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Sample records for bacterial antigen detection

  1. Bacterial surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies used to detect beer spoilage pediococci.

    PubMed

    Whiting, M S; Ingledew, W M; Lee, S Y; Ziola, B

    1999-08-01

    Fourteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were isolated that react with surface antigens of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms, including P. damnosus, P. pentosaceous, P. acidilactici, and unspeciated isolates. Immunoblotting, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) of protease- and neuraminidase-treated surface antigen extracts, carbohydrate competition EIAs, and cardiolipin EIAs were used to characterize the bacterial antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment or surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. In most cases, the Mabs bind to Pediococcus surface antigens that appear to be covalently bound cell wall polymers resistant to alteration or removal from the bacterial surface. These bacterial surface antigen reactive Mabs show good potential for rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay detection of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms.

  2. Brewing spoilage Lactobacilli detected using monoclonal antibodies to bacterial surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Whiting, M S; Gares, S L; Ingledew, W M; Ziola, B

    1999-01-01

    A panel of thirteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) was assembled that reacts with surface antigens on eight of eleven Lactobacillus brewing spoilage organisms, including one or more of L. brevis, L. buchneri, L. casei-alactosus, L. plantarum, or unspeciated isolate(s). Immunoblotting was done to identify the antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment and by surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. Protease susceptibility of extracted surface antigens was also examined. In most cases, Lactobacillus surface antigens detected by the Mabs appear to be noncovalently bound proteins readily altered or removed from the bacterium by various environmental conditions. This research identifies brewing conditions that need to be tested to ascertain whether bacterial surface antigen-reactive Mabs can be used for the rapid, sensitive, and specific detection of Lactobacillus brewing spoilage organisms.

  3. Use of bacterial antigen detection in the diagnosis of pediatric lower respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, B W; Marcuse, E K; Foy, H M; Cooney, M K; Allan, I; Brewer, D; Smith, A L

    1986-07-01

    Two immunochemical methods were used to identify Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular antigens in the urine and serum of 162 children with acute lower respiratory tract infection. These methods were compared with standard bacterial blood culture. Viral and mycoplasma cultures of respiratory secretions were obtained simultaneously to determine the frequency of antigenuria at the time of nonbacterial acute lower respiratory tract infection. Urine from groups of well children and children with acute otitis media was tested for capsular antigens to determine the incidence of antigenuria. Antigenuria was found in 24% of children 2 months to 18 years of age with acute lower respiratory tract infection compared with a 2% incidence of bacteremia. Antigenuria was found in 4% of asymptomatic children and 16% of children with acute otitis media. One third of children with symptoms of acute lower respiratory tract infection and viral isolates from the oropharynx had bacterial antigenuria. The sixfold increase in frequency of bacterial antigenuria in children at the time of lower respiratory symptoms suggests that bacterial acute lower respiratory tract infection may be more common than identified by traditional culture techniques. Because bacterial antigen may come from other sites such as the middle ear, further studies are needed to determine the role of antigen detection in the diagnosis of pediatric acute lower respiratory tract infection.

  4. Value of bacterial antigen detection in the diagnostic yield of transthoracic needle aspiration in severe community acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Bella, F.; Tort, J.; Morera, M. A.; Espaulella, J.; Armengol, J.

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Transthoracic needle aspiration (TNA) with an ultrathin needle is a safe and highly specific procedure for obtaining a diagnosis in bacterial pneumonias, but its sensitivity is at best 70%. A study was performed to assess whether Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b antigen detection by latex agglutination from the TNA sample enhanced the diagnostic yield. METHODS--Blood cultures, TNA with an ultrathin needle (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination), serological tests, and pneumococcal antigen detection in the urine by counterimmunoelectrophoresis were performed in samples from 18 of 23 consecutive patients with severe community acquired pneumonia. RESULTS--The causative organism was identified in 16 cases (88%): S pneumoniae (10 cases), S pneumoniae plus H influenzae (two cases), Legionella pneumophila (three cases), and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (one case). The investigation of antigens by latex agglutination in the pulmonary aspirate increased the diagnostic yield of TNA from 50% to 78% and provided a rapid diagnosis (in less than two hours) with therapeutic implications in seven cases. Its effectiveness was not modified by prior antibiotic therapy. CONCLUSIONS--A latex agglutination test on the pulmonary aspirate enhances the diagnostic yield of TNA in severe community acquired pneumonia. PMID:8303628

  5. Point-Counterpoint: A Nucleic Acid Amplification Test for Streptococcus pyogenes Should Replace Antigen Detection and Culture for Detection of Bacterial Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Pritt, Bobbi S; Patel, Robin; Kirn, Thomas J; Thomson, Richard B

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have frequently been the standard diagnostic approach when specific infectious agents are sought in a clinic specimen. They can be applied for specific agents such as S. pyogenes, or commercial multiplex NAATs for detection of a variety of pathogens in gastrointestinal, bloodstream, and respiratory infections may be used. NAATs are both rapid and sensitive. For many years, S. pyogenes testing algorithms used a rapid and specific group A streptococcal antigen test to screen throat specimens, followed, in some clinical settings, by a throat culture for S. pyogenes to increase the sensitivity of its detection. Now S. pyogenes NAATs are being used with increasing frequency. Given their accuracy, rapidity, and ease of use, should they replace antigen detection and culture for the detection of bacterial pharyngitis? Bobbi Pritt and Robin Patel of the Mayo Clinic, where S. pyogenes NAATs have been used for well over a decade with great success, will explain the advantages of this approach, while Richard (Tom) Thomson and Tom Kirn of the NorthShore University HealthSystem will discuss their concerns about this approach to diagnosing bacterial pharyngitis. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Antigen detection systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  7. Antigen detection systems

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissue using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular methodology is chosen ...

  8. Use of monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing effects on toxic antigens from human bacterial plaque to detect specific bacteria by colony blotting.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, M; Miller, F C

    1991-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal diseases are provoked by bacteria which adhere to teeth at the gingival margin and form plaques containing toxins detectable by their effect on mammalian cells in culture. The aim of this study was to make toxin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and determine whether they detect antigen in specific oral bacteria. Bacterial plaque was collected from teeth and homogenized, and the fluid phase (plaque extract) was boiled or first fractionated over Sephacryl S-300. Hybridomas from immunized mice secreted immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies which reacted to plaque antigens. Neutralization was detected by an increase in the growth of HL60 cells which were exposed to plaque toxins in the presence of IgM from hybridoma culture or ascitic fluids. However, the neutralization was obvious only when the plaque toxins reduced growth by 50% or less. Plaque toxin preparations were found to contain proteases which hydrolyzed all of the IgM in ascitic fluids within 24 h. Replenishing the IgM daily preserved protection compared with protection from IgM from other hybridomas or saline only. The decrease in the specific activity of plaque proteins caused by replenishing one such antibody (3hE5) was 2.5-fold compared with activity with unreplenished 3hE5, 3.8-fold compared with activity with saline only, and 10.7-fold compared with activity with replenished, unrelated antibody. The neutralizing IgM detected an array of 14,000- to 22,000-molecular-weight antigens. The native toxins may be aggregates of these antigens, or the array may indicate fragments of an undetected, larger antigen or a common, nonpeptide adduct. Only 0.5 to 0.8% of the bacteria from sites with periodontitis and grown on blood agar contained antigen. One group of reactive bacteria was identified as Actinomyces odontolyticus serotype I. Other isolates were identified as Staphylococcus epidermidis, but antigen disappeared from the these isolates within 6 weeks of subculture. Epitope

  9. Optoacoustic sensing of ocular bacterial antigen using targeted gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswadi, Saher; Page, Leland; Woodward, Lee; Glickman, Randolph D.; Barsalou, Norman

    2008-02-01

    Bacterial contamination can be detected using a minimally invasive optical method, based on laser-induced optoacoustic spectroscopy, to probe for specific antigens associated with a specific infectious agent. As a model system, we have used a surface antigen (Ag), isolated from Chlamydia trachomatis, and a complementary antibody (Ab). A preparation of 0.2 mg/ml of monoclonal Ab specific to the C. trachomatis surface Ag was conjugated to gold nanorods using standard commercial reagents, in order to produce a targeted contrast agent with a strong optoacoustic signal. The C. trachomatis Ag was absorbed in standard plastic microwells, and the binding of the complementary Ab-nanorod conjugate was tested in an immunoaffinity assay. Optoacoustic signals were elicited from the bound nanorods, using an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system as the optical pump. The wavelength tuneability of the OPO optimized the spectroscopic measurement by exciting the nanorods at their optical absorption maxima. Optoacoustic responses were measured in the microwells using a probe beam deflection technique. Immunoaffinity assays were performed on several dilutions of purified C. trachomatis antigen ranging from 50 μg/ml to 1 pg/ml, in order to determine the detection limit for the optoacoustic-based assay. Only when the antigen was present, and the complementary Ab-NR reagent was introduced into the microwell, was an enhanced optoacoustic signal obtained, which indicated specific binding of the Ab-NR complex. The limit of detection with the current system design is between 1 and 5 pg/ml of bacterial Ag.

  10. Bacterial vectors for the delivery of tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Toussaint, Bertrand; Le Gouëllec, Audrey

    2014-01-01

    The use of bacterial vectors, which offer ease of production and efficiency, has become an important mechanism for the delivery of protein antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in vivo. Proof of concept studies has been carried out utilizing different bacteria in various cancer models with some in clinical trials. Here we described the way to prepare Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) vaccines based on a virulence-attenuated strain to test the efficacy of different fragments of a well-known tumor antigen. This protocol could be applied to efficacy studies in murine models of human cancers.

  11. House dust mites as potential carriers for IgE sensitization to bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Dzoro, S; Mittermann, I; Resch-Marat, Y; Vrtala, S; Nehr, M; Hirschl, A M; Wikberg, G; Lundeberg, L; Johansson, C; Scheynius, A; Valenta, R

    2017-07-25

    IgE reactivity to antigens from Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is common in patients suffering from respiratory and skin manifestations of allergy, but the routes and mechanisms of sensitization are not fully understood. The analysis of the genome, transcriptome and microbiome of house dust mites (HDM) has shown that Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) species are abundant bacteria within the HDM microbiome. Therefore, our aim was to investigate whether HDM are carriers of bacterial antigens leading to IgE sensitization in patients suffering from atopic dermatitis. Plasma samples from patients with AD (n = 179) were analysed for IgE reactivity to a comprehensive panel of microarrayed HDM allergen molecules and to S. aureus and E. coli by IgE immunoblotting. Antibodies specific for S. aureus and E. coli antigens were tested for reactivity to nitrocellulose-blotted extract from purified HDM bodies, and the IgE-reactive antigens were detected by IgE immunoblot inhibition experiments. IgE antibodies directed to bacterial antigens in HDM were quantified by IgE ImmunoCAP™ inhibition experiments. IgE reactivity to bacterial antigens was significantly more frequent in patients with AD sensitized to HDM than in AD patients without HDM sensitization. S. aureus and E. coli antigens were detected in immune-blotted HDM extract, and the presence of IgE-reactive antigens in HDM was demonstrated by qualitative and quantitative IgE inhibition experiments. House dust mites (HDM) may serve as carriers of bacteria responsible for the induction of IgE sensitization to microbial antigens. © 2017 The Authors. Allergy Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Identification of bacterial antigens and super antigens in synovial fluid of patients with arthritis: a cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Noorbakhsh, Samileh; Talebi-Taher, Mahshid; Tabatabaei, Azardokht

    2013-02-01

    An accurate and prompt diagnosis of bacterial arthritis is essential for earlier treatment and a good outcome. Superantigens produced by Staph. Aureus are among the most lethal toxins. The paper objective was Identification of common bacterial antigens and S.aureus superantigens in synovial fluid (SF) of children with negative culture and direct smear for other bacteria except for S.aureus. In this cross-sectional study a total of 62 patients with a mean age of 11 ± 3.8 years (range: 5 months-16 years) with acute arthritis in pediatric and orthopedic wards of Rasoul Hospital (2008-2010) were studied. Three common bacterial antigens (e.g. S.pneumonia, H.influenza, N. meningitis) using LPA (latex particle antigen) and Staphylococcal superantigens (TSST1; Enterotoxin A; B; C) using ELISA method (ABcam; USA) were identified in 60 adequate SF samples with negative culture and negative direct smears) for other bacteria except for S.aureus. Staphylococcal superantigens were compared with S.aureus infection (positive culture or direct smear). Positive bacterial antigens (LPA test) were found in 4 cases including two S. Pneumonia, one N.meningitis, and one H.influenza. S.aureus was diagnosed in 7 cases including 4 positive cultures and 3 positive smears. Staphylococcal superantigens (toxins) were found in 73% of SF samples. Some cases had 2 or 3 types of toxins. S.aureus toxins were reported in 47% of culture negative SF samples. Positive TSST1, Enterotoxin B, Enterotoxin A, and Enterotoxin C were found in 47% (n= 28), 18% (n= 10), 39% (n= 22), and 39% (n = 21) of cases respectively. The most common type of superantigens was TSST1; and Enterotoxin A was the less common type. Except for Enterotoxin A, no relation between positive S.aureus culture and positive tests for superantigens in SF was found. S.aureus has a prominent role in septic arthritis. S.aureus toxins might have a prominent role in arthritis with negative SF culture. Rapid identification of bacterial antigens

  13. Detection of antigenically distinct rotaviruses from infants.

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, D H; Estes, M K; Rangelova, S M; Shindarov, L M; Melnick, J L; Graham, D Y

    1983-01-01

    Antigenically distinct rotaviruses, i.e., viruses morphologically identical to conventional rotaviruses by electron microscopy, yet lacking the common group antigen(s) detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, were found in 2 of 51 fecal samples from Bulgarian infants with rotavirus gastroenteritis. These antigenically distinct viruses contained 11 segments of double-stranded RNA, but they demonstrated a unique RNA migration profile after electrophoresis of the genome RNA in polyacrylamide gels. This report confirms the presence of a new group of rotaviruses in humans. The significance of these viruses is currently unknown, and specific diagnostic tests must be developed for epidemiological studies to determine their role as human and veterinary pathogens and to evaluate their impact on proposed vaccine development programs. Images PMID:6307873

  14. Preparation of urine samples for use in commercial latex agglutination tests for bacterial antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, G A; Storch, G A

    1985-01-01

    The use of latex agglutination (LA) tests for bacterial antigen detection in urine specimens is hindered by troublesome reactions such as nonspecific agglutination. Therefore, procedures such as boiling or membrane filtration of urine specimens are often used before LA testing. We discovered that the composition of the membrane filter used in filtration has a marked effect on the performance of an LA test used for detection of Haemophilus influenzae type b antigen. False-positive LA reactivity was common in urine specimens from pediatric patients that were processed by membrane filtration through certain filters; furthermore, such reactivity also occurred in LA tests for antigens other than those of H. influenzae. A protein present in urine at low concentrations appeared to be responsible for these phenomena. PMID:3874212

  15. Circulating filarial antigen detection in brugian filariasis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Praveen Kumar; Mahajan, Ramesh Chander; Malla, Nancy; Mewara, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Shailja Misra; Shenoy, Ranganatha Krishna; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2016-03-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a major cause of disability globally. The success of global elimination programmes for LF depends upon effectiveness of tools for diagnosis and treatment. In this study on stage-specific antigen detection in brugian filariasis, L3, adult worm (AW) and microfilarial antigenaemia were detected in around 90-95% of microfilariae carriers (MF group), 50-70% of adenolymphangitis (ADL) patients, 10-25% of chronic pathology (CP) patients and 10-15% of endemic normal (EN) controls. The sensitivity of the circulating filarial antigen (CFA) detection in serum samples from MF group was up to 95%. In sera from ADL patients, unexpectedly, less antigen reactivity was observed. In CP group all the CFA positive individuals were from CP grade I and II only and none from grade III or IV, suggesting that with chronicity the AWs lose fecundity and start to disintegrate and die. Amongst EN subject, 10-15% had CFA indicating that few of them harbour filarial AWs, thus they might not be truly immune as has been conventionally believed. The specificity for antigen detection was 100% when tested with sera from various other protozoan and non-filarial helminthic infections.

  16. Radial immunodiffusion: a simple and rapid method for detection of Marek's disease antigen(s).

    PubMed

    Marquardt, W W

    1972-05-01

    A qualitative radial immunodiffusion technique is described which detects antigen(s) in feathers from live or dead chickens infected with Marek's disease herpesvirus. Antiserum, which is incorporated into a support medium, reacts with antigen(s) in the feather tip producing a radial precipitin ring. Antigen(s) was detected in 93.3% of experimentally inoculated chickens 21 days postinoculation and in 100% of infected birds subsequently tested through 6 weeks. No antigen was detectable in the feathers of uninoculated control chickens. The technique is simple and rapid to perform. Positive tests could be detected after 1 to 2 hours of incubation. Antigen detection by the radial immunodiffusion test correlated well with other criteria of infection. This technique should have application as a laboratory research tool and as an adjunct for a rapid flock diagnosis of Marek's disease.

  17. Bacterial detection: from microscope to smartphone.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, Subash C B; Tang, Thean-Hock; Chen, Yeng; Citartan, Marimuthu; Lakshmipriya, Thangavel

    2014-10-15

    The ubiquitous nature of bacteria enables them to survive in a wide variety of environments. Hence, the rise of various pathogenic species that are harmful to human health raises the need for the development of accurate sensing systems. Sensing systems are necessary for diagnosis and epidemiological control of pathogenic organism, especially in the food-borne pathogen and sanitary water treatment facility' bacterial populations. Bacterial sensing for the purpose of diagnosis can function in three ways: bacterial morphological visualization, specific detection of bacterial component and whole cell detection. This paper provides an overview of the currently available bacterial detection systems that ranges from microscopic observation to state-of-the-art smartphone-based detection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Bacterial Glycoengineered Antigen for Improved Serodiagnosis of Porcine Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Cortina, María E.; Balzano, Rodrigo E.; Rey Serantes, Diego A.; Caillava, Ana J.; Elena, Sebastián; Ferreira, A. C.; Nicola, Ana M.; Ugalde, Juan E.

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis is a highly zoonotic disease that affects animals and human beings. Brucella suis is the etiological agent of porcine brucellosis and one of the major human brucellosis pathogens. Laboratory diagnosis of porcine brucellosis mainly relies on serological tests, and it has been widely demonstrated that serological assays based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide antibodies are the most sensitive tests. Here, we validate a recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide–protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti-O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates (glyco-iELISA). To validate the assay, 563 serum samples obtained from experimentally infected and immunized pigs, as well as animals naturally infected with B. suis biovar 1 or 2, were tested. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and based on this analysis, the optimum cutoff value was 0.56 (relative reactivity), which resulted in a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.7%, respectively. A cutoff value of 0.78 resulted in a test sensitivity of 98.4% and a test specificity of 100%. Overall, our results demonstrate that the glyco-iELISA is highly accurate for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis, improving the diagnostic performance of current serological tests. The recombinant glycoprotein OAg-AcrA can be produced in large homogeneous batches in a standardized way, making it an ideal candidate for further validation as a universal antigen for diagnosis of “smooth” brucellosis in animals and humans. PMID:26984975

  19. A Bacterial Glycoengineered Antigen for Improved Serodiagnosis of Porcine Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Cortina, María E; Balzano, Rodrigo E; Rey Serantes, Diego A; Caillava, Ana J; Elena, Sebastián; Ferreira, A C; Nicola, Ana M; Ugalde, Juan E; Comerci, Diego J; Ciocchini, Andrés E

    2016-06-01

    Brucellosis is a highly zoonotic disease that affects animals and human beings. Brucella suis is the etiological agent of porcine brucellosis and one of the major human brucellosis pathogens. Laboratory diagnosis of porcine brucellosis mainly relies on serological tests, and it has been widely demonstrated that serological assays based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide antibodies are the most sensitive tests. Here, we validate a recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti-O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates (glyco-iELISA). To validate the assay, 563 serum samples obtained from experimentally infected and immunized pigs, as well as animals naturally infected with B. suis biovar 1 or 2, were tested. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and based on this analysis, the optimum cutoff value was 0.56 (relative reactivity), which resulted in a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.7%, respectively. A cutoff value of 0.78 resulted in a test sensitivity of 98.4% and a test specificity of 100%. Overall, our results demonstrate that the glyco-iELISA is highly accurate for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis, improving the diagnostic performance of current serological tests. The recombinant glycoprotein OAg-AcrA can be produced in large homogeneous batches in a standardized way, making it an ideal candidate for further validation as a universal antigen for diagnosis of "smooth" brucellosis in animals and humans.

  20. Detection of O antigens in Escherichia coli

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lipopolysaccharide on the surface of Escherichia coli constitute the O antigens, which are important virulence factors that are targets of both the innate and adaptive immune system and play a major role in host-pathogen interactions. O antigens that are responsible for antigenic specificity of the ...

  1. Enzyme immunoassay for the detection of group A streptococcal antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Knigge, K M; Babb, J L; Firca, J R; Ancell, K; Bloomster, T G; Marchlewicz, B A

    1984-01-01

    A competitive inhibition enzyme immunoassay for the detection of Streptococcus pyogenes directly from throat specimens or from solid bacteriological medium is described. Group A-specific polysaccharide adsorbed onto treated polystyrene beads, in conjunction with rabbit antibody to S. pyogenes, was used to determine the presence of the polysaccharide antigen. Inhibition values in excess of 65% were observed with 10(4) or more CFU of S. pyogenes per test. An inhibition of 25% was demonstrated with as few as 10(3) CFU per test. Heterologous microorganisms tested at 10(6) CFU per test reacted at levels of inhibition less than 25%. Two types of bacterial transport medium and swabs of different fiber compositions did not alter the assay performance. Accurate identification of S. pyogenes was achieved by testing single colonies picked directly from blood agar plates which had been incubated for 18 to 24 h. In addition, the assay was performed on throat specimens from children and adults having pharyngitis. A single-swab, blind study was conducted in which enzyme immunoassay reactivity was compared with results of blood agar culture and bacitracin sensitivity. When there were discordant results, serological identification was used as the confirmatory test. At an optimal cutoff value of 40% inhibition, sensitivity and specificity by enzyme immunoassay were 97.0% and 97.9%, respectively, as compared with confirmed culture results. The assay has an incubation time of 3 h and is a sensitive and specific method for the detection of S. pyogenes antigen. PMID:6386878

  2. An O Antigen Capsule Modulates Bacterial Pathogenesis in Shigella sonnei

    PubMed Central

    Caboni, Mariaelena; Pédron, Thierry; Rossi, Omar; Goulding, David; Pickard, Derek; Citiulo, Francesco; MacLennan, Calman A.; Dougan, Gordon; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Saul, Allan; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Shigella is the leading cause for dysentery worldwide. Together with several virulence factors employed for invasion, the presence and length of the O antigen (OAg) of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a key role in pathogenesis. S. flexneri 2a has a bimodal OAg chain length distribution regulated in a growth-dependent manner, whereas S. sonnei LPS comprises a monomodal OAg. Here we reveal that S. sonnei, but not S. flexneri 2a, possesses a high molecular weight, immunogenic group 4 capsule, characterized by structural similarity to LPS OAg. We found that a galU mutant of S. sonnei, that is unable to produce a complete LPS with OAg attached, can still assemble OAg material on the cell surface, but a galU mutant of S. flexneri 2a cannot. High molecular weight material not linked to the LPS was purified from S. sonnei and confirmed by NMR to contain the specific sugars of the S. sonnei OAg. Deletion of genes homologous to the group 4 capsule synthesis cluster, previously described in Escherichia coli, abolished the generation of the high molecular weight OAg material. This OAg capsule strongly affects the virulence of S. sonnei. Uncapsulated knockout bacteria were highly invasive in vitro and strongly inflammatory in the rabbit intestine. But, the lack of capsule reduced the ability of S. sonnei to resist complement-mediated killing and to spread from the gut to peripheral organs. In contrast, overexpression of the capsule decreased invasiveness in vitro and inflammation in vivo compared to the wild type. In conclusion, the data indicate that in S. sonnei expression of the capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis resulting in balanced capabilities to invade and persist in the host environment. PMID:25794007

  3. Bacterial ghosts as carrier and targeting systems for mucosal antigen delivery.

    PubMed

    Jalava, Katri; Eko, Francis O; Riedmann, Eva; Lubitz, Werner

    2003-02-01

    The application of new strategies to develop effective vaccines is essential in modern medicine. The bacterial ghost system is a novel vaccine delivery system endowed with intrinsic adjuvant properties. Bacterial ghosts are nonliving gram-negative bacterial cell envelopes devoid of cytoplasmic contents while maintaining their cellular morphology and native surface antigenic structures including bioadhesive properties. They are produced by PhiX174 protein E-mediated lysis of gram-negative bacteria. The intrinsic adjuvant properties of bacterial ghost preparations enhance immune responses against envelope-bound antigens, including T-cell activation and mucosal immunity. Since native and foreign antigens can be expressed in the envelope complex of ghosts before E-mediated lysis, multiple antigens of various origin can be presented to the immune system simultaneously. In addition, the extended bacterial ghost system represents a platform technology for specific targeting of DNA-encoded antigens to primary antigen-presenting cells. The potency, safety and relatively low production cost of bacterial ghosts offer a significant technical advantage, especially when used as combination vaccines.

  4. The use of hydrogel microparticles to sequester and concentrate bacterial antigens in a urine test for Lyme disease.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Temple A; Tamburro, Davide; Fredolini, Claudia; Espina, Benjamin H; Lepene, Benjamin S; Ilag, Leopold; Espina, Virginia; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A; Luchini, Alessandra

    2011-02-01

    Hydrogel biomarker capturing microparticles were evaluated as a biomaterial to amplify the sensitivity of urine testing for infectious disease proteins. Lyme disease is a bacterial infection transmitted by ticks. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of Lyme disease reduces complications including arthritis and cardiac involvement. While a urine test is highly desirable for Lyme disease screening, this has been difficult to accomplish because the antigen is present at extremely low concentrations, below the detection limit of clinical immunoassays. N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm)-acrylic acid (AAc) microparticles were covalently functionalized with amine containing dyes via amidation of carboxylic groups present in the microparticles. The dyes act as affinity baits towards protein analytes in solution. NIPAm/AAc microparticles functionalized with acid black 48 (AB48) mixed with human urine, achieved close to one hundred percent capture and 100 percent extraction yield of the target antigen. In urine, microparticles sequestered and concentrated Lyme disease antigens 100 fold, compared to the absence of microparticles, achieving an immunoassay detection sensitivity of 700 pg/mL in 10 mL urine. Antigen present in a single infected tick could be readily detected following microparticle sequestration. Hydrogel microparticles functionalized with high affinity baits can dramatically increase the sensitivity of urinary antigen tests for infectious diseases such as Lyme disease. These findings justify controlled clinical studies evaluating the sensitivity and precision of Lyme antigen testing in urine. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... is a device that employs antibodies for the detection of specific malaria parasite antigens... with malaria infection. The detection of these antigens aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of malaria caused by the four malaria species capable of infecting humans: Plasmodium falciparum,...

  6. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... is a device that employs antibodies for the detection of specific malaria parasite antigens... with malaria infection. The detection of these antigens aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of malaria caused by the four malaria species capable of infecting humans: Plasmodium falciparum,...

  7. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... is a device that employs antibodies for the detection of specific malaria parasite antigens... with malaria infection. The detection of these antigens aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of malaria caused by the four malaria species capable of infecting humans: Plasmodium falciparum,...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... is a device that employs antibodies for the detection of specific malaria parasite antigens... with malaria infection. The detection of these antigens aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of malaria caused by the four malaria species capable of infecting humans: Plasmodium falciparum,...

  9. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... is a device that employs antibodies for the detection of specific malaria parasite antigens... with malaria infection. The detection of these antigens aids in the clinical laboratory diagnosis of malaria caused by the four malaria species capable of infecting humans: Plasmodium falciparum,...

  10. Development of a novel antigen detection test for histoplasmosis.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, B L; Figueroa, J I; Hamilton, A J; Ortiz, B L; Robledo, M A; Restrepo, A; Hay, R J

    1997-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is an important systemic fungal infection, particularly among immunocompromised individuals living or travelling in areas of endemicity, who, without antifungal therapy, may develop a progressive disseminated fatal infection. For such patients, the detection of antibody responses by immunodiffusion or complement fixation test is of limited use. In contrast, the detection of Histoplasma capsulatum circulating antigens may provide a more practical approach to the rapid diagnosis of the disease. Accordingly, an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of a 69- to 70-kDa H. capsulatum-specific determinant and incorporating a species-specific murine monoclonal antibody was developed. With sera from patients with different forms of the disease (n = 35), the overall sensitivity of the test was found to be 71.4%, while the specificity was found to be 98% with normal human sera from areas of endemicity (n = 44) and 85.4% with sera from patients with other chronic fungal or bacterial infections (n = 48). This novel, highly specific ELISA provides a significant addition to the existing diagnostic tests for the detection of histoplasmosis. PMID:9316918

  11. Analysis of Known Bacterial Protein Vaccine Antigens Reveals Biased Physical Properties and Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Mayers, Carl; Rowe, Sonya; Miller, Julie; Lingard, Bryan; Hayward, Sarah; Titball, Richard W.

    2003-01-01

    Many vaccines have been developed from live attenuated forms of bacterial pathogens or from killed bacterial cells. However, an increased awareness of the potential for transient side-effects following vaccination has prompted an increased emphasis on the use of sub-unit vaccines, rather than those based on whole bacterial cells. The identification of vaccine sub-units is often a lengthy process and bioinformatics approaches have recently been used to identify candidate protein vaccine antigens. Such methods ultimately offer the promise of a more rapid advance towards preclinical studies with vaccines. We have compared the properties of known bacterial vaccine antigens against randomly selected proteins and identified differences in the make-up of these two groups. A computer algorithm that exploits these differences allows the identification of potential vaccine antigen candidates from pathogenic bacteria on the basis of their amino acid composition, a property inherently associated with sub-cellular location. PMID:18629010

  12. Antigen discovery and delivery of subunit vaccines by nonliving bacterial ghost vectors.

    PubMed

    Walcher, Petra; Mayr, Ulrike B; Azimpour-Tabrizi, Chakameh; Eko, Francis O; Jechlinger, Wolfgang; Mayrhofer, Peter; Alefantis, Tim; Mujer, Cesar V; DelVecchio, Vito G; Lubitz, Werner

    2004-12-01

    The bacterial ghost (BG) platform system is a novel vaccine delivery system endowed with intrinsic adjuvant properties. BGs are nonliving Gram-negative bacterial cell envelopes which are devoid of their cytoplasmic contents, yet maintain their cellular morphology and antigenic structures, including bioadhesive properties. The main advantages of BGs as carriers of subunit vaccines include their ability to stimulate a high immune response and to target the carrier itself to primary antigen-presenting cells. The intrinsic adjuvant properties of BGs enhance the immune response to target antigens, including T-cell activation and mucosal immunity. Since native and foreign antigens can be carried in the envelope complex of BGs, combination vaccines with multiple antigens of diverse origin can be presented to the immune system simultaneously. Beside the capacity of BGs to function as carriers of protein antigens, they also have a high loading capacity for DNA. Thus, loading BGs with recombinant DNA takes advantage of the excellent bioavailability for DNA-based vaccines and the high expression rates of the DNA-encoded antigens in target cell types such as macrophages and dendritic cells. There are many spaces within BGs including the inner and outer membranes, the periplasmic space and the internal lumen which can carry antigens, DNA or mediators of the immune response. All can be used for subunit antigen to design new vaccine candidates with particle presentation technology. In addition, the fact that BGs can also carry piggyback large-size foreign antigen particles, increases the technologic usefulness of BGs as combination vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. Furthermore, the BG antigen carriers can be stored as freeze-dried preparations at room temperature for extended periods without loss of efficacy. The potency, safety and relatively low production cost of BGs offer a significant technical advantage over currently utilized vaccine technologies.

  13. Blastomyces dermatitidis Antigen Detection by Quantitative Enzyme Immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Chadi A.; Bariola, J. Ryan; Bensadoun, Eric; Rodgers, Mark; Bradsher, Robert W.; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The second-generation MVista Blastomyces antigen enzyme immunoassay was not quantitative; therefore, specimens obtained previously were tested in the same assay as new specimens to assess the change in antigen levels. Furthermore, the sensitivity in serum had not been fully evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a quantitative Blastomyces antigen assay and detection of antigen in serum. Calibrators containing known concentrations of Blastomyces galactomannan were used to quantify antigen in urine and serum from patients with proven blastomycosis and from controls. Paired current and previously obtained urine specimens were tested to determine if quantification eliminated the need for concurrent testing to assess change in antigen. Pretreatment of serum with EDTA at 104°C was evaluated to determine if dissociation of immune complexes improved detection of antigenemia. Antigenuria was detected in 89.9% of patients with culture- or histopathology-proven blastomycosis. Specificity was 99.0% in patients with nonfungal infections and healthy subjects, but cross-reactions occurred in 95.6% of patients with histoplasmosis. Change in antigen level categorized as increase, no change, or decrease based on antigen units determined in the same assay agreed closely with the category of change in ng/ml determined from different assays. Pretreatment increased the sensitivity of detection of antigenemia from 35.7% to 57.1%. Quantification eliminated the need for concurrent testing of current and previously obtained specimens for assessment of changes in antigen concentration. Pretreatment increased the sensitivity for detection of antigenemia. Differentiation of histoplasmosis and blastomycosis is not possible by antigen detection. PMID:22116687

  14. Biosensors for Whole-Cell Bacterial Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, Jo V.; Hirst, Natalie A.; Millner, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial pathogens are important targets for detection and identification in medicine, food safety, public health, and security. Bacterial infection is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of the availability of antibiotics, these infections are often misdiagnosed or there is an unacceptable delay in diagnosis. Current methods of bacterial detection rely upon laboratory-based techniques such as cell culture, microscopic analysis, and biochemical assays. These procedures are time-consuming and costly and require specialist equipment and trained users. Portable stand-alone biosensors can facilitate rapid detection and diagnosis at the point of care. Biosensors will be particularly useful where a clear diagnosis informs treatment, in critical illness (e.g., meningitis) or to prevent further disease spread (e.g., in case of food-borne pathogens or sexually transmitted diseases). Detection of bacteria is also becoming increasingly important in antibioterrorism measures (e.g., anthrax detection). In this review, we discuss recent progress in the use of biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells for sensitive and earlier identification of bacteria without the need for sample processing. There is a particular focus on electrochemical biosensors, especially impedance-based systems, as these present key advantages in terms of ease of miniaturization, lack of reagents, sensitivity, and low cost. PMID:24982325

  15. Immunization with bacterial antigens: infections with streptococci and related organisms.

    PubMed

    Bercovier, H; Ghittino, C; Eldar, A

    1997-01-01

    Streptococcal infections of fish have been reported from various parts of the world, including the Far East, the United States, South Africa, Australia, Israel and Europe. Classification of Gram-positive cocci (DNA-DNA hybridization studies coupled with 165 sequencing) has shown that at least five different defined species are pathogenic to fish, e.g. Streptococcus iniae (syn. S. shilot), Streptococcus difficile, Lactococcus garvieae (syn. Enterococcus seriolicida), Lactococcus piscium and Vagococcus salmoninarum. "Streptococcosis" of fish should therefore be regarded as a complex of similar diseases caused by different genera and species of Gram-positive cocci, each capable of inducing CNS damage, as well as various degrees of multisystem organ involvement. Panophthalmitis ("pop-eye") and meningitis/meningoencephalitis are the sole findings in trout infected by S. iniae and in tilapines infected by S. difficile. In contrast, L. garvieae-infected trout bear a systemic hyperacute infection with diffuse haemorrhages. Therapeutic measures are generally ineffective. Development of vaccines is therefore essential to control these diseases. In our studies, trout were vaccinated intraperitoneally with whole-cell formalin-inactivated S. iniae and L. garvieae and tilapines with whole-cell formalin-inactivated and acellular S. difficile extract. Under laboratory conditions, S. difficile-vaccinated tilapines were protected against a challenge of 100 LD50s. Protection was correlated with the development of specific agglutinins. Western blot analysis supported the hypothesis that only a few proteins act as protective antigens. S. iniae autovaccines were effective in preventing the disease in rainbow trout in Israel. Under field conditions, fish vaccinated at 50 g were protected for over four months. The qualitative analysis of the humoral response indicated that specific antibodies are directed against a few protein moieties. The fact that passive transfer of antibodies

  16. Point detection of bacterial and viral pathogens using oral samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Oral samples, including saliva, offer an attractive alternative to serum or urine for diagnostic testing. This is particularly true for point-of-use detection systems. The various types of oral samples that have been reported in the literature are presented here along with the wide variety of analytes that have been measured in saliva and other oral samples. The paper focuses on utilizing point-detection of infectious disease agents, and presents work from our group on a rapid test for multiple bacterial and viral pathogens by monitoring a series of targets. It is thus possible in a single oral sample to identify multiple pathogens based on specific antigens, nucleic acids, and host antibodies to those pathogens. The value of such a technology for detecting agents of bioterrorism at remote sites is discussed.

  17. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  18. Detection of bacterial antigens and Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in the central nervous system of BALB/c mice following intranasal infection with a laboratory isolate of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Little, Christopher S; Joyce, Timothy A; Hammond, Christine J; Matta, Hazem; Cahn, David; Appelt, Denah M; Balin, Brian J

    2014-01-01

    Pathology consistent with that observed in Alzheimer's disease (AD) has previously been documented following intranasal infection of normal wild-type mice with Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) isolated from an AD brain (96-41). In the current study, BALB/c mice were intranasally infected with a laboratory strain of Cpn, AR-39, and brain and olfactory bulbs were obtained at 1-4 months post-infection (pi). Immunohistochemistry for amyloid beta or Cpn antigens was performed on sections from brains of infected or mock-infected mice. Chlamydia-specific immunolabeling was identified in olfactory bulb tissues and in cerebrum of AR-39 infected mice. The Cpn specific labeling was most prominent at 1 month pi and the greatest burden of amyloid deposition was noted at 2 months pi, whereas both decreased at 3 and 4 months. Viable Cpn was recovered from olfactory bulbs of 3 of 3 experimentally infected mice at 1 and 3 months pi, and in 2 of 3 mice at 4 months pi. In contrast, in cortical tissues of infected mice at 1 and 4 months pi no viable organism was obtained. At 3 months pi, only 1 of 3 mice had a measurable burden of viable Cpn from the cortical tissues. Mock-infected mice (0 of 3) had no detectable Cpn in either olfactory bulbs or cortical tissues. These data indicate that the AR-39 isolate of Cpn establishes a limited infection predominantly in the olfactory bulbs of BALB/c mice. Although infection with the laboratory strain of Cpn promotes deposition of amyloid beta, this appears to resolve following reduction of the Cpn antigen burden over time. Our data suggest that infection with the AR-39 laboratory isolate of Cpn results in a different course of amyloid beta deposition and ultimate resolution than that observed following infection with the human AD-brain Cpn isolate, 96-41. These data further support that there may be differences, possibly in virulence factors, between Cpn isolates in the generation of sustainable AD pathology.

  19. Immunohistochemical detection of Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica antigens in goats with natural pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yener, Z; Ilhan, F; Ilhan, Z; Saglam, Y S

    2009-04-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of loss to ruminants throughout the world. Mannheimia (Pasteurella) haemolytica is one of the most important etiological agent of pneumonia in cattle, sheep, and goats. This study was carried out to determine the incidence of M.haemolytica antigens using immunohistochemistry labelling of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues in pneumonic lungs of goats slaughtered at abattoir, and then to compare these immunohistochemistry results with the results of bacterial isolation. For these objectives, a total of 1505 goat lungs slaughtered in slaughterhouse were grossly examined and pneumonia was detected in 74 cases (4.91%). Of these, with the exception of verminous pneumonia observed in 32 cases, on 42 pneumonic lungs immunohistochemical examinations were performed. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded lung tissue samples were immunohistochemically stained by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) procedure using polyclonal antibodies to detect M.haemolytica antigens. Pneumonic lesions were more frequently encountered in cranioventral lobes than caudal lobes, and characterized by irregular lobular foci of atelectasis or lobar pneumonia. The presence of M.haemolytica antigens was detected in 19 (45%) out of 42 pneumonic lungs. Bacterial antigens were found most frequently in the cytoplasm of bronchial and bronchiolar epithelial cells, in the swirling degenerating leukocytes in the alveoli, and in the degenerating leukocytes in the area of coagulation necrosis, less frequently in the epithelial cells of bronchial glands, and lymphoid cells. Conclusionly, immunohistochemical detection of M.haemolytica antigens in pneumonic lungs appear to be more reliable compared to bacterial isolation.

  20. Real time viability detection of bacterial spores

    DOEpatents

    Vanderberg, Laura A.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Obiso, Richard J.

    2003-07-29

    This invention relates to a process for detecting the presence of viable bacterial spores in a sample and to a spore detection system, the process including placing a sample in a germination medium for a period of time sufficient for commitment of any present viable bacterial spores to occur, mixing the sample with a solution of a lanthanide capable of forming a fluorescent complex with dipicolinic acid, and, measuring the sample for the presence of dipicolinic acid, and the system including a germination chamber having inlets from a sample chamber, a germinant chamber and a bleach chamber, the germination chamber further including an outlet through a filtering means, the outlet connected to a detection chamber, the detection chamber having an inlet from a fluorescence promoting metal chamber and the detection chamber including a spectral excitation source and a means of measuring emission spectra from a sample, the detection chamber further connected to a waste chamber. A germination reaction mixture useful for promoting commitment of any viable bacterial spores in a sample including a combination of L-alanine, L-asparagine and D-glucose is also described.

  1. Synovial fluid antigen-presenting cells unmask peripheral blood T cell responses to bacterial antigens in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Life, P F; Viner, N J; Bacon, P A; Gaston, J S

    1990-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that synovial fluid (SF) mononuclear cells (MC) from patients with both reactive arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides proliferate in vitro in response to bacteria clinically associated with the triggering of reactive arthritis. In all cases, such SFMC responses are greater than the corresponding peripheral blood (PB) MC responses, often markedly so, and the mechanism for this is unclear. We have investigated this phenomenon by comparing the relative abilities of irradiated non-T cells derived from PB and SF to support autologous T cell responses to ReA-associated bacteria. Seven patients whose SFMC had been shown previously to respond to bacteria were studied. We demonstrate antigen-specific responses of PB T cells to bacteria in the presence of SF non-T cells which are in marked contrast to the minimal responses of either unfractionated PBMC or PB T cells reconstituted with PB non-T cells. We also show that PB, but not SF T cells respond strongly to autologous SF non-T cells in the absence of antigen or mitogen. These findings demonstrate that SF antigen-presenting cells (APC) are potent activators of PB T cells. We conclude that the contrasting responses of SFMC and PBMC to bacterial antigens may be accounted for at least in part by an enhanced ability of SF APC to support T cell proliferative responses. PMID:2311298

  2. Detection of cell surface antigens on monolayer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Takehiko; Klein, Eva

    1970-01-01

    A small scale modified method of the immune adherence on monolayer cells grown in Falcon plastic `Microtest' plates is described. This method is especially useful in mouse systems as it simplifies the washing procedure which is an indispensable step for removal of the anticomplementary activity present in mouse serum. Histocompatibility antigens and the surface antigen induced by the Moloney virus could be detected with this method. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 1 PMID:5530203

  3. Detection of group B streptococcal antigens in amniotic fluid of rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Hemming, V G; London, W T; Smith, L P; Curfman, B L; Fischer, G W; Sever, J L

    1983-06-01

    To simulate group B streptococci (GBS) amniotic fluid infections common in humans and to examine bacterial growth and the appearance of GBS antigens in vivo, GBS were injected into the amniotic cavity of 19 near-term rhesus monkeys. Transabdominal aspirates of amniotic fluid were obtained before bacterial challenge, after 2 and 6 h, and during cesarean section delivery (24 h). Each fluid was quantitatively cultured for GBS. Specimens of amniotic fluid and gastric aspirate from each infant were tested for the presence of GBS antigens with a commercial latex particle agglutination test (Wellcogen Strep B; Wellcome Diagnostics, Dartford, England). To eliminate nonspecific latex particle agglutination reactivity, presumably caused by proteins, a processing procedure was required. Despite active proliferation of bacteria, only 12% of the 2-h amniotic specimens were latex particle agglutination positive. In contrast, 94% of th3 6-h and 100% of the 24-h specimens had detectable antigens, as did 89% of the gastric fluid specimens aspirated from the 19 newborns. Latex particle agglutination tests, after proper processing, will readily detect GBS antigens in amniotic or gastric aspirate fluid from experimentally infected rhesus monkeys.

  4. Antibody-based bacterial toxin detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menking, Darrell E.; Heitz, Jonathon M.; Anis, Nabil A.; Thompson, Roy G.

    1994-03-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a one step assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin or Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein-isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled toxins. In the two-step assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified antitoxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or antitoxin IgG in a dose-dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  5. Bacterial surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies: the methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.; Jovell, R.J.; Kandler, O.

    1982-01-01

    The methanogens (MB) are unique microbes of great evolutionary interest with applications in biotechnology-bioengineerings and are important in digestive processes. Their cell-wall composition is distinctively different from that of Eubacteria, e.g. the Methanobacteriaceae possess the peptidoglycan pseudomurein rather than murein. The range of cell-wall compositions among MB and their evolutionary and functional significance is not well known. The authors undertook a systematic study of the MB's surface structure using monoclonal antibodies through the following steps: (1) generation of hybridomas that produce antibody to several MB from 3 of their 4 families; (2) development of immunoenzymatic assays for MB's antigens and antibodies; (3) determination of the fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies by inhibition-blocking tests using cell-wall extracts and compounds of known structure; thus a set of monoclonal probes of predetermined specificity was assembled; and (4) resolution of surface determinants of MB representative of the Methanobacteriaceae using the monoclonal probes. Specific markers of MB strains were characterized. Two epitopes were identified within the pseudomurein molecule.

  6. Sensitive, Rapid Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chen, Fei; Pickett, Molly; Matsuyama, Asahi

    2009-01-01

    A method of sensitive detection of bacterial spores within delays of no more than a few hours has been developed to provide an alternative to a prior three-day NASA standard culture-based assay. A capability for relatively rapid detection of bacterial spores would be beneficial for many endeavors, a few examples being agriculture, medicine, public health, defense against biowarfare, water supply, sanitation, hygiene, and the food-packaging and medical-equipment industries. The method involves the use of a commercial rapid microbial detection system (RMDS) that utilizes a combination of membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and analysis of luminescence images detected by a charge-coupled-device camera. This RMDS has been demonstrated to be highly sensitive in enumerating microbes (it can detect as little as one colony-forming unit per sample) and has been found to yield data in excellent correlation with those of culture-based methods. What makes the present method necessary is that the specific RMDS and the original protocols for its use are not designed for discriminating between bacterial spores and other microbes. In this method, a heat-shock procedure is added prior to an incubation procedure that is specified in the original RMDS protocols. In this heat-shock procedure (which was also described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article on enumerating sporeforming bacteria), a sample is exposed to a temperature of 80 C for 15 minutes. Spores can survive the heat shock, but nonspore- forming bacteria and spore-forming bacteria that are not in spore form cannot survive. Therefore, any colonies that grow during incubation after the heat shock are deemed to have originated as spores.

  7. Broad-spectrum enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Legionella soluble antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, P W; Toma, S

    1986-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed which detected soluble antigens from culture extracts of Legionella pneumophila serogroups 1 to 8, L. micdadei, L. bozemanii serogroups 1 and 2, L. dumoffii, L. gormanii, L. longbeachae serogroups 1 and 2, L. wadsworthii, L. oakridgensis, L. anisa, L. feeleii serogroup 1, and L. jordanis. The assay was approximately 10-fold more sensitive for the eight L. pneumophila serogroups than for the other Legionella species tested. The ELISA detected Legionella antigens in the urine specimens of 25 of 35 patients with L. pneumophila serogroup 1, 3, 4, 6, and 8; L. micdadei; and L. longbeachae serogroup 1 infections. None of the 334 urine specimens from patients with either non-Legionella pneumonia or urinary tract infections was positive. For 10 patients from whom sequential urine specimens were available, Legionella antigens were not detectable from 7 to 19 days after laboratory diagnosis. Test sensitivity was not affected by heavy bacterial contamination. This ELISA offers the detection of a broad spectrum of Legionella antigens by a single test. PMID:3771744

  8. Identification of Bacterial Surface Antigens by Screening Peptide Phage Libraries Using Whole Bacteria Cell-Purified Antisera.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Zhao, Dun; Yu, Xing-Long; Hu, Yu-Li; Li, Run-Cheng; Ge, Meng; Xu, Tian-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Hua-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial surface proteins can be good vaccine candidates. In the present study, we used polyclonal antibodies purified with intact Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae to screen phage-displayed random dodecapeptide and loop-constrained heptapeptide libraries, which led to the identification of mimotopes. Homology search of the mimotope sequences against E. rhusiopthiae-encoded ORF sequences revealed 14 new antigens that may localize on the surface of E. rhusiopthiae. When these putative surface proteins were used to immunize mice, 9/11 antigens induced protective immunity. Thus, we have demonstrated that a combination of using the whole bacterial cells to purify antibodies and using the phage-displayed peptide libraries to determine the antigen specificities of the antibodies can lead to the discovery of novel bacterial surface antigens. This can be a general approach for identifying surface antigens for other bacterial species.

  9. Identification of Bacterial Surface Antigens by Screening Peptide Phage Libraries Using Whole Bacteria Cell-Purified Antisera

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yun-Fei; Zhao, Dun; Yu, Xing-Long; Hu, Yu-Li; Li, Run-Cheng; Ge, Meng; Xu, Tian-Qi; Liu, Xiao-Bo; Liao, Hua-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial surface proteins can be good vaccine candidates. In the present study, we used polyclonal antibodies purified with intact Erysipelothrix rhusiopthiae to screen phage-displayed random dodecapeptide and loop-constrained heptapeptide libraries, which led to the identification of mimotopes. Homology search of the mimotope sequences against E. rhusiopthiae-encoded ORF sequences revealed 14 new antigens that may localize on the surface of E. rhusiopthiae. When these putative surface proteins were used to immunize mice, 9/11 antigens induced protective immunity. Thus, we have demonstrated that a combination of using the whole bacterial cells to purify antibodies and using the phage-displayed peptide libraries to determine the antigen specificities of the antibodies can lead to the discovery of novel bacterial surface antigens. This can be a general approach for identifying surface antigens for other bacterial species. PMID:28184219

  10. Decreased 19S antibody response to bacterial antigens in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Baum, John; Ziff, Morris

    1969-01-01

    The antibody response to immunization with Brucella and the levels of natural antibody to Escherichia coli and Shigella were compared in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and control groups. After Brucella immunization, SLE patients showed a significantly lower antibody response in whole serum and in the macroglobulin antibody fraction separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Sucrose gradient fractionation of natural antibodies to E. coli and a polyvalent Shigella antigen showed a significant decrease in macroglobulin antibody against four of the five E. coli antigens tested and the Shigella polyvalent antigen in SLE patients when compared with a group of normal individuals and a matched control group with pulmonary tuberculosis. Whole serum natural antibody titers against 5 of 13 Shigella antigens were significantly lower in the SLE patients when compared with the normal group, and against 7 of 13 when compared with the matched tuberculosis controls. Whole serum titers against 8 of 13 E. coli antigens were significantly lower in the SLE patients when compared with normal subjects. The observed decreased antibody response to bacterial antigens in SLE patients, occurring mainly in the macroglobulin fraction, is discussed in relation to the increased incidence of infection commonly observed in these patients. PMID:4886647

  11. Antigen and Genome Detection of Arenavirus, Bunyavirus, and Filovirus Infections

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    The specific aims of this project were to develop detection systems for recognizing and quanitating antigens and genomes of hemorrhagic fever viruses ...and to use these detection systems to investigate the pathogenesis of these viruses in animal models. These were to be accomplished using existing...antibodies and nucleic acid probes supplied by the MRDC as well as virus infected tissues or cell cultures. Pichinde virus , an arenavirus non

  12. Detection of Trichomonas vaginalis antigen in women by enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Yule, A; Gellan, M C; Oriel, J D; Ackers, J P

    1987-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed for the detection of Trichomonas vaginalis antigen in vaginal swabs. Four hundred and eighty two women attending a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic were tested; 44 (9.1%) were positive by culture, 32 (6.6%) were positive by wet film examination, and 54 (11.2%) were considered to be positive for trichomonal antigen by EIA. Taking culture as the reference method, the EIA had a sensitivity of 93.2% and a specificity of 97.5%. The predictive value of a positive test was 82% and that of a negative test was 99.3%. PMID:3495554

  13. DETECTION OF BACTERIAL TOXINS WITH MONOSACCHARIDE ARRAYS

    PubMed Central

    Ngundi, Miriam M.; Taitt, Chris R.; McMurry, Scott A.; Kahne, Daniel; Ligler, Frances S.

    2006-01-01

    A large number of bacterial toxins, viruses and bacteria target carbohydrate derivatives on the cell surface to attach to and gain entry into the cell. We report here the use of a monosaccharide-based array to detect protein toxins. The array-based technique provides the capability to perform simultaneous multianalyte analyses. Arrays of N-acetyl galactosamine (GalNAc) and N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) derivatives were immobilized on the surface of a planar waveguide and were used as receptors for protein toxins. These arrays were probed with fluorescently labeled bacterial cells and protein toxins. While Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) did not bind to either of the monosaccharides, both cholera toxin and tetanus toxin bound to GalNAc and Neu5Ac. The results show that the binding of the toxins to the carbohydrates is density dependent and semi-selective. Both toxins were detectable at 100 ng/ml. PMID:15946840

  14. O Antigen Modulates Insect Vector Acquisition of the Bacterial Plant Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa

    PubMed Central

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N.; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M.; Backus, Elaine A.; Shugart, Holly J.; Walker, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen. PMID:26386068

  15. O antigen modulates insect vector acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M; Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Walker, Sharon; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen.

  16. Detection of squamous epithelial intercellular substance antigen(s) in Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus.

    PubMed

    Beletskaya, L V; Gnesditskaya, E V

    1980-01-01

    Using pemphigus sera containing high titres (1:1000) of non-species-specific antibodies to tissue-specific intercellular substance (ICS) antigen(s) of cover stratified epithelia (skin, oesophagus, vagina and so forth), we detected analogous antigen(s) by immunofluorescence in the ICS of the epithelium of Hassall's corpuscles of human and animal thymus. The results obtained, together with well-known data from histological and embryological studies, confirm the histogenetic relationship of the epithelium of thymus corpuscles and cover epithelia of ectodermal origin. ICS antigen(s) is related to the series of hetero-organic antigens, which probably take part in the natural immunological tolerance formation to the antigens of the organism's own tissues.

  17. Detection of peste des petits ruminants virus antigen using immunofiltration and antigen-competition ELISA methods.

    PubMed

    Raj, G Dhinakar; Rajanathan, T M C; Kumar, C Senthil; Ramathilagam, G; Hiremath, Geetha; Shaila, M S

    2008-06-22

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR) is one of the most economically important diseases affecting sheep and goats in India. An immunofiltration-based test has been developed using either mono-specific serum/monoclonal antibodies (mAb) prepared against a recombinant truncated nucleocapsid protein of rinderpest virus (RPV) cross-reactive with PPR virus. This method consists of coating ocular swab eluate from suspected animals onto a nitrocellulose membrane housed in a plastic module, which is allowed to react with suitable dilutions of a mAb or a mono-specific polyclonal antibody. The antigen-antibody complex formed on the membrane is then detected by protein A-colloidal gold conjugate, which forms a pink colour. In the immunofiltration test, concordant results were obtained using either PPRV mAb or mono-specific serum. Another test, an antigen-competition ELISA which relies on the competition between plate-coated recombinant truncated 'N' protein of RPV and the PPRV 'N' protein present in ocular swab eluates (sample) for binding to the mono-specific antibody against N protein of RPV (in liquid phase) was developed. The cut-off value for this test was established using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positive and negative oculo-nasal swab samples. Linear correlation between percent inhibition (PI) values in antigen-competition ELISA and virus infectivity titres was 0.992. Comparison of the immunofiltration test with the antigen-competition ELISA yielded a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 100%. These two tests can serve as a screening (immunofiltration) and confirmatory (antigen-competition ELISA) test, respectively, in the diagnosis of PPR in sheep or goats.

  18. Virulence Role of V Antigen of Yersinia pestis at the Bacterial Surface

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Kenneth A.; Nilles, Matthew L.; Cowan, Clarissa; Straley, Susan C.

    1999-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of plague, secretes a set of environmentally regulated, plasmid pCD1-encoded virulence proteins termed Yops and V antigen (LcrV) by a type III secretion mechanism (Ysc). LcrV is a multifunctional protein that has been shown to act at the level of secretion control by binding the Ysc inner-gate protein LcrG and to modulate the host immune response by altering cytokine production. LcrV also is essential for the unidirectional targeting of Yops to the cytosol of infected eukaryotic cells. In this study, we constructed an in-frame deletion within lcrG (ΔlcrG3) to further analyze the requirement of LcrV in Yop targeting. We confirmed the essentiality of LcrV and found that LcrG may have a facilitative role, perhaps by promoting efficient secretion of LcrV. We also constructed mutants of lcrV expressing LcrV truncated at the N or C terminus. Both the N and C termini of LcrV were required for the secretion of LcrV into the medium and targeting of Yops. LcrV was detected in punctate zones on the surface of fixed Y. pestis by laser-scanning confocal microscopy, and this localization required a functional Ysc. However, the truncated LcrV proteins were not found on the bacterial surface. Finally, we tested the ability of LcrV-specific Fab antibody fragments or full-length antibody to interfere with Yop targeting and found no interference, even though this antibody protects mice against plague. These results indicate that LcrV may function in Yop targeting at the extracellular surface of yersiniae and that the protective efficacy of LcrV-specific antibodies can be manifested without blocking Yop targeting. PMID:10496922

  19. Benchtop Antigen Detection Technique using Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    The designed benchtop technique is primed to detect bacteria and viruses from antigenic surface marker proteins in solutions, initially water. This inclusive bio-immunoassay uniquely combines nanofiltration and near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to antibodies to isolate and distinguish microbial antigens, using laser excitation and spectrometric analysis. The project goals include detecting microorganisms aboard the International Space Station, space shuttle, Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), and human habitats on future Moon and Mars missions, ensuring astronaut safety. The technique is intended to improve and advance water contamination testing both commercially and environmentally as well. Lastly, this streamlined technique poses to greatly simplify and expedite testing of pathogens in complex matrices, such as blood, in hospital and laboratory clinics.

  20. Directed antigen delivery as a vaccine strategy for an intracellular bacterial pathogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwer, H. G. Archie; Alberti-Segui, Christine; Montfort, Megan J.; Berkowitz, Nathan D.; Higgins, Darren E.

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a vaccine strategy for generating an attenuated strain of an intracellular bacterial pathogen that, after uptake by professional antigen-presenting cells, does not replicate intracellularly and is readily killed. However, after degradation of the vaccine strain within the phagolysosome, target antigens are released into the cytosol for endogenous processing and presentation for stimulation of CD8+ effector T cells. Applying this strategy to the model intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, we show that an intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain is cleared rapidly in normal and immunocompromised animals, yet antigen-specific CD8+ effector T cells are stimulated after immunization. Furthermore, animals immunized with the intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strain are resistant to lethal challenge with a virulent WT strain of L. monocytogenes. These studies suggest a general strategy for developing safe and effective, attenuated intracellular replication-deficient vaccine strains for stimulation of protective immune responses against intracellular bacterial pathogens. CD8+ T cell | replication-deficient | Listeria monocytogenes

  1. Detection of brown-rot antigens in southern pine

    Treesearch

    Carol A. Clausen

    1996-01-01

    Brown-rot fungal antigens were detected by particle capture immunoassay(PCI) in southern pine 2 X 4’s beyond visible or culturable hyphal growth. Further analysis of test samples revealed changes along the 2 X 4’s that could be grouped into zones. Zone 1, the point of inoculation through 6 cm, showed low pH, measurable oxalic acid, high moisture, and high protein. Zone...

  2. Serological versus antigen detection methods for Giardia duodenalis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bashir, M; Farid, A; Rabia, I; Mostafa, B; El Amir, A

    2014-12-01

    Giardiasis constitutes an important public health problem in the world. Contamination of the water with fecal materials including viruses and pathogenic protozoa still represents an environmental health hazard, especially in rural areas. The survey study evaluated the relation between seropositivity and some risk factors. Moreover, the study compared between the serological IgG and IgM level and antigen detection methods for the diagnosis of giardiasis. The results indicate that sex distribution and age were the mean risk factors for seroprevelence. In this study, sera samples were employed in sandwich ELISA assay, to detect circulating Giardia antigens. None of the negative control serum samples gave a positive reaction, but cross reaction was encountered with 3 case of Cryptosporidium. The specificity of the assay was 94.830/a. On the other hand, the sensitivity of the Giardia patient's sera was 94.12% which was higher than that of IgG (86.25%) and IgM (87.50%) secretion measurements. In conclusion, antigen detection methods give better and earlier diagnosis for giardiasis can be performed quickly and do not require an experienced and skilled morphologist.

  3. Influence of macrophage activation on their capacity to bind bacterial antigens studied with atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Targosz, Marta; Labuda, Aleksander; Czuba, Pawel; Biedroń, Rafal; Strus, Magdalena; Gamian, Andrzej; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Szymoński, Marek

    2006-06-01

    In this work we studied interactions between bacterial antigens and receptors on the surface of macrophages using atomic force microscopy (AFM). We used two bacterial cell wall components: lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from gram-negative Escherichia coli and exopolysaccharide (EPS) derived from gram-positive Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Interactions between these bacterial antigens and immune cell receptors were studied in peritoneal macrophages derived from two strains of mice, CBA and C3H/J, in which the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is genetically disabled. We collected 500 force-distance curves for LPS-activated cells using an EPS-covered AFM tip, and for EPS-activated cells using an LPS-covered AFM tip. Nonactivated cells were tested as reference cells. The results show that LPS-primed macrophages decrease their ability to bind EPS. Surprisingly, EPS-activated macrophages maintain or even increase their ability to bind LPS. This may suggest that in vivo commensal enteric bacteria, such as lactobacilli, will enhance the defense potential of local macrophages against pathogens expressing LPS.

  4. Microbiology: Detection of Bacterial Pathogens and Their Occurrence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reasoner, Donald J.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of bacterial pathogens that are related to water pollution, covering publications from 1976-77. This review includes: (1) bacterial pathogens in animals; and (2) detection and identification of waterborne bacterial pathogens. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  5. Intracellular staining for TNF and IFN-gamma detects different frequencies of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Badovinac, V P; Harty, J T

    2000-04-21

    CD8(+) T lymphocytes are important mediators of adaptive immunity against certain viral, protozoan and bacterial pathogens. Activated CD8(+) T cells are able to induce cytolysis of infected cells (perforin and CD95-CD95L mediated pathways) and also elaborate cytokines, including IFN-gamma and TNF after appropriate MHC class I-peptide recognition. New technologies for the detection of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, including tetrameric MHC class I-peptide complexes, intracellular IFN-gamma staining and IFN-gamma ELISPOT analysis have revised our understanding of the magnitude of the CD8(+) T cell response to infection. Here, using intracellular cytokine staining, we compare detection of IFN-gamma and TNF in the analysis of pathogen-specific CD8(+) T cell lines and CD8(+) T cells after primary viral infection (LCMV) or secondary bacterial infection (Listeria monocytogenes). Under multiple conditions and with multiple epitopes, we find that staining for intracellular IFN-gamma consistently detects a higher frequency of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells than detection of intracellular TNF. However, (a) intracellular staining for TNF can be used to detect antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses and (b) intracellular staining for cytokines is a useful approach for in vitro characterization of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell lines.

  6. Detection of functional class II-associated antigen: role of a low density endosomal compartment in antigen processing

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a functional assay to identify processed antigen in subcellular fractions from antigen-presenting cells; stimulatory activity in this assay may be caused by either free peptide fragments or by complexes of peptide fragments and class II molecules present on organellar membrane sheets and vesicles. In addition, we have developed a functional assay to identify proteolytic activity in subcellular fractions capable of generating antigenic peptides from intact proteins. These techniques permit the direct identification of intracellular sites of antigen processing and class II association. Using a murine B cell line stably transfected with a phosphorylcholine (PC)-specific membrane-bound immunoglobulin (Ig), we show that PC- conjugated antigens are rapidly internalized and efficiently degraded to generate processed antigen within an early low density compartment. Proteolytic activity capable of generating antigenic peptide fragments from intact proteins is found within low density endosomes and a dense compartment consistent with lysosomes. However, neither processed peptide nor peptide-class II complexes are detected in lysosomes from antigen-pulsed cells. Furthermore, blocking the intracellular transport of internalized antigen from the low density endosome to lysosomes does not inhibit the generation of processed antigen. Therefore, antigens internalized in association with membrane Ig on B cells can be efficiently processed in low density endosomal compartments without the contribution of proteases present within denser organelles. PMID:7722450

  7. Detection of Lewis antigen structural change by FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A T; Jones, K; Lewis, K E; Jones, S; Lewis, P D

    2013-02-15

    Mucins are a family of extensively glycosylated, high molecular weight glycoproteins. Secretion of mucins with altered terminal carbohydrate moieties alters the rheological and viscoelastic properties of mucus and observed glycosylation changes in respiratory diseases may vary with disease status. Structural modifications to the Lewis x antigen with sialic acid (sialyl-Lewis x) and sulphate (sulfo-Lewis x) in particular are associated with respiratory diseases and deemed potential biomarkers for disease diagnosis, severity and progression. The major aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to detect, via infrared (IR) spectra, the structural changes between the Lewis x antigen and sialylated and sulphated derivatives. Although FTIR only provides information on vibrations of chemical groups, we show that by comparing mono- and oligosaccharide specific IR spectra it is possible to determine the contribution of key sugar moieties to the altered Lewis x spectral pattern. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Specific Detection of Antigen-Binding Cells by Localized Growth of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rotman, Boris; Cox, David R.

