia due to a gram-positive species. Toxic neutrophils were observed more often in blood obtained from patients with bacteremia due to gram-negative bacteria. The development of fever correlated with the bacteremic state regardless of the species of bacteria in the blood.

  14. Listeria monocytogenes meningitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-positive patient undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Calubiran, O V; Horiuchi, J; Klein, N C; Cunha, B A

    1990-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes bacteremia without meningitis has been reported in patients who have undergone long-term hemodialysis and have transfusional iron overload. On the other hand, cases of Listeria bacteremia without meningitis have occurred sporadically among the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome population, mostly homosexuals. There have been no reports of Listeria meningitis occurring among persons who are antibody positive to human immunodeficiency virus or are intravenous drug abusers having chronic renal failure and undergoing hemodialysis. This patient represents the first case of Listeria bacteremia and meningitis to occur in an intravenous drug abuser who is human immunodeficient antibody positive, is receiving hemodialysis, and has transfusional iron overload.

  15. Fosfomycin i.v. for Treatment of Severely Infected Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-28

    Bacterial Infections; Bone Diseases, Infectious; Osteomyelitis; Central Nervous System Bacterial Infections; Meningitis, Bacterial; Encephalitis; Brain Abscess; Urinary Tract Infections; Respiratory Tract Infections; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Skin Diseases, Bacterial; Soft Tissue Infections; Intraabdominal Infections; Sepsis; Bacteremia; Endocarditis, Bacterial

  16. Central Nervous System Infections in Patients with Severe Burns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    both patients had bacteremia with identical microorganisms as isolated from CSF ( Acinetobacter baumannii and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus...multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii central nervous system infections with intraventricular or intrathecal colistin: case series and literature review. J

  17. Bordetella holmesii, an emerging cause of septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Abouanaser, Salaheddin F; Srigley, Jocelyn A; Nguyen, Tram; Dale, Suzanne E; Johnstone, Jennie; Wilcox, Lindsay; Jamieson, Frances; Rawte, Prasad; Pernica, Jeffrey M

    2013-04-01

    Bordetella holmesii is a well-described pathogen in asplenic and immunocompromised patients. Here we report the first two published cases of septic arthritis caused by B. holmesii documented in apparently immunocompetent patients and unaccompanied by bacteremia.

  18. Bloodstream infection due to Brachyspira pilosicoli in a patient with multiorgan failure.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Pericas, Roser; Español, Montse; Rivera, Alba; Mirelis, Beatriz; Coll, Pere

    2011-10-01

    Brachyspira pilosicoli is an etiological agent of human intestinal spirochetosis. Bloodstream infection due to this microorganism is rare. We report a case of B. pilosicoli bacteremia in a 70-year-old patient who presented with multiorgan failure.

  19. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    MedlinePlus

    ... is getting into your child's blood from the lungs Blood culture and sputum culture to look for the ... Fluid around the lung , which can become infected Lung abscesses Bacteria in blood (bacteremia) The provider may order another x-ray. ...

  20. Septicemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... that often occurs with severe infections. Also called sepsis , septicemia is a serious, life-threatening infection that ... very quickly. Alternative Names Blood poisoning; Bacteremia with sepsis References Shapiro NI, Zimmer GD, Barkin AZ. Sepsis ...

  1. Epidemiology of pediatric community-acquired bloodstream infections in a children hospital in Paris, France, 2001 to 2008.

    PubMed

    Doit, Catherine; Mariani-Kurkdjian, Patricia; Mahjoub-Messai, Farah; Bidet, Philippe; Bonacorsi, Stéphane; Carol, Agnès; Varon, Emmanuelle; Bingen, Edouard

    2010-03-01

    In 2001 to 2008, we documented 483 cases of pediatric community-acquired bacteremia mostly because of Streptococcus agalactiae (< 4 days), Escherichia coli (4 days to 3 months), pneumococci (3 months to 5 years), and Staphylococcus aureus (> 5 years). Pneumococcal conjugate vaccination affected the serotype distribution of pneumococcal bacteremia but not its frequency. Serotype 19A represented 12% and 22% of pneumococci in the prevaccine and vaccine periods, respectively.

  2. The Effect of Recombinant Activated Factor VII on Mortality in Combat-Related Casualties With Severe Trauma and Massive Transfusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    adverse events included bacteremia, ARDS, Multi-Organ Failure (MOF), deep vein thrombosis ( DVT ), pulmonary embolism ( PE ), and stroke. Similar to the... DVT , PE , and stroke), bacteremia, ARDS, and MOF were similar in both groups studied, despite the difference in survival time in those patients who...and severe thrombotic events ( DVT , PE , and stroke) between study groups. We did not prospectively assess patients for any of these conditions, though

  3. A Safety and Environmental Assessment of the Biological Simulants Bacillus subtilis and Newcastle Disease Virus. Volume 1: Discussion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Vander Snoeck, P., Daneau, R.D., and Meunier, F. "Nosocomial Bacteremia Caused by Bacillus species", Clin. Micro bioi. Infect. Dis., 7, pp. 783...between B. cereus and B. subtilis existed in diagnostic laboratories before that time (Gordon 1973). B. subtilis, as well as other Bacillus species...or other interventions, which may have introduced the organism to sensitive tissue. Richard et al. (1988) described 11 cases of Bacillus bacteremias

  4. Extraintestinal salmonellosis in a general hospital (1991 to 1996): relationships between Salmonella genomic groups and clinical presentations.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, M; de Diego, I; Mendoza, M C

    1998-11-01

    Episodes of extraintestinal salmonellosis treated at a general hospital (1,522 beds) over a 6-year period (1991 to 1996) were characterized by the analysis of phenotypic and genotypic traits of Salmonella organisms and clinical data from medical reports. Extraintestinal salmonellosis accounted for 8% of all salmonellosis episodes. Fifty-two medical reports, dealing with 6 cases of typhoid fever, 32 cases of bacteremia, and 14 focal infections, were reviewed. All cases of typhoid fever except 1, 7 cases of bacteremia, and 5 focal infections were not related to any underlying disease or predisposing factors, while 25 cases of bacteremia and 9 focal infections were associated with some of these risk factors. All typhoid isolates and 65.4% of the nontyphoid isolates were susceptible to antimicrobials. Fifty-one nontyphoid strains were analyzed and assigned to 21 genomic groups, which were defined by serotype, combined ribotype, and combined randomly amplified polymorphic DNA type (each genomic group could include organisms differing in some phenotypic traits). The relationships between genomic groups and clinical presentations were traced. Organisms causing 22 episodes (17 episodes of bacteremia, 2 of pneumonia, 1 of peritonitis, 1 of pyelonephritis, and 1 of cystitis) belonged to a prevalent Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis genomic group, which included organisms assigned to four phage types, five biotypes, and four resistance patterns, causing infections in patients with and without risk factors. Seven other genomic groups, 4 Enteritidis groups (associated with both bacteremia and focal infections), 2 Typhimurium groups (one associated with bacteremia and the other with focal infections) and 1 Brandenburg group (associated with bacteremia) included two or more strains, and the remaining 13 genomic groups consisted of only one strain each.

