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Sample records for bacterial antigen detection

  1. Bacterial surface antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies used to detect beer spoilage pediococci.

    PubMed

    Whiting, M S; Ingledew, W M; Lee, S Y; Ziola, B

    1999-08-01

    Fourteen monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) were isolated that react with surface antigens of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms, including P. damnosus, P. pentosaceous, P. acidilactici, and unspeciated isolates. Immunoblotting, enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) of protease- and neuraminidase-treated surface antigen extracts, carbohydrate competition EIAs, and cardiolipin EIAs were used to characterize the bacterial antigens involved in Mab binding. Antigen stability in situ was tested by protease treatment or surface antigen extraction of washed bacteria. In most cases, the Mabs bind to Pediococcus surface antigens that appear to be covalently bound cell wall polymers resistant to alteration or removal from the bacterial surface. These bacterial surface antigen reactive Mabs show good potential for rapid, sensitive, and specific immunoassay detection of Pediococcus beer spoilage organisms.

  2. Preparation of miniantibodies to Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 surface antigens and their use for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Dykman, Lev A; Staroverov, Sergei A; Guliy, Olga I; Ignatov, Oleg V; Fomin, Alexander S; Vidyasheva, Irina V; Karavaeva, Olga A; Bunin, Viktor D; Burygin, Gennady L

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the first preparation of miniantibodies to Azospirillum brasilense Sp245 surface antigens by using a combinatorial phage library of sheep antibodies. The prepared phage antibodies were used for the first time for lipopolysaccharide and flagellin detection by dot assay, electro-optical analysis of cell suspensions, and transmission electron microscopy. Interaction of A. brasilense Sp245 with antilipopolysaccharide and antiflagellin phage-displayed miniantibodies caused the magnitude of the electro-optical signal to change considerably. The electro-optical results were in good agreement with the electron microscopic data. This is the first reported possibility of employing phage-displayed miniantibodies in bacterial detection aided by electro-optical analysis of cell suspensions.

  3. Point-Counterpoint: A Nucleic Acid Amplification Test for Streptococcus pyogenes Should Replace Antigen Detection and Culture for Detection of Bacterial Pharyngitis.

    PubMed

    Pritt, Bobbi S; Patel, Robin; Kirn, Thomas J; Thomson, Richard B

    2016-10-01

    Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) have frequently been the standard diagnostic approach when specific infectious agents are sought in a clinic specimen. They can be applied for specific agents such as S. pyogenes, or commercial multiplex NAATs for detection of a variety of pathogens in gastrointestinal, bloodstream, and respiratory infections may be used. NAATs are both rapid and sensitive. For many years, S. pyogenes testing algorithms used a rapid and specific group A streptococcal antigen test to screen throat specimens, followed, in some clinical settings, by a throat culture for S. pyogenes to increase the sensitivity of its detection. Now S. pyogenes NAATs are being used with increasing frequency. Given their accuracy, rapidity, and ease of use, should they replace antigen detection and culture for the detection of bacterial pharyngitis? Bobbi Pritt and Robin Patel of the Mayo Clinic, where S. pyogenes NAATs have been used for well over a decade with great success, will explain the advantages of this approach, while Richard (Tom) Thomson and Tom Kirn of the NorthShore University HealthSystem will discuss their concerns about this approach to diagnosing bacterial pharyngitis.

  4. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  5. Discriminating antigen and non-antigen using proteome dissimilarity: bacterial antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Kamna; Flower, Darren R

    2010-01-01

    It has been postulated that immunogenicity results from the overall dissimilarity of pathogenic proteins versus the host proteome. We have sought to use this concept to discriminate between antigens and non-antigens of bacterial origin. Sets of 100 known antigenic and nonantigenic peptide sequences from bacteria were compared to human and mouse proteomes. Both antigenic and non-antigenic sequences lacked human or mouse homologues. Observed distributions were compared using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. The statistical null hypothesis was accepted, indicating that antigen and non-antigens did not differ significantly. Likewise, we were unable to determine a threshold able to separate meaningfully antigen from non-antigen. Thus, antigens cannot be predicted from pathogen genomes based solely on their dissimilarity to the human genome. PMID:20975907

  6. Optoacoustic sensing of ocular bacterial antigen using targeted gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswadi, Saher; Page, Leland; Woodward, Lee; Glickman, Randolph D.; Barsalou, Norman

    2008-02-01

    Bacterial contamination can be detected using a minimally invasive optical method, based on laser-induced optoacoustic spectroscopy, to probe for specific antigens associated with a specific infectious agent. As a model system, we have used a surface antigen (Ag), isolated from Chlamydia trachomatis, and a complementary antibody (Ab). A preparation of 0.2 mg/ml of monoclonal Ab specific to the C. trachomatis surface Ag was conjugated to gold nanorods using standard commercial reagents, in order to produce a targeted contrast agent with a strong optoacoustic signal. The C. trachomatis Ag was absorbed in standard plastic microwells, and the binding of the complementary Ab-nanorod conjugate was tested in an immunoaffinity assay. Optoacoustic signals were elicited from the bound nanorods, using an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system as the optical pump. The wavelength tuneability of the OPO optimized the spectroscopic measurement by exciting the nanorods at their optical absorption maxima. Optoacoustic responses were measured in the microwells using a probe beam deflection technique. Immunoaffinity assays were performed on several dilutions of purified C. trachomatis antigen ranging from 50 μg/ml to 1 pg/ml, in order to determine the detection limit for the optoacoustic-based assay. Only when the antigen was present, and the complementary Ab-NR reagent was introduced into the microwell, was an enhanced optoacoustic signal obtained, which indicated specific binding of the Ab-NR complex. The limit of detection with the current system design is between 1 and 5 pg/ml of bacterial Ag.

  7. Autotransporter-Based Antigen Display in Bacterial Ghosts

    PubMed Central

    Hjelm, Anna; Söderström, Bill; Vikström, David; Jong, Wouter S. P.; Luirink, Joen

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial ghosts are empty cell envelopes of Gram-negative bacteria that can be used as vehicles for antigen delivery. Ghosts are generated by releasing the bacterial cytoplasmic contents through a channel in the cell envelope that is created by the controlled production of the bacteriophage ϕX174 lysis protein E. While ghosts possess all the immunostimulatory surface properties of the original host strain, they do not pose any of the infectious threats associated with live vaccines. Recently, we have engineered the Escherichia coli autotransporter hemoglobin protease (Hbp) into a platform for the efficient surface display of heterologous proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, HbpD. Using the Mycobacterium tuberculosis vaccine target ESAT6 (early secreted antigenic target of 6 kDa), we have explored the application of HbpD to decorate E. coli and Salmonella ghosts with antigens. The use of different promoter systems enabled the concerted production of HbpD-ESAT6 and lysis protein E. Ghost formation was monitored by determining lysis efficiency based on CFU, the localization of a set of cellular markers, fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and electron microscopy. Hbp-mediated surface display of ESAT6 was monitored using a combination of a protease accessibility assay, fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and (immuno-)electron microscopy. Here, we show that the concerted production of HbpD and lysis protein E in E. coli and Salmonella can be used to produce ghosts that efficiently display antigens on their surface. This system holds promise for the development of safe and cost-effective vaccines with optimal intrinsic adjuvant activity and exposure of heterologous antigens to the immune system. PMID:25398861

  8. Circulating filarial antigen detection in brugian filariasis.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Praveen Kumar; Mahajan, Ramesh Chander; Malla, Nancy; Mewara, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Shailja Misra; Shenoy, Ranganatha Krishna; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2016-03-01

    Human lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a major cause of disability globally. The success of global elimination programmes for LF depends upon effectiveness of tools for diagnosis and treatment. In this study on stage-specific antigen detection in brugian filariasis, L3, adult worm (AW) and microfilarial antigenaemia were detected in around 90-95% of microfilariae carriers (MF group), 50-70% of adenolymphangitis (ADL) patients, 10-25% of chronic pathology (CP) patients and 10-15% of endemic normal (EN) controls. The sensitivity of the circulating filarial antigen (CFA) detection in serum samples from MF group was up to 95%. In sera from ADL patients, unexpectedly, less antigen reactivity was observed. In CP group all the CFA positive individuals were from CP grade I and II only and none from grade III or IV, suggesting that with chronicity the AWs lose fecundity and start to disintegrate and die. Amongst EN subject, 10-15% had CFA indicating that few of them harbour filarial AWs, thus they might not be truly immune as has been conventionally believed. The specificity for antigen detection was 100% when tested with sera from various other protozoan and non-filarial helminthic infections.

  9. Autologous tumor cells engineered to express bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Ramiya, Vijayakumar K; Jerald, Maya M; Lawman, Patricia D; Lawman, Michael J P

    2014-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapies are emerging as promising treatment modalities in the management of the disease. As a result, cancer vaccines are considered to be immensely crucial in preventing recurrence, a well-known nemesis in cancer patients because they have the potential to activate memory antitumor immunity. Due to poor antigenicity and self-tolerance, most tumor antigens require interventional vaccine therapies to provide an adequate "danger" signal to the immune system in order to activate a robust, clinically meaningful antitumor immunity. It has been postulated that this requirement may be achieved by providing bacterial and/or viral immunogens to prime this type of immune response. Briefly, we provide here a method of transfecting whole tumor cells with plasmid DNA encoding an immunogenic bacterial protein such as Emm55, which was derived from Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes). Subsequent inactivation of the transfected cells by irradiation (100 Gray) prevents replication. This type of whole-cell vaccine, e.g., ImmuneFx™, has demonstrated activity in a murine neuroblastoma model, in canine lymphoma patients with naturally occurring disease, and in many cancer types in companion animals. The protocols described in this chapter provide the necessary materials and methodologies to manufacture such a vaccine.

  10. ERYTHROCYTE SENSITIZATION BY BLOOD GROUP-SPECIFIC BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.

    PubMed

    SPRINGER, G F; HORTON, R E

    1964-07-01

    Human and chicken erythrocytes are readily coated in vitro by blood group active protein-lipopolysaccharides and lipopolysaccharides from E. coli O(86) and E. coli O(128). Serum albumin, alpha(2)- and beta-lipoproteins inhibit this sensitization. Blood group B specific agglutination of erythrocytes with B or B-like antigens was obtained with antibodies purified by adsorption on and elution from B erythrocytes. Anti-blood group B and E. coli O(86)-specific antibodies could be eluted from E. coli O(86)-coated O erythrocytes. Eel anti-H(O) serum agglutinated O erythrocytes and only those A(1)B red cells which were coated with blood group H(O) active E. coli products. Blood group active substances specifically inhibited agglutination of lipopolysaccharide-coated erythrocytes by anti-B and anti-H(O) agglutinins. Demonstrable amounts of lipopolysaccharide could only be removed from coated erythrocytes by washing them at elevated temperatures (58 degrees C) in physiological solutions. Red cell sensitization with B active E. coli O(86) substances was achieved in vivo in a minority of severely diseased infants and in germ-free and ordinary chicks which were in tourniquet shock after treatment with cathartics. Therefore, a possible mode by which erythrocytes of patients with severe intestinal disorders acquire antigens is the fixation of bacterial substances to their surfaces, if there are not enough of the normally interfering plasma factors present.

  11. A Bacterial Glycoengineered Antigen for Improved Serodiagnosis of Porcine Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Cortina, María E; Balzano, Rodrigo E; Rey Serantes, Diego A; Caillava, Ana J; Elena, Sebastián; Ferreira, A C; Nicola, Ana M; Ugalde, Juan E; Comerci, Diego J; Ciocchini, Andrés E

    2016-06-01

    Brucellosis is a highly zoonotic disease that affects animals and human beings. Brucella suis is the etiological agent of porcine brucellosis and one of the major human brucellosis pathogens. Laboratory diagnosis of porcine brucellosis mainly relies on serological tests, and it has been widely demonstrated that serological assays based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide antibodies are the most sensitive tests. Here, we validate a recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti-O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates (glyco-iELISA). To validate the assay, 563 serum samples obtained from experimentally infected and immunized pigs, as well as animals naturally infected with B. suis biovar 1 or 2, were tested. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and based on this analysis, the optimum cutoff value was 0.56 (relative reactivity), which resulted in a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.7%, respectively. A cutoff value of 0.78 resulted in a test sensitivity of 98.4% and a test specificity of 100%. Overall, our results demonstrate that the glyco-iELISA is highly accurate for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis, improving the diagnostic performance of current serological tests. The recombinant glycoprotein OAg-AcrA can be produced in large homogeneous batches in a standardized way, making it an ideal candidate for further validation as a universal antigen for diagnosis of "smooth" brucellosis in animals and humans.

  12. A Bacterial Glycoengineered Antigen for Improved Serodiagnosis of Porcine Brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Cortina, María E; Balzano, Rodrigo E; Rey Serantes, Diego A; Caillava, Ana J; Elena, Sebastián; Ferreira, A C; Nicola, Ana M; Ugalde, Juan E; Comerci, Diego J; Ciocchini, Andrés E

    2016-06-01

    Brucellosis is a highly zoonotic disease that affects animals and human beings. Brucella suis is the etiological agent of porcine brucellosis and one of the major human brucellosis pathogens. Laboratory diagnosis of porcine brucellosis mainly relies on serological tests, and it has been widely demonstrated that serological assays based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide antibodies are the most sensitive tests. Here, we validate a recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti-O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay plates (glyco-iELISA). To validate the assay, 563 serum samples obtained from experimentally infected and immunized pigs, as well as animals naturally infected with B. suis biovar 1 or 2, were tested. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed, and based on this analysis, the optimum cutoff value was 0.56 (relative reactivity), which resulted in a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 99.7%, respectively. A cutoff value of 0.78 resulted in a test sensitivity of 98.4% and a test specificity of 100%. Overall, our results demonstrate that the glyco-iELISA is highly accurate for diagnosis of porcine brucellosis, improving the diagnostic performance of current serological tests. The recombinant glycoprotein OAg-AcrA can be produced in large homogeneous batches in a standardized way, making it an ideal candidate for further validation as a universal antigen for diagnosis of "smooth" brucellosis in animals and humans. PMID:26984975

  13. An O antigen capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis in Shigella sonnei.

    PubMed

    Caboni, Mariaelena; Pédron, Thierry; Rossi, Omar; Goulding, David; Pickard, Derek; Citiulo, Francesco; MacLennan, Calman A; Dougan, Gordon; Thomson, Nicholas R; Saul, Allan; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-03-01

    Shigella is the leading cause for dysentery worldwide. Together with several virulence factors employed for invasion, the presence and length of the O antigen (OAg) of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a key role in pathogenesis. S. flexneri 2a has a bimodal OAg chain length distribution regulated in a growth-dependent manner, whereas S. sonnei LPS comprises a monomodal OAg. Here we reveal that S. sonnei, but not S. flexneri 2a, possesses a high molecular weight, immunogenic group 4 capsule, characterized by structural similarity to LPS OAg. We found that a galU mutant of S. sonnei, that is unable to produce a complete LPS with OAg attached, can still assemble OAg material on the cell surface, but a galU mutant of S. flexneri 2a cannot. High molecular weight material not linked to the LPS was purified from S. sonnei and confirmed by NMR to contain the specific sugars of the S. sonnei OAg. Deletion of genes homologous to the group 4 capsule synthesis cluster, previously described in Escherichia coli, abolished the generation of the high molecular weight OAg material. This OAg capsule strongly affects the virulence of S. sonnei. Uncapsulated knockout bacteria were highly invasive in vitro and strongly inflammatory in the rabbit intestine. But, the lack of capsule reduced the ability of S. sonnei to resist complement-mediated killing and to spread from the gut to peripheral organs. In contrast, overexpression of the capsule decreased invasiveness in vitro and inflammation in vivo compared to the wild type. In conclusion, the data indicate that in S. sonnei expression of the capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis resulting in balanced capabilities to invade and persist in the host environment.

  14. An O Antigen Capsule Modulates Bacterial Pathogenesis in Shigella sonnei

    PubMed Central

    Caboni, Mariaelena; Pédron, Thierry; Rossi, Omar; Goulding, David; Pickard, Derek; Citiulo, Francesco; MacLennan, Calman A.; Dougan, Gordon; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Saul, Allan; Sansonetti, Philippe J.; Gerke, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Shigella is the leading cause for dysentery worldwide. Together with several virulence factors employed for invasion, the presence and length of the O antigen (OAg) of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) plays a key role in pathogenesis. S. flexneri 2a has a bimodal OAg chain length distribution regulated in a growth-dependent manner, whereas S. sonnei LPS comprises a monomodal OAg. Here we reveal that S. sonnei, but not S. flexneri 2a, possesses a high molecular weight, immunogenic group 4 capsule, characterized by structural similarity to LPS OAg. We found that a galU mutant of S. sonnei, that is unable to produce a complete LPS with OAg attached, can still assemble OAg material on the cell surface, but a galU mutant of S. flexneri 2a cannot. High molecular weight material not linked to the LPS was purified from S. sonnei and confirmed by NMR to contain the specific sugars of the S. sonnei OAg. Deletion of genes homologous to the group 4 capsule synthesis cluster, previously described in Escherichia coli, abolished the generation of the high molecular weight OAg material. This OAg capsule strongly affects the virulence of S. sonnei. Uncapsulated knockout bacteria were highly invasive in vitro and strongly inflammatory in the rabbit intestine. But, the lack of capsule reduced the ability of S. sonnei to resist complement-mediated killing and to spread from the gut to peripheral organs. In contrast, overexpression of the capsule decreased invasiveness in vitro and inflammation in vivo compared to the wild type. In conclusion, the data indicate that in S. sonnei expression of the capsule modulates bacterial pathogenesis resulting in balanced capabilities to invade and persist in the host environment. PMID:25794007

  15. Analysis of Known Bacterial Protein Vaccine Antigens Reveals Biased Physical Properties and Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Mayers, Carl; Rowe, Sonya; Miller, Julie; Lingard, Bryan; Hayward, Sarah; Titball, Richard W.

    2003-01-01

    Many vaccines have been developed from live attenuated forms of bacterial pathogens or from killed bacterial cells. However, an increased awareness of the potential for transient side-effects following vaccination has prompted an increased emphasis on the use of sub-unit vaccines, rather than those based on whole bacterial cells. The identification of vaccine sub-units is often a lengthy process and bioinformatics approaches have recently been used to identify candidate protein vaccine antigens. Such methods ultimately offer the promise of a more rapid advance towards preclinical studies with vaccines. We have compared the properties of known bacterial vaccine antigens against randomly selected proteins and identified differences in the make-up of these two groups. A computer algorithm that exploits these differences allows the identification of potential vaccine antigen candidates from pathogenic bacteria on the basis of their amino acid composition, a property inherently associated with sub-cellular location. PMID:18629010

  16. Antigen discovery and delivery of subunit vaccines by nonliving bacterial ghost vectors.

    PubMed

    Walcher, Petra; Mayr, Ulrike B; Azimpour-Tabrizi, Chakameh; Eko, Francis O; Jechlinger, Wolfgang; Mayrhofer, Peter; Alefantis, Tim; Mujer, Cesar V; DelVecchio, Vito G; Lubitz, Werner

    2004-12-01

    The bacterial ghost (BG) platform system is a novel vaccine delivery system endowed with intrinsic adjuvant properties. BGs are nonliving Gram-negative bacterial cell envelopes which are devoid of their cytoplasmic contents, yet maintain their cellular morphology and antigenic structures, including bioadhesive properties. The main advantages of BGs as carriers of subunit vaccines include their ability to stimulate a high immune response and to target the carrier itself to primary antigen-presenting cells. The intrinsic adjuvant properties of BGs enhance the immune response to target antigens, including T-cell activation and mucosal immunity. Since native and foreign antigens can be carried in the envelope complex of BGs, combination vaccines with multiple antigens of diverse origin can be presented to the immune system simultaneously. Beside the capacity of BGs to function as carriers of protein antigens, they also have a high loading capacity for DNA. Thus, loading BGs with recombinant DNA takes advantage of the excellent bioavailability for DNA-based vaccines and the high expression rates of the DNA-encoded antigens in target cell types such as macrophages and dendritic cells. There are many spaces within BGs including the inner and outer membranes, the periplasmic space and the internal lumen which can carry antigens, DNA or mediators of the immune response. All can be used for subunit antigen to design new vaccine candidates with particle presentation technology. In addition, the fact that BGs can also carry piggyback large-size foreign antigen particles, increases the technologic usefulness of BGs as combination vaccines against viral and bacterial pathogens. Furthermore, the BG antigen carriers can be stored as freeze-dried preparations at room temperature for extended periods without loss of efficacy. The potency, safety and relatively low production cost of BGs offer a significant technical advantage over currently utilized vaccine technologies.

  17. Biosensors for Whole-Cell Bacterial Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, Jo V.; Hirst, Natalie A.; Millner, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial pathogens are important targets for detection and identification in medicine, food safety, public health, and security. Bacterial infection is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of the availability of antibiotics, these infections are often misdiagnosed or there is an unacceptable delay in diagnosis. Current methods of bacterial detection rely upon laboratory-based techniques such as cell culture, microscopic analysis, and biochemical assays. These procedures are time-consuming and costly and require specialist equipment and trained users. Portable stand-alone biosensors can facilitate rapid detection and diagnosis at the point of care. Biosensors will be particularly useful where a clear diagnosis informs treatment, in critical illness (e.g., meningitis) or to prevent further disease spread (e.g., in case of food-borne pathogens or sexually transmitted diseases). Detection of bacteria is also becoming increasingly important in antibioterrorism measures (e.g., anthrax detection). In this review, we discuss recent progress in the use of biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells for sensitive and earlier identification of bacteria without the need for sample processing. There is a particular focus on electrochemical biosensors, especially impedance-based systems, as these present key advantages in terms of ease of miniaturization, lack of reagents, sensitivity, and low cost. PMID:24982325

  18. Analysis of protective antigen peptide binding motifs using bacterial display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Dorsey, Brandi L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2015-05-01

    In today's fast-paced world, a new biological threat could emerge at any time, necessitating a prompt, reliable, inexpensive detection reagent in each case. Combined with magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS), bacterial display technology makes it possible to isolate selective, high affinity peptide reagents in days to weeks. Utilizing the eCPX display scaffold is also a rapid way to screen potential peptide reagents. Peptide affinity reagents for protective antigen (PA) of the biothreat Bacillus anthracis were previously discovered using bacterial display. Bioinformatics analysis resulted in the consensus sequence WXCFTC. Additionally, we have discovered PA binding peptides with a WW motif, one of which, YGLHPWWKNAPIGQR, can pull down PA from 1% human serum. The strength of these two motifs combined, to obtain a WWCFTC consensus, is assessed here using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS). While monitoring binding to PA, overall expression of the display scaffold was assessed using the YPet Mona expression control tag (YPet), and specificity was assessed by binding to Streptavidin R-Phycoerythrin (SAPE). The importance of high YPet binding is highlighted as many of the peptides in one of the three replicate experiments fell below our 80% binding threshold. We demonstrate that it is preferable to discard this experiment, due to questionable expression of the peptide itself, than to try to normalize for relative expression. The peptides containing the WWCFTC consensus were of higher affinity and greater specificity than the peptides containing the WW consensus alone, validating further investigation to optimize known PA binders.

  19. Mini-review: Strategies for Variation and Evolution of Bacterial Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Across the eubacteria, antigenic variation has emerged as a strategy to evade host immunity. However, phenotypic variation in some of these antigens also allows the bacteria to exploit variable host niches as well. The specific mechanisms are not shared-derived characters although there is considerable convergent evolution and numerous commonalities reflecting considerations of natural selection and biochemical restraints. Unlike in viruses, mechanisms of antigenic variation in most bacteria involve larger DNA movement such as gene conversion or DNA rearrangement, although some antigens vary due to point mutations or modified transcriptional regulation. The convergent evolution that promotes antigenic variation integrates various evolutionary forces: these include mutations underlying variant production; drift which could remove alleles especially early in infection or during life history phases in arthropod vectors (when the bacterial population size goes through a bottleneck); selection not only for any particular variant but also for the mechanism for the production of variants (i.e., selection for mutability); and overcoming negative selection against variant production. This review highlights the complexities of drivers of antigenic variation, in particular extending evaluation beyond the commonly cited theory of immune evasion. A deeper understanding of the diversity of purpose and mechanisms of antigenic variation in bacteria will contribute to greater insight into bacterial pathogenesis, ecology and coevolution with hosts. PMID:26288700

  20. Point detection of bacterial and viral pathogens using oral samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Oral samples, including saliva, offer an attractive alternative to serum or urine for diagnostic testing. This is particularly true for point-of-use detection systems. The various types of oral samples that have been reported in the literature are presented here along with the wide variety of analytes that have been measured in saliva and other oral samples. The paper focuses on utilizing point-detection of infectious disease agents, and presents work from our group on a rapid test for multiple bacterial and viral pathogens by monitoring a series of targets. It is thus possible in a single oral sample to identify multiple pathogens based on specific antigens, nucleic acids, and host antibodies to those pathogens. The value of such a technology for detecting agents of bioterrorism at remote sites is discussed.

  1. Thalidomide inhibits granulocyte responses in healthy humans after ex vivo stimulation with bacterial antigens.

    PubMed

    Juffermans, N P; Verbon, A; Schultz, M J; Hack, C E; van Deventer, S J; Speelman, P; van der Poll, T

    2001-05-01

    Ingestion of thalidomide was associated with a reduction in the upregulation of the granulocyte activation marker CD11b and a reduced capacity to release elastase and lactoferrin after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide or lipoteichoic acid. A single oral dose of thalidomide attenuates neutrophil activation upon ex vivo stimulation with bacterial antigens.

  2. Real time viability detection of bacterial spores

    DOEpatents

    Vanderberg, Laura A.; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Obiso, Richard J.

    2003-07-29

    This invention relates to a process for detecting the presence of viable bacterial spores in a sample and to a spore detection system, the process including placing a sample in a germination medium for a period of time sufficient for commitment of any present viable bacterial spores to occur, mixing the sample with a solution of a lanthanide capable of forming a fluorescent complex with dipicolinic acid, and, measuring the sample for the presence of dipicolinic acid, and the system including a germination chamber having inlets from a sample chamber, a germinant chamber and a bleach chamber, the germination chamber further including an outlet through a filtering means, the outlet connected to a detection chamber, the detection chamber having an inlet from a fluorescence promoting metal chamber and the detection chamber including a spectral excitation source and a means of measuring emission spectra from a sample, the detection chamber further connected to a waste chamber. A germination reaction mixture useful for promoting commitment of any viable bacterial spores in a sample including a combination of L-alanine, L-asparagine and D-glucose is also described.

  3. Bacterial cell surface display for epitope mapping of hepatitis C virus core antigen.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Min; Rhee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Eui-Joong; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Oh, Jong-Won

    2003-09-26

    Cell surface expression of protein has been widely used to display enzymes and antigens. Here we show that Pseudomonas syringae ice nucleation protein with a deletion of internal repeating domain (INC) can be used in Escherichia coli to display peptide in a conformationally active form on the outside of the folded protein by fusing to the C-terminus of INC. Diagnostic potential of this technology was demonstrated by effective mapping of antigenic epitopes derived from hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Amino acids 1-38 and 26-53 of HCV core protein were found to react more sensitively in a native conformation with the HCV patient sera than commercial diagnostic antigen, c22p (amino acids 10-53) by display-ELISA. These results demonstrate that the bacterial cell surface display using INC is useful for peptide presentation and thus epitope mapping of antigen. PMID:14553932

  4. [Detection and typing for swine leukocyte antigen].

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Luo, Huai-Rong; Zhang, Ya-Ping; Qiu, Xiang-Pin; Ye, Chun

    2004-03-01

    Traditionally the cluster of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) was typed by serological, cytological and biochemical methods. Many special molecular typing methods have been developed with the progress of molecular biological technology, such as PCR-RFLP, PCR-SSCP , MS and DNA sequencing. Here we discussed the advantages and disadvantages of each method based on the polymorphic and conservative (from the functional aspect, such as supertype and supermotif) characteristics of SLA, and illustrated the development of typing for SLA in the future. In addition, we pointed out the editorial mistakes about the serological haplotype of SLA in reference book and emphasized that the accurate polymorphism of SLA-DQB gene must be based on the cloning sequencing. PMID:15639990

  5. Bacterial surface antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies: the methanogens

    SciTech Connect

    Conway de Macario, E.; Macario, A.J.L.; Magarinos, M.C.; Jovell, R.J.; Kandler, O.

    1982-01-01

    The methanogens (MB) are unique microbes of great evolutionary interest with applications in biotechnology-bioengineerings and are important in digestive processes. Their cell-wall composition is distinctively different from that of Eubacteria, e.g. the Methanobacteriaceae possess the peptidoglycan pseudomurein rather than murein. The range of cell-wall compositions among MB and their evolutionary and functional significance is not well known. The authors undertook a systematic study of the MB's surface structure using monoclonal antibodies through the following steps: (1) generation of hybridomas that produce antibody to several MB from 3 of their 4 families; (2) development of immunoenzymatic assays for MB's antigens and antibodies; (3) determination of the fine specificity of monoclonal antibodies by inhibition-blocking tests using cell-wall extracts and compounds of known structure; thus a set of monoclonal probes of predetermined specificity was assembled; and (4) resolution of surface determinants of MB representative of the Methanobacteriaceae using the monoclonal probes. Specific markers of MB strains were characterized. Two epitopes were identified within the pseudomurein molecule.

  6. Antigen detection for the diagnosis of pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Altacílio A; Camargos, Paulo A M; Costa, Petrônio R; Campos, Maria Tereza K

    2004-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b are the main agents of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia in developing countries, although a definite etiologic diagnosis cannot be established in most cases. This study was carried out to assess the performance of a latex particle agglutination test (LPAT) from a commercial kit (Slidex Méningite Kit trade mark, BioMérieux, France) in diagnosing pneumococcal and H. influenzae type b pneumonia. One hundred and seven children (45 ill subjects and 62 healthy controls) were enrolled. All 45 cases had a presumptive diagnosis of bacterial pneumonia based on clinical (WHO criteria), laboratory (white blood cell count > or = 15.000/mm3, polymorphonuclear leukocytes > or = 70%, bands > or = 500/mm3, and C-reactive protein > or = 40 mg/l), and radiological findings, i.e., two or more positive points in the scoring system described by Khamapirad and Glezen (Semin Respir Infect 1987;2:130-144). Clinical, laboratory, and radiological assessments were performed in a blinded manner. LPAT was performed in urine samples after concentration through an ethanol-acetone solution. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were 77.3% (95% CI, 61.8-88.0%), 90.3% (95% CI, 79.5-96.0%), 85.0% (95% CI, 69.5-93.8%), and 84.8% (95% CI, 73.4-92.1%), respectively. Results suggest that LPAT is a useful diagnostic tool for the etiologic diagnosis of S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae type b pneumonia, especially in the developing world. PMID:15211697

  7. Common antigens prediction in bacterial bioweapons: a perspective for vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Varun; Chauhan, Rajinder S; Rout, Chittaranjan

    2014-01-01

    Bioweapons (BWs) are a serious threat to mankind and the lack of efficient vaccines against bacterial bioweapons (BBWs) further worsens the situation in face of BW attack. Experts believe that difficulties in detection and ease in dissemination of deadly pathogens make BW a better option for attack compared to nuclear weapons. Molecular biology techniques facilitate the use of genetically modified BBWs thus creating uncertainty on which bacteria will be used for BW attack. In the present work, available resources such as proteomic sequences of BBWs, protective antigenic proteins (PAPs) reported in Protegen database and VaxiJen dataset, and immunogenic epitopes in immune epitope database (IEDB) were used to predict potential broad-specific vaccine candidates against BBWs. Comparison of proteomes sequences of BBWs and their analyses using in-house PERL scripts identified 44 conserved proteins and many of them were known to be immunogenic. Comparison of conserved proteins against PAPs identified six either as PAPs or their homologues with a potential of providing protection against multiple pathogens. Similarly, mapping of conserved proteins against experimentally known IEDB epitopes identified six epitopes which had exact epitope match in four proteins including three from earlier predicted six PAPs. These epitopes were also reported to provide protection against several pathogens. In the backdrop of conserved heat shock GroEL protein from Salmonella enterica providing protection against five diverse bacterial pathogens involved in different diseases, and synthetic proteins produced by combination of epitopes from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 4 viruses providing protection against both bacterium and viruses, the identified putative immunogenic conserved proteins and immune-protective epitopes can further be explored for their potential as broad-specific vaccine candidates against BBWs.

  8. Sensitive, Rapid Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Chen, Fei; Pickett, Molly; Matsuyama, Asahi

    2009-01-01

    A method of sensitive detection of bacterial spores within delays of no more than a few hours has been developed to provide an alternative to a prior three-day NASA standard culture-based assay. A capability for relatively rapid detection of bacterial spores would be beneficial for many endeavors, a few examples being agriculture, medicine, public health, defense against biowarfare, water supply, sanitation, hygiene, and the food-packaging and medical-equipment industries. The method involves the use of a commercial rapid microbial detection system (RMDS) that utilizes a combination of membrane filtration, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence chemistry, and analysis of luminescence images detected by a charge-coupled-device camera. This RMDS has been demonstrated to be highly sensitive in enumerating microbes (it can detect as little as one colony-forming unit per sample) and has been found to yield data in excellent correlation with those of culture-based methods. What makes the present method necessary is that the specific RMDS and the original protocols for its use are not designed for discriminating between bacterial spores and other microbes. In this method, a heat-shock procedure is added prior to an incubation procedure that is specified in the original RMDS protocols. In this heat-shock procedure (which was also described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article on enumerating sporeforming bacteria), a sample is exposed to a temperature of 80 C for 15 minutes. Spores can survive the heat shock, but nonspore- forming bacteria and spore-forming bacteria that are not in spore form cannot survive. Therefore, any colonies that grow during incubation after the heat shock are deemed to have originated as spores.

  9. Detection of heat-stable antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli by direct agglutination and passive hemagglutination.

    PubMed

    Oza, A N; Thwaites, R T; Wareing, D R A; Bolton, F J; Frost, J A

    2002-03-01

    The two serotyping schemes for the detection of heat-stable antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli use the same strains for antiserum production but differ in the detection systems used for identifying agglutination. The Penner method uses passive hemagglutination (PHA) while the Laboratory of Enteric Pathogens method uses the same antisera but in a whole-bacterial-cell direct agglutination (DA) protocol. C. jejuni produces a polysaccharide capsule, which is antigenic, and is the main component detected by the PHA method. The DA method will detect both capsule antigens and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipooligosaccharide (LOS) surface antigens. Comparison of both methods by using a selection of isolates from human infection has shown a range of variation in agglutination specificity, reflecting the differences in antigens detected by the two methods. While 27.4% of the 416 C. jejuni isolates reacted with the antisera raised against the same type strains by either method, the majority showed a range of more complex relationships. None of the 37 C. coli isolates reacted with the same antiserum by both methods. Together the two schemes gave a total of 102 distinct combined serogroups for C. jejuni and 16 for C. coli. Thus, while some clonally related isolates share the same capsule and LOS or LPS antigens, other strains appear to have a common capsule antigen but differ in their LPS or LOS structures or vice versa.

  10. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  11. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  12. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  13. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  14. 21 CFR 866.3402 - Plasmodium species antigen detection assays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Plasmodium species antigen detection assays. 866.3402 Section 866.3402 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents §...

  15. Protein Stains to Detect Antigen on Membranes.

    PubMed

    Dsouza, Anil; Scofield, R Hal

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting (protein blotting/electroblotting) is the gold standard in the analysis of complex protein mixtures. Electroblotting drives protein molecules from a polyacrylamide (or less commonly, of an agarose) gel to the surface of a binding membrane, thereby facilitating an increased availability of the sites with affinity for both general and specific protein reagents. The analysis of these complex protein mixtures is achieved by the detection of specific protein bands on a membrane, which in turn is made possible by the visualization of protein bands either by chemical staining or by reaction with an antibody of a conjugated ligand. Chemical methods employ staining with organic dyes, metal chelates, autoradiography, fluorescent dyes, complexing with silver, or prelabeling with fluorophores. All of these methods have differing sensitivities and quantitative determinations vary significantly. This review will describe the various protein staining methods applied to membranes after western blotting. "Detection" precedes and is a prerequisite to obtaining qualitative and quantitative data on the proteins in a sample, as much as to comparing the protein composition of different samples. "Detection" is often synonymous to staining, i.e., the reversible or irreversible binding by the proteins of a colored organic or inorganic chemical.

  16. Protein stains to detect antigen on membranes.

    PubMed

    D'souza, Anil; Scofield, R Hal

    2009-01-01

    Western blotting (protein blotting/electroblotting) is the gold standard in the analysis of complex protein mixtures. Electroblotting drives protein molecules from a polyacrylamide (or less commonly, of an agarose) gel to the surface of a binding membrane, thereby facilitating an increased availability of the sites with affinity for both general and specific protein reagents. The analysis of these complex protein mixtures is achieved by the detection of specific protein bands on a membrane, which in turn is made possible by the visualization of protein bands either by chemical staining or by reaction with an antibody of a conjugated ligand. Chemical methods employ staining with organic dyes, metal chelates, autoradiography, fluorescent dyes, complexing with silver, or prelabeling with fluorophores. All of these methods have differing sensitivities and quantitative determinations vary significantly. This review will describe the various protein staining methods applied to membranes after electrophoresis. "Detection" precedes and is a prerequisite to obtaining qualitative and quantitative data on the proteins in a sample, as much as to comparing the protein composition of different samples. Detection is often synonymous to staining, i.e., the reversible or irreversible binding by the proteins of a colored organic or inorganic chemical. PMID:19378080

  17. Shared themes of antigenic variation and virulence in bacterial, protozoal, and fungal infections.

    PubMed Central

    Deitsch, K W; Moxon, E R; Wellems, T E

    1997-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes have evolved highly sophisticated mechanisms for colonizing host tissues and evading or deflecting assault by the immune response. The ability of these microbes to avoid clearance prolongs infection, thereby promoting their long-term survival within individual hosts and, through transmission, between hosts. Many pathogens are capable of extensive antigenic changes in the face of the multiple constitutive and dynamic components of host immune defenses. As a result, highly diverse populations that have widely different virulence properties can arise from a single infecting organism (clone). In this review, we consider the molecular and genetic features of antigenic variation and corresponding host-parasite interactions of different pathogenic bacterial, fungal, and protozoan microorganisms. The host and microbial molecules involved in these interactions often determine the adhesive, invasive, and antigenic properties of the infecting organisms and can dramatically affect the virulence and pathobiology of individual infections. Pathogens capable of such antigenic variation exhibit mechanisms of rapid mutability in confined chromosomal regions containing specialized genes designated contingency genes. The mechanisms of hypermutability of contingency genes are common to a variety of bacterial and eukaryotic pathogens and include promoter alterations, reading-frame shifts, gene conversion events, genomic rearrangements, and point mutations. PMID:9293182

  18. Antigen capture assay for detection of a 43-kilodalton Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Wadee, A A; Boting, L; Reddy, S G

    1990-01-01

    This study describes the development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens in body fluids. A double-antibody sandwich procedure that used human and rabbit anti-M. tuberculosis immunoglobulin G antibodies was followed. The ELISA was able to detect as little as 0.8 micrograms of protein of M. tuberculosis sonic extract. Of 253 cerebrospinal fluid specimens submitted for analysis, 11 (4.3%) false-positive results were recorded. Analysis of 317 pleural and ascitic fluid specimens resulted in 6 (1.9%) false-positive recordings. No false-negative results were recorded for any of the body fluids tested. This technique is rapid (5.5 h) and sensitive, may be developed and used in many laboratories with limited resources, and may prove useful in the diagnosis of extrapulmonary and pulmonary tuberculoses. Analysis of these body fluids by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblotting indicated that the antibody used in the ELISA detects a mycobacterial antigen of 43 kDa. Such antigens were not detected in body fluids of nontuberculous patients. Images PMID:2126267

  19. O antigen modulates insect vector acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M; Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Walker, Sharon; Roper, M Caroline

    2015-12-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen. PMID:26386068

  20. O Antigen Modulates Insect Vector Acquisition of the Bacterial Plant Pathogen Xylella fastidiosa

    PubMed Central

    Rapicavoli, Jeannette N.; Kinsinger, Nichola; Perring, Thomas M.; Backus, Elaine A.; Shugart, Holly J.; Walker, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Hemipteran insect vectors transmit the majority of plant pathogens. Acquisition of pathogenic bacteria by these piercing/sucking insects requires intimate associations between the bacterial cells and insect surfaces. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant macromolecule displayed on the cell surface of Gram-negative bacteria and thus mediates bacterial interactions with the environment and potential hosts. We hypothesized that bacterial cell surface properties mediated by LPS would be important in modulating vector-pathogen interactions required for acquisition of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causative agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. Utilizing a mutant that produces truncated O antigen (the terminal portion of the LPS molecule), we present results that link this LPS structural alteration to a significant decrease in the attachment of X. fastidiosa to blue-green sharpshooter foreguts. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that this defect in initial attachment compromised subsequent biofilm formation within vector foreguts, thus impairing pathogen acquisition. We also establish a relationship between O antigen truncation and significant changes in the physiochemical properties of the cell, which in turn affect the dynamics of X. fastidiosa adhesion to the vector foregut. Lastly, we couple measurements of the physiochemical properties of the cell with hydrodynamic fluid shear rates to produce a Comsol model that predicts primary areas of bacterial colonization within blue-green sharpshooter foreguts, and we present experimental data that support the model. These results demonstrate that, in addition to reported protein adhesin-ligand interactions, O antigen is crucial for vector-pathogen interactions, specifically in the acquisition of this destructive agricultural pathogen. PMID:26386068

  1. Simultaneous in situ detection of viral RNA and antigens.

    PubMed

    Brahic, M; Haase, A T; Cash, E

    1984-09-01

    We have combined in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry to detect RNA and proteins in the same cell. We envision a wide range of applications for this method, and, as one example, we show that viral genomes and capsid antigens can be detected simultaneously in paraffin sections of the central nervous system of mice infected with Theiler's virus, the causative agent of a slow demyelinating disease.

  2. Benchtop Antigen Detection Technique using Nanofiltration and Fluorescent Dyes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2009-01-01

    The designed benchtop technique is primed to detect bacteria and viruses from antigenic surface marker proteins in solutions, initially water. This inclusive bio-immunoassay uniquely combines nanofiltration and near infrared (NIR) dyes conjugated to antibodies to isolate and distinguish microbial antigens, using laser excitation and spectrometric analysis. The project goals include detecting microorganisms aboard the International Space Station, space shuttle, Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), and human habitats on future Moon and Mars missions, ensuring astronaut safety. The technique is intended to improve and advance water contamination testing both commercially and environmentally as well. Lastly, this streamlined technique poses to greatly simplify and expedite testing of pathogens in complex matrices, such as blood, in hospital and laboratory clinics.

  3. Highly Sensitive Nanoparticle-based Multifunctional Biosensor for Antigen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siavoshi, Salome

    Precise and selective positioning of nanoparticles gives rise to many applications where assembly of nano building blocks with different biological or chemical functionalization is necessary. One remarkable application is the simultaneous early detection of multiple biomarkers in the field of miniaturized multiplex biosensors. To enable multiplex detection of antigens, nanoparticles with various antibody coatings can be selectively assembled in trenches on different regions on a biochip so that they bind selectively to the specific antigen of interest. The presented work utilizes electric field assisted assembly techniques to assemble nanoparticles with various surface functionalization and coatings. Nanoparticles are assembled into pre-fabricated via and trench patterns generated on a PMMA coated gold surface, using electron-beam lithography. Two techniques have been developed for selective assembly of nanoparticles: sequential size-selective directed assembly and sequential site-selective assembly. Both selective assembly techniques provide fast and reproducible assembly over large areas while achieving high yield. The sequential size-selective assembly is a template-assisted technique where the selectivity is achieved by controlling the size of the nanopatterns and the size of the nanoparticles. The possibility of particle detachment and the factors affecting the sorting efficiency for this technique is studied. We show that a complete sorting can be achieved when the size of the vias is close to the diameter of the nanoparticles and the size distribution of the chosen nanoparticles do not overlap. In the site-selective assembly, the selectivity is achieved by having electrically isolated sites (regions) on the same chip. Electrophoresis is performed for each region in a step by step process. Selective assembly results, for up to four nanoparticles with various coating/functionalization are presented using the site-selective assembly technique. We use the

  4. Gold nanoparticle-based fluorescence immunoassay for malaria antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Guirgis, Bassem S S; Sá e Cunha, Cláudia; Gomes, Inês; Cavadas, Miguel; Silva, Isabel; Doria, Gonçalo; Blatch, Gregory L; Baptista, Pedro V; Pereira, Eulália; Azzazy, Hassan M E; Mota, Maria M; Prudêncio, Miguel; Franco, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The development of rapid detection assays for malaria diagnostics is an area of intensive research, as the traditional microscopic analysis of blood smears is cumbersome and requires skilled personnel. Here, we describe a simple and sensitive immunoassay that successfully detects malaria antigens in infected blood cultures. This homogeneous assay is based on the fluorescence quenching of cyanine 3B (Cy3B)-labeled recombinant Plasmodium falciparum heat shock protein 70 (PfHsp70) upon binding to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with an anti-Hsp70 monoclonal antibody. Upon competition with the free antigen, the Cy3B-labeled recombinant PfHsp70 is released to solution resulting in an increase of fluorescence intensity. Two types of AuNP-antibody conjugates were used as probes, one obtained by electrostatic adsorption of the antibody on AuNPs surface and the other by covalent bonding using protein cross-linking agents. In comparison with cross-linked antibodies, electrostatic adsorption of the antibodies to the AuNPs surfaces generated conjugates with increased activity and linearity of response, within a range of antigen concentration from 8.2 to 23.8 μg.mL(-1). The estimated LOD for the assay is 2.4 μg.mL(-1) and the LOQ is 7.3 μg.mL(-1). The fluorescence immunoassay was successfully applied to the detection of antigen in malaria-infected human blood cultures at a 3% parasitemia level, and is assumed to detect parasite densities as low as 1,000 parasites.μL(-1).

  5. Serological versus antigen detection methods for Giardia duodenalis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bashir, M; Farid, A; Rabia, I; Mostafa, B; El Amir, A

    2014-12-01

    Giardiasis constitutes an important public health problem in the world. Contamination of the water with fecal materials including viruses and pathogenic protozoa still represents an environmental health hazard, especially in rural areas. The survey study evaluated the relation between seropositivity and some risk factors. Moreover, the study compared between the serological IgG and IgM level and antigen detection methods for the diagnosis of giardiasis. The results indicate that sex distribution and age were the mean risk factors for seroprevelence. In this study, sera samples were employed in sandwich ELISA assay, to detect circulating Giardia antigens. None of the negative control serum samples gave a positive reaction, but cross reaction was encountered with 3 case of Cryptosporidium. The specificity of the assay was 94.830/a. On the other hand, the sensitivity of the Giardia patient's sera was 94.12% which was higher than that of IgG (86.25%) and IgM (87.50%) secretion measurements. In conclusion, antigen detection methods give better and earlier diagnosis for giardiasis can be performed quickly and do not require an experienced and skilled morphologist. PMID:25643512

  6. Immunoglobulin (Ig) D in Labeo rohita is widely expressed and differentially modulated in viral, bacterial and parasitic antigenic challenges.

    PubMed

    Basu, Madhubanti; Lenka, Saswati S; Paichha, Mahismita; Swain, Banikalyan; Patel, Bhakti; Banerjee, Rajanya; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Das, Surajit; Samanta, Mrinal

    2016-10-15

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) play critical roles in protecting host against diverse pathogenic invasion and diseases. Among all Ig isotypes, IgD is the most recently-evolved and enigmatic molecule detected in all vertebrates species except birds. In South-East Asia, Labeo rohita (rohu) is the leading candidate fish species for freshwater aquaculture, and this article describes about IgD gene expression in rohu following viral, bacterial and parasitic antigenic challenges. The partial cDNA (761bp) of Labeo rohita-IgD (LrIgD) was cloned and submitted in the GenBank with the accession no KT883581. Phylogenetically, LrIgD was closely related to grass carp IgD. Analysis of LrIgD gene expression in juveniles by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assay revealed gradual increase in IgD expression with the advancement of time. In the healthy rohu fingerlings, LrIgD expression occurred predominantly in kidney followed by liver and spleen. In response to rhabdoviral antigenic stimulation, LrIgD expression was significantly enhanced in all tested tissues. In bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) infection, transcripts of LrIgD increased more dramatically in liver followed by kidney and gill. In parasitic (Argulus) infection, most significant expression of IgD was noted in the skin, followed by kidney, liver, spleen and gill. These results collectively suggest the key role of IgD in the immune response of rohu during viral, bacterial and parasitic infections. PMID:27590429

  7. Microbiology: Detection of Bacterial Pathogens and Their Occurrence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reasoner, Donald J.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of bacterial pathogens that are related to water pollution, covering publications from 1976-77. This review includes: (1) bacterial pathogens in animals; and (2) detection and identification of waterborne bacterial pathogens. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  8. Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates: pathogen detection and inactivation methods

    PubMed Central

    Védy, Dana; Robert, Daniel; Gasparini, Danielle; Canellini, Giorgia; Waldvogel, Sophie; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Whereas the reduction of transfusion related viral transmission has been a priority during the last decade, bacterial infection transmitted by transfusion still remains associated to a high morbidity and mortality, and constitutes the most frequent infectious risk of transfusion. This problem especially concerns platelet concentrates because of their favorable bacterial growth conditions. This review gives an overview of platelet transfusion-related bacterial contamination as well as on the different strategies to reduce this problem by using either bacterial detection or inactivation methods.

  9. Optoacoustic detection of viral antigens using targeted gold nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maswadi, Saher; Woodward, Lee; Glickman, Randolph D.; Barsalou, Norman

    2009-02-01

    We are detecting antigens (Ag), isolated from infectious organisms, utilizing laser optoacoustic spectroscopy and antibody-coupled gold nanorod (NR) contrast agents specifically targeted to the antigen of interest. We have detected, in clinical ocular samples, both Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) . A monoclonal antibody (Ab) specific to both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was conjugated to gold nanorods to produce a targeted contrast agent with a strong optoacoustic signal. Elutions obtained from patient corneal swabs were adsorbed in standard plastic micro-wells. An immunoaffinity reaction was then performed with the functionalized gold nanorods, and the results were probed with an OPO laser, emitting wavelengths at the peak absorptions of the nanorods. Positive optoacoustic responses were obtained from samples containing authentic (microbiologically confirmed) HSV-1 and HSV-2. To obtain an estimate of the sensitivity of the technique, serial dilutions from 1 mg/ml to 1 pg/ml of a C. trachomatis surface Ag were prepared, and were probed with a monoclonal Ab, specific to the C. trachomatis surface Ag, conjugated to gold nanorods. An optoacoustic response was obtained, proportional to the concentration of antigen, and with a limit of detection of about 5 pg/ml. The optoacoustic signals generated from micro-wells containing albumin or saline were similar to those from blank wells. The potential benefit of this method is identify viral agents more rapidly than with existing techniques. In addition, the sensitivity of the assay is comparable or superior to existing colorimetric- or fluorometric-linked immunoaffinity assays.

  10. Demonstration of cross-reactivity between bacterial antigens and class I human leukocyte antigens by using monoclonal antibodies to Shigella flexneri.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, K M; Raybourne, R B

    1990-01-01

    Bacterial envelope proteins which share immunodeterminants with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I histocompatibility antigen HLA-B27 may invoke spondyloarthritic disease through the process of molecular mimicry in patients expressing this phenotype. Monoclonal antibodies generated by the immunization of BALB/c mice with envelope proteins of Shigella flexneri type 2a were tested for reactivity against cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines of defined HLA phenotype. As measured by flow microfluorometry, four immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies reacted preferentially with HLA-B27-positive lymphocytes (HOM-2, MM) as compared with a B27-loss mutant line (1065) or cells lacking major histocompatibility complex class I antigen (Daudi, K562). Monoclonal antibodies also reacted with mouse EL-4 cells transfected with and expressing the HLA-B7 gene. Western immunoblot analysis of isolated enterobacterial envelopes demonstrated that the reactive epitope was present on bacterial proteins with an apparent relative molecular mass of 36 and 19 kilodaltons. The structural basis for the cross-reactivity of bacterial antigen and HLA-B27 appeared to reside in the portion of the HLA molecule that is responsible for allotypic specificity (amino acids 63 through 83), since monoclonal antibodies were positive by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with synthetic polypeptides corresponding to this segment. Images PMID:2187807

  11. Comparison of commercial kits for detection of cryptococcal antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, D C; Weinstein, M P; Fedorciw, B; Joho, K L; Thorpe, J J; Reller, L

    1994-01-01

    Although kits to detect cryptococcal antigen are used widely to diagnose cryptococcal infection, the comparative performance of commercially available assays has not been evaluated in the past decade. Therefore, we compared the sensitives and specificities of five commercially available kits for detecting cryptococcal antigen (four latex agglutination test kits--Calas [Meridian Diagnostics])--Crypto-LA [International Biological Labs], Myco-Immune [MicroScan], and Immy [Immunomycologics]--and an enzyme immunoassay kit, Premier [Meridian Diagnostics]) with culture for the diagnosis of cryptococcal meningitis and fungemia. Of 182 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and 90 serum samples submitted for cryptococcal antigen and fungal culture, 49 (19 and 30 samples, respectively) from 20 patients had a culture positive for Cryptococcus neoformans. For CSF specimens, the sensitivities and specificities of all kits were comparable (sensitivity, 93 to 100%; specificity, 93 to 98%). There was a significant difference in sensitivities of the kits when serum samples were tested with the International Biological Labs and MicroScan kits, which do not pretreat serum with pronase. These kits were less sensitive (sensitivity, 83%) than the Immy and Meridian latex kits (sensitivity, 97%), which do pretreat with pronase. The sensitivity of the Meridian enzyme immunoassay kit was comparable to that of the pronase-containing latex kits. These kits were of equivalent specificities (93 to 100%) when testing serum. Some of the currently available kits have limitations that need to be recognized for proper interpretation of results. Specifically, the use of pronase on serum samples reduces the number of false-positive results, and a titer of < or = 1:4 can be a false-positive result when CSF samples are being tested. PMID:7929757

  12. Nonvalue of antigen detection immunoassays for diagnosis of candidemia.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, P; Dowd, A; Jewesson, P; Radigan, G; Tweeddale, M G; Clarke, A; Geere, I; Kelly, M

    1990-01-01

    We evaluated the Cand-Tec (Ramco Laboratories Inc., Houston, Tex.) and LA-Candida antigen detection system (Immuno-Mycologics Inc., Norman, Okla.) tests as possible rapid alternatives to blood cultures for the identification of patients with candidemia. Tests were performed on sera from (i) 33 patients with candidemia, (ii) 82 patients with fever and risk factors for invasive candidiasis, and (iii) 13 healthy controls. A total of 21 patients had no evidence of invasive candidiasis, as determined by clinical course, blood culture, and/or autopsy; results for 61 patients were indeterminate regarding the presence of invasive candidiasis, or else the patients had invasive candidiasis with organ involvement. By using a threshold positive Cand-Tec titer of greater than or equal to 1:4, the sensitivity in candidemic patients was 49%; the specificity was 43% (patients with true-negative results had neither candidemia nor other evidence of invasive candidiasis). Coexistent disseminated candidiasis in some candidemic patients may have accounted for some positive Cand-Tec tests and possible overestimation of the sensitivity of the test for candidemia. Cand-Tec test results were negative for healthy controls. All test results obtained by the LA-Candida antigen detection system assay were negative. Our findings indicate that neither of these assays reliably identifies patients with candidemia. PMID:2229358

  13. A bacterial engineered glycoprotein as a novel antigen for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ciocchini, Andrés E; Serantes, Diego A Rey; Melli, Luciano J; Guidolin, Leticia S; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A; Elena, Sebastián; Franco, Cristina; Nicola, Ana M; Feldman, Mario F; Comerci, Diego J; Ugalde, Juan E

    2014-08-27

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis that affects livestock and human beings. Laboratory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis mainly relies on serological diagnosis using serum and/or milk samples. Although there are several serological tests with different diagnostic performance and capacity to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals, there is still no standardized reference antigen for the disease. Here we validate the first recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. This antigen can be produced in homogeneous batches without the need of culturing pathogenic brucellae; all characteristics that make it appropriate for standardization. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies in bovine samples was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to magnetic beads or ELISA plates. As a proof of concept and to validate the antigen, we analyzed serum, whole blood and milk samples obtained from non-infected, experimentally infected and vaccinated animals included in a vaccination/infection trial performed in our laboratory as well as more than 1000 serum and milk samples obtained from naturally infected and S19-vaccinated animals from Argentina. Our results demonstrate that OAg-AcrA-based assays are highly accurate for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis, even in vaccinated herds, using different types of samples and in different platforms. We propose this novel recombinant glycoprotein as an antigen suitable for the development of new standard immunological tests for screening and confirmatory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis in regions or countries with brucellosis-control programs. PMID:24984948

  14. A bacterial engineered glycoprotein as a novel antigen for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ciocchini, Andrés E; Serantes, Diego A Rey; Melli, Luciano J; Guidolin, Leticia S; Iwashkiw, Jeremy A; Elena, Sebastián; Franco, Cristina; Nicola, Ana M; Feldman, Mario F; Comerci, Diego J; Ugalde, Juan E

    2014-08-27

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis that affects livestock and human beings. Laboratory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis mainly relies on serological diagnosis using serum and/or milk samples. Although there are several serological tests with different diagnostic performance and capacity to differentiate vaccinated from infected animals, there is still no standardized reference antigen for the disease. Here we validate the first recombinant glycoprotein antigen, an N-formylperosamine O-polysaccharide-protein conjugate (OAg-AcrA), for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. This antigen can be produced in homogeneous batches without the need of culturing pathogenic brucellae; all characteristics that make it appropriate for standardization. An indirect immunoassay based on the detection of anti O-polysaccharide IgG antibodies in bovine samples was developed coupling OAg-AcrA to magnetic beads or ELISA plates. As a proof of concept and to validate the antigen, we analyzed serum, whole blood and milk samples obtained from non-infected, experimentally infected and vaccinated animals included in a vaccination/infection trial performed in our laboratory as well as more than 1000 serum and milk samples obtained from naturally infected and S19-vaccinated animals from Argentina. Our results demonstrate that OAg-AcrA-based assays are highly accurate for diagnosis of bovine brucellosis, even in vaccinated herds, using different types of samples and in different platforms. We propose this novel recombinant glycoprotein as an antigen suitable for the development of new standard immunological tests for screening and confirmatory diagnosis of bovine brucellosis in regions or countries with brucellosis-control programs.

  15. AgdbNet – antigen sequence database software for bacterial typing

    PubMed Central

    Jolley, Keith A; Maiden, Martin CJ

    2006-01-01

    Background Bacterial typing schemes based on the sequences of genes encoding surface antigens require databases that provide a uniform, curated, and widely accepted nomenclature of the variants identified. Due to the differences in typing schemes, imposed by the diversity of genes targeted, creating these databases has typically required the writing of one-off code to link the database to a web interface. Here we describe agdbNet, widely applicable web database software that facilitates simultaneous BLAST querying of multiple loci using either nucleotide or peptide sequences. Results Databases are described by XML files that are parsed by a Perl CGI script. Each database can have any number of loci, which may be defined by nucleotide and/or peptide sequences. The software is currently in use on at least five public databases for the typing of Neisseria meningitidis, Campylobacter jejuni and Streptococcus equi and can be set up to query internal isolate tables or suitably-configured external isolate databases, such as those used for multilocus sequence typing. The style of the resulting website can be fully configured by modifying stylesheets and through the use of customised header and footer files that surround the output of the script. Conclusion The software provides a rapid means of setting up customised Internet antigen sequence databases. The flexible configuration options enable typing schemes with differing requirements to be accommodated. PMID:16790057

  16. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms. PMID:8731834

  17. [Detection of T-antigen in colorectal adenocarcinoma and polyps].

    PubMed

    Xu, S; Lu, Y; Wang, Q

    1995-10-01

    Galactose oxidase method was employed to detect the beta-D-Gal (1-->3) -D-Gal NAc residue of T-antigen present in the large intestinal mucus of 156 subjects. The positive rates of the test were 84.4%, 29.1%, and 7.2% in the mucus samples obtained from 32 patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas, 55 with polyps and 69 controls respectively. Chi-square test demonstrated that there were significant differences between the group of carcinoma and control (P < 0.001) as well as between also polyp and control (P < 0.01). The test had a high sensitivity (84.4%) and specificity (92.8%) in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer and may be used as a practical mass screening test for colorectal neoplasms.

  18. Heterosandwich immunoswab assay for dengue virus Ns1 antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Advaita; Malabadi, Ravindra B; Loebenberg, Raimer; Suresh, Mavanur R; Sunwoo, Hoon H

    2014-01-01

    Dengue and the more severe dengue hemorrhagic fever have been a very critical public health problem globally. Millions of people especially in the tropical areas get infected with dengue. An efficient diagnostic is very important for early screening of dengue infection. In dengue-infected patients, the nonstructural protein NS1 is present on the surface of infected cells and secreted in plasma. The NS1 antigen is an important target for developing a quick diagnostic largely due to its long presence in the blood. We have developed a simple-to-use immunoswab-based diagnostic procedure employing monoclonal antibodies and the second-generation quadromas. The detection limit for NS1 has been established to be in the subnanogram range. The assay is very sensitive, has a visual end point, and also being extremely inexpensive. With this assay, screening time for a dengue-infected person would be very rapid. PMID:24211216

  19. Th2 Allergic Immune Response to Inhaled Fungal Antigens is Modulated By TLR-4-Independent Bacterial Products

    PubMed Central

    Allard, Jenna B.; Rinaldi, Lisa; Wargo, Matt; Allen, Gilman; Akira, Shizuo; Uematsu, Satoshi; Poynter, Matthew E.; Hogan, Deborah A.; Rincon, Mercedes; Whittaker, Laurie A.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Allergic airway disease is characterized by eosinophilic inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and increased airway resistance. Fungal antigens are ubiquitous within the environment and are well know triggers of allergic disease. Bacterial products are also frequently encountered within the environment and may alter the immune response to certain antigens. The consequence of simultaneous exposure to bacterial and fungal products on the lung adaptive immune response has not been explored. Here we show that oropharyngeal aspiration of fungal lysates (Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus) promotes airway eosinophilia, secretion of Th2 cytokines and mucus cell metaplasia. In contrast, oropharyngeal exposure to bacterial lysates (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) promotes airway inflammation characterized by neutrophils, Th1 cytokine secretion and no mucus production. More importantly, administration of bacterial lysates together with fungal lysates deviates the adaptive immune response to a Th1 type associated with neutrophilia and diminished mucus production. The immunomodulatory effect that bacterial lysates have on the response to fungi is TLR4-independent but MyD88 dependent. Thus, different types of microbial products within the airway can alter the host's adaptive immune response, and potentially impact the development of allergic airway disease to environmental fungal antigens. PMID:19224641

  20. Role of K1 capsule antigen in cirrhotic patients with Escherichia coli spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wang, M C; Lin, W H; Tseng, C C; Wu, A B; Teng, C H; Yan, J J; Wu, J J

    2013-03-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is one of the most serious complications in patients with cirrhosis. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of SBP caused by Escherichia coli isolates with or without the K1 capsule antigen in cirrhotic patients and the outcome. From January 2004 to January 2012, a total of 54 and 41 E. coli strains derived from patients with SBP and intestinal perforation (IP), respectively, were included for comparison in this study. Bacterial characteristics including phylogenetic groups, K1 capsule antigen, and 14 virulence factor genetic determinants, as well as data regarding patient characteristics, clinical manifestations, and in-hospital deaths, were collected and analyzed. The prevalence of the K1 capsule antigen gene neuA was more common in SBP isolates compared to IP isolates (28 % vs. 10 %, p = 0.0385). Phylogenetic groups B2 and group D were dominant in E. coli isolates with and without the K1 capsule antigen, respectively. The prevalence of virulence factors genes papG II, ompT, and usp was higher in E. coli K1 strains. There were 26 deaths (48 %) during hospitalization. Presence of the K1 capsule antigen in E. coli isolates was significantly associated with in-hospital death in cirrhotic patients with SBP (42 % vs. 14 %, p = 0.0331). This study demonstrates a higher prevalence of the K1 capsule antigen in E. coli SBP compared to E. coli peritonitis caused by IP. There were significant associations between the K1 capsule antigen and in-hospital mortality and bacterial virulence in cirrhotic patients with E. coli SBP.

  1. Gravimetric antigen detection utilizing antibody-modified lipid bilayers.

    PubMed

    Larsson, Charlotte; Bramfeldt, Hanna; Wingren, Christer; Borrebaeck, Carl; Höök, Fredrik

    2005-10-01

    Lipid bilayers containing 5% nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) lipids supported on SiO2 have been used as a template for immobilization of oligohistidine-tagged single-chained antibody fragments (scFvs) directed against cholera toxin. It was demonstrated that histidine-tagged scFvs could be equally efficiently coupled to an NTA-Ni2+-containing lipid bilayer from a purified sample as from an expression supernatant, thereby providing a coupling method that eliminates time-consuming protein prepurification steps. Irrespective of whether the coupling was made from the unpurified or purified antibody preparation, the template proved to be efficient for antigen (cholera toxin) detection, verified using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. In addition, via a secondary amplification step using lipid vesicles containing GM1 (the natural membrane receptor for cholera toxin), the detection limit of cholera toxin was less than 750 pM. To further strengthen the coupling of scFvs to the lipid bilayer, scFvs containing two histidine tags, instead of just one tag, were also evaluated. The increased coupling strength provided via the bivalent anchoring significantly reduced scFv displacement in complex solutions containing large amounts of histidine-containing proteins, verified via cholera toxin detection in serum.

  2. Immunochemical detection of a common antigen among Streptococcus uberis isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, K F; Norcross, N L

    1983-01-01

    Fifty-three isolates of Streptococcus uberis from various sources were examined for the presence of a common antigen. Initially, a serum was produced in rabbits which, by using rocket line immunoelectrophoresis, proved to react with identity to all of the S. uberis crude extracts as well as group B and E streptococcal extracts. The antigen(s) responsible for this cross-reactivity was partially purified by Sephacryl S-200 gel chromatography and analyzed by fused rocket immunoelectrophoresis. Further analysis by immunodiffusion showed that probably two antigens in the gel chromatography-consolidated fractions were common to the S. uberis and group B and E isolates, but that one of the antigens present was unique to S. uberis. Trypsin destroyed the immunoreactivity of this antigen. Isolation of this common antigen could possibly alleviate some of the tedium associated with the identification of this organism. Images PMID:6408120

  3. Investigation of contactless detection using a giant magnetoresistance sensor for detecting prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuecheng; Zhi, Shaotao; Lei, Chong; Zhou, Yong

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a contactless detection method for detecting prostate specific antigen with a giant magnetoresistance sensor. In contactless detection case, the prostate specific antigen sample preparation was separated from the sensor that prevented the sensor from being immersed in chemical solvents, and made the sensor implementing in immediately reuse without wash. Experimental results showed that applied an external magnetic field in a range of 50 Oe to 90 Oe, Dynabeads with a concentration as low as 0.1 μg/mL can be detected by this system and could give an approximate quantitation to the logarithmic of Dynabeads concentration. Sandwich immunoassay was employed for preparing PSA samples. The PSA capture was implemented on a gold film modified with a self-assembled monolayer and using biotinylated secondary antibody against PSA and streptavidinylated Dynabeads. With DC magnetic field in the range of 50 to 90 Oe, PSA can be detected with a detection limit as low as 0.1 ng/mL. Samples spiked with different concentrations of PSA can be distinguished clearly. Due to the contactless detection method, the detection system exhibited advantages such as convenient manipulation, reusable, inexpensive, small weight. So, this detection method was a promising candidate in biomarker detection, especially in point of care detection. PMID:27379844

  4. Antibody production in vitamin A-depleted rats is impaired after immunization with bacterial polysaccharide or protein antigens.

    PubMed

    Pasatiempo, A M; Kinoshita, M; Taylor, C E; Ross, A C

    1990-05-01

    Vitamin A nutritional status has been implicated as important in maintaining the integrity of immune functions. We have determined the effect of vitamin A (retinol) depletion on the ability of young animals to produce antibodies after challenge with various bacterial antigens. Male Lewis rats raised on vitamin A-free or adequate diets were immunized either near 40 days of age, before signs of vitamin A deficiency were apparent, or near 47 days of age when symptoms of deficiency were beginning to be manifest. For rats immunized with polysaccharide antigens from Streptococcus pneumoniae or Neisseria meningitidis, antibody production did not exceed 0-19% of the response of control rats. Vitamin A depletion also severely compromised the response to two T cell-dependent antigens, tetanus toxoid and sheep red blood cells. In striking contrast, retinol-depleted rats immunized with lipopolysaccharides from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Serratia marcesens produced an antibody response indistinguishable from retinol-sufficient animals. These lipopolysaccharides could elicit antibodies in rat pups, whereas the capsular polysaccharide antigens could not. This is consistent with the characteristics of type 1 and type 2 antigens, respectively. These studies indicate that retinol status is an important determinant of the humoral immune response to certain types of antigen and suggest that antibody production to capsular polysaccharides and T cell-dependent antigens is particularly dependent on adequate retinol status.

  5. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with a monoclonal antibody for detecting group A meningococcal antigens in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Sugasawara, R J; Prato, C M; Sippel, J E

    1984-02-01

    Hybridomas were produced from spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with a membrane preparation from Neisseria meningitidis group A strain 4402 and S194/5.XXOBU.14 myeloma cells. The hybridomas were screened for secretion of antibodies suitable for an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) diagnostic for group A meningococcal meningitis. One hybridoma antibody, 3G7, was directed against the pilus protein. This antibody bound to all six lipopolysaccharide and protein group A meningococcal serotyping strains, as well as to meningococcal strains from serogroups C, W135, and Y, but not to a strain of Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae type b, or to two or more strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Salmonella typhi. The ELISA used on antibody, antigen, antibody-conjugate sandwich. Rabbit anti-meningococcal serum was the coating antibody for the antibody sandwich, cerebrospinal fluids contained the bacterial antigens, and 3G7-alkaline phosphatase conjugate was the detecting antibody. The monoclonal antibody conjugate ELISA system was able to detect group A meningococcal antigens in 21 of 25 cerebrospinal fluid specimens that were positive in an immune rabbit serum conjugate ELISA; cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with Haemophilus meningitis served as the controls. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis detected meningococcal antigens in 16 of the same 25 cerebrospinal fluid samples.

