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Sample records for bacterial dermatitis staphylococcus

  1. Dysbiosis and Staphylococcus aureus colonization drives inflammation in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Glatz, Martin; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kaplan, Daniel H.; Kong, Heidi H.; Amagai, Masayuki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Summary Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization is universal in atopic dermatitis and common in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. However, the causal relationship of dysbiosis and eczema has yet to be clarified. Herein, we demonstrate that Adam17fl/flSox9-Cre mice, generated to model ADAM17-deficiency in human, developed eczematous dermatitis with naturally occurring dysbiosis, similar to that observed in atopic dermatitis. Corynebacterium mastitidis, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis sequentially emerged during the onset of eczematous dermatitis, and antibiotic specific for these bacterial species almost completely reversed dysbiosis and eliminated skin inflammation. Whereas S. aureus prominently drove eczema formation, C. bovis induced robust T helper 2 cell responses. Langerhans cells were required for eliciting immune responses against S. aureus inoculation. These results characterize differential contributions of dysbiotic flora during eczema formation, and highlight the microbiota-host immunity axis as a possible target for future therapeutics in eczematous dermatitis. PMID:25902485

  2. Dysbiosis and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization Drives Inflammation in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Glatz, Martin; Horiuchi, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kaplan, Daniel H; Kong, Heidi H; Amagai, Masayuki; Nagao, Keisuke

    2015-04-21

    Staphylococcus aureus skin colonization is universal in atopic dermatitis and common in cancer patients treated with epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors. However, the causal relationship of dysbiosis and eczema has yet to be clarified. Herein, we demonstrate that Adam17(fl/fl)Sox9-(Cre) mice, generated to model ADAM17-deficiency in human, developed eczematous dermatitis with naturally occurring dysbiosis, similar to that observed in atopic dermatitis. Corynebacterium mastitidis, S. aureus, and Corynebacterium bovis sequentially emerged during the onset of eczematous dermatitis, and antibiotics specific for these bacterial species almost completely reversed dysbiosis and eliminated skin inflammation. Whereas S. aureus prominently drove eczema formation, C. bovis induced robust T helper 2 cell responses. Langerhans cells were required for eliciting immune responses against S. aureus inoculation. These results characterize differential contributions of dysbiotic flora during eczema formation, and highlight the microbiota-host immunity axis as a possible target for future therapeutics in eczematous dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis strain diversity underlying pediatric atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Allyson L; Deming, Clay; Cassidy, Sara K B; Harrison, Oliver J; Ng, Weng-Ian; Conlan, Sean; Belkaid, Yasmine; Segre, Julia A; Kong, Heidi H

    2017-07-05

    The heterogeneous course, severity, and treatment responses among patients with atopic dermatitis (AD; eczema) highlight the complexity of this multifactorial disease. Prior studies have used traditional typing methods on cultivated isolates or sequenced a bacterial marker gene to study the skin microbial communities of AD patients. Shotgun metagenomic sequence analysis provides much greater resolution, elucidating multiple levels of microbial community assembly ranging from kingdom to species and strain-level diversification. We analyzed microbial temporal dynamics from a cohort of pediatric AD patients sampled throughout the disease course. Species-level investigation of AD flares showed greater Staphylococcus aureus predominance in patients with more severe disease and Staphylococcus epidermidis predominance in patients with less severe disease. At the strain level, metagenomic sequencing analyses demonstrated clonal S. aureus strains in more severe patients and heterogeneous S. epidermidis strain communities in all patients. To investigate strain-level biological effects of S. aureus , we topically colonized mice with human strains isolated from AD patients and controls. This cutaneous colonization model demonstrated S. aureus strain-specific differences in eliciting skin inflammation and immune signatures characteristic of AD patients. Specifically, S. aureus isolates from AD patients with more severe flares induced epidermal thickening and expansion of cutaneous T helper 2 (T H 2) and T H 17 cells. Integrating high-resolution sequencing, culturing, and animal models demonstrated how functional differences of staphylococcal strains may contribute to the complexity of AD disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  4. Nickel allergy and relationship with Staphylococcus aureus in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bogdali, Anna M; Anna, Bogdali M; Grazyna, Antoszczyk; Wojciech, Dyga; Aleksander, Obtulowicz; Anna, Bialecka; Andrzej, Kasprowicz; Zofia, Magnowska; Krystyna, Obtulowicz

    2016-01-01

    The increase of nickel air pollution is supposed to frequent side effects of nickel action related to virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with nickel allergy in atopic dermatitis. The goal was to investigate the relationship between nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus in atopic dermatitis. Nickel allergy was confirmed in atopic patients and excluded in healthy volunteers using patch testing. Infection by S. aureus was tested in atopic patients and healthy volunteers by use of API Staph system. The specific IgE for staphylococcal enterotoxin A and B were measured. Secretion of IFN-g, IL-2, IL-13 by PBMC under nickel sulfate and the enterotoxins A and B stimulations were studied with ELISpot. We found the increased number of infections by S. aureus in atopic patients with nickel allergy in comparison to atopic patients and healthy volunteers without nickel allergy. The elevated secretion of IL-2 under nickel sulfate stimulation in vitro was exclusively found in atopic patients with nickel allergy infected by S. aureus. Our data suggest that nickel allergy and infection by S. aureus are linked in atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Food compounds inhibit Staphylococcus aureus bacteria and the toxicity of Staphylococcus Enterotoxin A (SEA) associated with atopic dermatitis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Atopic dermatitis or eczema is characterized by skin rashes and itching is an inflammatory disease that affects 10-20% of children and 1-3% of adults. Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are present on the skin of nearly all patients with atopic dermatitis. Antibiotics that suppress colonization of S. au...

  6. A high incidence of Staphylococcus aureus colonization in the external eyes of patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Nakata, K; Inoue, Y; Harada, J; Maeda, N; Watanabe, H; Tano, Y; Shimomura, Y; Harino, S; Sawa, M

    2000-12-01

    To determine the frequency distribution of bacteria on the external surface of eyes of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and to investigate the relationship between the frequency of bacterial colonization and the grade of atopy or ocular diseases associated with AD. Comparative cross-sectional study. Thirty-six AD patients (mean age, 24.5 years) and 16 nonatopic, age-matched control participants (mean age, 25.5 years). The eyelid margins and conjunctival sacs were scraped with sterile swabs. These samples were inoculated into aerobic and anaerobic culture media. The frequency distribution of bacteria isolated from the eyelid margins and conjunctival sacs. Bacteria isolated from AD patients were: Staphylococcus aureus in 21 of 36 patients (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in two patients); Staphylococcus epidermidis in two patients (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis in one patient); other coagulase-negative Staphylococcus in six patients;alpha-streptococcus in three patients; Corynebacterium species in three patients; Neisseria species in two patients; and Propionibacterium acnes in one patient. From the nonatopic control participants, we isolated S. aureus in one patient, S. epidermidis in two patients and alpha-streptococcus in one patient. S. aureus was isolated from 67% of the AD patients, and any type of bacteria was isolated from 86% of the patients. These rates were significantly higher than those of nonatopic control participants (6% S. aureus and 25% any bacteria). There was no significant relationship between the frequency distribution of bacteria and the grade of atopy or associated ocular diseases. High rates of bacterial colonization, especially S. aureus, were found in the conjunctival sacs and eyelid margins of AD patients. In case management of AD patients, this unique distribution of bacteria must be carefully considered.

  7. Bacterial pattern and antibiotic sensitivity in children and adolescents with infected atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samosir, C. T.; Ruslie, R. H.; Rusli, R. E.

    2018-03-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a pruritic and chronic inflammatory skin disease which affected approximately 20% in children. Bacterial infection is common in AD patients and correlates directly with AD severity. A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of bacterial skin infection in AD patients and its relation with severity of AD and also to study bacteria in the infected AD and its antibiotic sensitivity. Samples were 86 children and adolescents with an AD in Helvetia Community Health Center Medan from March 2016 until February 2017. Index of SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) was used to evaluate the severity of AD. Lesion and nonlesional skinwere swabbed to take sterile cultures. All bacteria noted and tested for antibiotic sensitivity. Datawere by using Chi-Square and Mann Whitney test with 95% CI and p-value<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Fifty-six AD patients (65.1%) were bacterial infected. There was a significant relationship between severity of AD and bacterial infection (p = 0.006). Staphylococcus aureus was the leading bacteria from all degrees of AD severity. Isolated Staphylococcus aureuswas sensitive to amoxicillin-clavulanate (93.3%), clindamycin (90%), erythromycin (90%), and gentamicin (90%), while sensitivity to tetracycline was low (20%).

  8. Digital Dermatitis in Cattle: Current Bacterial and Immunological Findings

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Welder, Jennifer H.; Alt, David P.; Nally, Jarlath E.

    2015-01-01

    Simple Summary Digital dermatitis causes lameness in cattle. Numerous studies have identified multiple bacteria associated with these painful lesions. Several types of a spiral shaped bacteria, Treponema species, are thought to play a role in disease development. Little is known about the immune response to bacteria involved in digital dermatitis. Local inflammatory cells can contribute to the non-healing nature of the disease. Animal models of infection are required to develop effective vaccines and treatments. Abstract Globally; digital dermatitis is a leading form of lameness observed in production dairy cattle. While the precise etiology remains to be determined; the disease is clearly associated with infection by numerous species of treponemes; in addition to other anaerobic bacteria. The goal of this review article is to provide an overview of the current literature; focusing on discussion of the polybacterial nature of the digital dermatitis disease complex and host immune response. Several phylotypes of treponemes have been identified; some of which correlate with location in the lesion and some with stages of lesion development. Local innate immune responses may contribute to the proliferative, inflammatory conditions that perpetuate digital dermatitis lesions. While serum antibody is produced to bacterial antigens in the lesions, little is known about cellular-based immunity. Studies are still required to delineate the pathogenic traits of treponemes associated with digital dermatitis; and other host factors that mediate pathology and protection of digital dermatitis lesions. PMID:26569318

  9. Classification and possible bacterial infection in outpatients with eczema and dermatitis in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Shi, Xiao-Dong; Li, Lin-Feng; Zhou, Ping; Shen, Yi-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the classification and bacterial infection in outpatients with eczema and dermatitis in China. To investigate the prevalence of eczema and dermatitis in outpatients of dermatology clinics in China, examine classification and proportion of common types of dermatitis and the possible bacterial infection, and analyze the possible related factors. Outpatients with eczema or dermatitis from 39 tertiary hospitals of 15 provinces in mainland China from July 1 to September 30, 2014, were enrolled in this cross-sectional and multicenter study. Among 9393 enrolled outpatients, 636 patients (6.7%) were excluded because of incomplete information. The leading subtypes of dermatitis were unclassified eczema (35.5%), atopic dermatitis (13.4%), irritant dermatitis (9.2%), and widespread eczema (8.7%). Total bacterial infection rate was 52.3%, with widespread eczema, stasis dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis being the leading three (65.7%, 61.8%, and 61.4%, respectively). Clinically very likely bacterial infection has a significant positive correlation with disease duration, history of allergic disease, history of flexion dermatitis, and severe itching. Atopic dermatitis has become a common subtype of dermatitis in China. Secondary bacterial infection is common in all patients with dermatitis, and more attentions should be paid on this issue in other type of dermatitis apart from atopic dermatitis. PMID:28858126

  10. Coral Dermatitis or Infectious Dermatitis: Report of a Case of Staphylococcus Aureus Infection of Skin After Scuba Diving

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Skin lesion which develops after deep sea diving is termed as coral dermatitis. The corals are known to produce a toxic substance which when comes in to contact with human skin may elicit hypersensitive reactions. Most previous reports highlight the allergic reactions caused by deep sea diving. This is a rare case of staphylococcal skin infection in a second-year medical student caused by Staphylococcus aureus; he reported a history of deep sea diving before being presented to the hospital with skin rashes. This case highlights the importance of considering infectious aetiology in cases of coral dermatitis. PMID:29666774

  11. Analysis of Bacterial and Fungal Nucleic Acid in Canine Sterile Granulomatous and Pyogranulomatous Dermatitis and Panniculitis.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Fabio B; Older, Caitlin E; Meason-Smith, Courtney; Suchodolski, Jan S; Lingsweiler, Sonia; Mansell, Joanne E; Hoffmann, Aline Rodrigues

    2018-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) studies are revealing a diverse microbiota on the skin of dogs. The skin microbiota of canine sterile granulomatous and pyogranulomatous dermatitis (SGPD) has yet to be investigated using NGS techniques. NGS targeting the 16S rRNA and ITS-1 region of bacterial and fungal DNA, respectively, were used to investigate if bacterial and fungal DNA were associated with skin lesions in cases of canine SGPD. The study included 20 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) skin samples and 12 fresh samples from SGPD-affected dogs, and 10 FFPE and 10 fresh samples from healthy dogs. DNA was extracted from deep dermis and panniculus, and microbial DNA was amplified using primers targeting the bacterial 16S rRNA V1-V3 and fungal ITS-1 regions. The amplified DNA was utilized for NGS on an Illumina MiSeq instrument. The sequences were processed using QIIME. No differences in fungal or bacterial alpha diversity were observed between the SGPD and control samples. Beta diversity analysis demonstrated differences in the bacterial communities between SGPD and control, but not in the fungal communities. Compared to controls, the family Erysipelotrichaceae and genus Staphylococcus were significantly more abundant in the SGPD FFPE samples, and genus Corynebacterium were more abundant in fresh samples. The bacteria found to be more abundant in SGPD are common inhabitants of skin surfaces, and likely secondary contaminants in SGPD cases. This study provides additional evidence that SGPD lesions are likely sterile.

  12. Classification and possible bacterial infection in outpatients with eczema and dermatitis in China: A cross-sectional and multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Shi, Xiao-Dong; Li, Lin-Feng; Zhou, Ping; Shen, Yi-Wei

    2017-09-01

    Little is known about the classification and bacterial infection in outpatients with eczema and dermatitis in China.To investigate the prevalence of eczema and dermatitis in outpatients of dermatology clinics in China, examine classification and proportion of common types of dermatitis and the possible bacterial infection, and analyze the possible related factors.Outpatients with eczema or dermatitis from 39 tertiary hospitals of 15 provinces in mainland China from July 1 to September 30, 2014, were enrolled in this cross-sectional and multicenter study. Among 9393 enrolled outpatients, 636 patients (6.7%) were excluded because of incomplete information.The leading subtypes of dermatitis were unclassified eczema (35.5%), atopic dermatitis (13.4%), irritant dermatitis (9.2%), and widespread eczema (8.7%). Total bacterial infection rate was 52.3%, with widespread eczema, stasis dermatitis, and atopic dermatitis being the leading three (65.7%, 61.8%, and 61.4%, respectively). Clinically very likely bacterial infection has a significant positive correlation with disease duration, history of allergic disease, history of flexion dermatitis, and severe itching.Atopic dermatitis has become a common subtype of dermatitis in China. Secondary bacterial infection is common in all patients with dermatitis, and more attentions should be paid on this issue in other type of dermatitis apart from atopic dermatitis.

  13. Balance between beneficial microflora and Staphylococcus aureus colonisation: in vivo evaluation in patients with atopic dermatitis during hydrotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bourrain, Muriel; Ribet, Virginie; Calvez, Audrey; Lebaron, Philippe; Schmitt, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    The role of the balance between Staphylococcus aureus and commensal flora in the severity of atopic dermatitis (AD) lesions is not well understood. To determine the structure of skin microbiome in patients with AD and its changes during an 18-day course of hydrotherapy and to assess the association between S. aureus and micro-organism colonisation, local skin condition and AD severity. Three skin areas (xerotic, inflammatory and healthy) were identified in 25 moderate to severe AD patients for sampling before treatment, just after (day 1), and at day 10 and day 18. The structure of the bacterial community in the samples was assessed using a molecular biology approach based on 16S rRNA gene profiling. At each visit, AD severity was measured globally by the SCORAD index and at the lesional and healthy sampling sites. Clustering analysis of 296 samples showed two different bacterial community profiles: one with 2 peaks corresponding to S. aureus, the other displayed multiple peaks, identified as diversified microflora. At baseline, xerotic areas seemed to be less colonised by S. aureus than inflammatory areas. After 18 days of hydrotherapy, the number of lesional sites colonised by S. aureus (p<0.05) and the SCORAD index (p<0.00001) were significantly reduced, mainly in inflammatory and moist areas, promoting the emergence of a diversified microflora. We identified two bacterial community profiles corresponding to S. aureus and diversified microflora. The competitive balance between both profiles appears to be a key element associated with the severity of AD lesions.

  14. Antimicrobials from human skin commensal bacteria protect against Staphylococcus aureus and are deficient in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Chen, Tiffany H.; Narala, Saisindhu; Chun, Kimberly A.; Two, Aimee M.; Yun, Tong; Shafiq, Faiza; Kotol, Paul F.; Bouslimani, Amina; Melnik, Alexey V.; Latif, Haythem; Kim, Ji-Nu; Lockhart, Alexandre; Artis, Keli; David, Gloria; Taylor, Patricia; Streib, Joanne; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Grier, Alex; Gill, Steven R.; Zengler, Karsten; Hata, Tissa R.; Leung, Donald Y. M.; Gallo, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    The microbiome can promote or disrupt human health by influencing both adaptive and innate immune functions. We tested whether bacteria that normally reside on human skin participate in host defense by killing Staphylococcus aureus, a pathogen commonly found in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and an important factor that exacerbates this disease. High-throughput screening for antimicrobial activity against S.aureus was performed on isolates of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) collected from the skin of healthy and AD subjects. CoNS strains with antimicrobial activity were common on the normal population but rare on AD subjects. A low frequency of strains with antimicrobial activity correlated with colonization by S.aureus. The antimicrobial activity was identified as previously unknown antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) produced by CoNS species including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus hominis. These AMPs were strain-specific, highly potent, selectively killed S.aureus, and synergized with the human AMP LL-37. Application of these CoNS strains to mice confirmed their defense function in vivo relative to application of nonactive strains. Strikingly, reintroduction of antimicrobial CoNS strains to human subjects with AD decreased colonization by S.aureus. These findings show how commensal skin bacteria protect against pathogens and demonstrate how dysbiosis of the skin microbiome can lead to disease. PMID:28228596

  15. Increasing rate of daptomycin non-susceptible strains of Staphylococcus aureus in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Błażewicz, Izabela; Jaśkiewicz, Maciej; Piechowicz, Lidia; Neubauer, Damian; Nowicki, Roman J; Kamysz, Wojciech; Barańska-Rybak, Wioletta

    2017-12-01

    Daptomycin is a cyclic lipopeptide that is bactericidal against Staphylococcus aureus , including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA) and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) strains. Daptomycin exerts its antimicrobial effect by a calcium-dependent interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane resulting in depolarization, ion loss and rapid cell death. Unfortunately, loss of daptomycin susceptibility in S. aureus in the clinical setting has been noted. To evaluate the susceptibility profile to daptomycin among S. aureus strains isloted from patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). Another point was to correlate the results obtained by broth microdilution method and Etest, which is commonly applied in clinical setting. One hundred patients with the diagnosis of atopic dermatitis were microbiologically assessed for the carriage of S. aureus . Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed using broth-microdilution (BMD) and Etests for daptomycin. Staphylococcus aureus strains were isolated from the majority of our patients, either from the skin (73%) or the anterior nares (75%). Six of the 100 nasal swabs (6%) and 5 of the 100 skin swabs (5%) were positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A total of 81 of 148 (54.7%) daptomycin non-susceptible isolates of S. aureus were identified by BMD. Only 19 of 81 were also classified as non-susceptible by Etest. Clinicians and microbiologists should be aware of the possibility of the emergence of daptomycin non-susceptibility (or increase in minimal inhibitory concentration) during prolonged therapy and closely monitor the susceptibility of persisting isolates that might be recovered during therapy.

