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Sample records for bacteria regulated polymerization

  1. Redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from electroactive bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shan-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Although the capacity for electroactive bacteria to convert environmental metallic minerals and organic pollutants is well known, the role of the redox properties of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in this process is poorly understood. In this work, the redox properties of EPS from two widely present electroactive bacterial strains (Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida) were explored. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates that the EPS extracted from the two strains exhibited redox properties. Spectroelectrochemical and protein electrophoresis analyses indicate that the extracted EPS from S. oneidensis and P. putida contained heme-binding proteins, which were identified as the possible redox components in the EPS. The results of heme-mediated behavior of EPS may provide an insight into the important roles of EPS in electroactive bacteria to maximize their redox capability for biogeochemical cycling, environmental bioremediation and wastewater treatment.

  2. Redox properties of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from electroactive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shan-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Although the capacity for electroactive bacteria to convert environmental metallic minerals and organic pollutants is well known, the role of the redox properties of microbial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in this process is poorly understood. In this work, the redox properties of EPS from two widely present electroactive bacterial strains (Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida) were explored. Electrochemical analysis demonstrates that the EPS extracted from the two strains exhibited redox properties. Spectroelectrochemical and protein electrophoresis analyses indicate that the extracted EPS from S. oneidensis and P. putida contained heme-binding proteins, which were identified as the possible redox components in the EPS. The results of heme-mediated behavior of EPS may provide an insight into the important roles of EPS in electroactive bacteria to maximize their redox capability for biogeochemical cycling, environmental bioremediation and wastewater treatment. PMID:27991531

  3. Cell Size Regulation in Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-05-01

    Various bacteria such as the canonical gram negative Escherichia coli or the well-studied gram positive Bacillus subtilis divide symmetrically after they approximately double their volume. Their size at division is not constant, but is typically distributed over a narrow range. Here, we propose an analytically tractable model for cell size control, and calculate the cell size and interdivision time distributions, as well as the correlations between these variables. We suggest ways of extracting the model parameters from experimental data, and show that existing data for E. coli supports partial size control, and a particular explanation: a cell attempts to add a constant volume from the time of initiation of DNA replication to the next initiation event. This hypothesis accounts for the experimentally observed correlations between mother and daughter cells as well as the exponential dependence of size on growth rate.

  4. Regulating alternative lifestyles in entomopathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Jason M; Kontnik, Renee; Clardy, Jon

    2010-01-12

    Bacteria belonging to the genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus participate in a trilateral symbiosis in which they enable their nematode hosts to parasitize insect larvae. The bacteria switch from persisting peacefully in a nematode's digestive tract to a lifestyle in which pathways to produce insecticidal toxins, degrading enzymes to digest the insect for consumption, and antibiotics to ward off bacterial and fungal competitors are activated. This study addresses three questions: (1) What molecular signal triggers antibiotic production in the bacteria? (2) What small molecules are regulated by the signal? And (3), how do the bacteria recognize the signal? Differential metabolomic profiling in Photorhabdus luminescens TT01 and Xenorhabdus nematophila revealed that L-proline in the insect's hemolymph initiates a metabolic shift. Small molecules known to be crucial for virulence and antibiosis in addition to previously unknown metabolites are dramatically upregulated by L-proline, linking the recognition of host environment to bacterial metabolic regulation. To identify the L-proline-induced signaling pathway, we deleted the proline transporters putP and proU in P. luminescens TT01. Studies of these strains support a model in which acquisition of L-proline both regulates the metabolic shift and maintains the bacterial proton motive force that ultimately regulates the downstream bacterial pathways affecting virulence and antibiotic production.

  5. Polymerization of actin does not regulate desensitization in human basophils

    PubMed Central

    MacGlashan, Donald; Vilariño, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that maintenance of IgE-mediated signaling results from regulation of the activity of signaling complexes by actin polymerization. This process is also hypothesized to be related to desensitization of basophils and mast cells. Recent studies demonstrated that any signaling process dependent on syk or PI-3K activity cannot be a mechanism of desensitization, and in this context, syk and PI-3K inhibitors were found to inhibit actin polymerization. Inhibitors of actin polymerization were tested for their effect on desensitization of human peripheral blood basophils. Latrunculin A, in particular, removed all resting and stimulated f-actin but did not inhibit desensitization. Cytochalasin D and latrunculin A also did not reverse the loss of syk phosphorylation that accompanies desensitization. These results demonstrate that desensitization mechanisms are not dependent on actin polymerization. In this context, it was also shown that progressive immobilization of FcεRI during aggregation was sensitive to syk or actin polymerization inhibition. Therefore, desensitization is also not dependent on receptor immobilization. These studies demonstrate that desensitization is not the result of two signaling pathways once considered relevant to down-regulation of IgE-mediated signaling. PMID:19150851

  6. Peroxide-Sensing Transcriptional Regulators in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2012-01-01

    The ability to maintain intracellular concentrations of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) within safe limits is essential for all aerobic life forms. In bacteria, as well as other organisms, ROS are produced during the normal course of aerobic metabolism, necessitating the constitutive expression of ROS scavenging systems. However, bacteria can also experience transient high-level exposure to ROS derived either from external sources, such as the host defense response, or as a secondary effect of other seemingly unrelated environmental stresses. Consequently, transcriptional regulators have evolved to sense the levels of ROS and coordinate the appropriate oxidative stress response. Three well-studied examples of these are the peroxide responsive regulators OxyR, PerR, and OhrR. OxyR and PerR are sensors of primarily H2O2, while OhrR senses organic peroxide (ROOH) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). OxyR and OhrR sense oxidants by means of the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine residues. In contrast, PerR senses H2O2 via the Fe-catalyzed oxidation of histidine residues. These transcription regulators also influence complex biological phenomena, such as biofilm formation, the evasion of host immune responses, and antibiotic resistance via the direct regulation of specific proteins. PMID:22797754

  7. Peroxide-sensing transcriptional regulators in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dubbs, James M; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2012-10-01

    The ability to maintain intracellular concentrations of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) within safe limits is essential for all aerobic life forms. In bacteria, as well as other organisms, ROS are produced during the normal course of aerobic metabolism, necessitating the constitutive expression of ROS scavenging systems. However, bacteria can also experience transient high-level exposure to ROS derived either from external sources, such as the host defense response, or as a secondary effect of other seemingly unrelated environmental stresses. Consequently, transcriptional regulators have evolved to sense the levels of ROS and coordinate the appropriate oxidative stress response. Three well-studied examples of these are the peroxide responsive regulators OxyR, PerR, and OhrR. OxyR and PerR are sensors of primarily H(2)O(2), while OhrR senses organic peroxide (ROOH) and sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). OxyR and OhrR sense oxidants by means of the reversible oxidation of specific cysteine residues. In contrast, PerR senses H(2)O(2) via the Fe-catalyzed oxidation of histidine residues. These transcription regulators also influence complex biological phenomena, such as biofilm formation, the evasion of host immune responses, and antibiotic resistance via the direct regulation of specific proteins.

  8. Do bacteria need to be regulated?

    PubMed

    Silley, P

    2006-09-01

    Additives for use in animal nutrition are regulated under Regulation (EC) No. 1831/2003. The scope of this paper addresses the specific microbiological issues relevant to a microbial feed additive, containing a Bacillus spp. and uses as an example a product with the trade name, Calsporin. Bacillus subtilis C-3102 is the active ingredient in Calsporin and is added to animal feed to favourably affect animal production and performance (growth and feed efficiency), by modulating the gastrointestinal flora. It is not the purpose of this review to present the raw data for Calsporin but rather to use Calsporin as an example of the type of data required by the European regulatory authorities. At the time of preparation of this manuscript Calsporin has yet to be reviewed by the authorities. The regulatory system under the auspices of the EFSA FEEDAP Panel is clearly attempting to move in line with development of scientific opinion and is to be applauded for such efforts. Bacteria do need to be regulated, and the regulations clearly provide adequate and appropriate protection to human health and to environmental considerations.

  9. Fabrication of nonfouling, bactericidal, and bacteria corpse release multifunctional surface through surface-initiated RAFT polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bailiang; Ye, Zi; Tang, Yihong; Han, Yuemei; Lin, Quankui; Liu, Huihua; Chen, Hao; Nan, Kaihui

    2017-01-01

    Infections after surgery or endophthalmitis are potentially blinding complications caused by bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation on the intraocular lens. Neither single-function anti-adhesion surface nor contacting killing surface can exhibit ideal antibacterial function. In this work, a novel (2-(dimethylamino)-ethyl methacrylate-co-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (p (DMAEMA-co-MPC)) brush was synthesized by “grafting from” method through reversible–addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. 1-Bromoheptane was used to quaternize the p (DMAEMA-co-MPC) brush coating and to endow the surface with bactericidal function. The success of the surface functionalization was confirmed by atomic force microscopy, water contact angle, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The quaternary ammonium salt units were employed as efficient disinfection that can eliminate bacteria through contact killing, whereas the 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine units were introduced to suppress unwanted nonspecific adsorption. The functionalized poly(dimethyl siloxane) surfaces showed efficiency in reducing bovine serum albumin adsorption and in inhibiting bacteria adhesion and biofilm formation. The copolymer brushes also demonstrated excellent bactericidal function against gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria measured by bacteria live/dead staining and shake-flask culture methods. The surface biocompatibility was evaluated by morphology and activity measurement with human lens epithelial cells in vitro. The achievement of the p (DMAEMA+-co-MPC) copolymer brush coating with nonfouling, bactericidal, and bacteria corpse release properties can be used to modify intraocular lenses. PMID:28053527

  10. Fabrication of nonfouling, bactericidal, and bacteria corpse release multifunctional surface through surface-initiated RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bailiang; Ye, Zi; Tang, Yihong; Han, Yuemei; Lin, Quankui; Liu, Huihua; Chen, Hao; Nan, Kaihui

    Infections after surgery or endophthalmitis are potentially blinding complications caused by bacterial adhesion and subsequent biofilm formation on the intraocular lens. Neither single-function anti-adhesion surface nor contacting killing surface can exhibit ideal antibacterial function. In this work, a novel (2-(dimethylamino)-ethyl methacrylate-co-2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (p (DMAEMA-co-MPC)) brush was synthesized by "grafting from" method through reversible-addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. 1-Bromoheptane was used to quaternize the p (DMAEMA-co-MPC) brush coating and to endow the surface with bactericidal function. The success of the surface functionalization was confirmed by atomic force microscopy, water contact angle, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. The quaternary ammonium salt units were employed as efficient disinfection that can eliminate bacteria through contact killing, whereas the 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine units were introduced to suppress unwanted nonspecific adsorption. The functionalized poly(dimethyl siloxane) surfaces showed efficiency in reducing bovine serum albumin adsorption and in inhibiting bacteria adhesion and biofilm formation. The copolymer brushes also demonstrated excellent bactericidal function against gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria measured by bacteria live/dead staining and shake-flask culture methods. The surface biocompatibility was evaluated by morphology and activity measurement with human lens epithelial cells in vitro. The achievement of the p (DMAEMA(+)-co-MPC) copolymer brush coating with nonfouling, bactericidal, and bacteria corpse release properties can be used to modify intraocular lenses.

  11. Transcriptional regulation by Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) in pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Hassan, Hosni M

    2013-01-01

    In the ancient anaerobic environment, ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) was one of the first metal cofactors. Oxygenation of the ancient world challenged bacteria to acquire the insoluble ferric iron (Fe(3+)) and later to defend against reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the Fenton chemistry. To acquire Fe(3+), bacteria produce low-molecular weight compounds, known as siderophores, which have extremely high affinity for Fe(3+). However, during infection the host restricts iron from pathogens by producing iron- and siderophore-chelating proteins, by exporting iron from intracellular pathogen-containing compartments, and by limiting absorption of dietary iron. Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) is a transcription factor which utilizes Fe(2+) as a corepressor and represses siderophore synthesis in pathogens. Fur, directly or indirectly, controls expression of enzymes that protect against ROS damage. Thus, the challenges of iron homeostasis and defense against ROS are addressed via Fur. Although the role of Fur as a repressor is well-documented, emerging evidence demonstrates that Fur can function as an activator. Fur activation can occur through three distinct mechanisms (1) indirectly via small RNAs, (2) binding at cis regulatory elements that enhance recruitment of the RNA polymerase holoenzyme (RNAP), and (3) functioning as an antirepressor by removing or blocking DNA binding of a repressor of transcription. In addition, Fur homologs control defense against peroxide stress (PerR) and control uptake of other metals such as zinc (Zur) and manganese (Mur) in pathogenic bacteria. Fur family members are important for virulence within bacterial pathogens since mutants of fur, perR, or zur exhibit reduced virulence within numerous animal and plant models of infection. This review focuses on the breadth of Fur regulation in pathogenic bacteria.

  12. Identification of MltG as a potential terminase for peptidoglycan polymerization in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yunck, Rachel; Cho, Hongbaek; Bernhardt, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial cells are fortified against osmotic lysis by a cell wall made of peptidoglycan (PG). Synthases called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), the targets of penicillin and related antibiotics, polymerize the glycan strands of PG and crosslink them into the cell wall meshwork via attached peptides. The average length of glycan chains inserted into the matrix by the PBPs is thought to play an important role in bacterial morphogenesis, but polymerization termination factors controlling this process have yet to be discovered. Here, we report the identification of Escherichia coli MltG (YceG) as a potential terminase for glycan polymerization that is broadly conserved in bacteria. A clone containing mltG was initially isolated in a screen for multicopy plasmids generating a lethal phenotype in cells defective for the PG synthase PBP1b. Biochemical studies revealed that MltG is an inner membrane enzyme with endolytic transglycosylase activity capable of cleaving at internal positions within a glycan polymer. Radiolabeling experiments further demonstrated MltG-dependent nascent PG processing in vivo, and bacterial two-hybrid analysis identified an MltG-PBP1b interaction. Mutants lacking MltG were also shown to have longer glycans in their PG relative to wild-type cells. Our combined results are thus consistent with a model in which MltG associates with PG synthetic complexes to cleave nascent polymers and terminate their elongation. PMID:26507882

  13. Plasma nanotextured polymeric lab-on-a-chip for highly efficient bacteria capture and lysis.

    PubMed

    Tsougeni, K; Papadakis, G; Gianneli, M; Grammoustianou, A; Constantoudis, V; Dupuy, B; Petrou, P S; Kakabakos, S E; Tserepi, A; Gizeli, E; Gogolides, E

    2016-01-07

    We describe the design, fabrication, and successful demonstration of a sample preparation module comprising bacteria cell capture and thermal lysis on-chip with potential applications in food sample pathogen analysis. Plasma nanotexturing of the polymeric substrate allows increase of the surface area of the chip and the antibody binding capacity. Three different anti-Salmonella antibodies were directly and covalently linked to plasma treated chips without any additional linker chemistry or other treatment. Then, the Ab-modified chips were tested for their capacity to bind bacteria in the concentration range of 10(2)-10(8) cells per mL; the module exhibited 100% efficiency in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteria capture for cell suspensions below 10(5) cells per mL (10(4) cells injected with a 100 μL sample volume) and efficiency higher than 50% for 10(7) cells per mL. Moreover, thermal lysis achieved on-chip from as low as 10 captured cells was demonstrated and shown to compare well with off-chip lysis. Excellent selectivity (over 1 : 300) was obtained in a sample containing, in addition to S. Typhimurium and E. coli bacteria.

  14. Extracellular polymeric substances mediate bioleaching/biocorrosion via interfacial processes involving iron(III) ions and acidophilic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sand, Wolfgang; Gehrke, Tilman

    2006-01-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances seem to play a pivotal role in biocorrosion of metals and bioleaching, biocorrosion of metal sulfides for the winning of precious metals as well as acid rock drainage. For better control of both processes, the structure and function of extracellular polymeric substances of corrosion-causing or leaching bacteria are of crucial importance. Our research focused on the extremophilic bacteria Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans, because of the "simplicity" and knowledge about the interactions of these bacteria with their substrate/substratum and their environment. For this purpose, the composition of the corresponding extracellular polymeric substances and their functions were analyzed. The extracellular polymeric substances of both species consist mainly of neutral sugars and lipids. The functions of the exopolymers seem to be: (i) to mediate attachment to a (metal) sulfide surface, and (ii) to concentrate iron(III) ions by complexation through uronic acids or other residues at the mineral surface, thus, allowing an oxidative attack on the sulfide. Consequently, dissolution of the metal sulfide is enhanced, which may result in an acceleration of 20- to 100-fold of the bioleaching process over chemical leaching. Experiments were performed to elucidate the importance of the iron(III) ions complexed by extracellular polymeric substances for strain-specific differences in oxidative activity for pyrite. Strains of A. ferrooxidans with a high amount of iron(III) ions in their extracellular polymeric substances possess greater oxidation activity than those with fewer iron(III) ions. These data provide insight into the function of and consequently the advantages that extracellular polymeric substances provide to bacteria. The role of extracellular polymeric substances for attachment under the conditions of a space station and resulting effects like biofouling, biocorrosion, malodorous gases, etc. will be discussed.

  15. Rational Design of Single-Chain Polymeric Nanoparticles That Kill Planktonic and Biofilm Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thuy-Khanh; Lam, Shu Jie; Ho, Kitty K K; Kumar, Naresh; Qiao, Greg G; Egan, Suhelen; Boyer, Cyrille; Wong, Edgar H H

    2017-02-08

    Infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria are on the rise and, therefore, new antimicrobial agents are required to prevent the onset of a postantibiotic era. In this study, we develop new antimicrobial compounds in the form of single-chain polymeric nanoparticles (SCPNs) that exhibit excellent antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative bacteria (e.g., Pseudomonas aeruginosa) at micromolar concentrations (e.g., 1.4 μM) and remarkably kill ≥99.99% of both planktonic cells and biofilm within an hour. Linear random copolymers, which comprise oligoethylene glycol (OEG), hydrophobic, and amine groups, undergo self-folding in aqueous systems due to intramolecular hydrophobic interactions to yield these SCPNs. By systematically varying the hydrophobicity of the polymer, we can tune the extent of cell membrane wall disruption, which in turn governs the antimicrobial activity and rate of resistance acquisition in bacteria. We also show that the incorporation of OEG groups into the polymer design is essential in preventing complexation with proteins in biological medium, thereby maintaining the antimicrobial efficacy of the compound even in in vivo mimicking conditions. In comparison to the last-resort antibiotic colistin, our lead agents have a higher therapeutic index (by ca. 2-3 times) and hence better biocompatibility. We believe that the SCPNs developed here have potential for clinical applications and the information pertaining to their structure-activity relationship will be valuable toward the general design of synthetic antimicrobial (macro)molecules.

  16. The Interaction of Bacteria with Engineered Nanostructured Polymeric Materials: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Armentano, Ilaria; Arciola, Carla Renata; Fortunati, Elena; Ferrari, Davide; Mattioli, Samantha; Amoroso, Concetta Floriana; Rizzo, Jessica; Kenny, Jose M.; Imbriani, Marcello; Visai, Livia

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of great advances in biomaterials research and development, a significant proportion of medical devices undergo bacterial colonization and become the target of an implant-related infection. We present a review of the two major classes of antibacterial nanostructured materials: polymeric nanocomposites and surface-engineered materials. The paper describes antibacterial effects due to the induced material properties, along with the principles of bacterial adhesion and the biofilm formation process. Methods for antimicrobial modifications of polymers using a nanocomposite approach as well as surface modification procedures are surveyed and discussed, followed by a concise examination of techniques used in estimating bacteria/material interactions. Finally, we present an outline of future sceneries and perspectives on antibacterial applications of nanostructured materials to resist or counteract implant infections. PMID:25025086

  17. Stuttering Min oscillations within E. coli bacteria: a stochastic polymerization model.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, Supratim; Derr, Julien; Sain, Anirban; Rutenberg, Andrew D

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a 3D off-lattice stochastic polymerization model to study the subcellular oscillation of Min proteins in the bacteria Escherichia coli, and used it to investigate the experimental phenomenon of Min oscillation stuttering. Stuttering was affected by the rate of immediate rebinding of MinE released from depolymerizing filament tips (processivity), protection of depolymerizing filament tips from MinD binding and fragmentation of MinD filaments due to MinE. Processivity, protection and fragmentation each reduce stuttering, speed oscillations and MinD filament lengths. Neither processivity nor tip protection were, on their own, sufficient to produce fast stutter-free oscillations. While filament fragmentation could, on its own, lead to fast oscillations with infrequent stuttering; high levels of fragmentation degraded oscillations. The infrequent stuttering observed in standard Min oscillations is consistent with short filaments of MinD, while we expect that mutants that exhibit higher stuttering frequencies will exhibit longer MinD filaments. Increased stuttering rate may be a useful diagnostic to find observable MinD polymerization under experimental conditions.

  18. Stuttering Min oscillations within E. coli bacteria: a stochastic polymerization model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Supratim; Derr, Julien; Sain, Anirban; Rutenberg, Andrew D.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a 3D off-lattice stochastic polymerization model to study the subcellular oscillation of Min proteins in the bacteria Escherichia coli, and used it to investigate the experimental phenomenon of Min oscillation stuttering. Stuttering was affected by the rate of immediate rebinding of MinE released from depolymerizing filament tips (processivity), protection of depolymerizing filament tips from MinD binding and fragmentation of MinD filaments due to MinE. Processivity, protection and fragmentation each reduce stuttering, speed oscillations and MinD filament lengths. Neither processivity nor tip protection were, on their own, sufficient to produce fast stutter-free oscillations. While filament fragmentation could, on its own, lead to fast oscillations with infrequent stuttering; high levels of fragmentation degraded oscillations. The infrequent stuttering observed in standard Min oscillations is consistent with short filaments of MinD, while we expect that mutants that exhibit higher stuttering frequencies will exhibit longer MinD filaments. Increased stuttering rate may be a useful diagnostic to find observable MinD polymerization under experimental conditions.

  19. Calcium carbonate mineralization: involvement of extracellular polymeric materials isolated from calcifying bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ercole, Claudia; Bozzelli, Paola; Altieri, Fabio; Cacchio, Paola; Del Gallo, Maddalena

    2012-08-01

    This study highlights the role of specific outer bacterial structures, such as the glycocalix, in calcium carbonate crystallization in vitro. We describe the formation of calcite crystals by extracellular polymeric materials, such as exopolysaccharides (EPS) and capsular polysaccharides (CPS) isolated from Bacillus firmus and Nocardia calcarea. Organic matrices were isolated from calcifying bacteria grown on synthetic medium--in the presence or absence of calcium ions--and their effect on calcite precipitation was assessed. Scanning electron microscopy observations and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry analysis showed that CPS and EPS fractions were involved in calcium carbonate precipitation, not only serving as nucleation sites but also through a direct role in crystal formation. The utilization of different synthetic media, with and without addition of calcium ions, influenced the biofilm production and protein profile of extracellular polymeric materials. Proteins of CPS fractions with a molecular mass between 25 and 70 kDa were overexpressed when calcium ions were present in the medium. This higher level of protein synthesis could be related to the active process of bioprecipitation.

  20. Component analysis and heavy metal adsorption ability of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from sulfate reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yue, Zheng-Bo; Li, Qing; Li, Chuan-chuan; Chen, Tian-hu; Wang, Jin

    2015-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) play an important role in the treatment of acid mine drainage (AMD) by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). In this paper, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans was used as the test strain to explore the effect of heavy metals on the components and adsorption ability of EPS. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analysis results showed that heavy metals did not influence the type of functional groups of EPS. Potentiometric titration results indicated that the acidic constants (pKa) of the EPS fell into three ranges of 3.5-4.0, 5.9-6.7, and 8.9-9.8. The adsorption site concentrations of the surface functional groups also increased. Adsorption results suggested that EPS had a specific binding affinity for the dosed heavy metal, and that EPS extracted from the Zn(2+)-dosed system had a higher binding affinity for all heavy metals. Additionally, Zn(2+) decreased the inhibitory effects of Cd(2+) and Cu(2+) on the SRB.

  1. Caspase-11 promotes the fusion of phagosomes harboring pathogenic bacteria with lysosomes by modulating actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Anwari; Caution, Kyle; Abu Khweek, Arwa; Tazi, Mia; Abdulrahman, Basant A; Abdelaziz, Dalia H A; Voss, Oliver H; Doseff, Andrea I; Hassan, Hoda; Azad, Abul K; Schlesinger, Larry S; Wewers, Mark D; Gavrilin, Mikhail A; Amer, Amal O

    2012-07-27

    Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that include members of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat containing) family and caspase-1. Once bacterial molecules are sensed within the macrophage, the inflammasome is assembled, mediating the activation of caspase-1. Caspase-11 mediates caspase-1 activation in response to lipopolysaccharide and bacterial toxins, and yet its role during bacterial infection is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that caspase-11 was dispensable for caspase-1 activation in response to Legionella, Salmonella, Francisella, and Listeria. We also determined that active mouse caspase-11 was required for restriction of L. pneumophila infection. Similarly, human caspase-4 and caspase-5, homologs of mouse caspase-11, cooperated to restrict L. pneumophila infection in human macrophages. Caspase-11 promoted the fusion of the L. pneumophila vacuole with lysosomes by modulating actin polymerization through cofilin. However, caspase-11 was dispensable for the fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes containing nonpathogenic bacteria, uncovering a fundamental difference in the trafficking of phagosomes according to their cargo.

  2. Caspase-11 promotes the fusion of phagosomes harboring pathogenic bacteria with lysosomes by modulating actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Akhter, Anwari; Caution, Kyle; Khweek, Arwa Abu; Tazi, Mia; Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Abdelaziz, Dalia H.A.; Voss, Oliver H.; Doseff, Andrea I.; Hassan, Hoda; Azad, Abul K.; Schlesinger, Larry S.; Wewers, Mark D.; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Amer, Amal O.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that include members of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat containing) family and caspase-1. Once bacterial molecules are sensed within the macrophage, the inflammasome is assembled mediating the activation of caspase-1. Caspase-11 mediates caspase-1 activation in response to lipopolysaccharide and bacterial toxins. Yet, its role during bacterial infection is unknown. Here, we demonstrated that caspase-11 was dispensable for caspase-1 activation in response to Legionella, Salmonella, Francisella and Listeria. We also determined that active mouse caspase-11 was required for restriction of L. pneumophila infection. Similarly, human caspase-4 and 5, homologs of mouse caspase-11, cooperated to restrict L. pneumophila infection in human macrophages. Caspase-11 promoted the fusion of the L. pneumophila- vacuole with lysosomes by modulating actin polymerization through cofilin. However, caspase-11 was dispensable for the fusion of lysosomes with phagosomes containing non-pathogenic bacteria, uncovering a fundamental difference in the trafficking of phagosomes according to their cargo. PMID:22658523

  3. Gene regulation by phosphate in enteric bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wanner, B L

    1993-01-01

    The Escherichia coli phosphate (PHO) regulon includes 31 (or more) genes arranged in eight separate operons. All are coregulated by environmental (extra-cellular) phosphate and are probably involved in phosphorus assimilation. Pi control of these genes requires the sensor PhoR, the response regulator PhoB, the binding protein-dependent Pi-specific transporter Pst, and the accessory protein PhoU. During Pi limitation, PhoR turns on genes of the PHO regulon by phosphorylating PhoB that in turn activates transcription by binding to promoters that share an 18-base consensus PHO Box. When Pi is in excess, PhoR, Pst, and PhoU together turn off the PHO regulon, presumably by dephosphorylating PhoB. In addition, two Pi-independent controls that may be forms of cross regulation turn on the PHO regulon in the absence of PhoR. The sensor CreC, formerly called PhoM, phosphorylates PhoB in response to some (unknown) catabolite, while acetyl phosphate may directly phosphorylate PhoB. Cross regulation of the PHO regulon by CreC and acetyl phosphate may be examples of underlying control mechanisms important for the general (global) control of cell growth and metabolism.

  4. Actin Polymerization: An Event Regulated by Tyrosine Phosphorylation During Buffalo Sperm Capacitation.

    PubMed

    Naresh, S; Atreja, S K

    2015-12-01

    In the female reproductive tract, the spermatozoa undergo a series of physiological and biochemical changes, prior to gaining the ability to fertilize, that result to capacitation. However, the actin polymerization and protein tyrosine phosphorylation are the two necessary steps for capacitation. In this study, we have demonstrated the actin polymerization and established the correlation between protein tyrosine phosphorylation and actin reorganization during in vitro capacitation in buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) spermatozoa. Indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot techniques were used to detect actin polymerization and tyrosine phosphorylation. The time-dependent fluorimetric studies revealed that the actin polymerization starts from the tail region and progressed towards the head region of spermatozoa during capacitation. The lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC)-induced acrosome reaction (AR) stimulated quick actin depolymerization. The inhibitor cytochalasin D (CD) blocked the in vitro capacitation by inhibiting the actin polymerization. In addition, we also performed different inhibitor (Genistein, H-89, PD9809 and GF-109) and enhancer (dbcAMP, H(2)O(2) and vanadate) studies on actin tyrosine phosphorylation and actin polymerization. The inhibitors of tyrosine phosphorylation inhibit actin tyrosine phosphorylation and polymerization, whereas enhancers of tyrosine phosphorylation stimulate F-actin formation and tyrosine phosphorylation. These observations suggest that the tyrosine phosphorylation regulates the actin polymerization, and both are coupled processes during capacitation of buffalo spermatozoa.

  5. Photodynamic inactivation of bacteria using novel electrogenerated porphyrin-fullerene C60 polymeric films.

    PubMed

    Ballatore, M Belén; Durantini, Javier; Gsponer, Natalia S; Suarez, María B; Gervaldo, Miguel; Otero, Luis; Spesia, Mariana B; Milanesio, M Elisa; Durantini, Edgardo N

    2015-06-16

    A porphyrin-fullerene C60 dyad (TCP-C60) substituted by carbazoyl groups was used to obtain electrogenerated polymeric films on optically transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes. This approach produced stable and reproducible polymers, holding fullerene units. The properties of this film were compared with those formed by layers of TCP/TCP-C60 and TCP/ZnTCP. Absorption spectra of the films presented the Soret and Q bands of the corresponding porphyrins. The TCP-C60 film produced a high photodecomposition of 2,2-(anthracene-9,10-diyl)bis(methylmalonate), which was used to detect singlet molecular oxygen O2((1)Δg) production in water. In addition, the TCP-C60 film induced the reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium to diformazan in the presence of NADH, indicating the formation of superoxide anion radical. Moreover, photooxidation of L-tryptophan mediated by TCP-C60 films was found in water. In biological media, photoinactivation of Staphylococcus aureus was evaluated depositing a drop with 2.5 × 10(3) cells on the films. After 30 min irradiation, no colony formation was detected using TCP-C60 or TCP/TCP-C60 films. Furthermore, photocytotoxic activity was observed in cell suspensions of S. aureus and Escherichia coli. The irradiated TCP-C60 film produced a 4 log decrease of S. aureus survival after 30 min. Also, a 4 log reduction of E. coli viability was obtained using the TCP-C60 film after 60 min irradiation. Therefore, the TCP-C60 film is an interesting and versatile photodynamic active surface to eradicate bacteria.

  6. Regulation of the histidine utilization (hut) system in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bender, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    The ability to degrade the amino acid histidine to ammonia, glutamate, and a one-carbon compound (formate or formamide) is a property that is widely distributed among bacteria. The four or five enzymatic steps of the pathway are highly conserved, and the chemistry of the reactions displays several unusual features, including the rearrangement of a portion of the histidase polypeptide chain to yield an unusual imidazole structure at the active site and the use of a tightly bound NAD molecule as an electrophile rather than a redox-active element in urocanase. Given the importance of this amino acid, it is not surprising that the degradation of histidine is tightly regulated. The study of that regulation led to three central paradigms in bacterial regulation: catabolite repression by glucose and other carbon sources, nitrogen regulation and two-component regulators in general, and autoregulation of bacterial regulators. This review focuses on three groups of organisms for which studies are most complete: the enteric bacteria, for which the regulation is best understood; the pseudomonads, for which the chemistry is best characterized; and Bacillus subtilis, for which the regulatory mechanisms are very different from those of the Gram-negative bacteria. The Hut pathway is fundamentally a catabolic pathway that allows cells to use histidine as a source of carbon, energy, and nitrogen, but other roles for the pathway are also considered briefly here.

  7. Fibronectin matrix polymerization regulates smooth muscle cell phenotype through a Rac1 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Long, Xiaochun; Hendershot, Allison; Miano, Joseph M; Sottile, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are maintained in a differentiated state in the vessel wall, but can be modulated to a synthetic phenotype following injury. Smooth muscle phenotypic modulation is thought to play an important role in the pathology of vascular occlusive diseases. Phenotypically modulated smooth muscle cells exhibit increased proliferative and migratory properties that accompany the downregulation of smooth muscle cell marker proteins. Extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, can regulate the smooth muscle phenotype when used as adhesive substrates. However, cells produce and organize a 3-dimensional fibrillar extracellular matrix, which can affect cell behavior in distinct ways from the protomeric 2-dimensional matrix proteins that are used as adhesive substrates. We previously showed that the deposition/polymerization of fibronectin into the extracellular matrix can regulate the deposition and organization of other extracellular matrix molecules in vitro. Further, our published data show that the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor results in increased expression of smooth muscle cell differentiation proteins and inhibits vascular remodeling in vivo. In this manuscript, we used an in vitro cell culture system to determine the mechanism by which fibronectin polymerization affects smooth muscle phenotypic modulation. Our data show that fibronectin polymerization decreases the mRNA levels of multiple smooth muscle differentiation genes, and downregulates the levels of smooth muscle α-actin and calponin proteins by a Rac1-dependent mechanism. The expression of smooth muscle genes is transcriptionally regulated by fibronectin polymerization, as evidenced by the increased activity of luciferase reporter constructs in the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor. Fibronectin polymerization also promotes smooth muscle cell growth, and decreases the levels of actin stress fibers. These data define a Rac1-dependent pathway wherein

  8. Regulation of glycogen metabolism in yeast and bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Wayne A.; Roach, Peter J.; Montero, Manuel; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Muñoz, Francisco José; Eydallin, Gustavo; Viale, Alejandro M.; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms have the capacity to utilize a variety of nutrients and adapt to continuously changing environmental conditions. Many microorganisms, including yeast and bacteria, accumulate carbon and energy reserves to cope with starvation conditions temporarily present in the environment. Glycogen biosynthesis is a main strategy for such metabolic storage and a variety of sensing and signaling mechanisms have evolved in evolutionarily distant species to guarantee the production of this homopolysaccharide. At the most fundamental level, the processes of glycogen synthesis and degradation in yeast and bacteria share certain broad similarities. However, the regulation of these processes is sometimes quite distinct, indicating that they have evolved separately to respond optimally to the habitat conditions of each species. This review aims to highlight the mechanisms, both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels, which regulate glycogen metabolism in yeast and bacteria, focusing on selected areas where the greatest increase in knowledge has occurred during the last few years. In the yeast system, we focus particularly on the various signaling pathways that control the activity of the enzymes of glycogen storage. We also discuss our recent understanding of the important role played by the vacuole in glycogen metabolism. In the case of bacterial glycogen, especial emphasis is given to aspects related with genetic regulation of glycogen metabolism and its connection with other biological processes. PMID:20412306

  9. Oxygen regulated gene expression in facultatively anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Unden, G; Becker, S; Bongaerts, J; Schirawski, J; Six, S

    1994-01-01

    In facultatively anaerobic bacteria such as Escherichia coli, oxygen and other electron acceptors fundamentally influence catabolic and anabolic pathways. E. coli is able to grow aerobically by respiration and in the absence of O2 by anaerobic respiration with nitrate, nitrite, fumarate, dimethylsulfoxide and trimethylamine N-oxide as acceptors or by fermentation. The expression of the various catabolic pathways occurs according to a hierarchy with 3 or 4 levels. Aerobic respiration at the highest level is followed by nitrate respiration (level 2), anaerobic respiration with the other acceptors (level 3) and fermentation. In other bacteria, different regulatory cascades with other underlying principles can be observed. Regulation of anabolism in response to O2 availability is important, too. It is caused by different requirements of cofactors or coenzymes in aerobic and anaerobic metabolism and by the requirement for different O2-independent biosynthetic routes under anoxia. The regulation mainly occurs at the transcriptional level. In E. coli, 4 global regulatory systems are known to be essential for the aerobic/anaerobic switch and the described hierarchy. A two-component sensor/regulator system comprising ArcB (sensor) and ArcA (transcriptional regulator) is responsible for regulation of aerobic metabolism. The FNR protein is a transcriptional sensor-regulator protein which regulates anaerobic respiratory genes in response to O2 availability. The gene activator FhlA regulates fermentative formate and hydrogen metabolism with formate as the inductor. ArcA/B and FNR directly respond to O2, FhlA indirectly by decreased levels of formate in the presence of O2. Regulation of nitrate/nitrite catabolism is effected by two 2-component sensor/regulator systems NarX(Q)/NarL(P) in response to nitrate/nitrite. Co-operation of the different regulatory systems at the target promoters which are in part under dual (or manifold) transcriptional control causes the expression

  10. Regulation of Apoptosis by Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ulett, Glen C.; Adderson, Elisabeth E.

    2008-01-01

    Apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), is an important physiological mechanism, through which the human immune system regulates homeostasis and responds to diverse forms of cellular damage. PCD may also be involved in immune counteraction to microbial infection. Over the past decade, the amount of research on bacteria-induced PCD has grown tremendously, and the implications of this mechanism on immunity are being elucidated. Some pathogenic bacteria actively trigger the suicide response in critical lineages of leukocytes that orchestrate both the innate and adaptive immune responses; other bacteria proactively prevent PCD to benefit their own survival and persistence. Currently, the microbial virulence factors, which represent the keys to unlocking the suicide response in host cells, are a primary focus of this field. In this review, we discuss these bacterial “apoptosis regulatory molecules” and the apoptotic events they either trigger or prevent, the host target cells of this regulatory activity, and the possible ramifications for immunity to infection. Gram-positive pathogens including Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Bacillus, Listeria, and Clostridia species are discussed as important agents of human infection that modulate PCD pathways in eukaryotic cells. PMID:19081777

  11. The Role of the Cytoskeleton in the Life Cycle of Viruses and Intracellular Bacteria: Tracks, Motors, and Polymerization Machines

    PubMed Central

    Bearer, E.L.; Satpute-Krishnan, P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in microbiology implicate the cytoskeleton in the life cycle of some pathogens, such as intracellular bacteria, Rickettsia and viruses. The cellular cytoskeleton provides the basis for intracellular movements such as those that transport the pathogen to and from the cell surface to the nuclear region, or those that produce cortical protrusions that project the pathogen outwards from the cell surface towards an adjacent cell. Transport in both directions within the neuron is required for pathogens such as the herpesviruses to travel to and from the nucleus and perinuclear region where replication takes place. This trafficking is likely to depend on cellular motors moving on a combination of microtubule and actin filament tracks. Recently, Bearer et al. reconstituted retrograde transport of herpes simplex virus (HSV) in the giant axon of the squid. These studies identified the tegument proteins as the viral proteins most likely to recruit retrograde motors for the transport of HSV to the neuronal nucleus. Similar microtubule-based intracellular movements are part of the biological behavior of vaccinia, a poxvirus, and of adenovirus. Pathogen-induced surface projections and motility within the cortical cytoplasm also play a role in the life cycle of intracellular pathogens. Such motility is driven by pathogen-mediated actin polymerization. Virulence depends on this actin-based motility, since virulence is reduced in Listeria ActA mutants that lack the ability to recruit Arp2/3 and polymerize actin and in vaccinia virus mutants that cannot stimulate actin polymerization. Inhibition of intracellular movements provides a potential strategy to limit pathogenicity. The host cell motors and tracks, as well as the pathogen factors that interact with them, are potential targets for novel antimicrobial therapy. PMID:12462128

  12. Protein phosphorylation and regulation of adaptive responses in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stock, J B; Ninfa, A J; Stock, A M

    1989-01-01

    Bacteria continuously adapt to changes in their environment. Responses are largely controlled by signal transduction systems that contain two central enzymatic components, a protein kinase that uses adenosine triphosphate to phosphorylate itself at a histidine residue and a response regulator that accepts phosphoryl groups from the kinase. This conserved phosphotransfer chemistry is found in a wide range of bacterial species and operates in diverse systems to provide different regulatory outputs. The histidine kinases are frequently membrane receptor proteins that respond to environmental signals and phosphorylate response regulators that control transcription. Four specific regulatory systems are discussed in detail: chemotaxis in response to attractant and repellent stimuli (Che), regulation of gene expression in response to nitrogen deprivation (Ntr), control of the expression of enzymes and transport systems that assimilate phosphorus (Pho), and regulation of outer membrane porin expression in response to osmolarity and other culture conditions (Omp). Several additional systems are also examined, including systems that control complex developmental processes such as sporulation and fruiting-body formation, systems required for virulent infections of plant or animal host tissues, and systems that regulate transport and metabolism. Finally, an attempt is made to understand how cross-talk between parallel phosphotransfer pathways can provide a global regulatory curcuitry. PMID:2556636

  13. Redox regulation by reversible protein S-thiolation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Loi, Vu Van; Rossius, Martina; Antelmann, Haike

    2015-01-01

    Low molecular weight (LMW) thiols function as thiol-redox buffers to maintain the reduced state of the cytoplasm. The best studied LMW thiol is the tripeptide glutathione (GSH) present in all eukaryotes and Gram-negative bacteria. Firmicutes bacteria, including Bacillus and Staphylococcus species utilize the redox buffer bacillithiol (BSH) while Actinomycetes produce the related redox buffer mycothiol (MSH). In eukaryotes, proteins are post-translationally modified to S-glutathionylated proteins under conditions of oxidative stress. S-glutathionylation has emerged as major redox-regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes and protects active site cysteine residues against overoxidation to sulfonic acids. First studies identified S-glutathionylated proteins also in Gram-negative bacteria. Advances in mass spectrometry have further facilitated the identification of protein S-bacillithiolations and S-mycothiolation as BSH- and MSH-mixed protein disulfides formed under oxidative stress in Firmicutes and Actinomycetes, respectively. In Bacillus subtilis, protein S-bacillithiolation controls the activities of the redox-sensing OhrR repressor and the methionine synthase MetE in vivo. In Corynebacterium glutamicum, protein S-mycothiolation was more widespread and affected the functions of the maltodextrin phosphorylase MalP and thiol peroxidase (Tpx). In addition, novel bacilliredoxins (Brx) and mycoredoxins (Mrx1) were shown to function similar to glutaredoxins in the reduction of BSH- and MSH-mixed protein disulfides. Here we review the current knowledge about the functions of the bacterial thiol-redox buffers glutathione, bacillithiol, and mycothiol and the role of protein S-thiolation in redox regulation and thiol protection in model and pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25852656

  14. Profilin Regulates Apical Actin Polymerization to Control Polarized Pollen Tube Growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaonan; Qu, Xiaolu; Jiang, Yuxiang; Chang, Ming; Zhang, Ruihui; Wu, Youjun; Fu, Ying; Huang, Shanjin

    2015-12-07

    Pollen tube growth is an essential step during flowering plant reproduction, whose growth depends on a population of dynamic apical actin filaments. Apical actin filaments were thought to be involved in the regulation of vesicle fusion and targeting in the pollen tube. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the construction of apical actin structures in the pollen tube remain largely unclear. Here, we identify profilin as an important player in the regulation of actin polymerization at the apical membrane in the pollen tube. Downregulation of profilin decreased the amount of filamentous actin and induced disorganization of apical actin filaments, and reduced tip-directed vesicle transport and accumulation in the pollen tube. Direct visualization of actin dynamics revealed that the elongation of actin filaments originating at the apical membrane decreased in profilin mutant pollen tubes. Mutant profilin that is defective in binding poly-L-proline only partially rescues the actin polymerization defect in profilin mutant pollen tubes, although it fully rescues the actin turnover phenotype. We propose that profilin controls the construction of actin structures at the pollen tube tip, presumably by favoring formin-mediated actin polymerization at the apical membrane.

  15. Sequence-regulated copolymers via tandem catalysis of living radical polymerization and in situ transesterification.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Yusuke; Koda, Yuta; Terashima, Takaya; Sawamoto, Mitsuo

    2012-03-07

    Sequence regulation of monomers is undoubtedly a challenging issue as an ultimate goal in polymer science. To efficiently produce sequence-controlled copolymers, we herein developed the versatile tandem catalysis, which concurrently and/or sequentially involved ruthenium-catalyzed living radical polymerization and in situ transesterification of methacrylates (monomers: RMA) with metal alkoxides (catalysts) and alcohols (ROH). Typically, gradient copolymers were directly obtained from the synchronization of the two reactions: the instantaneous monomer composition in feed gradually changed via the transesterification of R(1)MA into R(2)MA in the presence of R(2)OH during living polymerization to give R(1)MA/R(2)MA gradient copolymers. The gradient sequence of monomers along a chain was catalytically controlled by the reaction conditions such as temperature, concentration and/or species of catalysts, alcohols, and monomers. The sequence regulation of multimonomer units was also successfully achieved in one-pot by monomer-selective transesterification in concurrent tandem catalysis and iterative tandem catalysis, providing random-gradient copolymers and gradient-block counterparts, respectively. In contrast, sequential tandem catalysis via the variable initiation of either polymerization or in situ transesterification led to random or block copolymers. Due to the versatile adaptability of common and commercially available reagents (monomers, alcohols, catalysts), this tandem catalysis is one of the most efficient, convenient, and powerful tools to design tailor-made sequence-regulated copolymers.

  16. Bacteria-repulsive polyglycerol surfaces by grafting polymerization onto aminopropylated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Weber, Theresa; Gies, Yasmin; Terfort, Andreas

    2012-11-13

    The formation of hydrogels on surfaces is a frequently used strategy to render these surfaces biorepulsive. Hyperbranched polyglycerol layers are a promising alternative to the frequently used polyethyleneglycol layers. Here, we present a strategy to covalently graft polyglycerol layers onto surfaces by first depositing an aminopropylsiloxane layer, which then acts as initiator layer for the ring-opening polymerization of 2-(hydroxymethyl)oxirane (glycidol). For silicon surfaces, the resulting polyglycerol layers start being biorepulsive for E. coli at a thickness of 2 nm and reach their highest bacterial repulsion (98%) at thicknesses of 7 nm or larger. This deposition strategy promises general applicability because the formation of aminopropylsiloxane layers has already been described for many materials.

  17. Regulation of surface architecture by symbiotic bacteria mediates host colonization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cui Hua; Lee, S Melanie; Vanlare, Jordan M; Kasper, Dennis L; Mazmanian, Sarkis K

    2008-03-11

    Microbes occupy countless ecological niches in nature. Sometimes these environments may be on or within another organism, as is the case in both microbial infections and symbiosis of mammals. Unlike pathogens that establish opportunistic infections, hundreds of human commensal bacterial species establish a lifelong cohabitation with their hosts. Although many virulence factors of infectious bacteria have been described, the molecular mechanisms used during beneficial host-symbiont colonization remain almost entirely unknown. The novel identification of multiple surface polysaccharides in the important human symbiont Bacteroides fragilis raised the critical question of how these molecules contribute to commensalism. To understand the function of the bacterial capsule during symbiotic colonization of mammals, we generated B. fragilis strains deleted in the global regulator of polysaccharide expression and isolated mutants with defects in capsule expression. Surprisingly, attempts to completely eliminate capsule production are not tolerated by the microorganism, which displays growth deficits and subsequent reversion to express capsular polysaccharides. We identify an alternative pathway by which B. fragilis is able to reestablish capsule production and modulate expression of surface structures. Most importantly, mutants expressing single, defined surface polysaccharides are defective for intestinal colonization compared with bacteria expressing a complete polysaccharide repertoire. Restoring the expression of multiple capsular polysaccharides rescues the inability of mutants to compete for commensalism. These findings suggest a model whereby display of multiple capsular polysaccharides provides essential functions for bacterial colonization during host-symbiont mutualism.

  18. Airway bacteria drive a progressive COPD-like phenotype in mice with polymeric immunoglobulin receptor deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Richmond, Bradley W.; Brucker, Robert M.; Han, Wei; Du, Rui-Hong; Zhang, Yongqin; Cheng, Dong-Sheng; Gleaves, Linda; Abdolrasulnia, Rasul; Polosukhina, Dina; Clark, Peter E.; Bordenstein, Seth R.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms driving persistent airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are incompletely understood. As secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) deficiency in small airways has been reported in COPD patients, we hypothesized that immunobarrier dysfunction resulting from reduced SIgA contributes to chronic airway inflammation and disease progression. Here we show that polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-deficient (pIgR−/−) mice, which lack SIgA, spontaneously develop COPD-like pathology as they age. Progressive airway wall remodelling and emphysema in pIgR−/− mice are associated with an altered lung microbiome, bacterial invasion of the airway epithelium, NF-κB activation, leukocyte infiltration and increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-12 and neutrophil elastase. Re-derivation of pIgR−/− mice in germ-free conditions or treatment with the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor roflumilast prevents COPD-like lung inflammation and remodelling. These findings show that pIgR/SIgA deficiency in the airways leads to persistent activation of innate immune responses to resident lung microbiota, driving progressive small airway remodelling and emphysema. PMID:27046438

  19. Airway bacteria drive a progressive COPD-like phenotype in mice with polymeric immunoglobulin receptor deficiency.

    PubMed

    Richmond, Bradley W; Brucker, Robert M; Han, Wei; Du, Rui-Hong; Zhang, Yongqin; Cheng, Dong-Sheng; Gleaves, Linda; Abdolrasulnia, Rasul; Polosukhina, Dina; Clark, Peter E; Bordenstein, Seth R; Blackwell, Timothy S; Polosukhin, Vasiliy V

    2016-04-05

    Mechanisms driving persistent airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are incompletely understood. As secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) deficiency in small airways has been reported in COPD patients, we hypothesized that immunobarrier dysfunction resulting from reduced SIgA contributes to chronic airway inflammation and disease progression. Here we show that polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-deficient (pIgR(-/-)) mice, which lack SIgA, spontaneously develop COPD-like pathology as they age. Progressive airway wall remodelling and emphysema in pIgR(-/-) mice are associated with an altered lung microbiome, bacterial invasion of the airway epithelium, NF-κB activation, leukocyte infiltration and increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-12 and neutrophil elastase. Re-derivation of pIgR(-/-) mice in germ-free conditions or treatment with the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor roflumilast prevents COPD-like lung inflammation and remodelling. These findings show that pIgR/SIgA deficiency in the airways leads to persistent activation of innate immune responses to resident lung microbiota, driving progressive small airway remodelling and emphysema.

  20. Conserved-residue mutations in Wzy affect O-antigen polymerization and Wzz-mediated chain-length regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Salim T.; Huszczynski, Steven M.; Nugent, Timothy; Gold, Alexander C.; Lam, Joseph S.

    2013-12-01

    O antigen (O-Ag) in many bacteria is synthesized via the Wzx/Wzy-dependent pathway in which Wzy polymerizes lipid-linked O-Ag subunits to modal lengths regulated by Wzz. Characterization of 83 site-directed mutants of Wzy from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (WzyPa) in topologically-mapped periplasmic (PL) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) verified the functional importance of PL3 and PL5, with the former shown to require overall cationic properties. Essential Arg residues in the RX10G motifs of PL3 and PL5 were found to be conserved in putative homologues of WzyPa, as was the overall sequence homology between these two periplasmic loops in each protein. Amino acid substitutions in CL6 were found to alter Wzz-mediated O-antigen modality, with evidence suggesting that these changes may perturb the C-terminal WzyPa tertiary structure. Together, these data suggest that the catch-and-release mechanism of O-Ag polymerization is widespread among bacteria and that regulation of polymer length is affected by interaction of Wzz with Wzy.

  1. Photodynamic effects of methylene blue-loaded polymeric nanoparticles on dental plaque bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Klepac-Ceraj, Vanja; Patel, Niraj; Song, Xiaoqing; Holewa, Colleen; Patel, Chitrang; Kent, Ralph; Amiji, Mansoor M.; Soukos, Nikolaos S.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objectives Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is increasingly being explored for treatment of oral infections. Here, we investigate the effect of PDT on human dental plaque bacteria in vitro using methylene blue (MB)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic) (PLGA) nanoparticles with a positive or negative charge and red light at 665 nm. Study Design/Materials and Methods Subgingival plaque samples were obtained from 14 patients with chronic periodontitis. Suspensions of plaque microorganisms from seven patients were sensitized with anionic, cationic PLGA nanoparticles (50 μg/ml equivalent to MB) or free MB (50 μg/ml) for 20 min followed by exposure to red light for 5 min with a power density of 100 mW/cm2. Polymicrobial oral biofilms, which were developed on blood agar in 96-well plates from dental plaque inocula obtained from seven patients, were also exposed to PDT as above. Following the treatment, survival fractions were calculated by counting the number of colony-forming units. Results The cationic MB-loaded nanoparticles exhibited greater bacterial phototoxicity in both planktonic and biofilm phase compared to anionic MB-loaded nanoparticles and free MB, but results were not significantly different (p>0.05). Conclusion Cationic MB-loaded PLGA nanoparticles have the potential to be used as carriers of MB for PDT systems. PMID:22057487

  2. A traceless reversible polymeric colistin prodrug to combat multidrug-resistant (MDR) gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chongyu; Schneider, Elena K; Wang, Jiping; Kempe, Kristian; Wilson, Paul; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian; Davis, Thomas P; Whittaker, Michael R; Haddleton, David M

    2017-02-05

    Colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) is the only prodrug of colistin available for clinical use for the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria. Owing to its slow and variable release, an alternative is urgently required to improve effectiveness. Herein we describe a PEGylated colistin prodrug whereby the PEG is attached via a cleavable linker (col-aaPEG) introducing an acetic acid terminated poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether (aaPEG) onto the Thr residue of colistin. Due to the labile ester containing link, this prodrug is converted back into active colistin in vitro within 24h. Compared to CMS, it showed a similar or better antimicrobial performance against two MDR isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii through in vitro disk diffusion, broth dilution and time-kill studies. In a mouse infection model, col-aaPEG displayed acceptable bacterial killing against P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and no nephrotoxicity was found after systemic administration, suggesting it to be a potential alternative for CMS.

  3. Group B Streptococcus pilus sortase regulation: a single mutation in the lid region induces pilin protein polymerization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Roberta; Zerbini, Francesca; Assfalg, Michael; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Biagini, Massimiliano; Martinelli, Manuele; Nuccitelli, Annalisa; Norais, Nathalie; Telford, John L; Maione, Domenico; Rinaudo, C Daniela

    2013-08-01

    Gram-positive bacteria build pili on their cell surface via a class C sortase-catalyzed transpeptidation mechanism from pilin protein substrates. Despite the availability of several crystal structures, pilus-related C sortases remain poorly characterized to date, and their mechanisms of transpeptidation and regulation need to be further investigated. The available 3-dimensional structures of these enzymes reveal a typical sortase fold, except for the presence of a unique feature represented by an N-terminal highly flexible loop known as the "lid." This region interacts with the residues composing the catalytic triad and covers the active site, thus maintaining the enzyme in an autoinhibited state and preventing the accessibility to the substrate. It is believed that enzyme activation may occur only after lid displacement from the catalytic domain. In this work, we provide the first direct evidence of the regulatory role of the lid, demonstrating that it is possible to obtain in vitro an efficient polymerization of pilin subunits using an active C sortase lid mutant carrying a single residue mutation in the lid region. Moreover, biochemical analyses of this recombinant mutant reveal that the lid confers thermodynamic and proteolytic stability to the enzyme.

  4. Actin-binding Protein Drebrin Regulates HIV-1-triggered Actin Polymerization and Viral Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; Álvarez, Susana; Ursa, Ángeles; Izquierdo-Useros, Nuria; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Muñoz-Fernández, María A.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 contact with target cells triggers F-actin rearrangements that are essential for several steps of the viral cycle. Successful HIV entry into CD4+ T cells requires actin reorganization induced by the interaction of the cellular receptor/co-receptor complex CD4/CXCR4 with the viral envelope complex gp120/gp41 (Env). In this report, we analyze the role of the actin modulator drebrin in HIV-1 viral infection and cell to cell fusion. We show that drebrin associates with CXCR4 before and during HIV infection. Drebrin is actively recruited toward cell-virus and Env-driven cell to cell contacts. After viral internalization, drebrin clustering is retained in a fraction of the internalized particles. Through a combination of RNAi-based inhibition of endogenous drebrin and GFP-tagged expression of wild-type and mutant forms, we establish drebrin as a negative regulator of HIV entry and HIV-mediated cell fusion. Down-regulation of drebrin expression promotes HIV-1 entry, decreases F-actin polymerization, and enhances profilin local accumulation in response to HIV-1. These data underscore the negative role of drebrin in HIV infection by modulating viral entry, mainly through the control of actin cytoskeleton polymerization in response to HIV-1. PMID:23926103

  5. Regulating the Intersection of Metabolism and Pathogenesis in Gram-positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    RICHARDSON, ANTHONY R.; SOMERVILLE, GREG A.; SONENSHEIN, ABRAHAM L.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria must contend with immune systems that actively restrict the availability of nutrients and cofactors, and create a hostile growth environment. To deal with these hostile environments, pathogenic bacteria have evolved or acquired virulence determinants that aid in the acquisition of nutrients. This connection between pathogenesis and nutrition may explain why regulators of metabolism in nonpathogenic bacteria are used by pathogenic bacteria to regulate both metabolism and virulence. Such coordinated regulation is presumably advantageous because it conserves carbon and energy by aligning synthesis of virulence determinants with the nutritional environment. In Gram-positive bacterial pathogens, at least three metabolite-responsive global regulators, CcpA, CodY, and Rex, have been shown to coordinate the expression of metabolism and virulence genes. In this chapter, we discuss how environmental challenges alter metabolism, the regulators that respond to this altered metabolism, and how these regulators influence the host-pathogen interaction. PMID:26185086

  6. Expression of type I collagen and tenascin C is regulated by actin polymerization through MRTF in dedifferentiated chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Parreno, Justin; Raju, Sneha; Niaki, Mortah Nabavi; Andrejevic, Katarina; Jiang, Amy; Delve, Elizabeth; Kandel, Rita

    2014-10-16

    This study examined actin regulation of fibroblast matrix genes in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. We demonstrated that dedifferentiated chondrocytes exhibit increased actin polymerization, nuclear localization of myocardin related transcription factor (MRTF), increased type I collagen (col1) and tenascin C (Tnc) gene expression, and decreased Sox9 gene expression. Induction of actin depolymerization by latrunculin treatment or cell rounding, reduced MRTF nuclear localization, repressed col1 and Tnc expression, and increased Sox9 gene expression in dedifferentiated chondrocytes. Treatment of passaged chondrocytes with MRTF inhibitor repressed col1 and Tnc expression, but did not affect Sox9 expression. Our results show that actin polymerization regulates fibroblast matrix gene expression through MRTF in passaged chondrocytes.

  7. Breath Figure Micromolding Approach for Regulating the Microstructures of Polymeric Films for Triboelectric Nanogenerators.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianliang; Xu, Bingang; Tao, Xiaoming

    2017-02-08

    A triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is an innovative kind of energy harvester recently developed on the basis of organic materials for converting mechanical energy into electricity through the combined use of the triboelectric effect and electrostatic induction. Polymeric materials and their microstructures play key roles in the generation, accumulation, and retainment of triboelectric charges, which decisively determines the final electric performance of TENGs. Herein we report a simple and efficient breath figure (BF) micromolding approach to rapidly regulate the surface microstructures of polymeric films for the assembly of TENGs. Honeycomb porous films with adjustable pore size and dimensional architectures were first prepared by the BF technique through simply adjusting the concentration of the polymer solution. They were then used as negative molds for straightforward synthesis of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) films with different microlens arrays (MLAs) and lens sizes, which were further assembled for TENGs to investigate the influence of film microstructures. All MLA-based TENGs were found to have an obviously enhanced electric performance in comparison with a flat-PDMS-film-based TENG. Specifically, up to 3 times improvement in the electric performance can be achieved by the MLA-based TENG with optimal surface microstructures over flat-PDMS-film-based TENG under the same triggering conditions. A MLA-based TENG was further successfully used to harvest the waste mechanical energy generated by different human body motions, including finger tapping, hand clapping, and walking with a frequency ranging from 0.5 to 5.5 Hz.