  6. Detection of candidal antigens in autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, P; Perheentupa, J; Krohn, K J

    1996-01-01

    Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome type I (APS I) is associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. To characterize the antibody responses in this subgroup of Candida albicans infections, we screened a candidal cDNA expression library with patient sera and found four cDNA clones encoding the immunopositive proteins enolase, heat shock protein 90, pyruvate kinase, and alcohol dehydrogenase. The reactivity to these antigens was studied further by immunoprecipitation assays with in vitro-transcribed and -translated proteins. Analysis of sera from 44 APS I patients showed that the highest antibody reactivity was found with enolase (80% of patients reactive), but significant serological responses were also found with heat shock protein 90 (67%), pyruvate kinase (62.5%), and alcohol dehydrogenase (64%). Overall, 95.5% of patients had detectable antibodies to at least one of these proteins. The cDNAs of enolase and heat shock protein 90 were also expressed in Escherichia coli and studied by immunoblotting. Again, 84% of sera reacted with enolase, whereas 44% of sera reacted with heat shock protein 90. A good correlation between the two methods was found for both enolase (r = 0.86; n = 58; P < 0.001) and heat shock protein 90 (r = 0.71; n = 56; P < 0.001). Our results indicate that the four abundant candidal proteins are the major antigens and can be used as accurate markers of candidiasis in APS I patients. The immunoprecipitation assay described here is particularly useful for the rapid analysis of a large number of samples. PMID:8705671

  7. Bacteriophage Amplification-Coupled Detection and Identification of Bacterial Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Christopher R.; Voorhees, Kent J.

    Current methods of species-specific bacterial detection and identification are complex, time-consuming, and often require expensive specialized equipment and highly trained personnel. Numerous biochemical and genotypic identification methods have been applied to bacterial characterization, but all rely on tedious microbiological culturing practices and/or costly sequencing protocols which render them impractical for deployment as rapid, cost-effective point-of-care or field detection and identification methods. With a view towards addressing these shortcomings, we have exploited the evolutionarily conserved interactions between a bacteriophage (phage) and its bacterial host to develop species-specific detection methods. Phage amplification-coupled matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was utilized to rapidly detect phage propagation resulting from species-specific in vitro bacterial infection. This novel signal amplification method allowed for bacterial detection and identification in as little as 2 h, and when combined with disulfide bond reduction methods developed in our laboratory to enhance MALDI-TOF-MS resolution, was observed to lower the limit of detection by several orders of magnitude over conventional spectroscopy and phage typing methods. Phage amplification has been combined with lateral flow immunochromatography (LFI) to develop rapid, easy-to-operate, portable, species-specific point-of-care (POC) detection devices. Prototype LFI detectors have been developed and characterized for Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agents of plague and anthrax, respectively. Comparable sensitivity and rapidity was observed when phage amplification was adapted to a species-specific handheld LFI detector, thus allowing for rapid, simple, POC bacterial detection and identification while eliminating the need for bacterial culturing or DNA isolation and amplification techniques.

  8. Clinicopathological features and immunohistochemical detection of antigens in acute experimental Streptococcus agalactiae infection in red tilapia (Oreochromis spp.).

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Syuhaidah; Omar, Noraini; Yusoff, Sabri Mohd; Obukwho, Emikpe Benjamin; Nwunuji, Tanko Polycarp; Hanan, Latifah; Samad, Jamil

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the clinicopathological features of acute experimental streptococcosis in red tilapia using various routes of infection; intraperitoneal (IP), immersion (IM) and immersion cut (IC). Twenty four red tilapia in duplicates were inoculated intraperitoneally with 10(9) CFU/ml of S. agalactiae while another sets: intact, one with sharp cut at the tail end were exposed to bacterial inoculums 10(9) CFU/ml diluted in water while two groups of control fish were similarly manipulated. Clinical signs were recorded; samples from the gills, brain, eyes and kidneys were also taken for bacterial isolation and histopathology. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were employed to detect the antigen. The diseased fish showed skin, fin haemorrhages and exophthalmia with obvious signs in IP at 2 hpc followed by IC and IM at 4 hpc. The lesions were noticed earlier in the kidney and most severe in IP. IHC detected antigen as early as PCR and isolation with intense staining in blood vessel lumen and wall, macrophages in choroid, focal haemorrhage in the renal interstitium and meninges especially in IP followed by IC and IM. The immunolocalisation of the antigen described for the first time further explain the pathogenesis of streptococcosis in red tilapia. PMID:23961386

  9. Detecting Bacterial Vaginosis Using Machine Learning

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Yolanda S.; Agrawal, Rajeev; Foster, James A.; Beck, Daniel; Dozier, Gerry

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) is the most common of vaginal infections diagnosed among women during the years where they can bear children. Yet, there is very little insight as to how it occurs. There are a vast number of criteria that can be taken into consideration to determine the presence of BV. The purpose of this paper is two-fold; first to discover the most significant features necessary to diagnose the infection, second is to apply various classification algorithms on the selected features. It is observed that certain feature selection algorithms provide only a few features; however, the classification results are as good as using a large number of features. PMID:26753179

  10. Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of excretory secretory antigens in humans with fascioliasis.

    PubMed Central

    Espino, A M; Finlay, C M

    1994-01-01

    A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has been developed for the detection of Fasciola hepatica excretory secretory (ES) antigens in stool specimens of infected humans. The assay uses antibodies against F. hepatica ES antigens. A monoclonal antibody (ES78, mouse immunoglobulin G2a) was used to capture ES antigens, and a rabbit polyclonal antibody, peroxidase conjugate, was used to identify ES antigens. Thirteen of 14 patients with parasitological evidence of fascioliasis had a detectable concentration of ES antigens (more than 15 ng/ml). None of the stool specimens from controls and from patients with parasites other than F. hepatica showed a positive reaction, suggesting the absence of cross-reactions in this assay. When the 14 patients were retested 2 months after treatment, all of the specimens from the 11 parasitologically cured patients were negative by the antigen detection assay while the specimens from the 3 patients with persisting F. hepatica eggs in their stools remained positive. PMID:8126178

  11. Detection of Bacterial Spores with Lanthanide-Macrocycle Binary Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Cable, Morgan L.; Kirby, James P.; Levine, Dana J.; Manary, Micah J.; Gray, Harry B.; Ponce, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    The detection of bacterial spores via dipicolinate-triggered lanthanide luminescence has been improved in terms of detection limit, stability, and susceptibility to interferents by use of lanthanide-macrocycle binary complexes. Specifically, we compared the effectiveness of Sm, Eu, Tb and Dy complexes with the macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-diacetate (DO2A) to the corresponding lanthanide aquo ions. The Ln(DO2A)+ binary complexes bind dipicolinic acid (DPA), a major constituent of bacterial spores, with greater affinity and demonstrate significant improvement in bacterial spore detection. Of the four luminescent lanthanides studied, the terbium complex exhibits the greatest dipicolinate binding affinity (100-fold greater than Tb3+ alone, and 10-fold greater than other Ln(DO2A)+ complexes) and highest quantum yield. Moreover, the inclusion of DO2A extends the pH range over which Tb-DPA coordination is stable, reduces the interference of calcium ions nearly 5-fold, and mitigates phosphate interference 1000-fold compared to free terbium alone. In addition, detection of Bacillus atrophaeus bacterial spores was improved by the use of Tb(DO2A)+, yielding a 3-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio over Tb3+. Out of the eight cases investigated, the Tb(DO2A)+ binary complex is best for the detection of bacterial spores. PMID:19537757

  12. [Detection of dengue virus antigen in post-mortem tissues].

    PubMed

    Rivera, Jorge; Neira, Marcela; Parra, Edgar; Méndez, Jairo; Sarmiento, Ladys; Caldas, María Leonor

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiological situation of dengue has worsened over the last decade. The difficulties in preventing its transmission and the absence of a vaccine or specific treatment have made dengue a serious risk to public health, health centers and research systems at different levels. Currently, most studies on the pathogenesis of dengue infection focus on the T-cell immune response almost exclusively in secondary infections and are aimed at identifying the mechanisms involved in the development of vascular permeability and bleeding events that accompany the infection. This report describes the case of a baby girl less than 45 days of age with clinical signs of severe dengue, whose diagnosis was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in post-mortem tissue samples and by the ancillary diagnostic use of immunohistochemistry, which detected viral antigens in all organs obtained at autopsy. This case highlights the importance of studying primary infections associated with severe dengue, particularly in children, who are more likely to develop the severe form of the disease without previous infection, and it further stresses the importance of a diagnosis that should not be based solely on the examination of liver tissue samples when studying the pathogenesis of the viral infection. PMID:25504239

  13. Electrochemical immunosensor based on hyperbranched structure for carcinoembryonic antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jingjing; Wang, Xiaobo; Lu, Liandi; Zhu, Peiyuan; Mao, Chun; Zhao, Haolin; Song, Youchao; Shen, Jian

    2014-08-15

    Sensitive determination of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is very important in clinical research and diagnosis. Herein we report the design and synthesis of a new kind of immunosensor based on the benefits of hyperbranched structure. The hyperbranched polyester was grafted to the surface of indium tin oxides glass (ITO) electrode, and the grafting processes were characterized by attentuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). After CEA and horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled antibody-conjugated AuNPs (HRP-Ab2-AuNPs) bioconjugates were immobilized on the surface of the hyperbranched structure-modified electrode, the optimized conditions of the above electrode were investigated. Moreover, the analytical performance of the proposed immunosensor showed a high sensitivity, a linear range from 0.01 to 80ng/mL with a low detection limit of 2.36pg/mL, and good selectivity for CEA. The designed immunoassay system holds great potential for ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensing of other analytes. PMID:24607616

  14. Non-labeled QCM Biosensor for Bacterial Detection using Carbohydrate and Lectin Recognitions

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Zhihong; Huang, Mingchuan; Xiao, Caide; Zhang, Yun; Zeng, Xiangqun; Wang, Peng G.

    2008-01-01

    High percentages of harmful microbes or their secreting toxins bind to specific carbohydrate sequences on human cells at the recognition and attachment sites. A number of studies also show that lectins react with specific structures of bacteria and fungi. In this report, we take advantage of the fact that a high percentage of microorganisms have both carbohydrate and lectin binding pockets at their surface. We demonstrate here for the first time that a carbohydrate non-labeled mass sensor in combination with lectin-bacterial O-antigen recognition can be used for detection of high molecular weight bacterial targets with remarkably high sensitivity and specificity. A functional mannose self-assembled monolayer (SAM) in combination with lectin Con A was used as molecular recognition elements for the detection of E. coli W1485 using Quartz Crytsal Microbalance (QCM) as a transducer. The multivalent binding of Concanavalin A (Con A) to the Escherichia coli (E. coli) surface O-antigen favors the strong adhesion of E. coli to mannose modified QCM surface by forming bridges between these two. As a result, the contact area between cell and QCM surface increases that leads to rigid and strong attachment. Therefore it enhances the binding between E. coli and the mannose. Our results show a significant improvement of the sensitivity and specificity of carbohydrate QCM biosensor with a experimental detection limit of a few hundred bacterial cells. The linear range is from 7.5 × 102 to 7.5 × 107 cells/mL that is four decade wider than the mannose alone QCM sensor. The change of damping resistances for E. coli adhesion experiments was no more than 1.4% suggesting that the bacterial attachment was rigid, rather than a viscoelastic behavior. Little non-specific binding was observed for Staphylococcus aureus and other proteins (Fetal Bovine serum, Erythrina cristagalli lectin). Our approach not only overcomes the challenges of applying QCM technology for bacterial detection but

  15. A bacterial protease inhibitor protects antigens delivered in oral vaccines from digestion while triggering specific mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Andrés Esteban; Coria, Lorena Mirta; Carabajal, Marianela Verónica; Delpino, María Victoria; Risso, Gabriela Sofía; Cobiello, Paula Gonzalez; Rinaldi, Jimena; Barrionuevo, Paula; Bruno, Laura; Frank, Fernanda; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Briones, Gabriel; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Pasquevich, Karina Alejandra; Cassataro, Juliana

    2015-12-28

    We report here that a bacterial protease inhibitor from Brucella spp. called U-Omp19 behaves as an ideal constituent for a vaccine formulation against infectious diseases. When co-administered orally with an antigen (Ag), U-Omp19: i) can bypass the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract by inhibiting stomach and intestine proteases and consequently increases the half-life of the co-administered Ag at immune inductive sites: Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes while ii) it induces the recruitment and activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and increases the amount of intracellular Ag inside APCs. Therefore, mucosal as well as systemic Ag-specific immune responses, antibodies, Th1, Th17 and CD8(+) T cells are enhanced when U-Omp19 is co-administered with the Ag orally. Finally, this bacterial protease inhibitor in an oral vaccine formulation confers mucosal protection and reduces parasite loads after oral challenge with virulent Toxoplasma gondii.

  16. Terahertz spectroscopy for bacterial detection: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang; Yang, Ke; Luo, Yang; Fu, Weiling

    2016-06-01

    The demand for advanced bacterial detection tools is continuously increasing, promoted by its significant benefits in various applications. For instance, in the medical field, these tools would facilitate decision making about more tailored therapies once the infection source has been identified. In the past few years, terahertz (THz = 10(12) Hz) spectroscopy has also shown potential as a novel bacterial detection modality due to its unique advantages. Impressive breakthroughs have been achieved in this field related to bacterial component characterization, spore identification, and cell detection. However, some intrinsic limitations and technical bottlenecks have led to some debates about the practicability of its clinical adoption. In this review, we summarize the progress achieved in this field and discuss some challenges and strategies for future implementation of practical applications. PMID:27131501

  17. FACS technology used in a new rapid bacterial detection method.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M; Hourfar, M K; Nicol, S-B; Spengler, H-P; Montag, T; Seifried, Erhard

    2006-10-01

    Culture methods for bacterial detection (BacT/ALERT or Pall eBDS) are currently implemented in blood donor screening procedures in many countries. Experience in the first years after implementation of these detection assays showed that although the analytical sensitivity was extremely high (about 1 CFU mL(-1)), the majority of these platelets were still transfused before a positive screening result was attained. Rapid technologies were developed to more effectively prevent transfusion-transmitted bacterial infection. In this study, a new rapid bacterial detection method based on fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) technology was developed. Bacteria were stained with thiazole orange dye for 5 min and measurement was taken immediately after staining. The entire process took only 30 min. Six transfusion-relevant bacteria strains were tested in a spiking study. Without pre-incubation in a special bacteria growth medium, analytical sensitivity ranged between 10(5) CFU mL(-1) (Klebsiella oxytoca and Serratia marcesens) and 10(3) CFU mL(-1) (Escherichia coli). Sensitivity could be improved to 10(1) CFU mL(-1) for all tested bacteria by adding a pre-incubation step (6 h at 37 degrees C). Although preliminary in nature, results of our study suggest that bacterial detection by FACS technology in conjunction with a pre-incubation step offers a sensitive alternative technology to culture methods. Additionally, it provides the benefit of a rapid test time and the opportunity of preventing bacterial transmitted infections more effectively.

  18. [Prevention of bacterial risk: pathogen inactivation/detection of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Morel, P; Naegelen, C; Deschaseaux, M; Bardiaux, L

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products remains the most important infectious risk of blood transfusion in 2013. Platelet concentrates (PC) are in cause in the majority of the transfusion reaction due to bacterial contaminations. A lot of prevention methods have been developed over the last 10 years (pre-donation interview, skin decontamination, diversion of the first 30 mL of the donation, leuko-reduction...), they have focused on limiting the contamination of the donations and prevent the bacterial growth in donations and/or in the blood products. These measures were effective and led to significantly reducing the risk of adverse effects associated with bacterial growth. However, every year there are about six accidents (with a high level of imputability) and one death. The reduction of the bacterial risk remains a priority for the French Blood Establishment (EFS). The procedure for skin disinfection is going to be improved in order to further strengthen this crucial step to avoid the contamination of donation. Methods of pathogen inactivation applied to plasma and PC are available in France and their effectiveness is demonstrated on the bacterial risk. Methods for bacterial detection of PC are used in many countries now. Automated culture is the most common. Alternatives are now available in the form of rapid tests able to analyze the PC just before the delivery and avoid false negatives observed with automated culture. Assessments are under way to confirm these benefits in 2013.

  19. Detection of 2 immunoreactive antigens in the cell wall of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Baca, Estela; Hernández-Mendoza, Gustavo; Cuéllar-Cruz, Mayra; Toriello, Conchita; López-Romero, Everardo; Gutiérrez-Sánchez, Gerardo

    2014-07-01

    The cell wall of members of the Sporothrix schenckii complex contains highly antigenic molecules which are potentially useful for the diagnosis and treatment of sporotrichosis. In this study, 2 immunoreactive antigens of 60 (Gp60) and 70 kDa (Gp70) were detected in the cell wall of the yeast morphotypes of Sporothrix brasiliensis and Sporothrix globosa.

  20. Risk of underdiagnosing amebic dysentery due to false-negative Entamoeba histolytica antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Prim, Núria; Escamilla, Pilar; Solé, Roser; Llovet, Teresa; Soriano, Germán; Muñoz, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica antigen assays on stool are widely used to diagnose amebiasis. We report a case of confirmed amebic colitis with a false-negative antigen detection that became positive after treatment. Our results indicate that these assays may underdiagnose acute amebic infection when used alone and should be used cautiously.

  1. Direct Testing of Blood Cultures for Detection of Streptococcal Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Wetkowski, Maryellen A.; Peterson, Ellena M.; De La Maza, Luis M.

    1982-01-01

    A direct, rapid, and simple method for the detection of streptococcal antigens of Lancefield groups A, B, C, D, and G from blood cultures was developed by using a coagglutination test. Fifty-five clinical specimens and 117 simulated blood cultures containing gram-positive cocci were tested. Out of 6,261 clinical blood cultures screened, 55 cultures from 53 patients were positive, with organisms resembling streptococci, by Gram stain. Of these cultures, 78% (43 of 55) were pure cultures of streptococci, and 22% (12 of 55) were mixed with at least one other organism. Of the 43 pure cultures only, correct reactions were obtained (grouping correctly or giving no cross-reactions, or both) with 86% (37 of 43) of the isolates, 12% (5 of 43) exhibited cross-reactions, and 2% (1 of 43) gave false-negative reactions. All of the cross-reacting isolates were Streptococcus pneumoniae, which reacted with the group C reagent, and the false-negative reaction occurred with a Streptococcus bovis isolate. However, by using a direct modified bile solubility test, the correct identification of the S. pneumoniae isolates was obtained. Therefore, by using the modified bile solubility test in conjunction with the direct grouping method, 98% (42 of 43) of the isolates in pure culture could be identified accurately and rapidly after the detection of a positive Gram stain. Correct grouping reactions were obtained with 83% (10 of 12) of the mixed blood cultures, and false-negative results occurred with 17% (2 of 12) of them. Both cultures contained an enterococcus and a gram-negative rod. Of the 117 simulated blood cultures, there was only one incorrect grouping reaction; this occurred with an S. bovis isolate that cross-reacted with the group C reagent. The direct grouping reaction was positive when blood cultures contained a minimum of 1 × 108 to 8 × 108 colony-forming units per ml. In general, this procedure provided information on the identification of the organism 24 h earlier than by

  2. Sensitivity and Specificity of Histoplasma Antigen Detection by Enzyme Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Lauren; Cook, Audrey; Hanzlicek, Andrew; Harkin, Kenneth; Wheat, Joseph; Goad, Carla; Kirsch, Emily

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of an antigen enzyme immunoassay (EIA) on urine samples for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs. This retrospective medical records review included canine cases with urine samples submitted for Histoplasma EIA antigen assay between 2007 and 2011 from three veterinary institutions. Cases for which urine samples were submitted for Histoplasma antigen testing were reviewed and compared to the gold standard of finding Histoplasma organisms or an alternative diagnosis on cytology or histopathology. Sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and the kappa coefficient and associated confidence interval were calculated for the EIA-based Histoplasma antigen assay. Sixty cases met the inclusion criteria. Seventeen cases were considered true positives based on identification of the organism, and 41 cases were considered true negatives with an alternative definitive diagnosis. Two cases were considered false negatives, and there were no false positives. Sensitivity was 89.47% and the negative predictive value was 95.35%. Specificity and the positive predictive value were both 100%. The kappa coefficient was 0.9207 (95% confidence interval, 0.8131-1). The Histoplasma antigen EIA test demonstrated high specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of histoplasmosis in dogs.

  3. Homogeneous electrochemical detection of hippuric acid in urine based on the osmium-antigen conjugate.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Won-Yong; Choi, Young-Bong; Kim, Hyug-Han

    2013-07-22

    A homogeneous electrochemical immunoassay is based on the interaction of osmium-antigen conjugate with its antibody. The novelty presented herein is the direct conjugation of the osmium complex to a small antigen and the application of the quantitative analysis of the antigen and its antibody as the electrical signal for homogeneous immunoassay. The small antigen chosen is hippuric acid (HA), a major urinary metabolite in toluene-exposed humans. As a redox mediator, [Os(4,4'-dimethoxy-2,2'-bipyridine)2(4-aminomethylpyridine-HA)Cl](+/2+) (Os-HA antigen) has been synthesized and characterized on screen-printed carbon electrodes. The synthesized Os-HA antigen shows reversible redox peaks at E(½)=0.056 V versus Ag/AgCl. The homogeneous competitive immunoassay relies on the interaction between Os-HA antigen conjugate and free antigen to its antibody, which can generate electrical signals linearly proportional to the free antigen monitored by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry in the range of 10 μg mL(-1) to 5.12 mg mL(-1). The cutoff concentration of HA in urine samples is 2.0 mg mL(-1), so the method can be used to develop a HA immunosensor. Moreover, the proposed homogeneous electrochemical immunoassay method can be applied to detect low concentrations of small antigens found in the healthcare area.

  4. A multiplex method for the detection of serum antibodies against in silico-predicted tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; Dörre, Jonathan; Waterboer, Tim; Kopitz, Jürgen; Schneider, Martin; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jäger, Elke; Kloor, Matthias; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2014-12-01

    Humoral immune responses against tumor antigens are studied as indirect markers of antigen exposure and in cancer vaccine studies. An increasing number of tumor antigens potentially translated from mutant genes is identified by advances in genomic sequencing. They represent an interesting source for yet unknown immunogenic epitopes. We here describe a multiplex method using the Luminex technology allowing for the detection of antibodies against multiple in silico-predicted linear neo-antigens in large sets of sera. The approach included 32 synthetic biotinylated peptides comprising a predicted set of frameshift mutation-induced neo-antigens. The antigens were fused to a FLAG epitope to ensure monitoring antigen binding to avidin-linked microspheres in the absence of monoclonal antibodies. Analytical specificity of measured serum antibody reactivity was proven by the detection of immune responses in immunized rabbits and a colorectal cancer patient vaccinated with peptides included in the assay. The measured antibody responses were comparable to peptide ELISA, and inter-assay reproducibility of the multiplex approach was excellent (R (2) > 0.98) for 20 sera tested against all antigens. Our methodic approach represents a valuable platform to monitor antibody responses against predicted antigens. It may be used in individualized cancer vaccine studies, thereby extending the relevance beyond the model system in the presented approach.

  5. Improved method for detection of glycosidases in bacterial colonies.

    PubMed Central

    Paoni, N F; Arroyo, R L

    1984-01-01

    An assay has been developed to detect bacterial glycosidases in colonies grown on the surface of agar plates. Advantages of this technique over previously described methods include elimination of the need for replica plating, better visualization of chromagenic reaction products, and a simple permeabilization step to enable better penetration by chromagenic substrates. Images PMID:6364970

  6. Heat treatment prior to testing allows detection of antigen of Dirofilaria immitis in feline serum

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of Dirofilaria immitis infection in cats is complicated by the difficulty associated with reliable detection of antigen in feline blood and serum samples. Methods To determine if antigen-antibody complex formation may interfere with detection of antigen in feline samples, we evaluated the performance of four different commercially available heartworm tests using serum samples from six cats experimentally infected with D. immitis and confirmed to harbor a low number of adult worms (mean = 2.0). Sera collected 168 (n = 6), 196 (n = 6), and 224 (n = 6) days post infection were tested both directly and following heat treatment. Results Antigen was detected in serum samples from 0 or 1 of 6 infected cats using the assays according to manufacturer’s directions, but after heat treatment of serum samples, as many as 5 of 6 cats had detectable antigen 6–8 months post infection. Antibodies to D. immitis were detected in all six infected cats by commercial in-clinic assay and at a reference laboratory. Conclusions These results indicate that heat treatment of samples prior to testing can improve the sensitivity of antigen assays in feline patients, supporting more accurate diagnosis of this infection in cats. Surveys conducted by antigen testing without prior heat treatment of samples likely underestimate the true prevalence of infection in cats. PMID:24411014

  7. Serogroup-Specific Bacterial Engineered Glycoproteins as Novel Antigenic Targets for Diagnosis of Shiga Toxin-Producing-Escherichia coli-Associated Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Melli, Luciano J.; Ciocchini, Andrés E.; Caillava, Ana J.; Vozza, Nicolás; Chinen, Isabel; Rivas, Marta; Feldman, Mario F.

    2014-01-01

    Human infection with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a major cause of postdiarrheal hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS), a life-threatening condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. E. coli O157:H7 is the dominant STEC serotype associated with HUS worldwide, although non-O157 STEC serogroups can cause a similar disease. The detection of anti-O157 E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antibodies in combination with stool culture and detection of free fecal Shiga toxin considerably improves the diagnosis of STEC infections. In the present study, we exploited a bacterial glycoengineering technology to develop recombinant glycoproteins consisting of the O157, O145, or O121 polysaccharide attached to a carrier protein as serogroup-specific antigens for the serological diagnosis of STEC-associated HUS. Our results demonstrate that using these antigens in indirect ELISAs (glyco-iELISAs), it is possible to clearly discriminate between STEC O157-, O145-, and O121-infected patients and healthy children, as well as to confirm the diagnosis in HUS patients for whom the classical diagnostic procedures failed. Interestingly, a specific IgM response was detected in almost all the analyzed samples, indicating that it is possible to detect the infection in the early stages of the disease. Additionally, in all the culture-positive HUS patients, the serotype identified by glyco-iELISAs was in accordance with the serotype of the isolated strain, indicating that these antigens are valuable not only for diagnosing HUS caused by the O157, O145, and O121 serogroups but also for serotyping and guiding the subsequent steps to confirm diagnosis. PMID:25472487

  8. Genetic Diversity of O-Antigens in Hafnia alvei and the Development of a Suspension Array for Serotype Detection.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhifeng; Niedziela, Tomasz; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Cao, Boyang; Wang, Tianwei; Xu, Lingling; Yang, Baopeng; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Hafnia alvei is a facultative and rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Although it has been more than 50 years since the genus was identified, very little is known about variations among Hafnia species. Diversity in O-antigens (O-polysaccharide, OPS) is thought to be a major factor in bacterial adaptation to different hosts and situations and variability in the environment. Antigenic variation is also an important factor in pathogenicity that has been used to define clones within a number of species. The genes that are required to synthesize OPS are always clustered within the bacterial chromosome. A serotyping scheme including 39 O-serotypes has been proposed for H. alvei, but it has not been correlated with known OPS structures, and no previous report has described the genetic features of OPS. In this study, we obtained the genome sequences of 21 H. alvei strains (as defined by previous immunochemical studies) with different lipopolysaccharides. This is the first study to show that the O-antigen gene cluster in H. alvei is located between mpo and gnd in the chromosome. All 21 of the OPS gene clusters contain both the wzx gene and the wzy gene and display a large number of polymorphisms. We developed an O serotype-specific wzy-based suspension array to detect all 21 of the distinct OPS forms we identified in H. alvei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the genetic features of H. alvei antigenic variation and to develop a molecular technique to identify and classify different serotypes. PMID:27171009

  9. Genetic Diversity of O-Antigens in Hafnia alvei and the Development of a Suspension Array for Serotype Detection

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhifeng; Niedziela, Tomasz; Lugowski, Czeslaw; Cao, Boyang; Wang, Tianwei; Xu, Lingling; Yang, Baopeng; Liu, Bin; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Hafnia alvei is a facultative and rod-shaped gram-negative bacterium that belongs to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Although it has been more than 50 years since the genus was identified, very little is known about variations among Hafnia species. Diversity in O-antigens (O-polysaccharide, OPS) is thought to be a major factor in bacterial adaptation to different hosts and situations and variability in the environment. Antigenic variation is also an important factor in pathogenicity that has been used to define clones within a number of species. The genes that are required to synthesize OPS are always clustered within the bacterial chromosome. A serotyping scheme including 39 O-serotypes has been proposed for H. alvei, but it has not been correlated with known OPS structures, and no previous report has described the genetic features of OPS. In this study, we obtained the genome sequences of 21 H. alvei strains (as defined by previous immunochemical studies) with different lipopolysaccharides. This is the first study to show that the O-antigen gene cluster in H. alvei is located between mpo and gnd in the chromosome. All 21 of the OPS gene clusters contain both the wzx gene and the wzy gene and display a large number of polymorphisms. We developed an O serotype-specific wzy-based suspension array to detect all 21 of the distinct OPS forms we identified in H. alvei. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify the genetic features of H. alvei antigenic variation and to develop a molecular technique to identify and classify different serotypes. PMID:27171009

  10. Sensitive immunoradiometric assay for the detection of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigens in human sera.

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira-da-Cruz, M F; Galvão-Castro, B; Daniel-Ribeiro, C T

    1991-01-01

    In the present study we report the standardization of an immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for detection of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis circulating antigens that could be useful in the diagnosis and prognosis of paracoccidioidomycosis. For this purpose we studied the reactivities of P. brasiliensis and other mycotic antigens with rabbit polyclonal anti-P. brasiliensis antibodies (immunoglobulin G) in order to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of an IRMA for detecting P. brasiliensis antigens. The results were compared with those obtained by the double immunodiffusion test, the standard technique for the serodiagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis. By using the immunoglobulin G fraction of rabbit antisera (900 ng per well), it was possible to detect up to 3.6 ng (0.12 micrograms/ml) of cellular antigen and 360 ng (12 micrograms/ml) of metabolic antigen in contrast to the double immunodiffusion test that could detect only 12 micrograms (1.2 mg/ml) of both antigens. IRMA was shown to be feasible and very sensitive and may therefore help, together with clinical data, in establishing early diagnosis and assessing disease activity. It could also allow the study of relationships between P. brasiliensis circulating antigens and host defense mechanisms during the disease. PMID:1907608

  11. Detection of non-jejuni and -coli Campylobacter species from stool specimens with an immunochromatographic antigen detection assay.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Brianne A; Couturier, Marc Roger; Kalp, Kim J; Fisher, Mark A

    2013-06-01

    The STAT! Campy immunochromatographic assay for Campylobacter antigen was compared to culture for 500 clinical stool specimens. Antigen was detected in six culture-negative, PCR-positive specimens. C. upsaliensis, a pathogenic species that is traditionally difficult to recover in routine stool cultures, was detected in two of these culture-negative specimens. This study provides evidence that antigen testing may cross-react with at least one additional non-jejuni and -coli Campylobacter species that may be missed by routine culture for campylobacteriosis.

  12. Specific radioimmunoprecipitation of histone H2A antigens by protein A conjugated sepharose.

    PubMed

    Ruder, F J; Frasch, M; Büsen, W

    1988-04-15

    A modified radioimmunoprecipitation technique is described which allows the specific detection of histone H2A antigens. The technique circumvents unspecific binding of histones to the bacterial adsorbent.

  13. Improved Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis by Combining Antigen and Antibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Sarah M.; Smedema, Melinda L.; Durkin, Michelle M.; Herman, Katie M.; Hage, Chadi A.; Fuller, Deanna; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis can be severe, especially following heavy inoculum exposure. Rapid diagnosis is critical and often possible by detection of antigen, but this test may be falsely negative in 17% of such cases. Antibody detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) may increase sensitivity and permit the measurement of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) classes of antibodies separately. Methods. Microplates coated with Histoplasma antigen were used for testing of serum from patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis and controls in the MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA. Results for IgG and IgM were reported independently. Results. IgG antibodies were detected in 87.5%, IgM antibodies in 67.5%, and IgG and/or IgM antibodies in 88.8% of patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis in this assay, while immunodiffusion, complement fixation, and antigen testing showed sensitivities of 55.0%, 73.1%, and 67.5%, respectively (n = 80). Combining antigen and antibody detection increased the sensitivity to 96.3%. Conclusions. The MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA offers increased sensitivity over current antibody tests while also allowing separate detection of IgG and IgM antibodies and complementing antigen detection. Combining antigen and EIA antibody testing provides an optimal method for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. PMID:26797210

  14. DNA signature-based approaches for bacterial detection and identification.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Pedro; Mendes, Marta V; Santos, Catarina L; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Tavares, Fernando

    2009-06-01

    During the late eighties, environmental microbiologists realized the potential of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the design of innovative approaches to study microbial communities or to detect and identify microorganisms in diverse and complex environments. In contrast to long-established methods of cultivation-based microbial identification, PCR-based techniques allow for the identification of microorganisms regardless of their culturability. A large number of reports have been published that describe PCR-inspired methods, frequently complemented by sequencing or hybridization profiling, to infer taxonomic and clonal microbial diversity or to detect and identify microorganisms using taxa-specific genomic markers. Typing methods have been particularly useful for microbial ecology-driven studies; however, they are not suitable for diagnostic purposes, such as the detection of specific species, strains or clones. Recently, comprehensive reviews have been written describing the panoply of typing methods available and describing their advantages and limitations; however, molecular approaches for bacterial detection and identification were either not considered or only vaguely discussed. This review focuses on DNA-based methods for bacterial detection and identification, highlighting strategies for selecting taxa-specific loci and emphasizing the molecular techniques and emerging technological solutions for increasing the detection specificity and sensitivity. The massive and increasing number of available bacterial sequences in databases, together with already employed bioinformatics tools, hold promise of more reliable, fast and cost-effective methods for bacterial identification in a wide range of samples in coming years. This tendency will foster the validation and certification of these methods and their routine implementation by certified diagnostic laboratories.

  15. A Cronobacter turicensis O1 Antigen-Specific Monoclonal Antibody Inhibits Bacterial Motility and Entry into Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lehner, Angelika; Dietrich, Richard; Kleinsteuber, Ina; Canals, Rocío; Zurfluh, Katrin; Weiner, Kerstin; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Cronobacter turicensis is an opportunistic foodborne pathogen that can cause a rare but sometimes lethal infection in neonates. Little is known about the virulence mechanisms and intracellular lifestyle of this pathogen. In this study, we developed an IgG monoclonal antibody (MAb; MAb 2G4) that specifically recognizes the O1 antigen of C. turicensis cells. The antilipopolysaccharide antibody bound predominantly monovalently to the O antigen and reduced bacterial growth without causing cell agglutination. Furthermore, binding of the antibody to the O1 antigen of C. turicensis cells caused a significant reduction of the membrane potential which is required to energize flagellar rotation, accompanied by a decreased flagellum-based motility. These results indicate that binding of IgG to the O antigen of C. turicensis causes a direct antimicrobial effect. In addition, this feature of the antibody enabled new insight into the pathogenicity of C. turicensis. In a tissue culture infection model, pretreatment of C. turicensis with MAb 2G4 showed no difference in adhesion to human epithelial cells, whereas invasion of bacteria into Caco-2 cells was significantly inhibited. PMID:25534937

  16. Bacteriophage functional genomics and its role in bacterial pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Jochen; Fouts, Derrick E; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2013-07-01

    Emerging and reemerging bacterial infectious diseases are a major public health concern worldwide. The role of bacteriophages in the emergence of novel bacterial pathogens by horizontal gene transfer was highlighted by the May 2011 Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreaks that originated in Germany and spread to other European countries. This outbreak also highlighted the pivotal role played by recent advances in functional genomics in rapidly deciphering the virulence mechanism elicited by this novel pathogen and developing rapid diagnostics and therapeutics. However, despite a steady increase in the number of phage sequences in the public databases, boosted by the next-generation sequencing technologies, few functional genomics studies of bacteriophages have been conducted. Our definition of 'functional genomics' encompasses a range of aspects: phage genome sequencing, annotation and ascribing functions to phage genes, prophage identification in bacterial sequences, elucidating the events in various stages of phage life cycle using genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, defining the mechanisms of host takeover including specific bacterial-phage protein interactions and identifying virulence and other adaptive features encoded by phages and finally, using prophage genomic information for bacterial detection/diagnostics. Given the breadth and depth of this definition and the fact that some of these aspects (especially phage-encoded virulence/adaptive features) have been treated extensively in other reviews, we restrict our focus only on certain aspects. These include phage genome sequencing and annotation, identification of prophages in bacterial sequences and genetic characterization of phages, functional genomics of the infection process and finally, bacterial identification using genomic information.

  17. Bacteriophage functional genomics and its role in bacterial pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Klumpp, Jochen; Fouts, Derrick E; Sozhamannan, Shanmuga

    2013-07-01

    Emerging and reemerging bacterial infectious diseases are a major public health concern worldwide. The role of bacteriophages in the emergence of novel bacterial pathogens by horizontal gene transfer was highlighted by the May 2011 Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreaks that originated in Germany and spread to other European countries. This outbreak also highlighted the pivotal role played by recent advances in functional genomics in rapidly deciphering the virulence mechanism elicited by this novel pathogen and developing rapid diagnostics and therapeutics. However, despite a steady increase in the number of phage sequences in the public databases, boosted by the next-generation sequencing technologies, few functional genomics studies of bacteriophages have been conducted. Our definition of 'functional genomics' encompasses a range of aspects: phage genome sequencing, annotation and ascribing functions to phage genes, prophage identification in bacterial sequences, elucidating the events in various stages of phage life cycle using genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, defining the mechanisms of host takeover including specific bacterial-phage protein interactions and identifying virulence and other adaptive features encoded by phages and finally, using prophage genomic information for bacterial detection/diagnostics. Given the breadth and depth of this definition and the fact that some of these aspects (especially phage-encoded virulence/adaptive features) have been treated extensively in other reviews, we restrict our focus only on certain aspects. These include phage genome sequencing and annotation, identification of prophages in bacterial sequences and genetic characterization of phages, functional genomics of the infection process and finally, bacterial identification using genomic information. PMID:23520178

  18. Structure of a metal-independent bacterial glycosyltransferase that catalyzes the synthesis of histo-blood group A antigen

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Pham, Tram T. K.; Stinson, Brittany; Sundriyal, Amit; Tumbale, Percy; Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Brew, Keith; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are a source of antigenic variation between individuals that modulates resistance and susceptibility to pathogens and is a barrier to the spread of enveloped viruses. HBGAs are also produced by a few prokaryotes where they are synthesized by glycosyltransferases (GTs) related to human HBGA synthases. Here we report the first structure of a bacterial GT of this family, from an intestinal resident, Bacteroides ovatus. Unlike its mammalian homologues and other GTs with similar folds, this protein lacks a metal-binding Asp-X-Asp motif and is fully active in the absence of divalent metal ions, yet is strikingly similar in structure and in its interactions with substrates to structurally characterized mammalian metal-dependent mammalian homologues. This shows how an apparently major divergence in catalytic properties can be accommodated by minor structural adjustments and illustrates the structural underpinnings of horizontal transfer of a functional gene from prokaryotes to vertebrates. PMID:23230506

  19. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for a soluble antigen of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent for salmonid bacterial kidney disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Mulcahy, D.

    1987-01-01

    A double-antibody enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of a soluble fraction of Renibacterium salmoninarum was developed from components extracted from the supernatant of an R. salmoninarum broth culture. The Costar® Serocluster™ EIA microplate gave the highest absorbance and signal-to-noise ratios among seven types tested. Including Tween 80 in the wash buffer resulted in higher absorbances than Tween 20 when antigen was present. Background absorbance did not increase when Tween 80 was added to the wash buffer, but did when Tween 80 replaced Tween 20 in antigen and conjugate diluents. Adsorption of coating antibody peaked within 4 h at 37 °C and 16 h at 4 °C. Antigen attachment to antibody-coated microplate wells depended more on incubation temperature than duration; we adopted a 3-h incubation at 25 °C. Conjugate incubation for longer than 1 h at 37 °C or 3 h at 25 °C resulted in unacceptable background levels. No cross-reactions resulted from heat-extracted antigens of 10 other species of bacteria. The optimized ELISA is a 6-h test that enables detection of levels of soluble antigen as low as 2–20 ng.

  20. Liquid crystals as optical amplifiers for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Zafiu, C; Hussain, Z; Küpcü, S; Masutani, A; Kilickiran, P; Sinner, E-K

    2016-06-15

    Interactions of bacteria with target molecules (e.g. antibiotics) or other microorganisms are of growing interest. The first barrier for targeting gram-negative bacteria is layer of a Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Liquid crystal (LC) based sensors covered with LPS monolayers, as presented in this study, offer a simple model to study and make use of this type of interface for detection and screening. This work describes in detail the production and application of such sensors based on three different LPS that have been investigated regarding their potential to serve as sensing layer to detect bacteria. The LPS O127:B8 in combination with a LC based sensor was identified to be most useful as biomimetic sensing surface. This LPS/LC combination interacts with three different bacteria species, one gram-positive and two gram-negative species, allowing the detection of bacterial presence regardless from their viability. It could be shown that even very low bacterial cell numbers (minimum 500 cell ml(-1)) could be detected within minutes (maximum 15 min). The readout mechanism is the adsorption of bacterial entities on surface bond LPS molecules with the LC serving as an optical amplifier.

  1. Molecular detection of bacterial contamination in gnotobiotic rodent units

    PubMed Central

    Packey, Christopher D; Shanahan, Michael T; Manick, Sayeed; Bower, Maureen A; Ellermann, Melissa; Tonkonogy, Susan L; Carroll, Ian M; Sartor, R Balfour

    2013-01-01

    Gnotobiotic rodents provide an important technique to study the functional roles of commensal bacteria in host physiology and pathophysiology. To ensure sterility, these animals must be screened frequently for contamination. The traditional screening approaches of culturing and Gram staining feces have inherent limitations, as many bacteria are uncultivable and fecal Gram stains are difficult to interpret. Thus, we developed and validated molecular methods to definitively detect and identify contamination in germ-free (GF) and selectively colonized animals. Fresh fecal pellets were collected from rodents housed in GF isolators, spontaneously contaminated ex-GF isolators, selectively colonized isolators and specific pathogen-free (SPF) conditions. DNA isolated from mouse and rat fecal samples was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subjected to quantitative PCR (qPCR) using universal primers that amplify the 16S rRNA gene from all bacterial groups. PCR products were sequenced to identify contaminating bacterial species. Random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR profiles verified bacterial inoculation of selectively colonized animals. These PCR techniques more accurately detected and identified GF isolator contamination than current standard approaches. These molecular techniques can be utilized to more definitively screen GF and selectively colonized animals for bacterial contamination when Gram stain and/or culture results are un-interpretable or inconsistent. PMID:23887190

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigen testing to detect HIV infection in female sex workers in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chan, R K; Ali, K; Thoe, S Y

    1995-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterised by seroconversion after a ¿window¿ period of 2 to 3 months. After this period antibodies are usually detectable by screening tests (enzyme immunoassay or particle agglutination) confirmed by Western blot analysis. We studied 1000 newly enrolled female sex workers who had not been previously tested for HIV to assess the usefulness of HIV antigen testing to improve the efficacy of HIV infection detection. Blood was taken at enrollment for HIV antigen and HIV antibody testing. The Abbott HIVAG-1 test was used to detect antigen; antibody detection was by the Abbott recombinant HIV-1/HIV-2 3rd generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) test, the Fujirebio Serodia-HIV particle agglutination (PA) test for screening, and the Diagnostic Biotechnology HIV Blot 2.2 Western blot (WB) test for antibody confirmation. Of the 1000 samples, 26 were positive for HIV antibody testing (26/26 for EIA, 25/25 for PA, 26/26 for WB), giving a prevalence rate of 2.6%, Of these 26 seropositive samples 1 was positive on HIV antigen testing. There were no samples which were antigen-positive and antibody-negative. HIV antigen testing does not add to increased efficacy of HIV detection among female sex workers in Singapore.

  3. Mycobacterial antigen detection by immunohistochemistry in goat paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, J A; Bernabé, A; Gómez, M A; Sánchez, J; Gómez, S

    1991-05-01

    An immunohistochemical method (PAP) for a microscopic diagnosis of paratuberculosis in goats is described as an alternative method to the Ziehl-Neelsen technique. Mycobacterial antigens are only found in enteric and mesenteric lymph node lesions. This method is the most sensible, particularly in cases in which there are no paratuberculosis lesions and the Ziehl-Neelsen technique shows no acid-fast bacilli (AFB).

  4. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  5. Performance Assessment of Four Chimeric Trypanosoma cruzi Antigens Based on Antigen-Antibody Detection for Diagnosis of Chronic Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Santos, Fred Luciano Neves; Celedon, Paola Alejandra Fiorani; Zanchin, Nilson Ivo Tonin; Brasil, Tatiana de Arruda Campos; Foti, Leonardo; Souza, Wayner Vieira de; Silva, Edmilson Domingos; Gomes, Yara de Miranda; Krieger, Marco Aurélio

    2016-01-01

    The performance of serologic tests in chronic Chagas disease diagnosis largely depends on the type and quality of the antigen preparations that are used for detection of anti-Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies. Whole-cell T. cruzi extracts or recombinant proteins have shown variation in the performance and cross-reactivity. Synthetic chimeric proteins comprising fragments of repetitive amino acids of several different proteins have been shown to improve assay performances to detect Chagasic infections. Here, we describe the production of four chimeric T. cruzi proteins and the assessment of their performance for diagnostic purposes. Circular Dichroism spectra indicated the absence of well-defined secondary structures, while polydispersity evaluated by Dynamic Light Scattering revealed only minor aggregates in 50 mM carbonate-bicarbonate (pH 9.6), demonstrating that it is an appropriate buffering system for sensitizing microplates. Serum samples from T. cruzi-infected and non-infected individuals were used to assess the performance of these antigens for detecting antibodies against T. cruzi, using both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and a liquid bead array platform. Performance parameters (AUC, sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and J index) showed high diagnostic accuracy for all chimeric proteins for detection of specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies and differentiated seropositive individuals from those who were seronegative. Our data suggest that these four chimeric proteins are eligible for phase II studies. PMID:27517281

  6. Microbiology: detection of bacterial pathogens and their occurrence. [Water pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Reasoner, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of waterborne diseases are reported in this literature review. Contaminated water is a major source of exposure to bacterial pathogens for both humans and animals. Legionella, an aquatic organism, is of special interest because of its importance as a respiratory pathogen and the human disease outbreaks associated with contaminated air conditioning cooling tower waters and contaminated shower heads in health care institutions. The occurrence and detection of Legionella in water is presented in one of seven tables. Included are 147 references. (JMT)

  7. Detection of serum anti-melanocyte antibodies and identification of related antigens in patients with vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Zhu, M C; Liu, C G; Wang, D X; Zhan, Z

    2015-12-07

    We detected autoantibodies against melanocytes in serum samples obtained from 50 patients, including 4 with HBV, with vitiligo and identified the associated membrane antigens. Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and anti-tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1) antibody levels were analyzed. The associated antigens in normal human melanocyte were identified by immunofluorescence. Autoantibodies against melanocyte membrane and cytoplasmic proteins were detected by western blot. Membrane antigens with higher frequencies were identified by protein mass spectrometry. The HSP70 and anti-TRP-1 antibody levels (N = 70; 10 with HBV) were detected by ELISA. The specific antigens were detected in melanocyte cytoplasm and membrane (40/50; 80% incidence; western blot). The autoantibodies reacted with several membrane antigens with approximate molecular weights (Mr) of 86,000, 75,000, 60,000, 52,000, and 44,000 (strip positive rates: 36, 58, 22, 2, and 2%, respectively). Thirty percent of the patients showed the presence of cytoplasmic antigens (Mr: 110,000, 90,000, 75,000, 50,000, and 400,000; strip positive rates: 12, 4, 12, 10, and 2%, respectively). Fifteen and 5% of the healthy subjects showed positive expression of membrane and cytoplasmic antigens, respectively. Protein mass spectrometry predicted membrane proteins with Mr of 86,000 and 75,000 and 60,000 to be Lamin A /C and Vimentin X1, respective. High titers of anti-TRP-1 antibody were detected and showed positive correlation with HSP70 (r = 0. 927, P < 0. 01). This study identified a novel membrane antigen associated with vitiligo, which might assist future investigations into autoimmune pathogenesis of vitiligo and formation of autoantibodies. HBV infection was correlated to vitiligo.

  8. Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen detection across whole cattle hides using two antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Vander Ley, Brian L; Ridpath, Julia F; Sweiger, Shaun H

    2012-05-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus is a costly disease of cattle that can be controlled by vaccination, biosecurity, and removal of persistently infected cattle. Development and proficiency testing of assays to identify persistently infected cattle requires substantial quantities of known positive- and negative-sample material. The objective of this study was to determine what sections of bovine skin contained Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen. Two commercially available antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunoassays were used to test subsamples representing the entire skin of 3 persistently infected calves. Both assays detected Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen in the samples indicated for use by assay protocol. However, one assay identified all subsamples as positive, while the second assay identified 64.4% of subsamples as positive. These results show that use of samples other than those specified by the assay protocol must be validated for each individual assay. In this study, alternative sample sites and use of the entire hide for proficiency testing would be acceptable for only one of the assays tested.

  9. The antigen 43 structure reveals a molecular Velcro-like mechanism of autotransporter-mediated bacterial clumping

    PubMed Central

    Heras, Begoña; Totsika, Makrina; Peters, Kate M.; Paxman, Jason J.; Gee, Christine L.; Jarrott, Russell J.; Perugini, Matthew A.; Whitten, Andrew E.; Schembri, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Aggregation and biofilm formation are critical mechanisms for bacterial resistance to host immune factors and antibiotics. Autotransporter (AT) proteins, which represent the largest group of outer-membrane and secreted proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, contribute significantly to these phenotypes. Despite their abundance and role in bacterial pathogenesis, most AT proteins have not been structurally characterized, and there is a paucity of detailed information with regard to their mode of action. Here we report the structure–function relationships of Antigen 43 (Ag43a), a prototypic self-associating AT protein from uropathogenic Escherichia coli. The functional domain of Ag43a displays a twisted L-shaped β-helical structure firmly stabilized by a 3D hydrogen-bonded scaffold. Notably, the distinctive Ag43a L shape facilitates self-association and cell aggregation. Combining all our data, we define a molecular “Velcro-like” mechanism of AT-mediated bacterial clumping, which can be tailored to fit different bacterial lifestyles such as the formation of biofilms. PMID:24335802

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Rapid Antigen Detection and Serotyping Lateral Flow Antigen Detection System for Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus

    PubMed Central

    Morioka, Kazuki; Fukai, Katsuhiko; Yoshida, Kazuo; Kitano, Rie; Yamazoe, Reiko; Yamada, Manabu; Nishi, Tatsuya; Kanno, Toru

    2015-01-01

    We developed a lateral flow strip using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which allows for rapid antigen detection and serotyping of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). This FMDV serotyping strip was able to detect all 7 serotypes and distinguish serotypes O, A, C and Asia1. Its sensitivities ranged from 103 to 104 of a 50% tissue culture infectious dose of each FMDV stain; this is equal to those of the commercial product Svanodip (Boehringer Ingelheim Svanova, Uppsala, Sweden), which can detect all seven serotypes of FMDV, but does not distinguish them. Our evaluation of the FMDV serotyping strip using a total of 118 clinical samples (vesicular fluids, vesicular epithelial emulsions and oral and/or nasal swabs) showed highly sensitive antigen detection and accuracy in serotyping in accordance with ELISA or RT-PCR. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on any FMDV serotyping strip that provides both rapid antigen detection and serotyping of FMDV at the same time on one strip without extra devices. This method will be useful in both FMD-free countries and FMD-infected countries, especially where laboratory diagnosis cannot be carried out. PMID:26270053

  11. [Detection of bacterial DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)].

    PubMed

    Höfler, G

    1994-01-01

    Enzymatic amplification of DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a very sensitive and rapid way of detecting specific DNA sequences. Bacterial DNA can be detected in a wide variety of samples provided at least partial sequence information is available. For a great number of bacteria PCR detection methods have been published. Most important for the pathologist are mycobacteriae (M. tuberculosis, avium, etc.). Borellia burgdorferi, Listeria monozytogenes and chlamydiae (Ce. trachomatis, C. psittaci). Fresh or fixed paraffin embedded tissues, exfoliated cells, whole blood, serum, sputum, urine, ascites or pleural fluid etc. can be analyzed. The time needed to perform the analysis varies between 5 hours and 2 days mostly depending on the DNA extraction method. Several potential pitfalls have to be avoided. The most common problem is contamination of reagents with target DNA. Amplification of DNA from biological samples may be prevented by enzyme inhibitors (salts, proteins). This problem can at least partially be avoided by changing the DNA purification method. Several additional problems may arise if bacterial DNA has to be amplified. Bacterial walls may have to be disrupted using heat or detergent for accessibility of target DNA. Positive results have to be judged carefully. Unlike the situation in retroviral infections with the virus sometimes present in the absence of disease, in the majority of bacterial infections the presence of bacteria signals manifest disease. A possible exception may be the finding of mycobacterial DNA in sarcoidosis patients who can be treated with steroids without provoking tuberculosis. PCR is especially useful in situations where rapid results are necessary or only fixed tissue is available.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7533972

  12. Changes in the antigenic and molecular structure of. gamma. -irradiated bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Suba, E.A.; Tsai, C.M.; Elin, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    Ionization radiation is known to alter the biological properties of LPS. The author treated a highly purified LPS from E. coli in aqueous medium with /sup 60/Co-radiation. The changes in the antigenic and molecular structure of LPS were studied in double immunodiffusion/immunoelectrophoresis (rabbit antiserum) and sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), respectively. Untreated LPS revealed two major antigenic components and, due to varying lengths of the O-polysaccharide side chain, a series of homopolymers (SDS-PAGE). High doses of ..gamma..-radiation destroyed all antigenic reactivities and all stainable bands on SDS-PAGE. However, lower doses of radiation were selective. Disappearance of the more radiation-sensitive, electrophoretically fast-migrating antigenic component paralleled elimination of the long O-side chain containing molecules. The relatively radiation-resistant, less anodic second antigenic component cross-reacted with LPS of another E. coli strain and corresponded to LPS molecules composed of R-core and lipid A (SDS-PAGE). These findings explain the in vivo loss of antibody protection from shock before non-specific resistance with ..gamma..-irradiation of LPS.

  13. A bacterial protease inhibitor protects antigens delivered in oral vaccines from digestion while triggering specific mucosal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ibañez, Andrés Esteban; Coria, Lorena Mirta; Carabajal, Marianela Verónica; Delpino, María Victoria; Risso, Gabriela Sofía; Cobiello, Paula Gonzalez; Rinaldi, Jimena; Barrionuevo, Paula; Bruno, Laura; Frank, Fernanda; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto; Briones, Gabriel; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Pasquevich, Karina Alejandra; Cassataro, Juliana

    2015-12-28

    We report here that a bacterial protease inhibitor from Brucella spp. called U-Omp19 behaves as an ideal constituent for a vaccine formulation against infectious diseases. When co-administered orally with an antigen (Ag), U-Omp19: i) can bypass the harsh environment of the gastrointestinal tract by inhibiting stomach and intestine proteases and consequently increases the half-life of the co-administered Ag at immune inductive sites: Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes while ii) it induces the recruitment and activation of antigen presenting cells (APCs) and increases the amount of intracellular Ag inside APCs. Therefore, mucosal as well as systemic Ag-specific immune responses, antibodies, Th1, Th17 and CD8(+) T cells are enhanced when U-Omp19 is co-administered with the Ag orally. Finally, this bacterial protease inhibitor in an oral vaccine formulation confers mucosal protection and reduces parasite loads after oral challenge with virulent Toxoplasma gondii. PMID:26456256

  14. A novel inhibition ELISA for the detection and monitoring of Penicillium marneffei antigen in human serum.

    PubMed

    Prakit, K; Nosanchuk, J D; Pruksaphon, K; Vanittanakom, N; Youngchim, S

    2016-04-01

    The thermally dimorphic fungus Penicillium marneffei is a causative agent of penicilliosis marneffei, a disease considered to be an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining illness in Southeast Asia and southern China. We have developed an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (inh-ELISA) incorporating the yeast phase specific mannoprotein-binding monoclonal antibody 4D1 for the detection of P. marneffei infection. In our sample set, the test detected antigenemia in all 45 (100 %) patients with P. marneffei, with a mean antigen concentration of 4.32 μg/ml. No cross-reactivity in this assay was found using serum from 44 additional patients with other fungal infections, such as Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Candida albicans, as well as 44 patients with bacterial infections, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Streptococcus suis. Additionally, no reactivity occurred using serum from 31 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients without a history of fungal infections and 113 healthy controls residing in endemic areas. To investigate the potential of the inh-ELISA for disease monitoring, we followed the reduction in antigenemia in six patients who clinically responded to itraconazole and P. marneffei was no longer isolated from their blood or tissues. In contrast, we correlated increased concentrations of antigenemia in patients with relapsed P. marneffei infection with the progression of their clinical symptoms and the isolation of P. marneffei from their clinical specimens. In summary, the P. marneffei inh-ELISA is a promising new assay for the rapid diagnosis of P. marneffei, as well as a tool for evaluating clinical response and clearance of the fungus during treatment. PMID:26838686

  15. The defined antigen substrate sphere system with direct immunohistoperoxidase for detection of soluble dengue antigen in sera of patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Boonpucknavig, S; Bunnag, C; Vuttiviroj, O; Nimmannitya, S

    1978-09-01

    The defined antigen substrate sphere system is a simple method for detecting antigen or antibody in the circulation. The technic is based on the coupling of antigen or antibody with Sepharose 4B beads that have been activated by cyanogen bromide. In this study the activated beads were exposed to dengue antigen in the serum from a patient with dengue hemorrhagic fever and then stained with antidengue antibody conjugated with horseradish peroxidase. The positive reaction showed brown beads by light microscopy, whereas the negative reaction gave colorless beads. The authors examined 134 specimens from 91 cases. The results were positive in 53.85%. The dengue antigen appeared in the sera on the day before shock or subsidence of fever. The percentages of sera containing soluble dengue antigen were greatest on the day of shock or subsidence of fever (33.33%) and on the fifth day of fever (28.07%). The highest titers of soluble dengue antigen (1:40 to 1:80) appeared in the sera of patients who had Grade III disease on the day of shock. The dengue antigen appeared most often in sera that had high titers of dengue antibody. It is postulated that this detected dengue antigen may be a part of soluble immune complexes formed during the hyperimmune stage of the immune response, and plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome.

  16. Immuno-PCR: Very sensitive antigen detection by means of specific antibody-DNA conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, T.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. )

    1992-10-02

    An antigen detection system, termed immuno-polymerase chain reaction (immuno-PCR), was developed in which a specific DNA molecule is used as the marker. A streptavidin-protein A chimera that possesses tight and specific binding affinity both for biotin and immunoglobulin G was used to attach a biotinylated DNA specifically to antigen-monoclonal antibody complexes that had been immobilized on microtiter plate wells. Then, a segment of the attached DNA was amplified by PCR. Analysis of the PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis after staining with ethidium bromide allowed as few as 580 antigen molecules to be readily and reproducibly detected. Direct comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of a chimera-alkaline phosphatase conjugate demonstrates that enhancement in detection sensitivity was obtained with the use of immuno-PCR. Given the enormous amplification capability and specificity of PCR, this immuno-PCR technology has a sensitivity greater than any existing antigen detection system and, in principle, could be applied to the detection of single antigen molecules.

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of Seven Commercial Assays for Rapid Detection of Group A Rotavirus Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Fremy, Céline; Pillet, Sylvie; Mendes Martins, Lucile; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Aho, Serge L.; Pothier, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Seven commercial immunochromatographic assays intended for the detection of group A rotavirus antigens in human stool samples were evaluated. These assays showed similar levels of diagnostic accuracy and were suitable for the detection of rotavirus in patients with acute gastroenteritis but missed some asymptomatic rotavirus shedding identified by real-time reverse transcription-PCR. PMID:26378280

  18. The immune responses to bacterial antigens encountered in vivo at mucosal surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Dougan, G; Ghaem-Maghami, M; Pickard, D; Frankel, G; Douce, G; Clare, S; Dunstan, S; Simmons, C

    2000-01-01

    Mammals have evolved a sophisticated immune system for handling antigens encountered at their mucosal surfaces. The way in which mucosally delivered antigens are handled influences our ability to design effective mucosal vaccines. Live attenuated derivatives of pathogens are one route towards the development of mucosal vaccines. However, some molecules, described as mucosal immunogens, are inherently immunogenic at mucosal surfaces. Studies on mucosal immunogens may facilitate the identification of common characteristics that contribute to mucosal immunogenicity and aid the development of novel, non-living mucosal vaccines and immunostimulators. PMID:10874742

  19. Mechanism of Asp24 Upregulation in Brucella abortus Rough Mutant with a Disrupted O-Antigen Export System and Effect of Asp24 in Bacterial Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Peng, Daxin

    2014-01-01

    We previously showed that Brucella abortus rough mutant strain 2308 ΔATP (called the ΔrfbE mutant in this study) exhibits reduced intracellular survival in RAW264.7 cells and attenuated persistence in BALB/c mice. In this study, we performed microarray analysis to detect genes with differential expression between the ΔrfbE mutant and wild-type strain S2308. Interestingly, acid shock protein 24 gene (asp24) expression was significantly upregulated in the ΔrfbE mutant compared to S2308, as confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Further studies using additional strains indicated that the upregulation of asp24 occurred only in rough mutants with disrupted O-antigen export system components, including the ATP-binding protein gene rfbE (bab1_0542) and the permease gene rfbD (bab1_0543), while the ΔwboA rough mutant (which lacks an O-antigen synthesis-related glycosyltransferase) and the RB51 strain (a vaccine strain with the rough phenotype) showed no significant changes in asp24 expression compared to S2308. In addition, abolishing the intracellular O-antigen synthesis of the ΔrfbE mutant by deleting the wboA gene (thereby creating the ΔrfbE ΔwboA double-knockout strain) recovered asp24 expression. These results indicated that asp24 upregulation is associated with intracellular O-antigen synthesis and accumulation but not with the bacterial rough phenotype. Further studies indicated that asp24 upregulation in the ΔrfbE mutant was associated neither with bacterial adherence and invasion nor with cellular necrosis on RAW264.7 macrophages. However, proper expression of the asp24 gene favors intracellular survival of Brucella in RAW264.7 cells and HeLa cells during an infection. This study reveals a novel mechanism for asp24 upregulation in B. abortus mutants. PMID:24752516

  20. Mechanism of Asp24 upregulation in Brucella abortus rough mutant with a disrupted O-antigen export system and effect of Asp24 in bacterial intracellular survival.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingxing; Qu, Jing; Han, Xiangan; Ding, Chan; Wang, Shaohui; Peng, Daxin; Yu, Shengqing

    2014-07-01

    We previously showed that Brucella abortus rough mutant strain 2308 ΔATP (called the ΔrfbE mutant in this study) exhibits reduced intracellular survival in RAW264.7 cells and attenuated persistence in BALB/c mice. In this study, we performed microarray analysis to detect genes with differential expression between the ΔrfbE mutant and wild-type strain S2308. Interestingly, acid shock protein 24 gene (asp24) expression was significantly upregulated in the ΔrfbE mutant compared to S2308, as confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting. Further studies using additional strains indicated that the upregulation of asp24 occurred only in rough mutants with disrupted O-antigen export system components, including the ATP-binding protein gene rfbE (bab1_0542) and the permease gene rfbD (bab1_0543), while the ΔwboA rough mutant (which lacks an O-antigen synthesis-related glycosyltransferase) and the RB51 strain (a vaccine strain with the rough phenotype) showed no significant changes in asp24 expression compared to S2308. In addition, abolishing the intracellular O-antigen synthesis of the ΔrfbE mutant by deleting the wboA gene (thereby creating the ΔrfbE ΔwboA double-knockout strain) recovered asp24 expression. These results indicated that asp24 upregulation is associated with intracellular O-antigen synthesis and accumulation but not with the bacterial rough phenotype. Further studies indicated that asp24 upregulation in the ΔrfbE mutant was associated neither with bacterial adherence and invasion nor with cellular necrosis on RAW264.7 macrophages. However, proper expression of the asp24 gene favors intracellular survival of Brucella in RAW264.7 cells and HeLa cells during an infection. This study reveals a novel mechanism for asp24 upregulation in B. abortus mutants.

  1. Radioimmunoassay for detecting antibodies against murine malarial parasite antigens: monoclonal antibodies recognizing Plasmodium yoelii antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.J.; Taylor, D.W.; Evans, C.B.; Asofsky, R.

    1980-12-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay (SPRIA) in microtiter wells was established for detecting antibodies against Plasmodium yoelii Ag. The SPRIA was found (1) to require as little as 5 ..mu..g of crude parasite Ag per well, (2) to be able to detect 0.5 ng of monoclonal Ab, and (3) to be 10/sup 4/ times more sensitive than the indirect fluorescent Ab staining technique. In a modification of the above assay using intact RBC as an Ag, hyperimmune serum showed significant binding to the surface of erythrocytes of mice infected with P. yoelii parasites but not to RBC of normal mice. Hybridomas were prepared by fusing infected mouse spleen cells with myeloma cells. Using the SPRIA, hybrids secreting Ab against P. yoelii 17XL Ag were detected.

  2. Rapid Bacterial Detection via an All-Electronic CMOS Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhoo, Nasim; Cumby, Nichole; Gulak, P. Glenn; Maxwell, Karen L.

    2016-01-01

    The timely and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases is one of the greatest challenges currently facing modern medicine. The development of innovative techniques for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens in point-of-care facilities using low-cost, portable instruments is essential. We have developed a novel all-electronic biosensor that is able to identify bacteria in less than ten minutes. This technology exploits bacteriocins, protein toxins naturally produced by bacteria, as the selective biological detection element. The bacteriocins are integrated with an array of potassium-selective sensors in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor technology to provide an inexpensive bacterial biosensor. An electronic platform connects the CMOS sensor to a computer for processing and real-time visualization. We have used this technology to successfully identify both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria commonly found in human infections. PMID:27618185

  3. Nucleic acid detection technologies and marker molecules in bacterial diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Ott; Glynn, Barry; Kurg, Ants

    2014-05-01

    There is a growing need for quick and reliable methods for microorganism detection and identification worldwide. Although traditional culture-based technologies are trustworthy and accurate at a relatively low cost, they are also time- and labor-consuming and are limited to culturable bacteria. Those weaknesses have created a necessity for alternative technologies that are capable for faster and more precise bacterial identification from medical, food or environmental samples. The most common current approach is to analyze the nucleic acid component of analyte solution and determine the bacterial composition according to the specific nucleic acid profiles that are present. This review aims to give an up-to-date overview of different nucleic acid target sequences and respective analytical technologies.

  4. Rapid Bacterial Detection via an All-Electronic CMOS Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Nikkhoo, Nasim; Cumby, Nichole; Gulak, P Glenn; Maxwell, Karen L

    2016-01-01

    The timely and accurate diagnosis of infectious diseases is one of the greatest challenges currently facing modern medicine. The development of innovative techniques for the rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens in point-of-care facilities using low-cost, portable instruments is essential. We have developed a novel all-electronic biosensor that is able to identify bacteria in less than ten minutes. This technology exploits bacteriocins, protein toxins naturally produced by bacteria, as the selective biological detection element. The bacteriocins are integrated with an array of potassium-selective sensors in Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor technology to provide an inexpensive bacterial biosensor. An electronic platform connects the CMOS sensor to a computer for processing and real-time visualization. We have used this technology to successfully identify both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria commonly found in human infections. PMID:27618185

  5. Rapid detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen using magnetic immuno-chromatography (MICT).

    PubMed

    Workman, Shon; Wells, Susan K; Pau, Chou-Pong; Owen, S Michele; Dong, X Fan; LaBorde, Ron; Granade, Timothy C

    2009-09-01

    Detection of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections has been enhanced by incorporating p24 antigen detection with current HIV antibody detection using enzyme immunoassays (EIAs). However, screening for HIV antibodies has increased through the use of rapid, lateral-flow HIV antibody detection assays that currently do not have the capability to detect HIV p24 antigen. In this report, a lateral-flow based assay using super-paramagnetic particles as the detection marker was developed for the detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen. This magnetic immuno-chromatographic test (MICT) uses an inexpensive, low-maintenance instrument that detects the magnetic moment of the super-paramagnetic particles in a magnetic field. MICT is simple to perform, provides a numerical output for easier determination of reactive results and can be completed in 40min. The lower limit of detection for HIV-1 p24 spiked into assay sample buffer and 50% plasma was 30pg/ml for both. Detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen at 50pg/ml was reproducible in both inter-run and intra-run assays with coefficients of variation of <13%. Furthermore, the MICT p24 assay was able to detect intact virus spiked into 50% plasma (lower detection limit of approximately 250,000 viral RNA copies/ml). MICT detection of increasing HIV-1 p24 levels in commercially available seroconversion panels by MICT was only slightly later than that detected by much more complex EIAs. MICT could provide a simple, low-cost, and portable method for rapid HIV-1 p24 detection in a variety of testing environments. PMID:19482361

  6. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    PubMed

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane. PMID:27095709

  7. Detection of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens from Individual Filth Flies

    PubMed Central

    Pava-Ripoll, Monica; Pearson, Rachel E.G.; Miller, Amy K.; Ziobro, George C.