  16. High Staphylococcus epidermidis Colonization and Impaired Permeability Barrier in Facial Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    An, Qian; Sun, Meng; Qi, Rui-Qun; Zhang, Li; Zhai, Jin-Long; Hong, Yu-Xiao; Song, Bing; Chen, Hong-Duo; Gao, Xing-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background: Seborrheic dermatitis (SD) is a common inflammatory skin condition. The etiology is unclear, although overgrowth of Malassezia on the skin has been suggested to cause SD. This study investigated whether colonization with Staphylococcus plays a role in facial SD, which was not well addressed previously. Methods: The study was conducted from September 1, 2011 to February 20, 2012 in the First Hospital of China Medical University. In the first phase, the study evaluated the level of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and the number of colony-forming units (CFU) of Staphylococcus in defined skin areas of SD patients who were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive (HIV [+] SD [+] group, n = 13), classical SD (HIV [−] SD [+] group, n = 24) patients, HIV seropositive-non-SD (HIV [+] SD [−] group, n = 16) patients, and healthy volunteers (HIV [−] SD [−] group, n = 16). In the second phase, we enrolled another cohort of HIV (−) SD (+) patients who applied topical fusidic acid (n = 15), tacrolimus (n = 16), or moisturizer (n = 12). Changes in the Seborrheic Dermatitis Area Severity Index (SDASI), TEWL, and Staphylococcus density were evaluated 2 weeks later. Comparisons of each index were performed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and least significant difference method. Results: The level of TEWL was greater through lesional sites in the HIV (+) SD (+) group than that in HIV (+) SD (−) and HIV (−) SD (−) groups (95% confidence interval [CI]: 18.873–47.071, P < 0.001 and 95% CI: 28.755–55.936, P < 0.001, respectively). The number of CFU of Staphylococcus was greater in the HIV (+) SD (+) group than that in HIV (+) SD (−) and HIV (−) SD (−) groups (95% CI: 37.487–142.744, P = 0.001 and 95% CI: 54.936–156.400, P < 0.001, respectively). TEWL was significantly more improved in patients treated with tacrolimus and fusidic acid than that in those treated with moisturizers (95% CI: 7.560–38.987, P = 0.004 and 95% CI: 4.659–37

  17. Staphylococcus aureus clonal dynamics and virulence factors in children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lomholt, Hans; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Kilian, Mogens

    2005-11-01

    A prospective cohort study was undertaken to determine the clonal dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and infection during 1 y in children with atopic dermatitis, and to correlate specific clones, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, and production of virulence factors with eczema activity. Eleven children were examined every 6 wk with swaps taken from active eczema, anterior nose, axillae and perineum, and scoring of eczema activity by severity scoring of atopic dermatitis (SCORAD). Individual S. aureus clonal types were identified and examined for production of superantigens, toxins, and were assigned to agr groups. S. aureus colonization patterns ranged from rare colonization over transient colonization to persistent colonization by a single clone or a dynamic exchange of up to five clones. Production of no single virulence factor including superantigens and toxins was significantly associated with exacerbation of eczema. In four children there was a shift between visits in agr group of colonizing clones. These shifts were associated with an increased SCORAD value of 19 (SE = 7, p = 0.009). Change of clones belonging to the same agr group was not associated with a higher SCORAD value. In 11 of 12 cases with two different clones co-colonizing a child the clones belonged to the same agr group. In conclusion, this limited group of children with atopic dermatitis showed highly variable colonization patterns of S. aureus, and communication between strains by use of agr encoded octa peptides appeared to be active in vivo. Increased severity of eczema was related to a change in agr group and may have been because of inflammation triggered by the takeover of an antigenically different clone, as agr groups represent ancient phylogenetic lineages.

  18. Digital dermatitis in cattle: current bacterial and immunological findings

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Globally, digital dermatitis is a leading form of lameness observed in production dairy cattle. While the precise etiology remains to be determined, the disease is clearly associated with infection by numerous Treponema species in addition to other anaerobic bacteria. Multiple treponeme phylotypes, ...

  19. Superantigens Modulate Bacterial Density during Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Stacey X.; Kasper, Katherine J.; Zeppa, Joseph J.; McCormick, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Superantigens (SAgs) are potent microbial toxins that function to activate large numbers of T cells in a T cell receptor (TCR) Vβ-specific manner, resulting in excessive immune system activation. Staphylococcus aureus possesses a large repertoire of distinct SAgs, and in the context of host-pathogen interactions, staphylococcal SAg research has focused primarily on the role of these toxins in severe and invasive diseases. However, the contribution of SAgs to colonization by S. aureus remains unclear. We developed a two-week nasal colonization model using SAg-sensitive transgenic mice expressing HLA-DR4, and evaluated the role of SAgs using two well-studied stains of S. aureus. S. aureus Newman produces relatively low levels of staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), and although we did not detect significant TCR-Vβ specific changes during wild-type S. aureus Newman colonization, S. aureus Newman Δsea established transiently higher bacterial loads in the nose. S. aureus COL produces relatively high levels of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), and colonization with wild-type S. aureus COL resulted in clear Vβ8-specific T cell skewing responses. S. aureus COL Δseb established consistently higher bacterial loads in the nose. These data suggest that staphylococcal SAgs may be involved in regulating bacterial densities during nasal colonization. PMID:26008236

  20. Metabolic sensor governing bacterial virulence in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yue; Liu, Xing; Chen, Feifei; Di, Hongxia; Xu, Bin; Zhou, Lu; Deng, Xin; Wu, Min; Yang, Cai-Guang; Lan, Lefu

    2014-11-18

    An effective metabolism is essential to all living organisms, including the important human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. To establish successful infection, S. aureus must scavenge nutrients and coordinate its metabolism for proliferation. Meanwhile, it also must produce an array of virulence factors to interfere with host defenses. However, the ways in which S. aureus ties its metabolic state to its virulence regulation remain largely unknown. Here we show that citrate, the first intermediate of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, binds to and activates the catabolite control protein E (CcpE) of S. aureus. Using structural and site-directed mutagenesis studies, we demonstrate that two arginine residues (Arg145 and Arg256) within the putative inducer-binding cavity of CcpE are important for its allosteric activation by citrate. Microarray analysis reveals that CcpE tunes the expression of 126 genes that comprise about 4.7% of the S. aureus genome. Intriguingly, although CcpE is a major positive regulator of the TCA-cycle activity, its regulon consists predominantly of genes involved in the pathogenesis of S. aureus. Moreover, inactivation of CcpE results in increased staphyloxanthin production, improved ability to acquire iron, increased resistance to whole-blood-mediated killing, and enhanced bacterial virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection. This study reveals CcpE as an important metabolic sensor that allows S. aureus to sense and adjust its metabolic state and subsequently to coordinate the expression of virulence factors and bacterial virulence.

  1. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an emerging cause of acute bacterial parotitis.

    PubMed

    Nicolasora, Nelson P; Zacharek, Mark A; Malani, Anurag N

    2009-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has long been recognized as a cause of acute bacterial parotitis. A case of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) parotitis is presented, highlighting the emergence of this increasingly important pathogen to cause a wide variety of infections. Also reviewed are the salient clinical and microbiologic features of this novel infection.

  2. Effect of a lotion containing the heat-treated probiotic strain Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 on Staphylococcus aureus colonization in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Blanchet-Réthoré, Sandrine; Bourdès, Valérie; Mercenier, Annick; Haddar, Cyrille H; Verhoeven, Paul O; Andres, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus dominates the skin microbiota in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), with bacterial loads correlating with disease severity. The aim of this exploratory study was to investigate the effect of a cosmetic lotion containing heat-treated Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC 533 (HT La1) on S. aureus colonization in AD patients. This open-label, multicenter study was performed in AD patients in Germany. First, detection of S. aureus was performed in all patients using the swab or scrub-wash method of sampling, followed by quantitative culture or quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Repeatability and reproducibility of all method combinations were evaluated to select the best combination of sampling and quantification. Second, a lotion containing HT La1 was applied to lesional skin twice daily for 3 weeks. Scoring using local objective SCORing Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD), measurement of S. aureus load, and lesional microbiome analysis were performed before and after the 3-week treatment period. Thirty-one patients with AD were included in the study. All sampling and quantification methods were found to be robust, reproducible, and repeatable for assessing S. aureus load. For simplicity, a combination of swab and quantitative polymerase chain reaction was chosen to assess the efficacy of HT La1. Following application of a lotion containing HT La1 to AD lesions for 3 weeks, a reduction in S. aureus load was observed in patients, which correlated with a decrease in local objective SCORAD. Interestingly, high baseline skin concentrations of S. aureus were associated with good responses to the lotion. This study demonstrated that the application of a lotion containing HT La1 to the lesional skin of patients with AD for 3 weeks controlled S. aureus colonization and was associated with local clinical improvement (SCORAD). These findings support further development of topical treatments containing heat-treated nonreplicating beneficial bacteria for patients with

  3. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Skin Microbiome and Association with Microenvironment and Treatment in Canine Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Charles W; Morris, Daniel O; Rankin, Shelley C; Cain, Christine L; Misic, Ana M; Houser, Timothy; Mauldin, Elizabeth A; Grice, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    Host-microbe interactions may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disorder characterized by universal colonization with Staphylococcus species. To examine the relationship between epidermal barrier function and the cutaneous microbiota in atopic dermatitis, this study used a spontaneous model of canine atopic dermatitis. In a cohort of 14 dogs with canine atopic dermatitis, the skin microbiota were longitudinally evaluated with parallel assessment of skin barrier function at disease flare, during antimicrobial therapy, and post-therapy. Sequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene showed decreased bacterial diversity and increased proportions of Staphylococcus (S. pseudintermedius in particular) and Corynebacterium species compared with a cohort of healthy control dogs (n = 16). Treatment restored bacterial diversity with decreased proportions of Staphylococcus species, concurrent with decreased canine atopic dermatitis severity. Skin barrier function, as measured by corneometry, pH, and transepidermal water loss also normalized with treatment. Bacterial diversity correlated with transepidermal water loss and pH level but not with corneometry results. These findings provide insights into the relationship between the cutaneous microbiome and skin barrier function in atopic dermatitis, show the impact of antimicrobial therapy on the skin microbiome, and highlight the utility of canine atopic dermatitis as a spontaneous nonrodent model of atopic dermatitis. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Pathogenetic Effect of Natural and Bacterial Toxins on Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung-Duck; Pak, Sok Cheon; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common allergic skin disease that is associated with chronic, recurrent eczematous and pruritic lesions at the flexural folds caused by interacting factors related to environmental and immune system changes. AD results in dry skin, and immunoglobulin E-mediated allergic reactions to foods and environmental allergens. While steroids and anti-histamines temporarily relieve the symptoms of AD, the possibility of side effects from pharmacological interventions remains. Despite intensive research, the underlying mechanisms for AD have not been clarified. A study of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) established the role of its toxins in the pathogenesis of AD. Approximately 90% of patients with AD experience S. aureus colonization and up to 50%–60% of the colonizing S. aureus is toxin-producing. Any damage to the protective skin barrier allows for the entry of invading allergens and pathogens that further drive the pathogenesis of AD. Some natural toxins (or their components) that have therapeutic effects on AD have been studied. In addition, recent studies on inflammasomes as one component of the innate immune system have been carried out. Additionally, studies on the close relationship between the activation of inflammasomes and toxins in AD have been reported. This review highlights the literature that discusses the pathogenesis of AD, the role of toxins in AD, and the positive and negative effects of toxins on AD. Lastly, suggestions are made regarding the role of inflammasomes in AD. PMID:28025545

  5. Deficient production of hexadecenoic acid in the skin is associated in part with the vulnerability of atopic dermatitis patients to colonization by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Hirofumi; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Kuzukawa, Michiya; Mori, Hajime; Imokawa, Genji

    2005-01-01

    As one of the major skin fatty acids, cis-6-hexadecenoic acid (C16:1Delta6) exhibits a specific antibacterial activity and might play a specific role in the defense mechanism against Staphylococcus aureus, in healthy subjects whereas S. aureus frequently colonizes the skin of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD). Fatty acid composition of sebum at the recovery level was analyzed by gas chromatography and S. aureus colonizing the skin was assessed by the 'cup-scrub' method (9 patients and 10 healthy controls). To evaluate in vivo effect of C16:1Delta6 on colonization, C16:1Delta6 was applied for 2 weeks on the upper arm skin of another group of AD patients (11 patients). Analysis of sebum lipids revealed that there is a significant lower free C16:1Delta6 content in nonlesional skin from AD patients compared with healthy controls. This lower content is also accompanied by a significantly lower level of C16:1Delta6 in the total fatty acid composition of sebum (analyzed following hydrolysis). The lower level of free C16:1Delta6 correlated significantly (R(2) = 0.41, p < 0.01) with the numbers of S. aureus colonizing nonlesional skin. Topical application of free C16:1Delta6 on the skin of AD patients for 2 weeks abolished the markedly increased bacterial count in 6 out of the 8 AD patients tested. Free C16:1Delta6 may be involved in the defense mechanism against S. aureus in healthy skin and this deficit triggers the susceptibility of the skin to colonization by S. aureus in AD. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Secreted virulence factor comparison between methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, and its relevance to atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Schlievert, Patrick M; Strandberg, Kristi L; Lin, Ying-Chi; Peterson, Marnie L; Leung, Donald Y M

    2010-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains have emerged as serious health threats in the last 15 years. They are associated with large numbers of atopic dermatitis skin and soft tissue infections, but when they originate from skin and mucous membranes, have the capacity to produce sepsis and highly fatal pulmonary infections characterized as necrotizing pneumonia, purpura fulminans, and postviral toxic shock syndrome. This review is a discussion of the emergence of 3 major CA-MRSA organisms, designated CA-MRSA USA400, followed by USA300, and most recently USA200. CA-MRSA USA300 and USA400 isolates and their methicillin-sensitive counterparts (community-associated methicillin-sensitive S aureus) typically produce highly inflammatory cytolysins alpha-toxin, gamma-toxin, delta-toxin (as representative of the phenol soluble modulin family of cytolysins), and Panton Valentine leukocidin. USA300 isolates produce the superantigens enterotoxin-like Q and a highly pyrogenic deletion variant of toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), whereas USA400 isolates produce the superantigens staphylococcal enterotoxin B or staphylococcal enterotoxin C. USA200 CA-MRSA isolates produce small amounts of cytolysins but produce high levels of TSST-1. In contrast, their methicillin-sensitive S aureus counterparts produce various cytolysins, apparently in part dependent on the niche occupied in the host and levels of TSST-1 expressed. Significant differences seen in production of secreted virulence factors by CA-MRSA versus hospital-associated methicillin-resistant S aureus and community-associated methicillin-sensitive S aureus strains appear to be a result of the need to specialize as the result of energy drains from both virulence factor production and methicillin resistance. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. High Frequency and Diversity of Antimicrobial Activities Produced by Nasal Staphylococcus Strains against Bacterial Competitors

    PubMed Central

    Janek, Daniela; Zipperer, Alexander; Kulik, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human nasal microbiota is highly variable and dynamic often enclosing major pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. The potential roles of bacteriocins or other mechanisms allowing certain bacterial clones to prevail in this nutrient-poor habitat have hardly been studied. Of 89 nasal Staphylococcus isolates, unexpectedly, the vast majority (84%) was found to produce antimicrobial substances in particular under habitat-specific stress conditions, such as iron limitation or exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Activity spectra were generally narrow but highly variable with activities against certain nasal members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, or several groups of bacteria. Staphylococcus species and many other Firmicutes were insusceptible to most of the compounds. A representative bacteriocin was identified as a nukacin-related peptide whose inactivation reduced the capacity of the producer Staphylococcus epidermidis IVK45 to limit growth of other nasal bacteria. Of note, the bacteriocin genes were found on mobile genetic elements exhibiting signs of extensive horizontal gene transfer and rearrangements. Thus, continuously evolving bacteriocins appear to govern bacterial competition in the human nose and specific bacteriocins may become important agents for eradication of notorious opportunistic pathogens from human microbiota. PMID:27490492

  8. Adjuvant treatment with the bacterial lysate (OM-85) improves management of atopic dermatitis: A randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Bodemer, Christine; Guillet, Gerard; Cambazard, Frederic; Boralevi, Franck; Ballarini, Stefania; Milliet, Christian; Bertuccio, Paola; La Vecchia, Carlo; Bach, Jean-François; de Prost, Yves

    2017-01-01

    Background Environmental factors play a major role on atopic dermatitis (AD) which shows a constant rise in prevalence in western countries over the last decades. The Hygiene Hypothesis suggesting an inverse relationship between incidence of infections and the increase in atopic diseases in these countries, is one of the working hypothesis proposed to explain this trend. Objective This study tested the efficacy and safety of oral administration of the bacterial lysate OM-85 (Broncho-Vaxom®, Broncho-Munal®, Ommunal®, Paxoral®, Vaxoral®), in the treatment of established AD in children. Methods Children aged 6 months to 7 years, with confirmed AD diagnosis, were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to receive, in addition to conventional treatment with emollients and topical corticosteroids, 3.5mg of the bacterial extract OM-85 or placebo daily for 9 months. The primary end-point was the difference between groups in the occurrence of new flares (NF) during the study period, evaluated by Hazard Ratio (HR) derived from conditional Cox proportional hazard regression models accounting for repeated events. Results Among the 179 randomized children, 170 were analysed, 88 in the OM-85 and 82 in the placebo group. As expected most children in both treatment groups experienced at least 1 NF during the study period (75 (85%) patients in the OM-85 group and 72 (88%) in the placebo group). Patients treated with OM-85 as adjuvant therapy had significantly fewer and delayed NFs (HR of repeated flares = 0.80; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.67–0.96), also when potential confounding factors, as family history of atopy and corticosteroids use, were taken into account (HR = 0.82; 95% CI: 0.69–0.98). No major side effect was reported, with comparable and good tolerability for OM-85 and placebo. Conclusions Results show an adjuvant therapeutic effect of a well standardized bacterial lysate OM-85 on established AD. PMID:28333952

  9. Subacute Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacterial Endocarditis Complicated by Mitral-Aortic Intervalvular Fibrosa Pseudoaneurysm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacterial Endocarditis Complicated byMitral-Aortic Intervalvular Fibrosa Pseudoaneurysm Diane Elegino-Steffens,1 Amy Stratton,1... endocarditis . 1. Introduction The mitral-aortic intervalvular fibrosa (MAIF), also known as the mitral-aortic membrane, is a fibrous region of the heart...of his aortic valve for severe aortic regurgitation that was subsequently found to have infective endocarditis prompting antibiotic treatment. His

  10. Natural and ion-exchanged illite clays reduce bacterial burden and inflammation in cutaneous meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in mice

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Caitlin C.; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-01

    Discoveries associated with antibacterial activity of hydrated clays necessitate assessments of in vivo efficacy, practical use and safety. Surface properties of clays can lead to variations in the composition and abundance of bound compounds or ions, thus affecting antibacterial activity. Since exchangeable metal ions released from the clay surface are responsible for in vitro antibacterial activity, we evaluated the in vivo antibacterial efficacy of four natural clays (one illite clay, two montmorillonite clays and one kaolinite clay) and three ion-exchanged, antibacterial clays against superficial, cutaneous meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in mice. Superficial, cutaneous wounds on the back of SKH1-Elite mice were generated and subsequently infected with MRSA. Following twice daily applications of a hydrated clay poultice to infected wounds for 7 days, we observed significant differences in the in vivo antibacterial efficacy between different types of clays. The natural and ion-exchanged illite clays performed best, as measured by bacterial load, inflammatory response and gross wound morphology with significant decreases in bacterial viability and dermatitis. Topical application of kaolinite clay was the least effective, resulting in the lowest decrease in bacterial load and exhibiting severe dermatitis. These data suggest that specific types of clays may offer a complementary and integrative strategy for topically treating MRSA and other cutaneous infections. However, since natural clays exhibit in vitro antibacterial variability and vary vastly in surface chemistries, adsorptive/absorptive characteristics and structural composition, the properties and characteristics of illite clays could aid in the development of standardized and customized aluminosilicates for topical infections. PMID:26508716

  11. Multidrug Efflux Pumps from Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus Bacterial Food Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Jody L.; He, Gui-Xin; Kakarla, Prathusha; KC, Ranjana; Kumar, Sanath; Lakra, Wazir Singh; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Tran, Thuy; Varela, Manuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses caused by bacterial microorganisms are common worldwide and constitute a serious public health concern. In particular, microorganisms belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families of Gram-negative bacteria, and to the Staphylococcus genus of Gram-positive bacteria are important causative agents of food poisoning and infection in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Recently, variants of these bacteria have developed resistance to medically important chemotherapeutic agents. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter spp., and Staphylococcus aureus are becoming increasingly recalcitrant to clinical treatment in human patients. Of the various bacterial resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial agents, multidrug efflux pumps comprise a major cause of multiple drug resistance. These multidrug efflux pump systems reside in the biological membrane of the bacteria and actively extrude antimicrobial agents from bacterial cells. This review article summarizes the evolution of these bacterial drug efflux pump systems from a molecular biological standpoint and provides a framework for future work aimed at reducing the conditions that foster dissemination of these multidrug resistant causative agents through human populations. PMID:25635914

  12. Multidrug efflux pumps from Enterobacteriaceae, Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus bacterial food pathogens.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jody L; He, Gui-Xin; Kakarla, Prathusha; K C, Ranjana; Kumar, Sanath; Lakra, Wazir Singh; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ranaweera, Indrika; Shrestha, Ugina; Tran, Thuy; Varela, Manuel F

    2015-01-28

    Foodborne illnesses caused by bacterial microorganisms are common worldwide and constitute a serious public health concern. In particular, microorganisms belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae and Vibrionaceae families of Gram-negative bacteria, and to the Staphylococcus genus of Gram-positive bacteria are important causative agents of food poisoning and infection in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. Recently, variants of these bacteria have developed resistance to medically important chemotherapeutic agents. Multidrug resistant Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholerae, Enterobacter spp., and Staphylococcus aureus are becoming increasingly recalcitrant to clinical treatment in human patients. Of the various bacterial resistance mechanisms against antimicrobial agents, multidrug efflux pumps comprise a major cause of multiple drug resistance. These multidrug efflux pump systems reside in the biological membrane of the bacteria and actively extrude antimicrobial agents from bacterial cells. This review article summarizes the evolution of these bacterial drug efflux pump systems from a molecular biological standpoint and provides a framework for future work aimed at reducing the conditions that foster dissemination of these multidrug resistant causative agents through human populations.