  5. Prospective Multicenter Study of the Impact of Carbapenem Resistance on Mortality in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Cristina; Gozalo, Mónica; Murillas, Javier; Almirante, Benito; Pomar, Virginia; Aguilar, Manuela; Granados, Ana; Calbo, Esther; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Rodríguez, Fernando; Tubau, Fe; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Oliver, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The impact of antimicrobial resistance on clinical outcomes is the subject of ongoing investigations, although uncertainty remains about its contribution to mortality. We investigated the impact of carbapenem resistance on mortality in Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia in a prospective multicenter (10 teaching hospitals) observational study of patients with monomicrobial bacteremia followed up for 30 days after the onset of bacteremia. The adjusted influence of carbapenem resistance on mortality was studied by using Cox regression analysis. Of 632 episodes, 487 (77%) were caused by carbapenem-susceptible P. aeruginosa (CSPA) isolates, and 145 (23%) were caused by carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa (CRPA) isolates. The median incidence density of nosocomial CRPA bacteremia was 2.3 episodes per 100,000 patient-days (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9 to 2.8). The regression demonstrated a time-dependent effect of carbapenem resistance on mortality as well as a significant interaction with the Charlson index: the deleterious effect of carbapenem resistance on mortality decreased with higher Charlson index scores. The impact of resistance on mortality was statistically significant only from the fifth day after the onset of the bacteremia, reaching its peak values at day 30 (adjusted hazard ratio for a Charlson score of 0 at day 30, 9.9 [95% CI, 3.3 to 29.4]; adjusted hazard ratio for a Charlson score of 5 at day 30, 2.6 [95% CI, 0.8 to 8]). This study clarifies the relationship between carbapenem resistance and mortality in patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Although resistance was associated with a higher risk of mortality, the study suggested that this deleterious effect may not be as great during the first days of the bacteremia or in the presence of comorbidities. PMID:22155832

  6. Determination of clinical significance of coagulase-negative staphylococci in blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Karakullukçu, Asiye; Kuşkucu, Mert Ahmet; Ergin, Sevgi; Aygün, Gökhan; Midilli, Kenan; Küçükbasmaci, Ömer

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the criteria used to distinguish coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) bacteremia from contamination. We evaluated 162 adult patients with CoNS-positive blood cultures (BCs). Of the 162 patients, 35 (21.6%) had at least 2 positive BCs and 127 (78.4%) had a single positive BC. According to the Laboratory-Confirmed Bloodstream Infection (LCBI) criteria, 24 (14.8%) patients with the same species of CoNS had true bacteremia, and 138 (85.2%) patients had contaminants. Despite the detection of the same CoNS species, 9 of the 24 patients had different CoNS genotypes. Using clinical assessments, only 20 patients were diagnosed with true bacteremia, 8 of them had a single positive BC. We concluded that only using the LCBI criteria or clinical evaluations of a patient were not sufficient to distinguish CoNS bacteremia from contamination. Molecular identification should also be performed as a diagnostic laboratory parameter for CoNS bacteremia.

  7. Dissemination of Periodontal Pathogens in the Bloodstream after Periodontal Procedures: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Horliana, Anna Carolina Ratto Tempestini; Chambrone, Leandro; Foz, Adriana Moura; Artese, Hilana Paula Carillo; Rabelo, Mariana de Sousa; Pannuti, Cláudio Mendes; Romito, Giuseppe Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Background To date, there is no compilation of evidence-based information associating bacteremia and periodontal procedures. This systematic review aims to assess magnitude, duration, prevalence and nature of bacteremia caused by periodontal procedures. Study Design Systematic Review Types of Studies Reviewed MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS databases were searched in duplicate through August, 2013 without language restriction. Observational studies were included if blood samples were collected before, during or after periodontal procedures of patients with periodontitis. The methodological quality was assessed in duplicate using the modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale (NOS). Results Search strategy identified 509 potentially eligible articles and nine were included. Only four studies demonstrated high methodological quality, whereas five were of medium or low methodological quality. The study characteristics were considered too heterogeneous to conduct a meta-analysis. Among 219 analyzed patients, 106 (49.4%) had positive bacteremia. More frequent bacteria were S. viridans, A. actinomycetemcomitans P. gingivalis, M. micros and species Streptococcus and Actinomyces, although identification methods of microbiologic assays were different among studies. Clinical Implications Although half of the patients presented positive bacteremia after periodontal procedures, accurate results regarding the magnitude, duration and nature of bacteremia could not be confidentially assessed. PMID:24870125

  8. Experimental Colibacillosis in Gnotobiotic Baby Pigs I. Microbiological and Clinical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Christie, B. R.; Waxler, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Sixty-two gnotobiotic pigs were used in three experiments to determine the means whereby two related strains of Escherichia coli colonized the intestinal tract. Pigs were exposed by a method simulating neonatal contamination of the umbilical stump. Bacteremia was produced within one and one half hours, and by 24 hours the infection was generally well established in the gastrointestinal tract. By 48 hours after exposure, the bacteremia had subsided so that only an occasional isolation from organs other than the gastrointestinal tract was made. Oral exposure of one litter of germfree pigs produced heavy colonization of the entire gastrointestinal tract within four hours. Evidence of intermittent bacteremia was present in pigs of this litter. Diarrhea appeared earlier when pigs were exposed orally than when they were exposed by way of the umbilical stump. PMID:4270433

  9. [Cellulitis due to Achromobacter xylosoxidans during bortezomib therapy for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Taku; Mori, Takehiko; Kohashi, Sumiko; Yamane, Yusuke; Okayama, Mikio; Mashima, Eri; Murakami, Koichi; Shimizu, Takayuki; Kurihara, Yuichi; Ueda, Tomomi; Suzuki, Takeshi; Okamoto, Shinichiro

    2016-02-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans (A. xylosoxidans) is a non-fermentative gram-negative rod. This organism is reportedly a causative pathogen of bacteremia mainly in patients with hematological disorders. However, only one case of cellulitis due to A. xylosoxidans associated with hematological malignancy has been reported. An 80-year-old man developed cellulitis and subsequent bacteremia due to A. xylosoxidans during bortezomib therapy for multiple myeloma. Although his condition was serious enough to require intensive care, he fully recovered with appropriate antimicrobial agents and supportive care. The isolate was broadly resistant to antimicrobial agents, including cefepime, amikacin, and ciprofloxacin. Therefore, the identification and selection of appropriate antimicrobial agents were considered to have contributed to the successful outcome in this case. Physicians should recognize A. xylosoxidans as a possible pathogen causing cellulitis and secondary bacteremia, as well as being aware of its broad resistance to antimicrobial agents.