    1971-01-01

    A new method for the enumeration of lymphoid cells with specific surface-receptors for antigen is described, based on the use of β-D-galactosidase (EC 3.2.1.23), either directly as an antigen or as a conjugated antigen. Binding of β-D-galactosidase is revealed by its activity in releasing riboflavin from a synthetic substrate, riboflavin-β-D-galactopyranoside. The riboflavin, inactive as a vitamin in the galactosidic form, becomes active when released by the enzyme, and can be detected by bioassay. Hence, lymphoid cells with receptors for β-D-galactosidase on their surface can be detected after they have been exposed to the enzyme, washed, and then plated in agar containing riboflavin-β-D-galactopyranoside, streptomycin, riboflavin-deficient medium, and a streptomycin-resistant strain of Streptococcus faecalis that requires riboflavin. Release of riboflavin is signalled by the growth of characteristic bacterial colonies over the cell that bound β-D-galactosidase. Images PMID:5002817

  9. High-sensitivity detection of fruit tree viruses using bacterial magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji-Feng; Li, Ying; Wang, Zhen-Fang; Li, Ji-Lun; Jiang, Wei; Li, Shao-Hua

    2009-04-01

    Prunus necrotic ring spot virus (PNRSV) and grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) were detected by fluoroimmunoassay using bacterial magnetic particles (BMPs), and a double antibody sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA). For the fluoroimmunoassay, fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled anti-PNRSV antibody or anti-GFLV antibody was conjugated onto BMPs of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. With this method, a very low minimum antigen concentration (1 x 10(6) dilution of the original sample concentration) could be detected. Using DAS-ELISA, the minimum antigen detection concentration was the original sample concentration. Thus, comparing these two methods, a BMP-based method could increase the sensitivity up to six orders of magnitude (10(6)) higher than an ELISA-based method of detection PNRSV and GFLV.

  10. Immunoliposome-PCR: a generic ultrasensitive quantitative antigen detection system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The accurate quantification of antigens at low concentrations over a wide dynamic range is needed for identifying biomarkers associated with disease and detecting protein interactions in high-throughput microarrays used in proteomics. Here we report the development of an ultrasensitive quantitative assay format called immunoliposome polymerase chain reaction (ILPCR) that fulfills these requirements. This method uses a liposome, with reporter DNA encapsulated inside and biotin-labeled polyethylene glycol (PEG) phospholipid conjugates incorporated into the outer surface of the liposome, as a detection reagent. The antigenic target is immobilized in the well of a microplate by a capture antibody and the liposome detection reagent is then coupled to a biotin-labeled second antibody through a NeutrAvidin bridge. The liposome is ruptured to release the reporter DNA, which serves as a surrogate to quantify the protein target using real-time PCR. Results A liposome detection reagent was prepared, which consisted of a population of liposomes ~120 nm in diameter with each liposome possessing ~800 accessible biotin receptors and ~220 encapsulated reporters. This liposome detection reagent was used in an assay to quantify the concentration of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) in human serum. This ILPCR assay exhibited a linear dose–response curve from 10-10 M to 10-16 M CEA. Within this range the assay coefficient of variance was <6 % for repeatability and <2 % for reproducibility. The assay detection limit was 13 fg/mL, which is 1,500-times more sensitive than current clinical assays for CEA. An ILPCR assay to quantify HIV-1 p24 core protein in buffer was also developed. Conclusions The ILPCR assay has several advantages over other immuno-PCR methods. The reporter DNA and biotin-labeled PEG phospholipids spontaneously incorporate into the liposomes as they form, simplifying preparation of the detection reagent. Encapsulation of the reporter inside the

  11. Optoacoustic detection of viral antigens using targeted gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswadi, Saher; Woodward, Lee; Glickman, Randolph D.; Barsalou, Norman

    2009-02-01

    We are detecting antigens (Ag), isolated from infectious organisms, utilizing laser optoacoustic spectroscopy and antibody-coupled gold nanorod (NR) contrast agents specifically targeted to the antigen of interest. We have detected, in clinical ocular samples, both Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) . A monoclonal antibody (Ab) specific to both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was conjugated to gold nanorods to produce a targeted contrast agent with a strong optoacoustic signal. Elutions obtained from patient corneal swabs were adsorbed in standard plastic micro-wells. An immunoaffinity reaction was then performed with the functionalized gold nanorods, and the results were probed with an OPO laser, emitting wavelengths at the peak absorptions of the nanorods. Positive optoacoustic responses were obtained from samples containing authentic (microbiologically confirmed) HSV-1 and HSV-2. To obtain an estimate of the sensitivity of the technique, serial dilutions from 1 mg/ml to 1 pg/ml of a C. trachomatis surface Ag were prepared, and were probed with a monoclonal Ab, specific to the C. trachomatis surface Ag, conjugated to gold nanorods. An optoacoustic response was obtained, proportional to the concentration of antigen, and with a limit of detection of about 5 pg/ml. The optoacoustic signals generated from micro-wells containing albumin or saline were similar to those from blank wells. The potential benefit of this method is identify viral agents more rapidly than with existing techniques. In addition, the sensitivity of the assay is comparable or superior to existing colorimetric- or fluorometric-linked immunoaffinity assays.

  12. Detection of Magnetically-Tagged Antigens with a SQUID Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemla, Y. R.; Grossman, H. L.; Clarke, John; Poon, Y. S.; Alper, M. D.; Stevens, R. C.

    2000-03-01

    We describe a novel immunoassay using a SQUID microscope to detect magnetically-tagged antigens. The SQUID microscope consists of a Superconducting QUantum Interference Device, cooled to 77K inside a vacuum enclosure, thermally isolated from a room-temperature sample which may be positioned to within 15μ m of the SQUID. At this distance we are able to detect a dipole moment of 10-17 Am^2 in a 1 Hz bandwidth, corresponding to one single-domain 35nm magnetite nanoparticle. A substrate of liposomes labeled with the FLAG epitope is placed on the microscope and immersed in a solution of superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with anti-FLAG antibodies. A pulse of magnetic field aligns the magnetic moments parallel to the SQUID. Subsequently, the SQUID detects the decay of the remanent magnetization of the magnetic tags bound to the antigens, whereas unbound magnetic nanoparticles relax very rapidly by Brownian rotation and do not contribute to the signal. We also explore the possible use of nanoparticles extracted from magnetotactic bacteria as magnetic tags.

  13. Comparison of four assays for the detection of cryptococcal antigen.

    PubMed

    Binnicker, M J; Jespersen, D J; Bestrom, J E; Rollins, L O

    2012-12-01

    We compared the performance of four assays for the detection of cryptococcal antigen in serum samples (n = 634) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples (n = 51). Compared to latex agglutination, the sensitivity and specificity of the Premier enzyme immunoassay (EIA), Alpha CrAg EIA, and CrAg lateral flow assay (LFA) were 55.6 and 100%, 100 and 99.7%, and 100 and 99.8%, respectively, from serum samples. There was 100% agreement among the four tests for CSF samples, with 18 samples testing positive by each of the assays.

  14. Circulating follicular helper T cells presented distinctively different responses toward bacterial antigens in primary biliary cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zun-Qiang; Tong, Da-Nian; Guan, Jiao; Li, Mei-Fang; Feng, Qi-Ming; Zhou, Min-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Yun

    2017-10-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a chronic and progressive cholestatic liver disease with unknown causes. The initiation of PBC is associated with bacterial infections and abnormal immune correlates, such as the presence of self-reactive anti-mitochondrial antibodies and shifted balance of T cell subsets. In particular, the CD4(+)CXCR5(+) follicular helper T (Tfh) cells are highly activated in PBC patients and are significantly associated with PBC severity, but the underlying reasons are unknown. In this study, we found that the circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells were enriched with the interferon (IFN)-γ-secreting Th1-subtype and the interleukin (IL)-17-secreting Th17-subtype, but not the IL-4-secreting Th2 subtype. We further demonstrated that a host of microbial motifs, including Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C), LPS, imiquimod, and CpG, could significantly stimulate IFN-γ, IL-17, and/or IL-21 from circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells in PBC patients, especially in the presence of monocytes and B cells. Whole bacterial cells of Escherichia coli, Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, and Mycobacterium gordonae, could also potently stimulate IFN-γ, IL-17, and/or IL-21 production from circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells. But interestingly, while the whole cell could potently stimulate circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells from both healthy controls and PBC patients, the cell protein lysate could only potently stimulate circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells from PBC patients, but not those from healthy controls, suggesting that circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells in PBC patients had distinctive antigen-specificity from those in healthy individuals. Together, these data demonstrated that bacterial antigen stimulation is a potential source of aberrant Tfh cell activation in PBC patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Optimisation of immuno-gold nanoparticle complexes for antigen detection.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Susan; Russell, David A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to define the optimum method of binding antibodies to the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and then to apply the optimised antibody-functionalised AuNPs for the detection of a target antigen. A detailed investigation of three different techniques for the functionalisation of AuNPs with anti-cocaine antibody and methods for the subsequent characterisation of the antibody-functionalised AuNP are reported. The addition of anti-cocaine antibody onto the AuNP surface was facilitated by either: a polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker with a COOH terminal functional group; an aminated PEG ligand; or an N-succinimidyl 3-(2-pyridyldithio)-propionate (SPDP)-Protein A/G intermediate. Characterisation of the functionalised particles was performed using transmission electron microscopy, UV-Visible spectrophotometry and by agarose gel electrophoresis. In addition, the cocaine binding efficacy of the resultant AuNPs and their cocaine-binding capacity was determined using a cocaine-horseradish peroxidase conjugate, and by the application of a microtiter plate-based immunoassay. The results showed that the number of antibody per particle was the highest when the AuNP were functionalised with the Protein A/G intermediate. As compared to free antibody, the cocaine binding efficacy was significantly enhanced using the AuNP-Protein A/G-antibody complex. This optimal antibody-antigen binding efficacy is thought to be the result of the large number of antibody per particle and the oriented binding of the antibody to the Protein A/G on the AuNP surface. These results highlight the ideal immuno-gold nanoparticle characteristics for the detection of target antigens such as cocaine.

  16. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms compromise the inflammatory response against bacterial antigen translocation in cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Piñero, Paula; Juanola, Oriol; Caparrós, Esther; Zapater, Pedro; Giménez, Paula; González-Navajas, José M; Such, José; Francés, Rubén

    2017-04-18

    Bacterial translocation is associated with clinically relevant complications in cirrhosis. We evaluated the effect of toll-like receptor polymorphisms in the soluble response against these episodes. Consecutive patients with cirrhosis and ascitic fluid were distributed by TLR2 rs4696480, TLR4 rs4986790, and TLR9 rs187084 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Lipoteichoic acid, lipopolyssaccharide, bacterial-DNA, pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide levels were quantified in serum samples. In vitro response against specific ligands in variant TLR genotypes was evaluated. One hundred and fourteen patients were included. Variant TLR-2, TLR-4 and TLR-9 SNP genotypes were associated with significantly increased serum levels of LTA, LPS and bacterial-DNA. TNF-α, IL-6 and nitric oxide serum levels were significantly decreased in all variant TLR genotyped patients. Cytokine levels were significantly less upregulated in response to specific TLR-ligands in patients with all variant vs wildtype TLR genotypes. Although in vitro gene expression levels of all wildtype and variant TLRs were similar, MyD88 and NFkB were significantly downregulated in cells from TLR-variant genotyped patients in response to their ligands. Variant TLR genotypes are associated with an increased circulating antigen burden and a decreased proinflammatory response in cirrhosis. This immunodeficiency may facilitate bacteria-related complications in cirrhosis and enhance TLR targeting for its management.

  17. Automated Image Analysis for Determination of Antibody Titers Against Occupational Bacterial Antigens Using Indirect Immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Brauner, Paul; Jäckel, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Employees who are exposed to high concentrations of microorganisms in bioaerosols frequently suffer from respiratory disorders. However, etiology and in particular potential roles of microorganisms in pathogenesis still need to be elucidated. Thus, determination of employees' antibody titers against specific occupational microbial antigens may lead to identification of potentially harmful species. Since indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) is easy to implement, we used this technique to analyze immunoreactions in human sera. In order to address disadvantageous inter-observer variations as well as the absence of quantifiable fluorescence data in conventional titer determination by eye, we specifically developed a software tool for automated image analysis. The 'Fluorolyzer' software is able to reliably quantify fluorescence intensities of antibody-bound bacterial cells on digital images. Subsequently, fluorescence values of single cells have been used to calculate non-discrete IgG titers. We tested this approach on multiple bacterial workplace isolates and determined titers in sera from 20 volunteers. Furthermore, we compared image-based results with the conventional manual readout and found significant correlation as well as statistically confirmed reproducibility. In conclusion, we successfully employed 'Fluorolyzer' for determination of titers against various bacterial species and demonstrated its applicability as a useful tool for reliable and efficient analysis of immune response toward occupational exposure to bioaerosols. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  18. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms compromise the inflammatory response against bacterial antigen translocation in cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Piñero, Paula; Juanola, Oriol; Caparrós, Esther; Zapater, Pedro; Giménez, Paula; González-Navajas, José M.; Such, José; Francés, Rubén

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial translocation is associated with clinically relevant complications in cirrhosis. We evaluated the effect of toll-like receptor polymorphisms in the soluble response against these episodes. Consecutive patients with cirrhosis and ascitic fluid were distributed by TLR2 rs4696480, TLR4 rs4986790, and TLR9 rs187084 single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Lipoteichoic acid, lipopolyssaccharide, bacterial-DNA, pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide levels were quantified in serum samples. In vitro response against specific ligands in variant TLR genotypes was evaluated. One hundred and fourteen patients were included. Variant TLR-2, TLR-4 and TLR-9 SNP genotypes were associated with significantly increased serum levels of LTA, LPS and bacterial-DNA. TNF-α, IL-6 and nitric oxide serum levels were significantly decreased in all variant TLR genotyped patients. Cytokine levels were significantly less upregulated in response to specific TLR-ligands in patients with all variant vs wildtype TLR genotypes. Although in vitro gene expression levels of all wildtype and variant TLRs were similar, MyD88 and NFkB were significantly downregulated in cells from TLR-variant genotyped patients in response to their ligands. Variant TLR genotypes are associated with an increased circulating antigen burden and a decreased proinflammatory response in cirrhosis. This immunodeficiency may facilitate bacteria-related complications in cirrhosis and enhance TLR targeting for its management. PMID:28418003

  19. Nonvalue of antigen detection immunoassays for diagnosis of candidemia.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, P; Dowd, A; Jewesson, P; Radigan, G; Tweeddale, M G; Clarke, A; Geere, I; Kelly, M

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated the Cand-Tec (Ramco Laboratories Inc., Houston, Tex.) and LA-Candida antigen detection system (Immuno-Mycologics Inc., Norman, Okla.) tests as possible rapid alternatives to blood cultures for the identification of patients with candidemia. Tests were performed on sera from (i) 33 patients with candidemia, (ii) 82 patients with fever and risk factors for invasive candidiasis, and (iii) 13 healthy controls. A total of 21 patients had no evidence of invasive candidiasis, as determined by clinical course, blood culture, and/or autopsy; results for 61 patients were indeterminate regarding the presence of invasive candidiasis, or else the patients had invasive candidiasis with organ involvement. By using a threshold positive Cand-Tec titer of greater than or equal to 1:4, the sensitivity in candidemic patients was 49%; the specificity was 43% (patients with true-negative results had neither candidemia nor other evidence of invasive candidiasis). Coexistent disseminated candidiasis in some candidemic patients may have accounted for some positive Cand-Tec tests and possible overestimation of the sensitivity of the test for candidemia. Cand-Tec test results were negative for healthy controls. All test results obtained by the LA-Candida antigen detection system assay were negative. Our findings indicate that neither of these assays reliably identifies patients with candidemia. PMID:2229358

  20. The Toll-like receptor 9 signalling pathway regulates MR1-mediated bacterial antigen presentation in B cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianyun; Brutkiewicz, Randy R

    2017-10-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are conserved T cells that express a semi-invariant T-cell receptor (Vα7.2 in humans and Vα19 in mice). The development of MAIT cells requires the antigen-presenting MHC-related protein 1 (MR1), as well as commensal bacteria. The mechanisms that regulate the functional expression of MR1 molecules and their loading with bacterial antigen in antigen-presenting cells are largely unknown. We have found that treating B cells with the Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist CpG increases MR1 surface expression. Interestingly, activation of TLR9 by CpG-A (but not CpG-B) enhances MR1 surface expression. This is limited to B cells and not other types of cells such as monocytes, T or natural killer cells. Knocking-down TLR9 expression by short hairpin RNA reduces MR1 surface expression and MR1-mediated bacterial antigen presentation. CpG-A triggers early endosomal TLR9 activation, whereas CpG-B is responsible for late endosomal/lysosomal activation of TLR9. Consistently, blocking endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi protein transport, rather than lysosomal acidification, suppressed MR1 antigen presentation. Overall, our results indicate that early endosomal TLR9 activation is important for MR1-mediated bacterial antigen presentation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Engineering Bacterial Thiosulfate and Tetrathionate Sensors for Detecting Gut Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-03

    Article Engineering bacterial thiosulfate and tetrathionate sensors for detecting gut inflammation Kristina N-M Daeffler1 , Jeffrey D Galley2, Ravi U...mice harboring native gut microbiota. Our thiosulfate sensor may have applications in bacterial diagnostics or therapeutics. Finally, our approach can...be replicated for a wide range of bacterial sensors and should thus enable a new class of minimally invasive studies of gut microbiota pathways

  2. Evaluation of antigen detection kits for diagnosis of equine influenza.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Takashi; Tsujimura, Koji; Kondo, Takashi; Matsumura, Tomio

    2008-02-01

    In this study, we evaluated whether five rapid antigen detection kits for human influenza could be used for the diagnosis of equine influenza (EI). Limiting dilution analyses showed that Directigen Flu A+B and ESPLINE INFLUENZA A&B-N had the highest sensitivities to equine-2 influenza viruses (EIVs) among the kits investigated. From the results of virus detection in nasal swabs taken from horses infected with EIV, these two kits could produce positive results in reasonable agreement with those obtained by virus isolation or RT-PCR, suggesting that these kits could be useful for rapid diagnosis of EI in the field. However, from the viewpoint of specificity for EIV, Espline seems to be superior to Directigen.

  3. A novel method for rapid detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens in blood.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Kubo, Toru; Ehara, Naomi; Nakano, Reiji; Matsutake, Toyoshi; Ishimatu, Yuji; Tanaka, Yumi; Akamatsu, Suguru; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we used "RAPIRUN(®)Streptococcus pneumoniae HS (otitis media/sinusitis) (RAPIRUN-HS)," a rapid S. pneumoniae antigen detection kit, to investigate methods for detecting S. pneumoniae antigens in blood of 32 bacterial pneumonia patients. We simultaneously performed PCR to detect S. pneumoniae in blood samples. The results of these tests were compared based on pneumonia severity, determined using the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) score classification. Four S. pneumoniae PCR-positive patients of the six severe pneumococcal pneumonia patients (PSI risk class IV/V) also tested positive using RAPIRUN-HS. Twenty-four mild to moderate pneumonia patients (PSI risk class I-III) were S. pneumoniae PCR-negative; of these, 21 tested negative using RAPIRUN-HS. The pneumococcal pneumonia patients testing positive using RAPIRUN-HS had low leukocyte counts and elevated C-reactive protein and procalcitonin levels, indicating that RAPIRUN-HS results were correlated with pneumonia severity. The time course evaluations of the laboratory tests for severe pneumococcal pneumonia patients showed that RAPIRUN-HS and S. pneumoniae PCR yielded positive results earlier than the changes in procalcitonin and IL-6. Thus, concomitant pneumococcal bacteremia was strongly suspected in patients testing positive using RAPIRUN-HS. In conclusion, RAPIRUN-HS may be useful for determining whether to admit patients into hospitals and selecting the appropriate antimicrobial agents.

  4. Protective effect of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 against induced bacterial antigen translocation in experimental cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Moratalla, Alba; Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Santacruz, Arlette; Moya, Ángela; Peiró, Gloria; Zapater, Pedro; González-Navajas, José M; Giménez, Paula; Such, José; Sanz, Yolanda; Francés, Rubén

    2014-07-01

    Intervention in the gut ecosystem is considered as a potential strategy to treat liver diseases and their complications. We have evaluated the effects of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 on bacterial translocation and the liver status in experimental cirrhosis. Liver damage was induced in Balb/c mice by weight-controlled oral administration of carbon tetrachloride. Laparotomies were performed at week 12. One week prior to laparotomy, animals received B. pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 (10(9) cfu/daily) or placebo intragastrically. All animals received Escherichia coli (10(7) cfu/single dose) intragastrically 24 hours before laparotomy. A group of naïve non-treated animals was included as control. Liver tissue specimens, mesenteric lymph nodes, intestinal content and blood were collected. Liver histology, profibrogenic genes expression, bacterial DNA translocation, serum endotoxaemia and liver cytokine levels were measured. Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 showed no significant effect on structural liver damage, as determined by histological evaluation, alpha-smooth muscle actin distribution, profibrogenic gene expression levels, total hydroxyproline levels and malon dialdehyde production compared with mice receiving placebo. Interestingly, bacterial DNA translocation and serum endotoxin levels were significantly decreased in mice receiving the Bifidobacterium strain compared with placebo. Gut barrier integrity markers were up-regulated in mice receiving B. pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 and quantitatively correlated with intestinal gene copy numbers of the bifidobacterial strain. Gene expression levels of several anti-inflammatory mediators were also increased in mice receiving B. pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 compared with placebo. Oral administration of B. pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 is associated with improved gut barrier integrity and shows a beneficial effect against induced bacterial antigen translocation in the CCl4 -model of cirrhosis. © 2013 John

  5. A bacterial engineered glycoprotein as a novel antigen for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ciocchini, Andrés E; Serantes, Diego A Rey; Melli, Luciano J; Guidolin, Leticia S; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A; Elena, Sebastián; Franco, Cristina; Nicola, Ana M; Feldman, Mario F; Comerci, Diego J; Ugalde, Juan E

    2014-08-27

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis that affects livestock and human beings. Laboratory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis mainly relies on serological diagnosis using serum and/or milk samples. Although there are several serological tests with different diagnostic performance and capacity to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals, there is still no standardized reference antigen for the disease. Here we validate the first recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. This antigen can be produced in homogeneous batches without the need of culturing pathogenic brucellae; all characteristics that make it appropriate for standardization. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies in bovine samples was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to magnetic beads or ELISA plates. As a proof of concept and to validate the antigen, we analyzed serum, whole blood and milk samples obtained from non-infected, experimentally infected and vaccinated animals included in a vaccination/infection trial performed in our laboratory as well as more than 1000 serum and milk samples obtained from naturally infected and S19-vaccinated animals from Argentina. Our results demonstrate that OAg-AcrA-based assays are highly accurate for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis, even in vaccinated herds, using different types of samples and in different platforms. We propose this novel recombinant glycoprotein as an antigen suitable for the development of new standard immunological tests for screening and confirmatory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis in regions or countries with brucellosis-control programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Leaky RAG Deficiency in Adult Patients with Impaired Antibody Production against Bacterial Polysaccharide Antigens.

    PubMed

    Geier, Christoph B; Piller, Alexander; Linder, Angela; Sauerwein, Kai M T; Eibl, Martha M; Wolf, Hermann M

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the recombination activating genes RAG1 and RAG2 have been reported to cause a T-B-NK+ type of severe combined immunodeficiency. In addition identification of hypomorphic mutations in RAG1 and RAG2 has led to an expansion of the spectrum of disease to include Omenn syndrome, early onset autoimmunity, granuloma, chronic cytomegalovirus- or EBV-infection with expansion of gamma/delta T-cells, idiophatic CD4 lymphopenia and a phenotype resembling common variable immunodeficiency. Herein we describe a novel presentation of leaky RAG1 and RAG2 deficiency in two unrelated adult patients with impaired antibody production against bacterial polysaccharide antigens. Clinical manifestation included recurrent pneumonia, sinusitis, otitis media and in one patient recurrent cutaneous vasculitis. Both patients harbored a combination of a null mutation on one allele with a novel hypomorphic RAG1/2 mutation on the other allele. One of these novel mutations affected the start codon of RAG1 and resulted in an aberrant gene and protein expression. The second novel RAG2 mutation leads to a truncated RAG2 protein, lacking the C-terminus with intact core RAG2 and reduced VDJ recombination capacity as previously described in a mouse model. Both patients presented with severely decreased numbers of naïve CD4+ T cells and defective T independent IgG responses to bacterial polysaccharide antigens, while T cell-dependent IgG antibody formation e.g. after tetanus or TBEV vaccination was intact. In conclusion, hypomorphic mutations in genes responsible for SCID should be considered in adults with predominantly antibody deficiency.

  7. Rapid diagnosis of cryptococcosis using an antigen detection immunochromatographic test.

    PubMed

    Rivet-Dañon, Diane; Guitard, Juliette; Grenouillet, Frédéric; Gay, Frédérick; Ait-Ammar, Nawel; Angoulvant, Adela; Marinach, Carine; Hennequin, Christophe

    2015-05-01

    Current methods for cryptococcal antigen detection have some limitations. This study aimed at evaluating a lateral flow assay (LFA) for the diagnosis of cryptococcosis in a French University medical center. A retrospective study was performed on samples collected from patients with a definitive diagnosis of cryptococcosis (group I 66 samples; 28 patients) or with non-Cryptococcus invasive fungal infection (group II 18 samples; 17 patients). In addition, 274 samples from 205 consecutive patients, either suspected of cryptococcal infection or routinely screened during their follow-up, were prospectively tested (group III). Cryptococcal antigen was assayed using LFA and an EIA. A latex-based test was used for confirmation. Sensitivity calculated on group I and specificity on group II, were respectively at 100% and 90.0%. Two false positives were related to Trichosporon fungemia. Per-sample analysis on group III revealed sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values all at 100% for CSF, and at 100%, 98.9%, 75% and 100%, respectively for serum samples. LFA enabled the diagnosis of two cases of asymptomatic cryptococcosis. The excellent diagnostic value and practicality (visual reading results in 15 min) of LFA make it fully appropriate for the diagnosis of cryptococcosis in this particular setting. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fluorescence spectroscopy for rapid detection and classification of bacterial pathogens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study deals with the rapid detection and classification of three bacteria, Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Campylobacter, using fluorescence spectroscopy and multivariative analysis. Each bacterial sample was diluted in physiologic saline for analysis. Fluoroscence spectra were collected ...

  9. Sensitive Detection of Deliquescent Bacterial Capsules through Nanomechanical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Song Ha; Webb, Hayden K

    2015-10-20

    Encapsulated bacteria usually exhibit strong resistance to a wide range of sterilization methods, and are often virulent. Early detection of encapsulation can be crucial in microbial pathology. This work demonstrates a fast and sensitive method for the detection of encapsulated bacterial cells. Nanoindentation force measurements were used to confirm the presence of deliquescent bacterial capsules surrounding bacterial cells. Force/distance approach curves contained characteristic linear-nonlinear-linear domains, indicating cocompression of the capsular layer and cell, indentation of the capsule, and compression of the cell alone. This is a sensitive method for the detection and verification of the encapsulation status of bacterial cells. Given that this method was successful in detecting the nanomechanical properties of two different layers of cell material, i.e. distinguishing between the capsule and the remainder of the cell, further development may potentially lead to the ability to analyze even thinner cellular layers, e.g. lipid bilayers.

  10. Identification of in vivo-induced bacterial protein antigens during calf infection with Chlamydia psittaci.

    PubMed

    Kästner, Julia; Saluz, Hans Peter; Hänel, Frank

    2015-05-01

    Chlamydia (C.) psittaci, the causative agent of ornithosis, is an obligate intracellular pathogen with a unique developmental cycle and a high potential for zoonotic transmission. Various mammalian hosts, such as cattle, horse, sheep and man that are in close contact with contaminated birds can get infected (referred to as psittacosis). Since little is known about long-term sequelae of chronic disease and the molecular mechanisms of chlamydial pathogenesis, a key step in understanding the in vivo situation is the identification of C. psittaci infection-associated proteins. For this, we investigated sera of infected calves. Using the immunoscreening approach In Vivo Induced Antigen Technology (IVIAT) including all relevant controls, we focused on C. psittaci proteins, which are induced in vivo during infection. Sera were pooled, extensively adsorbed against in vitro antigens to eliminate false positive results, and used to screen an inducible C. psittaci 02DC15 genomic expression library. Screening and control experiments revealed 19 immunogenic proteins, which are expressed during infection. They are involved in transport and oxidative stress response, heme and folate biosynthesis, DNA replication, recombination and repair, cell envelope, bacterial secretion systems and hypothetical proteins of so far unknown functions. Some of the proteins found may be considered as diagnostic markers or as candidates for the development of vaccines.

  11. Comparison of Binax Legionella Urinary Antigen EIA kit with Binax RIA Urinary Antigen kit for detection of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Hackman, B A; Plouffe, J F; Benson, R F; Fields, B S; Breiman, R F

    1996-01-01

    The Legionella Urinary Antigen EIA kit (Binax, Portland, Maine) was compared with the EQUATE RIA Legionella Urinary Antigen kit (Binax) for its ability to detect the presence of urinary antigens to Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1. Urine specimens from patients without Legionnaires' disease (n = 33) were negative by both methods (specificity, 100%). Twenty (77%) of 26 urine specimens from patients with Legionnaires' disease positive by the radioimmunoassay kit were also positive by the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) kit. If the cutoff for a positive EIA result were lowered to a ration of > or = 2.5, 23 of 26 (88%) urine specimens would have been positive by EIA and the specificity would remain 100%. Use of the EIA kit is an acceptable method for detecting L. pneumophila serogroup 1 urinary antigens by laboratories that do not want to handle radioactive materials. PMID:8735125

  12. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms.

  13. Antigen detection based on background fluorescence quenching immunochromatographic assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangjun; Xu, Yangyang; Yu, Jinsheng; Li, Jiutong; Zhou, Xuelei; Wu, Chuanyong; Ji, Qiuliang; Ren, Yuan; Wang, Liqun; Huang, Zhengyi; Zhuang, Hanling; Piao, Long; Head, Richard; Wang, Yajie; Lou, Jiatao

    2014-09-02

    Gold immunochromatographic assay (GICA) has been around for quite a while, but it is qualitative in the vast majority of applications. A fast, simple and quantitative GICA is in call for better medicine. In the current study, we have established a novel, quantitative GICA based on fluorescence quenching and nitrocellulose membrane background signals, called background fluorescence quenching immunochromatographic assay (bFQICA). Using model analyte alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), the present study assessed the performance of bFQICA in numerous assay aspects. With serial dilutions of the international AFP standard, standard curves for the calculation of AFP concentration were successfully established. At 10 and 100ngmL(-1) of the international AFP standard, the assay variability was defined with a coefficient of variance at 10.4% and 15.2%, respectively. For samples with extended range of AFP levels, bFQICA was able to detect AFP at as low as 1ngmL(-1). Fluorescence in bFQICA strips stayed constant over months. A good correlation between the results from bFQICA and from a well-established Roche electrochemiluminescence immunoassay was observed in 27 serum samples (r=0.98, p<0.001). In conclusion, our study has demonstrated distinctive features of bFQICA over conventional GICA, including utilization of a unique fluorescence ratio between nitrocellulose membrane background and specific signals (F1/F2) to ensure accurate measurements, combined qualitative and quantitative capabilities, and exceptionally high sensitivity for detection of very low levels of antigens. All of these features could make bFQICA attractive as a model for antigen-antibody complex based GICA, and could promote bFQICA to a broad range of applications for investigation of a variety of diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis with negative cryptococcal antigen: Evaluation of a new immunochromatographic detection assay.

    PubMed

    Opota, O; Desgraz, B; Kenfak, A; Jaton, K; Cavassini, M; Greub, G; Prod'hom, G; Giulieri, S

    2015-03-01

    Detection of cryptococcal antigen in serum or cerebrospinal fluid allows cryptococcal meningitis diagnosis within few hours with >90% sensitivity. In an HIV-positive patient with Cryptococcus neoformans meningitis, initial antigen detection by immunoagglutination was negative. We thus evaluated a new immunochromatographic detection assay that exhibited a higher sensitivity.

  15. Detection of eastern equine encephalomyelitis viral antigen in avian blood by enzyme immunoassay: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    Scott, T W; Olson, J G

    1986-05-01

    An enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was evaluated for its efficacy at detecting eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) virus in avian blood and brain specimens. Preliminary analysis of blood from experimentally infected house sparrows and naturally infected whooping cranes showed that EEE antigen could be detected with the EIA. Polyclonal mouse antibodies were selected for antigen capture, and rabbit antibodies were selected for antigen detection. Overnight antigen incubation increased sensitivity. The lower limit of EEE antigen detection was 10(3.5) TCID50/ml for a stock of virus. Sensitivity was 10% (2/20) for antigen detection in the blood of chicks inoculated with EEE virus less than 24 hr earlier. At 24 and 48 hr after infection, sensitivity was 100% (10/10). Sensitivity and specificity of antigen detection were excellent (100% for both) in house sparrows experimentally inoculated with EEE, Highlands J (HJ), western equine encephalomyelitis (WEE), or St. Louis encephalitis (SLE) virus and bled at 24 hr intervals. Cross-reactivity was observed, however, with high concentrations (10(5.5) TCID50/ml) of HJ virus. EEE antigen was detected in avian blood by the EIA after infectious virus had declined to undetectable levels. The EIA is a useful alternative to virus isolation in cell culture for diagnosis or detection of EEE virus infections in birds. The test has the advantages of being simple, rapid, and capable of detecting antigen in the absence of infectious virus.

  16. Gravimetric antigen detection utilizing antibody-modified lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Charlotte; Bramfeldt, Hanna; Wingren, Christer; Borrebaeck, Carl; Höök, Fredrik

    2005-10-01

    Lipid bilayers containing 5% nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) lipids supported on SiO2 have been used as a template for immobilization of oligohistidine-tagged single-chained antibody fragments (scFvs) directed against cholera toxin. It was demonstrated that histidine-tagged scFvs could be equally efficiently coupled to an NTA-Ni2+-containing lipid bilayer from a purified sample as from an expression supernatant, thereby providing a coupling method that eliminates time-consuming protein prepurification steps. Irrespective of whether the coupling was made from the unpurified or purified antibody preparation, the template proved to be efficient for antigen (cholera toxin) detection, verified using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. In addition, via a secondary amplification step using lipid vesicles containing GM1 (the natural membrane receptor for cholera toxin), the detection limit of cholera toxin was less than 750 pM. To further strengthen the coupling of scFvs to the lipid bilayer, scFvs containing two histidine tags, instead of just one tag, were also evaluated. The increased coupling strength provided via the bivalent anchoring significantly reduced scFv displacement in complex solutions containing large amounts of histidine-containing proteins, verified via cholera toxin detection in serum.

  17. Th2 Allergic Immune Response to Inhaled Fungal Antigens is Modulated By TLR-4-Independent Bacterial Products

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Jenna B.; Rinaldi, Lisa; Wargo, Matt; Allen, Gilman; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi; Poynter, Matthew E.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Rincon, Mercedes; Whittaker, Laurie A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Allergic airway disease is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and increased airway resistance. Fungal antigens are ubiquitous within the environment and are well know triggers of allergic disease. Bacterial products are also frequently encountered within the environment and may alter the immune response to certain antigens. The consequence of simultaneous exposure to bacterial and fungal products on the lung adaptive immune response has not been explored. Here we show that oropharyngeal aspiration of fungal lysates (Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus) promotes airway eosinophilia, secretion of Th2 cytokines and mucus cell metaplasia. In contrast, oropharyngeal exposure to bacterial lysates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) promotes airway inflammation characterized by neutrophils, Th1 cytokine secretion and no mucus production. More importantly, administration of bacterial lysates together with fungal lysates deviates the adaptive immune response to a Th1 type associated with neutrophilia and diminished mucus production. The immunomodulatory effect that bacterial lysates have on the response to fungi is TLR4-independent but MyD88 dependent. Thus, different types of microbial products within the airway can alter the host's adaptive immune response, and potentially impact the development of allergic airway disease to environmental fungal antigens. PMID:19224641

  18. Bacteriophage Amplification-Coupled Detection and Identification of Bacterial Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Christopher R.; Voorhees, Kent J.

    Current methods of species-specific bacterial detection and identification are complex, time-consuming, and often require expensive specialized equipment and highly trained personnel. Numerous biochemical and genotypic identification methods have been applied to bacterial characterization, but all rely on tedious microbiological culturing practices and/or costly sequencing protocols which render them impractical for deployment as rapid, cost-effective point-of-care or field detection and identification methods. With a view towards addressing these shortcomings, we have exploited the evolutionarily conserved interactions between a bacteriophage (phage) and its bacterial host to develop species-specific detection methods. Phage amplification-coupled matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was utilized to rapidly detect phage propagation resulting from species-specific in vitro bacterial infection. This novel signal amplification method allowed for bacterial detection and identification in as little as 2 h, and when combined with disulfide bond reduction methods developed in our laboratory to enhance MALDI-TOF-MS resolution, was observed to lower the limit of detection by several orders of magnitude over conventional spectroscopy and phage typing methods. Phage amplification has been combined with lateral flow immunochromatography (LFI) to develop rapid, easy-to-operate, portable, species-specific point-of-care (POC) detection devices. Prototype LFI detectors have been developed and characterized for Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agents of plague and anthrax, respectively. Comparable sensitivity and rapidity was observed when phage amplification was adapted to a species-specific handheld LFI detector, thus allowing for rapid, simple, POC bacterial detection and identification while eliminating the need for bacterial culturing or DNA isolation and amplification techniques.

  19. Label-free detection of antigens using implantable SERS nanosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Honggang; Baum, Caitlin E.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2005-11-01

    Monitoring the presence, production and transport of proteins inside individual living cells can provide vital information about cellular signaling pathways and the overall biological response of an organism. For example, cellular response to external stimuli, such as biological warfare (BW) agents, can be monitored by measuring interleukin-II (IL-2) expression inside T-cells as well as other chemical species associated with T-cell activation. By monitoring such species, pre-symptomatic detection of exposure to BW agents can be achieved, leading to significantly increased post-exposure survival rates. To accomplish such monitoring, we have developed and optimized implantable nanosphere-based nanosensors for the intracellular analysis of specific proteins in a label-free fashion. These sensors consist of 300-520 nm diameter silica spheres that have been coated with silver and antibodies to allow for trace protein detection via surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). They have been optimized for SERS response by evaluating the size of the nanospheres best suited to 632.8 nm laser excitation, as well as the various nanosensor fabrication steps (i.e., silver deposition process, antibody binding, etc.). During usage, the presence of the specific protein of interest is monitored by either directly measuring SERS signals associated with the protein and/or changes in the SERS spectrum of the antibodies resulting from conformational changes after antigen binding. In this work, human insulin was used as a model compound for initial studies into the sensitivity of these optimized nanosensors.

  20. Detection of bacterial spores with lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes.

    PubMed

    Cable, Morgan L; Kirby, James P; Levine, Dana J; Manary, Micah J; Gray, Harry B; Ponce, Adrian

    2009-07-15

    The detection of bacterial spores via dipicolinate-triggered lanthanide luminescence has been improved in terms of detection limit, stability, and susceptibility to interferents by use of lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes. Specifically, we compared the effectiveness of Sm, Eu, Tb, and Dy complexes with the macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetate (DO2A) to the corresponding lanthanide aquo ions. The Ln(DO2A)(+) binary complexes bind dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major constituent of bacterial spores, with greater affinity and demonstrate significant improvement in bacterial spore detection. Of the four luminescent lanthanides studied, the terbium complex exhibits the greatest dipicolinate binding affinity (100-fold greater than Tb(3+) alone, and 10-fold greater than other Ln(DO2A)(+) complexes) and highest quantum yield. Moreover, the inclusion of DO2A extends the pH range over which Tb-DPA coordination is stable, reduces the interference of calcium ions nearly 5-fold, and mitigates phosphate interference 1000-fold compared to free terbium alone. In addition, detection of Bacillus atrophaeus bacterial spores was improved by the use of Tb(DO2A)(+), yielding a 3-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio over Tb(3+). Out of the eight cases investigated, the Tb(DO2A)(+) binary complex is best for the detection of bacterial spores.

  1. Detection of Bacterial Spores with Lanthanide-Macrocycle Binary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Morgan L.; Kirby, James P.; Levine, Dana J.; Manary, Micah J.; Gray, Harry B.; Ponce, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The detection of bacterial spores via dipicolinate-triggered lanthanide luminescence has been improved in terms of detection limit, stability, and susceptibility to interferents by use of lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes. Specifically, we compared the effectiveness of Sm, Eu, Tb and Dy complexes with the macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetate (DO2A) to the corresponding lanthanide aquo ions. The Ln(DO2A)+ binary complexes bind dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major constituent of bacterial spores, with greater affinity and demonstrate significant improvement in bacterial spore detection. Of the four luminescent lanthanides studied, the terbium complex exhibits the greatest dipicolinate binding affinity (100-fold greater than Tb3+ alone, and 10-fold greater than other Ln(DO2A)+ complexes) and highest quantum yield. Moreover, the inclusion of DO2A extends the pH range over which Tb-DPA coordination is stable, reduces the interference of calcium ions nearly 5-fold, and mitigates phosphate interference 1000-fold compared to free terbium alone. In addition, detection of Bacillus atrophaeus bacterial spores was improved by the use of Tb(DO2A)+, yielding a 3-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio over Tb3+. Out of the eight cases investigated, the Tb(DO2A)+ binary complex is best for the detection of bacterial spores. PMID:19537757

  2. Identification of In Vivo-Induced Bacterial Protein Antigens during Human Infection with Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jason B.; Baresch-Bernal, Andrea; Rollins, Sean M.; Alam, Ashfaqul; LaRocque, Regina C.; Bikowski, Margaret; Peppercorn, Amanda F.; Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffery D.; Qadri, Firdausi; Calderwood, Stephen B.; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Breiman, Robert F.; Brooks, W. Abdullah; Ryan, Edward T.

    2006-01-01

    We applied an immunoscreening technique, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT), to identify immunogenic bacterial proteins expressed during human infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, the cause of typhoid fever. We were able to assign a functional classification to 25 of 35 proteins identified by IVIAT. Of these 25, the majority represent proteins with known or potential roles in the pathogenesis of S. enterica. These include proteins implicated in fimbrial structure and biogenesis, antimicrobial resistance, heavy metal transport, bacterial adhesion, and extracytoplasmic substrate trafficking as well as secreted hydrolases. The 10 remaining antigens represent proteins with unknown functions. Of the 35 identified antigens, four had no immunoreactivity when probed with control sera from individuals never exposed to serovar Typhi organisms; these four included PagC, TcfB, and two antigens of unknown function encoded by STY0860 and STY3683. PagC is a virulence factor known to be upregulated in vivo in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection of mice. TcfB is the major structural subunit of a fimbrial operon found in serovar Typhi with no homolog in serovar Typhimurium organisms. By examining differential immunoreactivities in acute- versus convalescent-phase human serum samples, we found specific anti-PagC and anti-TcfB immunoglobulin G responses in patients with serovar Typhi bacteremia. Serovar Typhi antigens identified by IVIAT warrant further evaluation for their contributions to pathogenesis, and they may have diagnostic, therapeutic, or preventive uses. PMID:16926408

  3. Identification of in vivo-induced bacterial protein antigens during human infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jason B; Baresch-Bernal, Andrea; Rollins, Sean M; Alam, Ashfaqul; LaRocque, Regina C; Bikowski, Margaret; Peppercorn, Amanda F; Handfield, Martin; Hillman, Jeffery D; Qadri, Firdausi; Calderwood, Stephen B; Hohmann, Elizabeth; Breiman, Robert F; Brooks, W Abdullah; Ryan, Edward T

    2006-09-01

    We applied an immunoscreening technique, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT), to identify immunogenic bacterial proteins expressed during human infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, the cause of typhoid fever. We were able to assign a functional classification to 25 of 35 proteins identified by IVIAT. Of these 25, the majority represent proteins with known or potential roles in the pathogenesis of S. enterica. These include proteins implicated in fimbrial structure and biogenesis, antimicrobial resistance, heavy metal transport, bacterial adhesion, and extracytoplasmic substrate trafficking as well as secreted hydrolases. The 10 remaining antigens represent proteins with unknown functions. Of the 35 identified antigens, four had no immunoreactivity when probed with control sera from individuals never exposed to serovar Typhi organisms; these four included PagC, TcfB, and two antigens of unknown function encoded by STY0860 and STY3683. PagC is a virulence factor known to be upregulated in vivo in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection of mice. TcfB is the major structural subunit of a fimbrial operon found in serovar Typhi with no homolog in serovar Typhimurium organisms. By examining differential immunoreactivities in acute- versus convalescent-phase human serum samples, we found specific anti-PagC and anti-TcfB immunoglobulin G responses in patients with serovar Typhi bacteremia. Serovar Typhi antigens identified by IVIAT warrant further evaluation for their contributions to pathogenesis, and they may have diagnostic, therapeutic, or preventive uses.

  4. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of excretory secretory antigens in humans with fascioliasis.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, A M; Finlay, C M

    1994-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been developed for the detection of Fasciola hepatica excretory secretory (ES) antigens in stool specimens of infected humans. The assay uses antibodies against F. hepatica ES antigens. A monoclonal antibody (ES78, mouse immunoglobulin G2a) was used to capture ES antigens, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody, peroxidase conjugate, was used to identify ES antigens. Thirteen of 14 patients with parasitological evidence of fascioliasis had a detectable concentration of ES antigens (more than 15 ng/ml). None of the stool specimens from controls and from patients with parasites other than F. hepatica showed a positive reaction, suggesting the absence of cross-reactions in this assay. When the 14 patients were retested 2 months after treatment, all of the specimens from the 11 parasitologically cured patients were negative by the antigen detection assay while the specimens from the 3 patients with persisting F. hepatica eggs in their stools remained positive. PMID:8126178

  5. Blastomyces Antigen Detection for Diagnosis and Management of Blastomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Novicki, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Blastomyces spp. antigen testing was evaluated over a 10-year period in an area where blastomycosis is endemic. Antigen testing was less sensitive than previously reported, but serial urine testing was useful in monitoring disease resolution or progression. Culture and cytopathology remain the gold standard for diagnosis and exclusion of this infection. PMID:26338856

  6. Blastomyces Antigen Detection for Diagnosis and Management of Blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Frost, Holly M; Novicki, Thomas J

    2015-11-01

    Blastomyces spp. antigen testing was evaluated over a 10-year period in an area where blastomycosis is endemic. Antigen testing was less sensitive than previously reported, but serial urine testing was useful in monitoring disease resolution or progression. Culture and cytopathology remain the gold standard for diagnosis and exclusion of this infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Pre-treatment with heat facilitates detection of antigen of Dirofilaria immitis in canine samples.

    PubMed

    Little, Susan E; Munzing, Candace; Heise, Steph R; Allen, Kelly E; Starkey, Lindsay A; Johnson, Eileen M; Meinkoth, James; Reichard, Mason V

    2014-06-16

    Diagnosis of Dirofilaria immitis infection in dogs is largely dependent on detection of antigen in canine serum, plasma, or whole blood, but antigen may be bound in immune complexes and thus not detected. To develop a model for antigen blocking, we mixed serum from a microfilaremic, antigen-positive dog with that of a hypergammaglobulinemic dog not currently infected with D. immitis and converted the positive sample to antigen-negative; detection of antigen was restored when the mixed sample was heat-treated, presumably due to disruption of antigen/antibody complexes. A blood sample was also evaluated from a dog that was microfilaremic and for which microfilariae were identified as D. immitis by morphologic examination. Antigen of D. immitis was not detected in this sample prior to heating but the sample was strongly positive after heat treatment of whole blood. Taken together, our results indicate that blood samples from some dogs may contain factors that inhibit detection of antigen of D. immitis, and that heat treatment of these samples prior to testing could improve the sensitivity of these assays in some patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-labeled QCM Biosensor for Bacterial Detection using Carbohydrate and Lectin Recognitions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhihong; Huang, Mingchuan; Xiao, Caide; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Wang, Peng G.

    2008-01-01

    High percentages of harmful microbes or their secreting toxins bind to specific carbohydrate sequences on human cells at the recognition and attachment sites. A number of studies also show that lectins react with specific structures of bacteria and fungi. In this report, we take advantage of the fact that a high percentage of microorganisms have both carbohydrate and lectin binding pockets at their surface. We demonstrate here for the first time that a carbohydrate non-labeled mass sensor in combination with lectin-bacterial O-antigen recognition can be used for detection of high molecular weight bacterial targets with remarkably high sensitivity and specificity. A functional mannose self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in combination with lectin Con A was used as molecular recognition elements for the detection of E. coli W1485 using Quartz Crytsal Microbalance (QCM) as a transducer. The multivalent binding of Concanavalin A (Con A) to the Escherichia coli (E. coli) surface O-antigen favors the strong adhesion of E. coli to mannose modified QCM surface by forming bridges between these two. As a result, the contact area between cell and QCM surface increases that leads to rigid and strong attachment. Therefore it enhances the binding between E. coli and the mannose. Our results show a significant improvement of the sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate QCM biosensor with a experimental detection limit of a few hundred bacterial cells. The linear range is from 7.5 × 102 to 7.5 × 107 cells/mL that is four decade wider than the mannose alone QCM sensor. The change of damping resistances for E. coli adhesion experiments was no more than 1.4% suggesting that the bacterial attachment was rigid, rather than a viscoelastic behavior. Little non-specific binding was observed for Staphylococcus aureus and other proteins (Fetal Bovine serum, Erythrina cristagalli lectin). Our approach not only overcomes the challenges of applying QCM technology for bacterial detection but

  9. A magnetic Gram stain for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Budin, Ghyslain; Chung, Hyun Jung; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2012-07-27

    Magnetizing: Bacteria are often classified into gram-positive and gram-negative strains by staining with crystal violet (CV). The described bioorthogonal modification of CV with trans-cyclooctene (TCO) can be used to render gram-positive bacteria magnetic with tetrazine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNP-Tz). This method allows class-specific automated magnetic detection and magnetic separation.

  10. Stable reagent for the detection of antibody to the specific fraction I antigen of Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed

    Rust, J H; Berman, S; Habig, W H; Marshall, J D; Cavanaugh, D C

    1972-04-01

    A stable hemagglutinating antigen for detection of fraction I (FR-I) antibody of Yersinia pestis (Pasteurella pestis) is described. The antigen was prepared by sensitizing tanned, pyruvaldehyde-treated sheep erythrocytes (PAT SRBC) with FR-I antigen. Preliminary standardization by titration of each lot of FR-I was required to minimize the effect of molecular heterogeneity of specific FR-I antigen and to eliminate nonspecific reactions caused by the presence of a minor antigenic contaminant. In tests with sera from rabbits, dogs, and humans, FR-I PAT SRBC were as reactive as the previously employed standard antigen, FR-I-sensitized tanned erythrocytes. Fluid suspensions of FR-I PAT SRBC stored at 4 C for 3 months, or lyophilized preparations stored at ambient temperature for 6 months, showed no loss in antigenic activity.

  11. A bacterial protease inhibitor protects antigens delivered in oral vaccines from digestion while triggering specific mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Andrés Esteban; Coria, Lorena Mirta; Carabajal, Marianela Verónica; Delpino, María Victoria; Risso, Gabriela Sofía; Cobiello, Paula Gonzalez; Rinaldi, Jimena; Barrionuevo, Paula; Bruno, Laura; Frank, Fernanda; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Briones, Gabriel; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Pasquevich, Karina Alejandra; Cassataro, Juliana

    2015-12-28

    We report here that a bacterial protease inhibitor from Brucella spp. called U-Omp19 behaves as an ideal constituent for a vaccine formulation against infectious diseases. When co-administered orally with an antigen (Ag), U-Omp19: i) can bypass the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract by inhibiting stomach and intestine proteases and consequently increases the half-life of the co-administered Ag at immune inductive sites: Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes while ii) it induces the recruitment and activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and increases the amount of intracellular Ag inside APCs. Therefore, mucosal as well as systemic Ag-specific immune responses, antibodies, Th1, Th17 and CD8(+) T cells are enhanced when U-Omp19 is co-administered with the Ag orally. Finally, this bacterial protease inhibitor in an oral vaccine formulation confers mucosal protection and reduces parasite loads after oral challenge with virulent Toxoplasma gondii.

  12. Detection of membrane-bound and soluble antigens by magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mikkel Schou; Howard, Emily; Lu, Shulin; Richard, Matthew; Gregory, Mark; Ogembo, Gordon; Mazor, Ofer; Gorelik, Pavel; Shapiro, Nathan I; Sharda, Anish V; Ghiran, Ionita

    2017-09-14

    Magnetic levitation is a technique for measuring the density and the magnetic properties of objects suspended in a paramagnetic field. We describe a novel magnetic levitation-based method that can specifically detect cell membrane-bound and soluble antigens by measurable changes in levitation height that result from the formation of antibody-coated bead and antigen complex. We demonstrate our method's ability to sensitively detect an array of membrane-bound and soluble antigens found in blood, including T-cell antigen CD3, eosinophil antigen Siglec-8, red blood cell antigens CD35 and RhD, red blood cell-bound Epstein-Barr viral particles, and soluble IL-6, and validate the results by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy performed in parallel. Additionally, employing an inexpensive, single lens, manual focus, wifi-enabled camera, we extend the portability of our method for its potential use as a point-of-care diagnostic assay.

  13. Bacterial Detection & Identification Using Electrochemical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Halford, Colin; Gau, Vincent; Churchill, Bernard M.; Haake, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical sensors are widely used for rapid and accurate measurement of blood glucose and can be adapted for detection of a wide variety of analytes. Electrochemical sensors operate by transducing a biological recognition event into a useful electrical signal. Signal transduction occurs by coupling the activity of a redox enzyme to an amperometric electrode. Sensor specificity is either an inherent characteristic of the enzyme, glucose oxidase in the case of a glucose sensor, or a product of linkage between the enzyme and an antibody or probe. Here, we describe an electrochemical sensor assay method to directly detect and identify bacteria. In every case, the probes described here are DNA oligonucleotides. This method is based on sandwich hybridization of capture and detector probes with target ribosomal RNA (rRNA). The capture probe is anchored to the sensor surface, while the detector probe is linked to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). When a substrate such as 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) is added to an electrode with capture-target-detector complexes bound to its surface, the substrate is oxidized by HRP and reduced by the working electrode. This redox cycle results in shuttling of electrons by the substrate from the electrode to HRP, producing current flow in the electrode. PMID:23644406

  14. Detection of Blastomyces dermatitidis antigen in patients with newly diagnosed blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bariola, J Ryan; Hage, Chadi A; Durkin, Michelle; Bensadoun, Eric; Gubbins, Paul O; Wheat, L Joseph; Bradsher, Robert W

    2011-02-01

    Blastomycosis is a serious and potentially fatal infection, and diagnosis can be difficult at times. We evaluated the diagnostic utility of a commercially available assay for detection of Blastomyces dermatitidis antigen, recently modified to permit quantitation, in subjects with newly diagnosed blastomycosis. Twenty-three of 27 (85.1%) subjects had detectable B. dermatitidis antigenuria. In 2 of these 23, positive results were obtained after concentration of the urine specimen. Nine of 11 (81.8%) subjects had detectable B. dermatitidis antigen in serum, including 3 subjects with negative results before treatment of serum with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and positive results after EDTA treatment. B. dermatitidis antigen was not detected in specimens from 50 control subjects but was detected in 15 patients with histoplasmosis. B. dermatitidis antigen was detected in most of the patients with blastomycosis and can be a useful tool for timely diagnosis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Detection Of Bacterial Endosymbionts In Clinical Acanthamoeba Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Iovieno, Alfonso; Ledee, Dolena R.; Miller, Darlene; Alfonso, Eduardo C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To determine the presence of four clinically relevant bacterial endosymbionts in Acanthamoeba isolates obtained from patients with Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) and the possible contribution of endosymbionts to the pathogenesis of AK. Design Experimental study Participants Acanthamoeba isolates (N=37) recovered from cornea and contact lens paraphernalia of 23 patients with culture proven AK and 1 environmental isolate. Methods Acanthamoeba isolates were evaluated for the presence of microbial endosymbionts belonging to the bacterial genera Legionella, Pseudomonas, Mycobacteria and Chlamydia using molecular techniques (Polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis, fluorescent in situ hybridization) and transmission electron microscopy. Corneal toxicity and virulence of Acanthamoeba isolates with and without endosymbionts were compared using a cytopathic effect (CPE) assay of human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Initial visual acuity (VA), location and characteristics of the infiltrate, time to detection of the infection and symptoms duration at presentation were evaluated in all patients. Main Outcome Measures Prevalence and potential pathobiology of bacterial endosymbionts detected in Acanthamoeba isolates recovered from AK. Results Twenty-two of the 38 (59.4%) cultures examined contained at least one bacterial endosymbiont. One isolate contained two endosymbionts, Legionella and Chlamydia, confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Corneal toxicity (CPE) was significantly higher for Acanthamoebae hosting endosymbionts compared to isolates without endosymbionts (p<0.05). Corneal pathogenic endosymbionts such as Pseudomonas and Mycobacterium enhanced Acanthamoeba CPE significantly more than Legionella (p<0.05). In the presence of bacterial endosymbionts, there was a trend toward worse initial VA (p>0.05), central location (p<0.05), absence of radial perineuritis (p<0.05), delayed time to detection (p>0.05) and longer symptoms duration at

  16. Evaluation of a rapid immunochromatographic ODK0501 assay for detecting Streptococcus pneumoniae antigens in the sputum of pneumonia patients with positive S. pneumoniae urinary antigens.

    PubMed

    Mukae, Hiroshi; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Noguchi, Shingo; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yamasaki, Kei; Tokuyama, Susumu; Inoue, Naoyuki; Nishida, Chinatsu; Kawanami, Yukiko; Ogoshi, Takaaki; Orihashi, Takeshi; Yoshii, Chiharu; Ishimoto, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    A novel, rapid and noninvasive test (ODK0501, RAPIRUN(®)Streptococcus pneumoniae) uses polyclonal antibodies to detect C polysaccharide of S. pneumoniae derived from sputum samples using an immunochromatographic assay. We evaluated its usefulness in Japanese patients with pneumonia who exhibited positive urinary antigen tests for S. pneumoniae (BinaxNOW(®)S. pneumoniae). Forty adult patients with pneumonia treated between May 2011 and August 2013 were enrolled. Bacterial cultures, Gram staining and ODK0501 assays of sputum as well as urinary antigen tests for S. pneumoniae using urine samples obtained from the same patients were performed upon admission, the fourth day after starting antimicrobial treatment and at the end of the antimicrobial treatment. Twenty-seven of the 40 patients were positive for ODK0501, while a negative result for ODK0501 was associated with low-quality sputum samples according to the Geckler classification of sputum. The sensitivity and specificity of the ODK0501 assay in the 40 patients were 90.9% and 61.1%, respectively, based on the culture results. The results obtained with this kit were more favorable than those observed on Gram staining. The ODK0501 assay also showed a rapid reaction to the disappearance of S. pneumoniae in the sputum samples, while approximately 80% of the patients exhibited persistent positive results on the urinary antigen detection tests at the end of treatment. The ODK0501 test is a noninvasive, rapid and accurate tool for diagnosing respiratory infections caused by S. pneumoniae, although good quality sputum must be obtained prior to adequate treatment with antibiotics. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk of underdiagnosing amebic dysentery due to false-negative Entamoeba histolytica antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Escamilla, Pilar; Solé, Roser; Llovet, Teresa; Soriano, Germán; Muñoz, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica antigen assays on stool are widely used to diagnose amebiasis. We report a case of confirmed amebic colitis with a false-negative antigen detection that became positive after treatment. Our results indicate that these assays may underdiagnose acute amebic infection when used alone and should be used cautiously.

  18. Increased detection of Dirofilaria immitis antigen in cats after heat pretreatment of samples.

    PubMed

    Gruntmeir, Jeff M; Adolph, Chris B; Thomas, Jennifer E; Reichard, Mason V; Blagburn, Byron L; Little, Susan E

    2017-10-01

    Objectives To determine whether pretreating diagnostic samples with heat increases the detection of Dirofilaria immitis antigen in adult cats, we evaluated feline serum and plasma samples collected in heartworm-endemic areas of the southern United States. Methods Commercial microtiter well assays for detection of D immitis antigen were used to evaluate serum or plasma samples from 385 shelter and free-roaming cats from the southcentral and southeastern United States before and after heat treatment; commercial antibody tests were performed on a subset of samples. Results Prior to sample heat treatment, 1/220 (0.5%) shelter cats and 4/165 (2.4%) free-roaming cats had detectable D immitis antigen. After heat pretreatment, the detection rate increased to 13/220 (5.9%) and 13/165 (7.9%), respectively. Antibody reactive to D immitis was significantly more common ( P <0.001) in the serum of cats that were antigen positive after heat treatment (10/13; 76.9%) than serum from cats that remained antigen negative after heat treatment (22/163; 13.5%). Conclusions and relevance Heat pretreatment of feline samples increased antigen detection by commercial assays for D immitis and improved overall concordance of antigen and antibody test results in antigen-positive samples in this population. Although further work to investigate the specificity of D immitis antigen assays when using pre-treated samples is warranted, this approach may be useful in the diagnosis of heartworm infection in individual cats and may increase the accuracy of surveys based on antigen detection.

  19. Sensitivity and Specificity of Histoplasma Antigen Detection by Enzyme Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Lauren; Cook, Audrey; Hanzlicek, Andrew; Harkin, Kenneth; Wheat, Joseph; Goad, Carla; Kirsch, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of an antigen enzyme immunoassay (EIA) on urine samples for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs. This retrospective medical records review included canine cases with urine samples submitted for Histoplasma EIA antigen assay between 2007 and 2011 from three veterinary institutions. Cases for which urine samples were submitted for Histoplasma antigen testing were reviewed and compared to the gold standard of finding Histoplasma organisms or an alternative diagnosis on cytology or histopathology. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and the kappa coefficient and associated confidence interval were calculated for the EIA-based Histoplasma antigen assay. Sixty cases met the inclusion criteria. Seventeen cases were considered true positives based on identification of the organism, and 41 cases were considered true negatives with an alternative definitive diagnosis. Two cases were considered false negatives, and there were no false positives. Sensitivity was 89.47% and the negative predictive value was 95.35%. Specificity and the positive predictive value were both 100%. The kappa coefficient was 0.9207 (95% confidence interval, 0.8131-1). The Histoplasma antigen EIA test demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs.

  20. Induction of bacterial antigen-specific colitis by a simplified human microbiota consortium in gnotobiotic interleukin-10-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Eun, Chang Soo; Mishima, Yoshiyuki; Wohlgemuth, Steffen; Liu, Bo; Bower, Maureen; Carroll, Ian M; Sartor, R Balfour

    2014-06-01

    We evaluated whether a simplified human microbiota consortium (SIHUMI) induces colitis in germfree (GF) 129S6/SvEv (129) and C57BL/6 (B6) interleukin-10-deficient (IL-10(-/-)) mice, determined mouse strain effects on colitis and the microbiota, examined the effects of inflammation on relative bacterial composition, and identified immunodominant bacterial species in "humanized" IL-10(-/-) mice. GF wild-type (WT) and IL-10(-/-) 129 and B6 mice were colonized with 7 human-derived inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related intestinal bacteria and maintained under gnotobiotic conditions. Quantification of bacteria in feces, ileal and colonic contents, and tissues was performed using 16S rRNA gene selective quantitative PCR. Colonic segments were scored histologically, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-12p40, and IL-17 levels were measured in supernatants of unstimulated colonic tissue explants and of mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells stimulated by lysates of individual or aggregate bacterial strains. Relative bacterial species abundances changed over time and differed between 129 and B6 mice, WT and IL-10(-/-) mice, luminal and mucosal samples, and ileal and colonic or fecal samples. SIHUMI induced colitis in all IL-10(-/-) mice, with more aggressive colitis and MLN cell activation in 129 mice. Escherichia coli LF82 and Ruminococcus gnavus lysates induced dominant effector ex vivo MLN TH1 and TH17 responses, although the bacterial mucosal concentrations were low. In summary, this study shows that a simplified human bacterial consortium induces colitis in ex-GF 129 and B6 IL-10(-/-) mice. Relative concentrations of individual SIHUMI species are determined by host genotype, the presence of inflammation, and anatomical location. A subset of IBD-relevant human enteric bacterial species preferentially stimulates bacterial antigen-specific TH1 and TH17 immune responses in this model, independent of luminal and mucosal bacterial concentrations.

  1. Detection and quantification of pharaoh ant antigens in household dust samples as newly identified aeroallergens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Cheol-Woo; Song, Jae-Seok; Choi, Soo-Young; Park, Jung-Won; Hong, Chein-Soo

    2007-01-01

    The widespread house ant, Monomorium pharaonis (pharaoh ant, PA), was recently identified as a potential cause of respiratory allergies. However, there are no reports of the distribution of PA allergens in various environments. We developed specific ELISA inhibition assays and measured the distribution and amount of PA antigens in household dust samples. Floor dust was collected at 3-month intervals from 56 homes in Seoul over a 1-year period. PA antigens in fine dusts were quantified by ELISA inhibition assays using rabbit anti-PA sera, and specific IgE to PA antigens in residents' serum was measured by ELISA. In 18 of the 56 homes (32.1%), PA antigen was detected in at least 1 floor dust sample either from the living room or the kitchen. Levels of PA antigens showed seasonal variations with peaks in autumn and winter. The detection rate of PA antigens was significantly higher in homes with visual evidence of PA infestations (70%) than in homes without such infestations (23.9%; p < 0.05). However, a significant amount of PA antigens was still detected in uninfested homes. Thirteen of 113 (11.5%) residents were positive for PA-specific IgE. PA-specific IgE was detected more frequently in residents living in PA antigen-positive homes (19.6%) than in antigen-negative homes (4.8%; p < 0.05). A considerable level of PA antigens is distributed in the indoor environment. Therefore, inhalant exposure to PA antigens can occur during domestic activities. These results suggest that PAs might be a significant source of aeroallergens in households. 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles for the Detection and Quantitative Analysis of Cell Surface Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Abdolahi, Mohammad; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Sayyed Hamid; Laurent, Sophie; Sermeus, Corine; Gruettner, Cordula

    2013-01-01

    Cell surface antigens as biomarkers offer tremendous potential for early diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutic response in a variety of diseases such as cancers. In this research, a simple, rapid, accurate, inexpensive, and easily available in vitro assay based on magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic cell separation principle was applied to identify and quantitatively analyze the cell surface antigen expression in the case of prostate cancer cells. Comparing the capability of the assay with flow cytometry as a gold standard method showed similar results. The results showed that the antigen-specific magnetic cell separation with antibody-coated magnetic nanoparticles has high potential for quantitative cell surface antigen detection and analysis. PMID:23484112

  3. [Comparison of five commercial assays for the detection of Legionella pneumophila antigens in urine].