  13. A secreted bacterial protease tailors the Staphylococcus aureus virulence repertoire to modulate bone remodeling during osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Cassat, James E.; Hammer, Neal D.; Campbell, J. Preston; Benson, Meredith A.; Perrien, Daniel S.; Mrak, Lara N.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Torres, Victor J.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Osteomyelitis is a common manifestation of invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection. Pathogen-induced bone destruction limits antimicrobial penetration to the infectious focus and compromises treatment of osteomyelitis. To investigate mechanisms of S. aureus-induced bone destruction, we developed a murine model of osteomyelitis. Micro-computed tomography of infected femurs revealed that S. aureus triggers profound alterations in bone turnover. The bacterial regulatory locus sae was found to be critical for osteomyelitis pathogenesis, as Sae-regulated factors promote pathologic bone remodeling and intraosseous bacterial survival. Exoproteome analyses revealed the Sae-regulated protease aureolysin as a major determinant of the S. aureus secretome and identified the phenol soluble modulins as aureolysin-degraded, osteolytic peptides that trigger osteoblast cell death and bone destruction. These studies establish a murine model for pathogen-induced bone remodeling, define Sae as critical for osteomyelitis pathogenesis, and identify protease-dependent exoproteome remodeling as a major determinant of the staphylococcal virulence repertoire. PMID:23768499

  14. Topical Antimicrobial Treatments Can Elicit Shifts to Resident Skin Bacterial Communities and Reduce Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus Competitors

    PubMed Central

    SanMiguel, Adam J.; Meisel, Jacquelyn S.; Horwinski, Joseph; Zheng, Qi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The skin microbiome is a complex ecosystem with important implications for cutaneous health and disease. Topical antibiotics and antiseptics are often employed to preserve the balance of this population and inhibit colonization by more pathogenic bacteria. However, despite their widespread use, the impact of these interventions on broader microbial communities remains poorly understood. Here, we report the longitudinal effects of topical antibiotics and antiseptics on skin bacterial communities and their role in Staphylococcus aureus colonization resistance. In response to antibiotics, cutaneous populations exhibited an immediate shift in bacterial residents, an effect that persisted for multiple days posttreatment. By contrast, antiseptics elicited only minor changes to skin bacterial populations, with few changes to the underlying microbiota. While variable in scope, both antibiotics and antiseptics were found to decrease colonization by commensal Staphylococcus spp. by sequencing- and culture-based methods, an effect which was highly dependent on baseline levels of Staphylococcus. Because Staphylococcus residents have been shown to compete with the skin pathogen S. aureus, we also tested whether treatment could influence S. aureus levels at the skin surface. We found that treated mice were more susceptible to exogenous association with S. aureus and that precolonization with the same Staphylococcus residents that were previously disrupted by treatment reduced S. aureus levels by over 100-fold. In all, the results of this study indicate that antimicrobial drugs can alter skin bacterial residents and that these alterations can have critical implications for cutaneous host defense. PMID:28630195

  15. Topical Antimicrobial Treatments Can Elicit Shifts to Resident Skin Bacterial Communities and Reduce Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus Competitors.

    PubMed

    SanMiguel, Adam J; Meisel, Jacquelyn S; Horwinski, Joseph; Zheng, Qi; Grice, Elizabeth A

    2017-09-01

    The skin microbiome is a complex ecosystem with important implications for cutaneous health and disease. Topical antibiotics and antiseptics are often employed to preserve the balance of this population and inhibit colonization by more pathogenic bacteria. However, despite their widespread use, the impact of these interventions on broader microbial communities remains poorly understood. Here, we report the longitudinal effects of topical antibiotics and antiseptics on skin bacterial communities and their role in Staphylococcus aureus colonization resistance. In response to antibiotics, cutaneous populations exhibited an immediate shift in bacterial residents, an effect that persisted for multiple days posttreatment. By contrast, antiseptics elicited only minor changes to skin bacterial populations, with few changes to the underlying microbiota. While variable in scope, both antibiotics and antiseptics were found to decrease colonization by commensal Staphylococcus spp. by sequencing- and culture-based methods, an effect which was highly dependent on baseline levels of Staphylococcus Because Staphylococcus residents have been shown to compete with the skin pathogen S. aureus , we also tested whether treatment could influence S. aureus levels at the skin surface. We found that treated mice were more susceptible to exogenous association with S. aureus and that precolonization with the same Staphylococcus residents that were previously disrupted by treatment reduced S. aureus levels by over 100-fold. In all, the results of this study indicate that antimicrobial drugs can alter skin bacterial residents and that these alterations can have critical implications for cutaneous host defense. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. New perspectives on dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis: lessons we learned from bacterial and fungal skin microbiota.

    PubMed

    Paulino, Luciana Campos

    2017-06-01

    The human body is inhabited by complex microbial communities, which positively impact different aspects of our health, and might also be related to the development of diseases. Progress in technologies, particularly sequencing methods and bioinformatics tools, has been crucial for the advances in this field. Microbial communities from skin can modulate immune response and protect the host against pathogens, and there are also data supporting their association with several skin conditions; including dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis. For decades, they have been thought to be related to Malassezia yeasts; however, the microbial role has not been elucidated, and their etiology remains poorly understood. This review discusses the recent findings in dandruff and seborrheic dermatitis and their relation to the skin microbiota. Data provided new perceptions to aid in the understanding of these skin disorders, broadening our view of their etiology and the possible roles of microbial communities in symptom development.

  17. Moxifloxacin superior to cefuroxime in reducing bacterial adhesion of Staphylococcus epidermidis on hydrophobic intraocular lenses.

    PubMed

    Benbouzid, Fathalah; Kodjikian, Laurent; Hartmann, Daniel; Renaud, François; Baillif, Stéphanie

    2016-02-01

    To compare the anti-adhesive effect of cefuroxime and moxifloxacin on the primary attachment phase of Staphylococcus epidermidis on hydrophobic acrylic intraocular lenses (IOLs). Forty hydrophobic acrylic IOLs were used. Two groups of IOLs were soaked in a moxifloxacin (Mox-T1: 0.5 mg/0.1 ml) or a cefuroxime (Cef-T1: cefuroxime 1 mg/0.1 ml) solution before incubation in a S. epidermidis bacterial suspension. Two other groups were incubated in the bacterial suspension before antibiotics (Cef-T2 and Mox-T2) were added. The control group (Ctrl) consisted of IOLs incubated in the bacterial suspension. After incubation, IOLs were sonicated and vortexed. The resultant suspension was spread over a nutritive agar plate. Bacterial colonies were counted after 24 hr of incubation. Mean number of colony-forming units per IOL was Cef-T1: 184 × 10(3) (SE: 5.24; SD: 28.21), Cef-T2: 117 × 10(3) (SE: 5.74; SD: 30.37), Mox-T1: 1.27 × 10(3) (SE: 0.12; SD: 0.61), Mox-T2: 25 × 10(3) (SE:1.98; SD: 9.72) and Ctrl: 361 × 10(3) (SE: 26.9; SD: 107.6). The number of adhering bacteria did not vary whether cefuroxime was added before or after IOL incubation in the bacterial suspension (p = 0.132). Moxifloxacin was more effective in reducing the number of adhering bacteria when used before IOL incubation (p < 0.001). Overall for T1 and T2, moxifloxacin was more effective than cefuroxime in reducing bacterial adhesion on IOLs (p < 0.001). Moxifloxacin and cefuroxime significantly reduced S. epidermidis adhesion on hydrophobic acrylic IOLs. The anti-adhesive effect was superior with moxifloxacin. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Evaluation on the effects of 0.1% Peumus boldus leaf and Spiraea ulmaria plant extract combination on bacterial colonization in canine atopic dermatitis: A preliminary randomized, placebo controlled, double-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Domenico; Bohannon, Mary; Ahrens, Kim; Navarro, Christelle; Gatto, Hugues; Marsella, Rosanna

    2018-06-01

    Defective skin barrier characterize canine atopic dermatitis (AD). Pyoderma is the most common complication. Herbal compounds have been suggested as alternatives to control bacterial colonization for their effect on natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). This study evaluated the effects of 0.1% Peumus boldus leaf and Spiraea ulmaria plant extract combination on clinical signs, bacterial colonization and AMPs secretion in atopic dogs compared to placebo. Twenty privately-owned atopic dogs were randomly divided in 2 groups (treatment: n = 10; placebo: n = 10) and their abdomen was sprayed every 24 h for 4 weeks. Total and inguinal clinical scores (CADESI-03), manual bacterial count, and skin washes for AMPs (cBD3-like and cCath) were performed on days 0, 14 and 28. AMPs were detected using in-house, previously-validated, canine-specific ELISAs. Data were statistically analyzed and a p < 0.05 was considered significant. Clinical scores and AMPs secretion did not differ significantly between the two groups at any time point. A significant reduction of the clinical scores was seen in the placebo group at 14 and 28 days (p < 0.04). On days 14 and 28, a reduction in the bacterial count was seen in the treated group compared with placebo (p < 0.009 and p = 0.04, respectively). Compared to baseline, a reduction in Staphylococcus spp. was seen in the treated group after 14 days of treatment (p < 0.03). These results show the efficacy of this plant extract combination against bacterial colonization, suggesting its potential usefulness in preventing bacterial infection in atopic dogs. The influence of this compound on AMPs secretion or other mechanisms should be further evaluated. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. The crystal structures of EAP domains from Staphylococcus aureus reveal an unexpected homology to bacterial superantigens.

    PubMed

    Geisbrecht, Brian V; Hamaoka, Brent Y; Perman, Benjamin; Zemla, Adam; Leahy, Daniel J

    2005-04-29

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 A resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an alpha-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed beta-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the beta-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  20. Bacterial Cytological Profiling (BCP) as a Rapid and Accurate Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method for Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Quach, D T; Sakoulas, G; Nizet, V; Pogliano, J; Pogliano, K

    2016-02-01

    Successful treatment of bacterial infections requires the timely administration of appropriate antimicrobial therapy. The failure to initiate the correct therapy in a timely fashion results in poor clinical outcomes, longer hospital stays, and higher medical costs. Current approaches to antibiotic susceptibility testing of cultured pathogens have key limitations ranging from long run times to dependence on prior knowledge of genetic mechanisms of resistance. We have developed a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility assay for Staphylococcus aureus based on bacterial cytological profiling (BCP), which uses quantitative fluorescence microscopy to measure antibiotic induced changes in cellular architecture. BCP discriminated between methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and -resistant (MRSA) clinical isolates of S. aureus (n = 71) within 1-2 h with 100% accuracy. Similarly, BCP correctly distinguished daptomycin susceptible (DS) from daptomycin non-susceptible (DNS) S. aureus strains (n = 20) within 30 min. Among MRSA isolates, BCP further identified two classes of strains that differ in their susceptibility to specific combinations of beta-lactam antibiotics. BCP provides a rapid and flexible alternative to gene-based susceptibility testing methods for S. aureus, and should be readily adaptable to different antibiotics and bacterial species as new mechanisms of resistance or multidrug-resistant pathogens evolve and appear in mainstream clinical practice.

  1. Development of a multicomponent Staphylococcus aureus vaccine designed to counter multiple bacterial virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Annaliesa S.; Miller, Alita A.; Donald, Robert G.K.; Scully, Ingrid L.; Nanra, Jasdeep S.; Cooper, David; Jansen, Kathrin U.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of healthcare-associated infections and is responsible for a substantial burden of disease in hospitalized patients. Despite increasingly rigorous infection control guidelines, the prevalence and corresponding negative impact of S. aureus infections remain considerable. Difficulties in controlling S. aureus infections as well as the associated treatment costs are exacerbated by increasing rates of resistance to available antibiotics. Despite ongoing efforts over the past 20 years, no licensed S. aureus vaccine is currently available. However, learnings from past clinical failures of vaccine candidates and a better understanding of the immunopathology of S. aureus colonization and infection have aided in the design of new vaccine candidates based on multiple important bacterial pathogenesis mechanisms. This review outlines important considerations in designing a vaccine for the prevention of S. aureus disease in healthcare settings. PMID:22922765

  2. Molecular mechanics of Staphylococcus aureus adhesin, CNA, and the inhibition of bacterial adhesion by stretching collagen

    PubMed Central

    Madani, Ali; Garakani, Kiavash

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion to collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, is a critical step in the initiation and persistence of numerous bacterial infections. In this study, we explore the collagen binding mechanism of the multi-modular cell wall anchored collagen adhesin (CNA) in Staphylococcus aureus and examine how applied mechanical forces can modulate adhesion ability. The common structural-functional elements and domain organization of CNA are present across over 50 genera of bacteria. Through the use of molecular dynamics models and normal mode analysis, we shed light on the CNA’s structural and conformational dynamics and its interactions with collagen that lead to collagen binding. Our results suggest that the linker region, CNA165-173, acts as a hinge exhibiting bending, extensional, and torsional modes of structural flexibility and its residues are key in the interaction of the CNA-collagen complex. Steered molecular dynamics simulations were conducted with umbrella sampling. During the course of these simulations, the ‘locking’ latch from the CNA N2 domain was dissociated from its groove in the CNA N1 domain, implying the importance of the latch for effective ligand binding. Finally, we observed that the binding efficiency of the CNA N1-N2 domains to collagen decreases greatly with increasing tensile force application to the collagen peptides. Thus, CNA and similar adhesins might preferentially bind to sites in which collagen fibers are cleaved, such as in wounded, injured, or inflamed tissues, or in which the collagenous tissue is less mature. As alternative techniques for control of bacterial infection are in-demand due to the rise of bacterial antibiotic resistance, results from our computational studies with respect to the mechanoregulation of the collagen binding site may inspire new therapeutics and engineering solutions by mechanically preventing colonization and/or further pathogenesis. PMID:28665944

  3. PHACOS, a functionalized bacterial polyester with bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Dinjaski, Nina; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Mar; Selvam, Shivaram; Parra-Ruiz, Francisco J.; Lehman, Susan M.; Román, Julio San; García, Ernesto; García, José L.; García, Andrés J.; Prieto, María Auxiliadora

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial-associated infections represent a significant clinical problem, and treatment of these microbial infections is becoming troublesome due to the increasing number of antibiotic-resistant strains. Here, we report a naturally functionalized bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHACOS) with antibacterial properties. We demonstrate that PHACOS selectively and efficiently inhibits the growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) both in vitro and in vivo. This ability has been ascribed to the functionalized side chains containing thioester groups. Significantly less (3.2-fold) biofilm formation of S. aureus was detected on PHACOS compared to biofilms formed on control poly(3-hydroxyoctanoate-co-hydroxyhexanoate) and poly(ethylene terephthalate), but no differences were observed in bacterial adhesion among these polymers. PHACOS elicited minimal cytotoxic and inflammatory effects on murine macrophages and supported normal fibroblast adhesion. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrated minimal inflammation and excellent antibacterial activity for PHACOS compared to controls in an in vivo model of implant-associated infection. Additionally, reductions in neutrophils and macrophages in the vicinity of sterile PHACOS compared to sterile PHO implant were observed by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, a similar percentage of inflammatory cells was found in the tissue surrounding sterile PHACOS and S. aureus pre-colonized PHACOS implants, and these levels were significantly lower than S. aureus pre-colonized control polymers. These findings support a contact active surface mode of antibacterial action for PHACOS and establish this functionalized polyhydroxyalkanoate as an infection-resistant biomaterial. PMID:24094939

  4. Distribution of bacterial contamination in a teaching hospital in Tehran - a special focus on Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Mirzaii, Mehdi; Emaneini, Mohammad; Maleknejad, Parviz; Jonaidi, Nematollah; Fooladi, Abbas Ali Imani; Aligholi, Marzieh; Jabalameli, Fereshteh; Halimi, Shahnaz; Taherikalani, Morovat; Kasaeian, Amir

    2012-03-01

    There are documents that confirm the cycle of bacterial transmission between patients, staff, and the inanimate environment. The environment may have more effect on intensive care units (ICUs), because the patients who require intensive care have unstable clinical conditions and are more sensitive to infections. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of bacteria in air and inanimate surface in the ICUs and to compare the microbial levels to standard levels.Air and inanimate surface in the four ICUs of a teaching hospital underwent weekly surveillance by means of air sampler and swabs for a period of six-month. Total bacterial counts were evaluated onto trypticase soy agar and mannitol salt agar (MSA).A total of 725 samples [air (168) and inanimate surfaces (557)] were collected. The total mean ± SD CFU/m3 of airborne bacteria in all of the ICUs were 115.93 ± 48.04. The most common bacteria in air of the ICUs were Gram-positive cocci (84.2%). The total mean ± SD airborne of Staphylococcus aureus was 12.10±8.11 CFU/m3. The highest levels of S. aureus contamination were found in ventilators and bed ledges. More suitable disinfection of hospital environments and monthly rotation in utilization of the various disinfectant agents are needed for the prevention of airborne and inanimate transmission of S. aureus.

  5. Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus and Analysis of Associated Bacterial Communities on Food Industry Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Delgado, Susana; Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel; Martínez, Beatriz; Cabo, Marta López; Rodríguez, Ana; Herrera, Juan J.

    2012-01-01

    Biofilms are a common cause of food contamination with undesirable bacteria, such as pathogenic bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major bacteria causing food-borne diseases in humans. A study designed to determine the presence of S. aureus on food contact surfaces in dairy, meat, and seafood environments and to identify coexisting microbiota has therefore been carried out. A total of 442 samples were collected, and the presence of S. aureus was confirmed in 6.1% of samples. Sixty-three S. aureus isolates were recovered and typed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Profiles were clustered into four groups which were related to specific food environments. All isolates harbored some potential virulence factors such as enterotoxin production genes, biofilm formation-associated genes, antibiotic resistance, or lysogeny. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints of bacterial communities coexisting with S. aureus revealed the presence of bacteria either involved in food spoilage or of concern for food safety in all food environments. Food industry surfaces could thus be a reservoir for S. aureus forming complex communities with undesirable bacteria in multispecies biofilms. Uneven microbiological conditions were found in each food sector, which indicates the need to improve hygienic conditions in food processing facilities, particularly the removal of bacterial biofilms, to enhance the safety of food products. PMID:23023749

  6. Incidence of Staphylococcus aureus and analysis of associated bacterial communities on food industry surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Diana; Delgado, Susana; Vázquez-Sánchez, Daniel; Martínez, Beatriz; Cabo, Marta López; Rodríguez, Ana; Herrera, Juan J; García, Pilar

    2012-12-01

    Biofilms are a common cause of food contamination with undesirable bacteria, such as pathogenic bacteria. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major bacteria causing food-borne diseases in humans. A study designed to determine the presence of S. aureus on food contact surfaces in dairy, meat, and seafood environments and to identify coexisting microbiota has therefore been carried out. A total of 442 samples were collected, and the presence of S. aureus was confirmed in 6.1% of samples. Sixty-three S. aureus isolates were recovered and typed by random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD). Profiles were clustered into four groups which were related to specific food environments. All isolates harbored some potential virulence factors such as enterotoxin production genes, biofilm formation-associated genes, antibiotic resistance, or lysogeny. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) fingerprints of bacterial communities coexisting with S. aureus revealed the presence of bacteria either involved in food spoilage or of concern for food safety in all food environments. Food industry surfaces could thus be a reservoir for S. aureus forming complex communities with undesirable bacteria in multispecies biofilms. Uneven microbiological conditions were found in each food sector, which indicates the need to improve hygienic conditions in food processing facilities, particularly the removal of bacterial biofilms, to enhance the safety of food products.

  7. Failure of bacterial screening to detect Staphylococcus aureus: the English experience of donor follow-up.

    PubMed

    Brailsford, S R; Tossell, J; Morrison, R; McDonald, C P; Pitt, T L

    2018-05-24

    Between February 2011 and December 2016, over 1·6 million platelet units, 36% pooled platelets, underwent bacterial screening prior to issue. Contamination rates for apheresis and pooled platelets were 0·02% and 0·07%, respectively. Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 21 contaminations, including four pooled platelets, one confirmed transfusion-transmitted infection (TTI) and three 'near-miss' incidents detected on visual inspection which were negative on screening. We describe follow-up investigations of 16 donors for skin carriage of S. aureus and molecular characterisation of donor and pack isolates. Units were screened by the BacT/ALERT 3D detection system. Contributing donors were interviewed and consent requested for skin and nasal swabbing. S. aureus isolates were referred for spa gene type and DNA macrorestriction profile to determine identity between carriage strains and packs. Donors of 10 apheresis and two pooled packs screen positive for S. aureus were confirmed as the source of contamination; seven had a history of skin conditions, predominantly eczema; 11 were nasal carriers. The 'near-miss' incidents were associated with apheresis donors, two donors harboured strains indistinguishable from the pack strain. The TTI was due to a screen-negative pooled unit, and a nasal isolate of one donor was indistinguishable from that in the unit. Staphylococcus aureus contamination is rare but potentially harmful in platelet units. Donor isolates showed almost universal correspondence in molecular type with pack isolates, thus confirming the source of contamination. The importance of visual inspection of packs prior to transfusion is underlined by the 'near-miss' incidents. © 2018 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  8. Epidermal Growth Factor Relieves Inflammatory Signals in Staphylococcus aureus-Treated Human Epidermal Keratinocytes and Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in Nc/Nga Mice.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Young; Lee, You Jin; Kim, Ji Min; Kang, Hyun Ji; Cho, Sang Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun

    2018-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a defective immunologic barrier, which is aggravated by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) . Epidermal growth factor (EGF) suppresses inflammation and EGF receptor inhibitors increased S. aureus colonization. Thus, we investigated the potential roles of EGF in AD, which is often aggravated by S. aureus . We determined how EGF affects the expression of inflammatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) treated with heat-inactivated S. aureus (HKSA) in vitro and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced AD-like skin lesions in Nc/Nga mice. HKSA increased IL-6 and NF κ B expression; EGF treatment had the opposite effect. EGF increased human β defensin-2 expression in HEKs and murine β defensin-3 in mice. In mice, both EGF and pimecrolimus groups showed less erythema with significantly reduced inflammation and decreased expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin. EGF relieved S. aureus -induced inflammation and AD-like skin lesions in Nc/Nga mice. Therefore, EGF could be a potential topical treatment for AD.