  8. Light-dependent gene regulation in nonphototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Elías-Arnanz, Montserrat; Padmanabhan, S; Murillo, Francisco J

    2011-04-01

    Bacteria sense and respond to light, a fundamental environmental factor, by employing highly evolved machineries and mechanisms. Cellular systems exist to harness light energy usefully as in phototrophic bacteria, to combat photo-oxidative damage stemming from the highly reactive species generated on absorption of light energy, and to link the light stimulus to DNA repair, taxis, development, and virulence. Recent findings on the genetic response to light in nonphototrophic bacteria highlight the ingenious transcriptional regulatory mechanisms and the panoply of factors that have evolved to perceive and transmit the signal, and to bring about finely tuned gene expression.

  9. Regulation of actin polymerization by tropomodulin-3 controls megakaryocyte actin organization and platelet biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sui, Zhenhua; Nowak, Roberta B; Sanada, Chad; Halene, Stephanie; Krause, Diane S; Fowler, Velia M

    2015-07-23

    The actin cytoskeleton is important for platelet biogenesis. Tropomodulin-3 (Tmod3), the only Tmod isoform detected in platelets and megakaryocytes (MKs), caps actin filament (F-actin) pointed ends and binds tropomyosins (TMs), regulating actin polymerization and stability. To determine the function of Tmod3 in platelet biogenesis, we studied Tmod3(-/-) embryos, which are embryonic lethal by E18.5. Tmod3(-/-) embryos often show hemorrhaging at E14.5 with fewer and larger platelets, indicating impaired platelet biogenesis. MK numbers are moderately increased in Tmod3(-/-) fetal livers, with only a slight increase in the 8N population, suggesting that MK differentiation is not significantly affected. However, Tmod3(-/-) MKs fail to develop a normal demarcation membrane system (DMS), and cytoplasmic organelle distribution is abnormal. Moreover, cultured Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit impaired proplatelet formation with a wide range of proplatelet bud sizes, including abnormally large proplatelet buds containing incorrect numbers of von Willebrand factor-positive granules. Tmod3(-/-) MKs exhibit F-actin disturbances, and Tmod3(-/-) MKs spreading on collagen fail to polymerize F-actin into actomyosin contractile bundles. Tmod3 associates with TM4 and the F-actin cytoskeleton in wild-type MKs, and confocal microscopy reveals that Tmod3, TM4, and F-actin partially colocalize near the membrane of proplatelet buds. In contrast, the abnormally large proplatelets from Tmod3(-/-) MKs show increased F-actin and redistribution of F-actin and TM4 from the cortex to the cytoplasm, but normal microtubule coil organization. We conclude that F-actin capping by Tmod3 regulates F-actin organization in mouse fetal liver-derived MKs, thereby controlling MK cytoplasmic morphogenesis, including DMS formation and organelle distribution, as well as proplatelet formation and sizing.

  10. Tubulin polymerization disrupts cardiac β-adrenergic regulation of late INa

    PubMed Central

    Dybkova, Nataliya; Wagner, Stefan; Backs, Johannes; Hund, Thomas J.; Mohler, Peter J.; Sowa, Thomas; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Maier, Lars S.

    2014-01-01

    Aims The anticancer drug paclitaxel (TXL) that polymerizes microtubules is associated with arrhythmias and sinus node dysfunction. TXL can alter membrane expression of Na channels (NaV1.5) and Na current (INa), but the mechanisms are unknown. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) can be activated by β-adrenergic stimulation and regulates INa gating. We tested whether TXL interferes with isoproterenol (ISO)-induced activation of CaMKII and consequent INa regulation. Methods and results In wild-type mouse myocytes, the addition of ISO (1 µmol/L) resulted in increased CaMKII auto-phosphorylation (western blotting). This increase was completely abolished after pre-treatment with TXL (100 µmol/L, 1.5 h). The mechanism was further investigated in human embryonic kidney cells. TXL inhibited the ISO-induced β-arrestin translocation. Interestingly, both knockdown of β-arrestin2 expression using small interfering RNA and inhibition of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) blocked the ISO-induced CaMKII auto-phosphorylation similar to TXL. The generation of cAMP, however, was unaltered (Epac1-camps). CaMKII-dependent Na channel function was measured using patch-clamp technique in isolated cardiomyoctes. ISO stimulation failed to induce CaMKII-dependent enhancement of late INa and Na channel inactivation (negative voltage shift in steady-state activation and enhanced intermediate inactivation) after pre-incubation with TXL. Consistent with this, TXL also inhibited ISO-induced CaMKII-specific Na channel phosphorylation (at serine 571 of NaV1.5). Conclusion Pre-incubation with TXL disrupts the ISO-dependent CaMKII activation and consequent Na channel regulation. This may be important for patients receiving TXL treatments, but also relevant for conditions of increased CaMKII expression and enhanced β-adrenergic stimulation like in heart failure. PMID:24812278

  11. A WASp-VASP complex regulates actin polymerization at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Castellano, F; Le Clainche, C; Patin, D; Carlier, M F; Chavrier, P

    2001-10-15

    Proteins of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and Ena/VASP families both play essential functions in the regulation of actin dynamics at the cell leading edge. However, possibilities of functional interplay between members of these two families have not been addressed. Here we show that, in hemopoietic cells, recruitment of the C-terminal VCA (Verprolin homology, Cofilin homology, Acidic) domain of WASp at the plasma membrane by a ligand technique using rapamycin as an intermediate is not sufficient to elicit efficient Arp2/3 complex-mediated actin polymerization. Other domains of WASp, in particular the proline-rich domain, are required for the formation of actin-rich structures. An in vitro analysis demonstrates that the proline-rich domain of WASp binds VASP with an affinity of approximately 10(6) M(-1). In addition, WASp and VASP both accumulate in actin-rich phagocytic cups. Finally, in a reconstituted motility medium, VASP enhances actin-based propulsion of WASp-coated beads in a fashion reminiscent of its effect on Listeria movement. We propose that VASP and WASp cooperation is essential in stimulating actin assembly and membrane protrusion at the leading edge.

  12. Parvulin 17-catalyzed Tubulin Polymerization Is Regulated by Calmodulin in a Calcium-dependent Manner*

    PubMed Central

    Burgardt, Noelia Inés; Schmidt, Andreas; Manns, Annika; Schutkowski, Alexandra; Jahreis, Günther; Lin, Yi-Jan; Schulze, Bianca; Masch, Antonia; Lücke, Christian; Weiwad, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recently we have shown that the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase parvulin 17 (Par17) interacts with tubulin in a GTP-dependent manner, thereby promoting the formation of microtubules. Microtubule assembly is regulated by Ca2+-loaded calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM) both in the intact cell and under in vitro conditions via direct interaction with microtubule-associated proteins. Here we provide the first evidence that Ca2+/CaM interacts also with Par17 in a physiologically relevant way, thus preventing Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. In contrast, parvulin 14 (Par14), which lacks only the first 25 N-terminal residues of the Par17 sequence, does not interact with Ca2+/CaM, indicating that this interaction is exclusive for Par17. Pulldown experiments and chemical shift perturbation analysis with 15N-labeled Par17 furthermore confirmed that calmodulin (CaM) interacts in a Ca2+-dependent manner with the Par17 N terminus. The reverse experiment with 15N-labeled Ca2+/CaM demonstrated that the N-terminal Par17 segment binds to both CaM lobes simultaneously, indicating that Ca2+/CaM undergoes a conformational change to form a binding channel between its two lobes, apparently similar to the structure of the CaM-smMLCK796–815 complex. In vitro tubulin polymerization assays furthermore showed that Ca2+/CaM completely suppresses Par17-promoted microtubule assembly. The results imply that Ca2+/CaM binding to the N-terminal segment of Par17 causes steric hindrance of the Par17 active site, thus interfering with the Par17/tubulin interaction. This Ca2+/CaM-mediated control of Par17-assisted microtubule assembly may provide a mechanism that couples Ca2+ signaling with microtubule function. PMID:25940090

  13. N-acyl homoserinelactone-mediated gene regulation in gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Eberl, L

    1999-12-01

    The view of bacteria as unicellular organisms has strong roots in the tradition of culturing bacteria in liquid media. However, in nature microbial activity is mainly associated with surfaces where bacteria form highly structured and cooperative consortia which are commonly referred to as biofilms. The ability of bacteria to organize structurally and to distribute metabolic activities between the different members of the consortium demands a high degree of coordinated cell-cell interaction. Recent work has established that many bacteria employ sophisticated intercellular communication systems that rely on small signal molecules to control the expression of multiple target genes. In Gram-negative bacteria, the most intensively investigated signal molecules are N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones (AHLs), which are utilized by the bacteria to monitor their own population densities in a process known as 'quorum sensing'. These density-dependent regulatory systems rely on two proteins, an AHL synthase, usually a member of the LuxI family of proteins, and an AHL receptor protein belonging to the LuxR family of transcriptional regulators. At low population densities cells produce a basal level of AHL via the activity of an AHL synthase. As the cell density increases, AHL accumulates in the growth medium. On reaching a critical threshold concentration, the AHL molecule binds to its cognate receptor which in turn leads to the induction/repression of AHL-regulated genes. To date, AHL-dependent quorum sensing circuits have been identified in a wide range of gram-negative bacteria where they regulate various functions including bioluminescence, plasmid conjugal transfer, biofilm formation, motility, antibiotic biosynthesis, and the production of virulence factors in plant and animal pathogens. Moreover, AHL signal molecules appear to play important roles in the ecology of complex consortia as they allow bacterial populations to interact with each other as well as with their

  14. Rapid start-up of the anammox process: Effects of five different sludge extracellular polymeric substances on the activity of anammox bacteria.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianbo; Wang, Sihui; Lian, Jing; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Liu, Yunman; Song, Yuanyuan

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the rapid start-up of the anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) strategy by inoculating different biomass ratios of denitrifying granular sludge and anammox bacteria. The results demonstrated that two reactors (R1 and R2) were rapidly and successfully started-up on days 25 and 28, respectively, with nitrogen removal rates (NRRs) of 0.70kg/(m(3)·d) and 0.72kg/(m(3)·d) at biomass ratios of 10:1 (R1) and 50:1 (R2). The explanation for rapid start-up was found by examining the effect of five different sludge extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on the activity of anammox bacteria in the batch experiments. Batch experiments results first demonstrated that the denitrification sludge EPS (DS-EPS) enhanced the anammox bacteria activity the most, and NO2(-)-N, NH4(+)-N removal rates were 1.88- and 1.53-fold higher than the control with optimal DS-EPS volume of 10mL. The rapid start-up strategy makes possible the application of anammox to practical engineering.

  15. Control of magnetite nanocrystal morphology in magnetotactic bacteria by regulation of mms7 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Ayana; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Lenders, Jos J. M.; Thiesbrummel, Jarla; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.; Matsunaga, Tadashi; Arakaki, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms can produce inorganic materials with unique structure and properties. The biomineralization process is of great interest as it forms a source of inspiration for the development of methods for production of diverse inorganic materials under mild conditions. Nonetheless, regulation of biomineralization is still a challenging task. Magnetotactic bacteria produce chains of a prokaryotic organelle comprising a membrane-enveloped single-crystal magnetite with species-specific morphology. Here, we describe regulation of magnetite biomineralization through controlled expression of the mms7 gene, which plays key roles in the control of crystal growth and morphology of magnetite crystals in magnetotactic bacteria. Regulation of the expression level of Mms7 in bacterial cells enables switching of the crystal shape from dumbbell-like to spherical. The successful regulation of magnetite biomineralization opens the door to production of magnetite nanocrystals of desired size and morphology. PMID:27417732

  16. Ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) links the regulation of oxygenic photosynthesis to deeply rooted bacteria.

    PubMed

    Balsera, Monica; Uberegui, Estefania; Susanti, Dwi; Schmitz, Ruth A; Mukhopadhyay, Biswarup; Schürmann, Peter; Buchanan, Bob B

    2013-02-01

    Uncovered in studies on photosynthesis 35 years ago, redox regulation has been extended to all types of living cells. We understand a great deal about the occurrence, function, and mechanism of action of this mode of regulation, but we know little about its origin and its evolution. To help fill this gap, we have taken advantage of available genome sequences that make it possible to trace the phylogenetic roots of members of the system that was originally described for chloroplasts-ferredoxin, ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR), and thioredoxin as well as target enzymes. The results suggest that: (1) the catalytic subunit, FTRc, originated in deeply rooted microaerophilic, chemoautotrophic bacteria where it appears to function in regulating CO(2) fixation by the reverse citric acid cycle; (2) FTRc was incorporated into oxygenic photosynthetic organisms without significant structural change except for addition of a variable subunit (FTRv) seemingly to protect the Fe-S cluster against oxygen; (3) new Trxs and target enzymes were systematically added as evolution proceeded from bacteria through the different types of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms; (4) an oxygenic type of regulation preceded classical light-dark regulation in the regulation of enzymes of CO(2) fixation by the Calvin-Benson cycle; (5) FTR is not universally present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, and in certain early representatives is seemingly functionally replaced by NADP-thioredoxin reductase; and (6) FTRc underwent structural diversification to meet the ecological needs of a variety of bacteria and archaea.

  17. Light-Regulated Polymerization under Near-Infrared/Far-Red Irradiation Catalyzed by Bacteriochlorophyll a.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Sivaprakash; Xu, Jiangtao; Boyer, Cyrille

    2016-01-18

    Photoregulated polymerizations are typically conducted using high-energy (UV and blue) light, which may lead to undesired side reactions. Furthermore, as the penetration of visible light is rather limited, the range of applications with such wavelengths is likewise limited. We herein report the first living radical polymerization that can be activated and deactivated by irradiation with near-infrared (NIR) and far-red light. Bacteriochlorophyll a (Bachl a) was employed as a photoredox catalyst for photoinduced electron transfer/reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (PET-RAFT) polymerization. Well-defined polymers were thus synthesized within a few hours under NIR (λ=850 nm) and far-red (λ=780 nm) irradiation with excellent control over the molecular weight (M(n)/M(w)<1.25). Taking advantage of the good penetration of NIR light, we showed that the polymerization also proceeded smoothly when a translucent barrier was placed between light source and reaction vessel.

  18. Polarized Exocytosis Induces Compensatory Endocytosis by Sec4p-Regulated Cortical Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Jesper; Alfaro, Gabriel; Beh, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized growth is maintained by both polarized exocytosis, which transports membrane components to specific locations on the cell cortex, and endocytosis, which retrieves these components before they can diffuse away. Despite functional links between these two transport pathways, they are generally considered to be separate events. Using live cell imaging, in vivo and in vitro protein binding assays, and in vitro pyrene-actin polymerization assays, we show that the yeast Rab GTPase Sec4p couples polarized exocytosis with cortical actin polymerization, which induces endocytosis. After polarized exocytosis to the plasma membrane, Sec4p binds Las17/Bee1p (yeast Wiskott—Aldrich Syndrome protein [WASp]) in a complex with Sla1p and Sla2p during actin patch assembly. Mutations that inactivate Sec4p, or its guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Sec2p, inhibit actin patch formation, whereas the activating sec4-Q79L mutation accelerates patch assembly. In vitro assays of Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization established that GTPγS-Sec4p overrides Sla1p inhibition of Las17p-dependent actin nucleation. These results support a model in which Sec4p relocates along the plasma membrane from polarized sites of exocytic vesicle fusion to nascent sites of endocytosis. Activated Sec4p then promotes actin polymerization and triggers compensatory endocytosis, which controls surface expansion and kinetically refines cell polarization. PMID:27526190

  19. Bicc1 Polymerization Regulates the Localization and Silencing of Bound mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Rothé, Benjamin; Leal-Esteban, Lucia; Bernet, Florian; Urfer, Séverine; Doerr, Nicholas; Weimbs, Thomas; Iwaszkiewicz, Justyna

    2015-01-01

    Loss of the RNA-binding protein Bicaudal-C (Bicc1) provokes renal and pancreatic cysts as well as ectopic Wnt/β-catenin signaling during visceral left-right patterning. Renal cysts are linked to defective silencing of Bicc1 target mRNAs, including adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6). RNA binding of Bicc1 is mediated by N-terminal KH domains, whereas a C-terminal sterile alpha motif (SAM) self-polymerizes in vitro and localizes Bicc1 in cytoplasmic foci in vivo. To assess a role for multimerization in silencing, we conducted structure modeling and then mutated the SAM domain residues which in this model were predicted to polymerize Bicc1 in a left-handed helix. We show that a SAM-SAM interface concentrates Bicc1 in cytoplasmic clusters to specifically localize and silence bound mRNA. In addition, defective polymerization decreases Bicc1 stability and thus indirectly attenuates inhibition of Dishevelled 2 in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Importantly, aberrant C-terminal extension of the SAM domain in bpk mutant Bicc1 phenocopied these defects. We conclude that polymerization is a novel disease-relevant mechanism both to stabilize Bicc1 and to present associated mRNAs in specific silencing platforms. PMID:26217012

  20. Effects of Extracellular Polymeric Substance Composition on Bacteria Disinfection by Monochloramine: Application of MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS and Multivariate Analysis.

    PubMed

    Coburn, Kimberly M; Wang, Qinzhe; Rediske, Dustin; Viola, Ronald E; Hanson, B Leif; Xue, Zheng; Seo, Youngwoo

    2016-09-06

    In our previous study, we reported that the transport of monochloramine is affected by the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) composition, which in turn affects the cell viability of both biofilm and detached clusters.11 However, although the transport and reaction of monochloramine in biofilm could be observed, the specific biomolecules reacting with the disinfectant and the mechanism of disinfection remains elusive. In this study, the impact of EPS composition on bacteria disinfection by monochloramine was qualitatively determined using both wild-type and isogenic mutant Pseudomonas strains with different EPS-secretion capacity and composition. To evaluate their EPS reactivity and contribution to susceptibility to monochloramine, we investigated the bacteria disinfection process using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS). Canonical correlation analysis and partial least-squares regression modeling were employed to explore the changes that EPS underwent during the monochloramine disinfection process. The analyses results suggested significant reactions of the monochloramine with peptide fragments of proteins that are associated with carbohydrate utilization. Selected enzymes also showed different levels of inhibition by monochloramine when tested.

  1. Aggregated LDL in contact with macrophages induces local increases in free cholesterol levels that regulate local actin polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Grosheva, Inna; Haka, Abigail S.; Qin, Chunbo; Pierini, Lynda M.; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Interaction of macrophages with aggregated matrix-anchored lipoprotein deposits is an important initial step in atherogenesis. Aggregated lipoproteins require different cellular uptake processes than those used for endocytosis of monomeric lipoproteins. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that engagement of aggregated LDL (agLDL) by macrophages could lead to local increases in free cholesterol levels and that these increases in free cholesterol regulate signals that control cellular actin. Methods and Results AgLDL resides for prolonged periods in surface-connected compartments. While agLDL is still extracellular, we demonstrate that an increase in free cholesterol occurs at sites of contact between agLDL and cells due to hydrolysis of agLDL-derived cholesteryl ester. This increase in free cholesterol causes enhanced actin polymerization around the agLDL. Inhibition of cholesteryl ester hydrolysis results in decreased actin polymerization. Conclusions We describe a novel process that occurs during agLDL-macrophage interactions in which local release of free cholesterol causes local actin polymerization, promoting a pathologic positive feedback loop for increased catabolism of agLDL and eventual foam cell formation. PMID:19556523

  2. Antagonistic regulation of F-BAR protein assemblies controls actin polymerization during podosome formation.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Kazuya; Kondo, Akihiro; Kurisu, Shusaku; Hasegawa, Junya; Itoh, Toshiki; Takenawa, Tadaomi

    2013-05-15

    FBP17, an F-BAR domain protein, has emerged as a crucial factor linking the plasma membrane to WASP-mediated actin polymerization. Although it is well established that FBP17 has a powerful self-polymerizing ability that promotes actin nucleation on membranes in vitro, knowledge of inhibitory factors that counteract this activity in vivo is limited. Here, we demonstrate that the assembly of FBP17 on the plasma membranes is antagonized by PSTPIP2, another F-BAR protein implicated in auto-inflammatory disorder. Knockdown of PSTPIP2 in macrophage promotes the assembly of FBP17 as well as subsequent actin nucleation at podosomes, resulting in an enhancement of matrix degradation. This phenotype is rescued by expression of PSTPIP2 in a manner dependent on its F-BAR domain. Time-lapse total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy observations reveal that the self-assembly of FBP17 at the podosomal membrane initiates actin polymerization, whereas the clustering of PSTPIP2 has an opposite effect. Biochemical analysis and live-cell imaging show that PSTPIP2 inhibits actin polymerization by competing with FBP17 for assembly at artificial as well as the plasma membrane. Interestingly, the assembly of FBP17 is dependent on WASP, and its dissociation by WASP inhibition strongly induces a self-organization of PSTPIP2 at podosomes. Thus, our data uncover a previously unappreciated antagonism between different F-BAR domain assemblies that determines the threshold of actin polymerization for the formation of functional podosomes and may explain how the absence of PSTPIP2 causes auto-inflammatory disorder.

  3. Regulation of riboflavin biosynthesis and transport genes in bacteria by transcriptional and translational attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Vitreschak, Alexey G.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Mironov, Andrey A.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2002-01-01

    The riboflavin biosynthesis in bacteria was analyzed using comparative analysis of genes, operons and regulatory elements. A model for regulation based on formation of alternative RNA structures involving the RFN elements is suggested. In Gram-positive bacteria including actinomycetes, Thermotoga, Thermus and Deinococcus, the riboflavin metabolism and transport genes are predicted to be regulated by transcriptional attenuation, whereas in most Gram-negative bacteria, the riboflavin biosynthesis genes seem to be regulated on the level of translation initiation. Several new candidate riboflavin transporters were identified (impX in Desulfitobacterium halfniense and Fusobacterium nucleatum; pnuX in several actinomycetes, including some Corynebacterium species and Strepto myces coelicolor; rfnT in Rhizobiaceae). Traces of a number of likely horizontal transfer events were found: the complete riboflavin operon with the upstream regulatory element was transferred to Haemophilus influenzae and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae from some Gram-positive bacterium; non-regulated riboflavin operon in Pyrococcus furiousus was likely transferred from Thermotoga; and the RFN element was inserted into the riboflavin operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from some other Pseudomonas species, where it had regulated the ribH2 gene. PMID:12136096

  4. Inactivation of bacteria by electric current in the presence of carbon nanotubes embedded within a polymeric membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Anna; Liu, Harris K; Long, Feng; Su, Erzheng; Klibanov, Alexander M

    2015-01-01

    Uniform conductive composite membranes were prepared using a phase inversion method by blending carboxyl-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a polysulfone polymer. At 6 % of the embedded CNTs, the membrane pore size measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was approximately 50 nm. Electric current in the presence of the composite membranes markedly inactivated the model pathogenic bacteria Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, with the extent of bacterial inactivation rising when the current was increased. Over 99.999 % inactivation of both bacteria was observed in deionized water after 40 min at 5 mA direct current (DC); importantly, no appreciable inactivation occurred in the absence of either the electric field or the CNTs within the membranes under otherwise the same conditions. A much lower, although still pronounced, inactivation was seen with alternating current (AC) in a 25 mM NaCl aqueous solution.

  5. Term-seq reveals abundant ribo-regulation of antibiotics resistance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dar, Daniel; Shamir, Maya; Mellin, J R; Koutero, Mikael; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Cossart, Pascale; Sorek, Rotem

    2016-04-08

    Riboswitches and attenuators are cis-regulatory RNA elements, most of which control bacterial gene expression via metabolite-mediated, premature transcription termination. We developed an unbiased experimental approach for genome-wide discovery of such ribo-regulators in bacteria. We also devised an experimental platform that quantitatively measures the in vivo activity of all such regulators in parallel and enables rapid screening for ribo-regulators that respond to metabolites of choice. Using this approach, we detected numerous antibiotic-responsive ribo-regulators that control antibiotic resistance genes in pathogens and in the human microbiome. Studying one such regulator in Listeria monocytogenes revealed an attenuation mechanism mediated by antibiotic-stalled ribosomes. Our results expose broad roles for conditional termination in regulating antibiotic resistance and provide a tool for discovering riboswitches and attenuators that respond to previously unknown ligands.

  6. Lysis of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria by antibacterial porous polymeric monolith formed in microfluidic biochips for sample preparation.

    PubMed

    Aly, Mohamed Aly Saad; Gauthier, Mario; Yeow, John

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial cell lysis is demonstrated using polymeric microfluidic biochips operating via a hybrid mechanical shearing/contact killing mechanism. These biochips are fabricated from a cross-linked poly(methyl methacrylate) (X-PMMA) substrate by well-controlled, high-throughput laser micromachining. The unreacted double bonds at the surface of X-PMMA provide covalent bonding for the formation of a porous polymeric monolith (PPM), thus contributing to the mechanical stability of the biochip and eliminating the need for surface treatment. The lysis efficiency of these biochips was tested for gram-positive (Enterococcus saccharolyticus and Bacillus subtilis) and gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and confirmed by off-chip PCR without further purification. The influence of the flow rate when pumping the bacterial suspension through the PPM, and of the hydrophobic-hydrophilic balance on the cell lysis efficiency was investigated at a cell concentration of 10(5) CFU/mL. It was shown that the contribution of contact killing to cell lysis was more important than that of mechanical shearing in the PPM. The biochip showed better lysis efficiency than the off-chip chemical, mechanical, and thermal lysis techniques used in this work. The biochip also acts as a filter that isolates cell debris and allows PCR-amplifiable DNA to pass through. The system performs more efficient lysis for gram-negative than for gram-positive bacteria. The biochip does not require chemical/enzymatic reagents, power consumption, or complicated design and fabrication processes, which makes it an attractive on-chip lysis device that can be used in sample preparation for genetics and point-of-care diagnostics. The biochips were reused for 20 lysis cycles without any evidence of physical damage to the PPM, significant performance degradation, or DNA carryover when they were back-flushed between cycles. The biochips efficiently lysed both gram-positive and gram

  7. Bacteria associated with benthic diatoms from Lake Constance: phylogeny and influences on diatom growth and secretion of extracellular polymeric substances.

    PubMed

    Bruckner, Christian G; Bahulikar, Rahul; Rahalkar, Monali; Schink, Bernhard; Kroth, Peter G

    2008-12-01

    The composition of diatom-associated bacterial communities was studied with 14 different unialgal xenic diatom cultures isolated from freshwater epilithic biofilms of Lake Constance, Germany. A clear dominance of Alphaproteobacteria was observed, followed by Betaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Verrucomicrobia. Pure cultures of the diatom Cymbella microcephala, which was found to be dominant in epilithic biofilms in Lake Constance, were cocultivated with six associated bacterial strains. All these bacterial strains were able to grow in C. microcephala cultures in the absence of organic cosubstrates. Diatom growth was generally enhanced in the presence of bacteria, and polysaccharide secretion was generally increased in the presence of Proteobacteria. The monomer composition of extracellular polysaccharides of C. microcephala changed in relation to the presence of different bacteria, but the dominant monomers were less affected. Our results indicate that these changes were caused by the diatom itself rather than by specific bacterial degradation. One Bacteroidetes strain strongly influenced carbohydrate secretion by the alga via extracellular soluble compounds. Biofilms were formed only in the presence of bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis and coculture studies indicate an adaptation of Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes to the microenvironment created by the diatom biofilm.

  8. Crk Adaptors Negatively Regulate Actin Polymerization in Pedestals Formed by Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) by Binding to Tir Effector

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Villa, José Manuel; Benito-León, María; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa

    2014-01-01

    Infections by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) cause diarrhea linked to high infant mortality in developing countries. EPEC adheres to epithelial cells and induces the formation of actin pedestals. Actin polymerization is driven fundamentally through signaling mediated by Tir bacterial effector protein, which inserts in the plasma membrane of the infected cell. Tir binds Nck adaptor proteins, which in turn recruit and activate N-WASP, a ubiquitous member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome family of proteins. N-WASP activates the Arp2/3 complex to promote actin polymerization. Other proteins aside from components of the Tir-Nck-N-WASP pathway are recruited to the pedestals but their functions are unknown. Here we investigate the function of two alternatively spliced isoforms of Crk adaptors (CrkI/II) and the paralog protein CrkL during pedestal formation by EPEC. We found that the Crk isoforms act as redundant inhibitors of pedestal formation. The SH2 domain of CrkII and CrkL binds to phosphorylated tyrosine 474 of Tir and competes with Nck to bind Tir, preventing its recruitment to pedestals and thereby inhibiting actin polymerization. EPEC infection induces phosphorylation of the major regulatory tyrosine in CrkII and CrkL, possibly preventing the SH2 domain of these proteins from interacting with Tir. Phosphorylated CrkII and CrkL proteins localize specifically to the plasma membrane in contact with EPEC. Our study uncovers a novel role for Crk adaptors at pedestals, opening a new perspective in how these oncoproteins regulate actin polymerization. PMID:24675776

  9. Characterization of extracellular polymeric substances in the biofilms of typical bacteria by the sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huirong; Ye, Chengsong; Lv, Lu; Zheng, Clark Renjun; Zhang, Shenghua; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Yidong; Yu, Xin

    2014-08-01

    A combined approach of physicochemical extraction and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was applied to characterize the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of typical bacterial biofilms in this study. Physicochemical analysis showed variation of the contents of DNA, polysaccharide and protein in different fractions of EPS in different mediums. The sulfur K-edge XANES analysis yielded a variety of spectra. Spectral fitting of the XANES spectra utilizing a large set of model compounds showed that there was more reduced sulfur in both LB-EPS (loosely bound EPS) and TB-EPS (tightly bound EPS) of all the biofilms in LB medium than in R2A medium. More oxidized sulfur was identified in LB-EPS than that in TB-EPS, suggesting different niches and physiological heterogeneity in the biofilms. Our results suggested that the sulfur K-edge XANES can be a useful tool to analyze the sulfur speciation in EPS of biofilms.

  10. YihE kinase is a central regulator of programmed cell death in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dorsey-Oresto, Angella; Lu, Tao; Mosel, Michael; Wang, Xiuhong; Salz, Tal; Drlica, Karl; Zhao, Xilin

    2013-01-01

    Stress-mediated programmed cell death (PCD) in bacteria has recently attracted attention, largely because it raises novel possibilities for controlling pathogens. How PCD in bacteria is regulated to avoid population extinction from transient, moderate stress remains a central question. We report that the YihE protein kinase is a key regulator that protects Escherichia coli from antimicrobial and environmental stressors by antagonizing the MazEF toxin-antitoxin module. YihE was linked to a reactive oxygen species (ROS) cascade, and a deficiency of yihE stimulated stress-induced PCD even after stress dissipated. YihE was partially regulated by the Cpx envelope stress-response system, which, along with MazF toxin and superoxide, has both protective and destructive roles that help bacteria make a live-or-die decision in response to stress. YihE probably acts early in the stress response to limit self-sustaining ROS production and PCD. Inhibition of YihE may provide a new way to enhance antimicrobial lethality and attenuate virulence. PMID:23416055

  11. Molecular Regulation of Photosynthetic Carbon Dioxide Fixation in Nonsulfur Purple Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Tabita, Fred Robert

    2015-12-01

    The overall objective of this project is to determine the mechanism by which a transcriptional activator protein affects CO2 fixation (cbb) gene expression in nonsulfur purple photosynthetic bacteria, with special emphasis to Rhodobacter sphaeroides and with comparison to Rhodopseudomonas palustris. These studies culminated in several publications which indicated that additional regulators interact with the master regulator CbbR in both R. sphaeroides and R. palustris. In addition, the interactive control of the carbon and nitrogen assimilatory pathways was studied and unique regulatory signals were discovered.

  12. O2-sensing and O2-dependent gene regulation in facultatively anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Unden, G; Becker, S; Bongaerts, J; Holighaus, G; Schirawski, J; Six, S

    1995-08-01

    Availability of O2 is one of the most important regulatory signals in facultatively anaerobic bacteria. Various two- or one-component sensor/regulator systems control the expression of aerobic and anaerobic metabolism in response to O2. Most of the sensor proteins contain heme or Fe as cofactors that interact with O2 either by binding or by a redox reaction. The ArcA/ArcB regulator of aerobic metabolism in Escherichia coli may use a different sensory mechanism. In two-component regulators, the sensor is located in the cytoplasmic membrane, whereas one-component regulators are located in the cytoplasm. Under most conditions, O2 can readily reach the cytoplasm and could provide the signal in the cytoplasm. The transcriptional regulator FNR of E. Coli controls the expression of many genes required for anaerobic metabolism in response to O2. Functional homologs of FNR are present in facultatively anaerobic Proteobacteria and presumably also in gram-positive bacteria. The target genes of FNR are mostly under multiple regulation by FNR and other regulators that respond to O2, nitrate, or glucose. FNR represents a 'one-component' sensor/regulator and contains Fe for signal perception. In response to O2 availability, FNR is converted reversibly from the aerobic (inactive) state to the anaerobic (active) state. Experiments suggest that the Fe cofactor is bound by four essential cysteine residues. The O2-triggered transformation between active and inactive FNR presumably is due to a redox reaction at the Fe cofactor, but other modes of interaction cannot be excluded. O2 seems to affect the site-specific DNA binding of FNR at target genes or the formation of an active transcriptional complex with RNA polymerase.

  13. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Activated Protein Kinase 2 Regulates Actin Polymerization and Vascular Leak in Ventilator Associated Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Damarla, Mahendra; Hasan, Emile; Boueiz, Adel; Le, Anne; Pae, Hyun Hae; Montouchet, Calypso; Kolb, Todd; Simms, Tiffany; Myers, Allen; Kayyali, Usamah S.; Gaestel, Matthias; Peng, Xinqi; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Damico, Rachel; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation, a fundamental therapy for acute lung injury, worsens pulmonary vascular permeability by exacting mechanical stress on various components of the respiratory system causing ventilator associated lung injury. We postulated that MK2 activation via p38 MAP kinase induced HSP25 phosphorylation, in response to mechanical stress, leading to actin stress fiber formation and endothelial barrier dysfunction. We sought to determine the role of p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector MK2 on HSP25 phosphorylation and actin stress fiber formation in ventilator associated lung injury. Wild type and MK2−/− mice received mechanical ventilation with high (20 ml/kg) or low (7 ml/kg) tidal volumes up to 4 hrs, after which lungs were harvested for immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting and lung permeability assays. High tidal volume mechanical ventilation resulted in significant phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, MK2, HSP25, actin polymerization, and an increase in pulmonary vascular permeability in wild type mice as compared to spontaneous breathing or low tidal volume mechanical ventilation. However, pretreatment of wild type mice with specific p38 MAP kinase or MK2 inhibitors abrogated HSP25 phosphorylation and actin polymerization, and protected against increased lung permeability. Finally, MK2−/− mice were unable to phosphorylate HSP25 or increase actin polymerization from baseline, and were resistant to increases in lung permeability in response to HVT MV. Our results suggest that p38 MAP kinase and its downstream effector MK2 mediate lung permeability in ventilator associated lung injury by regulating HSP25 phosphorylation and actin cytoskeletal remodeling. PMID:19240800

  14. Replenishing the cyclic-di-AMP pool: regulation of diadenylate cyclase activity in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Huong; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Marcellin, Esteban; Turner, Mark S

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria can sense environmental cues and alter their physiology accordingly through the use of signal transduction pathways involving second messenger nucleotides. One broadly conserved second messenger is cyclic-di-AMP (c-di-AMP) which regulates a range of processes including cell wall homeostasis, potassium uptake, DNA repair, fatty acid synthesis, biofilm formation and central metabolism in bacteria. The intracellular pool of c-di-AMP is maintained by the activities of diadenylate cyclase (DAC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes, as well as possibly via c-di-AMP export. Whilst extracellular stimuli regulating c-di-AMP levels in bacteria are poorly understood, recent work has identified effector proteins which directly interact and alter the activity of DACs. These include the membrane bound CdaR and the phosphoglucosamine mutase GlmM which both bind directly to the membrane bound CdaA DAC and the recombination protein RadA which binds directly to the DNA binding DisA DAC. The genes encoding these multiprotein complexes are co-localised in many bacteria providing further support for their functional connection. The roles of GlmM in peptidoglycan synthesis and RadA in Holliday junction intermediate processing suggest that c-di-AMP synthesis by DACs will be responsive to these cellular activities. In addition to these modulatory interactions, permanent dysregulation of DAC activity due to suppressor mutations can occur during selection to overcome growth defects, rapid cell lysis and osmosensitivity. DACs have also been investigated as targets for the development of new antibiotics and several small compound inhibitors have recently been identified. This review aims to provide an overview of how c-di-AMP synthesis by DACs can be regulated.

  15. Understanding how commensal obligate anaerobic bacteria regulate immune functions in the large intestine.

    PubMed

    Maier, Eva; Anderson, Rachel C; Roy, Nicole C

    2014-12-24

    The human gastrointestinal tract is colonised by trillions of commensal bacteria, most of which are obligate anaerobes residing in the large intestine. Appropriate bacterial colonisation is generally known to be critical for human health. In particular, the development and function of the immune system depends on microbial colonisation, and a regulated cross-talk between commensal bacteria, intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells is required to maintain mucosal immune homeostasis. This homeostasis is disturbed in various inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Several in vitro and in vivo studies indicate a role for Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides fragilis, Akkermansia muciniphila and segmented filamentous bacteria in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. These obligate anaerobes are abundant in the healthy intestine but reduced in several inflammatory diseases, suggesting an association with protective effects on human health. However, knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the effects of obligate anaerobic intestinal bacteria remains limited, in part due to the difficulty of co-culturing obligate anaerobes together with oxygen-requiring human epithelial cells. By using novel dual-environment co-culture models, it will be possible to investigate the effects of the unstudied majority of intestinal microorganisms on the human epithelia. This knowledge will provide opportunities for improving human health and reducing the risk of inflammatory diseases.

  16. Understanding How Commensal Obligate Anaerobic Bacteria Regulate Immune Functions in the Large Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Eva; Anderson, Rachel C.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2014-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract is colonised by trillions of commensal bacteria, most of which are obligate anaerobes residing in the large intestine. Appropriate bacterial colonisation is generally known to be critical for human health. In particular, the development and function of the immune system depends on microbial colonisation, and a regulated cross-talk between commensal bacteria, intestinal epithelial cells and immune cells is required to maintain mucosal immune homeostasis. This homeostasis is disturbed in various inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. Several in vitro and in vivo studies indicate a role for Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides fragilis, Akkermansia muciniphila and segmented filamentous bacteria in maintaining intestinal immune homeostasis. These obligate anaerobes are abundant in the healthy intestine but reduced in several inflammatory diseases, suggesting an association with protective effects on human health. However, knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the effects of obligate anaerobic intestinal bacteria remains limited, in part due to the difficulty of co-culturing obligate anaerobes together with oxygen-requiring human epithelial cells. By using novel dual-environment co-culture models, it will be possible to investigate the effects of the unstudied majority of intestinal microorganisms on the human epithelia. This knowledge will provide opportunities for improving human health and reducing the risk of inflammatory diseases. PMID:25545102

  17. PHOSPHOINOSITIDE 3-KINASE REGULATES THE ROLE OF RETROMER IN TRANSCYTOSIS OF THE POLYMERIC IMMUNOGLOBULIN RECEPTOR

    PubMed Central

    Vergés, Marcel; Sebastián, Isabel; Mostov, Keith E.

    2007-01-01

    Retromer is a multimeric protein complex that mediates intracellular receptor sorting. One of the roles of retromer is to promote transcytosis of the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) and its ligand polymeric immunoglobulin A (pIgA) in polarized epithelial cells. In Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells, overexpression of Vps35, the retromer subunit key for cargo recognition, restores transcytosis to a pIgR mutant that is normally degraded. Here we show that pIgA transcytosis was not restored in these cells when treated with the specific phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002. Likewise, the decrease in pIgA transcytosis by wild-type pIgR seen upon PI3K inhibition was not reverted by Vps35 overexpression. PI3K inhibition reduced membrane association of sorting-nexins (SNX) 1 and 2, which constitute the retromer subcomplex involved in membrane deformation, while association of the Vps35-Vps26-Vps29 subcomplex, involved in cargo recognition, remained virtually unaffected. Colocalization between the two retromer subcomplexes was reduced upon the treatment. Whereas the interaction among the subunits of the Vps35-Vps26-Vps29 subcomplex remained unchanged, less Vps35 was found associated with pIgR upon PI3K inhibition. In addition, colocalization of internalized pIgA with subunits of both retromer subcomplexes throughout the transcytotic pathway was substantially reduced by LY294002 treatment. These data implicate PI3K in controlling retromer’s role in pIgR-pIgA transcytosis. PMID:17184770

  18. Harnessing single cell sorting to identify cell division genes and regulators in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Burke, Catherine; Liu, Michael; Britton, Warwick; Triccas, James A; Thomas, Torsten; Smith, Adrian L; Allen, Steven; Salomon, Robert; Harry, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Cell division is an essential cellular process that requires an array of known and unknown proteins for its spatial and temporal regulation. Here we develop a novel, high-throughput screening method for the identification of bacterial cell division genes and regulators. The method combines the over-expression of a shotgun genomic expression library to perturb the cell division process with high-throughput flow cytometry sorting to screen many thousands of clones. Using this approach, we recovered clones with a filamentous morphology for the model bacterium, Escherichia coli. Genetic analysis revealed that our screen identified both known cell division genes, and genes that have not previously been identified to be involved in cell division. This novel screening strategy is applicable to a wide range of organisms, including pathogenic bacteria, where cell division genes and regulators are attractive drug targets for antibiotic development.

  19. Harnessing Single Cell Sorting to Identify Cell Division Genes and Regulators in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Catherine; Liu, Michael; Britton, Warwick; Triccas, James A.; Thomas, Torsten; Smith, Adrian L.; Allen, Steven; Salomon, Robert; Harry, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Cell division is an essential cellular process that requires an array of known and unknown proteins for its spatial and temporal regulation. Here we develop a novel, high-throughput screening method for the identification of bacterial cell division genes and regulators. The method combines the over-expression of a shotgun genomic expression library to perturb the cell division process with high-throughput flow cytometry sorting to screen many thousands of clones. Using this approach, we recovered clones with a filamentous morphology for the model bacterium, Escherichia coli. Genetic analysis revealed that our screen identified both known cell division genes, and genes that have not previously been identified to be involved in cell division. This novel screening strategy is applicable to a wide range of organisms, including pathogenic bacteria, where cell division genes and regulators are attractive drug targets for antibiotic development. PMID:23565292

  20. Dispersal and regulation of an adaptive mutagenesis cassette in the bacteria domain

    PubMed Central

    Erill, Ivan; Campoy, Susana; Mazon, Gerard; Barbé, Jordi

    2006-01-01

    Recently, a multiple gene cassette with mutagenic translation synthesis activity was identified and shown to be under LexA regulation in several proteobacteria species. In this work, we have traced down instances of this multiple gene cassette across the bacteria domain. Phylogenetic analyses show that this cassette has undergone several reorganizations since its inception in the actinobacteria, and that it has dispersed across the bacterial domain through a combination of vertical inheritance, lateral gene transfer and duplication. In addition, our analyses show that LexA regulation of this multiple gene cassette is persistent in all the phyla in which it has been detected, and suggest that this regulation is prompted by the combined activity of two of its constituent genes: a polymerase V homolog and an alpha subunit of the DNA polymerase III. PMID:16407325

  1. Innate lymphoid cells regulate CD4+ T-cell responses to intestinal commensal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Matthew R; Monticelli, Laurel A; Fung, Thomas C; Ziegler, Carly G K; Grunberg, Stephanie; Sinha, Rohini; Mantegazza, Adriana R; Ma, Hak-Ling; Crawford, Alison; Angelosanto, Jill M; Wherry, E John; Koni, Pandelakis A; Bushman, Frederic D; Elson, Charles O; Eberl, Gérard; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2013-06-06

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently characterized family of immune cells that have critical roles in cytokine-mediated regulation of intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity. Alterations in ILC responses are associated with multiple chronic human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, implicating a role for ILCs in disease pathogenesis. Owing to an inability to target ILCs selectively, experimental studies assessing ILC function have predominantly used mice lacking adaptive immune cells. However, in lymphocyte-sufficient hosts ILCs are vastly outnumbered by CD4(+) T cells, which express similar profiles of effector cytokines. Therefore, the function of ILCs in the presence of adaptive immunity and their potential to influence adaptive immune cell responses remain unknown. To test this, we used genetic or antibody-mediated depletion strategies to target murine ILCs in the presence of an adaptive immune system. We show that loss of retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor-γt-positive (RORγt(+)) ILCs was associated with dysregulated adaptive immune cell responses against commensal bacteria and low-grade systemic inflammation. Remarkably, ILC-mediated regulation of adaptive immune cells occurred independently of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22 or IL-23. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and functional analyses revealed that RORγt(+) ILCs express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and can process and present antigen. However, rather than inducing T-cell proliferation, ILCs acted to limit commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses. Consistent with this, selective deletion of MHCII in murine RORγt(+) ILCs resulted in dysregulated commensal bacteria-dependent CD4(+) T-cell responses that promoted spontaneous intestinal inflammation. These data identify that ILCs maintain intestinal homeostasis through MHCII-dependent interactions with CD4(+) T cells that limit pathological adaptive immune cell responses to commensal

  2. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Álvaro D.; Quereda, Juan J.; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles is regulated in both space and time. Non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulatory molecules that fine-tune important processes in bacterial physiology including cell envelope architecture, intermediate metabolism, bacterial communication, biofilm formation, and virulence. Recent studies have shown production of defined sRNA species by intracellular bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells. The molecules targeted by these sRNAs and their expression dynamics along the intracellular infection cycle remain, however, poorly characterized. Technical difficulties linked to the isolation of “intact” intracellular bacteria from infected host cells might explain why sRNA regulation in these specialized pathogens is still a largely unexplored field. Transition from the extracellular to the intracellular lifestyle provides an ideal scenario in which regulatory sRNAs are intended to participate; so much work must be done in this direction. This review focuses on sRNAs expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens during the infection of eukaryotic cells, strategies used with these pathogens to identify sRNAs required for virulence, and the experimental technical challenges associated to this type of studies. We also discuss varied techniques for their potential application to study RNA regulation in intracellular bacterial infections. PMID:25429360

  3. A novel acetylation of β-tubulin by San modulates microtubule polymerization via down-regulating tubulin incorporation

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Chih-Wen; Hou, Fajian; Zhang, Junmei; Phu, Lilian; Loktev, Alex V.; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Jackson, Peter K.; Zhao, Yingming; Zou, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic instability is a critical property of microtubules (MTs). By regulating the rate of tubulin polymerization and depolymerization, cells organize the MT cytoskeleton to accommodate their specific functions. Among many processes, posttranslational modifications of tubulin are implicated in regulating MT functions. Here we report a novel tubulin acetylation catalyzed by acetyltransferase San at lysine 252 (K252) of β-tubulin. This acetylation, which is also detected in vivo, is added to soluble tubulin heterodimers but not tubulins in MTs. The acetylation-mimicking K252A/Q mutants were incorporated into the MT cytoskeleton in HeLa cells without causing any obvious MT defect. However, after cold-induced catastrophe, MT regrowth is accelerated in San-siRNA cells while the incorporation of acetylation-mimicking mutant tubulins is severely impeded. K252 of β-tubulin localizes at the interface of α-/β-tubulins and interacts with the phosphate group of the α-tubulin-bound GTP. We propose that the acetylation slows down tubulin incorporation into MTs by neutralizing the positive charge on K252 and allowing tubulin heterodimers to adopt a conformation that disfavors tubulin incorporation. PMID:21177827

  4. The Circadian Clock Protein Timeless Regulates Phagocytosis of Bacteria in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, Janelle S.; Pham, Linh N.; Ziauddin, Junaid; Shirasu-Hiza, Mimi M.

    2012-01-01

    Survival of bacterial infection is the result of complex host-pathogen interactions. An often-overlooked aspect of these interactions is the circadian state of the host. Previously, we demonstrated that Drosophila mutants lacking the circadian regulatory proteins Timeless (Tim) and Period (Per) are sensitive to infection by S. pneumoniae. Sensitivity to infection can be mediated either by changes in resistance (control of microbial load) or tolerance (endurance of the pathogenic effects of infection). Here we show that Tim regulates resistance against both S. pneumoniae and S. marcescens. We set out to characterize and identify the underlying mechanism of resistance that is circadian-regulated. Using S. pneumoniae, we found that resistance oscillates daily in adult wild-type flies and that these oscillations are absent in Tim mutants. Drosophila have at least three main resistance mechanisms to kill high levels of bacteria in their hemolymph: melanization, antimicrobial peptides, and phagocytosis. We found that melanization is not circadian-regulated. We further found that basal levels of AMP gene expression exhibit time-of-day oscillations but that these are Tim-independent; moreover, infection-induced AMP gene expression is not circadian-regulated. We then show that phagocytosis is circadian-regulated. Wild-type flies exhibit up-regulated phagocytic activity at night; Tim mutants have normal phagocytic activity during the day but lack this night-time peak. Tim appears to regulate an upstream event in phagocytosis, such as bacterial recognition or activation of phagocytic hemocytes. Interestingly, inhibition of phagocytosis in wild type flies results in survival kinetics similar to Tim mutants after infection with S. pneumoniae. Taken together, these results suggest that loss of circadian oscillation of a specific immune function (phagocytosis) can have significant effects on long-term survival of infection. PMID:22253593

  5. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.

    1993-12-31

    The project deals with understanding the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that physiologically control and regulate carbon and electron flow in anaerobic chemosynthetic bacteria that couple metabolism of single carbon compounds and hydrogen to the production of organic acids (formic, acetic, butyric, and succinic) or methane. The authors compare the regulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism by fermentation, enzyme, and electron carrier analysis using Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, Anaeroblospirillum succiniciproducens, Methanosarcina barkeri, and a newly isolated tri-culture composed of a syntrophic butyrate degrader strain IB, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobacterium formicicum as model systems. To understand the regulation of hydrogen metabolism during butyrate production or acetate degradation, hydrogenase activity in B. methylotrophicum or M. barkeri is measured in relation to growth substrate and pH; hydrogenase is purified and characterized to investigate number of hydrogenases; their localization and functions; and, their sequences are determined. To understand the mechanism for catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation to succinate the PEP carboxykinase enzyme and gene of A. succiniciproducens are purified and characterized. Genetically engineered strains of Escherichia coli containing the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase gene are examined for their ability to produce succinate in high yield. To understand the mechanism of fatty acid degradation by syntrophic acetogens during mixed culture methanogenesis formate and hydrogen production are characterized by radio tracer studies. It is intended that these studies provide strategies to improve anaerobic fermentations used for the production of organic acids or methane and, new basic understanding on catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation mechanisms and on the function of hydrogenase in anaerobic bacteria.

  6. A prebiotic role of Ecklonia cava improves the mortality of Edwardsiella tarda-infected zebrafish models via regulating the growth of lactic acid bacteria and pathogen bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lee, WonWoo; Oh, Jae Young; Kim, Eun-A; Kang, Nalae; Kim, Kil-Nam; Ahn, Ginnae; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the beneficial prebiotic roles of Ecklonia cava (E. cava, EC) were evaluated on the growth of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and pathogen bacteria and the mortality of pathogen-bacteria infected zebrafish model. The result showed that the original E. cava (EC) led to the highest growth effects on three LABs (Lactobacillus brevis, L. brevis; Lactobacillus pentosus, L. pentosus; Lactobacillus plantarum; L. plantarum) and it was dose-dependent manners. Also, EC, its Celluclast enzymatic (ECC) and 100% ethanol extracts (ECE) showed the anti-bacterial activities on the fish pathogenic bacteria such as (Edwardsiella tarda; E. tarda, Streptococcus iniae; S. iniae, and Vibrio harveyi; V. harveyi). Interestingly, EC induced the higher production of the secondary metabolites from L. plantarum in MRS medium. The secondary metabolites produced by EC significantly inhibited the growth of pathogen bacteria. In further in vivo study, the co-treatment of EC and L. plantarum improved the growth and mortality of E. tarda-infected zebrafish as regulating the expression of inflammatory molecules such as iNOS and COX2. Taken together, our present study suggests that the EC plays an important role as a potential prebiotic and has a protective effect against the infection caused by E. tarda injection in zebrafish. Also, our conclusion from this evidence is that EC can be used and applied as a useful prebiotic.

  7. Elk-3 is a KLF4-regulated gene that modulates the phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages.

    PubMed

    Tsoyi, Konstantin; Geldart, Adriana M; Christou, Helen; Liu, Xiaoli; Chung, Su Wol; Perrella, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    ETS family proteins play a role in immune responses. A unique member of this family, Elk-3, is a transcriptional repressor that regulates the expression of HO-1. Elk-3 is very sensitive to the effects of inflammatory mediators and is down-regulated by bacterial endotoxin (LPS). In the present study, exposure of mouse macrophages to Escherichia coli LPS resulted in decreased, full-length, and splice-variant isoforms of Elk-3. We isolated the Elk-3 promoter and demonstrated that LPS also decreased promoter activity. The Elk-3 promoter contains GC-rich regions that are putative binding sites for zinc-finger transcription factors, such as Sp1 and KLFs. Mutation of the GC-rich region from bp -613 to -603 blunted LPS-induced down-regulation of the Elk-3 promoter. Similar to the LPS response, coexpression of KLF4 led to repression of Elk-3 promoter activity, whereas coexpression of Sp1 increased activity. ChIP assays revealed that KLF4 binding to the Elk-3 promoter was increased by LPS exposure, and Sp1 binding was decreased. Thus, down-regulation of Elk-3 by bacterial LPS is regulated, in part, by the transcriptional repressor KLF4. Overexpression of Elk-3, in the presence of E. coli bacteria, resulted in decreased macrophage phagocytosis. To determine whether limited expression of HO-1 may contribute to this response, we exposed HO-1-deficient bone marrow-derived macrophages to E. coli and found a comparable reduction in bacterial phagocytosis. These data suggest that down-regulation of Elk-3 and the subsequent induction of HO-1 are important for macrophage function during the inflammatory response to infection.

  8. HIV-1 Tat regulates the expression of the dcw operon and stimulates the proliferation of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinsong; Zhang, Yumin; Knapp, Pamela E; Zhao, Tianyong

    2016-01-01

    Infections of pathogenic bacteria are very common in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. However, the biological effects of HIV-1 Tat on bacteria are incompletely understood. In this study, HIV-1 Tat was expressed in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA01) to investigate its biological effects on bacteria. Bacterial cells expressing either HIV-1 Tat1-86 (Tat1-86) or HIV-1 Tat1-72 (Tat1-72) grow significantly faster than those with either only an empty vector or an unrelated control (GFP or Rluc). Supplementation of purified HIV-1 Tat1-86 or Tat1-101 protein into bacterial culture medium stimulated the growth of both E. coli and PA01. The expression profile of certain cell division-associated genes, such as those in the division cell wall (dcw) operon (ftsA, ftsQ, ftsW and ftsZ), yafO and zipA, was altered in HIV-1 Tat1-86 expressing E. coli BL21(DE3). Furthermore, the expression of firefly luciferase (Fluc) reporter gene, when engineered for control by the dcw promoter and terminator, was enhanced by HIV-1 Tat in E. coli, confirming that HIV-1 Tat transcriptionally regulates the expression of the dcw operon. The finding that HIV-1 Tat stimulates bacterial growth whether it is produced intracellularly or applied extracellularly may have relevance for HIV patients who are highly susceptible to opportunistic bacterial infections. Contents category: Viruses -Retroviruses. The GenBank accession number for the sequence of HIV-1 Tat1-86 is AF324439.1.

  9. Stimulation of growth by proteorhodopsin phototrophy involves regulation of central metabolic pathways in marine planktonic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Palovaara, Joakim; Akram, Neelam; Baltar, Federico; Bunse, Carina; Forsberg, Jeremy; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos; González, José M.; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2014-01-01

    Proteorhodopsin (PR) is present in half of surface ocean bacterioplankton, where its light-driven proton pumping provides energy to cells. Indeed, PR promotes growth or survival in different bacteria. However, the metabolic pathways mediating the light responses remain unknown. We analyzed growth of the PR-containing Dokdonia sp. MED134 (where light-stimulated growth had been found) in seawater with low concentrations of mixed [yeast extract and peptone (YEP)] or single (alanine, Ala) carbon compounds as models for rich and poor environments. We discovered changes in gene expression revealing a tightly regulated shift in central metabolic pathways between light and dark conditions. Bacteria showed relatively stronger light responses in Ala compared with YEP. Notably, carbon acquisition pathways shifted toward anaplerotic CO2 fixation in the light, contributing 31 ± 8% and 24 ± 6% of the carbon incorporated into biomass in Ala and YEP, respectively. Thus, MED134 was a facultative double mixotroph, i.e., photo- and chemotrophic for its energy source and using both bicarbonate and organic matter as carbon sources. Unexpectedly, relative expression of the glyoxylate shunt genes (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase) was >300-fold higher in the light—but only in Ala—contributing a more efficient use of carbon from organic compounds. We explored these findings in metagenomes and metatranscriptomes and observed similar prevalence of the glyoxylate shunt compared with PR genes and highest expression of the isocitrate lyase gene coinciding with highest solar irradiance. Thus, regulatory interactions between dissolved organic carbon quality and central metabolic pathways critically determine the fitness of surface ocean bacteria engaging in PR phototrophy. PMID:25136122

  10. Computational Analysis of Cysteine and Methionine Metabolism and Its Regulation in Dairy Starter and Related Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengjin; Prakash, Celine; Nauta, Arjen; Siezen, Roland J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfuric volatile compounds derived from cysteine and methionine provide many dairy products with a characteristic odor and taste. To better understand and control the environmental dependencies of sulfuric volatile compound formation by the dairy starter bacteria, we have used the available genome sequence and experimental information to systematically evaluate the presence of the key enzymes and to reconstruct the general modes of transcription regulation for the corresponding genes. The genomic organization of the key genes is suggestive of a subdivision of the reaction network into five modules, where we observed distinct differences in the modular composition between the families Lactobacillaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Leuconostocaceae, on the one hand, and the family Streptococcaceae, on the other. These differences are mirrored by the way in which transcription regulation of the genes is structured in these families. In the Lactobacillaceae, Enterococcaceae, and Leuconostocaceae, the main shared mode of transcription regulation is methionine (Met) T-box-mediated regulation. In addition, the gene metK, encoding S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthetase, is controlled via the SMK box (SAM). The SMK box is also found upstream of metK in species of the family Streptococcaceae. However, the transcription control of the other modules is mediated via three different LysR-family regulators, MetR/MtaR (methionine), CmbR (O-acetyl[homo]serine), and HomR (O-acetylhomoserine). Redefinition of the associated DNA-binding motifs helped to identify/disentangle the related regulons, which appeared to perfectly match the proposed subdivision of the reaction network. PMID:22522891

  11. Redox regulation of energy transfer efficiency in antennas of green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.; Cheng, P.; Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Wang, J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of energy transfer from the peripheral chlorosome antenna structure to the membrane-bound antenna in green sulfur bacteria depends strongly on the redox potential of the medium. The fluorescence spectra and lifetimes indicate that efficient quenching pathways are induced in the chlorosome at high redox potential. The midpoint redox potential for the induction of this effect in isolated chlorosomes from Chlorobium vibrioforme is -146 mV at pH 7 (vs the normal hydrogen electrode), and the observed midpoint potential (n = 1) decreases by 60 mV per pH unit over the pH range 7-10. Extraction of isolated chlorosomes with hexane has little effect on the redox-induced quenching, indicating that the component(s) responsible for this effect are bound and not readily extractable. We have purified and partially characterized the trimeric water-soluble bacteriochlorophyll a-containing protein from the thermophilic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. This protein is located between the chlorosome and the membrane. Fluorescence spectra of the purified protein indicate that it also contains groups that quench excitations at high redox potential. The results indicate that the energy transfer pathway in green sulfur bacteria is regulated by redox potential. This regulation appears to operate in at least two distinct places in the energy transfer pathway, the oligomeric pigments in the interior of the chlorosome and in the bacteriochlorophyll a protein. The regulatory effect may serve to protect the cell against superoxide-induced damage when oxygen is present. By quenching excitations before they reach the reaction center, reduction and subsequent autooxidation of the low potential electron acceptors found in these organisms is avoided.