    2015-01-01

    There is unanimous consensus that insects are important vectors of foodborne pathogens. However, linking insects as vectors of the pathogen causing a particular foodborne illness outbreak has been challenging. This is because insects are not being aseptically collected as part of an environmental sampling program during foodborne outbreak investigations and because there is not a standardized method to detect foodborne bacteria from individual insects. To take a step towards solving this problem, we adapted a protocol from a commercially available PCR-based system that detects foodborne pathogens from food and environmental samples, to detect foodborne pathogens from individual flies.Using this standardized protocol, we surveyed 100 wild-caught flies for the presence of Cronobacter spp., Salmonella enterica, and Listeria monocytogenes and demonstrated that it was possible to detect and further isolate these pathogens from the body surface and the alimentary canal of a single fly. Twenty-two percent of the alimentary canals and 8% of the body surfaces from collected wild flies were positive for at least one of the three foodborne pathogens. The prevalence of Cronobacter spp. on either body part of the flies was statistically higher (19%) than the prevalence of S. enterica (7%) and L.monocytogenes (4%). No false positives were observed when detecting S. enterica and L. monocytogenes using this PCR-based system because pure bacterial cultures were obtained from all PCR-positive results. However, pure Cronobacter colonies were not obtained from about 50% of PCR-positive samples, suggesting that the PCR-based detection system for this pathogen cross-reacts with other Enterobacteriaceae present among the highly complex microbiota carried by wild flies. The standardized protocol presented here will allow laboratories to detect bacterial foodborne pathogens from aseptically collected insects, thereby giving public health officials another line of evidence to find out how

  8. Use of in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT) for the identification of Streptococcus suis serotype 2 in vivo-induced bacterial protein antigens

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (SS2) is a zoonotic agent that causes death and disease in both humans and swine. A better understanding of SS2-host molecular interactions is crucial for understanding SS2 pathogenesis and immunology. Conventional genetic and biochemical approaches used to study SS2 virulence factors are unable to take into account the complex and dynamic environmental stimuli associated with the infection process. In this study, in vivo-induced antigen technology (IVIAT), an immunoscreening technique, was used to identify the immunogenic bacterial proteins that are induced or upregulated in vivo during SS2 infection. Results Convalescent-phase sera from pigs infected with SS2 were pooled, adsorbed against in vitro antigens, and used to screen SS2 genomic expression libraries. Upon analysis of the identified proteins, we were able to assign a putative function to 40 of the 48 proteins. These included proteins implicated in cell envelope structure, regulation, molecule synthesis, substance and energy metabolism, transport, translation, and those with unknown functions. The in vivo-induced changes in the expression of 10 of these 40 genes were measured using real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, revealing that the expression of 6 of the 10 genes was upregulated in the in vivo condition. The strain distribution of these 10 genes was analyzed by PCR, and they were found in the most virulent SS2 strains. In addition, protein sequence alignments of the newly identified proteins demonstrate that three are putative virulence-associated proteins. Conclusion Collectively, our results suggest that these in vivo-induced or upregulated genes may contribute to SS2 disease development. We hypothesize that the identification of factors specifically induced or upregulated during SS2 infection will aid in our understanding of SS2 pathogenesis and may contribute to the control SS2 outbreaks. In addition, the proteins identified using IVIAT may be useful

  9. Immunological detection of lipopolysaccharide antigens of thermophilic campylobacters captured on polymyxin-coated polyester cloth.

    PubMed

    Gomi, K; Brooks, B; Blais, B; Garcia, M; Yamazaki, H

    1996-05-01

    Cholate-extracted lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigens from thermophilic campylobacters were captured on polymyxin-coated polyester cloth. The captured antigens were detected by sequential reactions with rabbit anti-Campylobacter antibody, anti-rabbit IgG peroxidase conjugate and chromogenic peroxidase substrate. A polyclonal rabbit antibody elicited against a single Campylobacter-jejuni strain detected the reference strains of the twenty most frequently isolated thermophilic campylobacters in the Lior serotyping scheme. Moreover, LPS antigens of six C. Jejuni Penner serotypes fractionated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and examined by immunoblotting were recognized by four antisera prepared against homologous and heterologous Penner serotypes. The results suggest the potential application of polymyxin-cloth enzyme immunoassay for rapid detection of thermophilic campylobacters where monoclonal antibodies can be raised to possible common LPS epitopes.

  10. An antigen trapping ELISA for the detection of capripoxvirus in tissue culture supernatant and biopsy samples.

    PubMed

    Carn, V M

    1995-01-01

    A trapping ELISA for the detection of capripoxvirus antigen in tissue culture supernatant and biopsy material was developed, using a guinea-pig polyclonal detector antiserum raised against a recombinant capripoxvirus specific antigen, expressed in Escherichia coli using the plasmid vector pGEX-2T. The ELISA detected antigen in tissue culture samples that on virus titration contained equal to or in excess of 10(2.8) TCID50/ml. Virus isolation and ELISA were compared for the detection of capripoxvirus in skin biopsy samples from sheep, goats and cattle. The ELISA compared well with virus isolation, and has applications as a diagnostic test. This assay reduces the reliance of diagnostic laboratories on tissue culture facilities, and can be used to confirm the presence of capripoxvirus in tissue culture.

  11. [A new method for detection and erradication of Helicobacter pylori infection by stool antigens test].

    PubMed

    Amèndola, R; Doweck, J; Katz, J; Racca, J; Menendez, G; Schenone, L; Farìas, R; Barrantes, C; Quintanta, C; Zerbo, O; Kogan, Z; Valero, J; Bartellini, M A; Questa, U; Luna, P; Corti, R E

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays technics for Helicobacter pylori detection in stools like culture, and PCR, are expensive and difficult to perform. The aim of this study was to evaluate ELISA test efficacy for detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools comparing this results with standarized technics like histology (Giemsa), ureasa test and UBT C 14. 26 patients were evaluated in this study, ages between 15-75 with upper gastrointestinal symptoms; all of them required gastroduodenal endoscopy, status H. Pylori was determined with methods upon mentioned. 24 hours after endoscopy H. Pylori antigens in stools with the technique Premier Platinum Htsa, Elisa were determined. The detection of H. Pylori antigens in stools accurately identified active H. Pylori infection. The performance characteristics of this non-invasive method was similar in sensibility and specificity to conventional tests.

  12. Detection and identification of platelet antibodies and antigens in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Curtis, B R; McFarland, J G

    2009-01-01

    As a result of the unique functional properties of platelets, more-robust methods were required for detection of antibodies raised against them. Immunofluorescence detection by flow cytometry, solid-phase red cell adherence, and antigen capture ELISAs are some of the current tests that have been developed to meet the challenges of platelet antibody detection and identification and antigen phenotyping. Recently developed protein liquid bead arrays are becoming the next-generation platelet antibody tests. Fueled by development of PCR and determination of the molecular basis of the PlA1 human platelet antigen (HPA), serologic platelet typing has now been replaced by genotyping of DNA. Allele-specific PCR, melting curve analysis, and 5'-nuclease assays are now evolving into more high-throughput molecular tests. Laboratory testing for the diagnosis of immune platelet disorders has advanced considerably from its humble beginnings.

  13. Development of Primers to O-Antigen Biosynthesis Genes for Specific Detection of Escherichia coli O157 by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, John J.; Schmidt, Denise; Petrosko, Patricia; Sanchez, Susan; Bolton, Lance; Lee, Margie D.

    1999-01-01

    The chemical composition of each O-antigen subunit in gram-negative bacteria is a reflection of the unique DNA sequences within each rfb operon. By characterizing DNA sequences contained with each rfb operon, a diagnostic serotype-specific probe to Escherichia coli O serotypes that are commonly associated with bacterial infections can be generated. Recently, from an E. coli O157:H7 cosmid library, O-antigen-positive cosmids were identified with O157-specific antisera. By using the cosmid DNAs as probes, several DNA fragments which were unique to E. coli O157 serotypes were identified by Southern analysis. Several of these DNA fragments were subcloned from O157-antigen-positive cosmids and served as DNA probes in Southern analysis. One DNA fragment within plasmid pDS306 which was specific for E. coli O157 serotypes was identified by Southern analysis. The DNA sequence for this plasmid revealed homology to two rfb genes, the first of which encodes a GDP-mannose dehydratase. These rfb genes were similar to O-antigen biosynthesis genes in Vibrio cholerae and Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:8. An oligonucleotide primer pair was designed to amplify a 420-bp DNA fragment from E. coli O157 serotypes. The PCR test was specific for E. coli O157 serotypes. PCR detected as few as 10 cells with the O157-specific rfb oligonucleotide primers. Coupled with current enrichment protocols, O157 serotyping by PCR will provide a rapid, specific, and sensitive method for identifying E. coli O157. PMID:10388689

  14. Analyzing titers of antibodies against bacterial and viral antigens, and bacterial toxoids in the intravenous immunoglobulins utilized in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chi-Yu; Wang, Hsiu-Chi; Wang, Kun-Teng; Yang-Chih Shih, Daniel; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wang, Der-Yuan

    2013-03-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) manufactured from human plasma contains IgG as the primary ingredient, and is used for indications such as immunodeficiency syndrome. Available IVIGs in Taiwan are either manufactured from Taiwanese or North American plasma. The effectiveness of the national immunization program of Taiwan can be evaluated by analyzing and comparing IVIG antibody titers that are induced through the corresponding vaccines (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis, measles, rubella, hepatitis A, hepatitis B and varicella). Both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the in vitro neutralization test demonstrated that all IVIGs provide adequate clinical protection against diphtheria and tetanus toxins. ELISA results further revealed that plasma of Taiwanese subjects contains higher levels of pertussis toxin and filamentous hemagglutinin antibodies, when compared to foreign IVIGs. This may be related to the later adoption of acellular pertussis vaccine in Taiwan. Antibodies titers against measles, rubella, hepatitis A, and varicella-zoster virus were otherwise low. Low titers of hepatitis B surface antigen antibodies are present in Taiwanese plasma IVIG, indicating immune memory decline or loss. In conclusion, our results show that Taiwanese IVIG contains varying titers of vaccine-induced antibodies, and serves as a guide for future amendments to Taiwan's immunization program.

  15. Selective detection of bacterial layers with terahertz plasmonic antennas

    PubMed Central

    Berrier, Audrey; Schaafsma, Martijn C.; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Bergquist, Jonas; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2012-01-01

    Current detection and identification of micro-organisms is based on either rather unspecific rapid microscopy or on more accurate but complex and time-consuming procedures. In a medical context, the determination of the bacteria Gram type is of significant interest. The diagnostic of microbial infection often requires the identification of the microbiological agent responsible for the infection, or at least the identification of its family (Gram type), in a matter of minutes. In this work, we propose to use terahertz frequency range antennas for the enhanced selective detection of bacteria types. Several microorganisms are investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy: a fast, contactless and damage-free investigation method to gain information on the presence and the nature of the microorganisms. We demonstrate that plasmonic antennas enhance the detection sensitivity for bacterial layers and allow the selective recognition of the Gram type of the bacteria. PMID:23162730

  16. Selective detection of bacterial layers with terahertz plasmonic antennas.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Audrey; Schaafsma, Martijn C; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Bergquist, Jonas; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2012-11-01

    Current detection and identification of micro-organisms is based on either rather unspecific rapid microscopy or on more accurate but complex and time-consuming procedures. In a medical context, the determination of the bacteria Gram type is of significant interest. The diagnostic of microbial infection often requires the identification of the microbiological agent responsible for the infection, or at least the identification of its family (Gram type), in a matter of minutes. In this work, we propose to use terahertz frequency range antennas for the enhanced selective detection of bacteria types. Several microorganisms are investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy: a fast, contactless and damage-free investigation method to gain information on the presence and the nature of the microorganisms. We demonstrate that plasmonic antennas enhance the detection sensitivity for bacterial layers and allow the selective recognition of the Gram type of the bacteria.

  17. Selective detection of bacterial layers with terahertz plasmonic antennas.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Audrey; Schaafsma, Martijn C; Nonglaton, Guillaume; Bergquist, Jonas; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2012-11-01

    Current detection and identification of micro-organisms is based on either rather unspecific rapid microscopy or on more accurate but complex and time-consuming procedures. In a medical context, the determination of the bacteria Gram type is of significant interest. The diagnostic of microbial infection often requires the identification of the microbiological agent responsible for the infection, or at least the identification of its family (Gram type), in a matter of minutes. In this work, we propose to use terahertz frequency range antennas for the enhanced selective detection of bacteria types. Several microorganisms are investigated by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy: a fast, contactless and damage-free investigation method to gain information on the presence and the nature of the microorganisms. We demonstrate that plasmonic antennas enhance the detection sensitivity for bacterial layers and allow the selective recognition of the Gram type of the bacteria. PMID:23162730

  18. Simultaneous multicolor detection system of the single-molecular microbial antigen by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with fluorescent nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Yamamoto, Mayu; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Yasuhara, Masato; Suzuki, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2005-11-01

    Immunological diagnostic methods have been widely performed and showed high performance in molecular and cellular biology, molecular imaging, and medical diagnostics. We have developed novel methods for the fluorescent labeling of several antibodies coupled with fluorescent nanocrystals QDs. In this study we demonstrated that two bacterial toxins, diphtheria toxin and tetanus toxin, were detected simultaneously in the same view field of a cover slip by using directly QD-conjugated antibodies. We have succeeded in detecting bacterial toxins by counting luminescent spots on the evanescent field with using primary antibody conjugated to QDs. In addition, each bacterial toxin in the mixture can be separately detected by single excitation laser with emission band pass filters, and simultaneously in situ pathogen quantification was performed by calculating the luminescent density on the surface of the cover slip. Our results demonstrate that total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) enables us to distinguish each antigen from mixed samples and can simultaneously quantitate multiple antigens by QD-conjugated antibodies. Bioconjugated QDs could have great potentialities for in practical biomedical applications to develop various high-sensitivity detection systems.

  19. Gibbs motif sampling: detection of bacterial outer membrane protein repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A. F.; Liu, J. S.; Lawrence, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The detection and alignment of locally conserved regions (motifs) in multiple sequences can provide insight into protein structure, function, and evolution. A new Gibbs sampling algorithm is described that detects motif-encoding regions in sequences and optimally partitions them into distinct motif models; this is illustrated using a set of immunoglobulin fold proteins. When applied to sequences sharing a single motif, the sampler can be used to classify motif regions into related submodels, as is illustrated using helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. Other statistically based procedures are described for searching a database for sequences matching motifs found by the sampler. When applied to a set of 32 very distantly related bacterial integral outer membrane proteins, the sampler revealed that they share a subtle, repetitive motif. Although BLAST (Altschul SF et al., 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410) fails to detect significant pairwise similarity between any of the sequences, the repeats present in these outer membrane proteins, taken as a whole, are highly significant (based on a generally applicable statistical test for motifs described here). Analysis of bacterial porins with known trimeric beta-barrel structure and related proteins reveals a similar repetitive motif corresponding to alternating membrane-spanning beta-strands. These beta-strands occur on the membrane interface (as opposed to the trimeric interface) of the beta-barrel. The broad conservation and structural location of these repeats suggests that they play important functional roles. PMID:8520488

  20. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, Madhukar L.

    1990-01-01

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents.

  1. Detection of Precytopathic Effect of Enteroviruses in Clinical Specimens by Centrifugation-Enhanced Antigen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, Steven M.; David, Kathryn; Shaikh, Fatima; Qian, Lian

    2001-01-01

    Rapid enterovirus detection is important for decisions about antibiotic administration and length of hospital stay. The efficacy of rapid antigen detection-cell culture amplification (Ag-CCA) was evaluated with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 5-D8/1 (DAKO) and Pan-Enterovirus clone 2E11 (Chemicon) with 10 poliovirus, echovirus, and coxsackievirus type A and B stock isolates and College of American Pathologists check samples. By using Ag-CCA technology, MAb 2E11 was more sensitive than 5-D8/1 at detecting a greater number of stock isolates at or past tube (cytopathic effect [CPE]) culture (TC) end points. The efficacy of Ag-CCA in the clinical setting was subsequently confirmed with 273 consecutively freshly collected nasopharyngeal aspirate or swab specimens, rectal swab, and cerebrospinal fluid specimens during the 1999 enterovirus season. All specimens were tested by Ag-CCA in parallel with rhesus monkey kidney (RhMk), MRC-5, and A549 conventional TCs. Approximately 60% of field specimens were additionally tested with Hep-2 and HNK conventional TCs. Sixty-two percent of the clinical specimens tested were Ag-CCA positive after 48 h. Among 51 isolates, the mean time to CPE or culture confirmation was 5.5 days (range, 2 to 18 days). After 48 h, Ag-CCA achieved sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 62, 100, 100, and 93%, respectively. During the same period, TC-CPE displayed test parameters of 12, 100, 100, and 85%, respectively. After 5 days, the sensitivity and specificity of Ag-CCA increased to 92 and 98%, respectively. Within the same period, isolation attained sensitivity and specificity of 52 and 100%, respectively. Although Ag-CCA displayed slightly reduced sensitivity and reduced specificity compared with conventional cell culture after 14 days, the markedly superior 48-h enterovirus Ag-CCA detection rate supports incorporation of this assay into the routine clinical setting. PMID:11473988

  2. Synthetic oligonucleotide antigens modified with locked nucleic acids detect disease specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Samuelsen, Simone V.; Solov’yov, Ilia A.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Mellins, Elizabeth; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Astakhova, Kira

    2016-01-01

    New techniques to detect and quantify antibodies to nucleic acids would provide a significant advance over current methods, which often lack specificity. We investigate the potential of novel antigens containing locked nucleic acids (LNAs) as targets for antibodies. Particularly, employing molecular dynamics we predict optimal nucleotide composition for targeting DNA-binding antibodies. As a proof of concept, we address a problem of detecting anti-DNA antibodies that are characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic autoimmune disease with multiple manifestations. We test the best oligonucleotide binders in surface plasmon resonance studies to analyze binding and kinetic aspects of interactions between antigens and target DNA. These DNA and LNA/DNA sequences showed improved binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using human samples of pediatric lupus patients. Our results suggest that the novel method is a promising tool to create antigens for research and point-of-care monitoring of anti-DNA antibodies. PMID:27775006

  3. Detection and manipulation of live antigen-expressing cells using conditionally stable nanobodies.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jonathan Cy; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Etemad, Behzad; Rudolph, Stephanie; Guo, Binggege; Wang, Sui; Ellis, Emily G; Li, Jonathan Z; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect and/or manipulate specific cell populations based upon the presence of intracellular protein epitopes would enable many types of studies and applications. Protein binders such as nanobodies (Nbs) can target untagged proteins (antigens) in the intracellular environment. However, genetically expressed protein binders are stable regardless of antigen expression, complicating their use for applications that require cell-specificity. Here, we created a conditional system in which the stability of an Nb depends upon an antigen of interest. We identified Nb framework mutations that can be used to rapidly create destabilized Nbs. Fusion of destabilized Nbs to various proteins enabled applications in living cells, such as optogenetic control of neural activity in specific cell types in the mouse brain, and detection of HIV-infected human cells by flow cytometry. These approaches are generalizable to other protein binders, and enable the rapid generation of single-polypeptide sensors and effectors active in cells expressing specific intracellular epitopes. PMID:27205882

  4. Detection of Blood Culture Bacterial Contamination using Natural Language Processing

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Michael E.; FitzHenry, Fern; Speroff, Theodore; Hathaway, Jacob; Murff, Harvey J.; Brown, Steven H.; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Dittus, Robert S.; Elkin, Peter L.

    2009-01-01

    Microbiology results are reported in semi-structured formats and have a high content of useful patient information. We developed and validated a hybrid regular expression and natural language processing solution for processing blood culture microbiology reports. Multi-center Veterans Affairs training and testing data sets were randomly extracted and manually reviewed to determine the culture and sensitivity as well as contamination results. The tool was iteratively developed for both outcomes using a training dataset, and then evaluated on the test dataset to determine antibiotic susceptibility data extraction and contamination detection performance. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 84.8% and a positive predictive value of 96.0% for mapping the antibiotics and bacteria with appropriate sensitivity findings in the test data. The bacterial contamination detection algorithm had a sensitivity of 83.3% and a positive predictive value of 81.8%. PMID:20351890

  5. Detection of blood culture bacterial contamination using natural language processing.

    PubMed

    Matheny, Michael E; Fitzhenry, Fern; Speroff, Theodore; Hathaway, Jacob; Murff, Harvey J; Brown, Steven H; Fielstein, Elliot M; Dittus, Robert S; Elkin, Peter L

    2009-11-14

    Microbiology results are reported in semi-structured formats and have a high content of useful patient information. We developed and validated a hybrid regular expression and natural language processing solution for processing blood culture microbiology reports. Multi-center Veterans Affairs training and testing data sets were randomly extracted and manually reviewed to determine the culture and sensitivity as well as contamination results. The tool was iteratively developed for both outcomes using a training dataset, and then evaluated on the test dataset to determine antibiotic susceptibility data extraction and contamination detection performance. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 84.8% and a positive predictive value of 96.0% for mapping the antibiotics and bacteria with appropriate sensitivity findings in the test data. The bacterial contamination detection algorithm had a sensitivity of 83.3% and a positive predictive value of 81.8%.

  6. Bacterial foraging based edge detection for cell image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongsheng; Zhou, Tao; Xia, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Edge detection is the most popular and common choices for cell image segmentation, in which local searching strategies are commonly used. In spite of their computational efficiency, traditional edge detectors, however, may either produce discontinued edges or rely heavily on initializations. In this paper, we propose a bacterial foraging based edge detection (BFED) algorithm for cell image segmentation. We model the gradients of intensities as the nutrient concentration and propel bacteria to forage along nutrient-rich locations via mimicking the behavior of Escherichia coli, including the chemotaxis, swarming, reproduction, elimination and dispersal. As a nature-inspired evolutionary technique, this algorithm can identify the desired edges and mark them as the tracks of bacteria. We have evaluated the proposed algorithm against the Canny, SUSAN, Verma's and an active contour model (ACM) based edge detectors on both synthetic and real cell images. Our results suggest that the BFED algorithm can identify boundaries more effectively and provide more accurate cell image segmentation. PMID:26737139

  7. Investigation of magnetic microdiscs for bacterial pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Torres, Keisha Y.; Garraud, Nicolas; Arnold, David P.; McLamore, Eric S.

    2016-05-01

    Despite strict regulations to control the presence of human pathogens in our food supply, recent foodborne outbreaks have heightened public concern about food safety and created urgency to improve methods for pathogen detection. Herein we explore a potentially portable, low-cost system that uses magnetic microdiscs for the detection of bacterial pathogens in liquid samples. The system operates by optically measuring the rotational dynamics of suspended magnetic microdiscs functionalized with pathogen-binding aptamers. The soft ferromagnetic (Ni80Fe20) microdiscs exhibit a closed magnetic spin arrangement (i.e. spin vortex) with zero magnetic stray field, leading to no disc agglomeration when in free suspension. With very high surface area for functionalization and volumes 10,000x larger than commonly used superparamagnetic nanoparticles, these 1.5-μm-diameter microdiscs are well suited for tagging, trapping, actuating, or interrogating bacterial targets. This work reports a wafer-level microfabrication process for fabrication of 600 million magnetic microdiscs per substrate and measurement of their rotational dynamics response. Additionally, the biofunctionalization of the microdiscs with DNA aptamers, subsequent binding to E. coli bacteria, and their magnetic manipulation is reported.

  8. Haloarchaeal gas vesicle nanoparticles displaying Salmonella SopB antigen reduce bacterial burden when administered with live attenuated bacteria.

    PubMed

    DasSarma, Priya; Negi, Vidya Devi; Balakrishnan, Arjun; Karan, Ram; Barnes, Susan; Ekulona, Folasade; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; DasSarma, Shiladitya

    2014-07-31

    Innovative vaccines against typhoid and other Salmonella diseases that are safe, effective, and inexpensive are urgently needed. In order to address this need, buoyant, self-adjuvating gas vesicle nanoparticles (GVNPs) from the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 were bioengineered to display the highly conserved Salmonella enterica antigen SopB, a secreted inosine phosphate effector protein injected by pathogenic bacteria during infection into the host cell. Two highly conserved sopB gene segments near the 3'-coding region, named sopB4 and B5, were each fused to the gvpC gene, and resulting GVNPs were purified by centrifugally accelerated flotation. Display of SopB4 and B5 antigenic epitopes on GVNPs was established by Western blotting analysis using antisera raised against short synthetic peptides of SopB. Immunostimulatory activities of the SopB4 and B5 nanoparticles were tested by intraperitoneal administration of recombinant GVNPs to BALB/c mice which had been immunized with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium 14028 ΔpmrG-HM-D (DV-STM-07), a live attenuated vaccine strain. Proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-9 were significantly induced in mice boosted with SopB5-GVNPs, consistent with a robust Th1 response. After challenge with virulent S. enterica serovar Typhimurium 14028, bacterial burden was found to be diminished in spleen of mice boosted with SopB4-GVNPs and absent or significantly diminished in liver, mesenteric lymph node, and spleen of mice boosted with SopB5-GVNPs, indicating that the C-terminal portions of SopB displayed on GVNPs elicit a protective response to Salmonella infection in mice. SopB antigen-GVNPs were found to be stable at elevated temperatures for extended periods without refrigeration in Halobacterium cells. The results all together show that bioengineered GVNPs are likely to represent a valuable platform for the development of improved vaccines against Salmonella diseases.

  9. Enzyme immunoassays in which biotinillated beta-lactamase is used for the detection of microbial antigens.

    PubMed

    Yolken, R H; Wee, S B

    1984-03-01

    The performance characteristics of enzyme immunoassays are determined to a great extent by the enzyme-substrate system utilized for the immunoassay. Beta-lactamases (penicillin amido-beta-lactamhydrolase EC 3.5.2.6) offer a number of advantages which might make them useful in immunoassay systems. We linked beta-lactamase from Bacillus cereus with biotin and used the biotinillated enzyme to devise immunoassay systems for the detection of a number of microbial antigens. An assay system in which antibodies to the polyribitol phosphate antigen of Haemophilus influenzae type b were used was capable of detecting between 0.4 and 1.6 ng of that antigen. Similarly, an assay in which antibodies to the common antigens of adenoviruses and biotin-linked beta-lactamase were used was capable of detecting between 1 and 10 50% tissue culture infective doses of a strain of enteric-type adenovirus. When applied to the detection of rotavirus, a similar system in which biotinillated beta-lactamase was used was capable of detecting small amounts of antigen in a standard rotavirus preparation. This assay could also detect virus in 36 of 37 stool specimens from children with rotavirus gastroenteritis. The positive specimens could easily be distinguished from negative ones by the naked eye, and a permanent record of the qualitative results could be obtained by the use of a standard office photocopying machine. Beta-lactamases have promise for use in practical enzyme immunoassay systems, especially in situations in which expensive colorimetric instrumentation is not available. PMID:6325489

  10. Biomarker Detection Using NAPPA Tumor Antigen Arrays — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer patients spontaneously generate autoantibodies (AAb) to tumor-derived proteins. To detect AAb, we have probed novel high-density custom protein microarrays (NAPPA) expressing 4988 candidate tumor antigens with sera from patients with early stage breast cancer (IBC), and bound IgG was measured. We used a three-phase serial screening approach. First, a prescreen was performed to eliminate uninformative antigens. Sera from stage I-III IBC (n = 53) and healthy women (n = 53) were screened for AAb to all 4988 protein antigens. Antigens were selected if the 95th percentile of signal of cases and controls were significantly different (p 91% specificity. Twenty-eight of these antigens were confirmed using an independent serum cohort (n = 51 cases/38 controls, p < 0.05). Using all 28 AAb, a classifier was identified with a sensitivity of 80.8% and a specificity of 61.6% (AUC = 0.756). These are potential biomarkers for the early detection of breast cancer.

  11. Identification and Analysis of Immunodominant Antigens for ELISA-Based Detection of Theileria annulata.

    PubMed

    Bilgic, Huseyin Bilgin; Karagenc, Tulin; Bakırcı, Serkan; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andrew; Kinnaird, Jane; Eren, Hasan; Weir, William

    2016-01-01

    Tropical or Mediterranean theileriosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Theileria annulata, remains an economically important bovine disease in North Africa, Southern Europe, India, the Middle East and Asia. The disease affects mainly exotic cattle and imposes serious constraints upon livestock production and breed improvement programmes. While microscopic and molecular methods exist which are capable of detecting T. annulata during acute infection, the identification of animals in the carrier state is more challenging. Serological tests, which detect antibodies that react against parasite-encoded antigens, should ideally have the potential to identify carrier animals with very high levels of sensitivity and specificity. However, assays developed to date have suffered from a lack of sensitivity and/or specificity and it is, therefore, necessary to identify novel parasite antigens, which can be developed for this purpose. In the present study, genes encoding predicted antigens were bioinformatically identified in the T. annulata genome. These proteins, together with a panel of previously described antigens, were assessed by western blot analysis for immunoreactivity, and this revealed that four novel candidates and five previously described antigens were recognised by immune bovine serum. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrophotometric analysis, an immunodominant protein (encoded by TA15705) was identified as Ta9, a previously defined T cell antigen. Western blotting revealed another of the five proteins in the Ta9 family, TA15710, also to be an immunodominant protein. However, validation by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay indicated that due to either allelic polymorphism or differential immune responses of individual hosts, none of the novel candidates can be considered ideal for routine detection of T. annulata-infected/carrier animals. PMID:27270235

  12. Identification and Analysis of Immunodominant Antigens for ELISA-Based Detection of Theileria annulata

    PubMed Central

    Bakırcı, Serkan; Tait, Andrew; Kinnaird, Jane; Eren, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Tropical or Mediterranean theileriosis, caused by the protozoan parasite Theileria annulata, remains an economically important bovine disease in North Africa, Southern Europe, India, the Middle East and Asia. The disease affects mainly exotic cattle and imposes serious constraints upon livestock production and breed improvement programmes. While microscopic and molecular methods exist which are capable of detecting T. annulata during acute infection, the identification of animals in the carrier state is more challenging. Serological tests, which detect antibodies that react against parasite-encoded antigens, should ideally have the potential to identify carrier animals with very high levels of sensitivity and specificity. However, assays developed to date have suffered from a lack of sensitivity and/or specificity and it is, therefore, necessary to identify novel parasite antigens, which can be developed for this purpose. In the present study, genes encoding predicted antigens were bioinformatically identified in the T. annulata genome. These proteins, together with a panel of previously described antigens, were assessed by western blot analysis for immunoreactivity, and this revealed that four novel candidates and five previously described antigens were recognised by immune bovine serum. Using a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrophotometric analysis, an immunodominant protein (encoded by TA15705) was identified as Ta9, a previously defined T cell antigen. Western blotting revealed another of the five proteins in the Ta9 family, TA15710, also to be an immunodominant protein. However, validation by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay indicated that due to either allelic polymorphism or differential immune responses of individual hosts, none of the novel candidates can be considered ideal for routine detection of T. annulata-infected/carrier animals. PMID:27270235

  13. Salmonella typhimurium-induced M1 macrophage polarization is dependent on the bacterial O antigen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fengling; Sun, Xiaoming; Qu, Zhen; Zhang, Xiaolian

    2016-02-01

    Recently, macrophages were shown to be capable of differentiating toward two phenotypes after antigen stimulation: a classically activated (M1) or an alternatively activated phenotype (M2). To investigate the effect of Salmonella enteric serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) on macrophage differentiation, we compared macrophage phenotypes after infection of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with wild-type S. typhimurium and its isogenic rfc mutant. S. typhimurium C5 induced M1 macrophage polarization and enhanced inducible nitric oxide synthase expression by macrophages; this induction was dependent on Toll-like receptor 4. In contrast, the Δrfc mutant (S. typhimurium C5 rfc::Km(r)) lost this function and induced an M2 response in the macrophages. Here, we propose that S. typhimurium C5 is capable of polarizing macrophages towards the M1 phenotype and that this polarization is dependent on the O antigen encoded by rfc. Our finding indicates that M1 macrophage polarization induced by S. typhimurium may be related to the ability of this intracellular bacterium to survive and replicate within macrophages, which is essential for systemic disease.

  14. Holographic sensors for the detection of bacterial spores.

    PubMed

    Bhatta, D; Christie, G; Madrigal-González, B; Blyth, J; Lowe, C R

    2007-11-30

    Holographic sensors for the detection of Bacillus species spore germination and vegetative growth are described. Reflection holograms were fabricated using a diffusion method for the distribution of ultra-fine silver bromide grains into pre-formed polymer films, followed by holographic recording using a frequency doubled Nd:YAG (532 nm) laser. Changes in holographic replay wavelength or diffraction intensity were used to characterise the swelling behaviour or structural integrity of a range of holographic matrices in response to various extracellular products of bacterial spore germination and vegetative metabolism. Divalent metal ion-sensitive holograms containing a methacrylated analogue of nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as the chelating monomer were successfully used to monitor Ca2+ ions released during B. subtilis spore germination in real-time, which was within minutes of sample addition; the holographic response manifested as a 16 nm blue-shift in diffraction wavelength over the progress of germination. Similarly, pH-sensitive holograms comprising methacrylic acid (MAA) as the ionisable monomer were responsive to changes in pH associated with early vegetative metabolism following germination of B. megaterium spores; a visually perceptible blue-shift in holographic replay wavelength of 75 nm was observed. Casein and starch-based holographic matrices, prepared by co-polymerisation of the appropriate substrate with acrylamide, were used to detect exo-enzymes released during later stages of B. megaterium and B. subtilis vegetative cell growth; holographic responses of both matrices were visible as a reduction in diffraction intensity due to progressive fringe disruption caused by enzymatic cleavage. The combined monitoring of various germination and growth events using the range of aforementioned holographic sensors provides a novel, comprehensive means for the detection of viable bacterial spores.

  15. Novel fusion antigen displayed-bacterial ghosts vaccine candidate against infection of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kun; Tu, Wei; Liu, Yuenan; Li, Tao; Wang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Escherichia coli O157:H7 may develop into hemorrhagic colitis, or hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which usually causes kidney failure or even death. The adhesion and toxins are the important virulent factors. In this study, a novel vaccine candidate rSOBGs was constructed based on the bacterial ghost (BG). rSOBGs maintained the integrity of cellular morphology and displayed the linear Stx2Am-Stx1B antigen on the surface of outer membrane. rSOBGs induced Stxs-specific IgA/IgG antibodies and stronger intimin-specific IgA/IgG antibodies effectively in sera in this study. In vivo, the rSOBGs provided the higher protection rate (52%) than native bacterial ghost-OBGs (12%) when challenged intragastricly with high dose (500 LD50) viable E. coli O157:H7. Meanwhile, the rSOBGs provided higher protection rate (73.33%) than OBGs when challenged with 2 LD50 even to 5 LD50 lysed E. coli O157:H7. In vitro, the rSOBGs-immunized sera possessed neutralizing activity to lysed pathogenic bacteria. Furthermore, the results of histopathology also displayed that the administration of rSOBGs have the ability to reduce or inhibit the adhesion lesions and toxins damages of organs. The novel vaccine candidate rSOBGs induced both anti-toxin and anti-adhesion immune protection, suggesting the possibility to prevent the infectious diseases caused by Escherichia coli O157:H7.

  16. Detection of antibodies to Helicobacter pylori cell surface antigens.

    PubMed

    Guruge, J L; Schalén, C; Nilsson, I; Ljungh, A; Tyszkiewicz, T; Wikander, M; Wadström, T

    1990-01-01

    Serum IgG antibodies of Helicobacter pylori were detected in single-dilution ELISA using glycine extracted material. Among 148 endoscopy patients 59% displayed antibodies; as expected, a higher occurrence (90%) was found in patients with positive gastric culture for H. pylori than in culture negative patients (37%). Among 68 blood donors the frequency of H. pylori antibodies was 28%. In 73 children less than 15 years of age examined for unrelated disorders the occurrence was 4%. By immunoblotting using the same extract, 3 prominent bands, 29K, 54K and 60K and several weak bands were identified. These were formed by 57%, 92%, and 65%, respectively, of the ELISA positive patient sera. Comparing culture positive and negative patients, the 3 bands occurred more often among the culture positive subjects though between 18 and 61% of the sera from culture negative patients gave either of the bands. When comparing the glycine extracts of 4 different H. pylori strains with separate haemagglutinating patterns no differences in the position of the major bands emerged. By absorption experiments no immunological cross-reactivity with components of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Campylobacter jejuni or C. fetus was found. Thus, the glycine extract seemed specific for the detection of antibodies to H. pylori.

  17. A novel agglutination test for antigen-specific detection of platelet antibodies.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Oliver; Agaylan, Ashraf; Borchert, Hans-Hubert; Aslan, Tunay; Bombard, Stéphane; Kiesewetter, Holger; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2006-10-15

    A simple and rapid antigen-specific assay for the identification antibodies to platelets is lacking, yet. Red-dyed polystyrene microbeads were coated with monoclonal antibodies to various platelet glycoprotein complexes, and used for the detection of platelet autoantibodies and alloantibodies. The results were largely identical with those obtained by monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigen assay (MAIPA). The new test is reliable yet less complex and time-consuming than the currently available assays, and it can be implemented in any routine laboratory. PMID:16933262

  18. Detection of circulating antigen in amoebic liver abscess by counter-current immunoelectrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Parija, S C; Karki, B M

    1999-01-01

    Fifty serum samples from patients with amoebic liver abscess and 50 from subjects who had not suffered from the disease (25 from patients with other, chiefly parasitic, infections and 25 from healthy blood donors, staff or students) were tested for circulating amoebic antigen by counter-current immuno-electrophoresis (CIEP). Amoebic antigen was detected in 38 sera (76%) from cases of amoebic liver abscess, but in none of the other sera. Although CIEP is only moderately sensitive, the high specificity suggests that this simple test may be useful in the diagnosis of amoebic liver abscess.

  19. [Systematics, differentiation, and detection of bacterial infections-- the family Mycobacteriaceae].

    PubMed

    Böttger, E C

    1991-10-01

    Comparative 16S rRNA sequencing allows to infer natural relationships among bacteria, to characterize and identify microorganisms at a molecular level and to develop DNA probes specific at any desired taxonomic level (e.g. family, genus, species). Probes targeted at ribosomal RNA are suitable for in situ hybridization of whole, intact bacterial cells as well as in polymerase-chain-reaction techniques for sensitive detection and identification of bacteria. Comparative 16S rRNA sequencing provided the basis for a systematic phylogenetic analysis of the genus Mycobacterium. Certain growth characteristics, i.e. thermotolerance and growth rate correspond to natural relationships among the mycobacteria. However, the phylogenetic relatedness within the slow-growing species did not reflect the Runyon classification of photochromogenic, scotochromogenic and nonphotochromogenic mycobacteria. The use of oligonucleotides targeted at highly or semi-conserved regions within the 16S rRNA molecule allows a universal procedure for amplification and rapid sequence determination of 16S rDNA-gene fragments from any virtually bacterial organism. This method of amplification of 16S rDNA-gene fragments was used to identify a novel, uncultured pathogen and opens new perspectives for other infectious diseases of unknown cause.

  20. Detecting Bacterial Surface Organelles on Single Cells Using Optical Tweezers.

    PubMed

    Zakrisson, Johan; Singh, Bhupender; Svenmarker, Pontus; Wiklund, Krister; Zhang, Hanqing; Hakobyan, Shoghik; Ramstedt, Madeleine; Andersson, Magnus

    2016-05-10

    Bacterial cells display a diverse array of surface organelles that are important for a range of processes such as intercellular communication, motility and adhesion leading to biofilm formation, infections, and bacterial spread. More specifically, attachment to host cells by Gram-negative bacteria are mediated by adhesion pili, which are nanometers wide and micrometers long fibrous organelles. Since these pili are significantly thinner than the wavelength of visible light, they cannot be detected using standard light microscopy techniques. At present, there is no fast and simple method available to investigate if a single cell expresses pili while keeping the cell alive for further studies. In this study, we present a method to determine the presence of pili on a single bacterium. The protocol involves imaging the bacterium to measure its size, followed by predicting the fluid drag based on its size using an analytical model, and thereafter oscillating the sample while a single bacterium is trapped by an optical tweezer to measure its effective fluid drag. Comparison between the predicted and the measured fluid drag thereby indicate the presence of pili. Herein, we verify the method using polymer coated silica microspheres and Escherichia coli bacteria expressing adhesion pili. Our protocol can in real time and within seconds assist single cell studies by distinguishing between piliated and nonpiliated bacteria.

  1. Detection of Salivary IgA Antibodies Against the HlyE Antigen as a Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Kai Ling; Redhuan, Nur Eliyana Mohd; Balaram, Prabha; Phua, Kia Kien

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Salmonella typhi (S. typhi) haemolysin E protein (HlyE) has been shown to be a sensitive and specific antigen for the detection of typhoid fever through the detection of anti-HlyE antibodies in sera. Saliva can also be a useful diagnostic fluid as it also contains antibodies against bacterial pathogens. Aim This study aims to evaluate the potential detection of salivary anti-HlyE antibodies as a diagnosis of typhoid fever. Materials and Methods Saliva was collected from acute typhoid patients (n=16) who presented at Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia with prolonged fever of more than five days and were positive for S. Typhi blood culture. Saliva was also collected from convalescent typhoid patients (n=11), patients with other febrile fevers (n=15), and from healthy individuals (n=25). An ELISA was developed to detect the presence of IgA antibodies against HlyE in the saliva of typhoid patients. Results The acute typhoid group had a higher mean absorbance value of 1.496 compared to the convalescent typhoid (0.538), other febrile fevers (0.678), and healthy individuals (0.457) group. Conclusion This study demonstrated the utility of salivary anti-HlyE IgA antibody as a biomarker for the diagnosis of typhoid fever. Follow-up studies with a larger sample size will allow the optimization of the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. This non-invasive method can be useful for mass screening programs. PMID:27504289

  2. Vesicles for Signal Amplification in a Biosensor for the Detection of Low Antigen Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Grieshaber, Dorothee; de Lange, Victoria; Hirt, Thomas; Lu, Zhihua; Vörös, Janos

    2008-01-01

    The sensitivity of biosensors is often not sufficient to detect diagnostically relevant biomarker concentrations. In this paper we have utilized a Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) to detect dissipative losses induced by the attachment of intact vesicles. We modified a sandwich assay by coupling the secondary antibodies to vesi-cles. This resulted in an increase of detection sensitivity, achieving a diagnostically relevant detection limit of 5 ng/ml or 30 pM antigens. In addition, we could combine the individual assay steps to decrease the total time to result in about 30 minutes.

  3. Evaluation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of Renibacterium salmoninarum bacterins affected by persistence of bacterial antigens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pascho, R.J.; Goodrich, T.D.; McKibben, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss were injected intraperitoneally with a bacterin containing killed Renibacterium salmoninarum cells delivered alone or in an oil-based adjuvant. We evaluated the relative abilities of the batterins to prevent the initiation or progression of infection in fish challenged by waterborne exposure to R. salmoninarum. Sixty-one days after vaccination, fish were held for 24 h in water containing either no bacteria or approximately 1.7 x 103, 1.7 x 105, or 5.3 x 106 live R. salmoninarum cells/mL. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to monitor changes in the levels of R. salmoninarum antigen in live fish before and after the immersion challenges. High levels of R. salmoninarum antigens were detected by ELISA in kidney-spleen tissue homogenates from vaccinated fish immediately before the challenges. Levels of those antigens remained high in the tissues of unchallenged fish throughout the study. We found that the ELISA used in this study may be unsuitable for evaluating the efficacy of batterins because it did not distinguish antigens produced by the challenge bacteria during an infection from those of the bacterins. Groups of control and vaccinated fish also were injected with either 1.7 x 104 or 1.7 x 106 R. salmoninarum cells and served as R. salmoninarum virulence controls. Relative survival among the various subgroups in the injection challenge suggests that adverse effects might have been associated with the adjuvant used in this study. The lowest survival at both injection challenge levels was among fish vaccinated with bacteria in adjuvant.

  4. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  5. Detection of Yersinia pestis fraction 1 antigen with a fiber optic biosensor.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, L K; Anderson, G P; Ligler, F S; Ezzell, J

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic biosensor was used to detect the fraction 1 (F1) antigen from Yersinia pestis, the etiologic agent of plague. The instrument employs an argon ion laser (514 nm) to launch light into a long-clad fiber and measures the fluorescence produced by an immunofluorescent complex formed in the evanescent wave region. This sensing area is a short section (12.5 cm) at the end of the optical fiber from which the cladding has been removed and in which the silica core has been tapered. Capture antibodies, which bind to F1 antigen, were immobilized on the core surface to form the basis of the sandwich fluoroimmunoassay. The ability to detect bound F1 antigen was provided by adding tetramethylrhodamine-labeled anti-plaque antibody to form fluorescent complexes. The evanescent wave has a limited penetration depth (< 1 lambda), which restricts detection of the fluorescent complexes bound to the fiber's surface. The direct correlation between the F1 antigen concentration and the signal provided an effective method for sample quantitation. This method achieved a high level of accuracy for determining F1 antigen concentrations from 50 to 400 ng/ml in phosphate-buffered saline, serum, plasma, and whole blood, with a 5-ng/ml limit of detection. Subsequent blind studies, which included serum samples from patients, yielded results in good agreement with measurements by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A major advantage of the fiber optic biosensor is that results can be generated within minutes while isolating the user from hazardous samples. These factors favor development of this biosensor into a facile and rapid diagnostic device. PMID:7714189

  6. Serological detection of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma-associated antigens

    PubMed Central

    Eichmüller, Stefan; Usener, Dirk; Dummer, Reinhard; Stein, Angelika; Thiel, Daniela; Schadendorf, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are a group of skin neoplasms that originate from T lymphocytes and are difficult to treat in advanced stages. The present study is aimed at the identification of tumor-specific antigens from a human testis cDNA library using human sera known as the SEREX (serological identification of recombinantly expressed genes) approach. A cDNA library from normal testicle tissue was prepared and approximately 2 million recombinants were screened with sera from Sézary Syndrome and Mycosis fungoides patients. A total of 28 positive clones belonging to 15 different genes/ORFs were identified, including five hitherto unknown sequences. Whereas control sera did not react with most clones, 11–71% sera from CTCL patients were reactive against the identified clones. Expression analysis on 28 normal control and 17 CTCL tissues by reverse transcription–PCR (RT-PCR) and Northern blotting revealed seven ubiquitously distributed antigens, six differentially expressed antigens (several normal tissues were positive), and two tumor-specific antigens that were expressed only in testis and tumor tissues: (i) A SCP-1-like sequence, which has already been detected in various tumors, has been found in one CTCL tumor and four sera of CTCL patients reacted with various SCP-1-like clones and (ii) a new sequence named cTAGE-1 (CTCL-associated antigen 1) was detected in 35% of CTCL tumor tissues and sera of 6/18 patients reacted with this clone. The present study unravels CTCL-associated antigens independent of the T-cell receptor. The SCP-1-like gene and cTAGE-1 were shown to be immunogenic and immunologically tumor-specific and may therefore be candidates for immunotherapy targeting CTCL. PMID:11149944

  7. Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Kaare M.; Bøhn, Thomas; Townsend, Jeffrey P.

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research. PMID:24432015

  8. Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Kaare M; Bøhn, Thomas; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research.

  9. Detection of targeted carcinoembryonic antigens using a micro-fluxgate-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Jian; Lei, Chong; Wang, Tao; Yang, Zhen; Zhou, Yong

    2013-11-01

    In this work, a micro-fluxgate-based biosensor was designed for the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) labeled by Dynabeads. The sensor with Fe-based amorphous core and three dimension solenoid coils was fabricated by Micro Electro-Mechanical system technology. Sandwich assays are performed using antibody-antigen pair combination of biotin-streptavidin assay on a separated Au film substrate surface with a self-assembled layer. With dc magnetic fields in the range of 560 μT to 875 μT, detection of CEAs with different concentrations was performed and a minimum detectable concentration of 1 pg/ml was achieved. Furthermore, CEA samples with different concentrations can be distinguished.

  10. [Immunotherapy by polyvalent bacterial antigen (Broncasma Berna) in the prevention of pneumonia in the elderly].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Yamamoto, K; Adachi, S; Yamamoto, T

    1989-03-01

    Pneumonia in the elderly often occurs repeatedly, and the mortality rate from pneumonia continues to remain high today despite the usual use of antibacterial chemotherapy. Therefore, we conducted immunotherapy using a polyvalent bacterial vaccine (broncasma Berna). We treated 54 elderly patients with Broncasma Berna, containing chief bacterial pathogens responsible for pneumonia in the elderly. Clinical results obtained during 2 years were compared with those of 18 subjects not treated with Broncasma Berna. The survival rate was 64.8% for the group treated with Broncasma Berna and 50% for the group not treated. The frequency of contraction of pneumonia decreased significantly in the group treated. Clinical efficacy was obtained in 63% of the group treated to prevent pneumonia. The death rate from pneumonia was 17.6% for the group treated and 44.4% for the group not treated. Immunologically, reinforcement in humoral and cellular immunities was indicated by immunoglobulin values, positive tuberculin skin tests, and an increase in lymphocyte stimulation index values for Broncasma Berna. Significant pathogens in sputum disappeared or decreased in 6 (54.6%) out of 11 patients. Side effects such as pain or redness at the site of injection were observed in 6 patients. From the above results, it may be concluded that Broncasma Berna can be considered to be effective as a long-term immunoprophylactic agent in the prevention of pneumonia in the elderly.

  11. Detection of avian influenza antigens in proximity fiber, droplet, and optical waveguide microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol; Heinze, Brian C.; Gamboa, Jessica; You, David J.

    2009-05-01

    Virus antigens of avian influenza subtype H3N2 were detected on two different microfluidic platforms: microchannel and droplet. Latex immunoagglutination assays were performed using 920-nm highly carboxylated polystyrene beads that are conjugated with antibody to avian influenza virus. The bead suspension was merged with the solutions of avian influenza virus antigens in a Y-junction of a microchannel made by polydimethylsiloxane soft lithography. The resulting latex immunoagglutinations were measured with two optical fibers in proximity setup to detect 45° forward light scattering. Alternatively, 10 μL droplets of a bead suspension and an antigen solution were merged on a superhydrophobic surface (water contact angle = 155°), whose movement was guided by a metal wire, and 180° back light scattering is measured with a backscattering optical probe. Detection limits were 0.1 pg mL-1 for both microchannel with proximity fibers and droplet microfluidics, thanks to the use of micro-positioning stages to help generate reproducible optical signals. Additionally, optical waveguide was tested by constructing optical waveguide channels (filled with mineral oil) within a microfluidic device to detect the same light scattering. Detection limit was 0.1 ng mL-1 for an optical waveguide device, with a strong potential of improvement in the near future. The use of optical waveguide enabled smaller device setup, easier operation, smaller standard deviations and broader linear range of assay than proximity fiber microchannel and droplet microfluidics. Total assay time was less than 10 min.

  12. A rapid antigen capture ELISA for the detection of orthopox viruses.

    PubMed

    Johann, S; Czerny, C P

    1993-10-01

    A genus-specific antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection orthopox viruses (OPV) was established, testing various combinations of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and rabbit hyper-immune sera. The most sensitive assay was based on capturing antigen with a non-neutralizing MAb against a highly conserved antigenic site of the OPV fusion protein. Bound antigen was detected by a mixture of the two broadly-reactive rabbit anti-monkey-pox- and rabbit anti-vaccinia virus hyper-immune sera. The reaction was visualized by the corresponding anti-species-horseradish-peroxidase- (HRP) conjugate and 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as substrate. This system was able to identify all OPV-species and isolates which were investigated. The ELISA demonstrated complete agreement with conventional procedures undertaken for qualitative and quantitative OPV-detection. In parallel, 16 defined OPV-strains were analysed by quantitative electron microscopy (calculation of the number of physical particles; PN) and infectivity titration (TCID50/ml) on tissue cultures. When ELISA data were compared with infectivity titers, the detection limits in the ELISA varied in a wide range of 10(2)-10(4) TCID50/ml., depending on different replicative potencies of the individual virus strains. However, when PN was the basis for calculation, a minimum of 10(5) physical virus particles/ml could be detected. Gradient-purified virus was detectable up to a protein content of 15 ng/ml. Maximum optical densities in the sample (OD450nm) reached 2.0, while mock infected tissue cultures of negative samples offered corresponding values of < 0.01.

  13. Evaluation of an enzyme immunoassay-based stool antigen test to detect Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli.

    PubMed

    Tissari, Päivi; Rautelin, Hilpi

    2007-06-01

    An enzyme immunoassay-based antigen test (Ridascreen Campylobacter; R-Biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany) was evaluated for the detection of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli in 1050 clinical stool samples as compared with culture on selective medium. After routine inoculation for Salmonella, Shigella, Yersinia, Aeromonas, Plesiomonas, and Campylobacter, the same swab specimens were used for the antigen test. The positivity rate for Campylobacter was 9.3% in culture, and the antigen test gave a sensitivity of 69%. Forty-six stool samples culture-negative for Campylobacter grew other enteropathogens; one (positive for Salmonella sp.) was positive in the antigen test. Of all the 952 Campylobacter culture-negative samples, 830 were negative in the antigen test, giving a specificity of 87%. Almost 5% of the samples showed equivocal antigen test results. If the moderate sensitivity of the antigen test was due to a low sensitivity of culture or receiving the stool samples in transportation tubes remains to be studied.

  14. Target-specific capture enhances sensitivity of electrochemical detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mayank; Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Halford, Colin; Lewinski, Michael A; Landaw, Elliot M; Churchill, Bernard M; Haake, David A

    2011-12-01

    We report the concentration and purification of bacterial 16S rRNA by the use of a biotinylated DNA target-specific capture (TSC) probe. For both cultivated bacterial and urine specimens from urinary tract infection patients, TSC resulted in a 5- to 8-fold improvement in the sensitivity of bacterial detection in a 16S rRNA electrochemical sensor assay.

  15. Quantitative, multiplexed detection of bacterial pathogens: DNA and protein applications of the Luminex LabMAP system.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, Sherry A; Vander Zee, Coe A; Oliver, Kerry G; Karem, Kevin L; Jacobson, James W

    2003-05-01

    Escherichia coli, Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter jejuni are bacterial pathogens commonly implicated in foodborne illnesses. Generally used detection methods (i.e., culture, biochemical testing, ELISA and nucleic acid amplification) can be laborious, time-consuming and require multiple tests to detect all of the pathogens. Our objective was to develop rapid assays to simultaneously detect these four organisms through the presence of antigen or DNA using the Luminex LabMAP system. For nucleic acid detection, organism-specific capture probes corresponding to the 23S ribosomal RNA gene (rrl) were coupled covalently to LabMAP microspheres. Target molecules included synthetic complementary oligonucleotides and genomic DNA isolated from ATCC type strains or other well-characterized strains of each organism. Universal PCR primers were designed to amplify variable regions of bacterial 23S ribosomal DNA, yielding biotinylated amplicons of 86 to 109 bp in length. Varying quantities of targets were hybridized to the combined microsphere sets, labeled with streptavidin-R-phycoerythrin and analyzed on the Luminex(100) system. Results of nucleic acid detection assays, obtained in 30 to 40 min following amplification, correctly and specifically identified each bacterial species with a detection sensitivity of 10(3) to 10(5) genome copies. Capture-sandwich immunoassays were developed with organism-specific antibodies coupled to different microsphere sets. Microspheres were incubated with organism-specific standards and reactivity was assessed with biotinylated detection antibodies and streptavidin-R-phycoerythrin. In the immunoassays, microsphere-associated fluorescence was organism concentration dependent with detectable response at < or = 1000 organisms/ml and with no apparent cross-reactivity. We have demonstrated that the Luminex LabMAP system is a rapid, flexible platform capable of simultaneous, sensitive and specific detection of pathogens. The

  16. Development of specific scFv antibodies to detect neurocysticercosis antigens and potential applications in immunodiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Vanessa da Silva; Araújo, Thaise Gonçalves; Gonzaga, Henrique Tomaz; Nascimento, Rafael; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2013-01-01

    We have shown previously that detection of circulating antibodies against mimotopes selected by phage display were useful in neurocysticercosis diagnosis. However, circulating antigens may also be useful in patients' clinical follow-up. Therefore, we aimed to select novel combinatorial antibodies, single-chain variable fragment (scFv), which can be used for specific antigens with pre-defined affinity and specificity without prior immunization. A phage scFv antibody library was selected against Taenia solium mimotopes displayed on phages coupled in beads and total saline extract of T. solium metacestodes (S) immobilized on microtiter plate wells. After two rounds of selection, 96 phage clones were evolved and validated against each target by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and dot-blot, and three specific antibodies (B6, G10 and A4) were further characterized by sequencing and indirect immunofluorescence (IFI) assays. IFI revealed tegument staining for the B6, while the others showed a non-uniform staining in the whole parasite. The selected scFvs were used to capture their antigen targets that were elucidated through mass spectrometry, and used for antibody detection in NC patients' sera by ELISA, which achieved sensitivities greater than 97% and specificities above 95%. We have successfully developed scFv antibodies against important mimotopes used in NC diagnosis, and can be further explored to detect circulating antigens for clinical follow-up of patients with NC. Our strategy also highlighted the possibility of using this combinatorial approach to select, capture and characterize specific antigens to better understand this intriguing parasite infection and disease evolution.

  17. Bacteriophage Tailspikes and Bacterial O-Antigens as a Model System to Study Weak-Affinity Protein-Polysaccharide Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yu; Gohlke, Ulrich; Engström, Olof; Hamark, Christoffer; Scheidt, Tom; Kunstmann, Sonja; Heinemann, Udo; Widmalm, Göran; Santer, Mark; Barbirz, Stefanie

    2016-07-27

    Understanding interactions of bacterial surface polysaccharides with receptor protein scaffolds is important for the development of antibiotic therapies. The corresponding protein recognition domains frequently form low-affinity complexes with polysaccharides that are difficult to address with experimental techniques due to the conformational flexibility of the polysaccharide. In this work, we studied the tailspike protein (TSP) of the bacteriophage Sf6. Sf6TSP binds and hydrolyzes the high-rhamnose, serotype Y O-antigen polysaccharide of the Gram-negative bacterium Shigella flexneri (S. flexneri) as a first step of bacteriophage infection. Spectroscopic analyses and enzymatic cleavage assays confirmed that Sf6TSP binds long stretches of this polysaccharide. Crystal structure analysis and saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy using an enhanced method to interpret the data permitted the detailed description of affinity contributions and flexibility in an Sf6TSP-octasaccharide complex. Dodecasaccharide fragments corresponding to three repeating units of the O-antigen in complex with Sf6TSP were studied computationally by molecular dynamics simulations. They showed that distortion away from the low-energy solution conformation found in the octasaccharide complex is necessary for ligand binding. This is in agreement with a weak-affinity functional polysaccharide-protein contact that facilitates correct placement and thus hydrolysis of the polysaccharide close to the catalytic residues. Our simulations stress that the flexibility of glycan epitopes together with a small number of specific protein contacts provide the driving force for Sf6TSP-polysaccharide complex formation in an overall weak-affinity interaction system. PMID:27045683

  18. Accurate detection of Campylobacter spp. antigens by immunochromatography and enzyme immunoassay in routine microbiological laboratory.

    PubMed

    Regnath, Thomas; Ignatius, Ralf

    2014-09-01

    Campylobacter spp. are fastidious microorganisms, and their detection by culture depends on the freshness of the stool sample and the skills of the laboratory staff. To improve laboratory diagnosis, assays for the detection of specific antigens have been developed. Here, we evaluated two assays for the detection of Campylobacter spp.-specific antigens, i.e., one immunochromatographic test and one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA), in 38 frozen Campylobacter spp.-positive specimens and prospectively in 533 fresh stool samples with a conventional enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and culture. Both assays were positive for 36 samples with Campylobacter jejuni and one with Campylobacter coli among 38 Campylobacter spp.-positive frozen samples. One Campylobacter lari-positive sample was identified by the immunochromatographic assay (ICA) only. In a prospective study performed within the course of routine microbiology, both assays were positive for 24/25 C. jejuni culture-positive samples (positive percent agreement, 96.0% [95% CI: 78.9-100%]). ICA and EIA also were positive for 14 and 10 culture-negative samples, respectively (negative percent agreement: ICA, 97.2% [95% CI: 95.4-98.4%]; EIA, 98.0% [95% CI: 96.4-99.0%]). In conclusion, the high agreement between both antigen-detection assays and culture indicates that both assays may be initially performed followed by culture only upon a positive test result.

  19. Comparative efficacy of antigen and antibody detection tests for human trichinellosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanoska, D.; Cuperlovic, K.; Gamble, H.R.; Murrell, K.D.

    1989-02-01

    Sera collected from patients with suspected or confirmed exposure to Trichinella spiralis were tested for circulating parasite antigens and antiparasite antibodies. Using an immunoradiometric assay, excretory--secretory antigens from muscle-stage larvae of T. spiralis were detected in the sera of 47% of 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 13% of 39 patients without clinical signs but suspected of exposure to infected meat. In comparison, antibodies were detected using an indirect immunofluorescent test in the circulation of 100% of the 62 patients with clinical trichinellosis and 46% of the 39 patients with suspected exposure. The presence of antibodies specific to excretory-secretory products of T. spiralis muscle larvae was confirmed in the majority of the samples tested by a monoclonal antibody-based competitive inhibition assay. These results indicate that antibody detection is a more sensitive diagnostic method for human trichinellosis, but that antigen detection might be a useful confirmatory test because it is a direct demonstration of parasite products in the circulation.

  20. Detection and Characterization of Autoantibodies to Neuronal Cell-Surface Antigens in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    van Coevorden-Hameete, Marleen H.; Titulaer, Maarten J.; Schreurs, Marco W. J.; de Graaff, Esther; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A. E.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune encephalitis (AIE) is a group of disorders in which autoantibodies directed at antigens located on the plasma membrane of neurons induce severe neurological symptoms. In contrast to classical paraneoplastic disorders, AIE patients respond well to immunotherapy. The detection of neuronal surface autoantibodies in patients’ serum or CSF therefore has serious consequences for the patients’ treatment and follow-up and requires the availability of sensitive and specific diagnostic tests. This mini-review provides a guideline for both diagnostic and research laboratories that work on the detection of known surface autoantibodies and/or the identification of novel surface antigens. We discuss the strengths and pitfalls of different techniques for anti-neuronal antibody detection: (1) Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and immunofluorescence on rat/primate brain sections; (2) Immunocytochemistry (ICC) of living cultured hippocampal neurons; and (3) Cell Based Assay (CBA). In addition, we discuss the use of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis for the detection of novel neuronal surface antigens, which is a crucial step in further disease classification and the development of novel CBAs. PMID:27303263

  1. Nanostructured materials detect epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase and carcinoembryonic antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan-van Staden, Raluca-Ioana; Comnea-Stancu, Ionela Raluca; Surdu-Bob, Carmen Cristina; Badulescu, Marius

    2015-09-01

    New nanostructured materials based on thin films of Cu and Ni deposited on textile material (veil), as well as gold nanostructured microspheres were used for the design of new stochastic sensors. The stochastic sensors were able to detect simultaneously a panel of biomarkers comprising epidermal growth factor receptor, neuron specific enolase, and carcinoembryonic antigen from whole blood samples with high reliabilities - recovery tests higher than 97.00%, with a RSD (%) lower than 0.1%. The stochastic sensors had shown high sensitivities and low determination levels for the detection of the proposed panel of biomarkers making early detection of lung cancer possible by fast screening of whole blood.

  2. Generation of Two-color Antigen Microarrays for the Simultaneous Detection of IgG and IgM Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Chruscinski, Andrzej; Huang, Flora Y Y; Ulndreaj, Antigona; Chua, Conan; Fehlings, Michael; Rao, Vivek; Ross, Heather J; Levy, Gary A

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies, which are antibodies against self-antigens, are present in many disease states and can serve as markers for disease activity. The levels of autoantibodies to specific antigens are typically detected with the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. However, screening for multiple autoantibodies with ELISA can be time-consuming and requires a large quantity of patient sample. The antigen microarray technique is an alternative method that can be used to screen for autoantibodies in a multiplex fashion. In this technique, antigens are arrayed onto specially coated microscope slides with a robotic microarrayer. The slides are probed with patient serum samples and subsequently fluorescent-labeled secondary antibodies are added to detect binding of serum autoantibodies to the antigens. The autoantibody reactivities are revealed and quantified by scanning the slides with a scanner that can detect fluorescent signals. Here we describe methods to generate custom antigen microarrays. Our current arrays are printed with 9 solid pins and can include up to 162 antigens spotted in duplicate. The arrays can be easily customized by changing the antigens in the source plate that is used by the microarrayer. We have developed a two-color secondary antibody detection scheme that can distinguish IgG and IgM reactivities on the same slide surface. The detection system has been optimized to study binding of human and murine autoantibodies. PMID:27685156

  3. Biotin avidin amplified magnetic immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection using GoldMag nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, An; Geng, Tingting; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Chao; Cui, Yali

    2007-04-01

    Using GoldMag (Fe3O4/Au) nanoparticles as a carrier, a biotin-avidin amplified ELISA was developed to detect hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). A specific antibody was labeled with biotin and then used to detect the antigen with an antibody coated on GoldMag nanoparticles by a sandwich ELISA assay. The results showed that 5 mol of biotin were surface bound per mole of antibody. The biotin-avidin amplified ELISA assay has a higher sensitivity than that of the direct ELISA assay. There is 5-fold difference between HBsAg positive and negative serum even at dilution of 1:10000, and the relative standard deviation of the parallel positive serum at dilution of 1:4000 is 5.98% (n=11).

  4. Detection of rotavirus antigen in diarrhoeic and non-diarrhoeic piglets in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Atii, D J; Ojeh, C K; Durojaiye, O A

    1990-01-01

    Faecal samples from 96 piglets with acute gastroenteritis and 41 samples from non-diarrhoeic piglets were investigated for porcine rotavirus (PRV) antigens by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PRV was detected in 43 of 96 (44.8%) in the diarrhoeic group whilst none of the samples in the non-diarrhoeic group was positive for PRV (P less than 0.01). Age distribution of infection showed a higher infection rate of 30.2% in piglets aged 1-3 weeks, which was significantly higher (P less than 0.05) than in piglets aged 4-6 weeks, where the infection rate was 14.6 per cent. No PRV antigen was detected in diarrhoeic piglets above 6 weeks of age. Titration of 10 randomly selected ELISA-positive samples showed titres ranging from 512 to greater than or equal to 4.096.

  5. Development of an enzyme immunoassay using recombinant expressed antigen to detect hepatitis delta virus antibodies.

    PubMed

    Puig, J; Fields, H A

    1989-10-01

    Two generic enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) were developed for detection of anti-hepatitis delta virus antibodies (anti-HD) and compared with a commercially available radioimmunoassay. Both generic assays were configured as blocking assays and used hepatitis delta antigen (HDAg) derived from infected chimpanzee liver (EIA-1) or from Escherichia coli transformed with a plasmid containing an insert from within an open reading frame encoding HDAg (EIA-2). Absolute sensitivity was ascertained by endpoint titration, which demonstrated essentially identical endpoints for EIA-1 and EIA-2. The absolute sensitivities of the EIAs were approximately four times greater than that of the radioimmunoassay. Specificity and sensitivity were ascertained by testing a panel of 176 serum specimens by each assay. The specimens were selected to represent a panel composed of sera from individuals with or without markers of viral hepatitis as follows: (i) serologically confirmed by exclusion as posttransfusion non-A, non-B hepatitis; (ii) acute or chronic hepatitis B virus infection, positive for hepatitis B surface antigen; (iii) resolved hepatitis B virus infection, positive for anti-hepatitis B surface antigen; (iv) acute hepatitis A virus infection, positive for anti-hepatitis A virus immunoglobulin M; and (v) normal human sera. All three assays for anti-HD gave similar specificity and sensitivity values. In conclusion, the recombinant expressed HDAg can replace antigen derived from infected liver tissue as a diagnostic reagent used to configure an EIA for detection of anti-HD. Furthermore, the results suggest that the expressed antigen contains the important immunodominant epitope(s).

  6. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigens in faecal material.

    PubMed

    Grundy, M S; Voller, A; Warhurst, D

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a method for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigens in stool samples using a multi-layer ELISA. The method is sensitive and specific, showing no interference with other intestinal parasites, e.g. E. coli, E. hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba buetschlii, Hymenolepis nana, Giardia lamblia, Trichomonas and Ascaris. The method provides a rapid and simple screening assay for E. histolytica infections and should assist in diagnosis and epidemiological studies of the disease. PMID:2895514

  7. Evaluation of a Combination Rapid Immunoassay for Detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Raymond; Chen, Jing; York, Mary K.; Setijono, Norman; Kaplan, Raymond L.; Graham, Fitzroy; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2000-01-01

    A combination cassette format nonenzymatic rapid immunoassay for detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium antigens was evaluated by using 556 patient stool specimens from three clinical laboratories. This assay (Genzyme Diagnostics Contrast Giardia/Cryptosporidium), which can be used with fresh or formalin-fixed specimens, had unadjusted sensitivities and specificities of 96.1 and 98.5% for Giardia and 100 and 98.7% for Cryptosporidium, respectively, in this study. PMID:10618122

  8. Detecting West Nile Virus in Owls and Raptors by an Antigen-capture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Douglas G.; Barker, Ian K.; Lindsay, Robbin; Hunter, Bruce

    2004-01-01

    We evaluated a rapid antigen-capture assay (VecTest) for detection of West Nile virus in oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs, collected at necropsy from owls (N = 93) and raptors (N = 27). Sensitivity was 93.5%–95.2% for northern owl species but <42.9% for all other species. Specificity was 100% for owls and 85.7% for raptors. PMID:15663862

  9. Validation of ELISA for the detection of African horse sickness virus antigens and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Rubio, C; Cubillo, M A; Hooghuis, H; Sanchez-Vizcaino, J M; Diaz-Laviada, M; Plateau, E; Zientara, S; Crucière, C; Hamblin, C

    1998-01-01

    The mortality rate in susceptible populations of horses during an epizootic of African horse sickness (AHS) may be in excess of 90%. Rapid and reliable assays are therefore essential for the confirmation of clinical diagnoses and to enable control strategies to be implemented without undue delay. One of the major objectives of a recent European Union funded project was the validation of newly developed diagnostic assays which are rapid, sensitive, highly reproducible and inexpensive, for the detection of African horse sickness virus (AHSV) antigens and antibodies. The Laboratorio de Sanidad y Produccion Animal (LSPA) in Algete, Spain was charged with the responsibility of co-ordinating and supplying samples of viruses and antisera to the participating laboratories in Spain, France and the United Kingdom. The panels comprised 76 antigen samples for assay by indirect sandwich ELISAs and 53 serum samples for antibody detection by either indirect or competitive ELISAs. Results generated by ELISA for each laboratory were analysed in LSPA in terms of their relative sensitivities and specificities. There was a good agreement between the ELISAs used for either antigen or antibody detection. The participating groups agreed that any field sample giving a doubtful result would always be retested by ELISA and an alternative assay.