  9. Epidermal Growth Factor Relieves Inflammatory Signals in Staphylococcus aureus-Treated Human Epidermal Keratinocytes and Atopic Dermatitis-Like Skin Lesions in Nc/Nga Mice

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun Young; Lee, You Jin; Kim, Ji Min; Kang, Hyun Ji

    2018-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a defective immunologic barrier, which is aggravated by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Epidermal growth factor (EGF) suppresses inflammation and EGF receptor inhibitors increased S. aureus colonization. Thus, we investigated the potential roles of EGF in AD, which is often aggravated by S. aureus. We determined how EGF affects the expression of inflammatory cytokines and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) in human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKs) treated with heat-inactivated S. aureus (HKSA) in vitro and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene-induced AD-like skin lesions in Nc/Nga mice. HKSA increased IL-6 and NFκB expression; EGF treatment had the opposite effect. EGF increased human β defensin-2 expression in HEKs and murine β defensin-3 in mice. In mice, both EGF and pimecrolimus groups showed less erythema with significantly reduced inflammation and decreased expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin. EGF relieved S. aureus-induced inflammation and AD-like skin lesions in Nc/Nga mice. Therefore, EGF could be a potential topical treatment for AD.

  10. Rapid Detection of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus in Atopic Dermatitis by Using the BD Max StaphSR Assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Park, Kui Young; Jin, Taewon; Kim, Ju Hee; Seo, Seong Jun

    2017-07-01

    Eczematous lesions of atopic dermatitis (AD) patients are known to be a source of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) transmission and might be a reservoir for community-associated methicillin-resistant SA (MRSA). The BD Max StaphSR (BD-SR) is a fully automated, multiplex real-time PCR assay for the direct detection and differentiation of SA and MRSA from nasal swab samples. We evaluated the detection rates of SA and MRSA from skin lesions of outpatients with AD using the BD-SR assay, and determined the usefulness of the BD-SR assay. A total of 244 skin swab samples (skin lesions of 213 outpatients with AD and normal skin of 31 healthy controls) were tested directly by using the BD-SR assay. Of the 213 samples from patients with AD, 69 (32.4%) were positive for SA, 6 (8.7%) of which were positive for MRSA. Only 1 (3.2%) of 31 samples from healthy controls was positive for SA. The BD-SR assay is effective for the rapid detection of SA and MRSA from skin swab samples, which can provide important information for managing patients with AD and preventing the spread of MRSA. © The Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine.

  11. Virulence Factor Targeting of the Bacterial Pathogen Staphylococcus aureus for Vaccine and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Trevor L.; Carothers, Katelyn E.; Lee, Shaun W.

    2018-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is a major bacterial pathogen capable of causing a range of infections in humans from gastrointestinal disease, skin and soft tissue infections, to severe outcomes such as sepsis. Staphylococcal infections in humans can be frequent and recurring, with treatments becoming less effective due to the growing persistence of antibiotic resistant S. aureus strains. Due to the prevalence of antibiotic resistance, and the current limitations on antibiotic development, an active and highly promising avenue of research has been to develop strategies to specifically inhibit the activity of virulence factors produced S. aureus as an alternative means to treat disease. Objective In this review we specifically highlight several major virulence factors produced by S. aureus for which recent advances in antivirulence approaches may hold promise as an alternative means to treating diseases caused by this pathogen. Strategies to inhibit virulence factors can range from small molecule inhibitors, to antibodies, to mutant and toxoid forms of the virulence proteins. Conclusion The major prevalence of antibiotic resistant strains of S. aureus combined with the lack of new antibiotic discoveries highlight the need for vigorous research into alternative strategies to combat diseases caused by this highly successful pathogen. Current efforts to develop specific antivirulence strategies, vaccine approaches, and alternative therapies for treating severe disease caused by S. aureus have the potential to stem the tide against the limitations that we face in the post-antibiotic era. PMID:27894236

  12. Transcription of thymic stromal lymphopoietin via Toll-like receptor 2 in canine keratinocytes: a possible association of Staphylococcus spp. in the deterioration of allergic inflammation in canine atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Mayu; Asahina, Ryota; Kamishina, Hiroaki; Maeda, Sadatoshi

    2016-06-01

    Colonization, overgrowth and subsequent infection by Staphylococcus spp. is frequently observed in canine atopic dermatitis (CAD), where it contributes to the intensity of cutaneous inflammation. The mechanisms by which staphylococci contribute to the pathogenesis of CAD are unclear. Studies suggest that thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), a cytokine induced by a cell wall component of Staphylococcus spp., may play a critical role in Th2 responses including the pathogenesis of CAD. To determine if synthetic triacylated lipopeptide (TLR1/2 ligand), a cell wall component of Staphylococcus spp., induces the transcription of TSLP via TLR2 in canine keratinocytes. Transcription of TSLP was quantified in a canine keratinocyte cell line after stimulation with synthetic triacylated lipopeptide, and again after inhibition of TLR2 by a targeted small interfering RNA. The transcription of TSLP was enhanced 6 h after stimulation with the synthetic triacylated lipopeptide; it was completely suppressed by knockdown of TLR2. The results demonstrated that a synthetic cell wall component of Staphylococcus spp. induced transcription of TSLP via TLR2 in canine keratinocytes. Additional studies will be required to investigate whether Staphylococcus spp. contributes to Th2 responses in CAD through TLR2-mediated TSLP production. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  13. Perioral dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... dermatitis URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001455.htm Perioral dermatitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Perioral dermatitis is a skin disorder resembling acne ...

  14. Dermatitis herpetiformis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001480.htm Dermatitis herpetiformis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is a very itchy rash consisting ...

  15. Staphylococcus aureus Membrane-Derived Vesicles Promote Bacterial Virulence and Confer Protective Immunity in Murine Infection Models.

    PubMed

    Askarian, Fatemeh; Lapek, John D; Dongre, Mitesh; Tsai, Chih-Ming; Kumaraswamy, Monika; Kousha, Armin; Valderrama, J Andrés; Ludviksen, Judith A; Cavanagh, Jorunn P; Uchiyama, Satoshi; Mollnes, Tom E; Gonzalez, David J; Wai, Sun N; Nizet, Victor; Johannessen, Mona

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces membrane-derived vesicles (MVs), which share functional properties to outer membrane vesicles. Atomic force microscopy revealed that S. aureus -derived MVs are associated with the bacterial surface or released into the surrounding environment depending on bacterial growth conditions. By using a comparative proteomic approach, a total of 131 and 617 proteins were identified in MVs isolated from S. aureus grown in Luria-Bertani and brain-heart infusion broth, respectively. Purified S. aureus MVs derived from the bacteria grown in either media induced comparable levels of cytotoxicity and neutrophil-activation. Administration of exogenous MVs increased the resistance of S. aureus to killing by whole blood or purified human neutrophils ex vivo and increased S. aureus survival in vivo . Finally, immunization of mice with S. aureus -derived MVs induced production of IgM, total IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b resulting in protection against subcutaneous and systemic S. aureus infection. Collectively, our results suggest S. aureus MVs can influence bacterial-host interactions during systemic infections and provide protective immunity in murine models of infection.

  16. Slime-producing Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. aureus in acute bacterial conjunctivitis in soft contact lens wearers.

    PubMed

    Catalanotti, Piergiorgio; Lanza, Michele; Del Prete, Antonio; Lucido, Maria; Catania, Maria Rosaria; Gallè, Francesca; Boggia, Daniela; Perfetto, Brunella; Rossano, Fabio

    2005-10-01

    In recent years, an increase in ocular pathologies related to soft contact lens has been observed. The most common infectious agents were Staphylococcus spp. Some strains produce an extracellular polysaccharidic slime that can cause severe infections. Polysaccharide synthesis is under genetic control and involves a specific intercellular adhesion (ica) locus, in particular, icaA and icaD genes. Conjunctival swabs from 97 patients with presumably bacterial bilateral conjunctivitis, wearers of soft contact lenses were examined. We determined the ability of staphylococci to produce slime, relating it to the presence of icaA and icaD genes. We also investigated the antibiotic susceptibility and Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the clinical isolates. We found that 74.1% of the S. epidermidis strains and 61.1% of the S. aureus strains isolated were slime producers and showed icaA and icaD genes. Both S. epidermidis and S. aureus slime-producing strains exhibited more surface hydrophobicity than non-producing slime strains. The PFGE patterns overlapped in S. epidermidis strains with high hydrophobicity. The similar PFGE patterns were not related to biofilm production. We found scarce matching among the Staphylococcus spp. studied, slime production, surface hydrophobicity and antibiotic susceptibility.

  17. Laser Desorption 7.87 eV Postionization Mass Spectrometry of Antibiotics in Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Gerald L.; Carlson, Ross; Akhmetov, Artem; Moore, Jerry F.; Hanley, Luke

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the development of laser desorption 7.87 eV vacuum ultraviolet postionization mass spectrometry (LDPI-MS) to detect antibiotics within intact bacterial colony biofilms. As >99% of the molecules ejected by laser desorption are neutrals, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of these neutrals can provide significantly increased signal compared to detection of directly emitted ions. Postionization with VUV radiation from the molecular fluorine laser single photon ionizes laser desorbed neutrals with ionization potentials below the 7.87 eV photon energy. Antibiotics with structures indicative of sub-7.87 eV ionization potentials were examined for their ability to be detected by 7.87 eV LDPI-MS. Tetracycline, sulfadiazine, and novobiocin were successfully detected neat as dried films physisorbed on porous silicon oxide substrates. Tetracycline and sulfadiazine were then detected within intact Staphylococcus epidermidis colony biofilms, the former with LOD in the micromolar concentration range. PMID:18704905

  18. Staphylococcus aureus Tissue Infection During Sepsis Is Supported by Differential Use of Bacterial or Host-Derived Lipoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Francis

    2016-01-01

    To thrive in diverse environments, bacteria must shift their metabolic output in response to nutrient bioavailability. In many bacterial species, such changes in metabolic flux depend upon lipoic acid, a cofactor required for the activity of enzyme complexes involved in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, glycine catabolism, and branched chain fatty acid biosynthesis. The requirement of lipoic acid for metabolic enzyme activity necessitates that bacteria synthesize the cofactor and/or scavenge it from environmental sources. Although use of lipoic acid is a conserved phenomenon, the mechanisms behind its biosynthesis and salvage can differ considerably between bacterial species. Furthermore, low levels of circulating free lipoic acid in mammals underscore the importance of lipoic acid acquisition for pathogenic microbes during infection. In this study, we used a genetic approach to characterize the mechanisms of lipoic acid biosynthesis and salvage in the bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and evaluated the requirements for both pathways during murine sepsis. We determined that S. aureus lipoic acid biosynthesis and salvage genes exist in an arrangement that directly links redox stress response and acetate biosynthesis genes. In addition, we found that lipoic acid salvage is dictated by two ligases that facilitate growth and lipoylation in distinct environmental conditions in vitro, but that are fully compensatory for survival in vivo. Upon infection of mice, we found that de novo biosynthesis or salvage promotes S. aureus survival in a manner that depends upon the infectious site. In addition, when both lipoic acid biosynthesis and salvage are blocked S. aureus is rendered avirulent, implying an inability to induce lipoic acid-independent metabolic programs to promote survival. Together, our results define the major pathways of lipoic acid biosynthesis and salvage in S. aureus and support the notion that bacterial nutrient acquisition schemes are instrumental

  19. Staphylococcus aureus Tissue Infection During Sepsis Is Supported by Differential Use of Bacterial or Host-Derived Lipoic Acid.

    PubMed

    Zorzoli, Azul; Grayczyk, James P; Alonzo, Francis

    2016-10-01

    To thrive in diverse environments, bacteria must shift their metabolic output in response to nutrient bioavailability. In many bacterial species, such changes in metabolic flux depend upon lipoic acid, a cofactor required for the activity of enzyme complexes involved in glycolysis, the citric acid cycle, glycine catabolism, and branched chain fatty acid biosynthesis. The requirement of lipoic acid for metabolic enzyme activity necessitates that bacteria synthesize the cofactor and/or scavenge it from environmental sources. Although use of lipoic acid is a conserved phenomenon, the mechanisms behind its biosynthesis and salvage can differ considerably between bacterial species. Furthermore, low levels of circulating free lipoic acid in mammals underscore the importance of lipoic acid acquisition for pathogenic microbes during infection. In this study, we used a genetic approach to characterize the mechanisms of lipoic acid biosynthesis and salvage in the bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and evaluated the requirements for both pathways during murine sepsis. We determined that S. aureus lipoic acid biosynthesis and salvage genes exist in an arrangement that directly links redox stress response and acetate biosynthesis genes. In addition, we found that lipoic acid salvage is dictated by two ligases that facilitate growth and lipoylation in distinct environmental conditions in vitro, but that are fully compensatory for survival in vivo. Upon infection of mice, we found that de novo biosynthesis or salvage promotes S. aureus survival in a manner that depends upon the infectious site. In addition, when both lipoic acid biosynthesis and salvage are blocked S. aureus is rendered avirulent, implying an inability to induce lipoic acid-independent metabolic programs to promote survival. Together, our results define the major pathways of lipoic acid biosynthesis and salvage in S. aureus and support the notion that bacterial nutrient acquisition schemes are instrumental

  20. Micro-Raman spectroscopic identification of bacterial cells of the genus Staphylococcus and dependence on their cultivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Harz, M; Rösch, P; Peschke, K-D; Ronneberger, O; Burkhardt, H; Popp, J

    2005-11-01

    Microbial contamination is not only a medical problem, but also plays a large role in pharmaceutical clean room production and food processing technology. Therefore many techniques were developed to achieve differentiation and identification of microorganisms. Among these methods vibrational spectroscopic techniques (IR, Raman and SERS) are useful tools because of their rapidity and sensitivity. Recently we have shown that micro-Raman spectroscopy in combination with a support vector machine is an extremely capable approach for a fast and reliable, non-destructive online identification of single bacteria belonging to different genera. In order to simulate different environmental conditions we analyzed in this contribution different Staphylococcus strains with varying cultivation conditions in order to evaluate our method with a reliable dataset. First, micro-Raman spectra of the bulk material and single bacterial cells that were grown under the same conditions were recorded and used separately for a distinct chemotaxonomic classification of the strains. Furthermore Raman spectra were recorded from single bacterial cells that were cultured under various conditions to study the influence of cultivation on the discrimination ability. This dataset was analyzed both with a hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and a support vector machine (SVM).

  1. Infected Atopic Dermatitis Lesions Contain Pharmacologic Amounts of Lipoteichoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Jeffrey B.; Kozman, Amal; Mousdicas, Nico; Saha, Chandan; Landis, Megan; Al-Hassani, Mohammed; Yao, Weiguo; Yao, Yongxue; Hyatt, Ann-Marie; Sheehan, Michael P.; Haggstrom, Anita N.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Bacterial infection with Staphylococcus aureus is a known trigger for worsening of atopic dermatitis (AD); the exact mechanisms by which bacterial infection worsens dermatitis are unknown. Objective We sought to characterize the amounts of the biologically active bacterial lipoprotein lipoteichoic acid (LTA) in infected AD lesions. Methods Eighty-nine children with clinically impetiginized lesions of AD were enrolled in this study. A lesion was graded clinically using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI), and then wash fluid obtained from the lesion for quantitative bacterial culture, and measurement of LTA and cytokines. The staphylococcal isolate was tested for antibiotic susceptibilities. The patients were treated with a regimen that included topical corticosteroids and systemic antibiotics and the lesion was re-analyzed after two weeks. Results S. aureus was identified in 79 of 89 children enrolled in the study. The bacterial CFU correlated with the EASI lesional score (p = 0.04). LTA levels up to 9.8 μg/ml were measured in the wash fluid samples and the amounts correlated with the lesional EASI scores (p = 0.01) and S. aureus CFU (p < 0.001). Approximately 30% of clinically impetiginized AD lesions contained greater than 1 μg/ml LTA, amounts that exert effects on various cell types in vitro. Moreover, injection of skin tissue ex vivo with amounts of LTA found in AD lesions resulted in epidermal cytokine gene expression. Conclusions Pharmacologic levels of LTA are found in many infected atopic dermatitis lesions. Clinical Implications These findings suggest that staphylococcal LTA could be an important mediator of the increased skin inflammation associated with infected AD. Capsule Summary These studies demonstrate high levels of staphylococcal LTA are found on impetiginized AD lesions. Moreover, subjects harboring MRSA exhibited greater total body involvement of AD. PMID:19962742

  2. "Dermatitis" defined.

    PubMed

    Smith, Suzanne M; Nedorost, Susan T

    2010-01-01

    The term "dermatitis" can be defined narrowly or broadly, clinically or histologically. A common and costly condition, dermatitis is underresourced compared to other chronic skin conditions. The lack of a collectively understood definition of dermatitis and its subcategories could be the primary barrier. To investigate how dermatologists define the term "dermatitis" and determine if a consensus on the definition of this term and other related terms exists. A seven-question survey of dermatologists nationwide was conducted. Of respondents (n  =  122), half consider dermatitis to be any inflammation of the skin. Nearly half (47.5%) use the term interchangeably with "eczema." Virtually all (> 96%) endorse the subcategory "atopic" under the terms "dermatitis" and "eczema," but the subcategories "contact," "drug hypersensitivity," and "occupational" are more highly endorsed under the term "dermatitis" than under the term "eczema." Over half (55.7%) personally consider "dermatitis" to have a broad meaning, and even more (62.3%) believe that dermatologists as a whole define the term broadly. There is a lack of consensus among experts in defining dermatitis, eczema, and their related subcategories.

  3. Stoma dermatitis: prevalent but often overlooked.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shilpa; Ehrlich, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Peristomal dermatoses commonly afflict the area around stoma openings in ostomy patients. These complications, however, are often unreported by patients and remain untreated for years, thus affecting maintenance and recovery from the surgery. These dermatoses can have chemical, mechanical, irritant, bacterial, immunologic, or disease-related etiologies. Examples of common forms of dermatitis that occur peristomally include fecal or urine irritant contact dermatitis, chronic papillomatous dermatitis, mechanical dermatitis, and allergic contact dermatitis. This article summarizes various skin irritations that can occur after an ostomy and also reviews previously published reports of peristomal allergic contact dermatitis. In addition, the clinical importance of identifying these dermatoses (most important, their effects on the patient's quality of life), risk factors for the skin irritations, the importance of patch testing, treatment of stoma dermatitis, and the importance of patient education and patient-doctor communication are also discussed.

  4. Impact of Bacterial Membrane Fatty Acid Composition on the Failure of Daptomycin To Kill Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Boudjemaa, Rym; Cabriel, Clément; Dubois-Brissonnet, Florence; Bourg, Nicolas; Dupuis, Guillaume; Gruss, Alexandra; Lévêque-Fort, Sandrine; Briandet, Romain; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre; Steenkeste, Karine

    2018-07-01

    Daptomycin is a last-resort membrane-targeting lipopeptide approved for the treatment of drug-resistant staphylococcal infections, such as bacteremia and implant-related infections. Although cases of resistance to this antibiotic are rare, increasing numbers of clinical, in vitro , and animal studies report treatment failure, notably against Staphylococcus aureus The aim of this study was to identify the features of daptomycin and its target bacteria that lead to daptomycin treatment failure. We show that daptomycin bactericidal activity against S. aureus varies significantly with the growth state and strain, according to the membrane fatty acid composition. Daptomycin efficacy as an antibiotic relies on its ability to oligomerize within membranes and form pores that subsequently lead to cell death. Our findings ascertain that daptomycin interacts with tolerant bacteria and reaches its membrane target, regardless of its bactericidal activity. However, the final step of pore formation does not occur in cells that are daptomycin tolerant, strongly suggesting that it is incapable of oligomerization. Importantly, membrane fatty acid contents correlated with poor daptomycin bactericidal activity, which could be manipulated by fatty acid addition. In conclusion, daptomycin failure to treat S. aureus is not due to a lack of antibiotic-target interaction, but is driven by its capacity to form pores, which depends on membrane composition. Manipulation of membrane fluidity to restore S. aureus daptomycin bactericidal activity in vivo could open the way to novel antibiotic treatment strategies. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Inactivation of the Ecs ABC transporter of Staphylococcus aureus attenuates virulence by altering composition and function of bacterial wall.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Ing-Marie; Juuti, Jarmo T; François, Patrice; AlMajidi, Rana; Pietiäinen, Milla; Girard, Myriam; Lindholm, Catharina; Saller, Manfred J; Driessen, Arnold J M; Kuusela, Pentti; Bokarewa, Maria; Schrenzel, Jacques; Kontinen, Vesa P

    2010-12-02

    Ecs is an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter present in aerobic and facultative anaerobic gram-positive Firmicutes. Inactivation of Bacillus subtilis Ecs causes pleiotropic changes in the bacterial phenotype including inhibition of intramembrane proteolysis. The molecule(s) transported by Ecs is (are) still unknown. In this study we mutated the ecsAB operon in two Staphylococcus aureus strains, Newman and LS-1. Phenotypic and functional characterization of these Ecs deficient mutants revealed a defect in growth, increased autolysis and lysostaphin sensitivity, altered composition of cell wall proteins including the precursor form of staphylokinase and an altered bacterial surface texture. DNA microarray analysis indicated that the Ecs deficiency changed expression of the virulence factor regulator protein Rot accompanied by differential expression of membrane transport proteins, particularly ABC transporters and phosphate-specific transport systems, protein A, adhesins and capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis proteins. Virulence of the ecs mutants was studied in a mouse model of hematogenous S. aureus infection. Mice inoculated with the ecs mutant strains developed markedly milder infections than those inoculated with the wild-type strains and had consequently lower mortality, less weight loss, milder arthritis and decreased persistence of staphylococci in the kidneys. The ecs mutants had higher susceptibility to ribosomal antibiotics and plant alkaloids chelerythrine and sanguinarine. Our results show that Ecs is essential for staphylococcal virulence and antimicrobial resistance probably since the transport function of Ecs is essential for the normal structure and function of the cell wall. Thus targeting Ecs may be a new approach in combating staphylococcal infection.