    PubMed

    de Ory, Fernando; Minguito, Teodora

    2009-02-01

    Antigenuria detection is the main approach for diagnosing Legionella infections. The aim of this study was to compare 5 commercially available methods for detecting Legionella pneumophila soluble antigens in urine. Seventy-one urine samples were tested, 62 from patients with bacterial infection and 9 from patients with respiratory syncytial virus infection. All samples were assayed for the presence of L. pneumophila by immunoenzymatic (ELISA) (Binax and Bartels), and immunochromatographic (IC) (Binax, SAS and Uni-Gold) methods. Identical results (35 positive and 17 negative) were obtained by the 5 assays in 52 samples (73.2%). Samples showing discrepant results were classified by the majority criterion, and/or other laboratory results (serology), and/or epidemiological findings. On this basis, 51 samples were ultimately classified as positive, and 20 as negative. Sensitivity values of ELISA-Binax, ELISA-Bartels, IC-Binax, IC-SAS and IC-Uni-Gold were 80.4, 100, 82.4, 86.3, and 70.6%, respectively. Corresponding values for specificity were 90, 95, 100, 95 and 100%. The results indicate that the methods compared are all adequate for diagnosing Legionella infection, although some have certain limitations regarding sensitivity.

  4. Homogeneous electrochemical detection of hippuric acid in urine based on the osmium-antigen conjugate.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Won-Yong; Choi, Young-Bong; Kim, Hyug-Han

    2013-07-22

    A homogeneous electrochemical immunoassay is based on the interaction of osmium-antigen conjugate with its antibody. The novelty presented herein is the direct conjugation of the osmium complex to a small antigen and the application of the quantitative analysis of the antigen and its antibody as the electrical signal for homogeneous immunoassay. The small antigen chosen is hippuric acid (HA), a major urinary metabolite in toluene-exposed humans. As a redox mediator, [Os(4,4'-dimethoxy-2,2'-bipyridine)2(4-aminomethylpyridine-HA)Cl](+/2+) (Os-HA antigen) has been synthesized and characterized on screen-printed carbon electrodes. The synthesized Os-HA antigen shows reversible redox peaks at E(½)=0.056 V versus Ag/AgCl. The homogeneous competitive immunoassay relies on the interaction between Os-HA antigen conjugate and free antigen to its antibody, which can generate electrical signals linearly proportional to the free antigen monitored by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry in the range of 10 μg mL(-1) to 5.12 mg mL(-1). The cutoff concentration of HA in urine samples is 2.0 mg mL(-1), so the method can be used to develop a HA immunosensor. Moreover, the proposed homogeneous electrochemical immunoassay method can be applied to detect low concentrations of small antigens found in the healthcare area.

  5. Aptamer-assisted novel technologies for detecting bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh, Naser; Memar, Mohammad Yousef; Moaddab, Seyyed Reza; Kafil, Hossein Samadi

    2017-09-01

    Nowadays, all people are at risk of infectious diseases that are mainly caused by bacteria causing infection. There is a permanent demand for an appropriate detection method that is affordable, practical, careful, rapid, sensitive, efficient and economical. Aptamers are single stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides, which can be recognized specifically and bind to their target molecules and also, be exploited in diagnostic applications. Recently, aptamer-based systems have offered great potentials in applications for the recognition of several important bacterial pathogens from clinical and food specimens. There are several reports appraising the diagnostic applicability of aptamer-based systems for the detection of pathogens. As for its excellent sensitivity, as well as its rapid and efficient detectability, this technique may be practical to indicate bacterial targets with less sample size and may consume less time than traditional methods These systems offer a promising approach for the sensitive and quick detection of food-borne and clinical agents. This review provides an overview of aptamer-based methods as a novel approach for detecting bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection of bacterial signaling molecules in liquid or gaseous environments.

    PubMed

    Edmonson, Peter; Stubbs, Desmond; Hunt, William

    2011-01-01

    The detection of bacterial signaling molecules in liquid or gaseous environments has been occurring in nature for billions of years. More recently, man-made materials and systems has also allowed for the detection of small molecules in liquid or gaseous environments. This chapter will outline some examples of these man-made detection systems by detailing several acoustic-wave sensor systems applicable to quorum sensing. More importantly though, a comparison will be made between existing bacterial quorum sensing signaling systems, such as the Vibrio harveyi two-component system and that of man-made detection systems, such as acoustic-wave sensor systems and digital communication receivers similar to those used in simple cell phone technology. It will be demonstrated that the system block diagrams for either bacterial quorum sensing systems or man-made detection systems are all very similar, and that the established modeling techniques for digital communications and acoustic-wave sensors can also be transformed to quorum sensing systems.

  7. Analysis of humoral immune response of animals exposed to bacterial antigens

    PubMed Central

    Pugazhenthi, M.; Valivittan, K.

    2014-01-01

    From the Aeromonas hydrophila strain, five different types of antigens such as heat killed antigen, whole cell antigen, heat killed antigen with antiserum, whole cell antigen with antiserum and nucleotide antigens were prepared and injected into the experimental fish (Catla catla) groups for the study of immunomodulation. Analysis of immunogenicity of antigens against the fish Catla catla was estimated. The A. hydrophila produced β hemolytic pattern on the blood agar plate. B lymphocyte counts using rosette forming assay revealed a significant decrement in pathogens exposed fishes as compared to controls. Fishes exposed to pathogenic strains (1/10th sublethal concentration) for 3 weeks showed a reduction in PFC. The effect or pathogenic antigens in direct spleenic plaque forming cells (1 g M producing cells) showed a reduction in the secondary plaque forming cell in the first 3 weeks and a time- and dose-dependent decrease in primary and secondary PFC response. A remarkable observation enhancement in B cell production due to immune complex of antigens was noted in the present study. The enhancement of this type of immune responses confirms the potential of immune complexes to be used as vaccines. PMID:26155142

  8. Heat treatment prior to testing allows detection of antigen of Dirofilaria immitis in feline serum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of Dirofilaria immitis infection in cats is complicated by the difficulty associated with reliable detection of antigen in feline blood and serum samples. Methods To determine if antigen-antibody complex formation may interfere with detection of antigen in feline samples, we evaluated the performance of four different commercially available heartworm tests using serum samples from six cats experimentally infected with D. immitis and confirmed to harbor a low number of adult worms (mean = 2.0). Sera collected 168 (n = 6), 196 (n = 6), and 224 (n = 6) days post infection were tested both directly and following heat treatment. Results Antigen was detected in serum samples from 0 or 1 of 6 infected cats using the assays according to manufacturer’s directions, but after heat treatment of serum samples, as many as 5 of 6 cats had detectable antigen 6–8 months post infection. Antibodies to D. immitis were detected in all six infected cats by commercial in-clinic assay and at a reference laboratory. Conclusions These results indicate that heat treatment of samples prior to testing can improve the sensitivity of antigen assays in feline patients, supporting more accurate diagnosis of this infection in cats. Surveys conducted by antigen testing without prior heat treatment of samples likely underestimate the true prevalence of infection in cats. PMID:24411014

  9. T cell-dependent IgM Memory B Cells Generated During Bacterial Infection are Required for IgG Responses to Antigen Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Jennifer L.; Racine, Rachael; McBride, Kevin M.; Winslow, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Immunological memory has long considered to be harbored in B cells that express high affinity class-switched IgG. IgM-positive memory B cells can also be generated following immunization, although their physiological role has been unclear. Here we show that bacterial infection elicited a relatively large population of IgM memory B cells that were uniquely identified by their surface expression of CD11c, CD73, and PD-L2. The cells lacked expression of cell surface markers typically expressed by GC B cells, were CD138-negative, and did not secrete antibody ex vivo. The population was also largely quiescent, and accumulated somatic mutations. The IgM memory B cells were located in the region of the splenic marginal zone, and were not detected in blood or other secondary lymphoid organs. Generation of the memory cells was CD4 T cell-dependent, and required IL-21R signaling. In vivo depletion of the IgM memory B cells abrogated the IgG recall responses to specific antigen challenge, demonstrating that the cell population was required for humoral memory, and underwent class switch recombination following antigen encounter. Our findings demonstrate that T cell-dependent IgM memory B cells can be elicited at high frequency, and can play an important role in maintaining long-term immunity during bacterial infection. PMID:23804710

  10. Immunohistochemical detection of Brucella melitensis antigens in cases of naturally occurring abortions in sheep.

    PubMed

    Ilhan, Fatma; Yener, Zabit

    2008-11-01

    Brucella melitensis, a worldwide zoonotic pathogen, is a significant cause of abortion in sheep and goats in some countries. The present study was carried out to determine, by immunohistochemistry, the presence of B. melitensis antigens in 110 naturally occurring aborted sheep fetuses. Sections of lung, liver, kidney, and spleen of each fetus were stained with immunoperoxidase to detect Brucella antigens. Brucella melitensis antigens were detected in 33 of 110 fetuses (30%). In the 33 positive cases, Brucella antigens were found in lung (25 [22.7%]), liver (21 [19%]), spleen (13 [11.8%]), and kidney (6 [5.4%]). Microscopic studies demonstrated that Brucella antigens were mainly located in the cytoplasm of macrophages and neutrophils of the lung, and in the cytoplasm of macrophages in the portal infiltrates and Kupffer cells of the liver. It was concluded that immunohistochemistry in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues is a useful tool for the diagnosis of spontaneous ovine abortion caused by B. melitensis.

  11. Antigen detection assay for identification of Penicillium marneffei infection.

    PubMed

    Chaiyaroj, Sansanee C; Chawengkirttikul, Runglawan; Sirisinha, Stitaya; Watkins, Pramuan; Srinoulprasert, Yuttana

    2003-01-01

    Two recently produced monoclonal antibodies were used to develop an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for rapid diagnosis of Penicillium marneffei. The method was evaluated with 53 patients with culture-confirmed penicilliosis and 240 controls. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the ELISA were 92.45, 97.5, and 96.59%, respectively.

  12. [Serological detection of Rhesus antigen D in blood traces from Rh-negative (cde) people].

    PubMed

    Sakharov, R S; Kondratova, I V; Fedulova, M V; Krest'ianova, I N

    2002-01-01

    A D-like structure was serologically detected on the internal side of Rh-negative (cde) erythrocyte membrane. This structure is absolutely inaccessible for anti-D antibodies in morphologically intact liquid blood erythrocytes. In hemolyzed erythrocytes of blood stains this antigenic structure, serologically identified as Rh antigen D, is accessible for binding with anti-D antibodies and for detection by the absorption-elution test, particularly so after blood stain treatment with proteases.

  13. Liquid crystals as optical amplifiers for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Zafiu, C; Hussain, Z; Küpcü, S; Masutani, A; Kilickiran, P; Sinner, E-K

    2016-06-15

    Interactions of bacteria with target molecules (e.g. antibiotics) or other microorganisms are of growing interest. The first barrier for targeting gram-negative bacteria is layer of a Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Liquid crystal (LC) based sensors covered with LPS monolayers, as presented in this study, offer a simple model to study and make use of this type of interface for detection and screening. This work describes in detail the production and application of such sensors based on three different LPS that have been investigated regarding their potential to serve as sensing layer to detect bacteria. The LPS O127:B8 in combination with a LC based sensor was identified to be most useful as biomimetic sensing surface. This LPS/LC combination interacts with three different bacteria species, one gram-positive and two gram-negative species, allowing the detection of bacterial presence regardless from their viability. It could be shown that even very low bacterial cell numbers (minimum 500 cell ml(-1)) could be detected within minutes (maximum 15 min). The readout mechanism is the adsorption of bacterial entities on surface bond LPS molecules with the LC serving as an optical amplifier.

  14. Genetic Diversity of O-Antigens in Hafnia alvei and the Development of a Suspension Array for Serotype Detection

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhifeng; Niedziela, Tomasz; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Cao, Boyang; Wang, Tianwei; Xu, Lingling; Yang, Baopeng; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Hafnia alvei is a facultative and rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Although it has been more than 50 years since the genus was identified, very little is known about variations among Hafnia species. Diversity in O-antigens (O-polysaccharide, OPS) is thought to be a major factor in bacterial adaptation to different hosts and situations and variability in the environment. Antigenic variation is also an important factor in pathogenicity that has been used to define clones within a number of species. The genes that are required to synthesize OPS are always clustered within the bacterial chromosome. A serotyping scheme including 39 O-serotypes has been proposed for H. alvei, but it has not been correlated with known OPS structures, and no previous report has described the genetic features of OPS. In this study, we obtained the genome sequences of 21 H. alvei strains (as defined by previous immunochemical studies) with different lipopolysaccharides. This is the first study to show that the O-antigen gene cluster in H. alvei is located between mpo and gnd in the chromosome. All 21 of the OPS gene clusters contain both the wzx gene and the wzy gene and display a large number of polymorphisms. We developed an O serotype-specific wzy-based suspension array to detect all 21 of the distinct OPS forms we identified in H. alvei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the genetic features of H. alvei antigenic variation and to develop a molecular technique to identify and classify different serotypes. PMID:27171009

  15. Genetic Diversity of O-Antigens in Hafnia alvei and the Development of a Suspension Array for Serotype Detection.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhifeng; Niedziela, Tomasz; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Cao, Boyang; Wang, Tianwei; Xu, Lingling; Yang, Baopeng; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Hafnia alvei is a facultative and rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Although it has been more than 50 years since the genus was identified, very little is known about variations among Hafnia species. Diversity in O-antigens (O-polysaccharide, OPS) is thought to be a major factor in bacterial adaptation to different hosts and situations and variability in the environment. Antigenic variation is also an important factor in pathogenicity that has been used to define clones within a number of species. The genes that are required to synthesize OPS are always clustered within the bacterial chromosome. A serotyping scheme including 39 O-serotypes has been proposed for H. alvei, but it has not been correlated with known OPS structures, and no previous report has described the genetic features of OPS. In this study, we obtained the genome sequences of 21 H. alvei strains (as defined by previous immunochemical studies) with different lipopolysaccharides. This is the first study to show that the O-antigen gene cluster in H. alvei is located between mpo and gnd in the chromosome. All 21 of the OPS gene clusters contain both the wzx gene and the wzy gene and display a large number of polymorphisms. We developed an O serotype-specific wzy-based suspension array to detect all 21 of the distinct OPS forms we identified in H. alvei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the genetic features of H. alvei antigenic variation and to develop a molecular technique to identify and classify different serotypes.

  16. Serogroup-Specific Bacterial Engineered Glycoproteins as Novel Antigenic Targets for Diagnosis of Shiga Toxin-Producing-Escherichia coli-Associated Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Melli, Luciano J.; Ciocchini, Andrés E.; Caillava, Ana J.; Vozza, Nicolás; Chinen, Isabel; Rivas, Marta; Feldman, Mario F.

    2014-01-01

    Human infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a major cause of postdiarrheal hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a life-threatening condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. E. coli O157:H7 is the dominant STEC serotype associated with HUS worldwide, although non-O157 STEC serogroups can cause a similar disease. The detection of anti-O157 E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in combination with stool culture and detection of free fecal Shiga toxin considerably improves the diagnosis of STEC infections. In the present study, we exploited a bacterial glycoengineering technology to develop recombinant glycoproteins consisting of the O157, O145, or O121 polysaccharide attached to a carrier protein as serogroup-specific antigens for the serological diagnosis of STEC-associated HUS. Our results demonstrate that using these antigens in indirect ELISAs (glyco-iELISAs), it is possible to clearly discriminate between STEC O157-, O145-, and O121-infected patients and healthy children, as well as to confirm the diagnosis in HUS patients for whom the classical diagnostic procedures failed. Interestingly, a specific IgM response was detected in almost all the analyzed samples, indicating that it is possible to detect the infection in the early stages of the disease. Additionally, in all the culture-positive HUS patients, the serotype identified by glyco-iELISAs was in accordance with the serotype of the isolated strain, indicating that these antigens are valuable not only for diagnosing HUS caused by the O157, O145, and O121 serogroups but also for serotyping and guiding the subsequent steps to confirm diagnosis. PMID:25472487

  17. A direct antigen-binding assay for detection of antibodies against native epitopes using alkaline phosphatase-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Baranov, Konstantin; Volkova, Olga; Chikaev, Nikolai; Mechetina, Ludmila; Laktionov, Pavel; Najakshin, Alexander; Taranin, Alexander

    2008-03-20

    We describe a simple and efficient method to detect antibodies against native epitopes following immunization with denatured proteins and peptides. With this method, soluble antigens genetically fused with placental alkaline phosphatase (AP) are used as probes to detect antibodies immobilized on nitrocellulose membranes. The AP-tagged proteins can be produced in sufficient amounts using transient transfection of eukaryotic cells with an appropriate cDNA fragment in a commercial AP-tag vector. The intrinsic thermo-stable phosphatase activity of a tagged protein obviates the need for its purification. To evaluate the method, three recently identified proteins of the FcR family, FCRLA, FCRL1, and FCRL4, were fused with AP and tested in a reaction with various polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies raised by immunization with bacterially produced antigens and peptide conjugates. All the three probes demonstrated high specificity in analysis of immune sera and hybridoma supernatants. Sensitivity of the assay varied depending on antibody tested and, in some cases, was in the subnanogram range. The results obtained show that AP-tagged proteins are useful tools for discrimination of antibodies against native epitopes when production of antigen in its native conformation is laborious and expensive.

  18. Detection of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I in stool specimens by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, D G; Evans, D J; Clegg, S

    1980-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to detect and quantitate the fimbrial colonization factor antigen (CFA/I) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in stool specimens obtained from adult cases of diarrhea in which CFA/I-positive E. coli was the known causative agent. The inhibition method, or blocking technique, was used. In this method, a standardized dilution of human anti-CFA/I serum was preincubated with dilutions of stool extract before transfer to CFA/I-coated microtiter plate wells, and then ELISA was performed with alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin. CFA/I purified from E. coli strain H-10407 (O78:H11) was used. Acute-phase diarrheal stool specimens were found to contain approximately 3.0 mg of antigen (mean value) per g stool, whereas control (CFA/I-negative) specimens contained insignificant amounts (less than 0.03 mg/g) of antigen. Also, CFA/I was detected in culture fluids of CFA/I positive enterotoxigenic E. coli belonging to a variety of serotypes and was undetectable in similar preparations from P-strains (spontaneous CFA/I-negative derivatives) of the same test cultures. Equivalent results were obtained in ELISA tests by using bacterial cells taken from isolated colonies grown on CFA agar. These results indicate that the ELISA technique will be useful for the diagnosis of diarrhea caused by CFA/I-positive enterotoxigenic E. coli. PMID:7031075

  19. Molecular detection of bacterial contamination in gnotobiotic rodent units

    PubMed Central

    Packey, Christopher D; Shanahan, Michael T; Manick, Sayeed; Bower, Maureen A; Ellermann, Melissa; Tonkonogy, Susan L; Carroll, Ian M; Sartor, R Balfour

    2013-01-01

    Gnotobiotic rodents provide an important technique to study the functional roles of commensal bacteria in host physiology and pathophysiology. To ensure sterility, these animals must be screened frequently for contamination. The traditional screening approaches of culturing and Gram staining feces have inherent limitations, as many bacteria are uncultivable and fecal Gram stains are difficult to interpret. Thus, we developed and validated molecular methods to definitively detect and identify contamination in germ-free (GF) and selectively colonized animals. Fresh fecal pellets were collected from rodents housed in GF isolators, spontaneously contaminated ex-GF isolators, selectively colonized isolators and specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions. DNA isolated from mouse and rat fecal samples was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subjected to quantitative PCR (qPCR) using universal primers that amplify the 16S rRNA gene from all bacterial groups. PCR products were sequenced to identify contaminating bacterial species. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR profiles verified bacterial inoculation of selectively colonized animals. These PCR techniques more accurately detected and identified GF isolator contamination than current standard approaches. These molecular techniques can be utilized to more definitively screen GF and selectively colonized animals for bacterial contamination when Gram stain and/or culture results are un-interpretable or inconsistent. PMID:23887190

  20. Detection of non-jejuni and -coli Campylobacter Species from Stool Specimens with an Immunochromatographic Antigen Detection Assay

    PubMed Central

    Couturier, Brianne A.; Couturier, Marc Roger; Kalp, Kim J.

    2013-01-01

    The STAT! Campy immunochromatographic assay for Campylobacter antigen was compared to culture for 500 clinical stool specimens. Antigen was detected in six culture-negative, PCR-positive specimens. C. upsaliensis, a pathogenic species that is traditionally difficult to recover in routine stool cultures, was detected in two of these culture-negative specimens. This study provides evidence that antigen testing may cross-react with at least one additional non-jejuni and -coli Campylobacter species that may be missed by routine culture for campylobacteriosis. PMID:23554192

  1. Improved Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis by Combining Antigen and Antibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Sarah M.; Smedema, Melinda L.; Durkin, Michelle M.; Herman, Katie M.; Hage, Chadi A.; Fuller, Deanna; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis can be severe, especially following heavy inoculum exposure. Rapid diagnosis is critical and often possible by detection of antigen, but this test may be falsely negative in 17% of such cases. Antibody detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) may increase sensitivity and permit the measurement of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) classes of antibodies separately. Methods. Microplates coated with Histoplasma antigen were used for testing of serum from patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis and controls in the MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA. Results for IgG and IgM were reported independently. Results. IgG antibodies were detected in 87.5%, IgM antibodies in 67.5%, and IgG and/or IgM antibodies in 88.8% of patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis in this assay, while immunodiffusion, complement fixation, and antigen testing showed sensitivities of 55.0%, 73.1%, and 67.5%, respectively (n = 80). Combining antigen and antibody detection increased the sensitivity to 96.3%. Conclusions. The MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA offers increased sensitivity over current antibody tests while also allowing separate detection of IgG and IgM antibodies and complementing antigen detection. Combining antigen and EIA antibody testing provides an optimal method for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. PMID:26797210

  2. Improved Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis by Combining Antigen and Antibody Detection.

    PubMed

    Richer, Sarah M; Smedema, Melinda L; Durkin, Michelle M; Herman, Katie M; Hage, Chadi A; Fuller, Deanna; Wheat, L Joseph

    2016-04-01

    Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis can be severe, especially following heavy inoculum exposure. Rapid diagnosis is critical and often possible by detection of antigen, but this test may be falsely negative in 17% of such cases. Antibody detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) may increase sensitivity and permit the measurement of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) classes of antibodies separately. Microplates coated with Histoplasma antigen were used for testing of serum from patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis and controls in the MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA. Results for IgG and IgM were reported independently. IgG antibodies were detected in 87.5%, IgM antibodies in 67.5%, and IgG and/or IgM antibodies in 88.8% of patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis in this assay, while immunodiffusion, complement fixation, and antigen testing showed sensitivities of 55.0%, 73.1%, and 67.5%, respectively (n = 80). Combining antigen and antibody detection increased the sensitivity to 96.3%. The MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA offers increased sensitivity over current antibody tests while also allowing separate detection of IgG and IgM antibodies and complementing antigen detection. Combining antigen and EIA antibody testing provides an optimal method for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  3. Dysregulated luminal bacterial antigen-specific T-cell responses and antigen-presenting cell function in HLA-B27 transgenic rats with chronic colitis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Bi-Feng; Tonkonogy, Susan L; Hoentjen, Frank; Dieleman, Levinus A; Sartor, R Balfour

    2005-01-01

    HLA-B27/β2 microglobulin transgenic (TG) rats spontaneously develop T-cell-mediated colitis when colonized with normal commensal bacteria, but remain disease-free under germ-free conditions. We investigated regulation of in vitro T-cell responses to enteric bacterial components. Bacterial lysates prepared from the caecal contents of specific pathogen-free (SPF) rats stimulated interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production by TG but not non-TG mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells. In contrast, essentially equivalent amounts of interleukin-10 (IL-10) were produced by TG and non-TG cells. However, when cells from MLNs of non-TG rats were cocultured with TG MLN cells, no suppression of IFN-γ production was noted. Both non-TG and TG antigen-presenting cells (APC) pulsed with caecal bacterial lysate were able to induce IFN-γ production by TG CD4+ cells, although non-TG APC were more efficient than TG APC. Interestingly, the addition of exogenous IL-10 inhibited non-TG APC but not TG APC stimulation of IFN-γ production by cocultured TG CD4+ lymphocytes. Conversely, in the presence of exogenous IFN-γ, production of IL-10 was significantly lower in the supernatants of TG compared to non-TG APC cultures. We conclude that commensal luminal bacterial components induce exaggerated in vitro IFN-γ responses in HLA-B27 TG T cells, which may in turn inhibit the production of regulatory molecules, such as IL-10. Alterations in the production of IFN-γ, and in responses to this cytokine, as well as possible resistance of TG cells to suppressive regulation could together contribute to the development of chronic colitis in TG rats. PMID:16108823

  4. Comparison of techniques for the detection of monocyte specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Jager, M J; Thompson, J S; Claas, F H; Van Rood, J J

    1985-10-10

    Monocyte specific antigens are relevant in renal and bone marrow transplantation, but a reproducible monocyte-antigen system has not yet been recognized. In order to establish a sensitive test system with reproducible results in monocyte serology, 3 different monocyte cytotoxicity techniques were compared. In our hands the two-colour fluorescence test on post-Ficoll total leukocyte suspensions fulfilled the criteria. This technique was used to screen sera from multiparous women and renal transplant recipients for the presence of monocyte specific antibodies. By testing sera on cells from individuals who were HLA compatible with the serum donors, anti-HLA reactions were excluded. Several promising sera containing monocyte specific antibodies were identified, thus indicating the success of our approach.

  5. Western blot assay for quantitative and qualitative antigen detection in vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjai; Zheng, Hong; Mahajan, Babita; Kozakai, Yukiko; Morin, Merribeth; Locke, Emily

    2014-05-01

    Immunological methods for quantitative measurement, antigenic characterization, and monitoring the stability of active immunogenic component(s) are a critical need in the vaccine development process. This unit describes an enhanced chemiluminescence-based western blot for quantitative detection of Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (PfCSP), a major malaria candidate vaccine antigen. The most salient features of this assay are its high sensitivity and reproducibility; it can reliably detect ∼5 to 10 pg PfCSP expressed on native parasites or recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. Although described for a specific vaccine antigen, this assay should be applicable for any antigen-antibody combination for which relevant detection reagents are available. Detailed stepwise experimental procedures and methods for data acquisition and analysis are described. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Immunochemical characterization of EBV antigens detected by double immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    Sternås, L; Kallin, B; Luka, J; Klein, G

    1982-01-01

    Double immunodiffusion (Ouchterlony) tests gave regularly positive reactions when extracts of [35S]-methionine-labeled, n-butyrate-induced P3HR-1 cells were allowed to react with serum pools with high Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody titers from Burkitt lymphoma or nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients, but not with EBV antibody-negative sera. Similarly prepared extracts of noninduced P3HR-1 cells gave no precipitation lines with the antibody-positive sera. The composition of the precipitates was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and compared with immunoprecipitates obtained by indirect immunoprecipitation in solution. Three lines precipitated on the Ouchterlony plate were analyzed; these lines were located at close (a), intermediate (b), and distant (c) positions in relation to the antigen well. Precipitate (a) contained polypeptides with molecular weights of 165,000 (165K), 152K, 138K, 134K, 103K, and 55K. Precipitate (b) contained 152K and 138K as the major components, while 55K was relatively underrepresented. Precipitate (c) contained 90K and 55K as major components, while 152K was a minor component. The method is suitable for the study of possible subtype differences between defined antigenic components of the early and late EBV-determined antigen complexes.

  7. [Clinical value of a rapid respiratory syncytial virus antigen detection in point-of-care testing].

    PubMed

    Ding, Y X; Tian, R; Qian, Y; Sun, Y; Deng, J; Wang, F; Zhu, R N; Zhao, L Q

    2017-02-02

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of a rapid respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antigen detection in point-of-care testing (POCT). Method: A total of 209 specimens, including 78 throat swabs (TS) and 131 nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs), were collected from inpatients who visited the Children's Hospital Affiliated to the Capital Institute of Pediatrics and were diagnosed as acute respiratory infection from 5 January to 7 February, 2015. These specimens were tested for RSV by a rapid antigen detection kit which was compared with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and direct immunofluorescence assay (DFA) for RSV detection. Result: Compared with DFA for NPAs, the sensitivity and specificity of rapid antigen detection were 83.9% and 97.3%, respectively, with Kappa value of 0.86; Compared with RT-PCR, the sensitivity (NPAs, 74.2%; TS, 77.8%) and specificity (NPAs, 100.0%; TS, 92.0%) of rapid antigen detection were high, too, with Kappa value of 0.74 in NPAs and 0.62 in TS. However, the RSV positive rate of rapid antigen detection in TS (21.7%) from pediatric patients with acute lower respiratory tract infection was lower than that in NPAs (78.3%), as well as that of RT-PCR (7.3% in TS verse 78% in NPAs). The RSV rapid antigen detection kit can be finished in about 10 minutes. Conclusion: With characteristics of high specificity, high sensitivity, being rapid, efficient and easy to operate in comparison with DFA and RT-PCR, RSV rapid antigen detection in this study is suitable for POCT. For pediatric patients with acute respiratory tract infection, NPA was better than TS for RSV detection.

  8. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for a soluble antigen of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent for salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Mulcahy, D.

    1987-01-01

    A double-antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of a soluble fraction of Renibacterium salmoninarum was developed from components extracted from the supernatant of an R. salmoninarum broth culture. The Costar® Serocluster™ EIA microplate gave the highest absorbance and signal-to-noise ratios among seven types tested. Including Tween 80 in the wash buffer resulted in higher absorbances than Tween 20 when antigen was present. Background absorbance did not increase when Tween 80 was added to the wash buffer, but did when Tween 80 replaced Tween 20 in antigen and conjugate diluents. Adsorption of coating antibody peaked within 4 h at 37 °C and 16 h at 4 °C. Antigen attachment to antibody-coated microplate wells depended more on incubation temperature than duration; we adopted a 3-h incubation at 25 °C. Conjugate incubation for longer than 1 h at 37 °C or 3 h at 25 °C resulted in unacceptable background levels. No cross-reactions resulted from heat-extracted antigens of 10 other species of bacteria. The optimized ELISA is a 6-h test that enables detection of levels of soluble antigen as low as 2–20 ng.

  9. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  10. pH6 antigen (PsaA protein) of Yersinia pestis, a novel bacterial Fc-receptor.

    PubMed

    Zav'yalov, V P; Abramov, V M; Cherepanov, P G; Spirina, G V; Chernovskaya, T V; Vasiliev, A M; Zav'yalova, G A

    1996-05-01

    It was found that recombinant pH6 antigen (rPsaA protein) forming virulence-associated fimbriae on the surface of Yersinia pestis at pH 6.7 in host macrophage phagolysosomes or extracellularly in abscesses such as buboes, is a novel bacterial Fc-receptor. rPsaA protein displays reactivity with human IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 subclasses but does not react with rabbit, mouse and sheep IgG.

  11. Detection of serum anti-melanocyte antibodies and identification of related antigens in patients with vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M C; Liu, C G; Wang, D X; Zhan, Z

    2015-12-07

    We detected autoantibodies against melanocytes in serum samples obtained from 50 patients, including 4 with HBV, with vitiligo and identified the associated membrane antigens. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and anti-tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1) antibody levels were analyzed. The associated antigens in normal human melanocyte were identified by immunofluorescence. Autoantibodies against melanocyte membrane and cytoplasmic proteins were detected by western blot. Membrane antigens with higher frequencies were identified by protein mass spectrometry. The HSP70 and anti-TRP-1 antibody levels (N = 70; 10 with HBV) were detected by ELISA. The specific antigens were detected in melanocyte cytoplasm and membrane (40/50; 80% incidence; western blot). The autoantibodies reacted with several membrane antigens with approximate molecular weights (Mr) of 86,000, 75,000, 60,000, 52,000, and 44,000 (strip positive rates: 36, 58, 22, 2, and 2%, respectively). Thirty percent of the patients showed the presence of cytoplasmic antigens (Mr: 110,000, 90,000, 75,000, 50,000, and 400,000; strip positive rates: 12, 4, 12, 10, and 2%, respectively). Fifteen and 5% of the healthy subjects showed positive expression of membrane and cytoplasmic antigens, respectively. Protein mass spectrometry predicted membrane proteins with Mr of 86,000 and 75,000 and 60,000 to be Lamin A /C and Vimentin X1, respective. High titers of anti-TRP-1 antibody were detected and showed positive correlation with HSP70 (r = 0. 927, P < 0. 01). This study identified a novel membrane antigen associated with vitiligo, which might assist future investigations into autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo and formation of autoantibodies. HBV infection was correlated to vitiligo.

  12. [Detection of Neisseria meningitidis group B antigens by MB-Dot-Elisa test in patients with meningitis].

    PubMed

    Alkmin, M G; Landgraf, I M; Shimizu, S H

    1997-03-01

    Infection with Neisseria meningitidis group B has been difficult to detect, partly because this bacterial group's polysaccharide is a weak immunogen. This article describes work carried out to test a new procedure (MB-Dot-ELISA) employing a high-titered horse antiserum for detection of N. meningitidis group B antigens. The study assayed cerebrospinal fluid samples from 585 subjects, 574 with suspected meningitis cases and 11 with neurologic disorders. The results of the assay indicated a sensitivity of 0.991 and a specificity of 0.826. These results were superior to those obtained with latex agglutination and in substantial agreement with the results of counterimmunoelectrophoresis and bacteriologic methods. Overall, the MB-Dot-ELISA was found to be sensitive, inexpensive, and suitable for public health laboratory investigations.

  13. Fast and efficient detection of tuberculosis antigens using liposome encapsulated secretory proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Dileep; Haque, Shafiul; Tiwari, Ram P; Jawed, Arshad; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G

    2017-04-01

    A rapid and efficient diagnostic test was developed for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in serum samples of active tuberculosis (TB) and extrapulmonary TB patients via a liposomal agglutination-based method. A rapid card test has been developed to facilitate the recognition of high-affinity binding rabbit raised purified culture filtrate protein antibodies coupled on the surface of activated liposomal preparation. In the presence of TB antigens, the polyclonal antibodies bound to the liposomal particles demonstrate a visible agglutination reaction. The developed assay was simple, rapid, reliable, sensitive, and specific as a diagnostic test for the detection of antigens in serum samples of clinically confirmed cases of TB within 4-5 minutes' duration. The test was evaluated at different hospitals, medical colleges, and pathology centers, and involved 1483 participants. This investigation was conducted to detect the presence of these antigens during the period of active growth of the microorganism in serum samples for pulmonary TB and processed tissue biopsy for other extrapulmonary TB. Results obtained using this test were compared with acid-fast bacilli smear and culture results. Our study demonstrated that the newly developed liposome tuberculosis antigen card test detected antigens in our study population with approximately 97.48% sensitivity and 95.79% specificity. This is the first study to report the liposomal encapsulation of culture filtrate proteins from M. tuberculosis for diagnostic application. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Vander Ley, Brian L; Ridpath, Julia F; Sweiger, Shaun H

    2012-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle requires substantial quantities of known positive- and negative-sample material. The objective of this study was to determine what sections of bovine skin contained Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen. Two commercially available antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunoassays were used to test subsamples representing the entire skin of 3 persistently infected calves. Both assays detected Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen in the samples indicated for use by assay protocol. However, one assay identified all subsamples as positive, while the second assay identified 64.4% of subsamples as positive. These results show that use of samples other than those specified by the assay protocol must be validated for each individual assay. In this study, alternative sample sites and use of the entire hide for proficiency testing would be acceptable for only one of the assays tested.

  15. Antigenic differences between AKR lymphoma and thymus cells leading to detection of a tumor antigen associated with immunological enhancement.

    PubMed

    Laguens, R P; Colmerauer, M E; Segal, A; Pasqualini, C D

    1978-06-15

    In an experimental model conditioning for enhancement, an AKR lymphoma was made to grow in BALB/c mice, permitting the simultaneous comparison of tumor-bearing (progressor) and tumor-rejecting (regressor) animals. By immunofluorescence using as target AKR lymphoma and normal thymus cells, both acetone-fixed and unfixed, it was observed that the allogeneic progressor serum contained three antibodies, two of which could be asborbed by thymocytes while the other combined selectively with the acetone-fixed lymphoma target. This tumor-specific antibody could not be detected in regressor serum which, on the other hand, could be completely absorbed by thymocytes. The identification of this acetone-resistant tumor antigen led to the preparation of aceton-treated acellular lymphoma extracts: a precipitate was obtained which upon inoculation in BALB/c mice produced an antiserum that combined selectively with lymphoma targets. In vivo experiments showed that pretreatment with this antigen led to a significant increase in allogeneic tumor incidence, 76% as compared to 37% in the controls. It is concluded that in this allogeneic model, an acetone-resistant tumor-specific antigen and the corresponding antibody are involved in tumor enhancement.

  16. Comprehensive assessment for serum treatment for single antigen test for detection of HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaohai; Reinsmoen, Nancy L

    2017-09-09

    The single antigen test is widely used in the field of transplantation to determine the specificity of HLA antibodies. It will be beneficial to standardize the procedure of the single antigen test among HLA laboratories. It is not uncommon that single antigen testing on native sera fails to detect antibodies with very high concentrations. It has been shown that cleavage products of activated complement components may mask strongly binding antibodies in single antigen testing. To overcome inhibition by the activated complement products, sera are pretreated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), dithiothreitol (DTT), or heat inactivation before single antigen testing. However, no studies have been published to systemically compare the impact of these treatments on single antigen testing. The aim of this study is to understand the different effects these treatments may have on single antigen test results. We found that mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) obtained from sera treated with EDTA and heat inactivation were nearly identical, while DTT treatment was less potent to remove the inhibition. In addition, sera dilution did not further increase MFI of antibodies after EDTA treatment. Our results provide guidance to choose a pretreatment reagent for single antigen testing, and to compare studies obtained from laboratories using different treatments. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The antigen 43 structure reveals a molecular Velcro-like mechanism of autotransporter-mediated bacterial clumping

    PubMed Central

    Heras, Begoña; Totsika, Makrina; Peters, Kate M.; Paxman, Jason J.; Gee, Christine L.; Jarrott, Russell J.; Perugini, Matthew A.; Whitten, Andrew E.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation and biofilm formation are critical mechanisms for bacterial resistance to host immune factors and antibiotics. Autotransporter (AT) proteins, which represent the largest group of outer-membrane and secreted proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, contribute significantly to these phenotypes. Despite their abundance and role in bacterial pathogenesis, most AT proteins have not been structurally characterized, and there is a paucity of detailed information with regard to their mode of action. Here we report the structure–function relationships of Antigen 43 (Ag43a), a prototypic self-associating AT protein from uropathogenic Escherichia coli. The functional domain of Ag43a displays a twisted L-shaped β-helical structure firmly stabilized by a 3D hydrogen-bonded scaffold. Notably, the distinctive Ag43a L shape facilitates self-association and cell aggregation. Combining all our data, we define a molecular “Velcro-like” mechanism of AT-mediated bacterial clumping, which can be tailored to fit different bacterial lifestyles such as the formation of biofilms. PMID:24335802

  18. Discrepancies between Antigen and Polymerase Chain Reaction Tests for the Detection of Rotavirus and Norovirus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jae-Seok

    2016-05-01

    We compared the results of an antigen test (ELISA) with those of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of rotavirus and norovirus in stool specimens. Rotavirus and norovirus antigen-positive stool specimens were collected, and rotavirus and norovirus PCRs were performed on these specimens. Of the 325 rotavirus antigen-positive specimens, 200 were positive for both assays and 125 were PCR negative. Of 286 norovirus antigen-positive specimens, 51 were PCR negative. Comparison of the lower limit of detection showed that rotavirus PCR was 16 times more sensitive and norovirus PCR was over 4,000 times more sensitive than the ELISA. Discrepant results between ELISA and PCR were common, and the possibility of false-positive and false-negative results should be considered with rotavirus and norovirus assays.

  19. Rapid Bacterial Detection via an All-Electronic CMOS Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Nikkhoo, Nasim; Cumby, Nichole; Gulak, P Glenn; Maxwell, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The timely and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases is one of the greatest challenges currently facing modern medicine. The development of innovative techniques for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens in point-of-care facilities using low-cost, portable instruments is essential. We have developed a novel all-electronic biosensor that is able to identify bacteria in less than ten minutes. This technology exploits bacteriocins, protein toxins naturally produced by bacteria, as the selective biological detection element. The bacteriocins are integrated with an array of potassium-selective sensors in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor technology to provide an inexpensive bacterial biosensor. An electronic platform connects the CMOS sensor to a computer for processing and real-time visualization. We have used this technology to successfully identify both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria commonly found in human infections.

  20. Rapid Bacterial Detection via an All-Electronic CMOS Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhoo, Nasim; Cumby, Nichole; Gulak, P. Glenn; Maxwell, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The timely and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases is one of the greatest challenges currently facing modern medicine. The development of innovative techniques for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens in point-of-care facilities using low-cost, portable instruments is essential. We have developed a novel all-electronic biosensor that is able to identify bacteria in less than ten minutes. This technology exploits bacteriocins, protein toxins naturally produced by bacteria, as the selective biological detection element. The bacteriocins are integrated with an array of potassium-selective sensors in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor technology to provide an inexpensive bacterial biosensor. An electronic platform connects the CMOS sensor to a computer for processing and real-time visualization. We have used this technology to successfully identify both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria commonly found in human infections. PMID:27618185

  1. Detection of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens from Individual Filth Flies

    PubMed Central

    Pava-Ripoll, Monica; Pearson, Rachel E.G.; Miller, Amy K.; Ziobro, George C.

    2015-01-01

    There is unanimous consensus that insects are important vectors of foodborne pathogens. However, linking insects as vectors of the pathogen causing a particular foodborne illness outbreak has been challenging. This is because insects are not being aseptically collected as part of an environmental sampling program during foodborne outbreak investigations and because there is not a standardized method to detect foodborne bacteria from individual insects. To take a step towards solving this problem, we adapted a protocol from a commercially available PCR-based system that detects foodborne pathogens from food and environmental samples, to detect foodborne pathogens from individual flies.Using this standardized protocol, we surveyed 100 wild-caught flies for the presence of Cronobacter spp., Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes and demonstrated that it was possible to detect and further isolate these pathogens from the body surface and the alimentary canal of a single fly. Twenty-two percent of the alimentary canals and 8% of the body surfaces from collected wild flies were positive for at least one of the three foodborne pathogens. The prevalence of Cronobacter spp. on either body part of the flies was statistically higher (19%) than the prevalence of S. enterica (7%) and L.monocytogenes (4%). No false positives were observed when detecting S. enterica and L. monocytogenes using this PCR-based system because pure bacterial cultures were obtained from all PCR-positive results. However, pure Cronobacter colonies were not obtained from about 50% of PCR-positive samples, suggesting that the PCR-based detection system for this pathogen cross-reacts with other Enterobacteriaceae present among the highly complex microbiota carried by wild flies. The standardized protocol presented here will allow laboratories to detect bacterial foodborne pathogens from aseptically collected insects, thereby giving public health officials another line of evidence to find out how

  2. Detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens from individual filth flies.

    PubMed

    Pava-Ripoll, Monica; Pearson, Rachel E G; Miller, Amy K; Ziobro, George C

    2015-02-13

    There is unanimous consensus that insects are important vectors of foodborne pathogens. However, linking insects as vectors of the pathogen causing a particular foodborne illness outbreak has been challenging. This is because insects are not being aseptically collected as part of an environmental sampling program during foodborne outbreak investigations and because there is not a standardized method to detect foodborne bacteria from individual insects. To take a step towards solving this problem, we adapted a protocol from a commercially available PCR-based system that detects foodborne pathogens from food and environmental samples, to detect foodborne pathogens from individual flies.Using this standardized protocol, we surveyed 100 wild-caught flies for the presence of Cronobacter spp., Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes and demonstrated that it was possible to detect and further isolate these pathogens from the body surface and the alimentary canal of a single fly. Twenty-two percent of the alimentary canals and 8% of the body surfaces from collected wild flies were positive for at least one of the three foodborne pathogens. The prevalence of Cronobacter spp. on either body part of the flies was statistically higher (19%) than the prevalence of S. enterica (7%) and L.monocytogenes (4%). No false positives were observed when detecting S. enterica and L. monocytogenes using this PCR-based system because pure bacterial cultures were obtained from all PCR-positive results. However, pure Cronobacter colonies were not obtained from about 50% of PCR-positive samples, suggesting that the PCR-based detection system for this pathogen cross-reacts with other Enterobacteriaceae present among the highly complex microbiota carried by wild flies. The standardized protocol presented here will allow laboratories to detect bacterial foodborne pathogens from aseptically collected insects, thereby giving public health officials another line of evidence to find out how

  3. Changes in the antigenic and molecular structure of. gamma. -irradiated bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Suba, E.A.; Tsai, C.M.; Elin, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    Ionization radiation is known to alter the biological properties of LPS. The author treated a highly purified LPS from E. coli in aqueous medium with /sup 60/Co-radiation. The changes in the antigenic and molecular structure of LPS were studied in double immunodiffusion/immunoelectrophoresis (rabbit antiserum) and sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), respectively. Untreated LPS revealed two major antigenic components and, due to varying lengths of the O-polysaccharide side chain, a series of homopolymers (SDS-PAGE). High doses of ..gamma..-radiation destroyed all antigenic reactivities and all stainable bands on SDS-PAGE. However, lower doses of radiation were selective. Disappearance of the more radiation-sensitive, electrophoretically fast-migrating antigenic component paralleled elimination of the long O-side chain containing molecules. The relatively radiation-resistant, less anodic second antigenic component cross-reacted with LPS of another E. coli strain and corresponded to LPS molecules composed of R-core and lipid A (SDS-PAGE). These findings explain the in vivo loss of antibody protection from shock before non-specific resistance with ..gamma..-irradiation of LPS.

  4. Focused specificity of intestinal TH17 cells towards commensal bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Torchinsky, Miriam B; Gobert, Michael; Xiong, Huizhong; Xu, Mo; Linehan, Jonathan L; Alonzo, Francis; Ng, Charles; Chen, Alessandra; Lin, Xiyao; Sczesnak, Andrew; Liao, Jia-Jun; Torres, Victor J; Jenkins, Marc K; Lafaille, Juan J; Littman, Dan R

    2014-06-05

    T-helper-17 (TH17) cells have critical roles in mucosal defence and in autoimmune disease pathogenesis. They are most abundant in the small intestine lamina propria, where their presence requires colonization of mice with microbiota. Segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) are sufficient to induce TH17 cells and to promote TH17-dependent autoimmune disease in animal models. However, the specificity of TH17 cells, the mechanism of their induction by distinct bacteria, and the means by which they foster tissue-specific inflammation remain unknown. Here we show that the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) repertoire of intestinal TH17 cells in SFB-colonized mice has minimal overlap with that of other intestinal CD4(+) T cells and that most TH17 cells, but not other T cells, recognize antigens encoded by SFB. T cells with antigen receptors specific for SFB-encoded peptides differentiated into RORγt-expressing TH17 cells, even if SFB-colonized mice also harboured a strong TH1 cell inducer, Listeria monocytogenes, in their intestine. The match of T-cell effector function with antigen specificity is thus determined by the type of bacteria that produce the antigen. These findings have significant implications for understanding how commensal microbiota contribute to organ-specific autoimmunity and for developing novel mucosal vaccines.

  5. Immunological detection of nucleic acids and antibodies to nucleic acids and nuclear antigens by counterimmunoelectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Schur, P. H.; De Angelis, Diane; Jackson, Jean M.

    1974-01-01

    A counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIEP) technique has been developed for the rapid, simple, specific detection of nucleic acids as antigens, or for the detection of precipitating antibodies to nucleic acids or nuclear antigens. The majority of precipitins could be detected within 1 hr. As little as 0·0015 μg of antigen per ml (e.g. poly A: poly U) could be detected. Specificity of rabbit antisera to nucleic acids was demonstrated by selective reactions using a panel of polynucleotides. 1091 patient sera were examined for precipitins to DNA, single-stranded DNA, nucleoprotein and calf thymus nucleoprotein. Precipitins to DNA were found in 42% of systemic lupus erythematosus sera, 9% of rheumatoid arthritis sera and 4% of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis sera. Results with the CIEP method showed equal sensitivity as results obtained by complement fixation or binding assays, but were more sensitive than double diffusion in agar (Ouchterlony). PMID:4549570

  6. A comparison of the antigen detection ELISA and parasite detection for diagnosis of Trypanosoma evansi infections in camels.

    PubMed

    Waitumbi, J N; Nantulya, V M

    1993-09-01

    Two herds of 60 camels each, living in Trypanosoma evansi endemic areas, were selected and studied for a period of 18 months. Animals in one herd were treated prophylactically with quinapyramine prosalt (May and Baker, Dagenham, UK), while those in the other herd were treated individually with quinapyramine dimethylsulphate (May and Baker, Dagenham, UK) when proven parasitaemic. The herd on prophylaxis was sampled for antigen and patent infection monthly. The other herd was sampled weekly for patent infection and fortnightly for antigen. The results obtained could be divided into four categories. The first category comprised cases (52 out of 61) in which the presence of trypanosome antigens could be correlated with parasitological diagnosis. In 80% of these animals the antigens disappeared from the circulation within a period of 30 days following chemotherapy. The second category comprised those animals with parasitologically proven infections but which did not have antigens in their sera. This was observed in nine camels, seven of which were from the herd that was being examined weekly for the presence of trypanosomes. These were considered to be animals in early infection, as the subsequent sera were also negative for anti-trypanosome antibodies and immune complexes. The third category comprised camels which were antigen-positive but aparasitaemic. Sera from these animals were also positive for anti-trypanosome antibodies, indicating that antigen-positivity was a true reflection of trypanosome infections in these animals. The last category comprised pre-weaned camel calves which appeared to have some form of protection against trypanosomiasis, as evidenced by the absence of trypanosomes, antigens and antibodies throughout the early period of their lives. Only occasional antigenaemia was found in a few calves. It is concluded that trypanosome antigen detection may give a more accurate idea of the prevalence of T. evansi infections than does whole parasite

  7. Immuno-PCR: Very sensitive antigen detection by means of specific antibody-DNA conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, T.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. )

    1992-10-02

    An antigen detection system, termed immuno-polymerase chain reaction (immuno-PCR), was developed in which a specific DNA molecule is used as the marker. A streptavidin-protein A chimera that possesses tight and specific binding affinity both for biotin and immunoglobulin G was used to attach a biotinylated DNA specifically to antigen-monoclonal antibody complexes that had been immobilized on microtiter plate wells. Then, a segment of the attached DNA was amplified by PCR. Analysis of the PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis after staining with ethidium bromide allowed as few as 580 antigen molecules to be readily and reproducibly detected. Direct comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of a chimera-alkaline phosphatase conjugate demonstrates that enhancement in detection sensitivity was obtained with the use of immuno-PCR. Given the enormous amplification capability and specificity of PCR, this immuno-PCR technology has a sensitivity greater than any existing antigen detection system and, in principle, could be applied to the detection of single antigen molecules.

  8. Validity of rapid antigen detection testing in group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Küçük, Oznur; Biçer, Suat; Giray, Tuba; Cöl, Defne; Erdağ, Gülay Ciler; Gürol, Yeşim; Kaspar, Ciğdem E; Vitrinel, Ayça

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the utility of rapid antigen detection testing (RADT) for the diagnosis of group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal tonsillopharyngitis in children, and to detect the sensitivity and specificity of rapid antigen detection of group A beta-hemolytic streptococci from throat specimen compared with throat culture. Rapid antigen detection and throat culture results for group A beta-hemolytic streptococci from outpatients attending university hospital between 1st January 2011 and 31st of December 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. The antigen test negative-throat culture positive patients were investigated for streptococcal carriage. For this purpose, the throat culture results taken from these patients were reviewed after treatment. Eight hundred and ninetytwo children were included in the studywith a mean age of 5.34 y. There were 639 and 253 children in two groups with age of 0-6 and 7-17 y, RADT sensitivity and specificity were found to be 59.5 % and 97.2 %, respectively. The positive predictive value was 87.1 %, whereas negative predictive value was 88.4 %. After treatment of 74 patients with throat culture positive and antigen test negative. Group A beta-hemolytic streptococci were isolated in 12 of them (16.2 %) and accepted as a carrier. The low sensitivity of the RADT may be related to streptococcal carriage in some patients. The throat culture should be repeated after treatment to detect streptococcal carriage.

  9. [Contribution of urinary pneumococcal antigen detection combined with the research of legionella antigen for diagnosis of pneumonia in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Honoré, S; Trillard, M; Ould-Hocine, Z; Lesprit, P; Deforges, L; Legrand, P

    2004-10-01

    Bacteriological confirmation of pneumonia (PNM) in hospitalized patients is often erratic or belated. Because of importance of prognosis, early adaptation of treatment requires an empirical antimicrobial therapy (generally aminopenicillin and macrolide combination). The starting therapeutic strategy should profit by a fast and reliable test asserting a pneumococcal etiology. The Binax Now S. pneumoniae (BNP) test allows an urinary pneumococcal antigen (UPA) detection using an immunochromatographic membrane assay within 15 minutes. We first evaluated the BNP test for 28 patients with pneumococcal PNM proved by culture, and 118 negative control patients without PNM. The BNP test was then evaluated by testing urine from 158 hospitalized patients with a clinical picture of PNM (community-acquired: 90, nosocomial: 68) for whom a research of urinary Legionella antigen (Binax Now) was prescribed and was positive for only two cases. 57 patients (36.1%) were hospitalized in ICU. The sensitivity was 71.4% (85.7% for the 21 bacteriemic PNM), and the specificity was 98.3%; that is consistent with previous published data. Among the 158 patients with PNM, UPA was detected in 17 cases (10.8%): 15 within the community-acquired PNM (16.7%) and 2 (2.9%) within the nosocomial cases. The pneumococcal etiology was confirmed by bacteriological samples in 7/17 patients (6 by blood cultures). The 10 others showed clinical and radiological features in agreement with a pneumococcal PNM. Among the 141 patients with negative AUP, S. pneumoniae was isolated from 6 of them (2 in blood cultures). The Binax Now S. pneumoniae test allowed a fast and reliable etiological diagnosis in 10.8% of hospitalized PNM (16.7% of the community-acquired cases) having a research of urinary Legionella antigen (conceiving with severity factors). So it could conduce to an improved adjustment of the starting antimicrobial therapy of hospitalized adult patients with PNM.

  10. Novel aptamer-linked nanoconjugate approach for detection of waterborne bacterial pathogens: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Gulshan; Manohar, Murli; Adegoke, Anthony Ayodeji; Stenström, Thor Axel; Shanker, Rishi

    2017-01-01

    The lack of microbiologically safe water in underdeveloped nations is the prime cause of infectious disease outbreaks. The need for the specific identification and detection of microorganisms encourages the development of advanced, rapid, sensitive and highly specific methods for the monitoring of pathogens and management of potential risk to human health. The rapid molecular assays based on detection of specific molecular signatures offer advantages over conventional methods in terms of specificity and sensitivity but require complex instrumentation and skilled personnel. Nanotechnology is an emerging area and provides a robust approach for the identification of pathogenic microorganism utilizing the peculiar properties of nanomaterials, i.e. small size (1-100 nm) and large surface area. This emerging technology promises to fulfill the urgent need of a novel strategy to enhance the bacterial identification and quantitation in the environment. In this context, the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles, their plasmonic shifts, and changes in magnetic properties have been utilized for the simple and cost-effective detection of bacterial nucleic acids, antigens and toxins with quite improved sensitivity. One of the promising leads to develop an advance detection method might be the coupling of nucleic acid aptamers (capable of interacting specifically with bacteria, protozoa, and viruses) with nanomaterials. Such aptamer-nano conjugate can be used for the specific recognition of infectious agents in different environmental matrices. This review summarizes the application of nanotechnology in the area of pathogen detection and discusses the prospects of coupling nucleic acid aptamers with nanoparticles for the specific detection of targeted pathogens.

  11. Selective detection of bacterial layers with terahertz plasmonic antennas

    PubMed Central

    Berrier, Audrey; Schaafsma, Martijn C.; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Bergquist, Jonas; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Current detection and identification of micro-organisms is based on either rather unspecific rapid microscopy or on more accurate but complex and time-consuming procedures. In a medical context, the determination of the bacteria Gram type is of significant interest. The diagnostic of microbial infection often requires the identification of the microbiological agent responsible for the infection, or at least the identification of its family (Gram type), in a matter of minutes. In this work, we propose to use terahertz frequency range antennas for the enhanced selective detection of bacteria types. Several microorganisms are investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy: a fast, contactless and damage-free investigation method to gain information on the presence and the nature of the microorganisms. We demonstrate that plasmonic antennas enhance the detection sensitivity for bacterial layers and allow the selective recognition of the Gram type of the bacteria. PMID:23162730

  12. Immunofluorescence versus ELISA for the detection of antinuclear antigens.

    PubMed

    Rondeel, Jan M M

    2002-05-01

    Determining the presence and specificity of antinuclear antigens (ANA) is a challenge to a laboratory involved in the diagnosis of connective tissue disease (CTD). The immunofluorescent technique (IF), once considered the gold standard, is more and more displaced by ELISA. ELISA can be fully automated and the interpretation does not require the extensive experience needed in IF. However, literature in which both techniques are compared does not give unequivocal conclusions that ELISA indeed performs better. The clue as to which technique is best in the cascade testing of ANA, is given by its clinical value, not only by its technical and logistic performance. Selective test ordering is strongly recommended to increase the predictive value of these tests. The pros and cons of both techniques are discussed.

  13. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Vectored Multi-Antigen Tuberculosis Vaccine Limits Bacterial Proliferation in Mice following a Single Intranasal Dose

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious health problem worldwide, and an urgent need exists to improve or replace the available vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Most vaccination protocols adapt two or three doses to induce long-term lasting immunity. Our previous study showed that the naked DNA encoding the triple-antigen fusion TFP846 (Rv3615c-Mtb10.4-Rv2660c) induced robust T cellular immune responses accompanying four inoculations against mycobacteria infection. However, a number of compliance issues exist in some areas lacking the appropriate medical infrastructure with multiple administrations. In this study, a novel vesicular stomatitis virus expressing TFP846 (VSV-846) was developed and the immune responses elicited by VSV-846 were evaluated. We observed that intranasal delivery of VSV-846 induced a potent antigen-specific T cell response following a single dose and VSV-846 efficiently controlled bacterial growth to levels ~10-fold lower than that observed in the mock group 6 weeks post-infection in BCG-infected mice. Importantly, mice immunized with VSV-846 provided long-term protection against mycobacteria infection compared with those receiving p846 or BCG immunization. Increased memory T cells were also observed in the spleens of VSV-846-vaccinated mice, which could be a potential mechanism associated with long-term protective immune response. These findings supported the use of VSV as an antigen delivery vector with the potential for TB vaccine development. PMID:28224119

  14. Gibbs motif sampling: detection of bacterial outer membrane protein repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A. F.; Liu, J. S.; Lawrence, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The detection and alignment of locally conserved regions (motifs) in multiple sequences can provide insight into protein structure, function, and evolution. A new Gibbs sampling algorithm is described that detects motif-encoding regions in sequences and optimally partitions them into distinct motif models; this is illustrated using a set of immunoglobulin fold proteins. When applied to sequences sharing a single motif, the sampler can be used to classify motif regions into related submodels, as is illustrated using helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. Other statistically based procedures are described for searching a database for sequences matching motifs found by the sampler. When applied to a set of 32 very distantly related bacterial integral outer membrane proteins, the sampler revealed that they share a subtle, repetitive motif. Although BLAST (Altschul SF et al., 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410) fails to detect significant pairwise similarity between any of the sequences, the repeats present in these outer membrane proteins, taken as a whole, are highly significant (based on a generally applicable statistical test for motifs described here). Analysis of bacterial porins with known trimeric beta-barrel structure and related proteins reveals a similar repetitive motif corresponding to alternating membrane-spanning beta-strands. These beta-strands occur on the membrane interface (as opposed to the trimeric interface) of the beta-barrel. The broad conservation and structural location of these repeats suggests that they play important functional roles. PMID:8520488

  15. Mechanism of Asp24 Upregulation in Brucella abortus Rough Mutant with a Disrupted O-Antigen Export System and Effect of Asp24 in Bacterial Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Peng, Daxin

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that Brucella abortus rough mutant strain 2308 ΔATP (called the ΔrfbE mutant in this study) exhibits reduced intracellular survival in RAW264.7 cells and attenuated persistence in BALB/c mice. In this study, we performed microarray analysis to detect genes with differential expression between the ΔrfbE mutant and wild-type strain S2308. Interestingly, acid shock protein 24 gene (asp24) expression was significantly upregulated in the ΔrfbE mutant compared to S2308, as confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Further studies using additional strains indicated that the upregulation of asp24 occurred only in rough mutants with disrupted O-antigen export system components, including the ATP-binding protein gene rfbE (bab1_0542) and the permease gene rfbD (bab1_0543), while the ΔwboA rough mutant (which lacks an O-antigen synthesis-related glycosyltransferase) and the RB51 strain (a vaccine strain with the rough phenotype) showed no significant changes in asp24 expression compared to S2308. In addition, abolishing the intracellular O-antigen synthesis of the ΔrfbE mutant by deleting the wboA gene (thereby creating the ΔrfbE ΔwboA double-knockout strain) recovered asp24 expression. These results indicated that asp24 upregulation is associated with intracellular O-antigen synthesis and accumulation but not with the bacterial rough phenotype. Further studies indicated that asp24 upregulation in the ΔrfbE mutant was associated neither with bacterial adherence and invasion nor with cellular necrosis on RAW264.7 macrophages. However, proper expression of the asp24 gene favors intracellular survival of Brucella in RAW264.7 cells and HeLa cells during an infection. This study reveals a novel mechanism for asp24 upregulation in B. abortus mutants. PMID:24752516

  16. Mechanism of Asp24 upregulation in Brucella abortus rough mutant with a disrupted O-antigen export system and effect of Asp24 in bacterial intracellular survival.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-07-01

    We previously showed that Brucella abortus rough mutant strain 2308 ΔATP (called the ΔrfbE mutant in this study) exhibits reduced intracellular survival in RAW264.7 cells and attenuated persistence in BALB/c mice. In this study, we performed microarray analysis to detect genes with differential expression between the ΔrfbE mutant and wild-type strain S2308. Interestingly, acid shock protein 24 gene (asp24) expression was significantly upregulated in the ΔrfbE mutant compared to S2308, as confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Further studies using additional strains indicated that the upregulation of asp24 occurred only in rough mutants with disrupted O-antigen export system components, including the ATP-binding protein gene rfbE (bab1_0542) and the permease gene rfbD (bab1_0543), while the ΔwboA rough mutant (which lacks an O-antigen synthesis-related glycosyltransferase) and the RB51 strain (a vaccine strain with the rough phenotype) showed no significant changes in asp24 expression compared to S2308. In addition, abolishing the intracellular O-antigen synthesis of the ΔrfbE mutant by deleting the wboA gene (thereby creating the ΔrfbE ΔwboA double-knockout strain) recovered asp24 expression. These results indicated that asp24 upregulation is associated with intracellular O-antigen synthesis and accumulation but not with the bacterial rough phenotype. Further studies indicated that asp24 upregulation in the ΔrfbE mutant was associated neither with bacterial adherence and invasion nor with cellular necrosis on RAW264.7 macrophages. However, proper expression of the asp24 gene favors intracellular survival of Brucella in RAW264.7 cells and HeLa cells during an infection. This study reveals a novel mechanism for asp24 upregulation in B. abortus mutants. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Rapid methods for detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    March-Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto

    2017-03-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. Here we review the main techniques for rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, microarrays, commercial methods used in work routine, immunochromatographic methods, colorimetric methods, image methods, nephelometry, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence and bioluminescence, microfluids and methods based on cell disruption are analysed in detail.

  18. [Bacterial contamination: should it be detected or inactivated?].

    PubMed

    Cazenave, J-P

    2007-05-01

    The main cause of adverse events secondary to the transfusion of platelet concentrates (PC) is due to bacterial contamination. The detection of bacteria in PC is not associated with a beneficial effect in terms of prevention of fatal septic events. Inactivation of pathogen in PC using photochemical techniques is targeted not only to bacteria but also to a wide spectrum of viruses, spirochetes, parasites and leukocytes. Pathogen inactivation is a pro-active method which anticipates the contamination of the blood pool by emerging pathogens.