  10. Liver dendritic cells present bacterial antigens and produce cytokines upon Salmonella encounter.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Cecilia; Wick, Mary Jo

    2004-02-15

    The capacity of murine liver dendritic cells (DC) to present bacterial Ags and produce cytokines after encounter with Salmonella was studied. Freshly isolated, nonparenchymal liver CD11c(+) cells had heterogeneous expression of MHC class II and CD11b and a low level of CD40 and CD86 expression. Characterization of liver DC subsets revealed that CD8alpha(-)CD4(-) double negative cells constituted the majority of liver CD11c(+) ( approximately 85%) with few cells expressing CD8alpha or CD4. Flow cytometry analysis of freshly isolated CD11c(+) cells enriched from the liver and cocultured with Salmonella expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed that CD11c(+) MHC class II(high) cells had a greater capacity to internalize Salmonella relative to CD11c(+) MHC class II(low) cells. Moreover, both CD8alpha(-) and CD8alpha(+) liver DC internalized bacteria with similar efficiency after both in vitro and in vivo infection. CD11c(+) cells enriched from the liver could also process Salmonella for peptide presentation on MHC class I and class II to primary, Ag-specific T cells after internalization requiring actin cytoskeletal rearrangements. Flow cytometry analysis of liver CD11c(+) cells infected with Salmonella expressing GFP showed that both CD8alpha(-) and CD8alpha(+) DC produced IL-12p40 and TNF-alpha. The majority of cytokine-positive cells did not contain bacteria (GFP(-)) whereas only a minor fraction of cytokine-positive cells were GFP(+). Furthermore, only approximately 30-50% of liver DC containing bacteria (GFP(+)) produced cytokines. Thus, liver DC can internalize and process Salmonella for peptide presentation to CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells and elicit proinflammatory cytokine production upon Salmonella encounter, suggesting that DC in the liver may contribute to immunity against hepatotropic bacteria.

  11. Mining the bacterial unknown proteome: identification and characterization of a novel family of highly conserved protective antigens in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schluepen, Christina; Malito, Enrico; Marongiu, Ambra; Schirle, Markus; McWhinnie, Elisabeth; Lo Surdo, Paola; Biancucci, Marco; Falugi, Fabiana; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Marchi, Sara; Fontana, Maria Rita; Lombardi, Benedetta; De Falco, Maria Grazia; Rinaudo, C Daniela; Spraggon, Glen; Nissum, Mikkel; Bagnoli, Fabio; Grandi, Guido; Bottomley, Matthew J; Liberatori, Sabrina

    2013-11-01

    In the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, there exists an enormous diversity of proteins containing DUFs (domains of unknown function). In the present study, we characterized the family of conserved staphylococcal antigens (Csa) classified as DUF576 and taxonomically restricted to Staphylococci. The 18 Csa paralogues in S. aureus Newman are highly similar at the sequence level, yet were found to be expressed in multiple cellular locations. Extracellular Csa1A was shown to be post-translationally processed and released. Molecular interaction studies revealed that Csa1A interacts with other Csa paralogues, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the same cellular process. The structures of Csa1A and Csa1B were determined by X-ray crystallography, unveiling a peculiar structure with limited structural similarity to other known proteins. Our results provide the first detailed biological characterization of this family and confirm the uniqueness of this family also at the structural level. We also provide evidence that Csa family members elicit protective immunity in in vivo animal models of staphylococcal infections, indicating a possible important role for these proteins in S. aureus biology and pathogenesis. These findings identify the Csa family as new potential vaccine candidates, and underline the importance of mining the bacterial unknown proteome to identify new targets for preventive vaccines.

  12. Detection of antibodies to Anisakis simplex larvae by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoelectrophoresis using crude or purified antigens.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez Ramos, R; Tsuji, M

    1994-12-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoelectrophoresis (IEP) were used for the serodiagnosis of larval Anisakis simplex infections in man and immunized rabbits. Sephacryl S-300 gel filtration was used for separating crude antigen. Four fractions were obtained. Sera from patients with other helminth infections sometimes cross reacted with Anisakis larval antigens. With IEP, crude antigen is more sensitive than purified antigens. With ELISA, the third fraction is the most sensitive for detecting antibodies to Anisakis larvae in the sera of humans and immunized rabbits.

  13. Use of monoclonal antibodies in diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis: new strategies for detection of circulating antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, B L; Figueroa, J I; Hamilton, A J; Ortiz, B; Robledo, M A; Hay, R J; Restrepo, A

    1997-01-01

    The precise diagnosis of paracoccidioidomycosis, in most cases, is established by direct methods and indirect immunological tests. The latter method is reliant on the identification of the host's humoral responses, which are usually impaired or absent in patients with severe juvenile forms of the disease and in immunocompromised patients. Determining disease activity or assessing treatment responses by measuring antibody levels is difficult, since antibody titer may remain elevated or persist at stationary levels, even in the presence of clinical improvement. Consequently, there is a need for alternative tests aimed at the identification of circulating antigens. A modification of the standard hybridoma production method was used to raise a panel of murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the yeast form of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Of these, MAb PIB, directed against an 87-kDa determinant, was used to develop an inhibition ELISA (inh-ELISA) capable of detecting as little as 5.8 ng of circulating antigen per ml of serum. Sera from 46 patients with paracoccidioidomycosis or other mycoses and sera from healthy individuals were evaluated by the inh-ELISA; overall sensitivity was 80.4% (37 of 46 paracoccidioidomycosis patients tested positive), and specificity compared with that of normal controls from areas of endemicity was 81.4%. The inh-ELISA detected circulating antigen in 100% of patients with the acute form of paracoccidioidomycosis and in 83.3 and 60% of patients with the chronic multifocal and unifocal forms of paracoccidioidomycosis according to the patients' clinical presentation. These results indicate that the inh-ELISA with MAb PIB is effective in the detection of circulating antigen and that this test may be useful for monitoring responses to treatment and establishing disease prognoses. PMID:9399534

  14. Rapid pathogen detection with bacterial-assembled magnetic mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Youn; Lee, Jiho; Lee, Hye Sun; Chang, Jeong Ho

    2014-03-15

    We report rapid and accurate pathogen detection by coupling with high efficiency magnetic separation of pathogen by Ni(2+)-heterogeneous magnetic mesoporous silica (Ni-HMMS) and real time-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique. Ni-HMMS was developed with a significant incorporation of Fe particles within the silica mesopores by programmed thermal hydrogen reaction and functionalized with Ni(2+) ion on the surface by the wet impregnation process. High abundant Ni(2+) ions on the Ni-HMMS surface were able to assemble with cell wall component protein NikA (nickel-binding membrane protein), which contains several pathogenic bacteria including Escherichia coli O157:H7. NikA protein expression experiment showed the outstanding separation rate of the nikA gene-overexpressed E. coli (pSY-Nik) when comparing with wild-type E. coli (44.5 ± 13%) or not over-expressed E. coli (pSY-Nik) (53.2 ± 2.7%). Moreover, Ni-HMMS showed lower obstacle effect by large reaction volume (10 mL) than spherical core/shell-type silica magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with Ni(2+) (ca. 40 nm-diameters). Finally, the Ni-HMMS was successfully assessed to separate pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and applied to direct and rapid RT-PCR to quantitative detection at ultralow concentration (1 Log10 cfu mL(-1)) in the real samples (milk and Staphylococcus aureus culture broth) without bacterial amplification and DNA extraction step.

  15. Biomimetic/Optical Sensors for Detecting Bacterial Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Ksendzov, Alexander; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Ryan, Margaret; Lazazzera, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Biomimetic/optical sensors have been proposed as means of real-time detection of bacteria in liquid samples through real-time detection of compounds secreted by the bacteria. Bacterial species of interest would be identified through detection of signaling compounds unique to those species. The best-characterized examples of quorum-signaling compounds are acyl-homoserine lactones and peptides. Each compound, secreted by each bacterium of an affected species, serves as a signal to other bacteria of the same species to engage in a collective behavior when the population density of that species reaches a threshold level analogous to a quorum. A sensor according to the proposal would include a specially formulated biomimetic film, made of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), that would respond optically to the signaling compound of interest. The MIP film would be integrated directly onto an opticalwaveguide- based ring resonator for optical readout. Optically, the sensor would resemble the one described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. MIPs have been used before as molecular- recognition compounds, though not in the manner of the present proposal. Molecular imprinting is an approach to making molecularly selective cavities in a polymer matrix. These cavities function much as enzyme receptor sites: the chemical functionality and shape of a cavity in the polymer matrix cause the cavity to bind to specific molecules. An MIP matrix is made by polymerizing monomers in the presence of the compound of interest (template molecule). The polymer forms around the template. After the polymer solidifies, the template molecules are removed from the polymer matrix by decomplexing them from their binding sites and then dissolving them, leaving cavities that are matched to the template molecules in size, shape, and chemical functionality. The cavities thus become molecular-recognition sites

  16. Detection and monitoring of human bocavirus 1 infection by a new rapid antigen test

    PubMed Central

    Bruning, A.H.L.; Susi, P.; Toivola, H.; Christensen, A.; Söderlund-Venermo, M.; Hedman, K.; Aatola, H.; Zvirbliene, A.; Koskinen, J.O.

    2016-01-01

    Clinically relevant diagnosis of human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) is challenging, as the virus is frequently detected in asymptomatic patients, and cofindings with other respiratory viruses are common. The clinical value of current diagnostic methods, such as PCR, is therefore low, and alternative diagnostic strategies are needed. We describe for the first time the use of an antigen detection assay for the rapid identification of HBoV1 in a paediatric patient with respiratory tract infection symptoms. We estimate the duration of active HBoV1 infection to be 6 days. PMID:27014463

  17. Detection and monitoring of human bocavirus 1 infection by a new rapid antigen test.

    PubMed

    Bruning, A H L; Susi, P; Toivola, H; Christensen, A; Söderlund-Venermo, M; Hedman, K; Aatola, H; Zvirbliene, A; Koskinen, J O

    2016-05-01

    Clinically relevant diagnosis of human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) is challenging, as the virus is frequently detected in asymptomatic patients, and cofindings with other respiratory viruses are common. The clinical value of current diagnostic methods, such as PCR, is therefore low, and alternative diagnostic strategies are needed. We describe for the first time the use of an antigen detection assay for the rapid identification of HBoV1 in a paediatric patient with respiratory tract infection symptoms. We estimate the duration of active HBoV1 infection to be 6 days. PMID:27014463

  18. Detection of circulating toxocaral antigens in dogs by sandwich enzyme-immunoassay.

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, K; Kazuta, Y; Endo, R; Tanaka, K

    1984-01-01

    This study describes the presence of circulating toxocaral antigens (CTA) in the sera of dogs infected with Toxocara canis (T. canis) by using a sandwich enzyme-immunoassay (SEIA). A specificity of this assay with different antigens was observed, i.e. the EIA values, which express the antigen concentration, of excretory-secretory antigen from T. canis larvae were higher than those of other antigens (Ascaris lumbricoides, Dirofilaria immitis and Fasciola hepatica). The variability in intra-assay was below 10%. In age distribution of CTA levels, the highest level was observed at 1 month of age. Thereafter, the levels decreased gradually until 6 months of age and then the same levels were maintained until adult age. Also, slightly elevated levels were found in the sera of foetuses. A significant correlation was obtained between age and CTA levels. The positive correlation between the number of worms and CTA levels was significant. As for the IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies, a significant correlation was observed between the IgM antibody activities and CTA levels, but this was not observed with IgG and IgA antibodies. From these results, it was indicated that the immunological response to T. canis infection in dogs may not be reached until 1 or 2 months after birth, although detectable CTA levels were observed in foetal and early life. It was also suggested that the immunological stimulation for canine toxocariasis may be maintained by the excretory-secretory materials from the larvae through life and as a result, IgM antibody production may be observed even in chronically infected adult dogs. The SEIA technique reported in this study may be useful as a diagnostic tool of human toxocariasis, since the CTA can be directly demonstrated by the technique. PMID:6365746

  19. [Detections of hepatitis C virus RNA and NS3 antigen and their relation to liver histopathology].

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Wang, S; Jin, L

    1995-11-01

    To detect the distribution of hepatitis C virus and investigate the pathogenesis mechanisms of the viral infection in the liver tissues of the patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C, we examined HCV antigen expression by using the murine monoclonal antibody against HCV C33c peptide in the paraffin-embedded liver tissues from 28 patients with acute or chronic hepatitis C. The NS3 antigen was detected in 85.7% (24/28) of all the biopsy specimens. The distribution and staining density of the antigen immunoreactive signal varied according to different types of patients and the regions in the liver sections, but they obviously had a topographical relationship with the inflammatory-necrosis areas such as fatty and ballooning degeneration and focal necrosis in the liver tissues of nearly all the patients. In addition, the localization of HCV RNA investigated by in situ hybridization assay in 20 liver tissues the above 28 biopsy HD in the Chinese. They also provide valuable data for HD molecular diagnosis, genetic counselling and genetic health. PMID:8697087

  20. Influenza virus titration, antigenic characterization, and serological methods for antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Klimov, Alexander; Balish, Amanda; Veguilla, Vic; Sun, Hong; Schiffer, Jarad; Lu, Xiuhua; Katz, Jacqueline M; Hancock, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes some commonly used methods of influenza virus titration, antigenic characterization, and serological methods by antibody detection. These methods are essential not only for virus characterization but also for identifying new antigenic variants, vaccine strain selection, and sero-epidemiologic studies of influenza virus transmission and prevalence. Virus titration methods such as the hemagglutination assay, 50% egg or tissue culture infectious dose, and plaque assay are employed to determine the amount of virus particles in a sample. The hemagglutination inhibition assay is a reliable, relatively simple and inexpensive technique to antigenically characterize isolates of influenza viruses. Serological methods such as virus neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition are the fundamental tools used in sero-epidemiologic studies of influenza virus transmission and prevalence and in the evaluation of vaccine immunogenicity. While serological methods rarely yield an early diagnosis of acute influenza virus infection, well-timed, paired acute, and convalescent serum samples may establish the diagnosis of a recent influenza infection even when attempts to detect the virus are negative.

  1. Immunoelectrophoresis employing avian antisera for the detection and quantitation of Pasteurella multocida antigens.

    PubMed

    McKinney, K L; Rimler, R B

    1981-01-01

    Immunoelectrophoresis with various buffer systems at high and low pH was examined for suitability to detect and quantitate Pasteurella multocida antigens with turkey or chicken anti-P. multocida sera. Counterimmunoelectrophoresis was used to develop a buffer system for one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and rocket immunoelectrophoresis. The effects of pH, buffer, and molarity on resolution of immunoprecipitates were determined; 0.05 M sodium acetate-acetic acid buffer at pH 5.6 was the most suitable buffer. This buffer could be used in counterimmunoelectrophoresis with turkey or chicken sera to detect minute amounts of P. multocida protein antigens (4.3 ng/test) or lipopolysaccharide (3.12 micrograms/test). One-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis with the acetate buffer system required treatment of the gels with a 17% NaCl solution to induce immunoprecipitation of P. multocida lipopolysaccharide. Other techniques using the acetate buffer system did not require the high salt treatment. In two-dimensional immunoelectrophoresis, antisera migrated in the second dimension at pH 8.6, but did not migrate at pH 5.6. Rocket immunoelectrophoresis with the acetate buffer system was effective for quantitating P. multocida antigens.

  2. Detection and manipulation of live antigen-expressing cells using conditionally stable nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jonathan CY; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Etemad, Behzad; Rudolph, Stephanie; Guo, Binggege; Wang, Sui; Ellis, Emily G; Li, Jonathan Z; Cepko, Constance L

    2016-01-01

    The ability to detect and/or manipulate specific cell populations based upon the presence of intracellular protein epitopes would enable many types of studies and applications. Protein binders such as nanobodies (Nbs) can target untagged proteins (antigens) in the intracellular environment. However, genetically expressed protein binders are stable regardless of antigen expression, complicating their use for applications that require cell-specificity. Here, we created a conditional system in which the stability of an Nb depends upon an antigen of interest. We identified Nb framework mutations that can be used to rapidly create destabilized Nbs. Fusion of destabilized Nbs to various proteins enabled applications in living cells, such as optogenetic control of neural activity in specific cell types in the mouse brain, and detection of HIV-infected human cells by flow cytometry. These approaches are generalizable to other protein binders, and enable the rapid generation of single-polypeptide sensors and effectors active in cells expressing specific intracellular epitopes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15312.001 PMID:27205882

  3. Detection of urinary Vi antigen as a diagnostic test for typhoid fever.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D N; Harris, J R; Barrett, T J; Hargrett, N T; Prentzel, I; Valdivieso, C; Palomino, C; Levine, M M; Blake, P A

    1983-01-01

    Since Vi antigen is limited primarily to Salmonella typhi, it has been thought that detection of the antigen may be a useful method for diagnosing acute typhoid fever. The slide coagglutination method and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have recently been suggested as ways to detect small quantities of Vi antigen in urine. In Santiago, Chile, we compared the results of these two methods in patients with acute typhoid fever, paratyphoid fever, and other febrile illnesses and in afebrile control subjects. Using a cut-off value that maximally separated typhoid patients from controls, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive in 62.4% of 141 patients with culture-proven typhoid infections and in 13.2% of 159 afebrile control subjects. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was false positive in 64.7% of 34 culture-proven paratyphoid A or B patients and 47.1% of 21 patients with other nontyphoidal febrile illnesses. The coagglutination test was positive in 34% of typhoid patients, 14% of afebrile control subjects, and 46% of febrile control subjects. We conclude that these tests when performed with the Vi antibodies employed in this study are of little value for the diagnosis of typhoid fever in this setting. PMID:6630465

  4. Detection of urinary Vi antigen as a diagnostic test for typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Taylor, D N; Harris, J R; Barrett, T J; Hargrett, N T; Prentzel, I; Valdivieso, C; Palomino, C; Levine, M M; Blake, P A

    1983-10-01

    Since Vi antigen is limited primarily to Salmonella typhi, it has been thought that detection of the antigen may be a useful method for diagnosing acute typhoid fever. The slide coagglutination method and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay have recently been suggested as ways to detect small quantities of Vi antigen in urine. In Santiago, Chile, we compared the results of these two methods in patients with acute typhoid fever, paratyphoid fever, and other febrile illnesses and in afebrile control subjects. Using a cut-off value that maximally separated typhoid patients from controls, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was positive in 62.4% of 141 patients with culture-proven typhoid infections and in 13.2% of 159 afebrile control subjects. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was false positive in 64.7% of 34 culture-proven paratyphoid A or B patients and 47.1% of 21 patients with other nontyphoidal febrile illnesses. The coagglutination test was positive in 34% of typhoid patients, 14% of afebrile control subjects, and 46% of febrile control subjects. We conclude that these tests when performed with the Vi antibodies employed in this study are of little value for the diagnosis of typhoid fever in this setting.

  5. Practical Evaluation of Methods for Detection and Specificity of Autoantibodies to Extractable Nuclear Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Orton, Susan M.; Peace-Brewer, Amy; Schmitz, John L.; Freeman, Kristie; Miller, William C.; Folds, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Detection and specificity of autoantibodies against extractable nuclear antigens (ENA) play a critical role in the diagnosis and management of autoimmune disease. Historically, the detection of these antibodies has employed double immunodiffusion (DID). Autoantibody specificity was correlated with diagnoses by this technique. Enzyme immunoassays have been developed by multiple manufacturers to detect and identify the specificity ENA autoantibodies. To address the relationship of ENA detection by DID and enzyme immunoassay, the performances of five immunoassays were compared. These included two DID and three enzyme-linked immunoassays (ELISA) (both screening and individual antigen profile kits). The sample set included 83 ENA-positive, antinuclear-antibody (ANA)-positive specimens, 77 ENA-negative, ANA-positive specimens, and 20 ENA- and ANA-negative specimens. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated by two methods: first, by using the in-house DID result as the reference standard, and second, by using latent class analysis, which evaluates each kit result independently. Overall, the results showed that the ELISA methods were more sensitive for detection of ENA autoantibodies than DID techniques, but presence and/or specific type of ENA autoantibody did not always correlate with the patient's clinical presentation. Regardless of the testing strategy an individual laboratory uses, clear communication with the clinical staff regarding the significance of a positive result is imperative. The laboratory and the clinician must both be aware of the sensitivity and specificity of each testing method in use in the clinical laboratory. PMID:15013979

  6. Parallel optical read-out of micromechanical pillars applied to prostate specific membrane antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Tardivo, Martina; Toffoli, Valeria; Fracasso, Giulio; Borin, Daniele; Dal Zilio, Simone; Colusso, Andrea; Carrato, Sergio; Scoles, Giacinto; Meneghetti, Moreno; Colombatti, Marco; Lazzarino, Marco

    2015-10-15

    Micro and nanomechanical resonators represent a promising platform for proteins label-free detection because of their extreme sensitivity, fast response and low cost. Micro-pillars are columnar resonators that can be easily arranged in dense arrays of several thousand sensors in a squared mm. To exploit such a large density, however, a method for tracking independently micropillars resonance frequency is required. Here we present a detection method based on CCD imaging and software image analysis, which can measure the resonance frequency of tens of pillars in parallel. Acquiring simultaneously the frequency shift of up to 40 sensors and applying a proper statistical analysis, we were able to overcome the variability of the single measures improving the device sensitivity at low analyte concentration range. As a proof of concept, this method has been tested for the detection of a tumor marker, the Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA). Pillars have been functionalized with an antibody against PSMA. The tumor marker (PSMA) has been detected in a range of concentrations between 300 pM and 100 nM, in buffer and in diluted bovine serum. The sensitivity of our method was limited only by the affinity constant of the antigen-antibody recognition. Moreover, this detection technique demonstrated to be effective in the 1-6 nM range, which is the window of PSMA concentration of clinical interest.

  7. Use of Strep-tag II for rapid detection and purification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis recombinant antigens secreted by Streptomyces lividans.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Julio C; Pimienta, Elsa; Rodríguez, Caridad; Anné, Jozef; Vallín, Carlos; Milanés, María T; King-Batsios, Emmanuel; Huygen, Kris; Van Mellaert, Lieve

    2013-09-01

    Recent results with respect to the secretory production of bio-active Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins in Streptomyces have stimulated the further exploitation of this host as a bacterial cell factory. However, the rapid isolation of a recombinant protein by conventional procedures can be a restrictive step. A previous attempt to isolate recombinant antigens fused to the widely used 6His-tag was found to be relatively incompatible with secretory production in the Streptomyces host. As an alternative, the eight-residue Strep-tag® II (WSHPQFEK), displaying intrinsic binding affinity towards streptavidin, was evaluated for the secretory production of two M. tuberculosis immunodominant antigens in Streptomyces lividans and their subsequent downstream processing. Therefore, the genes ag85A (Rv3804c, encoding the mycolyl-transferase Ag85A) and Rv2626c (encoding hypoxic response protein 1), were equipped with a 3'-Strep-tag® II-encoding sequence and placed under control of the Streptomyces venezuelae CBS762.70 subtilisin inhibitor (vsi) transcriptional, translational and signal sequences. Strep-tagged Ag85A and Rv2626c proteins were detected in the spent medium of recombinant S. lividans cultures at 48h of growth, and purified using a Strep-Tactin Superflow® matrix. Recombinant Ag85A appeared as a 30-kDa protein of which the N-terminal amino acid sequence was identical to the expected one. Rv2626c was produced in two forms of 17 and 37kDa respectively, both with the same predicted N-terminal sequence, suggesting that the 37-kDa product is an Rv2626c dimer. The obtained results indicate that the Strep-tagII is proteolytically stable in Streptomyces and does not interfere with the membrane translocation of Ag85A and Rv2626c. A comparison of reactivity of serum from tuberculosis patients versus healthy persons by ELISA showed that both S. lividans-derived antigens were recognized by sera of individuals infected with M. tuberculosis, indicating that they remained

  8. Carcinoembryonic antigen radioimmunodetection in the evaluation of colorectal cancer and in the detection of occult neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Goldenberg, D.M.; Kim, E.E.; Bennett, S.J.; Nelson, M.O.; Deland, F.H.

    1983-03-01

    Radioimmunodetection of colorectal cancer was evaluated in 51 patients by injecting /sup 131/I-labeled goat antibody immunoglobulin G against carcinoembryonic antigen and performing total-body photoscans with a gamma scintillation camera 24 and 48 h later. The scintigrams were then processed by computer to subtract the images of the /sup 99m/Tc-serum albumin and pertechnetate administered, which reflect background and nontarget radioactivity, from the /sup 131/I-antibody scans. The results indicate that radioimmunodetection is a safe and a potentially clinically useful cancer detection method, which in this study demonstrated primary colorectal carcinomas in 10 of 12 (83%) of the patients evaluated preoperatively and between 87% (46 of 53) and 92% (49 of 53) of known metastatic tumor sites. Thus, the method's overall sensitivity (true-positive rate) was 86%-91% on a tumor-site basis. A false-negative rate of between 9% and 14% and a false-positive rate of less than 4% were found. In 11 of the 51 patients evaluated, tumor sites were detected that were not found by other clinical methods of cancer detection. These sites of tumor were then confirmed later, as much as 40 wk after radioimmunodetection was performed. It is concluded that in colorectal cancer patients, the current method of carcinoembryonic antigen radioimmunodetection can contribute to the preoperative clinical staging of the patients, assist in the postoperative evaluation of tumor recurrence or spread, complement other methods used to assess tumor response to therapy, support the indication of a rising carcinoembryonic antigen titer (when other methods cannot detect tumor) for second-look surgery, and confirm the findings of other detection measures that are less tumor-specific.

  9. Improved Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Surface Antigen by a New Rapid Automated Assay

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernard; Bayer, Anja; Kirch, Peter; Schlüter, Volker; Schlieper, Dietmar; Melchior, Walter

    1999-01-01

    The performance of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen (HBsAg) screening assays is continuously improved in order to reduce the residual risk of transfusion-associated hepatitis B. In a multicenter study, a new automated rapid screening assay, Elecsys HBsAg (Roche Diagnostics), was compared to well-established tests (Auszyme Monoclonal [overnight incubation] version B and IMx HBsAg [Abbott]). Included in the evaluation were 23 seroconversion panels; sera from the acute and chronic phases of infection; dilution series of various HBsAg standards, HBV subtypes, and S gene mutants; and isolated anti-HBV core antigen-positive samples. To challenge the specificity of the new assay, sera from HBsAg-negative blood donors, pregnant women, and dialysis and hospitalized patients and potentially cross-reactive samples were investigated. Elecsys HBsAg showed a higher sensitivity for HBsAg subtypes ad, ay, adw2, adw4, ayw1, ayw2, ayw4, and adr detection in dilution series of different standards or sera than Auszyme Monoclonal version B and/or IMx HBsAg. Acute hepatitis B was detected in 11 to 16 of 23 seroconversion panels between 2 and 16 days earlier with Elecsys HBsAg than with the alternative assays. Elecsys HBsAg and Auszyme Monoclonal version B detected HBsAg surface mutants with equal sensitivity. The sensitivity and specificity of Elecsys HBsAg were 100%. Auszyme Monoclonal version B had a 99.9% specificity, and its sensitivity was 96.6%. IMx HBsAg showed a poorer sensitivity and specificity than the other assays. In conclusion, Elecsys HBsAg permits earlier detection of acute hepatitis B and different HBV subtypes than the alternative assays. By using highly sensitive HBsAg screening assays, low-level HBsAg carriers among isolated anti-HBV core antigen-positive individuals can be detected. PMID:10405414

  10. Cell surface antigens detected on mature and leukemic granulocytic populations by cytotoxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Drew, S I; Carter, B M; Terasaki, P I; Naiem, F; Nathanson, D S; Abromowitz, B; Gale, R P

    1978-08-01

    Using a microcytotoxicity assay, the serological reactivity of human granulocytes, namely neutrophils and eosinophils, and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells and cultured CML cell lines (K562, NALM-1) were examined. Mature granulocyte forms and cord granulocytes are readily lysed by specific granulocyte cytotoxins that do not react with random T and B lymphocytes, monocytes, red blood cells, or platelets. Furthermore, certain antisera were preferentially cytotoxic for eosinophil-enriched populations. Granulocytotoxin detected antigens on one of three CML blast cell populations tested and K562, but failed to react with NALM-1. By cytotoxicity, mature granulocytes were poor targets for B2-microglobulin and the appropriate HLA antisera although both sera types are absorbed with granulocytes. Furthermore, granulocytes did not possess B-lymphocytes (Ia-like) or blood group A, B, and Rh (D) antigens. Except for K562, both HLA and heterologous B-lymphocyte antisera were cytotoxic for the CML blast cell populations tested.

  11. Development of Lateral Flow Immunoassay for Antigen Detection in Human Angiostrongylus cantonensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mu-Xin; Chen, Jia-Xu; Chen, Shao-Hong; Huang, Da-Na; Ai, Lin; Zhang, Ren-Li

    2016-01-01

    Angiostrongyliasis is difficult to be diagnosed for the reason that no ideal method can be used. Serologic tests require specific equipment and are not always available in poverty-stricken zone and are time-consuming. A lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) may be useful for angiostrongyliasis control. We established a LFIA for the diagnosis of angiostrongyliasis based on 2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against antigens of Angiostrongylus cantonensis adults. The sensitivity and specificity were 91.1% and 100% in LFIA, while those of commercial ELISA kit was 97.8% and 86.3%, respectively. Youden index was 0.91 in LFIA and 0.84 in commercial ELISA kit. LFIA showed detection limit of 1 ng/ml of A. cantonensis ES antigens. This LFIA was simple, rapid, highly sensitive and specific, which opened an alternative approach for the diagnosis of human angiostrongyliasis. PMID:27417097

  12. Novel use of a radiolabelled antibody against stage specific embryonic antigen for the detection of occult abscesses in mammals

    DOEpatents

    Thakur, M.L.

    1990-04-17

    The invention discloses improved reagents containing antibodies against stage specific embryonic antigen-1 antibodies and improved methods for detection of occult abscess and inflammation using the improved reagents. No Drawings

  13. Detection of circulating trypanosomal antigens in Trypanosoma evansi-infected animals using a T. brucei group-specific monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Nantulya, V M; Bajyana Songa, E; Hamers, R

    1989-09-01

    An antigen-detection enzyme immunoassay based on a T. brucei group-specific monoclonal antibody was used for the detection of circulating antigens in several animal species experimentally infected with T. evansi stocks from Sudan, Indonesia, Thailand and South America. Circulating antigens were detected as early as 6 days after infection, and they persisted throughout the observation period of up to 60 days postinfection. In an analysis of sera from naturally infected water buffaloes from Thailand, the test identified all the animals with positive parasitological findings, and 3 additional cases that had not been diagnosed by parasitological techniques. In an analysis of sera from pigs on a farm in Thailand suspected of a T. evansi outbreak, the assay detected "antigenaemia" in 66.7% of the animals, with antigen titres ranging from 1:2 to 1.512.

  14. Bacterial membranes enhance the immunogenicity and protective capacity of the surface exposed tick Subolesin-Anaplasma marginale MSP1a chimeric antigen.

    PubMed

    Contreras, Marinela; Moreno-Cid, Juan A; Domingos, Ana; Canales, Mario; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Pérez de la Lastra, José M; Sánchez, Emilio; Merino, Octávio; Zavala, Rigoberto López; Ayllón, Nieves; Boadella, Mariana; Villar, Margarita; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2015-09-01

    Ticks are vectors of diseases that affect humans and animals worldwide. Tick vaccines have been proposed as a cost-effective and environmentally sound alternative for tick control. Recently, the Rhipicephalus microplus Subolesin (SUB)-Anaplasma marginale MSP1a chimeric antigen was produced in Escherichia coli as membrane-bound and exposed protein and used to protect vaccinated cattle against tick infestations. In this research, lipidomics and proteomics characterization of the E. coli membrane-bound SUB-MSP1a antigen showed the presence of components with potential adjuvant effect. Furthermore, vaccination with membrane-free SUB-MSP1a and bacterial membranes containing SUB-MSP1a showed that bacterial membranes enhance the immunogenicity of the SUB-MSP1a antigen in animal models. R. microplus female ticks were capillary-fed with sera from pigs orally immunized with membrane-free SUB, membrane bound SUB-MSP1a and saline control. Ticks ingested antibodies added to the blood meal and the effect of these antibodies on reduction of tick weight was shown for membrane bound SUB-MSP1a but not SUB when compared to control. Using the simple and cost-effective process developed for the purification of membrane-bound SUB-MSP1a, endotoxin levels were within limits accepted for recombinant vaccines. These results provide further support for the development of tick vaccines using E. coli membranes exposing chimeric antigens such as SUB-MSP1a. PMID:26219233

  15. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: a matrix including lanthanide ions is provided on the surface containing the bacterial spores; functionalized aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores on the surface; a complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is formed on the surface; the complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence of the complex on the surface; and the bacterial spores exhibiting the luminescence of the complex on the surface are detected and quantified.

  16. Prostate specific antigen detection using AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Wang, H. T.; Lele, T. P.; Tseng, Y.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S. J.; Johnson, J. W.; Rajagopal, P.; Roberts, J. C.; Piner, E. L.; Linthicum, K. J.

    2007-09-01

    Antibody-functionalized Au-gated AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA). The PSA antibody was anchored to the gate area through the formation of carboxylate succinimdyl ester bonds with immobilized thioglycolic acid. The AlGaN /GaN HEMT drain-source current showed a rapid response of less than 5s when target PSA in a buffer at clinical concentrations was added to the antibody-immobilized surface. The authors could detect a wide range of concentrations from 10pg/mlto1μg/ml. The lowest detectable concentration was two orders of magnitude lower than the cutoff value of PSA measurements for clinical detection of prostate cancer. These results clearly demonstrate the promise of portable electronic biological sensors based on AlGaN /GaN HEMTs for PSA screening.

  17. A new virion precipitation test for oncovirus envelope antigens which detects common antigenic determinants in mammalian type-C viruses and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus.

    PubMed

    Altstein, A D; Zakharova, L G; Zhdanov, V M

    1979-03-15

    A method for the study of oncovirus envelope antigens was developed, bases on the precipitation of intact virions by a double antibody technique. The amount of precipitated virus was then measured as reverse transcriptase activity. The method was designated the virion precipitation test (VPT). It has been used for titration of antibodies to envelope antigens of oncoviruses. The study of envelop antigens of 11 different oncoviruses permitted their differentiation into the following groups: (1) murine type-C viruses: (2) feline type-C viruses; (3) simian type-C viruses; (4) the RD-114/BEV group; (5) Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV); (6) bovine leukemia virus; (7) avian type-C viruses; (8) mouse mammary tumor virus. No common antigenic determinants were detected in the last three groups. Mammalian type-C viruses (RD-114, NIH-MuLV, G-MuLV) had common antigenic determinants in the envelope, as demonstrated with an anti-RD-114 serum. Mammalian type-C viruses also shared antigenic determinants with M-PMV. The relationship of type-C viruses to M-PMV decreased in the following order: RD-114--NIH-MuLV--G-MuLV. It was also shown that the endogenous xenotropic feline RD-114 virus was more closely related to xenotropic NIH-MuLV than to ecotropic G-MuLV. The nature of the common antigenic determinants, as demonstrated by VPT on the surface of mammalian type-C viruses and M-PMV, and their significance for the concept of oncovirus evolution are discussed.

  18. Detection of a Pancreatic Cancer-Associated Antigen (DU-PAN-2 Antigen) in Serum and Ascites of Patients with Adenocarcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzgar, Richard S.; Rodriguez, Ned; Finn, Olivera J.; Lan, Michael S.; Daasch, Vicki N.; Fernsten, Philip D.; Meyers, William C.; Sindelar, William F.; Sandler, Robert S.; Seigler, H. F.

    1984-08-01

    A competition radioimmunoassay was developed, utilizing a murine monoclonal antibody to human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells. Immunoblotting of a standard antigen preparation from either serum or ascites fluid after electrophoresis in 1% agarose showed that the specific DUPAN-2 activity resided in two major high molecular weight bands. DU-PAN-2 antigen levels were expressed as arbitrary units based on a standard partially purified antigen preparation. The inhibition curve with standard antigen was reproducible (SD < 10%) and essentially linear from 25 to 200 units/ml. The mean DU-PAN-2 antigen concentration for the sera from 126 normal individuals was 81 units/ml. Sera from pediatric patients with malignancy had a mean of 127 units/ml, while nasopharyngeal, stage III melanoma, and ovarian carcinoma patients had means of 89, 92, and 119 units/ml, respectively. All values in normal subjects as well as the melanoma, nasopharyngeal, ovarian, and pediatric cancer patients were less than 400 units/ml. Intermediate antigen levels were detected in patients with alimentary tract malignancies. Eight of 20 gastric cancer and 8 of 76 colorectal carcinoma patients and 3 patients with benign or nonmalig nant gastrointestinal tract disease had DU-PAN-2 values exceeding 400 units/ml. Ascites fluids from 6/6 and pancreatic juice from 2/2 pancreatic cancer patients had values greater than 750 units/ml. Serum from 68% of the 89 pancreatic cancer patients tested had DU-PAN-2 antigen levels greater than 400 units/ml. The mean serum value in this patient population was 4888 units/ml.

  19. IgA detection in human neurocysticercosis using different preparations of heterologous antigen.

    PubMed

    da S Ribeiro, Vanessa; Manhani, Marianna N; Costa-Cruz, Julia M

    2010-06-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NC) is the most important neurological disease of parasitic origin in humans. IgA and IgG detection in serum from neurocysticercosis patients was tested using some antigenic preparations of total saline extract from Taenia saginata: detergent (D) and aqueous (A) phases extracted with Triton X-114 and the jacalin bound (JBF) and unbound fractions (JUF) obtained by affinity chromatography using jacalin column. Samples were obtained from 45 patients with definitive NC, who were subdivided into active-NC group and inactive-NC group; 35 patients with other parasitoses; and 30 apparently healthy individuals. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Specificity to detect IgA and IgG for D phase, respectively, were 89.8% and 86.9% and for IgG detection 91.3% and 76.8% when using D phase and JUF, respectively. D phase and JBF proved to be specific and efficient and could be efficiently utilized as an alternative antigen for IgA detection in NC, with comparable results with IgG.

  20. A novel nanostructured biosensor for the detection of the dust mite antigen Der p2

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jaw-Ji; Bau, I-Jiuan; Chen, He-Tsing; Lin, Yu-Ta; Wang, Gou-Jen

    2011-01-01

    The group 2 allergen, Der p2, has been reported to activate innate toll-like receptors (TLRs) on respiratory epithelial cells and thus aggravate respiratory diseases. In this study, a highly sensitive nanostructured biosensor based on a 3D sensing element with uniformly deposited gold nanoparticles is proposed for the detection of the dust mite antigen Der p2. The barrier layer comprises an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) film which is used as the template in this highly sensitive nanostructured biosensor. Simple electrochemical deposition without reducing agent and stabilizer was enough to uniformly synthesize gold nanoparticles on the surface of the barrier layer. The size and the distribution density of the nanoparticles can be well controlled by the applied potential during electrochemical deposition. Following this procedure, the dust mite monoclonal antibodies (IgG) were then immobilized through the 11-MUA (11-mercaptoundecanoic acid), (1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl-aminopropyl)-carbodiimide)/(N-hydroxysuccinimide) self-assembled monolayer approach for the dust mite antigen Der p2 detection. The detection limit of the proposed 3D gold nanoparticle-based nanostructured biosensor was examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis and found to be 1 pg/mL. The dynamic range was found to be 5 μg/mL. The proposed nanostructured biosensor would be useful for fast detection of rare molecules in a solution. PMID:21822382

  1. Detection of Leptospira-Specific Antibodies Using a Recombinant Antigen-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Halsey, Eric S.; Guevara, Carolina; Canal, Enrique; Hall, Eric; Maves, Ryan; Tilley, Drake H.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2013-01-01

    We produced three highly purified recombinant antigens rLipL32, rLipL41, and rLigA-Rep (leptospiral immunoglobulin-like A repeat region) for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The performance of these recombinant antigens was evaluated using 121 human sera. Among them, 63 sera were microscopic agglutination test (MAT)-confirmed positive sera from febrile patients in Peru, 22 sera were indigenous MAT-negative febrile patient sera, and 36 sera were from patients with other febrile diseases from Southeast Asia, where leptospirosis is also endemic. Combining the results of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG detection from these three antigens, the overall sensitivity is close to 90% based on the MAT. These results suggest that an ELISA using multiple recombinant antigens may be used as an alternative method for the detection of Leptospira-specific antibodies. PMID:24166046

  2. Rapid diagnosis of typhoid fever by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection of Salmonella serotype typhi antigens in urine.

    PubMed

    Fadeel, Moustafa Abdel; Crump, John A; Mahoney, Frank J; Nakhla, Isabelle A; Mansour, Adel M; Reyad, Baheia; El Melegi, Dawlat; Sultan, Yehia; Mintz, Eric D; Bibb, William F

    2004-03-01

    We developed and evaluated an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies to capture somatic antigen 9 (O9), flagellar antigen d (Hd), and the Vi capsular polysaccharide antigen (Vi) from the urine of persons with and without typhoid fever. Sequential urine samples were collected from 44 patients with blood culture-confirmed typhoid fever and from two control groups. The first control group included patients with brucellosis (n = 12) and those with clinically diagnosed, non-typhoid, acute, febrile illness (n = 27). The second control group was a sample of healthy volunteer laboratory workers (n = 11). When assessed relative to date of fever onset, sensitivity was highest during the first week for all three antigens: Vi was detected in the urine of nine (100%) patients, O9 in 4 (44%) patients, and Hd in 4 (44%) patients. Sequential testing of two urine samples from the same patient improved test sensitivity. Combined testing for Vi with O9 and Hd produced a trend towards increased sensitivity without compromising specificity. The specificity for Vi exceeded 90% when assessed among both febrile and healthy control subjects, but was only 25% when assessed among patients with brucellosis. Detection of urinary Vi antigen with this ELISA shows promise for the diagnosis of typhoid fever, particularly when used within the first week after fever onset. However, positive reactions for Vi antigen in patients with brucellosis must be understood before urinary Vi antigen detection can be developed further as a useful rapid diagnostic test.

  3. Development of a PMMA Electrochemical Microfluidic Device for Carcinoembryonic Antigen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Anh, Nguyen; Van Trung, Hoang; Tien, Bui Quang; Binh, Nguyen Hai; Ha, Cao Hong; Le Huy, Nguyen; Loc, Nguyen Thai; Thu, Vu Thi; Lam, Tran Dai

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic device fabricated by an inexpensive CO2 laser etching system was developed for detection of carcino-embryonic antigens (CEA). The device was capable of working in continuous mode and was designed with the aid of numerical simulation. The detection of target CEA was based on immuno-assay via magnetic particles and electrochemical sensing. The as-prepared microfluidic can be used to detect CEA at the relatively low concentration of 150 pg mL-1. The device could be reused many times, since the capture and removal of magnetic particles in the assay could be manipulated by an external magnetic field. The proposed approach appears to be suitable for high-throughput and automated analysis of large biomolecules such as tumor markers and pathogens.

  4. Virus-based assay for antigen detection using infective growth as signal transduction mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cheok, Hui Shan; Jaworski, Justyn

    2016-03-15

    Viruses have the ability to infect and thereby confer new phenotypes on host cells. E. coli, for example, if infected by viruses containing antibiotic resistance genes, can benefit by surviving in the presence of the corresponding antibiotics to grow into colonies observable by the naked eye. Using this concept as a signal transduction mechanism for our immunoassay, we have engineered ampicillin resistant virions to display a dimer of the z domain from Protein A. This zz-domain selectively binds to the conserved heavy domain of IgG across various species. As commercially available antibodies are in no short supply, this engineered virion can be used modularly with existing antibodies for converting the presence of target antigen into a visually detectable colony forming unit. Here we demonstrate that this scheme for zz-phage transfection and selective growth of infected E. coli can facilitate sub-nanomolar detection limits for target antigen. Moreover, this phage infectivity assay works over a range of concentrations competitive with existing ELISA techniques. Because this system is derived from self-regenerating components (i.e., virus and bacteria) and furthermore obviates the need for chromogenic substrates or spectroscopic equipment, we find it particularly suitable for use in regions where cost effective detection is a necessity.

  5. Detection, phenotyping, and quantification of antigen-specific T cells using a peptide-MHC dodecamer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Zeng, Xun; Sigal, Natalia; Lund, Peder J; Su, Laura F; Huang, Huang; Chien, Yueh-hsiu; Davis, Mark M

    2016-03-29

    Here we report a peptide-MHC (pMHC) dodecamer as a "next generation" technology that is a significantly more sensitive and versatile alternative to pMHC tetramers for the detection, isolation, and phenotypic analysis of antigen-specific T cells. In particular, dodecamers are able to detect two- to fivefold more antigen-specific T cells in both human and murine CD4(+)and CD8(+)αβ T-cell compartments compared with the equivalent tetramers. The low-affinity, tetramer-negative, dodecamer-positive T cells showed comparable effector cytokine responses as those of high-affinity, tetramer-positive T cells. Dodecamers are able to detect early stage CD4(+)CD8(+)double-positive thymocytes on which T-cell receptors are 10- to 30-fold less dense than mature T cells. Dodecamers also show utility in the analysis of γδ T cells and in cytometry by time-of-flight applications. This construct has a simple structure with a central scaffold protein linked to four streptavidin molecules, each having three pMHC ligands or other molecules. The dodecamer is straightforward and inexpensive to produce and is compatible with current tetramer technology and commercially available streptavidin conjugates. PMID:26979955

  6. Detection of Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Pasteurella haemolytica antigens by an immunoperoxidase technique in pneumonic ovine lungs.

    PubMed

    Haziroglu, R; Diker, K S; Turkarslan, J; Gulbahar, M Y

    1996-01-01

    Four hundred twenty pneumonic lungs from lambs were examined for Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Pasteurella haemolytica by an immunoperoxidase technique using an extravidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections. Histologic examination of tissue sections revealed strong positive reactions in 60.9% and 68.3% of the lungs against M. ovipneumoniae and P. haemolytica, respectively. M. ovipneumoniae and P. haemolytica antigens were observed at the surface and/or within the epithelial cells, macrophages, leucocytes, and bronchiolar exudate. The location of M. ovipneumoniae in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells and P. haemolytica in the neutrophils was detected immunohistochemically.

  7. Detection of a human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle antigenically related to HIV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garry, R. F.; Fermin, C. D.; Hart, D. J.; Alexander, S. S.; Donehower, L. A.; Luo-Zhang, H.

    1990-01-01

    Sjogren's syndrome is an autoimmune disease that is characterized by dryness of the mouth and eyes. The loss of salivary and lacrimal gland function is accompanied by lymphocytic infiltration. Because similar symptoms and glandular pathology are observed in certain persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a search was initiated for a possible retroviral etiology in this syndrome. A human intracisternal A-type retroviral particle that is antigenically related to HIV was detected in lymphoblastoid cells exposed to homogenates of salivary tissue from patients with Sjogren's syndrome. Comparison of this retroviral particle to HIV indicates that they are distinguishable by several ultrastructural, physical, and enzymatic criteria.

  8. Evaluation of turkey erythrocyte hemagglutination assay for the detection of hepatitis B antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, R I; Tiku, M L; Ogra, P L

    1975-01-01

    A recently described hemagglutination test for hepatitis B antigen (HBsAg) using turkey erythrocytes coated with horse antibody to HBsAg purified by affinity column chromatography was evaluated on a comparative basis with 100 HBsAg-positive and -negative serum samples. The turkey erythrocyte hemagglutination test (TEHA) was found to be less sensitive than radioimmunoassay (RIA) but gave far better results than counterimmunoelectrophoresis. Quantitative titration of HBsAg in serial dilutions of the samples appeared to be more reliably performed by TEHA than by RIA. TEHA is a simple and sensitive technique for the detection of HBsAg and may offer several practical advantages over RIA. PMID:1236871

  9. Salivary, nasal, genital, and systemic antibody responses in monkeys immunized intranasally with a bacterial protein antigen and the Cholera toxin B subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, M W; Moldoveanu, Z; White, P L; Sibert, G J; Mestecky, J; Michalek S, M

    1996-01-01

    Previous attempts to induce mucosal antibodies in rhesus monkeys by enteric immunization have resulted in only modest and short-lived responses, dominated by immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies in the plasma. In this study, two groups of rhesus monkeys were immunized intranasally three times at 2-week intervals with a bacterial protein antigen (AgI/II) either chemically coupled to or mixed with the B subunit of cholera toxin (CT), a known potent mucosal immunogen and carrier for other immunogens. Cells secreting antibodies, predominantly of the IgA isotype, to AgI/II and to CT were detected in the peripheral blood 1 week after each immunization, indicating the dissemination of IgA-secreting precursor cells through the mucosal immune system. IgG and, to a lesser extent, IgA antibodies to both proteins were induced in the plasma commencing after the second immunization. Plasma IgE concentrations and IgE antibody levels were not consistently raised during the immunization period. IgA antibodies were found in nasal and vaginal washes. Nasal IgG but not IgA antibodies showed a significant positive correlation with plasma IgG antibody levels, suggesting that they were largely derived by transudation from the circulation. Analysis of the molecular form of vaginal IgA indicated that both secretory and monomeric forms of IgA were present in various proportions. Furthermore, neither IgG nor IgA antibodies in vaginal washes were correlated with plasma antibody responses, suggesting the contribution of locally synthesized antibodies of both isotypes. Comparison of the responses between the two groups of animals showed only sporadic significant differences, indicating that intranasal immunization with AgI/II either coupled to or mixed with the B subunit of CT was equally effective at inducing generalized IgA antibody responses in the mucosal immune system and predominantly IgG antibodies in the plasma. PMID:8606090

  10. Molecular detection of bacterial pathogens using microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probes.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Mach, Kathleen E; Mohan, Ruchika; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2011-08-15

    Rapid, specific, and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens is essential toward clinical management of infectious diseases. Traditional approaches for pathogen detection, however, often require time-intensive bacterial culture and amplification procedures. Herein, a microparticle enhanced double-stranded DNA probe is demonstrated for rapid species-specific detection of bacterial 16S rRNA. In this molecular assay, the binding of the target sequence to the fluorophore conjugated probe thermodynamically displaces the quencher probe and allows the fluorophore to fluoresce. By incorporation of streptavidin-coated microparticles to localize the biotinylated probes, the sensitivity of the assay can be improved by 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection of the assay is as few as eight bacteria without target amplification and is highly specific against other common pathogens. Its applicability toward clinical diagnostics is demonstrated by directly identifying bacterial pathogens in urine samples from patients with urinary tract infections.

  11. Effective detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile by a two-step algorithm including tests for antigen and cytotoxin.

    PubMed

    Ticehurst, John R; Aird, Deborah Z; Dam, Lisa M; Borek, Anita P; Hargrove, John T; Carroll, Karen C

    2006-03-01

    We evaluated a two-step algorithm for detecting toxigenic Clostridium difficile: an enzyme immunoassay for glutamate dehydrogenase antigen (Ag-EIA) and then, for antigen-positive specimens, a concurrent cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Antigen-negative results were > or = 99% predictive of CCNA negativity. Because the Ag-EIA reduced cell culture workload by approximately 75 to 80% and two-step testing was complete in < or = 3 days, we decided that this algorithm would be effective. Over 6 months, our laboratories' expenses were US dollar 143,000 less than if CCNA alone had been performed on all 5,887 specimens.

  12. Detection of Q Fever Specific Antibodies Using Recombinant Antigen in ELISA with Peroxidase Based Signal Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Wei; Zhang, Zhiwen; Glennon, Erin; Ching, Wei-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the accepted method for Q fever serodiagnosis is indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA) using the whole cell antigen. In this study, we prepared the recombinant antigen of the 27-kDa outer membrane protein (Com1) which has been shown to be recognized by Q fever patient sera. The performance of recombinant Com1 was evaluated in ELISA by IFA confirmed serum samples. Due to the low titers of IgG and IgM in Q fever patients, the standard ELISA signals were further amplified by using biotinylated anti-human IgG or IgM plus streptavidin-HRP polymer. The modified ELISA can detect 88% (29 out of 33) of Q fever patient sera collected from Marines deployed to Iraq. Less than 5% (5 out of 156) of the sera from patients with other febrile diseases reacted with the Com1. These results suggest that the modified ELISA using Com1 may have the potential to improve the detection of Q fever specific antibodies. PMID:26904739

  13. Immunohistochemical detection of papillomavirus structural antigens in animal hyperplastic and neoplastic epithelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Sironi, G; Caniatti, M; Scanziani, E

    1990-12-01

    One hundred and seventy-two hyperplastic and neoplastic epithelial lesions from 8 different mammalian and 1 avian species have been tested with an immunohistochemical technique to detect papillomavirus structural antigens. Selected lesions were diagnosed histologically as papilloma, fibropapilloma, equine sarcoid, squamous cell carcinoma, basalioma, epulis, keratoacanthoma, trichoepithelioma, pilomatrixoma, epidermal inclusion cyst, and hyperkeratotic or acanthotic epidermal lesions. Positive nuclear staining was detected in 14 out of 23 papillomas, 8 out of 32 fibropapillomas and in 1 out of 3 hyperplastic epidermal lesions. Positive samples were found in 5 of 8 mammalian species. Selected samples were also examined by transmission electron microscopy. In 4 samples papillomavirus was seen. In two other samples, negative with immunoperoxidase technique, papovavirus-like particles were observed.

  14. Application of fluorescent substrates to the in situ detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Gooch, James; Daniel, Barbara; Frascione, Nunzianda

    2014-07-01

    The forensic identification of body fluids frequently presents an important source of genetic material and investigative interpretation. However, presumptive testing techniques presently employed in the discrimination of biological fluids are subject to criticism for poor specificity, lack of fluid localisation ability and detrimental effects on DNA recovery rates. The recognition of fluid-specific biomarkers by fluorogenic substrates may provide a novel resolution to these issues but research has yet to establish any pertinent in situ fluid detection applicability. This study therefore utilises a fluorogenic substrate (Mu-HSSKLQ-AFC) specific to the seminal protein prostate specific antigen in an effort to detect human semen deposited on a number of surfaces typical to criminal investigation. The ability of fluorescent fluorogenic substrates to simultaneously identify and visualise biological fluids in situ is demonstrated for the first time, whilst the production of complete STR profiles from fluid sources is also confirmed to be completely unaffected by substrate application.

  15. Detection of dengue NS1 antigen using long-range surface plasmon waveguides.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wei Ru; Sekaran, Shamala Devi; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd; Berini, Pierre

    2016-04-15

    The non-structural 1 (NS1) protein of the dengue virus circulates in infected patients' blood samples and can be used for early diagnosis of dengue infection. In this paper, we present the detection of naturally-occurring dengue NS1 antigen in infected patient blood plasma using straight long-range surface plasmon waveguides. Three commercially-available anti-NS1 monoclonal antibodies were used for recognition and their performance was compared and discussed. A similar figure of merit to the one used in conventional dengue NS1 capture using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was applied to our results. In general, the positive patient samples can be clearly differentiated from the negative ones and the results agree with those obtained using ELISA. The largest signal-to-noise ratio observed during the experiments was 356 and the best detection limit observed is estimated as 5.73 pg/mm(2).

  16. Hantavirus antigen detection using human serum immunoglobulin M as the capturing antibody in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Alexeyev, O A; Elgh, F; Ahlm, C; Stigbrand, T; Settergren, B; Wadell, G; Juto, P

    1996-04-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to detect different hantavirus antigens in cell culture; i.e. Puumala (PUU), Hantaan (HTN), and Dobrava (DOB) viruses. The assay was based on binding human serum immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies to the solid phase by use of goat anti-IgM antibodies. The captured IgM antibodies were present in the acute phase serum from two patients: one infected in Sweden and the other in Bosnia. Antigens being bound to the solid phase by the human anti-PUU and anti-DOB/HTN IgM antibodies were detected by a broadly reacting polyclonal rabbit anti PUU-recombinant nucleocapsid protein antiserum. The IgM isotype was proven to be at least five times more efficient than IgG when used as the capturing antibody. The sensitivity of the PUU antigen ELISA was approximately 0.5 ng/ml, as measured by titration with a PUU recombinant nucleoprotein antigen. Cell-associated PUU antigen in tissue culture was seen after 48 hr by the PUU-ELISA and after 96 hr by immunofluorescent assay. When tested for capacity to discriminate between PUU, DOB, and HTN viruses, significant differences were found: the Swedish serum detected PUU antigen at high titers, whereas no reactivity was found against DOB and HTN; the Bosnian serum detected both DOB and HTN at high titers but had a low reactivity to PUU. The method was also tested for its usefulness in detecting PUU antigen in bank vole (clethrionomys glareolus) lungs. Of 59 animals captured from the surroundings of patients with nephropathia epidemica, three became positive with a high activity in the PUU-ELISA, but with low reactivity in the DOB/HTN-ELISA. It is concluded that a sensitive ELISA has been developed to detect different hantaviruses in cell culture and lungs of bank voles.

  17. Subdominant antigens in bacterial vaccines: AM779 is subdominant in the Anaplasma marginale outer membrane vaccine but does not associate with protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Albarrak, Saleh M; Brown, Wendy C; Noh, Susan M; Reif, Kathryn E; Scoles, Glen A; Turse, Joshua E; Norimine, Junzo; Ueti, Massaro W; Palmer, Guy H

    2012-01-01

    Identification of specific antigens responsible for the ability of complex immunogens to induce protection is a major goal in development of bacterial vaccines. Much of the investigation has focused on highly abundant and highly immunodominant outer membrane proteins. Recently however, genomic and proteomic approaches have facilitated identification of minor components of the bacterial outer membrane that have previously been missed or ignored in immunological analyses. Immunization with Anaplasma marginale outer membranes or a cross-linked surface complex induces protection against bacteremia, however the components responsible for protection within these complex immunogens are unknown. Using outer membrane protein AM779 as a model, we demonstrated that this highly conserved but minor component of the A. marginale surface was immunologically sub-dominant in the context of the outer membrane or surface complex vaccines. Immunologic sub-dominance could be overcome by targeted vaccination with AM779 for T lymphocyte responses but not for antibody responses, suggesting that both abundance and intrinsic immunogenicity determine relative dominance. Importantly, immunization with AM779 supports that once priming is achieved by specific targeting, recall upon infectious challenge is achieved. While immunization with AM779 alone was not sufficient to induce protection, the ability of targeted immunization to prime the immune response to highly conserved but low abundance proteins supports continued investigation into the role of sub-dominant antigens, individually and collectively, in vaccine development for A. marginale and related bacterial pathogens.

  18. Comparison of Stool Antigen Detection Kits to PCR for Diagnosis of Amebiasis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stark, D.; van Hal, S.; Fotedar, R.; Butcher, A.; Marriott, D.; Ellis, J.; Harkness, J.

    2008-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare two stool antigen detection kits with PCR for the diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica infections by using fecal specimens submitted to the Department of Microbiology at St. Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, and the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide, Australia. A total of 279 stool samples containing the E complex (E. histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba moshkovskii) were included in this study. The stool specimens were tested by using two commercially produced enzyme immunoassays (the Entamoeba CELISA PATH and TechLab E. histolytica II kits) to detect antigens of E. histolytica. DNA was extracted from all of the samples with a Qiagen DNA stool mini kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany), and a PCR targeting the small-subunit ribosomal DNA was performed on all of the samples. When PCR was used as a reference standard, the CELISA PATH kit showed 28% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The TechLab ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) kit did not prove to be useful in detecting E. histolytica, as it failed to identify any of the E. histolytica samples which were positive by PCR. With the TechLab kit, cross-reactivity was observed for three specimens, one of which was positive for both E. dispar and E. moshkovskii while the other two samples contained E. moshkovskii. Quantitative assessment of the PCR and ELISA results obtained showed that the ELISA kits were 1,000 to 10,000 times less sensitive, and our results show that the CELISA PATH kit and the TechLab ELISA are not useful for the detection of E. histolytica in stool samples from patients in geographical regions where this parasite is not endemic. PMID:18367563

  19. Method and Apparatus for Detecting and Quantifying Bacterial Spores on a Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: bacterial spores are transferred from a place of origin to a test surface, the test surface comprises lanthanide ions. Aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores; a complex of the lanthanide ions and aromatic molecules is formed on the test surface, the complex is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence on the test surface; the luminescence on the test surface is detected and quantified.

  20. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: bacterial spores are transferred from a place of origin to a test surface, the test surface comprises lanthanide ions. Aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores; a complex of the lanthanide ions and aromatic molecules is formed on the test surface, the complex is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence on the test surface; the luminescence on the test surface is detected and quantified.

  1. Suitability of optical, physical and chemical measurements for detection of changes in bacterial drinking water quality.

    PubMed

    Ikonen, Jenni; Pitkänen, Tarja; Miettinen, Ilkka T

    2013-10-25

    In this study, different optical, physical and chemical measurements were tested for their capacity to detect changes in water quality. The tests included UV-absorbance at 254 nm, absorbance at 420 nm, turbidity, particle counting, temperature, pH, electric conductivity (EC), free chlorine concentration and ATP concentration measurements. Special emphasis was given to investigating the potential for measurement tools to detect changes in bacterial concentrations in drinking water. Bacterial colony counts (CFU) and total bacterial cell counts (TBC) were used as reference methods for assessing the bacterial water quality. The study consists of a series of laboratory scale experiments: monitoring of regrowth of Pseudomonas fluorescens, estimation of the detection limits for optical measurements using Escherichia coli dilutions, verification of the relationships by analysing grab water samples from various distribution systems and utilisation of the measurements in the case of an accidentally contaminated distribution network. We found significant correlations between the tested measurements and the bacterial water quality. As the bacterial contamination of water often co-occurs with the intrusion of matrixes containing mainly non-bacterial components, the tested measurement tools can be considered to have the potential to rapidly detect any major changes in drinking water quality.

  2. Dose-dependent changes in the antigenicity of bacterial endotoxin exposed to ionizing radiation. Report No. 2, 1986-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Csako, G.; Suba, E.A.; Tsai, C.M.; Mocca, L.F.; Elin, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The antigenic properties of the highly purified US reference standard endotoxin (RSE) exposed to varying doses of ionizing radiation were studied with double immuno-diffusion, immunoelectrophoresis, and immunoblotting. Rabbit RSE antisera identified 2 distinct major antigenic components for untreated RSE: one related to the O-polysaccharide side chain (O-antigenic specificity), the other to the R-core. Based on a serologic cross-reactivity of R-core of RSE (Escherichia coli 0113) with the R-core of the lipopolysaccharide from E. coli 0111, the core type of E. coli 0113 was identified as coli R3. Increasing exposure of RSE to ionizing radiation progressively destroyed all antigenic reactivities; at lower doses of radiation the rate of elimination differed for the 2 antigen classes. The O-polysaccharide was more sensitive to gamma radiation than the R-core and the O-antigenicity was lost before that of the R-core. Endotoxin molecules containing incomplete R-core (radiation-induced or mutant) did not react with the RSE antiserum. Keywords: Antigenicity, Reprints. (KT/KR)

  3. Construction and bacterial expression of a recombinant single-chain antibody fragment against Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 antigen for the diagnosis of lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Kamatchi, R; Charumathi, J; Ravishankaran, R; Kaliraj, P; Meenakshisundaram, S

    2016-01-01

    Global programmes to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (GPELF) require mapping, monitoring and evaluation using filarial antigen diagnostic kits. To meet this objective, a functional single-chain fragment variable (ScFv) specific for filarial Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 (Wb-SXP-1) antigen was constructed for the diagnosis of active filarial infection, an alternative to the production of complete antibodies using hybridomas. The variable heavy chain (VH) and the variable light chain (kappa) (Vκ) genes were amplified from the mouse hybridoma cell line and were linked together with a flexible linker by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The ScFv construct (Vκ-Linker-VH) was expressed as a fusion protein with N-terminal His tag in Escherichia coli and purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) without the addition of reducing agents. Immunoblotting and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to analyse the antigen binding affinity of purified ScFv. The purified ScFv was found to recognize recombinant and native Wb-SXP-1 antigen in microfilariae (Mf)-positive patient sera. The affinity of ScFv was comparable with that of the monoclonal antibody. The development of recombinant ScFv to replace monoclonal antibody for detection of filarial antigen was achieved. The recombinant ScFv was purified, on-column refolded and its detection ability validated using field samples.

  4. Construction and bacterial expression of a recombinant single-chain antibody fragment against Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 antigen for the diagnosis of lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Kamatchi, R; Charumathi, J; Ravishankaran, R; Kaliraj, P; Meenakshisundaram, S

    2016-01-01

    Global programmes to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (GPELF) require mapping, monitoring and evaluation using filarial antigen diagnostic kits. To meet this objective, a functional single-chain fragment variable (ScFv) specific for filarial Wuchereria bancrofti SXP-1 (Wb-SXP-1) antigen was constructed for the diagnosis of active filarial infection, an alternative to the production of complete antibodies using hybridomas. The variable heavy chain (VH) and the variable light chain (kappa) (Vκ) genes were amplified from the mouse hybridoma cell line and were linked together with a flexible linker by overlap extension polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The ScFv construct (Vκ-Linker-VH) was expressed as a fusion protein with N-terminal His tag in Escherichia coli and purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) without the addition of reducing agents. Immunoblotting and sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to analyse the antigen binding affinity of purified ScFv. The purified ScFv was found to recognize recombinant and native Wb-SXP-1 antigen in microfilariae (Mf)-positive patient sera. The affinity of ScFv was comparable with that of the monoclonal antibody. The development of recombinant ScFv to replace monoclonal antibody for detection of filarial antigen was achieved. The recombinant ScFv was purified, on-column refolded and its detection ability validated using field samples. PMID:26693887

  5. Screen Printed Carbon Electrode Based Electrochemical Immunosensor for the Detection of Dengue NS1 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Parkash, Om; Yean Yean, Chan; Hanim Shueb, Rafidah

    2014-01-01

    An electrochemical immunosensor modified with the streptavidin/biotin system on screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) for the detection of the dengue NS1 antigen was developed in this study. Monoclonal anti-NS1 capture antibody was immobilized on streptavidin-modified SPCEs to increase the sensitivity of the assay. Subsequently, a direct sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) format was developed and optimized. An anti-NS1 detection antibody conjugated with horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) and 3,3,5,5'-tetramethybezidine dihydrochloride (TMB/H2O2) was used as an enzyme mediator. Electrochemical detection was conducted using the chronoamperometric technique, and electrochemical responses were generated at −200 mV reduction potential. The calibration curve of the immunosensor showed a linear response between 0.5 µg/mL and 2 µg/mL and a detection limit of 0.03 µg/mL. Incorporation of a streptavidin/biotin system resulted in a well-oriented antibody immobilization of the capture antibody and consequently enhanced the sensitivity of the assay. In conclusion, this immunosensor is a promising technology for the rapid and convenient detection of acute dengue infection in real serum samples. PMID:26852684

  6. A novel approach for reliable detection of cathepsin S activities in mouse antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Steimle, Alex; Kalbacher, Hubert; Maurer, Andreas; Beifuss, Brigitte; Bender, Annika; Schäfer, Andrea; Müller, Ricarda; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a eukaryotic protease mostly expressed in professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Since CTSS activity regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and psoriasis as well as in cancer progression, there is an ongoing interest in the reliable detection of cathepsin S activity. Various applications have been invented for specific detection of this enzyme. However, most of them have only been shown to be suitable for human samples, do not deliver quantitative results or the experimental procedure requires technical equipment that is not commonly available in a standard laboratory. We have tested a fluorogen substrate, Mca-GRWPPMGLPWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, that has been described to specifically detect CTSS activities in human APCs for its potential use for mouse samples. We have modified the protocol and thereby offer a cheap, easy, reproducible and quick activity assay to detect CTSS activities in mouse APCs. Since most of basic research on CTSS is performed in mice, this method closes a gap and offers a possibility for reliable and quantitative CTSS activity detection that can be performed in almost every laboratory. PMID:26899824

  7. Detection of prostate cancer with a blood-based assay for early prostate cancer antigen.

    PubMed

    Paul, Barbara; Dhir, Rajiv; Landsittel, Douglas; Hitchens, Moira R; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2005-05-15

    Prostate-specific antigen lacks specificity for prostate cancer, so the identification and characterization of a unique blood-based marker for the disease would provide for a more accurate diagnosis, reducing both unnecessary biopsies and patient uncertainty. We previously identified a novel biomarker for prostate cancer, early prostate cancer antigen (EPCA). EPCA antibodies positively stained the negative biopsies of men who, as much as 5 years later, were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The goal of this study was to determine whether EPCA antibodies could be used in a clinically applicable plasma-based immunoassay to specifically detect prostate cancer. Using an EPCA-based ELISA, the protein was measured in the plasma of 46 individuals, including prostate cancer patients, healthy individuals, other cancer patients, spinal cord injury victims, and patients with prostatitis. With a predetermined cutoff value of 1.7 absorbance at 450 nm, only the prostate cancer population, as a whole, expressed plasma-EPCA levels above the cutoff. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in EPCA levels between the prostate cancer population and each of the other groups, specifically the healthy donors (P < 0.0001), bladder cancer patients (P = 0.03), and spinal cord injury patients (P = 0.001). Sensitivity of the EPCA assay for prostate cancer patients was 92% whereas the overall specificity was 94%. Specificity for the healthy donors was 100%. Although larger trials are required, this initial study shows the potential of EPCA to serve as a highly specific blood-based marker for prostate cancer. EPCA, when coupled with prostate-specific antigen, may help reduce the number of both unnecessary biopsies and undetected prostate tumors.