  10. Multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in children undergoing chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Caselli, Désirée; Cesaro, Simone; Ziino, Ottavio; Zanazzo, Giulio; Manicone, Rosaria; Livadiotti, Susanna; Cellini, Monica; Frenos, Stefano; Milano, Giuseppe M.; Cappelli, Barbara; Licciardello, Maria; Beretta, Chiara; Aricò, Maurizio; Castagnola, Elio

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one leading gram-negative organism associated with nosocomial infections. Bacteremia is life-threatening in the immunocompromised host. Increasing frequency of multi-drug-resistant (MDRPA) strains is concerning. We started a retrospective survey in the pediatric hematology oncology Italian network. Between 2000 and 2008, 127 patients with Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia were reported from 12 centers; 31.4% of isolates were MDRPA. Death within 30 days of a positive blood culture occurred in 19.6% (25/127) of total patients; in patients with MDRPA infection it occurred in 35.8% (14/39). In the multivariate analysis, only MDRPA had significant association with infection-related death. This is the largest series of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia cases from pediatric hematology oncology centers. Monitoring local bacterial isolates epidemiology is mandatory and will allow empiric antibiotic therapy to be tailored to reduce fatalities. PMID:20305140

  11. Host Factors and Portal of Entry Outweigh Bacterial Determinants To Predict the Severity of Escherichia coli Bacteremia▿

    PubMed Central

    Lefort, Agnès; Panhard, Xavière; Clermont, Olivier; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Branger, Catherine; Mentré, France; Fantin, Bruno; Wolff, Michel; Denamur, Erick

    2011-01-01

    Escherichia coli ranks among the organisms most frequently isolated from cases of bacteremia. The relative contribution of the host and bacteria to E. coli bacteremia severity remains unknown. We conducted a prospective multicenter cohort study to identify host and bacterial factors associated with E. coli bacteremia severity. The primary endpoint was in-hospital death, up to 28 days after the first positive blood culture. Among 1,051 patients included, 136 (12.9%) died. Overall, 604 (57.5%) patients were female. The median age was 70 years, and 202 (19.2%) episodes were nosocomial. The most frequent comorbidities were immunocompromised status (37.9%), tobacco addiction (21.5%), and diabetes mellitus (20.1%). The most common portal of entry was the urinary tract (56.9%). Most E. coli isolates belonged to phylogenetic group B2 (52.0%). The multivariate analysis retained the following factors as predictive of death: older age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.09 to 1.43] for each 10-year increment), cirrhosis (OR = 4.85 [95% CI, 2.49 to 9.45]), hospitalization before bacteremia (OR = 4.13 [95% CI, 2.49 to 6.82]), being an immunocompromised patient not hospitalized before bacteremia (OR = 3.73 [95% CI, 2.25 to 6.18]), and a cutaneous portal of entry (OR = 6.45 [95% CI, 1.68 to 24.79]); a urinary tract portal of entry and the presence of the ireA virulence gene were negatively correlated with death (OR = 0.46 [95% CI, 0.30 to 0.70] and OR = 0.53 [95% CI, 0.30 to 0.91], respectively). In summary, host factors and the portal of entry outweigh bacterial determinants for predicting E. coli bacteremia severity. PMID:21177892

  12. Moraxella lacunata infection associated with septicemia, endocarditis, and bilateral septic arthritis in a patient undergoing hemodialysis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Asami; Yamanaka, Katsuo; Hayashi, Hiroki; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi

    2014-01-01

    We report the first case of both endocarditis and bilateral septic arthritis in a patient caused by Moraxella lacunata and successful management of the infection with antimicrobial therapy. The route of entry leading to bacteremia may have been the oral cavity given the poor oral hygiene of the patient as evidenced by bleeding gums. We hypothesize that the bacteremia led to septic arthritis and mitral valve infective endocarditis. In this case report, we also review the literature on M. lacunata infections and conclude that this organism should be considered in bilateral septic arthritis in a patient with underlying heart abnormalities and/or with renal failure.

  13. Bordetella trematum sepsis with shock in a diabetic patient with rapidly developing soft tissue infection.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Lorrance L; Nogi, Masayuki; Bankowski, Matthew J; Chung, Heath H

    2016-09-01

    Bordetella is a gram-negative, glucose non-fermenting bacillus, consisting of many host-associated species. B. trematum has previously been identified in wound infections, but rarely known to be a source of bacteremia. Currently, 16S rRNA sequencing represents the reference standard method by which identification is made. Herein, we present a case of fatal B. trematum bacteremia with septic shock. The presumed primary site of the infection was a rapidly developing left leg deep soft tissue infection without necrotizing fasciitis. B. trematum should now be considered as a significant pathogen in sepsis.

  14. The Genome Sequence of Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 Reveals Metabolic Adaptations and a Large Plasmid Related to Bacillus anthracis pXO1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    R.L. and Waites,K.B. (2003) Bacillus cereus bacteremia in a preterm neonate. J. Clin. Microbiol., 41, 3441±3444. 9. Ginsburg,A.S., Salazar,L.G., True... bacteremia and pneumonia due to Bacillus cereus . J. Clin. Microbiol., 35, 504±507. 12. Okinaka,R., Cloud,K., Hampton,O., Hoffmaster,A., Hill,K., Keim,P...The genome sequence of Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 reveals metabolic adaptations and a large plasmid related to Bacillus anthracis pXO1 David A. Rasko

  15. Risk factors and treatment outcomes of bloodstream infection caused by extended-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacter species in adults with cancer.

    PubMed

    Huh, Kyungmin; Kang, Cheol-In; Kim, Jungok; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Joo, Eun-Jeong; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Lee, Nam Yong; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2014-02-01

    Treatment of Enterobacter infection is complicated due to its intrinsic resistance to cephalosporins. Medical records of 192 adults with cancer who had Enterobacter bacteremia were analyzed retrospectively to evaluate the risk factors for and the treatment outcomes in extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant Enterobacter bacteremia in adults with cancer. The main outcome measure was 30-day mortality. Of the 192 patients, 53 (27.6%) had bloodstream infections caused by ESC-resistant Enterobacter species. Recent use of a third-generation cephalosporin, older age, tumor progression at last evaluation, recent surgery, and nosocomial acquisition were associated with ESC-resistant Enterobacter bacteremia. The 30-day mortality rate was significantly higher in the resistant group. Multivariate analysis showed that respiratory tract infection, tumor progression, septic shock at presentation, Enterobacter aerogenes as the culprit pathogen, and diabetes mellitus were independent risk factors for mortality. ESC resistance was significantly associated with mortality in patients with E. aerogenes bacteremia, although not in the overall patient population.

  16. Moraxella lacunata Septic Arthritis in a Patient with Lupus Nephritis▿

    PubMed Central

    Woodbury, Anna; Jorgensen, James; Owens, Aaron; Henao-Martinez, Andres

    2009-01-01

    Moraxella lacunata is a rare, usually commensal gram-negative rod most commonly associated with eye infections. We report a unique case of noniatrogenic M. lacunata bacteremia and septic knee arthritis in a patient with class III-IV lupus nephritis and speculate on the association between invasive Moraxella infection and renal impairment. PMID:19794049

  17. Bacterial Peritonitis Caused by Kingella kingae▿

    PubMed Central

    Bofinger, Jason J.; Fekete, Thomas; Samuel, Rafik

    2007-01-01

    Kingella kingae is a commensal of the upper respiratory tract that occasionally causes skeletal infections in children and endocarditis in children and adults. We report a case of a 55-year-old man with liver disease and tense ascites who performed a paracentesis on himself and developed K. kingae peritonitis and bacteremia. PMID:17634309

  18. Bacterial peritonitis caused by Kingella kingae.

    PubMed

    Bofinger, Jason J; Fekete, Thomas; Samuel, Rafik

    2007-09-01

    Kingella kingae is a commensal of the upper respiratory tract that occasionally causes skeletal infections in children and endocarditis in children and adults. We report a case of a 55-year-old man with liver disease and tense ascites who performed a paracentesis on himself and developed K. kingae peritonitis and bacteremia.