  19. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair IgM responses against T-independent bacterial antigens

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Paul J.; Simchoni, Noa; Black, Samuel; Radigan, Lin; Overbey, Jessica R.; Bagiella, Emilia; Bussel, James B.; Bossuyt, Xavier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Meyts, Isabelle; Cerutti, Andrea; Picard, Capucine

    2014-01-01

    IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair interleukin 1 receptor and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and lead to heightened susceptibility to invasive bacterial infections. Individuals with these primary immunodeficiencies have fewer immunoglobulin M (IgM)+IgD+CD27+ B cells, a population that resembles murine splenic marginal zone B cells that mount T-independent antibody responses against bacterial antigens. However, the significance of this B-cell subset in humans is poorly understood. Using both a 610 carbohydrate array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that patients with IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies have reduced serum IgM, but not IgG antibody, recognizing T-independent bacterial antigens. Moreover, the quantity of specific IgM correlated with IgM+IgD+CD27+ B-cell frequencies. As with mouse marginal zone B cells, human IgM+CD27+ B cells activated by TLR7 or TLR9 agonists produced phosphorylcholine-specific IgM. Further linking splenic IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells with production of T-independent IgM, serum from splenectomized subjects, who also have few IgM+IgD+CD27+ B cells, had reduced antibacterial IgM. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impaired TLR-induced proliferation of this B-cell subset, suggesting a means by which loss of this activation pathway leads to reduced cell numbers. Thus, by bolstering the IgM+IgD+CD27+ B-cell subset, IRAK-4 and MyD88 promote optimal T-independent IgM antibody responses against bacteria in humans. PMID:25320238

  20. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair IgM responses against T-independent bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Paul J; Simchoni, Noa; Black, Samuel; Radigan, Lin; Overbey, Jessica R; Bagiella, Emilia; Bussel, James B; Bossuyt, Xavier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Meyts, Isabelle; Cerutti, Andrea; Picard, Capucine; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte

    2014-12-04

    IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impair interleukin 1 receptor and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling and lead to heightened susceptibility to invasive bacterial infections. Individuals with these primary immunodeficiencies have fewer immunoglobulin M (IgM)(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells, a population that resembles murine splenic marginal zone B cells that mount T-independent antibody responses against bacterial antigens. However, the significance of this B-cell subset in humans is poorly understood. Using both a 610 carbohydrate array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we found that patients with IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies have reduced serum IgM, but not IgG antibody, recognizing T-independent bacterial antigens. Moreover, the quantity of specific IgM correlated with IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B-cell frequencies. As with mouse marginal zone B cells, human IgM(+)CD27(+) B cells activated by TLR7 or TLR9 agonists produced phosphorylcholine-specific IgM. Further linking splenic IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells with production of T-independent IgM, serum from splenectomized subjects, who also have few IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B cells, had reduced antibacterial IgM. IRAK-4 and MyD88 deficiencies impaired TLR-induced proliferation of this B-cell subset, suggesting a means by which loss of this activation pathway leads to reduced cell numbers. Thus, by bolstering the IgM(+)IgD(+)CD27(+) B-cell subset, IRAK-4 and MyD88 promote optimal T-independent IgM antibody responses against bacteria in humans.

  1. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane.

  2. Analyzing titers of antibodies against bacterial and viral antigens, and bacterial toxoids in the intravenous immunoglobulins utilized in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Yu; Wang, Hsiu-Chi; Wang, Kun-Teng; Yang-Chih Shih, Daniel; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wang, Der-Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) manufactured from human plasma contains IgG as the primary ingredient, and is used for indications such as immunodeficiency syndrome. Available IVIGs in Taiwan are either manufactured from Taiwanese or North American plasma. The effectiveness of the national immunization program of Taiwan can be evaluated by analyzing and comparing IVIG antibody titers that are induced through the corresponding vaccines (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis, measles, rubella, hepatitis A, hepatitis B and varicella). Both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the in vitro neutralization test demonstrated that all IVIGs provide adequate clinical protection against diphtheria and tetanus toxins. ELISA results further revealed that plasma of Taiwanese subjects contains higher levels of pertussis toxin and filamentous hemagglutinin antibodies, when compared to foreign IVIGs. This may be related to the later adoption of acellular pertussis vaccine in Taiwan. Antibodies titers against measles, rubella, hepatitis A, and varicella-zoster virus were otherwise low. Low titers of hepatitis B surface antigen antibodies are present in Taiwanese plasma IVIG, indicating immune memory decline or loss. In conclusion, our results show that Taiwanese IVIG contains varying titers of vaccine-induced antibodies, and serves as a guide for future amendments to Taiwan's immunization program. Copyright © 2013 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The detection of African horse sickness virus antigens and antibodies in young Equidae.

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, C.; Anderson, E. C.; Mellor, P. S.; Graham, S. D.; Mertens, P. P.; Burroughs, J. N.

    1992-01-01

    Four ponies were each inoculated with a different serotype of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) which had been passaged through cell culture in order to achieve attenuation. Three of the ponies died suddenly after showing mild clinical signs, the fourth pony remained clinically normal and was killed at day 38. Infectious AHSV was isolated from blood samples collected at intervals from all four ponies. Positive antigen ELISA reactions were only observed with blood samples from two of the ponies on the two days preceding death. Specific AHSV antibodies were detected by ELISA in serum samples from the other two ponies although one eventually died. African horse sickness viral antigens were detected by ELISA in post-mortem tissue samples collected from all four ponies. No infectious virus could be detected in tissue samples taken post-mortem from the pony which survived African horse sickness (AHS) infection. In the event of a suspected outbreak of AHS it is recommended that sera and heparinized blood should be tested for specific antibodies and AHSV antigen respectively. When available, post-mortem tissues, including spleen, heart, lung and liver, should also be tested for AHSV antigen. Although the ELISA used for the detection of AHSV antigen is highly sensitive and specific, negative ELISA results should be confirmed by virus isolation attempts. PMID:1547837

  4. [A new method for detection and erradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by stool antigens test].

    PubMed

    Amèndola, R; Doweck, J; Katz, J; Racca, J; Menendez, G; Schenone, L; Farìas, R; Barrantes, C; Quintanta, C; Zerbo, O; Kogan, Z; Valero, J; Bartellini, M A; Questa, U; Luna, P; Corti, R E

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays technics for Helicobacter pylori detection in stools like culture, and PCR, are expensive and difficult to perform. The aim of this study was to evaluate ELISA test efficacy for detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools comparing this results with standarized technics like histology (Giemsa), ureasa test and UBT C 14. 26 patients were evaluated in this study, ages between 15-75 with upper gastrointestinal symptoms; all of them required gastroduodenal endoscopy, status H. Pylori was determined with methods upon mentioned. 24 hours after endoscopy H. Pylori antigens in stools with the technique Premier Platinum Htsa, Elisa were determined. The detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools accurately identified active H. Pylori infection. The performance characteristics of this non-invasive method was similar in sensibility and specificity to conventional tests.

  5. Detection of canine distemper virus antigen in canine serum and its application to diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Soma, T; Ishii, H; Hara, M; Ohe, K; Hagimori, I; Ishikawa, Y; Taneno, A

    2003-10-18

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) antigen was detected in the serum of dogs by an ELISA and the results of this assay were compared with an anti-CDV immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody test. In paired sera from 26 naturally infected dogs, the antigen-positive rate was 26.9 per cent at the first examination and 11.5 per cent at the second examination two to three weeks later. The antigen was detected in three of the 10 dogs which were negative for anti-CDV IgM antibody at the first examination. It could also be detected in the serum of between eight and two of 40 specific pathogen-free dogs vaccinated against CDV, for up to four weeks after they were vaccinated.

  6. [Development and testing of an enzyme immunoassay-based monoclonal test system for the detection of the Yersinia pestis V antigen].

    PubMed

    Ivashchenko, T A; Belova, E V; Dentovskaia, S V; Bel'kova, S A; Balakhonov, S V; Ignatov, S G; Shemiakin, I G

    2014-01-01

    An enzyme immunoassay-based test system for Y. pestis V antigen detection was developed. The specificity and sensitivity of this system met the requirements for medical immunobiological preparations for the identification of causative agents of highly fatal diseases. The sensitivity of the test system was assessed, and its high specificity was also demonstrated: the test system did not detect bacterial cells of closely related (four Y. pseudotuberculosis strains) and heterologous microorganism strains. The test system developed was able to detect the V antigen at concentrations as low as 2.0 ng/mL in cells of nine experimental Y. pestis cultures. The obtained preparation can be recommended for use in laboratory diagnostics of plaque.

  7. Modulation of an adhesion-related surface antigen on equine neutrophils by bacterial lipopolysaccharide and antiinflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Bochsler, P N; Slauson, D O; Neilsen, N R

    1990-10-01

    The essential role of the CD11/CD18 family of leukocyte adhesion molecules (LeuCams) in neutrophil-substrate adhesion is well documented. We have found that a monoclonal antibody designated 60.3 (MoAb 60.3) that recognizes the common beta-subunit (CD18) on human neutrophils (PMN) also recognizes a surface antigen on equine PMN. Antigen expression as assessed by immunofluorescence flow cytometry was enhanced by zymosan-activated serum (ZAS) or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation. Pretreatment of equine PMN with MoAb 60.3 inhibited ZAS-stimulated aggregation, indicating that the monoclonal recognized a functional epitope on equine PMN involved in adhesion-related functions. Cells pretreated only with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 microgram/ml) exhibited moderate increased binding of MoAb 60.3 as determined by fluorescence intensity. Preincubation of PMN with LPS resulted in a slight increase in MoAb 60.3 binding after subsequent ZAS stimulation, greater than that with either LPS or ZAS as sole stimulus. Similarly, enhanced binding of MoAb 60.3 was observed with LPS preincubation when PMA was used as a stimulus, but this effect was dose dependent and was observed at only one of three PMA concentrations tested (1 ng/ml). In other experiments, preincubation of PMN with antiinflammatory drugs inhibited 41.5-45.1% of ZAS-stimulated PMN adhesion to monolayers of equine endothelial cells. To determine whether modulation of expression of the adhesion-related antigen recognized by MoAb 60.3 correlated with these observed adhesive responses of PMN, we used immunofluorescence flow cytometry to assess expression of the antigen on drug-treated PMN. Using 10% ZAS as a stimulus, phenylbutazone (PBZ; 100 micrograms/ml) pretreatment of PMN reduced subsequent MoAb 60.3 binding by only 12.3%, and dexamethasone (DEX; 10(-5) M) reduced binding by only 1.0%; reductions of 16.4% with PBZ and 9.3% with DEX occurred when PMA (10 ng/ml) was used as the PMN stimulant

  8. Detection of Precytopathic Effect of Enteroviruses in Clinical Specimens by Centrifugation-Enhanced Antigen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, Steven M.; David, Kathryn; Shaikh, Fatima; Qian, Lian

    2001-01-01

    Rapid enterovirus detection is important for decisions about antibiotic administration and length of hospital stay. The efficacy of rapid antigen detection-cell culture amplification (Ag-CCA) was evaluated with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 5-D8/1 (DAKO) and Pan-Enterovirus clone 2E11 (Chemicon) with 10 poliovirus, echovirus, and coxsackievirus type A and B stock isolates and College of American Pathologists check samples. By using Ag-CCA technology, MAb 2E11 was more sensitive than 5-D8/1 at detecting a greater number of stock isolates at or past tube (cytopathic effect [CPE]) culture (TC) end points. The efficacy of Ag-CCA in the clinical setting was subsequently confirmed with 273 consecutively freshly collected nasopharyngeal aspirate or swab specimens, rectal swab, and cerebrospinal fluid specimens during the 1999 enterovirus season. All specimens were tested by Ag-CCA in parallel with rhesus monkey kidney (RhMk), MRC-5, and A549 conventional TCs. Approximately 60% of field specimens were additionally tested with Hep-2 and HNK conventional TCs. Sixty-two percent of the clinical specimens tested were Ag-CCA positive after 48 h. Among 51 isolates, the mean time to CPE or culture confirmation was 5.5 days (range, 2 to 18 days). After 48 h, Ag-CCA achieved sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 62, 100, 100, and 93%, respectively. During the same period, TC-CPE displayed test parameters of 12, 100, 100, and 85%, respectively. After 5 days, the sensitivity and specificity of Ag-CCA increased to 92 and 98%, respectively. Within the same period, isolation attained sensitivity and specificity of 52 and 100%, respectively. Although Ag-CCA displayed slightly reduced sensitivity and reduced specificity compared with conventional cell culture after 14 days, the markedly superior 48-h enterovirus Ag-CCA detection rate supports incorporation of this assay into the routine clinical setting. PMID:11473988

  9. Simultaneous multicolor detection system of the single-molecular microbial antigen by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with fluorescent nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Yamamoto, Mayu; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Yasuhara, Masato; Suzuki, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2005-11-01

    Immunological diagnostic methods have been widely performed and showed high performance in molecular and cellular biology, molecular imaging, and medical diagnostics. We have developed novel methods for the fluorescent labeling of several antibodies coupled with fluorescent nanocrystals QDs. In this study we demonstrated that two bacterial toxins, diphtheria toxin and tetanus toxin, were detected simultaneously in the same view field of a cover slip by using directly QD-conjugated antibodies. We have succeeded in detecting bacterial toxins by counting luminescent spots on the evanescent field with using primary antibody conjugated to QDs. In addition, each bacterial toxin in the mixture can be separately detected by single excitation laser with emission band pass filters, and simultaneously in situ pathogen quantification was performed by calculating the luminescent density on the surface of the cover slip. Our results demonstrate that total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) enables us to distinguish each antigen from mixed samples and can simultaneously quantitate multiple antigens by QD-conjugated antibodies. Bioconjugated QDs could have great potentialities for in practical biomedical applications to develop various high-sensitivity detection systems.

  10. Detection of rabies virus antigen in dog saliva using a latex agglutination test.

    PubMed

    Kasempimolporn, S; Saengseesom, W; Lumlertdacha, B; Sitprija, V

    2000-08-01

    Dog bites are responsible for more than 90% of human rabies deaths in Asia. We developed a simple and inexpensive test based on latex agglutination (LA) for rabies virus antigen detection in dog saliva. Rabies virus antigen could be detected by agglutination on a glass slide using latex particles coated with gamma globulin. By evaluation of paired saliva-brain specimens from 238 dogs, the LA test using saliva was 99% specific and 95% sensitive compared to the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) on brain smears. The advantages of the LA test over the standard FAT are that it is comparatively simple and there is no need to kill the animal before examination.

  11. Bacterial foraging based edge detection for cell image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongsheng; Zhou, Tao; Xia, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Edge detection is the most popular and common choices for cell image segmentation, in which local searching strategies are commonly used. In spite of their computational efficiency, traditional edge detectors, however, may either produce discontinued edges or rely heavily on initializations. In this paper, we propose a bacterial foraging based edge detection (BFED) algorithm for cell image segmentation. We model the gradients of intensities as the nutrient concentration and propel bacteria to forage along nutrient-rich locations via mimicking the behavior of Escherichia coli, including the chemotaxis, swarming, reproduction, elimination and dispersal. As a nature-inspired evolutionary technique, this algorithm can identify the desired edges and mark them as the tracks of bacteria. We have evaluated the proposed algorithm against the Canny, SUSAN, Verma's and an active contour model (ACM) based edge detectors on both synthetic and real cell images. Our results suggest that the BFED algorithm can identify boundaries more effectively and provide more accurate cell image segmentation.

  12. Detection of Blood Culture Bacterial Contamination using Natural Language Processing

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; FitzHenry, Fern; Speroff, Theodore; Hathaway, Jacob; Murff, Harvey J.; Brown, Steven H.; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Dittus, Robert S.; Elkin, Peter L.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiology results are reported in semi-structured formats and have a high content of useful patient information. We developed and validated a hybrid regular expression and natural language processing solution for processing blood culture microbiology reports. Multi-center Veterans Affairs training and testing data sets were randomly extracted and manually reviewed to determine the culture and sensitivity as well as contamination results. The tool was iteratively developed for both outcomes using a training dataset, and then evaluated on the test dataset to determine antibiotic susceptibility data extraction and contamination detection performance. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 84.8% and a positive predictive value of 96.0% for mapping the antibiotics and bacteria with appropriate sensitivity findings in the test data. The bacterial contamination detection algorithm had a sensitivity of 83.3% and a positive predictive value of 81.8%. PMID:20351890

  13. Investigation of magnetic microdiscs for bacterial pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Torres, Keisha Y.; Garraud, Nicolas; Arnold, David P.; McLamore, Eric S.

    2016-05-01

    Despite strict regulations to control the presence of human pathogens in our food supply, recent foodborne outbreaks have heightened public concern about food safety and created urgency to improve methods for pathogen detection. Herein we explore a potentially portable, low-cost system that uses magnetic microdiscs for the detection of bacterial pathogens in liquid samples. The system operates by optically measuring the rotational dynamics of suspended magnetic microdiscs functionalized with pathogen-binding aptamers. The soft ferromagnetic (Ni80Fe20) microdiscs exhibit a closed magnetic spin arrangement (i.e. spin vortex) with zero magnetic stray field, leading to no disc agglomeration when in free suspension. With very high surface area for functionalization and volumes 10,000x larger than commonly used superparamagnetic nanoparticles, these 1.5-μm-diameter microdiscs are well suited for tagging, trapping, actuating, or interrogating bacterial targets. This work reports a wafer-level microfabrication process for fabrication of 600 million magnetic microdiscs per substrate and measurement of their rotational dynamics response. Additionally, the biofunctionalization of the microdiscs with DNA aptamers, subsequent binding to E. coli bacteria, and their magnetic manipulation is reported.

  14. A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective Antigen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective Antigen...A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective Antigen...AND SUBTITLE A Chemically Synthesized Capture Agent Enables the Selective, Sensitive, and Robust Electrochemical Detection of Anthrax Protective

  15. A recombinant antigen-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for lungworm detection in seals.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Sophia Arlena; Lehnert, Kristina; Siebert, Ursula; Strube, Christina

    2015-09-02

    Pinnipeds are frequently infected by the lungworms Otostrongylus circumlitus and Parafilaroides gymnurus (Metastrongyloidea). Infections are frequently associated with secondary bacterial bronchopneumonia and are often lethal. To date, a reliable lungworm diagnosis in individual seals is only possible during necropsy as examination of faeces collected from resting places does not allow assignment to individuals. Therefore, a diagnostic tool for lungworm detection in living seals is desirable for monitoring health of seals in the wild and in captivity. Previously, an ELISA based on recombinant bovine lungworm major sperm protein (MSP) as diagnostic antigen was developed for lungworm diagnosis in cattle. In the present study, this test was adapted for detection of antibodies against lungworms in harbour (Phoca vitulina) and grey seals (Halichoerus grypus). Furthermore, sera of northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) were tested to evaluate whether the harbour/grey seal ELISA is suitable for this seal species as well. For ELISA evaluation, lungworm-positive and -negative sera of harbour and grey seals were analysed using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated Protein A as secondary antibody. Optical density was measured and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine a cut-off value. Potential cross-reactions were examined by testing serum of seals positive for gastrointestinal and heart nematodes, but negative for lungworm infections. In addition, sera of northern elephant seals were analysed. Harbour and grey seal serum samples showed significant differences in optical density (OD) between serum of infected and uninfected animals resulting in a cut-off value of 0.422 OD with a specificity of 100% (95% CI: 87.23-100%) and a sensitivity of 97.83% (95% CI: 88.47-99.94%). Cross-reactions with heart or gastrointestinal nematodes were not observed. Analysis of northern elephant seal samples resulted in detection of antibodies

  16. Cancer Specific Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen as a Novel Diagnostic Marker for the Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    CELLS(BIOLOGY), *ANTIGENS, *MAMMARY GLANDS, *BREAST CANCER, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), DETECTION, PEPTIDES, ENZYMES, PROTEINS , DIAGNOSIS(MEDICINE), PATIENTS, BLOOD SERUM, IMMUNOASSAY, GELS, ELECTROPHORESIS, SENSE ORGANS, ESTROGENS.

  17. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Madhukar L.

    1990-01-01

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents.

  18. Detection of Hepatitis B virus antigen from human blood: SERS immunoassay in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Kamińska, Agnieszka; Witkowska, Evelin; Winkler, Katarzyna; Dzięcielewski, Igor; Weyher, Jan L; Waluk, Jacek

    2015-04-15

    A highly sensitive immunoassay utilizing surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been developed with a new Raman reporter and a unique SERS-active substrate incorporated into a microfluidic device. An appropriately designed Raman reporter, basic fuchsin (FC), gives strong SERS enhancement and has the ability to bind both the antibody and gold nanostructures. The fuchsin-labeled immuno-Au nanoflowers can form a sandwich structure with the antigen and the antibody immobilized on the SERS-active substrate based on Au-Ag coated GaN. Our experimental results indicate that this SERS-active substrate with its strong surface-enhancement factor, high stability and reproducibility plays a crucial role in improving the efficiency of SERS immunoassay. This SERS assay was applied to the detection of Hepatitis B virus antigen (HBsAg) in human blood plasma. A calibration curve was obtained by plotting the intensity of SERS signal of FC band at 1178cm(-1) versus the concentration of antigen. The low detection limit for Hepatitis B virus antigen was estimated to be 0.01IU/mL. The average relative standard deviation (RSD) of this method is less than 10%. This SERS immunoassay gives exact results over a broad linear range, reflecting clinically relevant HBsAg concentrations. It also exhibits high biological specificity for the detection of Hepatitis B virus antigen.

  19. Dose-Dependent Changes in the Antigenicity of Bacterial Endotoxin Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    56T for 30 minutics. WVhen tested in double site 02 5 54) Itg of S DS-tirca itd L PS %%ais .pplied. After elect rophorcsis, immunodiffusion (see below...irradiated RSE in double immunodiffusion (Figures Ila and b). The appearance and density of the precipitin bands were dependent on the E. cok 0113...other (RSE), we found 2 distinct major antigenic components experiments as well. Like RSE antisera, antimeningococ- with double immunodiffusion in the

  20. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  1. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’Yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-10-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies.

  2. Adult T-cell leukemia: antigen in an ATL cell line and detection of antibodies to the antigen in human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Hinuma, Y; Nagata, K; Hanaoka, M; Nakai, M; Matsumoto, T; Kinoshita, K I; Shirakawa, S; Miyoshi, I

    1981-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence of certain human sera demonstrated an antigen(s) in the cytoplasm of 1--5% of the cells of a T-cell line, MT-1, from a patient with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), which is endemic in southwestern Japan. The antigen was not detected in other human lymphoid cell lines, including six T-cell lines, seven B-cell lines, and four non-T non-B cell lines. The antigen did not show cross antigenicity with that of herpesviruses, including Epstein--Barr virus, herpes simplex virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella-zoster virus, herpesvirus saimiri, and Marek disease virus. The proportion of antigen-bearing cells was increased by a factor of approximately 5 on culture in the presence of 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. Antibodies against the antigen in MT-1 cells were found in all 44 patients with ATL examined and in 32 of 40 patients with malignant T-cell lymphomas (most of them had diseases similar to ATL except that leukemic cells were not found in the peripheral blood). The antibodies were also detected in 26% of the healthy adults examined from ATL-endemic areas but in only a few of those examined from ATL-non-endemic areas. On electron microscopy, extracellular type C virus particles were detected in pelleted MT-1 cells cultured in the presence of 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine. Images PMID:7031654

  3. Detection of bacterial-reactive natural IgM antibodies in desert bighorn sheep populations

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Amy L.; Zielke, Ryszard A.; Sikora, Aleksandra E.; Beechler, Brianna R.; Jolles, Anna E.; Epps, Clinton W.

    2017-01-01

    Ecoimmunology is a burgeoning field of ecology which studies immune responses in wildlife by utilizing general immune assays such as the detection of natural antibody. Unlike adaptive antibodies, natural antibodies are important in innate immune responses and often recognized conserved epitopes present in pathogens. Here, we describe a procedure for measuring natural antibodies reactive to bacterial antigens that may be applicable to a variety of organisms. IgM from desert bighorn sheep plasma samples was tested for reactivity to outer membrane proteins from Vibrio coralliilyticus, a marine bacterium to which sheep would have not been exposed. Immunoblotting demonstrated bighorn sheep IgM could bind to a variety of bacterial cell envelope proteins while ELISA analysis allowed for rapid determination of natural antibody levels in hundreds of individual animals. Natural antibody levels were correlated with the ability of plasma to kill laboratory strains of E. coli bacteria. Finally, we demonstrate that natural antibody levels varied in two distinct populations of desert bighorn sheep. These data demonstrate a novel and specific measure of natural antibody function and show that this varies in ecologically relevant ways. PMID:28662203

  4. Comparison of antigen assay and reverse transcriptase assay for detecting human immunodeficiency virus in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Feorino, P; Forrester, B; Schable, C; Warfield, D; Schochetman, G

    1987-01-01

    We compared an antigen capture assay (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Ill.) with a reverse transcriptase assay to identify and quantify human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in culture. In direct comparisons of serial dilutions of lymphadenopathy-associated virus type 1, the antigen assay was 100-fold more sensitive than the reverse transcriptase assay in detecting the virus. The antigen assay reacted strongly with 60 different HIV isolates but did not cross-react with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type II, cytomegalovirus, varicella-zoster virus, herpes simplex virus type 1, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus type 5, or poliovirus type 1 or with extracts from four different control human cell lines and eight different phytohemagglutinin-stimulated normal human lymphocytes. Peripheral blood lymphocyte samples from 50 individuals were evaluated by both the antigen assay and the reverse transcriptase assay. The cells from the 34 seropositive individuals were all positive by the antigen assay (range, 3 to 9 days; average time, 5.9 days) and the reverse transcriptase assay (range, 7 to 16 days; average time, 9.6 days). Cells from the 16 seronegative individuals were negative by both assays. These results indicate that the antigen assay is an important addition to the monitoring of HIV production in the lymphocytes of infected patients. PMID:2448334

  5. Detection of Antigenic Variants of Subtype H3 Swine Influenza A Viruses from Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brigitte E; Bowman, Andrew S; Li, Lei; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Smith, David R; Hanson, Larry A; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2017-04-01

    A large population of genetically and antigenically diverse influenza A viruses (IAVs) are circulating among the swine population, playing an important role in influenza ecology. Swine IAVs not only cause outbreaks among swine but also can be transmitted to humans, causing sporadic infections and even pandemic outbreaks. Antigenic characterizations of swine IAVs are key to understanding the natural history of these viruses in swine and to selecting strains for effective vaccines. However, influenza outbreaks generally spread rapidly among swine, and the conventional methods for antigenic characterization require virus propagation, a time-consuming process that can significantly reduce the effectiveness of vaccination programs. We developed and validated a rapid, sensitive, and robust method, the polyclonal serum-based proximity ligation assay (polyPLA), to identify antigenic variants of subtype H3N2 swine IAVs. This method utilizes oligonucleotide-conjugated polyclonal antibodies and quantifies antibody-antigen binding affinities by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). Results showed the assay can rapidly detect H3N2 IAVs directly from nasal wash or nasal swab samples collected from laboratory-challenged animals or during influenza surveillance at county fairs. In addition, polyPLA can accurately separate the viruses at two contemporary swine IAV antigenic clusters (H3N2 swine IAV-α and H3N2 swine IAV-ß) with a sensitivity of 84.9% and a specificity of 100.0%. The polyPLA can be routinely used in surveillance programs to detect antigenic variants of influenza viruses and to select vaccine strains for use in controlling and preventing disease in swine. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. SPR platform based on image acquisition for HER2 antigen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Johny P.; Predabon, Sheila M.; Bonafé, Elton G.; Martins, Alessandro F.; Brolo, Alexandre G.; Radovanovic, Eduardo; Girotto, Emerson M.

    2017-01-01

    HER2 antigen is a marker used for breast cancer diagnosis and prevention. Its determination has great importance since breast cancer is one of the most insidious types of cancer in women. HER2 antigen assessment in human serum is traditionally achieved by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA method), but it has some disadvantages, such as suppressing the thermodynamic-kinetic studies regarding the antibody-antigen interaction, and the use of labeled molecules that can promote false positive responses. Biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) are sensitive optical techniques widely applied on bioassays. The plasmonic devices do not operate with labeled molecules, overcoming conventional immunoassay limitations, and enabling a direct detection of target analytes. In this way, a new SPR biosensor to assess HER2 antigen has been proposed, using nanohole arrays on a gold thin film by signal transduction of transmitted light measurements from array image acquisitions. These metallic nanostructures may couple the light directly on surface plasmons using a simple collinear arrangement. The proposed device reached an average sensitivity for refractive index (RI) variation on a metal surface of 4146 intensity units/RIU (RIU = RI units). The device feasibility on biomolecular assessment was evaluated. For this, 3 ng ml-1 known HER2 antigen concentration was efficiently flowed (using a microfluidic system) and detected from aqueous solutions. This outcome shows that the device may be a powerful apparatus for bioassays, particularly toward breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis.

  7. Biomarker Detection Using NAPPA Tumor Antigen Arrays — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer patients spontaneously generate autoantibodies (AAb) to tumor-derived proteins. To detect AAb, we have probed novel high-density custom protein microarrays (NAPPA) expressing 4988 candidate tumor antigens with sera from patients with early stage breast cancer (IBC), and bound IgG was measured. We used a three-phase serial screening approach. First, a prescreen was performed to eliminate uninformative antigens. Sera from stage I-III IBC (n = 53) and healthy women (n = 53) were screened for AAb to all 4988 protein antigens. Antigens were selected if the 95th percentile of signal of cases and controls were significantly different (p 91% specificity. Twenty-eight of these antigens were confirmed using an independent serum cohort (n = 51 cases/38 controls, p < 0.05). Using all 28 AAb, a classifier was identified with a sensitivity of 80.8% and a specificity of 61.6% (AUC = 0.756). These are potential biomarkers for the early detection of breast cancer.

  8. Rapid SNP Detection and Genotyping of Bacterial Pathogens by Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Kingsley K; Thomas, Matthew C; Janzen, Timothy W; Goji, Noriko

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial identification and typing are fixtures of microbiology laboratories and are vital aspects of our response mechanisms in the event of foodborne outbreaks and bioterrorist events. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is leading the way in terms of expanding our ability to identify and characterize bacteria through the identification of subtle differences between genomes (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertions/deletions). Modern high-throughput technologies such as pyrosequencing can facilitate the typing of bacteria by generating short-read sequence data of informative regions identified by WGS analyses, at a fraction of the cost of WGS. Thus, pyrosequencing systems remain a valuable asset in the laboratory today. Presented in this chapter are two methods developed in the Amoako laboratory that detail the identification and genotyping of bacterial pathogens. The first targets canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms (canSNPs) of evolutionary importance in Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of Anthrax. The second assay detects Shiga-toxin (stx) genes, which are associated with virulence in Escherichia coli and Shigella spp., and differentiates the subtypes of stx-1 and stx-2 based on SNP loci. These rapid methods provide end users with important information regarding virulence traits as well as the evolutionary and biogeographic origin of isolates.

  9. Development of a tape transport bacterial detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witz, S.; Hartung, W. H.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of a tape transport chemiluminescence system for bacterial monitoring of regenerated water was demonstrated using a manually operated laboratory breadboard. The principle of detection is based on measuring the increase in chemiluminescence produced by the catalytic action of bacterial porphyrins on a luminol-hydrogen peroxide mixture. Viable organisms are distinguished from nonviable by comparing the signals of incubated and unincubated water samples. Using optimized protocols, sensitivities were obtained with 400 ml suspensions of E. coli and Cl. sporogenes. The sensitivity of the unincubated cycle E. coli (aerobe) was found to be 30 to 35 cells/m1, and that of the Cl. sporogenes (anaerobe) was 1000 to 10,000 cells/m1. The lower sensitivity toward Cl. sporogenes is attributed to several factors, namely the lower cytochrome content, the tendency to sporulate, long lag periods and the lower growth rate of Clostridia in general. The operational procedures used for processing the incubated and unincubated samples involved the following sequence: (1) concentrating the sample by filtration through a membrane filter, (2) washing with Dextrose-Thioglycollate Broth (3) incubating (0 to 4 hrs as required), (4) washing with 4M Urea, and (5) reacting with reagent in front of a photomultiplier tube. The signal output was recorded on a strip chart recorder.

  10. Detection of Schistosoma mansoni circulating cathodic antigen for evaluation of resistance induced by irradiated cercariae.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, I S; Bogitsh, B J; Colley, D G

    1992-08-01

    The appearance of serum levels of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) detectable by a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (5H11) antigen-capture sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) system was evaluated during acute Schistosoma mansoni infections in female CF1 mice exposed to either 100 or 25 cercariae. Measurable CCA levels occurred in these groups at 5 and 7 wk after infection, respectively. The kinetics of appearance of CCA were thus related to the intensity of infection. The level of resistance developed by female C57BL/6 mice upon immunization with irradiated cercariae, as expressed by both worm burden and CCA levels after cercarial challenge was evaluated. Immunization conferred 44% protection against the challenge infection, and the level of CCA detected in the sera of the control group was significantly (P less than 0.02) higher than that found in the sera of the immunized group, 6 wk after challenge. These results demonstrate that CCA detection by the 5H11 mAb antigen-capture sandwich ELISA can reflect vaccine-induced resistance against S. mansoni. Localization studies showed that 5H11 reacts with a CCA epitope in the adult worm gut and to a lesser extent with the male tegument. Adaptations of this and other antigen detection systems may prove useful in monitoring the efficacy of developmental vaccines, an ability that may be essential for the extension of such studies to humans.

  11. Optical detection of CA 15.3 breast cancer antigen using CdS quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Elakkiya, Venugopal; Menon, Mridula Prakash; Nataraj, Devaraj; Biji, Pullithadathil; Selvakumar, Rajendran

    2017-04-01

    The present study focus on optical sensing of breast cancer antigen 15.3 (CA 15.3) using cadmium sulphide quantum dot (CdS-QD) in saline and serum samples spiked with antigen. The surface of CdS-QD was modified by cysteamine capping followed by tagging of CA 15.3 antibody. The samples were characterised using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-VIS Spectroscopy), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) attached with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, phase contrast inverted epi-fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry (EDS). The CdS-QD showed a mean diameter of 3.02 ± 0.6 nm. The complex formed after antigen-antibody interaction resulted in distinguishable optical and fluorescence intensity with respect to varying concentration of antigen. The PL study revealed that CA 15.3 antibody labelled CdS QD can detect CA 15.3 tumour marker even at very low concentration of 0.002 KU/L with a constant response time of 15 min. This study clearly indicates that detection of CA 15.3 at low concentration is possible using surface modified CdS QD in serum samples and can find immense applications in biosensor development for detection of breast cancer marker similar to various automated detection kits available in market.

  12. Evaluation of four methods for the detection of streptococcal group A antigen directly from throat swabs.

    PubMed

    Betriu, C; de la Torre, F; Muñoz, P; Fernández, A; Picazo, J J

    1988-12-01

    We have compared the sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility of four rapid tests for the detection of group A beta-hemolytic streptococci antigen directly from a throat swab. The four methods were very specific, all of them offered reproductibility and surpassed conventional culture in speed and simplicity.

  13. Early detection of prostate cancer. Role of prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, V. M.

    1996-01-01

    Pressure to request prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests for early detection of prostate cancer in middle-aged and older men is increasing. However, current scientific data suggest that such testing does more harm than good. Most professional groups do not advise routine screening for prostate cancer. This paper reviews the current status of PSA testing. PMID:8653039

  14. Detection of Urinary Excreted Fungal Galactomannan-like Antigens for Diagnosis of Invasive Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinming; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Staab, Janet F.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Feldmesser, Marta; Marr, Kieren A.

    2012-01-01

    Mortality associated with invasive aspergillosis (IA) remains high, partly because of delayed diagnosis. Detection of microbial exoantigens, released in serum and other body fluids during infection, may help timely diagnosis. In course of IA, Aspergillus galactomannan (GM), a well established polysaccharide biomarker, is released in body fluids including urine. Urine is an abundant, safely collected specimen, well-suited for point-of-care (POC) testing, which could play an increasing role in screening for early disease. Our main objective was to demonstrate GM antigenuria as a clinically relevant biological phenomenon in IA and establish proof-of-concept that it could be translated to POC diagnosis. Utilizing a novel IgM monoclonal antibody (MAb476) that recognizes GM-like antigens from Aspergillus and other molds, we demonstrated antigenuria in an experimental animal IA model (guinea pig), as well as in human patients. In addition, we investigated the chemical nature of the urinary excreted antigen in human samples, characterized antigen detection in urine by immunoassays, described a putative assay inhibitor in urine, and indicated means of alleviation of the inhibition. We also designed and used a lateral flow immunochromatographic assay to detect urinary excreted antigen in a limited number of IA patient urine samples. In this study, we establish that POC diagnosis of IA based on urinary GM detection is feasible. Prospective studies will be necessary to establish the performance characteristics of an optimized device and define its optimal clinical use. PMID:22900046

  15. Universal Breast Cancer Antigens as Targets Linking Early Detection and Therapeutic Vaccination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Timeline: 1. Attempt to enroll patients with BIRADS category 4 mammograms on ductal lavage study (0-12 months) limited by poor accrual 2. Establish...Summary 11 Aug 2004 - 100 Aug 2005 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Universal Breast Cancer Antigens as Targets Linking Early Detection and...3 Reportable Outcomes ....................................................................... 4

  16. Production of a novel monoclonal antibody, JT-95, which can detect antigen of thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, H; Hosoya, T; Sakurai, K; Mori, Y; Watanabe, M; Kisaki, H; Ohno, T

    1996-04-15

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) JT-95 was produced by immunization of mice with membrane fractions of a human thyroid carcinoma. Immuno-histochemical staining has demonstrated that the antigen recognized by JT-95 is strongly expressed in 95 (95%) of 100 cases of papillary carcinomas and in 3 (75%) of 4 cases of follicular carcinomas. In benign diseases of the thyroid gland, MAb JT-95 reacted with 0 (0%) of 39 adenomas, 1 (4%) of 21 adenomatous goiters, 0 (0%) of 8 hyperthyroidism specimens, and 3 (38%) of 8 chronic thyroiditis specimens. The antigen detected by MAb JT-95 has an apparent Mr 250,000 in thyroid carcinomas. Moreover, circulating antigen in thyroid carcinoma patients was detected by MAb JT-95 in an ELISA and in Western blotting. The circulating antigen has a Mr 105,000. MAb JT-95 conjugated with (131) I was administrated to nude mice bearing a human thyroid carcinoma. JT-95 131I accumulation at the transplanted tumor was visualized by autoradiography with 2.68-14.75-fold higher levels detected at the xenograft compared to that for normal organs. Based on these data, MAb JT-95 may be useful in the diagnosis detection and therapy of thyroid carcinoma.

  17. Detecting West Nile virus in owls and raptors by an antigen-capture assay.

    PubMed

    Gancz, Ady Y; Campbell, Douglas G; Barker, Ian K; Lindsay, Robbin; Hunter, Bruce

    2004-12-01

    We evaluated a rapid antigen-capture assay (VecTest) for detection of West Nile virus in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs, collected at necropsy from owls (N = 93) and raptors (N = 27). Sensitivity was 93.5%-95.2% for northern owl species but <42.9% for all other species. Specificity was 100% for owls and 85.7% for raptors.

  18. Selective Infection of Antigen-Specific B Lymphocytes by Salmonella Mediates Bacterial Survival and Systemic Spreading of Infection

    PubMed Central

    de Wit, Jelle; Martinoli, Chiara; Zagato, Elena; Janssen, Hans; Jorritsma, Tineke; Bar-Ephraïm, Yotam E.; Rescigno, Maria; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S. Marieke

    2012-01-01

    Background The bacterial pathogen Salmonella causes worldwide disease. A major route of intestinal entry involves M cells, providing access to B cell-rich Peyer’s Patches. Primary human B cells phagocytose Salmonella typhimurium upon recognition by the specific surface Ig receptor (BCR). As it is unclear how Salmonella disseminates systemically, we studied whether Salmonella can use B cells as a transport device for spreading. Methodology/Principal Findings Human primary B cells or Ramos cell line were incubated with GFP-expressing Salmonella. Intracellular survival and escape was studied in vitro by live cell imaging, flow cytometry and flow imaging. HEL-specific B cells were transferred into C57BL/6 mice and HEL-expressing Salmonella spreading in vivo was analyzed investigating mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen and blood. After phagocytosis by B cells, Salmonella survives intracellularly in a non-replicative state which is actively maintained by the B cell. Salmonella is later excreted followed by reproductive infection of other cell types. Salmonella-specific B cells thus act both as a survival niche and a reservoir for reinfection. Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific B cells before oral infection of mice showed that these B cells mediate in vivo systemic spreading of Salmonella to spleen and blood. Conclusions/Significance This is a first example of a pathogenic bacterium that abuses the antigen-specific cells of the adaptive immune system for systemic spreading for dissemination of infection. PMID:23209805

  19. Detection of antibodies against hepatitis B virus surface antigen and hepatitis C virus core antigen in plasma with a waveguide-mode sensor.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takenori; Tanaka, Torahiko; Uno, Shigeyuki; Ashiba, Hiroki; Fujimaki, Makoto; Tanaka, Mutsuo; Awazu, Koichi; Makishima, Makoto

    2017-06-01

    In large-scale disasters, such as huge significant earthquakes, on-site examination for blood typing and infectious disease screening will be very helpful to save lives of victims who need surgical treatment and/or blood transfusion. However, physical damage, such as building collapse, electric power failure and traffic blockage, disrupts the capacity of the medical system. Portable diagnostic devices are useful in such cases of emergency. In this study, we evaluated a waveguide-mode sensor for detection of anti-hepatitis virus antibodies. First, we examined whether we can detect antigen-antibody interaction on a sensor chip immobilized hepatitis B virus surface (HBs) antigen and hepatitis C virus (HCV) core antigen using monoclonal mouse antibodies for HBs antigen and HCV core antigen. We obtained significant changes in the reflectance spectra, which indicate specific antigen-antibody interaction for anti-HBs antibody and anti-HCV antibody. Next, we examined the effect of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody using aminoethyl carbazole as the peroxidase substrate and found that the colorimetric reaction increases detection sensitivity for anti-HBs antibody more than 300 times. Finally, we successfully detected anti-HBs antibody in human blood samples with an enhancing method using a peroxidase reaction. Thus, a portable device utilizing a waveguide-mode sensor may be applied to on-site blood testing in emergency settings. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  1. Detection of salivary antibodies to crude antigens of Opisthorchis viverrini in opisthorchiasis and cholangiocarcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Thuwajit, Chanitra; Yongvanit, Puangrat

    2011-08-01

    Opisthorchis viverrini (O. viverrini; known as human liver fluke) is a major health problem in the northeastern region of Thailand. Infection with O. viverrini is the cause of hepatobiliary disease and cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). Previous studies demonstrated specific antibodies to crude O. viverrini antigens in serum from O. viverrini-infected patients. However, no studies have measured specific antibodies to O. viverrini antigens in saliva from patients with opisthorchiasis and CCA. The objective of the study was to detect specific antibodies to crude O. viverrini antigens in saliva from patients with opisthorchiasis and CCA, and to evaluate their use for diagnosis of O. viverrini infection. Saliva samples from 23 control subjects, 30 opisthorchiasis patients, and 38 CCA patients were collected. ELISA was established for detection of salivary IgA and IgG to crude O. viverrini antigens. ANOVA was used to compare salivary IgA and IgG levels among groups. Salivary IgA to crude O. viverrini antigens in CCA patients was significantly higher than controls (p = 0.007). Salivary IgG in CCA patients was significantly higher than opisthorchiasis patients and controls (p = 0.010 and p < 0.001, respectively). The cut-off value from salivary IgG test demonstrated higher accuracy for positivity of O. viverrini infection than salivary IgA. In conclusion, specific antibodies to crude O. viverrini antigens were detected in saliva of patients with opisthorchiasis and CCA. Salivary antibodies reflect serum immune response to O. viverrini infection, and salivary IgG tends to be a good candidate for diagnosis of O. viverrini infection.

  2. Detection of Metal and Organometallic Compounds with Bioluminescent Bacterial Bioassays.

    PubMed

    Durand, M J; Hua, A; Jouanneau, S; Cregut, M; Thouand, G

    2015-10-17

    Chemical detection of metal and organometallic compounds is very specific and sensitive, but these techniques are time consuming and expensive. Although these techniques provide information about the concentrations of compounds, they fail to inform us about the toxicity of a sample. Because the toxic effects of metals and organometallic compounds are influenced by a multitude of environmental factors, such as pH, the presence of chelating agents, speciation, and organic matter, bioassays have been developed for ecotoxicological studies. Among these bioassays, recombinant luminescent bacteria have been developed over the past 20 years, and many of them are specific for the detection of metals and metalloids. These bioassays are simple to use, are inexpensive, and provide information on the bioavailable fraction of metals and organometals. Thus, they are an essential complementary tool for providing information beyond chemical analysis. In this chapter, we propose to investigate the detection of metals and organometallic compounds with bioluminescent bacterial bioassays and the applications of these bioassays to environmental samples. Graphical Abstract.

  3. A Valuable Antigen Detection Method for Diagnosis of Acute Hepatitis E

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Gui-Ping; Tang, Zi-Min; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Ke; Ji, Wen-Fang; Cai, Wei; Huang, Shou-Jie; Wu, Ting; Zhang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a serious public health problem. The commonly used tests that are specific for current HEV infection diagnosis include the detection of anti-HEV IgM and HEV RNA. Here, we report an improved enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method for HEV antigen detection with a linear range equivalent to 6.3 × 103 to 9.2 × 105 RNA copies per ml. The monoclonal antibody (MAb) 12F12, a high-ability MAb that binds HEV virus, was selected as the capture antibody from a panel of 95 MAbs. The positive period of HEV antigenemia in infected monkeys using this test was, on average, 3 weeks longer than previously reported and covered the majority of the acute phase. The positive detection rates of IgM, RNA, and new antigen from the first serum samples collected from 16 confirmed acute hepatitis E patients were 81% (13/16), 81% (13/16), and 100% (16/16), respectively. In three patients, the initial serum specimens that tested negative for IgM, despite the presence of symptoms of acute hepatitis and elevated alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, were positive for HEV antigen and HEV RNA. In contrast, the serum samples of the three RNA-negative patients were antigen positive (and IgM positive), possibly due to the degradation of HEV nucleic acids. Our results suggest that this new antigen detection method has acceptable concordance with RNA detection and could serve as an important tool for diagnosing acute hepatitis E. PMID:25540394

  4. Detection of an Antigenic Group 2 Coronavirus in an Adult Alpaca with Enteritis▿

    PubMed Central

    Genova, Suzanne G.; Streeter, Robert N.; Simpson, Katharine M.; Kapil, Sanjay

    2008-01-01

    Antigenic group 2 coronavirus was detected in a fecal sample of an adult alpaca by reverse transcription-PCR. The presence of alpaca coronavirus (ApCoV) in the small intestine was demonstrated by immune histochemistry with an antinucleocapsid monoclonal antibody that reacts with group 2 coronaviruses. Other common causes of diarrhea in adult camelids were not detected. We conclude that nutritional stress may have predisposed the alpaca to severe ApCoV infection. PMID:18716008

  5. Value of whole-cell antigen extracts for serologic detection of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed Central

    Salama, S M; Wefuan, J N; Shiro-Koulla, S; Mbakop, A; Tagni-Sartre, M; Ndam, E C; Ngu, J L; Taylor, D E

    1993-01-01

    Whole-cell protein extracts of Helicobacter pylori strains were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to detect immunoglobulin G antibody against H. pylori in 113 patients with upper gastrointestinal complaints. These antigen preparations were of value for detecting infection by H. pylori in patients with high antibody titers (> or = 12,800), whereas for patients with lower titers, the results were inconclusive. PMID:8308132

  6. Novel fusion antigen displayed-bacterial ghosts vaccine candidate against infection of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kun; Tu, Wei; Liu, Yuenan; Li, Tao; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-02

    Infection with Escherichia coli O157:H7 may develop into hemorrhagic colitis, or hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which usually causes kidney failure or even death. The adhesion and toxins are the important virulent factors. In this study, a novel vaccine candidate rSOBGs was constructed based on the bacterial ghost (BG). rSOBGs maintained the integrity of cellular morphology and displayed the linear Stx2Am-Stx1B antigen on the surface of outer membrane. rSOBGs induced Stxs-specific IgA/IgG antibodies and stronger intimin-specific IgA/IgG antibodies effectively in sera in this study. In vivo, the rSOBGs provided the higher protection rate (52%) than native bacterial ghost-OBGs (12%) when challenged intragastricly with high dose (500 LD50) viable E. coli O157:H7. Meanwhile, the rSOBGs provided higher protection rate (73.33%) than OBGs when challenged with 2 LD50 even to 5 LD50 lysed E. coli O157:H7. In vitro, the rSOBGs-immunized sera possessed neutralizing activity to lysed pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, the results of histopathology also displayed that the administration of rSOBGs have the ability to reduce or inhibit the adhesion lesions and toxins damages of organs. The novel vaccine candidate rSOBGs induced both anti-toxin and anti-adhesion immune protection, suggesting the possibility to prevent the infectious diseases caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7.

  7. Procedures for Sxs antigen detection by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests. A comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, A; Jiménez, R; Burgos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R

    1994-11-01

    Biological reagents used in the serological detection of Sxs antigen by antibody-mediated cytotoxicity tests were compared in order to optimize the method. Our analyses showed that: (a) red cell-free spleen cells are the best target cells, (b) rabbit serum used as the complement source should be obtained from females, and absorbed with female spleen cells before use, (c) antiserum obtained by immunizing females with repeated injections of syngenic male spleen cells provides the highest anti-Sxs antibody titer, and (d) of the different biological fluids investigated, testis supernatant has highest concentration of Sxs antigen.

  8. Subdominant antigens in bacterial vaccines: Am779 is subdominant in the anaplasma marginale outer membrane vaccine but does not associate with protective immunity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identification of specific antigens responsible for the ability of complex immunogens to induce protection is a major goal in development of bacterial vaccines. Much of the investigation has focused on highly abundant and highly immunodominant outer membrane proteins. Recently however, genomic and p...

  9. Detection of Salivary IgA Antibodies Against the HlyE Antigen as a Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Kai Ling; Redhuan, Nur Eliyana Mohd; Balaram, Prabha; Phua, Kia Kien

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Salmonella typhi (S. typhi) haemolysin E protein (HlyE) has been shown to be a sensitive and specific antigen for the detection of typhoid fever through the detection of anti-HlyE antibodies in sera. Saliva can also be a useful diagnostic fluid as it also contains antibodies against bacterial pathogens. Aim This study aims to evaluate the potential detection of salivary anti-HlyE antibodies as a diagnosis of typhoid fever. Materials and Methods Saliva was collected from acute typhoid patients (n=16) who presented at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia with prolonged fever of more than five days and were positive for S. Typhi blood culture. Saliva was also collected from convalescent typhoid patients (n=11), patients with other febrile fevers (n=15), and from healthy individuals (n=25). An ELISA was developed to detect the presence of IgA antibodies against HlyE in the saliva of typhoid patients. Results The acute typhoid group had a higher mean absorbance value of 1.496 compared to the convalescent typhoid (0.538), other febrile fevers (0.678), and healthy individuals (0.457) group. Conclusion This study demonstrated the utility of salivary anti-HlyE IgA antibody as a biomarker for the diagnosis of typhoid fever. Follow-up studies with a larger sample size will allow the optimization of the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. This non-invasive method can be useful for mass screening programs. PMID:27504289

  10. Detection of Salivary IgA Antibodies Against the HlyE Antigen as a Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kai Ling; Redhuan, Nur Eliyana Mohd; Balaram, Prabha; Phua, Kia Kien; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng

    2016-06-01

    The Salmonella typhi (S. typhi) haemolysin E protein (HlyE) has been shown to be a sensitive and specific antigen for the detection of typhoid fever through the detection of anti-HlyE antibodies in sera. Saliva can also be a useful diagnostic fluid as it also contains antibodies against bacterial pathogens. This study aims to evaluate the potential detection of salivary anti-HlyE antibodies as a diagnosis of typhoid fever. Saliva was collected from acute typhoid patients (n=16) who presented at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia with prolonged fever of more than five days and were positive for S. Typhi blood culture. Saliva was also collected from convalescent typhoid patients (n=11), patients with other febrile fevers (n=15), and from healthy individuals (n=25). An ELISA was developed to detect the presence of IgA antibodies against HlyE in the saliva of typhoid patients. The acute typhoid group had a higher mean absorbance value of 1.496 compared to the convalescent typhoid (0.538), other febrile fevers (0.678), and healthy individuals (0.457) group. This study demonstrated the utility of salivary anti-HlyE IgA antibody as a biomarker for the diagnosis of typhoid fever. Follow-up studies with a larger sample size will allow the optimization of the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. This non-invasive method can be useful for mass screening programs.

  11. Detection of an early cytomegalovirus antigen with two-color quantitative flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Elmendorf, S; McSharry, J; Laffin, J; Fogleman, D; Lehman, J M

    1988-05-01

    An early cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen was detected with a monoclonal antibody by two-color fluorescent flow cytometry. With the aid of a human diploid fibroblast cell strain, FLOW 2000, infected with the AD169 strain of CMV, the viral antigen and the DNA content of infected or uninfected cells were measured. There was no evidence of change in the cell-cycle distribution of the infected cells. The viral antigen was detected within 30 minutes following virus adsorption at 0.1 and 1.0 plaque-forming units/cells; and the percentage of positive cells increased with time and viral dosage. All stages of the cell cycle were susceptible to viral infection and the average fluorescence was greater than the background fluorescence. Flow cytometry detected the viral antigen earlier than conventional immunofluorescent microscopy and cell culture for CMV cytopathological effect (CPE). Ten bronchoalveolar lavages assayed by flow cytometry and conventional diagnostic procedures demonstrated that flow cytometry might be useful in early diagnosis for CMV infection.

  12. Sensitive and selective detection of prostate-specific antigen using a photonic crystal nanolaser.

    PubMed

    Hachuda, Shoji; Watanabe, Takumi; Takahashi, Daichi; Baba, Toshihiko

    2016-06-13

    The detection of low-concentration biomarkers is expected to facilitate the early diagnosis of severe diseases, including malignant tumors. Using photonic crystal nanolaser sensors, we detected prostate-specific antigen (PSA) from a concentration of 1 fM, which is difficult to detect by conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The signal intensity and stability were improved by using a surfactant (i.e., ethanolamine). Even when a contaminant such as bovine serum albumin was mixed into the PSA sample, thereby increasing the concentration of the contaminant ten billion times, it was still possible to maintain a high level of detection.

  13. Blastomyces Antigen Detection for Monitoring Progression of Blastomycosis in a Pregnant Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Megan; Marcinak, John; Mongkolrattanothai, Kanokporn; Burns, Jennifer L.; Wheat, L. Joseph; Durkin, Michelle; Ismail, Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    Although disseminated blastomycosis is a rare complication in pregnancy, delay in diagnosis and treatment can be fatal. We investigate the use of the Blastomyces urine antigen in diagnosis following disease progression in the intrapartum, postpartum, and neonatal periods. We describe a case of disseminated blastomycosis in a pregnant adolescent and review the pertinent literature regarding treatment and monitoring blastomycosis in pregnancy and the neonatal periods. This is the first reported case in which the Blastomyces urine antigen is utilized as a method of following disease activity during pregnancy confirming absence of clinically evident disease in a neonate. Urine antigen detection for blastomycosis can be useful for following progression of disease in patients with disseminated blastomycosis in both the intrapartum and postpartum periods. PMID:17641724

  14. Comparison of the Binax Legionella Urinary Antigen Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA) with the Biotest Legionella Urin Antigen EIA for Detection of Legionella Antigen in both Concentrated and Nonconcentrated Urine Samples

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, J. A.; Galí, N.; Pedroso, P.; Fargas, A.; Padilla, E.; Manterola, J. M.; Matas, L.

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated a newly commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Biotest Legionella Urin Antigen EIA; Biotest AG, Dreieich, Germany) for detection of antigens of all Legionella pneumophila serogroups with a relatively wide spectrum of cross-reactivity as well as antigens of other Legionella spp. by comparing its sensitivity and specificity with those of an EIA for detection of L. pneumophila serogroup 1 antigen (Legionella urinary antigen EIA; Binax, Portland, Maine). Both tests were performed with both concentrated and nonconcentrated urine samples. We also evaluated the capabilities of both EIAs to detect extracted soluble antigens of American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) Legionella strains (L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 14, L. bozemanii, and L. longbeachae). The sensitivity of the Biotest EIA was 66.66% in nonconcentrated urine and 86.66% in concentrated urine. The sensitivity of the Binax EIA was 63.76% and 88.88% in nonconcentrated and concentrated urine, respectively. The specificity was 100% in nonconcentrated and concentrated urine for both assays. The Binax EIA and Biotest EIA detected extracted soluble antigens of L. pneumophila serogroups 1 to 14 and L. bozemanii ATCC strains. The cross-reactions observed with the Binax EIA were probably due to common epitopes directly related to lipopolysaccharide. Further studies are required to determine the usefulness of the Binax EIA for detection of urinary antigens from Legionella species and serogroups other than L. pneumophila serogroup 1. The Biotest EIA proved to be as rapid, sensitive, and specific as the Binax EIA for the diagnosis of legionellosis. Concentration of antigen present in urine increased the sensitivities of both techniques with no reduction in specificity. PMID:9705420

  15. Evaluation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of Renibacterium salmoninarum bacterins affected by persistence of bacterial antigens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Goodrich, T.D.; McKibben, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were injected intraperitoneally with a bacterin containing killed Renibacterium salmoninarum cells delivered alone or in an oil-based adjuvant. We evaluated the relative abilities of the batterins to prevent the initiation or progression of infection in fish challenged by waterborne exposure to R. salmoninarum. Sixty-one days after vaccination, fish were held for 24 h in water containing either no bacteria or approximately 1.7 x 103, 1.7 x 105, or 5.3 x 106 live R. salmoninarum cells/mL. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to monitor changes in the levels of R. salmoninarum antigen in live fish before and after the immersion challenges. High levels of R. salmoninarum antigens were detected by ELISA in kidney-spleen tissue homogenates from vaccinated fish immediately before the challenges. Levels of those antigens remained high in the tissues of unchallenged fish throughout the study. We found that the ELISA used in this study may be unsuitable for evaluating the efficacy of batterins because it did not distinguish antigens produced by the challenge bacteria during an infection from those of the bacterins. Groups of control and vaccinated fish also were injected with either 1.7 x 104 or 1.7 x 106 R. salmoninarum cells and served as R. salmoninarum virulence controls. Relative survival among the various subgroups in the injection challenge suggests that adverse effects might have been associated with the adjuvant used in this study. The lowest survival at both injection challenge levels was among fish vaccinated with bacteria in adjuvant.

  16. Detection of non-A, non-B hepatitis antigen by immunocytochemical staining.

    PubMed Central

    Burk, K H; Oefinger, P E; Dreesman, G R

    1984-01-01

    Liver tissue obtained from a chimpanzee during the acute phase of an experimental non-A, non-B (NANB) hepatitis virus infection was studied by a sensitive immunocytochemical staining procedure for the presence of NANB viral antigens. Initial investigations were conducted with a model system of hepatitis B virus (HBV) antigens for purposes of comparing two immunocytochemical staining methods. Of these two procedures, an immunoperoxidase procedure, utilizing an avidin-biotinylated enzyme complex, was at least 40-fold more sensitive than a conventional immunoperoxidase technique for the detection of HBV-specific tissue antigens. Utilization of the avidin-biotin-amplified immunoperoxidase staining procedure, in conjunction with four primary convalescent antisera obtained from NANB hepatitis-implicated donors, resulted in the observation of NANB virus-associated antigen in the cytoplasm of hepatocytes from an infected chimpanzee liver. These same human antisera were not reactive with a number of uninfected control cells nor with cells infected with HBV, hepatitis A virus, or cytomegalovirus. Preincubation of one of these convalescent NANB sera, or IgG derived thereof, with an acute-phase serum obtained from a NANB hepatitis virus-infected chimpanzee abolished the antibody reactivity. We conclude from these observations that selected convalescent sera from NANB hepatitis virus-infected patients contain low levels of antibody that specifically react with a cytoplasmic antigen associated with NANB virus-infected hepatocytes. Images PMID:6203116

  17. Detection of targeted carcinoembryonic antigens using a micro-fluxgate-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jian; Lei, Chong; Wang, Tao; Yang, Zhen; Zhou, Yong

    2013-11-01

    In this work, a micro-fluxgate-based biosensor was designed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) labeled by Dynabeads. The sensor with Fe-based amorphous core and three dimension solenoid coils was fabricated by Micro Electro-Mechanical system technology. Sandwich assays are performed using antibody-antigen pair combination of biotin-streptavidin assay on a separated Au film substrate surface with a self-assembled layer. With dc magnetic fields in the range of 560 μT to 875 μT, detection of CEAs with different concentrations was performed and a minimum detectable concentration of 1 pg/ml was achieved. Furthermore, CEA samples with different concentrations can be distinguished.

  18. Magnetic gold nanoparticles in SERS-based sandwich immunoassay for antigen detection by well oriented antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baniukevic, Julija; Hakki Boyaci, Ismail; Goktug Bozkurt, Akif; Tamer, Ugur; Ramanavicius, Arunas; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2013-05-15

    The aim of the study was to develop an indirect, robust and simple in application method for the detection of bovine leukemia virus antigen gp51. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was applied as detection method. Magnetic gold nanoparticles (MNP-Au) modified by antibodies in oriented or random manner were used for the binding of gp51. The high performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated that the best antibody immobilization and antigen capturing efficiency was achieved using fragmented antibodies obtained after reduction of intact antibodies with dithiothreitol. In order to increase efficiency and sensitivity of immunoassay Raman labels consisting of gold nanorods coated by 5-thio-nitrobenzoic acid layer with covalently bounded antibodies have been constructed. The LOD and LOQ of the proposed immunoassay for antigen gp51 detection were found to be 0.95μgmL(-1) and 3.14μgmL(-1), respectively. This immunoassay was successfully applied for the detection of gp51 in milk samples in a rapid, reliable and selective manner. We believe that the proposed SERS-based immunoassay format can be applied for the detection of other proteins.

  19. Comparative tests for detection of plague antigen and antibody in experimentally infected wild rodents.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, A J; Hummitzsch, D E; Leman, P A; Swanepoel, R; Searle, L A

    1986-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was compared with other standard tests for detection of plague (Yersinia pestis) antibody and antigen in multimammate mice (Mastomys coucha and M. natalensis) which were experimentally infected and then killed at daily intervals postinoculation. For detection of antibody in sera from M. natalensis, the immunoglobulin G (IgG) ELISA was equivalent in sensitivity to passive hemagglutination and more sensitive than the IgM ELISA and complement fixation. Antibody was first detected on postinfection day 6 by all four tests, but IgM ELISA titers had declined to undetectable levels after 8 weeks. For detection of fraction 1 Y. pestis antigen in rodent organs, the ELISA was less sensitive than fluorescent antibody but more sensitive than complement fixation or immunodiffusion. Plague fraction 1 antigen was detected in 16 of 34 bacteremic sera from M. coucha and M. natalensis. The threshold sensitivity of the ELISA was approximately 10(5) Y. pestis per ml. PMID:3097065

  20. Detection of avian influenza antigens in proximity fiber, droplet, and optical waveguide microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol; Heinze, Brian C.; Gamboa, Jessica; You, David J.

    2009-05-01

    Virus antigens of avian influenza subtype H3N2 were detected on two different microfluidic platforms: microchannel and droplet. Latex immunoagglutination assays were performed using 920-nm highly carboxylated polystyrene beads that are conjugated with antibody to avian influenza virus. The bead suspension was merged with the solutions of avian influenza virus antigens in a Y-junction of a microchannel made by polydimethylsiloxane soft lithography. The resulting latex immunoagglutinations were measured with two optical fibers in proximity setup to detect 45° forward light scattering. Alternatively, 10 μL droplets of a bead suspension and an antigen solution were merged on a superhydrophobic surface (water contact angle = 155°), whose movement was guided by a metal wire, and 180° back light scattering is measured with a backscattering optical probe. Detection limits were 0.1 pg mL-1 for both microchannel with proximity fibers and droplet microfluidics, thanks to the use of micro-positioning stages to help generate reproducible optical signals. Additionally, optical waveguide was tested by constructing optical waveguide channels (filled with mineral oil) within a microfluidic device to detect the same light scattering. Detection limit was 0.1 ng mL-1 for an optical waveguide device, with a strong potential of improvement in the near future. The use of optical waveguide enabled smaller device setup, easier operation, smaller standard deviations and broader linear range of assay than proximity fiber microchannel and droplet microfluidics. Total assay time was less than 10 min.

  1. Stable Reagent for the Detection of Antibody to the Specific Fraction I Antigen of Yersinia pestis1

    PubMed Central

    Rust, James H.; Berman, Sanford; Habig, William H.; Marshall, John D.; Cavanaugh, Dan C.

    1972-01-01

    A stable hemagglutinating antigen for detection of fraction I (FR-I) antibody of Yersinia pestis (Pasteurella pestis) is described. The antigen was prepared by sensitizing tanned, pyruvaldehyde-treated sheep erythrocytes (PAT SRBC) with FR-I antigen. Preliminary standardization by titration of each lot of FR-I was required to minimize the effect of molecular heterogeneity of specific FR-I antigen and to eliminate nonspecific reactions caused by the presence of a minor antigenic contaminant. In tests with sera from rabbits, dogs, and humans, FR-I PAT SRBC were as reactive as the previously employed standard antigen, FR-I-sensitized tanned erythrocytes. Fluid suspensions of FR-I PAT SRBC stored at 4 C for 3 months, or lyophilized preparations stored at ambient temperature for 6 months, showed no loss in antigenic activity. PMID:5062977

  2. Disulfide-modified antigen for detection of celiac disease-associated anti-tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Rivera, Luis Carlos; Dulay, Samuel; Lozano-Sánchez, Pablo; Katakis, Ioanis; Acero-Sánchez, Josep Lluís; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2017-03-29

    A simple and rapid immunosensor for the determination of the celiac disease-related antibody, anti-tissue transglutaminase, was investigated. The antigenic protein tissue transglutaminase was chemically modified, introducing disulfide groups through different moieties of the molecule (amine, carboxylic, and hydroxyl groups), self-assembled on gold surfaces, and used for the detection of IgA and IgG autoantibodies. The modified proteins were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance, which showed that only introduction of the disulfide groups through amine moieties in the tissue transglutaminase preserved its antigenic properties. The disulfide-modified antigen was co-immobilized via chemisorption with a poly(ethylene glycol) alkanethiol on gold electrodes. The modified electrodes were then exposed to IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies and subsequently to horseradish peroxidase-labeled anti-idiotypic antibodies, achieving a detection limit of 260 ng ml(-1). Immunosensor performance in the presence of complex matrixes, including clinically relevant serum reference solutions and real patient samples, was evaluated. The introduction of disulfides in the antigenic protein enabled a simple and convenient one-step surface immobilization procedure involving only spontaneous gold-thiol covalent binding. Complete amperometric assay time was 30 min.