  12. Signal transduction and transcriptional and posttranscriptional control of iron-regulated genes in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Crosa, J H

    1997-01-01

    Iron is an essential element for nearly all living cells. Thus, the ability of bacteria to utilize iron is a crucial survival mechanism independent of the ecological niche in which the microorganism lives, because iron is scarce both in potential biological hosts, where it is bound by high-affinity iron-binding proteins, and in the environment, where it is present as part of insoluble complex hydroxides. Therefore, pathogens attempting to establish an infection and environmental microorganisms must all be able to utilize the otherwise unavailable iron. One of the strategies to perform this task is the possession of siderophore-mediated iron uptake systems that are capable of scavenging the hoarded iron. This metal is, however, a double-edged sword for the cell because it can catalyze the production of deadly free hydroxyl radicals, which are harmful to the cells. It is therefore imperative for the cell to control the concentration of iron at levels that permit key metabolic steps to occur without becoming a messenger of cell death. Early work identified a repressor, Fur, which as a complex with iron repressed the expression of most iron uptake systems as well as other iron-regulated genes when the iron concentration reached a certain level. However, later work demonstrated that this regulation by Fur was not the only answer under low-iron conditions, there was a need for activation of iron uptake genes as well as siderophore biosynthetic genes. Furthermore, it was also realized that in some instances the actual ferric iron-siderophore complex induced the transcription of the cognate receptor and transport genes. It became evident that control of the expression of iron-regulated genes was more complex than originally envisioned. In this review, I analyze the processes of signal transduction, transcriptional control, and posttranscriptional control of iron-regulated genes as reported for the ferric dicitrate system in Escherichia coli; the pyochelin, pyoverdin, and

  13. Silencing of Anopheles stephensi Heme Peroxidase HPX15 Activates Diverse Immune Pathways to Regulate the Growth of Midgut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Choudhury, Tania P.; Kakani, Parik; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Rini; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Anopheles mosquito midgut harbors a diverse group of endogenous bacteria that grow extensively after the blood feeding and help in food digestion and nutrition in many ways. Although, the growth of endogenous bacteria is regulated by various factors, however, the robust antibacterial immune reactions are generally suppressed in this body compartment by a heme peroxidase HPX15 crosslinked mucins barrier. This barrier is formed on the luminal side of the midgut and blocks the direct interactions and recognition of bacteria or their elicitors by the immune reactive midgut epithelium. We hypothesized that in the absence of HPX15, an increased load of exogenous bacteria will enormously induce the mosquito midgut immunity and this situation in turn, can easily regulate mosquito-pathogen interactions. In this study, we found that the blood feeding induced AsHPX15 gene in Anopheles stephensi midgut and promoted the growth of endogenous as well as exogenous fed bacteria. In addition, the mosquito midgut also efficiently regulated the number of these bacteria through the induction of classical Toll and Imd immune pathways. In case of AsHPX15 silenced midguts, the growth of midgut bacteria was largely reduced through the induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene, a downstream effector molecule of the JAK/STAT pathway. Interestingly, no significant induction of the classical immune pathways was observed in these midguts. Importantly, the NOS is a well known negative regulator of Plasmodium development, thus, we proposed that the induction of diverged immune pathways in the absence of HPX15 mediated midgut barrier might be one of the strategies to manipulate the vectorial capacity of Anopheles mosquito. PMID:27630620

  14. A novel transcriptional regulator of L-arabinose utilization in human gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Changsoo; Tesar, Christine; Li, Xiaoqing; Kim, Youngchang; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-12-02

    Carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the ecophysiology of human gut microbiota. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of sugar catabolism in commensal and prevalent human gut bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron remain mostly unknown. By a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches, we have identified an NrtR family transcription factor (BT0354 in B. thetaiotaomicron, BtAraR) as a novel regulator controlling the arabinose utilization genes. L-arabinose was confirmed to be a negative effector of BtAraR. We have solved the crystal structures of the apo and L-arabinose-bound BtAraR proteins, as well as the complex of apo-protein with a specific DNA operator. BtAraR forms a homodimer with each subunit comprised of the ligand-binding Nudix hydrolase-like domain and the DNA-binding winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain. We have identified the residues involved in binding of L-arabinose and recognition of DNA. The majority of these residues are well conserved in the AraR orthologs in Bacteroidetes. In the structure of the BtAraR-DNA complex, we found the unique interaction of arginine intercalating its guanidinum moiety into the base pair stacking of B-DNA. L-arabinose binding induces movement of wHTH domains, resulting in a conformation unsuitable for DNA binding. Our analysis facilitates reconstruction of the metabolic and regulatory networks involved in carbohydrate utilization in human gut Bacteroides.

  15. MAP1S Protein Regulates the Phagocytosis of Bacteria and Toll-like Receptor (TLR) Signaling.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ming; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Leyuan; Zhang, Tingting; Han, Fang; Cleveland, Joseph; Wang, Fen; McKeehan, Wallace L; Li, Yu; Zhang, Dekai

    2016-01-15

    Phagocytosis is a critical cellular process for innate immune defense against microbial infection. The regulation of phagocytosis process is complex and has not been well defined. An intracellular molecule might regulate cell surface-initiated phagocytosis, but the underlying molecular mechanism is poorly understood (1). In this study, we found that microtubule-associated protein 1S (MAP1S), a protein identified recently that is involved in autophagy (2), is expressed primarily in macrophages. MAP1S-deficient macrophages are impaired in the phagocytosis of bacteria. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MAP1S interacts directly with MyD88, a key adaptor of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), upon TLR activation and affects the TLR signaling pathway. Intriguingly, we also observe that, upon TLR activation, MyD88 participates in autophagy processing in a MAP1S-dependent manner by co-localizing with MAP1 light chain 3 (MAP1-LC3 or LC3). Therefore, we reveal that an intracellular autophagy-related molecule of MAP1S controls bacterial phagocytosis through TLR signaling.

  16. Temperature and carbon assimilation regulate the chlorosome biogenesis in green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang; Saikin, Semion K; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Enriquez, Miriam M; Huh, Joonsuk; Frank, Harry A; Urban, Volker S; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-09-17

    Green photosynthetic bacteria adjust the structure and functionality of the chlorosome-the light-absorbing antenna complex-in response to environmental stress factors. The chlorosome is a natural self-assembled aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. In this study, we report the regulation of the biogenesis of the Chlorobaculum tepidum chlorosome by carbon assimilation in conjunction with temperature changes. Our studies indicate that the carbon source and thermal stress culture of C. tepidum grows slower and incorporates fewer BChl c in the chlorosome. Compared with the chlorosome from other cultural conditions we investigated, the chlorosome from the carbon source and thermal stress culture displays (a) smaller cross-sectional radius and overall size, (b) simplified BChl c homologs with smaller side chains, (c) blue-shifted Qy absorption maxima, and (d) a sigmoid-shaped circular dichroism spectra. Using a theoretical model, we analyze how the observed spectral modifications can be associated with structural changes of BChl aggregates inside the chlorosome. Our report suggests a mechanism of metabolic regulation for chlorosome biogenesis.

  17. The RhoA effector mDia is induced during T cell activation and regulates actin polymerization and cell migration in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Rey, Mercedes; Pérez-Martínez, Manuel; Yáñez-Mó, María; Sancho, David; Cabrero, José Román; Barreiro, Olga; de la Fuente, Hortensia; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2003-07-15

    Regulation of actin polymerization is critical for many different functions of T lymphocytes, including cell migration. Here we show that the RhoA effector mDia is induced in vitro in activated PBL and is highly expressed in vivo in diseased tissue-infiltrating activated lymphocytes. mDia localizes at the leading edge of polarized T lymphoblasts in an area immediately posterior to the leading lamella, in which its effector protein profilin is also concentrated. Overexpression of an activated mutant of mDia results in an inhibition of both spontaneous and chemokine-directed T cell motility. mDia does not regulate the shape of the cell, which involves another RhoA effector, p160 Rho-coiled coil kinase, and is not involved in integrin-mediated cell adhesion. However, mDia activation blocked CD3- and PMA-mediated cell spreading. mDia activation increased polymerized actin levels, which resulted in the blockade of chemokine-induced actin polymerization by depletion of monomeric actin. Moreover, mDia was shown to regulate the function of the small GTPase Rac1 through the control of actin availability. Together, our data demonstrate that RhoA is involved in the control of the filamentous actin/monomeric actin balance through mDia, and that this balance is critical for T cell responses.

  18. Creation of biological module for self-regulating ecological system by the way of polymerization of composite materials in free space.

    PubMed

    Kondyurin, A; Lauke, B; Kondyurina, I; Orba, E

    2004-01-01

    The large-size frame of space ship and space station can be created with the use of the technology of the polymerization of fiber-filled composites and a liquid reactionable matrix applied in free space or on the other space body when the space ship or space station will be used during a long period of time. For the polymerization of the station frame the fabric impregnated with a long-life polymer matrix (prepreg) is prepared in terrestrial conditions and, after folding, can be shipped in a compact container to orbit and kept folded on board the station. In due time the prepreg is carried out into free space and unfolded. Then a reaction of matrix polymerization starts. After reaction of polymerization the durable frame is ready for exploitation. After that, the frame can be filled out with air, the apparatus and life support systems. The technology can be used for creation of biological frame as element of self regulating ecological system, and for creation of technological frame which can be used for a production of new materials on Earth orbit in microgravity conditions and on other space bodies (Mars, Moon, asteroids) for unique high price mineral extraction. Based on such technology a future space base on Earth orbit with volume of 10(6) m3 and a crew of 100 astronauts is considered.

  19. Polymeric microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Walt, David R.; Mandal, Tarun K.; Fleming, Michael S.

    2004-04-13

    The invention features core-shell microsphere compositions, hollow polymeric microspheres, and methods for making the microspheres. The microspheres are characterized as having a polymeric shell with consistent shell thickness.

  20. A novel transcriptional regulator of L-arabinose utilization in human gut bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Chang, Changsoo; Tesar, Christine; Li, Xiaoqing; ...

    2015-10-04

    We report that carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the ecophysiology of human gut microbiota. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of sugar catabolism in commensal and prevalent human gut bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron remain mostly unknown. By a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches, we have identified an NrtR family transcription factor (BT0354 in B. thetaiotaomicron, BtAraR) as a novel regulator controlling the arabinose utilization genes. L-arabinose was confirmed to be a negative effector of BtAraR. We have solved the crystal structures of the apo and L-arabinose-bound BtAraR proteins, as well as the complex of apo-protein with a specificmore » DNA operator. BtAraR forms a homodimer with each subunit comprised of the ligand-binding Nudix hydrolase-like domain and the DNA-binding winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain. We have identified the residues involved in binding of L-arabinose and recognition of DNA. The majority of these residues are well conserved in the AraR orthologs in Bacteroidetes. In the structure of the BtAraR–DNA complex, we found the unique interaction of arginine intercalating its guanidinum moiety into the base pair stacking of B-DNA. L-arabinose binding induces movement of wHTH domains, resulting in a conformation unsuitable for DNA binding. Furthermore, our analysis facilitates reconstruction of the metabolic and regulatory networks involved in carbohydrate utilization in human gut Bacteroides.« less

  1. A novel transcriptional regulator of L-arabinose utilization in human gut bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Changsoo; Tesar, Christine; Li, Xiaoqing; Kim, Youngchang; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2015-10-04

    We report that carbohydrate metabolism plays a crucial role in the ecophysiology of human gut microbiota. Mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of sugar catabolism in commensal and prevalent human gut bacteria such as Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron remain mostly unknown. By a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches, we have identified an NrtR family transcription factor (BT0354 in B. thetaiotaomicron, BtAraR) as a novel regulator controlling the arabinose utilization genes. L-arabinose was confirmed to be a negative effector of BtAraR. We have solved the crystal structures of the apo and L-arabinose-bound BtAraR proteins, as well as the complex of apo-protein with a specific DNA operator. BtAraR forms a homodimer with each subunit comprised of the ligand-binding Nudix hydrolase-like domain and the DNA-binding winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) domain. We have identified the residues involved in binding of L-arabinose and recognition of DNA. The majority of these residues are well conserved in the AraR orthologs in Bacteroidetes. In the structure of the BtAraR–DNA complex, we found the unique interaction of arginine intercalating its guanidinum moiety into the base pair stacking of B-DNA. L-arabinose binding induces movement of wHTH domains, resulting in a conformation unsuitable for DNA binding. Furthermore, our analysis facilitates reconstruction of the metabolic and regulatory networks involved in carbohydrate utilization in human gut Bacteroides.

  2. N2 fixation in marine heterotrophic bacteria: dynamics of environmental and molecular regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Coyer, J A; Cabello-Pasini, A; Swift, H; Alberte, R S

    1996-01-01

    Molecular and immunological techniques were used to examine N2 fixation in a ubiquitous heterotrophic marine bacterium, the facultative anaerobic Vibrio natriegens. When batch cultures were shifted from aerobic N-replete to anaerobic N-deplete conditions, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of N2 fixation was observed. Levels of nifHDK mRNA encoding the nitrogenase enzyme were highest at 140 min postshift and undetectable between 6 and 9 h later. Immunologically determined levels of nitrogenase enzyme (Fe protein) were highest between 6 and 15 h postshift, and nitrogenase activity peaked between 6 and 9 h postshift, declining by a factor of 2 after 12-15 h. Unlike their regulation in cyanobacteria, Fe protein and nitrogenase activity were present when nifHDK mRNA was absent in V. natriegens, indicating that nitrogenase is stored and stable under anaerobic conditions. Both nifHDK mRNA and Fe protein disappeared within 40 min after cultures were shifted from N2-fixing conditions (anaerobic, N-deplete) to non- N2-fixing conditions (aerobic, N-enriched) but reappeared when shifted to conditions favoring N2 fixation. Thus, unlike other N2-fixing heterotrophic bacteria, nitrogenase must be resynthesized after aerobic exposure in V. natriegens. Immunological detection based on immunoblot (Western) analysis and immunogold labeling correlated positively with nitrogenase activity; no localization of nitrogenase was observed. Because V. natriegens continues to fix N2 for many hours after anaerobic induction, this species may play an important role in providing "new" nitrogen in marine ecosystems. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:11607653

  3. Regulation of the activity of lactate dehydrogenases from four lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Feldman-Salit, Anna; Hering, Silvio; Messiha, Hanan L; Veith, Nadine; Cojocaru, Vlad; Sieg, Antje; Westerhoff, Hans V; Kreikemeyer, Bernd; Wade, Rebecca C; Fiedler, Tomas

    2013-07-19

    Despite high similarity in sequence and catalytic properties, the l-lactate dehydrogenases (LDHs) in lactic acid bacteria (LAB) display differences in their regulation that may arise from their adaptation to different habitats. We combined experimental and computational approaches to investigate the effects of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), phosphate (Pi), and ionic strength (NaCl concentration) on six LDHs from four LABs studied at pH 6 and pH 7. We found that 1) the extent of activation by FBP (Kact) differs. Lactobacillus plantarum LDH is not regulated by FBP, but the other LDHs are activated with increasing sensitivity in the following order: Enterococcus faecalis LDH2 ≤ Lactococcus lactis LDH2 < E. faecalis LDH1 < L. lactis LDH1 ≤ Streptococcus pyogenes LDH. This trend reflects the electrostatic properties in the allosteric binding site of the LDH enzymes. 2) For L. plantarum, S. pyogenes, and E. faecalis, the effects of Pi are distinguishable from the effect of changing ionic strength by adding NaCl. 3) Addition of Pi inhibits E. faecalis LDH2, whereas in the absence of FBP, Pi is an activator of S. pyogenes LDH, E. faecalis LDH1, and L. lactis LDH1 and LDH2 at pH 6. These effects can be interpreted by considering the computed binding affinities of Pi to the catalytic and allosteric binding sites of the enzymes modeled in protonation states corresponding to pH 6 and pH 7. Overall, the results show a subtle interplay among the effects of Pi, FBP, and pH that results in different regulatory effects on the LDHs of different LABs.

  4. N2 fixation in marine heterotrophic bacteria: dynamics of environmental and molecular regulation.

    PubMed

    Coyer, J A; Cabello-Pasini, A; Swift, H; Alberte, R S

    1996-04-16

    Molecular and immunological techniques were used to examine N2 fixation in a ubiquitous heterotrophic marine bacterium, the facultative anaerobic Vibrio natriegens. When batch cultures were shifted from aerobic N-replete to anaerobic N-deplete conditions, transcriptional and post-translational regulation of N2 fixation was observed. Levels of nifHDK mRNA encoding the nitrogenase enzyme were highest at 140 min postshift and undetectable between 6 and 9 h later. Immunologically determined levels of nitrogenase enzyme (Fe protein) were highest between 6 and 15 h postshift, and nitrogenase activity peaked between 6 and 9 h postshift, declining by a factor of 2 after 12-15 h. Unlike their regulation in cyanobacteria, Fe protein and nitrogenase activity were present when nifHDK mRNA was absent in V. natriegens, indicating that nitrogenase is stored and stable under anaerobic conditions. Both nifHDK mRNA and Fe protein disappeared within 40 min after cultures were shifted from N2-fixing conditions (anaerobic, N-deplete) to non- N2-fixing conditions (aerobic, N-enriched) but reappeared when shifted to conditions favoring N2 fixation. Thus, unlike other N2-fixing heterotrophic bacteria, nitrogenase must be resynthesized after aerobic exposure in V. natriegens. Immunological detection based on immunoblot (Western) analysis and immunogold labeling correlated positively with nitrogenase activity; no localization of nitrogenase was observed. Because V. natriegens continues to fix N2 for many hours after anaerobic induction, this species may play an important role in providing "new" nitrogen in marine ecosystems.

  5. The role of commensal bacteria in the regulation of sensitization to food allergens

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Severine; Feehley, Taylor J.; Nagler, Cathryn R.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of life-threatening anaphylactic responses to food is rising at an alarming rate. The emerging role of the gut microbiota in regulating food allergen sensitization may help explain this trend. The mechanisms by which commensal bacteria influence sensitization to dietary antigens are only beginning to be explored. We have found that a population of mucosa-associated commensal anaerobes prevents food allergen sensitization by promoting an IL-22-dependent barrier protective immune response that limits the access of food allergens to the systemic circulation. This early response is followed by an adaptive immune response mediated in part by an expansion of Foxp3+ Tregs that fortifies the tolerogenic milieu needed to maintain non-responsiveness to food. Bacterial metabolites, such as short-chain fatty acids, may contribute to the process through their ability to promote Foxp3+ Treg differentiation. This work suggests that environmentally induced alterations of the gut microbiota offset the regulatory signals conferred by protective bacterial species to promote aberrant responses to food. Our research presents exciting new possibilities for preventing and treating food allergies based on interventions that modulate the composition of the gut microbiota. PMID:24791655

  6. Role of Protein Phosphorylation in the Regulation of Cell Cycle and DNA-Related Processes in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Garcia, Transito; Poncet, Sandrine; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Mijakovic, Ivan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise

    2016-01-01

    In all living organisms, the phosphorylation of proteins modulates various aspects of their functionalities. In eukaryotes, protein phosphorylation plays a key role in cell signaling, gene expression, and differentiation. Protein phosphorylation is also involved in the global control of DNA replication during the cell cycle, as well as in the mechanisms that cope with stress-induced replication blocks. Similar to eukaryotes, bacteria use Hanks-type kinases and phosphatases for signal transduction, and protein phosphorylation is involved in numerous cellular processes. However, it remains unclear whether protein phosphorylation in bacteria can also regulate the activity of proteins involved in DNA-mediated processes such as DNA replication or repair. Accumulating evidence supported by functional and biochemical studies suggests that phospho-regulatory mechanisms also take place during the bacterial cell cycle. Recent phosphoproteomics and interactomics studies identified numerous phosphoproteins involved in various aspect of DNA metabolism strongly supporting the existence of such level of regulation in bacteria. Similar to eukaryotes, bacterial scaffolding-like proteins emerged as platforms for kinase activation and signaling. This review reports the current knowledge on the phosphorylation of proteins involved in the maintenance of genome integrity and the regulation of cell cycle in bacteria that reveals surprising similarities to eukaryotes. PMID:26909079

  7. [Regulating acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria--a review].

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing

    2014-07-04

    As cell factories, lactic acid bacteria are widely used in food, agriculture, pharmaceutical and other industries. Acid stress is one the important survival challenges encountered by lactic acid bacteria both in fermentation process and in the gastrointestinal tract. Recently, the development of systems biology and metabolic engineering brings unprecedented opportunity for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and improving the acid stress resistance of lactic acid bacteria. This review addresses physiological mechanisms of lactic acid bacteria during acid stress. Moreover, strategies to improve the acid stress resistance of lactic acid were proposed.

  8. Overview of the gene regulation network and the bacteria biotope tasks in BioNLP'13 shared task

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background We present the two Bacteria Track tasks of BioNLP 2013 Shared Task (ST): Gene Regulation Network (GRN) and Bacteria Biotope (BB). These tasks were previously introduced in the 2011 BioNLP-ST Bacteria Track as Bacteria Gene Interaction (BI) and Bacteria Biotope (BB). The Bacteria Track was motivated by a need to develop specific BioNLP tools for fine-grained event extraction in bacteria biology. The 2013 tasks expand on the 2011 version by better addressing the biological knowledge modeling needs. New evaluation metrics were designed for the new goals. Moving beyond a list of gene interactions, the goal of the GRN task is to build a gene regulation network from the extracted gene interactions. BB'13 is dedicated to the extraction of bacteria biotopes, i.e. bacterial environmental information, as was BB'11. BB'13 extends the typology of BB'11 to a large diversity of biotopes, as defined by the OntoBiotope ontology. The detection of entities and events is tackled by distinct subtasks in order to measure the progress achieved by the participant systems since 2011. Results This paper details the corpus preparations and the evaluation metrics, as well as summarizing and discussing the participant results. Five groups participated in each of the two tasks. The high diversity of the participant methods reflects the dynamism of the BioNLP research community. The highest scores for the GRN and BB'13 tasks are similar to those obtained by the participants in 2011, despite of the increase in difficulty. The high density of events in short text segments (multi-event extraction) was a difficult issue for the participating systems for both tasks. The analysis of the BB'13 results also shows that co-reference resolution and entity boundary detection remain major hindrances. Conclusion The evaluation results suggest new research directions for the improvement and development of Information Extraction for molecular and environmental biology. The Bacteria Track tasks

  9. Diffusion-regulated phase-transfer catalysis for atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate in an aqueous/organic biphasic system.

    PubMed

    Ding, Mingqiang; Jiang, Xiaowu; Peng, Jinying; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2015-03-01

    A concept based on diffusion-regulated phase-transfer catalysis (DRPTC) in an aqueous-organic biphasic system with copper-mediated initiators for continuous activator regeneration is successfully developed for atom transfer radical polymerization (ICAR ATRP) (termed DRPTC-based ICAR ATRP here), using methyl methacrylate (MMA) as a model monomer, ethyl α-bromophenylacetate (EBrPA) as an initiator, and tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPMA) as a ligand. In this system, the monomer and initiating species in toluene (organic phase) and the catalyst complexes in water (aqueous phase) are simply mixed under stirring at room temperature. The trace catalyst complexes transfer into the organic phase via diffusion to trigger ICAR ATRP of MMA with ppm level catalyst content once the system is heated to the polymerization temperature (75 °C). It is found that well-defined PMMA with controlled molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions can be obtained easily. Furthermore, the polymerization can be conducted in the presence of limited amounts of air without using tedious degassed procedures. After cooling to room temperature, the upper organic phase is decanted and the lower aqueous phase is reused for another 10 recycling turnovers with ultra low loss of catalyst and ligand loading. At the same time, all the recycled catalyst complexes retain nearly perfect catalytic activity and controllability, indicating a facile and economical strategy for catalyst removal and recycling.

  10. Regulation of beta-galactoside transport and accumulation in heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Romano, A H; Brino, G; Peterkofsky, A; Reizer, J

    1987-01-01

    Galactose-grown cells of the heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus brevis and Lactobacillus buchneri transported methyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (TMG) by an active transport mechanism and accumulated intracellular free TMG when provided with an exogenous source of energy, such as arginine. The intracellular concentration of TMG resultant under these conditions was approximately 20-fold higher than that in the medium. In contrast, the provision of energy by metabolism of glucose, gluconate, or glucosamine promoted a rapid but transient uptake of TMG followed by efflux that established a low cellular concentration of the galactoside, i.e., only two- to fourfold higher than that in the medium. Furthermore, the addition of glucose to cells preloaded with TMG in the presence of arginine elicited a rapid efflux of the intracellular galactoside. The extent of cellular TMG displacement and the duration of the transient effect of glucose on TMG transport were related to the initial concentration of glucose in the medium. Exhaustion of glucose from the medium restored uptake and accumulation of TMG, providing arginine was available for ATP generation. The nonmetabolizable sugar 2-deoxyglucose elicited efflux of TMG from preloaded cells of L. buchneri but not from those of L. brevis. Phosphorylation of this glucose analog was catalyzed by cell extracts of L. buchneri but not by those of L. brevis. Iodoacetate, at a concentration that inhibits growth and ATP production from glucose, did not prevent efflux of cellular TMG elicited by glucose. The results suggested that a phosphorylated metabolite(s) at or above the level of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate was required to evoke displacement of intracellular TMG from the cells. Counterflow experiments suggested that glucose converted the active uptake of TMG in L. brevis to a facilitated diffusion mechanism that allowed equilibrium of TMG between the extra- and intracellular milieux. The means by which glucose

  11. Activated sludge filterability improvement by nitrifying bacteria abundance regulation in an adsorption membrane bioreactor (Ad-MBR).

    PubMed

    Sun, Fei-yun; Lv, Xiao-mei; Li, Ji; Peng, Zhong-yi; Li, Pu; Shao, Ming-fei

    2014-10-01

    Autotrophic nitrifying bacteria have its intrinsic properties including low EPS production, dense colonial structure and slow-growth rate, favoring the sludge filterability improvement. An adsorption-MBR (Ad-MBR) was developed to enrich nitrifier abundance in the MBR chamber by inlet C/N regulation, and its possible positive effect on sludge filterability and underlying mechanisms were investigated. By DNA extraction, PCR amplification and Illumina high-throughput pyrosequencing, the abundance of nitrifying bacteria was accurately quantified. More than 8.29% nitrifier abundance was achieved in Ad-MBR sludge, which was above three times of that in conventional MBR. Regulated C/N ratio and thereafter nitrifier abundance enrichment improved sludge filterability by altering sludge mixture and its supernatant properties, reflected by a good sludge settleability, a low supernatant viscosity and turbidity, a low supernatant organic substances concentration, and a small amount of strong hydrophobic fractional components, thus to profoundly improve sludge filterability and decelerate membrane fouling.

  12. Reduced platelets and bacteria adhesion on poly(ether ether ketone) by photoinduced and self-initiated graft polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, Takaharu; Kyomoto, Masayuki; Kakinoki, Sachiro; Yamaoka, Tetsuji; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    Aromatic poly(ether ether ketone) (PEEK) is a super engineering plastic, which has good mechanical properties and is resistant to physical and chemical stimuli. We have, therefore, attempted to use PEEK in cardiovascular devices. Synthetic cardiovascular devices require both high hemocompatibility and anti-inflammatory activity in addition to the mechanical properties. We modified the PEEK surface by photoinduced and self-initiated graft polymerization with 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC; PMPC-grafted PEEK) for obtaining good antithrombogenicity. Polymerization was carried out on the surface of PEEK under radiation of ultraviolet (UV) light during which we controlled monomer concentrations, temperatures, and UV intensities. The biological performance of the PMPC-grafted PEEK was examined and compared with that of unmodified PEEK. With increase in the thickness of the PMPC layer, the amount of fibrinogen adsorption decreased significantly in comparison to that in the case of unmodified PEEK. When placed in contact with human platelet-rich plasma, surface of the PMPC-grafted PEEK clearly showed inhibition of platelet adhesion and activation. Also, bacterial adhesion was reduced dramatically on the PMPC-grafted PEEK. Thus, the PMPC grafting on PEEK improved the antithrombogenicity.

  13. Coral-associated bacteria, quorum sensing disrupters, and the regulation of biofouling.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Karina; Pavlov, Valentina; Marks, Robert S; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    Marine biofouling, the settlement of microorganisms and macroorganisms on structures submerged in seawater, although economically detrimental, is a successful strategy for survival in hostile environments, where coordinated bacterial communities establish biofilms via the regulation of quorum sensing (QS) communication systems. The inhibition of QS activity among bacteria isolated from different coral species was investigated to gain further insight into its potency in the attenuation, or even the prevention, of undesirable biofouling on marine organisms. It is hypothesized that coral mucus/microorganism interactions are competitive, suggesting that the dominant communities secrete QS disruptive compounds. One hundred and twenty bacterial isolates were collected from healthy coral species and screened for their ability to inhibit QS using three bioreporter strains. Approximately 12, 11, and 24% of the isolates exhibited anti-QS activity against Escherichia coli pSB1075, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens KYC55 indicator strains, respectively. Isolates with positive activity against the bioluminescent monitor strains were scanned via a cytotoxic/genotoxic, E. coli TV1061 and DPD2794 antimicrobial panel. Isolates detected by C. violaceum CV026 and A. tumefaciens KYC55 reporter strains were tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of these reporter strains, which were found to be unaffected. Tests of the Favia sp. coral isolate Fav 2-50-7 (>98% similarity to Vibrio harveyi) for its ability to attenuate the formation of biofilm showed extensive inhibitory activity against biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. To ascertain the stability and general structure of the active compound, cell-free culture supernatants exposed to an increasing temperature gradient or to digestion by proteinase K, were shown to maintain potent QS attenuation and the ability to inhibit the growth of biofilms. Mass spectrometry confirmed

  14. Regulation by gut bacteria of immune response, Bacillus thuringiensis susceptibility and hemolin expression in Plodia interpunctella.

    PubMed

    Orozco-Flores, Alonso A; Valadez-Lira, Jose A; Oppert, Brenda; Gomez-Flores, Ricardo; Tamez-Guerra, Reyes; Rodríguez-Padilla, Cristina; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia

    2017-02-03

    Plodia interpunctella (Hübner) is an important stored grain insect pest worldwide, and the first lepidopteran with reported resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. Since gut bacteria may affect Bt insecticidal activity, we evaluated whether P. interpunctella lacking gut bacteria had differences in immune responses and susceptibility to the Bt formulation, Bactospeine. In order to clear gut bacteria, third instar larvae were reared on artificial diet containing antibiotics, or were obtained from sterilized eggs and reared under sterile conditions, and larvae were fed diets with or without Bt. Mortality was significantly lower (p<0.05) in bacteria-free larvae treated with Bt, compared with Bt-treated larvae with unaffected gut bacteria. The number of hemocytes was lower in control and Bt-treated larvae, but was significantly higher (p<0.001) in larvae treated with antibiotics and Bt, and larvae from presterilized eggs and reared on sterile diet had the highest number of hemocytes. Phenoloxidase activity was significantly lower (p<0.05) in Bt-treated larvae from presterilized eggs reared on antibiotics for 24h or in larvae reared on antibiotic-treated diets prior to Bt introduction compared with those fed control diet. Hemolin gene expression was reduced in larvae fed Bt diets compared with control and was not detected in larvae treated with antibiotics. Larvae from sterilized eggs and fed sterile diet never reached the pupal stage. Therefore, the loss of gut bacteria in P. interpunctella larvae affected the host immune response and expression of the hemolin gene, and significantly reduced susceptibility to Bt.

  15. A Flexible Binding Site Architecture Provides New Insights into CcpA Global Regulation in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunpeng; Zhang, Lu; Huang, He; Yang, Chen; Yang, Sheng

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Catabolite control protein A (CcpA) is the master regulator in Gram-positive bacteria that mediates carbon catabolite repression (CCR) and carbon catabolite activation (CCA), two fundamental regulatory mechanisms that enable competitive advantages in carbon catabolism. It is generally regarded that CcpA exerts its regulatory role by binding to a typical 14- to 16-nucleotide (nt) consensus site that is called a catabolite response element (cre) within the target regions. However, here we report a previously unknown noncanonical flexible architecture of the CcpA-binding site in solventogenic clostridia, providing new mechanistic insights into catabolite regulation. This novel CcpA-binding site, named crevar, has a unique architecture that consists of two inverted repeats and an intervening spacer, all of which are variable in nucleotide composition and length, except for a 6-bp core palindromic sequence (TGTAAA/TTTACA). It was found that the length of the intervening spacer of crevar can affect CcpA binding affinity, and moreover, the core palindromic sequence of crevar is the key structure for regulation. Such a variable architecture of crevar shows potential importance for CcpA’s diverse and fine regulation. A total of 103 potential crevar sites were discovered in solventogenic Clostridium acetobutylicum, of which 42 sites were picked out for electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs), and 30 sites were confirmed to be bound by CcpA. These 30 crevar sites are associated with 27 genes involved in many important pathways. Also of significance, the crevar sites are found to be widespread and function in a great number of taxonomically different Gram-positive bacteria, including pathogens, suggesting their global role in Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:28119470

  16. An optimized regulating method for composting phosphorus fractions transformation based on biochar addition and phosphate-solubilizing bacteria inoculation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuquan; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Huan; Lu, Qian; Cao, Zhenyu; Cui, Hongyang; Zhu, Longji; Wei, Zimin

    2016-12-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the influence of biochar and/or phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) inoculants on microbial biomass, bacterial community composition and phosphorus (P) fractions during kitchen waste composting amended with rock phosphate (RP). There were distinct differences in the physic-chemical parameters, the proportion of P fractions and bacterial diversity in different treatments. The contribution of available P fractions increased during composting especially in the treatment with the addition of PSB and biochar. Redundancy analysis showed that bacterial compositions were significantly influenced by P content, inoculation and biochar. Variance partitioning further showed that synergy of inoculated PSB and indigenous bacterial communities and the joint effect between biochar and bacteria explained the largest two proportion of the variation in P fractions. Therefore, the combined application of PSB and biochar to improve the inoculation effect and an optimized regulating method were suggested based on the distribution of P fractions.

  17. Formulations of polymeric biodegradable low-cost foam by melt extrusion to deliver plant growth-promoting bacteria in agricultural systems.

    PubMed

    Marcelino, Paulo Ricardo Franco; Milani, Karina Maria Lima; Mali, Suzana; Santos, Odair José Andrade Pais Dos; de Oliveira, André Luiz Martinez

    2016-08-01

    The extrusion technology of blends formed by compounds with different physicochemical properties often results in new materials that present properties distinctive from its original individual constituents. Here, we report the use of melt extrusion of blends made from low-cost materials to produce a biodegradable foam suitable for use as an inoculant carrier of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB). Six formulations were prepared with variable proportions of the raw materials; the resulting physicochemical and structural properties are described, as well as formulation performance in the maintenance of bacterial viability during 120 days of storage. Differences in blend composition influenced foam density, porosity, expansion index, and water absorption. Additionally, differences in the capability of sustaining bacterial viability for long periods of time were more related to the foam composition than to the resulting physicochemical characteristics. Microscopic analyses showed that the inoculant bacteria had firmly attached to the extruded material by forming biofilms. Inoculation assays using maize plants demonstrated that the bacteria attached to the extruded foams could survive in the soil for up to 10 days before maize sowing, without diminishing its ability to promote plant growth. The results presented demonstrate the viability of the new matrix as a biotechnological material for bacterial delivery not only in agriculture but also in other biotechnological applications, according to the selected bacterial strains.

  18. Zonulin Regulates Intestinal Permeability and Facilitates Enteric Bacteria Permeation in Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chuanwei; Gao, Min; Zhang, Wen; Chen, Caiyu; Zhou, Faying; Hu, Zhangxu; Zeng, Chunyu

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have reported an association between enteric bacteria and atherosclerosis. Bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene belong to Enterobacteriaceae have been detected in atherosclerotic plaques. How intestinal bacteria go into blood is not known. Zonulin reversibly modulate intestinal permeability (IP), the circulating zonulin levels were increased in diabetes, obesity, all of which are risk factors for atherosclerosis. It is unclear whether the circulating zonulin levels were changed in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and modulate IP. The 16S rRNA gene of bacteria in blood sample was checked by 454 pyrosequencing. The zonulin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The distribution of zonulin was detected by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. Bacteria and Caco-2 cell surface micro-structure were checked by transmission electron microscopy. A high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA gene can be detected in samples from CAD patients, most of them (99.4%) belong to Enterobacteriaceaes, eg. Rahnella. The plasma zonulin levels were significantly higher in CAD patients. Pseudomonas fluorescens exposure significantly increased zonulin expression and decreased IP in a time dependent manner. The elevated zonulin increase IP and may facilitate enteric translocation by disassembling the tight junctions, which might explain the observed high diversity of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in blood samples. PMID:27353603

  19. Tissue-specific activities of an immune signaling module regulate physiological responses to pathogenic and nutritional bacteria in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Shivers, Robert P; Kooistra, Tristan; Chu, Stephanie W; Pagano, Daniel J; Kim, Dennis H

    2009-10-22

    Microbes represent both an essential source of nutrition and a potential source of lethal infection to the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Immunity in C. elegans requires a signaling module comprised of orthologs of the mammalian Toll-interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain protein SARM, the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) ASK1, and MAPKK MKK3, which activates p38 MAPK. We determined that the SARM-ASK1-MKK3 module has dual tissue-specific roles in the C. elegans response to pathogens--in the cell-autonomous regulation of innate immunity and the neuroendocrine regulation of serotonin-dependent aversive behavior. SARM-ASK1-MKK3 signaling in the sensory nervous system also regulates egg-laying behavior that is dependent on bacteria provided as a nutrient source. Our data demonstrate that these physiological responses to bacteria share a common mechanism of signaling through the SARM-ASK1-MKK3 module and suggest the co-option of ancestral immune signaling pathways in the evolution of physiological responses to microbial pathogens and nutrients.

  20. Regulation of lysine biosynthesis and transport genes in bacteria: yet another RNA riboswitch?

    PubMed

    Rodionov, Dmitry A; Vitreschak, Alexey G; Mironov, Andrey A; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2003-12-01

    Comparative analysis of genes, operons and regulatory elements was applied to the lysine biosynthetic pathway in available bacterial genomes. We report identification of a lysine-specific RNA element, named the LYS element, in the regulatory regions of bacterial genes involved in biosynthesis and transport of lysine. Similarly to the previously described RNA regulatory elements for three vitamins (riboflavin, thiamin and cobalamin), purine and methionine regulons, this regulatory RNA structure is highly conserved on the sequence and structural levels. The LYS element includes regions of lysine-constitutive mutations previously identified in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. A possible mechanism of the lysine-specific riboswitch is similar to the previously defined mechanisms for the other metabolite-specific riboswitches and involves either transcriptional or translational attenuation in various groups of bacteria. Identification of LYS elements in Gram-negative gamma-proteobacteria, Gram-positive bacteria from the Bacillus/Clostridium group, and Thermotogales resulted in description of the previously uncharacterized lysine regulon in these bacterial species. Positional analysis of LYS elements led to identification of a number of new candidate lysine transporters, namely LysW, YvsH and LysXY. Finally, the most likely candidates for genes of lysine biosynthesis missing in Gram- positive bacteria were identified using the genome context analysis.

  1. Identification of TLR2/TLR6 signalling lactic acid bacteria for supporting immune regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chengcheng; Zhang, Qiuxiang; de Haan, Bart J.; Zhang, Hao; Faas, Marijke M.; de Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Although many lactic acid bacteria (LAB) influence the consumer’s immune status it is not completely understood how this is established. Bacteria-host interactions between bacterial cell-wall components and toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been suggested to play an essential role. Here we investigated the interaction between LABs with reported health effects and TLRs. By using cell-lines expressing single or combination of TLRs, we show that LABs can signal via TLR-dependent and independent pathways. The strains only stimulated and did not inhibit TLRs. We found that several strains such as L. plantarum CCFM634, L. plantarum CCFM734, L. fermentum CCFM381, L. acidophilus CCFM137, and S. thermophilus CCFM218 stimulated TLR2/TLR6. TLR2/TLR6 is essential in immune regulatory processes and of interest for prevention of diseases. Specificity of the TLR2/TLR6 stimulation was confirmed with blocking antibodies. Immunomodulatory properties of LABs were also studied by assessing IL-10 and IL-6 secretion patterns in bacteria-stimulated THP1-derived macrophages, which confirmed species and strain specific effects of the LABs. With this study we provide novel insight in LAB specific host-microbe interactions. Our data demonstrates that interactions between pattern recognition receptors such as TLRs is species and strain specific and underpins the importance of selecting specific strains for promoting specific health effects. PMID:27708357

  2. The mutual co-regulation of extracellular polymeric substances and iron ions in biocorrosion of cast iron pipes.

    PubMed

    Jin, Juntao; Guan, Yuntao

    2014-10-01

    New insights into the biocorrosion process may be gained through understanding of the interaction between extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and iron. Herein, the effect of iron ions on the formation of biofilms and production of EPS was investigated. Additionally, the impact of EPS on the corrosion of cast iron coupons was explored. The results showed that a moderate concentration of iron ions (0.06 mg/L) promoted both biofilm formation and EPS production. The presence of EPS accelerated corrosion during the initial stage, while inhibited corrosion at the later stage. The functional groups of EPS acted as electron shuttles to enable the binding of iron ions. Binding of iron ions with EPS led to anodic dissolution and promoted corrosion, while corrosion was later inhibited through oxygen reduction and availability of phosphorus from EPS. The presence of EPS also led to changes in crystalline phases of corrosion products.

  3. The Global Regulators Lrp, LeuO, and HexA Control Secondary Metabolism in Entomopathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Yvonne; Windhorst, Carina; Lu, Xiaojun; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Bode, Helge B.

    2017-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens TTO1 and Xenorhabdus nematophila HGB081 are insect pathogenic bacteria and producers of various structurally diverse bioactive natural products. In these entomopathogenic bacteria we investigated the role of the global regulators Lrp, LeuO, and HexA in the production of natural products. Lrp is a general activator of natural product biosynthesis in X. nematophila and for most compounds in TTO1. Microarray analysis confirmed these results in X. nematophila and enabled the identification of additional biosynthesis gene clusters (BGC) regulated by Lrp. Moreover, when promoters of two X. nematophila BGC were analyzed, transcriptional activation by Lrp was observed. In contrast, LeuO in X. nematophila and P. luminescens has both repressing and activating features, depending on the natural product examined. Furthermore, heterologous overexpression of leuO from X. nematophila in the closely related Xenorhabdus szentirmaii resulted in overproduction of several natural products including novel compounds. The presented findings could be of importance for establishing a tool for overproduction of secondary metabolites and subsequent identification of novel compounds. PMID:28261170

  4. The Global Regulators Lrp, LeuO, and HexA Control Secondary Metabolism in Entomopathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Engel, Yvonne; Windhorst, Carina; Lu, Xiaojun; Goodrich-Blair, Heidi; Bode, Helge B

    2017-01-01

    Photorhabdus luminescens TTO1 and Xenorhabdus nematophila HGB081 are insect pathogenic bacteria and producers of various structurally diverse bioactive natural products. In these entomopathogenic bacteria we investigated the role of the global regulators Lrp, LeuO, and HexA in the production of natural products. Lrp is a general activator of natural product biosynthesis in X. nematophila and for most compounds in TTO1. Microarray analysis confirmed these results in X. nematophila and enabled the identification of additional biosynthesis gene clusters (BGC) regulated by Lrp. Moreover, when promoters of two X. nematophila BGC were analyzed, transcriptional activation by Lrp was observed. In contrast, LeuO in X. nematophila and P. luminescens has both repressing and activating features, depending on the natural product examined. Furthermore, heterologous overexpression of leuO from X. nematophila in the closely related Xenorhabdus szentirmaii resulted in overproduction of several natural products including novel compounds. The presented findings could be of importance for establishing a tool for overproduction of secondary metabolites and subsequent identification of novel compounds.

  5. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Iñigo; Novick, Richard P; Christie, Gail E; Penadés, José R

    2013-08-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria.

  6. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P.; Christie, Gail E.; Penadés, José R.

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23771138

  7. Polymeric nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bolhassani, Azam; Javanzad, Shabnam; Saleh, Tayebeh; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad Reza; Sadat, Seyed Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Nanocarriers with various compositions and biological properties have been extensively applied for in vitro/in vivo drug and gene delivery. The family of nanocarriers includes polymeric nanoparticles, lipid-based carriers (liposomes/micelles), dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, and gold nanoparticles (nanoshells/nanocages). Among different delivery systems, polymeric carriers have several properties such as: easy to synthesize, inexpensive, biocompatible, biodegradable, non-immunogenic, non-toxic, and water soluble. In addition, cationic polymers seem to produce more stable complexes led to a more protection during cellular trafficking than cationic lipids. Nanoparticles often show significant adjuvant effects in vaccine delivery since they may be easily taken up by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Natural polymers such as polysaccharides and synthetic polymers have demonstrated great potential to form vaccine nanoparticles. The development of new adjuvants or delivery systems for DNA and protein immunization is an expanding research field. This review describes polymeric carriers especially PLGA, chitosan, and PEI as vaccine delivery systems. PMID:24128651

  8. Regulation Systems of Bacteria such as Escherichia coli in Response to Nutrient Limitation and Environmental Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    An overview was made to understand the regulation system of a bacterial cell such as Escherichia coli in response to nutrient limitation such as carbon, nitrogen, phosphate, sulfur, ion sources, and environmental stresses such as oxidative stress, acid shock, heat shock, and solvent stresses. It is quite important to understand how the cell detects environmental signals, integrate such information, and how the cell system is regulated. As for catabolite regulation, F1,6B P (FDP), PEP, and PYR play important roles in enzyme level regulation together with transcriptional regulation by such transcription factors as Cra, Fis, CsrA, and cAMP-Crp. αKG plays an important role in the coordinated control between carbon (C)- and nitrogen (N)-limitations, where αKG inhibits enzyme I (EI) of phosphotransferase system (PTS), thus regulating the glucose uptake rate in accordance with N level. As such, multiple regulation systems are co-ordinated for the cell synthesis and energy generation against nutrient limitations and environmental stresses. As for oxidative stress, the TCA cycle both generates and scavenges the reactive oxygen species (ROSs), where NADPH produced at ICDH and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathways play an important role in coping with oxidative stress. Solvent resistant mechanism was also considered for the stresses caused by biofuels and biochemicals production in the cell. PMID:24958385

  9. Alkali-treated titanium selectively regulating biological behaviors of bacteria, cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Guifang; Wang, Donghui; Wu, Qianju; Jiang, Xinquan; Liu, Xuanyong

    2014-12-15

    Many attentions have been paid to the beneficial effect of alkali-treated titanium to bioactivity and osteogenic activity, but few to the other biological effect. In this work, hierarchical micro/nanopore films were prepared on titanium surface by acid etching and alkali treatment and their biological effects on bacteria, cancer cells and mesenchymal stem cells were investigated. Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus, Gram-negative Escherichia coli, and human cholangiocarcinoma cell line RBE were used to investigate whether alkali-treated titanium can influence behaviors of bacteria and cancer cells. Responses of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) to alkali-treated titanium were also subsequently investigated. The alkali-treated titanium can potently reduce bacterial adhesion, inhibit RBE and BMMSCs proliferation, while can better promote BMMSCs osteogenesis and angiogenesis than acid-etched titanium. The bacteriostatic ability of the alkali-treated titanium is proposed to result from the joint effect of micro/nanotopography and local pH increase at bacterium/material interface due to the hydrolysis of alkali (earth) metal titanate salts. The inhibitory action of cell proliferation is thought to be the effect of local pH increase at cell/material interface which causes the alkalosis of cells. This alkalosis model reported in this work will help to understand the biologic behaviors of various cells on alkali-treated titanium surface and design the intended biomedical applications.

  10. Structure, Function, and Regulation of Antenna Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Robert E. Blankenship

    2001-04-27

    This project is concerned with the structure and function of the chlorosome antennas found in green photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes are ellipsoidal structures attached to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane. These antenna complexes provide a very large absorption cross section for light capture. Evidence is overwhelming that the chlorosome represents a very different type of antenna from that found in any other photosynthetic system yet studied. It is now clear that chlorosomes do not contain traditional pigment-proteins, in which the pigments bind to specific sites on proteins. Instead, the chlorosome pigments are organized in vivo into pigment oligomers in which direct pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. Our group has used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate this unique system, including model systems, ultrafast spectroscopy, molecular biology, protein chemistry and X-ray crystallography.

  11. A combination of lactic acid bacteria regulates Escherichia coli infection and inflammation of the bovine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Genís, Sandra; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Bach, Àlex; Fàbregas, Francesc; Arís, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Uterine function in cattle is compromised by bacterial contamination and inflammation after calving. The objective of this study was to select a combination of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) to decrease endometrium inflammation and Escherichia coli infection. Primary endometrial epithelial cells were cultured in vitro to select the most favorable LAB combination modulating basal tissue inflammation and E. coli infection. Supernatants were obtained to determine expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and E. coli infection was evaluated after harvesting the tissue and plate counting. The selected LAB combination was tested in uterus explants to assess its capacity to modulate basal and acute inflammation (associated with E. coli infection). The combination of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus acidilactici, and Lactobacillus reuteri at a ratio of 25:25:2, respectively, reduced E. coli infection in vitro with (89.77%) or without basal tissue inflammation (95.10%) compared with single LAB strains. Lactic acid bacteria treatment reduced CXCL8 and IL1B expression 4.7- and 2.2-fold, respectively, under acute inflammation. Ex vivo, the tested LAB combination reduced acute inflammation under E. coli infection, decreasing IL-8, IL-1β, and IL-6 up to 2.2-, 2.5-, and 2.2-fold, respectively. In the total inflammation model, the LAB combination decreased IL-8 1.6-fold and IL-6 1.2-fold. Ultrastructural evaluation of the tissue suggested no direct interaction between the LAB and E. coli, although pathological effects of E. coli in endometrial cells were greatly diminished or even reversed by the LAB combination. This study shows the promising potential of LAB probiotics for therapeutic use against endometrial inflammation and infection.

  12. RNA-binding proteins involved in post-transcriptional regulation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Van Assche, Elke; Van Puyvelde, Sandra; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steenackers, Hans P.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is a very important mechanism to control gene expression in changing environments. In the past decade, a lot of interest has been directed toward the role of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacterial post-transcriptional regulation. However, sRNAs are not the only molecules controlling gene expression at this level, RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play an important role as well. CsrA and Hfq are the two best studied bacterial proteins of this type, but recently, additional proteins involved in post-transcriptional control have been identified. This review focuses on the general working mechanisms of post-transcriptionally active RBPs, which include (i) adaptation of the susceptibility of mRNAs and sRNAs to RNases, (ii) modulating the accessibility of the ribosome binding site of mRNAs, (iii) recruiting and assisting in the interaction of mRNAs with other molecules and (iv) regulating transcription terminator/antiterminator formation, and gives an overview of both the well-studied and the newly identified proteins that are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory processes. Additionally, the post-transcriptional mechanisms by which the expression or the activity of these proteins is regulated, are described. For many of the newly identified proteins, however, mechanistic questions remain. Most likely, more post-transcriptionally active proteins will be identified in the future. PMID:25784899

  13. Gene regulation of plasmid- and chromosome-determined inorganic ion transport in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Silver, S; Walderhaug, M

    1992-01-01

    Regulation of chromosomally determined nutrient cation and anion uptake systems shows important similarities to regulation of plasmid-determined toxic ion resistance systems that mediate the outward transport of deleterious ions. Chromosomally determined transport systems result in accumulation of K+, Mg2+, Fe3+, Mn2+, PO4(3-), SO4(2-), and additional trace nutrients, while bacterial plasmids harbor highly specific resistance systems for AsO2-, AsO4(3-), CrO4(2-), Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, SbO2-, TeO3(2-), Zn2+, and other toxic ions. To study the regulation of these systems, we need to define both the trans-acting regulatory proteins and the cis-acting target operator DNA regions for the proteins. The regulation of gene expression for K+ and PO4(3-) transport systems involves two-component sensor-effector pairs of proteins. The first protein responds to an extracellular ionic (or related) signal and then transmits the signal to an intracellular DNA-binding protein. Regulation of Fe3+ transport utilizes the single iron-binding and DNA-binding protein Fur. The MerR regulatory protein for mercury resistance both represses and activates transcription. The ArsR regulatory protein functions as a repressor for the arsenic and antimony(III) efflux system. Although the predicted cadR regulatory gene has not been identified, cadmium, lead, bismuth, zinc, and cobalt induce this system in a carefully regulated manner from a single mRNA start site. The cadA Cd2+ resistance determinant encodes an E1(1)-1E2-class efflux ATPase (consisting of two polypeptides, rather than the one earlier identified). Cadmium resistance is also conferred by the czc system (which confers resistances to zinc and cobalt in Alcaligenes species) via a complex efflux pump consisting of four polypeptides. These two cadmium efflux systems are not otherwise related. For chromate resistance, reduced cellular accumulation is again the resistance mechanism, but the regulatory components are not identified

  14. Potential of lactic acid bacteria at regulating Escherichia coli infection and inflammation of bovine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Genís, Sandra; Bach, Àlex; Fàbregas, Francesc; Arís, Anna

    2016-03-01

    About 40% of dairy cattle develop uterine disease during postpartum period, causing infertility. Some studies indicate that uterine infection, predominantly by Escherichia coli in the first week postpartum, is associated with metritis, an uterus inflammation in which the cow fails to completely clear bacterial contaminants. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of four lactic acid bacteria (LAB) (Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Pediococcus acidilactici, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Lactobacillus sakei) to modulate the E coli infection and inflammation in endometrial cells. Primary endometrial epithelial cells were isolated from fresh endometrium of a healthy cow and cultured in vitro to evaluate the effects of LAB at three different doses. Cell extracts were obtained to analyze the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and to quantify E coli infection on MacConkey agar plates. L sakei and L reuteri showed a positive effect preventing E coli infection (87% and 78%, respectively, P < 0.001); however, they were also associated to a dose-variable effect on tissular inflammation that could further exacerbate the proinflammatory status. Infection of E coli was clearly reduced (P < 0.001) up to an 83% with P acidilactici, whereas, the expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-1β dropped significantly (P < 0.001) up to 85.11 and 5.24 folds, respectively, in the presence of L rhamnosus. In conclusion, these results demonstrate a clear potential of some LAB in the modulation of endometrial infection and inflammation in cattle.

  15. An Ancient Riboswitch Class in Bacteria Regulates Purine Biosynthesis and One-carbon Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Peter B.; Nelson, James W.; Breaker, Ronald R.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Over thirty years ago, ZTP (5-amino-4-imidazole carboxamide riboside 5'-triphosphate), a modified purine biosynthetic intermediate, was proposed to signal 10-formyl-tetrahydrofolate (10f-THF) deficiency in bacteria. However, the mechanisms by which this putative alarmone or its precursor ZMP (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide, also known as AICAR) brings about any metabolic changes remain unexplained. Herein we report the existence of a widespread riboswitch class that is most commonly associated with genes related to de novo purine biosynthesis and one carbon metabolism. Biochemical data confirms that members of this riboswitch class selectively bind ZMP and ZTP with nanomolar affinity, while strongly rejecting numerous natural analogs. Indeed, increases in the ZMP/ZTP pool, caused by folate stress in bacterial cells, trigger changes in the expression of a reporter gene fused to representative ZTP riboswitches in vivo. The wide distribution of this riboswitch class suggests that ZMP/ZTP signaling is important for species in numerous bacterial lineages. PMID:25616067

  16. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Secretes Compounds That Mimic Bacterial Signals and Interfere with Quorum Sensing Regulation in Bacteria1

    PubMed Central

    Teplitski, Max; Chen, Hancai; Rajamani, Sathish; Gao, Mengsheng; Merighi, Massimo; Sayre, Richard T.; Robinson, Jayne B.; Rolfe, Barry G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    2004-01-01

    The unicellular soil-freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was found to secrete substances that mimic the activity of the N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules used by many bacteria for quorum sensing regulation of gene expression. More than a dozen chemically separable but unidentified substances capable of specifically stimulating the LasR or CepR but not the LuxR, AhyR, or CviR AHL bacterial quorum sensing reporter strains were detected in ethyl acetate extracts of C. reinhardtii culture filtrates. Colonies of C. reinhardtii and Chlorella spp. stimulated quorum sensing-dependent luminescence in Vibrio harveyi, indicating that these algae may produce compounds that affect the AI-2 furanosyl borate diester-mediated quorum sensing system of Vibrio spp. Treatment of the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti with a partially purified LasR mimic from C. reinhardtii affected the accumulation of 16 of the 25 proteins that were altered in response to the bacterium's own AHL signals, providing evidence that the algal mimic affected quorum sensing-regulated functions in this wild-type bacterium. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified 32 proteins affected by the bacterium's AHLs or the purified algal mimic, including GroEL chaperonins, the nitrogen regulatory protein PII, and a GTP-binding protein. The algal mimic was able to cancel the stimulatory effects of bacterial AHLs on the accumulation of seven of these proteins, providing evidence that the secretion of AHL mimics by the alga could be effective in disruption of quorum sensing in naturally encountered bacteria. PMID:14671013

  17. A bioinformatic survey of distribution, conservation, and probable functions of LuxR solo regulators in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Florez Salcedo, Diana Vanessa; Suarez-Moreno, Zulma R

    2015-01-01

    LuxR solo transcriptional regulators contain both an autoinducer binding domain (ABD; N-terminal) and a DNA binding Helix-Turn-Helix domain (HTH; C-terminal), but are not associated with a cognate N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase coding gene in the same genome. Although a few LuxR solos have been characterized, their distributions as well as their role in bacterial signal perception and other processes are poorly understood. In this study we have carried out a systematic survey of distribution of all ABD containing LuxR transcriptional regulators (QS domain LuxRs) available in the InterPro database (IPR005143), and identified those lacking a cognate AHL synthase. These LuxR solos were then analyzed regarding their taxonomical distribution, predicted functions of neighboring genes and the presence of complete AHL-QS systems in the genomes that carry them. Our analyses reveal the presence of one or multiple predicted LuxR solos in many proteobacterial genomes carrying QS domain LuxRs, some of them harboring genes for one or more AHL-QS circuits. The presence of LuxR solos in bacteria occupying diverse environments suggests potential ecological functions for these proteins beyond AHL and interkingdom signaling. Based on gene context and the conservation levels of invariant amino acids of ABD, we have classified LuxR solos into functionally meaningful groups or putative orthologs. Surprisingly, putative LuxR solos were also found in a few non-proteobacterial genomes which are not known to carry AHL-QS systems. Multiple predicted LuxR solos in the same genome appeared to have different levels of conservation of invariant amino acid residues of ABD questioning their binding to AHLs. In summary, this study provides a detailed overview of distribution of LuxR solos and their probable roles in bacteria with genome sequence information.

  18. A bioinformatic survey of distribution, conservation, and probable functions of LuxR solo regulators in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Florez Salcedo, Diana Vanessa; Suarez-Moreno, Zulma R.

    2015-01-01

    LuxR solo transcriptional regulators contain both an autoinducer binding domain (ABD; N-terminal) and a DNA binding Helix-Turn-Helix domain (HTH; C-terminal), but are not associated with a cognate N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthase coding gene in the same genome. Although a few LuxR solos have been characterized, their distributions as well as their role in bacterial signal perception and other processes are poorly understood. In this study we have carried out a systematic survey of distribution of all ABD containing LuxR transcriptional regulators (QS domain LuxRs) available in the InterPro database (IPR005143), and identified those lacking a cognate AHL synthase. These LuxR solos were then analyzed regarding their taxonomical distribution, predicted functions of neighboring genes and the presence of complete AHL-QS systems in the genomes that carry them. Our analyses reveal the presence of one or multiple predicted LuxR solos in many proteobacterial genomes carrying QS domain LuxRs, some of them harboring genes for one or more AHL-QS circuits. The presence of LuxR solos in bacteria occupying diverse environments suggests potential ecological functions for these proteins beyond AHL and interkingdom signaling. Based on gene context and the conservation levels of invariant amino acids of ABD, we have classified LuxR solos into functionally meaningful groups or putative orthologs. Surprisingly, putative LuxR solos were also found in a few non-proteobacterial genomes which are not known to carry AHL-QS systems. Multiple predicted LuxR solos in the same genome appeared to have different levels of conservation of invariant amino acid residues of ABD questioning their binding to AHLs. In summary, this study provides a detailed overview of distribution of LuxR solos and their probable roles in bacteria with genome sequence information. PMID:25759807

  19. Myosin light chain kinase-regulated endothelial cell contraction: the relationship between isometric tension, actin polymerization, and myosin phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The phosphorylation of regulatory myosin light chains by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent enzyme myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) has been shown to be essential and sufficient for initiation of endothelial cell retraction in saponin permeabilized monolayers (Wysolmerski, R. B. and D. Lagunoff. 1990. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 87:16-20). We now report the effects of thrombin stimulation on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVE) actin, myosin II and the functional correlate of the activated actomyosin based contractile system, isometric tension development. Using a newly designed isometric tension apparatus, we recorded quantitative changes in isometric tension from paired monolayers. Thrombin stimulation results in a rapid sustained isometric contraction that increases 2- to 2.5-fold within 5 min and remains elevated for at least 60 min. The phosphorylatable myosin light chains from HUVE were found to exist as two isoforms, differing in their molecular weights and isoelectric points. Resting isometric tension is associated with a basal phosphorylation of 0.54 mol PO4/mol myosin light chain. After thrombin treatment, phosphorylation rapidly increases to 1.61 mol PO4/mol myosin light chain within 60 s and remains elevated for the duration of the experiment. Myosin light chain phosphorylation precedes the development of isometric tension and maximal phosphorylation is maintained during the sustained phase of isometric contraction. Tryptic phosphopeptide maps from both control and thrombin-stimulated cultures resolve both monophosphorylated Ser-19 and diphosphorylated Ser-19/Thr-18 peptides indicative of MLCK activation. Changes in the polymerization of actin and association of myosin II correlate temporally with the phosphorylation of myosin II and development of isometric tension. Activation results in a 57% increase in F-actin content within 90 s and 90% of the soluble myosin II associates with the reorganizing F-actin. Furthermore, the disposition of actin and

  20. A Balance of Capping Protein and Profilin Functions Is Required to Regulate Actin Polymerization in Drosophila Bristle

    PubMed Central

    Hopmann, Roberta; Miller, Kathryn G.