  6. Perfume dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Larsen, W G

    1985-01-01

    The most common reaction to fragrance materials seen by practicing dermatologists is allergic contact dermatitis. Photodermatitis is occasionally seen, as is contact urticaria, irritation, and depigmentation. Fragrances are the leading cause of allergic contact dermatitis due to cosmetics. The fragrance mixture can cause false-positive reactions; therefore, it is more desirable to test with a separate series of fragrance materials.

  7. Microbiology of infected poison ivy dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Brook, I; Frazier, E H; Yeager, J K

    2000-05-01

    We report the aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of secondarily infected poison ivy dermatitis. The study involved retrospective review of clinical and microbiology laboratory records of patients with secondarily infected poison ivy lesions. Bacterial growth was noted in 33 specimens. Aerobic or facultative anaerobic bacteria only were present in 18 (55%) patients, anaerobic bacteria only in seven (21%), and mixed anaerobic-aerobic bacteria in eight (24%). Forty-five isolates were recovered (1.4 per specimen): 27 aerobic or facultative anaerobic bacteria, and 18 strict anaerobes. The predominant aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus (13 isolates) and group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (six). The predominant anaerobes were Peptostreptococcus spp. (seven isolates), pigmented Prevotella and Porphyromonas spp. (four) and Fusobacterium spp. (two). Single bacterial isolates were recovered in 18 (55%) patients, eight of which were S. aureus. Nineteen of the organisms isolated from 16 (48%) patients produced the enzyme beta-lactamase. Organisms that resided in the mucous membranes close to the lesions predominated in those infections. Enteric gram-negative rods and Bacteroides fragilis group predominated in leg and buttock lesions. Group A beta-haemolytic streptococci, pigmented Prevotella and Porphyromonas and Fusobacterium spp. were most frequently recovered from lesions of the finger, face and neck. The polymicrobial aetiology of secondarily infected poison ivy lesions, and the association of bacterial flora with the anatomical site of the lesions, are demonstrated.

  8. Staphylococcus aureus leukocidin ED contributes to systemic infection by targeting neutrophils and promoting bacterial growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Francis; Benson, Meredith A.; Chen, John; Novick, Richard P.; Shopsin, Bo; Torres, Victor J.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Bloodstream infection with Staphylococcus aureus is common and can be fatal. However, virulence factors that contribute to lethality in S. aureus bloodstream infection are poorly defined. We discovered that LukED, a commonly overlooked leukotoxin, is critical for S. aureus bloodstream infection in mice. We also determined that LukED promotes S. aureus replication in vivo by directly killing phagocytes recruited to sites of hematogenously-seeded tissue. Furthermore, we established that murine neutrophils are the primary target of LukED, as the greater virulence of wild type S. aureus compared to a lukED mutant was abrogated by depleting neutrophils. The in vivo toxicity of LukED toward murine phagocytes is unique among S. aureus leukotoxins, implying its crucial role in pathogenesis. Moreover, the tropism of LukED for murine phagocytes highlights the utility of murine models to study LukED pathobiology, including development and testing of strategies to inhibit toxin activity and control bacterial infection. PMID:22142035

  9. Atopic dermatitis: an overview.

    PubMed

    Berke, Rebecca; Singh, Arshdeep; Guralnick, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis, also known as atopic eczema, is a chronic pruritic skin condition affecting approximately 17.8 million persons in the United States. It can lead to significant morbidity. A simplified version of the U.K. Working Party's Diagnostic Criteria can help make the diagnosis. Asking about the presence and frequency of symptoms can allow physicians to grade the severity of the disease and response to treatment. Management consists of relieving symptoms and lengthening time between flare-ups. Regular, liberal use of emollients is recommended. The primary pharmacologic treatment is topical corticosteroids. Twice-daily or more frequent application has not been shown to be more effective than once-daily application. A maintenance regimen of topical corticosteroids may reduce relapse rates in patients who have recurrent moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. Pimecrolimus and tacrolimus are calcineurin inhibitors that are recommended as second-line treatment for persons with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis and who are at risk of atrophy from topical corticosteroids. Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has issued a boxed warning about a possible link between these medications and skin malignancies and lymphoma, studies have not demonstrated a clear link. Topical and oral antibiotics may be used to treat secondary bacterial infections, but are not effective in preventing atopic dermatitis flare-ups. The effectiveness of alternative therapies, such as Chinese herbal preparations, homeopathy, hypnotherapy/biofeedback, and massage therapy, has not been established.

  10. Contact dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... BS, Burks AW, et al, eds. Middleton's Allergy: Principles and Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 35. Usatine RP, Riojas M. Diagnosis and management of contact dermatitis. Am Fam Physician . 2010;82( ...

  11. Seborrheic dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Dandruff; Seborrheic eczema; Cradle cap ... The exact cause of seborrheic dermatitis is unknown. It may be due to a combination of factors: Oil gland activity Yeasts, called malassezia, which live on the ...

  12. Dermatitis Herpetiformis

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Authors Information for Reviewers Human & Animal Rights Job Postings Sections of the JAOCD JAOCD Archive ... Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is an intensely itchy skin eruption. It usually shows up in young adults, and is more common in men and people ...

  13. Staphylococcus aureus-Induced G2/M Phase Transition Delay in Host Epithelial Cells Increases Bacterial Infective Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Sintia; Legembre, Patrick; Edmond, Valérie; Azevedo, Vasco; Miyoshi, Anderson; Even, Sergine; Taieb, Frédéric; Arlot-Bonnemains, Yannick; Le Loir, Yves; Berkova, Nadia

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a highly versatile, opportunistic pathogen and the etiological agent of a wide range of infections in humans and warm-blooded animals. The epithelial surface is its principal site of colonization and infection. In this work, we investigated the cytopathic effect of S. aureus strains from human and animal origins and their ability to affect the host cell cycle in human HeLa and bovine MAC-T epithelial cell lines. S. aureus invasion slowed down cell proliferation and induced a cytopathic effect, resulting in the enlargement of host cells. A dramatic decrease in the number of mitotic cells was observed in the infected cultures. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an S. aureus-induced delay in the G2/M phase transition in synchronous HeLa cells. This delay required the presence of live S. aureus since the addition of the heat-killed bacteria did not alter the cell cycle. The results of Western blot experiments showed that the G2/M transition delay was associated with the accumulation of inactive cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk1, a key inducer of mitosis entry, and with the accumulation of unphosphorylated histone H3, which was correlated with a reduction of the mitotic cell number. Analysis of S. aureus proliferation in asynchronous, G1- and G2-phase-enriched HeLa cells showed that the G2 phase was preferential for bacterial infective efficiency, suggesting that the G2 phase delay may be used by S. aureus for propagation within the host. Taken together, our results divulge the potential of S. aureus in the subversion of key cellular processes such as cell cycle progression, and shed light on the biological significance of S. aureus-induced host cell cycle alteration. PMID:23717407

  14. Role of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors in Inducing Inflammation and Vascular Permeability in a Mouse Model of Bacterial Endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is a common causative agent of bacterial endophthalmitis, a vision threatening complication of eye surgeries. The relative contribution of S. aureus virulence factors in the pathogenesis of endophthalmitis remains unclear. Here, we comprehensively analyzed the development of intraocular inflammation, vascular permeability, and the loss of retinal function in C57BL/6 mouse eyes, challenged with live S. aureus, heat-killed S. aureus (HKSA), peptidoglycan (PGN), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), staphylococcal protein A (SPA), α-toxin, and Toxic-shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST1). Our data showed a dose-dependent (range 0.01 μg/eye to 1.0 μg/eye) increase in the levels of inflammatory mediators by all virulence factors. The cell wall components, particularly PGN and LTA, seem to induce higher levels of TNF-α, IL-6, KC, and MIP2, whereas the toxins induced IL-1β. Similarly, among the virulence factors, PGN induced higher PMN infiltration. The vascular permeability assay revealed significant leakage in eyes challenged with live SA (12-fold) and HKSA (7.3-fold), in comparison to other virulence factors (~2-fold) and controls. These changes coincided with retinal tissue damage, as evidenced by histological analysis. The electroretinogram (ERG) analysis revealed a significant decline in retinal function in eyes inoculated with live SA, followed by HKSA, SPA, and α-toxin. Together, these findings demonstrate the differential innate responses of the retina to S. aureus virulence factors, which contribute to intraocular inflammation and retinal function loss in endophthalmitis. PMID:26053426

  15. Perianal Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Agulló-Pérez, Alfredo-Daniel; Hervella-Garcés, Marcos; Oscoz-Jaime, Saioa; Azcona-Rodríguez, Maialen; Larrea-García, Mónica; Yanguas-Bayona, Juan-Ignacio

    Perianal complaints are often consulted in dermatology clinics, and in many cases, a conclusive diagnosis is not easily made. The aim of this study was to study and identify the epidemiological, clinical, and contact allergy features of patients with perianal dermatitis who attended at a contact dermatitis unit in a tertiary hospital in Spain. Adult patients with long-lasting (>4 weeks) perianal dermatitis were recruited during the past 10 years for investigation and follow-up. Every patient underwent a diagnostic workup consisting of dermatological exploration and patch tests with the standard and specific series, as well as the patients' own products. General surgical exploration was also performed in some patients. One hundred twenty-four patients were included. The MOAHLFA index was as follows: 43.5, 0, 4.8, 11.3, 1.6, 8.1, and 75. The main final diagnoses were allergic contact dermatitis (32.3%), psoriasis (24.2%), irritant contact dermatitis (17.7%), and lichen simplex (neurodermatitis) (10%). Eighty-one patients (66.1%) showed 1 or more positive reactions, and in 52 patients (43%), positive reactions relevant to the present disease were found. Contact allergy in patients with long-lasting perianal complaints is frequent. It is mandatory for these patients to be referred to a dermatologist for an adequate evaluation and patch testing. Methylchloroisothiazolinone/methylisothiazolinone seems as the most common allergen implicated in perianal contact dermatitis.

  16. The skin microbiome in allergen-induced canine atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Pierezan, Felipe; Olivry, Thierry; Paps, Judith S; Lawhon, Sara D; Wu, Jing; Steiner, Jörg M; Suchodolski, Jan S; Rodrigues Hoffmann, Aline

    2016-10-01

    Studies focusing on next-generation sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene have allowed detailed surveys of skin bacterial populations (microbiota) of the skin. This study evaluated temporal changes in the skin microbiota in a canine model of atopic dermatitis. Eight atopic dogs previously sensitized with house dust mites (HDM). The dogs were topically challenged on the right groin with HDM allergens. Swabs were collected from the challenged and the contralateral nonchallenged sites prior to provocation (pre-challenge; baseline sample) and on days 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after allergen challenge. The 16S rRNA gene was amplified, sequenced and analysed. Staphylococcus spp. and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius were quantified with quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Skin lesions developed in all dogs on the challenged sites. Differences in bacterial groups were observed on the challenged site over time. Relatively lower abundances of Fusobacteriaceae on Day 7, and, based on LEfSe, increased abundances of Corynebacteriaceae on Day 1, and Staphylococcaceae on days 7, 14 and 21, were observed on the challenged site, compared to the contralateral site. Results of RT-qPCR correlated with those of next-generation sequencing, with significantly increased numbers of Staphylococcus spp. and S. pseudintermedius on Day 21, and days 7 and 21 on the challenged site compared to the contralateral site, respectively. This study demonstrates that an allergen challenge in sensitized dogs leads to bacterial dysbiosis with increased abundance of S. pseudintermedius at the site of lesion induction. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD.

  17. Longitudinal evaluation of the skin microbiome and association with microenvironment and treatment in canine atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Charles W.; Morris, Daniel O.; Rankin, Shelley C.; Cain, Christine L.; Misic, Ana M.; Houser, Timothy; Mauldin, Elizabeth A.; Grice, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Host-microbe interactions may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD), a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disorder characterized by universal colonization with Staphylococcus. To examine the relationship between epidermal barrier function and the cutaneous microbiota in AD, this study employed a spontaneous model of canine AD (cAD). In a cohort of 14 dogs with cAD, the skin microbiota was longitudinally evaluated with parallel assessment of skin barrier function at disease flare, during antimicrobial therapy and posttherapy. Sequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA gene revealed decreased bacterial diversity and increased proportions of Staphylococcus (S. pseudintermedius in particular) and Corynebacterium in comparison to a cohort of healthy control dogs (n=16). Treatment restored bacterial diversity with decreased Staphylococcus proportions, concurrent with decreased cAD severity. Skin barrier function, as measured by corneometry, pH, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL) also normalized with treatment. Bacterial diversity correlated with TEWL and pH, but not corneometry. These findings provide insights into the relationship between the cutaneous microbiome and skin barrier function in AD, the impact of antimicrobial therapy on the skin microbiome, and highlight the utility of cAD as a spontaneous non-rodent model of AD. PMID:26854488

  18. Molecular basis of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonness, Sonja; Bieber, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease and there are numerous publications on this topic. This review will focus on developments in understanding the molecular basis of atopic dermatitis while considering the genetic background, skin barrier impairment, immune system deviation and microbial superinfections. Atopic dermatitis is a complex genetic disease in which gene-gene and gene-environment interactions play a key role. Surprisingly some genetic regions of interest were found to be overlapping with loci identified to play a role in another very common inflammatory skin disease, psoriasis, while no overlap has so far been observed with asthma. Impairment of the skin barrier followed by antigens trespassing seems to play an important role, favouring sensitization via transepidermal penetration which is the focus of current investigations. Superinfections by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus due to a weak innate defence seem to be significant in atopic dermatitis as they elicit a strong inflammatory response. Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease with a high incidence in school children and adults. Disease pathogenesis is complex and the background is multifactorial, making the underlying predispositions elusive. Understanding new pathogenic pathways may lead to the development of new drugs with enhanced benefit for the patient.

  19. External Bacterial Flora and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Staphylococcus spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Isolated from Two Household Cockroaches, Blattella germanica and Blatta orientalis.

    PubMed

    Menasria, Taha; Tine, Samir; Mahcene, Djaouida; Benammar, Leyla; Megri, Rochdi; Boukoucha, Mourad; Debabza, Manel

    2015-04-01

    A study was performed to estimate the prevalence of the external bacterial flora of two domestic cockroaches (Blattella germanica and Blatta orientalis) collected from households in Tebessa (northeast Algeria). Three major bacterial groups were cultured (total aerobic, enterobacteria, and staphylococci) from 14 specimens of cockroaches, and antibiotic susceptibility was tested for both Staphylococcus and Pseudomonas isolates. Culturing showed that the total bacterial load of cockroaches from different households were comparable (P<0.001) and enterobacteria were the predominant colonizers of the insect surface, with a bacterial load of (2.1 × 10⁵ CFU/insect), whereas the staphylococci group was the minority. Twenty-eight bacterial species were isolated, and susceptibility patterns showed that most of the staphylococci isolates were highly susceptible to chloramphenicol, gentamycin, pristinamycin, ofloxacin, clindamycin, and vancomycin; however, Pseudomonas strains exhibited resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, imipenem, and the second-generation antibiotic cephalosporin cefuroxime. Copyright © 2015 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  20. Diversity of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in carriage sites and skin lesions of dogs with superficial bacterial folliculitis: potential implications for diagnostic testing and therapy.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Rikke Friis; Boysen, Lene; Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Guardabassi, Luca; Damborg, Peter

    2018-05-21

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is genotypically diverse within the canine population and multiple strains may colonize individual dogs at any given time. If multiple strains with distinct antimicrobial resistance profiles are present in superficial bacterial folliculitis (SBF), sampling a single skin lesion for culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) might be inadequate to select effective therapy. To investigate S. pseudintermedius diversity in carriage sites and lesions of dogs with SBF. Fourteen dogs with SBF. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates obtained from perineum, gingiva and four to six skin lesions per dog were subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and AST to assess diversity between lesions. For two dogs, 14-16 isolates per lesion were included in the analysis to assess diversity within lesions. Analysis of one isolate per lesion revealed one to four strains displaying unique PFGE profiles, and up to three unique antimicrobial resistance (AMR) profiles for each dog. Multiple pustules from the same dog always harboured the same strain, whereas papules, crusts and collarettes did not. Up to four strains with distinct AMR profiles were isolated from the same lesion in two dogs. In 12 dogs, at least one carriage site strain also was represented in lesions. Lesions of SBF may harbour multiple S. pseudintermedius strains with distinct antimicrobial resistance profiles. Pustules are the best target for bacterial culture. It remains unclear whether isolation of different strains from other lesion types is a consequence of contamination or co-infection by multiple strains. © 2018 ESVD and ACVD.

  1. Seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Ana Luisa Sobral Bittencourt; Mameri, Angela Cristina Akel; Vargas, Thiago Jeunon de Sousa; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia; Nunes, Amanda Pedreira; Carneiro, Sueli Coelho da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing erythematous scaly skin disease, the prevalence of which is around 1 to 3% of the general population in the United States. It has two incidence peaks, the first in the first three months of life and the second beginning at puberty and reaching its apex at 40 to 60 years of age. The prevalence of seborrheic dermatitis is higher in HIV-positive individuals and the condition tends to be more intense and refractory to treatment in these patients. Neurological disorders and other chronic diseases are also associated with the onset of seborrheic dermatitis. The currently accepted theory on the pathogenesis of this disease advocates that yeast of Malassezia spp., present on the skin surface of susceptible individuals, leads to a non-immunogenic irritation due to the production of unsaturated fatty acids deposited on the skin surface. This article provides a review of the literature on seborrheic dermatitis, focusing on immunogenetics, the clinical forms of the disease and its treatment.

  2. Seborrhoeic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Naldi, Luigi

    2010-12-07

    Seborrhoeic dermatitis affects at least 10% of the population. Malassezia (Pityrosporum) ovale is thought to be the causative organism, and causes inflammation by still poorly defined mechanisms. Seborrhoeic dermatitis tends to relapse after treatment. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of topical treatments for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the scalp in adults? What are the effects of topical treatments for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face and body in adults? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to April 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 12 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: bifonazole, emollients, ketoconazole, lithium succinate, selenium sulphide, tar shampoo, terbinafine, and topical corticosteroids (betamethasone valerate, clobetasol propionate, clobetasone butyrate, hydrocortisone, mometasone furoate).

  3. Cheyletiella dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Powell, R F; Palmer, S M; Palmer, C H; Smith, E B

    1977-10-01

    A mild dermatitis probably due to Cheyletiella yasguri was observed in 2 persons whose pet dog was infested with this parasite. Cheyletiella mites differ morphologically from sarcoptic mites, which cause canine and human scabies. Treatment of man and dog with 1% gamma benzene hexachloride is usually successful in clearing this condition.

  4. [Compositae dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Marina; Poljacki, Mirjana

    2003-01-01

    Compositae dermatitis is an allergic contact dermatitis caused by plant species of the Compositae family. The first report of a cutaneous reaction to the Chrysanthemum genus was made by Howe JS in 1887. In 1895 Maiden JH reported about skin lesions among men working with Tagetes minuta. Case reports of contact allergic-ragweed dermatitis appeared in the American literature as early as 1919. The North American feverfew--Parthenium Hysterophorus was brought to India from America in 1956 and it caused thousands of cases of so-called parthenium dermatitis. Ragweed and parthenium dermatitis became prototypes for the classic, so-called "airborne" Compositae dermatitis, that affects primarily exposed skin surfaces, and produces a universal erythroderma. The frequency of contact allergy to Compositae in Europe is higher than previously believed. It occurs most frequently in middle-aged and elderly persons, but also in all age groups. During the two past decades a more equal sex ratio has been established. The prevalence varies from 0.7-1.4% in the general population, up to 4.5% among occupationally exposed persons. Compositae allergy is among the top ten contact sensitivities in Europe. In North Europe plants were the cause of 4.4% cases of occupational allergic contact dermatitis. ETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS: Among cultivated Compositae plants, Chrysanthemum is considered to be a major sensitizer in Europe (60%). Among the edible types, it is lettuce--Lactuca sativa and endive Cichorium endivia (20-30%), and wild-growing feverfew--Tanace--tum parthenium (70-90%), tansy--Tanacetum vulgare (54%), and dandelion--Taraxacum officinale (65%). Sesquiterpene lactones are the main sensitizers of the Compositae family. Other components, thiophenes and acetylenes are said to elicit only phytophotodermatitis, but recent studies have demonstrated that some thiophenes and benzofuran derivates possess not only phototoxic activity, but also sensitizing properties. Photosensitivity is

  5. Tet38 Efflux Pump Affects Staphylococcus aureus Internalization by Epithelial Cells through Interaction with CD36 and Contributes to Bacterial Escape from Acidic and Nonacidic Phagolysosomes.