  3. An antibody profile of systemic lupus erythematosus detected by antigen microarray

    PubMed Central

    Fattal, Ittai; Shental, Noam; Mevorach, Dror; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Livneh, Avi; Langevitz, Pnina; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Pauzner, Rachel; Lerner, Miriam; Blank, Miri; Hincapie, Maria-Eugenia; Gafter, Uzi; Naparstek, Yaakov; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Domany, Eytan; Cohen, Irun R

    2010-01-01

    Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) produce antibodies to many different self-antigens. Here, we investigated antibodies in SLE sera using an antigen microarray containing many hundreds of antigens, mostly self-antigens. The aim was to detect sets of antibody reactivities characteristic of SLE patients in each of various clinical states – SLE patients with acute lupus nephritis, SLE patients in renal remission, and SLE patients who had never had renal involvement. The analysis produced two novel findings: (i) an SLE antibody profile persists independently of disease activity and despite long-term clinical remission, and (ii) this SLE antibody profile includes increases in four specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) reactivities to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and hyaluronic acid; the profile also includes decreases in specific IgM reactivities to myeloperoxidase (MPO), CD99, collagen III, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and cardiolipin. The reactivities together showed high sensitivity (> 93%) and high specificity for SLE (> 88%). A healthy control subject who had the SLE antibody profile was later found to develop clinical SLE. The present study did not detect antibody reactivities that differentiated among the various subgroups of SLE subjects with statistical significance. Thus, SLE is characterized by an enduring antibody profile irrespective of clinical state. The association of SLE with decreased IgM natural autoantibodies suggests that these autoantibodies might enhance resistance to SLE. PMID:20201986

  4. Comparison of three antigen preparations to detect Trichinellosis in live swine using IgG-ELISA.

    PubMed

    Tattiyapong, Muncharee; Chaisri, Urai; Vongpakorn, Montakan; Anantaphruti, Malinee T; Dekumyoy, Paron

    2011-11-01

    A swine infected with Trichinella spiralis is a source of transmission to human through consumption of raw or improperly cooked pork. Detection of larvae is suitable for carcasses, so that pigs in households or farms can be examined serologically for trichinellosis. This study compared antigens, crude (CAg), excretory-secretory (ESAg) and surface (SAg), for their potential use in IgG-ELISA. Serum samples were collected from 5 experimentally infected swine with T. spiralis (pTs), 147 positive cases of 9 other parasitic infections, 12 mixed infections of other parasites, and 35 normal controls. At the same 100% sensitivity, specificity of tests was in a range of 98-77%. ESAg was the best source of antigen with specificity of 98.3% at cut-off value of 0.439. False positives included coccidiasis (1/86) and mixed infections (2/39). For CAg, trichuriasis (2/11), coccidiasis (5/86), and mixed infections (8/39) gave cross-reactions and some of these samples had OD values far above cut-off value of 0.332. Cross-reactions of SAg were Oesophagostomum spp-like GI-nematode infection (1/1), unidentified GI-nematode infections (2/3), trichuriasis (5/11), coccidiasis (29/86) and mixed infections (4/39). Thus, ESAg has the highest potential in serodiagnosis, with antibody to T. spiralis in pigs being detected at the earliest 16 day post-infection. However, crude antigen demonstrated a good specificity at 91.8%, and this antigen has a potential to be used as a detection of choice for swine trichinellosis, but the antigen preparation must be improved for higher specificity.

  5. Piezoelectric immunochip coated with thin films of bacterial cellulose nanocrystals for dengue detection.

    PubMed

    Pirich, Cleverton Luiz; de Freitas, Rilton Alves; Torresi, Roberto Manuel; Picheth, Guilherme Fadel; Sierakowski, Maria Rita

    2017-06-15

    Low-cost piezoelectric devices, such as simple frequency monitoring quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices, have good clinical utility as fast diagnostic tools for the detection of several diseases. However, unspecific antigen recognition, poor molecular probe adsorption and the need for sample dilution are still common drawbacks that hinder their use in routine diagnosis. In this work, piezoelectric sensors were previously coated with thin films of bacterial cellulose nanocrystals (CN) to provide a more sensitive and adapted interface for the attachment of monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgGNS1) and to favor specific detection of non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of dengue fever. The assembly of the immunochip surface was analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the NS1 detection was followed by quartz crystal microbalance with (QCM-D) and without energy dissipation monitoring (QCM). The CN surface was able to immobilize 2.30±0.5mgm(-2) of IgGNS1, as confirmed by AFM topography and phase images along with QCM-D. The system was able to detect the NS1 protein in serum with only 10-fold dilution in the range of 0.01-10µgmL(-1) by both QCM and QCM-D. The limits of detection of the two devices were 0.1μgmL(-1) for QCM-D and 0.32μgmL(-1) for QCM. As a result, QCM-D and QCM apparatuses can be used to follow NS1 recognition and have good potential for more sensitive, fast and/or less expensive diagnostic assays for dengue.

  6. Detection of Circulating Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Antigen in Urine of Paracoccidioidomycosis Patients before and during Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Salina, Margarete Aparecida; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Mendes, Rinaldo Poncio; Barraviera, Benedito; Mendes Giannini, Maria José Soares

    1998-01-01

    For the diagnosis and follow-up of paracoccidioidomycosis patients undergoing therapy, we evaluated two methods (immunoblotting and competition enzyme immunoassay) for the detection of circulating antigen in urine samples. A complex pattern of reactivity was observed in the immunoblot test. Bands of 70 and 43 kDa were detected more often in urine samples from patients before treatment. The immunoblot method detected gp43 and gp70 separately or concurrently in 11 (91.7%) of 12 patients, whereas the competition enzyme immunoassay detected antigenuria in 9 (75%) of 12 patients. Both tests appeared to be highly specific (100%), considering that neither fraction detectable by immunoblotting was present in urine samples from the control group. gp43 remained present in the urine samples collected during the treatment period, with a significant decrease in reactivity in samples collected during clinical recovery and increased reactivity in samples collected during relapses. Reactivity of some bands was also detected in urine specimens from patients with “apparent cure.” The detection of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigens in urine appears to be a promising method for diagnosing infection, for evaluating the efficacy of treatment, and for detecting relapse. PMID:9620407

  7. Nanostructured materials detect epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Badulescu, Marius

    2015-09-01

    New nanostructured materials based on thin films of Cu and Ni deposited on textile material (veil), as well as gold nanostructured microspheres were used for the design of new stochastic sensors. The stochastic sensors were able to detect simultaneously a panel of biomarkers comprising epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase, and carcinoembryonic antigen from whole blood samples with high reliabilities - recovery tests higher than 97.00%, with a RSD (%) lower than 0.1%. The stochastic sensors had shown high sensitivities and low determination levels for the detection of the proposed panel of biomarkers making early detection of lung cancer possible by fast screening of whole blood.

  8. Rapid antigen detection test for respiratory syncytial virus diagnosis as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Flávio da Silva; Oliveira, Danielle Bruna Leal de; Crema, Daniela; Pinez, Célia Miranda Nunes; Colmanetti, Thaís Cristina; Thomazelli, Luciano Matsumia; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Vieira, Sandra Elisabeth; Martinez, Marina Baquerizo; Botosso, Viviane Fongaro; Durigon, Edison Luiz

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the QuickVue(®) RSV Test Kit (QUIDEL Corp, CA, USA) as a screening tool for respiratory syncytial virus in children with acute respiratory disease in comparison with the indirect immunofluorescence assay as gold standard. In Brazil, rapid antigen detection tests for respiratory syncytial virus are not routinely utilized as a diagnostic tool, except for the diagnosis of dengue and influenza. The authors retrospectively analyzed 486 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples from children under age 5 with acute respiratory infection, between December 2013 and August 2014, the samples were analyzed by indirect immunofluorescence assay and QuickVue(®) RSV Test kit. Samples with discordant results were analyzed by real time PCR and nucleotide sequencing. From 313 positive samples by immunofluorescence assays, 282 (90%) were also positive by the rapid antigen detection test, two were positive only by rapid antigen detection test, 33 were positive only by immunofluorescence assays, and 171 were positive by both methods. The 35 samples with discordant results were analyzed by real time PCR; the two samples positive only by rapid antigen detection test and the five positive only by immunofluorescence assays were also positive by real time PCR. There was no relation between the negativity by QuickVue(®) RSV Test and viral load or specific strain. The QuickVue(®) RSV Test showed sensitivity of 90%, specificity of 98.8%, predictive positive value of 99.3%, and negative predictive value of 94.6%, with accuracy of 93.2% and agreement κ index of 0.85 in comparison to immunofluorescence assay. This study demonstrated that the QuickVue(®) RSV Test Kit can be effective in early detection of Respiratory syncytial virus in nasopharyngeal aspirate and is reliable for use as a diagnostic tool in pediatrics. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. MPT 64 Antigen detection for Rapid confirmation of M.tuberculosis isolates

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A new rapid Immunochromatographic test kit(SD MPT64TB Ag Kit) for detection of MPT 64 Antigen in M. tuberculosis isolates using mouse monoclonal MPT 64 Antibody developed by SD Bioline, South Korea was evaluated for rapid identification of M. tuberculosis isolates. We also assessed the sensitivity, specificity and predictive values of this kit. The test kit has an excellent sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value & positive predictive value. This rapid method is found to be a reliable, rapid and cheaper method for confirming MTB culture isolates in resource poor laboratories. Material/methods: 54 culture isolates of M. tuberculosis in broth & on LJ medium, 12 Non mycobacterial isolates, 10 Non tubercular (NTM) rapidly growing Mycobacteria isolated from pus & 5 smear positive sputum samples were tested for detection of MPT64 antigen using the SD Bioline immunochromatography (ICT)test kit. H37 RV strain was employed as the positive reference control. Findings H37 RV strain showed the presence of MPT64 antigen band. Similar band was formed in all the 54 MTB isolates tested proving 100% sensitivity. MPT64 band formation was not detected in any of the other test isolates which proved the 100% specificity of the test kit. Both PPV & NPV were 100%. Conclusion Tuberculosis is a global pandemic. Rapid identification of MTB culture isolate is very important for drug susceptibility testing. MPT 64 TB Ag detection ICT kit is a rapid, reliable method; it can be a substitute for the molecular identification methods. PMID:21429231

  10. Comparative efficacy of antigen and antibody detection tests for human trichinellosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanoska, D.; Cuperlovic, K.; Gamble, H.R.; Murrell, K.D.

    1989-02-01

    Sera collected from patients with suspected or confirmed exposure to Trichinella spiralis were tested for circulating parasite antigens and antiparasite antibodies. Using an immunoradiometric assay, excretory--secretory antigens from muscle-stage larvae of T. spiralis were detected in the sera of 47% of 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 13% of 39 patients without clinical signs but suspected of exposure to infected meat. In comparison, antibodies were detected using an indirect immunofluorescent test in the circulation of 100% of the 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 46% of the 39 patients with suspected exposure. The presence of antibodies specific to excretory-secretory products of T. spiralis muscle larvae was confirmed in the majority of the samples tested by a monoclonal antibody-based competitive inhibition assay. These results indicate that antibody detection is a more sensitive diagnostic method for human trichinellosis, but that antigen detection might be a useful confirmatory test because it is a direct demonstration of parasite products in the circulation.

  11. Detection and Characterization of Autoantibodies to Neuronal Cell-Surface Antigens in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    van Coevorden-Hameete, Marleen H.; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Schreurs, Marco W. J.; de Graaff, Esther; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A. E.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis (AIE) is a group of disorders in which autoantibodies directed at antigens located on the plasma membrane of neurons induce severe neurological symptoms. In contrast to classical paraneoplastic disorders, AIE patients respond well to immunotherapy. The detection of neuronal surface autoantibodies in patients’ serum or CSF therefore has serious consequences for the patients’ treatment and follow-up and requires the availability of sensitive and specific diagnostic tests. This mini-review provides a guideline for both diagnostic and research laboratories that work on the detection of known surface autoantibodies and/or the identification of novel surface antigens. We discuss the strengths and pitfalls of different techniques for anti-neuronal antibody detection: (1) Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence on rat/primate brain sections; (2) Immunocytochemistry (ICC) of living cultured hippocampal neurons; and (3) Cell Based Assay (CBA). In addition, we discuss the use of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis for the detection of novel neuronal surface antigens, which is a crucial step in further disease classification and the development of novel CBAs. PMID:27303263

  12. Accurate detection of Campylobacter spp. antigens by immunochromatography and enzyme immunoassay in routine microbiological laboratory.

    PubMed

    Regnath, Thomas; Ignatius, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Campylobacter spp. are fastidious microorganisms, and their detection by culture depends on the freshness of the stool sample and the skills of the laboratory staff. To improve laboratory diagnosis, assays for the detection of specific antigens have been developed. Here, we evaluated two assays for the detection of Campylobacter spp.-specific antigens, i.e., one immunochromatographic test and one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA), in 38 frozen Campylobacter spp.-positive specimens and prospectively in 533 fresh stool samples with a conventional enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and culture. Both assays were positive for 36 samples with Campylobacter jejuni and one with Campylobacter coli among 38 Campylobacter spp.-positive frozen samples. One Campylobacter lari-positive sample was identified by the immunochromatographic assay (ICA) only. In a prospective study performed within the course of routine microbiology, both assays were positive for 24/25 C. jejuni culture-positive samples (positive percent agreement, 96.0% [95% CI: 78.9-100%]). ICA and EIA also were positive for 14 and 10 culture-negative samples, respectively (negative percent agreement: ICA, 97.2% [95% CI: 95.4-98.4%]; EIA, 98.0% [95% CI: 96.4-99.0%]). In conclusion, the high agreement between both antigen-detection assays and culture indicates that both assays may be initially performed followed by culture only upon a positive test result.

  13. Natural Killer Cells and Helicobacter pylori Infection: Bacterial Antigens and Interleukin-12 Act Synergistically To Induce Gamma Interferon Production

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Cheol H.; Lundgren, Anna; Azem, Josef; Sjöling, Åsa; Holmgren, Jan; Svennerholm, Ann-Mari; Lundin, B. Samuel

    2005-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is known to induce a local immune response, which is characterized by activation of lymphocytes and the production of IFN-γ in the stomach mucosa. Since not only T cells, but also natural killer (NK) cells, are potent producers of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), we investigated whether NK cells play a role in the immune response to H. pylori infection. Our results showed that NK cells were present in both the gastric and duodenal mucosae but that H. pylori infection did not affect the infiltration of NK cells into the gastrointestinal area. Furthermore, we could show that NK cells could be activated directly by H. pylori antigens, as H. pylori bacteria, as well as lysate from H. pylori, induced the secretion of IFN-γ by NK cells. NK cells were also activated without direct contact when separated from the bacteria by an epithelial cell layer, indicating that the activation of NK cells by H. pylori can also occur in vivo, in the infected stomach mucosa. Moreover, the production of IFN-γ by NK cells was greatly enhanced when a small amount of interleukin-12 (IL-12) was added, and this synergistic effect was associated with increased expression of the IL-12 receptor β2. It was further evident that bacterial lysate alone was sufficient to induce the activation of cytotoxicity-related molecules. In conclusion, we demonstrated that NK cells are present in the gastroduodenal mucosa of humans and that NK cells produce high levels of IFN-γ when stimulated with a combination of H. pylori antigen and IL-12. We propose that NK cells play an active role in the local immune response to H. pylori infection. PMID:15731046

  14. Osteosarcoma Microenvironment: Whole-Slide Imaging and Optimized Antigen Detection Overcome Major Limitations in Immunohistochemical Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Pierre; Fellenberg, Jörg; Moskovszky, Linda; Sápi, Zoltan; Krenacs, Tibor; Poeschl, Johannes; Lehner, Burkhard; Szendrõi, Miklos; Ewerbeck, Volker; Kinscherf, Ralf; Fritzsching, Benedikt

    2014-01-01

    Background In osteosarcoma survival rates could not be improved over the last 30 years. Novel biomarkers are warranted to allow risk stratification of patients for more individual treatment following initial diagnosis. Although previous studies of the tumor microenvironment have identified promising candidates, novel biomarkers have not been translated into routine histopathology. Substantial difficulties regarding immunohistochemical detection and quantification of antigens in decalcified and heterogeneous osteosarcoma might largely explain this translational short-coming. Furthermore, we hypothesized that conventional hot spot analysis is often not representative for the whole section when applied to heterogeneous tissues like osteosarcoma. We aimed to overcome these difficulties for major biomarkers of the immunovascular microenvironment. Methods Immunohistochemistry was systematically optimized for cell surface (CD31, CD8) and intracellular antigens (FOXP3) including evaluation of 200 different antigen retrieval conditions. Distribution patterns of these antigens were analyzed in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples from 120 high-grade central osteosarcoma biopsies and computer-assisted whole-slide analysis was compared with conventional quantification methods including hot spot analysis. Results More than 96% of osteosarcoma samples were positive for all antigens after optimization of immunohistochemistry. In contrast, standard immunohistochemistry retrieved false negative results in 35–65% of decalcified osteosarcoma specimens. Standard hot spot analysis was applicable for homogeneous distributed FOXP3+ and CD8+ cells. However, heterogeneous distribution of vascular CD31 did not allow reliable quantification with hot spot analysis in 85% of all samples. Computer-assisted whole-slide analysis of total CD31- immunoreactive area proved as the most appropriate quantification method. Conclusion Standard staining and quantification procedures are not

  15. Direct detection of various pathogens by loop-mediated isothermal amplification assays on bacterial culture and bacterial colony.

    PubMed

    Yan, Muxia; Li, Weidong; Zhou, Zhenwen; Peng, Hongxia; Luo, Ziyan; Xu, Ling

    2017-01-01

    In this work, loop-mediated isothermal amplification based detection assay using bacterial culture and bacterial colony for various common pathogens direct detection had been established, evaluated and further applied. A total of five species of common pathogens and nine detection targets (tlh, tdh and trh for V. Parahaemolyticus, rfbE, stx1 and stx2 for E. coli, oprI for P. aeruginosa, invA for Salmonella and hylA for L. monocytogenes) were performed on bacterial culture and bacterial colony LAMP. To evaluate and optimize this assay, a total of 116 standard strains were included. Then, for each detected targets, 20 random selected strains were applied. Results were determined through both visual observation of the changed color by naked eye and electrophoresis, which increased the accuracy of survey. The minimum adding quantity of each primer had been confirmed, and the optimal amplification was obtained under 65 °C for 45 min with 25 μl reaction volume. The detection limit of bacterial culture LAMP and PCR assay were determined to be 10(2) and 10(4) or 10(5) CFU/reaction, respectively. No false positive amplification was observed when subjecting the bacterial -LAMP assay to 116 reference strains. This was the first report of colony-LAMP and culture-LAMP assay, which had been demonstrated to be a fast, reliable, cost-effective and simple method on detection of various common pathogens.

  16. Procalcitonin to Detect Suspected Bacterial Infections in the PICU.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Iris M; Aghamohammadi, Sara; Deakers, Timothy; Khemani, Robinder G

    2016-01-01

    Nonspecific clinical symptoms frequently lead to suspicion of bacterial infection in critically ill children. Clinicians send bacterial cultures for suspected infection and begin an empiric course of antibiotics while microbiology results are pending. We investigated whether the biomarker procalcitonin could be useful to predict confirmed bacterial infection in critically ill children in the PICU, before culture results are available. Prospective, blinded single-center study. Tertiary PICU and cardiothoracic ICU. There were one hundred forty-four patients with suspected bacterial infections that had bacterial cultures sent by clinicians. Procalcitonin samples were obtained at three time intervals: as close to the time of the initial culture as possible (up to 12 hr after) and 24 and 72 hours after the initial culture. Patients were stratified into clinical outcome groups based on microbiology results and clinical symptoms using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. These assignments were blinded to procalcitonin levels. Primary outcome was the presence of culture-proven bacterial infection. There was a statistically significant difference in initial and subsequent median procalcitonin values between patients with confirmed bacterial infections and patients with low suspicion of bacterial infection (p < 0.02). However, there was extremely high variability in procalcitonin values among all groups. Procalcitonin had only a fair ability to predict bacterial infection, with area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic plots ranging between 0.63 and 0.71. When using serial procalcitonin values to predict bacterial infection, positive likelihood ratios were near 1 and negative likelihood ratios were between 0.3 and 0.4. Procalcitonin levels were higher in children with documented confirmed bacterial infection as compared with those with low suspicion of infection. However, neither single nor serial procalcitonin measurements were able to

  17. Presentation of antigen in immune complexes is boosted by soluble bacterial immunoglobulin binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Léonetti, M; Galon, J; Thai, R; Sautès-Fridman, C; Moine, G; Ménez, A

    1999-04-19

    Using a snake toxin as a proteic antigen (Ag), two murine toxin-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), splenocytes, and two murine Ag-specific T cell hybridomas, we showed that soluble protein A (SpA) from Staphylococcus aureus and protein G from Streptococcus subspecies, two Ig binding proteins (IBPs), not only abolish the capacity of the mAbs to decrease Ag presentation but also increase Ag presentation 20-100-fold. Five lines of evidence suggest that this phenomenon results from binding of an IBP-Ab-Ag complex to B cells possessing IBP receptors. First, we showed that SpA is likely to boost presentation of a free mAb, suggesting that the IBP-boosted presentation of an Ag in an immune complex results from the binding of IBP to the mAb. Second, FACS analyses showed that an Ag-Ab complex is preferentially targeted by SpA to a subpopulation of splenocytes mainly composed of B cells. Third, SpA-dependent boosted presentation of an Ag-Ab complex is further enhanced when splenocytes are enriched in cells containing SpA receptors. Fourth, the boosting effect largely diminishes when splenocytes are depleted of cells containing SpA receptors. Fifth, the boosting effect occurs only when IBP simultaneously contains a Fab and an Fc binding site. Altogether, our data suggest that soluble IBPs can bridge immune complexes to APCs containing IBP receptors, raising the possibility that during an infection process by bacteria secreting these IBPs, Ag-specific T cells may activate IBP receptor-containing B cells by a mechanism of intermolecular help, thus leading to a nonspecific immune response.

  18. Detection of Rabies Virus Antigen in Dog Saliva Using a Latex Agglutination Test

    PubMed Central

    Kasempimolporn, S.; Saengseesom, W.; Lumlertdacha, B.; Sitprija, V.

    2000-01-01

    Dog bites are responsible for more than 90% of human rabies deaths in Asia. We developed a simple and inexpensive test based on latex agglutination (LA) for rabies virus antigen detection in dog saliva. Rabies virus antigen could be detected by agglutination on a glass slide using latex particles coated with gamma globulin. By evaluation of paired saliva-brain specimens from 238 dogs, the LA test using saliva was 99% specific and 95% sensitive compared to the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) on brain smears. The advantages of the LA test over the standard FAT are that it is comparatively simple and there is no need to kill the animal before examination. PMID:10921987

  19. Biotin avidin amplified magnetic immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection using GoldMag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, An; Geng, Tingting; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Chao; Cui, Yali

    2007-04-01

    Using GoldMag (Fe3O4/Au) nanoparticles as a carrier, a biotin-avidin amplified ELISA was developed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). A specific antibody was labeled with biotin and then used to detect the antigen with an antibody coated on GoldMag nanoparticles by a sandwich ELISA assay. The results showed that 5 mol of biotin were surface bound per mole of antibody. The biotin-avidin amplified ELISA assay has a higher sensitivity than that of the direct ELISA assay. There is 5-fold difference between HBsAg positive and negative serum even at dilution of 1:10000, and the relative standard deviation of the parallel positive serum at dilution of 1:4000 is 5.98% (n=11).

  20. Chemotactic Migration of T Cells towards Dendritic Cells Promotes the Detection of Rare Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Vroomans, Renske M. A.; Marée, Athanasius F. M.; de Boer, Rob J.; Beltman, Joost B.

    2012-01-01

    In many immunological processes chemoattraction is thought to play a role in guiding cells to their sites of action. However, based on in vivo two-photon microscopy experiments in the absence of cognate antigen, T cell migration in lymph nodes (LNs) has been roughly described as a random walk. Although it has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) carrying cognate antigen in some circumstances attract T cells chemotactically, it is currently still unclear whether chemoattraction of T cells towards DCs helps or hampers scanning. Chemoattraction towards DCs could on the one hand help T cells to rapidly find DCs. On the other hand, it could be deleterious if DCs become shielded by a multitude of attracted yet non-specific T cells. Results from a recent simulation study suggested that the deleterious effect dominates. We re-addressed the question whether T cell chemoattraction towards DCs is expected to promote or hamper the detection of rare antigens using the Cellular Potts Model, a formalism that allows for dynamic, flexible cellular shapes and cell migration. Our simulations show that chemoattraction of T cells enhances the DC scanning efficiency, leading to an increased probability that rare antigen-specific T cells find DCs carrying cognate antigen. Desensitization of T cells after contact with a DC further improves the scanning efficiency, yielding an almost threefold enhancement compared to random migration. Moreover, the chemotaxis-driven migration still roughly appears as a random walk, hence fine-tuned analysis of cell tracks will be required to detect chemotaxis within microscopy data. PMID:23166480

  1. Chemotactic migration of T cells towards dendritic cells promotes the detection of rare antigens.

    PubMed

    Vroomans, Renske M A; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J; Beltman, Joost B

    2012-01-01

    In many immunological processes chemoattraction is thought to play a role in guiding cells to their sites of action. However, based on in vivo two-photon microscopy experiments in the absence of cognate antigen, T cell migration in lymph nodes (LNs) has been roughly described as a random walk. Although it has been shown that dendritic cells (DCs) carrying cognate antigen in some circumstances attract T cells chemotactically, it is currently still unclear whether chemoattraction of T cells towards DCs helps or hampers scanning. Chemoattraction towards DCs could on the one hand help T cells to rapidly find DCs. On the other hand, it could be deleterious if DCs become shielded by a multitude of attracted yet non-specific T cells. Results from a recent simulation study suggested that the deleterious effect dominates. We re-addressed the question whether T cell chemoattraction towards DCs is expected to promote or hamper the detection of rare antigens using the Cellular Potts Model, a formalism that allows for dynamic, flexible cellular shapes and cell migration. Our simulations show that chemoattraction of T cells enhances the DC scanning efficiency, leading to an increased probability that rare antigen-specific T cells find DCs carrying cognate antigen. Desensitization of T cells after contact with a DC further improves the scanning efficiency, yielding an almost threefold enhancement compared to random migration. Moreover, the chemotaxis-driven migration still roughly appears as a random walk, hence fine-tuned analysis of cell tracks will be required to detect chemotaxis within microscopy data.

  2. Use of Brucella canis antigen for detection of ovine serum antibodies against Brucella ovis.

    PubMed

    López, G; Ayala, S M; Escobar, G I; Lucero, N E

    2005-02-25

    Brucella ovis causes a genital disease of sheep manifested by epididymitis in rams and placentitis in ewes producing reduced fertility in the flock. Clinical diagnosis is not sensitive enough and bacteriological testing is not feasible for detection of the disease in large numbers of animals. Indirect methods of serological testing are preferred for routine diagnosis, of which agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID), complement fixation (CF) and ELISA tests are recommended as the most efficient. Since B. ovis shares antigenic components with Brucella canis, it would seem that either strain could be used as antigen with the same results; however, the advantage of the B. canis (M-) strain variant is that it can be used to develop a satisfactory antigen for agglutination tests. We present data on AGID and IELISA tests using B. ovis antigen and rapid screening agglutination test (RSAT), 2-mercapto-ethanol RSAT (2ME-RSAT) and IELISA using B. canis antigen. We tested 225 animals. The cut-off values were adjusted by ROC analysis using 51 negative and 32 positive sera; the IELISA-B. canis cut-off value was 39 (%P) and IELISA-B. ovis, 51 (%P), with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Of the 32 positive sera from the infected flock RSAT detected 32 (100%), 2ME-RSAT 29 (91%) and AGID 31 (97%). Of the 142 sera from suspicious flocks, 46 were negative and 56 positive in all the tests; 16 were positive by RSAT, IELISA-B. canis and IELISA-B. ovis, 20 positive only with RSAT and 2 positive only by both IELISAs. RSAT is a very sensitive screening test that, because of its simplicity and easy interpretation, following a study in larger sample, could replace AGID as a screening test for diagnosis of ovine brucellosis caused by B. ovis. The IELISA-B. canis or IELISA-B. ovis could be used as confirmatory tests, since they show equal specificity and sensitivity.

  3. Detecting West Nile Virus in Owls and Raptors by an Antigen-capture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Douglas G.; Barker, Ian K.; Lindsay, Robbin; Hunter, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a rapid antigen-capture assay (VecTest) for detection of West Nile virus in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs, collected at necropsy from owls (N = 93) and raptors (N = 27). Sensitivity was 93.5%–95.2% for northern owl species but <42.9% for all other species. Specificity was 100% for owls and 85.7% for raptors. PMID:15663862

  4. Antigen Detection in the Diagnosis of Histoplasmosis: A Meta-analysis of Diagnostic Performance.

    PubMed

    Fandiño-Devia, Estefanía; Rodríguez-Echeverri, Carolina; Cardona-Arias, Jaiberth; Gonzalez, Angel

    2016-04-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of diagnostic data to evaluate the performance of Histoplasma antigen detection tests for diagnosing histoplasmosis. We included all studies involving human subjects that assessed the performance of any antigen detection test for histoplasmosis in urine or serum by carrying out an exhaustive and reproducible search of the literature between 1980 and 2014 from four databases. Quality of the articles was assessed, and meta-analysis was performed under the random effects model, calculating sensitivity, specificity, likelihood and odds ratios, and ROC curve using Meta-DiSc(es). Nine out of a total of 23 studies met strict quality criteria and were therefore included. The overall sensitivity for antigen detection in serum and urine was 81% (95% CI 78-83%), while specificity was 99% (95% CI 98-99%). Sensitivity for antigenuria and antigenemia was 79% (95% CI 76-82%) and 82% (95% CI 79-85%), respectively; specificity values were 99% (95% CI 98-100%) in urine and 97% (95% CI 96-98%) in serum. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 49.5 (95% CI 20.7-118.7) and 0.19 (95% CI 0.14-0.26), respectively, while the diagnostic OR was 362 (95% CI 121.2-1080.3) and area under the curve was 0.99. In conclusion, the performance of Histoplasma antigen detection assay of urine was not significantly different from that of blood, indicating that antigenuria and antigenemia have equal diagnostic value in histoplasmosis.

  5. Biomimetic/Optical Sensors for Detecting Bacterial Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Ksendzov, Alexander; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Ryan, Margaret; Lazazzera, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Biomimetic/optical sensors have been proposed as means of real-time detection of bacteria in liquid samples through real-time detection of compounds secreted by the bacteria. Bacterial species of interest would be identified through detection of signaling compounds unique to those species. The best-characterized examples of quorum-signaling compounds are acyl-homoserine lactones and peptides. Each compound, secreted by each bacterium of an affected species, serves as a signal to other bacteria of the same species to engage in a collective behavior when the population density of that species reaches a threshold level analogous to a quorum. A sensor according to the proposal would include a specially formulated biomimetic film, made of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), that would respond optically to the signaling compound of interest. The MIP film would be integrated directly onto an opticalwaveguide- based ring resonator for optical readout. Optically, the sensor would resemble the one described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. MIPs have been used before as molecular- recognition compounds, though not in the manner of the present proposal. Molecular imprinting is an approach to making molecularly selective cavities in a polymer matrix. These cavities function much as enzyme receptor sites: the chemical functionality and shape of a cavity in the polymer matrix cause the cavity to bind to specific molecules. An MIP matrix is made by polymerizing monomers in the presence of the compound of interest (template molecule). The polymer forms around the template. After the polymer solidifies, the template molecules are removed from the polymer matrix by decomplexing them from their binding sites and then dissolving them, leaving cavities that are matched to the template molecules in size, shape, and chemical functionality. The cavities thus become molecular-recognition sites

  6. An electrochemically reduced graphene oxide-based electrochemical immunosensing platform for ultrasensitive antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Haque, Al-Monsur Jiaul; Park, Hyejin; Sung, Daekyung; Jon, Sangyong; Choi, Sung-Yool; Kim, Kyuwon

    2012-02-21

    We present an electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO)-based electrochemical immunosensing platform for the ultrasensitive detection of an antigen by the sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) protocol. Graphene oxide (GO) sheets were initially deposited on the amine-terminated benzenediazonium-modified indiun tin oxide (ITO) surfaces through both electrostatic and π-π interactions between the modified surfaces and GO. This deposition was followed by the electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide (GO) for preparing ERGO-modified ITO surfaces. These surfaces were then coated with an N-acryloxysuccinimide-activated amphiphilic polymer, poly(BMA-r-PEGMA-r-NAS), through π-π stacking interactions between the benzene ring tethered to the polymer and ERGO. After covalent immobilization of a primary antibody on the polymer-modified surfaces, sandwich ELISA was carried out for the detection of an antigen by use of a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled secondary antibody. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the developed electrochemical immunosensor exhibited a linear response over a wide range of antigen concentrations with a very low limit of detection (ca. 100 fg/mL, which corresponds to ca. 700 aM). The high sensitivity of the electrochemical immunosensor may be attributed not only to the enhanced electrocatalytic activity owing to ERGO but also to the minimized background current owing to the reduced nonspecific binding of proteins.

  7. Validation of ELISA for the detection of African horse sickness virus antigens and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rubio, C; Cubillo, M A; Hooghuis, H; Sanchez-Vizcaino, J M; Diaz-Laviada, M; Plateau, E; Zientara, S; Crucière, C; Hamblin, C

    1998-01-01

    The mortality rate in susceptible populations of horses during an epizootic of African horse sickness (AHS) may be in excess of 90%. Rapid and reliable assays are therefore essential for the confirmation of clinical diagnoses and to enable control strategies to be implemented without undue delay. One of the major objectives of a recent European Union funded project was the validation of newly developed diagnostic assays which are rapid, sensitive, highly reproducible and inexpensive, for the detection of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) antigens and antibodies. The Laboratorio de Sanidad y Produccion Animal (LSPA) in Algete, Spain was charged with the responsibility of co-ordinating and supplying samples of viruses and antisera to the participating laboratories in Spain, France and the United Kingdom. The panels comprised 76 antigen samples for assay by indirect sandwich ELISAs and 53 serum samples for antibody detection by either indirect or competitive ELISAs. Results generated by ELISA for each laboratory were analysed in LSPA in terms of their relative sensitivities and specificities. There was a good agreement between the ELISAs used for either antigen or antibody detection. The participating groups agreed that any field sample giving a doubtful result would always be retested by ELISA and an alternative assay.

  8. How to obtain good morphology and antigen detection in the same tissue section?

    PubMed

    Zupančič, Daša; Terčelj, Marjeta; Štrus, Bojan; Veranič, Peter

    2017-02-10

    Most human and animal biopsy samples are routinely embedded in paraffin since this enables the pathologist or researcher to obtain excellent morphology and simplifies storage. Nevertheless, in many cases, the antigen of interest cannot be detected in paraffin section. The alternative available for good immunohistochemistry is preparation of cryosections, which usually provide decent antigen preservation and are frequently used for immunofluorescence. However, cryosections often do not provide efficient morphological details of tissues and cells for pathologic evaluation. In order to obtain good antigen preservation and improve tissue and cell morphology after freezing, we tested three different fixations and freezing methodologies and compared them to routine formaldehyde fixation and paraffin embedding. As a model system, we selected the epithelium of the rat urinary bladder and trachea. On all samples, haematoxylin and eosin staining was performed as well as immunofluorescence with antibodies against tight junction protein ZO-1 and against intermediate filament cytokeratin 7. The best compromise between morphology and immunofluorescence was obtained with "sucrose impregnation prior to freezing" method. Moreover, this procedure is also quicker in comparison to standard paraffin section preparation. To check the clinical relevance of our study, this method was used for human biopsy samples of neoplastic urothelial and bronchial mucosa lesions. Besides good immunofluorescence results, the morphology of these samples was well preserved. We therefore propose that cryosection preparation with sucrose impregnation prior to freezing should be further exploited in other clinical and veterinary applications, since it enables good morphology and antigen preservation.

  9. Laminin, fibronectin, and Goodpasture antigen detection in patients with Alport's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basta-Jovanovic, G; Savin, M; Jovanovic, A Z; Veljovic, R; Sindjic, M

    1993-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence study with laminin and fibronectin monoclonal antibodies on paraffin sections, as well as with serum from a patient with Goodpasture's syndrome with high titer of autoantibodies that recognize the antigenic determinants in human glomerular and tubular basement membrane, was performed on 14 patients with Alport's syndrome and 5 specimens of normal renal tissue obtained from donors in cases of renal transplantation (control group). We found no binding of Goodpasture antigen to glomerular and distal tubular basement membranes in renal biopsy tissue from all 14 patients with Alport's syndrome. In contrast, there was bright linear fluorescence of Goodpasture antigen on glomerular and tubular basement membranes of normal renal material. There was no difference in laminin and fibronectin binding in patients with Alport's syndrome and controls. In all the cases binding was strongly positive. These results suggest an abnormality or absence of immunoreactive autoantigen in the glomerular and distal tubular basement membrane in patients with Alport's syndrome. Therefore, Goodpasture antigen detection could be an important diagnostic method in early stages of Alport's syndrome when characteristic morphological changes are not yet developed.

  10. Bacterial DNA Detected in Japanese Rice Wines and the Fermentation Starters.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Momoka; Fukuyama, Akari; Takahashi, Yurika; Yamada, Masato; Nishida, Hiromi

    2017-08-22

    As Japanese rice wine (sake) brewing is not done aseptically, bacterial contamination is conceivable during the process of sake production. There are two types of the fermentation starter, sokujo-moto and yamahai-moto (kimoto). We identified bacterial DNA found in various sakes, the sokujo-moto and the yamahai-moto making just after sake yeast addition. Each sake has a unique variety of bacterial DNA not observed in other sakes. Although most bacterial DNA sequences detected in the sokujo-moto were found in sakes of different sake breweries, most bacterial DNA sequences detected in the yamahai-moto at the early stage of the starter fermentation were not detected in any sakes. Our findings demonstrate that various bacteria grow and then die during the process of sake brewing, as indicated by the presence of trace levels of bacterial DNA.

  11. ELISA for detection of variant rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus RHDV2 antigen in liver extracts.

    PubMed

    Dalton, K P; Podadera, A; Granda, V; Nicieza, I; Del Llano, D; González, R; de Los Toyos, J R; Ocaña, M García; Vázquez, F; Alonso, J M Martin; Prieto, J M; Parra, F; Casais, R

    2017-09-20

    The emergence and rapid spread of variant of the rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV2) require new diagnostic tools to ensure that efficient control measures are adopted. In the present study, a specific sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of RHDV2 antigens in rabbit liver homogenates, based on the use of an RHDV2-specific monoclonal antibody (Mab) 2D9 for antigen capture and an anti-RHDV2 goat polyclonal antibody (Pab), was developed. This ELISA was able to successfully detect RHDV2 and RHDV2 recombinant virions with high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (97.22%). No cross-reactions were detected with RHDV G1 viruses while low cross-reactivity was detected with one of the RHDVa samples analyzed. The ELISA afforded good repeatability and had high analytical sensitivity as it was able to detect a dilution 1:163,640 (6.10ng/mL) of purified RHDV-N11 VLPs, which contained approximately 3.4×10(8)molecules/mL particles. The reliable discrimination between closely related viruses is crucial to understand the epidemiology and the interaction of co-existing pathogens. In the work described here we design and validate an ELISA for laboratory based, specific, sensitive and reliable detection of RHDV2/RHDV2. This ELISA is a valuable, specific virological tool for monitoring virus circulation, which will permit a better control of this disease. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Blastomyces dermatitidis antigen detection in urine specimens from dogs with blastomycosis using a competitive binding inhibition ELISA.

    PubMed

    Shurley, J F; Legendre, A M; Scalarone, G M

    2005-09-01

    A competitive binding inhibition enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect Blastomyces dermatitidis antigens in urine specimens from dogs with blastomycosis. Sera from rabbits immunized with B. dermatitidis killed whole yeast cells were used as the primary antibody in the competitive ELISA. This initial study was performed to determine if B. dermatitidis antigen detection was possible and to test the efficacy of the rabbit sera as a primary antibody. An indirect ELISA was also performed to compare antigen detection in urine to antibody detection in the sera of the infected dogs. The results indicate 100% (36/36 specimens) detection of both antigen and antibody. Cross reactivity with Histoplasma capsulatum, as well as non-specific binding with the normal urine specimens, was observed with the competitive binding inhibition ELISA.

  13. Use of monoclonal antibodies in diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis: new strategies for detection of circulating antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, B L; Figueroa, J I; Hamilton, A J; Ortiz, B; Robledo, M A; Hay, R J; Restrepo, A

    1997-01-01

    The precise diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis, in most cases, is established by direct methods and indirect immunological tests. The latter method is reliant on the identification of the host's humoral responses, which are usually impaired or absent in patients with severe juvenile forms of the disease and in immunocompromised patients. Determining disease activity or assessing treatment responses by measuring antibody levels is difficult, since antibody titer may remain elevated or persist at stationary levels, even in the presence of clinical improvement. Consequently, there is a need for alternative tests aimed at the identification of circulating antigens. A modification of the standard hybridoma production method was used to raise a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the yeast form of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Of these, MAb PIB, directed against an 87-kDa determinant, was used to develop an inhibition ELISA (inh-ELISA) capable of detecting as little as 5.8 ng of circulating antigen per ml of serum. Sera from 46 patients with paracoccidioidomycosis or other mycoses and sera from healthy individuals were evaluated by the inh-ELISA; overall sensitivity was 80.4% (37 of 46 paracoccidioidomycosis patients tested positive), and specificity compared with that of normal controls from areas of endemicity was 81.4%. The inh-ELISA detected circulating antigen in 100% of patients with the acute form of paracoccidioidomycosis and in 83.3 and 60% of patients with the chronic multifocal and unifocal forms of paracoccidioidomycosis according to the patients' clinical presentation. These results indicate that the inh-ELISA with MAb PIB is effective in the detection of circulating antigen and that this test may be useful for monitoring responses to treatment and establishing disease prognoses. PMID:9399534

  14. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: a matrix including lanthanide ions is provided on the surface containing the bacterial spores; functionalized aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores on the surface; a complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is formed on the surface; the complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence of the complex on the surface; and the bacterial spores exhibiting the luminescence of the complex on the surface are detected and quantified.

  15. Detection of circulating toxocaral antigens in dogs by sandwich enzyme-immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, K; Kazuta, Y; Endo, R; Tanaka, K

    1984-01-01

    This study describes the presence of circulating toxocaral antigens (CTA) in the sera of dogs infected with Toxocara canis (T. canis) by using a sandwich enzyme-immunoassay (SEIA). A specificity of this assay with different antigens was observed, i.e. the EIA values, which express the antigen concentration, of excretory-secretory antigen from T. canis larvae were higher than those of other antigens (Ascaris lumbricoides, Dirofilaria immitis and Fasciola hepatica). The variability in intra-assay was below 10%. In age distribution of CTA levels, the highest level was observed at 1 month of age. Thereafter, the levels decreased gradually until 6 months of age and then the same levels were maintained until adult age. Also, slightly elevated levels were found in the sera of foetuses. A significant correlation was obtained between age and CTA levels. The positive correlation between the number of worms and CTA levels was significant. As for the IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies, a significant correlation was observed between the IgM antibody activities and CTA levels, but this was not observed with IgG and IgA antibodies. From these results, it was indicated that the immunological response to T. canis infection in dogs may not be reached until 1 or 2 months after birth, although detectable CTA levels were observed in foetal and early life. It was also suggested that the immunological stimulation for canine toxocariasis may be maintained by the excretory-secretory materials from the larvae through life and as a result, IgM antibody production may be observed even in chronically infected adult dogs. The SEIA technique reported in this study may be useful as a diagnostic tool of human toxocariasis, since the CTA can be directly demonstrated by the technique. PMID:6365746

  16. Data for automated, high-throughput microscopy analysis of intracellular bacterial colonies using spot detection.

    PubMed

    Ernstsen, Christina L; Login, Frédéric H; Jensen, Helene H; Nørregaard, Rikke; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Nejsum, Lene N

    2017-10-01

    Quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies is useful in strategies directed against bacterial attachment, subsequent cellular invasion and intracellular proliferation. An automated, high-throughput microscopy-method was established to quantify the number and size of intracellular bacterial colonies in infected host cells (Detection and quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies by automated, high-throughput microscopy, Ernstsen et al., 2017 [1]). The infected cells were imaged with a 10× objective and number of intracellular bacterial colonies, their size distribution and the number of cell nuclei were automatically quantified using a spot detection-tool. The spot detection-output was exported to Excel, where data analysis was performed. In this article, micrographs and spot detection data are made available to facilitate implementation of the method.

  17. Novel surface antigen based impedimetric immunosensor for detection of Salmonella typhimurium in water and juice samples.

    PubMed

    Mutreja, Ruchi; Jariyal, Monu; Pathania, Preeti; Sharma, Arunima; Sahoo, D K; Suri, C Raman

    2016-11-15

    A specific surface antigen, OmpD has been reported first time as a surface biomarker in the development of selective and sensitive immunosensor for detecting Salmonella typhimurium species. The OmpD surface antigen extraction was done from Salmonella typhimurium serovars, under the optimized growth conditions for its expression. Anti-OmpD antibodies were generated and used as detector probe in immunoassay format on graphene-graphene oxide (G-GO) modified screen printed carbon electrodes. The water samples were spiked with standard Salmonella typhimurium cells, and detection was done by measuring the change in impedimetric response of developed immunosensor to know the concentration of serovar Salmonella typhimurium. The developed immunosensor was able to specifically detect S. typhimurium in spiked water and juice samples with a sensitivity upto 10(1)CFUmL(-1), with high selectivity and very low cross-reactivity with other strains. This is the first report on the detection of Salmonella typhimurum species using a specific biomarker, OmpD. The developed technique could be very useful for the detection of nontyphoidal Salmonellosis and is also important from an epidemiological point of view.

  18. Duplex Microfluidic SERS Detection of Pathogen Antigens with Nanoyeast Single-Chain Variable Fragments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative and accurate detection of multiple biomarkers would allow for the rapid diagnosis and treatment of diseases induced by pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies are standard affinity reagents applied for biomarkers detection; however, their production is expensive and labor-intensive. Herein, we report on newly developed nanoyeast single-chain variable fragments (NYscFv) as an attractive alternative to monoclonal antibodies, which offers the unique advantage of a cost-effective production, stability in solution, and target-specificity. By combination of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microspectroscopy using glass-coated, highly purified SERS nanoparticle clusters as labels, with a microfluidic device comprising multiple channels, a robust platform for the sensitive duplex detection of pathogen antigens has been developed. Highly sensitive detection for individual Entamoeba histolytica antigen EHI_115350 (limit of detection = 1 pg/mL, corresponding to 58.8 fM) and EHI_182030 (10 pg/mL, corresponding 453 fM) with high specificity has been achieved, employing the newly developed corresponding NYscFv as probe in combination with SERS microspectroscopy at a single laser excitation wavelength. Our first report on SERS-based immunoassays using the novel NYscFv affinity reagent demonstrates the flexibility of NYscFv fragments as viable alternatives to monoclonal antibodies in a range of bioassay platforms and paves the way for further applications. PMID:25192256

  19. Duplex microfluidic SERS detection of pathogen antigens with nanoyeast single-chain variable fragments.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuling; Rauf, Sakandar; Grewal, Yadveer S; Spadafora, Lauren J; Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Cangelosi, Gerard A; Schlücker, Sebastian; Trau, Matt

    2014-10-07

    Quantitative and accurate detection of multiple biomarkers would allow for the rapid diagnosis and treatment of diseases induced by pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies are standard affinity reagents applied for biomarkers detection; however, their production is expensive and labor-intensive. Herein, we report on newly developed nanoyeast single-chain variable fragments (NYscFv) as an attractive alternative to monoclonal antibodies, which offers the unique advantage of a cost-effective production, stability in solution, and target-specificity. By combination of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microspectroscopy using glass-coated, highly purified SERS nanoparticle clusters as labels, with a microfluidic device comprising multiple channels, a robust platform for the sensitive duplex detection of pathogen antigens has been developed. Highly sensitive detection for individual Entamoeba histolytica antigen EHI_115350 (limit of detection = 1 pg/mL, corresponding to 58.8 fM) and EHI_182030 (10 pg/mL, corresponding 453 fM) with high specificity has been achieved, employing the newly developed corresponding NYscFv as probe in combination with SERS microspectroscopy at a single laser excitation wavelength. Our first report on SERS-based immunoassays using the novel NYscFv affinity reagent demonstrates the flexibility of NYscFv fragments as viable alternatives to monoclonal antibodies in a range of bioassay platforms and paves the way for further applications.

  20. Influenza virus titration, antigenic characterization, and serological methods for antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Klimov, Alexander; Balish, Amanda; Veguilla, Vic; Sun, Hong; Schiffer, Jarad; Lu, Xiuhua; Katz, Jacqueline M; Hancock, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes some commonly used methods of influenza virus titration, antigenic characterization, and serological methods by antibody detection. These methods are essential not only for virus characterization but also for identifying new antigenic variants, vaccine strain selection, and sero-epidemiologic studies of influenza virus transmission and prevalence. Virus titration methods such as the hemagglutination assay, 50% egg or tissue culture infectious dose, and plaque assay are employed to determine the amount of virus particles in a sample. The hemagglutination inhibition assay is a reliable, relatively simple and inexpensive technique to antigenically characterize isolates of influenza viruses. Serological methods such as virus neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition are the fundamental tools used in sero-epidemiologic studies of influenza virus transmission and prevalence and in the evaluation of vaccine immunogenicity. While serological methods rarely yield an early diagnosis of acute influenza virus infection, well-timed, paired acute, and convalescent serum samples may establish the diagnosis of a recent influenza infection even when attempts to detect the virus are negative.

  1. [Evaluation of a new ELISA (Bartels) for detection of Legionella pneumophila antigen in urine].

    PubMed

    de Ory, Fernando

    2002-03-01

    Detection of Legionella pneumophila soluble antigens allows rapid diagnosis of pneumonia caused by these bacteria. A new ELISA (Bartels) for antigenuria detection has recently been commercialized. We compared the new ELISA with another well-established ELISA (Binax). To evaluate ELISA-Bartels (Legionella Urinary Antigen, Intracel, Issaquah, Washington, United States), urine samples previously characterized by ELISA Binax (Legionella Urinary Antigen Enzyme Immunoassay Kit, Binax, Portland, Maine, United States) were used. Samples came from Legionella outbreaks (n = 48), from sporadic legionellosis (n = 38), and from children with viral pneumonia (n = 21). Samples from the External Quality Control of Legionella of the European Working Group on Legionella Infections (n = 102) were also tested. Of the samples analyzed, 109 were positive in ELISA-Binax, 2 were equivocal and 98 were negative. Samples showing equivocal results were excluded from the analysis. The sensitivity of ELISA-Bartels in comparison with that of ELISA-Binax was 98.2% (107/109) and specificity was 82.7% (81/98). In the 17 samples that were positive in ELISA-Bartels and negative in ELISA-Binax, 10 were positive in ELISA-Binax after concentration by selective ultrafiltration and 6 further cases showed serology indicating or compatible with recent Legionella infection and were thus classified as true positives. ELISA-Bartels showed good sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity was even higher than that of ELISA-Binax. Thus, we consider it to be an appropriate method for diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia.

  2. TsPKA-r: a potential immunodiagnostic antigen for the detection of porcine cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangxue; Liang, Panhong; Zhang, Shaohua; Guo, Aijiang; Wang, Lijie; Zheng, Yadong; Luo, Xuenong

    2017-03-27

    Cysticercosis, caused by metacestodes of Taenia solium, has a significant soci-economic impact and is of considerable importance in public health. However, there are no specific diagnostic antigens to distinguish between T. solim and Taenia hydatigena. In the present study, cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunit (TsPKA-r), an excretory/secretary (ES) antigen of T. solium, was used to establish a specific and sensitive diagnostic tool for detection of porcine cysticercosis. The full-length sequence encoding TsPKA-r was amplified by PCR, sequenced and then identified by bioinformatics. The fusion protein with 6×His-tags was expressed in E. coli, purified by Ni Sepharose™ 6 Fast Flow and used to test reactionogenicity by immunoblotting. TsPKA-r based indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (iELISA) showed good performance in recognition of sera of pigs experimentally infected with T. solium metacestodes, with 93.88% sensitivity and 96.40% specificity. There were no cross-reactions against the sera samples from pigs experimentally infected with T. hydatigena, Toxoplasma gondii or Trichinella spiralis. These results indicate that the TsPKA-r is a promising immunodiagnostic antigen for detection of porcine cysticercosis.

  3. Detection and manipulation of live antigen-expressing cells using conditionally stable nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jonathan CY; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Etemad, Behzad; Rudolph, Stephanie; Guo, Binggege; Wang, Sui; Ellis, Emily G; Li, Jonathan Z; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect and/or manipulate specific cell populations based upon the presence of intracellular protein epitopes would enable many types of studies and applications. Protein binders such as nanobodies (Nbs) can target untagged proteins (antigens) in the intracellular environment. However, genetically expressed protein binders are stable regardless of antigen expression, complicating their use for applications that require cell-specificity. Here, we created a conditional system in which the stability of an Nb depends upon an antigen of interest. We identified Nb framework mutations that can be used to rapidly create destabilized Nbs. Fusion of destabilized Nbs to various proteins enabled applications in living cells, such as optogenetic control of neural activity in specific cell types in the mouse brain, and detection of HIV-infected human cells by flow cytometry. These approaches are generalizable to other protein binders, and enable the rapid generation of single-polypeptide sensors and effectors active in cells expressing specific intracellular epitopes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15312.001 PMID:27205882

  4. Detection of urinary Vi antigen as a diagnostic test for typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D N; Harris, J R; Barrett, T J; Hargrett, N T; Prentzel, I; Valdivieso, C; Palomino, C; Levine, M M; Blake, P A

    1983-01-01

    Since Vi antigen is limited primarily to Salmonella typhi, it has been thought that detection of the antigen may be a useful method for diagnosing acute typhoid fever. The slide coagglutination method and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have recently been suggested as ways to detect small quantities of Vi antigen in urine. In Santiago, Chile, we compared the results of these two methods in patients with acute typhoid fever, paratyphoid fever, and other febrile illnesses and in afebrile control subjects. Using a cut-off value that maximally separated typhoid patients from controls, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive in 62.4% of 141 patients with culture-proven typhoid infections and in 13.2% of 159 afebrile control subjects. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was false positive in 64.7% of 34 culture-proven paratyphoid A or B patients and 47.1% of 21 patients with other nontyphoidal febrile illnesses. The coagglutination test was positive in 34% of typhoid patients, 14% of afebrile control subjects, and 46% of febrile control subjects. We conclude that these tests when performed with the Vi antibodies employed in this study are of little value for the diagnosis of typhoid fever in this setting. PMID:6630465

  5. Use of Strep-tag II for rapid detection and purification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis recombinant antigens secreted by Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Julio C; Pimienta, Elsa; Rodríguez, Caridad; Anné, Jozef; Vallín, Carlos; Milanés, María T; King-Batsios, Emmanuel; Huygen, Kris; Van Mellaert, Lieve

    2013-09-01

    Recent results with respect to the secretory production of bio-active Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins in Streptomyces have stimulated the further exploitation of this host as a bacterial cell factory. However, the rapid isolation of a recombinant protein by conventional procedures can be a restrictive step. A previous attempt to isolate recombinant antigens fused to the widely used 6His-tag was found to be relatively incompatible with secretory production in the Streptomyces host. As an alternative, the eight-residue Strep-tag® II (WSHPQFEK), displaying intrinsic binding affinity towards streptavidin, was evaluated for the secretory production of two M. tuberculosis immunodominant antigens in Streptomyces lividans and their subsequent downstream processing. Therefore, the genes ag85A (Rv3804c, encoding the mycolyl-transferase Ag85A) and Rv2626c (encoding hypoxic response protein 1), were equipped with a 3'-Strep-tag® II-encoding sequence and placed under control of the Streptomyces venezuelae CBS762.70 subtilisin inhibitor (vsi) transcriptional, translational and signal sequences. Strep-tagged Ag85A and Rv2626c proteins were detected in the spent medium of recombinant S. lividans cultures at 48h of growth, and purified using a Strep-Tactin Superflow® matrix. Recombinant Ag85A appeared as a 30-kDa protein of which the N-terminal amino acid sequence was identical to the expected one. Rv2626c was produced in two forms of 17 and 37kDa respectively, both with the same predicted N-terminal sequence, suggesting that the 37-kDa product is an Rv2626c dimer. The obtained results indicate that the Strep-tagII is proteolytically stable in Streptomyces and does not interfere with the membrane translocation of Ag85A and Rv2626c. A comparison of reactivity of serum from tuberculosis patients versus healthy persons by ELISA showed that both S. lividans-derived antigens were recognized by sera of individuals infected with M. tuberculosis, indicating that they remained

  6. Rapid detection of bacterial pathogens using flourescence spectroscopy and chemometrics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This work presents the development of a method for rapid bacterial identification based on the fluorescence spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis. Fluorescence spectra of pure three different genera of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Salmonella, and Campylobacter) were collected from 200...

  7. Development of Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Antigen Detection in Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Chen, Jia-Xu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Huang, Da-Na; Ai, Lin; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2016-06-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is difficult to be diagnosed for the reason that no ideal method can be used. Serologic tests require specific equipment and are not always available in poverty-stricken zone and are time-consuming. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) may be useful for angiostrongyliasis control. We established a LFIA for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis based on 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis adults. The sensitivity and specificity were 91.1% and 100% in LFIA, while those of commercial ELISA kit was 97.8% and 86.3%, respectively. Youden index was 0.91 in LFIA and 0.84 in commercial ELISA kit. LFIA showed detection limit of 1 ng/ml of A. cantonensis ES antigens. This LFIA was simple, rapid, highly sensitive and specific, which opened an alternative approach for the diagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis.

  8. Development of Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Antigen Detection in Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Chen, Jia-Xu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Huang, Da-Na; Ai, Lin; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is difficult to be diagnosed for the reason that no ideal method can be used. Serologic tests require specific equipment and are not always available in poverty-stricken zone and are time-consuming. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) may be useful for angiostrongyliasis control. We established a LFIA for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis based on 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis adults. The sensitivity and specificity were 91.1% and 100% in LFIA, while those of commercial ELISA kit was 97.8% and 86.3%, respectively. Youden index was 0.91 in LFIA and 0.84 in commercial ELISA kit. LFIA showed detection limit of 1 ng/ml of A. cantonensis ES antigens. This LFIA was simple, rapid, highly sensitive and specific, which opened an alternative approach for the diagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis. PMID:27417097

  9. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, M.L.

    1990-04-17

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents. No Drawings

  10. Detection of HBV DNA and antigens in HBsAg-positive patients with primary hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fu, Sha; Li, Ning; Zhou, Peng-Cheng; Huang, Yan; Zhou, Rong-Rong; Fan, Xue-Gong

    2017-09-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) markers include HBV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and HBV antigens. The former involves HBV covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA) as well as total HBV DNA, whereas the latter involves HBsAg, HBcAg, and HBx. Samples of tumor and adjacent non-tumor liver tissue were collected from 28 HBV-associated HCC patients. Intrahepatic total HBV DNA and cccDNA were measured using the real-time PCR Taqman assay. HBV antigens in hepatocytes were detected using immunohistochemical staining. Intrahepatic levels of total HBV DNA or cccDNA in HCC patients with different intrahepatic HBV antigen expression patterns were compared, and the correlation between serum HBV DNA and intrahepatic HBV DNA was analyzed. No significant differences in intrahepatic cccDNA levels were observed between tumor and non-tumor liver tissue (median -3.00 vs. -2.30 log copies/cell, P=0.298). However, the tumor tissue had significantly higher levels of total HBV DNA (median -0.60 vs. -1.24 log copies/cell, P=0.045) but significantly lower proportion of intrahepatic HBV DNA in the form of cccDNA (median 0.25% vs. 4%, P=0.023) than the corresponding values in the non-tumor tissue. Also, HBV antigen levels were lower in the tumor tissue than in the non-tumor tissue. Analysis of the correlation between serum HBV DNA and intrahepatic HBV DNA indicated that the viral status in the tumor tissue was more complicated in HBV-HCC patients-the detected serum HBV DNA failed to accurately reflect intrahepatic viral load. HBV DNA may play an important role in hepatocarcinogenesis, and cccDNA was not the predominant form of HBV DNA in the tumor tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Homogeneous assay for detection of active Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 by thrombin activity modulation.

    PubMed

    Garai-Ibabe, Gaizka; Grinyte, Ruta; Canaan, Allon; Pavlov, Valeri

    2012-07-17

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been associated with several malignancies as Burkitt's lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and Hodgkin's disease. In those diseases, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) is constitutively expressed. Here, we reported an innovative system to detect active EBNA-1 protein in a homogeneous assay. The system is based on the modulation of thrombin activity by a self-complementary single stranded DNA (scssDNA), which was designed and synthesized to mimic the palindromic target sites of EBNA-1 in the EBV genome. This model system showed a limit of detection of 3.75 ng mL(-1) of active EBNA-1 protein with a dynamic detection range from 3.75 to 250 ng mL(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.997. This new homogeneous assay for active EBNA-1 protein detection and quantification provides a very useful tool for rapid screening of EBNA-1 blockers in biomedical research.

  12. Improvement in the specificity of assays for detection of antibody to hepatitis B core antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Weare, J A; Robertson, E F; Madsen, G; Hu, R; Decker, R H

    1991-01-01

    Reducing agents dramatically alter the specificity of competitive assays for antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc). A specificity improvement was demonstrated with a new assay which utilizes microparticle membrane capture and chemiluminescence detection as well as a current radioimmunoassay procedure (Corab: Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Ill.). The effect was most noticeable with elevated negative and weakly reactive samples. In both systems, reductants increased separation of a negative population (n = 160) from assay cutoffs. With a selected population (n = 307), inclusion of reductant eliminated apparent anti-HBc activity in 54 of 81 samples in the 30 to 70% inhibition range. Reductant-stable anti-HBc samples were strongly associated with the presence of antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen (21 of 27). The association persisted below the detection limits of current assays to 0.3 to 0.4 Paul Ehrlich Institute units per ml. Only 1 of 54 reduction-sensitive borderline samples was confirmed to be positive for antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen. The modified procedures had unchanged or slightly improved sensitivity for immunoglobulin G (IgG)-associated anti-HBc activity. Although IgM anti-HBc detection was reduced from four- to eightfold in the presence of reductants, sensitivities remained at least twofold greater than tha of an enzyme immunoassay (Corzyme M; Abbott) designed to detect acute-phase levels of IgM anti-HBc. The use of reducing agents should significantly improve the reliability of anti-HBc testing, especially near assay cutoffs. PMID:2037678

  13. Target-Specific Capture Enhances Sensitivity of Electrochemical Detection of Bacterial Pathogens ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mayank; Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Halford, Colin; Lewinski, Michael A.; Landaw, Elliot M.; Churchill, Bernard M.; Haake, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We report the concentration and purification of bacterial 16S rRNA by the use of a biotinylated DNA target-specific capture (TSC) probe. For both cultivated bacterial and urine specimens from urinary tract infection patients, TSC resulted in a 5- to 8-fold improvement in the sensitivity of bacterial detection in a 16S rRNA electrochemical sensor assay. PMID:21940468

  14. Use of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) dipsticks for detection of intestinal and urinary schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Stothard, J Russell; Kabatereine, Narcis B; Tukahebwa, Edridah M; Kazibwe, Francis; Rollinson, David; Mathieson, William; Webster, Joanne P; Fenwick, Alan

    2006-02-01

    An evaluation of a commercially available antigen capture dipstick that detects schistosome circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) in urine was conducted in representative endemic areas for intestinal and urinary schistosomiasis in Uganda and Zanzibar, respectively. Under field-based conditions, the sensitivity (SS) and specificity (SP) of the dipstick was 83 and 81% for detection of Schistosoma mansoni infections while positive predictive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were 84%. Light egg-positive infections were sometimes CCA-negative while CCA-positives included egg-negative children. A positive association between faecal egg output and intensity of CCA test band was observed. Estimating prevalence of intestinal schistosomiasis by school with dipsticks was highly correlated (r=0.95) with Kato-Katz stool examinations, typically within +/-8.5%. In Zanzibar, however, dipsticks totally failed to detect S. haematobium despite examining children with egg-patent schistosomiasis. This was also later corroborated by further surveys in Niger and Burkina Faso. Laboratory testing of dipsticks with aqueous adult worm lysates from several reference species showed correct functioning, however, dipsticks failed to detect CCA in urine from S. haematobium-infected hamsters. While CCA dipsticks are a good alternative, or complement, to stool microscopy for field diagnosis of intestinal schistosomiasis, they have no proven value for field diagnosis of urinary schistosomiasis. At approximately 2.6 US dollars per dipstick, they are presently too expensive to be cost-effective for wide scale use in disease mapping surveys unless Lot Quality Assurance Sampling (LQAS) strategies are developed.