  19. Live Vaccine Strain Francisella tularensis is Detectable at the Inoculation Site but Not in Blood after Vaccination Against Tularemia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-10

    The culture and PCR results of all blood samples were negative. Results of real - time PCR from the inoculation site samples were positive for 41 (100...LVS vaccination, with real - time PCR being more sensitive than culture. Our data suggest that bacteremia does not occur after LVS vaccination in normal, healthy human volunteers.

  20. Study or Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) Project : Prediction of Sepsis in the Burn ICU Patient

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-15

    suspected infection ? Study Aims: a) Develop a multivariable predictive model for detection of bacteremia in the burned ICU patient using 12...clinical measures associated with presence of infection (temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, platelet count, insulin resistance, feeding intolerance...independent group of burn ICU patients during periods of documented sepsis and absence of infection ; Hypothesis: A multivariate prediction model will

  1. First report of bloodstream infection caused by Pseudomonas fulva.

    PubMed

    Seok, Yoonmi; Shin, Heebong; Lee, Yangsoon; Cho, Injoo; Na, Sungwon; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon; Lee, Kyungwon

    2010-07-01

    Pseudomonas fulva has not yet been isolated from humans as a pathogen. Herein, we report the first case of P. fulva bacteremia in a patient hospitalized due to trauma. The species was identified using biochemical and molecular genetic analyses of the 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB, and rpoD genes.

  2. Rhodococcus Infection in Solid Organ and Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients1

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Heredia, Ella J.; Nellore, Anoma; Kotton, Camille N.; Kaul, Daniel R.; Morris, Michele I.; Kelesidis, Theodoros; Shah, Harshal; Park, Seo Young; Nguyen, M. Hong; Razonable, Raymund R.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a case–control study of 18 US transplant recipients with Rhodococcus infection and 36 matched controls. The predominant types of infection were pneumonia and bacteremia. Diabetes mellitus and recent opportunistic infection were independently associated with disease. Outcomes were generally favorable except for 1 relapse and 1 death. PMID:28221102

  3. First Report of Human Infection by Agromyces mediolanus, a Gram-Positive Organism Found in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Siddharth; Wang, Angela Y. M.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Yip, Cyril C. Y.; Woo, Patrick C. Y.; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2015-01-01

    We report the first human infection by a member of the Agromyces genus, a group of Gram-positive bacteria found in soil. A patient with a long-term venous catheter developed bacteremia due to a non-vancomycin-susceptible isolate of Agromyces mediolanus. Rapid identification was possible by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry. PMID:26202108

  4. Strategy for rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing of gram-negative bacteria directly recovered from positive blood cultures using the Bruker MALDI Biotyper and the BD Phoenix system.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Jana L; Long, S Wesley; Cernoch, Patricia; Land, Geoffrey A; Davis, James R; Musser, James M; Olsen, Randall J

    2012-07-01

    Decreasing the time to species identification and antibiotic susceptibility determination of strains recovered from patients with bacteremia significantly decreases morbidity and mortality. Herein, we validated a method to identify Gram-negative bacteria directly from positive blood culture medium using the Bruker MALDI Biotyper and to rapidly perform susceptibility testing using the BD Phoenix.

  5. Prospective Evaluation of Infection Episodes in Cancer Patients in a Tertiary Care Academic Center: Microbiological Features and Risk Factors for Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Çalık Başaran, Nursel; Karaağaoğlu, Ergun; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Durusu Tanrıöver, Mine; Akova, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to determine the frequency, type, and etiology of infections and the risk factors for infections and mortality in hospitalized cancer patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively enrolled adult cancer patients hospitalized in the internal medicine wards of a tertiary care academic center between January and August 2004. Patients were followed during their hospitalization periods for neutropenia, infections, culture results, and mortality. Results: We followed 473 cancer patients with 818 hospitalization episodes and 384 infection episodes in total. Seventy-nine percent of the infections were nosocomial, and febrile neutropenia (FN) was observed in 196 (51%) of the infection episodes. Bacteremia was found in 29% of FN episodes and in 8% of nonneutropenic patients. Gram-positive bacteria were the leading cause of bacteremia in both neutropenic and nonneutropenic cases (70% and 58%, respectively). Presence of an indwelling central catheter increased bacteremia risk by 3-fold. The overall mortality rate was 17%, whereas 34% of the patients with bloodstream infections died. Presence of bacteremia and advanced disease stage increased overall mortality by 6.1-fold and 3.7-fold, respectively. Conclusion: Nearly half of the cancer patients developed an infection during their hospital stays, with gram-positive bacteria being the predominant etiologic microorganisms. This demonstrates the changing trends in infections considering that, until 2004, gram-negative bacteria were the most predominant microorganisms among cancer patients in our institute. PMID:27095391

  6. Acute Effects of Gamma Radiation in Primates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1959-04-01

    histological- increased nuclear dust in the basilar portions ly normal (fig. -17). Necrobiosis of the chief of the small intestinal glands, the colonic...BACTEREMIA SEVERE --- G. I. ULCERATION MODERATE MILD - GUT CYTOLOGIC I ’ATYPISM SEVERE --- NECROBIOSIS ISLET MODERATE , ’i CELLS, ETC MILD - CEREBRAL

  7. Complete genome sequence of Helicobacter cinaedi type strain ATCC BAA-847.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi-Akiyama, Tohru; Takeshita, Nozomi; Ohmagari, Norio; Kirikae, Teruo

    2012-10-01

    Here we report the completely annotated genome sequence of the Helicobacter cinaedi type strain (ATCC BAA-847), which is an emerging pathogen that causes cellulitis and bacteremia. The genome sequence will provide new insights into the diagnosis, pathogenic mechanisms, and drug resistance of H. cinaedi.

  8. Endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter koseri.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Hsiang; Peng, Ming-Yieh; Wang, Ying-Chuan; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2009-12-01

    Endogenous endophthalmitis occurs when organisms are hematogenously disseminated in to the eye from a distant focus of infection. The most common isolated organisms that cause endogenous endophthalmitis are Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Previous reports on endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter species are limited. We present the first case of endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Citrobacter koseri bacteremia and renal abscesses.