    PubMed

    Truong-Bolduc, Q C; Khan, N S; Vyas, J M; Hooper, D C

    2017-02-01

    We previously reported that the Tet38 efflux pump is involved in internalization of Staphylococcus aureus by A549 lung epithelial cells. A lack of tet38 reduced bacterial uptake by A549 cells to 36% of that of the parental strain RN6390. Using invasion assays coupled with confocal microscopy imaging, we studied the host cell receptor(s) responsible for bacterial uptake via interaction with Tet38. We also assessed the ability of S. aureus to survive following alkalinization of the phagolysosomes by chloroquine. Antibody to the scavenger receptor CD36 reduced the internalization of S. aureus RN6390 by A549 cells, but the dependence on CD36 was reduced in QT7 tet38, suggesting that an interaction between Tet38 and CD36 contributed to S. aureus internalization. Following fusion of the S. aureus-associated endosomes with lysosomes, alkalinization of the acidic environment with chloroquine led to a rapid increase in the number of S. aureus RN6390 bacteria in the cytosol, followed by a decrease shortly thereafter. This effect of chloroquine was not seen in the absence of intact Tet38 in mutant QT7. These data taken together suggest that Tet38 plays a role both in bacterial internalization via interaction with CD36 and in bacterial escape from the phagolysosomes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Tet38 Efflux Pump Affects Staphylococcus aureus Internalization by Epithelial Cells through Interaction with CD36 and Contributes to Bacterial Escape from Acidic and Nonacidic Phagolysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Truong-Bolduc, Q. C.; Khan, N. S.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We previously reported that the Tet38 efflux pump is involved in internalization of Staphylococcus aureus by A549 lung epithelial cells. A lack of tet38 reduced bacterial uptake by A549 cells to 36% of that of the parental strain RN6390. Using invasion assays coupled with confocal microscopy imaging, we studied the host cell receptor(s) responsible for bacterial uptake via interaction with Tet38. We also assessed the ability of S. aureus to survive following alkalinization of the phagolysosomes by chloroquine. Antibody to the scavenger receptor CD36 reduced the internalization of S. aureus RN6390 by A549 cells, but the dependence on CD36 was reduced in QT7 tet38, suggesting that an interaction between Tet38 and CD36 contributed to S. aureus internalization. Following fusion of the S. aureus-associated endosomes with lysosomes, alkalinization of the acidic environment with chloroquine led to a rapid increase in the number of S. aureus RN6390 bacteria in the cytosol, followed by a decrease shortly thereafter. This effect of chloroquine was not seen in the absence of intact Tet38 in mutant QT7. These data taken together suggest that Tet38 plays a role both in bacterial internalization via interaction with CD36 and in bacterial escape from the phagolysosomes. PMID:27956597

  7. Stasis dermatitis and ulcers

    MedlinePlus

    ... ulcers; Ulcers - venous; Venous ulcer; Venous insufficiency - stasis dermatitis; Vein - stasis dermatitis ... veins. Some people with venous insufficiency develop stasis dermatitis. Blood pools in the veins of the lower ...

  8. The association between bedding material and the bacterial counts of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis and coliform bacteria on teat skin and in teat canals in lactating dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Jan-Hendrik; Mohr, Elmar; Krömker, Volker

    2013-05-01

    Several mastitis-causing pathogens are able to colonize the bovine teat canal. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between the treatment of sawdust bedding with a commercial alkaline conditioner and the bacterial counts on teat skin and in the teat canal. The study used a crossover design. Ten lactating Holstein cows that were free of udder infections and mastitis were included in the study. The animals were bedded on either untreated sawdust or sawdust that had been treated with a hydrated lime-based conditioner. Once a day, fresh bedding material was added. After 3 weeks, the bedding material was removed from the cubicles, fresh bedding material was provided, and the cows were rotated between the two bedding material groups. Teat skin and teat canals were sampled using the wet and dry swab technique after weeks 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus uberis, Escherichia coli and other coliform bacteria were detected in the resulting agar plate cultures. The treatment of the bedding material was associated with the teat skin bacterial counts of Str. uberis, Esch. coli and other coliform bacteria. An association was also found between the bedding material and the teat canal bacterial counts of coliform bacteria other than Esch. coli. For Staph. aureus, no associations with the bedding material were found. In general, the addition of a hydrated lime-based conditioner to sawdust reduces the population sizes of environmental pathogens on teat skin and in teat canals.

  9. An unresponsive progressive pustular and crusting dermatitis with acantholysis in nine cats.

    PubMed

    Outerbridge, Catherine A; Affolter, Verena K; Lyons, Leslie A; Crothers, Samantha L; Lam, Andrea T H; Bonenberger, Terri E; Ihrke, Peter J; White, Stephen D

    2018-02-01

    Between 2000 and 2012, nine cats were examined with a visually distinctive, progressive crusting dermatitis that was poorly responsive to all attempted therapies. Documentation of clinical and histopathological findings of this disease. Nine privately owned cats. Retrospective study. Eight neutered males and one (presumably spayed) female ranging in age from two to eight years, presented for a progressive, well-demarcated, crusting dermatitis with variable pruritus of 1.5 months to five years duration. All cats lived in northern California, USA; seven lived within a 30 mile radius. Two males were littermates. Histopathological investigation showed both parakeratotic and orthokeratotic crusts, intraepidermal pustules and superficial folliculitis with rare to frequent acantholytic cells. Bacterial and fungal cultures were performed in six cats: meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was isolated in three cats, two colonies of Trichophyton terrestre and three of Malassezia pachydermatis were isolated from one cat each. Treatment with various antibiotics, antifungal and a variety of immunosuppressive medications did not alter the progressive nature of the skin disease. The described disease shares some clinical and histopathological features with pemphigus foliaceus, but the lack of response to treatment, its progressive nature and the possible relatedness of some of the cats set it apart. The aetiology of this acantholytic dermatitis remains unknown. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  10. Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Thomas; Scheinfeld, Noah

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic inflammatory skin condition, characterized by scaling and poorly defined erythematous patches. It may be associated with pruritus, and it primarily affects sebum-rich areas, such as the scalp, face, upper chest, and back. Although its pathogenesis is not completely understood, some postulate that the condition results from colonization of the skin of affected individuals with species of the genus Malassezia (formerly, Pityrosporum). A variety of treatment modalities are available, including eradication of the fungus, reducing or treating the inflammatory process, and decreasing sebum production. PMID:20592880

  11. Activation of phagocytic cells by Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms: effects of extracellular matrix proteins and the bacterial stress protein GroEL on netosis and MRP-14 release.

    PubMed

    Dapunt, Ulrike; Gaida, Matthias M; Meyle, Eva; Prior, Birgit; Hänsch, Gertrud M

    2016-07-01

    The recognition and phagocytosis of free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria by polymorphonuclear neutrophils have been investigated in depth. However, less is known about the neutrophil response towards bacterial biofilms. Our previous work demonstrated that neutrophils recognize activating entities within the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) of biofilms (the bacterial heat shock protein GroEL) and that this process does not require opsonization. Aim of this study was to evaluate the release of DNA by neutrophils in response to biofilms, as well as the release of the inflammatory cytokine MRP-14. Neutrophils were stimulated with Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms, planktonic bacteria, extracted EPS and GroEL. Release of DNA and of MRP-14 was evaluated. Furthermore, tissue samples from patients suffering from biofilm infections were collected and evaluated by histology. MRP-14 concentration in blood samples was measured. We were able to show that biofilms, the EPS and GroEL induce DNA release. MRP-14 was only released after stimulation with EPS, not GroEL. Histology of tissue samples revealed MRP-14 positive cells in association with neutrophil infiltration and MRP-14 concentration was elevated in blood samples of patients suffering from biofilm infections. Our data demonstrate that neutrophil-activating entities are present in the EPS and that GroEL induces DNA release by neutrophils. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Covalent Immobilization of Enoxacin onto Titanium Implant Surfaces for Inhibiting Multiple Bacterial Species Infection and In Vivo Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Bin'en; Long, Teng; Ao, Haiyong; Zhou, Jianliang; Tang, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Infection is one of the most important causes of titanium implant failure in vivo. A developing prophylactic method involves the immobilization of antibiotics, especially vancomycin, onto the surface of the titanium implant. However, these methods have a limited effect in curbing multiple bacterial infections due to antibiotic specificity. In the current study, enoxacin was covalently bound to an amine-functionalized Ti surface by use of a polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer, and the bactericidal effectiveness was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The titanium surface was amine functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), through which PEG spacer molecules were covalently immobilized onto the titanium, and then the enoxacin was covalently bound to the PEG, which was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS). A spread plate assay, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the antimicrobial activity. For the in vivo study, Ti implants were inoculated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and implanted into the femoral medullary cavity of rats. The degree of infection was assessed by radiography, micro-computed tomography, and determination of the counts of adherent bacteria 3 weeks after surgery. Our data demonstrate that the enoxacin-modified PEGylated Ti surface effectively prevented bacterial colonization without compromising cell viability, adhesion, or proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, it prevented MRSA infection of the Ti implants in vivo. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the use of enoxacin-modified Ti is a potential approach to the alleviation of infections of Ti implants by multiple bacterial species. PMID:27799220

  13. Arylthiazole antibiotics targeting intracellular methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) that interfere with bacterial cell wall synthesis.

    PubMed

    Eid, Islam; Elsebaei, Mohamed M; Mohammad, Haroon; Hagras, Mohamed; Peters, Christine E; Hegazy, Youssef A; Cooper, Bruce; Pogliano, Joe; Pogliano, Kit; Abulkhair, Hamada S; Seleem, Mohamed N; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S

    2017-10-20

    The promising antibacterial potency of arylthiazole antibiotics is offset by their limited activity against intracellular bacteria (namely methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)), similar to many clinically-approved antibiotics. The failure to target these hidden pathogens is due to the compounds' lack of proper characteristics to accumulate intracellularly. Fine tuning of the size and polar-surface-area of the linking heteroaromatic ring provided a new series of 5-thiazolylarylthiazoles with balanced properties that allow them to sufficiently cross and accumulate inside macrophages infected with MRSA. The most promising compound 4i exhibited rapid bactericidal activity, good metabolic stability and produced over 80% reduction of intracellular MRSA in infected macrophages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Sofa dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Schad, Karin; Nobbe, Stephan; French, Lars E; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara

    2010-11-01

    Furniture components can cause contact allergies. In the last years several cases of eczema after sofa contact have been reported. Typically the skin lesions develop on the back, the buttocks, the dorsal aspects of the thighs and arms and are often very resistant to topical corticoid therapy. Dimethylfumarate (DMF) is postulated to be the causative agent for this Type IV hypersensitivity reaction. DMF is an antimicrobial substance, which is used in asian upholstered furniture industry amongst others. We report the case of a 65-year old patient with generalised severely itching maculopapular, partly eczematous skin lesions on the buttocks, back, abdomen and arms. The resistance to therapy, several relapses after discharge from hospital as well as the detailed history lead us to the tentative diagnosis. The sofa dermatitis was proven by positive patch testing with furniture material and dimethylfumarate. © The Authors • Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  15. Exfoliation rate of mammary epithelial cells in milk on bovine mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is associated with bacterial load.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Yuya; Kiku, Yoshio; Sugawara, Kazue; Tanabe, Fuyuko; Hayashi, Tomohito

    2018-01-01

    The exfoliation rate of mammary epithelial cells (MECs) in milk is affected by physiological, breeding and environmental factors. Little is known about the relationship between the MEC exfoliation into milk and mammary-infected Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) load on bovine mastitis caused by S. aureus. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between S. aureus load and the proportion of MEC exfoliation in milk using five substantial bovine mastitis models. In 64 randomly extracted milk samples from udders at 3-21 days after S. aureus infusion, there were various samples with different numbers of S. aureus counts and somatic cell counts. No significant correlations were found between the S. aureus counts and somatic cell count (r = 0.338). In contrast, a significant correlation was noted between S. aureus counts and the proportion of cytokeratin-positive cells in the milk from the infused udders (r = 0.734, P < 0.01). In conclusion, the increasing MEC exfoliation rate in milk from mastitis udders caused by S. aureus may contribute to reduced milk yield. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  16. Phagocytosis Escape by a Staphylococcus aureus Protein That Connects Complement and Coagulation Proteins at the Bacterial Surface

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Eva; van Rooijen, Willemien J.; Spaan, András N.; van Kessel, Kok P. M.; Höök, Magnus; Rooijakkers, Suzan H. M.

    2013-01-01

    Upon contact with human plasma, bacteria are rapidly recognized by the complement system that labels their surface for uptake and clearance by phagocytic cells. Staphylococcus aureus secretes the 16 kD Extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) that binds two different plasma proteins using separate domains: the Efb N-terminus binds to fibrinogen, while the C-terminus binds complement C3. In this study, we show that Efb blocks phagocytosis of S. aureus by human neutrophils. In vitro, we demonstrate that Efb blocks phagocytosis in plasma and in human whole blood. Using a mouse peritonitis model we show that Efb effectively blocks phagocytosis in vivo, either as a purified protein or when produced endogenously by S. aureus. Mutational analysis revealed that Efb requires both its fibrinogen and complement binding residues for phagocytic escape. Using confocal and transmission electron microscopy we show that Efb attracts fibrinogen to the surface of complement-labeled S. aureus generating a ‘capsule’-like shield. This thick layer of fibrinogen shields both surface-bound C3b and antibodies from recognition by phagocytic receptors. This information is critical for future vaccination attempts, since opsonizing antibodies may not function in the presence of Efb. Altogether we discover that Efb from S. aureus uniquely escapes phagocytosis by forming a bridge between a complement and coagulation protein. PMID:24348255

  17. Dermatitis, contact (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This picture shows a skin inflammation (dermatitis) caused by contact with a material that causes an allergic reaction in this person. Contact dermatitis is a relatively common condition, and can be caused ...

  18. Clinical impact of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus on bacterial pneumonia: cultivation and 16S ribosomal RNA gene analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed

    Kawanami, Toshinori; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Kei; Noguchi, Shingo; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Akata, Kentarou; Naito, Keisuke; Kido, Takashi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2016-04-16

    Determining whether methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a true causative pathogen or reflective of colonization when MRSA is cultured from the respiratory tract remains important in treating patients with pneumonia. We evaluated the bacterial microbiota in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) using the clone library method with a 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene analysis in 42 patients from a pneumonia registry who had MRSA cultured from their sputum or BALF samples. Patients were divided into two groups: those treated with (Group A) or without (Group B) anti-MRSA agents, and their clinical features were compared. Among 248 patients with pneumonia, 42 patients who had MRSA cultured from the respiratory tract were analyzed (Group A: 13 patients, Group B: 29 patients). No clones of S. aureus were detected in the BALF of 20 out of 42 patients. Twenty-eight of 29 patients in Group B showed favorable clinical outcomes, indicating that these patients had non-MRSA pneumonia. Using a microflora analysis of the BALF, the S. aureus phylotype was predominant in 5 of 28 (17.9%) patients among the detected bacterial phylotypes, but a minor population (the percentage of clones ≤ 10%) in 19 (67.9%) of 28 patients. A statistical analysis revealed no positive relationship between the percentage of clones of the S. aureus phylotype and risk factors of MRSA pneumonia. The molecular method using BALF specimens suggests that conventional cultivation method results may mislead true causative pathogens, especially in patients with MRSA pneumonia. Further studies are necessary to elucidate these clinically important issues.

  19. The Staphylococcus aureus leucine aminopeptidase LAP is localized to the bacterial cytosol and demonstrates a broad substrate range that extends beyond leucine

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Ronan K.; Veillard, Florian; Gagne, Danielle T.; Lindenmuth, Jarrod M.; Poreba, Marcin; Drag, Marcin; Potempa, Jan; Shaw, Lindsey N.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a potent pathogen of humans exhibiting a broad disease range, in part, due to an extensive repertoire of secreted virulence factors, including proteases. Recently, we identified the first example of an intracellular protease (leucine aminopeptidase - LAP) that is required for virulence in S. aureus. Disruption of pepZ, the gene encoding LAP, had no affect on the growth rate of bacteria, however, in systemic and localized infection models the pepZ mutant was significantly attenuated in virulence. Recently, a contradictory report has been published, suggesting that LAP is an extracellular enzyme and it is required for growth in S. aureus. Here, we investigate these results and confirm our previous findings that LAP is localized to the bacterial cytosol and is not required for growth. In addition we conduct a biochemical investigation of purified recombinant LAP identifying optimal conditions for enzymatic activity and substrate preference for hydrolysis. Our results show that LAP has a broad substrate range, including activity against the dipeptide cysteine-glycine and that leucine is not the primary target of LAP. PMID:23241672

  20. Atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Weidinger, Stephan; Novak, Natalija

    2016-03-12

    Atopic dermatitis (also known as atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is characterised by intense itching and recurrent eczematous lesions. Although it most often starts in infancy and affects two of ten children, it is also highly prevalent in adults. It is the leading non-fatal health burden attributable to skin diseases, inflicts a substantial psychosocial burden on patients and their relatives, and increases the risk of food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, other immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, and mental health disorders. Originally regarded as a childhood disorder mediated by an imbalance towards a T-helper-2 response and exaggerated IgE responses to allergens, it is now recognised as a lifelong disposition with variable clinical manifestations and expressivity, in which defects of the epidermal barrier are central. Present prevention and treatment focus on restoration of epidermal barrier function, which is best achieved through the use of emollients. Topical corticosteroids are still the first-line therapy for acute flares, but they are also used proactively along with topical calcineurin inhibitors to maintain remission. Non-specific immunosuppressive drugs are used in severe refractory cases, but targeted disease-modifying drugs are being developed. We need to improve understanding of the heterogeneity of the disease and its subtypes, the role of atopy and autoimmunity, the mechanisms behind disease-associated itch, and the comparative effectiveness and safety of therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Contact Dermatitis in Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Janice L; Perez, Caroline; Jacob, Sharon E

    2016-08-01

    Contact dermatitis is an umbrella term that describes the skin's reaction to contacted noxious or allergenic substances. The two main categories of contact dermatitis are irritant type and allergic type. This review discusses the signs, symptoms, causes, and complications of contact dermatitis. It addresses the testing, treatment, and prevention of contact dermatitis. Proper management of contact dermatitis includes avoidance measures for susceptible children. Implementation of a nickel directive (regulating the use of nickel in jewelry and other products that come into contact with the skin) could further reduce exposure to the most common allergens in the pediatric population. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e287-e292.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Seborrheic dermatitis: an update.

    PubMed

    Bukvić Mokos, Zrinka; Kralj, Martina; Basta-Juzbašić, Aleksandra; Lakoš Jukić, Ines

    2012-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disorder clinically characterized by scaling and poorly defined erythematous patches. The prevalence of adult seborrheic dermatitis is estimated at 5%. Although the exact cause of seborrheic dermatitis has yet to be understood, Malassezia yeasts, hormones (androgens), sebum levels and immune response are known to play important roles in its development. Additional factors including drugs, winter temperatures and stress may exacerbate seborrheic dermatitis. A variety of treatment modalities are available, including antifungal agents, topical low-potency steroids and calcineurin inhibitors (immunomodulators). This review summarizes current knowledge on the etiopathogenesis and therapy of adult seborrheic dermatitis.

  3. Flexural eczema versus atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; Goldenberg, Alina; Nedorost, Susan; Thyssen, Jacob P; Fonacier, Luz; Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2015-01-01

    Flexural eczema and atopic dermatitis are frequently synonymized. As respiratory atopy is rarely tested for and found in these patients, systematically equating a flexural distribution of dermatitis with atopic dermatitis may too frequently result in misclassified diagnoses and potentially missed opportunity for intervention toward improving patients' symptoms and quality of life. We present a critical review of the available evidence for the atopic dermatitis diagnosis and discuss the similarities between atopic dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. Because neither flexural predilection nor atopy is specific for atopic dermatitis, we conclude that the term atopic dermatitis is a misnomer and propose an etymologic reclassification of atopic dermatitis to "atopy-related" dermatitis. Allergic contact dermatitis can induce an atopic dermatitis-like phenotype, and thus, flexural dermatitis cannot be assumed as atopic without further testing. Patch testing should at least be considered in cases of chronic or recurrent eczema regardless of the working diagnosis.

  4. [Shiitake dermatitis: flagellate dermatitis after eating mushrooms].

    PubMed

    Haas, N; Vogt, R; Sterry, W

    2001-02-01

    The name of flagellate dermatitis originates from self-flagellating medieval people. This dermatitis is not rare as a drug eruption following bleomycin therapy. An identical skin eruption caused by the mushroom shiitake Lentinus edodes is more common but reported mostly from Japan. We saw a 67-year-old patient who presented with the typical linear scratch marks after a dinner in a Chinese restaurant. The basic mechanism is a toxic epidermal damage. Since it is not clear why the dermatitis does not occur frequently since Shiitake is the second most popular mushroom in the world, we discuss possible cofactors that may trigger the toxic reaction.