  15. Bioactive surfaces for antibody-antigen complex detection by Atomic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ierardi, Vincenzo; Ferrera, Francesca; Millo, Enrico; Damonte, Gianluca; Filaci, Gilberto; Valbusa, Ugo

    2013-06-01

    Recently there has been a great develop of new antibodies immobilization procedures, that keep antibodies to retain their orientation and functionality after the binding to a solid support. This allows the formation of immune-complexes useful for the detection of biomarkers from biological samples. We have developed a new method of functionalization for solid substrates that involves an initial surface activation, then a functionalization by means of 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane-followed by another functionalization step with a layer of very small peptides, which have a high affinity to the Antibody Fc portion, acting as antibody linkers. These antibody binding peptides can immobilize the antibodies with a proper configuration that allows an unambiguous detection of antibody-antigen complexes by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The AFM can act as a powerful label free detection technique, which allows to detect, in principle, single molecule interactions, with the only limitation to use substrate with low-roughness surfaces; in this case, the roughness can be interpreted as background noise in the AFM analysis. Moreover, our functionalization method can be used to obtain bioactive surfaces on a wide range of solid supports, making them capable to suitably immobilize the antibodies for the antigenic binding.

  16. Ultrasensitive detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen using nanofunctionalized surfaces in a capacitive immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Teeparuksapun, Kosin; Hedström, Martin; Wong, Eric Y; Tang, Shixing; Hewlett, Indira K; Mattiasson, Bo

    2010-10-15

    The HIV-1 capsid protein, p24 antigen, is of considerable diagnostic interest because following HIV exposure it is detectable several days earlier than host-generated HIV antibodies (which are the target of almost all current tests used in the field) and can be used to design very sensitive assays without the need for PCR. Here, we present an ultrasensitive capacitive immunosensor that is capable of detecting subattogram per milliliter concentrations of p24 antigen, which to our knowledge is the lowest level of detection ever reported. Dilution studies using p24-spiked human plasma samples indicate that the immunosensor is robust against the interfering effects of a complex biological matrix. Moreover, the capacitive immunosensor assay is rapid (<20 min), label-free, and generates data in real-time, with a portable format in development. Additional optimization of the capture agents and/or surface chemistries may further improve performance, highlighting the potential of this platform to serve as a diagnostic tool for early detection of HIV in field settings.

  17. Development of a Blocking Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for Detection of Serum Antibodies to O157 Antigen of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Laegreid, William; Hoffman, Mark; Keen, James; Elder, Robert; Kwang, Jimmy

    1998-01-01

    The O157 antigen of Escherichia coli shares structural elements with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens of other bacterial species, notably Brucella abortus and Yersinia enterocolitica O9, a fact that confounds the interpretation of assays for anti-O157 antibodies. To address this problem, a blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (bELISA) was designed with E. coli O157:H7 LPS as the antigen and a monoclonal antibody specific for E. coli O157, designated 13B3, as the competing antibody. The bELISA had equivalent sensitivity to, and significantly higher specificity than, the indirect ELISA (iELISA), detecting anti-O157 antibodies in sera from cattle experimentally inoculated with O157:H7. Only 13% of sera from naive heifers vaccinated for or experimentally infected with B. abortus had increased anti-O157 bELISA titers, while 61% of anti-O157 iELISA titers were increased. The bELISA is a sensitive and specific method for the detection of serum antibodies resulting from exposure to E. coli O157. PMID:9521150

  18. Presentation of lipid antigens to T cells.

    PubMed

    Mori, Lucia; De Libero, Gennaro

    2008-04-15

    T cells specific for lipid antigens participate in regulation of the immune response during infections, tumor immunosurveillance, allergy and autoimmune diseases. T cells recognize lipid antigens as complexes formed with CD1 antigen-presenting molecules, thus resembling recognition of MHC-peptide complexes. The biophysical properties of lipids impose unique mechanisms for their delivery, internalization into antigen-presenting cells, membrane trafficking, processing, and loading of CD1 molecules. Each of these steps is controlled at molecular and celular levels and determines lipid immunogenicity. Lipid antigens may derive from microbes and from the cellular metabolism, thus allowing the immune system to survey a large repertoire of immunogenic molecules. Recognition of lipid antigens facilitates the detection of infectious agents and the initiation of responses involved in immunoregulation and autoimmunity. This review focuses on the presentation mechanisms and specific recognition of self and bacterial lipid antigens and discusses the important open issues.

  19. Detection of a Pancreatic Cancer-Associated Antigen (DU-PAN-2 Antigen) in Serum and Ascites of Patients with Adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzgar, Richard S.; Rodriguez, Ned; Finn, Olivera J.; Lan, Michael S.; Daasch, Vicki N.; Fernsten, Philip D.; Meyers, William C.; Sindelar, William F.; Sandler, Robert S.; Seigler, H. F.

    1984-08-01

    A competition radioimmunoassay was developed, utilizing a murine monoclonal antibody to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Immunoblotting of a standard antigen preparation from either serum or ascites fluid after electrophoresis in 1% agarose showed that the specific DUPAN-2 activity resided in two major high molecular weight bands. DU-PAN-2 antigen levels were expressed as arbitrary units based on a standard partially purified antigen preparation. The inhibition curve with standard antigen was reproducible (SD < 10%) and essentially linear from 25 to 200 units/ml. The mean DU-PAN-2 antigen concentration for the sera from 126 normal individuals was 81 units/ml. Sera from pediatric patients with malignancy had a mean of 127 units/ml, while nasopharyngeal, stage III melanoma, and ovarian carcinoma patients had means of 89, 92, and 119 units/ml, respectively. All values in normal subjects as well as the melanoma, nasopharyngeal, ovarian, and pediatric cancer patients were less than 400 units/ml. Intermediate antigen levels were detected in patients with alimentary tract malignancies. Eight of 20 gastric cancer and 8 of 76 colorectal carcinoma patients and 3 patients with benign or nonmalig nant gastrointestinal tract disease had DU-PAN-2 values exceeding 400 units/ml. Ascites fluids from 6/6 and pancreatic juice from 2/2 pancreatic cancer patients had values greater than 750 units/ml. Serum from 68% of the 89 pancreatic cancer patients tested had DU-PAN-2 antigen levels greater than 400 units/ml. The mean serum value in this patient population was 4888 units/ml.

  20. Rapid solid-phase radioimmunoassay for detection of equine infectious anemia viral antigen and antibodies: parameters involved in standardization.

    PubMed

    Horenstein, A L; Feinstein, R E

    1985-10-01

    Solid-phase radioimmunoassays (SPRIA) are described for the detection of equine infectious anemia (EIA) viral antigen and antibodies. Protein-antigen P29 currently used in the agar-gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test was used as antigen in the SPRIA. Rabbit sera selected from positive AGID test data were used to standardize the method. Briefly, wells of flexible microtitre plates coated with antigen were incubated with antiserum followed by a secondary labelled antibody. The radioactivity remaining in the wells after washing provided a measure of the amount of specific antibodies in the serum. When testing a group of rabbit sera, negative for EIA virus antibodies by the AGID test, in the SPRIA a range of positive reactivities was noted. The specificity of the reaction was assessed by inhibition with the antigen. The reaction of immune serum against EIA-virus antigen adsorbed to the wells, was completely inhibited by the antigen in solution. This property was applied in an indirect competitive SPRIA for the detection of viral protein P29. The detection threshold of the SPRIA for EIA virus protein was about 5 ng and about 1 ng of antibody can be detected. The assay is rapid, specific and sensitive and allows the testing of multiple serum samples with the advantage of employing a single secondary labelled antibody.

  1. Comparison of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid with Bacterial Meningitis Score in children

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Frederico Ribeiro; Franco, Andréia Christine Bonotto Farias; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Troster, Eduardo Juan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To measure the role of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid compared with the Bacterial Meningitis Score in children with meningitis. Methods A retrospective cohort based on analysis of medical records of pediatric patients diagnosed as meningitis, seen at a private and tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil, between 2011 and 2014. Excluded were patients with critical illness, purpura, ventricular shunt or recent neurosurgery, immunosuppression, concomitant bacterial infection requiring parenteral antibiotic therapy, and those who received antibiotics 72 hours before lumbar puncture. Results The study included 503 patients. Sixty-four patients were excluded and 94 were not submitted to all tests for analysis. Of the remaining 345 patients, 7 were in the Bacterial Meningitis Group and 338 in the Aseptic Meningitis Group. There was no statistical difference between the groups. In the Bacterial Meningitis Score analysis, of the 338 patients with possible aseptic meningitis (negative cultures), 121 of them had one or more points in the Bacterial Meningitis Score, with sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 64.2%, and negative predictive value of 100%. Of the 121 patients with positive Bacterial Meningitis Score, 71% (86 patients) had a positive enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusion Enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid was effective to differentiate bacterial from viral meningitis. When the test was analyzed together with the Bacterial Meningitis Score, specificity was higher when compared to Bacterial Meningitis Score alone. PMID:28767914

  2. Real-time qPCR improves meningitis pathogen detection in invasive bacterial-vaccine preventable disease surveillance in Fiji.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Eileen M; Mantanitobua, Silivia; Singh, Shalini P; Reyburn, Rita; Tuivaga, Evelyn; Rafai, Eric; Tikoduadua, Lisi; Porter, Barbara; Satzke, Catherine; Strachan, Janet E; Fox, Kimberly K; Jenkins, Kylie M; Jenney, Adam; Baro, Silo; Mulholland, E Kim; Kama, Mike; Russell, Fiona M

    2016-12-23

    As part of the World Health Organization Invasive Bacterial-Vaccine Preventable Diseases (IB-VPD) surveillance in Suva, Fiji, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from suspected meningitis patients of all ages were examined by traditional methods (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination for bacterial antigen) and qPCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. Of 266 samples tested, pathogens were identified in 47 (17.7%). S. pneumoniae was the most common pathogen detected (n = 17) followed by N. meningitidis (n = 13). The use of qPCR significantly increased detection of IB-VPD pathogens (P = 0.0001): of 35 samples that were qPCR positive for S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, and H. influenzae, only 10 were culture positive. This was particularly relevant for N. meningitidis, as only 1/13 cases was culture positive. Molecular serotyping by microarray was used to determine pneumococcal serotypes from 9 of 16 (56%) of samples using DNA directly extracted from CSF specimens. Results indicate that qPCR significantly increases detection of S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, and H. influenzae in CSF, and that application of molecular diagnostics is a feasible way to enhance local and global surveillance for IB-VPD.

  3. Real-time qPCR improves meningitis pathogen detection in invasive bacterial-vaccine preventable disease surveillance in Fiji

    PubMed Central

    Dunne, Eileen M.; Mantanitobua, Silivia; Singh, Shalini P.; Reyburn, Rita; Tuivaga, Evelyn; Rafai, Eric; Tikoduadua, Lisi; Porter, Barbara; Satzke, Catherine; Strachan, Janet E.; Fox, Kimberly K.; Jenkins, Kylie M.; Jenney, Adam; Baro, Silo; Mulholland, E. Kim; Kama, Mike; Russell, Fiona M.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the World Health Organization Invasive Bacterial-Vaccine Preventable Diseases (IB-VPD) surveillance in Suva, Fiji, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from suspected meningitis patients of all ages were examined by traditional methods (culture, Gram stain, and latex agglutination for bacterial antigen) and qPCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae. Of 266 samples tested, pathogens were identified in 47 (17.7%). S. pneumoniae was the most common pathogen detected (n = 17) followed by N. meningitidis (n = 13). The use of qPCR significantly increased detection of IB-VPD pathogens (P = 0.0001): of 35 samples that were qPCR positive for S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, and H. influenzae, only 10 were culture positive. This was particularly relevant for N. meningitidis, as only 1/13 cases was culture positive. Molecular serotyping by microarray was used to determine pneumococcal serotypes from 9 of 16 (56%) of samples using DNA directly extracted from CSF specimens. Results indicate that qPCR significantly increases detection of S. pneumoniae, N. meningitidis, and H. influenzae in CSF, and that application of molecular diagnostics is a feasible way to enhance local and global surveillance for IB-VPD. PMID:28009001

  4. Rapid antigen-capture assay to detect West Nile virus in dead corvids.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Robbin; Barker, Ian k; Nayar, Gopi; Drebot, Michael; Calvin, Sharon; Scammell, Cherie; Sachvie, Cheril; Fleur, Tracy Scammell-La Fleur; Dibernardo, Antonia; Andonova, Maya; Artsob, Harvey

    2003-11-01

    The utility of the VecTest antigen-capture assay to detect West Nile virus (WNV) in field-collected dead corvids was evaluated in Manitoba and Ontario, Canada, in 2001 and 2002. Swabs were taken from the oropharynx, cloaca, or both of 109 American Crows, 31 Blue Jays, 6 Common Ravens, and 4 Black-billed Magpies from Manitoba, and 255 American Crows and 28 Blue Jays from Ontario. The sensitivity and specificity of the antigen-capture assay were greatest for samples from American Crows; oropharyngeal swabs were more sensitive than cloacal swabs, and interlaboratory variation in the results was minimal. The sensitivity and specificity of the VecTest using oropharyngeal swabs from crows were 83.9% and 93.6%, respectively, for Manitoba samples and 83.3% and 95.8%, respectively, for Ontario birds. The VecTest antigen-capture assay on oropharyngeal secretions from crows is a reliable and rapid diagnostic test that appears suitable for incorporation into a WNV surveillance program.

  5. Rapid Antigen-Capture Assay To Detect West Nile Virus in Dead Corvids

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Ian; Nayar, Gopi; Drebot, Michael; Calvin, Sharon; Scammell, Cherie; Sachvie, Cheryl; La Fleur, Tracy Scammell; Dibernardo, Antonia; Andonova, Maya; Artsob, Harvey

    2003-01-01

    The utility of the VecTest antigen-capture assay to detect West Nile virus (WNV) in field-collected dead corvids was evaluated in Manitoba and Ontario, Canada, in 2001 and 2002. Swabs were taken from the oropharynx, cloaca, or both of 109 American Crows, 31 Blue Jays, 6 Common Ravens, and 4 Black-billed Magpies from Manitoba, and 255 American Crows and 28 Blue Jays from Ontario. The sensitivity and specificity of the antigen-capture assay were greatest for samples from American Crows; oropharyngeal swabs were more sensitive than cloacal swabs, and interlaboratory variation in the results was minimal. The sensitivity and specificity of the VecTest using oropharyngeal swabs from crows were 83.9% and 93.6%, respectively, for Manitoba samples and 83.3% and 95.8%, respectively, for Ontario birds. The VecTest antigen-capture assay on oropharyngeal secretions from crows is a reliable and rapid diagnostic test that appears suitable for incorporation into a WNV surveillance program. PMID:14718083

  6. Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis by Reagent Strip Test for Detection of Circulating Cathodic Antigen

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, G. J.; Wichers, J. H.; Ferreira, T. M. Falcao; Ghati, D.; van Amerongen, A.; Deelder, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    A newly developed reagent strip assay for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis based on parasite antigen detection in urine of infected individuals was evaluated. The test uses the principle of lateral flow through a nitrocellulose strip of the sample mixed with a colloidal carbon conjugate of a monoclonal antibody specific for Schistosoma circulating cathodic antigen (CCA). The strip assay to diagnose a group of highly infected schoolchildren in Mwanza, Tanzania, demonstrated a high sensitivity and association with the intensity of infection as measured both by egg counts, and by circulating anodic antigen and CCA levels determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A specificity of ca. 90% was shown in a group of schistosome-negative schoolchildren from Tarime, Tanzania, an area where schistosomiasis is not endemic. The test is easy to perform and requires no technical equipment or special training. The stability of the strips and the conjugate in the dry format lasts for at least 3 months at ambient temperature in sealed packages, making it suitable for transport and use in areas where schistosomiasis is endemic. This assay can easily be developed to an end-user format. PMID:15583265

  7. Critical considerations in the immunochemical detection and quantitation of antigenic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D W; Benson, R W; Hinson, J A; Kadlubar, F F

    1991-06-01

    The formation of covalent adducts as a result of the interaction of metabolically activated chemicals with host macromolecules is a common critical event in mutagenic, carcinogenic, and immunologic phenomena. Because of their antigenicity and their immunogenicity, covalent adducts may be detected using sensitive immunochemical techniques. The immunochemical approaches to biomonitoring and molecular dosimetry of DNA damage are particularly attractive because they allow sensitive quantitation of specific DNA adducts present in small samples and do not rely on the use of radiolabeled adducts. Two examples of biomarker immunoassay development are presented: an avidin/biotin-amplified ELISA for the major DNA adduct of the human bladder carcinogen 4-aminobiphenyl (ABP), and a particle concentration fluorescent immunoassay (PCFIA) for the major protein adduct associated with toxicity by the prototype hepatotoxin acetaminophen. The examples illustrate critical steps in the development of biomarker immunoassays which include selection of the relevant adduct, preparation of an appropriate immunogen, immunization, characterization of antisera, and development of application-specific sample processing techniques for biomarker quantitation. Immunochemical procedures may be combined with other analytical techniques to form hybrid systems which take advantage of both the antigenicity and the physical or chemical properties of a biomarker to achieve greater specificity and/or sensitivity. The future usefulness of these new tools of molecular epidemiology will depend on a compound-by-compound validation of methods and critical evaluation of the biologic importance of the particular antigenic biomarker as an indicator of exposure and as an indicator of risk.

  8. Development and Validation of a High Throughput System for Discovery of Antigens for Autoantibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Isabel K.; Allen, Jared; Murray, Andrea; Parsy-Kowalska, Celine B.; Healey, Graham F.; Chapman, Caroline J.; Sewell, Herbert F.; Robertson, John F. R.

    2012-01-01

    An assay employing a panel of tumor-associated antigens has been validated and is available commercially (EarlyCDT®-Lung) to aid the early detection of lung cancer by measurement of serum autoantibodies. The high throughput (HTP) strategy described herein was pursued to identify new antigens to add to the EarlyCDT-Lung panel and to assist in the development of new panels for other cancers. Two ligation-independent cloning vectors were designed and synthesized, producing fusion proteins suitable for the autoantibody ELISA. We developed an abridged HTP version of the validated autoantibody ELISA, determining that results reflected the performance of the EarlyCDT assay, by comparing results on both formats. Once validated this HTP ELISA was utilized to screen multiple fusion proteins prepared on small-scale, by a HTP expression screen. We determined whether the assay performance for these HTP protein batches was an accurate reflection of the performance of R&D or commercial batches. A HTP discovery platform for the identification and optimal production of tumor- associated antigens which detects autoantibodies has been developed and validated. The most favorable conditions for the exposure of immunogenic epitopes were assessed to produce discriminatory proteins for use in a commercial ELISA. This process is rapid and cost-effective compared to standard cloning and screening technologies and enables rapid advancement in the field of autoantibody assay discovery. This approach will significantly reduce timescale and costs for developing similar panels of autoantibody assays for the detection of other cancer types with the ultimate aim of improved overall survival due to early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22815807

  9. Clinical relevance of HLA donor-specific antibodies detected by single antigen assay in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caro-Oleas, José Luis; González-Escribano, María Francisca; González-Roncero, Francisco Manuel; Acevedo-Calado, María José; Cabello-Chaves, Virginia; Gentil-Govantes, Miguel Ángel; Núñez-Roldán, Antonio

    2012-03-01

    Clinical relevance of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs) detected by a single antigen Luminex virtual crossmatch in pre-transplant serum samples from patients with a negative cytotoxicity-dependent complement crossmatch is controversial. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of a pre-transplant positive virtual crossmatch in the outcome of kidney transplantation. A total of 892 patients who received a graft from deceased donors after a negative cytotoxicity crossmatch were included. Presence of anti-human leucocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies was investigated using a Luminex screening assay and anti-HLA specificities were assigned performing a Luminex single antigen assay. Graft survival was significantly worse among patients with anti-HLA DSA compared to both patients with anti-HLA with no DSA (P = 0.001) and patients without HLA antibodies (P < 0.001) using a log-rank test. No graft survival differences between anti-HLA with no DSA and no HLA antibodies patient groups were observed (P = 0.595). Influence of both anti-Class I and anti-Class II DSA was detected (P < 0.0001 in both cases). When the fluorescence values were stratified in four groups, no significant differences in graft survival were observed among the groups with fluorescence levels >1500 (global P > 0.05). The presence of preformed HLA DSA in transplanted patients with a negative cytotoxicity crossmatch is associated with a lower allograft survival. The detection of anti-HLA with no DSA has no influence in the graft outcome. Finally, there were no demonstrable effects of mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) values >1500 on graft survival.

  10. Comparison of an Established Antibody Sandwich Method with an Inhibition Method of Histoplasma capsulatum Antigen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Garringer, Todd O.; Wheat, L. Joseph; Brizendine, Edward J.

    2000-01-01

    The Histoplasma antigen immunoassay utilizes an antibody sandwich method that provides a rapid and reliable means of diagnosing the more severe forms of histoplasmosis. Inhibition assays have been developed for antigen detection and offer at least one potential advantage, namely, reduced antibody requirements. We have developed an inhibition assay using the polyclonal antibody employed in our standard sandwich assay. Urine and serum specimens from patients with culture-proven histoplasmosis and controls were tested using both methods. The two methods had similar sensitivities for detection of antigen in urine (antibody sandwich = 92.5% versus inhibition = 87.5%, P = 0.500) and serum (82.5% versus 80.0%, P = 1.000). With serum, the specificities of both methods were similar (antibody sandwich assay = 95.0% versus inhibition assay = 92.5%, P = 1.000), and with urine, the specificity of the antibody sandwich method was superior (97.5% versus 80.0%, P = 0.039). While the overall reproducibility of both methods was excellent (with urine, antibody sandwich assay intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.9975 and with serum = 0.9949; correlation coefficient of the inhibition assay with urine = 0.9736 and with serum = 0.9850), that of the inhibition method was only fair to poor for the controls: urine = −0.0152, serum = 0.5595. Reproducibility was good for the controls using the sandwich method: urine = 0.7717, serum = 0.9470. Cross-reactivity was observed in specimens from patients infected with Blastomyces dermatitidis, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, and Penicillium marneffei. In conclusion, the decreased specificity and inferior reproducibility with control specimens suggest that the inhibition assay has poorer precision toward the lower end of the detection range. PMID:10921949

  11. Accuracy of a new rapid antigen detection test for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Aliannejad, Rasoul; Bahrmand, Ahmadreza; Abtahi, Hamidreza; Seifi, Mahnaz; Safavi, Enayat; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Shahriaran, Shahriyar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major problem in the world. Treatment and control of TB needs detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) in the proper samples. While smear doesn’t have enough sensitivity, culture and PCR are expensive, time consuming and unavailable in many centers. Recent development of a rapid TB antigen detection test (PrTBK) at Pasteur Institute of Iran could give a simple way for diagnosis of TB in about two hours. In this test the antigen-antibody complex will change color when gold conjugated mouse anti-rabbit antibody detects specific MT cell wall antigen in suspected samples. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of PrTBK for diagnosis of pulmonary TB in comparison with smear, culture and PCR techniques in 56 consecutive samples (47 BAL and 13 sputum samples) obtained from patients with clinical suspicion of active TB. Results: Twentynine patients (52%) were female and seven patients were HIV positive. PrTBK was positive in 17 culture positive and 4 culture negative samples (100% sensitivity, 89% specificity and 92% accuracy in comparison with culture method). In two out of four patients with negative culture who were positive for PrTBK, PCR and anti-tuberculosis drugs trial therapy responses were in favor of tuberculosis. If we take this finding into account, the accuracy of PrTBK will rise. Conclusion: High sensitivity and accuracy of PrTBK test enable us to initiate treatment on the basis of this convenient and rapid test. PMID:28210462

  12. Detection of Leptospira-Specific Antibodies Using a Recombinant Antigen-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Halsey, Eric S.; Guevara, Carolina; Canal, Enrique; Hall, Eric; Maves, Ryan; Tilley, Drake H.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2013-01-01

    We produced three highly purified recombinant antigens rLipL32, rLipL41, and rLigA-Rep (leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A repeat region) for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of these recombinant antigens was evaluated using 121 human sera. Among them, 63 sera were microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-confirmed positive sera from febrile patients in Peru, 22 sera were indigenous MAT-negative febrile patient sera, and 36 sera were from patients with other febrile diseases from Southeast Asia, where leptospirosis is also endemic. Combining the results of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG detection from these three antigens, the overall sensitivity is close to 90% based on the MAT. These results suggest that an ELISA using multiple recombinant antigens may be used as an alternative method for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies. PMID:24166046

  13. Development of a PMMA Electrochemical Microfluidic Device for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Anh, Nguyen; Van Trung, Hoang; Tien, Bui Quang; Binh, Nguyen Hai; Ha, Cao Hong; Le Huy, Nguyen; Loc, Nguyen Thai; Thu, Vu Thi; Lam, Tran Dai

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic device fabricated by an inexpensive CO2 laser etching system was developed for detection of carcino-embryonic antigens (CEA). The device was capable of working in continuous mode and was designed with the aid of numerical simulation. The detection of target CEA was based on immuno-assay via magnetic particles and electrochemical sensing. The as-prepared microfluidic can be used to detect CEA at the relatively low concentration of 150 pg mL-1. The device could be reused many times, since the capture and removal of magnetic particles in the assay could be manipulated by an external magnetic field. The proposed approach appears to be suitable for high-throughput and automated analysis of large biomolecules such as tumor markers and pathogens.

  14. Detection and identification of individual antigen molecules in human serum with pulsed semiconductor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, M.; Zander, C.; Müller, R.; Ullrich, B.; Drexhage, K. H.; Kaul, S.; Wolfrum, J.

    1997-09-01

    The fluorescence bursts of individual antibody molecules BM-7 (IgG1) labeled with single dye molecules were detected and identified by the characteristic fluorescence lifetimes of the dyes Cy5 (1.5 ns) and JA169 (2.7 ns) directly in neat human serum. Fluorescence excitation was performed by a short-pulse (FWHM<400 ps, 50 MHz) semiconductor diode laser. The tumor marker mucine (MUC1) was detected in neat human serum by single-molecule events containing both fluorescence lifetimes indicating specific binding of both antibody molecules (Cy5-BM-7 and JA169-BM-7). The sensitivity achieved allows the detection of antigens at concentrations below 10-11 M without separation steps.

  15. Antibiotic use in children is not influenced by the result of rapid antigen detection test for the respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Thibeault, Roseline; Gilca, Rodica; Côté, Stéphanie; De Serres, Gaston; Boivin, Guy; Déry, Pierre

    2007-07-01

    Rapid antigen detection test (RADT) for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is widely used in children hospitalized with acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI), but its influence on antibiotic (AB) use is uncertain. To evaluate if confirmation of RSV infection by RADT modified AB use and elucidate others factors associated with the continuation of antibiotics. Charts of children hospitalized with viral ARTI aged 0-35 months were reviewed. Modification of antibiotics according to RSV RADT results was compared using Kaplan-Meier estimates and multivariate Cox regression. Of children receiving antibiotics when the RSV RADT result was available, RSV RADT was positive in 144 and negative in 54. Positive RSV RADT results did not lead to modification of antibiotic use. Factors independently associated with cessation of intravenous antibiotics were age > or = 3 months (HR 2.44 [1.41-4.21]) and absence of pneumonia (HR 1.50 [1.03-2.19]). Absence of otitis was associated with cessation of oral antibiotics (HR 9.16 [95% CI, 2.35-35.76]). Confirmed presence of RSV by RADT did not influence antibiotic use in young children with ARTI. Except with pneumonia, the risk of bacterial superinfection of RSV infected children is minimal and confirmation of RSV infection should prompt treating physicians to interrupt antibiotics.

  16. Detection, phenotyping, and quantification of antigen-specific T cells using a peptide-MHC dodecamer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jun; Zeng, Xun; Sigal, Natalia; Lund, Peder J.; Su, Laura F.; Huang, Huang; Chien, Yueh-hsiu; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a peptide-MHC (pMHC) dodecamer as a “next generation” technology that is a significantly more sensitive and versatile alternative to pMHC tetramers for the detection, isolation, and phenotypic analysis of antigen-specific T cells. In particular, dodecamers are able to detect two- to fivefold more antigen-specific T cells in both human and murine CD4+ and CD8+ αβ T-cell compartments compared with the equivalent tetramers. The low-affinity, tetramer-negative, dodecamer-positive T cells showed comparable effector cytokine responses as those of high-affinity, tetramer-positive T cells. Dodecamers are able to detect early stage CD4+CD8+ double-positive thymocytes on which T-cell receptors are 10- to 30-fold less dense than mature T cells. Dodecamers also show utility in the analysis of γδ T cells and in cytometry by time-of-flight applications. This construct has a simple structure with a central scaffold protein linked to four streptavidin molecules, each having three pMHC ligands or other molecules. The dodecamer is straightforward and inexpensive to produce and is compatible with current tetramer technology and commercially available streptavidin conjugates. PMID:26979955

  17. ANA detected by ELISA using nucleus of egg cell as antigen.

    PubMed

    Hui, Liu; Shijun, Li; Yue, Ma

    2008-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies, ANA, were usually detected with antigen of somatic cell nucleus. It has not been reported to detect ANA with egg cell nucleus as antigen. Enzyme linked immuosorbent assay, ELISA, coated with yolk was developed to detect ANA in our laboratory. A quality control test, cross absorption test, and cross antibody-induced test with yolk were performed. Results showed a good agreement between our method and IFA through measurement of the same samples from patients suspected of having rheumatic connective tissue diseases (Kappa=0.668, P=0.000). The results were not influenced by the RF and different sources of egg. CVs of inter-assay, were less than 10%. The cross absorption test was negative, as well; the ANA to somatic cell nucleus could be induced with egg cell nucleus. It is implied that there were both cross as well as overlapped Egg-ANA and Somatic-ANA. As egg nucleus, its volume was large, its purification was simple, so the better method might be established.

  18. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  19. [Detection of arbovirus antigens in the mosquitoes and ticks inhabiting the Saratov Region].

    PubMed

    Shcherbakova, S A; Bil'ko, E A; Naĭdenova, E V; Kutyrev, I V; Krasovskaia, T Iu; Sludskiĭ, A a; Kniazeva, T V; Matrosov, A N; Chekashov, V N; Sharova, I N; Samoĭlova, L V

    2009-01-01

    The paper gives the results of a study dealing with the detection of the antigens of arboviruses of West Nile, Sindbis, Batai, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, a serocomplex of Californian encephalitis in the field material gathered in the Saratov Region in 2000-2006. The bloodsucking arthropods inhabiting the region were shown to be actively involved in the circulation of arboviruses in natural biotopes. The conclusion that it is expedient to organize an annual monitoring of arbovirus-induced infections in the areas where positive findings have been notified is justified.

  20. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  1. [The diagnosis of cryptococcosis. A comparison of 2 latex systems for antigen detection].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Bernal, L P; Martínez Machín, G; Fernández Andreu, C; Llop Hernández, A

    1992-01-01

    A latex reactive was designed for detecting Cryptococcus neoformans antigen. It was evaluated by a comparative study with a commercial system (Meridian Diagnostic, Inc.). Total coincidence was observed with both latex systems after studying 3 sample groups: patients with cryptococcosis diagnosis, blood bank donors and patients with clinical signs of the disease. Sensitivity, specificity and stability of the latex reactives prepared were assessed. This diagnostic technique opens new perspectives for quick diagnosis in Cuba, especially for immunosuppressed patients. It will allow for timely treatment and at the same time will contribute to saving expenses in imports.

  2. Immunohistochemical detection of major histocompatibility complex antigens and quantitative analysis of tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Y.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Sato, S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate the anti-tumour immune responsiveness of patients with renal cell cancer (RCC), we examined 30 such patients for the degree of expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II antigens on RCC and the populations of tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells (TIM). Normal renal tubular cells expressed class I but not class II antigens. Most of the tumour cells expressed class I antigens in 25 (83%) cases, but the proportion of such cells was reduced in five cases, three of which were of granular cell type histologically. Class II antigens were detected in all specimens with class I positivity. Various numbers of TIM were detected in 25 cases, being composed mainly of T cells and a smaller number of macrophages. Examination for the phenotype of T cells showed that CD8-positive cells were the dominant population. B cells were not detected. Quantitative analysis revealed that the numbers of TIM were significantly lower in cases showing class I reduction than in those with normal class I expression. Therefore, it was clear that class I antigens were preserved in RCC cells in most cases. Furthermore, a higher rate of reduction of class I antigens was observed in cases of granular cell type, which has been reported to have a worse prognosis than the clear cell type. The present data suggest that degree of the expression of MHC class I antigen on RCC might influence the host immune responsiveness against it. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2206942

  3. Molecular detection of bacterial pathogens using microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Mach, Kathleen E; Mohan, Ruchika; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-08-15

    Rapid, specific, and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens is essential toward clinical management of infectious diseases. Traditional approaches for pathogen detection, however, often require time-intensive bacterial culture and amplification procedures. Herein, a microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probe is demonstrated for rapid species-specific detection of bacterial 16S rRNA. In this molecular assay, the binding of the target sequence to the fluorophore conjugated probe thermodynamically displaces the quencher probe and allows the fluorophore to fluoresce. By incorporation of streptavidin-coated microparticles to localize the biotinylated probes, the sensitivity of the assay can be improved by 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection of the assay is as few as eight bacteria without target amplification and is highly specific against other common pathogens. Its applicability toward clinical diagnostics is demonstrated by directly identifying bacterial pathogens in urine samples from patients with urinary tract infections.

  4. Detection of bacterial blight resistance genes in basmati rice landraces.

    PubMed

    Ullah, I; Jamil, S; Iqbal, M Z; Shaheen, H L; Hasni, S M; Jabeen, S; Mehmood, A; Akhter, M

    2012-07-20

    Aromatic basmati rice is vulnerable to bacterial blight disease. Genes conferring resistance to bacterial blight have been identified in coarse rice; however, their incorporation into basmati varieties compromises the prized basmati aroma. We identified bacterial blight resistance genes Xa4, xa5, Xa7, and xa13 in 52 basmati landraces and five basmati cultivars using PCR markers. The Xa7 gene was found to be the most prevalent among the cultivars and landraces. The cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000 also contained the Xa4 gene; however, xa5 and xa13 were confined to landraces only. Ten landraces were found to have multiple resistance genes. Landraces Basmati-106, Basmati-189 and Basmati-208 contained Xa4 and Xa7 genes. Whereas, landraces Basmati-122, Basmati-427, Basmati-433 were observed to have xa5 and Xa7 genes. Landraces Basmati-48, Basmati-51A, Basmati-334, and Basmati-370A possessed Xa7 and xa13 genes. The use of landraces containing recessive genes xa5 and xa13 as donor parents in hybridization with cultivars Basmati-385 and Basmati-2000, which contain the genes Xa4 and Xa7, will expedite efforts to develop bacterial blight-resistant basmati rice cultivars through marker assisted selection, based on a pyramiding approach, without compromising aroma and grain quality.

  5. Field Effect Transistor Biosensor Using Antigen Binding Fragment for Detecting Tumor Marker in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shanshan; Hotani, Kaori; Hideshima, Sho; Kuroiwa, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Takuya; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Mori, Yasuro; Osaka, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Detection of tumor markers is important for cancer diagnosis. Field-effect transistors (FETs) are a promising method for the label-free detection of trace amounts of biomolecules. However, detection of electrically charged proteins using antibody-immobilized FETs is limited by ionic screening by the large probe molecules adsorbed to the transistor gate surface, reducing sensor responsiveness. Here, we investigated the effect of probe molecule size on the detection of a tumor marker, α-fetoprotein (AFP) using a FET biosensor. We demonstrated that the small receptor antigen binding fragment (Fab), immobilized on a sensing surface as small as 2–3 nm, offers a higher degree of sensitivity and a wider concentration range (100 pg/mL–1 μg/mL) for the FET detection of AFP in buffer solution, compared to the whole antibody. Therefore, the use of a small Fab probe molecule instead of a whole antibody is shown to be effective for improving the sensitivity of AFP detection in FET biosensors. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that a Fab-immobilized FET subjected to a blocking treatment, to avoid non-specific interactions, could sensitively and selectively detect AFP in human serum. PMID:28788579

  6. Minimum detectable level of Salmonellae using a binomial-based bacterial ice nucleation detection assay (BIND).

    PubMed

    Irwin, P; Gehring, A; Tu, S I; Brewster, J; Fanelli, J; Ehrenfeld, E

    2000-01-01

    A modified bacterial ice nucleation detection (BIND) assay was used for rapid and sensitive detection of several Salmonella species. For the BIND assay, Salmonella cells are infected with bacteriophage genetically modified to contain DNA encoding an ice nucleation protein (INP). After infection, de novo protein synthesis occurs and INPs are incorporated into the outer membrane of the organism. After supercooling (-9.3 degrees C), only buffer solutions containing transfected salmonellae freeze, causing a phase-sensitive dye to change color. This technique, and a probability-based protocol modification, provided quantitative detection with a minimum detectable level (MDL) of 2.0 +/- 0.3 S. enteritidis cells/mL in buffer (about 3 h). The MDLs for S. typhimurium DT104 and S. abaetetuba were 4.2 +/- 0.2 and 11.1 +/- 0.4 cells/mL, respectively. Using salmonellae-specific immunomagnetic bead separation technology in conjunction with the modified BIND protocol, we achieved an MDL of about 4.5 S. enteritidis cells/mL with an apparent capture efficiency of 56%.

  7. Bacterial contamination of platelet components not detected by BacT/ALERT®.

    PubMed

    Abela, M A; Fenning, S; Maguire, K A; Morris, K G

    2017-09-05

    To investigate the possible causes for false negative results in BacT/ALERT® 3D Signature System despite bacterial contamination of platelet units. The Northern Ireland Blood Transfusion Service (NIBTS) routinely extends platelet component shelf life to 7 days. Components are sampled and screened for bacterial contamination using an automated microbial detection system, the BacT/ALERT® 3D Signature System. We report on three platelet components with confirmed bacterial contamination, which represent false negative BacT/ALERT® results and near-miss serious adverse events. NIBTS protocols for risk reduction of bacterial contamination of platelet components are described. The methodology for bacterial detection using BacT/ALERT® is outlined. Laboratory tests, relevant patient details and relevant follow-up information are analysed. In all three cases, Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from the platelet residue and confirmed on terminal sub-culture using BacT/ALERT®. In two cases, S. aureus with similar genetic makeup was isolated from the donors. Risk reduction measures for bacterial contamination of platelet components are not always effective. Automated bacterial culture detection does not eliminate the risk of bacterial contamination. Visual inspection of platelet components prior to release, issue and administration remains an important last line of defence. © 2017 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  8. Detection by ELISA of bluetongue antigen directly in the blood of experimentally infected sheep.

    PubMed

    Stanislawek, W L; Lunt, R A; Blacksell, S D; Newberry, K M; Hooper, P T; White, J R

    1996-09-01

    An antigen-capture ELISA (Ag-ELISA) was developed to detect bluetongue virus (BTV) antigen directly from blood samples. Four blood preparations [whole blood, buffy coat, washed red blood cells (RBC) and plasma] taken pre-inoculation and on days 6 to 9 post-inoculation (PI) were used in the ELISA to study antigenaemia in forty sheep, each experimentally infected with one of 20 South African BTV serotypes. Seventeen of the 20 serotypes were detected and 27 of the 40 sheep were at some stage Ag-ELISA positive. Over the period of sampling, Ag-ELISA positive results were most frequently returned from whole blood taken on days 6 and 7 PI. However in some instances the quantity and/or duration of BTV antigenaemia was greater in buffy coat and washed RBC preparations. In a selection of samples examined, positive Ag-ELISA results were generally obtained when samples had an infectious virus titre in eggs of > 10(3.2) egg lethal doses (ELD50/ml). The appearance and duration of detectable antigenaemia was compared with the development of clinical signs and antibody responses of infected sheep. On days 6 and 7 PI the presence of fever (> 40 degrees C) was indicative to the likelihood of detectable antigenaemia. After day 5 PI antigenaemia declined and clinical signs of swollen face and inflamed feet appeared together with the first detectable antibody response. The Ag-ELISA, when used in conjunction with clinical observations and serologic data, should be useful as a rapid diagnostic procedure for bluetongue disease.

  9. Evolution of MHC-based technologies used for detection of antigen-responsive T cells.

    PubMed

    Bentzen, Amalie Kai; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2017-03-17

    T cell-mediated recognition of peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) class I and II molecules is crucial for the control of intracellular pathogens and cancer, as well as for stimulation and maintenance of efficient cytotoxic responses. Such interactions may also play a role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Novel insights into this mechanism are crucial to understanding disease development and establishing new treatment strategies. MHC multimers have been used for detection of antigen-responsive T cells since the first report by Altman et al. showed that tetramerization of pMHC class I molecules provided sufficient stability to T cell receptor (TCR)-pMHC interactions, allowing detection of MHC multimer-binding T cells using flow cytometry. Since this breakthrough the scientific community has aimed for expanding the capacity of MHC multimer-based detection technologies to facilitate large-scale epitope discovery and immune monitoring in limited biological material. Screening of T cell specificity using large libraries of pMHC molecules is suitable for analyses of T cell recognition potentially at genome-wide levels rather than analyses restricted to a selection of model antigens. Such strategies provide novel insights into the immune specificities involved in disease development and response to immunotherapy, and extend fundamental knowledge related to T cell recognition patterns and cross-recognition by TCRs. MHC multimer-based technologies have now evolved from detection of 1-2 different T cell specificities per cell sample, to include more than 1000 evaluable pMHC molecules using novel technologies. Here, we provide an overview of MHC multimer-based detection technologies developed over two decades, focusing primarily on MHC class I interactions.

  10. NK-2. 1: an NK-associated antigen detected with NZB anti-BALB/c serum

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, S.B.; Emmons, S.L.

    1982-11-01

    NZB/B1NJ mice immunized with BALB/c spleen cells produced antibodies to an NK-associated antigen(s). Antisera without detectable autoantibody lysed fewer than 5% of BALB/c spleen cells (SC) but mediated C-dependent depletion of Nk cell activity, as measured in a /sup 51/Cr-released assay with YAC-1 targets. To determine if NZB anti-BALB/c antibodies recognized an allele of the previously described locus NK-1, 136 (BALB/c x NZB)F/sub 2/ progeny were screened for sensitivity to NZB anti-BALB/c serum and anti-NK 1.1 (BALB/c x C3H F/sub 1/ anti-CE serum) and C. Segregation analysis of anti-sera sensitivity and coat color phenotype of 63 (BALB/c x NZB)F/sub 2/ indicated that sensitivity to NZB anti-BALB/c serum was linked to the agouti(a) locus on chromosome 2. Based on these data, the authors designate the antigen detected by NZB anti-BALB/c serum as NK-2 and the activity of the serum as anti-NK-2.1. Eighteen strains were tested for reactivity with anti-NK 2.1 and anti-NK-1.1. Nine were NK-1.1/sup +/, NK-2.1/sup -/, six were NK-1.1/sup -/, NK-2.1/sup +/. NK-2.1/sup +/ cells, selected with the fluorescene-activated cell sorter, were enriched in NK activity compared to NK-2.1/sup -/ SC.

  11. Detection of HP10 antigen in serum for diagnosis and follow‐up of subarachnoidal and intraventricular human neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, A; Hernández, M; Avila, M; Cárdenas, G; Bobes, R J; Huerta, M; Fragoso, G; Uribe‐Campero, L; Harrison, L J S; Parkhouse, R M E; Sciutto, E

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Neurocysticercosis (NC), a parasitic disease caused by Taenia solium, may be either asymptomatic or show a mild to severe clinical picture with intracranial hypertension. The most severe form of the disease is caused when viable cysticerci are localised in the ventricles or in subarachnoidal cisterns at the base of the skull. Detection of the secreted metacestode antigen HP10 in cerebrospinal fluid is a sensitive and specific method for the diagnosis of these severe NC cases. Objective and methods To evaluate the validity of HP10 antigen detection ELISA when applied to serum, using paired serum and cerebrospinal fluid samples from 116 radiologically and clinically characterised NC patients. Results The HP10 antigen assay exhibited a similarly high sensitivity in identifying severe NC cases from sera (84.8%) and CSF (91.3%). In contrast, HP10 antigen was rarely detected in asymptomatic or mild NC cases (3 of 57). Importantly, the HP10 antigen assay applied to serum showed high specificity (94%) when used in 126 serum samples of non‐NC subjects from an endemic community with a confirmed coproparasitological diagnosis of intestinal parasitic infections. Finally, the HP10 assay also proved to be of value in the follow‐up of treated patients. Conclusion This study confirms that detection of the metacestode HP10 antigen in serum is a useful tool for diagnosis and follow‐up of patients with severe forms of NC treated with cysticidal drugs. PMID:17337467

  12. False negative hepatitis B surface antigen detection in dialysis patients due to excess surface antigen: postzone phenomenon.

    PubMed Central

    Hefter, L G; Hix, M A; Stoner, M; Cook, C B

    1980-01-01

    Renal dialysis patients are well known to have a high incidence of hepatitis B carrier state. In studying a group of 63 long-term dialysis patients, 10 were found to be positive for hepatitis B surface antigen by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Surprisingly, however, only three of these RIA positive patients were positive by counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIEP). The discrepancy could not be accounted for by the difference in sensitivity of the two methods. The cause for the negative reactions by CIEP in seven patients was found to be the marked excess surface antigen in these sera which produced false negative results by the postzone phenomenon. After dilution all seven sera were positive by CIEP, requiring a dilution up to 1/20 to produce a positive result. Also, all seven sera were positive by the less sensitive Ouchterlony double diffusion. Images p994-a PMID:6776153

  13. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: bacterial spores are transferred from a place of origin to a test surface, the test surface comprises lanthanide ions. Aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores; a complex of the lanthanide ions and aromatic molecules is formed on the test surface, the complex is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence on the test surface; the luminescence on the test surface is detected and quantified.

  14. Method and Apparatus for Detecting and Quantifying Bacterial Spores on a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: bacterial spores are transferred from a place of origin to a test surface, the test surface comprises lanthanide ions. Aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores; a complex of the lanthanide ions and aromatic molecules is formed on the test surface, the complex is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence on the test surface; the luminescence on the test surface is detected and quantified.

  15. Suitability of optical, physical and chemical measurements for detection of changes in bacterial drinking water quality.

    PubMed

    Ikonen, Jenni; Pitkänen, Tarja; Miettinen, Ilkka T

    2013-10-25

    In this study, different optical, physical and chemical measurements were tested for their capacity to detect changes in water quality. The tests included UV-absorbance at 254 nm, absorbance at 420 nm, turbidity, particle counting, temperature, pH, electric conductivity (EC), free chlorine concentration and ATP concentration measurements. Special emphasis was given to investigating the potential for measurement tools to detect changes in bacterial concentrations in drinking water. Bacterial colony counts (CFU) and total bacterial cell counts (TBC) were used as reference methods for assessing the bacterial water quality. The study consists of a series of laboratory scale experiments: monitoring of regrowth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, estimation of the detection limits for optical measurements using Escherichia coli dilutions, verification of the relationships by analysing grab water samples from various distribution systems and utilisation of the measurements in the case of an accidentally contaminated distribution network. We found significant correlations between the tested measurements and the bacterial water quality. As the bacterial contamination of water often co-occurs with the intrusion of matrixes containing mainly non-bacterial components, the tested measurement tools can be considered to have the potential to rapidly detect any major changes in drinking water quality.

  16. Suitability of Optical, Physical and Chemical Measurements for Detection of Changes in Bacterial Drinking Water Quality

    PubMed Central

    Ikonen, Jenni; Pitkänen, Tarja; Miettinen, Ilkka T.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, different optical, physical and chemical measurements were tested for their capacity to detect changes in water quality. The tests included UV-absorbance at 254 nm, absorbance at 420 nm, turbidity, particle counting, temperature, pH, electric conductivity (EC), free chlorine concentration and ATP concentration measurements. Special emphasis was given to investigating the potential for measurement tools to detect changes in bacterial concentrations in drinking water. Bacterial colony counts (CFU) and total bacterial cell counts (TBC) were used as reference methods for assessing the bacterial water quality. The study consists of a series of laboratory scale experiments: monitoring of regrowth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, estimation of the detection limits for optical measurements using Escherichia coli dilutions, verification of the relationships by analysing grab water samples from various distribution systems and utilisation of the measurements in the case of an accidentally contaminated distribution network. We found significant correlations between the tested measurements and the bacterial water quality. As the bacterial contamination of water often co-occurs with the intrusion of matrixes containing mainly non-bacterial components, the tested measurement tools can be considered to have the potential to rapidly detect any major changes in drinking water quality. PMID:24284353

  17. Rapid formation of cell-particle complexes via dielectrophoretic manipulation for the detection of surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takuma; Yamamoto, Masashi; Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Mizutani, Fumio

    2014-11-15

    A rapid and simple method for the fabrication of the island patterns with particles and cells was applied to detect the presence of specific antigens on the cell surface. An upper interdigitated microband array (IDA) electrode was mounted on a lower substrate with the same design to fabricate a microfluidic-channel device for dielectrophoretic manipulation. The electrode grid structure was fabricated by rotating the upper template IDA by 90° relative to the lower IDA. A suspension of anti-CD33 modified particles and HL-60 cells was introduced into the channel. An AC electrical signal (typically 20 V peak-to-peak, 100 kHz) was then applied to the bands of the upper and lower IDAs, resulting in the formation of island patterns at the intersections with low electric fields. Immunoreactions between the antibodies immobilized on the accumulated particles and the CD33 present on the surface of the cells led to the formation of complexes comprising corresponding antigen-antibody pairs. Non-specific pairs accumulated at the intersection, which did not form complexes, were then dispersed after removal of the applied field. The time required for the detection of the formation/dispersion of the complexes is as short as 6 min in the present procedure. Furthermore, this novel cell binding assay does not require pretreatment such as target labeling or washing of the unbound cells.

  18. A comparative study of blood smear, QBC and antigen detection for diagnosis of malaria.

    PubMed

    Parija, S C; Dhodapkar, Rahul; Elangovan, Subashini; Chaya, D R

    2009-01-01

    Rapid diagnosis is prerequisite for effective treatment and reducing mortality and morbidity of malaria. This study was taken up to compare the efficacy of various methods available, i.e., thick and thin smear, quantitative buffy coat (QBC), plasmodium lactate dehydrogenase and aldolase in blood of patient. A total of 411 samples were collected from patients presenting with classic symptoms of malaria. For traditional microscopy; thick and thin smears were prepared and stained with Leishman's stain, taking thick smear as gold standard, thin smear had a sensitivity and specificity of 54.8% and 100%, respectively. QBC and antigen detection was done using commercially available kits; out of 411 samples, QBC and Malariagen were positive in 66 and 62 cases, with a sensitivity of 78% and 75%, respectively. Leishman's thick smear, although cost effective, is difficult to interpret for inexperienced microscopists; so if facilities are available, QBC should be used for routine diagnosis. In places where facilities are not available, rapid, simple and easy to interpret antigen detection test can be used despite low sensitivity.

  19. Evaluation of an Enzyme Immunoassay for Detection of Dengue Virus NS1 Antigen in Human Serum▿

    PubMed Central

    Dussart, Philippe; Labeau, Bhety; Lagathu, Gisèle; Louis, Philippe; Nunes, Marcio R. T.; Rodrigues, Sueli G.; Storck-Herrmann, Cécile; Cesaire, Raymond; Morvan, Jacques; Flamand, Marie; Baril, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated a one-step sandwich-format microplate enzyme immunoassay for detecting dengue virus NS1 antigen (Ag) in human serum by use of Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag kits (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Marnes La Coquette, France). We collected 299 serum samples from patients with dengue disease and 50 serum samples from patients not infected with dengue virus. For the 239 serum samples from patients with acute infections testing positive by reverse transcription-PCR and/or virus isolation for one of the four dengue virus serotypes, the sensitivity of the Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag kit was 88.7% (95% confidence interval, 84.0% to 92.4%). None of the serum samples from patients not infected with dengue virus tested positive with the Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag kit. A diagnostic strategy combining the Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag test for acute-phase sera and immunoglobulin M capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for early-convalescent-phase sera increased sensitivity only from 88.7% to 91.9%. Thus, NS1 antigen detection with the Platelia Dengue NS1 Ag kit could be used for first-line testing for acute dengue virus infection in clinical diagnostic laboratories. PMID:16988003

  20. Detection of Q Fever Specific Antibodies Using Recombinant Antigen in ELISA with Peroxidase Based Signal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Glennon, Erin; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the accepted method for Q fever serodiagnosis is indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA) using the whole cell antigen. In this study, we prepared the recombinant antigen of the 27-kDa outer membrane protein (Com1) which has been shown to be recognized by Q fever patient sera. The performance of recombinant Com1 was evaluated in ELISA by IFA confirmed serum samples. Due to the low titers of IgG and IgM in Q fever patients, the standard ELISA signals were further amplified by using biotinylated anti-human IgG or IgM plus streptavidin-HRP polymer. The modified ELISA can detect 88% (29 out of 33) of Q fever patient sera collected from Marines deployed to Iraq. Less than 5% (5 out of 156) of the sera from patients with other febrile diseases reacted with the Com1. These results suggest that the modified ELISA using Com1 may have the potential to improve the detection of Q fever specific antibodies. PMID:26904739

  1. Rapid, electrical impedance detection of bacterial pathogens using immobilized antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Lillehoj, Peter B; Kaplan, Christopher W; He, Jian; Shi, Wenyuan; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2014-02-01

    The detection of bacterial pathogens plays an important role in many biomedical applications, including clinical diagnostics, food and water safety, and biosecurity. Most current bacterial detection technologies, however, are unsuitable for use in resource-limited settings where the highest disease burdens often exist. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop portable, user-friendly biosensors capable of rapid detection of multiple pathogens in situ. We report a microfluidic chip for multiplexed detection of bacterial cells that uses antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with species-specific targeting and binding capabilities. The AMPs are immobilized onto an electrical impedance microsensor array and serve as biorecognition elements for bacterial cell detection. Characterization of peptide immobilization on the sensors revealed robust surface binding via cysteine-gold interactions and vertical alignment relative to the sensor surface. Samples containing Streptococcus mutans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were loaded in the chip, and both microorganisms were detected at minimum concentrations of 10⁵ cfu/mL within 25 min. Measurements performed in a variety of solutions revealed that high-conductivity solutions produced the largest impedance values. By integrating a highly specific bacterial cell capture scheme with rapid electrical detection, this device demonstrates great potential as a next-generation, point-of-care diagnostic platform for the detection of disease-causing pathogenic agents.

  2. Detection of carcinoembryonic antigen using functional magnetic and fluorescent nanoparticles in magnetic separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, H. Y.; Chang, C. Y.; Li, Y. C.; Chu, W. C.; Viswanathan, K.; Bor Fuh, C.

    2011-06-01

    We combined a sandwich immunoassay, anti-CEA/CEA/anti-CEA, with functional magnetic ( 80 nm) and fluorescent ( 180 nm) nanoparticles in magnetic separators to demonstrate a detection method for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Determination of CEA in serum can be used in clinical diagnosis and monitoring of tumor-related diseases. The CEA concentrations in samples were deduced and determined based on the reference plot using the measured fluorescent intensity of sandwich nanoparticles from the sample. The linear range of CEA detection was from 18 ng/mL to 1.8 pg/mL. The detection limit of CEA was 1.8 pg/mL. In comparison with most other detection methods, this method had advantages of lower detection limit and wider linear range. The recovery was higher than 94%. The CEA concentrations of two serum samples were determined to be 9.0 and 55 ng/mL, which differed by 6.7% (9.6 ng/mL) and 9.1% (50 ng/mL) from the measurements of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. The analysis time can be reduced to one third of ELISA. This method has good potential for other biomarker detections and biochemical applications.

  3. Highly sensitive nanoparticle-based immunoassays with elemental detection: Application to Prostate-Specific Antigen quantification.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cortes, Marta; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Costa-Fernandez, Jose M; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2016-11-15

    One of the major challenges in developing novel assay methods for the detection of biomolecules is achieving high sensitivity, because of the ultralow concentrations typically in clinical samples. Here, a Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots-based immunoassay platform is presented for highly sensitive detection of cancer biomarkers. Ultrahigh sensitivity is achieved through gold deposition on the surface of the nanoparticle tags acting as catalytic seeds, thus effectively amplifying the size of the metallic nanoparticles after the immunoassay and before the tag detection. Elemental mass spectrometry measurement of the gold content allowed detection of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) at the low attog mL(-1) level. Moreover, the developed method showed not only an extremely high sensitivity for PSA detection but also a broad dynamic range, higher than 8 orders of magnitude, particularly useful for clinical studies involving quantitative detection of diverse biomarkers at their very different relevant concentration levels. Its applicability to discriminate small differences in PSA concentrations at low levels (few pgmL(-1)) in real serum samples was successfully evaluated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Emerging frontiers in detection and control of bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Tan, Seth Yang-En; Chew, Su Chuen; Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Givskov, Michael; Yang, Liang

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria form surface-attached biofilm communities in nature. In contrast to free-living cells, bacterial cells within biofilms resist sanitizers and antimicrobials. While building biofilms, cells physiologically adapt to sustain the otherwise lethal impacts of a variety of environmental stress conditions. In this development, the production and embedding of cells in extracellular polymeric substances plays a key role. Biofilm bacteria can cause a range of problems to food processing including reduced heat-cold transfer, clogging water pipelines, food spoilage and they may cause infections among consumers. Recent biofilm investigations with the aim of potential control approaches include a combination of bacterial genetics, systems biology, materials and mechanic engineering and chemical biology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [THE SELECTION OF ANTIGENS FOR DETECTING OF IMMUNOGLOBULIN G TO CYTOMEGALOVIRUS ON THE BASIS OF FOSFAN TECHNOLOGY].

    PubMed

    Nikitina, A V; Pomelova, V G; Sokolova, M V; Osin, N S; Mardanly, S G

    2015-10-01

    The results of selection of composition of antigens to cytomegalovirus in the structure of multiplex test on the basis of FOSFAN™ technique are presented. In the process of detection of immunoglobulin G (IgG) to this virus the best indicators of sensitivity were registered with mosaic antigen containing immunodominant sequences of proteins pp150, gB, pp28 and pp52; reliably lower indicators of sensitivity was registered with phosphoprotein pp150; the lowest indicators of sensitivity were registered with proteins gB and pp65. The specificity made up from 93.5% to 96.8% independently of type of antigen. The mosaic antigen ensured the best ratio between sensitivity and specificity of immunoassay and is considered as the main component of immunochip for detecting IgG to cytomegalovirus.

  6. Detection of dengue NS1 antigen using long-range surface plasmon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wei Ru; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd; Berini, Pierre

    2016-04-15

    The non-structural 1 (NS1) protein of the dengue virus circulates in infected patients' blood samples and can be used for early diagnosis of dengue infection. In this paper, we present the detection of naturally-occurring dengue NS1 antigen in infected patient blood plasma using straight long-range surface plasmon waveguides. Three commercially-available anti-NS1 monoclonal antibodies were used for recognition and their performance was compared and discussed. A similar figure of merit to the one used in conventional dengue NS1 capture using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to our results. In general, the positive patient samples can be clearly differentiated from the negative ones and the results agree with those obtained using ELISA. The largest signal-to-noise ratio observed during the experiments was 356 and the best detection limit observed is estimated as 5.73 pg/mm(2).

  7. Detection of genome, antigen, and antibodies in oral fluids from pigs infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus

    PubMed Central

    Senthilkumaran, Chandrika; Yang, Ming; Bittner, Hilary; Ambagala, Aruna; Lung, Oliver; Zimmerman, Jeffrey; Giménez-Lirola, Luis G.; Nfon, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Virus nucleic acids and antibody response to pathogens can be measured using swine oral fluids (OFs). Detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome in swine OFs has previously been demonstrated. Virus isolation and viral antigen detection are additional confirmatory assays for diagnosing FMDV, but these methods have not been evaluated using swine OF. The objectives of this study were to further validate the molecular detection of FMDV in oral fluids, evaluate antigen detection and FMDV isolation from swine OFs, and develop an assay for isotypic anti-FMDV antibody detection in OFs. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) from FMDV was detected in OFs from experimentally infected pigs by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) from 1 day post-infection (dpi) to 21 dpi. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) was isolated from OFs at 1 to 5 dpi. Additionally, FMDV antigens were detected in OFs from 1 to 6 dpi using a lateral flow immunochromatographic strip test (LFIST), which is a rapid pen-side test, and from 2 to 3 dpi using a double-antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS ELISA). Furthermore, FMDV-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) was detected in OFs using an isotype-specific indirect ELISA starting at dpi 14. These results further demonstrated the potential use of oral fluids for detecting FMDV genome, live virus, and viral antigens, as well as for quantifying mucosal IgA antibody response. PMID:28408775

  8. Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man: detection of parasite antigens by ELISA*

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, L. J.; McGregor, I. A.; Paounova, N.; Lambert, P. H.

    1982-01-01

    An ELISA method has been developed for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man. Parasites from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum were used as source of antigen for the solid phase and the source of specific antibody was immune Gambian sera; binding of antibody in antigen-coated wells was registered by means of alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human IgG. Parasites were detected on the basis of inhibition of antibody-binding. The test was applied to the detection of parasites in human red blood cells (RBC) from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum and in RBC from infected Gambians; RBC from 100 Geneva blood donors served as normal, uninfected controls. In titration experiments, the degree of antibody-binding inhibition correlated with the number of parasites in the test RBC. Parasites were detected at a level of 8 parasites/106 RBC. Samples of RBC were tested from 126 Gambians with microscopically proven infection; significant antibody-binding inhibition was found in 86% of these cases, where parasitaemia ranged from 10 to 125 000/μl of blood. The presence of high-titre antibody in the test preparations was found to reduce the sensitivity of parasite detection in infected RBC from in vitro cultures mixed with equal volumes of different antibody-containing sera. The sensitivity was restored in most cases by recovering the RBC by centrifugation before testing. In a preliminary experiment, there was no significant difference in antibody-binding inhibition using fresh infected RBC and RBC dried on filter-paper and recovered by elution, although there was greater variation in the latter samples. PMID:7044589

  9. Diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man: detection of parasite antigens by ELISA.

    PubMed

    Mackey, L J; McGregor, I A; Paounova, N; Lambert, P H

    1982-01-01

    An ELISA method has been developed for the diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum infection in man. Parasites from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum were used as source of antigen for the solid phase and the source of specific antibody was immune Gambian sera; binding of antibody in antigen-coated wells was registered by means of alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human IgG. Parasites were detected on the basis of inhibition of antibody-binding. The test was applied to the detection of parasites in human red blood cells (RBC) from in vitro cultures of P. falciparum and in RBC from infected Gambians; RBC from 100 Geneva blood donors served as normal, uninfected controls. In titration experiments, the degree of antibody-binding inhibition correlated with the number of parasites in the test RBC. Parasites were detected at a level of 8 parasites/10(6) RBC. Samples of RBC were tested from 126 Gambians with microscopically proven infection; significant antibody-binding inhibition was found in 86% of these cases, where parasitaemia ranged from 10 to 125 000/mul of blood. The presence of high-titre antibody in the test preparations was found to reduce the sensitivity of parasite detection in infected RBC from in vitro cultures mixed with equal volumes of different antibody-containing sera. The sensitivity was restored in most cases by recovering the RBC by centrifugation before testing. In a preliminary experiment, there was no significant difference in antibody-binding inhibition using fresh infected RBC and RBC dried on filter-paper and recovered by elution, although there was greater variation in the latter samples.

  10. Direct detection of bacterial pathogens in representative dairy products using a combined bacterial concentration-PCR approach.

    PubMed

    Stevens, K A; Jaykus, L-A

    2004-01-01

    To develop a simple, rapid method to concentrate and purify bacteria and their nucleic acids from complex dairy food matrices in preparation for direct pathogen detection using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Plain non-fat yogurt and cheddar cheese were each seeded with Listeria monocytogenes or Salmonella enterica serovar. Enteritidis in the range of 10(1)-10(6) CFU per 11-g sample. Samples were then processed for bacterial concentration using high-speed centrifugation (9700 g) followed by DNA extraction, PCR amplification, and amplicon confirmation by hybridization. Bacterial recoveries after centrifugation ranged from 53 to >100% and 71 to >100% for serovar. Enteritidis and L. monocytogenes, respectively, in the non-fat yogurt samples; and from 77 to >100% and 69 to >100% for serovar. Enteritidis and L. monocytogenes, respectively, in the cheddar cheese samples. There were no significant differences in recovery efficiency at different inocula levels, and losses to discarded supernatants were always <5%, regardless of dairy product or pathogen. When followed by pathogen detection using PCR and confirmation by amplicon hybridization, detection limits of 10(3) and 10(1) CFU per 11-g sample were achieved for L. monocytogenes and serovar. Enteritidis, respectively, in both product types and without prior cultural enrichment. This study represents progress toward the rapid and efficient direct detection of pathogens from complex food matrices at detection limits approaching those that might be anticipated in naturally contaminated products.

  11. Electronic microarray analysis of 16S rDNA amplicons for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Barlaan, Edward A; Sugimori, Miho; Furukawa, Seiji; Takeuchi, Kazuhisa

    2005-01-12

    Electronic microarray technology is a potential alternative in bacterial detection and identification. However, conditions for bacterial detection by electronic microarray need optimization. Using the NanoChip electronic microarray, we investigated eight marine bacterial species. Based on the 16S rDNA sequences of these species, we constructed primers, reporter probes, and species-specific capture probes. We carried out two separate analyses for longer (533 bp) and shorter (350 and 200 bp) amplified products (amplicons). To detect simultaneously the hybridization signals for the 350- and 200-bp amplicons, we designed a common reporter probe from an overlapping sequence within both fragments. We developed methods to optimize detection of hybridization signals for processing the DNA chips. A matrix analysis was performed for different bacterial species and complementary capture probes on electronic microarrays. Results showed that, when using the longer amplicon, not all bacterial targets hybridized with the complementary capture probes, which was characterized by the presence of false-positive signals. However, with the shorter amplicons, all bacterial species were correctly and completely detected using the constructed complementary capture probes.