  8. Laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, L D; Fedorko, D P

    1992-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is relatively common, can progress rapidly, and can result in death or permanent debilitation. This infection justifiably elicits strong emotional reactions and, hopefully, immediate medical intervention. This review is a brief presentation of the pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis and a review of current knowledge, literature, and recommendations on the subject of laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. Those who work in clinical microbiology laboratories should be familiar with the tests used in detecting bacteria and bacterial antigens in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and should always have the utmost appreciation for the fact that results of such tests must always be reported immediately. Academic and practical aspects of the laboratory diagnosis of bacterial meningitis presented in this review include the following: anatomy of the meninges; pathogenesis; changes in the composition of CSF; etiological agents; processing CSF; microscopic examination of CSF; culturing CSF; methods of detecting bacterial antigens and bacterial components in CSF (counter-immunoelectrophoresis, coagglutination, latex agglutination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Limulus amebocyte lysate assay, and gas-liquid chromatography); use of the polymerase chain reaction; and practical considerations for testing CSF for bacterial antigens. PMID:1576585

  9. Development of dual-function ELISA for effective antigen and antibody detection against H7 avian influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Outbreaks in poultry involving influenza virus from H7 subtype have resulted in human infections, thus causing a major concern for public health, as well as for the poultry industry. Currently, no efficient rapid test is available for large-scale detection of either antigen or antibody of H7 avian influenza viruses. Results In the present study, a dual function ELISA was developed for the effective detection of antigen and antibody against H7 AIVs. The test was established based on antigen-capture-ELISA and epitope blocking ELISA. The two Mabs 62 and 98 which were exploited in the assay were identified to recognize two conformational neutralizing epitopes on H7 HA1. Both of the epitopes exist in all of the human H7 strains, including the recent H7N9 strain from China and > 96.6% of avian H7 strains. The dual ELISA was able to detect all of the five H7 antigens tested without any cross reaction to other influenza subtypes. The antigen detection limit was less than 1 HA unit of H7. For antibody detection, the sensitivity and specificity of the dual ELISA was evaluated and compared to HI and microneutralization using immunized animal sera to different H7 strains and different subtypes of AIVs. Results indicated that antibodies to H7 were readily detected in immunized animal sera by the dual ELISA whereas specimens with antibodies to other AIVs yielded negative results. Conclusions This is the first dual-function ELISA reported for either antigen or antibody detection against H7 AIVs. The assay was highly sensitive and 100% specific in both functions rendering it effective for H7 diagnosis. PMID:24083616

  10. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  11. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens. PMID:25915630

  12. Enhanced Sensitivity for Detection of HIV-1 p24 Antigen by a Novel Nuclease-Linked Fluorescence Oligonucleotide Assay.

    PubMed

    Fan, Peihu; Li, Xiaojun; Su, Weiheng; Kong, Wei; Kong, Xianggui; Wang, Zhenxin; Wang, Youchun; Jiang, Chunlai; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    The relatively high detection limit of the Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) prevents its application for detection of low concentrations of antigens. To increase the sensitivity for detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, we developed a highly sensitive nuclease-linked fluorescence oligonucleotide assay (NLFOA). Two major improvements were incorporated in NLFOA to amplify antibody-antigen interaction signals and reduce the signal/noise ratio; a large number of nuclease molecules coupled to the gold nanoparticle/streptavidin complex and fluorescent signals generated from fluorescent-labeled oligonucleotides by the nuclease. The detection limit of p24 by NLFOA was 1 pg/mL, which was 10-fold more sensitive than the conventional ELISA (10 pg/mL). The specificity was 100% and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 7.8% at low p24 concentration (1.5 pg/mL) with various concentrations of spiked p24 in HIV-1 negative sera. Thus, NLFOA is highly sensitive, specific, reproducible and user-friendly. The more sensitive detection of low p24 concentrations in HIV-1-infected individuals by NLFOA could allow detection of HIV-1 infections that are missed by the conventional ELISA at the window period during acute infection to further reduce the risk for HIV-1 infection due to the undetected HIV-1 in the blood products. Moreover, NLFOA can be easily applied to more sensitive detection of other antigens.

  13. An impedance biosensor array for label-free detection of multiple antigen-antibody reactions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; Xu, Dawei; Xu, Danke; Lv, Renjie; Liu, Zhihong

    2006-01-01

    An electrochemical impedance biosensor array with protein-modified electrodes was designed and fabricated in this report. To demonstrate its feasibility of the detection of multiple antigen-antibody binding reactions based on a label-free approach, human IgG (hIgG), rat IgG (rIgG), human globin and bovine serum albumin were immobilized, respectively, on the gold electrodes and then the resultant array was incubated with goat anti-hIgG, goat anti-rIgG, anti-human globin antibody and the mixture of three antibodies, respectively. The results indicated that the electron transfer resistance of the electrodes was significantly changed due to formation of the antigen-antibody conjugated layer. In addition, experimental conditions such as the protein concentration for the immobilization and screen were studied and optimized. Furthermore, the surface of various protein-modified electrodes was imaged with atomic force microscopy and the height distribution of protein particles was obtained with the Particle Analysis Software. The relative results were fully in accordance with the ones from the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

  14. Detection of antibody-antigen reaction by silicon nitride slot-ring biosensors using protein G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Tomoya; Hirowatari, Anna; Ikeda, Takeshi; Fukuyama, Masataka; Amemiya, Yoshiteru; Kuroda, Akio; Yokoyama, Shin

    2016-04-01

    Biosensors using ring resonators with silicon nitride (SiN) slot waveguides have been fabricated. The temperature coefficient of the resonance wavelength of the SiN resonator is 0.006 nm/°C, which is one order of magnitude smaller than that of Si. The sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by using slot waveguide together with Si-binding protein (designated as Si-tag), which bonds to SiN or SiO2 surface, as an anchoring molecule to immobilize bioreceptors on the SiN rings in an oriented manner. Furthermore, the protein G, which strongly bonds to many kinds of mammalian antibodies only by mixing the antibody solution, is used to efficiently immobilize the antigen on the sensor surface. By means of these devises the sensitivity of the biosensor has been improved by factor of 10-100 compared with that of normal Si ring resonator sensors without slot. Then the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) with the sensitivity of ~1×10-8 g/ml, which is the concentration of strongly suspicious for the prostate cancer, has been achieved.

  15. Diagnosis of Giardia lamblia infections by detection of parasite-specific antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Janoff, E N; Craft, J C; Pickering, L K; Novotny, T; Blaser, M J; Knisley, C V; Reller, L B

    1989-01-01

    Antigen detection methods may facilitate diagnosis of Giardia lamblia in stool specimens. As determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis and immunoblotting, G. lamblia cysts and trophozoites share several antigens, especially in the 65-kilodalton and 30- to 34-kilodalton regions. By using blind methods, we compared results obtained by counterimmunoelectrophoresis using cyst-immune rabbit serum and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using trophozoite-immune rabbit serum with results obtained by microscopic examination of a preserved, concentrated, and permanently stained stool specimen. Results were similar when these three methods were used to examine 118 stool specimens from clinical microbiology laboratories (53 specimens with G. lamblia) and specimens from 239 day-care-center toddlers (39 specimens with G. lamblia). Compared with microscopy, we found, for counterimmunoelectrophoresis and ELISA, respectively: sensitivity, 88 versus 94%; specificity, 97 versus 95%; positive predictive value, 86 versus 76%; negative predictive value, 98 versus 97%; and concordance, 89%. The false-positive rate by ELISA was 24% (10 of 42) in day-care-center toddlers but only 3% (1 of 32) in healthy adults (P less than 0.04) as corroborated by microscopy. This discrepancy suggests that the ELISA may be more sensitive than microscopy, which is considered the reference standard, and that results may be dependent, in part, on the epidemiology of the infection in the study subjects. Images PMID:2715318

  16. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  17. A comparison of two antigen-detection ELISA for detecting infection of Dirofilaria immitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Euclid, J M; Copeman, D B

    1997-09-01

    A survey on 87 dogs necropsied in the Townsville region revealed 34 (39%) were infected with Dirofilaria immitis. Infected dogs had an average of 6.1 adult worms in the heart and associated blood vessels. The VetRED assay detected 23 of the 34 infected dogs (sensitivity 65%) and the Og4C3 ELISA detected 27 (sensitivity 80%). Sensitivity of the VetRED and Og4C3 ELISA increased to 88 and 94% respectively in dogs with three or more worms. Both tests detected correctly all uninfected dogs. Despite the higher accuracy of the Og4C3 ELISA, compared to the VetRED assay, it is unlikely to be used widely as a field test for heartworm unless it can be modified from its present plate ELISA format which takes 4 hours, into one which is more rapid and convenient. However, as a reference ELISA, it may well be worthwhile in situations which require considerable accuracy for detecting D. immitis infection.

  18. Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 bacterial ghosts retain crucial surface properties and express chlamydial antigen: an imaging study of a delivery system for the ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Jacqueline; Inic-Kanada, Aleksandra; Ladurner, Angela; Stein, Elisabeth; Belij, Sandra; Bintner, Nora; Schlacher, Simone; Schuerer, Nadine; Mayr, Ulrike Beate; Lubitz, Werner; Leisch, Nikolaus; Barisani-Asenbauer, Talin

    2015-01-01

    To target chronic inflammatory ocular surface diseases, a drug delivery platform is needed that is safe, possesses immunomodulatory properties, and can be used either for drug delivery, or as a foreign antigen carrier. A new therapeutic approach that we have previously proposed uses nonliving bacterial ghosts (BGs) as a carrier-delivery system which can be engineered to carry foreign antigens and/or be loaded with therapeutic drugs. The parent strain chosen for development of our BG delivery system is the probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN), whose intrinsic properties trigger the innate immune system with the flagella and fimbriae used to attach and stimulate epithelial cells. In previous studies, we have shown that EcN BGs are safe for the ocular surface route, but evidence that EcN BGs retain flagella and fimbriae after transformation, has never been visually confirmed. In this study, we used different visualization techniques to determine whether flagella and fimbriae are retained on EcN BGs engineered either for drug delivery or as a foreign antigen carrier. We have also shown by immunoelectron microscopy that EcN retains two foreign antigens after processing to become EcN BGs. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BGs derived from EcN and expressing a foreign antigen attachment to conjunctival epithelial cells in vitro without causing reduced cell viability. These results are an important step in constructing a delivery system based on a nonliving probiotic that is suitable for use in ocular surface diseases pairing immunomodulation and targeted delivery. PMID:26229437

  19. Detection of cells captured with antigens on shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave sensors.

    PubMed

    Hao, Hsu-Chao; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Tsung-Pao; Yao, Da-Jeng

    2013-02-01

    Techniques to separate cells are widely applied in immunology. The technique to separate a specific antigen on a microfluidic platform involves the use of a shear horizontal surface-acoustic-wave (SH-SAW) sensor. With specific antibodies conjugated onto the surface of the SH-SAW sensors, this technique can serve to identify specific cells in bodily fluids. Jurkat cells, used as a target in this work, provide a model of cells in small abundance (1:1000) for isolation and purification with the ultimate goal of targeting even more dilute cells. T cells were separated from a mixed-cell medium on a chip (Jurkat cells/K562 cells, 1/1000). A novel microchamber was developed to capture cells during the purification, which required a large biosample. Cell detection was demonstrated through the performance of genetic identification on the chip.

  20. Validation and operational application of a rapid method for rabies antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Saturday, Greg A; King, Robin; Fuhrmann, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    The Veterinary Laboratory Europe (VLE) deployed a direct, rapid immunohistochemical test (DRIT), developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to the US military veterinary units in Iraq and Afghanistan. The test detects rabies virus antigen in fresh and frozen brainstem samples from various animal species. The goal was to conduct surveillance in 2 countries without current rabies diagnostic capabilities and little historical data on rabies prevalence. During the deployment the DRIT was evaluated, and Veterinary Corps officers and technicians were trained to operate the test. Civilian veterinarians from both Iraq and Afghanistan were organized for a lecture forum on rabies, a sample collection lab, and familiarization with the DRIT. Samples collected in Iraq and Afghanistan were tested in the field with the DRIT, and compared to the traditional laboratory standard utilizing direct fluorescent antibody testing at VLE and the CDC with 100% agreement.

  1. Pneumococcal antigen detection in cerebrospinal fluid: a comparative study on counter immunoelectrophoresis, latex agglutination and coagglutination.

    PubMed

    Rai, G P; Zachariah, K; Sharma, R; Phadke, S; Belapurkar, K M

    2003-07-01

    The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy and predictive values of counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE), latex agglutination (LA) and coagglutination (CoAg) tests were compared for detection of pneumococcal antigen in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients suspected of meningitis. A total of 95 CSF samples comprising 15 culture proven, 47 clinically suspected but culture negative cases of meningitis and 33 controls were screened by above tests. Among three tests, LA was found to have high sensitivity and moderately high negative predictive value than CIE and CoAg tests. However, CIE had slightly better specificity than LA and CoAg tests. Accuracywise CIE and LA tests were comparable than CoAg test. CIE and LA tests had high positive predictive value than CoAg test.

  2. [THE APPLICATION OF DOT-TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTING ANTIGENS OF ADENOVIRUS IN CLINICAL SAMPLES].

    PubMed

    Ivanova, I A; Pisareva, M M; Leontieva, G F; Smirnova, T D; Sorokin, E V; Amosova, I V; Petrova, E R; Shaldjian, A A; Sirosh, A A; Maiorova, V G

    2016-02-01

    The article substantiates possibility of application of point enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (dot-technique) for detecting viral antigens in samples from patients. To diagnose adenovirus infection conjugate of virus-specific monoclonal antibodies and peroxidase of horse-radish were used The chromatographic rectification of conjugate from free peroxidase permits diminishing background coloring of nitrocellulose membrane and therefore to increase sensitivity. The application of direct conjugates on the basis of virus-specific monoclonal antibodies increases specifcity of dot-technique and significantly shortens time period of analysis. As in case of application of direct conjugates on the basis of polyclonal serum, samples from patients require preliminary processing with detergent for preventing non-specific reactions. The dot-technique demonstrates good coincidence with data of polymerase chain reaction and after clinical trials it can be used in diagnostic of human viral infections. PMID:27455569

  3. Comparison of serologic tests for detection of antigen in canine heartworm infections.

    PubMed

    Brunner, C J; Hendrix, C M; Blagburn, B L; Hanrahan, L A

    1988-05-15

    In 30 random-source dogs, we determined sensitivity and specificity of 5 serologic tests for detection of canine heartworm antigens. Seventeen of the dogs were infected naturally with adult Dirofilaria immitis, and 4 of the infected dogs were amicrofilaremic. The ability of the serologic tests to predict whether a dog was infected or uninfected (overall test accuracy) ranged from 73 to 97%. Sensitivity was not affected by circulating D immitis microfilariae, but was markedly influenced by the number of adult D immitis present. False-positive reactions were rare and were not associated with intestinal parasites or Dipetalonema reconditum microfilariae. Modifications of some of the test procedures were necessary to maximize test accuracy and reproducibility. These modifications and other technical details might limit the usefulness of some of the tests in a veterinary practice.

  4. Mass spectrometric detection of the amino acid sequence polymorphism of the hepatitis C virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Kaysheva, A L; Ivanov, Yu D; Frantsuzov, P A; Krohin, N V; Pavlova, T I; Uchaikin, V F; Konev, V А; Kovalev, O B; Ziborov, V S; Archakov, A I

    2016-03-01

    A method for detection and identification of the hepatitis C virus antigen (HCVcoreAg) in human serum with consideration for possible amino acid substitutions is proposed. The method is based on a combination of biospecific capturing and concentrating of the target protein on the surface of the chip for atomic force microscope (AFM chip) with subsequent protein identification by tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) analysis. Biospecific AFM-capturing of viral particles containing HCVcoreAg from serum samples was performed by use of AFM chips with monoclonal antibodies (anti-HCVcore) covalently immobilized on the surface. Biospecific complexes were registered and counted by AFM. Further MS/MS analysis allowed to reliably identify the HCVcoreAg in the complexes formed on the AFM chip surface. Analysis of MS/MS spectra, with the account taken of the possible polymorphisms in the amino acid sequence of the HCVcoreAg, enabled us to increase the number of identified peptides.

  5. NAIP proteins are required for cytosolic detection of specific bacterial ligands in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Isabella; Tenthorey, Jeannette L; Nichols, Randilea D; Al Moussawi, Khatoun; Kang, James J; Kang, Chulho; Kazmierczak, Barbara I; Vance, Russell E

    2016-05-01

    NLRs (nucleotide-binding domain [NBD] leucine-rich repeat [LRR]-containing proteins) exhibit diverse functions in innate and adaptive immunity. NAIPs (NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory proteins) are NLRs that appear to function as cytosolic immunoreceptors for specific bacterial proteins, including flagellin and the inner rod and needle proteins of bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs). Despite strong biochemical evidence implicating NAIPs in specific detection of bacterial ligands, genetic evidence has been lacking. Here we report the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to generate Naip1(-/-) and Naip2(-/-) mice, as well as Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice lacking all functional Naip genes. By challenging Naip1(-/-) or Naip2(-/-) mice with specific bacterial ligands in vivo, we demonstrate that Naip1 is uniquely required to detect T3SS needle protein and Naip2 is uniquely required to detect T3SS inner rod protein, but neither Naip1 nor Naip2 is required for detection of flagellin. Previously generated Naip5(-/-) mice retain some residual responsiveness to flagellin in vivo, whereas Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice fail to respond to cytosolic flagellin, consistent with previous biochemical data implicating NAIP6 in flagellin detection. Our results provide genetic evidence that specific NAIP proteins function to detect specific bacterial proteins in vivo. PMID:27045008

  6. Identification of a cDNA clone encoding a mature blood stage antigen of Plasmodium falciparum by immunization of mice with bacterial lysates.

    PubMed Central

    Coppel, R L; Brown, G V; Mitchell, G F; Anders, R F; Kemp, D J

    1984-01-01

    A cDNA library was constructed in pBR322 using mRNA from blood stages of a Papua New Guinean isolate of Plasmodium falciparum. Expression of parasite antigens was not directly detectable by conventional immunological assays. To circumvent this, mice were immunized with lysates of cDNA clones, and the antisera raised were assayed for anti-parasite reactivity. One cDNA clone was identified which reliably elicited antibodies to P. falciparum. The mouse antisera were used to characterize the native P. falciparum protein as a 120-kd protein, which is antigenic during natural infection. The protein occurs in late trophozoite and schizont stages and is found in isolates of the parasite from widely separated geographical areas. The genomic context of the antigen gene is conserved in the different isolates. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:6370681

  7. Biotin-avidin-amplified enzyme immunoassay for detection of herpes simplex virus antigen in clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Adler-Storthz, K; Kendall, C; Kennedy, R C; Henkel, R D; Dreesman, G R

    1983-12-01

    A biotin-avidin-amplified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (B-A ELISA) has been developed to detect herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 antigens in clinical specimens. The test was designed as a solid-phase, double-antibody, sandwich assay in which plates were coated with a polyclonal rabbit immunoglobulin G anti-HSV reagent, and the sandwich antibody was a biotin-labeled mouse immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibody that reacts with a common antigen associated with HSV-1 and HSV-2. The test can be completed in 4 h if antibody-coated plates are available. The detection limit of the B-A ELISA, determined by titration of virus stocks, was found to be approximately 90 PFU or 6 X 10(3) physical particles of either HSV-1 or HSV-2 per 50 microliter of virus stock. The following results were obtained in a study in which swabs were taken from a variety of lesions and assayed for infectivity in tissue culture and by B-A ELISA. Of 421 suspected HSV lesions tested, 69 were positive by both tests and 159 were negative by both tests. A total of 122 were positive by B-A ELISA but negative for infectivity. Seventy-one were negative by B-A ELISA but contained infectious virus. The HSV specificity of the assay was substantiated by partial blocking of reactivity with rabbit immunoglobulin G anti-HSV and by the absence of reactivity with a nonspecific biotin-labeled mouse immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibody.

  8. Simplified Protocol for Carba NP Test for Enhanced Detection of Carbapenemase Producers Directly from Bacterial Cultures.

    PubMed

    Pasteran, Fernando; Tijet, Nathalie; Melano, Roberto G; Corso, Alejandra

    2015-12-01

    We compared carbapenemase detection among 266 Gram-negative bacilli (161 carbapenemase producers) using the Carba NP tests issued by the CLSI (CNPt-CLSI) and a novel protocol (CNPt-direct) designed for carbapenemase detection direct from bacterial cultures (instead of bacterial extracts required by the CLSI tests). The specificities were comparable (100%), but the CNPt-direct was more sensitive (98% versus 84%). The CNPt-direct was easier to perform due to the direct use of colonies and offered a more robust detection of carbapenemase producers.

  9. Simplified Protocol for Carba NP Test for Enhanced Detection of Carbapenemase Producers Directly from Bacterial Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pasteran, Fernando; Tijet, Nathalie; Melano, Roberto G.

    2015-01-01

    We compared carbapenemase detection among 266 Gram-negative bacilli (161 carbapenemase producers) using the Carba NP tests issued by the CLSI (CNPt-CLSI) and a novel protocol (CNPt-direct) designed for carbapenemase detection direct from bacterial cultures (instead of bacterial extracts required by the CLSI tests). The specificities were comparable (100%), but the CNPt-direct was more sensitive (98% versus 84%). The CNPt-direct was easier to perform due to the direct use of colonies and offered a more robust detection of carbapenemase producers. PMID:26424841

  10. Simplified Protocol for Carba NP Test for Enhanced Detection of Carbapenemase Producers Directly from Bacterial Cultures.

    PubMed

    Pasteran, Fernando; Tijet, Nathalie; Melano, Roberto G; Corso, Alejandra

    2015-12-01

    We compared carbapenemase detection among 266 Gram-negative bacilli (161 carbapenemase producers) using the Carba NP tests issued by the CLSI (CNPt-CLSI) and a novel protocol (CNPt-direct) designed for carbapenemase detection direct from bacterial cultures (instead of bacterial extracts required by the CLSI tests). The specificities were comparable (100%), but the CNPt-direct was more sensitive (98% versus 84%). The CNPt-direct was easier to perform due to the direct use of colonies and offered a more robust detection of carbapenemase producers. PMID:26424841

  11. Direct fluorescent antibody technique for the detection of bacterial kidney disease in paraffin-embedded tissues

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ochiai, T.; Yasutake, W.T.; Gould, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The direct fluorescent antibody technique (FAT) was successfully used to detect the causative agent of bacterial kidney disease (BKD), Renibacterium salmoninarum, in Bouin's solution flexed and paraffinembedded egg and tissue sections. This method is superior to gram stain and may be particularly useful in detecting the BKD organism in fish with low-grade infection.

  12. Bacterial regrowth in water reclamation and distribution systems revealed by viable bacterial detection assays.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-wen; Li, Dan; Gu, April Z; Zeng, Si-yu; He, Miao

    2016-02-01

    Microbial regrowth needs to be managed during water reclamation and distribution. The aim of present study was to investigate the removal and regrowth of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella in water reclamation and distribution system by using membrane integrity assay (PMA-qPCR), reverse transcriptional activity assay (Q-RT-PCR) and culture-based assay, and also to evaluate the relationships among bacterial regrowth, and environmental factors in the distribution system. The results showed that most of the water reclamation processes potentially induced bacteria into VBNC state. The culturable E. coli and Salmonella regrew 1.8 and 0.7 log10 in distribution system, which included reactivation of bacteria in the viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state and reproduction of culturable bacteria. The regrowth of culturable E. coli and Salmonella in the distribution system mainly depended on the residual chlorine levels, with correlations (R(2)) of -0.598 and -0.660. The abundances of membrane integrity and reverse transcriptional activity bacteria in reclamation effluents had significant correlations with the culturable bacteria at the end point of the distribution system, demonstrating that PMA-qPCR and Q-RT-PCR are sensitive and accurate tools to determine and predict bacterial regrowth in water distribution systems. This study has improved our understanding of microbial removal and regrowth in reclaimed water treatment and distribution systems. And the results also recommended that more processes should be equipped to remove viable bacteria in water reclamation plants for the sake of inhibition microbial regrowth during water distribution and usages.

  13. Field evaluation of urine antigen detection for diagnosis of Taenia solium cysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Mwape, K E; Praet, N; Benitez-Ortiz, W; Muma, J B; Zulu, G; Celi-Erazo, M; Phiri, I K; Rodriguez-Hidalgo, R; Dorny, P; Gabriël, S

    2011-10-01

    (Neuro)cysticercosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by infection with Taenia solium metacestode larvae. Existing immunodiagnostic techniques detect antibodies and circulating antigens (Ag) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Blood/CSF collection is an invasive procedure associated with blood-borne infections and is often not well accepted by communities. Detection of circulating Ag in urine has been suggested as an alternative, however this has been evaluated in clinical settings only. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the performance of a urine Ag-ELISA under field conditions. Paired serum and urine samples were obtained from participants in endemic areas of Ecuador (n=748) and Zambia (n=690) and were subjected to a monoclonal antibody-based Ag-ELISA. Calculation of positive and negative agreement indices (AI) showed better agreement in the negative direction both for Ecuadorian and Zambian samples (AI of 93.1 and 86.8, respectively). Using a Bayesian approach to determine the test characteristics, similar sensitivities were obtained for serum and urine Ag detection, whereas a decreased specificity was determined for the urine Ag-ELISA with a lower specificity (78.6%) for Zambian samples than for Ecuadorian samples (88.4%). This study indicates a higher specificity for the serum test under field conditions and promotes further research to improve the urine test. PMID:21862093

  14. Isothermal rolling circle amplification of virus genomes for rapid antigen detection and typing.

    PubMed

    Brasino, Michael D; Cha, Jennifer N

    2015-08-01

    In this work, isothermal rolling circle amplification (RCA) of the multi-kilobase genome of engineered filamentous bacteriophage is used to report the presence and identification of specific protein analytes in solution. First, bacteriophages were chosen as sensing platforms because peptides or antibodies that bind medically relevant targets can be isolated through phage display or expressed as fusions to their p3 and p8 coat proteins. Second, the circular, single-stranded genome contained within the phage serves as a natural large DNA template for a RCA reaction to rapidly generate exponential amounts of double stranded DNA in a single isothermal step that can be easily detected using low-cost fluorescent nucleic acid stains. Amplifying the entire phage genome also provides high detection sensitivities. Furthermore, since the sequence of the viral DNA can be easily modified with multiple restriction enzyme sites, a simple DNA digest can be applied to detect and identify multiple antigens simultaneously. The methods developed here will lead to protein sensors that are highly scalable to produce, can be run without complex biological equipment and do not require the use of multiple antibodies or high-cost fluorescent DNA probes or nucleotides.

  15. Serology of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: W-antigen serogrouping by coagglutination and protein I serotyping by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay both detect protein I antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Sandstrom, E G; Knapp, J S; Buchanan, T B

    1982-01-01

    A total of 224 strains were serogrouped by coagglutination (COA) and serotyped by protein I enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Of these strains, 61 were from patients with disseminated gonococcal infection, 21 were from patients with pelvic inflammatory disease, and 115 were from patients with uncomplicated gonococcal infection in Singapore, the Philippines, and Denmark. Twenty-seven were laboratory reference strains. Of the patient strains, 102 belonged to COA serogroup WI, and all of the 100 strains that typed with protein I serotypes 1, 2, or 3 were in this group. Most of the strains of gonococci from the 61 patients with disseminated gonococcal infection were within this group (COA WI, 53 or 87%; protein I serotypes 1, 2, or 3, 51 or 84%). All 46 strains that were protein I serotypes 4 through 7 were also COA serogroup WII. Protein I serotypes 8 and 9 accounted for 49 (25%) of the 197 patient strains. Twenty-eight of these strains typed as COA serogroup WII, 20 typed as serogroup WIII, and 1 typed as serogroups WII and WIII. COA W serogrouping and protein I ELISA both appeared to detect antigens on the protein I molecule of the outer membrane of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Protein I serotyping, which uses unboiled organisms, may generally recognize more variable and surface-exposed antigenic determinants. In contrast, COA W serogrouping, which uses boiled organisms, may recognize less exposed shared antigenic determinants in addition to variable protein I antigenic determinants. Both methods may prove useful for further studies of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of gonorrhea. Images PMID:6172380

  16. Evaluation of a novel chemiluminescent microplate enzyme immunoassay for hepatitis B surface antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin; Song, Liu-Wei; Fang, Lin-Lin; Wu, Yong; Ge, Sheng-Xiang; Li, Hui; Yuan, Quan; Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) is an important biomarker used in the diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, but false-negative results are still reported in the detection of HBsAg using commercial assays. In this study, we evaluated the qualitative properties of a novel HBsAg chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) assay--WTultra. WHO standard sample dilution series and samples from low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL) were used to evaluate the sensitivity of the WTultra assay. Boston Biomedica, Inc. (BBI) hepatitis B seroconversion panels were used to assess the ability of the WTultra assay to detect the window period. In addition, dilution series of 22 serum samples with different genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations were used to assess the WTultra assay, and these were compared with other commercial assays. The lower detection limit of the WTultra assay was 0.012 IU/mL, and it showed a high sensitivity (97.52%, 95% CI, 94.95-99.00) in the detection of 282 low-level HBsAg carriers (<1 ng/mL). In samples with various HBV genotypes, serotypes and HBsAg mutations, the WTultra assay yielded 117 positive results in 132 samples, which was significantly higher than the results with the other four commercial assays (89, 83, 65 and 45, respectively, p<0.01). In the assays of mutant strains, the WTultra assay detected 82 positive results in 90 samples, which was significantly better than the results for the Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (58 positive) and Architect (55 positive) (p<0.01) assays, which in turn were significantly better than the Murex V.3 (41 positive, p=0.026) and AxSYM V2 (29 positive, p<0.01) assays. However, in the detection of 42 samples of wild-type strains with various genotypes and serotypes, no significant differences were observed among the WTultra (35 positive), Architect (28 positive) and Hepanostika HBsAg Ultra (31 positive) assays. However, the WTultra assay detected significantly more samples than the Murex V.3 (24

  17. Evaluation of five different antigens in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the detection of avian pneumovirus antibodies.

    PubMed

    Maherchandani, Sunil; Patnayak, Devi P; Muñoz-Zanzi, Claudia A; Lauer, Dale; Goyal, Sagar M

    2005-01-01

    Five different antigens were evaluated in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests for the detection of avian pneumovirus (APV) antibodies. Two of the 5 antigens were prepared from recent APV isolates from Minnesota. The 2 older isolates were passage 63 of a strain currently used as a live, attenuated vaccine and a Colorado strain isolated for the first time in the United States and currently used in an ELISA test. The fifth antigen is based on an APV recombinant N-protein. Basic parameters and positive-negative threshold of the assays were established for all 5 antigens on the basis of data obtained by testing 46 known negative and 46 known positive serum samples. Subsequently, 449 field samples were tested by all 5 ELISAs. The optical density difference (ODD) was calculated by subtracting optical density of the sample in the negative antigen well from that in the positive antigen well. In the current ELISA test based on the Colorado strain, an ODD of 0.2 is considered to be the cutoff value to classify samples as negative or positive. In this study, however, use of different cutoffs, based on ODD of negative control plus 3 SD or values estimated from Receiver operating characteristic analysis, was considered to be more appropriate for the various antigens used. Overall person-to-person and day-to-day variability was found to be large for all tests using either ODD or sample to positive ratio to report results. In addition, results suggest that antigenicity of the APV isolates in the United States has not changed between 1997 and 2000.

  18. Detection of a unique antigen on radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemia B6RV2

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, E.; Uenaka, A.; Stockert, E.; Obata, Y.

    1984-11-01

    Radiation leukemia virus-induced leukemia of a male C57BL/6 mouse, B6RV2, is immunogenic to female BALB/c X C57BL/6 F1 mice. In these mice, B6RV2 tumors regressed after initial growth, and after tumor regression the mice were resistant to repeated inocula of up to 10(8) B6RV2 cells. Serum from these mice reacted with B6RV2 in mixed hemadsorption or protein A assays, and absorption analysis indicated that the antigen was restricted to B6RV2; it could not be detected in normal thymocytes or spleen concanavalin A blasts from different inbred strains, nor in 16 C57BL/6 or BALB/c leukemias. Spleen cells from mice in which the tumor had regressed were cytotoxic to B6RV2 after in vitro stimulation with B6RV2, as shown by /sup 51/chromium release assay. This cytotoxicity was eliminated by pretreatment of the cells with anti-Thy-1.2, anti-Lyt-2.2, anti-Lyt-3.2, and complement, indicating that the effector cells were T-cells. The specificity of T-cell killing of B6RV2 was examined by competitive inhibition assays with unlabeled cells; only B6RV2 inhibited killing, while eight other C57BL/6 leukemias did not inhibit. Thus, the antigen on B6RV2 defined serologically and by cytotoxic T-cells is a unique antigen. However, it was not revealed by antibody-blocking test whether the unique determinant defined serologically was related to that recognized by T-cells; B6RV2 antiserum did not block lytic activity in the absence of added complement, irrespective of whether the target cells were untreated or anti-H-2b-treated B6RV2. H-2Kb antisera, but not H-2Db antisera, blocked lysis. This indicated that the H-2Kb molecule was exclusively involved in recognition of B6RV2 by cytotoxic T-cell.

  19. New Automated Chemiluminescence Immunoassay for Simultaneous but Separate Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antigens and Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    López Roa, Paula; Suárez, Marisol; Bouza, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    The recently launched Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag assay (DiaSorin S.p.A) uses chemiluminescence immunoassay technology for the combined qualitative determination of p24 antigen of HIV-1 and specific antibodies to both HIV-1 and HIV-2. We studied 571 serum samples from those submitted to our laboratory for HIV screening. The samples were divided into 3 subsets: subset A, 365 samples collected prospectively during 1 week; subset B, 158 samples from confirmed HIV-positive patients; and subset C, 48 samples with a positive screening result but a negative or indeterminate confirmatory test result. Our standard screening/confirmatory algorithm was used as a reference. In subset A (prospective), 5 samples were positive and 360 negative by the standard procedure. Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag correctly identified all 5 positive samples (100%) and 357 negative samples (99.2%). In subset B (confirmed positive), all 158 positive samples were in total agreement in both procedures. In subset C (screen positive only), Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag yielded accurate results in 42 out of 48 samples (87.5%). Global sensitivity and specificity for Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag (all subsets included) were 98.3% and 98.5%, respectively. Considering only nonselected prospective samples and confirmed positive samples (subsets A and B), the corresponding sensitivity and specificity values were 100% and 99.2%, respectively. The new fully automated HIV screening test showed high sensitivity and specificity compared to our standard algorithm. Its added advantage of being able to detect HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies and p24 antigen separately could prove useful in the diagnosis of early infections. PMID:24574285

  20. Advances in the Diagnosis of Human Opisthorchiasis: Development of Opisthorchis viverrini Antigen Detection in Urine

    PubMed Central

    Duenngai, Kunyarat; Wangboon, Chompunoot; Sithithaworn, Jiraporn; Watwiengkam, Nattaya; Namwat, Nisana; Techasen, Anchalee; Loilome, Watcharin; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Loukas, Alex; Sithithaworn, Paiboon; Bethony, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many strategies to control opisthorchiasis have been employed in Thailand, but not in the other neighbouring countries. Specific control methods include mass drug administration (MDA) and health education to reduce raw fish consumption. These control efforts have greatly shifted the epidemiology of Opisthorchis viverrini (OV) infection over the last decade from presenting as densely concentrated "heavy" infections in single villages to widespread "light" OV infections distributed over wide geographical areas. Currently, the "gold standard" detection method for OV infection is formalin ethyl-acetate concentration technique (FECT), which has limited diagnostic sensitivity and diagnostic specificity for light OV infections, with OV eggs often confused with eggs of minute intestinal flukes (MIFs) in feces. In this study, we developed and evaluated the diagnostic performance of a monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the measurement of OV excretory-secretory (ES) antigens in urine (urine OV-ES assay) for the diagnosis of opisthorchiasis compared to the gold standard detection FECT method. Methodology We tested several methods for pre-treating urine samples prior to testing the diagnostic performance of the urine OV-ES assay. Using trichloroacetic acid (TCA) pre-treated urine, we compared detection and quantification of OV infection using the urine OV-ES assay versus FECT in OV-endemic areas in Northeastern Thailand. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the urine OV-ES assay using TCA pre-treated urine, and to establish diagnostic positivity thresholds. The Positive Predictive Value as well as the likelihood of obtaining a positive test result (LR+) or a negative test result (LR-) were calculated for the established diagnostic positivity threshold. Diagnostic risks (Odds Ratios) were estimated using logistic regression. Results When urine samples were pre

  1. Comparative detection of bacterial adhesion to Caco-2 cells with ELISA, radioactivity and plate count methods.

    PubMed

    Le Blay, Gwenaëlle; Fliss, Ismaïl; Lacroix, Christophe

    2004-11-01

    Different methods are used to study bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, which is an important step in pathogenic infection as well as in probiotic colonization of the intestinal tract. The aim of this study was to compare the ELISA-based method with more conventional plate count and radiolabeling methods for bacterial adhesion detection. An ELISA-based assay was optimized for the detection of Bifidobacterium longum and Escherichia coli O157:H7, which are low and highly adherent bacteria, respectively. In agreement with previous investigations, a percentage of adhesion below 1% was obtained for B. longum with ELISA. However, high nonspecific background and low positive signals were measured due to the use of polyclonal antibodies and the low adhesion capacity with this strain. In contrast, the ELISA-based method developed for E. coli adhesion detected a high adhesion percentage (15%). For this bacterium the three methods tested gave similar results for the highest bacterial concentrations (6.8 Log CFU added bacteria/well). However, differences among methods increased with the addition of decreased bacterial concentration due to different detection thresholds (5.9, 5.6 and 2.9 Log CFU adherent bacteria/well for radioactivity, ELISA and plate count methods, respectively). The ELISA-based method was shown to be a good predictor for bacterial adhesion compared to the radiolabeling method when good quality specific antibodies were used. This technique is convenient and allows handling of numerous samples.

  2. Taenia solium cysticercosis in a village in northern Viet Nam: seroprevalence study using an ELISA for detecting circulating antigen.

    PubMed

    Erhart, Annette; Dorny, Pierre; Van De, Nguyen; Vien, Ha Viet; Thach, Dang Cam; Toan, Nguyen Duy; Cong, Le Dinh; Geerts, Stanny; Speybroeck, Niko; Berkvens, Dirk; Brandt, Jef

    2002-01-01

    An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting circulating Taenia solium antigen was evaluated in Viet Nam; 12 of 210 people gave a positive result, including 5 persons with epilepsy. Cysticercosis was confirmed in 9 persons. Agreement between the ELISA, computerized tomography scanning and biopsy examination was high. PMID:12174775

  3. Fabrication of graphene/gold-modified screen-printed electrode for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Chan, K F; Lim, H N; Shams, N; Jayabal, S; Pandikumar, A; Huang, N M

    2016-01-01

    Immunosensors based on gold nanoparticles and reduced graphene oxide (AuNPs/rGO)-modified screen-printed electrodes (SPEs) were successfully synthesized using an electrochemical deposition method. The modified SPEs were characterized using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and Raman spectroscopy to analyze the morphology and composition of AuNPs and rGO. Both the FESEM and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the AuNPs were successfully anchored on the thin film of rGO deposited on the surface of the SPEs. Characterization with a ferri-ferrocyanide couple [Fe(CN)6(3-/4-)] showed that the electron transfer kinetic between the analyte and electrode was enhanced after the modification with the AuNPs/rGO composite on the electrode surface, in addition to increasing the effective surface area of the electrode. The modified SPE was immobilized with a sandwich type immunosensor to mimic the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) immunoassay. The modified SPE that was fortified with the sandwich type immunosensor exhibited double electrochemical responses in the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), with linear ranges of 0.5-50 ng/mL and 250-2000 ng/mL and limits of detection of 0.28 ng/mL and 181.5 ng/mL, respectively. PMID:26478358

  4. Construction of novel electrochemical immunosensor for detection of prostate specific antigen using ferrocene-PAMAM dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Çevik, Emre; Bahar, Özlem; Şenel, Mehmet; Abasıyanık, M Fatih

    2016-12-15

    In this study, an immunosensor was designed to utilize for the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) based on three different generations (G1, G2 and G3) of ferrocene (Fc) cored polyamidiamine dendrimers (Fc-PAMAM) gold (Au) electrode. The self-assembled monolayer principle (SAM) was used to fabricate the sensitive, selective and disposable immunosensor electrodes. In electrode fabrication cysteamine (Cys) was the first agent covalently linked on the Au electrode surface. Immobilized redox center (ferrocene) cored PAMAM dendrimers served as a layer for the further binding of biological components. The monoclonal antibody of PSA (anti-PSA) was covalently immobilized on dendrimers which were attached onto the modified Au surface (Au/Cys/Fc-PAMAMs/anti-PSA). PSA levels were quantitatively analyzed by using electrochemical differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) whose lowest detection limit was calculated as 0.001ngmL(-1). The Au/Cys/FcPAMAM/anti-PSA immunosensor showed excellent performance for PSA at the pulse amplitude; 50mV and the scan rate; 10mV/s in a wide linear concentration range of 0.01ng-100ngmL(-1). Analytical performance and specificity assays were carried out using human serum and different proteins.

  5. Detection of chikungunya virus antigen by a novel rapid immunochromatographic test.

    PubMed

    Okabayashi, Tamaki; Sasaki, Tadahiro; Masrinoul, Promsin; Chantawat, Nantarat; Yoksan, Sutee; Nitatpattana, Narong; Chusri, Sarunyou; Morales Vargas, Ronald E; Grandadam, Marc; Brey, Paul T; Soegijanto, Soegeng; Mulyantno, Kris Cahyo; Churrotin, Siti; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Faye, Oumar; Faye, Ousmane; Sow, Abdourahmane; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Puiprom, Orapim; Chaichana, Panjaporn; Kurosu, Takeshi; Kato, Seiji; Kosaka, Mieko; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    Chikungunya fever is a mosquito-borne disease of key public health importance in tropical and subtropical countries. Although severe joint pain is the most distinguishing feature of chikungunya fever, diagnosis remains difficult because the symptoms of chikungunya fever are shared by many pathogens, including dengue fever. The present study aimed to develop a new immunochromatographic diagnosis test for the detection of chikungunya virus antigen in serum. Mice were immunized with isolates from patients with Thai chikungunya fever, East/Central/South African genotype, to produce mouse monoclonal antibodies against chikungunya virus. Using these monoclonal antibodies, a new diagnostic test was developed and evaluated for the detection of chikungunya virus. The newly developed diagnostic test reacted with not only the East/Central/South African genotype but also with the Asian and West African genotypes of chikungunya virus. Testing of sera from patients suspected to have chikungunya fever in Thailand (n = 50), Laos (n = 54), Indonesia (n = 2), and Senegal (n = 6) revealed sensitivity, specificity, and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) agreement values of 89.4%, 94.4%, and 91.1%, respectively. In our study using serial samples, a new diagnostic test showed high agreement with the RT-PCR within the first 5 days after onset. A rapid diagnostic test was developed using mouse monoclonal antibodies that react with chikungunya virus envelope proteins. The diagnostic accuracy of our test is clinically acceptable for chikungunya fever in the acute phase.

  6. Development of monoclonal antibodies suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Chander, Vishal; Singh, R P; Verma, P C

    2012-12-01

    The control of an infectious viral disease as rabies is made easier by rapid and accurate diagnosis. Successful rabies prophylaxis is dependent upon the active immunization with vaccine along with passive administration of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies which together clear the virus before widespread infection of central nervous system occurs. The present study aimed at the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) suitable for rabies virus antibody and antigen detection. For the production of rabies specific MAbs, immunization of Swiss albino mice with a commercially available vaccine was done and Polyethylene glycol mediated fusion of spleenocytes with myeloma cells was performed. The positive clones were selected on the basis of distinct reactivity by cell Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence in Indirect Fluorescent antibody test. The positive clones obtained were subjected to single cell cloning by limiting dilution method. The reactive clones were further titrated and employed for virus titration and virus neutralization. The neutralizing activity was evaluated using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter technique. Three MAb clones showed a distinct percent inhibition in the presence of positive serum. One of the MAb clone No. 5C3 was relatively more specific in detecting rabies antibodies and also found suitable for competitive ELISA to assess the antibody level in vaccinated subjects.

  7. Construction of novel electrochemical immunosensor for detection of prostate specific antigen using ferrocene-PAMAM dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Çevik, Emre; Bahar, Özlem; Şenel, Mehmet; Abasıyanık, M Fatih

    2016-12-15

    In this study, an immunosensor was designed to utilize for the detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) based on three different generations (G1, G2 and G3) of ferrocene (Fc) cored polyamidiamine dendrimers (Fc-PAMAM) gold (Au) electrode. The self-assembled monolayer principle (SAM) was used to fabricate the sensitive, selective and disposable immunosensor electrodes. In electrode fabrication cysteamine (Cys) was the first agent covalently linked on the Au electrode surface. Immobilized redox center (ferrocene) cored PAMAM dendrimers served as a layer for the further binding of biological components. The monoclonal antibody of PSA (anti-PSA) was covalently immobilized on dendrimers which were attached onto the modified Au surface (Au/Cys/Fc-PAMAMs/anti-PSA). PSA levels were quantitatively analyzed by using electrochemical differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) whose lowest detection limit was calculated as 0.001ngmL(-1). The Au/Cys/FcPAMAM/anti-PSA immunosensor showed excellent performance for PSA at the pulse amplitude; 50mV and the scan rate; 10mV/s in a wide linear concentration range of 0.01ng-100ngmL(-1). Analytical performance and specificity assays were carried out using human serum and different proteins. PMID:27641479

  8. Avian host range of Chlamydophila spp. based on isolation, antigen detection and serology.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Taday, Eva M A

    2003-10-01

    Published reports and our own diagnostic data on the avian host range of avian Chlamydophila spp. are presented in an attempt to provide evidence for the large number of bird species that have been naturally infected with chlamydia. The term 'chlamydia-positive' is based on either isolation of the organism and antigen detection or on serological detection of circulating antibodies. The list of chlamydia-positive birds contains the six major domestic species (chicken, turkey, Pekin duck, Muscovy duck, goose, and pigeon), the three minor domestic species (Japanese quail, bobwhite quail, and peafowl) and a total of 460 free-living or pet bird species in 30 orders. The order Psittaciformes contains by far the most (153 of 342; 45%) chlamydia-positive bird species. More than 20% of all species per order are positive for chlamydia in the orders Lariformes (gulls, 26 of 92 species; 28%), Alciformes (alks, six of 23 species; 26%), Sphenisciformes (penguins, four of 16 species; 25%), and Anseriformes (ducks and geese, 33 of 157 species; 21%). Only 5% of all bird species (14 of 259 species) in the order Phasianiformes (gallinaceus birds) are chlamydia-positive. The different percentages of chlamydia-positive bird species reflect: (i) a high rate of investigations (e.g. of domestic birds) compared with infrequent testing (e.g. of Charadriiformes or Cuculiformes), (ii) frequent zoonotic implications (e.g. psittacine and columbiform birds), and (iii) an assumed high susceptibility to infection and subsequent seroconversion (e.g. waterfowl).

  9. Multi-scale silica structures for improved HIV-1 Capsid (p24) antigen detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sophia; Hedde, Per Niklas; Venugopalan, Vasan; Gratton, Enrico; Khine, Michelle

    2016-06-20

    Silica (SiO2) micro- and nanostructures fabricated with pre-stressed thermoplastic shrink wrap film have been shown to yield far-field fluorescence signal enhancements over their planar or wrinkled counterparts. The SiO2 structures have previously been used for improved detection of fluorescently labelled proteins and DNA. In this work, we probe the mechanism responsible for the dramatic increases in fluorescence signal intensity. Optical characterization studies attribute the fluorescence signal enhancements to increased surface density and light scattering from the rough SiO2 structures. Using this information, we come up with a theoretical approximation for the enhancement factor based off the scattering effects alone. We show that increased deposition thickness of SiO2 yields improved fluorescence signal enhancements, with an optimal SiO2 thin layer achieved at 20 nm. Finally, we show that the SiO2 substrates serve as a suitable platform for disease diagnostics, and show improved limits of detection (LOD) for the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) p24 antigen. PMID:27163263

  10. Evaluation of Leishmania (Leishmania) infantum excreted-secreted antigens for detection of canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Pinedo-Cancino, Viviana; Laurenti, Márcia Dalastra; Kesper, Norival; Umezawa, Eufrosina Setsu

    2016-09-01

    The efficacy of tests with L. (L.) infantum excreted-secreted antigens (ESA) to detect canine leishmaniasis (CanL) was evaluated using immunoblotting (ESA-blot), ELISA (ESA-ELISA) and ELISA with alkaline extract from promastigotes (PAE). Of one hundred fifty-five domestic dogs tested, 100 were suspected of CanL, 23 had other diseases and 32 were healthy. Sera from the dogs suspected of CanL were tested by immunohistochemistry (IHC), and 54% were confirmed to be infected by L. (L.) infantum (38 symptomatic and 16 asymptomatic). Of these, 100% were positive by ESA-blot, ESA-ELISA and PAE-ELISA. In the ESA-blot their sera recognized polypeptides in the 26.5-31.5kDa region. Of the 46% of dogs with negative IHC, 44-53% tested positive in all three tests irrespective of clinical status. The twenty-three dogs with other diseases were negative by ESA-blot, but sera from 9% and 26% of them reacted with ESA-ELISA and PAE-ELISA, respectively. The 32 healthy dogs were negative in all the tests. ESA-blot showed good correlation with IHC in the detection of CanL and a high specificity index. PMID:27212707

  11. Avian host range of Chlamydophila spp. based on isolation, antigen detection and serology.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, E F; Taday, Eva M A

    2003-10-01

    Published reports and our own diagnostic data on the avian host range of avian Chlamydophila spp. are presented in an attempt to provide evidence for the large number of bird species that have been naturally infected with chlamydia. The term 'chlamydia-positive' is based on either isolation of the organism and antigen detection or on serological detection of circulating antibodies. The list of chlamydia-positive birds contains the six major domestic species (chicken, turkey, Pekin duck, Muscovy duck, goose, and pigeon), the three minor domestic species (Japanese quail, bobwhite quail, and peafowl) and a total of 460 free-living or pet bird species in 30 orders. The order Psittaciformes contains by far the most (153 of 342; 45%) chlamydia-positive bird species. More than 20% of all species per order are positive for chlamydia in the orders Lariformes (gulls, 26 of 92 species; 28%), Alciformes (alks, six of 23 species; 26%), Sphenisciformes (penguins, four of 16 species; 25%), and Anseriformes (ducks and geese, 33 of 157 species; 21%). Only 5% of all bird species (14 of 259 species) in the order Phasianiformes (gallinaceus birds) are chlamydia-positive. The different percentages of chlamydia-positive bird species reflect: (i) a high rate of investigations (e.g. of domestic birds) compared with infrequent testing (e.g. of Charadriiformes or Cuculiformes), (ii) frequent zoonotic implications (e.g. psittacine and columbiform birds), and (iii) an assumed high susceptibility to infection and subsequent seroconversion (e.g. waterfowl). PMID:14522700

  12. APPLYING MACHINE LEARNING TECHNIQUES IN DETECTING BACTERIAL VAGINOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Yolanda S.; Agrawal, Rajeev; Foster, James A.; Beck, Daniel; Dozier, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    There are several diseases which arise because of changes in the microbial communities in the body. Scientists continue to conduct research in a quest to find the catalysts that provoke these changes in the naturally occurring microbiota. Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) is a disease that fits the above criteria. BV afflicts approximately 29% of women in child bearing age. Unfortunately, its causes are unknown. This paper seeks to uncover the most important features for diagnosis and in turn employ classification algorithms on those features. In order to fulfill our purpose, we conducted two experiments on the data. We isolated the clinical and medical features from the full set of raw data, we compared the accuracy, precision, recall and F-measure and time elapsed for each feature selection and classification grouping. We noticed that classification results were as good or better after performing feature selection although there was a wide range in the number of features produced from the feature selection process. After comparing the experiments, the algorithms performed best on the medical dataset. PMID:25914861

  13. Ultra-sensitive immunosensor for detection of hepatitis B surface antigen using multi-functionalized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shourian, M; Ghourchian, H; Boutorabi, M

    2015-10-01

    The signal amplification for analytical purposes has considerable potential in detecting trace levels of analytes for clinical, security or environmental applications. In the present report a strategy based on a sandwich type immunoassay system was designed for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen which exploits the specific affinity interaction between streptavidin and biotin recognition systems. The method involves the specific coupling of multi-functionalized gold nanoparticles (bearing biotin and luminol molecules) to the streptavidin modified by secondary antibody. The chemiluminescent signal is produced by the gold nanoparticles in the presence of HAuCl4 as catalyst and hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The immunosensor was able to detect hepatitis B surface antigen in the linear concentration range from 1.7 to 1920 pg mL(-1) and the detection limit of 0.358 pg mL(-1), at signal/noise = 3.

  14. Rapid, Portable, Multiplexed Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Directly from Clinical Sample Matrices.

    PubMed

    Phaneuf, Christopher R; Mangadu, Betty; Piccini, Matthew E; Singh, Anup K; Koh, Chung-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Enteric and diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood illness and death in countries with developing economies. Each year, more than half of a million children under the age of five die from these diseases. We have developed a portable, microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous, multiplexed detection of several of the bacterial pathogens that cause these diseases. This platform can perform fast, sensitive immunoassays directly from relevant, complex clinical matrices such as stool without extensive sample cleanup or preparation. Using only 1 µL of sample per assay, we demonstrate simultaneous multiplexed detection of four bacterial pathogens implicated in diarrheal and enteric diseases in less than 20 min. PMID:27669320

  15. Rapid, Portable, Multiplexed Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Directly from Clinical Sample Matrices.

    PubMed

    Phaneuf, Christopher R; Mangadu, Betty; Piccini, Matthew E; Singh, Anup K; Koh, Chung-Yan

    2016-09-23

    Enteric and diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood illness and death in countries with developing economies. Each year, more than half of a million children under the age of five die from these diseases. We have developed a portable, microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous, multiplexed detection of several of the bacterial pathogens that cause these diseases. This platform can perform fast, sensitive immunoassays directly from relevant, complex clinical matrices such as stool without extensive sample cleanup or preparation. Using only 1 µL of sample per assay, we demonstrate simultaneous multiplexed detection of four bacterial pathogens implicated in diarrheal and enteric diseases in less than 20 min.

  16. Detection of Only Viable Bacterial Spores Using a Live/Dead Indicator in Mixed Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Stam, Christina N.; Smiley, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    This method uses a photoaffinity label that recognizes DNA and can be used to distinguish populations of bacterial cells from bacterial spores without the use of heat shocking during conventional culture, and live from dead bacterial spores using molecular-based methods. Biological validation of commercial sterility using traditional and alternative technologies remains challenging. Recovery of viable spores is cumbersome, as the process requires substantial incubation time, and the extended time to results limits the ability to quickly evaluate the efficacy of existing technologies. Nucleic acid amplification approaches such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction) have shown promise for improving time to detection for a wide range of applications. Recent real-time PCR methods are particularly promising, as these methods can be made at least semi-quantitative by correspondence to a standard curve. Nonetheless, PCR-based methods are rarely used for process validation, largely because the DNA from dead bacterial cells is highly stable and hence, DNA-based amplification methods fail to discriminate between live and inactivated microorganisms. Currently, no published method has been shown to effectively distinguish between live and dead bacterial spores. This technology uses a DNA binding photoaffinity label that can be used to distinguish between live and dead bacterial spores with detection limits ranging from 109 to 102 spores/mL. An environmental sample suspected of containing a mixture of live and dead vegetative cells and bacterial endospores is treated with a photoaffinity label. This step will eliminate any vegetative cells (live or dead) and dead endospores present in the sample. To further determine the bacterial spore viability, DNA is extracted from the spores and total population is quantified by real-time PCR. The current NASA standard assay takes 72 hours for results. Part of this procedure requires a heat shock step at 80 degC for 15 minutes before the

  17. Electrochemical immunoassay for procalcitonin antigen detection based on signal amplification strategy of multiple nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi-Shan; Wang, Hai-Ying; Wang, Li-Shi; Wang, Ju-Fang

    2014-01-15

    Procalcitonin, as a medium of inflammation, has become a new marker of the identification of severe bacterial infections in recent years and has received high attention due to its most ideal diagnostic indicators of specificity with major types of organism systemic inflammation of bacterial infection in the early stages. Thus, a novel method for the determination of procalcitonin (PCT) was developed based on a sandwich-type electrochemical immunosensor, which combined a simple immunosensor array as well as an effectively designed trace tag. The immunosensor was fabricated by layer-by-layer coating graphene (GC), carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), chitosan (CS), glutaraldehyde (GA) composite on the working electrode, which can increase the electronic transfer rate and improve the surface area to capture a large number of primary antibodies (Ab1). The trace tag was prepared by loading high-content signal horseradish peroxidase labeled secondary PCT antibody (HRP-Ab2) with AuNPs, which were coated with mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MCM-41) through thionine linking. In comparison with conventional methods, the proposed immunosensor for PCT provided a better linear response range from 0.01 to 350 ng/mL and a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 0.5 pg/mL under optimal experimental conditions. In addition, the immunosensor exhibited convenience, low cost, rapidity, good specificity, acceptable stability and reproducibility. Moreover, satisfactory results were obtained for the determination of PCT in real human serum samples, indicating that the developed immunoassay has the potential to find application in clinical detection of PCT and other tumor markers as an alternative approach.

  18. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway.

    PubMed

    Tooker, Brian C; Brindley, Stephen M; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L; Turteltaub, Kenneth W; Newman, Lee S

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, it was determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) than HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  19. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstrate that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.

  20. Accelerator mass spectrometry detection of beryllium ions in the antigen processing and presentation pathway

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tooker, Brian C.; Brindley, Stephen M.; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L.; Turteltaub, Kenneth W.; Newman, Lee S.

    2014-06-16

    We report that exposure to small amounts of beryllium (Be) can result in beryllium sensitization and progression to Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). In CBD, beryllium is presented to Be-responsive T-cells by professional antigen-presenting cells (APC). This presentation drives T-cell proliferation and pro-inflammatory cytokine (IL-2, TNFα, and IFNγ) production and leads to granuloma formation. The mechanism by which beryllium enters an APC and is processed to become part of the beryllium antigen complex has not yet been elucidated. Developing techniques for beryllium detection with enough sensitivity has presented a barrier to further investigation. The objective of this study was to demonstratemore » that Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is sensitive enough to quantify the amount of beryllium presented by APC to stimulate Be-responsive T-cells. To achieve this goal, APC - which may or may not stimulate Be-responsive T-cells - were cultured with Be-ferritin. Then, by utilizing AMS, the amount of beryllium processed for presentation was determined. Further, IFNγ intracellular cytokine assays were performed to demonstrate that Be-ferritin (at levels used in the experiments) could stimulate Be-responsive T-cells when presented by an APC of the correct HLA type (HLA-DP0201). The results indicated that Be-responsive T-cells expressed IFNγ only when APC with the correct HLA type were able to process Be for presentation. Utilizing AMS, we determined that APC with HLA-DP0201 had membrane fractions containing 0.17-0.59 ng Be and APC with HLA-DP0401 had membrane fractions bearing 0.40-0.45 ng Be. However, HLA-DP0401 APC had 20-times more Be associated with the whole cells (57.68-61.12 ng) then HLA-DP0201 APC (0.90-3.49 ng). As these findings demonstrate, AMS detection of picogram levels of Be processed by APC is possible. Further, regardless of form, Be requires processing by APC to successfully stimulate Be-responsive T-cells to generate IFNγ.« less

  1. Quantitative detection of the tumor-associated antigen large external antigen in colorectal cancer tissues and cells using quantum dot probe.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Li, Wanming; Yuan, Dezheng; Song, Jindan; Fang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The large external antigen (LEA) is a cell surface glycoprotein that has been proven to be highly expressed in colorectal cancer (CRC) as a tumor-associated antigen. To evaluate and validate the relationship between LEA expression and clinical characteristics of CRC with high efficiency, LEA expression levels were detected in 85 tissue blocks from CRC patients by quantum dot-based immunohistochemistry (QD-IHC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis using quantum dots with a 605 nm emission wavelength (QD605) conjugated to an ND-1 monoclonal antibody against LEA as a probe. Conventional IHC was performed in parallel for comparison. Both QD-IHC and conventional IHC showed that LEA was specifically expressed in CRC, but not in non-CRC tissues, and high LEA expression was significantly associated with a more advanced T-stage (P<0.05), indicating that LEA is likely to serve as a CRC prognostic marker. Compared with conventional IHC, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that QD-IHC possessed higher sensitivity, resulting in an increased positive detection rate of CRC, from 70.1% to 89.6%. In addition, a simpler operation, objective analysis of results, and excellent repeatability make QD-IHC an attractive alternative to conventional IHC in clinical practice. Furthermore, to explore whether the QD probes can be utilized to quantitatively detect living cells or single cells, quantum dot-based immunocytochemistry (QD-ICC) combined with imaging quantitative analysis was developed to evaluate LEA expression in several CRC cell lines. It was demonstrated that QD-ICC could also predict the correlation between LEA expression and the T-stage characteristics of the cell lines, which was confirmed by flow cytometry. The results of this study indicate that QD-ICC has the potential to noninvasively detect rare circulating tumor cells in clinical samples in real clinical applications.

  2. Development of a mixed antigen agar gel enzyme assay (AGEA) for the detection of antibodies to poxvirus in chicken and turkey sera.

    PubMed

    Tadese, Theodros; Potter, E A; Reed, W M

    2003-02-01

    A mixed-antigen agar gel enzyme assay (AGEA) was developed to detect antibodies to poxviruses in chicken and turkey sera. The assay combines the principles of immunodiffusion and enzyme assay. For the detection of antibodies to fowl poxvirus (FP), pigeon poxvirus (PP) and turkey poxvirus (TP) in turkey serum samples, the three antigens were combined to form a mixed-antigen assay. To screen for antibodies to FP and PP in chicken serum samples, the two antigens were combined. When FP and PP viruses were combined as antigens, the sensitivity for chicken sera was 64% but the sensitivity of the agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) was 34% (P<0.001). When antibodies were detected in turkey sera using the mixed antigens, the AGEA had a sensitivity of 66.4% while that of AGPT was 25% (P<0.001). PMID:12655123

  3. Detection of dichloromethane with a bioluminescent (lux) bacterial bioreporter.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Nicholas; Hawkins, Shawn A; Jegier, Patricia; Menn, Fu-Min; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this research effort was to develop an autonomous, inducible, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter for the real-time detection of dichloromethane. Dichloromethane (DCM), also known as methylene chloride, is a volatile organic compound and one of the most commonly used halogenated solvents in the U.S., with applications ranging from grease and paint stripping to aerosol propellants and pharmaceutical tablet coatings. Predictably, it is released into the environment where it contaminates air and water resources. Due to its classification as a probable human carcinogen, hepatic toxin, and central nervous system effector, DCM must be carefully monitored and controlled. Methods for DCM detection usually rely on analytical techniques such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and capillary gas chromatography or photoacoustic environmental monitors, all of which require trained personnel and/or expensive equipment. To complement conventional monitoring practices, we have created a bioreporter for the self-directed detection of DCM by taking advantage of the evolutionary adaptation of bacteria to recognize and metabolize chemical agents. This bioreporter, Methylobacterium extorquens DCM( lux ), was engineered to contain a bioluminescent luxCDABE gene cassette derived from Photorhabdus luminescens fused downstream to the dcm dehalogenase operon, which causes the organism to generate visible light when exposed to DCM. We have demonstrated detection limits down to 1.0 ppm under vapor phase exposures and 0.1 ppm under liquid phase exposures with response times of 2.3 and 1.3 h, respectively, and with specificity towards DCM under relevant industrial environmental monitoring conditions.

  4. Detection of dichloromethane with a bioluminescent (lux) bacterial bioreporter.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Nicholas; Hawkins, Shawn A; Jegier, Patricia; Menn, Fu-Min; Sayler, Gary S; Ripp, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this research effort was to develop an autonomous, inducible, lux-based bioluminescent bioreporter for the real-time detection of dichloromethane. Dichloromethane (DCM), also known as methylene chloride, is a volatile organic compound and one of the most commonly used halogenated solvents in the U.S., with applications ranging from grease and paint stripping to aerosol propellants and pharmaceutical tablet coatings. Predictably, it is released into the environment where it contaminates air and water resources. Due to its classification as a probable human carcinogen, hepatic toxin, and central nervous system effector, DCM must be carefully monitored and controlled. Methods for DCM detection usually rely on analytical techniques such as solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and capillary gas chromatography or photoacoustic environmental monitors, all of which require trained personnel and/or expensive equipment. To complement conventional monitoring practices, we have created a bioreporter for the self-directed detection of DCM by taking advantage of the evolutionary adaptation of bacteria to recognize and metabolize chemical agents. This bioreporter, Methylobacterium extorquens DCM( lux ), was engineered to contain a bioluminescent luxCDABE gene cassette derived from Photorhabdus luminescens fused downstream to the dcm dehalogenase operon, which causes the organism to generate visible light when exposed to DCM. We have demonstrated detection limits down to 1.0 ppm under vapor phase exposures and 0.1 ppm under liquid phase exposures with response times of 2.3 and 1.3 h, respectively, and with specificity towards DCM under relevant industrial environmental monitoring conditions. PMID:21688172

  5. Efficiency of different strategies to detect autoantibodies to extractable nuclear antigens.

    PubMed

    Almeida González, Delia; Cabrera de León, Antonio; Rodríguez Pérez, María Del Cristo; Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; González Hernández, Ana; García García, Diego; Vázquez Moncholi, Carmen; Aguirre Jaime, Armando

    2010-08-31

    Autoantibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (anti-ENA) are identified mainly in samples positive for antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Although the method of choice for ANA screening is indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), several techniques are available to detect anti-ENA. The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of five different strategies to determine anti-ENA. During a 2-year period we screened ANA in 30375 samples with IIF, and the 4475 samples ANA positive were tested for anti-ENA by double immune diffusion screening or fluoroenzymeimmunoassay (Screening FI); anti-ENA specificities were then determined by line immunoassay (LIA) or fluoroenzymeimmunoassay (FI). We compared five strategies that involved FI or LIA identification of anti-ENA with or without prior screening, or an algorithm that combined fluorescence pattern, number of anti-ENA specificities requested by the clinician and ANA dilution titer. One cost unit (CU) was defined as the cost of 1 test of ANA determination. We detected 553 anti-ENA positive samples. The most efficient strategy was the algorithm, at a cost of 3.3 CU per sample processed, the second most efficient strategy was screening plus FI identification (cost=3.8 CU), and the third most efficient strategy was screening plus LIA identification (cost=3.9 CU). The fourth most efficient strategy was FI identification without prior screening (13.3 CU per sample) and the least efficient was LIA identification without prior screening (13.6 CU per sample). In conclusion, an algorithm that combined techniques for detection, ANA titer, fluorescence pattern and number of specificities requested was the most efficient strategy for determining anti-ENA.

  6. Evaluation of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, R D; Jaeger, K L; Wuhib, T; Lima, A A; Guerrant, R L; Sears, C L

    1993-01-01

    The diagnosis of the small (4- to 6-microns) Cryptosporidium oocysts is labor intensive and relies on stool concentration, with subsequent staining and microscopy. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical utility of an antigen capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (LMD Laboratories, Carlsbad, Calif.) in detecting Cryptosporidium oocysts in human stools. A total of 591 specimens (76 diarrheal, 515 control) obtained from 213 inhabitants of an urban slum in northeastern Brazil were examined by both ELISA and conventional microscopic examination (CME) of formalin-ethyl acetate-concentrated stool samples stained with modified acid-fast and auramine stains. Forty-eight diarrheal stools (63.2%) were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts by CME, with 40 of these positive by ELISA. Thirty-five control stools (6.8%) had Cryptosporidium oocysts detected by CME, with 15 of these also positive by ELISA. All of the 480 nondiarrheal stools and all but one of the diarrheal stools negative by CME were negative by ELISA. The test had an overall sensitivity of 66.3% and a specificity of 99.8% (positive predictive value, 98.2%; negative predictive value, 94.8%). In the evaluation of human diarrheal stool samples, the test sensitivity increased to 83.3%, with a specificity of 96.4%, and, in analysis of samples from individual patients with diarrhea, the sensitivity was 87.9%, with a specificity of 100%. These results indicate that this stool ELISA is sensitive and specific for the detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts in human diarrheal stool specimens but has limited use in epidemiologic studies for the diagnosis of asymptomatic Cryptosporidium infection. PMID:8370732

  7. Aptamer-based microchip electrophoresis assays for amplification detection of carcinoembryonia antigen

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li; Zhao, Jingjin; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Shulin; Liu, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) as one of the most widely used tumor marker is used in the clinical diagnosis of colorectal, pancreatic, gastric, and cervical carcinomas. We developed an aptamer-based microchip electrophoresis assay technique for assaying CEA in human serum for cancer diagnosis. Methods The magnetic beads (MBs) are employed as carriers of double strand DNA that is formed by an aptamer of target and a complementary DNA of aptamer. After the aptamer in MB-dsDNA conjugate binds with target, the complementary DNA was released from MB-dsDNA conjugate. The released complementary DNA hybridizes with a fluorescein amidite (FAM) labeled DNA, and forms DNA duplex, which triggers the selective cleavage of FAM labeled DNA by nicking endonuclease Nb.BbvCI, and generating FAM labeled DNA segment. The released complementary DNA hybridizes with another FAM labeled DNA, resulting in a continuous cleavage of FAM labeled DNA, and the generation of large numbers of FAM labeled DNA segments. In MCE laser induced fluorescence detection (LIF), FAM labeled DNA segment is separated and detected. Results The linear range for CEA was 130 pg/ml~8.0 ng/ml with a correlation coefficient of 0.9916 and a detection limit of 68 pg/ml. The CEA concentration in the serum samples from healthy subjects was found be in the range 1.3 ng/ml to 3.2 ng/ml. The CEA concentration in the samples from cancer patients was found to be >15 ng/ml. Conclusions This method may become a useful tool for rapid analysis of CEA and other tumor markers in biomedical analysis and clinical diagnosis. PMID:26344338

  8. Severe Fever with Thrombocytopenia Syndrome Virus Antigen Detection Using Monoclonal Antibodies to the Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fukuma, Aiko; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Tani, Hideki; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Kurosu, Takeshi; Egawa, Kazutaka; Suda, Yuto; Singh, Harpal; Nomachi, Taro; Gokuden, Mutsuyo; Ando, Katsuyuki; Kida, Kouji; Kan, Miki; Kato, Nobuyuki; Yoshikawa, Akira; Kitamoto, Hiroaki; Sato, Yuko; Suzuki, Tadaki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is a tick-borne infectious disease with a high case fatality rate, and is caused by the SFTS virus (SFTSV). SFTS is endemic to China, South Korea, and Japan. The viral RNA level in sera of patients with SFTS is known to be strongly associated with outcomes. Virological SFTS diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity are required in disease endemic areas. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated novel monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the SFTSV nucleocapsid (N) protein and developed a sandwich antigen (Ag)-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of N protein of SFTSV using MAb and polyclonal antibody as capture and detection antibodies, respectively. The Ag-capture system was capable of detecting at least 350–1220 TCID50/100 μl/well from the culture supernatants of various SFTSV strains. The efficacy of the Ag-capture ELISA in SFTS diagnosis was evaluated using serum samples collected from patients suspected of having SFTS in Japan. All 24 serum samples (100%) containing high copy numbers of viral RNA (>105 copies/ml) showed a positive reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA, whereas 12 out of 15 serum samples (80%) containing low copy numbers of viral RNA (<105 copies/ml) showed a negative reaction in the Ag-capture ELISA. Among these Ag-capture ELISA-negative 12 samples, 9 (75%) were positive for IgG antibodies against SFTSV. Conclusions The newly developed Ag-capture ELISA is useful for SFTS diagnosis in acute phase patients with high levels of viremia. PMID:27045364

  9. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C

    2007-11-01

    We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

  10. Detection of small cell lung cancer metastases in bone marrow aspirates using monoclonal antibody directed against neuroendocrine differentiation antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Berendsen, H H; de Leij, L; Postmus, P E; Ter Haar, J G; Poppema, S; The, T H

    1988-01-01

    To detect metastases in the bone marrow of patients with small cell lung cancer, immunofluorescence with a monoclonal antibody detecting a membrane antigen (MOC-1) associated with small cell lung cancer was performed on 53 bone marrow aspirates from 30 patients. In 19 (63%) patients MOC-1 reactive cells were detected. Simultaneous histopathological examination of the bone marrow biopsy specimens detected tumour cells in only six (20%). The method is more sensitive than conventional histochemical staining of bone marrow aspirate and may eventually be able to show additional subgroups, such as patients with limited disease who might benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy or surgery. Images p275-a PMID:2834417

  11. Advances in alloimmune thrombocytopenia: perspectives on current concepts of human platelet antigens, antibody detection strategies, and genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2015-01-01

    Alloimmunisation to platelets leads to the production of antibodies against platelet antigens and consequently to thrombocytopenia. Numerous molecules located on the platelet surface are antigenic and induce immune-mediated platelet destruction with symptoms that can be serious. Human platelet antigens (HPA) cause thrombocytopenias, such as neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, post-transfusion purpura, and platelet transfusion refractoriness. Thirty-four HPA are classified into 28 systems. Assays to identify HPA and anti-HPA antibodies are critically important for preventing and treating thrombocytopenia caused by anti-HPA antibodies. Significant progress in furthering our understanding of HPA has been made in the last decade: new HPA have been discovered, antibody-detection methods have improved, and new genotyping methods have been developed. We review these advances and discuss issues that remain to be resolved as well as future prospects for preventing and treating immune thrombocytopenia. PMID:26057488

  12. Brucella abortus RB51 and hot saline extract from Brucella ovis as antigens in a complement fixation test used To detect sheep vaccinated with Brucella abortus RB51.