    2003-01-01

    Profilin is a well-characterized protein known to be important for regulating actin filament assembly. Relatively few studies have addressed how profilin interacts with other actin-binding proteins in vivo to regulate assembly of complex actin structures. To investigate the function of profilin in the context of a differentiating cell, we have studied an instructive genetic interaction between mutations in profilin (chickadee) and capping protein (cpb). Capping protein is the principal protein in cells that caps actin filament barbed ends. When its function is reduced in the Drosophila bristle, F-actin levels increase and the actin cytoskeleton becomes disorganized, causing abnormal bristle morphology. chickadee mutations suppress the abnormal bristle phenotype and associated abnormalities of the actin cytoskeleton seen in cpb mutants. Furthermore, overexpression of profilin in the bristle mimics many features of the cpb loss-of-function phenotype. The interaction between cpb and chickadee suggests that profilin promotes actin assembly in the bristle and that a balance between capping protein and profilin activities is important for the proper regulation of F-actin levels. Furthermore, this balance of activities affects the association of actin structures with the membrane, suggesting a link between actin filament dynamics and localization of actin structures within the cell. PMID:12529431

  1. Concentrations of antibiotics predicted to select for resistant bacteria: Proposed limits for environmental regulation.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson-Palme, Johan; Larsson, D G Joakim

    2016-01-01

    There are concerns that selection pressure from antibiotics in the environment may accelerate the evolution and dissemination of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Nevertheless, there is currently no regulatory system that takes such risks into account. In part, this is due to limited knowledge of environmental concentrations that might exert selection for resistant bacteria. To experimentally determine minimal selective concentrations in complex microbial ecosystems for all antibiotics would involve considerable effort. In this work, our aim was to estimate upper boundaries for selective concentrations for all common antibiotics, based on the assumption that selective concentrations a priori need to be lower than those completely inhibiting growth. Data on Minimal Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) were obtained for 111 antibiotics from the public EUCAST database. The 1% lowest observed MICs were identified, and to compensate for limited species coverage, predicted lowest MICs adjusted for the number of tested species were extrapolated through modeling. Predicted No Effect Concentrations (PNECs) for resistance selection were then assessed using an assessment factor of 10 to account for differences between MICs and minimal selective concentrations. The resulting PNECs ranged from 8 ng/L to 64 μg/L. Furthermore, the link between taxonomic similarity between species and lowest MIC was weak. This work provides estimated upper boundaries for selective concentrations (lowest MICs) and PNECs for resistance selection for all common antibiotics. In most cases, PNECs for selection of resistance were below available PNECs for ecotoxicological effects. The generated PNECs can guide implementation of compound-specific emission limits that take into account risks for resistance promotion.

  2. pH regulates ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in paddy soils in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Weng, Bo-Sen; Huang, Fu-Yi; Su, Jian-Qiang; Yang, Xiao-Ru

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) play important roles in nitrogen cycling. However, the effects of environmental factors on the activity, abundance, and diversity of AOA and AOB and the relative contributions of these two groups to nitrification in paddy soils are not well explained. In this study, potential nitrification activity (PNA), abundance, and diversity of amoA genes from 12 paddy soils in Southern China were determined by potential nitrification assay, quantitative PCR, and cloning. The results showed that PNA was highly variable between paddy soils, ranging from 4.05 ± 0.21 to 9.81 ± 1.09 mg NOx-N kg(-1) dry soil day(-1), and no significant correlation with soil parameters was found. The abundance of AOA was predominant over AOB, indicating that AOA may be the major members in aerobic ammonia oxidation in these paddy soils. Community compositions of AOA and AOB were highly variable among samples, but the variations were best explained by pH. AOA sequences were affiliated to the Nitrosopumilus cluster and Nitrososphaera cluster, and AOB were classified into the lineages of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas, with Nitrosospira being predominant over Nitrosomonas, accounting for 83.6 % of the AOB community. Moreover, the majority of Nitrosomonas was determined in neutral soils. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) analysis further demonstrated that AOA and AOB community structures were significantly affected by pH, soil total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and C/N ratio, suggesting that these factors exert strong effects on the distribution of AOB and AOA in paddy soils in Southern China. In conclusion, our results imply that soil pH was a key explanatory variable for both AOA and AOB community structure and nitrification activity.

  3. Cell density-regulated recovery of starved biofilm populations of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Batchelor, S E; Cooper, M; Chhabra, S R; Glover, L A; Stewart, G S; Williams, P; Prosser, J I

    1997-01-01

    The speed of recovery of cell suspensions and biofilm populations of the ammonia oxidizer Nitrosomonas europaea, following starvation was determined. Stationary-phase cells, washed and resuspended in ammoniumfree inorganic medium, were starved for periods of up to 42 days, after which the medium was supplemented with ammonium and subsequent growth was monitored by measuring nitrite concentration changes. Cultures exhibited a lag phase prior to exponential nitrite production, which increased from 8.72 h (no starvation) to 153 h after starvation for 42 days. Biofilm populations of N. europaea colonizing sand or soil particles in continuous-flow, fixed column reactors were starved by continuous supply of ammonium-free medium. Following resupply of ammonium, starved biofilms exhibited no lag phase prior to nitrite production, even after starvation for 43.2 days, although there was evidence of cell loss during starvation. Biofilm formation will therefore provide a significant ecological advantage for ammonia oxidizers in natural environments in which the substrate supply is intermittent. Cell density-dependent phenomena in a number of gram-negative bacteria are mediated by N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL), including N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (OHHL). Addition of both ammonium and OHHL to cell suspensions starved for 28 days decreased the lag phase in a concentration-dependent manner from 53.4 h to a minimum of 10.8 h. AHL production by N. europaea was detected by using a luxR-luxAB AHL reporter system. The results suggest that rapid recovery of high-density biofilm populations may be due to production and accumulation of OHHL to levels not possible in relatively low-density cell suspensions. PMID:9172348

  4. Regulation of dynamic polarity switching in bacteria by a Ras-like G-protein and its cognate GAP.

    PubMed

    Leonardy, Simone; Miertzschke, Mandy; Bulyha, Iryna; Sperling, Eva; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2010-07-21

    The rod-shaped cells of the bacterium Myxococcus xanthus move uni-directionally and occasionally undergo reversals during which the leading/lagging polarity axis is inverted. Cellular reversals depend on pole-to-pole relocation of motility proteins that localize to the cell poles between reversals. We show that MglA is a Ras-like G-protein and acts as a nucleotide-dependent molecular switch to regulate motility and that MglB represents a novel GTPase-activating protein (GAP) family and is the cognate GAP of MglA. Between reversals, MglA/GTP is restricted to the leading and MglB to the lagging pole defining the leading/lagging polarity axis. For reversals, the Frz chemosensory system induces the relocation of MglA/GTP to the lagging pole causing an inversion of the leading/lagging polarity axis. MglA/GTP stimulates motility by establishing correct polarity of motility proteins between reversals and reversals by inducing their pole-to-pole relocation. Thus, the function of Ras-like G-proteins and their GAPs in regulating cell polarity is found not only in eukaryotes, but also conserved in bacteria.

  5. Theoretical models for the regulation of DNA replication in fast-growing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutziger, Martin; Schmidt, Mischa; Lenz, Peter

    2012-09-01

    Growing in always changing environments, Escherichia coli cells are challenged by the task to coordinate growth and division. In particular, adaption of their growth program to the surrounding medium has to guarantee that the daughter cells obtain fully replicated chromosomes. Replication is therefore to be initiated at the right time, which is particularly challenging in media that support fast growth. Here, the mother cell initiates replication not only for the daughter but also for the granddaughter cells. This is possible only if replication occurs from several replication forks that all need to be correctly initiated. Despite considerable efforts during the last 40 years, regulation of this process is still unknown. Part of the difficulty arises from the fact that many details of the relevant molecular processes are not known. Here, we develop a novel theoretical strategy for dealing with this general problem: instead of analyzing a single model, we introduce a wide variety of 128 different models that make different assumptions about the unknown processes. By comparing the predictions of these models we are able to identify the key quantities that allow the experimental discrimination of the different models. Analysis of these quantities yields that out of the 128 models 94 are not consistent with available experimental data. From the remaining 34 models we are able to conclude that mass growth and DNA replication need either to be truly coupled, by coupling DNA replication initiation to the event of cell division, or to the amount of accumulated mass. Finally, we make suggestions for experiments to further reduce the number of possible regulation scenarios.

  6. Antigen-specific Treg regulate Th17-mediated lung neutrophilic inflammation, B cell recruitment and polymeric IgA and IgM levels in the airways

    PubMed Central

    Jaffar, Zeina; Ferrini, Maria E.; Girtsman, Teri A.; Roberts, Kevan

    2010-01-01

    Summary Th17 cells play key roles in mediating autoimmunity, inflammation and mucosal host defense against pathogens. To determine whether naturally occurring Treg (nTreg) limit Th17-mediated pulmonary inflammation, OVA-specific CD4+ Th17 cells and expanded CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ nTreg were cotransferred into BALB/c mice that were then exposed to OVA aerosols. Th17 cells, when transferred alone, accumulated in the lungs and posterior mediastinal LN and evoked a pronounced airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and neutrophilic inflammation, characterized by B cell recruitment and elevated IgA and IgM levels. Cotransfer of antigen-specific nTreg markedly reduced the Th17-induced pulmonary inflammation and associated neutrophilia, B cell influx and polymeric Ig levels in the airways, but did not inhibit AHR. Moreover, the regulation appeared restricted to the site of mucosal inflammation, since transfer of nTreg did not affect the Th17 response developing in the lung draining LN, as evidenced by unaltered levels of IL-17 production and low numbers of Foxp3+ Treg. Our findings suggest a crucial role for Th17 cells in mediating airway B cell influx and IgA response and demonstrate that antigen-specific nTreg suppress Th17-mediated lung inflammation. These results provide new insights into how Th17 responses are limited and may facilitate development of novel approaches for controlling Th17-induced inflammation. PMID:19830731

  7. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  8. Biokompatible Polymere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Suk-Woo; Wintermantel, Erich; Maier, Gerhard

    Der klinische Einsatz von synthetischen Polymeren begann in den 60-er Jahren in Form von Einwegartikeln, wie beispielsweise Spritzen und Kathetern, vor allem aufgrund der Tatsache, dass Infektionen infolge nicht ausreichender Sterilität der wiederverwendbaren Artikel aus Glas und metallischen Werkstoffen durch den Einsatz von sterilen Einwegartikeln signifikant reduziert werden konnten [1]. Die Einführung der medizinischen Einwegartikel aus Polymeren erfolgte somit nicht nur aus ökonomischen, sondern auch aus hygienischen Gründen. Wegen der steigenden Anzahl synthetischer Polymere und dem zunehmenden Bedarf an ärztlicher Versorgung reicht die Anwendung von Polymeren in der Medizin von preisgünstigen Einwegartikeln, die nur kurzzeitig intrakorporal eingesetzt werden, bis hin zu Implantaten, welche über eine längere Zeit grossen Beanspruchungen im menschlichen Körper ausgesetzt sind. Die steigende Verbreitung von klinisch eingesetzten Polymeren ist auf ihre einfache und preisgünstige Verarbeitbarkeit in eine Vielzahl von Formen und Geometrien sowie auf ihr breites Eigenschaftsspektrum zurückzuführen. Polymere werden daher in fast allen medizinischen Bereichen eingesetzt.

  9. Papaverine Prevents Vasospasm by Regulation of Myosin Light Chain Phosphorylation and Actin Polymerization in Human Saphenous Vein

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Kyle M.; Putumbaka, Gowthami; Wise, Eric S.; Cheung-Flynn, Joyce; Brophy, Colleen M.; Komalavilas, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    Objective Papaverine is used to prevent vasospasm in human saphenous veins (HSV) during vein graft preparation prior to implantation as a bypass conduit. Papaverine is a nonspecific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases, leading to increases in both intracellular cGMP and cAMP. We hypothesized that papaverine reduces force by decreasing intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca2+]i) and myosin light chain phosphorylation, and increasing actin depolymerization via regulation of actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Approach and Results HSV was equilibrated in a muscle bath, pre-treated with 1 mM papaverine followed by 5 μM norepinephrine, and force along with [Ca2+]i levels were concurrently measured. Filamentous actin (F-actin) level was measured by an in vitro actin assay. Tissue was snap frozen to measure myosin light chain and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation. Pre-treatment with papaverine completely inhibited norepinephrine-induced force generation, blocked increases in [Ca2+]i and led to a decrease in the phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Papaverine pre-treatment also led to increased phosphorylation of the heat shock-related protein 20 (HSPB6) and the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), as well as decreased filamentous actin (F-actin) levels suggesting depolymerization of actin. Conclusions These results suggest that papaverine-induced force inhibition of HSV involves [Ca2+]i-mediated inhibition of myosin light chain phosphorylation and actin regulatory protein phosphorylation-mediated actin depolymerization. Thus, papaverine induces sustained inhibition of contraction of HSV by the modulation of both myosin cross-bridge formation and actin cytoskeletal dynamics and is a pharmacological alternative to high pressure distention to prevent vasospasm. PMID:27136356

  10. Retinoic acid-loaded polymeric nanoparticles enhance vascular regulation of neural stem cell survival and differentiation after ischaemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, R.; Fonseca, M. C.; Santos, T.; Sargento-Freitas, J.; Tjeng, R.; Paiva, F.; Castelo-Branco, M.; Ferreira, L. S.; Bernardino, L.

    2016-04-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. However, current therapies only reach a small percentage of patients and may cause serious side effects. We propose the therapeutic use of retinoic acid-loaded nanoparticles (RA-NP) to safely and efficiently repair the ischaemic brain by creating a favourable pro-angiogenic environment that enhances neurogenesis and neuronal restitution. Our data showed that RA-NP enhanced endothelial cell proliferation and tubule network formation and protected against ischaemia-induced death. To evaluate the effect of RA-NP on vascular regulation of neural stem cell (NSC) survival and differentiation, endothelial cell-conditioned media (EC-CM) were collected. EC-CM from healthy RA-NP-treated cells reduced NSC death and promoted proliferation while EC-CM from ischaemic RA-NP-treated cells decreased cell death, increased proliferation and neuronal differentiation. In parallel, human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPC), which are part of the endogenous repair response to vascular injury, were collected from ischaemic stroke patients. hEPC treated with RA-NP had significantly higher proliferation, which further highlights the therapeutic potential of this formulation. To conclude, RA-NP protected endothelial cells from ischaemic death and stimulated the release of pro-survival, proliferation-stimulating factors and differentiation cues for NSC. RA-NP were shown to be up to 83-fold more efficient than free RA and to enhance hEPC proliferation. These data serve as a stepping stone to use RA-NP as vasculotrophic and neurogenic agents for vascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases with compromised vasculature.

  11. Effects of polymerization and nucleotide identity on the conformational dynamics of the bacterial actin homolog MreB.

    PubMed

    Colavin, Alexandre; Hsin, Jen; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2014-03-04

    The assembly of protein filaments drives many cellular processes, from nucleoid segregation, growth, and division in single cells to muscle contraction in animals. In eukaryotes, shape and motility are regulated through cycles of polymerization and depolymerization of actin cytoskeletal networks. In bacteria, the actin homolog MreB forms filaments that coordinate the cell-wall synthesis machinery to regulate rod-shaped growth and contribute to cellular stiffness through unknown mechanisms. Like actin, MreB is an ATPase and requires ATP to polymerize, and polymerization promotes nucleotide hydrolysis. However, it is unclear whether other similarities exist between MreB and actin because the two proteins share low sequence identity and have distinct cellular roles. Here, we use all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to reveal surprising parallels between MreB and actin structural dynamics. We observe that MreB exhibits actin-like polymerization-dependent structural changes, wherein polymerization induces flattening of MreB subunits, which restructures the nucleotide-binding pocket to favor hydrolysis. MreB filaments exhibited nucleotide-dependent intersubunit bending, with hydrolyzed polymers favoring a straighter conformation. We use steered simulations to demonstrate a coupling between intersubunit bending and the degree of flattening of each subunit, suggesting cooperative bending along a filament. Taken together, our results provide molecular-scale insight into the diversity of structural states of MreB and the relationships among polymerization, hydrolysis, and filament properties, which may be applicable to other members of the broad actin family.

  12. Mediators of inflammation are down-regulated while apoptosis is up-regulated in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue by polymerized collagen

    PubMed Central

    FURUZAWA-CARBALLEDA, J; RODRÍQUEZ-CALDERÓN, R; DÍAZ DE LEÓN, L; ALCOCER-VARELA, J

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether collagen-polyvinylpyrrolidone (collagen-PVP) modifies some proinflammatory responses in synovium cultures from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Synovium from 10 RA patients were cultured with or without 1% collagen-PVP. Tissues on the 3rd, 5th and 7th culture day were sectioned and stained by the Herovici technique. Total collagen and type I/III collagen ratios were evaluated by the Woessner micromethod and by interrupted gel electrophoresis, respectively. Collagenolytic activity was assessed by degradation of [3H]-collagen in supernatants. TIMP-1, IL-1β and TNF-α were determined in supernatants by ELISA, and the results were normalized by DNA concentration. IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, MMP-1, TIMP-1, Cox-1, VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and Fas/APO95 expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL technique. The histological analysis and electrophoresis revealed a 1·7-fold increase of type III collagen in a time-dependent fashion in collagen-PVP-treated cultures. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β: 58 ± 9 versus 22 ± 10; TNF-α: 41 ± 6 versus 11 ± 3; IL-8: 59 ± 12 versus 29 ± 9; treated versus untreated), adhesion molecule (ICAM-1: 57 ± 11 versus 29 ± 15; VCAM-1: 49 ± 7 versus 21 ± 13; treated versus untreated) as well as Cox-1 (59 ± 10 versus 20 ± 3) expression was down-regulated in RA synovium treated. Meanwhile, TIMP-1 (36 ± 7 versus 57 ± 11) and Fas expression (20 ± 10 versus 55 ± 13) and apoptosis (14 ± 3 versus 55 ± 5) were up-regulated in treated cultures compared with controls. In supernatants, the collagenolytic activity, as well as IL-1β and TNF-α, levels were all down-regulated in treated cultures (two, three, fourfold, respectively). The addition of collagen-PVP to synovium-induced down-modulation of some inflammatory parameters and an increase in apoptosis of synovial cells. Perhaps this mechanism could contribute to inhibit outgrowth of pannus formation and to

  13. T-cell regulation of polyclonal B-cell activation induced by extracts of oral bacteria associated with periodontal diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, A B; Sully, E C; Ranney, R R; Bick, P H

    1984-01-01

    These studies were designed to examine the role of regulatory T cells in the polyclonal antibody response of human peripheral blood lymphocytes to extracts of bacterial isolates commonly associated with periodontal disease. Polyclonal antibody responses to the organisms tested were found to be T cell dependent, as are most of the B-cell activators in the human system. Functional T helper activity was resistant to 1,500 rads of irradiation. Optimal polyclonal antibody responses to the bacterial extracts occurred at a 3:1 T-cell-to-B-cell ratio, whereas pokeweed mitogen-induced responses peaked at a 1:1 ratio, suggesting a difference in T-cell regulatory influences in response to these activators. Purified populations of T helper and suppressor cells exerted potent regulatory control of the responses to the bacterial extracts. These findings support the conclusion that regulatory T lymphocytes exert a potent modulating influence over the polyclonal response to periodontally associated bacteria and may play an important role in regulating the lymphocyte response in the diseased site. PMID:6197378

  14. Immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria beneficially regulate immune response triggered by poly(I:C) in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Shoichi; Villena, Julio; Shimazu, Tomoyuki; Tohno, Masanori; Fujie, Hitomi; Chiba, Eriko; Shimosato, Takeshi; Aso, Hisashi; Suda, Yoshihito; Kawai, Yasushi; Saito, Tadao; Alvarez, Susana; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki; Kitazawa, Haruki

    2011-11-03

    This study analyzed the functional expression of TLR3 in various gastrointestinal tissues from adult swine and shows that TLR3 is expressed preferentially in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), CD172a(+)CD11R1(high) and CD4(+) cells from ileal Peyer's patches. We characterized the inflammatory immune response triggered by TLR3 activation in a clonal porcine intestinal epitheliocyte cell line (PIE cells) and in PIE-immune cell co-cultures, and demonstrated that these systems are valuable tools to study in vitro the immune response triggered by TLR3 on IEC and the interaction between IEC and immune cells. In addition, we selected an immunobiotic lactic acid bacteria strain, Lactobacillus casei MEP221106, able to beneficially regulate the anti-viral immune response triggered by poly(I:C) stimulation in PIE cells. Moreover, we deepened our understanding of the possible mechanisms of immunobiotic action by demonstrating that L. casei MEP221106 modulates the interaction between IEC and immune cells during the generation of a TLR3-mediated immune response.

  15. Bacteria clustering by polymers induces the expression of quorum sense controlled phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Leong T.; Xue, Xuan; Sui, Cheng; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David I.; Halliday, Nigel; Winzer, Klaus; Howdle, Steven M.; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Krasnogor, Natalio; Alexander, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria deploy a range of chemistries to regulate their behaviour and respond to their environment. Quorum sensing is one mean by which bacteria use chemical reactions to modulate pre-infection behaviour such as surface attachment. Polymers that can interfere with bacterial adhesion or the chemical reactions used for quorum sensing are thus a potential means to control bacterial population responses. Here we report how polymericbacteria sequestrants”, designed to bind to bacteria through electrostatic interactions and thus inhibit bacterial adhesion to surfaces, induce the expression of quorum sensing controlled phenotypes as a consequence of cell clustering. A combination of polymer and analytical chemistry, biological assays and computational modelling has been used to characterise the feedback between bacteria clustering and quorum sensing signaling. We have also derived design principles and chemical strategies for controlling bacterial behaviour at the population level. PMID:24256871

  16. Bacteria clustering by polymers induces the expression of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Leong T.; Xue, Xuan; Sui, Cheng; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David I.; Halliday, Nigel; Winzer, Klaus; Howdle, Steven M.; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Krasnogor, Natalio; Alexander, Cameron

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria deploy a range of chemistries to regulate their behaviour and respond to their environment. Quorum sensing is one method by which bacteria use chemical reactions to modulate pre-infection behaviour such as surface attachment. Polymers that can interfere with bacterial adhesion or the chemical reactions used for quorum sensing are therefore a potential means to control bacterial population responses. Here, we report how polymericbacteria sequestrants’, designed to bind to bacteria through electrostatic interactions and therefore inhibit bacterial adhesion to surfaces, induce the expression of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes as a consequence of cell clustering. A combination of polymer and analytical chemistry, biological assays and computational modelling has been used to characterize the feedback between bacteria clustering and quorum sensing signalling. We have also derived design principles and chemical strategies for controlling bacterial behaviour at the population level.

  17. Commensal Bacteria-induced Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) Secreted by Macrophages Up-regulates Hepcidin Expression in Hepatocytes by Activating the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Nanda Kumar N; Chen, Kejie; Cherayil, Bobby J

    2015-12-18

    The liver hormone hepcidin is the central regulator of systemic iron metabolism. Its increased expression in inflammatory states leads to hypoferremia and anemia. Elucidation of the mechanisms that up-regulate hepcidin during inflammation is essential for developing rational therapies for this anemia. Using mouse models of inflammatory bowel disease, we have shown previously that colitis-associated hepcidin induction is influenced by intestinal microbiota composition. Here we investigate how two commensal bacteria, Bifidobacterium longum and Bacteroides fragilis, representative members of the gut microbiota, affect hepcidin expression. We found that supernatants of a human macrophage cell line infected with either of the bacteria up-regulated hepcidin when added to a human hepatocyte cell line. This activity was abrogated by neutralization of IL-1β. Moreover, purified IL-1β increased hepcidin expression when added to the hepatocyte line or primary human hepatocytes and when injected into mice. IL-1β activated the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway in hepatocytes and in mouse liver, as indicated by increased phosphorylation of small mothers against decapentaplegic proteins. Activation of BMP signaling correlated with IL-1β-induced expression of BMP2 in human hepatocytes and activin B in mouse liver. Treatment of hepatocytes with two different chemical inhibitors of BMP signaling or with a neutralizing antibody to BMP2 prevented IL-1β-induced up-regulation of hepcidin. Our results clarify how commensal bacteria affect hepcidin expression and reveal a novel connection between IL-1β and activation of BMP signaling. They also suggest that there may be differences between mice and humans with respect to the mechanism by which IL-1β up-regulates hepcidin.

  18. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Goldstein EJ. Diseases caused by non-spore forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  19. Effects of Interactions of Auxin-Producing Bacteria and Bacterial-Feeding Nematodes on Regulation of Peanut Growths

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Xu, Wensi; Jiang, Ying; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin

    2015-01-01

    The influences of an IAA (indole-3-acetic acid)-producing bacterium (Bacillus megaterium) and two bacterial-feeding nematodes (Cephalobus sp. or Mesorhabditis sp.) on the growth of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. cv. Haihua 1) after various durations of time were investigated in natural soils. The addition of bacteria and nematodes and incubation time all significantly affected plant growth, plant root growth, plant nutrient concentrations, soil nutrient concentrations, soil microorganisms and soil auxin concentration. The addition of nematodes caused greater increases in these indices than those of bacteria, while the addition of the combination of bacteria and nematodes caused further increases. After 42-day growth, the increases in soil respiration differed between the additions of two kinds of nematodes because of differences in their life strategies. The effects of the bacteria and nematodes on the nutrient and hormone concentrations were responsible for the increases in plant growth. These results indicate the potential for promoting plant growth via the addition of nematodes and bacteria to soil. PMID:25867954

  20. Epigenetic regulation of human β-defensin 2 and CC chemokine ligand 20 expression in gingival epithelial cells in response to oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yin, L; Chung, W O

    2011-07-01

    Gingival epithelia utilize multiple signaling pathways to regulate innate immune responses to various oral bacteria, but little is understood about how these bacteria alter epithelial epigenetic status. In this study we report that DNA methyltransferase (DNMT1) and histone deacetylase expression were decreased in gingival epithelial cells treated with oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis and nonpathogen Fusobacterium nucleatum. Pretreatment with trichostatin A and sodium butyrate, which increase acetylation of chromatin histones, significantly enhanced the gene expression of antimicrobial proteins human β-defensin 2 (hBD2) and CC chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) in response to both bacterial challenges. Pretreatment with DNMT inhibitor 5'-azacytidine increased hBD2 and CCL20 expression in response to F. nucleatum, but not to P. gingivalis. Furthermore, we observed a differential pattern of protein levels of H3K4me3, which has been associated with chromatin remodeling and activation of gene transcription, in response to P. gingivalis vs. F. nucleatum. This study provides a new insight into the bacteria-specific innate immune responses via epigenetic regulation.

  1. Regulation of Light Output and Identification of Luminous Bacteria from Free-Living and Particle-Associated Bacterial Assemblages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-12-31

    Samples from a culture of the marine nitrogen-fixing bacteria Vibrio natriegens were collected from aerobic/combined-nitrogen replete conditions and...transcription and translation. APPROACH: Samples from a culture of the marine nitrogen-fixing bacteria Vibrio natriegens were collected from aerobic...after the-shift in a subsequent experiment 3 12 21 1 3 3-A 9-09 14. SUBJECT TERMS iii~lIIIIIIlI1fh1NUMBER Of PAGES 3 Nitrogenase, nitrogen-fixing, Vibrio

  2. Polymerization of perfluorobutadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, J.; Toy, M. S.

    1970-01-01

    Diisopropyl peroxydicarbonate dissolved in liquid perfluorobutadiene is conducted in a sealed vessel at the autogenous pressure of polymerization. Reaction temperature, ratio of catalyst to monomer, and amount of agitation determine degree of polymerization and product yield.

  3. Cellulose biosynthesis and function in bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, P; Mayer, R; Benziman, M

    1991-01-01

    The current model of cellulose biogenesis in plants, as well as bacteria, holds that the membranous cellulose synthase complex polymerizes glucose moieties from UDP-Glc into beta-1,4-glucan chains which give rise to rigid crystalline fibrils upon extrusion at the outer surface of the cell. The distinct arrangement and degree of association of the polymerizing enzyme units presumably govern extracellular chain assembly in addition to the pattern and width of cellulose fibril deposition. Most evident for Acetobacter xylinum, polymerization and assembly appear to be tightly coupled. To date, only bacteria have been effectively studied at the biochemical and genetic levels. In A. xylinum, the cellulose synthase, composed of at least two structurally similar but functionally distinct subunits, is subject to a multicomponent regulatory system. Regulation is based on the novel nucleotide cyclic diguanylic acid, a positive allosteric effector, and the regulatory enzymes maintaining its intracellular turnover: diguanylate cyclase and Ca2(+)-sensitive bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) phosphodiesterase. Four genes have been isolated from A. xylinum which constitute the operon for cellulose synthesis. The second gene encodes the catalytic subunit of cellulose synthase; the functions of the other three gene products are still unknown. Exclusively an extracellular product, bacterial cellulose appears to fulfill diverse biological roles within the natural habitat, conferring mechanical, chemical, and physiological protection in A. xylinum and Sarcina ventriculi or facilitating cell adhesion during symbiotic or infectious interactions in Rhizobium and Agrobacterium species. A. xylinum is proving to be most amenable for industrial purposes, allowing the unique features of bacterial cellulose to be exploited for novel product applications. Images PMID:2030672

  4. Metabolic Regulation and Coordination of the Metabolism in Bacteria in Response to a Variety of Growth Conditions.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Living organisms have sophisticated but well-organized regulation system. It is important to understand the metabolic regulation mechanisms in relation to growth environment for the efficient design of cell factories for biofuels and biochemicals production. Here, an overview is given for carbon catabolite regulation, nitrogen regulation, ion, sulfur, and phosphate regulations, stringent response under nutrient starvation as well as oxidative stress regulation, redox state regulation, acid-shock, heat- and cold-shock regulations, solvent stress regulation, osmoregulation, and biofilm formation, and quorum sensing focusing on Escherichia coli metabolism and others. The coordinated regulation mechanisms are of particular interest in getting insight into the principle which governs the cell metabolism. The metabolism is controlled by both enzyme-level regulation and transcriptional regulation via transcription factors such as cAMP-Crp, Cra, Csr, Fis, P(II)(GlnB), NtrBC, CysB, PhoR/B, SoxR/S, Fur, MarR, ArcA/B, Fnr, NarX/L, RpoS, and (p)ppGpp for stringent response, where the timescales for enzyme-level and gene-level regulations are different. Moreover, multiple regulations are coordinated by the intracellular metabolites, where fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), and acetyl-CoA (AcCoA) play important roles for enzyme-level regulation as well as transcriptional control, while α-ketoacids such as α-ketoglutaric acid (αKG), pyruvate (PYR), and oxaloacetate (OAA) play important roles for the coordinated regulation between carbon source uptake rate and other nutrient uptake rate such as nitrogen or sulfur uptake rate by modulation of cAMP via Cya.

  5. Polymerization Reactor Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skaates, J. Michael

    1987-01-01

    Describes a polymerization reactor engineering course offered at Michigan Technological University which focuses on the design and operation of industrial polymerization reactors to achieve a desired degree of polymerization and molecular weight distribution. Provides a list of the course topics and assigned readings. (TW)

  6. Delivery of antibiotics with polymeric particles.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Meng-Hua; Bao, Yan; Yang, Xian-Zhu; Zhu, Yan-Hua; Wang, Jun

    2014-11-30

    Despite the wide use of antibiotics, bacterial infection is still one of the leading causes of hospitalization and mortality. The clinical failure of antibiotic therapy is linked with low bioavailability, poor penetration to bacterial infection sites, and the side effects of antibiotics, as well as the antibiotic resistance properties of bacteria. Antibiotics encapsulated in nanoparticles or microparticles made up of a biodegradable polymer have shown great potential in replacing the administration of antibiotics in their "free" form. Polymeric particles provide protection to antibiotics against environmental deactivation and alter antibiotic pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. Polymeric particles can overcome tissue and cellular barriers and deliver antibiotics into very dense tissues and inaccessible target cells. Polymeric particles can be modified to target or respond to particular tissues, cells, and even bacteria, and thereby facilitate the selective concentration or release of the antibiotic at infection sites, respectively. Thus, the delivery of antibiotics with polymeric particles augments the level of the bioactive drug at the site of infection while reducing the dosage and the dosing frequency. The end results are improved therapeutic effects as well as decreased "pill burden" and drug side effects in patients. The main objective of this review is to analyze recent advances and current perspectives in the use of polymeric antibiotic delivery systems in the treatment of bacterial infection.

  7. Composition, Reactivity, and Regulations of Extracellular Metal-Reducing Structures (Bacterial Nanowires) Produced by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Scholten, Johannes

    2006-06-01

    This research proposal seeks to describe the composition and function of electrically conductive appendages known as bacterial nanowires. This project targets bacterial nanowires produced by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria Shewanella and Geobacter. Specifically, this project will investigate the role of these structures in the reductive transformation of iron oxides as solid phase electron acceptors, as well as uranium as a dissolved electron acceptor that forms nanocrystalline particles of uraninite upon reduction.

  8. [Genetic regulation of pathogenicity and virulence factors in bacteria Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica: identification of kduD gene].

    PubMed

    Miamin, V E; Pesniakevich, A G; Nikolaĭchik, E A; Prokulevich, V A

    2004-09-01

    A mutant that cannot utilize pectin substances of plant cell walls was obtained via insertion of mini-mini-Tn5xylE transposon into the chromosome of phytopathogenic bacteria Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica. The inability of mutant cells to utilize these substrates was caused by a failure to accomplish the catabolism of unsaturated digalacturonic acid (UDA). Study of enzymatic activities has established that mutant bacteria lost the ability to produce 2,5-diketo-3-deoxygluconate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of intracellular UDA utilization. Molecular cloning of the mutant gene was conducted, and its nucleotide sequence was determined. It was shown that the nucleotide sequence of this gene had an 82% homology with the sequence of Erwinia chrysanthemi EC3937 kduD gene encoding 2,5-diketo-3-deoxygluconate dehydrogenase. The intergene kdul-kduD region in bacteria Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica is shorter in length by 98 nucleotides than the corresponding region of Erwinia chrysanthemi and does not contain promoter sequences. The kduD gene was located at 126.8 min of the Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica genetic map.

  9. Vibrio parahaemolyticus Type VI Secretion System 1 Is Activated in Marine Conditions to Target Bacteria, and Is Differentially Regulated from System 2

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Dor; Gonzalez, Herman; Updegraff, Barrett L.; Orth, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a marine bacterium that thrives in warm climates. It is a leading cause of gastroenteritis resulting from consumption of contaminated uncooked shellfish. This bacterium harbors two putative type VI secretion systems (T6SS). T6SSs are widespread protein secretion systems found in many Gram-negative bacteria, and are often tightly regulated. For many T6SSs studied to date, the conditions and cues, as well as the regulatory mechanisms that control T6SS activity are unknown. In this study, we characterized the environmental conditions and cues that activate both V. parahaemolyticus T6SSs, and identified regulatory mechanisms that control T6SS gene expression and activity. We monitored the expression and secretion of the signature T6SS secreted proteins Hcp1 and Hcp2, and found that both T6SSs are differentially regulated by quorum sensing and surface sensing. We also showed that T6SS1 and T6SS2 require different temperature and salinity conditions to be active. Interestingly, T6SS1, which is found predominantly in clinical isolates, was most active under warm marine-like conditions. Moreover, we found that T6SS1 has anti-bacterial activity under these conditions. In addition, we identified two transcription regulators in the T6SS1 gene cluster that regulate Hcp1 expression, but are not required for immunity against self-intoxication. Further examination of environmental isolates revealed a correlation between the presence of T6SS1 and virulence of V. parahaemolyticus against other bacteria, and we also showed that different V. parahaemolyticus isolates can outcompete each other. We propose that T6SS1 and T6SS2 play different roles in the V. parahaemolyticus lifestyles, and suggest a role for T6SS1 in enhancing environmental fitness of V. parahaemolyticus in marine environments when competing for a niche in the presence of other bacterial populations. PMID:23613791

  10. Isolation and characterization of endophytic plant growth-promoting (PGPB) or stress homeostasis-regulating (PSHB) bacteria associated to the halophyte Prosopis strombulifera.

    PubMed

    Sgroy, Verónica; Cassán, Fabricio; Masciarelli, Oscar; Del Papa, María Florencia; Lagares, Antonio; Luna, Virginia

    2009-11-01

    This study was designed to isolate and characterize endophytic bacteria from halophyte Prosopis strombulifera grown under extreme salinity and to evaluate in vitro the bacterial mechanisms related to plant growth promotion or stress homeostasis regulation. Isolates obtained from P. strombulifera were compared genotypically by BOX-polymerase chain reaction, grouped according to similarity, and identified by amplification and partial sequences of 16S DNAr. Isolates were grown until exponential growth phase to evaluate the atmospheric nitrogen fixation, phosphate solubilization, siderophores, and phytohormones, such as indole-3-acetic acid, zeatin, gibberellic acid and abscisic acid production, as well as antifungal, protease, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) deaminase activity. A total of 29 endophytic strains were grouped into seven according to similarity. All bacteria were able to grow and to produce some phytohormone in chemically defined medium with or without addition of a nitrogen source. Only one was able to produce siderophores, and none of them solubilized phosphate. ACC deaminase activity was positive for six strains. Antifungal and protease activity were confirmed for two of them. In this work, we discuss the possible implications of these bacterial mechanisms on the plant growth promotion or homeostasis regulation in natural conditions.

  11. Regulation of actin polymerization and adhesion-dependent cell edge protrusion by the Abl-related gene (Arg) tyrosine kinase and N-WASp.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew M; Lapetina, Stefanie; MacGrath, Stacey M; Sfakianos, Mindan K; Pollard, Thomas D; Koleske, Anthony J

    2010-03-16

    Extracellular cues stimulate the Abl family nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Arg to promote actin-based cell edge protrusions. Several Arg-interacting proteins are potential links to the actin cytoskeleton, but exactly how Arg stimulates actin polymerization and cellular protrusion has not yet been fully elucidated. We used affinity purification to identify N-WASp as a novel binding partner of Arg. N-WASp activates the Arp2/3 complex and is an effector of Abl. We find that the Arg SH3 domain binds directly to N-WASp. Arg phosphorylates N-WASp on Y256, modestly increasing the affinity of Arg for N-WASp, an interaction that does not require the Arg SH2 domain. The Arg SH3 domain stimulates N-WASp-dependent actin polymerization in vitro, and Arg phosphorylation of N-WASp weakly stimulates this effect. Arg and N-WASp colocalize to adhesion-dependent cell edge protrusions in vivo. The cell edge protrusion defects of arg-/- fibroblasts can be complemented by re-expression of an Arg-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fusion, but not by an N-WASp binding-deficient Arg SH3 domain point mutant. These results suggest that Arg promotes actin-based protrusions in response to extracellular stimuli through phosphorylation of and physical interactions with N-WASp.

  12. The use of electron beam lithographic graft-polymerization on thermoresponsive polymers for regulating the directionality of cell attachment and detachment.

    PubMed

    Idota, Naokazu; Tsukahara, Takahiko; Sato, Kae; Okano, Teruo; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2009-04-01

    A simple process for nano-patterned cell culture substrates by direct graft-polymerization has been developed using an electron beam (EB) lithography system requiring no photo-masks or EB-sensitive resists. The compound N-isopropylacrylamide (IPAAm) was locally polymerized and grafted directly by EB lithographic exposure onto hydrophilic polyacrylamide (PAAm)-grafted glass surfaces. The size of the surface grafted polymers was controlled by varying the area of EB dose, and a minimal stripe pattern with a 200 nm line-width could be fabricated onto the surface. On the stripe-patterned surfaces, above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), the cells initially adhered and spread with an orientation along the pattern direction. The magnitude of the spreading angle and elongation of adhered cells depended on the pattern intervals of the grafted PIPAAm. When culture temperature was lower than the LCST, cultured cells detached from the surfaces with strong shrinkage along the pattern direction, and sometimes folded and became parallel with the stripe pattern. This patterned cell recovery technique may be useful for the construction of muscle cell sheets with efficient shrinkage/relaxation in a specific direction and spheroidal 3D cell structures, with application to tissue engineering and microfluidic cellular devices.

  13. Water discharge-regulated bacteria/heterotrophic nanoflagellate (HNF) interactions in the water column of the river Rhine.

    PubMed

    Weitere, M; Arndt, H

    2002-07-01

    Heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) make up a large fraction of the zooplankton biomass of rivers. Their abundance can be strongly affected by water discharge, but the consequences of this highly dynamic factor for their main prey, the bacteria, is still unknown. The focus of this study was on bacterial/HNF interactions in the Lower River Rhine (Germany) with respect to the discharge-dependent dynamics. The bacterial and HNF abundances and biomasses were determined over the course of 17 months. The potential consumption of bacteria by HNF was calculated based on the biomass data and on data on the HNF production. The mean bacterial abundance in the Rhine at Cologne ranged from 0.3 x 10(6) to 3.5 x 10(6) cells mL(-1), with lowest abundances in winter and highest in late spring. No significant changes in abundance during the downstream passage were found. Neither could a significant correlation be found between bacterial and HNF abundance. The ratio of bacterial to HNF abundance showed high variations which lay between 166 and 19,055 and was negatively dependent on water discharge. Monthly routine calculations on the potential bacterial consumption by HNF revealed a clearance of between 2 and 82% of the bacterial standing stock d(-1). The values increased greatly with water discharge and could exceed 100% d(-1) at times of high water flow. The presented data suggests a change in the top-down control of the planktonic bacteria due to the water discharge: The importance of benthic predation at low water flow (high contact probability to benthic predators) gives way to an increased importance in predation by planktonic HNF at high water flow.

  14. Contrasting regulation of macrophage iron homeostasis in response to infection with Listeria monocytogenes depending on localization of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Haschka, David; Nairz, Manfred; Demetz, Egon; Wienerroither, Sebastian; Decker, Thomas; Weiss, Günter

    2015-06-01

    Due to its multiple roles for the proliferation and pathogenicity of many microbes on the one hand and via modulation of immune effector functions on the other hand the control over iron homeostasis is thought to play a decisive role in the course of infections. Diversion of cellular iron traffic is considered as an important defense mechanism of macrophages to reduce metal availability for intracellular bacteria residing in the phagosome. However, evidence is lacking whether such alterations of iron homeostasis also become evident upon infection with bacteria gaining access to the cytosol like Listeria monocytogenes. Here we show that infection of macrophages with L. monocytogenes triggers the expression of the major cellular iron exporter ferroportin1 and induces cellular iron egress. As the growth of Listeria within macrophages is promoted by iron, stimulation of ferroportin1 functionality limits the availability of the metal for Listeria residing in the cytoplasm, whereas ferroportin1 degradation upon hepcidin treatment increases intracellular bacterial growth. In parallel to an increase of ferroportin1 expression, infected macrophages induce anti-microbial immune effector mechanisms such as TNFα formation or NO expression which are aggravated upon iron deficiency. These adaptive changes of iron homeostasis and immune response pathways are only found in macrophages infected with Listeria which express listeriolysin O and are therefore able to escape from the phagosome to the cytoplasm. Listeriolysin O deficient Listeria which are restricted to the phagosome are even killed by excess iron which may be based on "iron intoxification" via macrophage radical formation, because iron supplementation in that setting is paralleled by increased ROS formation. Our results indicate that ferroportin1 mediated iron export is a nutritional immune effector pathway to control infection with Listeria residing in the cytoplasm, whereas a different strategy is observed in mutant

  15. Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization of methyl methacrylate via a strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis in a liquid/liquid biphasic system: homogeneous catalysis, facile heterogeneous separation, and recycling.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jinlong; Zhang, Bingjie; Jiang, Xiaowu; Zhang, Lifen; Cheng, Zhenping; Zhu, Xiulin

    2014-09-01

    A strategy of thermo-regulated phase-separable catalysis (TPSC) is applied to the Cu(II)-mediated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of methyl methacrylate (MMA) in a p-xylene/PEG-200 biphasic system. Initiators for continuous activator regeneration ATRP (ICAR ATRP) are used to establish the TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system using water-soluble TPMA as a ligand, EBPA as an initiator, CuBr2 as a catalyst, and AIBN as a reducing agent. By heating to 70 °C, unlimited miscibility of both solvents is achieved and the polymerization can be carried out under homogeneous conditions; then on cooling to 25 °C, the mixture separates into two phases again. As a result, the catalyst complex remains in the PEG-200 phase while the obtained polymers stay in the p-xylene phase. The catalyst can therefore be removed from the resultant polymers by easily separating the two different layers and can be reused again. It is important that well-defined PMMA with a controlled molecular weight and narrow molecular weight distribution could be obtained using this TPSC-based ICAR ATRP system.

  16. The Potential of N-Rich Plasma-Polymerized Ethylene (PPE:N) Films for Regulating the Phenotype of the Nucleus Pulposus

    PubMed Central

    Mwale, Fackson; Petit, Alain; Tian Wang, Hong; Epure, Laura M; Girard-Lauriault, Pierre-Luc; Ouellet, Jean A; Wertheimer, Michael R; Antoniou, John

    2008-01-01

    We recently developed a nitrogen-rich plasma-polymerized biomaterial, designated “PPE:N” (N-doped plasma-polymerized ethylene) that is capable of suppressing cellular hypertrophy while promoting type I collagen and aggrecan expression in mesenchymal stem cells from osteoarthritis patients. We then hypothesized that these surfaces would form an ideal substrate on which the nucleus pulposus (NP) phenotype would be maintained. Recent evidence using microarrays showed that in young rats, the relative mRNA levels of glypican-3 (GPC3) and pleiotrophin binding factor (PTN) were significantly higher in nucleus pulposus (NP) compared to annulus fibrosus (AF) and articular cartilage. Furthermore, vimentin (VIM) mRNA levels were higher in NP versus articular cartilage. In contrast, the levels of expression of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and matrix gla protein precursor (MGP) were lower in NP compared to articular cartilage. The objective of this study was to compare the expression profiles of these genes in NP cells from fetal bovine lumbar discs when cultured on either commercial polystyrene (PS) tissue culture dishes or on PPE:N with time. We found that the expression of these genes varies with the concentration of N ([N]). More specifically, the expression of several genes of NP was sensitive to [N], with a decrease of GPC3, VIM, PTN, and MGP in function of decreasing [N]. The expression of aggrecan, collagen type I, and collagen type II was also studied: no significant differences were observed in the cells on different surfaces with different culture time. The results support the concept that PPE:N may be a suitable scaffold for the culture of NP cells. Further studies are however necessary to better understand their effects on cellular phenotypes. PMID:19478889

  17. Soil bacteria confer plant salt tolerance by tissue-specific regulation of the sodium transporter HKT1

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated sodium (Na+) decreases plant growth and thereby agricultural productivity. The ion transporter HKT1 controls Na+ import in roots, yet dysfunction or over-expression of HKT1 fails to increase salt tolerance, raising questions as to HKT1’s role in regulating Na+ homeostasis. Here, we report t...

  18. Interleukin-8 gene regulation in epithelial cells by Vibrio cholerae: role of multiple promoter elements, adherence and motility of bacteria and host MAPKs.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Madhubanti; Bhowmick, Swati; Casola, Antonella; Chaudhuri, Keya

    2012-04-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 is an important mediator in neutrophil-mediated acute inflammation. We previously demonstrated that incubation of intestinal epithelial cells with Vibrio cholerae O395 resulted in increased IL-8 mRNA expression and IL-8 secretion, which was associated with the adherence and motility of bacteria. However, the mechanisms responsible for transcriptional regulation of the IL-8 gene in epithelial cells during V. cholerae infections were not explored. Transient transfection analysis of 5' deletions and mutations of the IL-8 promoter driving expression of the luciferase reporter gene indicates that multiple binding sites contribute to IL-8 promoter induction in response to V. cholerae and that cooperation among these different sites is required for full activation of the promoter. Stimulation with V. cholerae O395 insertional mutants, defective in adherence and motility, significantly reduced IL-8 promoter activity compared with the wild-type strain. We further demonstrate maximal involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways to regulate IL-8 gene transcription. This study will help to design agents which could reduce the V. cholerae-induced inflammatory response and in the generation of safe vaccines.

  19. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  20. Making Polymeric Microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Hyson, Michael T.; Chung, Sang-Kun; Colvin, Michael S.; Chang, Manchium

    1989-01-01

    Combination of advanced techniques yields uniform particles for biomedical applications. Process combines ink-jet and irradiation/freeze-polymerization techniques to make polymeric microspheres of uniform size in diameters from 100 to 400 micrometer. Microspheres used in chromatography, cell sorting, cell labeling, and manufacture of pharmaceutical materials.

  1. A regulating method for the distribution of phosphorus fractions based on environmental parameters related to the key phosphate-solubilizing bacteria during composting.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuquan; Wei, Zimin; Cao, Zhenyu; Zhao, Yue; Zhao, Xinyu; Lu, Qian; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Xu

    2016-07-01

    This study was conducted to assess the abundance, incidence and diversity of the culturable phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) community during different organic wastes composting. The key PSB affecting different phosphorus (P) fractions and their relationship with environmental variables were analyzed by redundancy analysis (RDA). The results showed that there were distinct differences in amounts, incidence and community composition of PSB for the composts from different sources. Regression analysis demonstrated significant corrections between the density and incidence of PSB and pH, temperature, OM and DOC/DON. Most of culturable PSB showed high percentages of identity with the phyla of Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. There were thirteen key PSB correlated closely (p<0.05) with different P fractions variation. Conclusively, we suggested a process control method to regulate the distribution of P fractions during composting based on the relationship between the key PSB and P fractions as well as environmental parameters.

  2. Polymeric Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, C-S.

    1999-11-02

    Synthesis of polymeric carbon dioxide has long been of interest to many chemists and materials scientists. Very recently we discovered the polymeric phase of carbon dioxide (called CO{sub 2}-V) at high pressures and temperatures. Our optical and x-ray results indicate that CO{sub 2}-V is optically non-linear, generating the second harmonic of Nd: YLF laser at 527 nm and is also likely superhard similar to cubic-boron nitride or diamond. CO{sub 2}-V is made of CO{sub 4} tetrahedra, analogous to SiO{sub 2} polymorphs, and is quenchable at ambient temperature at pressures above 1 GPa. In this paper, we describe the pressure-induced polymerization of carbon dioxide together with the stability, structure, and mechanical and optical properties of polymeric CO{sub 2}-V. We also present some implications of polymeric CO{sub 2} for high-pressure chemistry and new materials synthesis.

  3. Soil bacteria confer plant salt tolerance by tissue-specific regulation of the sodium transporter HKT1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiming; Kim, Mi-Seong; Sun, Yan; Dowd, Scot E; Shi, Huazhong; Paré, Paul W

    2008-06-01

    Elevated sodium (Na(+)) decreases plant growth and, thereby, agricultural productivity. The ion transporter high-affinity K(+) transporter (HKT)1 controls Na(+) import in roots, yet dysfunction or overexpression of HKT1 fails to increase salt tolerance, raising questions as to HKT1's role in regulating Na(+) homeostasis. Here, we report that tissue-specific regulation of HKT1 by the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis GB03 confers salt tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana. Under salt stress (100 mM NaCl), GB03 concurrently down- and upregulates HKT1 expression in roots and shoots, respectively, resulting in lower Na(+) accumulation throughout the plant compared with controls. Consistent with HKT1 participation in GB03-induced salt tolerance, GB03 fails to rescue salt-stressed athkt1 mutants from stunted foliar growth and elevated total Na(+) whereas salt-stressed Na(+) export mutants sos3 show GB03-induced salt tolerance with enhanced shoot and root growth as well as reduced total Na(+). These results demonstrate that tissue-specific regulation of HKT1 is critical for managing Na(+) homeostasis in salt-stressed plants, as well as underscore the breadth and sophistication of plant-microbe interactions.

  4. Catabolism of Phenol and Its Derivatives in Bacteria: Genes, Their Regulation, and Use in the Biodegradation of Toxic Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Nešvera, Jan; Rucká, Lenka; Pátek, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Phenol and its derivatives (alkylphenols, halogenated phenols, nitrophenols) are natural or man-made aromatic compounds that are ubiquitous in nature and in human-polluted environments. Many of these substances are toxic and/or suspected of mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic effects. Bioremediation of the polluted soil and water using various bacteria has proved to be a promising option for the removal of these compounds. In this review, we describe a number of peripheral pathways of aerobic and anaerobic catabolism of various natural and xenobiotic phenolic compounds, which funnel these substances into a smaller number of central catabolic pathways. Finally, the metabolites are used as carbon and energy sources in the citric acid cycle. We provide here the characteristics of the enzymes that convert the phenolic compounds and their catabolites, show their genes, and describe regulatory features. The genes, which encode these enzymes, are organized on chromosomes and plasmids of the natural bacterial degraders in various patterns. The accumulated data on similarities and the differences of the genes, their varied organization, and particularly, an astonishingly broad range of intricate regulatory mechanism may be read as an exciting adventurous book on divergent evolutionary processes and horizontal gene transfer events inscribed in the bacterial genomes. In the end, the use of this wealth of bacterial biodegradation potential and the manipulation of its genetic basis for purposes of bioremediation is exemplified. It is envisioned that the integrated high-throughput techniques and genome-level approaches will enable us to manipulate systems rather than separated genes, which will give birth to systems biotechnology.

  5. 78 FR 46265 - Complex Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acids; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Complex Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acids; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance... an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of Complex Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acids... level for residues of Complex Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acids (CPPA) under FFDCA. DATES: This regulation...

  6. Actin cytoskeleton: putting a CAP on actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, V A; Theurkauf, W E

    2000-10-05

    Two recent studies have identified a Drosophila homolog of cyclase-associated protein (CAP) as a developmentally important negative regulator of actin polymerization that may also directly mediate signal transduction.

  7. Concise polymeric materials encyclopedia

    SciTech Connect

    Salamone, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    This comprehensive, accessible resource abridges the ``Polymeric Materials Encyclopedia'', presenting more than 1,100 articles and featuring contributions from more than 1,800 scientists from all over the world. The text discusses a vast array of subjects related to the: (1) synthesis, properties, and applications of polymeric materials; (2) development of modern catalysts in preparing new or modified polymers; (3) modification of existing polymers by chemical and physical processes; and (4) biologically oriented polymers.

  8. Radical-Mediated Enzymatic Polymerizations

    PubMed Central

    Zavada, Scott R.; Battsengel, Tsatsral; Scott, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Polymerization reactions are commonly effected by exposing monomer formulations to some initiation stimulus such as elevated temperature, light, or a chemical reactant. Increasingly, these polymerization reactions are mediated by enzymes―catalytic proteins―owing to their reaction efficiency under mild conditions as well as their environmental friendliness. The utilization of enzymes, particularly oxidases and peroxidases, for generating radicals via reduction-oxidation mechanisms is especially common for initiating radical-mediated polymerization reactions, including vinyl chain-growth polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization, thiol–ene step-growth polymerization, and polymerization via oxidative coupling. While enzyme-mediated polymerization is useful for the production of materials intended for subsequent use, it is especially well-suited for in situ polymerizations, where the polymer is formed in the place where it will be utilized. Such polymerizations are especially useful for biomedical adhesives and for sensing applications. PMID:26848652

  9. 75 FR 1773 - Notice of Receipt of a Pesticide Petition Filed for Residues of Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acid in or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... AGENCY Notice of Receipt of a Pesticide Petition Filed for Residues of Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acid in or... establishment of a regulation for residues of the plant growth regulator, polymeric polyhydroxy acid, in or on... polymeric polyhydroxy acid in or on all food commodities. EPA has determined that the pesticide...

  10. Antimicrobial selenium nanoparticle coatings on polymeric medical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Phong A.; Webster, Thomas J.

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria colonization on medical devices remains one of the most serious complications following implantation. Traditional antibiotic treatment has proven ineffective, creating an increasingly high number of drug-resistant bacteria. Polymeric medical devices represent a significant portion of the total medical devices used today due to their excellent mechanical properties (such as durability, flexibility, etc). However, many polymers (such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyurethane (PU) and silicone) become readily colonized and infected by bacteria immediately after use. Therefore, in this study, a novel antimicrobial coating was developed to inhibit bacterial growth on PVC, PU and silicone. Specifically, here, the aforementioned polymeric substrates were coated with selenium (Se) nanoparticles in situ. The Se-coated substrates were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and bacteria assays. Most importantly, bacterial growth was significantly inhibited on the Se-coated substrates compared to their uncoated counterparts. The reduction of bacteria growth directly correlated with the density of Se nanoparticles on the coated substrate surfaces. In summary, these results demonstrate that Se should be further studied as a novel anti-bacterial polymeric coating material which can decrease bacteria functions without the use of antibiotics.

  11. Antimicrobial selenium nanoparticle coatings on polymeric medical devices.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phong A; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-04-19

    Bacteria colonization on medical devices remains one of the most serious complications following implantation. Traditional antibiotic treatment has proven ineffective, creating an increasingly high number of drug-resistant bacteria. Polymeric medical devices represent a significant portion of the total medical devices used today due to their excellent mechanical properties (such as durability, flexibility, etc). However, many polymers (such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polyurethane (PU) and silicone) become readily colonized and infected by bacteria immediately after use. Therefore, in this study, a novel antimicrobial coating was developed to inhibit bacterial growth on PVC, PU and silicone. Specifically, here, the aforementioned polymeric substrates were coated with selenium (Se) nanoparticles in situ. The Se-coated substrates were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and bacteria assays. Most importantly, bacterial growth was significantly inhibited on the Se-coated substrates compared to their uncoated counterparts. The reduction of bacteria growth directly correlated with the density of Se nanoparticles on the coated substrate surfaces. In summary, these results demonstrate that Se should be further studied as a novel anti-bacterial polymeric coating material which can decrease bacteria functions without the use of antibiotics.

  12. Production of NO, N2O and N2 by extracted soil bacteria, regulation by NO2(-) and O2 concentrations.

    PubMed

    Morley, Nicholas; Baggs, Elizabeth M; Dörsch, Peter; Bakken, Lars

    2008-07-01

    The oxygen control of denitrification and its emission of NO/N2O/N2 was investigated by incubation of Nycodenz-extracted soil bacteria in an incubation robot which monitors O2, NO, N2O and N2 concentrations (in He+O2 atmosphere). Two consecutive incubations were undertaken to determine (1) the regulation of denitrification by O2 and NO2(-) during respiratory O2 depletion and (2) the effects of re-exposure to O2 of cultures with fully expressed denitrification proteome. Early denitrification was only detected (as NO and N2O) at

  13. Photo-responsive polymeric micelles.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Dong, Ruijiao; Zhu, Xinyuan; Yan, Deyue

    2014-09-07

    Photo-responsive polymeric micelles have received increasing attention in both academic and industrial fields due to their efficient photo-sensitive nature and unique nanostructure. In view of the photo-reaction mechanism, photo-responsive polymeric micelles can be divided into five major types: (1) photoisomerization polymeric micelles, (2) photo-induced rearrangement polymeric micelles, (3) photocleavage polymeric micelles, (4) photo-induced crosslinkable polymeric micelles, and (5) photo-induced energy conversion polymeric micelles. This review highlights the recent advances of photo-responsive polymeric micelles, including the design, synthesis and applications in various biomedical fields. Especially, the influence of different photo-reaction mechanisms on the morphology, structure and properties of the polymeric micelles is emphasized. Finally, the possible future directions and perspectives in this emerging area are briefly discussed.