  9. Burns in Morbidly Obese Patients,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    tract infection and one episode C obesity. The clinical records of these patients were reviewed in of sinusitis. Two patients had documented bacteremias...veloped pneumonia and two developed tracheobronchitis. 0 Research, seven of whom clearly fulfilled the criteria for morbid There were one urinary

  10. First report of infectious pericarditis due to Bordetella holmesii in an adult patient with malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nei, Takahito; Hyodo, Hideya; Sonobe, Kazunari; Dan, Kazuo; Saito, Ryoichi

    2012-05-01

    Bordetella holmesii is a fastidious Gram-negative rod first identified in 1995. Though rare, it is isolated mainly in immunocompromised and asplenic hosts and is associated with bacteremia, pertussis-like respiratory tract infection, and endocarditis. Herein, we describe a unique B. holmesii infectious pericarditis patient with malignant lymphoma.

  11. Nalidixic Acid-Resistant Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhi Presenting as a Primary Psoas Abscess: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Shakespeare, William A.; Davie, Daniel; Tonnerre, Claude; Rubin, Michael A.; Strong, Michael; Petti, Cathy A.

    2005-01-01

    We report an unusual case of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi presenting as a primary psoas abscess. The isolate tested susceptible to ciprofloxacin but resistant to nalidixic acid in vitro, a pattern associated with fluoroquinolone therapeutic failures. We review the literature for serovar Typhi psoas abscess in the absence of bacteremia and discuss the importance of identifying isolates with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. PMID:15695728

  12. Rothia dentocariosa Septicemia without Endocarditis in a Neonatal Infant with Meconium Aspiration Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jeong Hwan; Shim, Jae Dong; Kim, Hye Ran; Sinn, Jong Beom; Kook, Joong-Ki; Lee, Jeong Nyeo

    2004-01-01

    Rothia dentocariosa, a gram-positive coccoid- to rod-shaped bacterium with irregular morphology, is a rare cause of bacteremia in patients without endocarditis. We report the first case of R. dentocariosa septicemia without endocarditis, which occurred in a neonatal infant with meconium aspiration syndrome. PMID:15472374

  13. The fecal microbiome in pediatric patients with short bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in the intestinal microbiome of patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) are thought to significantly affect clinical outcome. These changes may not only delay enteral diet advancement but may also predispose patients to bacterial translocation, bacteremia, and liver disease. Patients with S...

  14. Typhoid Fever

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    pediatric ward for gram negative bacteremia. After several days, urine and fecal cultures showed no growth, but both blood cultures grew Salmonella typhi . DISCUSSION...Typhoid fever is caused by ingesting food or water contaminated with feces or urine containing the bacterium Salmonella typhi . While common

  15. Recurrent Septic Arthritis Due to Achromobacter xylosoxidans in a Patient With Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Payal K.; von Keudell, Arvind; Moroder, Philipp; Appleton, Paul; Wigmore, Robin; Rodriguez, Edward K.

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of recurrent Achromobacter xylosoxidans infections including bacteremia, sepsis, septic joints and endocarditis in a 72 year old female with granulomatosis with polyangiitis. Achromobacter xylosoxidans is a gram negative bacteria increasingly identified in immunocompromised patients. Surgical and medical therapy may need to be combined. PMID:26566537

  16. Multi-omics approaches to deciphering a hypervirulent strain of Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Campylobacter jejuni clone SA recently emerged as the predominant cause of sheep abortion in the U.S. and is also associated with foodborne gastroenteritis in humans. A distinct phenotype of this clone is its ability to induce bacteremia and abortion. To facilitate understanding the path...

  17. Capnophilic Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Sahuquillo-Arce, J M; Chouman-Arcas, R; Molina-Moreno, J M; Hernández-Cabezas, A; Frasquet-Artés, J; López-Hontangas, J L

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria use bicarbonate as substrate for crucial metabolic reactions. We report the first case of bacteremia by capnophilic E. coli without the YadF gene (also known as CynT2 or Can2) that needs high concentrations of CO2 to non-enzymatically produce bicarbonate. This lack may also apply to previously reported capnophilic Enterobacteriaceae.

  18. Genome Sequence of Clostridium paraputrificum 373-A1 Isolated in Chile from a Patient Infected with Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Araya, Enzo; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Díaz-Yañez, Fernando; Pizaro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Valenzuela, Sandro L.; Meneses, Claudio; Gil, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium paraputrificum is a gut microbiota member reported in several cases of bacteremia and coinfections. So far, only one genome sequence of a C. paraputrificum (AGR2156) isolate is available. Here, we present the draft genome of C. paraputrificum strain 373-A1, isolated from stools from a patient with C. difficile infection. PMID:27811092

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a Pseudomonas putida Clinical Isolate, Strain H8234

    PubMed Central

    Bernal, Patricia; Udaondo, Zulema; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2013-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida strain H8234, which was isolated from a hospital patient presenting with bacteremia. This strain has a single chromosome (6,870,827 bp) that contains 6,305 open reading frames. The strain is not a pathogen but exhibits multidrug resistance associated with 40 genomic islands. PMID:23868128

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a Pseudomonas putida Clinical Isolate, Strain H8234.

    PubMed

    Molina, Lázaro; Bernal, Patricia; Udaondo, Zulema; Segura, Ana; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2013-07-18

    We report the complete genome sequence of Pseudomonas putida strain H8234, which was isolated from a hospital patient presenting with bacteremia. This strain has a single chromosome (6,870,827 bp) that contains 6,305 open reading frames. The strain is not a pathogen but exhibits multidrug resistance associated with 40 genomic islands.

  1. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Ralstonia pickettii: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Orme, Joseph; Rivera-Bonilla, Tomas; Loli, Akil; Blattman, Negin N.

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii is a rare pathogen and even more rare in healthy individuals. Here we report a case of R. pickettii bacteremia leading to aortic valve abscess and complete heart block. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Ralstonia species causing infective endocarditis with perivalvular abscess. PMID:25648998

  2. Native Valve Endocarditis due to Ralstonia pickettii: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Orme, Joseph; Rivera-Bonilla, Tomas; Loli, Akil; Blattman, Negin N

    2015-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii is a rare pathogen and even more rare in healthy individuals. Here we report a case of R. pickettii bacteremia leading to aortic valve abscess and complete heart block. To our knowledge this is the first case report of Ralstonia species causing infective endocarditis with perivalvular abscess.

  3. Genome Sequence of Clostridium paraputrificum 373-A1 Isolated in Chile from a Patient Infected with Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Araya, Enzo; Plaza-Garrido, Angela; Díaz-Yañez, Fernando; Pizaro-Guajardo, Marjorie; Valenzuela, Sandro L; Meneses, Claudio; Gil, Fernando; Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel

    2016-11-03

    Clostridium paraputrificum is a gut microbiota member reported in several cases of bacteremia and coinfections. So far, only one genome sequence of a C. paraputrificum (AGR2156) isolate is available. Here, we present the draft genome of C. paraputrificum strain 373-A1, isolated from stools from a patient with C. difficile infection.

  4. Rapid identification and classification of Staphylococcus aureus by attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important bacterium that can cause serious infections in humans such as pneumonia and bacteremia. Rapid detection of this pathogen is crucial in food industries and clinical laboratories to control S. aureus food poisoning and human infections. In this study, fourier tran...