  12. Impact of the rapid antigen detection test in diagnosis and treatment of acute pharyngotonsillitis in a pediatric emergency room.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Débora Morais; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Hsin, Shieh Huei; Machado, Beatriz Marcondes; de Paulis, Milena; Lotufo, João Paulo B; Martinez, Marina Baquerizo; Grisi, Sandra Josefina E

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the impact of the routine use of rapid antigen detection test in the diagnosis and treatment of acute pharyngotonsillitis in children. This is a prospective and observational study, with a protocol compliance design established at the Emergency Unit of the University Hospital of Universidade de São Paulo for the care of children and adolescents diagnosed with acute pharyngitis. 650 children and adolescents were enrolled. Based on clinical findings, antibiotics would be prescribed for 389 patients (59.8%); using the rapid antigen detection test, they were prescribed for 286 patients (44.0%). Among the 261 children who would not have received antibiotics based on the clinical evaluation, 111 (42.5%) had positive rapid antigen detection test. The diagnosis based only on clinical evaluation showed 61.1% sensitivity, 47.7% specificity, 44.9% positive predictive value, and 57.5% negative predictive value. The clinical diagnosis of streptococcal pharyngotonsillitis had low sensitivity and specificity. The routine use of rapid antigen detection test led to the reduction of antibiotic use and the identification of a risk group for complications of streptococcal infection, since 42.5% positive rapid antigen detection test patients would not have received antibiotics based only on clinical diagnosis.

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of multiple viral antigens using magnetic capture of SERS-active nanoparticles

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A highly sensitive immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has been developed for multiplex detection of surface envelope and capsid antigens of the viral zoonotic pathogens West Nile virus (WNV) and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Detection was mediated by antibo...

  14. Dose-dependent changes in the antigenicity of bacterial endotoxin exposed to ionizing radiation. Report No. 2, 1986-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Suba, E.A.; Tsai, C.M.; Mocca, L.F.; Elin, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The antigenic properties of the highly purified US reference standard endotoxin (RSE) exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation were studied with double immuno-diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, and immunoblotting. Rabbit RSE antisera identified 2 distinct major antigenic components for untreated RSE: one related to the O-polysaccharide side chain (O-antigenic specificity), the other to the R-core. Based on a serologic cross-reactivity of R-core of RSE (Escherichia coli 0113) with the R-core of the lipopolysaccharide from E. coli 0111, the core type of E. coli 0113 was identified as coli R3. Increasing exposure of RSE to ionizing radiation progressively destroyed all antigenic reactivities; at lower doses of radiation the rate of elimination differed for the 2 antigen classes. The O-polysaccharide was more sensitive to gamma radiation than the R-core and the O-antigenicity was lost before that of the R-core. Endotoxin molecules containing incomplete R-core (radiation-induced or mutant) did not react with the RSE antiserum. Keywords: Antigenicity, Reprints. (KT/KR)

  15. Reevaluation of Commercial Reagents for Detection of Histoplasma capsulatum Antigen in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Harring, Julie A.; Dababneh, Ala S.; Rollins, Leonard O.; Bestrom, Jeannie E.; Jespersen, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the Histoplasma capsulatum urinary antigen (UAg) is among the most sensitive and rapid means to diagnose histoplasmosis. Previously, we evaluated analyte-specific reagents (ASR) manufactured by IMMY (Norman, OK) for detection of Histoplasma galactomannan (GM) in urine using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA), and we showed low positive agreement (64.5%) with the MiraVista (MVista) Histoplasma antigen (Ag) quantitative EIA (MiraVista Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN). Here we reevaluated the IMMY GM ASR following modification of our original assay protocol and introduction of an indeterminate range. A total of 150 prospectively collected urine samples were tested with both the IMMY and MVista EIAs, and clinical histories were recorded for all study subjects. The IMMY GM ASR showed positive and negative agreements of 82.3% (14/17 samples) and 100% (121/121 samples), respectively (with exclusion of 12 indeterminate results), and overall agreement of 90% (135/150 samples) with respect to the MVista EIA. Of the three patients with negative IMMY GM ASR results and positive MVista EIA results, testing was performed for initial diagnostic purposes for one patient (<0.4 ng/ml by the MVista EIA) and UAg levels were being monitored for the remaining two patients (both <0.7 ng/ml by the MVista EIA). The MVista EIA results were positive for 6/12 samples that tested indeterminate by the IMMY GM ASR. We also show that the IMMY GM ASR can be used to serially monitor Histoplasma UAg levels. In conclusion, we demonstrate that, with modification, the IMMY GM ASR is a reliable rapid assay for detection of Histoplasma UAg. PMID:25631806

  16. Laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, L D; Fedorko, D P

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is relatively common, can progress rapidly, and can result in death or permanent debilitation. This infection justifiably elicits strong emotional reactions and, hopefully, immediate medical intervention. This review is a brief presentation of the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis and a review of current knowledge, literature, and recommendations on the subject of laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Those who work in clinical microbiology laboratories should be familiar with the tests used in detecting bacteria and bacterial antigens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and should always have the utmost appreciation for the fact that results of such tests must always be reported immediately. Academic and practical aspects of the laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis presented in this review include the following: anatomy of the meninges; pathogenesis; changes in the composition of CSF; etiological agents; processing CSF; microscopic examination of CSF; culturing CSF; methods of detecting bacterial antigens and bacterial components in CSF (counter-immunoelectrophoresis, coagglutination, latex agglutination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Limulus amebocyte lysate assay, and gas-liquid chromatography); use of the polymerase chain reaction; and practical considerations for testing CSF for bacterial antigens. PMID:1576585

  17. Vaccination with Brucella abortus recombinant in vivo-induced antigens reduces bacterial load and promotes clearance in a mouse model for infection.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Jake E; Isaak, Dale D; Leonhardt, Jack A; Vernati, Giulia; Pate, Jessie C; Andrews, Gerard P

    2011-03-11

    Current vaccines used for the prevention of brucellosis are ineffective in inducing protective immunity in animals that are chronically infected with Brucella abortus, such as elk. Using a gene discovery approach, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) on B. abortus, we previously identified ten loci that encode products up-regulated during infection in elk and consequently may play a role in virulence. In our present study, five of the loci (D15, 0187, VirJ, Mdh, AfuA) were selected for further characterization and compared with three additional antigens with virulence potential (Hia, PrpA, MltA). All eight genes were PCR-amplified from B. abortus and cloned into E. coli. The recombinant products were then expressed, purified, adjuvanted, and delivered subcutaneously to BALB/c mice. After primary immunization and two boosts, mice were challenged i.p. with 5 x 10⁴ CFU of B. abortus strain 19. Spleens from challenged animals were harvested and bacterial loads determined by colony count at various time points. While vaccination with four of the eight individual proteins appeared to have some effect on clearance kinetics, mice vaccinated with recombinant Mdh displayed the most significant reduction in bacterial colonization. Furthermore, mice immunized with Mdh maintained higher levels of IFN-γ in spleens compared to other treatment groups. Collectively, our in vivo data gathered from the S19 murine colonization model suggest that vaccination with at least three of the IVIAT antigens conferred an enhanced ability of the host to respond to infection, reinforcing the utility of this methodology for the identification of potential vaccine candidates against brucellosis. Mechanisms for immunity to one protein, Mdh, require further in vitro exploration and evaluation against wild-type B. abortus challenge in mice, as well as other hosts. Additional studies are being undertaken to clarify the role of Mdh and other IVI antigens in B. abortus virulence and induction of

  18. A comparison of two antigen-detection ELISA for detecting infection of Dirofilaria immitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Euclid, J M; Copeman, D B

    1997-09-01

    A survey on 87 dogs necropsied in the Townsville region revealed 34 (39%) were infected with Dirofilaria immitis. Infected dogs had an average of 6.1 adult worms in the heart and associated blood vessels. The VetRED assay detected 23 of the 34 infected dogs (sensitivity 65%) and the Og4C3 ELISA detected 27 (sensitivity 80%). Sensitivity of the VetRED and Og4C3 ELISA increased to 88 and 94% respectively in dogs with three or more worms. Both tests detected correctly all uninfected dogs. Despite the higher accuracy of the Og4C3 ELISA, compared to the VetRED assay, it is unlikely to be used widely as a field test for heartworm unless it can be modified from its present plate ELISA format which takes 4 hours, into one which is more rapid and convenient. However, as a reference ELISA, it may well be worthwhile in situations which require considerable accuracy for detecting D. immitis infection.

  19. Antigenicity of a Bacterially Expressed Triple Chimeric Antigen of Plasmodium falciparum AARP, MSP-311 and MSP-119: PfAMSP-Fu35

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Alok Kumar; Chauhan, Virander S.

    2016-01-01

    Development of fusion chimeras as potential vaccine candidates is considered as an attractive strategy to generate effective immune responses to more than one antigen using a single construct. Here, we described the design, production, purification and antigenicity of a fusion chimera (PfAMSP-Fu35), comprised of immunologically relevant regions of three vaccine target malaria antigens, PfAARP, PfMSP-3 and PfMSP-1. The recombinant PfAMSP-Fu35 is expressed as a soluble protein and purified to homogeneity with ease at a yield of ~ 7 mg L-1. Conformational integrity of the C-terminal fragment of PfMSP-1, PfMSP-119 was retained in the fusion chimera as shown by ELISA with conformation sensitive monoclonal antibodies. High titre antibodies were raised to the fusion protein and to all the three individual components in mice and rabbits upon immunization with fusion chimera in two different adjuvant formulations. The sera against PfAMSP-Fu35 recognized native parasite proteins corresponding to the three components of the fusion chimera. As shown by invasion inhibition assay and antibody mediated cellular inhibition assay, antibodies purified from the PfAMSP-Fu35 immunized serum successfully and efficiently inhibited parasite invasion in P. falciparum 3D7 in vitro both directly and in monocyte dependent manner. However, the invasion inhibitory activity of anti-AMSP-Fu35 antibody is not significantly enhanced as expected as compared to a previously described two component fusion chimera, MSP-Fu24. Therefore, it may not be of much merit to consider AMSP-Fu35 as a vaccine candidate for preclinical development. PMID:27798691

  20. Development of dual-function ELISA for effective antigen and antibody detection against H7 avian influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Outbreaks in poultry involving influenza virus from H7 subtype have resulted in human infections, thus causing a major concern for public health, as well as for the poultry industry. Currently, no efficient rapid test is available for large-scale detection of either antigen or antibody of H7 avian influenza viruses. Results In the present study, a dual function ELISA was developed for the effective detection of antigen and antibody against H7 AIVs. The test was established based on antigen-capture-ELISA and epitope blocking ELISA. The two Mabs 62 and 98 which were exploited in the assay were identified to recognize two conformational neutralizing epitopes on H7 HA1. Both of the epitopes exist in all of the human H7 strains, including the recent H7N9 strain from China and > 96.6% of avian H7 strains. The dual ELISA was able to detect all of the five H7 antigens tested without any cross reaction to other influenza subtypes. The antigen detection limit was less than 1 HA unit of H7. For antibody detection, the sensitivity and specificity of the dual ELISA was evaluated and compared to HI and microneutralization using immunized animal sera to different H7 strains and different subtypes of AIVs. Results indicated that antibodies to H7 were readily detected in immunized animal sera by the dual ELISA whereas specimens with antibodies to other AIVs yielded negative results. Conclusions This is the first dual-function ELISA reported for either antigen or antibody detection against H7 AIVs. The assay was highly sensitive and 100% specific in both functions rendering it effective for H7 diagnosis. PMID:24083616

  1. Clinical significance of a new autoantibody against a human eye muscle soluble antigen, detected by immunofluorescence.

    PubMed Central

    Mengistu, M; Laryea, E; Miller, A; Wall, J R

    1986-01-01

    The clinical significance of a circulating autoantibody against a recently identified soluble human eye muscle-derived antigen was studied in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy and autoimmune thyroid disorders. Tests were positive in 73% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy, including six of seven with no associated thyroid disease (euthyroid Graves' disease). Tests were also positive in 27% of patients with hyperthyroidism but no clinically apparent eye disease, in 13% of patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis without eye disease, in two of 12 patients with subacute thyroiditis, in one of 20 patients with nonimmunological thyroid disorders but in none of 39 normal subjects. There were significant positive correlations between serum levels of the antibody (expressed as a titre) and the severity of the eye muscle component quantified as an index as well as the duration of the eye disease. Antibodies were detected in three of five patients with only lid lag and state who subsequently developed active ophthalmopathy, in six of nine patients who developed eye disease after treatment of their hyperthyroidism and in one of eight first degree relatives of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. In addition three of the 12 patients with autoimmune thyroid disease without apparent eye involvement, but positive antibody tests, have developed ophthalmopathy since the time of testing. These findings suggest that tests for antibodies against a soluble human eye muscle antigen may be useful clinically as a diagnostic test and to predict the onset of eye disease in predisposed patients and subjects. PMID:3539423

  2. Detection of antibody-antigen reaction by silicon nitride slot-ring biosensors using protein G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomoya; Hirowatari, Anna; Ikeda, Takeshi; Fukuyama, Masataka; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Kuroda, Akio; Yokoyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    Biosensors using ring resonators with silicon nitride (SiN) slot waveguides have been fabricated. The temperature coefficient of the resonance wavelength of the SiN resonator is 0.006 nm/°C, which is one order of magnitude smaller than that of Si. The sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by using slot waveguide together with Si-binding protein (designated as Si-tag), which bonds to SiN or SiO2 surface, as an anchoring molecule to immobilize bioreceptors on the SiN rings in an oriented manner. Furthermore, the protein G, which strongly bonds to many kinds of mammalian antibodies only by mixing the antibody solution, is used to efficiently immobilize the antigen on the sensor surface. By means of these devises the sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by factor of 10-100 compared with that of normal Si ring resonator sensors without slot. Then the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) with the sensitivity of ~1×10-8 g/ml, which is the concentration of strongly suspicious for the prostate cancer, has been achieved.

  3. Detection of Border disease antigen in tissues of affected sheep and in cell cultures by immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, C

    1978-11-01

    An account is presented of the distribution of fluorescence in cryostat sections of tissues from eight lambs with Border disease (BD). In young lambs fluorescence was observed in almost every organ, indicating a generalised infection with BD virus. Fluorescence was most prominent in the secretory glands of the alimentary and respiratory tracts, the basal cell layers of the epidermis and mucous membranes, and in the medullary rays of the kidneys. Abomasum, pancreas, kidneys, testicles and thyroid were most consistently affected. Although the number of fluorescing tissues decreased with age, viral antigen could still be detected in two sheep of 22 and 52 weeks old. Border disease viral antigen was demonstrated in cell cultures derived from the brain, kidney and testicle of six out of seven lambs despite the presence of neutralising antibody against bovine virus diarrhoea virus in three of them. The presence of the virus in the skin, the vascular walls and the endocrine system is discussed in relation to the aberrant development of fetal hair follicles, periarteritis and growth retardation respectively.

  4. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  5. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-08-12

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  6. Diagnosis of Giardia lamblia infections by detection of parasite-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Janoff, E N; Craft, J C; Pickering, L K; Novotny, T; Blaser, M J; Knisley, C V; Reller, L B

    1989-03-01

    Antigen detection methods may facilitate diagnosis of Giardia lamblia in stool specimens. As determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting, G. lamblia cysts and trophozoites share several antigens, especially in the 65-kilodalton and 30- to 34-kilodalton regions. By using blind methods, we compared results obtained by counterimmunoelectrophoresis using cyst-immune rabbit serum and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using trophozoite-immune rabbit serum with results obtained by microscopic examination of a preserved, concentrated, and permanently stained stool specimen. Results were similar when these three methods were used to examine 118 stool specimens from clinical microbiology laboratories (53 specimens with G. lamblia) and specimens from 239 day-care-center toddlers (39 specimens with G. lamblia). Compared with microscopy, we found, for counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA, respectively: sensitivity, 88 versus 94%; specificity, 97 versus 95%; positive predictive value, 86 versus 76%; negative predictive value, 98 versus 97%; and concordance, 89%. The false-positive rate by ELISA was 24% (10 of 42) in day-care-center toddlers but only 3% (1 of 32) in healthy adults (P less than 0.04) as corroborated by microscopy. This discrepancy suggests that the ELISA may be more sensitive than microscopy, which is considered the reference standard, and that results may be dependent, in part, on the epidemiology of the infection in the study subjects.

  7. Diagnosis of Giardia lamblia infections by detection of parasite-specific antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Janoff, E N; Craft, J C; Pickering, L K; Novotny, T; Blaser, M J; Knisley, C V; Reller, L B

    1989-01-01

    Antigen detection methods may facilitate diagnosis of Giardia lamblia in stool specimens. As determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting, G. lamblia cysts and trophozoites share several antigens, especially in the 65-kilodalton and 30- to 34-kilodalton regions. By using blind methods, we compared results obtained by counterimmunoelectrophoresis using cyst-immune rabbit serum and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using trophozoite-immune rabbit serum with results obtained by microscopic examination of a preserved, concentrated, and permanently stained stool specimen. Results were similar when these three methods were used to examine 118 stool specimens from clinical microbiology laboratories (53 specimens with G. lamblia) and specimens from 239 day-care-center toddlers (39 specimens with G. lamblia). Compared with microscopy, we found, for counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA, respectively: sensitivity, 88 versus 94%; specificity, 97 versus 95%; positive predictive value, 86 versus 76%; negative predictive value, 98 versus 97%; and concordance, 89%. The false-positive rate by ELISA was 24% (10 of 42) in day-care-center toddlers but only 3% (1 of 32) in healthy adults (P less than 0.04) as corroborated by microscopy. This discrepancy suggests that the ELISA may be more sensitive than microscopy, which is considered the reference standard, and that results may be dependent, in part, on the epidemiology of the infection in the study subjects. Images PMID:2715318

  8. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  9. Surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence on Au nanohole array for prostate-specific antigen detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Liedberg, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon (LSP) has been widely applied for the enhancement of fluorescence emission for biosensing owing to its potential for strong field enhancement. However, due to its small penetration depth, LSP offers limited fluorescence enhancement over a whole sensor chip and, therefore, insufficient sensitivity for the detection of biomolecules, especially large molecules. We demonstrate the simultaneous excitation of LSP and propagating surface plasmon (PSP) on an Au nanohole array under Kretschmann configuration for the detection of prostate-specific antigen with a sandwich immunoassay. The proposed method combines the advantages of high field enhancement by LSP and large surface area probed by PSP field. The simulated results indicated that a maximum enhancement of electric field intensity up to 1,600 times can be achieved under the simultaneous excitation of LSP and PSP modes. The sandwich assay of PSA carried out on gold nanohole array substrate showed a limit of detection of 140 fM supporting coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes. The limit of detection was approximately sevenfold lower than that when only LSP was resonantly excited on the same substrate. The results of this study demonstrate high fluorescence enhancement through the coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes and pave a way for its implementation as a highly sensitive bioassay. PMID:28392689

  10. Gold nanoparticle-based low limit of detection Love wave biosensor for carcinoembryonic antigens.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangming; Wan, Ying; Su, Yan; Fan, Chunhai; Bhethanabotla, Venkat R

    2017-09-15

    In this work, a Love wave biosensing platform is described for detecting cancer-related biomarker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). An ST 90°-X quartz Love wave device with a layer of SiO2 waveguide was combined with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) to amplify the mass loading effect of the acoustic wave sensor to achieve a limit of detection of 37pg/mL. The strategy involves modifying the Au NPs with anti-CEA antibody conjugates to form nanoprobes in a sandwich immunoassay. The unamplified detection limit of the Love wave biosensor is 9.4ng/mL. This 2-3 order of magnitude reduction in the limit of detection brings the SAW platform into the range useful for clinical diagnosis. Measurement electronics and microfluidics are easily constructed for acoustic wave biosensors, such as the Love wave device described here, allowing for robust platforms for point of care applications for cancer biomarkers in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Wicking assay for the rapid detection of Rift Valley fever viral antigens in mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Turell, M; Davé, K; Mayda, M; Parker, Z; Coleman, R; Davé, S; Strickman, D

    2011-05-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes outbreaks of severe disease in domestic ungulates as well as humans in Africa. There is a logical concern that RVFV could be introduced into the Americas and cause significant health and economic damage based on the precedent of the introduction and spread of West Nile virus (WNV). Unfortunately, there are currently no licensed diagnostic assays available for RVFV in the Americas. In this work, we report on the ability of a novel dipstick assay, VectorTest RVFV antigen assay, modeled on the VecTest assay for WNV, to detect a RVFV-infected female within a pool of mosquitoes. The dipsticks provided results in <20 min, were easy to use, and did not require a laboratory with containment facilities. Although readily able to detect a mosquito with a disseminated RVFV infection, it only occasionally detected RVFV in a mosquito with a nondisseminated infection, and therefore may fail to detect some pools that actually contain one or more positive mosquitoes. The RVFV dipstick assay was highly specific and did not react with samples to which had been added yellow fever, West Nile, Venezuelan equine encephalitis, sandfly fever Naples, sandfly fever Sicilian, or sandfly fever Toscana viruses. The RVFV assay can provide a rapid, safe, easy-to-use assay to alert public health personnel to the presence of RVFV in mosquitoes. Results from this assay will allow a rapid threat assessment and the focusing of vector control measures in high-risk areas.

  12. Surface plasmon-enhanced fluorescence on Au nanohole array for prostate-specific antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wu, Lin; Wong, Ten It; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Xiaohu; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bai, Ping; Liedberg, Bo; Wang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon (LSP) has been widely applied for the enhancement of fluorescence emission for biosensing owing to its potential for strong field enhancement. However, due to its small penetration depth, LSP offers limited fluorescence enhancement over a whole sensor chip and, therefore, insufficient sensitivity for the detection of biomolecules, especially large molecules. We demonstrate the simultaneous excitation of LSP and propagating surface plasmon (PSP) on an Au nanohole array under Kretschmann configuration for the detection of prostate-specific antigen with a sandwich immunoassay. The proposed method combines the advantages of high field enhancement by LSP and large surface area probed by PSP field. The simulated results indicated that a maximum enhancement of electric field intensity up to 1,600 times can be achieved under the simultaneous excitation of LSP and PSP modes. The sandwich assay of PSA carried out on gold nanohole array substrate showed a limit of detection of 140 fM supporting coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes. The limit of detection was approximately sevenfold lower than that when only LSP was resonantly excited on the same substrate. The results of this study demonstrate high fluorescence enhancement through the coexcitation of LSP and PSP modes and pave a way for its implementation as a highly sensitive bioassay.

  13. Development of an antigen-capture ELISA for the detection of equine influenza virus nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yuanyuan; Guo, Wei; Zhao, Liping; Li, Hongmei; Lu, Gang; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Guibin; Liu, Cuiyun; Xiang, Wenhua

    2011-07-01

    An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (AC-ELISA) was developed for the detection of the equine influenza virus (EIV), employing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against the A/equine/Xingjiang/2007 (H3N8) nucleoprotein (NP). Immunoglobulin G antibodies were purified and used as capture or detector antibodies. The specificity of the optimized AC-ELISA was evaluated using EIV, equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1), equine herpesvirus 4 (EHV-4), equine arteritis virus (EAV) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), resulting in only EIV specimens yielding a strong signal. A minimal concentration of 50 ng/ml EIV protein was detected in Nonidet P40-treated virus preparations. Virus from the nasal swabs of equines infected experimentally were detected from days 3 to 7 post-infection using this AC-ELISA, with results confirmed by virus isolation and multi reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Both H3N8 and H7N7 EIV subtypes were AC-ELISA positive, indicating that this assay is suitable for the detection of all EIV subtypes.

  14. Fluorescence-based endoscopic imaging of Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen to improve early detection of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Shinji; Yu, James Y H; Quang, Timothy; Hiwatari, Ken-Ichiro; Kumagai, Hironori; Kao, Stephanie; Holt, Alex; Erskind, Jalysa; McClure, Richard; Siuta, Michael; Kitamura, Tokio; Tobita, Etsuo; Koike, Seiji; Wilson, Kevin; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Liu, Eric; Washington, Kay; Omary, Reed; Gore, John C; Pham, Wellington

    2015-03-01

    Thomsen-Friedenreich (TF) antigen belongs to the mucin-type tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen. Notably, TF antigen is overexpressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) but is rarely expressed in normal colonic tissue. Increased TF antigen expression is associated with tumor invasion and metastasis. In this study, we sought to validate a novel nanobeacon for imaging TF-associated CRC in a preclinical animal model. We developed and characterized the nanobeacon for use with fluorescence colonoscopy. In vivo imaging was performed on an orthotopic rat model of CRC. Both white light and fluorescence colonoscopy methods were utilized to establish the ratio-imaging index for the probe. The nanobeacon exhibited specificity for TF-associated cancer. Fluorescence colonoscopy using the probe can detect lesions at the stage which is not readily confirmed by conventional visualization methods. Further, the probe can report the dynamic change of TF expression as tumor regresses during chemotherapy. Data from this study suggests that fluorescence colonoscopy can improve early CRC detection. Supplemented by the established ratio-imaging index, the probe can be used not only for early detection, but also for reporting tumor response during chemotherapy. Furthermore, since the data obtained through in vivo imaging confirmed that the probe was not absorbed by the colonic mucosa, no registered toxicity is associated with this nanobeacon. Taken together, these data demonstrate the potential of this novel probe for imaging TF antigen as a biomarker for the early detection and prediction of the progression of CRC at the molecular level. © 2014 UICC.

  15. Simplified Protocol for Carba NP Test for Enhanced Detection of Carbapenemase Producers Directly from Bacterial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pasteran, Fernando; Tijet, Nathalie; Melano, Roberto G.

    2015-01-01

    We compared carbapenemase detection among 266 Gram-negative bacilli (161 carbapenemase producers) using the Carba NP tests issued by the CLSI (CNPt-CLSI) and a novel protocol (CNPt-direct) designed for carbapenemase detection direct from bacterial cultures (instead of bacterial extracts required by the CLSI tests). The specificities were comparable (100%), but the CNPt-direct was more sensitive (98% versus 84%). The CNPt-direct was easier to perform due to the direct use of colonies and offered a more robust detection of carbapenemase producers. PMID:26424841

  16. Simplified Protocol for Carba NP Test for Enhanced Detection of Carbapenemase Producers Directly from Bacterial Cultures.

    PubMed

    Pasteran, Fernando; Tijet, Nathalie; Melano, Roberto G; Corso, Alejandra

    2015-12-01

    We compared carbapenemase detection among 266 Gram-negative bacilli (161 carbapenemase producers) using the Carba NP tests issued by the CLSI (CNPt-CLSI) and a novel protocol (CNPt-direct) designed for carbapenemase detection direct from bacterial cultures (instead of bacterial extracts required by the CLSI tests). The specificities were comparable (100%), but the CNPt-direct was more sensitive (98% versus 84%). The CNPt-direct was easier to perform due to the direct use of colonies and offered a more robust detection of carbapenemase producers. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. The detection of peste des petits ruminants (PPR) virus antigen by agar gel precipitation test and counter-immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed Central

    Obi, T. U.; Patrick, D.

    1984-01-01

    The detectability of peste des petits ruminants (PPR) viral antigen in both ante-mortem secretions and necropsy samples from experimentally infected goats was investigated by both the agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) and counter-immunoelectrophoresis (CIE). Viral antigen was detected from 42.6% of the samples tested by the AGPT and 80.3% by CIE. The detection of viral antigen in a high proportion of the ocular and nasal secretions as well as the faeces and buccal scrapings, particularly from those collected within seven days of the onset of fever, by both techniques, would seem to obviate the need for lymph node biopsies or post-mortem samples in order to make a diagnosis of PPRV infection. PMID:6512258

  18. Bacterial regrowth in water reclamation and distribution systems revealed by viable bacterial detection assays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-wen; Li, Dan; Gu, April Z; Zeng, Si-yu; He, Miao

    2016-02-01

    Microbial regrowth needs to be managed during water reclamation and distribution. The aim of present study was to investigate the removal and regrowth of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella in water reclamation and distribution system by using membrane integrity assay (PMA-qPCR), reverse transcriptional activity assay (Q-RT-PCR) and culture-based assay, and also to evaluate the relationships among bacterial regrowth, and environmental factors in the distribution system. The results showed that most of the water reclamation processes potentially induced bacteria into VBNC state. The culturable E. coli and Salmonella regrew 1.8 and 0.7 log10 in distribution system, which included reactivation of bacteria in the viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state and reproduction of culturable bacteria. The regrowth of culturable E. coli and Salmonella in the distribution system mainly depended on the residual chlorine levels, with correlations (R(2)) of -0.598 and -0.660. The abundances of membrane integrity and reverse transcriptional activity bacteria in reclamation effluents had significant correlations with the culturable bacteria at the end point of the distribution system, demonstrating that PMA-qPCR and Q-RT-PCR are sensitive and accurate tools to determine and predict bacterial regrowth in water distribution systems. This study has improved our understanding of microbial removal and regrowth in reclaimed water treatment and distribution systems. And the results also recommended that more processes should be equipped to remove viable bacteria in water reclamation plants for the sake of inhibition microbial regrowth during water distribution and usages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Direct fluorescent antibody technique for the detection of bacterial kidney disease in paraffin-embedded tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ochiai, T.; Yasutake, W.T.; Gould, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The direct fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) was successfully used to detect the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), Renibacterium salmoninarum, in Bouin's solution flexed and paraffinembedded egg and tissue sections. This method is superior to gram stain and may be particularly useful in detecting the BKD organism in fish with low-grade infection.

  20. Detection of Intracellular Bacterial Communities in Human Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, David A; Hooton, Thomas M; Stamm, Walter E; Humphrey, Peter A; Hultgren, Scott J

    2007-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common bacterial infections and are predominantly caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC). While UTIs are typically considered extracellular infections, it has been recently demonstrated that UPEC bind to, invade, and replicate within the murine bladder urothelium to form intracellular bacterial communities (IBCs). These IBCs dissociate and bacteria flux out of bladder facet cells, some with filamentous morphology, and ultimately establish quiescent intracellular reservoirs that can seed recurrent infection. This IBC pathogenic cycle has not yet been investigated in humans. In this study we sought to determine whether evidence of an IBC pathway could be found in urine specimens from women with acute UTI. Methods and Findings We collected midstream, clean-catch urine specimens from 80 young healthy women with acute uncomplicated cystitis and 20 asymptomatic women with a history of UTI. Investigators were blinded to culture results and clinical history. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy for evidence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria. Evidence of IBCs was found in 14 of 80 (18%) urines from women with UTI. Filamentous bacteria were found in 33 of 80 (41%) urines from women with UTI. None of the 20 urines from the asymptomatic comparative group showed evidence of IBCs or filaments. Filamentous bacteria were present in all 14 of the urines with IBCs compared to 19 (29%) of 66 samples with no evidence of IBCs (p < 0.001). Of 65 urines from patients with E. coli infections, 14 (22%) had evidence of IBCs and 29 (45%) had filamentous bacteria, while none of the gram-positive infections had IBCs or filamentous bacteria. Conclusions The presence of exfoliated IBCs and filamentous bacteria in the urines of women with acute cystitis suggests that the IBC pathogenic pathway characterized in the murine model may occur in humans. The findings

  1. [Prokaryotic expression and detective application of the main antigenic region of VP2 protein of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiang-Wei; Hua, Yu-Ping; Liang, Dong-Ying

    2007-12-01

    To research safer diagnosis antigen for ADV, the main antigenic region VP2a and VP2b gene of ADV were obtained by restriction digestion of the recombinant plasmids pMD-VP2a and pMD-VP2b. Then the genes were respectively cloned into pMAL-c2 to get two prokaryotic recombinant plasmids pMAL-VPa and pMAL-VPb. The target genes were successfully expressed in the host cell TB1 when induced by IPTG. The Western blot analysis proved the recombinant proteins have good antigenic. The recombinant proteins were purified by KCL dyeing method, and were used as antigen to establish VP2-CIEP for AD diagnoses. The detection result shared 94.3% identity with that of CIEP. The results reported here show that VP2-CIEP is highly sensitive and specific and can benefit the research on the serodiagnosis to AD.

  2. Detection and quantification of intracellular bacterial colonies by automated, high-throughput microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ernstsen, Christina L; Login, Frédéric H; Jensen, Helene H; Nørregaard, Rikke; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Nejsum, Lene N

    2017-08-01

    To target bacterial pathogens that invade and proliferate inside host cells, it is necessary to design intervention strategies directed against bacterial attachment, cellular invasion and intracellular proliferation. We present an automated microscopy-based, fast, high-throughput method for analyzing size and number of intracellular bacterial colonies in infected tissue culture cells. Cells are seeded in 48-well plates and infected with a GFP-expressing bacterial pathogen. Following gentamicin treatment to remove extracellular pathogens, cells are fixed and cell nuclei stained. This is followed by automated microscopy and subsequent semi-automated spot detection to determine the number of intracellular bacterial colonies, their size distribution, and the average number per host cell. Multiple 48-well plates can be processed sequentially and the procedure can be completed in one working day. As a model we quantified intracellular bacterial colonies formed by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) during infection of human kidney cells (HKC-8). Urinary tract infections caused by UPEC are among the most common bacterial infectious diseases in humans. UPEC can colonize tissues of the urinary tract and is responsible for acute, chronic, and recurrent infections. In the bladder, UPEC can form intracellular quiescent reservoirs, thought to be responsible for recurrent infections. In the kidney, UPEC can colonize renal epithelial cells and pass to the blood stream, either via epithelial cell disruption or transcellular passage, to cause sepsis. Intracellular colonies are known to be clonal, originating from single invading UPEC. In our experimental setup, we found UPEC CFT073 intracellular bacterial colonies to be heterogeneous in size and present in nearly one third of the HKC-8 cells. This high-throughput experimental format substantially reduces experimental time and enables fast screening of the intracellular bacterial load and cellular distribution of multiple

  3. DETECTION OF SPECIFIC ANTIGEN IN SV40-TRANSFORMED CELLS BY IMMUNOFLUORESCENCE

    PubMed Central

    Pope, John H.; Rowe, Wallace P.

    1964-01-01

    With an immunofluorescent technique involving the use of serum of hamsters with SV40 tumors, nuclear fluorescence was detected in each of five cell lines, derived from four mammalian species, transformed by SV40 virus. Essentially all nuclei, including those of multinuclear cells, were fluorescent-stainable. Serum of hamsters bearing SV40 tumors was also found to give nuclear fluorescence in susceptible cells (AGMK or BSC-1) acutely infected with SV40 virus. These findings provide further evidence that cellular incorporation of the SV40 viral genome, with partial expression of the genome by synthesis of at least one virus-specific antigen, is an integral property of all SV40 transformed cells. PMID:14206435

  4. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  5. Detection of antibodies to Hypoderma lineatum in cattle by Western blotting with recombinant hypodermin C antigen.

    PubMed

    Boldbaatar, D; Xuan, X; Kimbita, E; Huang, X; Igarashi, I; Byambaa, B; Battsetseg, B; Battur, B; Battsetseg, G; Batsukh, Z; Nagasawa, H; Fujisaki, K; Mikami, T

    2001-08-01

    The cDNA encoding the entire mature hypodermin C (HC) of Hypoderma lineatum was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein using pGEX vector. The recombinant HC protein (rHC) was tested by Western blotting to detect antibodies to H. lineatum in cattle. Western blotting with rHC as antigen clearly differentiated between H. lineatum-infested cattle sera and normal cattle sera. Forty-six out of forty-eight serum samples from cattle in Central Mongolia were positive, whereas all 30 serum samples from cows in Hokkaido, Japan, were negative by Western blotting. The result of Western blotting was identical to that of a previously developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These data demonstrated that Western blotting, with rHC expressed in E. coli, might be a useful method for the diagnosis of cattle hypodermosis.

  6. Solid-phase assays for the detection of alloantibody against human leukocyte antigens: panacea or Pandora?

    PubMed

    Roberts, T; Tumer, G; Gebel, H M; Bray, R A

    2014-10-01

    Serological assessments of antibodies directed against human leucocyte antigens (HLA) formed the basis of early histocompatibility testing (Patel & Terasaki, 1969 N Engl J Med, 280, 735). However, over the past decade, significant advances in HLA antibody detection technologies have emerged. The development and implementation of solid-phase assays has led to safer and more efficient allocation of organs by effectively distinguishing HLA from non-HLA antibodies. Although solid-phase assays are not standardized, they are widely accepted as the new 'gold standard'. However, this technology is not without its challenges. This review is intended to provide a better understanding of solid-phase HLA antibody testing and will focus on important caveats associated with this evolving technology. Examples of the limitations of the technology as well as common data misinterpretations will be shown. Both of which could pose potential harm to transplant recipients (Tait et al., Transplantation, 95, 19). © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. A new one-step antigen heterologous homogeneous fluorescence immunoassay for progesterone detection in serum.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chongxiao; Schenk, Jörg A; Gajovic-Eichelmann, Nenad; Sellrie, Frank; Bier, Frank F

    2015-03-01

    A new homogeneous immunoassay for the detection of progesterone was developed to measure its concentration in human serum. We utilized the weak cross-reactivity of a monoclonal anti-progesterone antibody to an analog molecule (in this case β-estradiol) to create a mixture, in which the fluorescence-labeled antibody (AbF) and quencher-labeled BSA-estradiol (eBSAq) were at optimized equilibrium. At this stage, most antibodies were bound to eBSAq and the fluorescence of AbF was quenched. After adding samples containing free progesterone to the system, these would replace the eBSAq at the antigen-binding site. The fluorescence would be released. In contrast to conventional competitive immunoassays, the fluorescence signal increases with increasing progesterone concentration, greatly simplifying detection and calibration. The performance of the assay was very simple; there was only one mixing step; and other hormones like testosterone, estradiol or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) do not interfere the assay. A wide linear range from 0.1 µg/L to 100 µg/L was achieved in buffer, with a LOD of 0.1 µg/L. In human serum the LOD was 5 µg/L, and the linear range was 5-500 µg/L. For this assay it is important to find the right combination of antibody and cross-reactive antigen. If such a combination could be defined, it is conceivable to apply this assay to a wide range of analytes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A panel of autoantibodies against multiple tumor-associated antigens for detecting gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Isamu; Nagata, Matsuo; Takiguchi, Nobuhiro; Nabeya, Yoshihiro; Ikeda, Atsushi; Yokoi, Sana; Kuwajima, Akiko; Tagawa, Masatoshi; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Satoshi, Yajima; Hideaki, Shimada

    2017-01-08

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the world, and effective diagnosis is extremely important for good outcome. We assessed the diagnostic potential of an autoantibody panel that may provide a novel tool for the early detection of gastric cancer. We analyzed data from patients with gastric cancer and normal controls in a test and validation cohorts. Autoantibody levels were measured against a panel of six tumor-associated antigens [TAAs; p53, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), HCC-22-5, peroxiredoxin VI (Prx VI), KM-HN-1, and p90 TAA (CYP2A)] via ELISA. We assessed serum autoantibodies in 100 participants in the test cohort. The validation cohort comprised 248 participants. Autoantibodies to at least one of the six antigens demonstrated a sensitivity/specificity of 49.0% [95% confidence interval (CI), 39.2-58.8%]/92.4% (95% CI, 87.2-97.6%) and 52.0% (95% CI, 42.2-61.8%)/90.5% (95% CI, 84.8-96.3%) in the test and validation cohorts, respectively. In the validation cohort, no significant differences were seen when patients were subdivided based on age, sex, depth of tumor invasion, lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis, peritoneal dissemination, and TNM stage. Patients who were positive for more than two antibodies in the panel tended to have a worse prognosis than those who were positive for one or no antibody. Measurement of autoantibody response to multiple TAAs in an optimized panel assay to discriminate patients with early stage gastric cancer from normal controls may aid in the early detection of gastric cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid detection of group B streptococcal antigen in human amniotic fluid.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, R A; Smith, L P; Hemming, V G; Fischer, G W

    1987-02-01

    Infants exposed in utero to group B streptococcus (GBS)-infected human amniotic fluid (HAF) are at high risk for serious infection. Latex particle agglutination (LPA) tests are not approved for detection of GBS in HAF. Two LPA systems, Patho-Dx Strep B and Wellcogen Strep B, were used to test unfiltered sterile HAF and filtered HAF containing concentrations of GBS carbohydrate from 0.2 to 100 micrograms/ml. Four different processing techniques were used to prevent nonspecific LPA: EDTA, nitrous acid, enzyme, and nitrous acid-heat. GBS (10(2) CFU/ml) was inoculated into filtered HAF, incubated, sampled serially, processed with enzyme, and tested by LPA. Unprocessed, unfiltered HAF showed 33% nonspecific agglutination when tested by LPA. Processing of HAF removed nonspecific agglutination and improved GBS antigen detection. Without processing, LPA could not detect less than 100 micrograms of GBS carbohydrate per ml. With nitrous acid or enzyme processing, as little as 0.2 microgram/ml could be detected. Results were easier to read after enzyme processing than after nitrous acid processing. Although both LPA systems were equally efficient, testing was easier with the Patho-Dx system. After enzyme processing, LPA could detect as few as 10(4) CFU/ml when agglutination was read with a 4 X hand lens. Substances in HAF induce false-positive reactions during LPA testing. Processing removes the interference and improves the detection of GBS. LPA testing of HAF may allow earlier identification and treatment of infants at risk for serious GBS infection.

  10. Counter-immunoelectro-osmophoresis for the detection of infantile gastroenteritis virus (orbi-group) antigen and antibody.

    PubMed

    Middleton, P J; Petric, M; Hewitt, C M; Szymanski, M T; Tam, J S

    1976-03-01

    A moderatley sensitive, rapid, and economical test scheme for the detection of infantile gastroenteritis virus (IGV) in stool or antibody in serum has been developed and evaluated. The test scheme with minor modifications was an adaptation of a counter-immunoelectro-osmophoresis system we once used for the detection of hepatitis B antigen. Large numbers of stool samples may be screened during half a working day for the presence of IGV using reference antiserum to IGV prepared in guinea-pigs. Serological studies of a diagnostic but not epidemiological nature may also be performed with equal facility by this same test scheme using highly purified IGV antigen derived from stool.

  11. Evaluation of antigen detection and antibody detection tests for Trypanosoma evansi infections of buffaloes in Indonesia.

    PubMed Central

    Davison, H. C.; Thrusfield, M. V.; Muharsini, S.; Husein, A.; Partoutomo, S.; Rae, P. F.; Masake, R.; Luckins, A. G.

    1999-01-01

    Two Ag-ELISAs, an IgG-specific antibody detection ELISA (IgG ELISA) and a card agglutination test (CATT) for the detection of Trypanasoma evansi infections in buffaloes in Indonesia, were compared. Diagnostic sensitivity estimates were obtained by testing sera from 139 Indonesian buffaloes which had been found to be infected by parasitological tests. Diagnostic specificity was estimated by testing sera from 263 buffaloes living in Australia. Response-operating characteristic curves were constructed, and optimal ELISA cut-off values, which minimized the number of false-negative and false-positive results, were chosen. The IgG ELISA had the highest sensitivity (89%) and the CATT had the highest specificity (100%). There was a significant difference between the sensitivities (71 and 81%), but not between the specificities (75 and 78%), of the two Ag-ELISAs. The four tests were further compared by calculation of post-test probabilities of infection for positive and negative test results using a range of prevalence values, and likelihood ratios. The results suggested that the CATT was the best test to 'rule-in' infection (i.e. the highest probability of infection in test-positive animals) and the IgG ELISA was the best test to 'rule-out' infection (i.e. the lowest probability of infection in test-negative animals). PMID:10487651

  12. Evaluation of antigen detection and antibody detection tests for Trypanosoma evansi infections of buffaloes in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Davison, H C; Thrusfield, M V; Muharsini, S; Husein, A; Partoutomo, S; Rae, P F; Masake, R; Luckins, A G

    1999-08-01

    Two Ag-ELISAs, an IgG-specific antibody detection ELISA (IgG ELISA) and a card agglutination test (CATT) for the detection of Trypanasoma evansi infections in buffaloes in Indonesia, were compared. Diagnostic sensitivity estimates were obtained by testing sera from 139 Indonesian buffaloes which had been found to be infected by parasitological tests. Diagnostic specificity was estimated by testing sera from 263 buffaloes living in Australia. Response-operating characteristic curves were constructed, and optimal ELISA cut-off values, which minimized the number of false-negative and false-positive results, were chosen. The IgG ELISA had the highest sensitivity (89%) and the CATT had the highest specificity (100%). There was a significant difference between the sensitivities (71 and 81%), but not between the specificities (75 and 78%), of the two Ag-ELISAs. The four tests were further compared by calculation of post-test probabilities of infection for positive and negative test results using a range of prevalence values, and likelihood ratios. The results suggested that the CATT was the best test to 'rule-in' infection (i.e. the highest probability of infection in test-positive animals) and the IgG ELISA was the best test to 'rule-out' infection (i.e. the lowest probability of infection in test-negative animals).

  13. A handheld magnetic sensing platform for antigen and nucleic acid detection.

    PubMed

    Pai, Alex; Khachaturian, Aroutin; Chapman, Stephen; Hu, Alexander; Wang, Hua; Hajimiri, Ali

    2014-03-21

    The core requirements for point-of-care (POC) diagnostics necessitate low-cost, portability, easily integrated sample preparation, and quick measurement time. Frequency-shift based magnetic sensing is a measurement technique utilizing a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) integrated-circuit (IC) chip for magnetic label detection. The sensing scheme leverages the low-cost manufacturing of IC chips while demonstrating the potential for multiplexing capabilities. In this article, we present modifications to this scheme for POC viability. We introduce a handheld reusable reader and a disposable open-well cartridge for the detection of nucleic acids and antigens. The diagnostic system utilizes a novel "magnetic freezing" technique to reduce measurement time, obviates baseline measurement before or during biological assay, and reduces sensor noise. We utilize these enhancements for the room temperature, amplification-free detection of a 31 base-pair DNA oligomer and the interferon-γ (IFN-γ) protein. We have demonstrated reliable measurements down to 100 pM for the DNA assay and 1 pM for the protein.

  14. Highly conducting gold nanoparticles-graphene nanohybrid films for ultrasensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Ya-Qin; Mao, Li; Yuan, Ya-Li; Yuan, Ruo

    2011-07-15

    A new label-free amperometric immunosensor was developed for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) based on chitosan-ferrocene (CS-Fc) and nano-TiO(2) (CS-Fc+TiO(2)) complex film and gold nanoparticles-graphene (Au-Gra) nanohybrid. CS-Fc+TiO(2) composite membrane was first modified on a bare glass carbon electrode. Then Au-Gra nanohybrid was formed on the CS-Fc+TiO(2) membrane by self-assembly strategy. Next, further immobilization of anti-CEA was constructed according to the strong interaction between Au-Gra and the amido groups of anti-CEA. Since Au-Gra nanohybrid films provided a congenial microenvironment for the immobilization of biomolecules, the surface coverage of antibody protein could be enhanced and the sensitivity of the immunosensor has been improved. The good electronic conductive characteristic might be attributed to the synergistic effect of graphene nanosheets and Au NPs. The modified process was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Under optimized conditions, the resulting biosensor displayed good amperometric response to CEA with linear range from 0.01 to 80 ng/mL and a detection limit of 3.4 pg/mL (signal/noise=3). The results demonstrated that the immunosensor has advantages of high conduction, sensitivity, and long life time. This assay approach showed a great potential in clinical applications and detection of low level proteins.

  15. Evaluation of counterimmunoelectrophoresis for serotyping Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae isolates and detection of type-specific antigens in lungs of infected pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, K R; Bourdon, S; Berrouard, M

    1993-01-01

    A rapid, simple, and accurate counterimmunoelectrophoresis technique was developed for serotyping cultures of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae as well as for detection of their type-specific antigens in the lung tissues of infected pigs. The counterimmunoelectrophoresis test correctly identified all of the reference antigens and more than 99% of 1,200 field isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae representing the 12 established serotypes within 1 h. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis and coagglutination tests did not differ broadly in sensitivity from each other. Both procedures were more rapid and more sensitive than immunodiffusion and indirect hemagglutination tests. A total of 355 lung tissue samples (130 lungs of pigs that died because of acute respiratory problems, 125 lungs of pigs from herds with chronically infected pleuropneumonia, and 100 lungs from apparently healthy pigs at the slaughterhouse) were examined for the presence of A. pleuropneumoniae type-specific antigens by counterimmunoelectrophoresis, coagglutination, and immunodiffusion tests. A. pleuropneumoniae type-specific antigen was found in all 55 samples from which the bacteria had earlier been isolated and in 27 specimens in which they had not been found. Detection of antigen in the lung tissues by coagglutination and counterimmunoelectrophoresis tests was found to be much simpler and much more rapid than conventional culture isolation. Both counterimmunoelectrophoresis and coagglutination tests were found extremely useful in the diagnosis of acute cases of porcine pleuropneumonia. However, these techniques were able to detect only some of the chronically infected carrier pigs. PMID:8408552

  16. Proximal bacterial lysis and detection in nanoliter wells using electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Besant, Justin D; Das, Jagotamoy; Sargent, Edward H; Kelley, Shana O

    2013-09-24

    Rapid and direct genetic analysis of low numbers of bacteria using chip-based sensors is limited by the slow diffusion of mRNA molecules. Long incubation times are required in dilute solutions in order to collect a sufficient number of molecules at the sensor surface to generate a detectable signal. To overcome this barrier here we present an integrated device that leverages electrochemistry-driven lysis less than 50 μm away from electrochemical nucleic acid sensors to overcome this barrier. Released intracellular mRNA can diffuse the short distance to the sensors within minutes, enabling rapid and sensitive detection. We validate this strategy through direct lysis and detection of E. coli mRNA at concentrations as low as 0.4 CFU/μL in 2 min, a clinically relevant combination of speed and sensitivity for a sample-to-answer molecular analysis approach.

  17. Detection of target staphylococcal enterotoxin B antigen in orange juice and popular carbonated beverages using antibody-dependent antigen-capture assays.

    PubMed

    Principato, MaryAnn; Njoroge, Joyce M; Perlloni, Andrei; O' Donnell, Michael; Boyle, Thomas; Jones, Robert L

    2010-10-01

    There is a critical need for qualitative and quantitative methodologies that provide the rapid and accurate detection of food contaminants in complex food matrices. However, the sensitivity of the assay can be affected when antigen-capture is applied to certain foods or beverages that are extremely acidic. This study was undertaken to assess the effects of orange juice and popular carbonated soft drink upon the fidelity of antibody-based antigen-capture assays and to develop simple approaches that could rescue assay performance without the introduction of additional or extensive extraction procedures. We examined the effects of orange juice and a variety of popular carbonated soft drink beverages upon a quantitative Interleukin-2 (IL-2) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) assay system and a lateral flow device (LFD) adapted for the detection of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) in foods. Alterations in the performance and sensitivity of the assay were directly attributable to the food matrix, and alterations in pH were especially critical. The results demonstrate that approaches such as an alteration of pH and the use of milk as a blocking agent, either singly or in combination, will partially rescue ELISA performance. The same approaches permit lateral flow to efficiently detect antigen. Practical Application: The authors present ways to rescue an ELISA assay compromised by acidity in beverages and show that either the alteration of pH, or the use of milk as a blocking agent are not always capable of restoring the assay to its intended efficiency. However, the same methods, when employed with lateral flow technology, are rapid and extremely successful.

  18. Multiplexed paper test strip for quantitative bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Hossain, S M Zakir; Ozimok, Cory; Sicard, Clémence; Aguirre, Sergio D; Ali, M Monsur; Li, Yingfu; Brennan, John D

    2012-06-01

    Rapid, sensitive, on-site detection of bacteria without a need for sophisticated equipment or skilled personnel is extremely important in clinical settings and rapid response scenarios, as well as in resource-limited settings. Here, we report a novel approach for selective and ultra-sensitive multiplexed detection of Escherichia coli (non-pathogenic or pathogenic) using a lab-on-paper test strip (bioactive paper) based on intracellular enzyme (β-galactosidase (B-GAL) or β-glucuronidase (GUS)) activity. The test strip is composed of a paper support (0.5 × 8 cm), onto which either 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D: -glucuronide sodium salt (XG), chlorophenol red β-galactopyranoside (CPRG) or both and FeCl(3) were entrapped using sol-gel-derived silica inks in different zones via an ink-jet printing technique. The sample was lysed and assayed via lateral flow through the FeCl(3) zone to the substrate area to initiate rapid enzyme hydrolysis of the substrate, causing a change from colorless-to-blue (XG hydrolyzed by GUS, indication of nonpathogenic E. coli) and/or yellow to red-magenta (CPRG hydrolyzed by B-GAL, indication of total coliforms). Using immunomagnetic nanoparticles for selective preconcentration, the limit of detection was ~5 colony-forming units (cfu) per milliliter for E. coli O157:H7 and ~20 cfu/mL for E. coli BL21, within 30 min without cell culturing. Thus, these paper test strips could be suitable for detection of viable total coliforms and pathogens in bathing water samples. Moreover, inclusion of a culturing step allows detection of less than 1 cfu in 100 mL within 8 h, making the paper tests strips relevant for detection of multiple pathogens and total coliform bacteria in beverage and food samples.

  19. APPLYING MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES IN DETECTING BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Yolanda S.; Agrawal, Rajeev; Foster, James A.; Beck, Daniel; Dozier, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    There are several diseases which arise because of changes in the microbial communities in the body. Scientists continue to conduct research in a quest to find the catalysts that provoke these changes in the naturally occurring microbiota. Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) is a disease that fits the above criteria. BV afflicts approximately 29% of women in child bearing age. Unfortunately, its causes are unknown. This paper seeks to uncover the most important features for diagnosis and in turn employ classification algorithms on those features. In order to fulfill our purpose, we conducted two experiments on the data. We isolated the clinical and medical features from the full set of raw data, we compared the accuracy, precision, recall and F-measure and time elapsed for each feature selection and classification grouping. We noticed that classification results were as good or better after performing feature selection although there was a wide range in the number of features produced from the feature selection process. After comparing the experiments, the algorithms performed best on the medical dataset. PMID:25914861

  20. Bacterial production and structure-functional validation of a recombinant antigen-binding fragment (Fab) of an anti-cancer therapeutic antibody targeting epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hun; Sim, Dae-Won; Park, Dongsun; Jung, Tai-Geun; Lee, Seonghwan; Oh, Taeheun; Ha, Jong-Ryul; Seok, Seung-Hyeon; Seo, Min-Duk; Kang, Ho Chul; Kim, Young Pil; Won, Hyung-Sik

    2016-12-01

    Fragment engineering of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has emerged as an excellent paradigm to develop highly efficient therapeutic and/or diagnostic agents. Engineered mAb fragments can be economically produced in bacterial systems using recombinant DNA technologies. In this work, we established recombinant production in Escherichia coli for monovalent antigen-binding fragment (Fab) adopted from a clinically used anticancer mAB drug cetuximab targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Recombinant DNA constructs were designed to express both polypeptide chains comprising Fab in a single vector and to secrete them to bacterial periplasmic space for efficient folding. Particularly, a C-terminal engineering to confer an interchain disulfide bond appeared to be able to enhance its heterodimeric integrity and EGFR-binding activity. Conformational relevance of the purified final product was validated by mass spectrometry and crystal structure at 1.9 Å resolution. Finally, our recombinant cetuximab-Fab was found to have strong binding affinity to EGFR overexpressed in human squamous carcinoma model (A431) cells. Its binding ability was comparable to that of cetuximab. Its EGFR-binding affinity was estimated at approximately 0.7 nM of Kd in vitro, which was quite stronger than the binding affinity of natural ligand EGF. Hence, the results validate that our construction could serve as an efficient platform to produce a recombinant cetuximab-Fab with a retained antigen-binding functionality.

  1. Evaluation of a novel chemiluminescent microplate enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Song, Liu-Wei; Fang, Lin-Lin; Wu, Yong; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Li, Hui; Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) is an important biomarker used in the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, but false-negative results are still reported in the detection of HBsAg using commercial assays. In this study, we evaluated the qualitative properties of a novel HBsAg chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) assay--WTultra. WHO standard sample dilution series and samples from low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL) were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the WTultra assay. Boston Biomedica, Inc. (BBI) hepatitis B seroconversion panels were used to assess the ability of the WTultra assay to detect the window period. In addition, dilution series of 22 serum samples with different genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations were used to assess the WTultra assay, and these were compared with other commercial assays. The lower detection limit of the WTultra assay was 0.012 IU/mL, and it showed a high sensitivity (97.52%, 95% CI, 94.95-99.00) in the detection of 282 low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL). In samples with various HBV genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations, the WTultra assay yielded 117 positive results in 132 samples, which was significantly higher than the results with the other four commercial assays (89, 83, 65 and 45, respectively, p<0.01). In the assays of mutant strains, the WTultra assay detected 82 positive results in 90 samples, which was significantly better than the results for the Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (58 positive) and Architect (55 positive) (p<0.01) assays, which in turn were significantly better than the Murex V.3 (41 positive, p=0.026) and AxSYM V2 (29 positive, p<0.01) assays. However, in the detection of 42 samples of wild-type strains with various genotypes and serotypes, no significant differences were observed among the WTultra (35 positive), Architect (28 positive) and Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (31 positive) assays. However, the WTultra assay detected significantly more samples than the Murex V.3 (24

  2. Rapid, Portable, Multiplexed Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Directly from Clinical Sample Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Mangadu, Betty; Piccini, Matthew E.; Singh, Anup K.; Koh, Chung-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Enteric and diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood illness and death in countries with developing economies. Each year, more than half of a million children under the age of five die from these diseases. We have developed a portable, microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous, multiplexed detection of several of the bacterial pathogens that cause these diseases. This platform can perform fast, sensitive immunoassays directly from relevant, complex clinical matrices such as stool without extensive sample cleanup or preparation. Using only 1 µL of sample per assay, we demonstrate simultaneous multiplexed detection of four bacterial pathogens implicated in diarrheal and enteric diseases in less than 20 min. PMID:27669320

  3. Rapid, portable, multiplexed detection of bacterial pathogens directly from clinical sample matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Mangadu, Betty Lou Bosano; Piccini, Matthew E.; Singh, Anup K.; Koh, Chung -Yan

    2016-09-23

    Enteric and diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood illness and death in countries with developing economies. Each year, more than half of a million children under the age of five die from these diseases. We have developed a portable, microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous, multiplexed detection of several of the bacterial pathogens that cause these diseases. Furthermore, this platform can perform fast, sensitive immunoassays directly from relevant, complex clinical matrices such as stool without extensive sample cleanup or preparation. Using only 1 µL of sample per assay, we demonstrate simultaneous multiplexed detection of four bacterial pathogens implicated in diarrheal and enteric diseases in less than 20 min.

  4. Detection, diversity and expression of aerobic bacterial arsenite oxidase genes.

    PubMed

    Inskeep, William P; Macur, Richard E; Hamamura, Natsuko; Warelow, Thomas P; Ward, Seamus A; Santini, Joanne M

    2007-04-01

    The arsenic (As) drinking water crisis in south and south-east Asia has stimulated intense study of the microbial processes controlling the redox cycling of As in soil-water systems. Microbial oxidation of arsenite is a critical link in the global As cycle, and phylogenetically diverse arsenite-oxidizing microorganisms have been isolated from various aquatic and soil environments. However, despite progress characterizing the metabolism of As in various pure cultures, no functional gene approaches have been developed to determine the importance and distribution of arsenite-oxidizing genes in soil-water-sediment systems. Here we report for the first time the successful amplification of arsenite oxidase-like genes (aroA/asoA/aoxB) from a variety of soil-sediment and geothermal environments where arsenite is known to be oxidized. Prior to the current work, only 16 aroA/asoA/aoxB-like gene sequences were available in GenBank, most of these being putative assignments from homology searches of whole genomes. Although aroA/asoA/aoxB gene sequences are not highly conserved across disparate phyla, degenerate primers were used successfully to characterize over 160 diverse aroA-like sequences from 10 geographically isolated, arsenic-contaminated sites and from 13 arsenite-oxidizing organisms. The primer sets were also useful for confirming the expression of aroA-like genes in an arsenite-oxidizing organism and in geothermal environments where arsenite is oxidized to arsenate. The phylogenetic and ecological diversity of aroA-like sequences obtained from this study suggests that genes for aerobic arsenite oxidation are widely distributed in the bacterial domain, are widespread in soil-water systems containing As, and play a critical role in the biogeochemical cycling of As.

  5. Multiple antigen peptide dendrimer elicits antibodies for detecting rat and mouse growth hormone binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Roberto M.; Talamantes, Frank J.; Bustamante, Juan J.; Muñoz, Jesus; Treviño, Lisa R.; Martinez, Andrew O.; Haro, Luis S.

    2009-01-01

    The membrane-bound rat growth hormone receptor (GH-R) and an alternatively spliced isoform, the soluble rat GH binding protein (GH-BP), are comprised of identical N-terminal GH binding domains, however, their C-terminal sequences differ. Immunological reagents are needed to distinguish between the two isoforms in order to understand their respective roles in mediating the actions of GH. Accordingly, a tetravalent multiple antigen peptide (MAP) dendrimer with four identical branches of a C-terminal peptide sequence of the rat GH-BP (GH-BP263-279) was synthesized and used as an immunogen in rabbits. Solid-phase peptide synthesis of four GH-BP263-279 segments onto a tetravalent Lys2-Lys-β-Ala-OH core peptide was carried out using N-(9-fluorenyl)methoxycarbonyl chemistry. The mass of the RP-HPLC purified synthetic product, 8398 Da, determined by ESI-MS, was identical to expected mass. Three anti-rat GH-BP263-279 MAP antisera, BETO-8039, BETO-8040 and BETO-8041, at dilutions of 10-3, recognized both the rat GH-BP263-279 MAP and recombinant mouse GH-BP with ED50s within a range of 5-10 fmol but did not cross-react with BSA in dot blot analyses. BETO-8041 antisera (10-3 dilution) recognized GH-BPs of rat serum and liver having Mrs ranging from 35-130 kDa but did not recognize full-length rat GH-Rs. The antisera also detected recombinant mouse GH-BPs. In summary, the tetravalent rat GH-BP263-279 MAP dendrimer served as an effective immunogenic antigen in eliciting high titer antisera specific for the C-termini of both rat and mouse GH-BPs. The antisera will facilitate studies aimed at improving our understanding of the biology of GH-BPs. PMID:19089805

  6. Antigenic Variation in Bacteroides forsythus Detected by a Checkerboard Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Tom J.; Mancl, Lloyd A.; Braham, Pamela H.; Page, Roy C.

    1998-01-01

    Evidence indicating that multiple serotypes of Bacteroides forsythus participate in rapidly progressing periodontal infections has not been reported previously. Our aim was to develop an assay for detecting subsets of B. forsythus clinical isolates which differ in serogroup membership and subsets of patients with immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses which differ in serogroup recognition. A checkerboard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to assess variation in the IgG binding profiles of 22 clinical isolates in sera from 28 patients with early-onset rapidly progressive periodontitis. To accommodate the maximum number of isolates and sera in a given assay run, a multiplate assay grid with standard 96-well microtest plates was established. Single dilutions of individual sera were placed in rows crossing columns of isolate-coated wells, and antigen-specific IgG immobilized in the wells was measured as ELISA absorbance. Pooled sera and isolates were assayed in parallel to serve as negative controls for variation in IgG binding profiles. Correlation and hierarchical cluster analysis of the absorbance data matrix showed that the isolates could be sorted into at least four clusters based on variations in their IgG binding profiles across different sera. Furthermore, at least two patient clusters were defined by variations in their serum IgG antigen recognition profiles across different isolates. We conclude that multiple serogroups of B. forsythus exist and that different serogroups are dominant in the antibody response of different patients. The method applied here could be used to serologically classify clinical isolates of other species which evoke a serum antibody response in patients. PMID:9729543

  7. Blastomyces dermatitidis: Antibody Detection in Sera from Dogs with Blastomycosis with Yeast Lysate Antigens Produced from Human and Dog Isolates.

    PubMed

    Mondada, Katie; Fullmer, Jessie; Hungerford, Eric; Novack, Katrina; Vickers, Kristen; Scalarone, Gene

    2014-01-01

    Dogs are common hosts to the fungal organism Blastomyces dermatitidis, which causes the systemic disease blastomycosis. The goal of our study was to compare the reactivity of two B. dermatitidis yeast lysate antigens prepared from dog isolates (ERC-2, Wisconsin; T-58, Tennessee) and two lysate antigens prepared from human isolates (B5931 and B5896, Minnesota) against 48 serum specimens from dogs with confirmed blastomycosis using the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Secondarily, we used three different ELISA substrates (Ultra TMB: A, SureBlue: B, and SureBlue Reserve: C) to compare the effectiveness of each substrate. Mean absorbance values ranged from 0.446 (B) to 0.651 (C) for the B5931 antigen and from 0.393 (B) to 0.540 (C) for the ERC-2 antigen in Trial 1. In Trial 2, the absorbance values ranged from 0.628 (B) to 0.909 (A) for the B5896 antigen and from 0.828 (B) to 1.375 (C) for the T-58 antigen. In Trial 1, the lysate antigen prepared from the human isolate B5931 exhibited the highest absorbance value and in Trial 2 the lysate prepared from the dog isolate T-58 was the most reactive. The overall results thus indicated that the T-58 lysate was the optimal reagent when used to detect antibody with the Sure-Blue Reserve substrate. Our laboratory is continuing to study B. dermatitidis antigen and substrate combinations for the reliable immunodiagnosis of blastomycosis in humans and animals.