  14. The unusual dynamics of parasite actin result from isodesmic polymerization.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Kristen M; Ma, Christopher I; Fremont, Daved H; Diraviyam, Karthikeyan; Cooper, John A; Sept, David; Sibley, L David

    2013-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that parasite actins are short and inherently unstable, despite being required for motility. Here we re-examine the polymerization properties of actin in Toxoplasma gondii, unexpectedly finding that it exhibits isodesmic polymerization in contrast to the conventional nucleation-elongation process of all previously studied actins from both eukaryotes and bacteria. Polymerization kinetics of actin in T. gondii lacks both a lag phase and critical concentration, normally characteristic of actins. Unique among actins, the kinetics of assembly can be fit with a single set of rate constants for all subunit interactions, without need for separate nucleation and elongation rates. This isodesmic model accurately predicts the assembly, disassembly and the size distribution of actin filaments in T. gondii in vitro, providing a mechanistic explanation for actin dynamics in vivo. Our findings expand the repertoire of mechanisms by which actin polymerization is governed and offer clues about the evolution of self-assembling, stabilized protein polymers.

  15. Controlled polymerization by incarceration of monomers in nanochannels.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takashi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2010-01-01

    Porous Coordination Polymers (PCPs) composed of transition metal ions and bridging organic ligands have been extensively studied. The characteristic features of PCPs are highly regular channel structures, controllable channel sizes approximating molecular dimensions, designable surface potentials and functionality, and flexible frameworks responsive to guest molecules. Owing to these advantages, successful applications of PCPs range from molecular storage and separation to heterogeneous catalysts. In particular, use of their regulated and tunable nanochannels in the field of polymerization has allowed multi-level control of polymerization via control of stereoregularlity, molecular weight, etc. In this chapter, we focus on recent progress in polymerization utilizing the nanochannels of PCPs, and demonstrate why this polymerization system is attractive and promising from the viewpoint of precision control of polymeric structures.

  16. Controlled Polymerization by Incarceration of Monomers in Nanochannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Takashi; Kitagawa, Susumu

    Porous Coordination Polymers (PCPs) composed of transition metal ions and bridging organic ligands have been extensively studied. The characteristic features of PCPs are highly regular channel structures, controllable channel sizes approximating molecular dimensions, designable surface potentials and functionality, and flexible frameworks responsive to guest molecules. Owing to these advantages, successful applications of PCPs range from molecular storage and separation to heterogeneous catalysts. In particular, use of their regulated and tunable nanochannels in the field of polymerization has allowed multi-level control of polymerization via control of stereoregularlity, molecular weight, etc. In this chapter, we focus on recent progress in polymerization utilizing the nanochannels of PCPs, and demonstrate why this polymerization system is attractive and promising from the viewpoint of precision control of polymeric structures.

  17. The sludge loading rate regulates the growth and release of heterotrophic bacteria resistant to six types of antibiotics in wastewater activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qing-Bin; Guo, Mei-Ting; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plants are considered as hot reservoirs of antimicrobial resistance. However, the fates of antibiotic-resistant bacteria during biological treatment processes and relevant influencing factors have not been fully understood. This study evaluated the effects of the sludge loading rate on the growth and release of six kinds of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in an activated sludge system. The results indicated that higher sludge loading rates amplified the growth of all six types of antibiotic resistant bacteria. The release of most antibiotic-resistant bacteria through both the effluent and biosolids was amplified with increased sludge loading rate. Biosolids were the main pattern for all antibiotic-resistant bacteria release in an activated sludge system, which was determined primarily by their growth in the activated sludge. A higher sludge loading rate reactor tended to retain more antibiotic resistance. An activated sludge system with lower sludge loading rates was considered more conducive to the control of antibiotic resistance.

  18. Polymerized and functionalized triglycerides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant oils are useful sustainable raw materials for the development of new chemical products. As part of our research emphasis in sustainability and green polymer chemistry, we have explored a new method for polymerizing epoxidized triglycerides with the use of fluorosulfonic acid. Depending on the ...

  19. Flame retardant polymeric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, M.; Atlas, S.M.; Pearce, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    The flame retardation of polyolefins is the focus of this volume. Methods for reduction of smoke and experimental evaluation of flammability parameters for polymeric materials are discussed. The flammability evaluation methods for textiles and the use of mass spectrometry for analysis of polymers and their degradation products are also presented.

  20. Variable Effect during Polymerization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunsford, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment performing the polymerization of 3-methylthiophene(P-3MT) onto the conditions for the selective electrode to determine the catechol by using cyclic voltammetry was performed. The P-3MT formed under optimized conditions improved electrochemical reversibility, selectivity and reproducibility for the detection of the catechol.

  1. Protein specific polymeric immunomicrospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Dreyer, William J. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Small, round, bio-compatible microspheres capable of covalently bonding proteins and having a uniform diameter below about 3500 A are prepared by substantially instantaneously initiating polymerization of an aqueous emulsion containing no more than 35% total monomer including an acrylic monomer substituted with a covalently bondable group such as hydroxyl, amino or carboxyl and a minor amount of a cross-linking agent.

  2. Quorum quenching activity in cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria isolated from Pterocarpus santalinus Linn., and its effect on quorum sensing regulated biofilm in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P S; Ravishankar Rai, V

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing mechanism allows the microorganisms to resist the antibiotic treatment by forming biofilms. Quorum quenching is one of the mechanisms to control the development of drug resistance in microbes. Endophyte bacteria are beneficial to plant growth as they support the immune system against the pathogen attack. The endophytic bacteria present in Pterocarpus santalinus were screened for the presence of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) degrading bacteria using biosensor strains and further confirmed by quantifying the violacein production. Cell-free lysate of endophytic bacteria, Bacillus firmus PT18 and Enterobacter asburiae PT39 exhibited potent AHL degrading ability by inhibiting about 80% violacein production in biosensor strain. Furthermore, when the cell-free lysate was applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and PAO1-JP2 biofilm it resulted in significant (p<0.01) inhibition of biofilm formation. The biofilm inhibition was confirmed by visualization of biofilm slides under fluorescence microscopy, which showed decrease in total biomass formation in treated slides. Isolation and amplification of the gene (aiiA) indicated that the presence of AHL lactonase in cell-free lysate and sequence alignment indicated that AiiA contains a "HXHXDH" zinc-binding motif that is being conserved in several groups of metallohydrolases. Therefore, the study shows the potential of AHLs degradation by AHL lactonase present in cell-free lysate of isolated endophytic bacteria and inhibition of quorum sensing regulated biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  3. Heat-killed probiotic bacteria differentially regulate colonic epithelial cell production of human β-defensin-2: dependence on inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Habil, N; Abate, W; Beal, J; Foey, A D

    2014-12-01

    The inducible antimicrobial peptide human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) stimulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial products is essential to antipathogen responses of gut epithelial cells. Commensal and probiotic bacteria can augment such mucosal defences. Probiotic use in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease, however, may have adverse effects, boosting inflammatory responses. The aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of selected probiotic strains on hBD-2 production by epithelial cells induced by pathologically relevant pro-inflammatory cytokines and the role of cytokine modulators in controlling hBD-2. Caco-2 colonic intestinal epithelial cells were pre-incubated with heat-killed probiotics, i.e. Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota (LcS) or Lactobacillus fermentum strain MS15 (LF), followed by stimulation of hBD-2 by interleukin (IL)-1β and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the absence or presence of exogenous IL-10 or anti-IL-10 neutralising antibody. Cytokines and hBD-2 mRNA and protein were analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. LcS augmented IL-1β-induced hBD-2, whereas LF enhanced TNF-α- and suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. LF enhanced TNF-α-induced TNF-α and suppressed IL-10, whereas augmented IL-1β-induced IL-10. LcS upregulated IL-1β-induced TNF-α mRNA and suppressed IL-10. Endogenous IL-10 differentially regulated hBD-2; neutralisation of IL-10 augmented TNF-α- and suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. Exogenous IL-10, however, suppressed both TNF-α- and IL-1β-induced hBD-2; LcS partially rescued suppression in TNF-α- and IL-1β-stimulation, whereas LF further suppressed IL-1β-induced hBD-2. It can be concluded that probiotic strains differentially regulate hBD-2 mRNA expression and protein secretion, modulation being dictated by inflammatory stimulus and resulting cytokine environment.

  4. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  5. Actin Polymerization is Stimulated by Actin Crosslinking Protein Palladin

    PubMed Central

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G.; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H.; Beck, Moriah R.

    2016-01-01

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the coordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. Here we show that the actin binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro crosslinking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of G-actin, akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or conformational changes. PMID:26607837

  6. Cationic Polymerization of Vinyl Ethers Controlled by Visible Light.

    PubMed

    Kottisch, Veronika; Michaudel, Quentin; Fors, Brett P

    2016-12-07

    Photoinitiated cationic polymerizations are widely used in industrial processes; however, gaining photocontrol over chain growth would expand the utility of these methods and facilitate the design of novel complex architectures. We report herein a cationic polymerization regulated by visible light. This polymerization proceeds under mild conditions: a combination of a metal-free photocatalyst, a chain-transfer agent, and light irradiation enables the synthesis of various poly(vinyl ether)s with good control over molecular weight and dispersity as well as excellent chain-end fidelity. Significantly, photoreversible cation formation in this system enables efficient control over polymer chain growth with light.

  7. Effect of polymeric substrate on sludge settleability.

    PubMed

    Martins, António M P; Karahan, Ozlem; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to evaluate the role of a polymeric substrate (starch) on sludge settleability. Despite being an important COD component of the wastewater, the relationship between polymeric substrates and bulking sludge has been hardly studied. The polymers are hydrolysed at a rate smaller than the consumption rate of monomers. This means that the soluble substrate resulting from hydrolysis is likely to be present at growth rate limiting concentrations. According to the kinetic selection theory this leads to bulking sludge. However, a recently postulated theory suggests that, strong diffusion limited micro-gradients of substrate concentration inside flocs lead to bulking sludge, and not a low substrate concentration as such. If the polymeric COD is first incorporated in the sludge floc and afterwards hydrolysed in the sludge floc then there is essentially no substrate gradient inside the biological flocs. The experiments showed that conditions leading to bulking sludge with monomers (glucose) did not lead to bulking when starch was used. A bulking sludge event was even cured just by substituting the monomer with starch. These results are clearly in line with a diffusion gradient--based theory for bulking sludge. Nevertheless, flocs growing on starch are more open, fluffy and porous than flocs formed on maltose or glucose, most likely because the starch needs to be hydrolysed at the surface of the micro-colonies forming the flocculated sludge. Some additional observations on occurrence of filamentous bacteria in oxygen diffusion limited systems are also discussed in this manuscript.

  8. Polymeric ion conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, J.; Mizuhashi, M.; Kamimori, T.

    1990-12-31

    There are several requirements for (polymeric) ion conductors in electrochromic window applications: (1) they have high ionic conductivity (desirably, > 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} Scm{sup {minus}1}); (2) they have high chemical and electrochemical stabilities with respect to the wide usable potential window and thermal and UV stabilities; (3) they are transparent in a specific wavelength region, which is, however, dependent of applications; and (4) they have enough adhesiveness to the substrates and have acceptable mechanical properties. Many kinds of polymeric ionic conductors have since been reported and some of them were applied to electrochromic uses. In this chapter, electrochemical and physicochemical properties of these materials are reviewed. However, certain aspects such as crystallographic studies and conduction models in detail have been omitted, which are still controversial.

  9. Organometallic polymerization catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Waymouth, R.M.

    1993-12-31

    Well-defined transition metal catalysts have resulted in exciting new opportunities in polymer synthesis. The stereochemistry of vinyl polymers can be rationally controlled with choice of the appropriate catalysts. Studies with optically active catalyst precursors have revealed considerable information on the absolute stereochemistry of olefin polymerization and have led to the synthesis of novel chiral polyolefins. The development of homogeneous olefin metathesis catalysts has also led to a variety of well-defined new polymer structures with controlled molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. Recent advances in understanding the mechanisms and stereochemistry of homogeneous transition metal catalyzed polymerization will be discussed. The ability to control polymer structure through catalyst design presents exciting opportunities in the synthesis of {open_quotes}tailor-made{close_quotes} macromolecules.

  10. Polymeric Microcapsule Arrays.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-24

    support, microencapsulation and entrapment within a membrane/film or gel. The ideal enzyme immobilization method would (1) Employ mild chemical...yields hollow polymeric microcapsules of uniform diameter and length. These microcapsules are arranged in a high density array in which the...individual capsules protrude from a surface like the bristles of a brush. We have developed procedures for filling these microcapsules with high

  11. Surface polymerization agents

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.; Wilkerson, C.

    1996-12-01

    This is the final report of a 1-year, Laboratory-Directed R&D project at LANL. A joint technical demonstration was proposed between US Army Missile Command (Redstone Arsenal) and LANL. Objective was to demonstrate that an unmanned vehicle or missile could be used as a platform to deliver a surface polymerization agent in such a manner as to obstruct the filters of an air-breathing mechanism, resulting in operational failure.

  12. Frontal Polymerization in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pojman, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Frontal polymerization systems, with their inherent large thermal and compositional gradients, are greatly affected by buoyancy-driven convection. Sounding rocket experiments allowed the preparation of benchmark materials and demonstrated that methods to suppress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in ground-based research did not significantly affect the molecular weight of the polymer. Experiments under weightlessness show clearly that bubbles produced during the reaction interact very differently than under 1 g.

  13. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end.

  14. Developments in polymerization lamps.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Planas, Amparo; Martín, Juan; Abalos, Camilo; Llamas, Rafael

    2008-02-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of composite resins and the consequent stress generated at the composite-tooth interface continue to pose a serious clinical challenge. The development of high-intensity halogen lamps and the advent of curing units providing higher energy performance, such as laser lamps, plasma arc units, and, most recently, light-emitting diode (LED) curing units, have revolutionized polymerization lamp use and brought major changes in light-application techniques. A comprehensive review of the literature yielded the following conclusions: (1) the most reliable curing unit for any type of composite resin is the high-density halogen lamp, fitted with a programming device to enable both pulse-delay and soft-start techniques; (2) if any other type of curing unit is used, information must be available on the compatibility of the unit with the composite materials to be used; (3) polymerization lamp manufacturers need to focus on the ongoing development of LED technology; (4) further research is required to identify the most reliable light-application techniques.

  15. Mechanisms of post-transcriptional gene regulation in bacterial biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Luary C.; Vadyvaloo, Viveka

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are characterized by a dense multicellular community of microorganisms that can be formed by the attachment of bacteria to an inert surface and to each other. The development of biofilm involves the initial attachment of planktonic bacteria to a surface, followed by replication, cell-to-cell adhesion to form microcolonies, maturation, and detachment. Mature biofilms are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix composed primarily of bacterial-derived exopolysaccharides, specialized proteins, adhesins, and occasionally DNA. Because the synthesis and assembly of biofilm matrix components is an exceptionally complex process, the transition between its different phases requires the coordinate expression and simultaneous regulation of many genes by complex genetic networks involving all levels of gene regulation. The finely controlled intracellular level of the chemical second messenger molecule, cyclic-di-GMP is central to the post-transcriptional mechanisms governing the switch between the motile planktonic lifestyle and the sessile biofilm forming state in many bacteria. Several other post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are known to dictate biofilm development and assembly and these include RNA-binding proteins, small non-coding RNAs, toxin-antitoxin systems, riboswitches, and RNases. Post-transcriptional regulation is therefore a powerful molecular mechanism employed by bacteria to rapidly adjust to the changing environment and to fine tune gene expression to the developmental needs of the cell. In this review, we discuss post-transcriptional mechanisms that influence the biofilm developmental cycle in a variety of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24724055

  16. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  17. The fecal bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  18. Hafnocene-Based Olefin Polymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diesner, T.; Troll, C.; Rieger, B.

    Zirconocenes have been used for a long time in the field of olefin polymerization using MAO as cocatalyst. The equivalent hafnocenes were seldom used due to a lack of productivity while using MAO activation. In the last few years borane and borate activation has come into the focus of research for olefin polymerization. A variety of different hafnocenes were used to investigate the polymerization mechanism and the different cocatalysts.

  19. Actin polymerization as a key innate immune effector mechanism to control Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Man, Si Ming; Ekpenyong, Andrew; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Achouri, Sarra; Cammarota, Eugenia; Hughes, Katherine; Rizzo, Alessandro; Ng, Gilbert; Wright, John A; Cicuta, Pietro; Guck, Jochen R; Bryant, Clare E

    2014-12-09

    Salmonellosis is one of the leading causes of food poisoning worldwide. Controlling bacterial burden is essential to surviving infection. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs), such as NLRC4, induce inflammasome effector functions and play a crucial role in controlling Salmonella infection. Inflammasome-dependent production of IL-1β recruits additional immune cells to the site of infection, whereas inflammasome-mediated pyroptosis of macrophages releases bacteria for uptake by neutrophils. Neither of these functions is known to directly kill intracellular salmonellae within macrophages. The mechanism, therefore, governing how inflammasomes mediate intracellular bacterial-killing and clearance in host macrophages remains unknown. Here, we show that actin polymerization is required for NLRC4-dependent regulation of intracellular bacterial burden, inflammasome assembly, pyroptosis, and IL-1β production. NLRC4-induced changes in actin polymerization are physically manifested as increased cellular stiffness, and leads to reduced bacterial uptake, production of antimicrobial molecules, and arrested cellular migration. These processes act in concert to limit bacterial replication in the cell and dissemination in tissues. We show, therefore, a functional link between innate immunity and actin turnover in macrophages that underpins a key host defense mechanism for the control of salmonellosis.

  20. Bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S. (Inventor); Curley, Michael J. (Inventor); Adamovsky, Grigory (Inventor); Sarkisov, Jr., Sergey S. (Inventor); Fields, Aisha B. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A bimorphic polymeric photomechanical actuator, in one embodiment using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) as a photosensitive body, transmitting light over fiber optic cables, and controlling the shape and pulse duration of the light pulse to control movement of the actuator. Multiple light beams are utilized to generate different ranges of motion for the actuator from a single photomechanical body and alternative designs use multiple light beams and multiple photomechanical bodies to provide controlled movement. Actuator movement using one or more ranges of motion is utilized to control motion to position an actuating element in three dimensional space.

  1. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, R.R.; Baumann, R.

    1999-03-30

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  2. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  3. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    2003-08-26

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  4. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOEpatents

    Schrock, Richard R.; Bauman, Robert

    2006-11-14

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  5. Polymerization Evaluation by Spectrophotometric Measurements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunach, Jaume

    1985-01-01

    Discusses polymerization evaluation by spectrophotometric measurements by considering: (1) association degrees and molar absorptivities; (2) association degrees and equilibrium constants; and (3) absorbance and equilibrium constants. (JN)

  6. Sustainable polymerizations in recoverable microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenzhen; Yan, Feng; Qiu, Lihua; Lu, Jianmei; Zhou, Yinxia; Chen, Jiaxin; Tang, Yishan; Texter, John

    2010-03-16

    Free radical and atom-transfer radical polymerizations were conducted in monomer/ionic liquid microemulsions. After the polymerization and isolation of the resultant polymers, the mixture of the catalyst and ionic liquids (surfactant and continuous phase) can be recovered and reused, thereby dramatically improving the environmental sustainability of such chemical processing. The addition of monomer to recovered ionic liquid mixtures regenerates transparent, stable microemulsions that are ready for the next polymerization cycle upon addition of initiator. The method combines the advantages of IL recycling and microemulsion polymerization and minimizes environmental disposable effects from surfactants and heavy metal ions.

  7. Bacteria Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc.'s ATP Photometer makes a rapid and accurate count of the bacteria in a body fluid sample. Instrument provides information on the presence and quantity of bacteria by measuring the amount of light emitted by the reaction between two substances. Substances are ATP adenosine triphosphate and luciferase. The reactants are applied to a human body sample and the ATP Photometer observes the intensity of the light emitted displaying its findings in a numerical output. Total time lapse is usually less than 10 minutes, which represents a significant time savings in comparison of other techniques. Other applications are measuring organisms in fresh and ocean waters, determining bacterial contamination of foodstuffs, biological process control in the beverage industry, and in assay of activated sewage sludge.

  8. Organometallic Polymeric Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    For aerospace applications, the use of polymers can result in tremendous weight savings over metals. Suitable polymeric materials for some applications like EMI shielding, spacecraft grounding, and charge dissipation must combine high electrical conductivity with long-term environmental stability, good processability, and good mechanical properties. Recently, other investigators have reported hybrid films made from an electrically conductive polymer combined with insulating polymers. In all of these instances, the films were prepared by infiltrating an insulating polymer with a precursor for a conductive polymer (either polypyrrole or polythiophene), and oxidatively polymerizing the precursor in situ. The resulting composite films have good electrical conductivity, while overcoming the brittleness inherent in most conductive polymers. The highest conductivities reported (approximately 4/Scm) were achieved with polythiophene in a polystyrene host polymer. The best films using a polyamide as base polymer were four orders of magnitude less conductive than the polystyrene films. The authors suggested that this was because polyimides were unable to swell sufficiently for infiltration of monomer as in the polystyrene. It was not clear, however, if the different conductivities obtained were merely the result of differing oxidation conditions. Oxidation time, temperature and oxidant concentration varied widely among the studies.

  9. Gratings in polymeric waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishakov, G.; Sokolov, V.; Kocabas, A.; Aydinli, A.

    2007-04-01

    Laser-induced formation of polymer Bragg grating filters for Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) applications is discussed. Acrylate monomers halogenated with both fluorine and chlorine, which possess absorption losses less than 0.25 dB/cm and wide choice of refractive indices (from 1.3 to 1.5) in the 1.5 μm telecom wavelength region were used. The monomers are highly intermixable thus permitting to adjust the refractive index of the composition within +/-0.0001. Moreover they are photocurable under UV exposure and exhibit high contrast in polymerization. These properties make halogenated acrylates very promising for fabricating polymeric waveguides and photonic circuits. Single-mode polymer waveguides were fabricated on silicon wafers using resistless contact lithography. Submicron index gratings have been written in polymer waveguides using holographic exposure with He-Cd laser beam (325 nm) through a phase mask. Both uniform and apodized gratings have been fabricated. The gratings are stable and are not erased by uniform UV exposure. The waveguide gratings possess narrowband reflection spectra in the 1.5 μm wavelength region of 0.4 nm width, nearly rectangular shape of the stopband and reflectivity R > 99%. The fabricated Bragg grating filters can be used for multiplexing/demultiplexing optical signals in high-speed DWDM optical fiber networks.

  10. Synthesis of glycopolymers by controlled radical polymerization techniques and their applications.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Dorbatt, Vimary; Lee, Juneyoung; Lin, En-Wei; Maynard, Heather D

    2012-11-26

    Natural saccharides are involved in numerous biological processes. It has been shown that these carbohydrates play a role in cell adhesion and proliferation, as well as protein stabilization, organization, and recognition. Certain carbohydrates also serve as receptors for viruses and bacteria. They are over expressed in diseases such as cancer. Hence, a lot of effort has been focused on mimicking these sugars. Polymers with pendent saccharide groups, also known as glycopolymers, are studied as oligo- and polysaccharide mimics. Controlled radical polymerization (CRP) techniques such as atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and nitroxide-mediated polymerization (NMP), as well as cyanoxyl-mediated free radical polymerization have allowed chemists to synthesize well-defined glycopolymers that, in some cases, have particular end-group functionalities. This review focuses on the synthesis of glycopolymers by these methods and the applications of glycopolymers as natural saccharide mimics.

  11. Coating of plasma polymerized film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morita, S.; Ishibashi, S.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma polymerized thin film coating and the use of other coatings is suggested for passivation film, thin film used for conducting light, and solid body lubrication film of dielectrics of ultra insulators for electrical conduction, electron accessories, etc. The special features of flow discharge development and the polymerized film growth mechanism are discussed.

  12. Platelet interaction with polymerizing fibrin.

    PubMed

    Niewiarowski, S; Regoeczi, E; Stewart, G J; Senyl, A F; Mustard, J F

    1972-03-01

    Interaction of washed pig, rabbit, or human platelets with fibrinogen was studied during its transition to fibrin using photometric, isotopic, and electron microscopic techniques. Untreated fibrinogen and fully polymerized fibrin had no detectable effect on platelets. Fibrinogen, incubated with low concentrations of reptilase or thrombin, formed intermediate products which readily became associated with platelets and caused their aggregation. Neutralization of the thrombin did not prevent this interaction. In the absence of fibrinogen, reptilase did not affect platelets. The interaction of polymerizing fibrin with platelets was accompanied by small losses of platelet constituents (serotonin, adenine nucleotides, platelet factor 4, and lactic dehydrogenase). This loss did not appear to be the result of the platelet release reaction. Inhibitors of the release reaction or of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation did not prevent the interaction of platelets with polymerizing fibrin. Apyrase or prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1)) reduced the extent of platelet aggregation by polymerizing fibrin, but the amount of protein associated with platelets was slightly increased. The interaction of polymerizing fibrin with platelets was completely inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) or ethylene glycol bis (beta-aminoethyl ether) N, N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA).Fibers formed in solutions of polymerizing fibrin were larger in the presence than in the absence of washed platelets, suggesting that platelets affect fibrin polymerization. The adherence of platelets to polymerizing fibrin may be responsible for the establishment of links between platelets and fibrin in hemostatic plugs and thrombi.

  13. Amplification of actin polymerization forces

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments. PMID:27002174

  14. Amplification of actin polymerization forces.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieff, Serge; Nédélec, François

    2016-03-28

    The actin cytoskeleton drives many essential processes in vivo, using molecular motors and actin assembly as force generators. We discuss here the propagation of forces caused by actin polymerization, highlighting simple configurations where the force developed by the network can exceed the sum of the polymerization forces from all filaments.

  15. [Synthesis of anabiosis autoinducers in non-spore-forming bacteria as a mechanism regulating their activity in soil and subsoil sedimentary rocks].

    PubMed

    Muliukin, A L; Demkina, E V; Kozlova, A N; Soina, V S; El'-Registan, G I

    2001-01-01

    Non-spore-forming bacteria of the genera Arthrobacter and Micrococcus, isolated from permafrost subsoil, were found to produce greater amounts of the d1 extracellular factor than closely related collection strains isolated from soil. The effect of this factor, responsible for cell transition to anabiosis, was not species-specific. Thus, the d1 crude preparation isolated from the culture liquid of the permafrost isolate Arthrobacter globiformis 245 produced an effect on the collection strain Arthrobacter globiformis B-1112 and also on Micrococcus luteus and Bacillus cereus. The crude d1 preparation from the permafrost isolate of Arthrobacter differed from the chemical analogue of this factor, 4n-hexylresorcinol, in the level of the induced cell response, which may have resulted from different cell sensitivity to various homologs of alkylhydroxybenzenes contained in the d1 preparation. Thus, additional evidence was obtained indicating that autoregulation of bacterial growth and development is implemented at the level of intercellular interactions in microbial communities. Abundant production of the d1 anabiosis-inducing factors by bacteria isolated from permafrost subsoil is probably a result of special antistress mechanisms responsible for the survival of these bacteria under extreme conditions of natural deep cooling.

  16. 40 CFR 180.1321 - Complex Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acids; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1321 Complex Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acids; exemption from... the residues of complex polymeric polyhydroxy acids in or on all food commodities when applied as a plant growth regulator and used in accordance with good agricultural practices....

  17. 49 CFR 176.907 - Polymeric Beads and Plastic Molding Compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Polymeric Beads and Plastic Molding Compounds. 176.907 Section 176.907 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS..., and Plastic Molding Compounds § 176.907 Polymeric Beads and Plastic Molding Compounds. (a)...

  18. 49 CFR 176.907 - Polymeric Beads and Plastic Molding Compounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Polymeric Beads and Plastic Molding Compounds. 176.907 Section 176.907 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS..., and Plastic Molding Compounds § 176.907 Polymeric Beads and Plastic Molding Compounds. (a)...

  19. Production of monodisperse, polymeric microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Rhim, Won-Kyu (Inventor); Hyson, Michael T. (Inventor); Chang, Manchium (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Very small, individual polymeric microspheres with very precise size and a wide variation in monomer type and properties are produced by deploying a precisely formed liquid monomer droplet, suitably an acrylic compound such as hydroxyethyl methacrylate into a containerless environment. The droplet which assumes a spheroid shape is subjected to polymerizing radiation such as ultraviolet or gamma radiation as it travels through the environment. Polymeric microspheres having precise diameters varying no more than plus or minus 5 percent from an average size are recovered. Many types of fillers including magnetic fillers may be dispersed in the liquid droplet.

  20. Melting line of polymeric nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, L. N.

    2013-05-01

    We made an attempt to predict location of the melting line of polymeric nitrogen using two equations for Helmholtz free energy: proposed earlier for cubic gauche-structure and developed recently for liquid polymerized nitrogen. The P-T relation, orthobaric densities and latent heat of melting were determined using a standard double tangent construction. The estimated melting temperature decreases with increasing pressure, alike the temperature of molecular-nonmolecular transition in solid. We discuss the possibility of a triple point (solid-molecular fluid-polymeric fluid) at ˜80 GPa and observed maximum of melting temperature of nitrogen.

  1. Organometallic Polymeric Conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngs, Wiley J.

    1997-01-01

    For aerospace applications, the use of polymers can result in tremendous weight savings over metals. Suitable polymeric materials for some applications like EMI shielding, spacecraft grounding, and charge dissipation must combine high electrical conductivity with long-term environmental stability, good processability, and good mechanical properties. Recently, other investigators have reported hybrid films made from an electrically conductive polymer combined with insulating polymers. In all of these instances, the films were prepared by infiltrating an insulating polymer with a precursor for a conductive polymer (either polypyrrole or polythiophene), and oxidatively polymerizing the precursor in situ. The resulting composite films have good electrical conductivity, while overcoming the brittleness inherent in most conductive polymers. Many aerospace applications require a combination of properties. Thus, hybrid films made from polyimides or other engineering resins are of primary interest, but only if conductivities on the same order as those obtained with a polystyrene base could be obtained. Hence, a series of experiments was performed to optimize the conductivity of polyimide-based composite films. The polyimide base chosen for this study was Kapton. 3-MethylThiophene (3MT) was used for the conductive phase. Three processing variables were identified for producing these composite films, namely time, temperature, and oxidant concentration for the in situ oxidation. Statistically designed experiments were used to examine the effects of these variables and synergistic/interactive effects among variables on the electrical conductivity and mechanical strength of the films. Multiple linear regression analysis of the tensile data revealed that temperature and time have the greatest effect on maximum stress. The response surface of maximum stress vs. temperature and time (for oxidant concentration at 1.2 M) is shown. Conductivity of the composite films was measured for

  2. Dynamic bioactive stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Heather Marie

    This dissertation focuses on the design, synthesis, and development of antimicrobial and anticoagulant surfaces of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) polymers. Aliphatic polymeric surfaces of PE and PP polymers functionalized using click chemistry reactions by the attachment of --COOH groups via microwave plasma reactions followed by functionalization with alkyne moieties. Azide containing ampicillin (AMP) was synthesized and subsequently clicked into the alkyne prepared PE and PP surfaces. Compared to non-functionalized PP and PE surfaces, the AMP clicked surfaces exhibited substantially enhanced antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. To expand the biocompatibility of polymeric surface anticoagulant attributes, PE and PTFE surfaces were functionalized with pH-responsive poly(2-vinyl pyridine) (P2VP) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) polyelectrolyte tethers terminated with NH2 and COOH groups. The goal of these studies was to develop switchable stimuli-responsive polymeric surfaces that interact with biological environments and display simultaneous antimicrobial and anticoagulant properties. Antimicrobial AMP was covalently attached to --COOH terminal ends of protected PAA, while anticoagulant heparin (HEP) was attached to terminal --NH2 groups of P2VP. When pH < 2.3, the P2VP segments are protonated and extend, but for pH > 5.5, they collapse while the PAA segments extend. Such surfaces, when exposed to Staphylococcus aureus, inhibit bacterial growth due to the presence of AMP, as well as are effective anticoagulants due to the presence of covalently attached HEP. Comparison of these "dynamic" pH responsive surfaces with "static" surfaces terminated with AMP entities show significant enhancement of longevity and surface activity against microbial film formation. The last portion of this dissertation focuses on the covalent attachment of living T1 and Φ11 bacteriophages (phages) on PE and PTFE surface

  3. High temperature structural, polymeric foams from high internal emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Hoisington, M.A.; Duke, J.R.; Apen, P.G.

    1996-02-01

    In 1982, a high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) polymerization process to manufacture microcellular, polymeric foam systems was patented by Unilever. This patent discloses a polymerization process that occurs in a water-in-oil emulsion in which the water represents at least 76% of the emulsion by volume. The oil phase consists of vinyl monomers such as styrene and acrylates that are crosslinked by divinyl monomers during polymerization. After polymerization and drying to remove the water phase, the result is a crosslinked polymer foam with an open cell microstructure that is homogeneous throughout in terms of morphology, density, and mechanical properties. Since 1982, numerous patents have examined various HIPE polymerized foam processing techniques and applications that include absorbents for body fluids, cleaning materials, and ion exchange systems. All the published HIPE polymerized foams have concentrated on materials for low temperature applications. Copolymerization of styrene with maleic anhydride and N-substituted maleimides to produce heat resistant thermoplastics has been studied extensively. These investigations have shown that styrene will free radically copolymerize with N-substituted maleimides to create an alternating thermoplastic copolymer with a Tg of approximately 200{degrees}C. However, there are many difficulties in attempting the maleimide styrene copolymerization in a HIPE such as lower polymerization temperatures, maleimide solubility difficulties in both styrene and water, and difficulty obtaining a stable HIPE with a styrene/maleimide oil phase. This work describes the preparation of copolymer foams from N-ethylmaleimide and Bis(3-ethyl-5-methyl-4-maleimide-phenyl)methane with styrene based monomers and crosslinking agents.

  4. Kinetics of silica polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Weres, O.; Yee, A.; Tsao, L.

    1980-05-01

    The polymerization of silicic acid in geothermal brine-like aqueous solutions to produce amorphous silica in colloidal form has been studied experimentally and theoretically. A large amount of high quality experimental data has been generated over the temperature rang 23 to 100{sup 0}C. Wide ranges of dissolved silica concentration, pH, and sodium chloride concentration were covered. The catalytic effects of fluoride and the reaction inhibiting effects of aluminum and boron were studied also. Two basic processes have been separately studied: the formation of new colloidal particles by the homogeneous nucleation process and the deposition of dissolved silica on pre-existing colloidal particles. A rigorous theory of the formation of colloidal particles of amorphous silica by homogeneous nucleation was developed. This theory employs the Lothe-Pound formalism, and is embodied in the computer code SILNUC which quantitatively models the homogeneous nucleation and growth of colloidal silica particles in more than enough detail for practical application. The theory and code were extensively used in planning the experimental work and analyzing the data produced. The code is now complete and running in its final form. It is capable of reproducing most of the experimental results to within experimental error. It is also capable of extrapolation to experimentally inaccessible conditions, i.e., high temperatures, rapidly varying temperature and pH, etc.

  5. Polymerization of anionic wormlike micelles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; González, Yamaira I; Xu, Hangxun; Kaler, Eric W; Liu, Shiyong

    2006-01-31

    Polymerizable anionic wormlike micelles are obtained upon mixing the hydrotropic salt p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) with the reactive anionic surfactant sodium 4-(8-methacryloyloxyoctyl)oxybenzene sulfonate (MOBS). Polymerization captures the cross-sectional radius of the micelles (approximately 2 nm), induces micellar growth, and leads to the formation of a stable single-phase dispersion of wormlike micellar polymers. The unpolymerized and polymerized micelles were characterized using static and dynamic laser light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering, 1H NMR, and stopped-flow light scattering. Stopped-flow light scattering was also used to measure the average lifetime of the unpolymerized wormlike micelles. A comparison of the average lifetime of unpolymerized wormlike micelles with the surfactant monomer propagation rate was used to elucidate the mechanism of polymerization. There is a significant correlation between the ratio of the average lifetime to the monomer propagation rate and the average aggregation number of the polymerized wormlike micelles.

  6. Polymerized supramolecular assemblies and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, David F.

    2001-03-01

    The creation of durable, biomembrane-mimetic coatings for inorganic and polymeric surfaces that are biocompatible, i.e. resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption, remains an important goal that is expected to impact numerous fields. It has already been shown that the physical stability of lipid bilayer vesicles can be dramatically enhanced by cross-linking polymerization of reactive lipids, such as phosphatidylcholines. Bilayers of these same lipids on clean silicon dioxide surfaces can be formed by fusion of small bilayer vesicles with the surface. Radical initiated polymerization of these supported bilayers yields a stable poly(lipid) film that is not perturbed upon exposure to surfactant. Moreover, the cross-linked bilayer film can be removed from water into air with retention of the poly(lipid) bilayer structure. These polymerized bilayer films could be repeatedly transferred from water to air to water with no obvious change in their biocompatibility. The supported bilayer films were equally resistant to non-specific protein adsorption before and after polymerization. This indicates that biocompatible nature of the phosphorylcholine head group of the lipids was not compromised by polymerization of the lipids. The ability to maintain surface biocompatibility of membranes while substantially increasing their stability would appear to extend the technological uses of supramolecular assemblies of lipids.

  7. Detection of Salmonella typhi utilizing bioconjugated fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Swati; Chattopadhyay, Sruti; Jackeray, Richa; Abid, Zainul; Singh, Harpal

    2016-05-01

    Present work demonstrates effective utilization of functionalized polymeric fluorescent nanoparticles as biosensing probe for the detection of Salmonella typhi bacteria on modified polycarbonate (PC) filters in about 3 h. Antibody modified-PC membranes were incubated with contaminated bacterial water for selective capturing which were detected by synthesized novel bioconjugate probe. Core-shell architecture of polymeric nanoparticles endows them with aqueous stabilization and keto-enolic functionalities making them usable for covalently linking S. typhi antibodies without any crosslinker or activator. Bradford analysis revealed that one nanoparticle has an average of 3.51 × 10-19 g or 21 × 104 bound S. typhi Ab molecules. Analysis of the regions of interest (ROI) in fluorescent micrographs of modified fluoroimmunoassay showed higher detection sensitivity of 5 × 102 cells/mL due to signal amplification unlike conventional naked dye FITC-Ab conjugate. Fluorescence of pyrene dye remained same on immobilization of biomolecules and nanoparticles showed stable fluorescent intensity under prolong exposure to laser owing to protective polymeric layer allowing accurate identification of bacteria. Surface-functionalized PC matrix and fluorescent label NPs permit covalent interactions among biomolecules enhancing signal acquisitions showing higher detection efficiency as compared to conventional microtiter plate-based system. Our novel immunoassay has the potential to be explored as rapid detection method for identifying S. typhi contaminations in water.

  8. Polymeric materials for neovascularization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVolder, Ross John

    Revascularization therapies have emerged as a promising strategy to treat various acute and chronic wounds, cardiovascular diseases, and tissue defects. It is common to either administer proangiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), or transplant cells that endogenously express multiple proangiogenic factors. Additionally, these strategies utilize a wide variety of polymeric systems, including hydrogels and biodegradable plastics, to deliver proangiogenic factors in a sophisticated manner to maintain a sustained proangiogenic environment. Despite some impressive results in rebuilding vascular networks, it is still a challenging task to engineer mature and functional neovessels in target tissues, because of the increasing complexities involved with neovascularization applications. To resolve these challenges, this work aims to design a wide variety of proangiogenic biomaterial systems with tunable properties used for neovascularization therapies. This thesis describes the design of several biomaterial systems used for the delivery of proangiogenic factors in neovascularization therapies, including: an electrospun/electrosprayed biodegradable plastic patch used for directional blood vessel growth (Chapter 2), an alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system that biochemically stimulates cellular endogenous proangiogenic factor expression (Chapter 3), an enzyme-catalyzed alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system for VEGF delivery (Chapter 4), an enzyme-activated alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel system with systematically controllable electrical and mechanical properties (Chapter 5), and an alginate-g-pyrrole hydrogel that enables the decoupled control of electrical conductivity and mechanical rigidity and is use to electrically stimulate cellular endogenous proangiogenic factor expression (Chapter 6). Overall, the biomaterial systems developed in this thesis will be broadly useful for improving the quality of a wide array of molecular and cellular based

  9. Polymeric materials in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skurat, Vladimir

    Paper of short review type. It is the continuation of and addition to previous review papers "V. E. Skurat. Polymers in Space. In: Encyclopedia of aerospace engineering, vol. 4, Wiley and sons, 2010; Ibid., 2012 (on line)". Following topics are considered: (1) Destruction of polymers by solar radiation with various wavelengths in different spectral regions (visible-UV, vacuum UV (VUV), deep UV, soft and hard X-rays) are discussed. In difference with common polymer photochemistry induced by UV radiation, directions of various routs of polymer phototransformations and their relative yields are greatly dependent on wavelength of light (photon energy) during illuminations in VUV, deep UV and X-ray regions. During last twenty years, intensive spacecraft investigations of solar spectrum show great periodic and spontaneous variations of radiation intensities in short-wavelengths regions - up to one - two decimal orders of magnitude for X-rays. As a result, during solar flares the absorbed dose on the polymer surfaces from X-rays can be compared with absorbed dose from VUV radiation. (2) Some new approaches to predictions of reaction efficiencies of fast orbital atomic oxygen in their interaction with polymeric materials are considered. (3) Some aspects of photocatalitic destruction of polymers in vacuum conditions by full-spectrum solar radiation are discussed. This process can take place in enamels containing semiconducting particles (TiO2, ZnO) as pigments. (4) Contamination of spacecraft surfaces from intrinsic outer atmosphere play important role not only from the point of view of deterioration of optical and thermophysical properties. Layers of SiO2 contaminations with nanometer thicknesses can greatly diminish mass losses from perfluorinated polymers under VUV irradiation.

  10. FtsZ polymerization assays: simple protocols and considerations.

    PubMed

    Król, Ewa; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2013-11-16

    During bacterial cell division, the essential protein FtsZ assembles in the middle of the cell to form the so-called Z-ring. FtsZ polymerizes into long filaments in the presence of GTP in vitro, and polymerization is regulated by several accessory proteins. FtsZ polymerization has been extensively studied in vitro using basic methods including light scattering, sedimentation, GTP hydrolysis assays and electron microscopy. Buffer conditions influence both the polymerization properties of FtsZ, and the ability of FtsZ to interact with regulatory proteins. Here, we describe protocols for FtsZ polymerization studies and validate conditions and controls using Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis FtsZ as model proteins. A low speed sedimentation assay is introduced that allows the study of the interaction of FtsZ with proteins that bundle or tubulate FtsZ polymers. An improved GTPase assay protocol is described that allows testing of GTP hydrolysis over time using various conditions in a 96-well plate setup, with standardized incubation times that abolish variation in color development in the phosphate detection reaction. The preparation of samples for light scattering studies and electron microscopy is described. Several buffers are used to establish suitable buffer pH and salt concentration for FtsZ polymerization studies. A high concentration of KCl is the best for most of the experiments. Our methods provide a starting point for the in vitro characterization of FtsZ, not only from E. coli and B. subtilis but from any other bacterium. As such, the methods can be used for studies of the interaction of FtsZ with regulatory proteins or the testing of antibacterial drugs which may affect FtsZ polymerization.

  11. Distribution of tetracycline resistance genes in anaerobic treatment of waste sludge: The role of pH in regulating tetracycline resistant bacteria and horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haining; Chen, Yinguang; Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Wan, Rui; Yang, Shouye

    2016-10-01

    Although pH value has been widely regarded as an important factor that affects resource recovery of waste sludge, the potential influence of diverse pHs on the distribution of tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) during sludge anaerobic treatment is largely unknown. Here we reported that in the range of pH 4-10, 0.58-1.18 log unit increase of target TRGs was observed at pH 4, compared with that at pH 7, while 0.70-1.31 log unit further removal were obtained at pH 10. Mechanism study revealed that varied pHs not only altered the community structures of tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB), but also changed their relative abundances, benefitting the propagation (acidic pHs) or attenuation (alkaline pHs) of TRB. Further investigation indicated that the amount and gene-possessing abilities of key genetic vectors for horizontal TRGs transfer were greatly promoted at acidic pHs but restricted under alkaline conditions.

  12. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, John E.; Herzog, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

  13. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Bercaw, J.E.; Herzog, T.A.

    1998-01-13

    A metallocene catalyst system is described for the polymerization of {alpha}-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula shown wherein: R{sup 1}, R{sup 2}, and R{sup 3} are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyls as a substituent, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R{sup 8}){sub 3} where R{sup 8} is selected from the group consisting of C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; R{sup 4} and R{sup 6} are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R{sup 1} and R{sup 3}; R{sup 5} is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E{sup 1}, E{sup 2} are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--Si(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Ge(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, Sn(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}--C(R{sup 9}){sub 2}, where R{sup 9} is C{sub 1} to C{sub 10} alkyl, C{sub 6} to C{sub 15} aryl or C{sub 3} to C{sub 10} cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C{sub S} or C{sub 1}-symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from {alpha}-olefin monomers.

  14. Mechanically controlled radical polymerization initiated by ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Hemakesh; Kleiman, Maya; Esser-Kahn, Aaron Palmer

    2016-10-01

    In polymer chemistry, mechanical energy degrades polymeric chains. In contrast, in nature, mechanical energy is often used to create new polymers. This mechanically stimulated growth is a key component of the robustness of biological materials. A synthetic system in which mechanical force initiates polymerization will provide similar robustness in polymeric materials. Here we show a polymerization of acrylate monomers initiated and controlled by mechanical energy provided by ultrasonic agitation. The activator for an atom-transfer radical polymerization is generated using piezochemical reduction of a Cu(II) precursor complex, which thus converts a mechanical activation of piezoelectric particles to the synthesis of a new material. This polymerization reaction has some characteristics of controlled radical polymerization, such as narrow molecular-weight distribution and linear dependence of the polymeric chain length on the time of mechanical activation. This new method of controlled radical polymerization complements the existing methods to synthesize commercially useful well-defined polymers.

  15. Cytokinesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Errington, Jeffery; Daniel, Richard A.; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2003-01-01

    Work on two diverse rod-shaped bacteria, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, has defined a set of about 10 conserved proteins that are important for cell division in a wide range of eubacteria. These proteins are directed to the division site by the combination of two negative regulatory systems. Nucleoid occlusion is a poorly understood mechanism whereby the nucleoid prevents division in the cylindrical part of the cell, until chromosome segregation has occurred near midcell. The Min proteins prevent division in the nucleoid-free spaces near the cell poles in a manner that is beginning to be understood in cytological and biochemical terms. The hierarchy whereby the essential division proteins assemble at the midcell division site has been worked out for both E. coli and B. subtilis. They can be divided into essentially three classes depending on their position in the hierarchy and, to a certain extent, their subcellular localization. FtsZ is a cytosolic tubulin-like protein that polymerizes into an oligomeric structure that forms the initial ring at midcell. FtsA is another cytosolic protein that is related to actin, but its precise function is unclear. The cytoplasmic proteins are linked to the membrane by putative membrane anchor proteins, such as ZipA of E. coli and possibly EzrA of B. subtilis, which have a single membrane span but a cytoplasmic C-terminal domain. The remaining proteins are either integral membrane proteins or transmembrane proteins with their major domains outside the cell. The functions of most of these proteins are unclear with the exception of at least one penicillin-binding protein, which catalyzes a key step in cell wall synthesis in the division septum. PMID:12626683

  16. Back To Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  17. Factors regulating community composition of methanogens and sulfate-reducing bacteria in brackish marsh sediments in the Min River estuary, southeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    She, C. X.; Zhang, Z. C.; Cadillo-Quiroz, H.; Tong, C.

    2016-11-01

    Assessing the diverse communities of methanogenic Archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is important to understand methane (CH4) production in wetland ecosystems. However, the vertical distribution of composition and diversity, and the effects of environmental factors on the methanogen and SRB communities in the sediments of subtropical estuarine brackish marshes have been poorly characterized. To assess the effects of variable environmental conditions on methanogenic and SRB communities in marshes, we studied three brackish marsh zones dominated by Phragmites australis, Cyperus malaccensis and Spartina alterniflora, respectively, in the Min River estuary, southeastern China. Methanogens of the Methanomicrobiales order was the dominant group at sediment depths of 0-30 cm, which indicated that the main pathway of methane production was H2/CO2 in this zone. In general, methanogens of the genus Methanoregula were dominant in the three marsh zones. For SRB, Desulfobacterales was the dominant group, and Desulfobacterium and Desulfosarcina were the predominant genera at the depth of 0-30 cm. The community composition of methanogens and SRB changed with vegetation type and soil depth. Compared with SRB, vegetation type demonstrated a stronger influence on the community composition of methanogens. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) analysis further revealed that the main factors affecting the methanogens community composition were EC (electric conductivity) and pH, and the main factors affecting SRB community composition were pH, SOC and TN, suggesting that pH is a common factor influencing the community compositions of both methanogen and SRB in the sediments of brackish marshes.

  18. On-demand photoinitiated polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Boydston, Andrew J; Grubbs, Robert H; Daeffler, Chris; Momcilovic, Nebojsa

    2015-01-13

    Compositions and methods for adjustable lenses are provided. In some embodiments, the lenses contain a lens matrix material, a masking compound, and a prepolymer. The lens matrix material provides structure to the lens. The masking compound is capable of blocking polymerization or crosslinking of the prepolymer, until photoisomerization of the compound is triggered, and the compound is converted from a first isomer to a second isomer having a different absorption profile. The prepolymer is a composition that can undergo a polymerization or crosslinking reaction upon photoinitiation to alter one or more of the properties of the lenses.

  19. On-demand photoinitiated polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Boydston, Andrew J; Grubbs, Robert H; Daeffler, Chris; Momcilovic, Nebojsa

    2013-12-10

    Compositions and methods for adjustable lenses are provided. In some embodiments, the lenses contain a lens matrix material, a masking compound, and a prepolymer. The lens matrix material provides structure to the lens. The masking compound is capable of blocking polymerization or crosslinking of the prepolymer, until photoisomerization of the compound is triggered, and the compound is converted from a first isomer to a second isomer having a different absorption profile. The prepolymer is a composition that can undergo a polymerization or crosslinking reaction upon photoinitiation to alter one or more of the properties of the lenses.

  20. Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Pyroelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycely O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers. acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors, in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors. weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 1000 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium; applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  1. Chemical communication in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suravajhala, Srinivasa Sandeep; Saini, Deepak; Nott, Prabhu

    Luminescence in Vibrio fischeri is a model for quorum-sensing-gene-regulation in bacteria. We study luminescence response of V. fischeri to both internal and external cues at the single cell and population level. Experiments with ES114, a wild-type strain, and ainS mutant show that luminescence induction in cultures is not always proportional to cell-density and there is always a basal level of luminescence. At any given concentration of the exogenously added signals, C6-HSL and C8-HSL, luminescence per cell reaches a maximum during the exponential phase and decreases thereafter. We hypothesize that (1) C6-HSL production and LuxR activity are not proportional to cell-density, and (2) there is a shift in equilibrium from C6-HSL to C8-HSL during the later stages of growth of the culture. RT-PCR analysis of luxI and luxR shows that the expression of these genes is maximum corresponding to the highest level of luminescence. The shift in equilibrium is shown by studying competitive binding of C6-HSL and C8-HSL to LuxR. We argue that luminescence is a unicellular behaviour, and an intensive property like per cell luminescence is more important than gross luminescence of the population in understanding response of bacteria to chemical signalling. Funding from the Department of Science and Technology, India is acknowledged.

  2. Low vibration polymeric composite engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimond, David P.; Muench, Rolf K.

    1994-12-01

    An internal combustion engine is constructed with metallic parts in its regions which are subjected to high stress (temperature, pressure) during combustion and polymeric materials in its regions which are subjected to relatively lower stresses. The integrated construction helps realize increased power densities and reductions on engine noise without compromising engine performance. V-configuration Diesel engines particularly benefit from this construction.

  3. Ballistic Resistance of Polymeric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Chad

    2005-03-01

    Ballistic-resistant body armor has been credited with saving more than 2,500 lives, but new materials are constantly being developed, and there currently exists no method for evaluating armor over time to ensure the continued effectiveness of the protection. We report on progress towards development of a standard test method for reliability of the active polymeric materials that comprise them.

  4. Novel polymeric materials from triglycerides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triglycerides are good platforms for new polymeric products that can substitute for petroleum-based materials. As part of our research emphasis in sustainability and green polymer chemistry, we have explored a number of reactions in efforts to produce a wide range of value-added products. In this ...

  5. The absorption of polymeric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řídký, R.; Popovič, M.; Rolc, S.; Drdlová, M.; Krátký, J.

    2016-06-01

    An absorption capacity of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates is important for wide range of practical applications. Nowadays there are many variants of numerical models suitable for this kind of analysis. The main difficulty is in selection of the most realistic numerical model and a correct setup of many unknown material constants. Cooperation between theoretical simulations and real testing is next crucial point in the investigation process. Standard open source material database offer material properties valid for strain rates less than 250 s-1. There are experiments suitable for analysis of material properties with strain rates close to 2000 s-1. The high strain-rate characteristics of a specific porous blast energy absorbing material measured by modified Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus is presented in this study. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. One of the possible solution leads to complex and frequency depended Young modulus of testing bars material. This testing technique was applied to materials composed of porous glass/ceramic filler and polymeric binder, with density of 125 - 300 kg/m3 and particle size in range of 50 µm - 2 mm. The achieved material model was verified in practical application of sandwich structure includes polymeric composites under a blast test.

  6. The Viscosity of Polymeric Fluids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, J. E.; Martin, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    To illustrate the behavior of polymeric fluids and in what respects they differ from Newtonian liquids, an experiment was developed to account for the shear-rate dependence of non-Newtonian fluids. Background information, procedures, and results are provided for the experiment. Useful in transport processes, fluid mechanics, or physical chemistry…

  7. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsooodi, S; Yi Pang.

    1993-10-19

    A polymeric material is described which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6].

  8. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Pang, Yi

    1992-05-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl.sub.5 or W(CO).sub.6 /hv.

  9. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina; Pang, Yi

    1993-10-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl.sub.5 or W(CO).sub.6 /hv.

  10. Nonlinear optical and conductive polymeric material

    DOEpatents

    Barton, T.J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, S.; Pang, Y.

    1992-05-19

    A polymeric material which exhibits nonlinear optical properties if undoped and conductive properties if doped. The polymer is prepared by polymerizing diethynylsilane compositions, the resulting polymeric material having a weight average molecular weight between about 20,000 and about 200,000 grams per mole. The polymer is prepared and catalytically polymerized by exposure to a catalyst, such as MoCl[sub 5] or W(CO)[sub 6]/hv.

  11. UV-triggered dopamine polymerization: control of polymerization, surface coating, and photopatterning.

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Li, Linxian; Li, Junsheng; Yang, Chengwu; Frenkel, Nataliya; Welle, Alexander; Heissler, Stefan; Nefedov, Alexei; Grunze, Michael; Levkin, Pavel A

    2014-12-17

    UV irradiation is demonstrated to initiate dopamine polymerization and deposition on different surfaces under both acidic and basic pH. The observed acceleration of the dopamine polymerization is explained by the UV-induced formation of reactive oxygen species that trigger dopamine polymerization. The UV-induced dopamine polymerization leads to a better control over polydopamine deposition and formation of functional polydopamine micropatterns.

  12. Augmented IFN-γ and TNF-α Induced by Probiotic Bacteria in NK Cells Mediate Differentiation of Stem-Like Tumors Leading to Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Reduction in Inflammatory Cytokine Release; Regulation by IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Vickie T.; Tseng, Han-Ching; Kozlowska, Anna; Maung, Phyu Ou; Kaur, Kawaljit; Topchyan, Paytsar; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-01-01

    Our previous reports demonstrated that the magnitude of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity correlate directly with the stage and level of differentiation of tumor cells. In addition, we have shown previously that activated NK cells inhibit growth of cancer cells through induction of differentiation, resulting in the resistance of tumor cells to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity through secreted cytokines, as well as direct NK-tumor cell contact. In this report, we show that in comparison to IL-2 + anti-CD16mAb-treated NK cells, activation of NK cells by probiotic bacteria (sAJ2) in combination with IL-2 and anti-CD16mAb substantially decreases tumor growth and induces maturation, differentiation, and resistance of oral squamous cancer stem cells, MIA PaCa-2 stem-like/poorly differentiated pancreatic tumors, and healthy stem cells of apical papillae through increased secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α, as well as direct NK-tumor cell contact. Tumor resistance to NK cell-mediated killing induced by IL-2 + anti-CD16mAb + sAJ2-treated NK cells is induced by combination of IFN-γ and TNF-α since antibodies to both, and not each cytokine alone, were able to restore tumor sensitivity to NK cells. Increased surface expression of CD54, B7H1, and MHC-I on NK-differentiated tumors was mediated by IFN-γ since the addition of anti-IFN-γ abolished their increase and restored the ability of NK cells to trigger cytokine and chemokine release; whereas differentiated tumors inhibited cytokine release by the NK cells. Monocytes synergize with NK cells in the presence of probiotic bacteria to induce regulated differentiation of stem cells through secretion of IL-10 resulting in resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity and inhibition of cytokine release. Therefore, probiotic bacteria condition activated NK cells to provide augmented differentiation of cancer stem cells resulting in inhibition of tumor growth, and decreased inflammatory cytokine release. PMID

  13. MicroRNA-302b augments host defense to bacteria by regulating inflammatory responses via feedback to TLR/IRAK4 circuits

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xikun; Li, Xuefeng; Ye, Yan; Zhao, Kelei; Zhuang, Yan; Li, Yi; Wei, Yuquan; Wu, Min

    2014-01-01

    Summary MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in a spectrum of physiological and pathological conditions, including immune responses. miR-302b has been implicated in stem cell differentiation but its role in immunity remains unknown. Here we show that miR-302b is induced by TLR2 and TLR4 through ERK-p38-NF-κB signaling upon Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Suppression of inflammatory responses to bacterial infection is mediated by targeting IRAK4, a protein required for the activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Through negative feedback, enforced expression of miR-302b or IRAK4 siRNA silencing inhibits downstream NF-κB signaling and airway leukocyte infiltration, thereby alleviating lung injury and increasing survival in P. aeruginosa-infected mice. In contrast, miR-302b inhibitors exacerbate inflammatory responses and decrease survival in P. aeruginosa-infected mice and lung cells. These findings reveal that miR-302b is a novel inflammatory regulator of NF-κB activation in respiratory bacterial infections by providing negative feedback to TLRs-mediated immunity. PMID:24717937

  14. Bioinspired anchoring AgNPs onto micro-nanoporous TiO2 orthopedic coatings: Trap-killing of bacteria, surface-regulated osteoblast functions and host responses.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhaojun; Xiu, Peng; Li, Ming; Xu, Xuchen; Shi, Yuying; Cheng, Yan; Wei, Shicheng; Zheng, Yufeng; Xi, Tingfei; Cai, Hong; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic applications of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against biomedical device-associated infections (BAI), by local delivery, are encountered with risks of detachment, instability and nanotoxicity in physiological milieus. To firmly anchor AgNPs onto modified biomaterial surfaces through tight physicochemical interactions would potentially relieve these concerns. Herein, we present a strategy for hierarchical TiO2/Ag coating, in an attempt to endow medical titanium (Ti) with anticorrosion and antibacterial properties whilst maintaining normal biological functions. In brief, by harnessing the adhesion and reactivity of bioinspired polydopamine, silver nanoparticles were easily immobilized onto peripheral surface and incorporated into interior cavity of a micro/nanoporous TiO2 ceramic coating in situ grown from template Ti. The resulting coating protected the substrate well from corrosion and gave a sustained release of Ag(+) up to 28 d. An interesting germicidal effect, termed "trap-killing", was observed against Staphylococcus aureus strain. The multiple osteoblast responses, i.e. adherence, spreading, proliferation, and differentiation, were retained normal or promoted, via a putative surface-initiated self-regulation mechanism. After subcutaneous implantation for a month, the coated specimens elicited minimal, comparable inflammatory responses relative to the control. Moreover, this simple and safe functionalization strategy manifested a good degree of flexibility towards three-dimensional sophisticated objects. Expectedly, it can become a prospective bench to bedside solution to current challenges facing orthopedics.