  5. Safety and immunogenicity of a single dose 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in Russian subjects.

    PubMed

    Ciprero, Karen; Zykov, Kirill A; Briko, Nikolay I; Shekar, Tulin; Sterling, Tina M; Bitieva, Elizaveta; Stek, Jon E; Musey, Luwy

    2016-08-02

    Pneumococcal infection is a major cause of pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. Incidence of pneumococcal disease (PD) varies worldwide. The 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) displays an acceptable safety profile and has been demonstrated cost-effective in reducing burden of PD.

  6. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  7. Association between tea ingestion and invasive Bacillus cereus infection among children with cancer.

    PubMed

    El Saleeby, C M; Howard, S C; Hayden, R T; McCullers, J A

    2004-11-15

    Bacillus cereus is an emerging pathogen that causes invasive disease in immunocompromised hosts. A case-control study, prompted by a clinical case, demonstrated an association between dietary tea ingestion and B. cereus bacteremia. Policies designed to interrupt transmission of this pathogen to susceptible patients should be considered.

  8. Case report of Streptomyces endocarditis of a prosthetic aortic valve.

    PubMed Central

    Mossad, S B; Tomford, J W; Stewart, R; Ratliff, N B; Hall, G S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the first case of prosthetic valve endocarditis due to a Streptomyces sp. The patient presented with fever, cutaneous embolic lesions, and bacteremia 3 months after aortic valve replacement. Treatment required valve replacement and a long course of parenteral imipenem. PMID:8586732

  9. Fatal wound infection caused by Chromobacterium violaceum in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stephen; Campbell, James I; Stabler, Richard; Nguyen, Hoang V M; To, Diep S; Nguyen, Dung V; Farrar, Jeremy

    2008-11-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a proteobacterium found in soil and water in tropical regions which rarely causes infection in humans. Here, we report a fatal bacteremia caused by Chromobacterium violaceum in Vietnam. We describe a number of clinical, microbiological, and molecular aspects associated with this bacterial infection.

  10. Characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteraemia and Predictors of Early and Late Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Bassetti, Matteo; Peghin, Maddalena; Trecarichi, Enrico Maria; Carnelutti, Alessia; Righi, Elda; Del Giacomo, Paola; Ansaldi, Filippo; Trucchi, Cecilia; Alicino, Cristiano; Cauda, Roberto; Sartor, Assunta; Spanu, Teresa; Scarparo, Claudio; Tumbarello, Mario

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to describe the characteristics of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and to evaluate the risk factors associated with early (7-day) and late (30-day) mortality. We performed an observational study including all consecutive episodes of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia diagnosed at two Italian university hospitals during 2010–2014. A total of 337 patients were included. Mean age was 69 years (range, 57–78) and 65% were males. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was identified in 132/337 (39%)cases. Overall 7- and 30-day mortality were 13% and 26%, respectively. Early mortality was associated with increased Charlson scores (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1–1.5), MRSA bacteremia (OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.4–8.1), presentation with septic shock (OR 13.5, 95% CI 5.4–36.4), and occurrence of endocarditis (OR 4.5, 95%CI 1.4–14.6). Similar risk factors were identified for late mortality, including increased Charlson scores (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1–1.4), MRSA bacteremia (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2–3.9), presentation with septic shock (OR 4, 95%CI 1.7–9.7), occurrence of endocarditis (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.4–10.2) as well as Child C cirrhosis (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.1–14.4) and primary bacteremia (OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.3–5). Infectious disease consultation resulted in better outcomes both at 7 (OR 0.1, 95% CI 0.05–0.4) and at 30 days (OR 0.4, 95% CI 0.2–0.7). In conclusion, our study highlighted high rates of MRSA infection in nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Multiple comorbidities, disease severity and methicillin-resistance are key factors for early and late mortality in this group. In patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, infectious disease consultation remains a valuable tool to improve clinical outcome. PMID:28152067

  11. Clinical Indicators for Bacterial Co-Infection in Ghanaian Children with P. falciparum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Maja Verena; Amemasor, Solomon; Agyekum, Alex; Loag, Wibke; Marks, Florian; Sarpong, Nimako; Dekker, Denise; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; May, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of infectious causes in severely ill children is essential but challenging in sub- Saharan Africa. The aim of the study was to determine clinical indicators that are able to identify bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children in rural Ghana. In total, 1,915 severely ill children below the age of 15 years were recruited at Agogo Presbyterian Hospital in Ghana between May 2007 and February 2011. In 771 (40%) of the children malaria parasites were detected. This group was analyzed for indicators of bacterial co-infections using bivariate and multivariate regression analyses with 24 socio-economic variables, 16 terms describing medical history and anthropometrical information and 68 variables describing clinical symptoms. The variables were tested for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value. In 46 (6.0%) of the children with malaria infection, bacterial co-infection was detected. The most frequent pathogens were non-typhoid salmonellae (45.7%), followed by Streptococcus spp. (13.0%). Coughing, dehydration, splenomegaly, severe anemia and leukocytosis were positively associated with bacteremia. Domestic hygiene and exclusive breastfeeding is negatively associated with bacteremia. In cases of high parasitemia (>10,000/μl), a significant association with bacteremia was found for splenomegaly (OR 8.8; CI 1.6–48.9), dehydration (OR 18.2; CI 2.0–166.0) and coughing (OR 9.0; CI 0.7–118.6). In children with low parasitemia, associations with bacteremia were found for vomiting (OR 4.7; CI 1.4–15.8), severe anemia (OR 3.3; CI 1.0–11.1) and leukocytosis (OR 6.8 CI 1.9–24.2). Clinical signs of impaired microcirculation were negatively associated with bacteremia. Ceftriaxone achieved best coverage of isolated pathogens. The results demonstrate the limitation of clinical symptoms to determine bacterial co-infections in P. falciparum infected children. Best clinical indicators are dependent on the

  12. Bloodstream infections in children caused by carbapenem-resistant versus carbapenem-susceptible gram-negative microorganisms: Risk factors and outcome.

    PubMed

    Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Aykac, Kubra; Cengiz, Ali Bulent; Basaranoglu, Sevgen Tanır; Sancak, Banu; Karahan, Sevilay; Kara, Ates; Ceyhan, Mehmet

    2017-04-01

    Carbapenems are often considered the last resort agents reserved for treatment of infections due to highly antimicrobial resistant organisms such as A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa. However, carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative (CRGN) pathogens have become much more prevalent in the last decade. The objective of this study was to determine risk factors for and outcome of bacteremia caused by Gram-negative microorganisms in a pediatric tertiary-care hospital. Among 97 patients with hospital-acquired Gram-negative bacteremia, 66 patients with carbapenem-susceptible Gram-negative pathogens (CSGN) were compared with the remaining 31 with CRGN isolates. The overall clinical response and microbiological response rates were 83.3% and 43.9% in CSGN group, and 54.8% and 32.3% in CRGN group, respectively (P=0.002 and P=0.004, respectively). The treatment failure and relapse rates were 18.2% and 6.1% in CSGN group, and 38.7% and 6.5% in CRGN group, respectively (P=0.03 in each). The infection-related mortality rates were 10.8% in the CSGN group and 32.3% in the CRGN group (P=0.01). The total length of stay in hospital before infection was longer in patients with CRGN bacteremia than that of the CSGN bacteremia (P=0.002). The extended spectrum antibiotic usage prior to infection was significantly different between the groups (P=0.008). Infections due to CRGN are generally associated with poorer patient outcomes. Longer hospital stay and extended spectrum antibiotic usage prior to infection are the most important risk factors for CRGN bacteremia in our cohort.