    PubMed

    Adone, R; Ciuchini, F

    2001-01-01

    The efficacy of Brucella abortus RB51 and hot saline extract (HSE) from Brucella ovis as antigens in complement fixation (CF) tests was comparatively evaluated in detecting immune responses of sheep vaccinated with B. abortus strain RB51. For this study, four 5-month-old sheep were vaccinated subcutaneously with 5 x 10(9) CFU of RB51, and two sheep received saline. Serum samples collected at different times after vaccination were tested for the presence of antibodies to RB51 by a CF test with RB51 as antigen, previously deprived of anticomplementary activity, and with HSE antigen, which already used as the official antigen to detect B. ovis-infected sheep. The results showed that vaccinated sheep developed antibodies which reacted weakly against HSE antigen and these antibodies were detectable for 30 days after vaccination. However, antibodies to RB51 could be detected for a longer period after vaccination by using homologous RB51 antigen in CF tests. In fact, high titers were still present at 110 days postvaccination with RB51 antigen. Sera from sheep naturally infected with B. ovis also reacted to RB51 but gave lower titers than those detected by HSE antigen. As expected, all sera from RB51-vaccinated sheep remained negative when tested with standard S-type Brucella standard antigens.

  13. Anti-Taenia solium monoclonal antibodies for the detection of parasite antigens in body fluids from patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Adriana; Sáenz, Patricia; Marzal, Miguel W; Orrego, Miguel A; Castillo, Yesenia; Rivera, Andrea; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; García, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E

    2016-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), an infection of the brain by Taenia solium (Ts) cysts, is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy in developing countries. Serological testing consists primarily of varying methods to detect antibodies in body fluids and more recently antigen (Ag) detection assays to identify individuals or animals with viable parasites. Antigen assays currently in use employ monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against T. saginata, which have known cross reactivity to animal cestodes but are highly specific in human samples. We produced, characterized and tested 21 mAbs raised against T. solium whole cyst antigens, vesicular fluid or excretory secretory products. Reactivity of the TsmAbs against specific cyst structures was determined using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry on histological sections of Ts muscle cysts. Four TsmAbs reacted to vesicular space alone, 9 to the neck and cyst wall, one to the neck and vesicular space and 7 to the neck, cyst wall and vesicular space. An in-house ELISA assay to detect circulating Ts antigen, using the TsmAbs as capture antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal anti-Ts whole cyst antibody as a detector antibody demonstrated that eight of the 21 TsmAbs detected antigens in known NCC-positive human sera and three of these also in urine samples. Reactivity was expressed as normalized ratios of optical densities (OD positive control/OD negative control). Three TsmAbs had ratios >10 and five between 2 and 10. The TsmAbs have potential utility for the diagnosis and post-treatment monitoring of patients with viable NCC infections. PMID:27018063

  14. Anti-Taenia solium monoclonal antibodies for the detection of parasite antigens in body fluids from patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Adriana; Sáenz, Patricia; Marzal, Miguel W; Orrego, Miguel A; Castillo, Yesenia; Rivera, Andrea; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Guerra-Giraldez, Cristina; García, Hector H; Nash, Theodore E

    2016-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC), an infection of the brain by Taenia solium (Ts) cysts, is the most common cause of adult-onset epilepsy in developing countries. Serological testing consists primarily of varying methods to detect antibodies in body fluids and more recently antigen (Ag) detection assays to identify individuals or animals with viable parasites. Antigen assays currently in use employ monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) raised against T. saginata, which have known cross reactivity to animal cestodes but are highly specific in human samples. We produced, characterized and tested 21 mAbs raised against T. solium whole cyst antigens, vesicular fluid or excretory secretory products. Reactivity of the TsmAbs against specific cyst structures was determined using immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry on histological sections of Ts muscle cysts. Four TsmAbs reacted to vesicular space alone, 9 to the neck and cyst wall, one to the neck and vesicular space and 7 to the neck, cyst wall and vesicular space. An in-house ELISA assay to detect circulating Ts antigen, using the TsmAbs as capture antibodies and a rabbit polyclonal anti-Ts whole cyst antibody as a detector antibody demonstrated that eight of the 21 TsmAbs detected antigens in known NCC-positive human sera and three of these also in urine samples. Reactivity was expressed as normalized ratios of optical densities (OD positive control/OD negative control). Three TsmAbs had ratios >10 and five between 2 and 10. The TsmAbs have potential utility for the diagnosis and post-treatment monitoring of patients with viable NCC infections.

  15. Bacteriophages for detection and control of bacterial pathogens in food and food-processing environment.

    PubMed

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents recent advances in bacteriophage research and their application in the area of food safety. Section 1 describes general facts on phage biology that are relevant to their application for control and detection of bacterial pathogens in food and environmental samples. Section 2 summarizes the recently acquired data on application of bacteriophages to control growth of bacterial pathogens and spoilage organisms in food and food-processing environment. Section 3 deals with application of bacteriophages for detection and identification of bacterial pathogens. Advantages of bacteriophage-based methods are presented and their shortcomings are discussed. The chapter is intended for food scientist and food product developers, and people in food inspection and health agencies with the ultimate goal to attract their attention to the new developing technology that has a tremendous potential in providing means for producing wholesome and safe food.

  16. Rapid detection of bacterial resistance to antibiotics using AFM cantilevers as nanomechanical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, G.; Alonso-Sarduy, L.; Rio, L. Marques; Bizzini, A.; Trampuz, A.; Notz, J.; Dietler, G.; Kasas, S.

    2013-07-01

    The widespread misuse of drugs has increased the number of multiresistant bacteria, and this means that tools that can rapidly detect and characterize bacterial response to antibiotics are much needed in the management of infections. Various techniques, such as the resazurin-reduction assays, the mycobacterial growth indicator tube or polymerase chain reaction-based methods, have been used to investigate bacterial metabolism and its response to drugs. However, many are relatively expensive or unable to distinguish between living and dead bacteria. Here we show that the fluctuations of highly sensitive atomic force microscope cantilevers can be used to detect low concentrations of bacteria, characterize their metabolism and quantitatively screen (within minutes) their response to antibiotics. We applied this methodology to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, showing that live bacteria produced larger cantilever fluctuations than bacteria exposed to antibiotics. Our preliminary experiments suggest that the fluctuation is associated with bacterial metabolism.

  17. Immaturity associated antigens are lost during induction for T cell lymphoblastic leukemia: implications for minimal residual disease detection

    PubMed Central

    Roshal, Mikhail; Fromm, Jonathan R; Winter, Stuart; Dunsmore, Kimberly; Wood, Brent

    2011-01-01

    Background Induction chemotherapy for acute leukemia often leads to antigenic shifts in residual abnormal blast populations. Studies in precursor B cell ALL (B-ALL) and AML have demonstrated that chemotherapy commonly results in the loss of antigens associated with immaturity, limiting their utility for minimal residual disease (MRD) detection. Little information is available about the stability of these antigens in precursor T cell ALL (T-ALL) though it is presumed that CD99 and TdT are highly informative based on limited studies. Methods In a longitudinal investigation, we explored patterns of lineage specific and immaturity associated antigens in T-ALL in a large cohort of patients treated under the multicenter Children's Oncology Group (COG) protocol. All samples were analyzed using multicolor flow cytometry in a standardized fashion at a single institution. Results We report that markers of immaturity particularly, TdT and CD99 dramatically decline on leukemic blasts during therapy. CD34 and CD10 expression is confined to a minority of pre-treatment samples and is also not stable. In contrast, lineage associated markers including CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7 and CD8 failed to show significant trends. Conclusions Our study strongly argues for expansion of immunophenotyping panels for T-ALL MRD to decrease reliance on immature antigens. This study represents the first demonstration of consistent immunophenotypic shifts in T-ALL. PMID:20155852

  18. Toxoplasma gondii: Recombinant GRA5 antigen for detection of immunoglobulin G antibodies using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Holec-Gasior, Lucyna; Kur, Józef

    2010-03-01

    In this study, for the first time, the evaluation of Toxoplasma gondii full-length recombinant GRA5 antigen for the serodiagnosis of human toxoplasmosis is shown. The recombinant GRA5 antigen as a fusion protein containing His-tag at both terminals was obtained using an Escherichia coli expression system. The usefulness of rGRA5 for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in an ELISA was tested on a total of 189 sera from patients with different stages of the infection and 31 sera from sero-negative individuals, obtained during routine diagnostic tests. Anti-GRA5 IgG antibodies were detected in 70.9% of all seropositive serum samples. This result was comparable to ELISA using a Toxoplasma lysate antigen (TLA) and six combinations of recombinant antigens. The sensitivity of IgG ELISA calculated from all positive serum samples was similar for TLA (94.2%), rMAG1+rSAG1+rGRA5 (92.6%), rGRA2+rSAG1+rGRA5 (93.1%) and rROP1+rSAG1+rGRA5 (94.2%) cocktails, whereas the sensitivity of cocktails without rGRA5 antigens was lower giving 82.0%, 86.2% and 87.8%, respectively. Thus, the present study showed that the full-length rGRA5 is suitable for use as a component of an antigen cocktail for the detection of anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies.

  19. Detection of antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen by immune adherence hemagglutination.

    PubMed

    Lennette, E T; Ward, E; Henle, G; Henle, W

    1982-01-01

    The immune adherence hemagglutination assay was found to be as sensitive and specific as the indirect immunofluorescence technique for titration of antibodies to Epstein-Barr virus capsid antigen. Satisfactory virus capsid antigen-specific and negative control antigens for the immune adherence hemagglutination assay were prepared from cell extracts of the Epstein-Barr virus producer P3HR-1 and the Epstein-Barr virus genome-negative BJAB lymphoblastoid cell lines, respectively. As the immune adherence hemagglutination assay can be used to titrate antibodies to both the heterophil antigen of the Paul-Bunnell type and to virus capsid antigen, it offers a promising alternative to the immunofluorescence methods in the serodiagnosis of Epstein-Barr virus infections which can be performed by most diagnostic laboratories.

  20. Excretory/secretory antigens (ES) from in-vitro cultures of Taenia crassiceps cysticerci, and use of an anti-ES monoclonal antibody for antigen detection in samples of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Espíndola, N M; Vaz, A J; Pardini, A X; Fernandes, I

    2002-06-01

    Antigens were obtained from cysticerci of the ORF strain of Taenia crassiceps, by culture of cysts in protein-free hybridoma medium (PFHM). Budding of new vesicles was observed after 24-48 h. Excretory/secretory (ES) antigens (peptides of <20 kDa) were recovered in the medium after culture for 48 h. SDS-PAGE analysis of vesicular-fluid (VF) antigens (obtained by rupturing T. crassiceps cysticerci in PFHM) and the ES antigens indicated partial homology between the two preparations. ES peptides of 18- and 14-kDa were recognized by polyclonal antibodies produced in rabbits immunized either with the VF antigens or with a total-antigen preparation of T. solium cysticerci. Antibodies present in samples of serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from patients with neurocysticercosis also reacted with ES peptides. An anti-ES monoclonal antibody detected antigens in the CSF from 10 patients with neurocysticercosis, showing the antigenic homology of the ES antigens with those of T. solium cysticerci in human infections.

  1. Phage-protease-peptide: a novel trifecta enabling multiplex detection of viable bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alcaine, S D; Tilton, L; Serrano, M A C; Wang, M; Vachet, R W; Nugen, S R

    2015-10-01

    Bacteriophages represent rapid, readily targeted, and easily produced molecular probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Molecular biology techniques have allowed researchers to make significant advances in the bioengineering of bacteriophage to further improve speed and sensitivity of detection. Despite their host specificity, bacteriophages have not been meaningfully leveraged in multiplex detection of bacterial pathogens. We propose a proof-of-principal phage-based scheme to enable multiplex detection. Our scheme involves bioengineering bacteriophage to carry a gene for a specific protease, which is expressed during infection of the target cell. Upon lysis, the protease is released to cleave a reporter peptide, and the signal detected. Here we demonstrate the successful (i) modification of T7 bacteriophage to carry tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease; (ii) expression of TEV protease by Escherichia coli following infection by our modified T7, an average of 2000 units of protease per phage are produced during infection; and (iii) proof-of-principle detection of E. coli in 3 h after a primary enrichment via TEV protease activity using a fluorescent peptide and using a designed target peptide for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. This proof-of-principle can be translated to other phage-protease-peptide combinations to enable multiplex bacterial detection and readily adopted on multiple platforms, like MALDI-TOF MS or fluorescent readers, commonly found in labs.

  2. Aptamer-MIP hybrid receptor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of prostate specific antigen.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Pawan; Tamboli, Vibha; Harniman, Robert L; Estrela, Pedro; Allender, Chris J; Bowen, Jenna L

    2016-01-15

    This study reports the design and evaluation of a new synthetic receptor sensor based on the amalgamation of biomolecular recognition elements and molecular imprinting to overcome some of the challenges faced by conventional protein imprinting. A thiolated DNA aptamer with established affinity for prostate specific antigen (PSA) was complexed with PSA prior to being immobilised on the surface of a gold electrode. Controlled electropolymerisation of dopamine around the complex served to both entrap the complex, holding the aptamer in, or near to, it's binding conformation, and to localise the PSA binding sites at the sensor surface. Following removal of PSA, it was proposed that the molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) cavity would act synergistically with the embedded aptamer to form a hybrid receptor (apta-MIP), displaying recognition properties superior to that of aptamer alone. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to evaluate subsequent rebinding of PSA to the apta-MIP surface. The apta-MIP sensor showed high sensitivity with a linear response from 100pg/ml to 100ng/ml of PSA and a limit of detection of 1pg/ml, which was three-fold higher than aptamer alone sensor for PSA. Furthermore, the sensor demonstrated low cross-reactivity with a homologous protein (human Kallikrein 2) and low response to human serum albumin (HSA), suggesting possible resilience to the non-specific binding of serum proteins.

  3. Transient Elastography with Serum Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Enhances Liver Fibrosis Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Tianyi; Si, Jia; Hao, Meina; Li, Cheng; Liu, Xia; Li, Jie; Ma, Anlin

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore transient elastography (TE) with quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg) for detecting advanced hepatic fibrosis. Material/Methods This was a single-center prospective real-life analysis of 111 treatment-naïve chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients enrolled into the Establishment of Non-invasive Diagnosis Criteria and Model of Hepatitis B Virus-related Cirrhosis Study. Results There were significant correlations between TE, qHBsAg, and fibrosis. Both qHBsAg and TE were identified as independent predictors for advanced fibrosis. In receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis, TEqHBsAg (combination of TE and qHBsAg) resulted in the highest area under the receiver-operator curve (AUC) (0.912), mainly due to increased specificity. Using the optimal cut-off, TEqHBsAg provided a sensitivity of 86.7%, and increased specificity from 78.7% to 85.1%. Conclusions Combining TE with qHBsAg enhances specificity in identifying advanced fibrosis in treatment-naïve CHB patients. PMID:27526179

  4. Recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions by antibodies against Doa antigens, not detected by cross-matching.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Ruben; van Gelder, Warry; van Wintershoven, Joyce; Maaskant-Van Wijk, Petra A; Beckers, Erik A M

    2006-02-01

    An 81-year-old male patient suffered from recurrent acute hemolytic transfusion reactions after transfusion with phenotyped cross-match-negative red blood cells (RBCs). Extensive posttransfusion workup eventually revealed Dombrock (a) (Do(a)) antibodies. Because commercially available cell panels do not allow for identification of anti-Do(a) and owing to the lack of Do(a) typing serum samples, selection of matched units of RBCs is dependent on negative cross-match results. In this case, selection of Do(a-) units by cross-matching failed, indicating that serologic methods were not reliable. A polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific priming assay was used to detect DOA and DOB alleles, which encode Do(a) and Do(b) antigens, respectively. The patient was confirmed to be DOB/DOB by DNA sequencing. Furthermore, the involved mismatched units in each of the three hemolytic episodes were shown to be Do(a+). In the presenting case, DNA typing appeared to be superior to serologic methods in selecting matched RBC units in the presence of anti-Do(a). PMID:16441602

  5. A novel label-free microfluidic paper-based immunosensor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Huiren; Luo, Jinping; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Li; Fan, Yan; Yan, Shi; Yang, Yue; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a highly sensitive label-free paper-based electrochemical immunosensor employing screen-printed working electrode (SPWE) for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was fabricated. In order to raise the detection sensitivity and immobilize anti-CEA, amino functional graphene (NH2-G)/thionine (Thi)/gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) nanocomposites were synthesized and coated on SPWE. The principle of the immunosensor determination was based on the fact that the decreased response currents of Thi were proportional to the concentrations of corresponding antigens due to the formation of antibody-antigen immunocomplex. Experimental results revealed that the immunoassay enabled the determination of standard CEA solutions with linear working ranges of 50pgmL(-1) to 500ngmL(-1), the limit of detections for CEA is 10pgmL(-1) (S/N=3) and its corresponding correlation coefficients were 0.996. Furthermore, the proposed immunosensor could be used for the determination of clinical serum samples. A large number of clinical serum samples were detected and the relative errors between measured values and reference concentrations were calculated. Results showed that this novel paper-based electrochemical immunosensor could provide a new platform for low cost, sensitive, specific, and point-of-care diagnosis in cancer detection. PMID:27132007

  6. A novel label-free microfluidic paper-based immunosensor for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Xu, Huiren; Luo, Jinping; Liu, Juntao; Wang, Li; Fan, Yan; Yan, Shi; Yang, Yue; Cai, Xinxia

    2016-09-15

    In this work, a highly sensitive label-free paper-based electrochemical immunosensor employing screen-printed working electrode (SPWE) for detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was fabricated. In order to raise the detection sensitivity and immobilize anti-CEA, amino functional graphene (NH2-G)/thionine (Thi)/gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) nanocomposites were synthesized and coated on SPWE. The principle of the immunosensor determination was based on the fact that the decreased response currents of Thi were proportional to the concentrations of corresponding antigens due to the formation of antibody-antigen immunocomplex. Experimental results revealed that the immunoassay enabled the determination of standard CEA solutions with linear working ranges of 50pgmL(-1) to 500ngmL(-1), the limit of detections for CEA is 10pgmL(-1) (S/N=3) and its corresponding correlation coefficients were 0.996. Furthermore, the proposed immunosensor could be used for the determination of clinical serum samples. A large number of clinical serum samples were detected and the relative errors between measured values and reference concentrations were calculated. Results showed that this novel paper-based electrochemical immunosensor could provide a new platform for low cost, sensitive, specific, and point-of-care diagnosis in cancer detection.

  7. Development of an engineered bioluminescent reporter phage for detection of bacterial blight of crucifers.

    PubMed

    Schofield, David A; Bull, Carolee T; Rubio, Isael; Wechter, W Patrick; Westwater, Caroline; Molineux, Ian J

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial blight, caused by the phytopathogen Pseudomonas cannabina pv. alisalensis, is an emerging disease afflicting important members of the Brassicaceae family. The disease is often misdiagnosed as pepper spot, a much less severe disease caused by the related pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. We have developed a phage-based diagnostic that can both identify and detect the causative agent of bacterial blight and differentiate the two pathogens. A recombinant "light"-tagged reporter phage was generated by integrating bacterial luxAB genes encoding luciferase into the genome of P. cannabina pv. alisalensis phage PBSPCA1. The PBSPCA1::luxAB reporter phage is viable and stable and retains properties similar to those of the wild-type phage. PBSPCA1::luxAB rapidly and sensitively detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis by conferring a bioluminescent signal response to cultured cells. Detection is dependent on cell viability. Other bacterial pathogens of Brassica species such as P. syringae pv. maculicola, Pseudomonas marginalis, Pectobacterium carotovorum, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, and X. campestris pv. raphani either do not produce a response or produce significantly attenuated signals with the reporter phage. Importantly, the reporter phage detects P. cannabina pv. alisalensis on diseased plant specimens, indicating its potential for disease diagnosis. PMID:22427491

  8. Detection of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

    PubMed

    Akutsu, Tomoko; Motani, Hisako; Watanabe, Ken; Iwase, Hirotaro; Sakurada, Koichi

    2012-05-01

    To preliminarily evaluate the applicability of bacterial DNA as a marker for the forensic identification of vaginal fluid, we developed and performed PCR-based detection of 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus spp. dominating the vagina and of bacterial vaginosis-related bacteria from DNA extracted from body fluids and stains. As a result, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus jensenii and Atopobium vaginae were specifically detected in vaginal fluid and female urine samples. Bacterial genes detected in female urine might have originated from contaminated vaginal fluid. In addition, those of Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus gasseri and Gardnerella vaginalis were also detected in non-vaginal body fluids such as semen. Because bacterial genes were successfully amplified in DNA samples extracted by using the general procedure for animal tissues without any optional treatments, DNA samples prepared for the identification of vaginal fluid can also be used for personal identification. In conclusion, 16S ribosomal RNA genes of L. crispatus, L. jensenii and A. vaginae could be effective markers for forensic identification of vaginal fluid.

  9. [Detection of cell death markers as a tool for bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility testing].

    PubMed

    Mlynárčik, P; Kolář, M

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance among nosocomial pathogens has emerged as one of the most important health care problems in the new millennium. In this review, we present new methods for bacterial antimicrobial susceptibility testing, based on the detection of antibiotic-mediated cell death markers that could provide valuable alternatives to existing phenotypic approaches in the very near future. PMID:27467325

  10. Surface-Enhanced Electrochemiluminescence of Ru@SiO2 for Ultrasensitive Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Daifang; Li, Yanyan; Lin, Zhenyu; Qiu, Bin; Guo, Longhua

    2015-06-16

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is recognized as a disease biomarker to reflect the existence of various cancers and tumors in the human body. Sensitive detection of CEA in body fluid is valuable for clinical diagnosis and treatment assessment of cancers. Herein, we present a new approach for ultrasensitive determination of CEA in human serum based on localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) enhanced electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of Ru(bpy)3(2+). In this surface-enhanced ECL (SEECL) sensing scheme, Ru(bpy)3(2+)-doped SiO2 nanoparticles (Ru@SiO2) act as ECL luminophores, and AuNPs are used as LSPR source to enhance the ECL signal. Two different kinds of aptamers specific to CEA are modified on the surface of Ru@SiO2 and AuNPs, respectively. In the presence of CEA, a multilayer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures would be formed. Our investigation reveals that the ECL signal of Ru@SiO2 can be effectively enhanced by AuNPs. One layer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures would generate about 3-fold ECL enhancement compared with the ECL of the nanoarchitectures without the presence of AuNPs. As much as 30-fold ECL enhancement could be obtained by a multilayer of Ru@SiO2-AuNPs nanoarchitectures. Under the optimal conditions, a detection limit of 1.52 × 10(-6) ng/mL of CEA in human serum was achieved. To the best of our knowledge, CEA assays with such a low LOD have never been reported for an ECL sensor.

  11. Power-free chip enzyme immunoassay for detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in serum.

    PubMed

    Adel Ahmed, Heba; Azzazy, Hassan M E

    2013-11-15

    A power-free, portable "Chip EIA" was designed to render the popular Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) more suitable for point-of-care testing. A number of microfluidic platforms have enabled miniaturization of the conventional microtitre plate ELISA, however, they require external pumping systems, valves, and electric power supply. The Chip EIA platform has eliminated the need for pumps and valves through utilizing a simple permanent magnet and magnetic nanoparticles. The magnetic nanoparticles act as solid support to capture the target and are then moved through chambers harboring different reagents necessary to perform a sandwich ELISA. The use of magnetic nanoparticles increases the volume-to-surface ratio reducing the assay time to 30 min. Changing the color of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) substrate to green indicates a positive result. In addition, a quantitative read-out was obtained through the use of cellphone camera imaging and analyzing the images using Matlab®. Cell phones, including smart ones, are readily available almost everywhere. The Chip EIA device was used to assay total prostate specific antigen (tPSA) in 19 serum samples. The PSA Chip EIA was tested for accuracy, precision, repeatability, and the results were correlated to the commercial Beckman Colter, Hybritech immunoassay® for determination of tPSA in serum samples with a Pearson correlation coefficient (R(2)=0.96). The lower detection limit of the PSA Chip EIA was 3.2 ng/mL. The assay has 88.9% recovery and good reproducibility (% CV of 6.5). We conclude that the developed Chip EIA can be used for detection of protein biomarkers in biological specimens.

  12. Metallothionein: structure/antigenicity and detection/quantitation in normal physiological fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, J S

    1984-01-01

    Recent experiments in the application of radioimmunoassay (RIA) in the detection and quantitation of metallothionein (MT) in human sera and urines demonstrate that it is possible to extend the lower limit of practical quantitation from the previous limit of 50-100 pg to 1 pg.RIA of normal sera indicates that the typical range of concentrations of MT is from less than 0.01 ng/mL to about 1 ng/mL, and that concentrations above 2 ng/mL should be considered abnormal. The typical range for normal urines is from less than 1 ng/mL to 10 ng/mL; concentrations above 10 ng/mL should be considered abnormal. A complementary assay, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), is under development. The ELISA is a competitive binding assay, detection and quantitation of MT being either by colorimetric or fluorimetric methods. The present useful range for MT quantitation in the ELISA is from about 50-50000 pg (fluorimetric) or 500-5000 pg (colorimetric). Recent experiments using the RIA have identified the principal antigenic determinants of vertebrate MTs as involving the immediate amino terminal residues (-MDPNC-) and the segment including residues 20-25 (-KCKECK- in human MT). Theoretical predictions of secondary structure based on hydrophilicity and sequence analysis indicate that the conformational profile is dominated by tetrapeptide candidates for beta turns (reverse turns) with 2-3 hexapeptide sequences being candidates for helical conformation and 4-5 short sequences (3-5 residues) being candidates for beta chain conformation. The helical candidates are predicted to be unstable and the analysis favors reverse turns for both determinants of vertebrate MT and a sequestered location for the joining region between clusters A and B. PMID:6203731

  13. Evaluation of saliva specimens as an alternative sampling method to detect hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Helena Medina; da Silva, Elisangela Ferreira; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A; Nabuco, Letícia C; do Ó, Kycia Maria Rodrigues; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; Yoshida, Clara Fumiko Tachibana; Lampe, Elisabeth; Villar, Livia Melo

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a modified enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was evaluated for the Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) among whole saliva and oral fluid samples. Specimens were collected from 115 individuals who gave serum and oral fluid using Salivette (Sarstedt, Nümbrecht, Germany) and whole saliva. Saliva specimens were tested following a modified ELISA, and the results were compared with paired serum specimens that were tested according to the supplier's instructions. Transport buffer for the oral fluids, sample volume for assay, incubation period of sample with conjugate as well as cut-off values were evaluated to optimize the assay. The highest sensitivity and specificity were obtained by increasing the incubation of sample and conjugate to 16  hr and using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to calculate cut-off values. HBsAg was detected in 40 oral fluids and 44 whole saliva samples out of 47 paired positive serum specimens and not detected in 64 oral fluids and 63 whole saliva samples out of 68 matched negative sera samples by the ELISA assay. There was excellent agreement between the results for the serum and saliva specimens kappa value (κ): 0.80 for oral fluid and κ: 0.87 for whole saliva and there was excellent reproducibility. Using an optimized protocol, the sensitivities of whole saliva and oral fluid were 93.6 and 85.1%, respectively, whereas specificities of whole saliva and oral fluid were 92.6 and 94.1%, respectively. Our data showed a significant promise for the use of whole saliva and oral fluid together with the modified commercial EIA for Hepatitis B virus infection surveillance.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies for detection of the H7 antigen of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    He, Y; Keen, J E; Westerman, R B; Littledike, E T; Kwang, J

    1996-01-01

    Two murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (2B7 and 46E9-9) reactive with the H7 flagellar antigen of Escherichia coli were produced and characterized. A total of 217 E. coli strains (48 O157:H7, 4 O157:NM, 23 O157:non-H7, 22 H7:non-O157, and 120 non-O157:nonH7), 17 Salmonella serovars, and 29 other gram-negative bacteria were used to evaluate the reactivities of the two MAbs by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Both MAbs reacted strongly with all E. coli strains possessing the H7 antigen and with H23- and H24-positive E. coli strains. Indirect ELISA MAb specificity was confirmed by inhibition ELISA and by Western blotting (immunoblotting), using partially purified flagellins from E. coli O157:H7 and other E. coli strains. On a Western blot, MAb 46E9-9 was more reactive against H7 flagellin of E. coli O157:H7 than against H7 flagellin of E. coli O1:K1:H7. Competition ELISA suggested that MAbs 2B7 and 46E9-9 reacted with closely related H7 epitopes. When the ELISA reactivities of the MAbs and two commercially available polyclonal anti-H7 antisera were compared, both polyclonal antisera and MAbs reacted strongly with E. coli H7 bacteria. However, the polyclonal antisera cross-reacted strongly both with non-H7 E. coli and with many non-E. coli bacteria. The polyclonal antisera also reacted strongly with H23 and H24 E. coli isolates. The data suggest the need to define serotype-specific epitopes among H7, H23, and H24 E. coli flagella. The anti-H7 MAbs described in this report have the potential to serve as high-quality diagnostic reagents, used either alone or in combination with O157-specific MAbs, to identify or detect E. coli O157:H7 in food products or in human and veterinary clinical specimens. PMID:8795222

  15. Evaluation of NS1 Antigen Detection for Early Diagnosis of Dengue in a Tertiary Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Ashwini Manoor; Dhodapkar, Rahul; Hamide, Abdoul; Biswal, Niranjan; Srinivasan, Badrinath

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease affecting mainly tropical and subtropical regions of the world. The early diagnosis of dengue is required for identifying an epidemic and also for implementing effective vector control measures. Aim To evaluate NS1 antigen assay as an alternative to RT-PCR for the early diagnosis of Dengue. Materials and Methods A comparative study was conducted to evaluate NS1 antigen assay in clinically suspected dengue cases admitted to JIPMER hospital from January to November 2011. Serum samples were tested for NS1 antigen, IgM and IgG antibodies by ELISA and RT-PCR. Results Out of total 112 clinically suspected dengue, 94 were laboratory-confirmed dengue cases (positive by one or more of the following tests - IgM ELISA, NS1 antigen ELISA and RT-PCR). NS1 was detectable from day 1 to day 12 of fever. The positive detection rate of NS1 antigen ELISA, RT-PCR and IgM ELISA were 80.9%, 68.1% and 47.9% respectively. NS1 antigen ELISA was evaluated using RT-PCR as the reference standard and showed a sensitivity of 96.8%, specificity of 53.3%, positive predictive value of 81.6% and negative predictive value of 88.9% with a likelihood ratio of 2.1 by Fisher’s-exact test. The combination of NS1 and IgM had the highest sensitivity of 97.8%. DEN-3 was the serotype identified by RT-PCR for 24 randomly selected samples. NS1 antigen detection had the highest sensitivity in the early stages while IgM detection was more sensitive in the later half of the illness. Conclusion Both NS1 and RT-PCR are useful for early dengue diagnosis, although in terms of cost, ease of performance and rapidity, NS1 is superior to RT-PCR. NS1 in combination with IgM assay offers the most sensitive and cost-effective diagnostic modality for dengue. PMID:27190798

  16. Nucleic Acid-based Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Using Integrated Microfluidic Platform Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Clarissa; Cady, Nathaniel C.; Batt, Carl A.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of nucleic acid-based pathogen detection methods offers increased sensitivity and specificity over traditional microbiological techniques, driving the development of portable, integrated biosensors. The miniaturization and automation of integrated detection systems presents a significant advantage for rapid, portable field-based testing. In this review, we highlight current developments and directions in nucleic acid-based micro total analysis systems for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Recent progress in the miniaturization of microfluidic processing steps for cell capture, DNA extraction and purification, polymerase chain reaction, and product detection are detailed. Discussions include strategies and challenges for implementation of an integrated portable platform. PMID:22412335

  17. Detection of bacterial biofilms in different types of chronic otitis media.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xingzhi; Keyoumu, Youlidusi; Long, Li; Zhang, Hua

    2014-11-01

    Biofilms are organized bacterial communities that may be homogeneous or heterogeneous. They play a significant role in the pathogenesis of chronic nasal sinusitis, chronic tonsillitis, cholesteatomas, and device-related infections. Despite this, few studies have been done that examine the presence of bacterial biofilms in tissues from patients with different types of COM or middle ear cholesteatomas. In the current study, we examined the presence of biofilms in surgical tissue specimens from humans with chronic ear infections using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We hypothesize that bacterial biofilms present differently in patients with different types of chronic otitis media. Our results provide new insights regarding treatment of chronic otitis media. A prospective study was conducted in which middle ear tissues were obtained from 38 patients who underwent tympanoplasty and/or tympanomastoid surgery due to chronic ear infections. A total of 50 middle and mastoid tissue samples were processed for SEM analysis. In addition, 38 middle ear secretion specimens were obtained for routine bacterial culture analysis. Bacterial biofilms were present in 85 % (11 of 13) of patients with middle ear cholesteatoma, 92 % (12/13) of patients with chronic otitis suppurative media (CSOM), and 16 % of patients (2/12) with tympanic membrane perforation (TMP). Fungal biofilms were found in two cases of cholesteatoma. The positive coincidence rate between bacterial biofilms visualized by SEM and bacteria detected by culture was 82 %. Our findings suggest that bacterial biofilms are very common in CSOM and middle ear cholesteatomas. Positive bacterial cultures imply the presence of biofilm formation in CSOM and cholesteatomas. As such, our results provide new insights regarding treatment of chronic otitis media.

  18. Detection of infectious bursal disease virus isolates with unknown antigenic properties by reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Icard, Alan H; Sellers, Holly S; Mundt, Egbert

    2008-12-01

    Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) serotype 1 is the causative agent of a highly contagious immunosuppressive disease of young chickens. In the past, a number of antigenic, as well as pathogenic, subtypes have been described. The determination of the antigenic makeup of circulating strains is of vital interest to the poultry industry because changes in the antigenicity of circulating field strains have an impact on the use of vaccines. To obtain a more comprehensive overview of the relationship between the nucleotide and amino acid sequence and the antigenic makeup of field isolates, a system based on reverse genetics of IBDV was established. Using this approach, a database for field isolates from three different states in the United States (Georgia, Alabama, and Louisiana), consisting of nucleotide sequence, amino acid sequence, and a reaction pattern based on a panel of monoclonal antibodies, was established. The obtained results showed that phylogenic analysis, which is based on the similarity of sequences, would lead to false conclusions regarding a possible antigenic makeup of the particular isolate. Sequences of field samples were divided into three groups: 1) those that grouped with variant strain E/Del sequences but were antigenically different, 2) those that did not group with sequences of E/Del but were similar in their antigenic makeup, and 3) those that did not group with E/Del sequences and were antigenically different. In addition, using the reverse-genetics approach, a number of field isolates showed no reactivity with any of the used monoclonal antibodies, indicating that an unknown, antigenic subtype of IBDV serotype 1 is circulating in the field. PMID:19166049

  19. Comparison of counter immunoelectrophoresis with immunoblotting for detection of anti-extractable nuclear antigen antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Chan, E Y; Mok, T M; Lawton, J W; Ko, O K; Ho, L; Lau, C S

    1999-12-01

    Anti-extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) antibodies were assayed by counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) and immunoblotting in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We found the two methods showed good concordance rates, the lowest being 67% for anti-SS-A. Immunoblotting was more sensitive in detecting anti-Sm, anti-SS-B and anti-PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen); CIE was more sensitive for anti-nRNP and anti-SS-A. Overall, the prevalence of these anti-ENA antibodies in SLE was increased by 9-20% if immunoblotting was used in addition to CIE. Sera specific for the 52 kDa peptide of the SS-A antigen (anti-52kDa SS-A) were better detected by immunoblotting. Anti-PCNA antibody was found in 6.3% of SLE patients and was associated with active disease and hemolytic anemia. The positive rate of anti-Sm was 9% by CIE and 23.7% by immunoblotting and this antibody was a specific marker for SLE using either method. It was concluded that using immunoblotting in addition to CIE, the overall sensitivity of detection of anti-ENA antibodies in SLE was increased and clinically useful antibodies such as anti-52kDa SS-A and anti-PCNA could be detected.

  20. Fluorescent method for the detection of excreted ribonuclease around bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Lanyi, J K; Lederberg, J

    1966-11-01

    Lanyi, Janos K. (Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, Calif.), and Joshua Lederberg. Fluorescent method for the detection of excreted ribonuclease around bacterial colonies. J. Bacteriol. 92:1469-1472. 1966.-A test for the release of extracellular ribonuclease by Bacillus subtilis colonles was developed. The method consists of incorporating acridine orange and ribonucleic acid into nutrient agar plates and viewing the grown bacterial colonies under ultraviolet light. Regions of ribonuclease secretion appear as dark halos around the colonies on a green fluorescent background. The theoretical basis and the utility of this test are discussed.

  1. Measurement of serum carcinoembryonic antigen, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, cytokeratin-19 fragment and matrix metalloproteinase-7 for detecting cholangiocarcinoma: a preliminary case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Lo Re, Giovanni; Tozzoli, Renato; D'Aurizio, Federica; Facomer, Flavio; Chiara, Giordano B; Basso, Stefano M M

    2014-11-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a malignant tumor of the liver arising from the bile duct epithelium, accounting for 10-25% of all primary hepatic cancers. The clinical presentation of this tumor is not specific and the diagnosis of early cholangiocarcinoma is difficult, especially in patients with other biliary diseases. Measurement of serum carbohydrate antigen (CA) 19-9 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) are commonly used to monitor response to therapy, but are also useful for confirming the presence of a cholangiocarcinoma. In this setting, other biomarkers have been previously tested, including cytokeratin-19 fragment (CYFRA 21-1) and the matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP7). The purpose of this retrospective study was to determine the clinical usefulness of the assay of serum CEA, CA 19-9, CYFRA 21-1 and MMP7, individually and together, as tumor markers for the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma. Twenty-four patients (14 men, 10 women, 62.6±8.2 years of age) with histologically-confirmed cholangiocarcinoma (cases) and 25 age- and sex-matched patients with benign liver disease (controls) underwent measurement of these biomarkers. The mean values of all serum markers of patients with cholangiocarcinoma were significantly higher (p<0.01) than that of the controls. No correlation was found between serum tumor markers and total bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were: CEA: 52%, 55%, and 58%; CA 19-9: 74%, 82% and 78%; CYFRA 21-1: 76%, 79% and 78%; MMP7: 78%, 77% and 80%, respectively. The combination of all serum markers afforded 92.0% sensitivity and 96% specificity in detecting cholangiocarcinoma, showing the highest diagnostic accuracy (94%). In conclusion, our preliminary results suggest that the measurement of all four biomarkers together can help in the early detection of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:25368272

  2. Detection of Group A Streptococcus from Pharyngeal Swab Samples by Bacterial Culture Is Challenged by a Novel mariPOC Point-of-Care Test

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, Janne O.; Brandt, Annika; Muotiala, Anna; Liukko, Viivi; Soittu, Sari; Meriluoto, Siiri; Vesalainen, Marika; Huovinen, Pentti; Irjala, Kerttu

    2015-01-01

    mariPOC is a novel point-of-care test system for rapid detection of respiratory tract infections. We compared the performance of the mariPOC test to that of bacterial culture for detecting group A streptococcus (GAS) in 219 pharyngitis patients (ages 1–64 years) and 109 healthy asymptomatic controls (ages 19–69 years). In addition, 42 patient samples were analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Of the 219 pharyngeal patient samples, 32 were positive in a GAS bacterial culture (prevalence 15%) and 65 (30%) in the mariPOC test. The amount of GAS in samples reported positive by the mariPOC test and negative by culture was, on average, 10-fold less than that of those positive in both methods. This indicated that the negative results in bacterial cultures were due to lower sensitivity. The qPCR results were positive and in line with the mariPOC results in 43% of the discordant samples studied. Two GAS culture-positive samples were negative by the mariPOC test. The prevalences of GAS in the control subjects were 2% and 6% by culture and mariPOC results, respectively. We conclude that the mariPOC antigen detection test is more sensitive than the conventional bacterial culture for the detection of GAS among symptomatic pharyngitis patients. The higher prevalence of GAS by the mariPOC test among symptomatic patients was probably not due to carriership, since among the control patients, the difference in the prevalence of GAS by the mariPOC test and culture was not nearly as high, 15% versus 4%, respectively. Clinical trials are needed to show the clinical importance of our findings. PMID:25903570

  3. Standoff detection of explosives and buried landmines using fluorescent bacterial sensor cells.

    PubMed

    Kabessa, Yossef; Eyal, Ori; Bar-On, Ofer; Korouma, Victor; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Agranat, Aharon J

    2016-05-15

    A standoff detection scheme for buried landmines and concealed explosive charges is presented. The detection procedure consists of the following: Live bacterial sensor strains, genetically engineered to produce a dose-dependent amount of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of explosives' vapors, are encapsulated and spread on the suspected area. The fluorescence produced by the bacteria in response to traces of the explosive material in their microenvironment is remotely detected by a phase-locked optoelectronic sampling system. This scheme enables fast direct access to a large minefield area, while obviating the need to endanger personnel and equipment. Moreover, the employment of phase locking detection efficiently isolates the bacterial sensors' fluorescent output from the background optical signals. This facilitates the application of bacterial sensors in an outdoor environment, where control of background illumination is not possible. Using this system, we demonstrate standoff detection of 2,4-DNT both in aqueous solution and when buried in soil, by sensor bacteria either in liquid culture or agar-immobilized, respectively, at a distance of 50 m in a realistic optically noisy environment. PMID:26774094

  4. Assessing the Probability of Detection of Horizontal Gene Transfer Events in Bacterial Populations

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Jeffrey P.; Bøhn, Thomas; Nielsen, Kaare Magne

    2012-01-01

    Experimental approaches to identify horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events of non-mobile DNA in bacteria have typically relied on detection of the initial transformants or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to be detected in a short time frame. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacterial genotypes is therefore necessary to account for natural selection and genetic drift during the time lag and to predict realistic time frames for detection with a given sampling design. Here we draw on statistical approaches to population genetic theory to construct a cohesive probabilistic framework for investigation of HGT of exogenous DNA into bacteria. In particular, the stochastic timing of rare HGT events is accounted for. Integrating over all possible event timings, we provide an equation for the probability of detection, given that HGT actually occurred. Furthermore, we identify the key variables determining the probability of detecting HGT events in four different case scenarios that are representative of bacterial populations in various environments. Our theoretical analysis provides insight into the temporal aspects of dissemination of genetic material, such as antibiotic resistance genes or transgenes present in genetically modified organisms. Due to the long time scales involved and the exponential growth of bacteria with differing fitness, quantitative analyses incorporating bacterial generation time, and levels of selection, such as the one presented here, will be a necessary component of any future experimental design and analysis of HGT as it occurs in natural settings. PMID:22363321

  5. Standoff detection of explosives and buried landmines using fluorescent bacterial sensor cells.

    PubMed

    Kabessa, Yossef; Eyal, Ori; Bar-On, Ofer; Korouma, Victor; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Agranat, Aharon J

    2016-05-15

    A standoff detection scheme for buried landmines and concealed explosive charges is presented. The detection procedure consists of the following: Live bacterial sensor strains, genetically engineered to produce a dose-dependent amount of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of explosives' vapors, are encapsulated and spread on the suspected area. The fluorescence produced by the bacteria in response to traces of the explosive material in their microenvironment is remotely detected by a phase-locked optoelectronic sampling system. This scheme enables fast direct access to a large minefield area, while obviating the need to endanger personnel and equipment. Moreover, the employment of phase locking detection efficiently isolates the bacterial sensors' fluorescent output from the background optical signals. This facilitates the application of bacterial sensors in an outdoor environment, where control of background illumination is not possible. Using this system, we demonstrate standoff detection of 2,4-DNT both in aqueous solution and when buried in soil, by sensor bacteria either in liquid culture or agar-immobilized, respectively, at a distance of 50 m in a realistic optically noisy environment.

  6. Assessing the probability of detection of horizontal gene transfer events in bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Jeffrey P; Bøhn, Thomas; Nielsen, Kaare Magne

    2012-01-01

    Experimental approaches to identify horizontal gene transfer (HGT) events of non-mobile DNA in bacteria have typically relied on detection of the initial transformants or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to be detected in a short time frame. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacterial genotypes is therefore necessary to account for natural selection and genetic drift during the time lag and to predict realistic time frames for detection with a given sampling design. Here we draw on statistical approaches to population genetic theory to construct a cohesive probabilistic framework for investigation of HGT of exogenous DNA into bacteria. In particular, the stochastic timing of rare HGT events is accounted for. Integrating over all possible event timings, we provide an equation for the probability of detection, given that HGT actually occurred. Furthermore, we identify the key variables determining the probability of detecting HGT events in four different case scenarios that are representative of bacterial populations in various environments. Our theoretical analysis provides insight into the temporal aspects of dissemination of genetic material, such as antibiotic resistance genes or transgenes present in genetically modified organisms. Due to the long time scales involved and the exponential growth of bacteria with differing fitness, quantitative analyses incorporating bacterial generation time, and levels of selection, such as the one presented here, will be a necessary component of any future experimental design and analysis of HGT as it occurs in natural settings.

  7. Comparison of clinical performance of antigen based-enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and major outer membrane protein (MOMP)-PCR for detection of genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection

    PubMed Central

    Nateghi Rostami, Mahmoud; Hossein Rashidi, Batool; Aghsaghloo, Fatemeh; Nazari, Razieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen worldwide. Early detection and treatment of C.trachomatis genital infection prevent serious reproductive complications. Objective: Performances of enzyme immunoassay (EIA) and major outer membrane protein (MOMP)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis of genital C.trachomatis infection in women were compared. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study a total of 518 women volunteers were included (33.67±8.3 yrs) who had been referred to Gynecology clinics of Qom province, Iran, were included. Endocervical swab specimens were collected to detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) antigen in EIA and to amplify MOMP gene of C.trachomatis in PCR. Results were confirmed using ompI nested-PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPV) were calculated for performance of the tests. Odds ratios were determined using binary logistic regression analysis. Results: In total, 37 (7.14%) cases were positive by EIA and/or MOMP-PCR. All discrepant results were confirmed by nested-PCR. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV values of EIA were 59.46%, 100%, 100% and 96.98%, and those of MOMP-PCR were 97.30%, 100%, 100%, 99.79%, respectively. Reproductive complications including 2.7% ectopic pregnancy, 5.4% stillbirth, 5.4% infertility, and 10.8% PROM were recorded. The risk of developing chlamydiosis was increased 4.8-fold in volunteers with cervicitis (p<0.05; OR 4.80; 95% CI 1.25-18.48). Conclusion: C.trachomatis infection should be regarded in women of reproductive ages especially those with cervicitis. Primary screening of women by using the low cost antigen-EIA is recommended; however, due to the low sensitivity of Ag-EIA, verification of the negative results by a DNA amplification method is needed. PMID:27525325

  8. Detecting human bacterial pathogens in wastewater treatment plants by a high-throughput shotgun sequencing technique.

    PubMed

    Cai, Lin; Zhang, Tong

    2013-05-21

    Human pathogens are one of the major threats to global public health. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) serve as city guts to receive and digest various human pathogens. Several techniques have been developed to detect human pathogens in WWTPs and to assess potential environmental risks. In this study, we employed 24 metagenomic DNA data sets derived from a high-throughput shotgun sequencing technique to more accurately and efficiently detect human bacterial pathogens in influent, activated sludge, and effluent of two Hong Kong WWTPs. Each data set was quality-filtered and normalized to 12,500,000 DNA sequences with a length of 150-190 bp. Then, a BLASTN search against Greengenes general 16S rRNA gene database and human pathogenic bacteria 16S rRNA gene database, a BLASTX search against human pathogenic bacteria virulence factor database, as well as MetaPhlAn analysis were conducted to survey the distribution, diversity, and abundance of human bacterial pathogens. The results revealed that (i) nine bacterial pathogens were detected; (ii) the overall pathogenic bacteria abundance was estimated as 0.06-3.20% in the total bacteria population using 16S rRNA gene fingerprinting; (iii) pathogenic bacteria detected in activated sludge and effluent shared similar profiles but were different from influent based on both 16S rRNA gene and virulence factor fingerprintings; (iv) Mycobacterium tuberculosis -like species may present potential pathogenic risks because it was detected with high abundance in both activated sludge and effluent. These findings provided a comprehensive profile of commonly concerned human pathogens in two Hong Kong WWTPs and demonstrated that the high-throughput shotgun sequencing technique is a feasible and effectual approach for environmental detection of human bacterial pathogens.

  9. Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Wolters, Tineke; Savage, Caroline J.; Cronin, Angel M.; O’Brien, M. Frank; Pettersson, Kim; Roobol, Monique J.; Aus, Gunnar; Scardino, Peter T.; Hugosson, Jonas; Schröder, Fritz H.; Lilja, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that changes in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) over time (ie, PSA velocity [PSAV]) aid prostate cancer detection. Some guidelines do incorporate PSAV cut points as an indication for biopsy. Objective To evaluate whether PSAV enhances prediction of biopsy outcome in a large, representative, population-based cohort. Design, setting, and participants There were 2742 screening-arm participants with PSA <3 ng/ml at initial screening in the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer in Rotterdam, Netherlands, or Göteborg, Sweden, and who were subsequently biopsied during rounds 2[en]6 due to elevated PSA. Measurements Total, free, and intact PSA and human kallikrein 2 were measured for 1[en]6 screening rounds at intervals of 2 or 4 yr. We created logistic regression models to predict prostate cancer based on age and PSA, with or without free-to-total PSA ratio (%fPSA). PSAV was added to each model and any enhancement in predictive accuracy assessed by area under the curve (AUC). Results and limitations PSAV led to small enhancements in predictive accuracy (AUC of 0.569 vs 0.531; 0.626 vs 0.609 if %fPSA was included), although not for high-grade disease. The enhancement depended on modeling a nonlinear relationship between PSAV and cancer. There was no benefit if we excluded men with higher velocities, which were associated with lower risk. These results apply to men in a screening program with elevated PSA; men with prior negative biopsy were not evaluated in this study. Conclusions In men with PSA of about ≥3 ng/ml, we found little justification for formal calculation of PSAV or for use of PSAV cut points to determine biopsy. Informal assessment of PSAV will likely aid clinical judgment, such as a sudden rise in PSA suggesting prostatitis, which could be further evaluated before biopsy. PMID:19682790

  10. Detection of Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Associated Antigen-4 Gene Polymorphism in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Arafa, Roshdan M; Desouky, Somaya M; Emam, Sherin M; Abed, Neveen Tawfik; Mohamed, Sahar Y

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is one of the most common chronic childhood illnesses. Interplay between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors is thought to provide the fundamental element for the disease. It has been shown that more than 40 genetic loci are associated with T1DM. Important one among these is the CTLA-4. This work aimed to detect Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) gene polymorphism in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus T1DM using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to clarify its role in the susceptibility to T1DM. The study was carried out on forty unrelated Egyptian children with TIDM. Twenty unrelated healthy children were enrolled as a control group. Blood samples were collected from patients and control groups and subjected to CTLA-4 gene polymorphism analysis using polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). CTLA-4 G allele and GG homozygous genotype were significantly increased in T1DM patients than in control group (P < 0.001, P = 0.002 respectively). There was significant association between the three CTLA-4 genotypes (AA, AG, GG) and diabetic complications (p = 0.002), AG and GG polymorphisms were associated with complications of diabetes with ratio 84.6% and 100% respectively. While no association was found with sex, weight, height, risk factors of diabetes or insulin treatment. It was concluded that there is a strong association between AG polymorphism and T1DM (P = 0.002). PMID:26415372

  11. Engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae: revealing distinct processes of bacterial entry by individual carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule family receptors.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Shannon E; Liao, Edward H; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2004-05-01

    Individual Neisseria gonorrhoeae colony opacity-associated (Opa) protein variants can bind up to four different carcinoembryonic antigen-related cellular adhesion molecule (CEACAM) receptors. Most human cells encountered by gonococci express a combination of CEACAM receptors, thereby complicating the elucidation of intracellular signaling pathways triggered by individual receptors. Here, we compare the process of bacterial engulfment by a panel of stably transfected HeLa epithelial cell lines expressing each CEACAM receptor in isolation. CEACAM1 and CEACAM3 each contain proteinaceous transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains; however, the processes of neisserial uptake mediated by these receptors differ with respect to their susceptibilities to both tyrosine kinase inhibitors and the actin microfilament-disrupting agent cytochalasin D. Neisserial uptake mediated by glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored CEACAM5 and CEACAM6 was not significantly affected by any of a broad spectrum of inhibitors tested. However, cleavage of the GPI anchor by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C reduced bacterial uptake by HeLa cells expressing CEACAM5, consistent with a single zipper-like mechanism of uptake mediated by this receptor. Regardless of the CEACAM receptor expressed, internalized gonococci were effectively killed by a microtubule-dependent process that required acidification of the bacterium-containing phagosome. Given the phase-variable nature of neisserial Opa proteins, these results indicate that the mechanism of bacterial engulfment and the cellular response to gonococcal infection depend on both the receptor specificities of the neisserial Opa protein variants expressed and the spectrum of CEACAM receptors present on target cells, each of which determines the combination of receptors ultimately engaged. PMID:15102784

  12. Protein antigens of Chlamydia psittaci present in infected cells but not detected in the infectious elementary body.

    PubMed

    Rockey, D D; Rosquist, J L

    1994-01-01

    Ocular infection of guinea pigs with the guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) strain of Chlamydia psittaci produces a clinical condition representative of acute chlamydial conjunctivitis in humans. Guinea pigs which had recovered from two challenges with GPIC were used as a source of sera for the identification of antigens present in GPIC-infected tissue culture cells but absent in the infectious elementary body (EB). Immunoblots of lysates of infected HeLa cells probed with the convalescent-phase sera identified protein antigens of 22, 34, and 52 kDa (p22, p34, and p52, respectively) that were not detected in lysates of purified EB or in uninfected HeLa cells. Protein p22 was also not detected in lysates of purified reticulate bodies. Immunoblotting of lysates of HeLa cells infected with other chlamydiae demonstrated that the antigenicity of p22 and p34 was subspecies specific. Immunoblotting was also used to detect p22 and p34 in lysates of the conjunctivae of infected guinea pigs. Adsorption of convalescent-phase sera with GPIC EB produced a reagent with dominant reactivity toward p22, p34, and a 28-kDa EB protein. Immunofluorescent staining of GPIC-infected HeLa cells demonstrated that these adsorbed sera labeled the inclusion and inclusion membrane, with no apparent reactivity toward EB or reticulate bodies. Collectively, these data identify non-EB chlamydial components which may be released into the inclusion during intracellular growth.

  13. Ratiometric luminescent detection of bacterial spores with terbium chelated semiconducting polymer dots.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Sun, Kai; Chang, Kaiwen; Yu, Jiangbo; Chiu, Daniel T; Wu, Changfeng; Qin, Weiping

    2013-10-01

    We report a ratiometric fluorescent sensor based on semiconducting polymer dots chelated with terbium ions to detect bacterial spores in aqueous solution. Fluorescent polyfluorene (PFO) dots serve as a scaffold to coordinate with lanthanide ions that can be sensitized by calcium dipicolinate (CaDPA), an important biomarker of bacterial spores. The absorption band of PFO dots extends to deep UV region, allowing both the reference and the sensitizer can be excited with a single wavelength (~275 nm). The fluorescence of PFO remains constant as a reference, while the Tb(3+) ions exhibit enhanced luminescence upon binding with DPA. The sharp fluorescence peaks of β-phase PFO dots and the narrow-band emissions of Tb(3+) ions enable ratiometric and sensitive CaDPA detection with a linear response over nanomolar concentration and a detection limit of ~0.2 nM. The Pdots based sensor also show excellent selectivity to CaDPA over other aromatic ligands. Our results indicate that the Tb(3+) chelated Pdots sensor is promising for sensitive and rapid detection of bacterial spores.

  14. Generation of novel bacterial regulatory proteins that detect priority pollutant phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, A.A.; Kuske, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    The genetic systems of bacteria that have the ability to use organic pollutants as carbon and energy sources can be adapted to create bacterial biosensors for the detection of industrial pollution. The creation of bacterial biosensors is hampered by a lack of information about the genetic systems that control production of bacterial enzymes that metabolize pollutants. The authors have attempted to overcome this problem through modification of DmpR, a regulatory protein for the phenol degradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain CF600. The phenol detection capacity of DmpR was altered by using mutagenic PCR targeted to the DmpR sensor domain. DmpR mutants were identified that both increased sensitivity to the phenolic effectors of wild-type DmpR and increased the range of molecules detected. The phenol detection characteristics of seven DmpR mutants were demonstrated through their ability to activate transcription of a lacZ reporter gene. Effectors of the DmpR derivatives included phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2-nitrophenol, and 4-nitrophenol.

  15. Electrochemical Biosensor for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Magnetically Extracted Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Setterington, Emma B.; Alocilja, Evangelyn C.

    2012-01-01

    Biological defense and security applications demand rapid, sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens. This work presents a novel qualitative electrochemical detection technique which is applied to two representative bacterial pathogens, Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) and Escherichia coli O157:H7, resulting in detection limits of 40 CFU/mL and 6 CFU/mL, respectively, from pure culture. Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results. An immunofunctionalized magnetic/polyaniline core/shell nano-particle (c/sNP) is employed to extract target cells from the sample solution and magnetically position them on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) sensor. The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE. This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens. PMID:25585629

  16. The Pan Genera Detection immunoassay: a novel point-of-issue method for detection of bacterial contamination in platelet concentrates.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Tanja; Hinse, Dennis; Kleesiek, Knut; Dreier, Jens

    2010-10-01

    Bacterial contamination of platelet concentrates (PCs) still represents an ongoing risk in transfusion-transmitted sepsis. Recently the Pan Genera Detection (PGD) system was developed and FDA licensed for screening of bacterial contamination of PCs directly prior to transfusion. The test principle is based on the immunological detection of lipopolysaccharide (for Gram-negative bacteria) or lipoteichoic acid (for Gram-positive bacteria). In the present study we analyzed the applicability of this method with regard to detection limit, practicability, implementation, and performance. PCs were spiked with Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and five different Klebsiella pneumoniae strains, as well as eight different Escherichia coli strains. The presence of bacteria was assessed by the PGD immunoassay, and bacteria were enumerated by plating cultures. Application of the PGD immunoassay showed that it is a rapid test with a short hands-on time for sample processing and no demand for special technical equipment and instrument operation. The lower detection limits of the assay for Gram-positive bacteria showed a good agreement with the manufacturer's specifications (8.2 × 10(3) to 5.5 × 10(4) CFU/ml). For some strains of K. pneumoniae and E. coli, the PGD test showed analytical sensitivities (>10(6) CFU/ml) that were divergent from the designated values (K. pneumoniae, 2.0 × 10(4) CFU/ml; E. coli, 2.8 × 10(4) CFU/ml). Result interpretation is sometimes difficult due to very faint bands. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the PGD immunoassay is an easy-to-perform bedside test for the detection of bacterial contamination in PCs. However, to date there are some shortcomings in the interpretation of results and in the detection limits for some strains of Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:20702673

  17. Comparison of nine antigen detection kits for diagnosis of urogenital infections due to Chlamydia psittaci in koalas.

    PubMed

    Wood, M M; Timms, P

    1992-12-01

    Chlamydia psittaci is the major cause of infectious disease in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). It causes four disease syndromes in the koala, namely, conjunctivitis, rhinitis, cystitis, and infertility (females only). Diagnosis of chlamydial infections in koalas relies primarily on isolation of the organism in cell culture. Serology has generally not been useful, and little use has previously been made of the commercially available antigen detection kits. We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and usefulness of three direct fluorescent-antibody kits (Vet-IF [Cell Labs], IMAGEN [Celltech], Chlamydia-Direct IF [Bio Merieux]) and six antigen detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits (Clearview [Unipath], Surecell [Kodak], Pathfinder [Kallestad], Chlamydia-EIA [Pharmacia], Chlamydiazyme [Abbott], IDEIA [Celltech]) for the detection of urogenital infections in koalas. Laboratory studies showed that the direct fluorescent-antibody kits were the least sensitive in this case and did not detect fewer than 10(4) elementary bodies per ml, while most ELISA kits detected between 130 and 600 elementary bodies per ml. Field study results showed that the Clearview kit was the most sensitive (91%) compared with the IDEIA (88%) and the Surecell (73%) kits. All three kits were more sensitive than cell culture (36%), highlighting viability loss problems that occur during transport. This study showed that the Clearview kit is sensitive, specific, and easy to use for the detection of type II (urogenital) C. psittaci from koalas in the field and warrants further evaluation. PMID:1452703

  18. Comparison of nine antigen detection kits for diagnosis of urogenital infections due to Chlamydia psittaci in koalas.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, M M; Timms, P

    1992-01-01

    Chlamydia psittaci is the major cause of infectious disease in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus). It causes four disease syndromes in the koala, namely, conjunctivitis, rhinitis, cystitis, and infertility (females only). Diagnosis of chlamydial infections in koalas relies primarily on isolation of the organism in cell culture. Serology has generally not been useful, and little use has previously been made of the commercially available antigen detection kits. We examined the sensitivity, specificity, and usefulness of three direct fluorescent-antibody kits (Vet-IF [Cell Labs], IMAGEN [Celltech], Chlamydia-Direct IF [Bio Merieux]) and six antigen detection enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits (Clearview [Unipath], Surecell [Kodak], Pathfinder [Kallestad], Chlamydia-EIA [Pharmacia], Chlamydiazyme [Abbott], IDEIA [Celltech]) for the detection of urogenital infections in koalas. Laboratory studies showed that the direct fluorescent-antibody kits were the least sensitive in this case and did not detect fewer than 10(4) elementary bodies per ml, while most ELISA kits detected between 130 and 600 elementary bodies per ml. Field study results showed that the Clearview kit was the most sensitive (91%) compared with the IDEIA (88%) and the Surecell (73%) kits. All three kits were more sensitive than cell culture (36%), highlighting viability loss problems that occur during transport. This study showed that the Clearview kit is sensitive, specific, and easy to use for the detection of type II (urogenital) C. psittaci from koalas in the field and warrants further evaluation. PMID:1452703

  19. Evaluation of bacterial aerotaxis for its potential use in detecting the toxicity of chemicals to microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Shitashiro, Maiko; Kato, Junichi; Fukumura, Tsuyoshi; Kuroda, Akio; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao

    2003-02-27

    Bacterial aerotaxis (the movement of a cell toward oxygen) was evaluated for its potential use in detecting the toxicity of chemicals to microorganisms. The level of toxicity was determined by the concentration of test chemicals resulting in a 50% inhibition of aerotaxis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 after 40 min of exposure. The aerotactic responses of P. aeruginosa were measured by using chemotaxis well chambers. Each clear acrylic chamber had a lower and upper well separated by a polycarbonate filter with a uniform pore size of 8.0 microm. To automatically detect bacterial cells that crossed the filter in response to a gradient of oxygen, P. aeruginosa PAO1 was marked with green fluorescent protein (GFP), and the GFP fluorescence intensity in the upper well was continuously monitored by using a fluorescence spectrometer. By using this technique, volatile chlorinated aliphatic compounds, including trichloroethylene (TCE), trichloroethane, and tetrachloroethylene, were found to be inhibitory to bacterial aerotaxis, suggesting their possible toxicity to microorganisms. We also examined more than 20 potential toxicants for their ability to inhibit the aerotaxis of P. aeruginosa. Based on these experimental results, we concluded that bacterial aerotaxis has potential for use as a fast and reliable indicator in assessing the toxicity of chemicals to microorganisms.

  20. Preparation of respiratory syncytial virus subgroup A and B antigens for enzyme immunoassay antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Mlinarić-Galinović, G; Chonmaintree, T; Abraham, R; Garofalo, R; Patel, J A; Ogra, P L

    1994-01-01

    A simplified method was described for purification of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) subgroup A and B aimed to be used as antigens in enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The titer of each RSV subgroup and the amount of protein was determined from the visible band in 45% sucrose gradient. The quality of prepared RSV subgroup antigens for EIA was described in terms of the achievable final titer, the amount of protein, and EIA criss-cross titration. The RSV subgroup A and B antigens, diluted as 1:100 (low opalescent band in 45% sucrose layer) or 1:800 (high opalescent band in 45% sucrose layer) produced a positive reaction in EIA criss-cross titration with IgG antibodies from the patient's serum (convalescent phase) diluted as 1:25,600 (for RSV A) and 1:6,400 (for RSV B). This method offers shorter and more simplified steps of viral antigen purification, and provides acceptable quantity and quality of viral antigens appropriate for use in EIA.

  1. Simple Objective Detection of Human Lyme Disease Infection Using Immuno-PCR and a Single Recombinant Hybrid Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Halpern, Micah D.; Molins, Claudia R.; Schriefer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    A serology-based tiered approach has, to date, provided the most effective means of laboratory confirmation of clinically suspected cases of Lyme disease, but it lacks sensitivity in the early stages of disease and is often dependent on subjectively scored immunoblots. We recently demonstrated the use of immuno-PCR (iPCR) for detecting Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in patient serum samples that were positive for Lyme disease. To better understand the performance of the Lyme disease iPCR assay, the repeatability and variability of the background of the assay across samples from a healthy population (n = 36) were analyzed. Both of these parameters were found to have coefficients of variation of <3%. Using eight antigen-specific iPCR assays and positive call thresholds established for each assay, iPCR IgM and/or IgG diagnosis from Lyme disease patient serum samples (n = 12) demonstrated a strong correlation with that of 2-tier testing. Furthermore, a simplified iPCR approach using a single hybrid antigen and detecting only IgG antibodies confirmed the 2-tier diagnosis in the Lyme disease patient serum samples (n = 12). Validation of the hybrid antigen IgG iPCR assay using a blinded panel of Lyme disease and non-Lyme disease patient serum samples (n = 92) resulted in a sensitivity of 69% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50% to 84%), compared to that of the 2-tier analysis at 59% (95% CI, 41% to 76%), and a specificity of 98% (95% CI, 91% to 100%) compared to that of the 2-tier analysis at 97% (95% CI, 88% to 100%). A single-tier hybrid antigen iPCR assay has the potential to be an improved method for detecting host-generated antibodies against B. burgdorferi. PMID:24899074

  2. Simple objective detection of human lyme disease infection using immuno-PCR and a single recombinant hybrid antigen.

    PubMed

    Halpern, Micah D; Molins, Claudia R; Schriefer, Martin; Jewett, Mollie W

    2014-08-01

    A serology-based tiered approach has, to date, provided the most effective means of laboratory confirmation of clinically suspected cases of Lyme disease, but it lacks sensitivity in the early stages of disease and is often dependent on subjectively scored immunoblots. We recently demonstrated the use of immuno-PCR (iPCR) for detecting Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies in patient serum samples that were positive for Lyme disease. To better understand the performance of the Lyme disease iPCR assay, the repeatability and variability of the background of the assay across samples from a healthy population (n = 36) were analyzed. Both of these parameters were found to have coefficients of variation of <3%. Using eight antigen-specific iPCR assays and positive call thresholds established for each assay, iPCR IgM and/or IgG diagnosis from Lyme disease patient serum samples (n = 12) demonstrated a strong correlation with that of 2-tier testing. Furthermore, a simplified iPCR approach using a single hybrid antigen and detecting only IgG antibodies confirmed the 2-tier diagnosis in the Lyme disease patient serum samples (n = 12). Validation of the hybrid antigen IgG iPCR assay using a blinded panel of Lyme disease and non-Lyme disease patient serum samples (n = 92) resulted in a sensitivity of 69% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50% to 84%), compared to that of the 2-tier analysis at 59% (95% CI, 41% to 76%), and a specificity of 98% (95% CI, 91% to 100%) compared to that of the 2-tier analysis at 97% (95% CI, 88% to 100%). A single-tier hybrid antigen iPCR assay has the potential to be an improved method for detecting host-generated antibodies against B. burgdorferi.