  5. Bacterial Genetic Architecture of Ecological Interactions in Co-culture by GWAS-Taking Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus as an Example.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoqing; Jin, Yi; Ye, Meixia; Chen, Nan; Zhu, Jing; Wang, Jingqi; Jiang, Libo; Wu, Rongling

    2017-01-01

    How a species responds to such a biotic environment in the community, ultimately leading to its evolution, has been a topic of intense interest to ecological evolutionary biologists. Until recently, limited knowledge was available regarding the genotypic changes that underlie phenotypic changes. Our study implemented GWAS (Genome-Wide Association Studies) to illustrate the genetic architecture of ecological interactions that take place in microbial populations. By choosing 45 such interspecific pairs of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus strains that were all genotyped throughout the entire genome, we employed Q-ROADTRIPS to analyze the association between single SNPs and microbial abundance measured at each time point for bacterial populations reared in monoculture and co-culture, respectively. We identified a large number of SNPs and indels across the genomes (35.69 G clean data of E. coli and 50.41 G of S. aureus ). We reported 66 and 111 SNPs that were associated with interaction in E. coli and S. aureus , respectively. 23 out of 66 polymorphic changes resulted in amino acid alterations.12 significant genes, such as murE, treA, argS , and relA , which were also identified in previous evolutionary studies. In S. aureus , 111 SNPs detected in coding sequences could be divided into 35 non-synonymous and 76 synonymous SNPs. Our study illustrated the potential of genome-wide association methods for studying rapidly evolving traits in bacteria. Genetic association study methods will facilitate the identification of genetic elements likely to cause phenotypes of interest and provide targets for further laboratory investigation.

  6. A multicentre study of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections in China: susceptibility to ceftaroline and molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Xiao, Meng; Kong, Fanrong; O'Sullivan, Matthew V N; Mao, Lei-Li; Zhao, Hao-Ran; Zhao, Ying; Wang, He; Xu, Ying-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Ceftaroline is a novel cephalosporin with activity against Gram-positive organisms, including meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The objective of this study was to investigate the susceptibility to ceftaroline of hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) isolates causing acute bacterial skin and skin-structure infections (ABSSSIs) in China and to examine their relationship by genotyping. A total of 251 HA-MRSA isolates causing ABSSSIs were collected from a multicentre study involving 56 hospitals in 38 large cities across 26 provinces in mainland China. All isolates were characterised by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, spa typing and detection of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin locus (lukS-PV and lukF-PV). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 14 antimicrobial agents, including ceftaroline, were determined by broth microdilution and were interpreted using Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute breakpoints. The ceftaroline MIC50 and MIC90 values (MICs that inhibit 50% and 90% of the isolates, respectively) were 1 μg/mL and 2 μg/mL, respectively; 33.5% (n=84) of the isolates studied were ceftaroline-non-susceptible, with MICs of 2 μg/mL, but no isolate exhibited ceftaroline resistance (MIC>2 μg/mL). All of the ceftaroline-non-susceptible isolates belonged to the predominant HA-MRSA clones: 95.2% (n=80) from MLST clonal complex 8 (CC8), with the remaining 4.8% (n=4) from CC5. The high rate of non-susceptibility to ceftaroline amongst HA-MRSA causing ABSSSIs in China is concerning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  7. Synergistic antibacterial effect of apigenin with β-lactam antibiotics and modulation of bacterial resistance by a possible membrane effect against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Akilandeswari, K; Ruckmani, K

    2016-12-30

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are easily spread among infected patients, where resistance has dramatically increased resulted in serious health issues. Therefore, there is a need to develop alternative natural or combination drug therapies. Apigenin (AP) is a natural poly phenolic flavonoid has been found to possess many beneficial biological actions. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-MRSA efficacy and synergistic effect of apigenin (AP) and in combination with ampicillin (AM) and ceftriaxone (CEF). The antibacterial activity of apigenin was assessed by the broth macro dilution, checkerboard micro dilution method and time-kill assay.  The mode of action was studied by outer and inner membrane permeabilisation assays, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of apigenin against gram positive and gram negative strain ranged from 32.5 to 62.5µg/ml. In checkerboard method apigenin markedly reduced the MIC of the antibiotics ampicillin 800 µg/ml shifted to 107 µg/ml (AM+AP) and ceftriaxone 58 µg/ml shifted to 2.6 µg/ml (CEF+AP) against MRSA. The synergistic activity of ampicillin and ceftriaxone plus apigenin combinations with FIC indices (CI) between 0.18-0.47. The modulation of methicillin-resistance by apigenin significantly enhanced the activities of ampicillin and ceftriaxone. The result of time-kill assays of the two drug combinations AM +AP and CEF+AP against MRSA showed significant inhibitory effect and reduced the colony count by approximately 99% after 8 h The results for outer membrane (OM) and inner membrane (IM) permeabilization showed that ampicillin and ceftriaxone in combination with apigenin damaged MRSA cytoplasmic membrane and caused subsequent leakage of intracellular constituents. Electron microscopy clearly showed that the above said combination also caused marked morphological damage of cell wall, cell shape and plasma

  8. [Canine atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Bensignor, Emmanuel

    2010-10-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by typical clinical signs and affecting up to 10 % of dogs aged from 1 to 3 years. The diagnosis is mainly clinical and the treatment is complex. This canine form may offer a good model of human atopic dermatitis, as the two diseases show many pathogenetic, clinical and therapeutic similarities.

  9. Paederus dermatitis featuring chronic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Stanimirović, Andrija; Skerlev, Mihael; Culav-Košćak, Ivana; Kovačević, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Paederus dermatitis is a distinct variant of acute irritant contact dermatitis caused by mucocutaneous contact with the specific toxin of an insect belonging to the genus Paederus. It is characterized by the sudden onset of erythema and vesiculobullous lesions on exposed skin, with special predilection for the periorbital region. Paederus species have been mostly identified in Africa, Asia, Australia, and Central/South America. We report a 51-year-old woman who experienced 4 recurrences of periorbital erythema and edema in the previous year. No consistent etiology could be established at the beginning. Only after taking a detailed medical history was it discovered that 1 year before our examination, the patient had traveled to Kenya, where she had experienced contact with the insect. This fact led us to the diagnosis of Paederus dermatitis. After appropriate treatment, a complete regression was observed over a 3-week period.

  10. Cutaneous microbiome effects of fluticasone proprionate cream and adjunctive bleach baths in childhood atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Mercedes E.; Schaffer, Julie V.; Orlow, Seth J.; Gao, Zhan; Li, Huilin; Alekseyenko, Alexander V.; Blaser, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are prone to skin infections, with microbes like Staphylococcus aureus suspected of contributing to pathogenesis. Bleach baths might improve AD by reducing skin microbial burden. Objective To characterize the microbiota of lesional and nonlesional skin in young children with AD and controls and compare changes after treatment with a topical corticosteroid (TCS) alone or TCS + dilute bleach baths (BB). Methods In a randomized, placebo-controlled, single-blinded clinical trial in 21 children with AD and 14 healthy children, lesional and nonlesional AD skin was examined at baseline and after 4-week treatment with TCS alone or TCS plus BB. Microbial DNA was extracted for qPCR of predominant genera and 16S rRNA sequencing. Results At baseline, densities of total bacteria and Staphylococcus, including S. aureus, were significantly higher at the worst AD lesional site than nonlesional (p=0.001) or control (p<0.001) skin; bacterial communities on lesional and nonlesional AD skin significantly differed from each other (p=0.04) and from control (p<0.001). After TCS + BB or TCS alone, bacterial compositions on lesional skin normalized (p<0.0001), resembling nonlesional skin, with microbial diversity restored to control skin levels. Limitations The 4-week time period and/or the twice-weekly baths may not have been sufficient for additional impact on the cutaneous microbiome. More detailed sequencing may allow better characterization of the distinguishing taxa with BB-treatment. Conclusions Treatment with a topical corticosteroid cream suffices to normalize the cutaneous microbiota on lesional AD; after treatment, bacterial communities on lesional skin resemble nonlesional skin but remain distinct from control. PMID:27543211

  11. A noninferiority clinical trial comparing fluconazole and ketoconazole in combination with cephalexin for the treatment of dogs with Malassezia dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sickafoose, L; Hosgood, G; Snook, T; Westermeyer, R; Merchant, S

    2010-01-01

    This double-blinded noninferiority clinical trial evaluated the use of oral fluconazole for the treatment of Malassezia dermatitis in dogs by comparing it with use of an accepted therapeutic agent, ketoconazole. Dogs presenting with Malassezia dermatitis were treated with either fluconazole or ketoconazole in addition to cephalexin for concurrent bacterial dermatitis. Statistically significant improvements in cytologic yeast count, clinical signs associated with Malassezia dermatitis, and pruritus were seen with both antifungal treatments. There was no statistical difference between the treatments with regard to the magnitude of reduction in these parameters. These results suggest that fluconazole is at least as effective as ketoconazole for the treatment of dogs with Malassezia dermatitis.

  12. PLANT DERMATITIS: ASIAN PERSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Goon, Anthony Teik Jin; Goh, Chee Leok

    2011-01-01

    Occupational and recreational plant exposure on the skin is fairly common. Plant products and extracts are commonly used and found extensively in the environment. Adverse reactions to plants and their products are also fairly common. However, making the diagnosis of contact dermatitis from plants and plant extracts is not always simple and straightforward. Phytodermatitis refers to inflammation of the skin caused by a plant. The clinical patterns may be allergic phytodermatitis, photophytodermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, pharmacological injury, and mechanical injury. In this article, we will focus mainly on allergy contact dermatitis from plants or allergic phytodermatitis occurring in Asia. PMID:22345775

  13. Shoe allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Matthys, Erin; Zahir, Amir; Ehrlich, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Foot dermatitis is a widespread condition, affecting men and women of all ages. Because of the location, this condition may present as a debilitating problem to those who have it. Allergic contact dermatitis involving the feet is frequently due to shoes or socks. The allergens that cause shoe dermatitis can be found in any constituent of footwear, including rubber, adhesives, leather, dyes, metals, and medicaments. The goal of treatment is to identify and minimize contact with the offending allergen(s). The lack of product information released from shoe manufacturers and the continually changing trends in footwear present a challenge in treating this condition. The aim of this study is to review the current literature on allergic contact shoe dermatitis; clinical presentation, allergens, patch testing, and management will be discussed. PubMed and MEDLINE databases were used for the search, with a focus on literature updates from the last 15 years.

  14. Acrylate Systemic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sauder, Maxwell B; Pratt, Melanie D

    2015-01-01

    Acrylates, the 2012 American Contact Dermatitis Society allergen of the year, are found in a range of products including the absorbent materials within feminine hygiene pads. When fully polymerized, acrylates are nonimmunogenic; however, if not completely cured, the monomers can be potent allergens.A 28-year-old woman is presented, who had her teeth varnished with Isodan (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossés, France) containing HEMA (2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) with no initial reaction. Approximately 1 month later, the patient developed a genital dermatitis secondary to her feminine hygiene pads. The initial reaction resolved, but 5 months later, the patient developed a systemic contact dermatitis after receiving a second varnishing.The patient was dramatically patch test positive to many acrylates. This case demonstrates a reaction to likely unpolymerized acrylates within a feminine hygiene pad, as well as broad cross-reactivity or cosensitivity to acrylates, and possibly a systemic contact dermatitis with systemic re-exposure to unpolymerized acrylates.

  15. Noneczematous Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Foti, Caterina; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Irritant or allergic contact dermatitis usually presents as an eczematous process, clinically characterized by erythematoedematovesicous lesions with intense itching in the acute phase. Such manifestations become erythematous-scaly as the condition progresses to the subacute phase and papular-hyperkeratotic in the chronic phase. Not infrequently, however, contact dermatitis presents with noneczematous features. The reasons underlying this clinical polymorphism lie in the different noxae and contact modalities, as well as in the individual susceptibility and the various targeted cutaneous structures. The most represented forms of non-eczematous contact dermatitis include the erythema multiforme-like, the purpuric, the lichenoid, and the pigmented kinds. These clinical entities must obviously be discerned from the corresponding “pure” dermatitis, which are not associated with contact with exogenous agents. PMID:24109520

  16. Adult Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a common chronic-recurrent inflammatory disorder that most commonly affects adults; however, a more transient infantile form also occurs. The definitive cause of seborrheic dermatitis is unknown. However, proliferation of Malassezia species has been described as a contributing factor. The adult form of seborrheic dermatitis affects up to approximately five percent of the general population. The disorder commonly affects the scalp, face, and periauricular region, with the central chest, axillae, and genital region also involved in some cases. Pruritus is not always present and is relatively common, especially with scalp disease. A variety of treatments are available including topical corticosteroids, topical antifungal agents, topical calcineurin inhibitors, and more recently, a nonsteroidal “device ”cream. This article reviews the practical topical management of seborrheic dermatitis in the United States, focusing on the adult population. PMID:21607192

  17. Occupational contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lushniak, Boris D

    2004-01-01

    The dermatologist should be aware of the many facets of occupational skin diseases, which can be caused by physical, chemical, and biological insults. The most common manifestation of occupational skin diseases is contact dermatitis (both irritant and allergic). Three factors point out the importance of occupational skin diseases as diseases that have a public health impact: 1) occupational skin diseases are common; 2) they often have a poor prognosis; and 3) they result in a noteworthy economic impact for society and for an individual. They are also diseases amenable to public health interventions. Specific industries and exposures may put a worker at risk of occupational contact dermatitis. The accuracy of the diagnosis of occupational contact dermatitis is related to the skill level, experience, and knowledge of the medical professional who makes the diagnosis and confirms the relationship with a workplace exposure. Prevention of occupational contact dermatitis is important, and a variety of prevention strategies are available.

  18. Atopic dermatitis: professional orientation.

    PubMed

    Frimat, Paul; Boughattas, Wided; Even, Dorothée

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is often exacerbated by the working environment. In order to reduce the risk of allergy, young people must receive better medical guidance when they choose a career. This is all the more relevant for young atopic patients.

  19. Poison Ivy Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Favorite Name: Category: Share: Yes No, Keep Private Poison Ivy Dermatitis Share | "Leaves of three - let it ... has a longer stem than the other two. Poison ivy clings to tree trunks and other vertical ...

  20. Chromate Dermatitis from Paint

    PubMed Central

    Engel, H. O.; Calnan, C. D.

    1963-01-01

    Among 250 workers engaged on wet sandpapering of primer paint on car bodies 65 developed a contact dermatitis. The average latent period before dermatitis developed was 4·6 months: only 60% of the patients made a completely satisfactory recovery. The average duration of dermatitis was 5·3 months. Two thirds of the men used one of two barrier creams supplied, while one third used none. Routine patch testing showed that the majority was allergic to chromate. It was found that a primer paint contained zinc chromate, which had been introduced into the paint by the manufacturers shortly before the first cases occurred. Removal of chromate from the paint resulted in a prompt cessation of new cases of dermatitis. Images PMID:14046155

  1. Genomics of Staphylococcus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Jodi A.

    The staphylococci are Gram-positive cocci that divide to form clusters that look like grapes. By 16S ribosomal sequencing, they are most closely related to the Gram-positive, low G+C content Bacillus-Lactobacillus-Staphylococcus genera (Woese, 1987). There are over 30 species of staphylococci identified, and they are typically found on the skin and mucous membranes of mammals. About a dozen species are frequently carried on humans, including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus cohnii, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, Staphylococcus schleiferi, Staphylococcus saprophyticus, Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus warneri and Staphylococcus xylosus.

  2. Stinging nettle dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Bryan E; Miller, Christopher J; Adams, David R

    2003-03-01

    The stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) is a common weed that can cause a wide range of cutaneous reactions. Contact with the hairs or spines on the stems and leaves of the stinging nettle causes the release of several biologically active substances. The released chemicals act to cause itching, dermatitis, and urticaria within moments of contact. Extracts from the stinging nettle may provide therapeutic value for some inflammatory medical conditions. There is no standard treatment for stinging nettle dermatitis.

  3. Inpatient management of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Shelley D; Theos, Amy

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease that is generally managed on an outpatient basis. However, a significant percentage of patients may develop complications severe enough to require inpatient treatment. The most common complications of AD that may require hospital admission include erythroderma, eczema herpeticum, and systemic bacterial infection. Hospital admission can also be useful for chronic and severe disease that has not responded to standard therapy or in situations where nonadherence is suspected as the cause of treatment failure. In these cases, inpatient treatment can offer an opportunity for caretaker education and allow for an objective evaluation of a patient's response to a structured treatment plan. This article will review the indications for inpatient management of AD and the therapies that can be used to acutely manage severe disease and associated complications. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Patch Test Negative Generalized Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Spiker, Alison; Mowad, Christen

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common condition in dermatology. Patch testing is the criterion standard for diagnosis. However, dermatitis is not always caused by an allergen, and patch testing does not identify a culprit in every patient. Generalized dermatitis, defined as eczematous dermatitis affecting greater than 3 body sites, is often encountered in dermatology practice, especially patch test referral centers. Management for patients with generalized dermatitis who are patch test negative is challenging. The purpose of this article is to outline an approach to this challenging scenario and summarize the paucity of existing literature on patch test negative generalized dermatitis.

  5. Stressors in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Barilla, Steven; Felix, Kayla; Jorizzo, Joseph L

    2017-01-01

    As with other inflammatory skin disorders, atopic dermatitis has a tendency to cause stress and also be exacerbated by it. Patients with atopic dermatitis have several disease-associated stressors, some of which include physical discomfort due to itching and altered appearance due to flare-ups. These stressors have been shown to effect patients psychosocially by altering sleep patterns, decreasing self-esteem and interfering with interpersonal relationships. In combination with its direct effect on patients, atopic dermatitis also causes stress for parents and caregivers. Studies suggest that atopic dermatitis is strongly correlated with co-sleeping habits, which can negatively impact the health and mood of parents or caregivers. It has also been reported to interfere with the formation of a strong mother-child relationship. In order to optimize treatment for patients with atopic dermatitis, it is important to note the impact that it has on quality of life. By implementing patient counseling, sleep-targeted therapies, and the use of quality of life (QoL) indices, atopic dermatitis patients and caregivers have the potential to experience greater satisfaction with treatment.

  6. Proof of Principle for a Real-Time Pathogen Isolation Media Diagnostic: The Use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to Discriminate Bacterial Pathogens and Antimicrobial-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Grown on Blood Agar

    PubMed Central

    Multari, Rosalie A.; Cremers, David A.; Bostian, Melissa L.; Dupre, Joanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is a rapid, in situ, diagnostic technique in which light emissions from a laser plasma formed on the sample are used for analysis allowing automated analysis results to be available in seconds to minutes. This speed of analysis coupled with little or no sample preparation makes LIBS an attractive detection tool. In this study, it is demonstrated that LIBS can be utilized to discriminate both the bacterial species and strains of bacterial colonies grown on blood agar. A discrimination algorithm was created based on multivariate regression analysis of spectral data. The algorithm was deployed on a simulated LIBS instrument system to demonstrate discrimination capability using 6 species. Genetically altered Staphylococcus aureus strains grown on BA, including isogenic sets that differed only by the acquisition of mutations that increase fusidic acid or vancomycin resistance, were also discriminated. The algorithm successfully identified all thirteen cultures used in this study in a time period of 2 minutes. This work provides proof of principle for a LIBS instrumentation system that could be developed for the rapid discrimination of bacterial species and strains demonstrating relatively minor genomic alterations using data collected directly from pathogen isolation media. PMID:24109513

  7. Contact dermatitis in students practicing sports: incidence of rubber sensitisation.

    PubMed

    Ventura, M T; Dagnello, M; Matino, M G; Di Corato, R; Giuliano, G; Tursi, A

    2001-04-01

    Over the last few years, changes in cutaneous homoeostasis resulting from sports activities have been reported. In particular, alterations in sweating mechanisms, the hydrolipid barrier, and surface bacterial flora, together with exposure to atmospheric conditions and the need to use medicaments, detergents, and other topical substances, predispose subjects to allergic contact dermatitis. To evaluate the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis in a group of young people practising sports activities. Patch tests were performed to confirm the diagnosis of irritant or allergic dermatitis; in addition, the radioallergoabsorbent test (RAST) to latex was evaluated in the group studied. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by thiourams (23.3%) and mercaptobenzothiazole (20.9%) was prevalent. Other haptens, such as benzocaine and nickel, which are contained in clothing, equipment, topical medicaments, and creams used for massage, were also allergenic. In two cases, RAST positivity to latex was registered. -The results suggest that close contact with sports equipment may increase the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis. Students practising certain sports may have "professional" allergic contact dermatitis to additives used in the production of rubber.

  8. Prevention of occupational dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sartorelli, P; Kezic, S; Larese Filon, F; John, S M

    2011-01-01

    Occupational dermatitis is among the most frequent occupational diseases. Dermal exposure risk affects many professional categories such as healthcare workers, hairdressers, bakers, cleaning and kitchen employees. The economical burden of occupational dermatitis (OD) is huge (greater than 5 billion Euro per year in Europe), comprising direct costs (treatment, compensation), as well as indirect costs due to sick leave and lack of productivity. A scientifically based preventive program consisting of skin protection during work, cleaning and skin care after work has generally been recommended to prevent occupational contact dermatitis. However the rate of reported occupational skin diseases seems unchanged in the recent years. In cases of impaired skin condition the secondary prevention (i.e. therapeutic treatment by dermatologists and health-educational intervention seminars) is fundamental. For cases of occupational dermatoses in which these outpatient prevention measures are not successful, interdisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation measures have been developed (tertiary individual prevention). In the past years, various pilot-concepts to improve occupational dermatitis prevention have been successfully put into practice focussing on interdisciplinary (dermatological and educational) skin protection training programmes for high-risk professions. Currently a multi-step intervention approach is implemented which is aiming at offering quick preventive help at all levels of severity of occupational contact dermatitis. Recent data reveals that there are reliable evidence-based options for multidisciplinary prevention and patient management of occupational dermatitis using a combined approach by a network of clinics, practices and statutory social insurance bodies. At this stage, it seemed reasonable to form a European joint initiative for skin prevention. Recently a European network of preventive dermatology (European Initiative for the Prevention of Occupational Skin

  9. [News on occupational contact dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Crépy, Marie-Noëlle; Bensefa-Colas, Lynda

    2014-03-01

    Contact dermatitis--irritant contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis and protein contact dermatitis--are the most common occupational skin diseases, most often localized to the hands. Contact urticaria is rarer The main occupational irritants are wet work, detergents and disinfectants, cutting oils, and solvents. The main occupational allergens are rubber additives, metals (chromium, nickel, cobalt), plastics (epoxy resins, acrylic), biocides and plants. Diagnosis is based on clinical examination, medical history and allergy testing. For a number of irritating or sensitizing agents, irritant or allergic dermatitis can be notified as occupational diseases. The two main prevention measures are reducing skin contact with irritants and complete avoidance of skin contact with offending allergens.