  13. Comparison of three DNA extraction methods for detection of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae in chicken blood by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kazuki; Uchiyama, Mariko; Hoshi, Teruyuki; Takahashi, Toshio

    2009-05-01

    A previously reported Erysipelothrix-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect Erysipelothrix bacteremia in chickens. The sensitivity of PCR using 3 DNA extraction methods (boiling method, commercial gene matrix, and DNA extractor kit) was compared by using a serial 10-fold dilution of a chicken isolate of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strain in chicken blood. Of the techniques used, the DNA extractor kit, followed by PCR, provided the most sensitive method for the detection of the E. rhusiopathiae strain in chicken blood (approximately 10(0) CFU/0.1 ml of blood). Two E. rhusiopathiae infection experiments were then attempted. In a total of 10 inoculated chickens, bacteremia developed in 9 chickens, consisting of all 5 chickens used in the first trial (ranging from 5.1 x 10(1) to 2.0 x 10(3) CFU/0.1 ml of blood) and 4 of the 5 chickens used in the second trial (ranging from 1.0 x 10(0) to 3.3 x 10(2) CFU/0.1 ml of blood). In the second trial, the 3 detection techniques were applied to the chickens with bacteremia, and the organism could be detected by using the DNA extractor kit in blood specimens from the 3 chickens exhibiting bacteremia of > or =4.2 x 10(1) CFU/0.1 ml of blood. This observation suggests that most E. rhusiopathiae-infected chickens develop more critical bacteremia than the detectable level by PCR with the DNA extractor kit, and the PCR detection method can be used as a first-line screening of avian erysipelas.

  14. Identification, Genotypic Relation, and Clinical Features of Colistin-Resistant Isolates of Acinetobacter Genomic Species 13BJ/14TU from Bloodstreams of Patients in a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Yeob; Shin, Jong Hee; Park, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Ju Hee; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2014-01-01

    Colistin resistance remains rare among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter species. We noted the emergence of colistin-resistant bloodstream isolates of the Acinetobacter genomic species (GS) 13BJ/14TU from patients at a university hospital between 2003 and 2011. We report here, for the first time, the microbiological and molecular characteristics of these isolates, with clinical features of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU bacteremia. All 11 available patient isolates were correctly identified as Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU using partial rpoB gene sequencing but were misidentified using the phenotypic methods Vitek 2 (mostly as Acinetobacter baumannii), MicroScan (mostly as A. baumannii/Acinetobacter haemolyticus), and the API 20 NE system (all as A. haemolyticus). Most isolates were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, including carbapenems, but all were resistant to colistin, for which it is unknown whether the resistance is acquired or intrinsic. However, the fact that none of the patients had a history of colistin therapy strongly suggests that Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU is innately resistant to colistin. The phylogenetic tree of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that all 11 isolates formed a separate cluster from other Acinetobacter species and yielded five sequence types. However, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed 11 distinct patterns, suggesting that the bacteremia had occurred sporadically. Four patients showed persistent bacteremia (6 to 17 days), and all 11 patients had excellent outcomes with cleared bacteremia, suggesting that patients with Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU-associated bacteremia show a favorable outcome. These results emphasize the importance of precise species identification, especially regarding colistin resistance in Acinetobacter species. In addition, MLST offers another approach to the identification of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU, whereas PFGE is useful for genotyping for this species. PMID:24403305

  15. Differential gene expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae in response to various iron sources.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Shah, P; Swiatlo, E

    2009-08-01

    Iron is a critical co-factor for several enzymes and is known to regulate gene expression in many pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) normally colonizes the upper respiratory mucosa, which is an iron-restricted environment. In contrast, during bacteremia available iron from heme and non-heme proteins potentially increases. In iron-depleted medium pneumococcal strain TIGR4 showed reduced growth, however, addition of several physiological iron sources restored growth. Gene expression of selected known and putative pneumococcal virulence factors was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR in response to iron sources in vitro and during colonization, pneumonia, and bacteremia in a mouse model. Change in mRNA levels relative to transcription in iron-depleted medium was reported. In presence of iron sources, transcription of cps4A, zmpA, pavA, hemolysin and a putative exfoliative toxin was significantly increased, but nanB was suppressed. Hemoglobin at physiological concentration repressed ply and pspA expression. Ferritin, an acute phase protein, increased expression of an iron ABC transporter and repressed expression of a bacterial non-heme iron-containing ferritin. Transcription of cps4A, nanB, hemolysin, and a putative exfoliative toxin were significantly up-regulated during pneumonia and bacteremia, while mRNA of pavA and non-heme ferritin were expressed at higher levels during pneumonia and carriage. An iron ABC transporter was most up-regulated during bacteremia, while pspA and ply were expressed only in pneumonia. Transcription of zmpA was elevated during both pneumonia and bacteremia. These findings suggest that a subset of virulence genes in pneumococci is differentially regulated in response to the quantity and form of iron sources available in a host.

  16. Control of hospital endemicity of multiple-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii ST457 with directly observed hand hygiene.

    PubMed

    Cheng, V C C; Chen, J H K; Poon, R W S; Lee, W M; So, S Y C; Wong, S C Y; Chau, P H; Yip, C C Y; Wong, S S Y; Chan, J F W; Hung, I F N; Ho, P L; Yuen, K Y

    2015-04-01

    An increasing endemicity of multiple-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MRAB) ST457 was noted in Hong Kong. The epidemiology, risk factors, and infection control measures to prevent nosocomial transmission of this epidemic clone were analyzed. A total of 5,058 patients cultured positive with A. baumannii between 1 January 2004 and 30 June 2014 were included, of which 297 (5.9 %) had bacteremia. The first case of MRAB bacteremia emerged in 2009, with an incidence that increased from 0.27 (one case) in 2009 to 1.86 (14 cases) per 100,000 patient-days in 2013 (p < 0.001). With the implementation of strict contact precautions and directly observed hand hygiene in conscious patients immediately before receiving meals and medications in July 2013, the incidence of MRAB bacteremia reduced from its peak to 0.77 (one case) per 100,000 patient-days in the first 6 months of 2014 (p < 0.001). Patients from long-term care facilities for the elderly [odds ratio (OR) 18.6, confidence interval (CI) 2.1-162.4, p = 0.008] and history of carbapenem (OR 7.0, CI 1.7-28.0, p = 0.006) and beta-lactam/beta-lactamase use (OR 5.6, CI 1.1-28.7, p = 0.038) 90 days prior to admission were independent risk factors for MRAB bacteremia by logistic regression when compared with carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii bacteremia.