  15. Glycine Polymerization on Oxide Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitadai, Norio; Oonishi, Hiroyuki; Umemoto, Koichiro; Usui, Tomohiro; Fukushi, Keisuke; Nakashima, Satoru

    2016-07-01

    It has long been suggested that mineral surfaces played an important role in peptide bond formation on the primitive Earth. However, it remains unclear which mineral species was key to the prebiotic processes. This is because great discrepancies exist among the reported catalytic efficiencies of minerals for amino acid polymerizations, owing to mutually different experimental conditions. This study examined polymerization of glycine (Gly) on nine oxide minerals (amorphous silica, quartz, α-alumina and γ-alumina, anatase, rutile, hematite, magnetite, and forsterite) using identical preparation, heating, and analytical procedures. Results showed that a rutile surface is the most effective site for Gly polymerization in terms of both amounts and lengths of Gly polymers synthesized. The catalytic efficiency decreased as rutile > anatase > γ-alumina > forsterite > α- alumina > magnetite > hematite > quartz > amorphous silica. Based on reported molecular-level information for adsorption of Gly on these minerals, polymerization activation was inferred to have arisen from deprotonation of the NH3 + group of adsorbed Gly to the nucleophilic NH2 group, and from withdrawal of electron density from the carboxyl carbon to the surface metal ions. The orientation of adsorbed Gly on minerals is also a factor influencing the Gly reactivity. The examination of Gly-mineral interactions under identical experimental conditions has enabled the direct comparison of various minerals' catalytic efficiencies and has made discussion of polymerization mechanisms and their relative influences possible Further systematic investigations using the approach reported herein (which are expected to be fruitful) combined with future microscopic surface analyses will elucidate the role of minerals in the process of abiotic peptide bond formation.

  16. Actin polymerization is stimulated by actin cross-linking protein palladin.

    PubMed

    Gurung, Ritu; Yadav, Rahul; Brungardt, Joseph G; Orlova, Albina; Egelman, Edward H; Beck, Moriah R

    2016-02-15

    The actin scaffold protein palladin regulates both normal cell migration and invasive cell motility, processes that require the co-ordinated regulation of actin dynamics. However, the potential effect of palladin on actin dynamics has remained elusive. In the present study, we show that the actin-binding immunoglobulin-like domain of palladin, which is directly responsible for both actin binding and bundling, also stimulates actin polymerization in vitro. Palladin eliminated the lag phase that is characteristic of the slow nucleation step of actin polymerization. Furthermore, palladin dramatically reduced depolymerization, slightly enhanced the elongation rate, and did not alter the critical concentration. Microscopy and in vitro cross-linking assays reveal differences in actin bundle architecture when palladin is incubated with actin before or after polymerization. These results suggest a model whereby palladin stimulates a polymerization-competent form of globular or monomeric actin (G-actin), akin to metal ions, either through charge neutralization or through conformational changes.

  17. Locomotion by tangential deformation in a polymeric fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lailai; Lauga, Eric; Brandt, Luca

    2010-11-01

    Many biological cells such as bacteria often encounter viscous environments with suspended microstructures or macromolecules. The physics of micro-propulsion in such a non-Newtonian viscoelastic fluid has only recently started to be addressed. Here we present results of three-dimensional numerical simulations for the steady locomotion of a self-propelled body in a model polymeric (Giesekus) fluid at low Reynolds number. The microswimmer is driven by a purely tangential distortion on the outer surface reproduced as non-homogenous boundary condition on a rigid body. The swimming speed and efficiency for different values of the Weissenberg number and the viscosity ratio are reported. The swimming speed is lower in a visco-elastic fluid and is asymptotically recovering for large We approaching values for Newtonian swimmer. Interestingly, the efficiency is seen to significantly increase as the viscosity of the polymeric fluid is increased. Further analysis reveals that polymeric stresses break the Newtonian front-back symmetry in the flow profile around the body. Speed and efficiency for pusher and puller squirmers will be reported together with analysis of the velocity fields. Time-dependent boundary conditions shall also be considered.

  18. Polymeric nanoparticles in development for treatment of pulmonary infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young H; Tiemann, Kristin M; Hunstad, David A; Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L

    2016-11-01

    Serious lung infections, such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, and chronic obstructive cystic fibrosis-related bacterial diseases, are increasingly difficult to treat and can be life-threatening. Over the last decades, an array of therapeutics and/or diagnostics have been exploited for management of pulmonary infections, but the advent of drug-resistant bacteria and the adverse conditions experienced upon reaching the lung environment urge the development of more effective delivery vehicles. Nanotechnology is revolutionizing the approach to circumventing these barriers, enabling better management of pulmonary infectious diseases. In particular, polymeric nanoparticle-based therapeutics have emerged as promising candidates, allowing for programmed design of multi-functional nanodevices and, subsequently, improved pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficiency, as compared to conventional routes of delivery. Direct delivery to the lungs of such nanoparticles, loaded with appropriate antimicrobials and equipped with 'smart' features to overcome various mucosal and cellular barriers, is a promising approach to localize and concentrate therapeutics at the site of infection while minimizing systemic exposure to the therapeutic agents. The present review focuses on recent progress (2005-2015) important for the rational design of nanostructures, particularly polymeric nanoparticles, for the treatment of pulmonary infections with highlights on the influences of size, shape, composition, and surface characteristics of antimicrobial-bearing polymeric nanoparticles on their biodistribution, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:842-871. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1401 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  19. Polymerization in highly compressed nitrogen (Review Article)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the thermodynamic properties of new polymeric phases of nitrogen at ultra-high pressures, as well as computer modeling of the structure and properties of polymeric nitrogen based on the potential models of interaction of atoms and molecules are reviewed. The location of the phase transition lines for the transitions between the molecular and polymeric crystals, molecular and polymeric fluids as well as the position of the melting line for the polymeric nitrogen in the phase diagram are discussed.

  20. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  1. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  2. Identification and molecular characterization of YsaL (Ye3555): a novel negative regulator of YsaN ATPase in type three secretion system of enteropathogenic bacteria Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Rakesh; Halder, Pranab Kumar; Datta, Saumen

    2013-01-01

    Type Three Secretion (T3S) ATPases are involved in delivery of virulent factors from bacteria to their hosts (through injectisome) in an energy (ATP) dependent manner during pathogenesis. The activities of these ATPases are tightly controlled by their specific regulators. In Yersinia enterocolitica, YsaN was predicted as a putative ATPase of the Ysa-Ysp Type Three Secretion System (T3SS) based on sequence similarity with other T3S ATPases. However detailed study and characterization of YsaN and its regulation remains largely obscure. Here, in this study, we have successfully cloned, over-expressed, purified and characterized the molecular properties of YsaN from Yersinia enterocolitica. YsaN acts as a Mg(2+) dependent ATPase and exists in solution as higher order oligomer (dodecamer). The ATPase activity of oligomeric YsaN is several fold higher than the monomeric form. Furthermore, by employing in silico studies we have identified the existence of a negative regulator of YsaN--a hypothetical protein YE3555 (termed 'YsaL'). To verify the functionality of YsaL, we have evaluated the biochemical and biophysical properties of YsaL. Purified YsaL is dimeric in solution and strongly associates with YsaN to form a stable heterotrimeric YsaL-YsaN complex (stoichiometry--2∶1). The N terminal 6-20 residues of YsaN are invariably required for stable YsaL-YsaN complex formation. YsaL inhibited the ATPase activity of YsaN with a maximum inhibition at the molar ratio 2∶1 (YsaL: YsaN). In short, our studies provide an insight into the presence of YsaN ATPase in Yersinia enterocolitica and its regulator YsaL. Our studies also correlate the functionality of one of the existing protein interaction networks that possibly is indispensable for the energy dependent process of Ysa-Ysp T3SS in pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica.

  3. Stoichiometry of Nck-dependent actin polymerization in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Ditlev, Jonathon A.; Michalski, Paul J.; Huber, Greg; Rivera, Gonzalo M.; Mohler, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of actin dynamics through the Nck/N-WASp (neural Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein)/Arp2/3 pathway is essential for organogenesis, cell invasiveness, and pathogen infection. Although many of the proteins involved in this pathway are known, the detailed mechanism by which it functions remains undetermined. To examine the signaling mechanism, we used a two-pronged strategy involving computational modeling and quantitative experimentation. We developed predictions for Nck-dependent actin polymerization using the Virtual Cell software system. In addition, we used antibody-induced aggregation of membrane-targeted Nck SH3 domains to test these predictions and to determine how the number of molecules in Nck aggregates and the density of aggregates affected localized actin polymerization in living cells. Our results indicate that the density of Nck molecules in aggregates is a critical determinant of actin polymerization. Furthermore, results from both computational simulations and experimentation support a model in which the Nck/N-WASp/Arp2/3 stoichiometry is 4:2:1. These results provide new insight into activities involving localized actin polymerization, including tumor cell invasion, microbial pathogenesis, and T cell activation. PMID:22613834

  4. Relative contribution of biomolecules in bacterial extracellular polymeric substances to disinfection byproduct formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhikang; Choi, Onekyun; Seo, Youngwoo

    2013-09-03

    In this study, detailed chemical compositions of the biomolecules in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from both pure cultures of bacteria and mixed species biofilm isolated from a water utility were analyzed. Then, based on detailed EPS analysis results, the DBP yield experiments were conducted with both extracted EPS and surrogate chemicals to indirectly identify the influence of biomolecules and their structures on DBP formation and speciation. DBP yield results of both extracted EPS and EPS surrogates indicated that proteins in EPS have a greater influence on DBP formation, especially on the formation of nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs), where amino acids containing unsaturated organic carbon or conjugated bonds in R-group produced higher amount of DBPs. For regulated DBPs, HAA yields were higher than THM yields, while haloacetonitriles were the dominant DBP species formed among unregulated DBPs. However, DBP yields of polysaccharide monomers were lower than those of tested amino acids groups and the DBP yields of polysaccharide monomers were not significantly influenced by their structures. Considering the results obtained in this study, biofilm needs to be considered an important precursor to DBP formation and biofilm eradication methods for water distribution systems need to be carefully selected to minimize subsequent DBP formation.

  5. Polymeric anti-HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Danial, Maarten; Klok, Harm-Anton

    2015-01-01

    The scope of this review is to highlight the application of polymer therapeutics in an effort to curb the transmission and infection of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Following a description of the HIV life cycle, the use of approved antiretroviral drugs that inhibit critical steps in the HIV infection process is highlighted. After that, a comprehensive overview of the structure and inhibitory properties of polymeric anti-HIV therapeutic agents is presented. This overview will include inhibitors based on polysaccharides, synthetic polymers, dendritic polymers, polymer conjugates as well as polymeric DC-SIGN antagonists. The review will conclude with a section that discusses the applications of polymers and polymer conjugates as systemic and topical anti-HIV therapeutics.

  6. Metal containing polymeric functional microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    Polymeric functional microspheres containing metal or metal compounds are formed by addition polymerization of a covalently bondable olefinic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate in the presence of finely divided metal or metal oxide particles, such as iron, gold, platinum or magnetite, which are embedded in the resulting microspheres. The microspheres can be covalently bonded to chemotherapeutic agents, antibodies, or other proteins providing a means for labeling or separating labeled cells. Labeled cells or microspheres can be concentrated at a specific body location such as in the vicinity of a malignant tumor by applying a magnetic field to the location and then introducing the magnetically attractable microspheres or cells into the circulatory system of the subject. Labeled cells can be separated from a cell mixture by applying a predetermined magnetic field to a tube in which the mixture is flowing. After collection of the labeled cells, the magnetic field is discontinued and the labeled sub-cell population recovered.

  7. Polymeric Nanofibers in Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Rebecca L.; Kasper, F. Kurtis

    2011-01-01

    Polymeric nanofibers can be produced using methods such as electrospinning, phase separation, and self-assembly, and the fiber composition, diameter, alignment, degradation, and mechanical properties can be tailored to the intended application. Nanofibers possess unique advantages for tissue engineering. The small diameter closely matches that of extracellular matrix fibers, and the relatively large surface area is beneficial for cell attachment and bioactive factor loading. This review will update the reader on the aspects of nanofiber fabrication and characterization important to tissue engineering, including control of porous structure, cell infiltration, and fiber degradation. Bioactive factor loading will be discussed with specific relevance to tissue engineering. Finally, applications of polymeric nanofibers in the fields of bone, cartilage, ligament and tendon, cardiovascular, and neural tissue engineering will be reviewed. PMID:21699434

  8. Polymeric nanofibers in tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Rebecca L; Kasper, F Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G

    2011-10-01

    Polymeric nanofibers can be produced using methods such as electrospinning, phase separation, and self-assembly, and the fiber composition, diameter, alignment, degradation, and mechanical properties can be tailored to the intended application. Nanofibers possess unique advantages for tissue engineering. The small diameter closely matches that of extracellular matrix fibers, and the relatively large surface area is beneficial for cell attachment and bioactive factor loading. This review will update the reader on the aspects of nanofiber fabrication and characterization important to tissue engineering, including control of porous structure, cell infiltration, and fiber degradation. Bioactive factor loading will be discussed with specific relevance to tissue engineering. Finally, applications of polymeric nanofibers in the fields of bone, cartilage, ligament and tendon, cardiovascular, and neural tissue engineering will be reviewed.

  9. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 2 carbon atoms of mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins or diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing one or more olefins in the presence of the catalyst system comprising (A) an organo aluminum cocatalyst, and (B) a vanadium-containing catalyst component obtained by sequentially treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent with (i) a dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound, (ii) optionally an oxygen-containing compound which is an alcohol, ketone or aldehyde, (iii) a vanadium compound, and (iv) a Group IIIa metal halide. The process as above is described wherein the inert solid support material is an inorganic oxide or mixtures of inorganic oxides.

  10. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-04-14

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alphaolefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins or diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing one or more olefins in the presence of the catalyst system comprising (A) an organo aluminum cocatalyst, and (B) a vanadium-containing catalyst component obtained by treating an inert support material in an inert solvent with (i) a dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound or a complex or mixture of an organic dihydrocarbyl magnesium compound and an aluminum compound, (ii) optionally an oxygen-containing compound which is an alcohol, ketone or aldehyde, (iii) a Group IIIa metal halide, (iv) at least one vanadium compound, and as the last step a second treatment with a Group IIIa metal halide.

  11. Bacteria-Targeting Nanoparticles for Managing Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar Filip

    Bacterial infections continue to be a significant concern particularly in healthcare settings and in the developing world. Current challenges include the increasing spread of drug resistant (DR) organisms, the side effects of antibiotic therapy, the negative consequences of clearing the commensal bacterial flora, and difficulties in developing prophylactic vaccines. This thesis was an investigation of the potential of a class of polymeric nanoparticles (NP) to contribute to the management of bacterial infections. More specifically, steps were taken towards using these NPs (1) to achieve greater spatiotemporal control over drug therapy by more targeted antibiotic delivery to bacteria, and (2) to develop a prophylactic vaccine formulation against the common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. In the first part, we synthesized polymeric NPs containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(L-histidine)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PLH-PEG). We show that these NPs are able to bind to bacteria under model acidic infection conditions and are able to encapsulate and deliver vancomycin to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in vitro. Further work showed that the PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs demonstrated the potential for competition for binding bacteria at a site of infection from soluble protein and model phagocytic and tissue-resident cells in a NP composition dependent manner. The NPs demonstrated low toxicity in vitro, were well tolerated by mice in vivo, and circulated in the blood on timescales comparable to control PLGA-PEG NPs. In the second part, we used PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs to design a prophylactic vaccine against the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis, the most common cause of bacterial STD in the world. Currently, no vaccines against this pathogen are approved for use in humans. We first formulated NPs encapsulating the TLR7 agonist R848 conjugated to poly(lactic acid) (R848-PLA

  12. Radiation-hardened polymeric films

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, C. Jr.; Hughes, R.C.; Kepler, R.G.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1984-07-16

    The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10/sup 15/ to 10/sup 21/ molecules of dopant/cm/sup 3/. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

  13. Stability of Polymeric Crystalline Polymorphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkovits, Daniel W.; Kumar, Sanat K.

    2014-03-01

    In the search for polymeric materials with novel properties, such as high dielectric constant and low loss, an important attribute of a material is its crystal structure. Most polymers can crystallize into multiple polymorphs whose properties vary. Therefore, the question of which polymorphs are thermodynamically preferred under what conditions is of great importance. We generate polymorphs using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and tackle the question of stability using a combination of molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo techniques. Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI).

  14. Macrokinetic characteristics of isobutylene polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Minsker, K.S.; Berlin, A.A.; Enikolopyan, N.S.; Prochukhan, Y.A.; Svinkov, A.G.

    1986-08-01

    This paper describes a method of obtaining oligo and polyisobutylene with a molecular mass of 112-50,000: the cationic polymerization of isobutylene carried out in the presence of AlCl/sub 3/, in an environment of hydrocarbons (butanes, etc.) or chlorinated hydrocarbons (ethyl chloride, methyl chloride, etc.) at a temperature of 173-353 K/sub 3/ and in mixer-reactors of complicated design with a volume of 1.5-30 m.

  15. Radiation-hardened polymeric films

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Jr., Charles; Hughes, Robert C.; Kepler, R. Glen; Kurtz, Steven R.

    1986-01-01

    The radiation-induced conductivity of polymeric dielectrics with low electronic mobility is reduced by doping with electron donor or electron acceptor compounds at a level of 10.sup.15 to 10.sup.21 molecules of dopant/cm.sup.3. Polyesters, polyolefins, perfluoropolyolefins, vinyl polymers, vinylidene polymers, polycarbonates, polysulfones and polyimides can benefit from such a treatment. Usable dopants include 2,4,7-trinitro-9-fluorenone, tetracyanethylene, 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane, m-dinitrobenzene, 2-isopropylcarbazole, and triphenylamine.

  16. Bacteria Inactivation During Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Sol Quintero, María; Mora, Ulises; Gutiérrez, Jorge; Mues, Enrique; Castaño, Eduardo; Fernández, Francisco; Loske, Achim M.

    2006-09-01

    The influence of extracorporeal and intracorporeal lithotripsy on the viability of bacteria contained inside artificial kidney stones was investigated in vitro. Two different bacteria were exposed to the action of one extracorporeal shock wave generator and four intracorporeal lithotripters.

  17. Polymeric nanocomposites: compounding and performance.

    PubMed

    Utracki, L A

    2008-04-01

    Polymeric nanocomposites (PNC) are binary mixtures of strongly interacting, inorganic platelets dispersed in a polymeric matrix. For full exfoliation, the thermodynamic miscibility is required. There are three basic methods of organically-modified clay dispersion that might result in PNC: (1) in polymer solution (followed by solvent removal), (2) in a monomer (followed by polymerization), and (3) in molten polymer (compounding). Most commercial PNC are produced by the second method, but it is the third one that has the greatest promise for the plastics industry. Similarly as during the manufacture of polymer blends, the layered silicates must be compatibilized by intercalation with organic salts and/or addition of functionalized macromolecules. Compounding affects the kinetics of dispersion process, but rarely the miscibility. Melt compounding is carried out either in a single-screw (SSE) or a twin-screw extruder (TSE). Furthermore, an extensional flow mixer (EFM) might be attached to an extruder. Two versions of EFM were evaluated: (1) designed for polymer homogenization and blending, and (2) designed for dispersing nano-particles. In this review, the dispersion of organoclay in polystyrene (PS), polyamide-6 (PA-6) or in polypropylene (PP) is discussed. The PNC based on PS or PA-6 contained two components (polymer and organoclay), whereas those based on PP in addition had a compatibilizer mixture of two maleated polypropylenes. Better dispersion was found compounding PNC's in a SSE + EFM than in TSE with or without EFM. The mechanical performance (tensile, flexural and impact) was examined.

  18. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-03-28

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  19. Thermal control of virulence factors in bacteria: A hot topic

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Oliver; Wheeler, Jun; Tang, Christoph M

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria sense environmental cues, including the local temperature, to control the production of key virulence factors. Thermal regulation can be achieved at the level of DNA, RNA or protein and although many virulence factors are subject to thermal regulation, the exact mechanisms of control are yet to be elucidated in many instances. Understanding how virulence factors are regulated by temperature presents a significant challenge, as gene expression and protein production are often influenced by complex regulatory networks involving multiple transcription factors in bacteria. Here we highlight some recent insights into thermal regulation of virulence in pathogenic bacteria. We focus on bacteria which cause disease in mammalian hosts, which are at a significantly higher temperature than the outside environment. We outline the mechanisms of thermal regulation and how understanding this fundamental aspect of the biology of bacteria has implications for pathogenesis and human health. PMID:25494856

  20. Ultrasound-Mediated Polymeric Micelle Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hesheng; Zhao, Yue; Tong, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of multi-functional nanocarriers and the design of new stimuli-responsive means are equally important for drug delivery. Ultrasound can be used as a remote, non-invasive and controllable trigger for the stimuli-responsive release of nanocarriers. Polymeric micelles are one kind of potential drug nanocarrier. By combining ultrasound and polymeric micelles, a new modality (i.e., ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery) has been developed and has recently received increasing attention. A major challenge remaining in developing ultrasound-responsive polymeric micelles is the improvement of the sensitivity or responsiveness of polymeric micelles to ultrasound. This chapter reviews the recent advance in this field. In order to understand the interaction mechanism between ultrasound stimulus and polymeric micelles, ultrasound effects, such as thermal effect, cavitation effect, ultrasound sonochemistry (including ultrasonic degradation, ultrasound-initiated polymerization, ultrasonic in-situ polymerization and ultrasound site-specific degradation), as well as basic micellar knowledge are introduced. Ultrasound-mediated polymeric micelle drug delivery has been classified into two main streams based on the different interaction mechanism between ultrasound and polymeric micelles; one is based on the ultrasound-induced physical disruption of the micelle and reversible release of payload. The other is based on micellar ultrasound mechanochemical disruption and irreversible release of payload.

  1. Controlled release of ethylene via polymeric films for food packaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisano, Roberto; Bazzano, Marco; Capozzi, Luigi Carlo; Ferri, Ada; Sangermano, Marco

    2015-12-01

    In modern fruit supply chain a common method to trigger ripening is to keep fruits inside special chambers and initiate the ripening process through administration of ethylene. Ethylene is usually administered through cylinders with inadequate control of its final concentration in the chamber. The aim of this study is the development of a new technology to accurately regulate ethylene concentration in the atmosphere where fruits are preserved: a polymeric film, containing an inclusion complex of α-cyclodextrin with ethylene, was developed. The complex was prepared by molecular encapsulation which allows the entrapment of ethylene into the cavity of α-cyclodextrin. After encapsulation, ethylene can be gradually released from the inclusion complex and its release rate can be regulated by temperature and humidity. The inclusion complex was dispersed into a thin polymeric film produced by UV-curing. This method was used because is solvent-free and involves low operating temperature; both conditions are necessary to prevent rapid release of ethylene from the film. The polymeric films were characterized with respect to thermal behaviour, crystalline structure and kinetics of ethylene release, showing that can effectively control the release of ethylene within confined volume.

  2. Polymeric slot waveguide for photonics sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chovan, J.; Uherek, F.

    2016-12-01

    Polymeric slot waveguide for photonics sensing was designed, simulated and studied in this work. The polymeric slot waveguide was designed on commercial Ormocer polymer platform and operates at visible 632.8 nm wavelength. Designed polymeric slot waveguide detects the refractive index change of the ambient material by evanescent field label-free techniques. The motivation for the reported work was to design a low-cost polymeric slot waveguide for sensing arms of integrated Mach-Zehnder interferometer optical sensor with reduced temperature dependency. The minimal dimensions of advanced sensing slot waveguide structure were designed for researcher direct laser writing fabrication by nonlinear two-photon polymerization. The normalized effective refractive index changes of TE and TM fundamental modes in polymeric slot waveguide and slab waveguides were compared. The sensitivity of the normalized effective refractive index changes of TE and TM fundamental modes on refractive index changes of the ambient material was investigated by glucose-water solutions.

  3. Preliminary study on treatment of waste organic matter from livestock by bacteria-mineral technology.

    PubMed

    He, Wenyuan; Yang, Haizhen; Gu, Guowei

    2008-01-01

    The present study dealt with relationships between the degradation and humification process that the organic matter underwent during bacteria-mineral technology. An inverse correlation was found between the protein, lipid, and some of the humification indices considered, suggesting that the humification theory is actually humic substances produced from simple-structured natural organic substrates. Weight-average molecular weight (Mw), number-average molecular weight (Mn), and the ratio Mw/Mn of dissolved organic matters at different stages of the process were measured by gel permeation chromatography. The results showed that Mn and Mw increased with reaction time from 352 to 17,191, and from 78,707 to 104,564, respectively. The ratio of Mn/Mw decreased from 223.3 to 6.1. This reflected the growth of the polymerization degree of dissolvable organic matters in the process; furthermore, it indicated the formation of complex molecules (humic substances) from more simple molecules. Bacteria-mineral water (BMW) (the effluent of the process) treatments can exert hormone-like activity for enhanced seed germination of wheat and rice and greatly improved chlorophyll synthesis in wheat and rice leaves. Major polyamines (plant regulators) putrescine, spermidine, and spermine, were found in BMW by a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method, which may explain the hormone-like activity of BMW.

  4. RADIATION-INDUCED POLYMERIZATION OF POLYFUNCTIONAL VINYLSILOXANE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    the molecular weights and characteristic viscosities of these polymers the hypothesis that polymer molecules are soluble microgels was arrived at. The...present work examines some properties of polymerization of these monomers. The hypotheses were confirmed. The polymer is a soluble microgel . The...possibility of inducing polymerization of vinyl monomers with microgels of polyvinylsiloxanes was established, and radiolysis and polymerization of polyfunctional vinylsiloxanes were studied. (Author)

  5. Ionene modified small polymeric beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Linear ionene polyquaternary cationic polymeric segments are bonded by means of the Menshutkin reaction (quaternization) to biocompatible, extremely small, porous particles containing halide or tertiary amine sites which are centers for attachment of the segments. The modified beads in the form of emulsions or suspensions offer a large, positively-charged surface area capable of irreversibly binding polyanions such as heparin, DNA, RNA or bile acids to remove them from solution or of reversibly binding monoanions such as penicillin, pesticides, sex attractants and the like for slow release from the suspension.

  6. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, Douglas B.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Segalman, Daniel J.; Witkowski, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  7. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  8. Marketing NASA Langley Polymeric Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Diane M.

    1995-01-01

    A marketing tool was created to expand the knowledge of LaRC developed polymeric materials, in order to facilitate the technology transfer process and increase technology commercialization awareness among a non-technical audience. The created brochure features four materials, LaRC-CP, LaRC-RP46, LaRC-SI, and LaRC-IA, and highlights their competitive strengths in potential commercial applications. Excellent opportunities exist in the $40 million per year microelectronics market and the $6 billion adhesives market. It is hoped that the created brochure will generate inquiries regarding the use of the above materials in markets such as these.

  9. Template polymerization of nucleotide analogues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orgel, L. E.

    1991-01-01

    Recent work on the template-directed reactions of the natural D-nucleotides has made it clear that l-nucleotides and nucleotide-like derivatives of other sugars would strongly inhibit the formation of long oligonucleotides. Consequently, attention is focusing on molecules simpler than nucleotides that might have acted as monomers of an information transfer system. We have begun a general exploration of the template directed reactions of diverse peptide analogues. I will present work by Dr. Taifeng Wu on oxidative oligomerization of phosphorothioates and of Dr. Mary Tohidi on the cyclic polymerization of nucleoside and related cyclic pyrophosphates.

  10. Polymeric materials science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on the use of polymers in enhanced oil recovery. Topics considered at the conference included polymer flow in porous media, hydrophobically associating polymers, mobility control,rheology, the direct determination of high molecular weights, size characterization of enhanced oil recovery polymers, MWD systems, light scattering, the use of size exclusion chromatography to study the degradation of water-soluble polymers for hydraulic fracturing fluids, polymer concentration in sandstone, electron microscopy, high salinity conditions, polymerization, and viscosity.

  11. Utilization of 'elemental' sulfur by different phototrophic sulfur bacteria (Chromatiaceae, Ectothiorhodospiraceae): A sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, B.; Lichtenberg, H.; Dahl, C.; Hormes, J.; Prange, A.

    2009-11-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are generally able to use elemental sulfur as an electron donor for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Elemental sulfur is mainly a mixture of cyclo-octasulfur and polymeric sulfur. The purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum strongly prefers the polymeric sulfur fraction showing that sulfur speciation has a strong influence on availability of elemental sulfur. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy was used to investigate whether polymeric sulfur is also the preferred sulfur species in other purple sulfur bacteria belonging to the families Chromatiaceae and Ecothiorodospiraceae. The cultures were fed with 50 mM of elemental sulfur consisting of 68% polymeric sulfur and 30% cyclo-octasulfur. In all cultures, elemental sulfur was converted into intra- or extracellular sulfur globules, respectively, and further oxidized to sulfate. Sulfate concentrations were determined by HPLC and turbidometric assays, respectively. However, the added elemental sulfur was only partly used by the bacteria, one part of the 'elemental sulfur' remained in the cultures and was not taken up. XANES spectroscopy revealed that only the polymeric sulfur fraction was taken up by all cultures investigated. This strongly indicates that polymeric 'chain-like' sulfur is the form preferably used by phototrophic sulfur bacteria.

  12. Polymeric materials combustion: Toxicity hazards and legal aspects. January 1973-December 1989 (Citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association data base). Report for January 1973-December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning toxicity hazards and legal aspects of polymeric materials combustion in building, electrical and electronic applications. Flammability assessment, flame retardant additives, and toxicity standards of polymeric materials are discussed. Regulations and legislation on polymer flammability are presented. Health hazards caused by toxic gases from polymeric materials combustion are considered. (This updated bibliography contains 238 citations, 28 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  13. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.; Etherton, B.P.; Kaus, M.J.

    1989-09-12

    This patent describes a polymerization process. It comprises polymerizing ethylene, alpha-olefins of 3 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene and the alpha-olefins in the presence of a catalyst system. The system comprising: an organo aluminum compound of the formula AIR'''/sub eta/X'''/sub 3-eta/ wherein R''' is hydrogen, hydrocarbyl, or substituted hydrocarbyl having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X''' is a halogen and eta is a number from 1 to 3, and a transition metal-containing catalyst component. The component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent with an organonmetallic compound represented by the formula R/sup 1/MgR/sup 2/ wherein R/sup 1/ and R/sup 2/, which may be the same of different,contain 1 to 20 carbon atoms and are selected from alkyl group, aryl group, cycloalkyl group, aralkyl group, alkadienyl group of group; an alcohol; an acyl halide; a titanium halide; Cl/sub 2/, and prereducing the transition metal-containing product with an aluminum alkyl, with the proviso that the first two ingredients can be added to the inert solid simultaneously, as the reaction product of the first two steps or treatment with step two immediately precedes treatment with step one.

  14. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compound of the formula ALR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and is a number from 1 to 3, and (b) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with (A) an organometallic compounds of a Group IIa, IIb or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, (B) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols or mixtures thereof, (C) an acyl halide, (D) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, Vb, VIb or VIII metal, and (E) a group IIIa metal hydrocarbyl dihalide.

  15. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compound of the formula AIR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R'' is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and n is a number from 1 to 3, and (B) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with, optionally (A) Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, an interhalogen or mixtures thereof, (B) an organometallic compound of a Group IIa, IIb or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, (C) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols or mixtures thereof, (D) an acyl halide, (E) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, VB, VIb or VIII metal, and (F) Cl/sub 2/, Br/sub 2/, an interhalogen or mixtures thereof.

  16. Polymerization catalyst, production and use

    SciTech Connect

    Best, S.A.

    1987-01-06

    A process is described for the polymerization of ethylene and alpha-olefins having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms or mixtures of ethylene, alpha-olefins and diolefins. The process comprises polymerizing in the presence of a catalyst system comprising (a) an organo aluminum compounds of the formula AIR''/sub n/X''/sub 3-n/ wherein R'' is hydrogen or a hydrocarbyl group having from 1 to 20 carbon atoms, X is halogen and n is a number from 1 to 3, and (b) a transition metal containing catalyst component comprising the solid reaction product obtained by treating an inert solid support material in an inert solvent. This is done sequentially with (A) an organometallic compound of a Group IIa, IIb, or IIIa metal wherein all the metal valencies are satisfied with a hydrocarbon group, optionally (B) an oxygen containing compound selected from ketones, aldehydes, alcohols, siloxanes or mixtures thereof, (C) at least one transition metal compound of a Group IVb, Vb, VIb or VIII metal, and (D) a group IIIa metal hydrocarbyl dihalide.

  17. Durable Nanolayer Graft Polymerization of Functional Finishes Using Atmospheric Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazloumpour, Maryam

    . Furthermore, spunbond nonwoven polypropylene fabric, commonly used for hygienic products, was treated with diallyldimethylammonium chloride (DADMAC). Atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma was used to induce free radical chain polymerization of the ADMAC monomer, which conferred a graft polymerized network on the fabric with durable antimicrobial properties. The effect of different DADMAC concentration, and plasma conditions including the RF power and the time of plasma exposure were studied and the optimum treatment conditions were identified by calculating the surface charge density on the treated fabrics. The presence of poly-DADMAC on the polypropylene surface was confirmed using SEM, FT-IR and TOF-SIMS. Antibacterial performance was investigated using standard test methods (AATCC TM 100) for both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. The antimicrobial results showed 6 log reductions in the bacterial activities of K. pneumoniae and S .aureus, which was unprecedented using a plasma-induced graft polymerization approach.

  18. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  19. Quorum sensing and swarming migration in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Ruth; Vanderleyden, Jos; Michiels, Jan

    2004-06-01

    Bacterial cells can produce and sense signal molecules, allowing the whole population to initiate a concerted action once a critical concentration (corresponding to a particular population density) of the signal has been reached, a phenomenon known as quorum sensing. One of the possible quorum sensing-regulated phenotypes is swarming, a flagella-driven movement of differentiated swarmer cells (hyperflagellated, elongated, multinucleated) by which bacteria can spread as a biofilm over a surface. The glycolipid or lipopeptide biosurfactants thereby produced function as wetting agent by reducing the surface tension. Quorum sensing systems are almost always integrated into other regulatory circuits. This effectively expands the range of environmental signals that influence target gene expression beyond population density. In this review, we first discuss the regulation of AHL-mediated surface migration and the involvement of other low-molecular-mass signal molecules (such as the furanosyl borate diester AI-2) in biosurfactant production of different bacteria. In addition, population density-dependent regulation of swarmer cell differentiation is reviewed. Also, several examples of interspecies signalling are reported. Different signal molecules either produced by bacteria (such as other AHLs and diketopiperazines) or excreted by plants (such as furanones, plant signal mimics) might influence the quorum sensing-regulated swarming behaviour in bacteria different from the producer. On the other hand, specific bacteria can reduce the local available concentration of signal molecules produced by others. In the last part, the role and regulation of a surface-associated movement in biofilm formation is discussed. Here we also describe how quorum sensing may disperse existing biofilms and control the interaction between bacteria and higher organisms (such as the Rhizobium-bean symbiosis).

  20. Polymeric microfluidic devices for the monitoring and separation of water-borne pathogens utilizing insulative dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Greg J.; Davalos, Rafael V.; Brazzle, John D.; Hachman, John T.; Hunter, Marion C.; Chames, Jeffery M.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Cummings, Eric B.; Fintschenko, Yolanda; Simmons, Blake A.

    2005-01-01

    We have successfully demonstrated selective trapping, concentration, and release of various biological organisms and inert beads by insulator-based dielectrophoresis within a polymeric microfluidic device. The microfluidic channels and internal features, in this case arrays of insulating posts, were initially created through standard wet-etch techniques in glass. This glass chip was then transformed into a nickel stamp through the process of electroplating. The resultant nickel stamp was then used as the replication tool to produce the polymeric devices through injection molding. The polymeric devices were made of Zeonor 1060R, a polyolefin copolymer resin selected for its superior chemical resistance and optical properties. These devices were then optically aligned with another polymeric substrate that had been machined to form fluidic vias. These two polymeric substrates were then bonded together through thermal diffusion bonding. The sealed devices were utilized to selectively separate and concentrate a variety of biological pathogen simulants and organisms. These organisms include bacteria and spores that were selectively concentrated and released by simply applying D.C. voltages across the plastic replicates via platinum electrodes in inlet and outlet reservoirs. The dielectrophoretic response of the organisms is observed to be a function of the applied electric field and post size, geometry and spacing. Cells were selectively trapped against a background of labeled polystyrene beads and spores to demonstrate that samples of interest can be separated from a diverse background. We have implemented a methodology to determine the concentration factors obtained in these devices.

  1. Self-folding polymeric containers for encapsulation and delivery of drugs

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Rohan; Gracias, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Self-folding broadly refers to self-assembly processes wherein thin films or interconnected planar templates curve, roll-up or fold into three dimensional (3D) structures such as cylindrical tubes, spirals, corrugated sheets or polyhedra. The process has been demonstrated with metallic, semiconducting and polymeric films and has been used to curve tubes with diameters as small as 2 nm and fold polyhedra as small as 100 nm, with a surface patterning resolution of 15 nm. Self-folding methods are important for drug delivery applications since they provide a means to realize 3D, biocompatible, all-polymeric containers with well-tailored composition, size, shape, wall thickness, porosity, surface patterns and chemistry. Self-folding is also a highly parallel process, and it is possible to encapsulate or self-load therapeutic cargo during assembly. A variety of therapeutic cargos such as small molecules, peptides, proteins, bacteria, fungi and mammalian cells have been encapsulated in self-folded polymeric containers. In this review, we focus on self-folding of all-polymeric containers. We discuss the mechanistic aspects of self-folding of polymeric containers driven by differential stresses or surface tension forces, the applications of self-folding polymers in drug delivery and we outline future challenges. PMID:22425612

  2. Escalation of polymerization in a thermal gradient.

    PubMed

    Mast, Christof B; Schink, Severin; Gerland, Ulrich; Braun, Dieter

    2013-05-14

    For the emergence of early life, the formation of biopolymers such as RNA is essential. However, the addition of nucleotide monomers to existing oligonucleotides requires millimolar concentrations. Even in such optimistic settings, no polymerization of RNA longer than about 20 bases could be demonstrated. How then could self-replicating ribozymes appear, for which recent experiments suggest a minimal length of 200 nt? Here, we demonstrate a mechanism to bridge this gap: the escalated polymerization of nucleotides by a spatially confined thermal gradient. The gradient accumulates monomers by thermophoresis and convection while retaining longer polymers exponentially better. Polymerization and accumulation become mutually self-enhancing and result in a hyperexponential escalation of polymer length. We describe this escalation theoretically under the conservative assumption of reversible polymerization. Taking into account the separately measured thermophoretic properties of RNA, we extrapolate the results for primordial RNA polymerization inside a temperature gradient in pores or fissures of rocks. With a dilute, nanomolar concentration of monomers the model predicts that a pore length of 5 cm and a temperature difference of 10 K suffice to polymerize 200-mers of RNA in micromolar concentrations. The probability to generate these long RNAs is raised by a factor of >10(600) compared with polymerization in a physical equilibrium. We experimentally validate the theory with the reversible polymerization of DNA blocks in a laser-driven thermal trap. The results confirm that a thermal gradient can significantly enlarge the available sequence space for the emergence of catalytically active polymers.

  3. Polymeric Additives For Graphite/Epoxy Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, D. A.; Nir, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental studies of properties of several graphite/epoxy composites containing polymeric additives as flexibilizing or toughening agents. Emphasizes effects of brominated polymeric additives (BPA's) with or without carboxy-terminated butadiene acrylonitrile rubber. Reviews effects of individual and combined additives on fracture toughnesses, environmental stabilities, hot/wet strengths, thermomechanical behaviors, and other mechanical properties of composites.

  4. Spring-loaded polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, M.

    1995-02-14

    Spring-loaded electrically controllable polymeric gel actuators are disclosed. The polymeric gels can be polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid, or polyacrylamide, and are contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as water plus acetone. The action of the gel is mechanically biased, allowing the expansive and contractile forces to be optimized for specific applications. 5 figs.

  5. VOLUMETRIC POLYMERIZATION SHRINKAGE OF CONTEMPORARY COMPOSITE RESINS

    PubMed Central

    Nagem, Halim; Nagem, Haline Drumond; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Franco, Eduardo Batista; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Coutinho, Kennedy Queiroz

    2007-01-01

    The polymerization shrinkage of composite resins may affect negatively the clinical outcome of the restoration. Extensive research has been carried out to develop new formulations of composite resins in order to provide good handling characteristics and some dimensional stability during polymerization. The purpose of this study was to analyze, in vitro, the magnitude of the volumetric polymerization shrinkage of 7 contemporary composite resins (Definite, Suprafill, SureFil, Filtek Z250, Fill Magic, Alert, and Solitaire) to determine whether there are differences among these materials. The tests were conducted with precision of 0.1 mg. The volumetric shrinkage was measured by hydrostatic weighing before and after polymerization and calculated by known mathematical equations. One-way ANOVA (á=0.05) was used to determine statistically significant differences in volumetric shrinkage among the tested composite resins. Suprafill (1.87±0.01) and Definite (1.89±0.01) shrank significantly less than the other composite resins. SureFil (2.01±0.06), Filtek Z250 (1.99±0.03), and Fill Magic (2.02±0.02) presented intermediate levels of polymerization shrinkage. Alert and Solitaire presented the highest degree of polymerization shrinkage. Knowing the polymerization shrinkage rates of the commercially available composite resins, the dentist would be able to choose between using composite resins with lower polymerization shrinkage rates or adopting technical or operational procedures to minimize the adverse effects deriving from resin contraction during light-activation. PMID:19089177

  6. Spring-loaded polymeric gel actuators

    DOEpatents

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen

    1995-01-01

    Spring-loaded electrically controllable polymeric gel actuators are disclosed. The polymeric gels can be polyvinyl alcohol, polyacrylic acid, or polyacrylamide, and are contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as water plus acetone. The action of the gel is mechanically biased, allowing the expansive and contractile forces to be optimized for specific applications.

  7. Escalation of polymerization in a thermal gradient

    PubMed Central

    Mast, Christof B.; Schink, Severin; Gerland, Ulrich; Braun, Dieter

    2013-01-01

    For the emergence of early life, the formation of biopolymers such as RNA is essential. However, the addition of nucleotide monomers to existing oligonucleotides requires millimolar concentrations. Even in such optimistic settings, no polymerization of RNA longer than about 20 bases could be demonstrated. How then could self-replicating ribozymes appear, for which recent experiments suggest a minimal length of 200 nt? Here, we demonstrate a mechanism to bridge this gap: the escalated polymerization of nucleotides by a spatially confined thermal gradient. The gradient accumulates monomers by thermophoresis and convection while retaining longer polymers exponentially better. Polymerization and accumulation become mutually self-enhancing and result in a hyperexponential escalation of polymer length. We describe this escalation theoretically under the conservative assumption of reversible polymerization. Taking into account the separately measured thermophoretic properties of RNA, we extrapolate the results for primordial RNA polymerization inside a temperature gradient in pores or fissures of rocks. With a dilute, nanomolar concentration of monomers the model predicts that a pore length of 5 cm and a temperature difference of 10 K suffice to polymerize 200-mers of RNA in micromolar concentrations. The probability to generate these long RNAs is raised by a factor of >10600 compared with polymerization in a physical equilibrium. We experimentally validate the theory with the reversible polymerization of DNA blocks in a laser-driven thermal trap. The results confirm that a thermal gradient can significantly enlarge the available sequence space for the emergence of catalytically active polymers. PMID:23630280

  8. Targeted polymeric nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayoung; Wilson, David R.; Zamboni, Camila G.; Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, advances in designing polymeric nanoparticles for targeted cancer gene therapy are reviewed. Characterization and evaluation of biomaterials, targeting ligands, and transcriptional elements are each discussed. Advances in biomaterials have driven improvements to nanoparticle stability and tissue targeting, conjugation of ligands to the surface of polymeric nanoparticles enable binding to specific cancer cells, and the design of transcriptional elements has enabled selective DNA expression specific to the cancer cells. Together, these features have improved the performance of polymeric nanoparticles as targeted non-viral gene delivery vectors to treat cancer. As polymeric nanoparticles can be designed to be biodegradable, non-toxic, and to have reduced immunogenicity and tumorigenicity compared to viral platforms, they have significant potential for clinical use. Results of polymeric gene therapy in clinical trials and future directions for the engineering of nanoparticle systems for targeted cancer gene therapy are also presented. PMID:26061296

  9. Interplay between cytoskeletal polymerization and the chondrogenic phenotype in chondrocytes passaged in monolayer culture.

    PubMed

    Parreno, Justin; Nabavi Niaki, Mortah; Andrejevic, Katarina; Jiang, Amy; Wu, Po-Han; Kandel, Rita A

    2017-02-01

    Tubulin and actin exist as monomeric units that polymerize to form either microtubules or filamentous actin. As the polymerization status (monomeric/polymeric ratio) of tubulin and/or actin have been shown to be important in regulating gene expression and phenotype in non-chondrocyte cells, the objective of this study was to examine the role of cytoskeletal polymerization on the chondrocyte phenotype. We hypothesized that actin and/or tubulin polymerization status modulates the chondrocyte phenotype during monolayer culture as well as in 3D culture during redifferentiation. To test this hypothesis, articular chondrocytes were grown and passaged in 2D monolayer culture. Cell phenotype was investigated by assessing cell morphology (area and circularity), actin/tubulin content, organization and polymerization status, as well as by determination of proliferation, fibroblast and cartilage matrix gene expression with passage number. Bovine chondrocytes became larger, more elongated, and had significantly (P < 0.05) increased gene expression of proliferation-associated molecules (cyclin D1 and ki67), as well as significantly (P < 0.05) decreased cartilage matrix (type II collagen and aggrecan) and increased fibroblast-like matrix, type I collagen (COL1), gene expression by passage 2 (P2). Although tubulin polymerization status was not significantly (P > 0.05) modulated, actin polymerization was increased in bovine P2 cells. Actin depolymerization, but not tubulin depolymerization, promoted the chondrocyte phenotype by inducing cell rounding, increasing aggrecan and reducing COL1 expression. Knockdown of actin depolymerization factor, cofilin, in these cells induced further P2 cell actin polymerization and increased COL1 gene expression. To confirm that actin status regulated COL1 gene expression in human P2 chondrocytes, human P2 chondrocytes were exposed to cytochalasin D. Cytochalasin D decreased COL1 gene expression in human passaged chondrocytes. Furthermore

  10. Inhibition of tubulin polymerization by hypochlorous acid and chloramines.

    PubMed

    Landino, Lisa M; Hagedorn, Tara D; Kim, Shannon B; Hogan, Katherine M

    2011-04-15

    Protein thiol oxidation and modification by nitric oxide and glutathione are emerging as common mechanisms to regulate protein function and to modify protein structure. Also, thiol oxidation is a probable outcome of cellular oxidative stress and is linked to degenerative disease progression. We assessed the effect of the oxidants hypochlorous acid and chloramines on the cytoskeletal protein tubulin. Total cysteine oxidation by the oxidants was monitored by labeling tubulin with the thiol-selective reagent 5-iodoacetamidofluorescein; by reaction with Ellman's reagent, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid); and by detecting interchain tubulin disulfides by Western blot under nonreducing conditions. Whereas HOCl induced both cysteine and methionine oxidation of tubulin, chloramines were predominantly cysteine oxidants. Cysteine oxidation of tubulin, rather than methionine oxidation, was associated with loss of microtubule polymerization activity, and treatment of oxidized tubulin with disulfide reducing agents restored a considerable portion of the polymerization activity that was lost after oxidation. By comparing the reactivity of hypochlorous acid and chloramines with the previously characterized oxidants, peroxynitrite and the nitroxyl donor Angeli's salt, we have identified tubulin thiol oxidation, not methionine oxidation or tyrosine nitration, as a common outcome responsible for decreased polymerization activity.

  11. Pressure induced polymerization of Formates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschauner, Oliver

    2004-03-01

    The discovery of pressure induced polymerization of CO2 inspired us to search for C-O based chain structures forming at high pressure. We used salts of carboxylic acids as starting materials and exposed them to pressures between 10 and 30 GPa. Upon heating to temperatures above 1800 K we observed deprotonation and significant changes in the Raman shifts of C-O streching modes. Structure analysis based on powder diffraction patterns collected at sector 16 of the APS showed formation of extended C-O chain structures with the cations of the salts residing in the interchain spaces. These new high pressure polymers are interesting by their mechanical strength and provide basic molecular patterns of organic metallic conductors.

  12. Molecular and polymeric ceramic precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Sneddon, L.G.

    1991-08-01

    The development of new methods for the production of complex materials is one of the most important problems in modern solid state chemistry and materials science. This project is attempting to apply the synthetic principles which have evolved inorganic and organometallic chemistry to the production of technologically important non-oxide ceramics, such as boron nitride, boron carbide and metal borides. Our recent work has now resulted in the production of new polymer systems, including poly(B-vinylborazine), polyvinylpentaborane and polyborazylene, that have proven to be high yield precursors to boron-based ceramic materials. Current work is now directed toward the synthesis of new types of molecular and polymeric boron-containing species and on exploration of the solid state properties of the ceramics that have been produced in these studies.

  13. Modeling liquid crystal polymeric devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimenez Pinto, Vianney Karina

    The main focus of this work is the theoretical and numerical study of materials that combine liquid crystal and polymer. Liquid crystal elastomers are polymeric materials that exhibit both the ordered properties of the liquid crystals and the elastic properties of rubbers. Changing the order of the liquid crystal molecules within the polymer network can induce shape change. These materials are very valuable for applications such as actuators, sensors, artificial muscles, haptic displays, etc. In this work we apply finite element elastodynamics simulations to study the temperature induced shape deformation in nematic elastomers with complex director microstructure. In another topic, we propose a novel numerical method to model the director dynamics and microstructural evolution of three dimensional nematic and cholesteric liquid crystals. Numerical studies presented in this work are in agreement with experimental observations and provide insight into the design of application devices.

  14. Characterization of microbes which polymerize and depolymerize lignite coals

    SciTech Connect

    Polman, J.K.; Breckenridge, C.R.; Quigley, D.R.

    1991-12-01

    Several bacteria were tested for their ability to modify the macromolecular structure of different coals. When grown in the presence of Mississippi Wilcox lignite, North Dakota Beulah Zap lignite, and North Dakota lenoardite, strain Con5-1L produces polymerization products that are derived from coal. This bacterium was characterized extensively with respect to physiology and morphology and may be a member of the genus Arthrobacter. Strain UPLCPS2-B, which was identified as Pseudomonas chlororaphis, may be capable of limited depolymerization of Mississippi Wilcox lignite and leonardite, but not Beulah Zap lignite. Fermentative strain Con5-5C, which may extensively depolymerize Mississippi Wilcox lignite, was characterized according to morphology and physiology. Other strains tested had little or no effect on coal macromolecular structure. These included Escherichia coli, Arthrobacter paraffineus, and strain BED1. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Characterization of microbes which polymerize and depolymerize lignite coals

    SciTech Connect

    Polman, J.K.; Breckenridge, C.R.; Quigley, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Several bacteria were tested for their ability to modify the macromolecular structure of different coals. When grown in the presence of Mississippi Wilcox lignite, North Dakota Beulah Zap lignite, and North Dakota lenoardite, strain Con5-1L produces polymerization products that are derived from coal. This bacterium was characterized extensively with respect to physiology and morphology and may be a member of the genus Arthrobacter. Strain UPLCPS2-B, which was identified as Pseudomonas chlororaphis, may be capable of limited depolymerization of Mississippi Wilcox lignite and leonardite, but not Beulah Zap lignite. Fermentative strain Con5-5C, which may extensively depolymerize Mississippi Wilcox lignite, was characterized according to morphology and physiology. Other strains tested had little or no effect on coal macromolecular structure. These included Escherichia coli, Arthrobacter paraffineus, and strain BED1. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inside Life Science > Bleach vs. Bacteria Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  17. Some bacteria are beneficial!

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMahon, Peter B.

    1995-01-01

    Most people would agree that bacteria usually spell trouble where the quality of drinking water is con cerned. However, recent studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) under the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program have shown that some bacteria can improve the quality of water.

  18. Bacteria turn tiny gears

    SciTech Connect

    2009-01-01

    Swarms of bacteria turn two 380-micron long gears, opening the possibility of building hybrid biological machines at the microscopic scale. Read more at Wired: http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2009/12/bacterial-micro-machine/#more-15684 or Scientific American: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=brownian-motion-bacteria

  19. Polymeric materials from renewable resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frollini, Elisabete; Rodrigues, Bruno V. M.; da Silva, Cristina G.; Castro, Daniele O.; Ramires, Elaine C.; de Oliveira, Fernando; Santos, Rachel P. O.

    2016-05-01

    The goals of our studies have been the use of renewable raw materials in the preparation of polymeric materials with diversified properties. In this context, lignosulfonate, which is produced in large scale around the world, but not widely used in the production of polymeric materials, was used to replace phenol and polyols in the preparation of phenolic- (Ligno-PH) and polyurethane-type (Ligno-PU) polymers, respectively. These polymers were used to prepare composites reinforced with sisal lignocellulosic fibers. The use of lignosulfonate in the formulation of both types of polymers was beneficial, because in general composites with improved properties, specially impact strength, were obtained. Composites were also prepared from the so called "biopolyethylene" (HDPE), curaua lignocellulosic fiber, and castor oil (CO). All composites HDBPE/CO/Fiber exhibited higher impact strength, when compared to those of the corresponding HDBPE/Fiber. These results, combined with others (eg SEM images of the fractured surfaces) indicated that, in addition to acting as a plasticizer, this oil may have acted as a compatibilizer of the hydrophilic fiber with the hydrophobic polymer. The set of results indicated that (i) mats with nano (diameter ≤ 100nm) and/or ultrafine (submicron scale) fibers were produced, (ii) hybrid fibers were produced (bio-based mats composites), (iii) cellulosic pulp (CP) and/or lignin (Lig) can be combined with PET matrices to control properties such as stiffness and hydrophilicity of the respective mats. Materials with diversified properties were prepared from high content of renewable raw materials, thus fulfilling the proposed targets.

  20. A requirement for polymerized actin in DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Andrin, Christi; McDonald, Darin; Attwood, Kathleen M; Rodrigue, Amélie; Ghosh, Sunita; Mirzayans, Razmik; Masson, Jean-Yves; Dellaire, Graham; Hendzel, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Nuclear actin is involved in several nuclear processes from chromatin remodeling to transcription. Here we examined the requirement for actin polymerization in DNA double-strand break repair. Double-strand breaks are considered the most dangerous type of DNA lesion. Double-strand break repair consists of a complex set of events that are tightly regulated. Failure at any step can have catastrophic consequences such as genomic instability, oncogenesis or cell death. Many proteins involved in this repair process have been identified and their roles characterized. We discovered that some DNA double-strand break repair factors are capable of associating with polymeric actin in vitro and specifically, that purified Ku70/80 interacts with polymerized actin under these conditions. We find that the disruption of polymeric actin inhibits DNA double strand break repair both in vitro and in vivo. Introduction of nuclear targeted mutant actin that cannot polymerize, or the depolymerization of endogenous actin filaments by the addition of cytochalasin D, alters the retention of Ku80 at sites of DNA damage in live cells. Our results suggest that polymeric actin is required for proper DNA double-strand break repair and may function through the stabilization of the Ku heterodimer at the DNA damage site.

  1. Effects of inulin chain length on fermentation by equine fecal bacteria and Streptococcus bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fructans from pasture can be fermented by Gram-positive bacteria (e.g., Streptococcus bovis) in the equine hindgut, increasing production of lactic acid and decreasing pH. The degree of polymerization (DP) of fructans has been suggested to influence fermentation rates. The objective of the current ...

  2. ESR studies of semicontinuous emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, W.; Westmoreland, D.G.

    1993-12-31

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) is used in the detection and quantification of propagating radicals during a semicontinuous emulsion polymerization. The propagating radical concentration is crucial for the determination of kinetic parameters of the emulsion polymerization process. A flow reactor was built which involves a closed-loop flow system that circulates latex from the polymerization reactor through the ESR cavity for free-radical measurements and back to the reactor. With the continuous measurement of the radical concentrations during a polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA), {bar n} (average number of radicals per particle) and k{sub p} (propagating rate constant), are measured throughout the entire polymerization. For the polymerization of the MMA system studied, the authors observed a gradual increased in n and decrease in k{sub p} during the run, suggesting a diffusionally controlled process and that the polymerization is not occurring homogeneously throughout the polymer particles. In the glassy pMMA matrix, radicals can be {open_quotes}trapped{close_quotes} within a minimum volume and remain unterminated.

  3. Antimicrobial Peptide Mimicking Primary Amine and Guanidine Containing Methacrylamide Copolymers Prepared by Raft Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Sarah E.; Paslay, Lea C.; Sahukhal, Gyan S.; Abel, Brooks A.; Brown, Tyler D.; McCormick, Charles L.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Koul, Veena; Choudhary, Veena; Elasri, Mohamed O.; Morgan, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) display the ability to eliminate a wide variety of bacteria, without toxicity to the host eukaryotic cells. Synthetic polymers containing moieties mimicking lysine and arginine components found in AMPs have been reported to show effectiveness against specific bacteria, with the mechanism of activity purported to depend on the nature of the amino acid mimic. In an attempt to incorporate the antimicrobial activity of both amino acids into a single water-soluble copolymer, a series of copolymers containing lysine mimicking aminopropyl methacrylamide (APMA) and arginine mimicking guanadinopropyl methacrylamide (GPMA) were prepared via aqueous RAFT polymerization. Copolymers were prepared with varying ratios of the comonomers, with degree of polymerization of 35–40 and narrow molecular weight distribution to simulate naturally occurring AMPs. Antimicrobial activity was determined against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria under conditions with varying salt concentration. Toxicity to mammalian cells was assessed by hemolysis of red blood cells and MTT assays of MCF-7 cells. Antimicrobial activity was observed for APMA homopolymer and copolymers with low concentrations of GPMA against all bacteria tested, with low toxicity toward mammalian cells. PMID:26558609

  4. Enhancement of tubulin polymerization by Cl(-)-induced blockade of intrinsic GTPase.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Niisato, Naomi; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2012-08-24

    In growing neurite of neuronal cells, it is suggested that α/β-tubulin heterodimers assemble to form microtubule, and assembly of microtubule promotes neurite elongation. On the other hand, recent studies reveal importance of intracellular Cl(-) in regulation of various cellular functions such as cell cycle progression, differentiation, cell migration, and elongation of neurite in neuronal cells. In this study, we investigated effects of Cl(-) on in vitro tubulin polymerization. We found that efficiency of in vitro tubulin polymerization (the number of microtubule) was higher (3 to 5-fold) in Cl(-)-containing solutions than that in Cl(-)-free solutions containing Br(-) or NO(3)(-). On the other hand, GTPase activity of tubulin was lower (2/3-fold) in Cl(-)-containing solutions than that in Cl(-)-free solutions containing Br(-) or NO(3)(-). Efficiency of in vitro tubulin polymerization in solutions containing a non-hydrolyzable analogue of GTP (GpCpp) instead of GTP was much higher than that in the presence of GTP. Effects of replacement of GTP with GpCpp on in vitro tubulin polymerization was weaker in Cl(-) solutions (10-fold increases) than that in Br(-) or NO(3)(-) solutions (20-fold increases), although the efficiency of in vitro tubulin polymerization in Cl(-) solutions containing GpCpp was still higher than that in Br(-) or NO(3)(-) solutions containing GpCpp. Our results suggest that a part of stimulatory effects of Cl(-) on in vitro tubulin polymerization is mediated via an inhibitory effect on GTPase activity of tubulin, although Cl(-) would also regulate in vitro tubulin polymerization by factors other than an inhibitory effect on GTPase activity.

  5. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  6. Effect of chitosan coating on a bacteria-based alginate microrobot.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung Jun; Lee, Yu Kyung; Cho, Sunghoon; Uthaman, Saji; Park, In-Kyu; Min, Jung-Joon; Ko, Seong Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-04-01

    To develop an efficient bacteria-based microrobot, first, therapeutic bacteria should be encapsulated into microbeads using biodegradable and biocompatible materials; second, the releasing rate of the encapsulated bacteria for theragnostic function should be regulated; and finally, flagellated bacteria should be attached on the microbeads to ensure the motility of the microrobot. For the therapeutic bacteria encapsulation, an alginate can be a promising candidate as a biodegradable and biocompatible material. Owing to the non-regulated releasing rate of the encapsulated bacteria in alginate microbeads and the weak attachment of flagellated bacteria on the surface of alginate microbeads, however, the alginate microbeads cannot be used as effective cargo for a bacteria-based microrobot. In this paper, to enhance the stability of the bacteria encapsulation and the adhesion of flagellated bacteria in alginate microbeads, we performed a surface modification of alginate microbeads using chitosan coating. The bacteria-encapsulated alginate microbeads with 1% chitosan coating maintained their structural integrity up to 72 h, whereas the control alginate microbead group without chitosan coating showed severe degradations after 24 h. The chitosan coating in alginate microbeads shows the enhanced attachment of flagellated bacteria on the surface of alginate microbeads. The bacteria-actuated microrobot with the enhanced flagellated bacteria attachment could show approximately 4.2 times higher average velocities than the control bacteria-actuated microrobot without chitosan coating. Consequently, the surface modification using chitosan coating enhanced the structural stability and the motility of the bacteria-based alginate microrobots.