  3. Impact of rapid antigen detection testing on antibiotic prescription in acute pharyngitis in adults. FARINGOCAT STUDY: a multicentric randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acute pharyngitis is one of the most frequent consultations to the general practitioner and in most of the cases an antibiotic is prescribed in primary care in Spain. Bacterial etiology, mainly by group A beta-hemolytic streptococcus (GABHS), accounts for 10-20% of all these infections in adults. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of rapid antigen detection testing (RADT) to identify GABHS in acute pharyngitis on the utilization of antibiotics in primary care. Methods/design Multicentric randomized controlled trial in which antibiotic prescription between two groups of patients with acute pharyngitis will be compared. The trial will include two arms, a control and an intervention group in which RADT will be performed. The primary outcome measure will be the proportion of inappropriate antibiotic prescription in each group. Two hundred seventy-six patients are required to detect a reduction in antibiotic prescription from 85% in the control group to 75% in the intervention group with a power of 90% and a level of significance of 5%. Secondary outcome measures will be specific antibiotic treatment, antibiotic resistance rates, secondary effects, days without working, medical visits during the first month and patient satisfaction. Discussion The implementation of RADT would allow a more rational use of antibiotics and would prevent adverse effects of antibiotics, emergence of antibiotic resistance and the growth of inefficient health expenses. Trial registration ISRCTN23587778 PMID:20331895

  4. Immunofluorescence detection of new antigen-antibody system (delta/anti-delta) associated to hepatitis B virus in liver and in serum of HBsAg carriers.

    PubMed Central

    Rizzetto, M; Canese, M G; Aricò, S; Crivelli, O; Trepo, C; Bonino, F; Verme, G

    1977-01-01

    A new antigen-antibody system associated with the hepatitis B virus and immunologically distinct from the HB surface, core, and e systems is reported. The new antigen, termed delta, was detected by direct immunofluorescence only in the liver cell nuclei of patients with HBsAg positive chronic liver disease. At present, the intrahepatic expression of HBcAg and delta antigen appears to be mutually exclusive. No ultrastructural aspect corresponding to the delta antigen could be identified under the electron microscope. delta antibody was found in the serum of chronic HBsAg carriers, with a higher prevalence in patients with liver damage. The nuclear fluorescence patterns of HBcAg and delta antigen were similar; it is only possible to discriminate between the two antigens by using the respective specific antisera. Images Figure PMID:75123

  5. Development of a set of bacterial biosensors for simultaneously detecting arsenic and mercury in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Wei; Yang, Shih-Hung; Sun, Man-Wai; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan

    2015-07-01

    There is a growing need for effective and inexpensive environmental monitoring strategies for assessing heavy metal contamination levels. We developed a set of bacterial biosensors to simultaneously detect multiple bioavailable heavy metals (As(III) and Hg(II)). The biosensors provide a choice of the two reporter systems, luxCDABE and gfp, combined with metal responsive regulatory elements (ars and mer for As(III) and Hg(II), respectively). The results showed that the induction of the luxCDABE-based constructs was more sensitive than that of the gfp-based constructs for the detection of As(III) and Hg(II). In addition, both the luminescent and fluorescent biosensors readily distinguished As and Hg concentrations in groundwater samples to meet the groundwater quality standards. Due to the potentially complicated chemicals present in environmental samples, using a set of bacterial biosensors with different reporter genes to simultaneously determine the bioavailable proportions of heavy metals is desirable.

  6. gfp-based N-acyl homoserine-lactone sensor systems for detection of bacterial communication.

    PubMed

    Andersen, J B; Heydorn, A; Hentzer, M; Eberl, L; Geisenberger, O; Christensen, B B; Molin, S; Givskov, M

    2001-02-01

    In order to perform single-cell analysis and online studies of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated communication among bacteria, components of the Vibrio fischeri quorum sensor encoded by luxR-P(luxI) have been fused to modified versions of gfpmut3* genes encoding unstable green fluorescent proteins. Bacterial strains harboring this green fluorescent sensor detected a broad spectrum of AHL molecules and were capable of sensing the presence of 5 nM N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone in the surroundings. In combination with epifluorescent microscopy, the sensitivity of the sensor enabled AHL detection at the single-cell level and allowed for real-time measurements of fluctuations in AHL concentrations. This green fluorescent AHL sensor provides a state-of-the-art tool for studies of communication between the individuals present in mixed bacterial communities.

  7. Nile Red Detection of Bacterial Hydrocarbons and Ketones in a High-Throughput Format

    SciTech Connect

    Pinzon, NM; Aukema, KG; Gralnick, JA; Wackett, LP

    2011-06-28

    A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones. IMPORTANCE In recent years, there has been renewed interest in advanced biofuel sources such as bacterial hydrocarbon production. Previous studies used solvent extraction of bacterial cultures followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and quantify ketones and hydrocarbons (Beller HR, Goh EB, Keasling JD, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 1212-1223, 2010; Sukovich DJ, Seffernick JL, Richman JE, Gralnick JA, Wackett LP, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 76: 3850-3862, 2010). While these analyses are powerful and accurate, their labor-intensive nature makes them intractable to high-throughput screening; therefore, methods for rapid identification of bacterial strains that are overproducing hydrocarbons are needed. The use of high

  8. Detection and identification of bacterial DNA in patients with cirrhosis and culture-negative, nonneutrocytic ascites.

    PubMed

    Such, José; Francés, Rubén; Muñoz, Carlos; Zapater, Pedro; Casellas, Juan A; Cifuentes, Ana; Rodríguez-Valera, Francisco; Pascual, Sonia; Sola-Vera, Javier; Carnicer, Fernando; Uceda, Francisco; Palazón, José M; Pérez-Mateo, Miguel

    2002-07-01

    The current pathogenic theory of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in patients with cirrhosis and ascites suggests that repeated episodes of bacterial translocation (BT) from intestinal lumen to mesenteric lymph nodes followed by systemic seeding are the key steps for the final development of infectious events. However, most of the episodes of systemic bacterial circulation remain undetected. Therefore, we investigated the hypothetical presence of bacteria in blood and/or ascitic fluid (AF) from patients with cirrhosis and sterile (culture negative) AF by means of bacterial DNA (bactDNA) detection and identification. Twenty-eight consecutively admitted patients with cirrhosis and presence of AF were included in the study. BactDNA was detected using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method. The corresponding bacteria were identified by nucleotide sequencing of purified PCR products. BactDNA was detected simultaneously in blood and AF in 9 patients (32.1%). DNA sequencing allowed the identification of Escherichia coli (n = 7) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 2). In all cases, the similarity between the sequence found in AF and blood indicated that the bactDNA present in both locations originated from a single clone (single translocation event). Child-Pugh score and basic hemodynamic, clinical, endoscopic, and biochemical characteristics were similar among patients with or without the presence of bactDNA. In conclusion, we have detected bactDNA in serum and AF in 32% of all patients studied, and this likely represents single clone episodes of translocation and systemic seeding. E. coli is the most frequently identified bacteria.

  9. Development of a multi-epitope antigen of S protein-based ELISA for antibodies detection against infectious bronchitis virus.

    PubMed

    Ding, Meng-Die; Wang, Hong-Ning; Cao, Hai-Peng; Fan, Wen-Qiao; Ma, Bing-Cun; Xu, Peng-Wei; Zhang, An-Yun; Yang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method based on a novel multi-epitope antigen of S protein (SE) was developed for antibodies detection against infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). The multi-epitope antigen SE protein was designed by arranging three S gene fragments (166-247 aa, S1 gene; 501-515 aa, S1 gene; 8-30 aa, S2 gene) in tandem. It was identified to be approximately 32 kDa as a His-tagged fusion protein and can bind IBV positive serum by western blot analysis. The conditions of the SE-ELISA method were optimized. The optimal concentration of the coating antigen SE was 3.689 μg/mL and the dilution of the primary antibodies was identified as 1:1000 using a checkerboard titration. The cut-off OD450 value was established at 0.332. The relative sensitivity and specificity between the SE-ELISA and IDEXX ELISA kit were 92.38 and 89.83%, respectively, with an accuracy of 91.46%. This assay is sensitive and specific for detection of antibodies against IBV.

  10. Standardization of natural mycolic acid antigen composition and production for use in biomarker antibody detection to diagnose active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ndlandla, F L; Ejoh, V; Stoltz, A C; Naicker, B; Cromarty, A D; van Wyngaardt, S; Khati, M; Rotherham, L S; Lemmer, Y; Niebuhr, J; Baumeister, C R; Al Dulayymi, J R; Swai, H; Baird, M S; Verschoor, J A

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is characterized by the abundance of species specific, antigenic cell wall lipids called mycolic acids. These wax-like molecules all share an identical, amphiphilic mycolic motif, but have different functional groups in a long hydrophobic hydrocarbon mero-chain that divide them into three main classes: alpha-, keto- and methoxy-mycolic acids. Whereas alpha-mycolic acids constitutively maintain an abundance of around 50%, the ratio of methoxy- to keto-mycolic acid types may vary depending on, among other things, the growth stage of M. tuberculosis. In human patients, antibodies to mycolic acids have shown potential as diagnostic serum biomarkers for active TB. Variations in mycolic acid composition affect the antigenic properties and can potentially compromise the precision of detection of anti-mycolic acids antibodies in patient sera to natural mixtures. We demonstrate this here with combinations of synthetic mycolic acid antigens, tested against TB patient and control sera. Combinations of methoxy- and α-mycolic acids are more antigenic than combinations of keto- and α-mycolic acids, showing the former to give a more sensitive test for TB biomarker antibodies. Natural mixtures of mycolic acids isolated from mature cultures of M. tuberculosis H37Rv give the same sensitivity as that with synthetic methoxy- and α-mycolic acids in combination, in a surface plasmon resonance inhibition biosensor test. To ensure that the antigenic activity of isolates of natural mycolic acids is reproducible, we cultured M. tuberculosis H37Rv on Middlebrook 7H10 solid agar plates to stationary growth phase in a standardized, optimal way. The proportions of mycolic acid classes in various batches of the isolates prepared from these cultures were compared to a commercially available natural mycolic acid isolate. LC-MS/MS and NMR data for quantitation of mycolic acids class compositions show that the variation in batches

  11. Oriented Immobilization of Fab Fragments by Site-Specific Biotinylation at the Conserved Nucleotide Binding Site for Enhanced Antigen Detection.

    PubMed

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-09-01

    Oriented immobilization of antibodies and antibody fragments has become increasingly important as a result of the efforts to reduce the size of diagnostic and sensor devices to miniaturized dimensions for improved accessibility to the end-user. Reduced dimensions of sensor devices necessitate the immobilized antibodies to conserve their antigen binding activity for proper operation. Fab fragments are becoming more commonly used in small-scaled diagnostic devices due to their small size and ease of manufacture. In this study, we used the previously described UV-NBS(Biotin) method to functionalize Fab fragments with IBA-EG11-Biotin linker utilizing UV energy to initiate a photo-cross-linking reaction between the nucleotide binding site (NBS) on the Fab fragment and IBA-Biotin molecule. Our results demonstrate that immobilization of biotinylated Fab fragments via UV-NBS(Biotin) method generated the highest level of immobilized Fab on surfaces when compared to other typical immobilization methods while preserving antigen binding activity. UV-NBS(Biotin) method provided 432-fold, 114-fold, and 29-fold improved antigen detection sensitivity than physical adsorption, NHS-Biotin, and ε-NH3(+), methods, respectively. Additionally, the limit of detection (LOD) for PSA utilizing Fab fragments immobilized via UV-NBS(Biotin) method was significantly lower than that of the other immobilization methods, with an LOD of 0.4 pM PSA. In summary, site-specific biotinylation of Fab fragments without structural damage or loss in antigen binding activity provides a wide range of application potential for UV-NBS immobilization technique across numerous diagnostic devices and nanotechnologies.

  12. Entamoeba histolytica antigenic protein detected in pus aspirates from patients with amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Othman, Nurulhasanah; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Yahya, Maya Mazuwin; Leow, Voon Meng; Lim, Boon Huat; Noordin, Rahmah

    2013-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a causative agent of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) and is endemic in many underdeveloped countries. We investigated antigenic E. histolytica proteins in liver abscess aspirates using proteomics approach. Pus samples were first tested by real-time PCR to confirm the presence of E. histolytica DNA and the corresponding serum samples tested for E. histolytica-specific IgG by a commercial ELISA. Proteins were extracted from three and one pool(s) of pus samples from ALA and PLA (pyogenic liver abscess) patients respectively, followed by analysis using isoelectric focussing, SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Unpurified pooled serum samples from infected hamsters and pooled human amoebic-specific IgG were used as primary antibodies. The antigenic protein band was excised from the gel, digested and analysed by MALDI-TOF/TOF and LC-MS/MS. The results using both primary antibodies showed an antigenic protein band of ∼14kDa. Based on the mass spectrum analysis, putative tyrosine kinase is the most probable identification of the antigenic band. PMID:23680184

  13. Entamoeba histolytica antigenic protein detected in pus aspirates from patients with amoebic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Othman, Nurulhasanah; Mohamed, Zeehaida; Yahya, Maya Mazuwin; Leow, Voon Meng; Lim, Boon Huat; Noordin, Rahmah

    2013-08-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a causative agent of amoebic liver abscess (ALA) and is endemic in many underdeveloped countries. We investigated antigenic E. histolytica proteins in liver abscess aspirates using proteomics approach. Pus samples were first tested by real-time PCR to confirm the presence of E. histolytica DNA and the corresponding serum samples tested for E. histolytica-specific IgG by a commercial ELISA. Proteins were extracted from three and one pool(s) of pus samples from ALA and PLA (pyogenic liver abscess) patients respectively, followed by analysis using isoelectric focussing, SDS-PAGE and Western blot. Unpurified pooled serum samples from infected hamsters and pooled human amoebic-specific IgG were used as primary antibodies. The antigenic protein band was excised from the gel, digested and analysed by MALDI-TOF/TOF and LC-MS/MS. The results using both primary antibodies showed an antigenic protein band of ∼14kDa. Based on the mass spectrum analysis, putative tyrosine kinase is the most probable identification of the antigenic band.

  14. Application of photostable quantum dots for indirect immunofluorescent detection of specific bacterial serotypes on small marine animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decho, Alan W.; Beckman, Erin M.; Chandler, G. Thomas; Kawaguchi, Tomohiro

    2008-06-01

    An indirect immunofluorescence approach was developed using semiconductor quantum dot nanocrystals to label and detect a specific bacterial serotype of the bacterial human pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus, attached to small marine animals (i.e. benthic harpacticoid copepods), which are suspected pathogen carriers. This photostable labeling method using nanotechnology will potentially allow specific serotypes of other bacterial pathogens to be detected with high sensitivity in a range of systems, and can be easily applied for sensitive detection to other Vibrio species such as Vibrio cholerae.

  15. Single-molecule detection of proteins with antigen-antibody interaction using resistive-pulse sensing of submicron latex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakura, T.; Yanagi, I.; Goto, Y.; Ishige, Y.; Kohara, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We developed a resistive-pulse sensor with a solid-state pore and measured the latex agglutination of submicron particles induced by antigen-antibody interaction for single-molecule detection of proteins. We fabricated the pore based on numerical simulation to clearly distinguish between monomer and dimer latex particles. By measuring single dimers agglutinated in the single-molecule regime, we detected single human alpha-fetoprotein molecules. Adjusting the initial particle concentration improves the limit of detection (LOD) to 95 fmol/l. We established a theoretical model of the LOD by combining the reaction kinetics and the counting statistics to explain the effect of initial particle concentration on the LOD. The theoretical model shows how to improve the LOD quantitatively. The single-molecule detection studied here indicates the feasibility of implementing a highly sensitive immunoassay by a simple measurement method using resistive-pulse sensing.

  16. A prospective field evaluation of an enzyme immunoassay: Detection of eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus antigen in pools of Culiseta melanura

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, T.W.; Olson, J.G.; Lewis, T.E.; Carpenter, J.W.; Lorenz, L.H.; Lembeck, L.A.; Joseph, S.R.; Pagac, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    A prospective field study was conducted to determine the sensitivity and specificity of an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) compared to virus isolation in cell culture for the detection of eastern equine encephalomyelitis (EEE) virus in naturally infected mosquitoes. A total of 10,811 adult female Culiseta melanura were collected in light traps during 1985 from four locations in Maryland. Eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus was isolated from 5 of 495 mosquito pools in African green monkey kidney and baby hamster kidney cell cultures. All five virus-infected pools were detected by the EIA, and all 490 uninfected pools were correctly scored as not containing virus. The EIA did not produce false positive or false negative results. Results support the assertion of previous researchers that the antigen detection EIA is a rapid, sensitive, specific, and simple alternative to traditional bioassays for the detection of EEE virus in mosquitoes.

  17. Comparison of a Stool Antigen Detection Kit and PCR for Diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar Infections in Asymptomatic Cyst Passers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Solaymani-Mohammadi, Shahram; Rezaian, Mostafa; Babaei, Zahra; Rajabpour, Azam; Meamar, Ahmad R.; Pourbabai, Ahmad A.; Petri, William A.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was conducted to compare stool antigen detection with PCR for the diagnosis of Entamoeba sp. infection in asymptomatic cyst passers from Iran. Entamoeba dispar and, in one case, E. moshkovskii were the Entamoeba spp. found in the amebic cyst passers. There was a 100% correlation between the results from the TechLab E. histolytica II stool antigen kit and those from nested PCR. We concluded that E. dispar is much more common in asymptomatic cyst passers in Iran and that antigen detection and PCR are comparable diagnostic modalities. PMID:16757634

  18. Molecular detection of tumor-associated antigens shared by human cutaneous melanomas and gliomas.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, D. D.; Merchant, R. E.; Rand, R.; Conrad, A. J.; Garrison, D.; Turner, R.; Morton, D. L.; Hoon, D. S.

    1997-01-01

    Both melanocytes and glial cells are derived embryologically from the neural ectoderm. Their malignant transformed counterparts, melanoma and glioma cells, respectively, may share common antigens. Numerous tumor-associated antigens have been identified in melanomas but only a few a gliomas. Using an established reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction plus Southern blot assay, we compared the mRNA expression of melanoma-associated antigens (MAAs) of melanomas to brain tumors primarily derived from glial cells. The MAAs studied included tyrosinase (Tyr), tyrosinase-related protein-1 and -2 (TRP-1 and TRP-2), gp100, human melanoma antigen-encoding genes 1 and 3 (MAGE-1 and MAGE-3), and melanotransferrin (p97). Glioblastoma multiforme (n = 21), anaplastic astrocytoma (n = 3), ependymoma (n = 2), meningioma (n = 3), oligodendroglioma (n = 1), and melanoma (n = 12) tumor specimens were assayed for MAA mRNA expression. Glioblastoma multiforme, astrocytoma, and melanoma cell lines were also assayed. We observed that individual MAA mRNAs were expressed in these brain tumors and cell lines at varying frequencies. The melanogenesis-pathway-related MAAs Tyr, TRP-1, TRP-2, and gp100 mRNAs were also expressed at different levels in normal brain tissues but at a much lower frequency than in glioblastoma multiforme and melanoma. MAGE-1 and MAGE-3 mRNA were expressed in different types of tumor specimens and cell lines but never in normal brain tissue. Tumor antigen p97 was expressed in all types of tumors and also in normal brain tissues. These studies demonstrate that melanomas and primary brain tumors express common MAAs and could be exploited in patients with malignant glioma by active specific immunotherapy against these common MAAs. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9176405

  19. Colorimetric detection of Shewanella oneidensis based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Junlin; Zhou, Shungui; Chen, Junhua

    2014-06-01

    Rapid detection and enumeration of target microorganisms is considered as a powerful tool for monitoring bioremediation process that typically involves cleaning up polluted environments with functional microbes. A novel colorimetric assay is presented based on immunomagnetic capture and bacterial intrinsic peroxidase activity for rapidly detecting Shewanella oneidensis, an important model organism for environmental bioremediation because of its remarkably diverse respiratory abilities. Analyte bacteria captured on the immunomagnetic beads provided a bacterial out-membrane peroxidase-amplified colorimetric readout of the immunorecognition event by oxidizing 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the present of hydrogen peroxide. The high-efficiency of immunomagnetic capture and signal amplification of peroxidase activity offers an excellent detection performance with a wide dynamic range between 5.0 × 103 and 5.0 × 106 CFU/mL toward target cells. Furthermore, this method was demonstrated to be feasible in detecting S. oneidensis cells spiked in environmental samples. The proposed colorimetric assay shows promising environmental applications for rapid detection of target microorganisms.

  20. Investigation of SPR and electrochemical detection of antigen with polypyrrole functionalized by biotinylated single-chain antibody: a review.

    PubMed

    Lê, H Q A; Sauriat-Dorizon, H; Korri-Youssoufi, H

    2010-07-26

    An electrochemical label-free immunosensor based on a biotinylated single-chain variable fragment (Sc-Fv) antibody immobilized on copolypyrrole film is described. An efficient immunosensor device formed by immobilization of a biotinylated single-chain antibody on an electropolymerized copolymer film of polypyrrole using biotin/streptavidin system has been demonstrated for the first time. The response of the biosensor toward antigen detection was monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and electrochemical analysis of the polypyrrole response by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The composition of the copolymer formed from a mixture of pyrrole (py) as spacer and a pyrrole bearing a N-hydroxyphthalimidyl ester group on its 3-position (pyNHP), acting as agent linker for biomolecule immobilization, was optimized for an efficient immunosensor device. The ratio of py:pyNHP for copolymer formation was studied with respect to the antibody immobilization and antigen detection. SPR was employed to monitor in real time the electropolymerization process as well as the step-by-step construction of the biosensor. FT-IR demonstrates the chemical copolymer composition and the efficiency of the covalent attachment of biomolecules. The film morphology was analyzed by electron scanning microscopy (SEM). Results show that a well organized layer is obtained after Sc-Fv antibody immobilization thanks to the copolymer composition defined with optimized pyrrole and functionalized pyrrole leading to high and intense redox signal of the polypyrrole layer obtained by the DPV method. Detection of specific antigen was demonstrated by both SPR and DPV, and a low concentration of 1 pg mL(-1) was detected by measuring the variation of the redox signal of polypyrrole.

  1. A double-antibody sandwich ELISA for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica antigen in stool samples of humans.

    PubMed

    Baumann, D; Gottstein, B

    1987-06-01

    A double-antibody sandwich ELISA was developed to detect detergent-solubilized antigens of Entamoeba histolytica in stool samples of humans. The test system was evaluated for its methodical and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. In recovery experiments the lower limit of detection was 400 ng E. histolytica (HK9) protein/ml stool, corresponding to approximately 2000 amoebic trophozoites/ml stool. Samples of 97 patients with suspected intestinal amoebiasis were examined. Specific antigens were detected by ELISA (= positive reaction) in 14 (93%) out of 15 stool samples containing trophozoites of E. histolytica. In contrast, 68 (93%) of 73 samples with other protozoa, including Entamoeba coli, E. hartmanni, Endolimax nana, Iodamoeba buetschlii and Giardia lamblia, did not react in the test system (= negative reaction). The test was shown to detect only trophozoites of E. histolytica and not the cyst stage. This fact could facilitate the differentiation between cyst carriers and persons excreting trophozoites. The results of this preliminary study justify a further large scale evaluation of the test system. PMID:2888183

  2. A Comparison between Transcriptome Sequencing and 16S Metagenomics for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Razzauti, Maria; Galan, Maxime; Bernard, Maria; Maman, Sarah; Klopp, Christophe; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Eloit, Marc; Cosson, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Background Rodents are major reservoirs of pathogens responsible for numerous zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock. Assessing their microbial diversity at both the individual and population level is crucial for monitoring endemic infections and revealing microbial association patterns within reservoirs. Recently, NGS approaches have been employed to characterize microbial communities of different ecosystems. Yet, their relative efficacy has not been assessed. Here, we compared two NGS approaches, RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) and 16S-metagenomics, assessing their ability to survey neglected zoonotic bacteria in rodent populations. Methodology/Principal Findings We first extracted nucleic acids from the spleens of 190 voles collected in France. RNA extracts were pooled, randomly retro-transcribed, then RNA-Seq was performed using HiSeq. Assembled bacterial sequences were assigned to the closest taxon registered in GenBank. DNA extracts were analyzed via a 16S-metagenomics approach using two sequencers: the 454 GS-FLX and the MiSeq. The V4 region of the gene coding for 16S rRNA was amplified for each sample using barcoded universal primers. Amplicons were multiplexed and processed on the distinct sequencers. The resulting datasets were de-multiplexed, and each read was processed through a pipeline to be taxonomically classified using the Ribosomal Database Project. Altogether, 45 pathogenic bacterial genera were detected. The bacteria identified by RNA-Seq were comparable to those detected by 16S-metagenomics approach processed with MiSeq (16S-MiSeq). In contrast, 21 of these pathogens went unnoticed when the 16S-metagenomics approach was processed via 454-pyrosequencing (16S-454). In addition, the 16S-metagenomics approaches revealed a high level of coinfection in bank voles. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that RNA-Seq and 16S-MiSeq are equally sensitive in detecting bacteria. Although only the 16S-MiSeq method enabled identification of bacteria in each

  3. Reverse Transcriptase-PCR Analysis of Bacterial rRNA for Detection and Characterization of Bacterial Species in Arthritis Synovial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kempsell, Karen E.; Cox, Charles J.; Hurle, Michael; Wong, Anthony; Wilkie, Scott; Zanders, Edward D.; Gaston, J. S. Hill; Crowe, J. Scott

    2000-01-01

    Onset of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is widely believed to be preceded by exposure to some environmental trigger such as bacterial infectious agents. The influence of bacteria on RA disease onset or pathology has to date been controversial, due to inconsistencies between groups in the report of bacterial species isolated from RA disease tissue. Using a modified technique of reverse transcriptase-PCR amplification, we have detected bacterial rRNA in the synovial tissue of late-stage RA and non-RA arthritis controls. This may be suggestive of the presence of live bacteria. Sequencing of cloned complementary rDNA (crDNA) products revealed a number of bacterial sequences in joint tissue from each patient, and from these analyses a comprehensive profile of the organisms present was compiled. This revealed a number of different organisms in each patient, some of which are common to both RA and non-RA controls and are probably opportunistic colonizers of previously diseased tissue and others which are unique species. These latter organisms may be candidates for a specific role in disease pathology and require further investigation to exclude them as causative agents in the complex bacterial millieu. In addition, many of the detected bacterial species have not been identified previously from synovial tissue or fluid from arthritis patients. These may not be easily cultivable, since they were not revealed in previous studies using conventional in vitro bacterial culture methods. In situ hybridization analyses have revealed the joint-associated bacterial rRNA to be both intra- and extracellular. The role of viable bacteria or their nucleic acids as triggers in disease onset or pathology in either RA or non-RA arthritis controls is unclear and requires further investigation. PMID:10992514

  4. Antigenic and genetic characterization of Bordetella pertussis recovered from Quebec, Canada, 2002-2014: detection of a genetic shift.

    PubMed

    Shuel, Michelle; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Whyte, Kathleen; Hayden, Kristy; De Serres, Gaston; Brousseau, Nicholas; Tsang, Raymond S W

    2016-05-01

    Despite vaccination, cyclical peaks of Bordetella pertussis incidence rates are still observed in Canada and other developed countries, making pertussis one of the most prevalent vaccine preventable bacterial diseases. In the postacellular vaccine era, evolution of bacterial strains has resulted in strains with altered vaccine antigens. Previous Canadian studies have focused on isolates mainly from the provinces of Ontario and Alberta, with only small numbers of isolates from other provinces. Therefore, in this study, we examined a larger sample (n = 52) of isolates from Quebec, Canada, between 2002 and 2014. Isolates were characterized by serotype, sequence type, and prevalence of pertactin deficiency. The Quebec isolates shared characteristics similar to other Canadian isolates and to isolates circulating globally. Although pertactin-deficient isolates were not present, a significant shift in sequence type was observed in more recent years. This study highlights the importance of continually monitoring disease-causing isolates to track evolutionary trends and gain a better understanding of the molecular epidemiology of pertussis in Canada.

  5. Species Specific Bacterial Spore Detection Using Lateral-Flow Immunoassay with DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of detecting bacterial spores incorporates (1) A method of lateral-flow immunoassay in combination with (2) A method based on the luminescence of Tb3+ ions to which molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) released from the spores have become bound. The present combination of lateral-flow immunoassay and DPA-triggered Tb luminescence was developed as a superior alternative to a prior lateral-flow immunoassay method in which detection involves the visual observation and/or measurement of red light scattered from colloidal gold nanoparticles. The advantage of the present combination method is that it affords both (1) High selectivity for spores of the species of bacteria that one seeks to detect (a characteristic of lateral-flow immunoassay in general) and (2) Detection sensitivity much greater (by virtue of the use of DPA-triggered Tb luminescence instead of gold nanoparticles) than that of the prior lateral-flow immunoassay method

  6. A major Sm epitope anchored to sequential oligopeptide carriers is a suitable antigenic substrate to detect anti-Sm antibodies.

    PubMed

    Petrovas, C J; Vlachoyiannopoulos, P G; Tzioufas, A G; Alexopoulos, C; Tsikaris, V; Sakarellos-Daitsiotis, M; Sakarellos, C; Moutsopoulos, H M

    1998-11-01

    A sensitive, highly reproducible, solid-phase enzyme immunoassay (ELISA), was developed in order to investigate whether the synthetic heptapeptide PPGMRPP-a major epitope of the Sm autoantigen-anchored in five copies to a sequential oligopeptide carrier (SOC), [(PPGMRPP)5-SOC5] is a suitable antigenic substrate to identify anti-Sm/antibodies. Sera with different autoantibody specificities [45 anti-Sm, 40 anti-U1RNP, 40 anti-Ro (SSA)/La(SSB) positive, 21 Antinuclear antibody positive, but negative for antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (ANA + /ENA - ) and 75 normal human sera, ANA negative] and 75 sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) were tested for anti-(PPGMRPP)5-(SOC)5 reactivity in order to evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of the method to detect anti-Sm antibodies. RNA immunoprecipitation assays for the detection of anti-Sm and anti-U1RNP antibodies and counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) for the detection of anti-Ro(SSA) and anti-La(SSB) antibodies were used as reference techniques. The sensitivity of the method was 98% and the specificity was 68% for the determination of anti-Sm antibodies, while for the determination of anti-Sm and/or anti-U1RNP reactivity (antibodies to snRNPs) the corresponding values were 82% and 86%, respectively. In a comparison of the above assay with an ELISA, using Sm/U1RNP purified complex as immobilized antigen it was shown that the sensitivity of the anti-Sm/U1RNP ELISA in detecting anti-snRNPs was 74%; in addition sera with anti-Sm antibodies gave higher binding in the anti-(PPGMRPP)5-(SOC)5 ELISA compared with anti-Sm/U1RNP ELISA. Intra- and inter-assay precision was measured on four sera with reactivities extending into a wide range of absorbance values showed that the intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV%) ranged from 2.7 to 6 and the inter-assay CV% ranged from 9 to 14.5. These results indicate that the PPGMRPP peptide anchored to a pentameric SOC as a carrier is a suitable antigen for

  7. Investigation of polymerase chain reaction assays to improve detection of bacterial involvement in bovine respiratory disease.

    PubMed

    Bell, Colin J; Blackburn, Paul; Elliott, Mark; Patterson, Tony I A P; Ellison, Sean; Lahuerta-Marin, Angela; Ball, Hywel J

    2014-09-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) causes severe economic losses to the cattle farming industry worldwide. The major bacterial organisms contributing to the BRD complex are Mannheimia haemolytica, Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, Pasteurella multocida, and Trueperella pyogenes. The postmortem detection of these organisms in pneumonic lung tissue is generally conducted using standard culture-based techniques where the presence of therapeutic antibiotics in the tissue can inhibit bacterial isolation. In the current study, conventional and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were used to assess the prevalence of these 5 organisms in grossly pneumonic lung samples from 150 animals submitted for postmortem examination, and the results were compared with those obtained using culture techniques. Mannheimia haemolytica was detected in 51 cases (34%) by PCR and in 33 cases (22%) by culture, H. somni was detected in 35 cases (23.3%) by PCR and in 6 cases (4%) by culture, Myc. bovis was detected in 53 cases (35.3%) by PCR and in 29 cases (19.3%) by culture, P. multocida was detected in 50 cases (33.3%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, and T. pyogenes was detected in 42 cases (28%) by PCR and in 31 cases (20.7%) by culture, with all differences being statistically significant. The PCR assays indicated positive results for 111 cases (74%) whereas 82 cases (54.6%) were culture positive. The PCR assays have demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of all 5 organisms in cases of pneumonia in cattle in Northern Ireland than was detected by current standard procedures.

  8. Use of a DNA Microarray for Detection and Identification of Bacterial Pathogens Associated with Fishery Products▿

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Boyang; Li, Rongrong; Xiong, Songjin; Yao, Fangfang; Liu, Xiangqian; Wang, Min; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    We established a microarray for the simultaneous detection and identification of diverse putative pathogens often associated with fishery products by targeting specific genes of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella, Shigella, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Yersinia enterocolitica and the 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of Proteus mirabilis and Proteus vulgaris. The microarray contained 26 specific probes and was tested against a total of 123 target bacterial strains that included 55 representative strains, 68 clinical isolates, and 45 strains of other bacterial species that belonged to 8 genera and 34 species, and it was shown to be specific and reproducible. A detection sensitivity of 10 ng DNA or 10 CFU/ml for pure cultures of each target organism demonstrated that the assay was highly sensitive and reproducible. Mock and real fishery product samples were tested by the microarray, and the accuracy was 100%. The DNA microarray method described in this communication is specific, sensitive, and reliable and has several advantages over traditional methods of bacterial culture and antiserum agglutination assays. PMID:21965411

  9. Diagnostic performances of antigen detection compared to conventional and nucleic acid detection of Entamoeba histolytica in a non-endemic setting.

    PubMed

    Calderaro, Adriana; Piergianni, Maddalena; Piccolo, Giovanna; Rossi, Sabina; Montecchini, Sara; Buttrini, Mirko; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; De Conto, Flora

    2016-04-01

    This study evaluated the immunochromatographic (IC) assay "TECHLAB(®) E. HISTOLYTICA QUIK CHEK™" analysing 36 faecal samples and 7 cultured strains. This assay was compared to the methods performed in our laboratory for the diagnosis of amoebiasis. The IC assay revealed a detection limit of 103 trophozoites/g faeces and no cross-reactivity with other parasites and failed to detect E. histolytica antigen in frozen faeces. In our laboratory located in a non-endemic setting this assay could not replace the methods currently used for the diagnosis of amoebiasis. PMID:27196557

  10. Detection of cell surface rubella virus antigens in Vero cells with Staphylococcus aureus rich in protein A.

    PubMed

    Montero, M T; Ortega, E; Gómez, B

    1988-12-01

    The presence of cell surface rubella antigen was used to verify and monitor viral replication in Vero cell monolayers. Viral antigen was observed in infected cells by the adherence of Staphylococcus aureus sensitized with immune anti-rubella sera. The staphylococci specifically bound to infected cells were Gram-stained and observed using light microscopy. The minimum titer of IgG antiviral hemagglutinin required for sensitizing the bacteria was 3.9 IU/ml. The specificity of the assay was demonstrated by treating the infected cells with bacteria sensitized with normal sera, by treating the mock-infected cells with staphylococci sensitized with either immune or normal sera, and by sensitizing the bacteria with immune sera from which anti-rubella antibodies had been removed. Viral antigens were detected from day 2-9 post-infection. The sensitivity of the assay in verifying and monitoring viral propagation was comparable to the titration of viral particles of hemagglutination. The assay is specific, rapid, simple and can be performed in laboratories with minimal equipment.

  11. An ELISA technique to detect IgG antibody to the early herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) antigen AG-4 in HSV-2 patients.

    PubMed

    Evans, L; Arsenakis, M; Sheppard, M; May, J T

    1983-05-01

    An ELISA system, based on urease activity was used for the detection and titration of IgG to the immediate early AG-4 antigen in sera from HSV-2 patients. It detected low levels of IgG to the AG-4 antigen in 32% of patients' sera known to contain complement fixing antibody to the antigen. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the ELISA system was 2- to 10-fold higher than the complement-fixation system depending on when the sera was taken from the HSV-2 patients. The system also allowed the easy detection and quantitation of AG-4 antigen production when various HSV-1 X HSV-2 intertypic recombinant viruses were used to infect BHK-21 cells.

  12. Detection of antibody responses in rabbits hyperimmunized with Campylobacter pylori. Enzyme immunoassay indicates extensive antigenic similarities.

    PubMed

    Höök, J; Blomberg, B; Danielsson, D; Kosunen, T U

    1989-01-01

    Acid glycine extracts from four Campylobacter pylori strains and one GCLO strain were used as antigens in enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Immune responses of rabbits immunized with C. pylori strains, the GCLO-strain and other campylobacter strains were studied. All 14 rabbit antisera against C. pylori reacted with all four C. pylori extracts and there were extensive cross-reactions between these extracts. Antisera against C. jejuni and C. coli strains did not react with a C. pylori extract but reached with the GCLO antigen. Acid glycine extracts proved to be very satisfactory in C. pylori serology and the use of an extract prepared from only one strain instead of a combination of strains seems justified.

  13. Detection of Goodpasture antigen in fractions prepared from collagenase digests of human glomerular basement membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Fish, A J; Lockwood, M C; Wong, M; Price, R G

    1984-01-01

    Preparations of human glomerular basement membrane (GBM) were digested with collagenase, and a Goodpasture (GP) antigen rich pool from gel filtration column runs was identified by antibody inhibition radioimmunoassay. The components of the GP antigen pool were separated on polyacrylamide gels, and transferred to nitrocellulose sheets by the 'western' blotting technique. The blots were separately reacted with thirteen GP sera as primary antibody, followed by peroxidase labelled goat anti-human IgG and revealed 45-50K (two bands) and 25-28K (one-three bands) components. No corresponding reactivity was observed using convalescent GP sera or other control sera (normal human serum, rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis with or without pulmonary haemorrhage, and lupus erythematosus) as primary antibody. Images Fig. 3 PMID:6319059

  14. Near-infrared spectroscopy for the detection and quantification of bacterial contaminations in pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Quintelas, Cristina; Mesquita, Daniela P; Lopes, João A; Ferreira, Eugénio C; Sousa, Clara

    2015-08-15

    Accurate detection and quantification of microbiological contaminations remains an issue mainly due the lack of rapid and precise analytical techniques. Standard methods are expensive and time-consuming being associated to high economic losses and public health threats. In the context of pharmaceutical industry, the development of fast analytical techniques able to overcome these limitations is crucial and spectroscopic techniques might constitute a reliable alternative. In this work we proved the ability of Fourier transform near infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIRS) to detect and quantify bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus epidermidis) from 10 to 10(8) CFUs/mL in sterile saline solutions (NaCl 0.9%). Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) models showed that FT-NIRS was able to discriminate between sterile and contaminated solutions for all bacteria as well as to identify the contaminant bacteria. Partial least squares (PLS) models allowed bacterial quantification with limits of detection ranging from 5.1 to 9 CFU/mL for E. coli and B. subtilis, respectively. This methodology was successfully validated in three pharmaceutical preparations (contact lens solution, cough syrup and topic anti-inflammatory solution) proving that this technique possess a high potential to be routinely used for the detection and quantification of bacterial contaminations.

  15. Near-infrared spectroscopy for the detection and quantification of bacterial contaminations in pharmaceutical products.

    PubMed

    Quintelas, Cristina; Mesquita, Daniela P; Lopes, João A; Ferreira, Eugénio C; Sousa, Clara

    2015-08-15

    Accurate detection and quantification of microbiological contaminations remains an issue mainly due the lack of rapid and precise analytical techniques. Standard methods are expensive and time-consuming being associated to high economic losses and public health threats. In the context of pharmaceutical industry, the development of fast analytical techniques able to overcome these limitations is crucial and spectroscopic techniques might constitute a reliable alternative. In this work we proved the ability of Fourier transform near infrared spectroscopy (FT-NIRS) to detect and quantify bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Salmonella enterica, Staphylococcus epidermidis) from 10 to 10(8) CFUs/mL in sterile saline solutions (NaCl 0.9%). Partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) models showed that FT-NIRS was able to discriminate between sterile and contaminated solutions for all bacteria as well as to identify the contaminant bacteria. Partial least squares (PLS) models allowed bacterial quantification with limits of detection ranging from 5.1 to 9 CFU/mL for E. coli and B. subtilis, respectively. This methodology was successfully validated in three pharmaceutical preparations (contact lens solution, cough syrup and topic anti-inflammatory solution) proving that this technique possess a high potential to be routinely used for the detection and quantification of bacterial contaminations. PMID:26151105

  16. Combined Serological Detection of Circulating Angiostrongylus vasorum Antigen and Parasite-specific Antibodies in Dogs from Hungary.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Manuela; Schaper, Roland; Lukács, Zoltán; Hornok, Sándor; Farkas, Róbert

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of the nematode Angiostrongylus vasorum, also known as the French heartworm, is increasingly being reported from various European countries. The adults of this parasite species live in the pulmonary arteries and right cardiac ventricle of wild canids and domestic dogs. Larval stages and eggs in the lungs induce inflammatory verminous pneumonia, causing severe respiratory disease in dogs. Furthermore, haematological and neurological signs and even death may occur. In Hungary, A. vasorum has been identified in red foxes, golden jackals and in two dogs and some slugs. In this first large-scale survey, 1247 sera from pet dogs were collected and tested by an ELISA for the detection of circulating antigen of A. vasorum and by a separate ELISA to detect specific antibodies against the parasite. A total of 1.36% (n = 17, 95 % confidence intervals, CI: 0.80 - 2.17 %) of the animals were positive in both ELISAs, while 1.76 % (n = 22, CI: 1.11 - 2.66 %) of the tested dogs were antigen-positive only and 2.73 % (n = 34, CI: 1.90 - 3.79 %) were positive for specific antibodies only. Regions with antigen- and antibody-positive animals overlapped and were distributed over nearly the whole sampled areas of the country. A considerable number of cases was observed in Budapest and also in the southern part of the country bordering Croatia, while in the most eastern part bordering Ukraine no positive samples were detected. These results confirm the endemic occurrence of A. vasorum in dogs originating from different parts of Hungary and the significant advantages of A. vasorum serology in epidemiological studies. PMID:26152415

  17. Combined Serological Detection of Circulating Angiostrongylus vasorum Antigen and Parasite-specific Antibodies in Dogs from Hungary.

    PubMed

    Schnyder, Manuela; Schaper, Roland; Lukács, Zoltán; Hornok, Sándor; Farkas, Róbert

    2015-08-01

    The occurrence of the nematode Angiostrongylus vasorum, also known as the French heartworm, is increasingly being reported from various European countries. The adults of this parasite species live in the pulmonary arteries and right cardiac ventricle of wild canids and domestic dogs. Larval stages and eggs in the lungs induce inflammatory verminous pneumonia, causing severe respiratory disease in dogs. Furthermore, haematological and neurological signs and even death may occur. In Hungary, A. vasorum has been identified in red foxes, golden jackals and in two dogs and some slugs. In this first large-scale survey, 1247 sera from pet dogs were collected and tested by an ELISA for the detection of circulating antigen of A. vasorum and by a separate ELISA to detect specific antibodies against the parasite. A total of 1.36% (n = 17, 95 % confidence intervals, CI: 0.80 - 2.17 %) of the animals were positive in both ELISAs, while 1.76 % (n = 22, CI: 1.11 - 2.66 %) of the tested dogs were antigen-positive only and 2.73 % (n = 34, CI: 1.90 - 3.79 %) were positive for specific antibodies only. Regions with antigen- and antibody-positive animals overlapped and were distributed over nearly the whole sampled areas of the country. A considerable number of cases was observed in Budapest and also in the southern part of the country bordering Croatia, while in the most eastern part bordering Ukraine no positive samples were detected. These results confirm the endemic occurrence of A. vasorum in dogs originating from different parts of Hungary and the significant advantages of A. vasorum serology in epidemiological studies.

  18. Increased sensitivity of bacterial detection in cerebrospinal fluid by fluorescent staining on low-fluorescence membrane filters.

    PubMed

    Durtschi, Jacob D; Erali, Maria; Bromley, L Kathryn; Herrmann, Mark G; Petti, Cathy A; Smith, Roger E; Voelkerding, Karl V

    2005-09-01

    A membrane-filter-based, fluorescent Gram stain method for bacterial detection in cerebrospinal fluid samples was developed and evaluated as a rapid, sensitive alternative to standard Gram stain protocols. A recently developed, modified version of the aluminium oxide membrane Anopore with low-fluorescence optical properties showed superior performance in this application. Other aspects of the fluorescent Gram stain system that were evaluated include membrane filter selection, strategies to reduce fluorescence fading and the effect of patient blood cells on bacterial detection in the fluorescently stained cerebrospinal fluid samples. The combination of the membrane filter's bacteria-concentrating ability and absolute retention along with high-contrast, fluorescent Gram discriminating dyes enabled rapid bacterial detection and Gram discrimination, with a 1-1.5 order of magnitude increase in the bacterial concentration limit of detection.

  19. Pretreatment of serum samples to reduce interference of colostrum-derived specific antibodies with detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus antigen by ELISA in young calves.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, Sasha R; Reichel, Michael P

    2016-05-01

    Antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is used for the detection of Bovine viral diarrhea virus persistently infected (BVDV PI) cattle; however, colostrum-derived antibodies may interfere with antigen detection in serum from young PI calves. Our study aimed to assess serum pretreatment methods for reducing such interference. Dilution of PI serum with serum containing specific antibody showed that antibody levels equivalent to those observed in colostrum-fed calves were able to eliminate all antigen signals in a serum sample. Serum was treated with ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid at pH 4.5, 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5, then boiled, centrifuged, and the supernatant-recovered. BVDV antibody was undetectable by ELISA in supernatants from treated samples, and the antigen ELISA signal was improved. Maximum antigen signal recovery of >90% was achieved at pH 5 ± 0.5. When this optimal treatment method was applied to field samples from 3 PI calves (which were negative in the antigen-capture ELISA without treatment), the antigen signal improved and gave a positive result in each case. Pretreatment may provide an improvement in the detection of young PI calves. PMID:27016723

  20. Establishment of a cell line panel for the detection of antibodies against human platelet antigen 4b.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Tomoya; Amakishi, Etsuko; Inoue, Masayasu; Hirayama, Fumiya

    2011-02-01

    Antibodies against human platelet antigens (HPAs) play important roles in thrombocytopenia. In Japan, HPA-4b antibody is frequently responsible for HPA-related neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. A highly sensitive assay using platelets has been developed for the detection of antibodies against HPAs. However, it is difficult to obtain the platelets expressing specific HPAs required for the assay. Therefore, an alternative method not requiring platelets would be helpful to detect antibodies against HPAs. Glycoprotein IIIa (GPIIIa) cDNA encoding HPA-4b was individually co-transduced with that of wild-type GPIIb in K562 cells, which is a non-adherent cell line, using a retroviral vector. The expression of transgene products in cultured cells were observed for over 6 months. Next, to evaluating the sensitivity and specificity of this cell line panel, we performed monoclonal antibody-specific immobilization of platelet antigens (MAIPA) assay with a serum previously identified by another method. All HPA-4b antibodies in serum samples were positive, and all serum samples, including normal serum and serum containing HLA antibodies were negative. No difference was observed in the specificity and sensitivity between our method and conventional MAIPA using platelets. The present results indicate that this established cell line panel permits highly sensitive detection of specific antibodies against HPA-4b. PMID:21286877

  1. A sandwich-type immunosensor using Pd-Pt nanocrystals as labels for sensitive detection of human tissue polypeptide antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yaoguang; Wei, Qin; Zhang, Yong; Wu, Dan; Ma, Hongmin; Guo, Aiping; Du, Bin

    2014-02-01

    A sandwich-type immunosensor was developed for the detection of human tissue polypeptide antigen (hTPA). In this work, a graphene sheet (GS) was synthesized to modify the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and Pd-Pt bimetallic nanocrystals were used as secondary-antibody (Ab2) labels for the fabrication of the immunosensor. The amperometric response of the immunosensor for catalyzing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was recorded. And electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to characterize the fabrication process of the immunosensor. The anti-human tissue polypeptide antigen primary antibody (Ab1) was immobilized onto the GS modified GCE via cross-linking with 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrochloride and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS). With Ab1 immobilized onto the GS modified GCE and Ab2 linked on Pd-Pt bimetallic nanocrystals, the immunosensor demonstrated a wide linear range (0.0050-15 ng ml-1), a low detection limit (1.2 pg ml-1), good reproducibility, good selectivity and acceptable stability. This design strategy may provide many potential applications in the detection of other cancer biomarkers.

  2. SDS-PAGE/immunoblot detection of Abeta multimers in human cortical tissue homogenates using antigen-epitope retrieval.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Rebecca F; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Ghiso, Jorge A; Walker, Lary C

    2010-01-01

    The anomalous folding and polymerization of the beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide is thought to initiate the neurodegenerative cascade in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis(1). Abeta is predominantly a 40- or 42-amino acid peptide that is prone to self-aggregation into beta-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils that are found in the cores of cerebral senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that low molecular weight, soluble Abeta multimers are more toxic than fibrillar Abeta amyloid(2). The identification and quantification of low- and high-molecular weight multimeric Abeta species in brain tissue is an essential objective in Alzheimer's disease research, and the methods employed also can be applied to the identification and characterization of toxic multimers in other proteopathies(3). Naturally occurring Abeta multimers can be detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting with Abeta-specific antibodies. However, the separation and detection of multimeric Abeta requires the use of highly concentrated cortical homogenates and antigen retrieval in small pore-size nitrocellulose membranes. Here we describe a technique for the preparation of clarified human cortical homogenates, separation of proteins by SDS-PAGE, and antigen-epitope retrieval/Western blotting with antibody 6E10 to the N-terminal region of the Abeta peptide. Using this protocol, we consistently detect Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, tetramers, and higher molecular weight multimers in cortical tissue from humans with Alzheimer's pathology. PMID:20418805

  3. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases. PMID:25628612

  4. Quantitative and simultaneous detection of four foodborne bacterial pathogens with a multi-channel SPR sensor.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Allen D; Ladd, Jon; Yu, Qiuming; Chen, Shengfu; Homola, Jirí; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2006-12-15

    We report the quantitative and simultaneous detection of four species of bacteria, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella choleraesuis serotype typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, and Campylobacter jejuni, using an eight-channel surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor based on wavelength division multiplexing. Detection curves showing SPR response versus analyte concentration were established for each species of bacteria in buffer at pH 7.4, apple juice at native pH 3.7, and apple juice at an adjusted pH of 7.4, as well as for a mixture containing all four species of bacteria in buffer. Control experiments were performed to show the non-fouling characteristics of the sensor surface as well as the specificity of the amplification antibodies used in this study. The limit of detection (LOD) for each of the four species of bacteria in the tested matrices ranges from 3.4 x 10(3) to 1.2 x 10(5) cfu/ml. Detection curves in buffer of an individual species of bacteria in a mixture of all four species of bacteria correlated well with detection curves of the individual species of bacteria alone. SPR responses were higher for bacteria in apple juice at pH 7.4 than in apple juice at pH 3.7. This difference in sensor response could be partly attributed to the pH dependence of antibody-antigen binding.

  5. Sequence specific detection of bacterial 23S ribosomal RNA by TLR13

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Zhijian J

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) detect microbial infections and trigger innate immune responses. Among vertebrate TLRs, the role of TLR13 and its ligand are unknown. Here we show that TLR13 detects the 23S ribosomal RNA of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. A sequence containing 13 nucleotides near the active site of 23S rRNA ribozyme, which catalyzes peptide bond synthesis, was both necessary and sufficient to trigger TLR13-dependent interleukin-1β production. Single point mutations within this sequence destroyed the ability of the 23S rRNA to stimulate the TLR13 pathway. Knockout of TLR13 in mice abolished the induction of interleukin-1β and other cytokines by the 23S rRNA sequence. Thus, TLR13 detects bacterial RNA with exquisite sequence specificity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00102.001 PMID:23110254

  6. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion.

  7. Antigen Export Reduces Antigen Presentation and Limits T Cell Control of M. tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Grace, Patricia S; Ernst, Joel D

    2016-01-13

    Persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from bacterial strategies that manipulate host adaptive immune responses. Infected dendritic cells (DCs) transport M. tuberculosis to local lymph nodes but activate CD4 T cells poorly, suggesting bacterial manipulation of antigen presentation. However, M. tuberculosis antigens are also exported from infected DCs and taken up and presented by uninfected DCs, possibly overcoming this blockade of antigen presentation by infected cells. Here we show that the first stage of this antigen transfer, antigen export, benefits M. tuberculosis by diverting bacterial proteins from the antigen presentation pathway. Kinesin-2 is required for antigen export and depletion of this microtubule-based motor increases activation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells by infected cells and improves control of intracellular infection. Thus, although antigen transfer enables presentation by bystander cells, it does not compensate for reduced antigen presentation by infected cells and represents a bacterial strategy for CD4 T cell evasion. PMID:26764596

  8. Sublingual therapeutic immunization with a polyvalent bacterial preparation in patients with recurrent respiratory infections: immunomodulatory effect on antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells and impact on clinical outcome

    PubMed Central

    Alecsandru, D; Valor, L; Sánchez-Ramón, S; Gil, J; Carbone, J; Navarro, J; Rodríguez, J J; Rodríguez-Sainz, C; Fernández-Cruz, E

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent respiratory tract infections (RRTIs) are common clinical conditions in individuals with alterations of the immune function. A prospective open pilot study in a cohort of patients with RRTIs has been performed to assess whether sublingual immunization with a polyvalent bacterial vaccine could exert an immunomodulatory effect on the antigen-specific immunological responses and have an impact on the clinical outcome. Seventeen patients with RRTIs were recruited. An oral polyvalent bacterial preparation (Bactek®) was administered to all patients daily for 6 months. Immunological assessment was performed at baseline and at the end of immunization. Immunological measurements included: T cell-specific proliferations of CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+ to Bactek® antigens, total immunoglobulin levels, antibodies to pneumococcal polysaccharide and tetanus toxoid and B, T and natural killer (NK) cell subsets. There was a significant increase in the proliferative capacity of CD3+CD4+ T cells specific to Bactek® antigens at month 6 in comparison to baseline (P < 0·0001). A significant increase in total CD3+ T cells was also observed (P < 0·05). No significant differences were observed between baseline and month 6 in levels of total immunoglobulins, specific antibodies and B, T or NK cell subsets. A significant reduction in the patient's rate of RRTIs was observed compared with 1 year prior to initiation of therapy (P < 0·0001). The results demonstrate that long-term administration of a sublingual polyvalent bacterial preparation in patients with RRTIs exerts an immune stimulating effect on CD4+ T helper cell responses to bacterial antigens which could be associated with clinical benefit. PMID:21391984

  9. Reliability of quantitative real-time PCR for bacterial detection in cystic fibrosis airway specimens.

    PubMed

    Zemanick, Edith T; Wagner, Brandie D; Sagel, Scott D; Stevens, Mark J; Accurso, Frank J; Harris, J Kirk

    2010-11-30

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) airway microbiome is complex; polymicrobial infections are common, and the presence of fastidious bacteria including anaerobes make culture-based diagnosis challenging. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) offers a culture-independent method for bacterial quantification that may improve diagnosis of CF airway infections; however, the reliability of qPCR applied to CF airway specimens is unknown. We sought to determine the reliability of nine specific bacterial qPCR assays (total bacteria, three typical CF pathogens, and five anaerobes) applied to CF airway specimens. Airway and salivary specimens from clinically stable pediatric CF subjects were collected. Quantitative PCR assay repeatability was determined using triplicate reactions. Split-sample measurements were performed to measure variability introduced by DNA extraction. Results from qPCR were compared to standard microbial culture for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae, common pathogens in CF. We obtained 84 sputa, 47 oropharyngeal and 27 salivary specimens from 16 pediatric subjects with CF. Quantitative PCR detected bacterial DNA in over 97% of specimens. All qPCR assays were highly reproducible at quantities≥10(2) rRNA gene copies/reaction with coefficient of variation less than 20% for over 99% of samples. There was also excellent agreement between samples processed in duplicate. Anaerobic bacteria were highly prevalent and were detected in mean quantities similar to that of typical CF pathogens. Compared to a composite gold standard, qPCR and culture had variable sensitivities for detection of P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and H. influenzae from CF airway samples. By reliably quantifying fastidious airway bacteria, qPCR may improve our understanding of polymicrobial CF lung infections, progression of lung disease and ultimately improve antimicrobial treatments.

  10. Reliability of Quantitative Real-Time PCR for Bacterial Detection in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Zemanick, Edith T.; Wagner, Brandie D.; Sagel, Scott D.; Stevens, Mark J.; Accurso, Frank J.; Harris, J. Kirk

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) airway microbiome is complex; polymicrobial infections are common, and the presence of fastidious bacteria including anaerobes make culture-based diagnosis challenging. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) offers a culture-independent method for bacterial quantification that may improve diagnosis of CF airway infections; however, the reliability of qPCR applied to CF airway specimens is unknown. We sought to determine the reliability of nine specific bacterial qPCR assays (total bacteria, three typical CF pathogens, and five anaerobes) applied to CF airway specimens. Airway and salivary specimens from clinically stable pediatric CF subjects were collected. Quantitative PCR assay repeatability was determined using triplicate reactions. Split-sample measurements were performed to measure variability introduced by DNA extraction. Results from qPCR were compared to standard microbial culture for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae, common pathogens in CF. We obtained 84 sputa, 47 oropharyngeal and 27 salivary specimens from 16 pediatric subjects with CF. Quantitative PCR detected bacterial DNA in over 97% of specimens. All qPCR assays were highly reproducible at quantities ≥102 rRNA gene copies/reaction with coefficient of variation less than 20% for over 99% of samples. There was also excellent agreement between samples processed in duplicate. Anaerobic bacteria were highly prevalent and were detected in mean quantities similar to that of typical CF pathogens. Compared to a composite gold standard, qPCR and culture had variable sensitivities for detection of P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and H. influenzae from CF airway samples. By reliably quantifying fastidious airway bacteria, qPCR may improve our understanding of polymicrobial CF lung infections, progression of lung disease and ultimately improve antimicrobial treatments. PMID:21152087

  11. Nanostructured sensor based on carbon nanotubes and clavanin A for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Andrade, César A S; Nascimento, Jéssica M; Oliveira, Idjane S; de Oliveira, Carlos V J; de Melo, Celso P; Franco, Octávio L; Oliveira, Maria D L

    2015-11-01

    Unusual methods for specific detection of pathogenic bacteria are becoming key points for control and identification of problems related to health and (bio)safety. In this context, this work aims to propose a new approach for the development of nanostructured biosensors based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and antimicrobial peptides for bacterial detection. Firstly, the antimicrobial peptide clavanin A (ClavA) was chemically immobilized on CNTs and surface-immobilized ClavA was used to detect Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis in a direct assay format. We used electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique to evaluate the effectiveness and sensitivity of the ClavA-based biosensors by measuring the modifications in their electrochemical responses before and after incubation in presence of different bacteria concentrations. The biosensor was able to discriminate between bacteria concentrations in the 10(2)-10(6)CFU mL(-1) range. Atomic force microscopy analysis confirmed the biosensor functionality for bacterial recognition. This new sensor system was capable of differentiating between Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, since ClavA showed different affinities toward the pathogenic bacteria species. PMID:25847459

  12. Label-Free Detection and Discrimination of Bacterial Pathogens Based on Hemin Recognition.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Thora R; Adak, Avijit K; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N; Wei, Alexander

    2016-07-20

    Hemin linked to hexa(ethylene glycol)bishydrazide was patterned by inkjet printing into periodic microarrays, and evaluated for their ability to capture bacterial pathogens expressing various hemin receptors. Bacterial adhesion was imaged under darkfield conditions with Fourier analysis, supporting a label-free method of pathogen detection. Hemin microarrays were screened against a panel of 16 bacteria and found capable of capturing multiple species, some with limits of detection as low as 10(3) cfu/mL. Several Gram-positive strains including Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis also exhibited rapid adhesion, enabling pattern recognition within minutes of exposure. This can be attributed to differences in hemin acquisition systems: aggressively adherent bacteria express cell-surface hemin receptors (CSHRs) that enable direct hemin binding and uptake, whereas other types of bacteria including most Gram-negative strains rely on the secretion and recapture of soluble proteins (hemophores) for hemin acquisition, with consequently longer times for ligand binding and detection. PMID:27337653

  13. Identification of Bacterial DNA Markers for the Detection of Human Fecal Pollution in Water▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Orin C.; Domingo, Jorge W. Santo; Lu, Jingrang; Kelty, Catherine A.; Graham, James E.

    2007-01-01

    We used genome fragment enrichment and bioinformatics to identify several microbial DNA sequences with high potential for use as markers in PCR assays for detection of human fecal contamination in water. Following competitive solution-phase hybridization of total DNA from human and pig fecal samples, 351 plasmid clones were sequenced and were determined to define 289 different genomic DNA regions. These putative human-specific fecal bacterial DNA sequences were then analyzed by dot blot hybridization, which confirmed that 98% were present in the source human fecal microbial community and absent from the original pig fecal DNA extract. Comparative sequence analyses of these sequences suggested that a large number (43.5%) were predicted to encode bacterial secreted or surface-associated proteins. Deoxyoligonucleotide primers capable of annealing to a subset of 26 of the candidate sequences predicted to encode factors involved in interactions with host cells were then used in the PCR and did not amplify markers in DNA from any additional pig fecal specimens. These 26 PCR assays exhibited a range of specificity in tests with 11 other animal sources, with more than half amplifying markers only in specimens from dogs or cats. Four assays were more specific, detecting markers only in specimens from humans, including those from 18 different human populations examined. We then demonstrated the potential utility of these assays by using them to detect human fecal contamination in several impacted watersheds. PMID:17209067

  14. Flow cytometry-based methods for assessing soluble scFv activities and detecting pathogen antigens in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, Sean; Weigel, Kris M.; Miller, Keith D.; Ndung'u, Joseph; Buscher, Philippe; Tran, Thao N.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Cangelosi, Gerard A.

    2010-04-01

    Novel methods are reported for evaluating and utilizing single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies derived from yeast-display libraries. Yeast-display was used to select scFv specific to invariant surface glycoproteins (ISG) of Trypanosoma brucei. A limiting step in the isolation of scFv from nonimmune libraries is the conversion of highly active yeast-displayed scFv into soluble antibodies that can be used in standard immunoassays. Challenges include limited solubility or activity following secretion and purification of scFv. For this reason, few scFv derived from yeast-display platforms have moved into development and implementation as diagnostic reagents. To address this problem, assays were developed that employ both yeastdisplayed and secreted scFv as analytical reagents. The first is a competitive inhibition flow cytometry (CIFC) assay that detects secreted scFv by virtue of its ability to competitively inhibit the binding of biotinylated antigen to yeast-displayed scFv. The second is an epitope binning assay that uses secreted scFv toidentify additional yeast-displayed scFv that bind nonoverlapping or noncompeting epitopes on an antigen. The epitope binning assay was used not only to identify sandwich assay pairs with yeast-displayed scFv, but also to identify active soluble scFv present in low concentration in a crude expression extract. Finally, a CIFC assay was developed that bypasses entirely the need for soluble scFv expression, by using yeast displayed scFv to detect unlabeled antigen in samples. These methods will facilitate the continued development and practical implementation of scFv derived from yeast-display libraries.

  15. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR)-Specific Monoclonal Antibody to Detect CD19-Specific T Cells in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Bipulendu; Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63). We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) to detect CD19-specific CAR+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:23469246

  16. Flow Cytometry-Based Methods for Assessing Soluble scFv Activities and Detecting Antigens in Solution

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Sean A.; Weigel, Kris M.; Miller, Keith D.; Ndung'u, Joseph; Büscher, Philippe; Tran, Thao; Baird, Cheryl; Cangelosi, Gerard A.

    2010-01-01

    Novel methods are reported for evaluating and utilizing single chain fragment variable (scFv) antibodies derived from yeast-display libraries. Yeast-display was used to select scFv specific to invariant surface glycoproteins (ISG) of Trypanosoma brucei. Alimiting step in the isolation of scFv from non-immune libraries is the conversion of highly active yeast-displayed scFv into soluble antibodies that can be used in standard immunoassays. Challenges include limited solubility or activity following secretion and purification of scFv. For this reason, few scFv derived from yeast-display platforms have moved into development and implementation as diagnostic reagents. To address this problem, assays were developed that employ both yeast-displayed and -secreted scFv as analytical reagents. The first is a competitive inhibition flow cytometry (CIFC) assay that detects secreted scFv by virtue of their ability to competitively inhibit the binding of biotinylated antigen to yeast-displayed scFv. The second is an epitope binning assay that uses secreted scFv to identify additional yeast-displayed scFv that bind non-overlapping or non-competing epitopes on an antigen. The epitope binning assay was used not only to identify sandwich assay pairs with yeast-displayed scFv, but also to identify active soluble scFv present in low concentration in a crude expression extract. Finally, a CIFC assay was developed that bypasses entirely the need for soluble scFv expression, by using yeast-displayed scFv to detect unlabeled antigen in samples. These methods will facilitate the continued development and practical implementation of scFv derived from yeast-display libraries. PMID:19953671

  17. Plate acoustic wave sensor for detection of small amounts of bacterial cells in micro-litre liquid samples.

    PubMed

    Anisimkin, V I; Kuznetsova, I Е; Kolesov, V V; Pyataikin, I I; Sorokin, V V; Skladnev, D A

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic waves propagating in thin piezoelectric plates with free faces are used for bacteria detection in micro-litre liquid samples deposited on one of the plate surface. The limits of the detection at normal conditions are as low as 0.04% for highly diluted rich cultural Luria-Bertani broth (LB-media) in distillate water, 0.07% for bacterial cells in distillate water, and 0.6% for bacterial cells in LB-media. For all analytes the most probable detection mechanism is the change in liquid conductivity. Because of no using any sorbent film the long-term stability of the detection is expected as very high.

  18. Disposable bioluminescence-based biosensor for detection of bacterial count in food.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jinping; Liu, Xiaohong; Tian, Qing; Yue, Weiwei; Zeng, Jing; Chen, Guangquan; Cai, Xinxia

    2009-11-01

    A biosensor for rapid detection of bacterial count based on adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) bioluminescence has been developed. The biosensor is composed of a key sensitive element and a photomultiplier tube used as a detector element. The disposable sensitive element consists of a sampler, a cartridge where intracellular ATP is chemically extracted from bacteria, and a microtube where the extracted ATP reacts with the luciferin-luciferase reagent to produce bioluminescence. The bioluminescence signal is transformed into relevant electrical signal by the detector and further measured with a homemade luminometer. Parameters affecting the amount of the extracted ATP, including the types of ATP extractants, the concentrations of ATP extractant, and the relevant neutralizing reagent, were optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the biosensor showed a linear response to standard bacteria in a concentration range from 10(3) to 10(8) colony-forming units (CFU) per milliliter with a correlation coefficient of 0.925 (n=22) within 5min. Moreover, the bacterial count of real food samples obtained by the biosensor correlated well with those by the conventional plate count method. The proposed biosensor, with characteristics of low cost, easy operation, and fast response, provides potential application to rapid evaluation of bacterial contamination in the food industry, environment monitoring, and other fields.

  19. Detection of antigens specific for B-lymphoid cultured cell lines with human alloantisera.

    PubMed

    Mann, D L; Abelson, L; Harris, S; Amos, D B

    1975-07-01

    Human sera were tested for cytotoxicity to pairs of long-term tissue-cultured cell lines. Each pair had been derived from the same individual and one of the pairs possessed the characteristics of either "T" or "B" cells. The alloantisera used were HL-A-typing reagents or sera obtained from Amish multiparas. Selected cytotoxicity was found against the B-cell lines by direct testing. Cytotoxicity was abolished by absorption with B-cell line but not by absorption with the T-cell lines. The results suggest that a group of allotypic antigens may be expressed exculsively on human B cells. PMID:1080182

  20. Application of 125I-labelled soluble proteins in the histoautoradiographic detection of antigen and antibodies in the spleen of rabbits during primary immune response.

    PubMed

    Rodák, L

    1975-10-01

    An autoradiographic method for detecting soluble antigen (chicken serum albumin, CSA) and specific antibodies in the spleen of rabbits during a primary immune response is described. The method consists of incubating sections from the spleen with 125I-labelled IgG2 anti CSA (for demonstration of antigen) or with 125I-labelled antigen (for demonstration of specific antibodies). This treatment of histological sections combines the advantages and principles of the immunofluorescence technique with the possibility of evaluating the exact localization of the proteins by light microscopy in preparations stained with haematoxylin or methyl green-pyronin. The sensitivity of detection is very high: both antigen and antibodies could be demonstrated in the spleen follicles for as long as 42 days after the primary intravenous injection.

  1. Development of an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using monoclonal antibodies for detecting H6 avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Tung; Tsao, Zak; Chang, Shu-Ting; Juang, Ron-Huay; Wang, Lih-Chiann; Chang, Chung-Ming; Wang, Ching-Ho

    2012-06-01

    The H6 subtype of avian influenza virus (AIV) infection occurs frequently in wild and domestic birds. AIV antigen detection is preferred for controlling AIV as birds are infected before they produce antibodies. The purpose of this study was to develop an early diagnostic method for AIV detection. Six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) developed from a field H6N1 AIV strain were tested for their ability to bind to viruses. The two that showed the greatest binding ability to AIVs were used for antigen detection. An antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect H6 AIVs was developed using these mAbs. One mAb was coated onto an ELISA plate as the capture antibody. The other mAb was used as the detector antibody after labeling with horseradish peroxidase. The antigen-capture ELISA detected H6N1 AIVs but not H5 AIVs, human H1N1, H3N2 influenza or other viruses. This antigen-capture ELISA could be used to specifically detect H6N1 AIV.