  17. Sepsis Caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)-Positive K. pneumoniae and E. coli: Comparison of Severity of Sepsis, Delay of Anti-Infective Therapy and ESBL Genotype.

    PubMed

    Sakellariou, Christian; Gürntke, Stephan; Steinmetz, Ivo; Kohler, Christian; Pfeifer, Yvonne; Gastmeier, Petra; Schwab, Frank; Kola, Axel; Deja, Maria; Leistner, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Infections with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are associated with increased mortality. Outcome differences due to various species of ESBL-E or ESBL genotypes are not well investigated. We conducted a cohort study to assess risk factors for mortality in cases of ESBL-E bacteremia (K. pneumoniae or E. coli) and the risk factors for sepsis with organ failure. All consecutive patients of our institution from 2008 to 2011 with bacteremia due to ESBL-E were included. Basic epidemiological data, underlying comorbidities, origin of bacteremia, severity of sepsis and delay of appropriate anti-infective treatment were collected. Isolates were PCR-screened for the presence of ESBL genes and plasmid-mediated AmpC β-lactamases. Cox proportional hazard regression on mortality and multivariable logistic regression on risk factors for sepsis with organ failure was conducted. 219 cases were included in the analysis: 73.1% due to E. coli, 26.9% due to K. pneumoniae. There was no significant difference in hospital mortality (ESBL-E. coli, 23.8% vs. ESBL-K. pneumoniae 27.1%, p = 0.724). However, the risk of sepsis with organ failure was associated in cases of K. pneumoniae bacteremia (OR 4.5, p<0.001) and patients with liver disease (OR 3.4, p = 0.004) or renal disease (OR 6.8, p<0.001). We found significant differences in clinical presentation of ESBL-E bacteremia due to K. pneumoniae compared to E. coli. As K. pneumoniae cases showed a more serious clinical presentation as E. coli cases and were associated with different risk factors, treatment and prevention strategies should be adjusted accordingly.

  18. Passive immunization does not provide protection against experimental infection with Mycoplasma haemofelis.

    PubMed

    Sugiarto, Sarah; Spiri, Andrea M; Riond, Barbara; Novacco, Marilisa; Oestmann, Angelina; de Miranda, Luisa H Monteiro; Meli, Marina L; Boretti, Felicitas S; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Willi, Barbara

    2016-08-05

    Mycoplasma haemofelis (Mhf) is the most pathogenic feline hemotropic mycoplasma. Cats infected with Mhf that clear bacteremia are protected from Mhf reinfection, but the mechanisms of protective immunity are unresolved. In the present study we investigated whether the passive transfer of antibodies from Mhf-recovered cats to naïve recipient cats provided protection against bacteremia and clinical disease following homologous challenge with Mhf; moreover, we characterized the immune response in the recipient cats. Ten specified pathogen-free (SPF) cats were transfused with pooled plasma from cats that had cleared Mhf bacteremia; five control cats received plasma from naïve SPF cats. After homologous challenge with Mhf, cats were monitored for 100 days using quantitative PCR, hematology, blood biochemistry, Coombs testing, flow cytometry, DnaK ELISA, and red blood cell (RBC) osmotic fragility (OF) measurement. Passively immunized cats were not protected against Mhf infection but, compared to control cats, showed significantly higher RBC OF and B lymphocyte (CD45R/B220(+)) counts and occasionally higher lymphocyte, monocyte and activated CD4(+) T lymphocyte (CD4(+)CD25(+)) counts; they also showed higher bilirubin, total protein and globulin levels compared to those of control cats. At times of peak bacteremia, a decrease in eosinophils and lymphocytes, as well as subsets thereof (B lymphocytes and CD5(+), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes), and an increase in monocytes were particularly significant in the passively immunized cats. In conclusion, passive immunization does not prevent bacteremia and clinical disease following homologous challenge with Mhf, but enhances RBC osmotic fragility and induces a pronounced immune response.

  19. Identification, genotypic relation, and clinical features of colistin-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter genomic species 13BJ/14TU from bloodstreams of patients in a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Yeob; Shin, Jong Hee; Park, Kyung Hwa; Kim, Ju Hee; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook; Kim, Soo Hyun

    2014-03-01

    Colistin resistance remains rare among clinical isolates of Acinetobacter species. We noted the emergence of colistin-resistant bloodstream isolates of the Acinetobacter genomic species (GS) 13BJ/14TU from patients at a university hospital between 2003 and 2011. We report here, for the first time, the microbiological and molecular characteristics of these isolates, with clinical features of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU bacteremia. All 11 available patient isolates were correctly identified as Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU using partial rpoB gene sequencing but were misidentified using the phenotypic methods Vitek 2 (mostly as Acinetobacter baumannii), MicroScan (mostly as A. baumannii/Acinetobacter haemolyticus), and the API 20 NE system (all as A. haemolyticus). Most isolates were susceptible to commonly used antibiotics, including carbapenems, but all were resistant to colistin, for which it is unknown whether the resistance is acquired or intrinsic. However, the fact that none of the patients had a history of colistin therapy strongly suggests that Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU is innately resistant to colistin. The phylogenetic tree of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that all 11 isolates formed a separate cluster from other Acinetobacter species and yielded five sequence types. However, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) revealed 11 distinct patterns, suggesting that the bacteremia had occurred sporadically. Four patients showed persistent bacteremia (6 to 17 days), and all 11 patients had excellent outcomes with cleared bacteremia, suggesting that patients with Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU-associated bacteremia show a favorable outcome. These results emphasize the importance of precise species identification, especially regarding colistin resistance in Acinetobacter species. In addition, MLST offers another approach to the identification of Acinetobacter GS 13BJ/14TU, whereas PFGE is useful for genotyping for this species.

  20. Increase in Antibiotic-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections in Febrile Neutropenic Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of bacteremia caused by Gram-negative bacteria has increased recently in febrile neutropenic patients with the increase of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections. This study aimed to identify the distribution of causative bacteria and the proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in bacteremia diagnosed in febrile neutropenic children. Materials and Methods The medical records of febrile neutropenic children diagnosed with bacteremia between 2010 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The causative bacteria and proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria were investigated and compared yearly during the study period. The clinical impact of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections was also determined. Results A total of 336 bacteremia episodes were identified. During the entire study period, 181 (53.9%) and 155 (46.1%) episodes were caused by Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. Viridans streptococci (25.9%), Klebsiella spp. (16.7%), and Escherichia coli (16.4%) were the most frequent causative bacteria. The overall distribution of causative bacteria was not significantly different annually. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were identified in 85 (25.3%) episodes, and the proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria was not significantly different annually. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli and Klebsiella spp. were most common among antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, and they accounted for 30.6% (n = 34) of the identified E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci were most common among antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and it accounted for 88.5% (n = 23) of the identified coagulase-negative staphylococci. Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, especially antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections, caused significantly higher mortality due to bacteremia compared with non-antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections (P <0