  7. Polymeric nanoparticles: the future of nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Banik, Brittany L; Fattahi, Pouria; Brown, Justin L

    2016-01-01

    Polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) are one of the most studied organic strategies for nanomedicine. Intense interest lies in the potential of polymeric NPs to revolutionize modern medicine. To determine the ideal nanosystem for more effective and distinctly targeted delivery of therapeutic applications, particle size, morphology, material choice, and processing techniques are all research areas of interest. Utilizations of polymeric NPs include drug delivery techniques such as conjugation and entrapment of drugs, prodrugs, stimuli-responsive systems, imaging modalities, and theranostics. Cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular diseases are fields impacted by NP technologies that push scientific boundaries to the leading edge of transformative advances for nanomedicine.

  8. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J [Livermore, CA; Hatch, Anson V [Tracy, CA; Wang, Ying-Chih [Pleasanton, CA; Singh, Anup K [Danville, CA; Renzi, Ronald F [Tracy, CA; Claudnic, Mark R [Livermore, CA

    2011-11-01

    Methods for making a micofluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining a cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  9. Method for forming polymerized microfluidic devices

    DOEpatents

    Sommer, Gregory J.; Hatch, Anson V.; Wang, Ying-Chih; Singh, Anup K.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Claudnic, Mark R.

    2013-03-12

    Methods for making a microfluidic device according to embodiments of the present invention include defining.about.cavity. Polymer precursor solution is positioned in the cavity, and exposed to light to begin the polymerization process and define a microchannel. In some embodiments, after the polymerization process is partially complete, a solvent rinse is performed, or fresh polymer precursor introduced into the microchannel. This may promote removal of unpolymerized material from the microchannel and enable smaller feature sizes. The polymer precursor solution may contain an iniferter. Polymerized features therefore may be capped with the iniferter, which is photoactive. The iniferter may aid later binding of a polyacrylamide gel to the microchannel surface.

  10. Polymeric MST - high precision at low cost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elderstig, Håkan; Larsson, Olle

    1997-09-01

    A low-cost production process for fabrication of polymeric microstructures from micromachined silicon is demonstrated in a splice for the splicing of optical fibers and an optical motherboard. Measurements on splices showed less than 0.5 dB insertion losses. The prototype polymeric motherboard concisted of an optical receiver module. The detector that was mounted on the polymeric optical motherboard detected about 70% of the transferred light. Measurements with modulated light indicates an optical bandwidth of 5 GHz at 2 V reverse current on the pin-diode.

  11. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Korp, Juliane; Vela Gurovic, María S

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism. PMID:27340451

  12. Mechanical force-induced polymerization and depolymerization of F-actin at water/solid interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xueqiang; Hu, Xiuyuan; Lei, Haozhi; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Actin molecules are among the three main cytoskeleton proteins of cells and undergo rapid cycling to regulate critical processes such as endocytosis, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. Although extensive studies have been carried out on the dynamics as well as biological functions of actin polymerization and depolymerization both in vivo and in vitro, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals are not fully understood. In particular, little attention has been paid to the effect of a physical force that is exerted directly on the actin cytoskeleton. In this paper, we have explored how the mechanical force affects the actin polymerization and depolymerization behaviors at water/solid interfaces using an atomic force microscope (AFM) operated in liquid. By raster scanning an AFM probe on a substrate surface with a certain load, it was found that actin monomers could polymerize into filaments without the help of actin related proteins (ARPs). Further study indicated that actin monomers were inclined to form filaments only under a small scanning load. The polymerized actin filaments would be depolymerized when the mechanical force was stronger. A possible mechanism has been suggested to explain the mechanical force induced actin polymerization.Actin molecules are among the three main cytoskeleton proteins of cells and undergo rapid cycling to regulate critical processes such as endocytosis, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. Although extensive studies have been carried out on the dynamics as well as biological functions of actin polymerization and depolymerization both in vivo and in vitro, the molecular mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to mechanical signals are not fully understood. In particular, little attention has been paid to the effect of a physical force that is exerted directly on the actin cytoskeleton. In this paper, we have explored how the mechanical force affects the actin

  13. Polymeric Coatings for Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.; Kamenetzky, Rachel R.; Finckenor, Miria M.; Schuler, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Two polymeric coatings have been developed for the Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) mission. ProSEDS is designed to provide an on-orbit demonstration of the electrodynamic propulsion capabilities of tethers in space. The ProSEDS experiment will be a secondary payload on a Delta II unmanned expendable booster scheduled for launch in August 2000. A 5-km conductive tether is attached to the Delta 11 second stage and collects current from the low Earth orbit (LEO) plasma to facilitate de-orbit of the spent stage. The conductive tether is attached to a 10-km non-conductive tether, the other end of which is attached to an endmass containing several scientific instruments. A bare metal tether would have the best conductivity but thermal concerns preclude this design. A conductive polymer developed by Triton Systems has been optimized for conductivity and thermo-optical properties. The current design for the ProSEDS conductive tether is seven strands of 28 AWG aluminum wire individually coated with 8.7 micrometers (0.35 mil) of an atomic oxygen-resistant conductive polymer composed of a mixture of 87% Clear Oxygen-Resistant polymer (COR) and 13% polyanaline (PANi), wrapped around a braided Kevlar (TM) 49 core. Extensive testing has been performed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to qualify this material for flight on ProSEDS. Atomic oxygen exposure was performed, with solar absorptance and infrared emittance measured before and after exposure. Conductivity was measured before and after atomic oxygen exposure. High voltage tests, up to 1500 V, of the current collecting ability of the COR/PANi have been completed. Approximately 160 meters of the conductive tether closest to the Delta 11 second stage is insulated to prevent any electron reconnection to the tether from the plasma contactor. The insulation is composed of polyimide overcoated with TOR-BP, another polymeric coating developed by Triton for this mission. TOR-BP acts as both insulator

  14. Properties of an indirect composite material polymerized with two different laboratory polymerizing systems.

    PubMed

    Satsukawa, Hidetada; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Tanoue, Naomi; Nemoto, Mika; Ogino, Tomohisa; Matsumura, Hideo

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the performance of two laboratory light polymerization systems used to polymerize an indirect composite (Sinfony). A two-step polymerization system (Visio-Alfa and Beta) and a halogen-metal halide unit (Twinkle MIII) were assessed. The composite was polymerized either with the Visio units or with the MIII unit for different exposure periods. Knoop hardness, water sorption, and solubility in water of the composite polymerized with the following modes were determined: Visio, 15 minutes; MIII, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 seconds. Extension of light exposure time to the MIII unit improved the hardness of the composite from 30.5 (30 s) to 40.7 (180 s), whereas hardness obtained with the Visio units resulted in 24.8 (15 minutes). Water sorption and solubility of the composite were greater when it was polymerized with the Visio units than with the MIII unit.

  15. Indicator For Pseudomonas Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margalit, Ruth

    1990-01-01

    Characteristic protein extracted and detected. Natural protein marker found in Pseudomonas bacteria. Azurin, protein containing copper readily extracted, purified, and used to prepare antibodies. Possible to develop simple, fast, and accurate test for marker carried out in doctor's office.

  16. Polycomb group protein ezh2 controls actin polymerization and cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Su, I-hsin; Dobenecker, Marc-Werner; Dickinson, Ephraim; Oser, Matthew; Basavaraj, Ashwin; Marqueron, Raphael; Viale, Agnes; Reinberg, Danny; Wülfing, Christoph; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2005-05-06

    Polycomb group protein Ezh2, one of the key regulators of development in organisms from flies to mice, exerts its epigenetic function through regulation of histone methylation. Here, we report the existence of the cytosolic Ezh2-containing methyltransferase complex and tie the function of this complex to regulation of actin polymerization in various cell types. Genetic evidence supports the essential role of cytosolic Ezh2 in actin polymerization-dependent processes such as antigen receptor signaling in T cells and PDGF-induced dorsal circular ruffle formation in fibroblasts. Revealed function of Ezh2 points to a broader usage of lysine methylation in regulation of both nuclear and extra-nuclear signaling processes.

  17. Polymeric conjugates for drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nate; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    The field of polymer therapeutics has evolved over the past decade and has resulted in the development of polymer-drug conjugates with a wide variety of architectures and chemical properties. Whereas traditional non-degradable polymeric carriers such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and N-(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylamide) (HPMA) copolymers have been translated to use in the clinic, functionalized polymer-drug conjugates are increasingly being utilized to obtain biodegradable, stimuli-sensitive, and targeted systems in an attempt to further enhance localized drug delivery and ease of elimination. In addition, the study of conjugates bearing both therapeutic and diagnostic agents has resulted in multifunctional carriers with the potential to both “see and treat” patients. In this paper, the rational design of polymer-drug conjugates will be discussed followed by a review of different classes of conjugates currently under investigation. The design and chemistry used for the synthesis of various conjugates will be presented with additional comments on their potential applications and current developmental status. PMID:22707853

  18. Radiation effects on polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    It is important to study changes in properties of polymeres after irradiation with charged particles, with ultraviolet radiation, and with combinations of both. An apparatus for this purpose has been built at the NASA Langley Research Center. It consists of a chamber 9 inches in diameter and 9 inches high with a port for an electron gun, another port for a mass spectrometer, and a quartz window through which an ultraviolet lamp can be focused. The chamber, including the electron gun and the mass spectrometer, can be evacuated to a pressure of 10 to the 8th power torr. A sample placed in the chamber can be irradiated with electrons and ultraviolet radiation separately, sequentially, or simultaneously, while volatile products can be monitored during all irradiations with the mass spectrometer. The apparatus described above has been used to study three different polymer films: lexan; a polycarbonate; P1700, a polysulfone; and mylar, a polyethylene terephthalate. All three polymers had been studied extensively with both electrons and ultraviolet radiation separately, but not simultaneously. Also, volatile products had not been monitored during irradiation for the materials. A high electron dose rate of 530 Mrads/hr was used so that a sufficient concentration of volatile products would be formed to yield a reasonable mass spectrum.

  19. Highly elastic conductive polymeric MEMS

    PubMed Central

    Ruhhammer, J; Zens, M; Goldschmidtboeing, F; Seifert, A; Woias, P

    2015-01-01

    Polymeric structures with integrated, functional microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) elements are increasingly important in various applications such as biomedical systems or wearable smart devices. These applications require highly flexible and elastic polymers with good conductivity, which can be embedded into a matrix that undergoes large deformations. Conductive polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a suitable candidate but is still challenging to fabricate. Conductivity is achieved by filling a nonconductive PDMS matrix with conductive particles. In this work, we present an approach that uses new mixing techniques to fabricate conductive PDMS with different fillers such as carbon black, silver particles, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Additionally, the electrical properties of all three composites are examined under continuous mechanical stress. Furthermore, we present a novel, low-cost, simple three-step molding process that transfers a micro patterned silicon master into a polystyrene (PS) polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) replica with improved release features. This PS/PTFE mold is used for subsequent structuring of conductive PDMS with high accuracy. The non sticking characteristics enable the fabrication of delicate structures using a very soft PDMS, which is usually hard to release from conventional molds. Moreover, the process can also be applied to polyurethanes and various other material combinations. PMID:27877753

  20. Highly elastic conductive polymeric MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhhammer, J.; Zens, M.; Goldschmidtboeing, F.; Seifert, A.; Woias, P.

    2015-02-01

    Polymeric structures with integrated, functional microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) elements are increasingly important in various applications such as biomedical systems or wearable smart devices. These applications require highly flexible and elastic polymers with good conductivity, which can be embedded into a matrix that undergoes large deformations. Conductive polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a suitable candidate but is still challenging to fabricate. Conductivity is achieved by filling a nonconductive PDMS matrix with conductive particles. In this work, we present an approach that uses new mixing techniques to fabricate conductive PDMS with different fillers such as carbon black, silver particles, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Additionally, the electrical properties of all three composites are examined under continuous mechanical stress. Furthermore, we present a novel, low-cost, simple three-step molding process that transfers a micro patterned silicon master into a polystyrene (PS) polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) replica with improved release features. This PS/PTFE mold is used for subsequent structuring of conductive PDMS with high accuracy. The non sticking characteristics enable the fabrication of delicate structures using a very soft PDMS, which is usually hard to release from conventional molds. Moreover, the process can also be applied to polyurethanes and various other material combinations.

  1. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, Harold K.; Babcock, Walter C.; Friensen, Dwayne T.; Smith, Kelly L.; Johnson, Bruce M.; Wamser, Carl C.

    1990-01-01

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclsoed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers.

  2. Polymerization as a Model Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Describes the features of the free radical, anionic, and cationic mechanisms of chain addition polymerization. Indicates that the nature of chain reactions can be best taught through the study of macromolecules. (CC)

  3. Hydrocarbon polymeric binder for advanced solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Potts, J. E. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    A series of DEAB initiated isoprene polymerizations were run in the 5-gallon stirred autoclave reactor. Polymerization run parameters such as initiator concentration and feed rate were correlated with the molecular weight to provide a basis for molecular weight control in future runs. Synthetic methods were developed for the preparation of n-1,3-alkadienes. By these methods, 1,3-nonadiene was polymerized using DEAB initiator to give an ester-telechelic polynonadiene. This was subsequently hydrogenated with copper chromite catalyst to give a hydroxyl terminated saturated liquid hydrocarbon prepolymer having greatly improved viscosity characteristics and a Tg 18 degrees lower than that of the hydrogenated polyisoprenes. The hydroxyl-telechelic saturated polymers prepared by the hydrogenolysis of ester-telechelic polyisoprene were reached with diisocyanates under conditions favoring linear chain extension gel permeation chromatography was used to monitor this condensation polymerization. Fractions having molecular weights above one million were produced.

  4. Isothermal Titration Calorimetry of Chiral Polymeric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Werber, Liora; Preiss, Laura C; Landfester, Katharina; Muñoz-Espí, Rafael; Mastai, Yitzhak

    2015-09-01

    Chiral polymeric nanoparticles are of prime importance, mainly due to their enantioselective potential, for many applications such as catalysis and chiral separation in chromatography. In this article we report on the preparation of chiral polymeric nanoparticles by miniemulsion polymerization. In addition, we describe the use of isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) to measure the chiral interactions and the energetics of the adsorption of enantiomers from aqueous solutions onto chiral polymeric nanoparticles. The characterization of chirality in nano-systems is a very challenging task; here, we demonstrate that ITC can be used to accurately determine the thermodynamic parameters associated with the chiral interactions of nanoparticles. The use of ITC to measure the energetics of chiral interactions and recognition at the surfaces of chiral nanoparticles can be applied to other nanoscale chiral systems and can provide further insight into the chiral discrimination processes of nanomaterials.

  5. Physicochemically functional ultrathin films by interfacial polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Lonsdale, H.K.; Babcock, W.C.; Friensen, D.T.; Smith, K.L.; Johnson, B.M.; Wamser, C.C.

    1990-08-14

    Interfacially-polymerized ultrathin films containing physicochemically functional groups are disclosed, both with and without supports. Various applications are disclosed, including membrane electrodes, selective membranes and sorbents, biocompatible materials, targeted drug delivery, and narrow band optical absorbers. 3 figs.

  6. Hydrogel polymerization in microgravity for contact lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, Oksana; Kostarev, Konstantin; Kondyurin, Alexey

    Contact lenses become widely used for vision correction. The modern contact lenses made of polymer materials have to satisfy a number of requirements: biocompatibility and non-toxicity, low elastic module, high oxygen permeability, good wettability, mechanical strength and stable shape. To following all these requirements, special polymer compositions and polymerization techniques are in development. One of the unique technology is based on polymerization process in microgravity. The synthesis of the polymer structures proceeds in low concentration solution and Earth gravity has a great influence on the polymerization kinetics and final properties of the gel. The microgravity conditions give a possibility to get a regular polymer network with specific macromolecular structure. The experiments on board of space station and theoretical models of the polymerization processes are considered for contact lenses application.

  7. Reverse-osmosis membranes by plasma polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Thin allyl amine polymer films were developed using plasma polymerization. Resulting dry composite membranes effectively reject sodium chloride during reverse osmosis. Films are 98% sodium chloride rejective, and 46% urea rejective.

  8. Polymerization of actin by positively charged liposomes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    By cosedimentation, spectrofluorimetry, and electron microscopy, we have established that actin is induced to polymerize at low salt concentrations by positively charged liposomes. This polymerization occurs only at the surface of the liposomes, and thus monomers not in direct contact with the liposome remain monomeric. The integrity of the liposome membrane is necessary to maintain actin in its polymerized state since disruption of the liposome depolymerizes actin. Actin polymerized at the surface of the liposome is organized into two filamentous structures: sheets of parallel filaments in register and a netlike organization. Spectrofluorimetric analysis with the probe N- pyrenyl-iodoacetamide shows that actin is in the F conformation, at least in the environment of the probe. However, actin assembly induced by the liposome is not accompanied by full ATP hydrolysis as observed in vitro upon addition of salts. PMID:3360852

  9. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  10. Amplification of signaling events in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dahlquist, Frederick W

    2002-05-14

    Bacteria respond to extremely shallow chemical gradients by modifying their motility in a process called chemotaxis. This chemotactic response is characterized by high sensitivity to small concentration differences, which extends over a large range of concentrations. This combination of high signal gain and large dynamic range results from both a memory of past events and the ability to amplify small differences in signal between the memory and the current environment. Dahlquist describes the signaling mechanism used by bacteria to regulate the flagellar motor and the places in this pathway where signal amplification may occur.

  11. Genetics in methylotrophic bacteria: Appendix. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lidstrom, M.E.

    1998-09-01

    This research has focused primarily on promoters in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 and in methanotrophic bacteria. In Methylobacterium extorquens work continued on the moxF promoter. The author constructed chromosomal lacZ fusions of this promoter to avoid the regulation problems of plasmid-borne fragments and has shown that this is regulated normally in the chromosome. She has constructed lacZ fusions to some of the mox genes involved in the synthesis of the cofactor, PQQ, in order to carry out similar analysis of transcription of PQQ genes. The author has continued to isolate mox genes in methanotrophs for the purpose of studying their promoters and transcriptional regulation.

  12. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  13. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yurkov, Vladimir V.; Beatty, J. Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a relatively recently discovered bacterial group. Although taxonomically and phylogenetically heterogeneous, these bacteria share the following distinguishing features: the presence of bacteriochlorophyll a incorporated into reaction center and light-harvesting complexes, low levels of the photosynthetic unit in cells, an abundance of carotenoids, a strong inhibition by light of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis, and the inability to grow photosynthetically under anaerobic conditions. Aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are classified in two marine (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter) and six freshwater (Acidiphilium, Erythromicrobium, Erythromonas, Porphyrobacter, Roseococcus, and Sandaracinobacter) genera, which phylogenetically belong to the α-1, α-3, and α-4 subclasses of the class Proteobacteria. Despite this phylogenetic information, the evolution and ancestry of their photosynthetic properties are unclear. We discuss several current proposals for the evolutionary origin of aerobic phototrophic bacteria. The closest phylogenetic relatives of aerobic phototrophic bacteria include facultatively anaerobic purple nonsulfur phototrophic bacteria. Since these two bacterial groups share many properties, yet have significant differences, we compare and contrast their physiology, with an emphasis on morphology and photosynthetic and other metabolic processes. PMID:9729607

  14. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Coari, Kristin M; Martin, Rebecca C; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B

    2017-02-03

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  15. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-02-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  16. Biaxially oriented film on flexible polymeric substrate

    DOEpatents

    Finkikoglu, Alp T.; Matias, Vladimir

    2009-10-13

    A flexible polymer-based template having a biaxially oriented film grown on the surface of a polymeric substrate. The template having the biaxially oriented film can be used for further epitaxial growth of films of interest for applications such as photovoltaic cells, light emitting diodes, and the like. Methods of forming such a flexible template and providing the polymeric substrate with a biaxially oriented film deposited thereon are also described.

  17. Post polymerization cure shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S; Hearon, Michael Keith; Bearinger, Jane P

    2014-11-11

    This invention relates to chemical polymer compositions, methods of synthesis, and fabrication methods for devices regarding polymers capable of displaying shape memory behavior (SMPs) and which can first be polymerized to a linear or branched polymeric structure, having thermoplastic properties, subsequently processed into a device through processes typical of polymer melts, solutions, and dispersions and then crossed linked to a shape memory thermoset polymer retaining the processed shape.

  18. Post polymerization cure shape memory polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Thomas S.; Hearon, II, Michael Keith; Bearinger, Jane P.

    2017-01-10

    This invention relates to chemical polymer compositions, methods of synthesis, and fabrication methods for devices regarding polymers capable of displaying shape memory behavior (SMPs) and which can first be polymerized to a linear or branched polymeric structure, having thermoplastic properties, subsequently processed into a device through processes typical of polymer melts, solutions, and dispersions and then crossed linked to a shape memory thermoset polymer retaining the processed shape.

  19. New Polybenzimidazole Architectures by Diels Alder Polymerization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-14

    REPORT New Polybenzimidazole Architectures By Diels Alder Polymerization. Final Report 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Due to their high...substituents to improve processability, are desirable. This project was a proof of principle study to determine if Diels - Alder polymerization of monomers...AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Polybenzimidazole, Diels Alder

  20. UV Polymerization of Hydrodynamically Shaped Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    parallel.17 One other example of non-round fibers was originally reported in 199518 and was produced by co -extrusion of polymers with different...ordinary as there is a minimum required exposure to initiate polymerization as shown with other polymers .25 It was desirable to maintain the same exposure...UV polymerization of hydrodynamically shaped fibers† Abel L. Thangawng, Peter B. Howell, Jr, Christopher M. Spillmann, Jawad Naciri and Frances S

  1. Catalytic living ring-opening metathesis polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarkar, Amit A.; Kilbinger, Andreas F. M.

    2015-09-01

    In living ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP), a transition-metal-carbene complex polymerizes ring-strained olefins with very good control of the molecular weight of the resulting polymers. Because one molecule of the initiator is required for each polymer chain, however, this type of polymerization is expensive for widespread use. We have now designed a chain-transfer agent (CTA) capable of reducing the required amount of metal complex while still maintaining full control over the living polymerization process. This new method introduces a degenerative transfer process to ROMP. We demonstrate that substituted cyclohexene rings are good CTAs, and thereby preserve the ‘living’ character of the polymerization using catalytic quantities of the metal complex. The resulting polymers show characteristics of a living polymerization, namely narrow molecular-weight distribution, controlled molecular weights and block copolymer formation. This new technique provides access to well-defined polymers for industrial, biomedical and academic use at a fraction of the current costs and significantly reduced levels of residual ruthenium catalyst.

  2. Polymeric micelles for acyclovir drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Sawdon, Alicia J; Peng, Ching-An

    2014-10-01

    Polymeric prodrug micelles for delivery of acyclovir (ACV) were synthesized. First, ACV was used directly to initiate ring-opening polymerization of ɛ-caprolactone to form ACV-polycaprolactone (ACV-PCL). Through conjugation of hydrophobic ACV-PCL with hydrophilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG) or chitosan, polymeric micelles for drug delivery were formed. (1)H NMR, FTIR, and gel permeation chromatography were employed to show successful conjugation of MPEG or chitosan to hydrophobic ACV-PCL. Through dynamic light scattering, zeta potential analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and critical micelle concentration (CMC), the synthesized ACV-tagged polymeric micelles were characterized. It was found that the average size of the polymeric micelles was under 200nm and the CMCs of ACV-PCL-MPEG and ACV-PCL-chitosan were 2.0mgL(-1) and 6.6mgL(-1), respectively. The drug release kinetics of ACV was investigated and cytotoxicity assay demonstrates that ACV-tagged polymeric micelles were non-toxic.

  3. Enhancement of growth and salt tolerance of red pepper seedlings (Capsicum annuum L.) by regulating stress ethylene synthesis with halotolerant bacteria containing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity.

    PubMed

    Siddikee, Md Ashaduzzaman; Glick, Bernard R; Chauhan, Puneet S; Yim, Woo jong; Sa, Tongmin

    2011-04-01

    Three 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase-producing halotolerant bacteria were isolated from West Coast soil of Yellow Sea, Incheon, South Korea and evaluated for their efficiency in improving red pepper plant growth under salt stress. The strains RS16, RS656 and RS111 were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Brevibacterium iodinum, Bacillus licheniformis and Zhihengliuela alba, respectively. Two hour exposure of 100, 150 and 200 mM NaCl stress on 8 day old red pepper seedlings caused 44, 64 and 74% increase ethylene production, while at 150 mM NaCl stress, inoculation of B. licheniformis RS656, Z. alba RS111, and Br. iodinum RS16 reduces ethylene production by 44, 53 and 57%, respectively. Similarly, 3 week old red pepper plants were subjected to salt stress for two weeks and approximately ∼50% reduction in growth recorded at 150 mM NaCl stress compared to negative control whereas bacteria inoculation significantly increase the growth compared to positive control. Salt stress also caused 1.3-fold reduction in the root/shoot dry weight ratio compared to the absence of salt while bacteria inoculation retained the biomass allocation similar to control plants. The salt tolerance index (ratio of biomass of salt stressed to non-stressed plant) was also significantly increased in inoculated plants compared to non-inoculated. Increase nutrient uptakes under salt stress by red pepper further evident that bacteria inoculation ameliorates salt stress effect. In summary, this study indicates that the use of ACC deaminase-producing halotolerant bacteria mitigates the salt stress by reducing salt stress-induced ethylene production on growth of red pepper plants.

  4. Gating mechanosensitive channels in bacteria with an atomic force microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, Renata; Miller, Samantha; Schmidt, Christoph F.; Third Institute of Physics Team; School of Medical Sciences Collaboration

    The regulation of growth and integrity of bacteria is critically linked to mechanical stress. Bacteria typically maintain a high difference of osmotic pressure (turgor pressure) with respect to the environment. This pressure difference (on the order of 1 atm) is supported by the cell envelope, a composite of lipid membranes and a rigid cell wall. Turgor pressure is controlled by the ratio of osmolytes inside and outside bacteria and thus, can abruptly increase upon osmotic downshock. For structural integrity bacteria rely on the mechanical stability of the cell wall and on the action of mechanosensitive (MS) channels: membrane proteins that release solutes in response to stress in the cell envelope. We here present experimental data on MS channels gating. We activate channels by indenting living bacteria with the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). We compare responses of wild-type and mutant bacteria in which some or all MS channels have been eliminated.

  5. Polymerization in emulsion microdroplet reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Nick J.

    The goal of this research project is to utilize emulsion droplets as chemical reactors for execution of complex polymerization chemistries to develop unique and functional particle materials. Emulsions are dispersions of immiscible fluids where one fluid usually exists in the form of drops. Not surprisingly, if a liquid-to-solid chemical reaction proceeds to completion within these drops, the resultant solid particles will possess the shape and relative size distribution of the drops. The two immiscible liquid phases required for emulsion polymerization provide unique and complex chemical and physical environments suitable for the engineering of novel materials. The development of novel non-ionic fluorosurfactants allows fluorocarbon oils to be used as the continuous phase in a water-free emulsion. Such emulsions enable the encapsulation of almost any hydrocarbon compound in droplets that may be used as separate compartments for water-sensitive syntheses. Here, we exemplify the promise of this approach by suspension polymerization of polyurethanes (PU), in which the liquid precursor is emulsified into droplets that are then converted 1:1 into polymer particles. The stability of the droplets against coalescence upon removal of the continuous phase by evaporation confirms the formation of solid PU particles. These results prove that the water-free environment of fluorocarbon based emulsions enables high conversion. We produce monodisperse, cross-linked, and fluorescently labeled PU-latexes with controllable mesh size through microfluidic emulsification in a simple one-step process. A novel method for the fabrication of monodisperse mesoporous silica particles is presented. It is based on the formation of well-defined equally sized emulsion droplets using a microfluidic approach. The droplets contain the silica precursor/surfactant solution and are suspended in hexadecane as the continuous oil phase. The solvent is then expelled from the droplets, leading to

  6. ["Quorum sensing" or social behavior of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Gintsburg, A L; Il'ina, T S; Romanova, Iu M

    2003-01-01

    The review deals with the data of literature on the role of the "quorum sensing" (QS) system ensuring the social behavior of bacteria in the regulation of virulence genes. The mechanisms of the action of these systems in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as the influence of acyl-homoserine lactones, one of the components of the QS system, on the immune response of the infected host are discussed. In addition, in this review the data of literature on the existence of bacteria in the form of biofilms are presented. The methods of the identification of biofilms, the methods of their experimental preparation and the role of the QS system in the process of their formation are considered.

  7. Quorum sensing in plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Loh, John; Pierson, Elizabeth A; Pierson, Leland S; Stacey, Gary; Chatterjee, Arun

    2002-08-01

    N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing by bacteria regulates traits that are involved in symbiotic, pathogenic and surface-associated relationships between microbial populations and their plant hosts. Recent advances demonstrate deviations from the classic LuxR/LuxI paradigm, which was first developed in Vibrio. For example, LuxR homologs can repress as well as activate gene expression, and non-AHL signals and signal mimics can affect the expression of genes that are controlled by quorum sensing. Many bacteria utilize multiple quorum-sensing systems, and these may be modulated via post-transcriptional and other global regulatory mechanisms. Microbes inhabiting plant surfaces also produce and respond to a diverse mixture of AHL signals. The production of AHL mimics by plants and the identification of AHL degradative pathways suggest that bacteria and plants utilize this method of bacterial communication as a key control point for influencing the outcome of their interactions.

  8. Promiscuous stimulation of ParF protein polymerization by heterogeneous centromere binding factors.

    PubMed

    Machón, Cristina; Fothergill, Timothy J G; Barillà, Daniela; Hayes, Finbarr

    2007-11-16

    The segrosome is the nucleoprotein complex that mediates accurate segregation of bacterial plasmids. The segrosome of plasmid TP228 comprises ParF and ParG proteins that assemble on the parH centromere. ParF, which exemplifies one clade of the ubiquitous ParA superfamily of segregation proteins, polymerizes extensively in response to ATP binding. Polymerization is modulated by the ParG centromere binding factor (CBF). The segrosomes of plasmids pTAR, pVT745 and pB171 include ParA homologues of the ParF subgroup, as well as diverse homodimeric CBFs with no primary sequence similarity to ParG, or each other. Centromere binding by these analogues is largely specific. Here, we establish that the ParF homologues of pTAR and pB171 filament modestly with ATP, and that nucleotide hydrolysis is not required for this polymerization, which is more prodigious when the cognate CBF is also present. By contrast, the ParF homologue of plasmid pVT745 did not respond appreciably to ATP alone, but polymerized extensively in the presence of both its cognate CBF and ATP. The co-factors also stimulated nucleotide-independent polymerization of cognate ParF proteins. Moreover, apart from the CBF of pTAR, the disparate ParG analogues promoted polymerization of non-cognate ParF proteins suggesting that filamentation of the ParF proteins is enhanced by a common mechanism. Like ParG, the co-factors may be modular, possessing a centromere-specific interaction domain linked to a flexible region containing determinants that promiscuously stimulate ParF polymerization. The CBFs appear to function as bacterial analogues of formins, microtubule-associated proteins or related ancillary factors that regulate eucaryotic cytoskeletal dynamics.

  9. The talking language in some major Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Goutam; Ray, Arun Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Cell-cell interaction or quorum sensing (QS) is a vital biochemical/physiological process in bacteria that is required for various physiological functions, including nutrient uptake, competence development, biofilm formation, sporulation, as well as for toxin secretion. In natural environment, bacteria live in close association with other bacteria and interaction among them is crucial for survival. The QS-regulated gene expression in bacteria is a cell density-dependent process and the initiation process depends on the threshold level of the signaling molecule, N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL). The present review summarizes the QS signal and its respective circuit in Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the human pathogens belong to Gram-negative group, and only a few of them cause disease through QS system. Thus, inhibition of pathogenic bacteria is important. Use of antibiotics creates a selective pressure (antibiotics act as natural selection factor to promote one group of bacteria over another group) for emerging multidrug-resistant bacteria and will not be suitable for long-term use. The alternative process of inhibition of QS in bacteria using different natural and synthetic molecules is called quorum quenching. However, in the long run, QS inhibitors or blockers may also develop resistance, but obviously it will solve some sort of problems. In this review, we also have stated the mode of action of quorum-quenching molecule. The understanding of QS network in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria will help us to solve many health-related problems in future.

  10. Analysis of Shape Dynamics and Actin Polymerization of Collectively Migrating Streams of Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenlu; Parent, Carole A.; Losert, Wolfgang

    We use Princiapl Component Analysis (PCA) to investigate cell-cell coupling during collective cell migration of Dictyostelium discoideun, and explore the underlying mechanisms that regulate the coupling. From PCA of the cell boundary motion obtained from time-lapse images of multicellular streams, we find that cells in streams exhibit more localized anterior protrusions than individually migrating cells. We also find that traveling protrusion waves along cell boundaries connect from cell to cell with high correlation. Further analysis of actin polymerization indicates that actin polymerization is significantly enhanced at the leading edge of cells at cell-cell contacts. The coupling of waves disappears when reducing F-actin polymerization with Latrunculin A.

  11. PNIPAM grafted surfaces through ATRP and RAFT polymerization: Chemistry and bioadhesion.

    PubMed

    Conzatti, G; Cavalie, S; Combes, C; Torrisani, J; Carrere, N; Tourrette, A

    2017-03-01

    Biomaterials surface design is critical for the control of materials and biological system interactions. Being regulated by a layer of molecular dimensions, bioadhesion could be effectively tailored by polymer surface grafting. Basically, this surface modification can be controlled by radical polymerization, which is a useful tool for this purpose. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the role of surface characteristics on bioadhesion properties. We place a particular focus on biomaterials functionalized with a brush surface, on presentation of grafting techniques for "grafting to" and "grafting from" strategies and on brush characterization methods. Since atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization are the most frequently used grafting techniques, their main characteristics will be explained. Through the example of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) which is a widely used polymer allowing tuneable cell adhesion, smart surfaces involving PNIPAM will be presented with their main modern applications.

  12. Protein Kinase D Controls Actin Polymerization and Cell Motility through Phosphorylation of Cortactin*

    PubMed Central

    Eiseler, Tim; Hausser, Angelika; De Kimpe, Line; Van Lint, Johan; Pfizenmaier, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We here identify protein kinase D (PKD) as an upstream regulator of the F-actin-binding protein cortactin and the Arp actin polymerization machinery. PKD phosphorylates cortactin in vitro and in vivo at serine 298 thereby generating a 14-3-3 binding motif. In vitro, a phosphorylation-deficient cortactin-S298A protein accelerated VCA-Arp-cortactin-mediated synergistic actin polymerization and showed reduced F-actin binding, indicative of enhanced turnover of nucleation complexes. In vivo, cortactin co-localized with the nucleation promoting factor WAVE2, essential for lamellipodia extension, in the actin polymerization zone in Heregulin-treated MCF-7 cells. Using a 3-dye FRET-based approach we further demonstrate that WAVE2-Arp and cortactin prominently interact at these structures. Accordingly, cortactin-S298A significantly enhanced lamellipodia extension and directed cell migration. Our data thus unravel a previously unrecognized mechanism by which PKD controls cancer cell motility. PMID:20363754

  13. Pilins in gram-positive bacteria: A structural perspective.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Vengadesan

    2015-07-01

    Pilins or fimbrilins are a class of proteins found in bacterial surface pilus, a hair-like surface appendage. Both the Gram-negative and -positive bacteria produce pilins to assemble pili on their cell-surface for different purposes including adherence, twitching motility, conjugation, immunomodulation, biofilm formation, and electron transfer. Immunogenic properties of the pilins make them attractive vaccine candidates. The polymerized pilins play a key role in the initiation of host adhesion, which is a critical step for bacterial colonization and infection. Because of their key role in adhesion and exposure on the cell surface, targeting the pilins-mediated adhesion (anti-adhesion therapy) is also seen as a promising alternative approach for preventing and treating bacterial infections, one that may overcome their ever-increasing repertoires of resistance mechanisms. Individual pilins interact with each other non-covalently to assemble the pilus fiber with the help of associated proteins like chaperones and Usher in Gram-negative bacteria. In contrast, the pilins in Gram-positive bacteria often connect with each other covalently, with the help of sortases. Certain unique structural features present on the pilins distinguish them from one another across different bacterial strains, and these dictate their cellular targets and functions. While the structure of pilins has been extensively studied in Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria, the pilins in Gram-positive pathogenic bacteria have been in only during the last decade. Recently, the discovery of pilins in non-pathogenic bacteria, such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, has received great attention, though traditionally the attention was on pathogenic bacteria. This review summarizes and discusses the current structural knowledge of pilins in Gram-positive bacteria with emphasis on those pilins which are sortase substrates.

  14. Engineering an artificial amoeba propelled by nanoparticle-triggered actin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Jinsoo; Schmidt, Jacob; Chien, Aichi; Montemagno, Carlo D.

    2009-02-01

    We have engineered an amoeba system combining nanofabricated inorganic materials with biological components, capable of propelling itself via actin polymerization. The nanofabricated materials have a mechanism similar to the locomotion of the Listeria monocytogenes, food poisoning bacteria. The propulsive force generation utilizes nanoparticles made from nickel and gold functionalized with the Listeria monocytogenes transmembrane protein, ActA. These Listeria-mimic nanoparticles were in concert with actin, actin binding proteins, ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and encapsulated within a lipid vesicle. This system is an artificial cell, such as a vesicle, where artificial nanobacteria and actin polymerization machinery are used in driving force generators inside the cell. The assembled structure was observed to crawl on a glass surface analogously to an amoeba, with the speed of the movement dependent on the amount of actin monomers and ATP present.

  15. Host actin polymerization tunes the cell division cycle of an intracellular pathogen.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, M Sloan; Aditham, Arjun K; Espaillat, Akbar; Cameron, Todd A; Whiteside, Sarah A; Cava, Felipe; Portnoy, Daniel A; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-04-28

    Growth and division are two of the most fundamental capabilities of a bacterial cell. While they are well described for model organisms growing in broth culture, very little is known about the cell division cycle of bacteria replicating in more complex environments. Using a D-alanine reporter strategy, we found that intracellular Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) spend a smaller proportion of their cell cycle dividing compared to Lm growing in broth culture. This alteration to the cell division cycle is independent of bacterial doubling time. Instead, polymerization of host-derived actin at the bacterial cell surface extends the non-dividing elongation period and compresses the division period. By decreasing the relative proportion of dividing Lm, actin polymerization biases the population toward cells with the highest propensity to form actin tails. Thus, there is a positive-feedback loop between the Lm cell division cycle and a physical interaction with the host cytoskeleton.

  16. Engineering an artificial amoeba propelled by nanoparticle-triggered actin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jinsoo; Schmidt, Jacob; Chien, Aichi; Montemagno, Carlo D

    2009-02-25

    We have engineered an amoeba system combining nanofabricated inorganic materials with biological components, capable of propelling itself via actin polymerization. The nanofabricated materials have a mechanism similar to the locomotion of the Listeria monocytogenes, food poisoning bacteria. The propulsive force generation utilizes nanoparticles made from nickel and gold functionalized with the Listeria monocytogenes transmembrane protein, ActA. These Listeria-mimic nanoparticles were in concert with actin, actin binding proteins, ATP (adenosine triphosphate) and encapsulated within a lipid vesicle. This system is an artificial cell, such as a vesicle, where artificial nanobacteria and actin polymerization machinery are used in driving force generators inside the cell. The assembled structure was observed to crawl on a glass surface analogously to an amoeba, with the speed of the movement dependent on the amount of actin monomers and ATP present.

  17. Signal amplification strategies for DNA and protein detection based on polymeric nanocomposites and polymerization: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shaohong; Yuan, Liang; Hua, Xin; Xu, Lingling; Liu, Songqin

    2015-06-02

    Demand is increasing for ultrasensitive bioassays for disease diagnosis, environmental monitoring and other research areas. This requires novel signal amplification strategies to maximize the signal output. In this review, we focus on a series of significant signal amplification strategies based on polymeric nanocomposites and polymerization. Some common polymers are used as carriers to increase the local concentration of signal probes and/or biomolecules on their surfaces or in their interiors. Some polymers with special fluorescence and optical properties can efficiently transfer the excitation energy from a single site to the whole polymer backbone. This results in superior fluorescence signal amplification due to the resulting collective effort (integration of signal). Recent polymerization-based signal amplification strategies that employ atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and photo-initiated polymerization are also summarized. Several distinctive applications of polymers in ultrasensitive bioanalysis are highlighted.

  18. Ice-Nucleating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Hitoshi

    Since the discovery of ice-nucleating bacteria in 1974 by Maki et al., a large number of studies on the biological characteristics, ice-nucleating substance, ice nucleation gene and frost damage etc. of the bacteria have been carried out. Ice-nucleating bacteria can cause the freezing of water at relatively warm temperature (-2.3°C). Tween 20 was good substrates for ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. Major fatty acids of Isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens) W-11 grown at 30°C were palmitic, cis-9-hexadecenoic and cis-11-octadecenoic which amounted to 90% of the total fatty acids. Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

  19. Fluorescent dye-labelled polymer synthesis by nitroxide mediated radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, Jozef; Chmela, Štefan; Hrčková, Ľudmila; Hrdlovič, Pavol

    2012-07-01

    New applications of polymers at advanced technologies demand increased requirements on their properties. These properties are influenced by molecular as well as supramolecular structure. Controlled radical polymerization mediated by stable nitroxides (NMP) or substituted alkoxyamines offers simple method for preparation of polymers with programmable structure of macromolecules which possess remarkable better physical as well as chemical properties. They can be used as a macro initiators for the synthesis of block copolymers. At the present time it has been generally accepted that the extent of "livingness" is high for all conversions [1-4]. To verify this statement a series of fluorescent dye-labelled regulators has been synthesized, spectrally characterized and used as the mediators of styrene and n-butyl acrylate polymerization. Direct quantification of dormant species concentration (extent of livingness) and calculation of molar mass of marked polymers was performed by absorption and/or emission spectroscopy. Controlled radical polymerization mediated by stable nitroxides bearing fluorescence mark represents unconventional approach for monitoring and evaluation of mechanism and kinetics of polymerization process. Results indicate that the extent of livingness is strongly influenced by conversion as well as mediator concentration. There is a clear tendency toward to decreasing amount of dormant species with increasing monomer conversion. Moreover, lower mediator concentration decreases livingness of polymerization process.

  20. Fire-Retardant Polymeric Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha K.; Smith, Trent M.

    2011-01-01

    component forms polybenzoxazole (PBO) in a reaction that absorbs heat from its surroundings. PBO under thermal stress cross-links, forming a protective char layer, which thermally insulates the polymer. Thus, the formation of the char layer further assists to extinguish the fire by preventing vaporization of the polymeric fuel.

  1. Mixing in polymeric microfluidic devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Sun, Amy Cha-Tien; Davis, Robert H.; Brotherton, Christopher M. (University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO)

    2006-04-01

    This SAND report describes progress made during a Sandia National Laboratories sponsored graduate fellowship. The fellowship was funded through an LDRD proposal. The goal of this project is development and characterization of mixing strategies for polymeric microfluidic devices. The mixing strategies under investigation include electroosmotic flow focusing, hydrodynamic focusing, physical constrictions and porous polymer monoliths. For electroosmotic flow focusing, simulations were performed to determine the effect of electroosmotic flow in a microchannel with heterogeneous surface potential. The heterogeneous surface potential caused recirculations to form within the microchannel. These recirculations could then be used to restrict two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the mixing region surface potential to the average channel surface potential was made large in magnitude and negative in sign, and when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the characteristic diffusion time was minimized. Based on these results, experiments were performed to evaluate the manipulation of surface potential using living-radical photopolymerization. The material chosen to manipulate typically exhibits a negative surface potential. Using living-radical surface grafting, a positive surface potential was produced using 2-(Dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and a neutral surface was produced using a poly(ethylene glycol) surface graft. Simulations investigating hydrodynamic focusing were also performed. For this technique, mixing is enhanced by using a tertiary fluid stream to constrict the two mixing streams and reduce the characteristic diffusion length. Maximum mixing occurred when the ratio of the tertiary flow stream flow-rate to the mixing streams flow-rate was maximized. Also, like the electroosmotic focusing mixer, mixing was also maximized when the ratio of the characteristic convection time to the

  2. Inclusion polymerization of isoprene in deoxycholic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cataldo, Franco; Ragni, Pietro; Rosati, Aldo; Ursini, Ornella

    2009-05-01

    The radiation-induced polymerization of isoprene was made on its inclusion (or clathrate) complex with deoxycholic acid (DOCA) at 150 and 300 kGy. The microstructure of the resulting polyisoprene (PIP) was studied by FTIR spectroscopy and found fully comparable to that of PIP prepared by emulsion polymerization by a free radical initiator. Thus, the 1,4-trans content was found to be 48% and that of 1,4-cis units was 28% of the polymer structure; the remaining are being 1,2 and 3,4 units. The PIP irregular microstructure was justified in terms of monomer dynamics inside the DOCA channels. PIP from inclusion polymerization is fully amorphous as studied by differential thermal analysis (DTA) in comparison to an authentic sample of trans-1,4-polyisoprene, which instead has a crystalline melting point of 71.5 °C. The inclusion complex of PIP with DOCA (PIP@DOCA) shows a DTA melting point of 194.4 °C, 12.4 °C higher than the melting point of pure DOCA. PIP isolated from inclusion polymerization from DOCA and its complex PIP@DOCA was studied also by thermogravimetry (TGA) and differential thermogravimetry (DTG). Isoprene does not form inclusion complexes with urea and thiourea. When irradiated with these two compounds it produces an oily PIP oligomer whose microstructure was found by FTIR spectroscopy analogous to that of PIP prepared by emulsion polymerization by a free radical initiator.

  3. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  4. Investigation of Solution Polymerizations in Microgravity and 1 G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Alvin P.

    1998-01-01

    The in-situ dielectric spectra for the solution polymerization of polydiacetylene has been successfully measured. The results show a distinct difference between the response for the bulk solution and surface polymerization. It also shows a low frequency peak in the dissipation factor which is present in both the bulk and surface polymerizations. These features may prove to be significant indicators for important polymerization processes. Future studies will investigate the mechanisms responsible for these dielectric responses. This technique will eventually be used to monitor microgravity polymerizations and provide in-situ data on how microgravity affects solution polymerization.

  5. Equilibrium polymerization on the equivalent-neighbor lattice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Miron

    1989-01-01

    The equilibrium polymerization problem is solved exactly on the equivalent-neighbor lattice. The Flory-Huggins (Flory, 1986) entropy of mixing is exact for this lattice. The discrete version of the n-vector model is verified when n approaches 0 is equivalent to the equal reactivity polymerization process in the whole parameter space, including the polymerized phase. The polymerization processes for polymers satisfying the Schulz (1939) distribution exhibit nonuniversal critical behavior. A close analogy is found between the polymerization problem of index the Schulz r and the Bose-Einstein ideal gas in d = -2r dimensions, with the critical polymerization corresponding to the Bose-Einstein condensation.

  6. Immobilization of Polymeric Luminophor on Nanoparticles Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolbukh, Yuliia; Podkoscielna, Beata; Lipke, Agnieszka; Bartnicki, Andrzej; Gawdzik, Barbara; Tertykh, Valentin

    2016-04-01

    Polymeric luminophors with reduced toxicity are of the priorities in the production of lighting devices, sensors, detectors, bioassays or diagnostic systems. The aim of this study was to develop a method of immobilization of the new luminophor on a surface of nanoparticles and investigation of the structure of the grafted layer. Monomer 2,7-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)naphthalene (2,7-NAF.DM) with luminophoric properties was immobilized on silica and carbon nanotubes in two ways: mechanical mixing with previously obtained polymer and by in situ oligomerization with chemisorption after carrier's modification with vinyl groups. The attached polymeric (or oligomeric) surface layer was studied using thermal and spectral techniques. Obtained results confirm the chemisorption of luminophor on the nanotubes and silica nanoparticles at the elaborated synthesis techniques. The microstructure of 2,7-NAF.DM molecules after chemisorption was found to be not changed. The elaborated modification approach allows one to obtain nanoparticles uniformly covered with polymeric luminophor.

  7. Molecular Probe Fluorescence Monitoring of Polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunton, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    This project investigated the feasibility of using fluorescence spectroscopy to determine viscosity of polymer/monomer in support of Transient Interfacial Phenomena in Miscible Polymer Systems (TIPMPS). This project will attempt to measure gradient induced flow at a miscible interface during and / or after in-flight polymerization of dodecyl acrylate (lauryl acrylate). Concentration and temperature gradients will be intentionally introduced during polymerization and the resultant fluid flow determined by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). This report describes an investigation of the feasibility of using fluorescence of a probe molecule to monitor viscosity and/or concentration during and after polymerization. The probe used was pyrene which has been shown to be sensitive to its local environment in methyl methacrylate.

  8. Photopolymerization of conductive polymeric metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xichen; Anyaogu, Kelechi C; Neckers, Douglas C

    2009-11-01

    5-Mercapto-2,2'-bithiophene functionalized metal nanoparticles BTSMs [M: copper (Cu), silver (Ag), and gold (Au)] of different diameters (2-8 nm) were synthesized. Conductive polymeric metal nanoparticles were formed from BTSM by UV irradiation. The photopolymerization mechanism was investigated using transient absorption measurements. Intramolecular electron transfer from the ligand to the metal nano-core was confirmed. Nanoparticle size, as well as plasmon electronic interactions, are important factors. The smaller the nanoparticle and the stronger the electronic interactions, the faster the electron transfer is. The three-dimensional structure of the polymerized BTSM was identified using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The conductivity of polymerized BTSM measured in poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) film is higher than that of the nonpolymerized BTSM.

  9. Methylenelactide: vinyl polymerization and spatial reactivity effects

    PubMed Central

    Britner, Judita

    2016-01-01

    The first detailed study on free-radical polymerization, copolymerization and controlled radical polymerization of the cyclic push–pull-type monomer methylenelactide in comparison to the non-cyclic monomer α-acetoxyacrylate is described. The experimental results revealed that methylenelactide undergoes a self-initiated polymerization. The copolymerization parameters of methylenelactide and styrene as well as methyl methacrylate were determined. To predict the copolymerization behavior with other classes of monomers, Q and e values were calculated. Further, reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT)-controlled homopolymerization of methylenelactide and copolymerization with N,N-dimethylacrylamide was performed at 70 °C in 1,4-dioxane using AIBN as initiator and 2-(((ethylthio)carbonothioyl)thio)-2-methylpropanoic acid as a transfer agent. PMID:28144306

  10. Attempting a classification for electrical polymeric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otero, T. F.; López Cascales, J.; Fernández-Romero, A. J.

    2007-04-01

    Polymeric actuators, electroactive polymer actuators, electromechanical polymeric actuators, artificial muscles, and other, are usual expressions to name actuators developed during the last 15-20 years based on interactions between the electric energy and polymer films. The polymeric actuators can be divided into two main fields: electromechanical actuators working by electrostatic interactions between the polymer and the applied electric fields, and electrochemomechanical actuators, or reactive actuators, working by an electrochemical reaction driven by the flowing electric current. The electromechanical actuators can be classified into electrostrictive, piezoelectric, ferroelectric, electrostatic and electrokinetic. They can include a solvent (wet) or not (dry), or they can include a salt or not. Similitude and differences related to the rate and position control or to the possibility or not to include sensing abilities are discussed.

  11. Self-Healing of biocompatible polymeric nanocomposities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espino, Omar; Chipara, Dorina

    2014-03-01

    Polymers are vulnerable to damage in form of cracks deep within the structure, where detection is difficult and repair is near to impossible. These cracks lead to mechanical degradation of the polymer. A method has been created to solve this problem named polymeric self healing. Self healing capabilities implies the dispersion within the polymeric matrix of microcapsules filled with a monomer and of catalyst. Poly urea-formaldehyde microcapsules used in this method are filled with dicyclopentadiene that is liberated after being ruptured by the crack propagation in the material. Polymerization is assisted by a catalyst FGGC that ignites the self healing process. Nanocomposites, such as titanium oxide, will be used as an integration of these polymers that will be tested by rupturing mechanically slowly. In order to prove the self healing process, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR, and SEM are used.

  12. Removal of radioactive contaminants by polymeric microspheres.

    PubMed

    Osmanlioglu, Ahmet Erdal

    2016-11-01

    Radionuclide removal from radioactive liquid waste by adsorption on polymeric microspheres is the latest application of polymers in waste management. Polymeric microspheres have significant immobilization capacity for ionic substances. A laboratory study was carried out by using poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) for encapsulation of radionuclide in the liquid radioactive waste. There are numbers of advantages to use an encapsulation technology in radioactive waste management. Results show that polymerization step of radionuclide increases integrity of solidified waste form. Test results showed that adding the appropriate polymer into the liquid waste at an appropriate pH and temperature level, radionuclide was encapsulated into polymer. This technology may provide barriers between hazardous radioactive ions and the environment. By this method, solidification techniques became easier and safer in nuclear waste management. By using polymer microspheres as dust form, contamination risks were decreased in the nuclear industry and radioactive waste operations.

  13. Universal metastability of sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Weijun

    Sickle hemoglobin (HbS) is a natural mutation of the normal hemoglobin (HbA) found in the red blood cells of human body. Polymerization of HbS occurs when the concentration of deoxyHbS exceeds a well-defined solubility, which is the underlying cause of the Sickle Cell Disease. It has long been assumed that thermodynamic equilibrium is reached when polymerization comes to an end. However, in this thesis we demonstrate that in confined volume as well as in bulk solution, HbS polymerization terminates prematurely, leaving the solution in a metastable state. A newly developed Reservoir method as well as modulated excitation method were adopted for the study. This discovery of universal metastability gives us new insights into understanding the mechanism of sickle cell disease.

  14. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  15. Bacteria-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Tuson, Hannah H; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-05-14

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field.

  16. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  17. Monoclonal antibodies against bacteria.

    PubMed

    Macario, A J; Conway de Macario, E

    1988-01-01

    Highlights are presented of most recent work in which monoclonal antibodies have been instrumental in the study of bacteria and their products. Topics summarized pertain to human and veterinary medicines, dentistry, phytopathology, ichthyology, and bacterial ecophysiology, differentiation, evolution and methanogenic biotechnology.

  18. Enteric bacteria mandibular osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Scolozzi, Paolo; Lombardi, Tommaso; Edney, Timothy; Jaques, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    Osteomyelitis of the mandible is a relatively rare inflammatory disease that usually stems from the odontogenic polymicrobial flora of the oral cavity. We are reporting 2 unusual cases of mandibular osteomyelitis resulting from enteric bacteria infection. In one patient, abundant clinical evidence suggested a diagnosis of a chronic factitious disease, whereas in the second patient no obvious etiology was found.

  19. Bacteria-surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Hannah H.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field. PMID:23930134

  20. Two-photon polymerization of polydiacetylene.

    PubMed

    Shusterman, Olga; Berman, Amir; Golan, Yuval; Horovitz, Baruch; Zeiri, Leila

    2009-02-05

    We show that visible light can polymerize diacetylene monomers into polydiacetylene (PDA) in a two-photon process. We monitor the process by measuring Raman intensities of PDA using a Raman laser at 633 nm with variable intensity I and show that the Raman cross section at short times increases as I3, corresponding to a two-photon process. The process generates a relatively stable blue phase PDA, in contrast with UV polymerization that leads to a fast blue to red phase transformation.

  1. Polymeric matrix materials for infrared metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Dirk, Shawn M; Rasberry, Roger D; Rahimian, Kamyar

    2014-04-22

    A polymeric matrix material exhibits low loss at optical frequencies and facilitates the fabrication of all-dielectric metamaterials. The low-loss polymeric matrix material can be synthesized by providing an unsaturated polymer, comprising double or triple bonds; partially hydrogenating the unsaturated polymer; depositing a film of the partially hydrogenated polymer and a crosslinker on a substrate; and photopatterning the film by exposing the film to ultraviolet light through a patterning mask, thereby cross-linking at least some of the remaining unsaturated groups of the partially hydrogenated polymer in the exposed portions.

  2. Colloidal polymeric nanoparticles and brain drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Najeh Maissar; Mainardes, Rubiana Mara

    2009-07-01

    The blood brain barrier protects the brain from harmful substances in the blood stream and has stopped the development of many powerful and interesting drugs candidates for central nervous system due to the low poor distribution and by efflux mechanisms. Many different approaches have been developed in order to overcome this barrier and the drug gain access to the brain. The polymeric nanoparticles are efficient colloidal systems that have been investigated to the brain drug delivery. This review will focus on the current strategies for brain drug delivery emphasizing the properties and characteristics of polymeric nanoparticles for this purpose.

  3. Polymeric Quaternary Ammonium Compounds: Versatile Antimicrobial Materials.

    PubMed

    Zubris, Deanna L; Minbiole, Kevin P C; Wuest, William M

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric Quaternary Ammonium Compounds (polyQACs) comprise a broad class of materials with applications in medical implants, food processing, and surface sanitizing, amongst many others. These polymeric substances are especially promising due to their potent antibacterial activity and limited hemolytic toxicity. In particular, many polyQACs have superior therapeutic indices and a lower likelihood of developing antibacterial resistance in comparison to their monomers, making them ideal materials for wound dressings, catheters, and other biomedical applications. This review outlines the history and development, previous successes, current state of the research, and future directions of polyQACs in society.

  4. Identification of bacteria in scuba divers' rinse tanks.

    PubMed

    Washburn, Brian K; Levin, Andrew E; Hennessy, Kristen; Miller, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    Scuba divers typically rinse equipment in communal tanks. Studies show these tanks are contaminated with bacteria, but the types of bacteria have not been studied. We sought to identify bacteria in rinse tanks at a dive facility at San Pedro, Belize, to determine the origin of the bacteria and determine whether the bacteria represented potential threats to human health. The identity of bacteria was investigated using reverse line blot (RLB) assays based on 28 different rDNA probes designed to detect known pathogens of sepsis, as well as by sequencing 23S rDNA from isolates and performing VITEK identification of several isolates. Based on the identities of bacteria in divers' rinse tanks, many likely originate from the ocean, and others likely originate from the divers themselves. None of the bacteria identified would be considered overt human pathogens. However, some of the bacteria found in the tanks are known to be associated with unsanitary conditions and can cause opportunistic infections, which may pose health problems to some individuals. Rinsing scuba equipment in communal tanks has the potential to transmit disease among some divers. Equipment, especially regulators and masks, should be rinsed/cleaned individually and not be placed in communal tanks.

  5. Antifouling activities of marine bacteria associated with sponge ( Sigmadocia sp.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satheesh, S.; Soniamby, A. R.; Sunjaiy Shankar, C. V.; Mary Josephine Punitha, S.

    2012-09-01

    The present study aimed at assessing the antifouling activity of bacteria associated with marine sponges. A total of eight bacterial strains were isolated from the surface of sponge Sigmadocia sp., of them, SS02, SS05 and SS06 showed inhibitory activity against biofilm-forming bacteria. The extracts of these 3 strains considerably affected the extracellular polymeric substance producing ability and adhesion of biofilm-forming bacterial strains. In addition to disc diffusion assay, microalgal settlement assay was carried out with the extracts mixed with polyurethane wood polish and coated onto stainless steel coupons. The extract of strain SS05 showed strong microalgal settlement inhibitory activity. Strain SS05 was identified as Bacillus cereus based on its 16S rRNA gene. Metabolites of the bacterial strains associated with marine invertebrates promise to be developed into environment-friendly antifouling agents.