  2. Detection of prostate specific antigen based on electrocatalytic platinum nanoparticles conjugated to a recombinant scFv antibody.

    PubMed

    Spain, Elaine; Gilgunn, Sarah; Sharma, Shikha; Adamson, Kellie; Carthy, Eadaoin; O'Kennedy, Richard; Forster, Robert J

    2016-03-15

    Highly sensitive and label free detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) still remains a challenge in prostate cancer diagnosis. In this paper, we propose a sensitive electrochemical immunosensor based on electrocatalytic platinum nanoparticles conjugated to a recombinant scFv antibody. Gold disc electrodes functionalised with a l-Cysteine (Cys) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) were used to covalently bind PSA specific monoclonal antibody (anti-PSA) using N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide and N-hydroxysuccinimide (EDC/NHS) chemistry. Immunosensing was completed using sandwich-type immunoreaction of the PSA-antigen (1-30 ng/mL) between anti-PSA immobilized on the l-Cys modified electrode using label free electrochemical impedance (EIS) technique. Furthermore, highly specific in-house generated scFv fragments as receptor proteins were utilised for one step site-directed immobilisation on the surface of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs). To improve the sensitivity of the immunoassay, these scFV labelled electrocatalytic PtNPs were then used for covalent hybridisation to the PSA modified electrode and then applied in a hybridisation assay to determine the concentration of the PSA by measuring the faradaic current associated with reduction of peroxide in solution. Semi-log plots of the PSA concentration vs. faradaic current are linear from 1 to 30 ng/mL and pM concentrations can be detected without the need for molecular, e.g., PCR or NASBA, amplification. PMID:26513282

  3. Immunodiagnosis of schistosomiasis patients in The Netherlands: comparison of antibody and antigen detection before and after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, N; Polderman, A M; Hilberath, G W; Krijger, F W; Deelder, A M

    1990-09-01

    We investigated in a retrospective study the application of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the quantitative detection of the schistosome circulating anodic antigen (CAA) to the diagnosis of schistosomiasis in our laboratory. CAA-titres were compared with IgG-titres as determined with an ELISA using soluble egg antigen (SEA) and IgM-titres as determined in an immuno fluorescence assay (IFA) on sections of Rossman's fixed schistosomes. Pre- and post-treatment serum samples of 182 individuals, suspected for schistosomiasis, were used for this study, including 100 control samples. CAA was detected in 20.7% of all patients who were positive in either IFA or SEA-ELISA or both. CAA-titres did not correlate with either IgM-titres or IgG-titres. No significant drop in IgG level was found after specific treatment (Wilcoxon's P = 0.35). In contrast, a significant fall in both IgM-titre (P less than 0.01), and CAA-level (P less than 0.01) was observed. All CAA-titres became negative after chemotherapy.

  4. Is there diagnostic value in detection of immunoglobulin g antibodies to the epstein-barr virus early antigen?

    PubMed

    Crowley, Andrea; Connell, Jeff; Schaffer, Kirsten; Hall, William; Hassan, Jaythoon

    2012-12-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV EA) complex consists of multiple proteins with potential significance for diagnosis of EBV-related diseases. In many individuals, detection of antibody to the early antigen (EA) is a sign of active infection, but 20% of healthy people may have this antibody for years. We studied the role of EA immunoglobulin G (IgG) in individuals with atypical antibody responses in the diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis (IM) and in EBV-infected transplant patients. EA IgG was present in 72% of confirmed IM patients. A trend was observed between high viral loads and the presence of EA IgG and between low viral loads and the absence of EA IgG in EBV-associated disease negative liver transplant recipients. Three assays that measure serum EA IgG were compared; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), chemiluminescent immunoassay (CLIA), and immunoblot assay. The automated CLIA was found to be more accurate than the ELISA when using the immunoblot assay as a "gold standard" assay in the detection of EA IgG. There may be a potential role for EA IgG testing, together with EBV viral load, in the prediction of transplant recipients at risk of EBV-associated disease; however, EA IgG does not play a significant role in the differential diagnosis of EBV infection in immunocompetent individuals.

  5. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave microsensor for Class A viral and bacterial detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Branch, Darren W.; Huber, Dale L.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Edwards, Thayne L.

    2008-10-01

    The rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms is critical to human health and safety. To achieve a high level of sensitivity for fluidic detection applications, we have developed a 330 MHz Love wave acoustic biosensor on 36{sup o} YX Lithium Tantalate (LTO). Each die has four delay-line detection channels, permitting simultaneous measurement of multiple analytes or for parallel detection of single analyte containing samples. Crucial to our biosensor was the development of a transducer that excites the shear horizontal (SH) mode, through optimization of the transducer, minimizing propagation losses and reducing undesirable modes. Detection was achieved by comparing the reference phase of an input signal to the phase shift from the biosensor using an integrated electronic multi-readout system connected to a laptop computer or PDA. The Love wave acoustic arrays were centered at 330 MHz, shifting to 325-328 MHz after application of the silicon dioxide waveguides. The insertion loss was -6 dB with an out-of-band rejection of 35 dB. The amplitude and phase ripple were 2.5 dB p-p and 2-3{sup o} p-p, respectively. Time-domain gating confirmed propagation of the SH mode while showing suppression of the triple transit. Antigen capture and mass detection experiments demonstrate a sensitivity of 7.19 {+-} 0.74{sup o} mm{sup 2}/ng with a detection limit of 6.7 {+-} 0.40 pg/mm{sup 2} for each channel.

  6. Rapid Detection of Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia Using a Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide-Specific Antigen Detection Latex Agglutination Test

    PubMed Central

    March, J. B.; Gammack, C.; Nicholas, R.

    2000-01-01

    Latex microspheres (diameter, 8 μm) were coated with anti-Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) antiserum (anti-F38 biotype). The coated microspheres, when used in a latex agglutination test (LAT), detected M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae antigen in the serum of goats with contagious caprine pleuropneumoniae (CCPP). Beads also agglutinated strongly in the presence of purified M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae capsular polysaccharide (CPS). Preabsorption of CPS-specific antibodies prior to coating of the beads removed agglutinating activity in the presence of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, strongly suggesting that CPS is the likely soluble antigen recognized by the test. In addition, the specificity of the LAT exactly mirrored that of an M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae CPS-specific monoclonal antibody (WM25): of the 8 other mycoplasma species tested, agglutination was observed only with bovine serogroup 7. The LAT detected all 11 strains of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae examined in this study, with a sensitivity level of 2 ng of CPS, or the equivalent of 1.7 × 104 CFU, in a reaction volume of 0.03 ml of serum. With field sera from goats with CCPP, the results of the LAT exhibited a 67% correlation with the results of the currently used complement fixation test (CFT), with the main discrepancy in diagnosis resulting from the increased sensitivity of the LAT compared to that of CFT. This antigen-detection LAT should prove particularly useful in identifying animals in the earliest stages of CCPP and combines sensitivity and low cost with ease of application in the field, without the need for any specialist training or equipment. PMID:11060083

  7. The use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay systems for serology and antigen detection in parvovirus, coronavirus and rotavirus infections in dogs in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Rimmelzwaan, G F; Groen, J; Egberink, H; Borst, G H; UytdeHaag, F G; Osterhaus, A D

    1991-01-01

    Complex trapping blocking (CTB) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and indirect ELISAs for the detection of antibodies to canine parvovirus (CPV), canine coronavirus (CCV) and rotavirus in sera of dogs were established. Double antibody sandwich ELISAs for the detection of CPV-, CCV- and rotavirus antigens in fecal samples were also developed. Both the serological and antigen-detection ELISAs were used to screen samples from dogs in The Netherlands, with or without a history of acute diarrhea. It was shown that the results of the respective serological ELISAs correlated well and that CPV was the major cause of virus-induced acute diarrhea in dogs in The Netherlands. PMID:1850889

  8. Bacterial fermentation of recombinant major wasp allergen Antigen 5 using oxygen limiting growth conditions improves yield and quality of inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Kischnick, Stefanie; Weber, Bernhard; Verdino, Petra; Keller, Walter; Sanders, Ernst A; Anspach, F Birger; Fiebig, Helmut; Cromwell, Oliver; Suck, Roland

    2006-06-01

    A process for bacterial expression and purification of the recombinant major wasp allergen Antigen 5 (Ves v 5) was developed to produce protein for diagnostic and therapeutic applications for type 1 allergic diseases. Special attention was focused on medium selection, fermentation conditions, and efficient refolding procedures. A soy based medium was used for fermentation to avoid peptone from animal origin. Animal-derived peptone required the use of isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for the induction of expression. In the case of soy peptone, a constitutive expression was observed, suggesting the presence of a component that mimics IPTG. Batch cultivation at reduced stirrer speed caused a reduced biomass due to oxygen limitation. However, subsequent purification and processing of inclusion bodies yielded significantly higher amount of product. Furthermore, the protein composition of the inclusion bodies differed. Inclusion bodies were denatured and subjected to diafiltration. Detailed monitoring of diafiltration enabled the determination of the transition point. Final purification was conducted using cation-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified recombinant Ves v 5 was analyzed by RP-HPLC, CD-spectroscopy, SDS-PAGE, and quantification ELISA. Up to 15 mg highly purified Ves v 5 per litre bioreactor volume were obtained, with endotoxin concentrations less than 20 EU mg(-1) protein and high comparability to the natural counterpart. Analytical results confirm the suitability of the recombinant protein for diagnostic and clinical applications. The results clearly demonstrate that not only biomass, but especially growth conditions play a key role in the production of recombinant Ves v 5. This has an influence on inclusion body formation, which in turn influences the renaturation rate and absolute product yield. This might also be true for other recombinant proteins that accumulate as inclusion bodies in Escherichia coli.

  9. Bacterial ClpB heat-shock protein, an antigen-mimetic of the anorexigenic peptide α-MSH, at the origin of eating disorders

    PubMed Central

    Tennoune, N; Chan, P; Breton, J; Legrand, R; Chabane, Y N; Akkermann, K; Järv, A; Ouelaa, W; Takagi, K; Ghouzali, I; Francois, M; Lucas, N; Bole-Feysot, C; Pestel-Caron, M; do Rego, J-C; Vaudry, D; Harro, J; Dé, E; Déchelotte, P; Fetissov, S O

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms at the origin of eating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia and binge-eating disorder (BED), are currently unknown. Previous data indicated that immunoglobulins (Igs) or autoantibodies (auto-Abs) reactive with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) are involved in regulation of feeding and emotion; however, the origin of such auto-Abs is unknown. Here, using proteomics, we identified ClpB heat-shock disaggregation chaperone protein of commensal gut bacteria Escherichia coli as a conformational antigen mimetic of α-MSH. We show that ClpB-immunized mice produce anti-ClpB IgG crossreactive with α-MSH, influencing food intake, body weight, anxiety and melanocortin receptor 4 signaling. Furthermore, chronic intragastric delivery of E. coli in mice decreased food intake and stimulated formation of ClpB- and α-MSH-reactive antibodies, while ClpB-deficient E. coli did not affect food intake or antibody levels. Finally, we show that plasma levels of anti-ClpB IgG crossreactive with α-MSH are increased in patients with AN, bulimia and BED, and that the ED Inventory-2 scores in ED patients correlate with anti-ClpB IgG and IgM, which is similar to our previous findings for α-MSH auto-Abs. In conclusion, this work shows that the bacterial ClpB protein, which is present in several commensal and pathogenic microorganisms, can be responsible for the production of auto-Abs crossreactive with α-MSH, associated with altered feeding and emotion in humans with ED. Our data suggest that ClpB-expressing gut microorganisms might be involved in the etiology of EDs. PMID:25290265

  10. Atypical sensors for direct and rapid neuronal detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji Yeon; Choi, Seung-In; Choi, Geunyeol; Hwang, Sun Wook

    2016-03-09

    Bacterial infection can threaten the normal biological functions of a host, often leading to a disease. Hosts have developed complex immune systems to cope with the danger. Preceding the elimination of pathogens, selective recognition of the non-self invaders is necessary. At the forefront of the body's defenses are the innate immune cells, which are equipped with particular sensor molecules that can detect common exterior patterns of invading pathogens and their secreting toxins as well as with phagocytic machinery. Inflammatory mediators and cytokines released from these innate immune cells and infected tissues can boost the inflammatory cascade and further recruit adaptive immune cells to maximize the elimination and resolution. The nervous system also seems to interact with this process, mostly known to be affected by the inflammatory mediators through the binding of neuronal receptors, consequently activating neural circuits that tune the local and systemic inflammatory states. Recent research has suggested new contact points: direct interactions of sensory neurons with pathogens. Latest findings demonstrated that the sensory neurons not only share pattern recognition mechanisms with innate immune cells, but also utilize endogenous and exogenous electrogenic components for bacterial pathogen detection, by which the electrical firing prompts faster information flow than what could be achieved when the immune system is solely involved. As a result, rapid pain generation and active accommodation of the immune status occur. Here we introduced the sensory neuron-specific detector molecules for directly responding to bacterial pathogens and their signaling mechanisms. We also discussed extended issues that need to be explored in the future.

  11. Comparison of individual and pooled sampling methods for detecting bacterial pathogens of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Evered, J.; Brunson, Ray; Levine, J.; Winton, J.

    2005-01-01

    Examination of finfish populations for viral and bacterial pathogens is an important component of fish disease control programs worldwide. Two methods are commonly used for collecting tissue samples for bacteriological culture, the currently accepted standards for detection of bacterial fish pathogens. The method specified in the Office International des Epizooties Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals permits combining renal and splenic tissues from as many as 5 fish into pooled samples. The American Fisheries Society (AFS) Blue Book/US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Inspection Manual specifies the use of a bacteriological loop for collecting samples from the kidney of individual fish. An alternative would be to more fully utilize the pooled samples taken for virology. If implemented, this approach would provide substantial savings in labor and materials. To compare the relative performance of the AFS/USFWS method and this alternative approach, cultures of Yersinia ruckeri were used to establish low-level infections in groups of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that were sampled by both methods. Yersinia ruckeri was cultured from 22 of 37 groups by at least 1 method. The loop method yielded 18 positive groups, with 1 group positive in the loop samples but negative in the pooled samples. The pooled samples produced 21 positive groups, with 4 groups positive in the pooled samples but negative in the loop samples. There was statistically significant agreement (Spearman coefficient 0.80, P < 0.001) in the relative ability of the 2 sampling methods to permit detection of low-level bacterial infections of rainbow trout.

  12. Detection of bacterial spoilage in some fruit flavoured ultra-high temperature milks in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Acheampong, Y B

    1986-01-01

    Statistical analyses of pH measurements and microbiological methods have been employed to monitor microbial activity (spoilage) in a brand of non-refrigerated mango and vanilla flavoured ultra-high temperature (UHT) milk drinks in Nigeria. The mango flavoured milks were more sensitive to changes in storage conditions than was the vanilla flavoured milks. The aerobic bacterial flora in the spoiled flavoured milks was dominated by Gram-positive cocci, both catalase-positive and catalase-negative types. Coliforms and pseudomonads were also detected. The importance of this study to the methods for detecting spoilage in quality control and to the storage conditions of such products in the tropics is discussed.

  13. Bacterial and viral pathogens detected in sea turtles stranded along the coast of Tuscany, Italy.

    PubMed

    Fichi, G; Cardeti, G; Cersini, A; Mancusi, C; Guarducci, M; Di Guardo, G; Terracciano, G

    2016-03-15

    During 2014, six loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta and one green turtle, Chelonia mydas, found stranded on the Tuscany coast of Italy, were examined for the presence of specific bacterial and viral agents, along with their role as carriers of fish and human pathogens. Thirteen different species of bacteria, 10 Gram negative and 3 Gram positive, were identified. Among them, two strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and one strain of Lactococcus garviae were recovered and confirmed by specific PCR protocols. No trh and tdh genes were detected in V. parahaemolyticus. The first isolation of L. garviae and the first detection of Betanodavirus in sea turtles indicate the possibility for sea turtles to act as carriers of fish pathogens. Furthermore, the isolation of two strains of V. parahaemolyticus highlights the possible role of these animals in human pathogens' diffusion.

  14. Phage-based platforms for the clinical detection of human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, David A.; Sharp, Natasha J.; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) have been utilized for decades as a means for uniquely identifying their target bacteria. Due to their inherent natural specificity, ease of use, and straightforward production, phage possess a number of desirable attributes which makes them particularly suited as bacterial detectors. As a result, extensive research has been conducted into the development of phage, or phage-derived products to expedite the detection of human pathogens. However, very few phage-based diagnostics have transitioned from the research lab into a clinical diagnostic tool. Herein we review the phage-based platforms that are currently used for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus anthracis and Staphylococcus aureus in the clinical field. We briefly describe the disease, the current diagnostic options, and the role phage diagnostics play in identifying the cause of infection, and determining antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:23050221

  15. Bacterial and viral pathogens detected in sea turtles stranded along the coast of Tuscany, Italy.

    PubMed

    Fichi, G; Cardeti, G; Cersini, A; Mancusi, C; Guarducci, M; Di Guardo, G; Terracciano, G

    2016-03-15

    During 2014, six loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta and one green turtle, Chelonia mydas, found stranded on the Tuscany coast of Italy, were examined for the presence of specific bacterial and viral agents, along with their role as carriers of fish and human pathogens. Thirteen different species of bacteria, 10 Gram negative and 3 Gram positive, were identified. Among them, two strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and one strain of Lactococcus garviae were recovered and confirmed by specific PCR protocols. No trh and tdh genes were detected in V. parahaemolyticus. The first isolation of L. garviae and the first detection of Betanodavirus in sea turtles indicate the possibility for sea turtles to act as carriers of fish pathogens. Furthermore, the isolation of two strains of V. parahaemolyticus highlights the possible role of these animals in human pathogens' diffusion. PMID:26931392

  16. Single-shot detection of bacterial endospores via coherent Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pestov, Dmitry; Wang, Xi; Ariunbold, Gombojav O.; Murawski, Robert K.; Sautenkov, Vladimir A.; Dogariu, Arthur; Sokolov, Alexei V.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in coherent Raman spectroscopy hold exciting promise for many potential applications. For example, a technique, mitigating the nonresonant four-wave-mixing noise while maximizing the Raman-resonant signal, has been developed and applied to the problem of real-time detection of bacterial endospores. After a brief review of the technique essentials, we show how extensions of our earlier experimental work [Pestov D, et al. (2007) Science 316:265–268] yield single-shot identification of a small sample of Bacillus subtilis endospores (≈104 spores). The results convey the utility of the technique and its potential for “on-the-fly” detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis. The application of optimized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering scheme to problems requiring chemical specificity and short signal acquisition times is demonstrated. PMID:18184801

  17. Genetic diversity of bacterial agents detected in ticks removed from asymptomatic patients in northeastern Italy.

    PubMed

    Sanogo, Y O; Parola, P; Shpynov, S; Camicas, J L; Brouqui, P; Caruso, G; Raoult, D

    2003-06-01

    A total of 360 ticks were removed from 353 asymptomatic subjects in Belluno Province, Italy and surrounding areas, from 1998 to 2001. Ticks were identified as Ixodes ricinus (357), Ixodes hexagonus (1), Rhipicephalus sanguineus (1), and Ixodes ventalloi (1). Tick DNA was investigated by PCR and subsequent sequencing of amplified products to identity associated bacterial agents. Primers targeting different genes of Rickettsia (gltA and OmpA), Borrelia (16S rDNA, rpoB), Francisella (16S rDNA), and all genera members of the Anaplasmataceae (16S rDNA), were used. DNA of bacterial agents was identified in 28 Ixodes ricinus specimens (7.8%). Rickettsia helvetica was detected in 7 ticks. Rickettsia sp. IRS4 and Borrelia afzelii was detected in 4 ticks each. B. garinii and B. valaisiana were identified in one tick each. Anaplasma phagocytophilum, the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, was identified in 1 specimen of I. ricinus. A new Ehrlichia sp. ("Candidatus Ehrlichia walkerii", sp. nov.) was identified in 10 I. ricinus specimens.

  18. A broadband capacitive sensing method for label-free bacterial LPS detection.

    PubMed

    Rydosz, Artur; Brzozowska, Ewa; Górska, Sabina; Wincza, Krzysztof; Gamian, Andrzej; Gruszczynski, Slawomir

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, the authors present a new type of highly sensitive label-free microwave sensor in a form of interdigital capacitor coated with T4 bacteriophage gp37 adhesin. The adhesin binds Escherichia coli B (E. coli B) by precise recognizing its bacterial host lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The C-terminal part of the adhesin consists of the receptor-binding amino acid residues which are involved in a specific interaction with two terminal glucose residues of the bacterial LPS. The change of the sensors' capacitance and conductance as a subject to LPS presence is an indicator of the detection. The measurements in the frequency range of 0-3GHz utilizing vector network analyzer have been carried out at different concentrations to verify experimentally the proposed method. The measured capacitance change between the reference and the biofunctionalized sensor equals 15% in the entire frequency range and the measured conductance change exceeds 19%. The changes of both parameters can be used as good indicators of the LPS detection. The selectivity has been confirmed by the ELISA experiments and tested by sensor measurements with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from E. coli B, E. coli 056, E. coli 0111, Pseudomonas aeruginosa NBRC 13743 and Hafnia alvei 1185. PMID:26339930

  19. A nanoparticle label/immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jun; Liu, Guodong; Wu, Hong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-06-15

    We present a nanoparticle (NP) label/immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) for rapid and sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum. This IEB integrates the immunochromatographic strip with the electrochemical detector for transducing quantitative signals. The NP label, made of CdSe@ZnS, serves as a signal-amplifier vehicle. A sandwich immunoreaction was performed on the immunochromatographic strip. The captured NP labels in the test zone were determined by highly sensitive stripping voltammetric measurement of the dissolved metallic component (cadmium) with a disposable-screen-printed electrode, which is embedded underneath the membrane of the test zone. Experimental parameters (e.g., immunoreaction time, the amount of anti-PSA-NP conjugations applied) and electrochemical detection conditions (e.g., preconcentration potential and time) were optimized using this biosensor for PSA detection. The analytical performance of this biosensor was evaluated with serum PSA samples according to the “figure-of-merits” (e.g., dynamic range, reproducibility, and detection limit). The results were validated with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and show high consistency. It is found that this biosensor is very sensitive with the detection limit of 0.02 ng/mL PSA and is quite reproducible. This method is rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive than other diagnosis tools for PSA; therefore, this IEB coupled with a portable electrochemical analyzer shows great promise for simple, sensitive, quantitative point-of-care testing of disease-related protein biomarkers.

  20. Direct Detection and Quantification of Bacterial Genes Associated with Inflammation in DNA Isolated from Stool

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Moreno, Ramón; Robledo, Iraida E.; Baerga-Ortiz, Abel

    2014-01-01

    Although predominantly associated with health benefits, the gut microbiota has also been shown to harbor genes that promote inflammation. In this work, we report a method for the direct detection and quantification of these pro-inflammatory bacterial genes by PCR and qPCR in DNA extracted from human stool samples. PCR reactions were performed to detect (i) the pks island genes, (ii) tcpC, which is present in some strains of Escherichia coli and (iii) gelE presented in some strains of Enterococcus faecalis. Additionally, we screened for the presence of the following genes encoding cyclomodulins that disrupted mammalian cell division: (iv) cdt (which encodes the cytolethal distending toxin) and (v) cnf-1 (which encodes the cytotoxic necrotizing factor-1). Our results show that 20% of the samples (N = 41) tested positive for detectable amounts of pks island genes, whereas 10% of individuals were positive for tcpC or gelE and only one individual was found to harbor the cnf-1 gene. Of the 13 individuals that were positive for at least one of the pro-inflammatory genes, 5 were found to harbor more than one. A quantitative version of the assay, which used real-time PCR, revealed the pro-inflammatory genes to be in high copy numbers: up to 1.3 million copies per mg of feces for the pks island genes. Direct detection of specific genes in stool could prove useful toward screening for the presence of pro-inflammatory bacterial genes in individuals with inflammatory bowel diseases or colorectal cancer. PMID:25635239

  1. Real-time Bacterial Detection by Single Cell Based Sensors UsingSynchrotron FTIR Spectromicroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Bertozzi,Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2005-08-10

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell based sensors weredeveloped and demonstrated for real time bacterium detection bysynchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold-SiO2substrates via a surface engineering technique by which the goldelectrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion andthe silicon oxide background were passivated with PEG to resist proteinadsorption and cell adhesion. Cellular morphology and IR spectra ofsingle, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed tolipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared toreveal the detection capabilities of these biosensors. The single-cellbased sensors were found to generate the most significant IR wave numbervariation and thus provide the highest detection sensitivity. Changes inmorphology and IR spectrum for single cells exposed to LPS were found tobe time- and concentration-dependent and correlated with each other verywell. FTIR spectra from single cell arrays of gold electrodes withsurface area of 25 mu-m2, 100 mu-m2, and 400 mu-m2 were acquired usingboth synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes to study thesensitivity of detection. The results indicated that the developedsingle-cell platform can be used with conventional FTIRspectromicroscopy. This technique provides real-time, label-free, andrapid bacterial detection, and may allow for statistic and highthroughput analyses, and portability.

  2. A self-amplified transistor immunosensor under dual gate operation: highly sensitive detection of hepatitis B surface antigen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, I.-K.; Jeun, M.; Jang, H.-J.; Cho, W.-J.; Lee, K. H.

    2015-10-01

    Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs), although they have attracted considerable attention as effective immunosensors, have still not been adopted for practical applications owing to several problems: (1) the poor sensitivity caused by the short Debye screening length in media with high ion concentration, (2) time-consuming preconditioning processes for achieving the highly-diluted media, and (3) the low durability caused by undesirable ions such as sodium chloride in the media. Here, we propose a highly sensitive immunosensor based on a self-amplified transistor under dual gate operation (immuno-DG ISFET) for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen. To address the challenges in current ISFET-based immunosensors, we have enhanced the sensitivity of an immunosensor by precisely tailoring the nanostructure of the transistor. In the pH sensing test, the immuno-DG ISFET showed superior sensitivity (2085.53 mV per pH) to both standard ISFET under single gate operation (58.88 mV per pH) and DG ISFET with a non-tailored transistor (381.14 mV per pH). Moreover, concerning the detection of hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg) using the immuno-DG ISFET, we have successfully detected trace amounts of HBsAg (22.5 fg mL-1) in a non-diluted 1× PBS medium with a high sensitivity of 690 mV. Our results demonstrate that the proposed immuno-DG ISFET can be a biosensor platform for practical use in the diagnosis of various diseases.Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs), although they have attracted considerable attention as effective immunosensors, have still not been adopted for practical applications owing to several problems: (1) the poor sensitivity caused by the short Debye screening length in media with high ion concentration, (2) time-consuming preconditioning processes for achieving the highly-diluted media, and (3) the low durability caused by undesirable ions such as sodium chloride in the media. Here, we propose a highly sensitive immunosensor

  3. Bacterial community composition of chronic periodontitis and novel oral sampling sites for detecting disease indicators

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Periodontitis is an infectious and inflammatory disease of polymicrobial etiology that can lead to the destruction of bones and tissues that support the teeth. The management of chronic periodontitis (CP) relies heavily on elimination or at least control of known pathogenic consortia associated with the disease. Until now, microbial plaque obtained from the subgingival (SubG) sites has been the primary focus for bacterial community analysis using deep sequencing. In addition to the use of SubG plaque, here, we investigated whether plaque obtained from supragingival (SupG) and tongue dorsum sites can serve as alternatives for monitoring CP-associated bacterial biomarkers. Results Using SubG, SupG, and tongue plaque DNA from 11 healthy and 13 diseased subjects, we sequenced V3 regions (approximately 200 bases) of the 16S rRNA gene using Illumina sequencing. After quality filtering, approximately 4.1 million sequences were collapsed into operational taxonomic units (OTUs; sequence identity cutoff of >97%) that were classified to a total of 19 phyla spanning 114 genera. Bacterial community diversity and overall composition was not affected by health or disease, and multiresponse permutation procedure (MRPP) on Bray-Curtis distance measures only supported weakly distinct bacterial communities in SubG and tongue plaque depending on health or disease status (P < 0.05). Nonetheless, in SubG and tongue sites, the relative abundance of Firmicutes was increased significantly from health to disease and members of Synergistetes were found in higher abundance across all sites in disease. Taxa indicative of CP were identified in all three locations (for example, Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Synergistes oral taxa 362 and 363). Conclusions For the first time, this study demonstrates that SupG and tongue dorsum plaque can serve as alternative sources for detecting and enumerating known and novel bacterial biomarkers of CP. This finding is clinically

  4. A self-amplified transistor immunosensor under dual gate operation: highly sensitive detection of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-K; Jeun, M; Jang, H-J; Cho, W-J; Lee, K H

    2015-10-28

    Ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs), although they have attracted considerable attention as effective immunosensors, have still not been adopted for practical applications owing to several problems: (1) the poor sensitivity caused by the short Debye screening length in media with high ion concentration, (2) time-consuming preconditioning processes for achieving the highly-diluted media, and (3) the low durability caused by undesirable ions such as sodium chloride in the media. Here, we propose a highly sensitive immunosensor based on a self-amplified transistor under dual gate operation (immuno-DG ISFET) for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen. To address the challenges in current ISFET-based immunosensors, we have enhanced the sensitivity of an immunosensor by precisely tailoring the nanostructure of the transistor. In the pH sensing test, the immuno-DG ISFET showed superior sensitivity (2085.53 mV per pH) to both standard ISFET under single gate operation (58.88 mV per pH) and DG ISFET with a non-tailored transistor (381.14 mV per pH). Moreover, concerning the detection of hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg) using the immuno-DG ISFET, we have successfully detected trace amounts of HBsAg (22.5 fg mL(-1)) in a non-diluted 1× PBS medium with a high sensitivity of 690 mV. Our results demonstrate that the proposed immuno-DG ISFET can be a biosensor platform for practical use in the diagnosis of various diseases.

  5. Rapid Detection of Contagious Bovine Pleuropneumonia by a Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC Capsular Polysaccharide-Specific Antigen Detection Latex Agglutination Test

    PubMed Central

    March, John B.; Kerr, Karen; Lema, Benedict

    2003-01-01

    A latex agglutination test (LAT) has been developed for the diagnosis of contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP). The latex microspheres were coated with MmmSC polyclonal immunoglobulin G antiserum and detected MmmSC antigen in the serum of cattle infected with CBPP and in growth medium containing MmmSC. The specific antigen recognizsed by this test appeared to be the capsular polysaccharide (CPS). The LAT recognized all 23 strains of MmmSC examined in this study, with a sensitivity level of 2 ng of CPS, or the equivalent of 5 × 103 CFU, in a reaction volume of 0.03 ml. Therefore, rapid identification of MmmSC cultures should be possible. Agglutination was also observed with the related goat pathogens and “Mycoplasma mycoides” cluster members Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides large colony biotype (four of six strains positive) and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (three of six strains positive), in agreement with the suggestion that these latter two mycoplasmas may in fact represent a single species (although collectively exhibiting two capsular serotypes). Comparisons in diagnosis with the complement fixation test (CFT) were made by using African field sera from CBPP-infected cattle. After 2 (or 3) min of incubation, the test detected 55% (or 61%) of CFT-positive sera and 29% (or 40%) of CFT-negative sera, with an overall correlation in diagnosis of 62% (or 61%). The rates for false-positive diagnoses made by using “known” CBPP-negative sera from the United Kingdom were 3 or 13% after 2 or 3 min of incubation, respectively. The data agree with previous findings that some CBPP CFT-negative misdiagnoses may occur due to “antibody eclipsing” by excess circulating antigen. The LAT combines low cost and high specificity with ease of application in the field, without the need for any specialist training or equipment. PMID:12626448

  6. Detection of IgG Anti-Leishmania Antigen by Flow Cytometry as a Diagnostic Test for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Schriefer, Albert; Magalhães, Andréa; Meyer, Roberto; Glesby, Marshall J.; Carvalho, Edgar M.; Carvalho, Lucas P.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) relies on clinical presentation, parasite isolation, histopathologic evaluation and positive Montenegro skin test. However, the low amounts of parasites in the lesion of these individuals make parasite isolation and histopatologic diagnosis unreliable, often leading to false-negative results. Also, 15% of people living in endemic areas have sub-clinical infection characterized by positive Montenegro skin test, which may contribute to misdiagnosis. Although the main Leishmania killing mechanism is through cell-mediated immune response, antibodies against Leishmania antigens are found in infected individuals. Here our goal was to develop a new serological technique using polystyrene microspheres sensitized with soluble Leishmania antigens as a tool for the detection of IgG in serum from CL patients by flow cytometry. To validate the assay we carried out a comparative test (ELISA) commonly used as a diagnostic test for parasitic diseases. To determine cross-reactivity we used serum from patients with Chagas disease, caused by a trypanosome that has several proteins with high homology to those of the Leishmania genus. We observed that the flow cytometry technique was more sensitive than the ELISA, but, less specific. Our results show that the flow cytometry serologic test can be used to confirm CL cases in L. braziliensis transmission areas, however, presence of Chagas disease has to be ruled out in these individuals. PMID:27622535

  7. Detection of IgG Anti-Leishmania Antigen by Flow Cytometry as a Diagnostic Test for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Pedral-Sampaio, Geraldo; Alves, Jessé S; Schriefer, Albert; Magalhães, Andréa; Meyer, Roberto; Glesby, Marshall J; Carvalho, Edgar M; Carvalho, Lucas P

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) relies on clinical presentation, parasite isolation, histopathologic evaluation and positive Montenegro skin test. However, the low amounts of parasites in the lesion of these individuals make parasite isolation and histopatologic diagnosis unreliable, often leading to false-negative results. Also, 15% of people living in endemic areas have sub-clinical infection characterized by positive Montenegro skin test, which may contribute to misdiagnosis. Although the main Leishmania killing mechanism is through cell-mediated immune response, antibodies against Leishmania antigens are found in infected individuals. Here our goal was to develop a new serological technique using polystyrene microspheres sensitized with soluble Leishmania antigens as a tool for the detection of IgG in serum from CL patients by flow cytometry. To validate the assay we carried out a comparative test (ELISA) commonly used as a diagnostic test for parasitic diseases. To determine cross-reactivity we used serum from patients with Chagas disease, caused by a trypanosome that has several proteins with high homology to those of the Leishmania genus. We observed that the flow cytometry technique was more sensitive than the ELISA, but, less specific. Our results show that the flow cytometry serologic test can be used to confirm CL cases in L. braziliensis transmission areas, however, presence of Chagas disease has to be ruled out in these individuals. PMID:27622535

  8. Detection of prostate-specific antigen with biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia-dong; Cheng, Jun-jie; Miao, Bin; Wei, Xiao-wei; Xie, Jie; Zhang, Jin-cheng; Zhang, Zhi-qiang; Wu, Dong-min

    2014-07-01

    In order to improve the sensitivity of AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) biosensors, a simple biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT structure was designed and successfully fabricated for prostate specific antigen (PSA) detection. UV/ozone was used to oxidize the GaN surface and then a 3-aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTES) self-assembled monolayer was bound to the sensing region. This monolayer serves as a binding layer for attachment of the prostate specific antibody (anti-PSA). The biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT sensor shows a rapid and sensitive response when the target prostate-specific antigen in buffer solution was added to the antibody-immobilized sensing area. The current change showed a logarithm relationship against the PSA concentration from 0.1 pg/ml to 0.993 ng/ml. The sensitivity of 0.215% is determined for 0.1 pg/ml PSA solution. The above experimental result of the biomolecule-gated AlGaN/GaN HEMT biosensor suggested that this biosensor might be a useful tool for prostate cancer screening.

  9. Collaborative evaluation of antigen detection by a commercial latex agglutination test and enzyme immunoassay in the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, C; St-Germain, G; Vincelette, J; Kaufman, L; de Repentigny, L

    1990-01-01

    The Cand-Tec Candida detection system and enzyme immunoassay for serum mannan were retrospectively compared in a controlled collaborative evaluation of antigen detection in 32 patients with candidiasis proven by biopsy or culture from a normally sterile site and with sera drawn within 7 days of inclusion. With a threshold titer of 1/8, which excluded false-positive results in 17 hospitalized patients without candidiasis, sensitivities for all 32 patients with candidiasis were 44% for the Cand-Tec assay and 17% for the enzyme immunoassay. Both assays provided greater sensitivity when sera were drawn within 24 h of inclusion in the study and in the category of patients with invasive candidiasis (57% by Cand-Tec and 33% by enzyme immunoassay). The Cand-Tec assay gave false-positive results (titer, greater than or equal to 1/8) in 4 of 6 patients with transient candidemia, in 1 of 20 otherwise healthy patients with rheumatoid factor, and in 1 patient with a positive cryptococcal latex agglutination test. Three serum specimens from 3 of 32 patients with candidiasis contained rheumatoid factor and gave titers of greater than or equal to 1/8 by the Cand-Tec assay. Detection of serum mannan by enzyme immunoassay was less sensitive but more specific than the Cand-Tec Candida detection system for the diagnosis of invasive candidiasis. PMID:2179258

  10. A chitosan-Au-hyperbranched polyester nanoparticles-based antifouling immunosensor for sensitive detection of carcinoembryonic antigen.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chong; Ma, Lie; Qian, Qiuhui; Parmar, Soniya; Zhao, Wenbo; Zhao, Bo; Shen, Jian

    2014-09-01

    Analysts are always interested in finding new functional nanomaterials and devices with good properties for electrochemical sensor applications. In this paper, hyperbranched polyester nanoparticles with carboxylic acid functional groups (HBPE-CA NPs) were synthesized and combined with chitosan wrapped around Au nanoparticles (CS-Au NPs) to prepare a novel and sensitive electrochemical immunosensor by adsorption of carcinoembryonic antibody (anti-CEA) on the (HBPE-CA)/CS-Au NPs modified glass carbon electrode (GCE). Under the optimized conditions, the proposed immunosensor displayed a good amperometric response to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Moreover, based on the antibiofouling properties, the immunosensor could be used for the direct detection of CEA in whole blood, and exhibited a wide detection range (1-10(7) fg mL(-1)), and a low detection limit of 0.251 fg mL(-1) (signal/noise = 3). Control experiments were also carried out by using ascorbic acid (AA), uric acid (UA), human immunoglobulin G (IgG), BSA and glucose in the absence of CEA. The good stability and repeatability of this immunosensor were also proven. Importantly, the results of the detection of clinical whole blood specimens with the proposed immunosensor showed good consistency with the data determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum samples. Furthermore, the developed immunosensor could provide a promising immunoassay strategy for clinical applications, since the values we measured in whole blood directly are likely closer to the real values. PMID:24957417

  11. Europium nanoparticle-based simple to perform dry-reagent immunoassay for the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    PubMed

    Talha, Sheikh M; Salminen, Teppo; Juntunen, Etvi; Spangar, Anni; Gurramkonda, Chandrasekhar; Vuorinen, Tytti; Khanna, Navin; Pettersson, Kim

    2016-03-01

    Hepatitis B infection, caused by hepatitis B virus (HBV), presents a huge global health burden. Serological diagnosis of HBV mainly relies on the detection of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Although there are high sensitivity commercial HBsAg enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) available, many low-resource laboratories lacking trained technicians continue to use rapid point-of-care assays with low sensitivities for HBsAg detection, due to their simplicity to operate. We developed a time-resolved fluorometric dry-reagent HBsAg immunoassay which meets the detection limit of high sensitivity EIAs but is simple to operate. To develop the assay, anti-HBsAg monoclonal antibody coated on europium nanoparticles was dried atop of biotinylated anti-HBsAg polyclonal antibody immobilized on streptavidin-coated microtiter wells. To test a sample in dry-reagent assay, serum sample and assay buffer were added to the wells, incubated, washed and europium signals were measured. The assay showed a detection limit of 0.25 ng/ml using HBsAg spiked in serum sample. When evaluated with 24 HBV positive and 37 negative serum samples, assay showed 100% sensitivity and specificity. Assay wells are stable for at least 26 weeks when stored at 4°C, and can tolerate elevated temperatures of up to 35°C for two weeks. The developed assay has high potential to be used in low-resource laboratories.

  12. Simultaneous Detection of α-Fetoprotein and Carcinoembryonic Antigen Based on Si Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kuiyu; Zhang, Ye; Li, Zengyao; Zhou, Fan; Feng, Kang; Dou, Huiqiang; Wang, Tong

    2015-01-01

    Primary hepatic carcinoma (PHC) is one of the most common malignancies worldwide, resulting in death within six to 20 months. The survival rate can be improved by effective treatments when diagnosed at an early stage. The α-fetoprotein (AFP) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) have been identified as markers that are expressed at higher levels in PHC patients. In this study, we employed silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (SiNW-FETs) with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic channels to simultaneously detect AFP and CEA in desalted human serum. Dual-channel PDMS was first utilized for the selective modification of AFP and CEA antibodies on SiNWs, while single-channel PDMS offers faster and more sensitive detection of AFP and CEA in serum. During the SiNW modification process, 0.1% BSA was utilized to minimize nonspecific protein binding from serum. The linear dynamic ranges for the AFP and CEA detection were measured to be 500 fg/mL to 50 ng/mL and 50 fg/mL to 10 ng/mL, respectively. Our work demonstrates the promising potential of fabricated SiNW-FETs as a direct detection kit for multiple tumor markers in serum; therefore, it provides a chance for early stage diagnose and, hence, more effective treatments for PHC patients. PMID:26251912

  13. Mini-Array of Multiple Tumor-Associated Antigens to Enhance Autoantibody Detection for Immunodiagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2009-01-01

    Liver cancer, especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), is particularly prevalent in Africa and Asia. HCC affects the Hispanic population of the United States at a rate double that of the white population. The majority of people with HCC will die within 1 year of its detection. This high case-fatality rate can in part be attributed to lack of diagnostic methods that allow early detection. How to establish a methodology to identify the high-risk individuals for HCC remains to be investigated. The multi-factorial and multi-step nature in the molecular pathogenesis of human cancers must be taken into account in both the design and interpretation of studies to identify markers which will be useful for early detection of cancer. Our recent studies demonstrated that a mini-array of multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) might enhance autoantibody detection for diagnosis of HCC, especially for the alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-negative cases. It also suggested that different types of cancer might require different panels of TAAs to achieve the sensitivity and specificity required to make immunodiagnosis a feasible adjunct to tumor diagnosis. PMID:17289549

  14. A microfluidic immunoassay platform for the detection of free prostate specific antigen: a systematic and quantitative approach.

    PubMed

    Madaboosi, Narayanan; Soares, Ruben R G; Chu, Virginia; Conde, João Pedro

    2015-07-01

    As a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men globally, prostate cancer (PCa) demands immense attention for theranostic purposes. There is an increasing need for the development of rapid, sensitive, economical, miniaturized and multiplexable assays. Towards this goal, we present a systematic approach for the optimisation of a microfluidic sandwich immunoassay, which can be applied as a generic biosensor platform for PCa detection. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was used as the model biomarker, and its free form was captured using commercially available antibodies and detected using chemiluminescence, both in spiked buffer and matrix solutions. Along with the optimisation of surface chemistry and microfluidic parameters, we report a bio-affinity amplification strategy based on biotin-streptavidin chemistry to bring the limits of detection for free-PSA from 21.4 ng mL(-1) down to 2.7 ng mL(-1), within the clinically relevant range. An estimate of the surface coverage and simulations of the interactions taking place in the microfluidic biosensor during the assay are also presented. This novel platform using a simple passive adsorption-based bio-affinity strategy, when coupled with multiplexing and integrated detection, can serve as a promising point-of-care diagnostic tool for PCa. PMID:25988197

  15. Optimisation of the detection of bacterial proteases using adsorbed immunoglobulins as universal substrates.

    PubMed

    Abuknesha, Ram A; Jeganathan, Fiona; Wildeboer, Dirk; Price, Robert G

    2010-06-15

    Bacterial proteases, Type XXIV from Bacillus licheniformens and Type XIV from Streptomyces griseus, were used to investigate the utility and optimisation of a solid phase assay for proteases, using immunoglobulin proteins as substrates. Immunoglobulins IgA and IgG were adsorbed on to surfaces of ELISA plates and exposed to various levels of the bacterial proteases which led to digestion and desorption of proportional amounts of the immunoglobulins. The assay signal was developed by measuring the remaining proteins on the polystyrene surface with appropriate enzyme-labelled anti-immunoglobulin reagents. The assay was fully optimised in terms of substrate levels employing ELISA techniques to titrate levels of adsorbed substrates and protease analytes. The critical factor which influences assay sensitivity was found to be the substrate concentration, the levels of adsorbed immunoglobulins. The estimated detection limits for protease XXIV and XIV were 10micro units/test and 9micro units/test using IgA as a substrate. EC(50) values were calculated as 213 and 48micro units/test for each protease respectively. Using IgG as a substrate, the estimated detection limits were 104micro units/test for protease XXIV and 9micro units/test for protease XIV. EC(50) values were calculated at 529micro units/test and 28micro units/test for protease XXIV and XIV respectively. The solid phase protease assay required no modification of the substrates and the adsorption step is merely simple addition of immunoglobulins to ELISA plates. Adsorption of the immunoglobulins to polystyrene enabled straightforward separation of reaction mixtures prior to development of assay signal. The assay exploits the advantages of the technical facilities of ELISA technology and commercially available reagents enabling the detection and measurement of a wide range of proteases. However, the key issue was found to be that in order to achieve the potential performance of the simple assay, optimisation of the

  16. Single-cell-based sensors and synchrotron FTIR spectroscopy: a hybrid system towards bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-09-30

    Microarrays of single macrophage cell-based sensors were developed and demonstrated for potential real-time bacterium detection by synchrotron FTIR microscopy. The cells were patterned on gold electrodes of silicon oxide substrates by a surface engineering technique, in which the gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin to mediate cell adhesion and the silicon oxide background was passivated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to resist protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Cell morphology and IR spectra of single, double, and triple cells on gold electrodes exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of different concentrations were compared to reveal the detection capability of this cell-based sensing platform. The single-cell-based system was found to generate the most significant and consistent IR spectrum shifts upon exposure to LPS, thus providing the highest detection sensitivity. Changes in cell morphology and IR shifts upon cell exposure to LPS were found to be dependent on the LPS concentration and exposure time, which established a method for the identification of LPS concentration and infected cell population. Possibility of using this single-cell system with conventional IR spectroscopy as well as its limitation was investigated by comparing IR spectra of single-cell arrays with gold electrode surface areas of 25, 100, and 400 microm2 using both synchrotron and conventional FTIR spectromicroscopes. This cell-based platform may potentially provide real-time, label-free, and rapid bacterial detection, and allow for high-throughput statistical analyses, and portability. PMID:17560777

  17. Label- and amplification-free electrochemical detection of bacterial ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Henihan, Grace; Schulze, Holger; Corrigan, Damion K; Giraud, Gerard; Terry, Jonathan G; Hardie, Alison; Campbell, Colin J; Walton, Anthony J; Crain, Jason; Pethig, Ronald; Templeton, Kate E; Mount, Andrew R; Bachmann, Till T

    2016-07-15

    Current approaches to molecular diagnostics rely heavily on PCR amplification and optical detection methods which have restrictions when applied to point of care (POC) applications. Herein we describe the development of a label-free and amplification-free method of pathogen detection applied to Escherichia coli which overcomes the bottleneck of complex sample preparation and has the potential to be implemented as a rapid, cost effective test suitable for point of care use. Ribosomal RNA is naturally amplified in bacterial cells, which makes it a promising target for sensitive detection without the necessity for prior in vitro amplification. Using fluorescent microarray methods with rRNA targets from a range of pathogens, an optimal probe was selected from a pool of probe candidates identified in silico. The specificity of probes was investigated on DNA microarray using fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA target. The probe yielding highest specificity performance was evaluated in terms of sensitivity and a LOD of 20 pM was achieved on fluorescent glass microarray. This probe was transferred to an EIS end point format and specificity which correlated to microarray data was demonstrated. Excellent sensitivity was facilitated by the use of uncharged PNA probes and large 16S rRNA target and investigations resulted in an LOD of 50 pM. An alternative kinetic EIS assay format was demonstrated with which rRNA could be detected in a species specific manner within 10-40min at room temperature without wash steps. PMID:27016627

  18. Label- and amplification-free electrochemical detection of bacterial ribosomal RNA.

    PubMed

    Henihan, Grace; Schulze, Holger; Corrigan, Damion K; Giraud, Gerard; Terry, Jonathan G; Hardie, Alison; Campbell, Colin J; Walton, Anthony J; Crain, Jason; Pethig, Ronald; Templeton, Kate E; Mount, Andrew R; Bachmann, Till T

    2016-07-15

    Current approaches to molecular diagnostics rely heavily on PCR amplification and optical detection methods which have restrictions when applied to point of care (POC) applications. Herein we describe the development of a label-free and amplification-free method of pathogen detection applied to Escherichia coli which overcomes the bottleneck of complex sample preparation and has the potential to be implemented as a rapid, cost effective test suitable for point of care use. Ribosomal RNA is naturally amplified in bacterial cells, which makes it a promising target for sensitive detection without the necessity for prior in vitro amplification. Using fluorescent microarray methods with rRNA targets from a range of pathogens, an optimal probe was selected from a pool of probe candidates identified in silico. The specificity of probes was investigated on DNA microarray using fluorescently labeled 16S rRNA target. The probe yielding highest specificity performance was evaluated in terms of sensitivity and a LOD of 20 pM was achieved on fluorescent glass microarray. This probe was transferred to an EIS end point format and specificity which correlated to microarray data was demonstrated. Excellent sensitivity was facilitated by the use of uncharged PNA probes and large 16S rRNA target and investigations resulted in an LOD of 50 pM. An alternative kinetic EIS assay format was demonstrated with which rRNA could be detected in a species specific manner within 10-40min at room temperature without wash steps.

  19. Smart central venous port for early detection of bacterial biofilm related infections.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J; Alonso-Arce, M; Schmidt, C; Valderas, D; Sedano, B; Legarda, J; Arizti, F; Gómez, E; Aguinaga, A; Del Pozo, J L; Arana, S

    2014-06-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are commonly used in clinical practice to improve a patient's quality of life. Unfortunately, there is an intrinsic risk of acquiring an infection related to microbial biofilm formation inside the catheter lumen. It has been estimated that 80 % of all human bacterial infections are biofilm-associated. Additionally, 50 % of all nosocomial infections are associated with indwelling devices. Bloodstream infections account for 30-40 % of all cases of severe sepsis and septic shock, and are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of bloodstream infections must be performed promptly so that adequate antimicrobial therapy can be started and patient outcome improved. An ideal diagnostic technology would identify the infecting organism(s) in a timely manner, so that appropriate pathogen-driven therapy could begin promptly. Unfortunately, despite the essential information it provides, blood culture, the gold standard, largely fails in this purpose because time is lost waiting for bacterial or fungal growth. This work presents a new design of a venous access port that allows the monitoring of the inner reservoir surface by means of an impedimetric biosensor. An ad-hoc electronic system was designed to manage the sensor and to allow communication with the external receiver. Historic data recorded and stored in the device was used as the reference value for the detection of bacterial biofilm. The RF communication system sends an alarm signal to the external receiver when a microbial colonization of the port occurs. The successful in vitro analysis of the biosensor, the electronics and the antenna of the new indwelling device prototype are shown. The experimental conditions were selected in each case as the closest to the clinical working conditions for the smart central venous catheter (SCVC) testing. The results of this work allow a new generation of this kind of device that could potentially provide more efficient treatments for

  20. Smart central venous port for early detection of bacterial biofilm related infections.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J; Alonso-Arce, M; Schmidt, C; Valderas, D; Sedano, B; Legarda, J; Arizti, F; Gómez, E; Aguinaga, A; Del Pozo, J L; Arana, S

    2014-06-01

    Central venous catheters (CVC) are commonly used in clinical practice to improve a patient's quality of life. Unfortunately, there is an intrinsic risk of acquiring an infection related to microbial biofilm formation inside the catheter lumen. It has been estimated that 80 % of all human bacterial infections are biofilm-associated. Additionally, 50 % of all nosocomial infections are associated with indwelling devices. Bloodstream infections account for 30-40 % of all cases of severe sepsis and septic shock, and are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Diagnosis of bloodstream infections must be performed promptly so that adequate antimicrobial therapy can be started and patient outcome improved. An ideal diagnostic technology would identify the infecting organism(s) in a timely manner, so that appropriate pathogen-driven therapy could begin promptly. Unfortunately, despite the essential information it provides, blood culture, the gold standard, largely fails in this purpose because time is lost waiting for bacterial or fungal growth. This work presents a new design of a venous access port that allows the monitoring of the inner reservoir surface by means of an impedimetric biosensor. An ad-hoc electronic system was designed to manage the sensor and to allow communication with the external receiver. Historic data recorded and stored in the device was used as the reference value for the detection of bacterial biofilm. The RF communication system sends an alarm signal to the external receiver when a microbial colonization of the port occurs. The successful in vitro analysis of the biosensor, the electronics and the antenna of the new indwelling device prototype are shown. The experimental conditions were selected in each case as the closest to the clinical working conditions for the smart central venous catheter (SCVC) testing. The results of this work allow a new generation of this kind of device that could potentially provide more efficient treatments for

  1. Diagnosis of Chikungunya Fever in an Indian Population by an Indirect Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Protocol Based on an Antigen Detection Assay: a Prospective Cohort Study▿

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Rajpal Singh; Morey, Shweta H.; Ramteke, Sonali S.; Chandak, Nitin H.; Parida, Manmohan; Deshpande, Poonam S.; Purohit, Hemant J.; Taori, Girdhar M.; Daginawala, Hatim F.

    2010-01-01

    A Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) outbreak continues in India. Monitoring of the clinical features of CHIKV infection is an important component of assessing the disease process. Diagnosis is usually made by an immunoglobulin M (IgM)/IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). However, these assays have extremely low sensitivities for the detection of infection in the majority of CHIKV patients during the acute stage of infection (during the 1 to 4 days after infection). In our laboratory, a sensitive ELISA protocol for antigen detection has been developed for the detection of CHIKV infection in the acute stage, and in the present study we assessed the usefulness of this ELISA-based system for the detection of CHIKV infection. We performed a prospective, double-blinded study of 205 Indian patients with suspected CHIKV infection in the Nagpur District. All patients underwent a full clinical assessment, and their serum samples were analyzed for the presence of antigens and of IgM and IgG by an ELISA protocol. In patients with CHIKV infection, the sensitivity of antigen detection was 85%, which was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than that of IgM (17%) or IgG (45%) detection. The sensitivity of IgM (20%) or IgG (25%) detection was significantly lower than that of the antigen assay (95%) for patients with acute infections (i.e., from day 1 to day 5 after infection). Antigen detection not only gives a positive confirmatory result in the early phase of the disease, but it is also useful in the prodromal and subclinical stage and may be useful for field applications for the rapid detection of CHIKV infection. PMID:20007365

  2. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R; Barany, Francis; Soper, Steven A

    2012-09-21

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft(3)). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic

  3. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R; Barany, Francis; Soper, Steven A

    2012-09-21

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft(3)). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic

  4. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Barany, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft3). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic system

  5. Identification of Threshold Prostate Specific Antigen Levels to Optimize the Detection of Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer by Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Ultrasound Fusion Guided Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Shakir, Nabeel A.; George, Arvin K.; Siddiqui, M. Minhaj; Rothwax, Jason T.; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Stamatakis, Lambros; Su, Daniel; Okoro, Chinonyerem; Raskolnikov, Dima; Walton-Diaz, Annerleim; Simon, Richard; Turkbey, Baris; Choyke, Peter L.; Merino, Maria J.; Wood, Bradford J.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Prostate specific antigen sensitivity increases with lower threshold values but with a corresponding decrease in specificity. Magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy detects prostate cancer more efficiently and of higher grade than standard 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsy but the optimal population for its use is not well defined. We evaluated the performance of magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsy vs 12-core biopsy across a prostate specific antigen continuum. Materials and Methods We reviewed the records of all patients enrolled in a prospective trial who underwent 12-core transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging/ultrasound targeted biopsies from August 2007 through February 2014. Patients were stratified by each of 4 prostate specific antigen cutoffs. The greatest Gleason score using either biopsy method was compared in and across groups as well as across the population prostate specific antigen range. Clinically significant prostate cancer was defined as Gleason 7 (4 + 3) or greater. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results A total of 1,003 targeted and 12-core transrectal ultrasound biopsies were performed, of which 564 diagnosed prostate cancer for a 56.2% detection rate. Targeted biopsy led to significantly more upgrading to clinically significant disease compared to 12-core biopsy. This trend increased more with increasing prostate specific antigen, specifically in patients with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 and greater than 10 ng/ml. Prostate specific antigen 5.2 ng/ml or greater captured 90% of upgrading by targeted biopsy, corresponding to 64% of patients who underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent fusion biopsy. Conversely a greater proportion of clinically insignificant disease was detected by 12-core vs targeted biopsy overall. These differences persisted when controlling for potential confounders on multivariate analysis. Conclusions Prostate

  6. Site-selective in situ growth of fluorescent polymer-antibody conjugates with enhanced antigen detection by signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Libin; Zhao, Wenguo; Liu, Xinyu; Wang, Guilin; Wang, Yang; Li, Dong; Xie, Liangzhi; Gao, Yan; Deng, Haiteng; Gao, Weiping

    2015-09-01

    This paper reports a new and general in situ methodology to grow fluorescent polymer conjugates from the interchain disulfide bridging sites of a monoclonal antibody. Atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) initiators were attached to a monoclonal antibody at its interchain disulfide bridging sites by disulfide re-bridging to yield a macroinitiator. Subsequent in situ ATRP of PEG-like monomers with dye-functionalized monomers from the macroinitiator formed antibody-polymer-dye conjugates with site-selectivity and tunable dye-to-antibody ratios. Notably, these conjugates can amplify antigen detection signal by reducing label-density dependent fluorescence quenching and by increasing dye-to-antibody ratios. The method developed may be applicable to a variety of antibodies, dyes and drugs to create a number of antibody-polymer-dye/drug conjugates for advanced diagnosis and therapy of diseases. PMID:26102329

  7. Virus enzyme-linked cell immunoassay (VELCIA): detection and titration of rotavirus antigen and demonstration of rotavirus neutralizing and total antibodies.

    PubMed

    Grom, J; Bernard, S

    1985-02-01

    Virus enzyme-linked cell immunoassay (VELCIA) for detection and titration of rotavirus antigen has been developed. Wild-type porcine rotavirus antigen can be detected and titrated directly from the fecal material within 24 h. Porcine OSU strain can be titrated higher than 10(-8). The method has also been introduced for the demonstration of rotavirus neutralizing and total antibodies. In VELCIA the advantages of the cell culture system for virus isolation are combined with enzyme immunodetection and spectrophotometrical reading of the test.

  8. Recombinant UL30 antigen-based single serum dilution ELISA for detection of duck viral enteritis.

    PubMed

    Aravind, S; Patil, B R; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan

    2012-11-01

    A recombinant UL30 antigen-based single serum dilution enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to measure specific antibody in the sera of ducks against duck enteritis virus (DEV). The partial UL30 gene of DEV was cloned, expressed, purified and tested for its diagnostic use by designing a single serum dilution enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). A total of 226 duck sera samples were tested using the assay. A linear relationship was found between the predicted antibody titres at a single working dilution of 1:100 and the corresponding serum titres observed as determined by the standard serial dilution method. Regression analysis was used to determine a standard curve from which an equation was derived which demonstrated this correlation. The equation was then used to convert the corrected absorbance readings of the single working dilution directly into the predicted ELISA antibody titres. The assay proved to be specific, sensitive and accurate as compared to the virus neutralization test with a specificity, sensitivity and accuracy being 96%, 95% and 95% respectively.

  9. Recent developments in antibody-based assays for the detection of bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kui; Dietrich, Richard; Didier, Andrea; Doyscher, Dominik; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2014-04-11

    Considering the urgent demand for rapid and accurate determination of bacterial toxins and the recent promising developments in nanotechnology and microfluidics, this review summarizes new achievements of the past five years. Firstly, bacterial toxins will be categorized according to their antibody binding properties into low and high molecular weight compounds. Secondly, the types of antibodies and new techniques for producing antibodies are discussed, including poly- and mono-clonal antibodies, single-chain variable fragments (scFv), as well as heavy-chain and recombinant antibodies. Thirdly, the use of different nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), quantum dots (QDs) and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotube), for labeling antibodies and toxins or for readout techniques will be summarized. Fourthly, microscale analysis or minimized devices, for example microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip (LOC), which have attracted increasing attention in combination with immunoassays for the robust detection or point-of-care testing (POCT), will be reviewed. Finally, some new materials and analytical strategies, which might be promising for analyzing toxins in the near future, will be shortly introduced.

  10. Nile Red Detection of Bacterial Hydrocarbons and Ketones in a High-Throughput Format

    PubMed Central

    Pinzon, Neissa M.; Aukema, Kelly G.; Gralnick, Jeffrey A.; Wackett, Lawrence P.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT A method for use in high-throughput screening of bacteria for the production of long-chain hydrocarbons and ketones by monitoring fluorescent light emission in the presence of Nile red is described. Nile red has previously been used to screen for polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and fatty acid esters, but this is the first report of screening for recombinant bacteria making hydrocarbons or ketones. The microtiter plate assay was evaluated using wild-type and recombinant strains of Shewanella oneidensis and Escherichia coli expressing the enzyme OleA, previously shown to initiate hydrocarbon biosynthesis. The strains expressing exogenous Stenotrophomonas maltophilia oleA, with increased levels of ketone production as determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, were distinguished with Nile red fluorescence. Confocal microscopy images of S. oneidensis oleA-expressing strains stained with Nile red were consistent with a membrane localization of the ketones. This differed from Nile red staining of bacterial PHB or algal lipid droplets that showed intracellular inclusion bodies. These results demonstrated the applicability of Nile red in a high-throughput technique for the detection of bacterial hydrocarbons and ketones. PMID:21712420

  11. Beetroot-pigment-derived colorimetric sensor for detection of calcium dipicolinate in bacterial spores.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Letícia Christina Pires; Da Silva, Sandra Maria; DeRose, Paul C; Ando, Rômulo Augusto; Bastos, Erick Leite

    2013-01-01

    In this proof-of-concept study, we describe the use of the main red beet pigment betanin for the quantification of calcium dipicolinate in bacterial spores, including Bacillus anthracis. In the presence of europium(III) ions, betanin is converted to a water-soluble, non-luminescent orange 1∶1 complex with a stability constant of 1.4 × 10(5) L mol(-1). The addition of calcium dipicolinate, largely found in bacterial spores, changes the color of the aqueous solution of [Eu(Bn)(+)] from orange to magenta. The limit of detection (LOD) of calcium dipicolinate is around 2.0 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) and the LOD determined for both spores, B. cereus and B. anthracis, is (1.1 ± 0.3)× 10(6) spores mL(-1). This simple, green, fast and low cost colorimetric assay was selective for calcium dipicolinate when compared to several analogous compounds. The importance of this work relies on the potential use of betalains, raw natural pigments, as colorimetric sensors for biological applications. PMID:24019934

  12. Recent Developments in Antibody-Based Assays for the Detection of Bacterial Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kui; Dietrich, Richard; Didier, Andrea; Doyscher, Dominik; Märtlbauer, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Considering the urgent demand for rapid and accurate determination of bacterial toxins and the recent promising developments in nanotechnology and microfluidics, this review summarizes new achievements of the past five years. Firstly, bacterial toxins will be categorized according to their antibody binding properties into low and high molecular weight compounds. Secondly, the types of antibodies and new techniques for producing antibodies are discussed, including poly- and mono-clonal antibodies, single-chain variable fragments (scFv), as well as heavy-chain and recombinant antibodies. Thirdly, the use of different nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), quantum dots (QDs) and carbon nanomaterials (graphene and carbon nanotube), for labeling antibodies and toxins or for readout techniques will be summarized. Fourthly, microscale analysis or minimized devices, for example microfluidics or lab-on-a-chip (LOC), which have attracted increasing attention in combination with immunoassays for the robust detection or point-of-care testing (POCT), will be reviewed. Finally, some new materials and analytical strategies, which might be promising for analyzing toxins in the near future, will be shortly introduced. PMID:24732203

  13. Prostate-specific Antigen Density Variation Rate as a Potential Guideline Parameter for Second Prostate Cancer Detection Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Gan-Sheng; Lyv, Jin-Xing; Li, Gang; Yan, Chun-Yin; Hou, Jian-Quan; Pu, Jin-Xian; Ding, Xiang; Huang, Yu-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: The diagnostic value of current prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests is challenged by the poor detection rate of prostate cancer (PCa) in repeat prostate biopsy. In this study, we proposed a novel PSA-related parameter named PSA density variation rate (PSADVR) and designed a clinical trial to evaluate its potential diagnostic value for detecting PCa on a second prostate biopsy. Methods: Data from 184 males who underwent second ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy 6 months after the first biopsy were included in the study. The subjects were divided into PCa and non-PCa groups according to the second biopsy pathological results. Prostate volume, PSA density (PSAD), free-total PSA ratio, and PSADVR were calculated according to corresponding formulas at the second biopsy. These parameters were compared using t-test or Mann-Whitney U-test between PCa and non-PCa groups, and receiver operating characteristic analysis were used to evaluate their predictability on PCa detection. Results: PCa was detected in 24 patients on the second biopsy. Mean values of PSA, PSAD, and PSADVR were greater in the PCa group than in the non-PCa group (8.39 μg/L vs. 7.16 μg/L, 0.20 vs. 0.16, 14.15% vs. −1.36%, respectively). PSADVR had the largest area under the curve, with 0.667 sensitivity and 0.824 specificity when the cutoff was 10%. The PCa detection rate was significantly greater in subjects with PSADVR >10% than PSADVR ≤10% (28.6% vs. 6.5%, P < 0.001). In addition, PSADVR was the only parameter in this study that showed a significant correlation with mid-to-high-risk PCa (r = 0.63, P = 0.03). Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that PSADVR improved the PCa detection rate on second biopsies, especially for mid-to-high-risk cancers requiring prompt treatment. PMID:27453228

  14. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Quinn, Conrad P; Schiffer, Jarad M; Boyer, Anne E; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A; Soroka, Stephen D; Dauphin, Leslie A; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63×10(-6)μM (0.551ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51×10(-5)μM (1.58ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through the use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex.

  15. Bacterial sensors based on biosilica immobilization for label-free OWLS detection.

    PubMed

    Adányi, Nóra; Bori, Zsuzsanna; Szendrő, István; Erdélyi, Katalin; Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2013-06-25

    In the last years, a new group of enzymes, the so-called silicateins, have been identified and characterized, which form the axial filaments of the spicules of the siliceous sponges, consisting of not only amorphous silica among others. These enzymes are able to catalyze the polycondensation and deposition of silica at mild conditions. Silicateins can be expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant proteins are expressed on the surface of the cell wall and are able to catalyze the formation of a polysilicate net around the bacterial cells providing the possibility for further attachment to the surface of SiO2 containing sensor chips. With this mild immobilization process it is now possible to prepare novel microbial sensors based on Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopy. In the present study, the immobilization of silicatein modified E. coli BL21AI cells onto the SiO2-type chips was optimized (buffer concentration, pH, temperature, reaction time, and so on) and then the biological properties, in particular the inhibitory effect of stressors/environmental pollutants on the novel bacterial sensor were studied in real time. The effect of oxidative stress was investigated by exposing the sensors containing biosilica-immobilized E. coli BL21AI cells to various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. The effect of antibiotics was tested using chloramphenicol (CAP) which is effective against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and penicillin G which destroys the bacterial cell wall. In addition, the inhibition by carbofuran (CF) pesticide was also tested. CF is a highly toxic compound which inhibits cholinesterase activity. According our results we can conclude that the novel bacterial sensor consisting of the silicatein modified E. coli BL21AI cells immobilized on OWLS sensor surface could be an effective tool to detect the presence of different type of pollutants in real time measurement. However penicillin G and CF are not specifically inhibitors of

  16. Detection of bacterial endospores by means of ultrafast coherent Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pestov, Dmitry Sergeyevich

    This work is devoted to formulation and development of a laser spectroscopic technique for rapid detection of biohazards, such as Bacillus anthracis spores. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is used as an underlying process for active retrieval of species-specific characteristics of an analyte. Vibrational modes of constituent molecules are Raman-excited by a pair of ultrashort, femtosecond laser pulses, and then probed through inelastic scattering of a third, time-delayed laser field. We first employ the already known time-resolved CARS technique. We apply it to the spectroscopy of easy-to-handle methanol-water mixtures, and then continue building our expertise on solutions of dipicolinic acid (DPA) and its salts, which happen to be marker molecules for bacterial spores. Various acquisition schemes are evaluated, and the preference is given to multi-channel frequency-resolved detection, when the whole CARS spectrum is recorded as a function of the probe pulse delay. We demonstrate a simple detection algorithm that manages to differentiate DPA solution from common interferents. We investigate experimentally the advantages and disadvantages of near-resonant probing of the excited molecular coherence, and finally observe the indicative backscattered CARS signal from DPA and NaDPA powders. The possibility of selective Raman excitation via pulse shaping of the preparation pulses is also demonstrated. The analysis of time-resolved CARS experiments on powders and B. subtilis spores, a harmless surrogate for B. anthracis, facilitates the formulation of a new approach, where we take full advantage of the multi-channel frequency-resolved acquisition and spectrally discriminate the Raman-resonant CARS signal from the background due to other instantaneous four-wave mixing (FWM) processes. Using narrowband probing, we decrease the magnitude of the nonresonant FWM, which is further suppressed by the timing of the laser pulses. The devised technique, referred to as

  17. A Protein-Conjugate Approach to Develop a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Antigen Detection Test for the Diagnosis of Human Brucellosis

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Kailash P.; Saito, Mayuko; Atluri, Vidya L.; Rolán, Hortensia G.; Young, Briana; Kerri