  8. Advances in the Diagnosis of Human Opisthorchiasis: Development of Opisthorchis viverrini Antigen Detection in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Duenngai, Kunyarat; Wangboon, Chompunoot; Sithithaworn, Jiraporn; Watwiengkam, Nattaya; Namwat, Nisana; Techasen, Anchalee; Loilome, Watcharin; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Loukas, Alex; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Bethony, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many strategies to control opisthorchiasis have been employed in Thailand, but not in the other neighbouring countries. Specific control methods include mass drug administration (MDA) and health education to reduce raw fish consumption. These control efforts have greatly shifted the epidemiology of Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) infection over the last decade from presenting as densely concentrated "heavy" infections in single villages to widespread "light" OV infections distributed over wide geographical areas. Currently, the "gold standard" detection method for OV infection is formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique (FECT), which has limited diagnostic sensitivity and diagnostic specificity for light OV infections, with OV eggs often confused with eggs of minute intestinal flukes (MIFs) in feces. In this study, we developed and evaluated the diagnostic performance of a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of OV excretory-secretory (ES) antigens in urine (urine OV-ES assay) for the diagnosis of opisthorchiasis compared to the gold standard detection FECT method. Methodology We tested several methods for pre-treating urine samples prior to testing the diagnostic performance of the urine OV-ES assay. Using trichloroacetic acid (TCA) pre-treated urine, we compared detection and quantification of OV infection using the urine OV-ES assay versus FECT in OV-endemic areas in Northeastern Thailand. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the urine OV-ES assay using TCA pre-treated urine, and to establish diagnostic positivity thresholds. The Positive Predictive Value as well as the likelihood of obtaining a positive test result (LR+) or a negative test result (LR-) were calculated for the established diagnostic positivity threshold. Diagnostic risks (Odds Ratios) were estimated using logistic regression. Results When urine samples were pre

  9. Detection of Only Viable Bacterial Spores Using a Live/Dead Indicator in Mixed Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Stam, Christina N.; Smiley, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    This method uses a photoaffinity label that recognizes DNA and can be used to distinguish populations of bacterial cells from bacterial spores without the use of heat shocking during conventional culture, and live from dead bacterial spores using molecular-based methods. Biological validation of commercial sterility using traditional and alternative technologies remains challenging. Recovery of viable spores is cumbersome, as the process requires substantial incubation time, and the extended time to results limits the ability to quickly evaluate the efficacy of existing technologies. Nucleic acid amplification approaches such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction) have shown promise for improving time to detection for a wide range of applications. Recent real-time PCR methods are particularly promising, as these methods can be made at least semi-quantitative by correspondence to a standard curve. Nonetheless, PCR-based methods are rarely used for process validation, largely because the DNA from dead bacterial cells is highly stable and hence, DNA-based amplification methods fail to discriminate between live and inactivated microorganisms. Currently, no published method has been shown to effectively distinguish between live and dead bacterial spores. This technology uses a DNA binding photoaffinity label that can be used to distinguish between live and dead bacterial spores with detection limits ranging from 109 to 102 spores/mL. An environmental sample suspected of containing a mixture of live and dead vegetative cells and bacterial endospores is treated with a photoaffinity label. This step will eliminate any vegetative cells (live or dead) and dead endospores present in the sample. To further determine the bacterial spore viability, DNA is extracted from the spores and total population is quantified by real-time PCR. The current NASA standard assay takes 72 hours for results. Part of this procedure requires a heat shock step at 80 degC for 15 minutes before the

  10. Multiplexing detection of IgG against Plasmodium falciparum pregnancy-specific antigens

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Ana Maria; Quinto, Llorenç; Jiménez, Alfons; González, Raquel; Bardají, Azucena; Maculuve, Sonia; Dobaño, Carlota; Rupérez, Maria; Vala, Anifa; Aponte, John J.; Sevene, Esperanza; Macete, Eusebio; Menéndez, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Background Pregnant women exposed to Plasmodium falciparum generate antibodies against VAR2CSA, the parasite protein that mediates adhesion of infected erythrocytes to the placenta. There is a need of high-throughput tools to determine the fine specificity of these antibodies that can be used to identify immune correlates of protection and exposure. Here we aimed at developing a multiplex-immunoassay to detect antibodies against VAR2CSA antigens. Methods and findings We constructed two multiplex-bead arrays, one composed of 3 VAR2CSA recombinant-domains (DBL3X, DBL5Ɛ and DBL6Ɛ) and another composed of 46 new peptides covering VAR2CSA conserved and semi-conserved regions. IgG reactivity was similar in multiplexed and singleplexed determinations (Pearson correlation, protein array: R2 = 0.99 and peptide array: R2 = 0.87). IgG recognition of 25 out of 46 peptides and all recombinant-domains was higher in pregnant Mozambican women (n = 106) than in Mozambican men (n = 102) and Spanish individuals (n = 101; p<0.05). Agreement of IgG levels detected in cryopreserved plasma and in elutions from dried blood spots was good after exclusion of inappropriate filter papers. Under heterogeneous levels of exposure to malaria, similar seropositivity cutoffs were obtained using finite mixture models applied to antibodies measured on pregnant Mozambican women and average of antibodies measured on pregnant Spanish women never exposed to malaria. The application of the multiplex-bead array developed here, allowed the assessment of higher IgG levels and seroprevalences against VAR2CSA-derived antigens in women pregnant during 2003–2005 than during 2010–2012, in accordance with the levels of malaria transmission reported for these years in Mozambique. Conclusions The multiplex bead-based immunoassay to detect antibodies against selected 25 VAR2CSA new-peptides and recombinant-domains was successfully implemented. Analysis of field samples showed that responses were specific among

  11. Multiplexing detection of IgG against Plasmodium falciparum pregnancy-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Maria; Quinto, Llorenç; Jiménez, Alfons; González, Raquel; Bardají, Azucena; Maculuve, Sonia; Dobaño, Carlota; Rupérez, Maria; Vala, Anifa; Aponte, John J; Sevene, Esperanza; Macete, Eusebio; Menéndez, Clara; Mayor, Alfredo

    2017-01-01

    Pregnant women exposed to Plasmodium falciparum generate antibodies against VAR2CSA, the parasite protein that mediates adhesion of infected erythrocytes to the placenta. There is a need of high-throughput tools to determine the fine specificity of these antibodies that can be used to identify immune correlates of protection and exposure. Here we aimed at developing a multiplex-immunoassay to detect antibodies against VAR2CSA antigens. We constructed two multiplex-bead arrays, one composed of 3 VAR2CSA recombinant-domains (DBL3X, DBL5Ɛ and DBL6Ɛ) and another composed of 46 new peptides covering VAR2CSA conserved and semi-conserved regions. IgG reactivity was similar in multiplexed and singleplexed determinations (Pearson correlation, protein array: R2 = 0.99 and peptide array: R2 = 0.87). IgG recognition of 25 out of 46 peptides and all recombinant-domains was higher in pregnant Mozambican women (n = 106) than in Mozambican men (n = 102) and Spanish individuals (n = 101; p<0.05). Agreement of IgG levels detected in cryopreserved plasma and in elutions from dried blood spots was good after exclusion of inappropriate filter papers. Under heterogeneous levels of exposure to malaria, similar seropositivity cutoffs were obtained using finite mixture models applied to antibodies measured on pregnant Mozambican women and average of antibodies measured on pregnant Spanish women never exposed to malaria. The application of the multiplex-bead array developed here, allowed the assessment of higher IgG levels and seroprevalences against VAR2CSA-derived antigens in women pregnant during 2003-2005 than during 2010-2012, in accordance with the levels of malaria transmission reported for these years in Mozambique. The multiplex bead-based immunoassay to detect antibodies against selected 25 VAR2CSA new-peptides and recombinant-domains was successfully implemented. Analysis of field samples showed that responses were specific among pregnant women and dependent on the level of

  12. The enhanced detection of persistent disease after prostatectomy with a new prostate specific antigen immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Takayama, T K; Vessella, R L; Brawer, M K; Noteboom, J; Lange, P H

    1993-08-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) determinations after radical prostatectomy are valuable in detecting persistent disease. Previously, we determined that 0.4 ng./ml. PSA was a reliable clinical threshold using the Hybritech Tandem-R PSA assay. Recently, we reported that a new PSA immunoassay (Abbott IMx PSA) correlated well with results of the Tandem-R immunoradiometric PSA assay and had a lower threshold. Using a conservative threshold of 0.1 ng./ml. PSA for the IMx PSA assay, we analyzed IMx PSA values in serial postoperative serum from 72 radical prostatectomy patients whose initial Tandem-R levels were less than 0.4 ng./ml. PSA. The lower detection limits of the IMx PSA assay allowed approximately a third (15 of 42) more detection of persistent disease within 8 months of surgery. When the PSA level remained undetectable for more than 8 months but the disease eventually recurred the lead times averaged 9 to 12 months when 0.1 ng./ml. PSA was used to signify persistent disease. All patients whose PSA levels reached 0.1 ng./ml. PSA and were subsequently followed for more than 3 months continued to have increasing levels. Also, every man who eventually had recurrence also had a PSA serum level of at least 0.1 ng./ml. PSA within 28 months postoperatively, although the subsequent increase from 0.1 to 0.4 ng./ml. PSA sometimes took several years. Although the clinical impact of these findings is yet unknown, new or altered PSA assays with lower detection limits can provide unique information that may offer opportunities for improved clinical investigation and possibly patient management.

  13. Detection of a low-molecular-weight antigen on melanoma cells by a human antiserum in leukocyte-dependent antibody assays.

    PubMed

    Hersey, P; Murray, E; Werkmeister, J; McCarthy, W H

    1979-10-01

    Biochemical characterization of serologically detected human melanoma antigens was undertaken for the development of immunodiagnostic assays in melanoma. An antiserum from a human melanoma patient, which detected melanoma antigens expressed on a large proportion of different melanoma cells, was used in leucocyte-dependent cytotoxic antibody (LDA) 51Cr-release assays to monitor the purification of melanoma antigens in urea/acetate extracts of lactoperoxidase 125I-labelled melanoma cell membranes. The separation procedures included affinity chromatography on Concanavalin A, gel filtration on porous polyacrylamide beads and preparative isoelectric focusing. The fractions were also monitored by polyacrylamide electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate and by measurement of beta 2 microglobulin and carcinoembryonic antigen content. The antigens detected by this antiserum appeared to be acidic (pI 3.5) low-mol.-wt glycoproteins of approximately 15,000 daltons which were resistant to heating at 56 degrees C and digestion with neuraminidase, but susceptible to repeated freeze-thawing and trypsin digestion. They did not appear to be related to HLA antigens, beta 2 microglobulin or known foetal antigens. The nature of the antigens detected in these studies is as yet unknown, but they appear similar to those described in the sera and urine of melanoma patients in previous reports. Thes combined results and the frequent expression of these antigens on melanoma cells from different patients suggest that assays to detect this antigen may provide a valuable immunodiagnostic aid in the management of melanoma.

  14. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C

    2007-11-01

    We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

  15. Selective detection of gold using genetically engineered bacterial reporters.

    PubMed

    Cerminati, Sebastián; Soncini, Fernando C; Checa, Susana K

    2011-11-01

    Salmonella typhimurium harbours a Au-resistance system whose expression is controlled by GolS, a transcriptional regulator of the MerR family that selectively detects Au with high sensitivity. We developed both Salmonella and genetically engineered Escherichia coli strains as Au-selective whole-cell biosensors by coupling the strictly regulated GolS-dependent golB promoter to the gfp reporter gene. The bio-reporters were evaluated under different laboratory conditions and calibrated for their use as selective Au detectors. Due to the intrinsic characteristics of the regulatory protein, the transgenic E. coli sensor exhibits low background, high signal-to-noise ratio, and improved sensitivity for detection of Au ions in a wide range of concentrations (up to 470 nM) with a calculated detection limit of ∼33 nM (6 µg L(-1) or parts per billion) Au(I). The fluorescent Au-sensing bacteria exhibit also minimal interference by chemically related metals such as Cu or Ag that are commonly found in Au deposits. These highly specific and sensitive Au detectors might allow the development of rapid and robust screening tools to improve discovery and extraction procedures.

  16. Detection of Chikungunya Virus Antigen by a Novel Rapid Immunochromatographic Test

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Tadahiro; Masrinoul, Promsin; Chantawat, Nantarat; Yoksan, Sutee; Nitatpattana, Narong; Chusri, Sarunyou; Morales Vargas, Ronald E.; Grandadam, Marc; Brey, Paul T.; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Mulyantno, Kris Cahyo; Churrotin, Siti; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Faye, Oumar; Faye, Ousmane; Sow, Abdourahmane; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Puiprom, Orapim; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Kurosu, Takeshi; Kato, Seiji; Kosaka, Mieko; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya fever is a mosquito-borne disease of key public health importance in tropical and subtropical countries. Although severe joint pain is the most distinguishing feature of chikungunya fever, diagnosis remains difficult because the symptoms of chikungunya fever are shared by many pathogens, including dengue fever. The present study aimed to develop a new immunochromatographic diagnosis test for the detection of chikungunya virus antigen in serum. Mice were immunized with isolates from patients with Thai chikungunya fever, East/Central/South African genotype, to produce mouse monoclonal antibodies against chikungunya virus. Using these monoclonal antibodies, a new diagnostic test was developed and evaluated for the detection of chikungunya virus. The newly developed diagnostic test reacted with not only the East/Central/South African genotype but also with the Asian and West African genotypes of chikungunya virus. Testing of sera from patients suspected to have chikungunya fever in Thailand (n = 50), Laos (n = 54), Indonesia (n = 2), and Senegal (n = 6) revealed sensitivity, specificity, and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) agreement values of 89.4%, 94.4%, and 91.1%, respectively. In our study using serial samples, a new diagnostic test showed high agreement with the RT-PCR within the first 5 days after onset. A rapid diagnostic test was developed using mouse monoclonal antibodies that react with chikungunya virus envelope proteins. The diagnostic accuracy of our test is clinically acceptable for chikungunya fever in the acute phase. PMID:25411170

  17. Prostate Cancer Detection and Prognosis: From Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) to Exosomal Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Filella, Xavier; Foj, Laura

    2016-10-26

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) remains the most used biomarker in the management of early prostate cancer (PCa), in spite of the problems related to false positive results and overdiagnosis. New biomarkers have been proposed in recent years with the aim of increasing specificity and distinguishing aggressive from non-aggressive PCa. The emerging role of the prostate health index and the 4Kscore is reviewed in this article. Both are blood-based tests related to the aggressiveness of the tumor, which provide the risk of suffering PCa and avoiding negative biopsies. Furthermore, the use of urine has emerged as a non-invasive way to identify new biomarkers in recent years, including the PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene. Available results about the PCA3 score showed its usefulness to decide the repetition of biopsy in patients with a previous negative result, although its relationship with the aggressiveness of the tumor is controversial. More recently, aberrant microRNA expression in PCa has been reported by different authors. Preliminary results suggest the utility of circulating and urinary microRNAs in the detection and prognosis of PCa. Although several of these new biomarkers have been recommended by different guidelines, large prospective and comparative studies are necessary to establish their value in PCa detection and prognosis.

  18. The diagnostic accuracy of carcinoembryonic antigen to detect colorectal cancer recurrence - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Caspar G; Karlsson, William K; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic Antigen (CEA) has been used as a tumor marker in the follow-up of colorectal cancer for more than 40 years. Controversy exists regarding its diagnostic applicability due to a relatively low sensitivity and a questionable effect on mortality. The aim of this review was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of CEA in detecting recurrence after intended curative surgery for primary colorectal cancer. Systematic literature searches were performed in PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases, and articles were chosen based on predefined inclusion criteria. Reference lists from included articles were manually searched for additional publications of relevance. Forty-two original studies with generally representative populations and long follow-up were included. Data were reported on outcomes from 9,834 CEA tests during follow-up. Reporting on the reference standards used was not optimal. Sensitivity of CEA ranged from 17.4 % to 100 %, specificity ranged from 66.1 % to 98.4 %, positive predictive value ranged from 45.8 % to 95.2% and negative predictive value ranged from 74.5 % to 100 %. Results point toward a sensitivity of CEA ranging between 50 % and 80 %, and a specificity and negative predictive value above 80 %. Results on positive predictive value showed low reliability. Overall, CEA did not effectively detect treatable recurrences at an early stage, and a clinically relevant effect on patient mortality remains to be proven. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Application of Immunohistochemical Staining to Detect Antigen Destruction as a Measure of Tissue Damage

    PubMed Central

    Onul, Abdullah; Colvard, Michael D.; Paradise, William A.; Elseth, Kim M.; Vesper, Benjamin J.; Gouvas, Eftychia; Deliu, Zane; Garcia, Kelly D.; Pestle, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Electrocautery and directed energy devices (DEDs) such as lasers, which are used in surgery, result in tissue damage that cannot be readily detected by traditional histological methods, such as hematoxylin and eosin staining. Alternative staining methods, including 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) to stain live tissue, have been reported. Despite providing superior detection of damaged tissue relative to the hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method, the MTT method possesses a number of drawbacks, most notably that it must be carried out on live tissue samples. Herein, we report the development of a novel staining method, “antigen destruction immunohistochemistry” (ADI), which can be carried out on paraffin-embedded tissue. The ADI method takes advantage of epitope loss to define the area of tissue damage and provides many of the benefits of live tissue MTT staining without the drawbacks inherent to that method. In addition, the authors provide data to support the use of antibodies directed at a number of gene products for use in animal tissue for which there are no species-specific antibodies commercially available, as well as an example of a species-specific direct antibody. Data are provided that support the use of this method in many tissue models, as well as evidence that ADI is comparable to the live tissue MTT method. PMID:22723525

  20. Application of immunohistochemical staining to detect antigen destruction as a measure of tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Onul, Abdullah; Colvard, Michael D; Paradise, William A; Elseth, Kim M; Vesper, Benjamin J; Gouvas, Eftychia; Deliu, Zane; Garcia, Kelly D; Pestle, William J; Radosevich, James A

    2012-09-01

    Electrocautery and directed energy devices (DEDs) such as lasers, which are used in surgery, result in tissue damage that cannot be readily detected by traditional histological methods, such as hematoxylin and eosin staining. Alternative staining methods, including 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) to stain live tissue, have been reported. Despite providing superior detection of damaged tissue relative to the hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) method, the MTT method possesses a number of drawbacks, most notably that it must be carried out on live tissue samples. Herein, we report the development of a novel staining method, "antigen destruction immunohistochemistry" (ADI), which can be carried out on paraffin-embedded tissue. The ADI method takes advantage of epitope loss to define the area of tissue damage and provides many of the benefits of live tissue MTT staining without the drawbacks inherent to that method. In addition, the authors provide data to support the use of antibodies directed at a number of gene products for use in animal tissue for which there are no species-specific antibodies commercially available, as well as an example of a species-specific direct antibody. Data are provided that support the use of this method in many tissue models, as well as evidence that ADI is comparable to the live tissue MTT method.

  1. Multi-scale silica structures for improved HIV-1 Capsid (p24) antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sophia; Hedde, Per Niklas; Venugopalan, Vasan; Gratton, Enrico; Khine, Michelle

    2016-06-20

    Silica (SiO2) micro- and nanostructures fabricated with pre-stressed thermoplastic shrink wrap film have been shown to yield far-field fluorescence signal enhancements over their planar or wrinkled counterparts. The SiO2 structures have previously been used for improved detection of fluorescently labelled proteins and DNA. In this work, we probe the mechanism responsible for the dramatic increases in fluorescence signal intensity. Optical characterization studies attribute the fluorescence signal enhancements to increased surface density and light scattering from the rough SiO2 structures. Using this information, we come up with a theoretical approximation for the enhancement factor based off the scattering effects alone. We show that increased deposition thickness of SiO2 yields improved fluorescence signal enhancements, with an optimal SiO2 thin layer achieved at 20 nm. Finally, we show that the SiO2 substrates serve as a suitable platform for disease diagnostics, and show improved limits of detection (LOD) for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p24 antigen.

  2. Detection of chikungunya virus antigen by a novel rapid immunochromatographic test.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Tamaki; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Masrinoul, Promsin; Chantawat, Nantarat; Yoksan, Sutee; Nitatpattana, Narong; Chusri, Sarunyou; Morales Vargas, Ronald E; Grandadam, Marc; Brey, Paul T; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Mulyantno, Kris Cahyo; Churrotin, Siti; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Faye, Oumar; Faye, Ousmane; Sow, Abdourahmane; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Puiprom, Orapim; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Kurosu, Takeshi; Kato, Seiji; Kosaka, Mieko; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    Chikungunya fever is a mosquito-borne disease of key public health importance in tropical and subtropical countries. Although severe joint pain is the most distinguishing feature of chikungunya fever, diagnosis remains difficult because the symptoms of chikungunya fever are shared by many pathogens, including dengue fever. The present study aimed to develop a new immunochromatographic diagnosis test for the detection of chikungunya virus antigen in serum. Mice were immunized with isolates from patients with Thai chikungunya fever, East/Central/South African genotype, to produce mouse monoclonal antibodies against chikungunya virus. Using these monoclonal antibodies, a new diagnostic test was developed and evaluated for the detection of chikungunya virus. The newly developed diagnostic test reacted with not only the East/Central/South African genotype but also with the Asian and West African genotypes of chikungunya virus. Testing of sera from patients suspected to have chikungunya fever in Thailand (n = 50), Laos (n = 54), Indonesia (n = 2), and Senegal (n = 6) revealed sensitivity, specificity, and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) agreement values of 89.4%, 94.4%, and 91.1%, respectively. In our study using serial samples, a new diagnostic test showed high agreement with the RT-PCR within the first 5 days after onset. A rapid diagnostic test was developed using mouse monoclonal antibodies that react with chikungunya virus envelope proteins. The diagnostic accuracy of our test is clinically acceptable for chikungunya fever in the acute phase.

  3. Avian host range of Chlamydophila spp. based on isolation, antigen detection and serology.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Taday, Eva M A

    2003-10-01

    Published reports and our own diagnostic data on the avian host range of avian Chlamydophila spp. are presented in an attempt to provide evidence for the large number of bird species that have been naturally infected with chlamydia. The term 'chlamydia-positive' is based on either isolation of the organism and antigen detection or on serological detection of circulating antibodies. The list of chlamydia-positive birds contains the six major domestic species (chicken, turkey, Pekin duck, Muscovy duck, goose, and pigeon), the three minor domestic species (Japanese quail, bobwhite quail, and peafowl) and a total of 460 free-living or pet bird species in 30 orders. The order Psittaciformes contains by far the most (153 of 342; 45%) chlamydia-positive bird species. More than 20% of all species per order are positive for chlamydia in the orders Lariformes (gulls, 26 of 92 species; 28%), Alciformes (alks, six of 23 species; 26%), Sphenisciformes (penguins, four of 16 species; 25%), and Anseriformes (ducks and geese, 33 of 157 species; 21%). Only 5% of all bird species (14 of 259 species) in the order Phasianiformes (gallinaceus birds) are chlamydia-positive. The different percentages of chlamydia-positive bird species reflect: (i) a high rate of investigations (e.g. of domestic birds) compared with infrequent testing (e.g. of Charadriiformes or Cuculiformes), (ii) frequent zoonotic implications (e.g. psittacine and columbiform birds), and (iii) an assumed high susceptibility to infection and subsequent seroconversion (e.g. waterfowl).

  4. Prostate Cancer Detection and Prognosis: From Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) to Exosomal Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Filella, Xavier; Foj, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) remains the most used biomarker in the management of early prostate cancer (PCa), in spite of the problems related to false positive results and overdiagnosis. New biomarkers have been proposed in recent years with the aim of increasing specificity and distinguishing aggressive from non-aggressive PCa. The emerging role of the prostate health index and the 4Kscore is reviewed in this article. Both are blood-based tests related to the aggressiveness of the tumor, which provide the risk of suffering PCa and avoiding negative biopsies. Furthermore, the use of urine has emerged as a non-invasive way to identify new biomarkers in recent years, including the PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene. Available results about the PCA3 score showed its usefulness to decide the repetition of biopsy in patients with a previous negative result, although its relationship with the aggressiveness of the tumor is controversial. More recently, aberrant microRNA expression in PCa has been reported by different authors. Preliminary results suggest the utility of circulating and urinary microRNAs in the detection and prognosis of PCa. Although several of these new biomarkers have been recommended by different guidelines, large prospective and comparative studies are necessary to establish their value in PCa detection and prognosis. PMID:27792187

  5. Probe functionalization with a Rhop-3 antibody: toward a Rhop-3 antigen immunosensor for detection of malaria.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Salaam; Moreno-Molek, Susan; Perera, Indika; Riga, Alan; Sam-Yellowe, Tobili; Bayachou, Mekki

    2012-03-01

    The antibody specific for the malaria protein, Rhop-3, and FL-Rhop-3, were immobilized on the surface of a gold electrode modified with cysteamine. Colloidal gold was used to enhance the detection signal for Rhop-3 antigens. The Rhop-3 antibody was also immobilized on gold electrodes preactivated with dithiobis(succinimidyl proprionate) (DSP). Immobilization was performed at room temperature and at 37 °C. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) was used to monitor the interaction between the immobilized antibody and its cognate antigen in solution, using ferricyanide, K3Fe(CN)6, as reporting electroactive probe. Tests indicate recognition of Rhop-3 protein by the immobilized antibody. Antigen recognition was enhanced by incubation at 37 °C compared with room-temperature incubation. Our results suggest that an immunosensor can be developed and optimized to aid detection of Rhop-3 antigens in samples from malaria patients. As far as we are aware, this is the first amperometric immunosensor targeting Rhop-3 antigen as a malaria biomarker.

  6. Preparation and evaluation of an IgG-Lucifer Yellow carbohydrazide conjugate for the detection of measles antigen.

    PubMed

    Njayou, M; Mouliom, C

    1996-05-01

    A conjugate, prepared by covalently coupling Lucifer Yellow carbohydrazide (LYCH) to monkey anti-measles IgG, was used to detect measles antigen in infected cell monolayers and in nasopharyngeal swabs from children. Compared with fluorescein isothiocyanate, LYCH is not only easier to couple to antibodies but also produces better fluorescence.

  7. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection and quantitation of capsular antigen of Haemophilus influenzae type b.

    PubMed Central

    Crosson, F J; Winkelstein, J A; Moxon, E R

    1978-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed to detect the presence of the ribose-ribitol phosphate capsular antigen of Haemophilus influenzae type b in laboratory and clinical specimens. The assay is simple, sensitive, specific, and quantitative and should prove to be of value in the diagnosis and management of H. influenzae infections. PMID:310425

  8. Multiplex PCR assay for simultaneous detection of six major bacterial pathogens of rice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Z; Ojaghian, M R; Tao, Z; Kakar, K U; Zeng, J; Zhao, W; Duan, Y; Vera Cruz, C M; Li, B; Zhu, B; Xie, G

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a multiplex PCR (mPCR) assay for rapid, sensitive and simultaneous detection of six important rice pathogens: Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, X. oryzae pv. oryzicola, Pseudomonas fuscovaginae, Burkholderia glumae, Burkholderia gladioli and Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae. Specific primers were designed through a bioinformatics pipeline. Sensitivity of detection was established using both traditional PCR and quantitative real-time PCR on isolated DNA and on bacterial cells both in vitro and in simulated diseased seeds and the parameters were optimized for an mPCR assay. A total of 150 bacterial strains were tested for specificity. The mPCR assay accurately predicted the presence of pathogens among 44 symptomatic and asymptomatic rice seed, sheath and leaf samples. This study confirmed that this mPCR assay is a rapid, reliable and simple tool for the simultaneous detection of six important rice bacterial pathogens. This study is the first report of a method allowing simultaneous detection of six major rice pathogens. The ability to use crude extracts from plants without bacterial isolation or DNA extraction enhances the value of this mPCR technology for rapid detection and aetiological/epidemiological studies. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Detection of bacterial cells by impedance spectra via fluidic electrodes in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Pei, Zhenhua; Huang, Jianyong; Xiong, Chunyang; Shi, Shenggen; Fang, Jing

    2010-06-21

    In this study, a novel method for detecting bacterial cells in deionized (DI) water suspension is presented by using fluidic electrodes with a hydrodynamic focusing technique. KCl solution was utilized as both sheath flow and fluidic electrodes, and the bacterial suspension was squeezed to form three flowing layers with different conductivities on a microfluidic chip. An impedance analyzer was connected with the KCl solution through two Ag/AgCl wires to apply an AC voltage to fluidic layers within a certain frequency for impedance measurements. Porphyromonas gingivalis and Escherichia coli were detected and linear relationships were found between the impedance and the logarithmic value of the bacterial concentration in certain cell concentration ranges. It is demonstrated that bacterial detection using the microdevice is rapid and convenient, with a chip made of simple flow channels, and the detection sensitivity of cell counting can be tuned by varying the width of the sample flow layer through changing input velocities, showing a detection limit of 10(3) cells mL(-1).

  10. A handheld real time thermal cycler for bacterial pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James A; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz; Karns, Jeffrey S; Shelton, Daniel R; Cooper, Mary; Gbakima, Aiah; Koopman, Ronald P

    2003-08-15

    The handheld advanced nucleic acid analyzer (HANAA) is a portable real time thermal cycler unit that weighs under 1 kg and uses silicon and platinum-based thermalcycler units to conduct rapid heating and cooling of plastic reaction tubes. Two light emitting diodes (LED) provide greater than 1 mW of electrical power at wavelengths of 490 nm (blue) and 525 nm (green), allowing detection of the dyes FAM and JOE/TAMRA. Results are displayed in real time as bar graphs, and up to three, 4-sample assays can be run on the charge of the 12 V portable battery pack. The HANAA was evaluated for detection of defined Escherichia coli strains, and wild-type colonies isolated from stream water, using PCR for the lac Z and Tir genes. PCR reactions using SYBR Green dye allowed detection of E. coli ATCC 11775 and E. coli O157:H7 cells in under 30 min of assay time; however, background fluorescence associated with dye binding to nonspecific PCR products was present. DNA extracted from three isolates of Bacillus anthracis Ames, linked to a bioterrorism incident in Washington DC in October 2001, were also successfully tested on the HANAA using primers for the vrrA and capA genes. Positive results were observed at 32 and 22 min of assay time, respectively. A TaqMan probe specific to the aroQ gene of Erwinia herbicola was tested on the HANAA and when 500 cells were used as template, positive results were observed after only 7 min of assay time. Background fluorescence associated with the use of the probe was negligible. The HANAA is unique in offering real time PCR in a handheld format suitable for field use; a commercial version of the instrument, offering six reaction chambers, is available as of Fall 2002.

  11. Detection of anti-extractable nuclear antigens in connective tissue diseases: comparison between passive hemagglutination, counterimmunoelectrophoresis and double immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    Siracusano, A; Agelli, M; Ioppolo, S; Quintieri, F; Bombardieri, S

    1985-01-01

    Antibodies to the three major components of the complex called soluble extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) were detected by passive hemagglutination (HA), counterimmunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and double immunodiffusion (DI) in 256 patients with connective tissue diseases. Anti-ENA antibodies were demonstrated by all the three employed methods in only 44.9% of the cases. These methods were not able to detect all antibodies to these antigens or any single specificity; CIE was however the most sensitive method for anti-RNP and HA for anti-Sm antibodies, while DI was the most suitable technique for serum samples with multiple anti-ENA specificities. Only in less than 50% of the cases the specificity detected by HA was comparable with that given by CIE or DI. Hence, for detecting anti-ENA antibodies a combination of these methods should be maintained, at least until more precise and reliable methods will become available.

  12. Ultra-sensitive immunosensor for detection of hepatitis B surface antigen using multi-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shourian, M; Ghourchian, H; Boutorabi, M

    2015-10-01

    The signal amplification for analytical purposes has considerable potential in detecting trace levels of analytes for clinical, security or environmental applications. In the present report a strategy based on a sandwich type immunoassay system was designed for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen which exploits the specific affinity interaction between streptavidin and biotin recognition systems. The method involves the specific coupling of multi-functionalized gold nanoparticles (bearing biotin and luminol molecules) to the streptavidin modified by secondary antibody. The chemiluminescent signal is produced by the gold nanoparticles in the presence of HAuCl4 as catalyst and hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The immunosensor was able to detect hepatitis B surface antigen in the linear concentration range from 1.7 to 1920 pg mL(-1) and the detection limit of 0.358 pg mL(-1), at signal/noise = 3.

  13. Rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics using AFM cantilevers as nanomechanical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, G.; Alonso-Sarduy, L.; Rio, L. Marques; Bizzini, A.; Trampuz, A.; Notz, J.; Dietler, G.; Kasas, S.

    2013-07-01

    The widespread misuse of drugs has increased the number of multiresistant bacteria, and this means that tools that can rapidly detect and characterize bacterial response to antibiotics are much needed in the management of infections. Various techniques, such as the resazurin-reduction assays, the mycobacterial growth indicator tube or polymerase chain reaction-based methods, have been used to investigate bacterial metabolism and its response to drugs. However, many are relatively expensive or unable to distinguish between living and dead bacteria. Here we show that the fluctuations of highly sensitive atomic force microscope cantilevers can be used to detect low concentrations of bacteria, characterize their metabolism and quantitatively screen (within minutes) their response to antibiotics. We applied this methodology to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, showing that live bacteria produced larger cantilever fluctuations than bacteria exposed to antibiotics. Our preliminary experiments suggest that the fluctuation is associated with bacterial metabolism.

  14. Simultaneous Detection of Three Bacterial Seed-Borne Diseases in Rice Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    PubMed

    Kang, In Jeong; Kang, Mi-Hyung; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Shim, Hyeong Kwon; Shin, Dong Bum; Heu, Suggi

    2016-12-01

    Burkholderia glumae (bacterial grain rot), Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (bacterial leaf blight), and Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae (bacterial brown stripe) are major seedborne pathogens of rice. Based on the 16S and 23S rDNA sequences for A. avenae subsp. avenae and B. glumae, and transposase A gene sequence for X. oryzae pv. oryzae, three sets of primers had been designed to produce 402 bp for B. glumae, 490 bp for X. oryzae, and 290 bp for A. avenae subsp. avenae with the 63°C as an optimum annealing temperature. Samples collected from naturally infected fields were detected with two bacteria, B. glumae and A. avenae subsp. avenae but X. oryzae pv. oryzae was not detected. This assay can be used to identify pathogens directly from infected seeds, and will be an effective tool for the identification of the three pathogens in rice plants.

  15. Bacteriophages for detection and control of bacterial pathogens in food and food-processing environment.

    PubMed

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents recent advances in bacteriophage research and their application in the area of food safety. Section 1 describes general facts on phage biology that are relevant to their application for control and detection of bacterial pathogens in food and environmental samples. Section 2 summarizes the recently acquired data on application of bacteriophages to control growth of bacterial pathogens and spoilage organisms in food and food-processing environment. Section 3 deals with application of bacteriophages for detection and identification of bacterial pathogens. Advantages of bacteriophage-based methods are presented and their shortcomings are discussed. The chapter is intended for food scientist and food product developers, and people in food inspection and health agencies with the ultimate goal to attract their attention to the new developing technology that has a tremendous potential in providing means for producing wholesome and safe food.

  16. Simultaneous Detection of Three Bacterial Seed-Borne Diseases in Rice Using Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Kang, In Jeong; Kang, Mi-Hyung; Noh, Tae-Hwan; Shim, Hyeong Kwon; Shin, Dong Bum; Heu, Suggi

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia glumae (bacterial grain rot), Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (bacterial leaf blight), and Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae (bacterial brown stripe) are major seedborne pathogens of rice. Based on the 16S and 23S rDNA sequences for A. avenae subsp. avenae and B. glumae, and transposase A gene sequence for X. oryzae pv. oryzae, three sets of primers had been designed to produce 402 bp for B. glumae, 490 bp for X. oryzae, and 290 bp for A. avenae subsp. avenae with the 63°C as an optimum annealing temperature. Samples collected from naturally infected fields were detected with two bacteria, B. glumae and A. avenae subsp. avenae but X. oryzae pv. oryzae was not detected. This assay can be used to identify pathogens directly from infected seeds, and will be an effective tool for the identification of the three pathogens in rice plants. PMID:27904465

  17. IgG against specific bacterial antigens in obese patients with diabetes and in mice with diet-induced obesity and glucose intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Nadeem; Tang, Lihua; Jahangiri, Anisa; de Villiers, Willem; Eckhardt, Erik

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE High fat diets increase the risk for insulin resistance by promoting inflammation. The cause of inflammation is unclear, but germfree mouse studies have implicated commensal gut bacteria. We tested whether diet-induced obesity, diabetes, and inflammation are associated with anti-bacterial IgG. MATERIALS/METHODS Blood from lean and obese healthy volunteers or obese patients with diabetes were analyzed by ELISA for IgG against extracts of potentially pathogenic and pro-biotic strains of Escherichia coli (LF-82 and Nissle), Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, and Lactobacillus acidophilus, and for circulating Tumor Necrosis Factor α (TNFα). C57Bl/6 mice were fed low- or high- fat diets (10 or 60% kcal from fat) for 10 weeks and tested for anti-bacterial IgG, bodyweight, fasting glucose, and inflammation. RESULTS Obese diabetic patients had significantly more IgG against extracts of E. coli LF-82 compared with lean controls, whereas IgG against extracts of the other bacteria was unchanged. Circulating TNFα was elevated and correlated with IgG against the LF-82 extract. Mice fed high-fat diets had increased fasting glucose levels, elevated TNFα and neutrophils, and significantly more IgG against the LF-82 extracts. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes in obesity is characterized by increased IgG against specific bacterial antigens. Specific commensal bacteria may mediate inflammatory effects of high-fat diets. PMID:22424821

  18. Improving dengue viral antigens detection in dengue patient serum specimens using a low pH glycine buffer treatment.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-Fan; Galula, Jedhan Ucat; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Wu, Han-Chung; King, Chwan-Chuen; Chao, Day-Yu

    2017-04-01

    Early diagnosis of dengue virus (DENV) infection to monitor the potential progression to hemorrhagic fever can influence the timely management of dengue-associated severe illness. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antigen detection in acute serum specimens has been widely accepted as an early diagnostic assay for dengue infection; however, lower sensitivity of the NS1 antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Ag-ELISA) in secondary dengue viral infection has been reported. In this study, we developed two forms of Ag-ELISA capable of detecting E-Ag containing virion and virus-like particles, and secreted NS1 (sNS1) antigens, respectively. The temporal kinetics of viral RNA, sNS1, and E-Ag were evaluated based on the in vitro infection experiment. Meanwhile, a panel of 62 DENV-2 infected patients' sera was tested. The sensitivity was 3.042 ng/mL and 3.840 ng/mL for sNS1 and E, respectively. The temporal kinetics of the appearance of viral RNA, E, NS1, and infectious virus in virus-infected tissue culture media suggested that viral RNAs and NS1 antigens could be detected earlier than E-Ag and infectious virus. Furthermore, a panel of 62 sera from patients infected by DENV Serotype 2 was tested. Treating clinical specimens with the dissociation buffer increased the detectable level of E from 13% to 92% and NS1 antigens from 40% to 85%. Inclusion of a low-pH glycine buffer treatment step in the commercially available Ag-ELISA is crucial for clinical diagnosis and E-containing viral particles could be a valuable target for acute DENV diagnosis, similar to NS1 detection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Detection of Beryllium Ions in the Antigen Processing and Presentation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ. PMID:24932923

  20. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Tooker, Brian C; Brindley, Stephen M; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Newman, Lee S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) than HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  1. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  2. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; ...

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstratemore » that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.« less

  3. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) than HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  4. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    DOE PAGES

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; ...

    2014-06-16

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Massmore » Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) than HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.« less

  5. Phage-protease-peptide: a novel trifecta enabling multiplex detection of viable bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alcaine, S D; Tilton, L; Serrano, M A C; Wang, M; Vachet, R W; Nugen, S R

    2015-10-01

    Bacteriophages represent rapid, readily targeted, and easily produced molecular probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Molecular biology techniques have allowed researchers to make significant advances in the bioengineering of bacteriophage to further improve speed and sensitivity of detection. Despite their host specificity, bacteriophages have not been meaningfully leveraged in multiplex detection of bacterial pathogens. We propose a proof-of-principal phage-based scheme to enable multiplex detection. Our scheme involves bioengineering bacteriophage to carry a gene for a specific protease, which is expressed during infection of the target cell. Upon lysis, the protease is released to cleave a reporter peptide, and the signal detected. Here we demonstrate the successful (i) modification of T7 bacteriophage to carry tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease; (ii) expression of TEV protease by Escherichia coli following infection by our modified T7, an average of 2000 units of protease per phage are produced during infection; and (iii) proof-of-principle detection of E. coli in 3 h after a primary enrichment via TEV protease activity using a fluorescent peptide and using a designed target peptide for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. This proof-of-principle can be translated to other phage-protease-peptide combinations to enable multiplex bacterial detection and readily adopted on multiple platforms, like MALDI-TOF MS or fluorescent readers, commonly found in labs.

  6. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Antigen Detection Using Monoclonal Antibodies to the Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Aiko; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Tani, Hideki; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Kurosu, Takeshi; Egawa, Kazutaka; Suda, Yuto; Singh, Harpal; Nomachi, Taro; Gokuden, Mutsuyo; Ando, Katsuyuki; Kida, Kouji; Kan, Miki; Kato, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Akira; Kitamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Yuko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a tick-borne infectious disease with a high case fatality rate, and is caused by the SFTS virus (SFTSV). SFTS is endemic to China, South Korea, and Japan. The viral RNA level in sera of patients with SFTS is known to be strongly associated with outcomes. Virological SFTS diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity are required in disease endemic areas. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated novel monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the SFTSV nucleocapsid (N) protein and developed a sandwich antigen (Ag)-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of N protein of SFTSV using MAb and polyclonal antibody as capture and detection antibodies, respectively. The Ag-capture system was capable of detecting at least 350–1220 TCID50/100 μl/well from the culture supernatants of various SFTSV strains. The efficacy of the Ag-capture ELISA in SFTS diagnosis was evaluated using serum samples collected from patients suspected of having SFTS in Japan. All 24 serum samples (100%) containing high copy numbers of viral RNA (>105 copies/ml) showed a positive reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA, whereas 12 out of 15 serum samples (80%) containing low copy numbers of viral RNA (<105 copies/ml) showed a negative reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA. Among these Ag-capture ELISA-negative 12 samples, 9 (75%) were positive for IgG antibodies against SFTSV. Conclusions The newly developed Ag-capture ELISA is useful for SFTS diagnosis in acute phase patients with high levels of viremia. PMID:27045364

  7. Evaluation of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R D; Jaeger, K L; Wuhib, T; Lima, A A; Guerrant, R L; Sears, C L

    1993-01-01

    The diagnosis of the small (4- to 6-microns) Cryptosporidium oocysts is labor intensive and relies on stool concentration, with subsequent staining and microscopy. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (LMD Laboratories, Carlsbad, Calif.) in detecting Cryptosporidium oocysts in human stools. A total of 591 specimens (76 diarrheal, 515 control) obtained from 213 inhabitants of an urban slum in northeastern Brazil were examined by both ELISA and conventional microscopic examination (CME) of formalin-ethyl acetate-concentrated stool samples stained with modified acid-fast and auramine stains. Forty-eight diarrheal stools (63.2%) were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts by CME, with 40 of these positive by ELISA. Thirty-five control stools (6.8%) had Cryptosporidium oocysts detected by CME, with 15 of these also positive by ELISA. All of the 480 nondiarrheal stools and all but one of the diarrheal stools negative by CME were negative by ELISA. The test had an overall sensitivity of 66.3% and a specificity of 99.8% (positive predictive value, 98.2%; negative predictive value, 94.8%). In the evaluation of human diarrheal stool samples, the test sensitivity increased to 83.3%, with a specificity of 96.4%, and, in analysis of samples from individual patients with diarrhea, the sensitivity was 87.9%, with a specificity of 100%. These results indicate that this stool ELISA is sensitive and specific for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in human diarrheal stool specimens but has limited use in epidemiologic studies for the diagnosis of asymptomatic Cryptosporidium infection. PMID:8370732

  8. Efficiency of different strategies to detect autoantibodies to extractable nuclear antigens.

    PubMed

    Almeida González, Delia; Cabrera de León, Antonio; Rodríguez Pérez, María Del Cristo; Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; González Hernández, Ana; García García, Diego; Vázquez Moncholi, Carmen; Aguirre Jaime, Armando

    2010-08-31

    Autoantibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (anti-ENA) are identified mainly in samples positive for antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Although the method of choice for ANA screening is indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), several techniques are available to detect anti-ENA. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of five different strategies to determine anti-ENA. During a 2-year period we screened ANA in 30375 samples with IIF, and the 4475 samples ANA positive were tested for anti-ENA by double immune diffusion screening or fluoroenzymeimmunoassay (Screening FI); anti-ENA specificities were then determined by line immunoassay (LIA) or fluoroenzymeimmunoassay (FI). We compared five strategies that involved FI or LIA identification of anti-ENA with or without prior screening, or an algorithm that combined fluorescence pattern, number of anti-ENA specificities requested by the clinician and ANA dilution titer. One cost unit (CU) was defined as the cost of 1 test of ANA determination. We detected 553 anti-ENA positive samples. The most efficient strategy was the algorithm, at a cost of 3.3 CU per sample processed, the second most efficient strategy was screening plus FI identification (cost=3.8 CU), and the third most efficient strategy was screening plus LIA identification (cost=3.9 CU). The fourth most efficient strategy was FI identification without prior screening (13.3 CU per sample) and the least efficient was LIA identification without prior screening (13.6 CU per sample). In conclusion, an algorithm that combined techniques for detection, ANA titer, fluorescence pattern and number of specificities requested was the most efficient strategy for determining anti-ENA. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Aptamer-based microchip electrophoresis assays for amplification detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Pan, Li; Zhao, Jingjin; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Shulin; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2015-10-23

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as one of the most widely used tumor markers is used in the clinical diagnosis of colorectal, pancreatic, gastric, and cervical carcinomas. We developed an aptamer-based microchip electrophoresis assay technique for assaying CEA in human serum for cancer diagnosis. The magnetic beads (MBs) are employed as carriers of double strand DNA that is formed by an aptamer of the target and a complementary DNA of the aptamer. After the aptamer in the MB-dsDNA conjugate binds with the target, the complementary DNA was released from the MB-dsDNA conjugate. The released complementary DNA hybridizes with a fluorescein amidite (FAM) labeled DNA, and forms a DNA duplex, which triggers the selective cleavage of FAM labeled DNA by nicking endonuclease Nb.BbvCI, and generating a FAM labeled DNA segment. The released complementary DNA hybridizes with another FAM labeled DNA, resulting in a continuous cleavage of FAM labeled DNA, and the generation of large numbers of FAM labeled DNA segments. In MCE laser induced fluorescence detection (LIF), the FAM labeled DNA segment is separated and detected. The linear range for CEA was 130 pg/ml-8.0 ng/ml with a correlation coefficient of 0.9916 and a detection limit of 68 pg/ml. The CEA concentration in the serum samples from healthy subjects was found to be in the range 1.3 ng/ml to 3.2 ng/ml. The CEA concentration in the samples from cancer patients was found to be >15 ng/ml. This method may become a useful tool for rapid analysis of CEA and other tumor markers in biomedical analysis and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Aptamer-based microchip electrophoresis assays for amplification detection of carcinoembryonia antigen

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Zhao, Jingjin; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Shulin; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as one of the most widely used tumor marker is used in the clinical diagnosis of colorectal, pancreatic, gastric, and cervical carcinomas. We developed an aptamer-based microchip electrophoresis assay technique for assaying CEA in human serum for cancer diagnosis. Methods The magnetic beads (MBs) are employed as carriers of double strand DNA that is formed by an aptamer of target and a complementary DNA of aptamer. After the aptamer in MB-dsDNA conjugate binds with target, the complementary DNA was released from MB-dsDNA conjugate. The released complementary DNA hybridizes with a fluorescein amidite (FAM) labeled DNA, and forms DNA duplex, which triggers the selective cleavage of FAM labeled DNA by nicking endonuclease Nb.BbvCI, and generating FAM labeled DNA segment. The released complementary DNA hybridizes with another FAM labeled DNA, resulting in a continuous cleavage of FAM labeled DNA, and the generation of large numbers of FAM labeled DNA segments. In MCE laser induced fluorescence detection (LIF), FAM labeled DNA segment is separated and detected. Results The linear range for CEA was 130 pg/ml~8.0 ng/ml with a correlation coefficient of 0.9916 and a detection limit of 68 pg/ml. The CEA concentration in the serum samples from healthy subjects was found be in the range 1.3 ng/ml to 3.2 ng/ml. The CEA concentration in the samples from cancer patients was found to be >15 ng/ml. Conclusions This method may become a useful tool for rapid analysis of CEA and other tumor markers in biomedical analysis and clinical diagnosis. PMID:26344338

  11. Role of serum carcinoembryonic antigen in the detection of colorectal cancer before and after surgical resection

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bin-Bin; Shi, Hui; Wan, Jun

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether serum levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) correlate with the presence of primary colorectal cancer (CRC), and/or recurrent CRC following radical resection. METHODS: A total of 413 patients with CRC underwent radical surgery between January 1998 and December 2002 in our department and were enrolled in this study. The median follow-up period was 69 mo (range, 3-118 mo), and CRC recurrence was experienced by 90/413 (21.8%) patients. Serum levels of CEA were assayed preoperatively, and using a cutoff value of 5 ng/mL, patients were divided into two groups, those with normal serum CEA levels (e.g., ≤ 5 ng/mL) and those with elevated CEA levels (> 5 ng/mL). RESULTS: The overall sensitivity of CEA for the detection of primary CRC was 37.0%. The sensitivity of CEA according to stage, was 21.4%, 38.9%, and 41.7% for stages I-III, respectively. Moreover, for stage II and stage III cases, the 5-year disease-free survival rates were reduced for patients with elevated preoperative serum CEA levels (P < 0.05). The overall sensitivity of CEA for detecting recurrent CRC was 54.4%, and sensitivity rates of 36.6%, 66.7%, and 75.0% were associated with cases of local recurrence, single metastasis, and multiple metastases, respectively. In patients with normal serum levels of CEA preoperatively, the sensitivity of CEA for detecting recurrence was reduced compared with patients having a history of elevated CEA prior to radical resection (32.6% vs 77.3%, respectively, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: CRC patients with normal serum CEA levels prior to resection maintained these levels during CRC recurrence, especially in cases of local recurrence vs cases of metastasis. PMID:22563201

  12. Development of a lateral flow immunoassay strip for rapid detection of CagA antigen of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Karakus, Cebrail

    2015-01-01

    About half of the world populations are known to be infected with Helicobacter pylori. The CagA antigen secreting strains provoke severe mucosal damages and act as a risk factor for the development of peptic ulceration and gastric cancer. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) strip was developed based on sandwich format for rapid detection of CagA antigen of H. pylori using gold conjugated monoclonal antibody. This LFIA strip will provide a good aid in the diagnosis of CagA-secreting H. pylori within 10 min instead of time consuming, expensive and laborious invasive approaches.

  13. Targeted PCR for detection of vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed

    Fredricks, David N; Fiedler, Tina L; Thomas, Katherine K; Oakley, Brian B; Marrazzo, Jeanne M

    2007-10-01

    Several novel bacterial species have been detected in subjects with bacterial vaginosis (BV) by using broad-range PCR assays, but this approach is insensitive for detecting minority species. We developed a series of taxon-directed 16S rRNA gene PCR assays for more sensitive detection of key vaginal bacteria. We sought to determine the prevalence of each species in the vagina, its association with BV, and the utility of PCR for the microbiological diagnosis of BV. Targeted PCR assays were developed for 17 vaginal bacterial species and applied to 264 vaginal-fluid samples from 81 subjects with and 183 subjects without BV. The results were compared to those of two widely accepted methods for diagnosing BV, the use of clinical findings (Amsel criteria) and the interpretation of vaginal-fluid Gram stains (Nugent criteria). Leptotrichia/Sneathia, Atopobium vaginae, an Eggerthella-like bacterium, Megasphaera species, and three novel bacteria in the order Clostridiales are among the bacterial species significantly associated with BV. PCR detection of either a Megasphaera species or one of the Clostridiales bacteria yielded a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 89% for diagnosis of BV compared to the Amsel clinical criteria and a sensitivity of 95.9% and a specificity of 93.7% compared to the Nugent criteria (Gram stain). PCR detection of one or more fastidious bacterial species is a more reliable indicator of BV than detection of bacteria, such as Gardnerella vaginalis, previously linked to BV, highlighting the potential of PCR for the diagnosis of BV.

  14. Targeted PCR for Detection of Vaginal Bacteria Associated with Bacterial Vaginosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Fredricks, David N.; Fiedler, Tina L.; Thomas, Katherine K.; Oakley, Brian B.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2007-01-01

    Several novel bacterial species have been detected in subjects with bacterial vaginosis (BV) by using broad-range PCR assays, but this approach is insensitive for detecting minority species. We developed a series of taxon-directed 16S rRNA gene PCR assays for more sensitive detection of key vaginal bacteria. We sought to determine the prevalence of each species in the vagina, its association with BV, and the utility of PCR for the microbiological diagnosis of BV. Targeted PCR assays were developed for 17 vaginal bacterial species and applied to 264 vaginal-fluid samples from 81 subjects with and 183 subjects without BV. The results were compared to those of two widely accepted methods for diagnosing BV, the use of clinical findings (Amsel criteria) and the interpretation of vaginal-fluid Gram stains (Nugent criteria). Leptotrichia/Sneathia, Atopobium vaginae, an Eggerthella-like bacterium, Megasphaera species, and three novel bacteria in the order Clostridiales are among the bacterial species significantly associated with BV. PCR detection of either a Megasphaera species or one of the Clostridiales bacteria yielded a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 89% for diagnosis of BV compared to the Amsel clinical criteria and a sensitivity of 95.9% and a specificity of 93.7% compared to the Nugent criteria (Gram stain). PCR detection of one or more fastidious bacterial species is a more reliable indicator of BV than detection of bacteria, such as Gardnerella vaginalis, previously linked to BV, highlighting the potential of PCR for the diagnosis of BV. PMID:17687006

  15. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Wanming; Yuan, Dezheng; Song, Jindan; Fang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The large external antigen (LEA) is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605) conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05), indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of the cell lines, which was confirmed by flow cytometry. The results of this study indicate that QD-ICC has the potential to noninvasively detect rare circulating tumor cells in clinical samples in real clinical applications.

  16. Mass-tag enhanced immuno-laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for sensitive detection of intact protein antigens.

    PubMed

    Lorey, Martina; Adler, Belinda; Yan, Hong; Soliymani, Rabah; Ekström, Simon; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Laurell, Thomas; Baumann, Marc

    2015-05-19

    A new read-out method for antibody arrays using laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (LDI-MS) is presented. Small, photocleavable reporter molecules with a defined mass called "mass-tags" are used for detection of immunocaptured proteins from human plasma. Using prostate specific antigen (PSA), a biomarker for prostate cancer, as a model antigen, a high sensitivity generic detection methodology based immunocapture with a primary antibody and with a biotin labeled secondary antibody coupled to mass-tagged avidin is demonstrated. As each secondary antibody can bind several avidin molecules, each having a large number of mass-tags, signal amplification can be achieved. The developed PSA sandwich mass-tag analysis method provided a limit of detection below 200 pg/mL (6 pM) for a 10 μL plasma sample, well below the clinically relevant cutoff value of 3-4 ng/mL. This brings the limit of detection (LOD) for detection of intact antigens with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) down to levels comparable to capture by anti-peptide antibodies selected reaction monitoring (SISCAPA SRM) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), as 6 pM corresponds to a maximal amount of 60 amol PSA captured on-spot. We propose the potential use of LDI (laser desorption/ionization) with mass-tag read-out implemented in a sandwich assay format for low abundant and/or early disease biomarker detection.

  17. Detection of bacterial contamination in starch and resin-based papermaking chemicals using fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Nohynek, Liisa; Saski, Eija; Haikara, Auli; Raaska, Laura

    2003-04-01

    Rapid fluorescence techniques were evaluated for the detection of bacterial contaminants in papermaking chemicals including starch and the resin-based sizes and starch slurries used in the paper industry. Viable and non-viable bacterial cells were visualised by fluorescent probes and detected by epifluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The best discrimination ability was obtained with the fluorescent probes LIVE/DEAD and SYBR Green, based on the staining of cellular nucleic acid, and ChemChrome V3, which demonstrated cellular enzymatic activity. The process samples had to be diluted and filtered before fluorescence staining and analysis because they were viscous and contained solid particles. Fluorescence microscopic counts of bacteria in highly contaminated process samples were similar to plate counts, but flow cytometric enumeration of bacterial cells in process samples yielded 2- to 10-fold lower counts compared with plate counts, depending on the consistency of the sample. The detection limits in flow cytometric analysis and in epifluorescence microscopy were 10(3)-10(6) cells ml(-1) and 10(5)-10(6) cells ml(-1), respectively. Intrinsic bacterial contamination was detectable with fluorescence techniques and highly contaminated process samples could be analysed with fluorescence methods.

  18. Detection of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Tomoko; Motani, Hisako; Watanabe, Ken; Iwase, Hirotaro; Sakurada, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    To preliminarily evaluate the applicability of bacterial DNA as a marker for the forensic identification of vaginal fluid, we developed and performed PCR-based detection of 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus spp. dominating the vagina and of bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria from DNA extracted from body fluids and stains. As a result, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii and Atopobium vaginae were specifically detected in vaginal fluid and female urine samples. Bacterial genes detected in female urine might have originated from contaminated vaginal fluid. In addition, those of Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus gasseri and Gardnerella vaginalis were also detected in non-vaginal body fluids such as semen. Because bacterial genes were successfully amplified in DNA samples extracted by using the general procedure for animal tissues without any optional treatments, DNA samples prepared for the identification of vaginal fluid can also be used for personal identification. In conclusion, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of L. crispatus, L. jensenii and A. vaginae could be effective markers for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

  19. Development of an engineered bioluminescent reporter phage for detection of bacterial blight of crucifers.

    PubMed

    Schofield, David A; Bull, Carolee T; Rubio, Isael; Wechter, W Patrick; Westwater, Caroline; Molineux, Ian J

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial blight, caused by the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, is an emerging disease afflicting important members of the Brassicaceae family. The disease is often misdiagnosed as pepper spot, a much less severe disease caused by the related pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. We have developed a phage-based diagnostic that can both identify and detect the causative agent of bacterial blight and differentiate the two pathogens. A recombinant "light"-tagged reporter phage was generated by integrating bacterial luxAB genes encoding luciferase into the genome of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis phage PBSPCA1. The PBSPCA1::luxAB reporter phage is viable and stable and retains properties similar to those of the wild-type phage. PBSPCA1::luxAB rapidly and sensitively detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis by conferring a bioluminescent signal response to cultured cells. Detection is dependent on cell viability. Other bacterial pathogens of Brassica species such as P. syringae pv. maculicola, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and X. campestris pv. raphani either do not produce a response or produce significantly attenuated signals with the reporter phage. Importantly, the reporter phage detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis on diseased plant specimens, indicating its potential for disease diagnosis.

  20. Development of an Engineered Bioluminescent Reporter Phage for Detection of Bacterial Blight of Crucifers

    PubMed Central

    Bull, Carolee T.; Rubio, Isael; Wechter, W. Patrick; Westwater, Caroline; Molineux, Ian J.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial blight, caused by the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, is an emerging disease afflicting important members of the Brassicaceae family. The disease is often misdiagnosed as pepper spot, a much less severe disease caused by the related pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. We have developed a phage-based diagnostic that can both identify and detect the causative agent of bacterial blight and differentiate the two pathogens. A recombinant “light”-tagged reporter phage was generated by integrating bacterial luxAB genes encoding luciferase into the genome of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis phage PBSPCA1. The PBSPCA1::luxAB reporter phage is viable and stable and retains properties similar to those of the wild-type phage. PBSPCA1::luxAB rapidly and sensitively detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis by conferring a bioluminescent signal response to cultured cells. Detection is dependent on cell viability. Other bacterial pathogens of Brassica species such as P. syringae pv. maculicola, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and X. campestris pv. raphani either do not produce a response or produce significantly attenuated signals with the reporter phage. Importantly, the reporter phage detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis on diseased plant specimens, indicating its potential for disease diagnosis. PMID:22427491

  1. Nucleic Acid-based Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Using Integrated Microfluidic Platform Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Clarissa; Cady, Nathaniel C.; Batt, Carl A.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of nucleic acid-based pathogen detection methods offers increased sensitivity and specificity over traditional microbiological techniques, driving the development of portable, integrated biosensors. The miniaturization and automation of integrated detection systems presents a significant advantage for rapid, portable field-based testing. In this review, we highlight current developments and directions in nucleic acid-based micro total analysis systems for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Recent progress in the miniaturization of microfluidic processing steps for cell capture, DNA extraction and purification, polymerase chain reaction, and product detection are detailed. Discussions include strategies and challenges for implementation of an integrated portable platform. PMID:22412335

  2. Evaluation of a new lateral flow test for detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila urinary antigen.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Charlotte S; Uldum, Søren A; Sørensen, Jesper F; Skovsted, Ian C; Otte, Sanne; Elverdal, Pernille L

    2015-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early diagnosis of the etiologic agent is important in order to choose the correct antibiotic treatment. In this study we evaluated the first commercial combined test for the agents of pneumococcal pneumonia and Legionnaires' disease based on urinary antigen detection, the ImmuView® Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila Urinary Antigen Test. In this evaluation, the new test had a significantly higher sensitivity than the BinaxNOW® lateral flow tests and the Binax® EIA test. This identifies the ImmuView® S. pneumoniae and L. pneumophila Urinary Antigen Test as a fast and sensitive point of care test for identification of the infectious agent in a major group of patients with pneumonia.

  3. Omp85 genosensor for detection of human brain bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Dash, Sandip Kumar; Sharma, Minakshi; Khare, Shashi; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-06-01

    The 5'-thiolated DNA probe based on specific virulence gene, Omp85, was immobilized onto a screen-printed gold electrode followed by hybridization with 6-100 ng/6 μl (5.9 × 10(5)-9.3 × 10(6 )c.f.u.) of Neisseria meningitidis single stranded genomic DNA (ssG-DNA) for 10 min at 25 °C from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a meningitis patient. The Omp85 genosensor can detect as little as 6 ng ssG-DNA in 6 μl CSF of a human brain meningitis patient in 30 min including a response time of 1 min by cyclic voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedance. The sensitivity of the genosensor electrode was 2.6(μA/cm(2))/ng using DPV with regression coefficient (R(2)) 0.954. The genosensor was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Omp85 genosensor was stable for 12 months at 4 °C with 12 % loss in DPV current.

  4. Anti-Taenia solium monoclonal antibodies for the detection of parasite antigens in body fluids from patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Adriana; Sáenz, Patricia; Marzal, Miguel W; Orrego, Miguel A; Castillo, Yesenia; Rivera, Andrea; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; García, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E

    2016-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), an infection of the brain by Taenia solium (Ts) cysts, is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy in developing countries. Serological testing consists primarily of varying methods to detect antibodies in body fluids and more recently antigen (Ag) detection assays to identify individuals or animals with viable parasites. Antigen assays currently in use employ monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against T. saginata, which have known cross reactivity to animal cestodes but are highly specific in human samples. We produced, characterized and tested 21 mAbs raised against T. solium whole cyst antigens, vesicular fluid or excretory secretory products. Reactivity of the TsmAbs against specific cyst structures was determined using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry on histological sections of Ts muscle cysts. Four TsmAbs reacted to vesicular space alone, 9 to the neck and cyst wall, one to the neck and vesicular space and 7 to the neck, cyst wall and vesicular space. An in-house ELISA assay to detect circulating Ts antigen, using the TsmAbs as capture antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal anti-Ts whole cyst antibody as a detector antibody demonstrated that eight of the 21 TsmAbs detected antigens in known NCC-positive human sera and three of these also in urine samples. Reactivity was expressed as normalized ratios of optical densities (OD positive control/OD negative control). Three TsmAbs had ratios >10 and five between 2 and 10. The TsmAbs have potential utility for the diagnosis and post-treatment monitoring of patients with viable NCC infections.

  5. The surface antigens of orthopoxviruses detected by cross-neutralization tests on cross-absorbed antisera.

    PubMed

    Baxby, D

    1982-02-01

    Cross-neutralization tests were done on accepted species and recently isolated members of the genus Orthopoxvirus using antisera which had been separately absorbed with the various viruses. The results provided evidence for the involvement of four neutralizing antigens, and their distribution among 13 virus strains was determined. Monkeypox (Congo-8-Lombe), camelpox (Gorgan), ectromelia (Mill Hill), 'Lenny' and elephant poxviruses had distinctive antigenic formulae. Lister and Wyeth vaccines were indistinguishable but different from Copenhagen and EM63 vaccines which were themselves distinct. Cowpox (Brighton), buffalopox (BP4), MK 10, and Moscow poxviruses were indistinguishable. Examples were found where viruses shared surface antigens but were not all neutralized by antibody to them. this reduced the practical value of the technique for virus identification. Evidence was also obtained for the existence in some viruses of a fifth antigen, antibody to which could block neutralization by antibody to one particular antigen.

  6. Detection of bacterial biofilms in different types of chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingzhi; Keyoumu, Youlidusi; Long, Li; Zhang, Hua

    2014-11-01

    Biofilms are organized bacterial communities that may be homogeneous or heterogeneous. They play a significant role in the pathogenesis of chronic nasal sinusitis, chronic tonsillitis, cholesteatomas, and device-related infections. Despite this, few studies have been done that examine the presence of bacterial biofilms in tissues from patients with different types of COM or middle ear cholesteatomas. In the current study, we examined the presence of biofilms in surgical tissue specimens from humans with chronic ear infections using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We hypothesize that bacterial biofilms present differently in patients with different types of chronic otitis media. Our results provide new insights regarding treatment of chronic otitis media. A prospective study was conducted in which middle ear tissues were obtained from 38 patients who underwent tympanoplasty and/or tympanomastoid surgery due to chronic ear infections. A total of 50 middle and mastoid tissue samples were processed for SEM analysis. In addition, 38 middle ear secretion specimens were obtained for routine bacterial culture analysis. Bacterial biofilms were present in 85 % (11 of 13) of patients with middle ear cholesteatoma, 92 % (12/13) of patients with chronic otitis suppurative media (CSOM), and 16 % of patients (2/12) with tympanic membrane perforation (TMP). Fungal biofilms were found in two cases of cholesteatoma. The positive coincidence rate between bacterial biofilms visualized by SEM and bacteria detected by culture was 82 %. Our findings suggest that bacterial biofilms are very common in CSOM and middle ear cholesteatomas. Positive bacterial cultures imply the presence of biofilm formation in CSOM and cholesteatomas. As such, our results provide new insights regarding treatment of chronic otitis media.

  7. Evaluation of recombinant Lig antigen-based ELISA for detection of leptospiral antibodies in canine sera.

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