  6. Triblock Terpolymers by Simultaneous Tandem Block Polymerization (STBP).

    PubMed

    Freudensprung, Ines; Klapper, Markus; Müllen, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    A route of synthesizing triblock terpolymers in a one-pot, "one-step" polymerization approach is presented. The combination of two distinct polymerization techniques through orthogonal catalyst/initiator functionalities attached to a polymeric linker furnishes novel pathways to ABC-terpolymers. Both polymerizations have to be compatible regarding mechanisms, chosen monomers, and solvents. Here, an α,ω-heterobifunctional poly(ethylene glycol) serves as poly-meric catalyst/initiator to obtain triblock terpolymers of poly(norbornene)-b-poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-lactic acid) PNB-PEG-PLLA via simultaneous ring opening metathesis poly-merization and ring opening polymerization in a fast one-pot polymerization. Structural characterization of the polymers is provided via (1)H-, DOSY-, and (1)H,(1)H-COSY-NMR, while solution and thin film self-assembly are investigated by dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy.

  7. Polymerization Initiated at the Sidewalls of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.; Hudson, Jared L.

    2011-01-01

    A process has been developed for growing polymer chains via anionic, cationic, or radical polymerization from the side walls of functionalized carbon nanotubes, which will facilitate greater dispersion in polymer matrices, and will greatly enhance reinforcement ability in polymeric material.

  8. Method of Making Thermally Stable, Piezoelectric and Proelectric Polymeric Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joycelyn O. (Inventor); St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate was prepared. This thermally stable, piezoelectric and pyroelectric polymeric substrate may be used to prepare electromechanical transducers, thermomechanical transducers, accelerometers, acoustic sensors, infrared sensors, pressure sensors, vibration sensors, impact sensors. in-situ temperature sensors, in-situ stress/strain sensors, micro actuators, switches, adjustable fresnel lenses, speakers, tactile sensors, weather sensors, micro positioners, ultrasonic devices, power generators, tunable reflectors, microphones, and hydrophones. The process for preparing these polymeric substrates includes: providing a polymeric substrate having a softening temperature greater than 100 C; depositing a metal electrode material onto the polymer film; attaching a plurality of electrical leads to the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate; heating the metal electrode coated polymeric substrate in a low dielectric medium: applying a voltage to the heated metal electrode coated polymeric substrate to induce polarization; and cooling the polarized metal electrode coated polymeric electrode while maintaining a constant voltage.

  9. Impregnated metal-polymeric functional beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Volksen, Willi (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Amine containing polymeric microspheres such as polyvinyl pyridine are complexed with metal salts or acids containing metals such as gold, platinum or iron. After reduction with sodium borohydride, the salt is reduced to finely divided free metal or metal oxides, useful as catalysts. Microspheres containing covalent bonding sites can be used for labeling or separating proteins.

  10. Impregnated metal-polymeric functional beads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Volksen, Willi (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Amine containing polymeric microspheres such as polyvinyl pyridine are complexed with metal salts or acids containing metals such as gold, platinum or iron. After reduction with sodium borohydride, the salt is reduced to finely divided free metal or metal oxides, useful as catalysts. Microspheres containing covalent bonding sites can be used for labeling or separating proteins.

  11. Next-generation polymeric photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.; Shacklette, Lawrence W.; Norwood, Robert A.; Yardley, James T.

    1997-07-01

    A versatile polymeric waveguide technology is proposed for low-cost high-performance photonic devices that address the needs of both the telecom and the datacom industries. We have developed advanced organic polymeric materials that can be readily made into both multimode and single-mode optical waveguide structures of controlled numerical aperture and geometry. These materials are formed from highly-crosslinked acrylate monomers with specific linkages that determine properties such as flexibility, toughness, loss, and stability with temperature and humidity. These monomers are intermiscible, providing for precise adjustment of the refractive index from 1.3 to 1.6. Waveguides are formed photolithographically, with the liquid monomer mixture polymerizing upon illumination in the UV via either mask exposure or laser direct-writing. A wide range of rigid and flexible substrates can be used, including glass, quartz, oxidized silicon, glass-filled epoxy printed circuit board substrate, and flexible polyimide film. We discuss the use of these materials on chips, on multi-chip modules, on boards, and on backplanes. Light coupling from and to chips is achieved by cutting 45 degree(s) mirrors using excimer laser ablation. Fabrication of the planar polymeric structures directly on the modules provides for stability, ruggedness, and hermeticity in packaging.

  12. Composite polymeric/ceramic pervaporation membrane reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Tsotsis, T.T.

    1995-12-01

    We have investigated the preparation of composite polymeric/ceramic membranes. We have studied the effect of the preparation techniques on the properties of these composite membranes. A model has been developed to describe the transport characteristics. We have used these membranes in pervaporation membrane reactor applications. Our experimental data and modeling results will be presented.

  13. Remendable Polymeric Materials Using Reversible Covalent Bonds

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    Novel Polymeric Dienes and Dienophiles: Synthesis of Reversibly Cross- Linked Elastomers . Macromolecules, 35, 7246- 7253. Goiti, E., M. Huglin, and J...Materials and Nanotechnology in Engineering. Edited by Du, 6423, 112. Liu, Y., and Y. Chen, 2007: Thermally Reversible Cross- Linked Polyamides with...High Toughness and Self- Repairing Ability from Maleimide- and Furan- Functionalized Aromatic Polyamides . Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics, 208

  14. Thermodynamics of glass forming polymeric melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Prapti B.; Patel, Ashmi T.; Pratap, Arun

    2013-06-01

    The temperature dependence of the Gibbs free energy difference (ΔG) between the under cooled melt and the corresponding equilibrium solid has been analyzed for two samples of glass forming polymeric melts; polyamid-6 (PA-6), polypropylene oxide (PPO) in the entire temperature range: i.e. Tm (melting temperature) to Tg (glass transition temperature).

  15. Bioactive Polymeric Materials for Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bienek, Diane R.; Tutak, Wojtek; Skrtic, Drago

    2017-01-01

    Bioactive polymeric materials based on calcium phosphates have tremendous appeal for hard tissue repair because of their well-documented biocompatibility. Amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)-based ones additionally protect against unwanted demineralization and actively support regeneration of hard tissue minerals. Our group has been investigating the structure/composition/property relationships of ACP polymeric composites for the last two decades. Here, we present ACP’s dispersion in a polymer matrix and the fine-tuning of the resin affects the physicochemical, mechanical, and biological properties of ACP polymeric composites. These studies illustrate how the filler/resin interface and monomer/polymer molecular structure affect the material’s critical properties, such as ion release and mechanical strength. We also present evidence of the remineralization efficacy of ACP composites when exposed to accelerated acidic challenges representative of oral environment conditions. The utility of ACP has recently been extended to include airbrushing as a platform technology for fabrication of nanofiber scaffolds. These studies, focused on assessing the feasibility of incorporating ACP into various polymer fibers, also included the release kinetics of bioactive calcium and phosphate ions from nanofibers and evaluate the biorelevance of the polymeric ACP fiber networks. We also discuss the potential for future integration of the existing ACP scaffolds into therapeutic delivery systems used in the precision medicine field. PMID:28134776

  16. Personal Cooling Fabric Based on Polymeric Thermoelectrics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-28

    organic polymers points to a spectrum of applications in which electrically powered cooling is required. Additionally, further materials development...cooling fabric could be developed. Organic polymers offer a light weight, environmentally friendly, and low cost alternative to the widely used...in a personal cooling fabric based on conductive polymeric or low molecular weight organic materials as a light weight, environmentally friendly

  17. The Morphology of Emulsion Polymerized Latex Particles

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wignall, G. D.; Ramakrishnan, V. R.; Linne, M. A.; Klein, A.; Sperling, L. H.; Wai, M. P.; Gelman, R. A.; Fatica, M. G.; Hoerl, R. H.; Fisher, L. W.

    1987-11-01

    Under monomer starved feed conditions, emulsion polymerization of perdeuterated methyl methacrylate and styrene in the presence of preformed polymethylmethacrylate latexes resulted in particles with a core-shell morphology, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis for a hollow sphere. The locus of polymerization of the added deuterated monomer is therefore at the particle surface. In similar measurements a statistical copolymer of styrene and methyl methacrylate was used as seed particles for further polymerization of trideuteromethyl methacrylate. The resulting polymer latex was again shown to have a core-shell morphological structure as determined by SANS. SANS experiments were also undertaken on polystyrene latexes polymerized by equilibrium swelling methods, with deuterated polymer forming the first or second step. The experiments covered a molecular weight range of 6 x 10{sup 4} 10{sup 6} the molecular weights are consistent with the experimental errors, indicating that the deuterium labeled molecules are randomly distributed in the latex. These results led to the finding that the polymer chains were constrained in the latex particles by factors of 2 to 4 from the relaxed coil dimensions. For M < 10{sup 6} g/mol SANS gave zero angle scattering intensities much higher than expected on the basis of a random distribution of labeled molecules. Several models were examined, including the possible development of core-shell structures at lower molecular weights.

  18. Kinetics of crosslinking in emulsion polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Ghielmi, A.; Fiorentino, S.; Morbidelli, M.

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical model for evaluating the chain length distribution of nonlinear polymers produced in emulsions is presented. The heterogeneous emulsion polymerization process is described. The aim of the analysis is the distribution of active polymer chains and pairs of chains with a given growth time in latex particles in state.

  19. Polymerization Mechanism of α-Linear Olefin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Wen-guo; Zhang, Chang-qiao; Yu, Ping; Liu, Cheng-bu; Wei, Yun-he

    2010-02-01

    The density functional theory on the level of B3LYP/6-31G was empolyed to study the chain growth mechanism in polymerization process of α-linear olefin in TiCl3/AlEt2Cl catalytic system to synthesize drag reduction agent. Full parameter optimization without symmetry restrictions for reactants, products, the possible transition states, and intermediates was calculated. Vibration frequency was analyzed for all of stagnation points on the potential energy surface at the same theoretical level. The internal reaction coordinate was calculated from the transition states to reactants and products respectively. The results showed as follows: (i) Coordination compounds were formed on the optimum configuration of TiCl3/AlEt2Cl. (ii) The transition states were formed. The energy difference between transition states and the coordination compounds was 40.687 kJ/mol. (iii) Double bond opened and Ti-C(4) bond fractured, and the polymerization was completed. The calculation results also showed that the chain growth mechanism did not essentially change with the increase of carbon atom number of α-linear olefin. From the relationship between polymerization activation energy and carbon atom number of the α-linear olefin, it can be seen that the α-linear olefin monomers with 6-10 carbon atoms had low activation energy and wide range. It was optimum to synthesize drag reduction agent by polymerization.

  20. Modeling the free radical polymerization of acrylates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günaydin, Hakan; Salman, Seyhan; Tüzün, Nurcan Şenyurt; Avci, Duygu; Aviyente, Viktorya

    Acrylates have gained importance because of their ease of conversion to high-molecular-weight polymers and their broad industrial use. Methyl methacrylate (MMA) is a well-known monomer for free radical polymerization, but its α-methyl substituent restricts the chemical modification of the monomer and therefore the properties of the resulting polymer. The presence of a heteroatom in the methyl group is known to increase the polymerizability of MMA. Methyl α-hydroxymethylacrylate (MHMA), methyl α-methoxymethylacrylate (MC1MA), methyl α-acetoxymethylacrylate (MAcMA) show even better conversions to high-molecular-weight polymers than MMA. In contrast, the polymerization rate is known to decrease as the methyl group is replaced by ethyl in ethyl α-hydroxymethylacrylate (EHMA) and t-butyl in t-butyl α-hydroxymethylacrylate (TBHMA). In this study, quantum mechanical tools (B3LYP/6-31G*) have been used in order to understand the mechanistic behavior of the free radical polymerization reactions of acrylates. The polymerization rates of MMA, MHMA, MC1MA, MAcMA, EHMA, TBHMA, MC1AN (α-methoxymethyl acrylonitrile), and MC1AA (α-methoxymethyl acrylic acid) have been evaluated and rationalized. Simple monomers such as allyl alcohol (AA) and allyl chloride (AC) have also been modeled for comparative purposes.

  1. The morphology of emulsion polymerized latex particles

    SciTech Connect

    Wignall, G.D.; Ramakrishnan, V.R.; Linne, M.A.; Klein, A.; Sperling, L.H.; Wai, M.P.; Gelman, R.A.; Fatica, M.G.; Hoerl, R.H.; Fisher, L.W.

    1987-11-01

    Under monomer starved feed conditions, emulsion polymerization of perdeuterated methyl methacrylate and styrene in the presence of preformed polymethylmethacrylate latexes resulted in particles with a core-shell morphology, as determined by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis for a hollow sphere. The locus of polymerization of the added deuterated monomer is therefore at the particle surface. In similar measurements a statistical copolymer of styrene and methyl methacrylate was used as seed particles for further polymerization of trideuteromethyl methacrylate. The resulting polymer latex was again shown to have a core-shell morphological structre as determined by SANS. SANS experiments were also undertaken on polystyrene latexes polymerized by equilibrium swelling methods, with deuterated polymer forming the first or second step. The experiments covered a molecular weight range of 6 x 10/sup 4/ < M < 6 x 10/sup 6/ g/mol. For M > 10/sup 6/ the molecular weights are consistent with the experimental errors, indicating that the deuterium labeled molecules are randomly distributed in the latex. These results led to the finding that the polymer chains were constrained in the latex particles by factors of 2 to 4 from the relaxed coil dimensions. For M < 10/sup 6/ g/mol SANS gave zero angle scattering intensities much higher than expected on the basis of a random distribution of labeled molecules. Several models were examined, including the possible development of core-shell structures at lower molecular weights. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Polymeric Electrolytic Hygrometer For Harsh Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D.; Shakkottai, Parthasarathy; Venkateshan, Shakkottai P.

    1989-01-01

    Design of polymeric electrolytic hygrometer improved to meet need for reliable measurements of relative humidity in harsh environments of pulpmills and papermills. Redesigned sensor head features shorter, more-rigidly-held sensing element, less vulnerable than previous version to swell and loss of electrical contact. Useful for control of batch dryers in food and pharmaceutical industries.

  3. Polymerization of epoxidized triglycerides with fluorosulfonic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of triglycerides as agri-based renewable raw materials for the development of new products is highly desirable in view of uncertain future petroleum prices. A new method of polymerizing epoxidized soybean oil has been devised with the use of fluorosulfonic acid. Depending on the reaction con...

  4. Reanimation of Ancient Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeland, Russell H.

    2009-01-09

    Recent highly publicized experiments conducted on salt crystals taken from the Permian Salado Formation in Southeastern New Mexico have shown that some ancient crystals contain viable microorganisms trapped within fluid inclusions. Stringent geological and microbiological selection criteria were used to select crystals and conduct all sampling. This talk will focus on how each of these lines of data support the conclusion that such isolated bacteria are as old as the rock in which they are trapped. In this case, the isolated microbes are salt tolerant bacilli that grow best in media containing 8% NaCl, and respond to concentrated brines by forming spores. One of the organisms is phylogenetically related to several bacilli, but does have several unique characteristics. This talk will trace the interdisciplinary data and procedures supporting these discoveries, and describe the various isolated bacteria.

  5. Reanimation of Ancient Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Vreeland, Russell H.

    2002-01-09

    Recent highly publicized experiments conducted on salt crystals taken from the Permian Salado Formation in Southeastern New Mexico have shown that some ancient crystals contain viable microorganisms trapped within fluid inclusions. Stringent geological and microbiological selection criteria were used to select crystals and conduct all sampling. This talk will focus on how each of these lines of data support the conclusion that such isolated bacteria are as old as the rock in which they are trapped. In this case, the isolated microbes are salt tolerant bacilli that grow best in media containing 8% NaCl, and respond to concentrated brines by forming spores. One of the organisms is phylogenetically related to several bacilli, but does have several unique characteristics. This talk will trace the interdisciplinary data and procedures supporting these discoveries, and describe the various isolated bacteria.

  6. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  7. A simple polymeric model describes cell nuclear mechanical response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward; Stephens, Andrew; Marko, John

    The cell nucleus must continually resist inter- and intracellular mechanical forces, and proper mechanical response is essential to basic cell biological functions as diverse as migration, differentiation, and gene regulation. Experiments probing nuclear mechanics reveal that the nucleus stiffens under strain, leading to two characteristic regimes of force response. This behavior depends sensitively on the intermediate filament protein lamin A, which comprises the outer layer of the nucleus, and the properties of the chromatin interior. To understand these mechanics, we study a simulation model of a polymeric shell encapsulating a semiflexible polymer. This minimalistic model qualitatively captures the typical experimental nuclear force-extension relation and observed nuclear morphologies. Using a Flory-like theory, we explain the simulation results and mathematically estimate the force-extension relation. The model and experiments suggest that chromatin organization is a dominant contributor to nuclear mechanics, while the lamina protects cell nuclei from large deformations.

  8. Computation by Bacteria

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-03

    inversion symmetry and time reversal symmetry by dissipat - ing energy , and breaking both these symmetries allows ratcheting. The ability of...durations. All of these devices take advantage of the conversion of chemical energy into propulsion that occurs within bacteria. These devices break spatial...micromachines relying on energy that microorganisms would dissipate “anyway” even in the absence of ratchet structures suggests that researchers could

  9. TRANSITION METAL CATALYSIS IN CONTROLLED RADICAL POLYMERIZATION: ATOM TRANSFER RADICAL POLYMERIZATION. (R826735)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Novel and diversified macromolecular structures, which include polymers with designed topologies (top), compostions (middle), and functionalities (bottom), can be prepared by atom transfer radical polymerization processes. These polymers can be synthesized from a large variety of...

  10. Biocide tolerance in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ortega Morente, Elena; Fernández-Fuentes, Miguel Angel; Grande Burgos, Maria José; Abriouel, Hikmate; Pérez Pulido, Rubén; Gálvez, Antonio

    2013-03-01

    Biocides have been employed for centuries, so today a wide range of compounds showing different levels of antimicrobial activity have become available. At the present time, understanding the mechanisms of action of biocides has also become an important issue with the emergence of bacterial tolerance to biocides and the suggestion that biocide and antibiotic resistance in bacteria might be linked. While most of the mechanisms providing antibiotic resistance are agent specific, providing resistance to a single antimicrobial or class of antimicrobial, there are currently numerous examples of efflux systems that accommodate and, thus, provide tolerance to a broad range of structurally unrelated antimicrobials, both antibiotics and biocides. If biocide tolerance becomes increasingly common and it is linked to antibiotic resistance, not only resistant (even multi-resistant) bacteria could be passed along the food chain, but also there are resistance determinants that can spread and lead to the emergence of new resistant microorganisms, which can only be detected and monitored when the building blocks of resistance traits are understood on the molecular level. This review summarizes the main advances reached in understanding the mechanism of action of biocides, the mechanisms of bacterial resistance to both biocides and antibiotics, and the incidence of biocide tolerance in bacteria of concern to human health and the food industry.

  11. How honey kills bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kwakman, Paulus H S; te Velde, Anje A; de Boer, Leonie; Speijer, Dave; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M J E; Zaat, Sebastian A J

    2010-07-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria tested, including Bacillus subtilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli, ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium, were killed by 10-20% (v/v) honey, whereas > or = 40% (v/v) of a honey-equivalent sugar solution was required for similar activity. Honey accumulated up to 5.62 +/- 0.54 mM H(2)O(2) and contained 0.25 +/- 0.01 mM methylglyoxal (MGO). After enzymatic neutralization of these two compounds, honey retained substantial activity. Using B. subtilis for activity-guided isolation of the additional antimicrobial factors, we discovered bee defensin-1 in honey. After combined neutralization of H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1, 20% honey had only minimal activity left, and subsequent adjustment of the pH of this honey from 3.3 to 7.0 reduced the activity to that of sugar alone. Activity against all other bacteria tested depended on sugar, H(2)O(2), MGO, and bee defensin-1. Thus, we fully characterized the antibacterial activity of medical-grade honey.

  12. Mitochondria: a target for bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lobet, Elodie; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Arnould, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells developed strategies to detect and eradicate infections. The innate immune system, which is the first line of defence against invading pathogens, relies on the recognition of molecular patterns conserved among pathogens. Pathogen associated molecular pattern binding to pattern recognition receptor triggers the activation of several signalling pathways leading to the establishment of a pro-inflammatory state required to control the infection. In addition, pathogens evolved to subvert those responses (with passive and active strategies) allowing their entry and persistence in the host cells and tissues. Indeed, several bacteria actively manipulate immune system or interfere with the cell fate for their own benefit. One can imagine that bacterial effectors can potentially manipulate every single organelle in the cell. However, the multiple functions fulfilled by mitochondria especially their involvement in the regulation of innate immune response, make mitochondria a target of choice for bacterial pathogens as they are not only a key component of the central metabolism through ATP production and synthesis of various biomolecules but they also take part to cell signalling through ROS production and control of calcium homeostasis as well as the control of cell survival/programmed cell death. Furthermore, considering that mitochondria derived from an ancestral bacterial endosymbiosis, it is not surprising that a special connection does exist between this organelle and bacteria. In this review, we will discuss different mitochondrial functions that are affected during bacterial infection as well as different strategies developed by bacterial pathogens to subvert functions related to calcium homeostasis, maintenance of redox status and mitochondrial morphology.

  13. Denitrification by extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extremely halophilic bacteria were isolated from widely separated sites by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. The anaerobic growth of several of these isolates was accompanied by the production of nitrite, nitrous oxide, and dinitrogen. These results are a direct confirmation of the existence of extremely halophilic denitrifying bacteria, and suggest that such bacteria may be common inhabitants of hypersaline environments.

  14. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet activator for polymerization is a device that...

  15. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet activator for polymerization is a device that...

  16. 21 CFR 872.6070 - Ultraviolet activator for polymerization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. 872.6070... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6070 Ultraviolet activator for polymerization. (a) Identification. An ultraviolet activator for polymerization is a device that...

  17. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  18. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  19. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  20. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  1. 21 CFR 870.3650 - Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. 870.3650 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3650 Pacemaker polymeric mesh bag. (a) Identification. A pacemaker polymeric mesh bag is an implanted device used to hold...

  2. Free heme and sickle hemoglobin polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Veselina V.

    This work investigates further the mechanism of one of the most interesting of the protein self-assembly systems---the polymerization of sickle hemoglobin and the role of free heme in it. Polymerization of sickle hemoglobin is the primary event in the pathology of a chronic hemolytic condition called sickle cell anemia with complex pathogenesis, unexplained variability and symptomatic treatment. Auto-oxidation develops in hemoglobin solutions exposed to room temperature and causes release of ferriheme. The composition of such solutions is investigated by mass spectrometry. Heme dimers whose amount corresponds to the initial amounts of heme released from the protein are followed. Differences in the dimer peak height are established for hemoglobin variants A, S and C and depending on the exposure duration. The effects of free heme on polymerization kinetics are studied. Growth rates and two characteristic parameters of nucleation are measured for stored Hb S. After dialysis of polymerizing solutions, no spherulites are detected at moderately high supersaturation and prolonged exposure times. The addition of 0.16-0.26 mM amounts of heme to dialyzed solutions leads to restoration of polymerization. The measured kinetic parameters have higher values compared to the ones before dialysis. The amount of heme in non-dialyzed aged solution is characterized using spectrophotometry. Three methods are used: difference in absorbance of dialyzed and non-dialyzed solutions, characteristic absorbance of heme-albumin complex and absorbance of non-dialyzed solutions with added potassium cyanide. The various approaches suggest the presence of 0.12 to 0.18 mM of free ferriheme in such solutions. Open questions are whether the same amounts of free heme are present in vivo and whether the same mechanism operates intracellulary. If the answer to those questions is positive, then removal of free heme from erythrocytes can influence their readiness to sickle.

  3. Polymerization by classical and frustrated Lewis pairs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Eugene Y-X

    2013-01-01

    Main-group classical and frustrated Lewis pairs (CLPs and FLPs) comprising strong Lewis acids (LAs) and strong Lewis bases (LBs) are highly active for polymerization of conjugated polar alkenes, affording typically high molecular weight polymers with relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. Especially effective systems are the Lewis pairs (LPs) consisting of the strong LA Al(C6F5)3 and strong LBs, such as achiral phosphines and chiral chelating diphosphines, N-heterocyclic carbenes, and phosphazene superbases, for polymerization of methacrylates and acrylamides as well as renewable α-methylene-γ-butyrolactones. Chain initiation involves cooperative addition of LPs to the monomer to generate zwitterionic active species, and chain propagation proceeds via a bimetallic, activated-monomer addition mechanism. Transition metal nucleophile/electrophile pairs comprising neutral metallocene bis(ester enolate)s and strong LAs E(C6F5)3 (E = Al, B) generate two drastically different polymerization systems, depending on the LA. With E = Al, catalyst activation and chain initiating events lead to dually active ion-pairs, thereby effecting ion-pairing polymerization that affords polymers with unique stereo-multiblock microstructures. With E = B, on the other hand, the FLP-induced catalyst activation generates metallacyclic cations paired with the hydridoborate anion [HB(C6F5)3](-); uniquely, such ion-pairs effect catalytic polymerization of conjugated polar alkenes by an H-shuttling mechanism, with the cation catalyzing chain growth and the anion promoting chain transfer by shuttling the hydride between the cation and anion centers through the neutral borane.

  4. Lactic acid bacteria as probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ljungh, Asa; Wadström, Torkel

    2006-09-01

    A number of Lactobacillus species, Bifidobacterium sp, Saccharomyces boulardii, and some other microbes have been proposed as and are used as probiotic strains, i.e. live microorganisms as food supplement in order to benefit health. The health claims range from rather vague as regulation of bowel activity and increasing of well-being to more specific, such as exerting antagonistic effect on the gastroenteric pathogens Clostridium difficile, Campylobacter jejuni, Helicobacter pylori and rotavirus, neutralising food mutagens produced in colon, shifting the immune response towards a Th2 response, and thereby alleviating allergic reactions, and lowering serum cholesterol (Tannock, 2002). Unfortunately, most publications are case reports, uncontrolled studies in humans, or reports of animal or in vitro studies. Whether or not the probiotic strains employed shall be of human origin is a matter of debate but this is not a matter of concern, as long as the strains can be shown to survive the transport in the human gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to colonise the human large intestine. This includes survival in the stressful environment of the stomach - acidic pH and bile - with induction of new genes encoding a number of stress proteins. Since the availability of antioxidants decreases rostrally in the GI tract production of antioxidants by colonic bacteria provides a beneficial effect in scavenging free radicals. LAB strains commonly produce antimicrobial substance(s) with activity against the homologous strain, but LAB strains also often produce microbicidal substances with effect against gastric and intestinal pathogens and other microbes, or compete for cell surface and mucin binding sites. This could be the mechanism behind reports that some probiotic strains inhibit or decrease translocation of bacteria from the gut to the liver. A protective effect against cancer development can be ascribed to binding of mutagens by intestinal bacteria, reduction of the enzymes beta

  5. Simple and Rapid Method for Detecting Biofilm Forming Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vipin Chandra; Prakash, Jyotsana; Koul, Shikha; Ray, Subhasree

    2017-03-01

    Biofilm forming bacteria play a vital role in causing infectious diseases and for enhancing the efficiency of the bioremediation process through immobilization. Different media and conditions have been reported for detecting biofilm forming bacteria, however, they are not quite rapid. Here, we propose the use of a simple medium which can be used for detecting biofilm former, and also provide a mechanism to regulate the expression of biofilm formation process.

  6. Neurite outgrowth is driven by actin polymerization even in the presence of actin polymerization inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Jonathan X.; Efimova, Nadia; Svitkina, Tatyana M.

    2016-01-01

    Actin polymerization is a universal mechanism to drive plasma membrane protrusion in motile cells. One apparent exception to this rule is continuing or even accelerated outgrowth of neuronal processes in the presence of actin polymerization inhibitors. This fact, together with the key role of microtubule dynamics in neurite outgrowth, led to the concept that microtubules directly drive plasma membrane protrusion either in the course of polymerization or by motor-driven sliding. The possibility that unextinguished actin polymerization drives neurite outgrowth in the presence of actin drugs was not explored. We show that cultured hippocampal neurons treated with cytochalasin D or latrunculin B contained dense accumulations of branched actin filaments at ∼50% of neurite tips at all tested drug concentrations (1–10 μM). Actin polymerization is required for neurite outgrowth because only low concentrations of either inhibitor increased the length and/or number of neurites, whereas high concentrations inhibited neurite outgrowth. Of importance, neurites undergoing active elongation invariably contained a bright F-actin patch at the tip, whereas actin-depleted neurites never elongated, even though they still contained dynamic microtubules. Stabilization of microtubules by Taxol treatment did not stop elongation of cytochalasin–treated neurites. We conclude that actin polymerization is indispensable for neurite elongation. PMID:27682586

  7. Polarity and the diversity of growth mechanisms in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Pamela J.B.; Kysela, David T.; Brun, Yves V.

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial cell growth is a complex process consisting of two distinct phases: cell elongation and septum formation prior to cell division. Although bacteria have evolved several different mechanisms for cell growth, it is clear that tight spatial and temporal regulation of peptidoglycan synthesis is a common theme. In this review, we discuss bacterial cell growth with a particular emphasis on bacteria that utilize tip extension as a mechanism for cell elongation. We describe polar growth among diverse bacteria and consider the advantages and consequences of this mode of cell elongation. PMID:21736947

  8. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  9. Novel polymeric nanoparticles targeting the lipopolysaccharides of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Long, Y; Li, Z; Bi, Q; Deng, C; Chen, Z; Bhattachayya, S; Li, C

    2016-04-11

    Considering outburst of various infectious diseases globally, nanoparticle assisted targeted drug delivery has emerged as a promising strategy that can enhance the therapeutic efficacy and minimize the undesirable side effects of an antimicrobial agents. Molecular imprinting is a newly developed strategy that can synthesize a drug carrier with highly stable ligand-like 'cavity', may serve as a new platform of ligand-free targeted drug delivery systems. In this study, we use the amphiphilic lipopolysaccharides, derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa as imprinting template and obtained an evenly distributed sub-40 nm polymeric nanoparticles by using inverse emulsion method. These molecularly imprinted nanoparticles (MIPNPs) showed specific binding to the lipopolysaccharide as determined by fluorescence polarization and microscale thermophoresis. MIPNPs showed selective recognition of target bacteria as detected by flow cytometry. Additionally, MIPNPs exhibited the in vivo targeting capabilities in both the keratitis model and meningitis model. Moreover, the photosensitizer methylene blue-loaded MIPNPs presented significantly strong inhibition of bacterial Growth, compared to non-imprinted controls for in vitro model of the photodynamic therapy. Our study shows an attempt to design a magic bullet by molecular imprinting that may provide a novel approach to generate synthetic carrier for targeting pathogen and treatment for a variety of infectious human diseases.

  10. Structure, Function, and Assembly of Adhesive Organelles by Uropathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chahales, Peter; Thanassi, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria assemble a wide range of adhesive proteins, termed adhesins, to mediate binding to receptors and colonization of surfaces. For pathogenic bacteria, adhesins are critical for early stages of infection, allowing the bacteria to initiate contact with host cells, colonize different tissues, and establish a foothold within the host. The adhesins expressed by a pathogen are also critical for bacterial-bacterial interactions and the formation of bacterial communities such as biofilms. The ability to adhere to host tissues is particularly important for bacteria that colonize sites such as the urinary tract, where the flow of urine functions to maintain sterility by washing away non-adherent pathogens. Adhesins vary from monomeric proteins that are directly anchored to the bacterial surface to polymeric, hairlike fibers that extend out from the cell surface. These latter fibers are termed pili or fimbriae, and were among the first identified virulence factors of uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Studies since then have identified a range of both pilus and non-pilus adhesins that contribute to bacterial colonization of the urinary tract, and have revealed molecular details of the structures, assembly pathways, and functions of these adhesive organelles. In this review, we describe the different types of adhesins expressed by both Gram-negative and Gram-positive uropathogens, what is known about their structures, how they are assembled on the bacterial surface, and the functions of specific adhesins in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections. PMID:26542038

  11. Pathophysiological Effects of Synthetic Derivatives of Polymeric Alkylpyridinium Salts from the Marine Sponge, Reniera sarai

    PubMed Central

    Grandič, Marjana; Frangež, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric 3-alkylpyridinium salts (poly-APS) are among the most studied natural bioactive compounds extracted from the marine sponge, Reniera sarai. They exhibit a wide range of biological activities, and the most prominent among them are the anti-acetylcholinesterase and membrane-damaging activity. Due to their membrane activity, sAPS can induce the lysis of various cells and cell lines and inhibit the growth of bacteria and fungi. Because of their bioactivity, poly-APS are possible candidates for use in the fields of medicine, pharmacy and industry. Due to the small amounts of naturally occurring poly-APS, methods for the synthesis of analogues have been developed. They differ in chemical properties, such as the degree of polymerization, the length of the alkyl chains (from three to 12 carbon atoms) and in the counter ions present in their structures. Such structurally defined analogues with different chemical properties and degrees of polymerization possess different levels of biological activity. We review the current knowledge of the biological activity and toxicity of synthetic poly-APS analogues, with particular emphasis on the mechanisms of their physiological and pharmacological effects and, in particular, the mechanisms of toxicity of two analogues, APS12-2 and APS3, in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24796301

  12. Nontoxic hydrophilic polymeric nanocomposites containing silver nanoparticles with strong antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Pozdnyakov, Alexander S; Emel'yanov, Artem I; Kuznetsova, Nadezhda P; Ermakova, Tamara G; Fadeeva, Tat'yana V; Sosedova, Larisa M; Prozorova, Galina F

    2016-01-01

    New nontoxic hydrophilic nanocomposites containing metallic silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in a polymer matrix were synthesized by the chemical reduction of silver ions in an aqueous medium. A new nontoxic water soluble copolymer of 1-vinyl-1,2,4-triazole and N-vinylpyrrolidone synthesized by free radical-initiated polymerization was used as a stabilizing agent. Transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption, and thermogravimetric analysis were used to characterize polymeric AgNPs nanocomposites. The results showed that the diameter of the synthesized AgNPs ranged from 2 to 6 nm. The toxicity of the initial copolymer of 1-vinyl-1,2,4-triazole and N-vinylpyrrolidone and its nanocomposite with AgNPs was found to be more than 5,000 mg/kg. The synthesized AgNP polymeric nanocomposite showed significant antimicrobial activity against different strains of Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentrations suppressing the growth of the microorganisms ranged from 0.5 to 8 µg/mL and the minimum bactericidal concentrations ranged from 0.5 to 16 µg/mL. The fabricated AgNP nanocomposites are promising materials for the design of novel nontoxic hydrophilic antiseptics and antimicrobial components for medical purposes.

  13. Living bacteria in silica gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, Nadine; Bouvet, Odile; Noelle Rager, Marie; Roux, Cécile; Coradin, Thibaud; Livage, Jacques

    2002-09-01

    The encapsulation of enzymes within silica gels has been extensively studied during the past decade for the design of biosensors and bioreactors. Yeast spores and bacteria have also been recently immobilized within silica gels where they retain their enzymatic activity, but the problem of the long-term viability of whole cells in an inorganic matrix has never been fully addressed. It is a real challenge for the development of sol-gel processes. Generic tests have been performed to check the viability of Escherichia coli bacteria in silica gels. Surprisingly, more bacteria remain culturable in the gel than in an aqueous suspension. The metabolic activity of the bacteria towards glycolysis decreases slowly, but half of the bacteria are still viable after one month. When confined within a mineral environment, bacteria do not form colonies. The exchange of chemical signals between isolated bacteria rather than aggregates can then be studied, a point that could be very important for 'quorum sensing'.

  14. Dynamic self-assembly of 'living' polymeric chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Binghui; Shi, Yunfeng

    2017-01-01

    We report a dynamic self-assembly system of 'living' polymeric chains sustained by chemistry using reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The linear polymeric chains consist of self-assembled nanoparticles connected by metastable linker molecules. As such, the polymeric chains, once assembled, undergo spontaneous dissociation driven by thermodynamics. However, with a continuous supply of linker molecules and the stored chemical energy therein, the polymeric chains can survive and maintain a steady state averaged chain length. These dynamically self-assembled polymeric chains are analogous to biological systems that both are thermodynamically metastable, yet dynamically stable upon continuous influx of matter and energy.

  15. Mechanisms of Drug Diffusion from Polymeric Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kuldeepak

    1987-09-01

    A detailed mechanistic study of drug diffusion and the factors which influence drug diffusion through polymeric controlled release systems was undertaken to understand drug diffusion through hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymeric systems. The effect of improved aqueous solubility of the salt form (ionizable form) of selected drugs on diffusion through hydrophilic and hydrophobic polymeric membranes was compared to diffusion of the less soluble (unionizable form) of the drugs. Model drugs chosen for these studies were prednisolone, prednisolone phosphate sodium (prednisolone phosphoric acid disodium salt), pilocarpine, pilocarpine hydrochloride, sulfacetamide and sodium sulfacetamide. The hydrophilic polymers were hydrogels of hydroxyethylmethacrylate (PHEMA) and hydrophobic polymers were copolyether-urethane -urea (Biomer) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). Salt forms of the drugs permeated faster than the free forms through the hydrophilic polymers because of higher aqueous solubility. The free forms of the drugs had higher diffusion rates than the salt forms due to increased solubility in the hydrophobic polymers. Drug solubility in polymers and the water fraction of the polymeric membrane were determined to be the primary factors in diffusion through polymeric membranes. Drug aqueous solubility was of secondary importance. Two controlled release systems were then designed to further study drug release. The Biomer and copolymers of polystyrene and PHEMA were chosen as the polymers for the fabrication of the devices. These copolymers incorporated the favorable attributes of hydrophobic and hydrophilic homopolymers into single polymers. Prednisolone was used as a model drug for these studies. The effects of initial drug load, drug loading solvents and the drug polymer interactions on drug release from the devices were then studied. The drug release from these devices increased as the initial drug load increased. Drug loading solvents had a marked effect on drug

  16. Tankyrase Polymerization Is Controlled by Its Sterile Alpha Motif and Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Domains

    PubMed Central

    De Rycker, Manu; Price, Carolyn M.

    2004-01-01

    Tankyrases are novel poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases that have SAM and ankyrin protein-interaction domains. They are found at telomeres, centrosomes, nuclear pores, and Golgi vesicles and have been shown to participate in telomere length regulation. Their other function(s) are unknown, and it has been difficult to envision a common role at such diverse cellular locations. We have shown that tankyrase 1 polymerizes through its sterile alpha motif (SAM) domain to assemble large protein complexes. In vitro polymerization is reversible and still allows interaction with ankyrin-domain binding proteins. Polymerization can also occur in vivo, with SAM-dependent association of overexpressed tankyrase leading to formation of large tankyrase-containing vesicles, disruption of Golgi structure, and inhibition of apical secretion. Finally, tankyrase polymers are dissociated efficiently by poly(ADP-ribosy)lation. This disassembly is prevented by mutation of the PARP domain. Our findings indicate that tankyrase 1 has the unique capacity to promote both assembly and disassembly of large protein complexes. Thus, tankyrases appear to be master scaffolding proteins that regulate the formation of dynamic protein networks at different cellular locations. This implies a common scaffolding function for tankyrases at each location, with specific tankyrase interaction partners conferring location-specific roles to each network, e.g., telomere compaction or regulation of vesicle trafficking. PMID:15509784

  17. Cyclic diguanylate signaling in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Erin B; Tamayo, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The nucleotide second messenger 3'-5' cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a central regulator of the transition between motile and non-motile lifestyles in bacteria, favoring sessility. Most research investigating the functions of c-di-GMP has focused on Gram-negative species, especially pathogens. Recent work in Gram-positive species has revealed that c-di-GMP plays similar roles in Gram-positives, though the precise targets and mechanisms of regulation may differ. The majority of bacterial life exists in a surface-associated state, with motility allowing bacteria to disseminate and colonize new environments. c-di-GMP signaling regulates flagellum biosynthesis and production of adherence factors and appears to be a primary mechanism by which bacteria sense and respond to surfaces. Ultimately, c-di-GMP influences the ability of a bacterium to alter its transcriptional program, physiology and behavior upon surface contact. This review discusses how bacteria are able to sense a surface via flagella and type IV pili, and the role of c-di-GMP in regulating the response to surfaces, with emphasis on studies of Gram-positive bacteria.

  18. Bacteria in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Mullineaux, Conrad W

    2015-02-15

    Even in clonal bacterial cultures, individual bacteria can show substantial stochastic variation, leading to pitfalls in the interpretation of data derived from millions of cells in a culture. In this issue of the Journal of Bacteriology, as part of their study on osmoadaptation in a cyanobacterium, Nanatani et al. describe employing an ingenious microfluidic device that gently cages individual cells (J Bacteriol 197:676-687, 2015, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.02276-14). The device is a welcome addition to the toolkit available to probe the responses of individual cells to environmental cues.

  19. Surface layers of bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, T J; Graham, L L

    1991-01-01

    Since bacteria are so small, microscopy has traditionally been used to study them as individual cells. To this end, electron microscopy has been a most powerful tool for studying bacterial surfaces; the viewing of macromolecular arrangements of some surfaces is now possible. This review compares older conventional electron-microscopic methods with new cryotechniques currently available and the results each has produced. Emphasis is not placed on the methodology but, rather, on the importance of the results in terms of our perception of the makeup and function of bacterial surfaces and their interaction with the surrounding environment. Images PMID:1723487

  20. Prebiotic potential of Agave angustifolia Haw fructans with different degrees of polymerization.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Martínez, José Rodolfo; González-Cervantes, Rina M; Hernández-Gallegos, Minerva Aurora; Mendiola, Roberto Campos; Aparicio, Antonio R Jiménez; Ocampo, Martha L Arenas

    2014-08-19

    Inulin-type fructans are the most studied prebiotic compounds because of their broad range of health benefits. In particular, plants of the Agave genus are rich in fructans. Agave-derived fructans have a branched structure with both β-(2→1) and β-(2→6) linked fructosyl chains attached to the sucrose start unit with a degree of polymerization (DP) of up to 80 fructose units. The objective of this work was to assess the prebiotic potential of three Agave angustifolia Haw fructan fractions (AFF) with different degrees of polymerization. The three fructan fractions were extracted from the agave stem by lixiviation and then purified by ultrafiltration and ion exchange chromatography: AFF1, AFF2 and AFF3 with high (3-60 fructose units), medium (2-40) and low (2-22) DP, respectively. The fructan profile was determined with high-performance anion exchange chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD), which confirmed a branched fructan structure. Structural elucidation was performed by Fourier Transform Infra-Red Spectroscopy. The AFF spectrum shows characteristic fructan bands. The prebiotic effect of these fractions was assessed in vitro through fermentation by Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains. Four growth patterns were observed. Some bacteria did not grow with any of the AFF, while other strains grew with only AFF3. Some bacteria grew according to the molecular weight of the AFF and some grew indistinctly with the three fructan fractions.

  1. Photoinduced Acrylate Polymerization: Unexpected Reduction in Chain Branching.

    PubMed

    Wenn, Benjamin; Reekmans, Gunter; Adriaensens, Peter; Junkers, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The branching stemming from midchain radical formation in n-butyl acrylate polymerization is investigated via melt-state (13) C NMR measurements. The dependence of the degree of branching (DB) on the monomer conversion of the system is examined for photoinduced polymerizations, revealing a steady increase in branching with conversion. For polymerization at moderate light intensities, an increase in branching from 0.03% to 0.37% is observed for polymerizations at 60 °C, which is fivefold below the level of branching observed in thermally initiated polymerizations under otherwise identical reaction conditions. The reason for this overall reduction in branching remains momentarily unclear; yet, a strong dependence of branching on light intensity is observed. While polymerization under a 1 W LED lamp results at almost full monomer conversion in branching degrees of 0.22%, polymerization under a 400 W lamp yields 1.81% of chain branches.

  2. Guanine nucleotide-induced polymerization of actin in electropermeabilized human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The effects of exogenous guanine nucleotides on the polymerization of actin in human neutrophils were tested in an electropermeabilized cell preparation. Close to 40% permeabilization was achieved with a single electric discharge as measured by nucleic acid staining with ethidium bromide or propidium iodide with minimal (less than 2%) release of the cytoplasmic marker lactate dehydrogenase. In addition, electropermeabilized neutrophils retained their capacity to produce superoxide anions and to sustain a polymerization of actin in response to surface-receptor dependent stimuli such as chemotactic factors. Electropermeabilization produced a rapid and transient permeabilization that allowed the entry of guanine nucleotides into the cells. GTP and, to a larger extent, its nonhydrolyzable analog guanosine 5'-O-2- thiotriphosphate (GTP[S]), induced a time- and concentration-dependent polymerization of actin, as determined by increased staining with 7- nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazolylphallacidin. The effects of the aforementioned guanine nucleotides were antagonized by GDP[S], but were insensitive to pertussis toxin. Cholera toxin potentiated to a small degree the amount of actin polymerization induced by GTP[S]. These results provided direct evidence for the involvement of GTP-binding proteins in the regulation of the organization of the cytoskeleton of neutrophils, an event that is of crucial importance to the performance of the defense-oriented functions of these cells. PMID:2768336

  3. Computational modeling of the quorum-sensing network in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenley, Andrew; Banik, Suman; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2007-03-01

    Certain species of bacteria are able produce and sense the concentration of small molecules called autodinducers in order to coordinate gene regulation in response to population density, a process known as ``quorum-sensing''. The resulting regulation of gene expression involves both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators. In particular, the species of bacteria in the Vibrio genus use small RNAs to regulate the master protein controlling the quorum-sensing response (luminescence, biofilm formation, virulence...). We model the network of interactions using a modular approach which provides a quantitative understanding of how signal transduction occurs. The parameters of the input-module are fit to current experimental results allowing for testable predictions to be made for future experiments. The results of our analysis offer a revised perspective on quorum-sensing based regulation.

  4. Simultaneous covalent and noncovalent hybrid polymerizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhilin; Tantakitti, Faifan; Yu, Tao; Palmer, Liam C.; Schatz, George C.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2016-01-01

    Covalent and supramolecular polymers are two distinct forms of soft matter, composed of long chains of covalently and noncovalently linked structural units, respectively. We report a hybrid system formed by simultaneous covalent and supramolecular polymerizations of monomers. The process yields cylindrical fibers of uniform diameter that contain covalent and supramolecular compartments, a morphology not observed when the two polymers are formed independently. The covalent polymer has a rigid aromatic imine backbone with helicoidal conformation, and its alkylated peptide side chains are structurally identical to the monomer molecules of supramolecular polymers. In the hybrid system, covalent chains grow to higher average molar mass relative to chains formed via the same polymerization in the absence of a supramolecular compartment. The supramolecular compartments can be reversibly removed and re-formed to reconstitute the hybrid structure, suggesting soft materials with novel delivery or repair functions.

  5. Polymeric synthesis of silicon carbide with microwaves.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Juan; Urueta, Luis; Valdez, Zarel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is conducting polymeric synthesis with microwaves for producing beta-SiC. A polymeric precursor was prepared by means of hydrolysis and condensation reactions from pheniltrimethoxysilane, water, methanol, ammonium hydroxide and chloride acid. The precursor was placed into a quartz tube in vacuum; pyrolysis was carried out conventionally in a tube furnace, and by microwaves at 2.45 GHz in a multimode cavity. Conventional tests took place in a scheme where temperature was up to 1500 degrees C for 120 minutes. Microwave heating rate was not controlled and tests lasted 60 and 90 minutes, temperature was around 900 degrees C. Products of the pyrolysis were analyzed by means of x-ray diffraction; in the microwave case the diffraction patterns showed a strong background of either very fine particles or amorphous material, then infrared spectroscopy was also employed for confirming carbon bonds. In both processes beta-SiC was found as the only produced carbide.

  6. Therapeutic Strategies Based on Polymeric Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vilos, C.; Velasquez, L. A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of the field of materials science, the ability to perform multidisciplinary scientific work, and the need for novel administration technologies that maximize therapeutic effects and minimize adverse reactions to readily available drugs have led to the development of delivery systems based on microencapsulation, which has taken one step closer to the target of personalized medicine. Drug delivery systems based on polymeric microparticles are generating a strong impact on preclinical and clinical drug development and have reached a broad development in different fields supporting a critical role in the near future of medical practice. This paper presents the foundations of polymeric microparticles based on their formulation, mechanisms of drug release and some of their innovative therapeutic strategies to board multiple diseases. PMID:22665988

  7. All-polymeric control of nanoferronics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Beibei; Li, Huashan; Hall, Asha; Gao, Wenxiu; Gong, Maogang; Yuan, Guoliang; Grossman, Jeffrey; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-12-01

    In the search for light and flexible nanoferronics, significant research effort is geared toward discovering the coexisting magnetic and electric orders in crystalline charge-transfer complexes. We report the first example of multiferroicity in centimeter-sized crystalline polymeric charge-transfer superstructures that grow at the liquid-air interface and are controlled by the regioregularity of the polymeric chain. The charge order-driven ferroic mechanism reveals spontaneous and hysteretic polarization and magnetization at the donor-acceptor interface. The charge transfer and ordering in the ferroic assemblies depend critically on the self-organizing and molecular packing of electron donors and acceptors. The invention described here not only represents a new coupling mechanism of magnetic and electric ordering but also creates a new class of emerging all-organic nanoferronics.

  8. Pressure induced polymerization of fluid ethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scelta, Demetrio; Ceppatelli, Matteo; Bini, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    The spontaneous polymerization of fluid ethylene under high temperature and pressure conditions has been characterized by using FTIR absorption spectroscopy. The fluid has been isobarically heated at pressures ranging between 0.4 and 1.5 GPa by means of a resistively heated membrane diamond anvil cell. Besides tracing the instability boundary for spontaneous polymerization in the fluid, we have also measured the reaction kinetics at 1.5 GPa and temperatures ranging between 340 and 423 K. From the rate constants the activation energy of the overall reaction could be computed, information that joined to the molecularity of the initiation step provides some insight about the reaction mechanism. The polymers recovered from the different reactions have been characterized by FTIR, Raman, and X-ray diffraction revealing in all the cases a crystalline material of astonishing quality, likely related to the growth of the polymer in the hot fluid monomer.

  9. Simultaneous covalent and noncovalent hybrid polymerizations

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Z.; Tantakitti, F.; Yu, T.; Palmer, L. C.; Schatz, G. C.; Stupp, S. I.

    2016-01-28

    Covalent and supramolecular polymers are two distinct forms of soft matter, composed of long chains of covalently and noncovalently linked structural units, respectively. We report a hybrid system formed by simultaneous covalent and supramolecular polymerizations of monomers. The process yields cylindrical fibers of uniform diameter that contain covalent and supramolecular compartments, a morphology not observed when the two polymers are formed independently. The covalent polymer has a rigid aromatic imine backbone with helicoidal conformation, and its alkylated peptide side chains are structurally identical to the monomer molecules of supramolecular polymers. In the hybrid system, covalent chains grow to higher average molar mass relative to chains formed via the same polymerization in the absence of a supramolecular compartment. The supramolecular compartments can be reversibly removed and re-formed to reconstitute the hybrid structure, suggesting soft materials with novel delivery or repair functions.

  10. Durability of Polymeric Glazing and Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, G.; Terwilliger, K.; Bingham, C.; Milbourne, M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Heating and Lighting Program has set the goal of reducing the cost of solar water heating systems by at least 50%. An attractive approach to such large cost reduction is to replace glass and metal parts with less-expensive, lighter-weight, more-integrated polymeric components. The key challenge with polymers is to maintain performance and assure requisite durability for extended lifetimes. The objective of this task is to quantify lifetimes through measurement of the optical and mechanical stability of candidate polymeric glazing and absorber materials. Polycarbonate sheet glazings, as proposed by two industry partners, have been tested for resistance to UV radiation with three complementary methods. Incorporation of a specific 2-mil thick UV-absorbing screening layer results in glazing lifetimes of at least 15 years; improved screens promise even longer lifetimes. Proposed absorber materials were tested for creep and embrittlement under high temperature, and appear adequate for planned ICS absorbers.

  11. Constructing monocrystalline covalent organic networks by polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Daniel; Maris, Thierry; Wuest, James D.

    2013-10-01

    An emerging strategy for making ordered materials is modular construction, which connects preformed molecular subunits to neighbours through interactions of properly selected reactive sites. This strategy has yielded remarkable materials, including metal-organic frameworks joined by coordinative bonds, supramolecular networks linked by strong non-covalent interactions, and covalent organic frameworks in which atoms of carbon and other light elements are bonded covalently. However, the strategy has not yet produced covalently bonded organic materials in the form of large single crystals. Here we show that such materials can result from reversible self-addition polymerizations of suitably designed monomers. In particular, monomers with four tetrahedrally oriented nitroso groups polymerize to form diamondoid azodioxy networks that can be fully characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. This work forges a strong new link between polymer science and supramolecular chemistry by showing how predictably ordered covalent or non-covalent structures can both be built using a single modular strategy.

  12. All-polymeric control of nanoferronics

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Beibei; Li, Huashan; Hall, Asha; Gao, Wenxiu; Gong, Maogang; Yuan, Guoliang; Grossman, Jeffrey; Ren, Shenqiang

    2015-01-01

    In the search for light and flexible nanoferronics, significant research effort is geared toward discovering the coexisting magnetic and electric orders in crystalline charge-transfer complexes. We report the first example of multiferroicity in centimeter-sized crystalline polymeric charge-transfer superstructures that grow at the liquid-air interface and are controlled by the regioregularity of the polymeric chain. The charge order–driven ferroic mechanism reveals spontaneous and hysteretic polarization and magnetization at the donor-acceptor interface. The charge transfer and ordering in the ferroic assemblies depend critically on the self-organizing and molecular packing of electron donors and acceptors. The invention described here not only represents a new coupling mechanism of magnetic and electric ordering but also creates a new class of emerging all-organic nanoferronics. PMID:26824068

  13. Polymeric assemblies for sensitive colorimetric assays

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    The presently claimed invention relates to polymeric assemblies which visibly change color in the presence of analyte. In particular, the presently claimed invention relates to liposomes comprising a plurality of lipid monomers, which comprises a polymerizable group, a hydrophilic head group and a hydrophobic tail group, and one or more ligands. Overall carbon chain length, and polymerizable group positioning on the monomer influence color change sensitivity to analyte concentrations.

  14. INHIBITING THE POLYMERIZATION OF NUCLEAR COOLANTS

    DOEpatents

    Colichman, E.L.

    1959-10-20

    >The formation of new reactor coolants which contain an additive tbat suppresses polymerization of the primary dissoclation free radical products of the pyrolytic and radiation decomposition of the organic coolants is described. The coolants consist of polyphenyls and condensed ring compounds having from two to about four carbon rings and from 0.1 to 5% of a powdered metal hydride chosen from the group consisting of the group IIA and IVA dispersed in the hydrocarbon.

  15. Biologically produced acid precipitable polymeric lignin

    DOEpatents

    Crawford, Don L.; Pometto, III, Anthony L.

    1984-01-01

    A water soluble, acid precipitable polymeric degraded lignin (APPL), having a molecular weight of at least 12,000 daltons, and comprising, by percentage of total weight, at least three times the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acid groups present in native lignin. The APPL may be modified by chemical oxidation and reduction to increase its phenolic hydroxyl content and reduce the number of its antioxidant inhibitory side chains, thereby improving antioxidant properties.

  16. Bimetallic complexes and polymerization catalysts therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Patton, Jasson T.; Marks, Tobin J.; Li, Liting

    2000-11-28

    Group 3-6 or Lanthanide metal complexes possessing two metal centers, catalysts derived therefrom by combining the same with strong Lewis acids, Bronsted acid salts, salts containing a cationic oxidizing agent or subjected to bulk electrolysis in the presence of compatible, inert non-coordinating anions and the use of such catalysts for polymerizing olefins, diolefins and/or acetylenically unsaturated monomers are disclosed.

  17. Supported polymeric liquid membranes for wastewater treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.V.

    1997-12-31

    The removal or elimination of organic residues from aqueous waste streams represents a major need in the chemical industry. A class of membrane has been developed called supported polymeric liquid membranes capable of removing and concentrating low molecular weight organic compounds from dilute aqueous solutions, especially those that also contain high concentrations of inorganic salts. These membranes are prepared by filling the pores of microfiltration or ultrafiltration membranes with polymeric (oligomeric) liquids having affinity for the organic compounds of interest. With this approach, membrane`s separation characteristics are decoupled from its mechanical stability and depend primarily on the chemical properties of the liquid polymer used. As a result, membranes of diverse separation capabilities can be conveniently prepared using liquid polymers possessing the appropriate functional groups. Physical properties typical of polymeric liquids such as high viscosity, extremely low volatility and insolubility in water contribute to the observed stability of the membranes under broad operating conditions. This membrane process has been successfully applied to several aqueous waste streams. This paper describes the early development activities for treating a waste stream containing a dilute mixture of C2-C6 carboxylic acids. Feasibility testings were initially carried out with flat sheet membranes in a small stirred cell. Scaleup was then conducted using hollow fiber membranes, first with small modules prepared in the laboratory, then with a much larger commercial module. Attractive features of this membrane process include the ability to recover the contaminants in concentrated form for either recycle or more economical disposal, low pressure (ambient) operation, simple scale-up using commercial hollow fiber modules, and ease of in-situ regeneration of the polymeric liquid.

  18. Homogeneous catalysts for stereoregular olefin polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Marks, T.J.; Eisen, M.S.; Giardello, M.A.

    1995-10-03

    The synthesis, and use as precatalysts of chiral organozirconium complexes for olefin polymerization are disclosed, having the structure (C{sub 5}R{prime}{sub 4{minus}x}R*{sub x})A(C{sub 5}R{double_prime}{sub 4{minus}y}R{double_prime}{prime}{sub y})MQ{sub p}, where x and y represent the number of unsubstituted locations on the cyclopentadienyl ring; R{prime}, R{double_prime}, R{double_prime}{prime}, and R* represent substituted and unsubstituted alkyl groups having 1--30 carbon atoms and R* is a chiral ligand; A is a fragment containing a Group 13, 14, 15, or 16 element of the Periodic Table; M is a Group 3, 4, or 5 metal of the Periodic Table; and Q is a hydrocarbyl radical, or halogen radical, with 3{>=}p{>=}0. Related complexes may be prepared by alkylation of the corresponding dichlorides. In the presence of methylalumoxane or triarylborane cocatalysts, these complexes form ``cation-like`` species which are highly active for olefin polymerization. In combination with a Lewis acid cocatalyst, propylene or other {alpha}-olefin polymerization can be effected with very high efficiency and isospecificity. 1 fig.

  19. Homogeneous catalysts for stereoregular olefin polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Marks, T.J.; Eisen, M.S.; Giardello, M.A.

    1994-07-19

    The synthesis, and use as precatalysts of chiral organozirconium complexes for olefin polymerization are disclosed, having the structure (C[sub 5]R[prime][sub 4[minus]x]R*[sub x])-A-(C[sub 5]R[double prime][sub 4[minus]y]R[prime][double prime][sub y])-M-Q[sub p], where x and y represent the number of unsubstituted locations on the cyclopentadienyl ring; R[prime], R[double prime], R[prime][double prime], and R* represent substituted and unsubstituted alkyl groups having 1--30 carbon atoms and R* is a chiral ligand; A is a fragment containing a Group 13, 14, 15, or 16 element of the Periodic Table; M is a Group 3, 4, or 5 metal of the Periodic Table; and Q is a hydrocarbyl radical, or halogen radical, with 3 [<=] p [<=] 0. Related complexes may be prepared by alkylation of the corresponding dichlorides. In the presence of methylalumoxane or triarylborane cocatalysts, these complexes form cation-like'' species which are highly active for olefin polymerization. In combination with a Lewis acid cocatalyst, propylene or other [alpha]-olefin polymerization can be effected with very high efficiency and isospecificity. 1 fig.

  20. Homogeneous catalysts for stereoregular olefin polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Marks, Tobin J.; Eisen, Moris S.; Giardello, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    The synthesis, and use as precatalysts of chiral organozirconium complexes for olefin polymerization are disclosed, having the structure (C.sub.5 R'.sub.4-x R*.sub.x) A (C.sub.5 R".sub.4-y R"'.sub.y) M Q.sub.p, where x and y represent the number of unsubstituted locations on the cyclopentadienyl ring; R', R", R"', and R* represent substituted and unsubstituted alkyl groups having 1-30 carbon atoms and R* is a chiral ligand; A is a fragment containing a Group 13, 14, 15, or 16 element of the Periodic Table; M is a Group 3, 4, or 5 metal of the Periodic Table; and Q is a hydrocarbyl radical, or halogen radical, with 3.ltoreq.p.ltoreq.o. Related complexes may be prepared by alkylation of the corresponding dichorides. In the presence of methylalumoxane or triarylborane cocatalysts, these complexes form "cation-like" species which are highly active for olefin polymerization. In combination with a Lewis acid cocatalyst, propylene or other .alpha.-olefin polymerization can be effected with very high efficiency and isospecificity.