  10. [Atopic dermatitis physiopathology].

    PubMed

    Waton, J

    2017-12-01

    Our understanding of the physiopathology of atopic dermatitis has much improved over the recent years. Epidermal barrier alterations are integrated into 2 theories called inside out and outside in. They are related to complex immune abnormalities. Understanding their mechanism makes it possible to foresee new therapeutics. Moreover, environmental biodiversity, the diversity of cutaneous microbiota and genetic predispositions in atopic dermatitis lead to a new, more comprehensive theory, « the biodiversity theory », integrating epigenetics. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  11. Colors and contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; Foti, Caterina; Romita, Paolo; Vestita, Michelangelo; Angelini, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of skin diseases relies on several clinical signs, among which color is of paramount importance. In this review, we consider certain clinical presentations of both eczematous and noneczematous contact dermatitis in which color plays a peculiar role orientating toward the right diagnosis. The conditions that will be discussed include specific clinical-morphologic subtypes of eczematous contact dermatitis, primary melanocytic, and nonmelanocytic contact hyperchromia, black dermographism, contact chemical leukoderma, and others. Based on the physical, chemical, and biologic factors underlying a healthy skin color, the various skin shades drawing a disease picture are thoroughly debated, stressing their etiopathogenic origins and histopathologic aspects.

  12. Early-life risk factors for occurrence of atopic dermatitis during the first year.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Mikio; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Ozawa, Kiyoshi; Mizuno, Takahisa; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Tokuyama, Kenichi; Morikawa, Akihiro

    2007-03-01

    In a prospective birth cohort study, we sought to identify perinatal predictors of the occurrence of atopic dermatitis in the first year of life. Associations of family history, infection during pregnancy, cord blood cytokine concentrations, and skin function parameters with atopic dermatitis were analyzed. Stratum corneum hydration was measured with an impedance meter until 5 days after delivery and again at 1 month. Complete data were obtained for 213 infants, including 27 diagnosed by a physician as having atopic dermatitis during their first year and 26 diagnosed as having infantile eczema during their first month. The risk of atopic dermatitis during the first year of life was related to maternal atopic dermatitis, lower concentrations of macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta in cord blood, and greater skin moisture in the surface and stratum corneum of the forehead and cheek at 1 month of age but not to viral or bacterial infection during pregnancy or breastfeeding. Paternal hay fever was associated negatively with the development of atopic dermatitis. High concentrations of interleukin-5, interleukin-17, and macrophage chemotactic protein-1 and only surface moisture in the cheek were associated with greater risk of infantile eczema in the first month. The association of atopic dermatitis in infancy with reduced neonatal macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta levels suggests a link with immature immune responses at birth. Stratum corneum barrier disruption in atopic dermatitis may involve impairment of cutaneous adaptation to extrauterine life. The majority of risk factors had different effects on infant eczema and atopic dermatitis, indicating different causes.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Promotes Smed-PGRP-2/Smed-setd8-1 Methyltransferase Signalling in Planarian Neoblasts to Sensitize Anti-bacterial Gene Responses During Re-infection.

    PubMed

    Torre, Cedric; Abnave, Prasad; Tsoumtsa, Landry Laure; Mottola, Giovanna; Lepolard, Catherine; Trouplin, Virginie; Gimenez, Gregory; Desrousseaux, Julie; Gempp, Stephanie; Levasseur, Anthony; Padovani, Laetitia; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Ghigo, Eric

    2017-06-01

    Little is known about how organisms exposed to recurrent infections adapt their innate immune responses. Here, we report that planarians display a form of instructed immunity to primo-infection by Staphylococcus aureus that consists of a transient state of heightened resistance to re-infection that persists for approximately 30days after primo-infection. We established the involvement of stem cell-like neoblasts in this instructed immunity using the complementary approaches of RNA-interference-mediated cell depletion and tissue grafting-mediated gain of function. Mechanistically, primo-infection leads to expression of the peptidoglycan receptor Smed-PGRP-2, which in turn promotes Smed-setd8-1 histone methyltransferase expression and increases levels of lysine methylation in neoblasts. Depletion of neoblasts did not affect S. aureus clearance in primo-infection but, in re-infection, abrogated the heightened elimination of bacteria and reduced Smed-PGRP-2 and Smed-setd8-1 expression. Smed-PGRP-2 and Smed-setd8-1 sensitize animals to heightened expression of Smed-p38 MAPK and Smed-morn2, which are downstream components of anti-bacterial responses. Our study reveals a central role of neoblasts in innate immunity against S. aureus to establish a resistance state facilitating Smed-sted8-1-dependent expression of anti-bacterial genes during re-infection. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from dairy cows and genetic diversity of resistant isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent and major contagious mastitis bacterial pathogen. The antibiotic treatment cure rates vary considerably from 4% to 92%. Staphylococcus aureus readily becomes resistant to antibiotics, resulting in persistent noncurable intramammary infection that usually results i...

  15. Poison Ivy Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... ivy is caused by an allergic reaction ( allergic contact dermatitis ) to the oily coating that covers of these ... person doesn't have to come in direct contact with the leaves, roots, or branches of Rhus plants to get the rash. One can get it from contaminated clothing. Even ...

  16. Both anti-TNF and CTLA4 Ig treatments attenuate the disease severity of staphylococcal dermatitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Na, Manli; Wang, Wanzhong; Fei, Ying; Josefsson, Elisabet; Ali, Abukar; Jin, Tao

    2017-01-01

    RA patients being treated with biologics are known to have an increased risk of infections. We recently demonstrated that both CTLA4 Ig and anti-TNF treatment aggravate systemic Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection in mice, but with distinct clinical manifestations. However, the effects of CTLA4 Ig and anti-TNF treatments on a local S. aureus infection (e.g., skin infection) might differ from their effects on a systemic infection. The aim of this study was to examine the differential effects of anti-TNF versus CTLA4 Ig treatment on S. aureus skin infections in mice. Abatacept (CTLA4 Ig), etanercept (anti-TNF treatment) or PBS was given to NMRI mice subcutaneously inoculated with S. aureus strain SH1000. The clinical signs of dermatitis, along with histopathological changes due to skin infection, were compared between the groups. Both CTLA4 Ig and anti-TNF treatment resulted in less severe skin infections and smaller post-infectious hyperpigmentation compared with controls. Consistent with the clinical signs of dermatitis, smaller lesion size, more epithelial hyperplasia and more granulation were found in skin biopsies from mice receiving anti-TNF compared with PBS controls. However, both CTLA4 Ig and anti-TNF therapy tended to prolong the healing time, although this finding was not statistically significant. Serum MCP-1 levels were elevated in the anti-TNF group relative to the CTLA4 Ig and PBS groups, whereas IL-6 levels were higher in PBS controls than in the other two groups. Both anti-TNF and CTLA4 Ig treatments tended to down-regulate the necrosis/apoptosis ratio in the locally infected skin tissue. Importantly, no tangible difference was found in the bacterial burden among groups. Both CTLA4 Ig and anti-TNF therapies attenuate disease severity but may prolong the healing time required for S. aureus skin infections. Neither treatment has an impact on bacterial clearance in skin tissues.

  17. Diet and Dermatitis: Food Triggers

    PubMed Central

    Schlichte, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Given increasing awareness of the link between diet and health, many patients are concerned that dietary factors may trigger dermatitis. Research has found that dietary factors can indeed exacerbate atopic dermatitis or cause dermatitis due to systemic contact dermatitis. In atopic dermatitis, dietary factors are more likely to cause an exacerbation among infants or children with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis relative to other populations. Foods may trigger rapid, immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reactions or may lead to late eczematous reactions. While immediate reactions occur within minutes to hours of food exposure, late eczematous reactions may occur anywhere from hours to two days later. Screening methods, such as food allergen-specific serum immunoglobulin E tests or skin prick tests, can identify sensitization to specific foods, but a diagnosis of food allergy requires specific signs and symptoms that occur reproducibly upon food exposure. Many patients who are sensitized will not develop clinical findings upon food exposure; therefore, these tests may result in false-positive tests for food allergy. This is why the gold standard for diagnosis remains the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge. In another condition, systemic contact dermatitis, ingestion of a specific food can actually cause dermatitis. Systemic contact dermatitis is a distinct T-cell mediated immunological reaction in which dietary exposure to specific allergens results in dermatitis. Balsam of Peru and nickel are well-known causes of systemic contact dermatitis, and reports have implicated multiple other allergens. This review seeks to increase awareness of important food allergens, elucidate their relationship with atopic dermatitis and systemic contact dermatitis, and review available diagnostic and treatment strategies. PMID:24688624

  18. Facial bacterial infections: folliculitis.

    PubMed

    Laureano, Ana Cristina; Schwartz, Robert A; Cohen, Philip J

    2014-01-01

    Facial bacterial infections are most commonly caused by infections of the hair follicles. Wherever pilosebaceous units are found folliculitis can occur, with the most frequent bacterial culprit being Staphylococcus aureus. We review different origins of facial folliculitis, distinguishing bacterial forms from other infectious and non-infectious mimickers. We distinguish folliculitis from pseudofolliculitis and perifolliculitis. Clinical features, etiology, pathology, and management options are also discussed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Dermatitis, contact on the cheek (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin inflammation (dermatitis) on the cheek caused by contact with a substance that produced an allergic reaction (allergen). Contact dermatitis causes redness, itching, and small blisters (vesicles).

  20. Effect of Benralizumab in Atopic Dermatitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2018-06-22

    Dermatitis, Atopic; Dermatitis; Eczema; Skin Diseases; Skin Diseases, Genetic; Genetic Diseases, Inborn; Skin Diseases, Eczematous; Hypersensitivity; Hypersensitivity, Immediate; Immune System Diseases

  1. Lactoferricin/verbascoside topical emulsion: a possible alternative treatment for atopic dermatitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Biasibetti, Elena; Bruni, Natascia; Bigliati, Mauro; Capucchio, Maria Teresa

    2017-08-28

    Atopic dermatitis affects 3-15% of the general dog population and it has been diagnosed by veterinarians up to 58% of dogs affected with skin disease. It is usually a life-long pathology which can be controlled, but it can be seldom cured. The present investigation describes a case study in which lactoferricin and verbascoside are part of a formulation to obtain a dermatological lotion for canine dermatitis treatment. The study was an open-label trial design of two-week treatment. Thirty-eight dogs (23 females and 15 males), with atopic dermatitis and secondary bacterial or yeast overgrowth have been included. During treatment period the total clinical score progressively decreased associated with an improvement in clinical signs. No adverse effects were reported in any of the treated dogs. The present research suggests that daily applications of tested emulsion are effective in reducing bacterial overgrowth and clinical signs in skin folds and atopic dermatitis.

  2. Fragrance allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Judy; Zug, Kathryn A

    2014-01-01

    Fragrances are a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis in Europe and in North America. They can affect individuals at any age and elicit a spectrum of reactions from contact urticaria to systemic contact dermatitis. Growing recognition of the widespread use of fragrances in modern society has fueled attempts to prevent sensitization through improved allergen identification, labeling, and consumer education. This review provides an overview and update on fragrance allergy. Part 1 discusses the epidemiology and evaluation of suspected fragrance allergy. Part 2 reviews screening methods, emerging fragrance allergens, and management of patients with fragrance contact allergy. This review concludes by examining recent legislation on fragrances and suggesting potential additions to screening series to help prevent and detect fragrance allergy.

  3. LytN, a Murein Hydrolase in the Cross-wall Compartment of Staphylococcus aureus, Is Involved in Proper Bacterial Growth and Envelope Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Frankel, Matthew B.; Hendrickx, Antoni P. A.; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle progression for the spherical microbe Staphylococcus aureus requires the coordinated synthesis and remodeling of peptidoglycan. The majority of these rearrangements takes place at the mid-cell, in a compartment designated the cross-wall. Secreted polypeptides endowed with a YSIRK-G/S signal peptide are directly delivered to the cross-wall compartment. One such YSIRK-containing protein is the murein hydrolase LytN. lytN mutations precipitate structural damage to the cross-wall and interfere with staphylococcal growth. Overexpression of lytN also affects growth and triggers rupture of the cross-wall. The lytN phenotype can be reversed by the controlled expression of lytN but not by adding purified LytN to staphylococcal cultures. LytN harbors LysM and CHAP domains, the latter of which functions as both an N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidase and d-alanyl-glycine endopeptidase. Thus, LytN secretion into the cross-wall promotes peptidoglycan separation and completion of the staphylococcal cell cycle. PMID:21784864

  4. Staphylococcus aureus ventriculitis treated with single-dose intraventricular vancomycin or daptomycin (LY146032): bacterial and antibiotic kinetics in hydrocephalic rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, C S; Sobieski, M W; Scheld, W M; Park, T S

    1990-01-01

    Vancomycin and a new antibiotic, daptomycin (LY146032), were tested in vitro and in vivo against Staphylococcus aureus. In vivo tests were performed with rabbits with kaolin-induced hydrocephalus. Five groups of rabbits were studied: untreated ventriculitis, intraventricular vancomycin only, and ventriculitis treated with intraventricular vancomycin (30 micrograms or 120 micrograms) or daptomycin (7.5 micrograms). Results of this study were as follows. (i) S. aureus demonstrated static growth in cerebrospinal fluid in vitro and in ventriculitis at a maximum titer of 10(5) to 10(6) CFU/ml. (ii) In vitro time kill curves in cerebrospinal fluid matched those in vivo. (iii) Single-dose intraventricular vancomycin did not lower S. aureus concentrations over 8 h, whereas daptomycin did. (iv) Ventriculitis did not significantly alter the clearance of intraventricular vancomycin. (v) Intraventricular half-lives were approximately 2.8 h (maximum) for vancomycin and 4.5 h for daptomycin. (vi) Vancomycin was detectable in the periventricular white matter only in the presence of ventriculitis. Daptomycin was also detectable in the periventricular white matter of rabbits with ventriculitis, but in amounts too small to quantitate. We concluded that daptomycin achieved greater bactericidal activity, more rapid killing kinetics, and a longer half-life in the ventricle than vancomycin did in this model. PMID:2158276

  5. Infective Dermatitis in an Adult Patient With HTLV-1

    PubMed Central

    Riveros, Rosalba; Medina, Raquel; Morel, Maida

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Infective dermatitis is a chronic exudative eczematous eruption presenting in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)–infected people. It presents with relapsing erythematous, scaly, and crusted lesions affecting simultaneously the scalp, external ear, retroauricular area, eyelid, paranasal skin, neck axilla, and groin. Superimposed Staphylococcus and Streptococcus infection are common. It mainly affects children and exceptionally adults, and there are only a few published cases. The authors present the first reported case in Paraguay of an adult patient who had symptoms of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1–associated progressive tropical spastic paraparesis, and 6 years after the onset of the neurological symptoms, the patient developed infective dermatitis lesions on the skin, with frequent exacerbations since then. PMID:26588341

  6. A retrospective review of streptococcal infections in pediatric atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Jeffrey L; Hersh, Adam L; Okamura, Tessie; Howard, Renee; Frieden, Ilona J

    2011-01-01

    In order to assess the clinical characteristics and impact of group A streptococcal infection in children with atopic dermatitis, a retrospective review was performed in children diagnosed with atopic dermatitis who had a skin culture. Culture results and clinical characteristics of those with group A streptococcus were compared with those with Staphlococcus aureus. Infection with group A streptococcus was present in 16%; infection with Staphlococcus aureus was present in 72%, and 14% had mixed cultures. Patients infected with group A streptococcus were more likely to be febrile, to have facial and periorbital involvement, and to be hospitalized compared with those infected with Staphlococcus aureus alone (p ≤ 0.01 for all comparisons). Bacteremia and cellulitis were significantly more common in those infected with group A streptococcus than in those infected with Staphlococcus aureus. Retrospective design and review of only those patients receiving bacterial cultures may select for greater severity than in the general atopic dermatitis population. Group A streptococcus appears to be a significant skin pathogen infecting children with atopic dermatitis. Children with atopic dermatitis and group A streptococcal infection are more likely to have invasive disease and complications than those infected with Staphlococcus aureus alone. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Devriesea agamarum causes dermatitis in bearded dragons (Pogona vitticeps).

    PubMed

    Hellebuyck, Tom; Martel, An; Chiers, Koen; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Pasmans, Frank

    2009-03-02

    Devriesea agamarum is frequently isolated from dermatitis in lizards, notably from cheilitis in spiny tailed lizards (genus Uromastyx). It was the aim of the present study to assess the role of this bacterium as a causative agent of dermatitis by fulfilling Koch's postulates. First, its association with diseased lizards was demonstrated. The bacterium was isolated from several, mainly desert dwelling squamate species showing symptoms of dermatitis and/or septicaemia. The affected lizards mainly belonged to the family of the Agamidae (genera Pogona, Uromastyx, Agama) and in one case to the Iguanidae (genus Crotaphytus). Secondly, the occurrence of D. agamarum in 66 clinically healthy bearded dragons, 21 clinically healthy Uromastyx species and 40 squamate eggshells was studied. The bacterium was isolated from the oral cavity of 10 bearded dragons but from none of the healthy Uromastyx species. Hence D. agamarum was found to be part of the oral microbiota in Pogona vitticeps. Finally, bearded dragons (P. vitticeps) were experimentally inoculated with D. agamarum by direct application of a bacterial suspension on intact and abraded skin. At the scarified skin of all inoculated lizards, dermatitis was induced from which D. agamarum was re-isolated. In conclusion, D. agamarum is a facultative pathogenic bacterium, able to cause dermatitis in agamid lizards when the integrity of the skin is breached.

  8. Occupational protein contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Barbaud, Annick; Poreaux, Claire; Penven, Emmanuelle; Waton, Julie

    2015-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is generally caused by haptens but can also be induced by proteins causing mainly immunological contact urticaria (ICU); chronic hand eczema in the context of protein contact dermatitis (PCD). In a monocentric retrospective study, from our database, only 31 (0.41%) of patients with contact dermatitis had positive skin tests with proteins: 22 had occupational PCD, 3 had non-occupational PCD, 5 occupational ICU and 1 cook had a neutrophilic fixed food eruption (NFFE) due to fish. From these results and analysis of literature, the characteristics of PCD can be summarized as follows. It is a chronic eczematous dermatitis, possibly exacerbated by work, suggestive if associated with inflammatory perionyxix and immediate erythema with pruritis, to be investigated when the patient resumes work after a period of interruption. Prick tests with the suspected protein-containing material are essential, as patch tests have negative results. In case of multisensitisation revealed by prick tests, it is advisable to analyse IgE against recombinant allergens. A history of atopy, found in 56 to 68% of the patients, has to be checked for. Most of the cases are observed among food-handlers but PCD can also be due to non-edible plants, latex, hydrolysed proteins or animal proteins. Occupational exposure to proteins can thus lead to the development of ICU. Reflecting hypersensitivity to very low concentrations of allergens, investigating ICU therefore requires caution and prick tests should be performed with a diluted form of the causative protein-containing product. Causes are food, especially fruit peel, non-edible plants, cosmetic products, latex, animals.

  9. Atopic dermatitis: emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Eric; Udkoff, Jeremy; Borok, Jenna; Tom, Wynnis; Beck, Lisa; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2017-09-01

    Crisaborole and dupilumab represent the first 2 Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved therapies for atopic dermatitis (AD) in more than 15 years, and there are many promising drugs currently in development. This new wave of therapeutics capitalizes on the large body of work clarifying the pathogenesis of AD over the last several decades. In particular, type 2 cytokine-driven inflammation and skin barrier dysfunction are key processes underlying AD pathogenesis. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  10. Dermatitis and aircrew.

    PubMed

    Leggat, Peter A; Smith, Derek R

    2006-01-01

    Dermatitis is a common problem both in the workplace and in the general community. Airline personnel represent a novel occupational group as they are also exposed to a wide range of potential chemical irritants and other aggravating factors, such as low relative humidity and airborne pollutants. Common skin irritants include dielectric fluids from electrodischarge machining, 'prepreg' materials and sealants in aircraft manufacture, kerosene and various jet-fuel components. Commercial jet fuel is a complex mixture of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, and there is potential for dermal exposure among refueling and maintenance crew. Low relative humidity appears to exacerbate dermatitis amongst aircrew, especially on longer flight durations. Pilots may also be exposed to additional skin irritants outside of the cabin environment, such as ethylene glycol, hydraulic fluid or jet fuel, all of which may be encountered during routine inspections of aircraft before and after flight. Given these factors, preventive measures must carefully consider the undoubted potential for contact with irritants and allergens, which may lead to dermatitis in airline personnel.

  11. Pizza makers' contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lembo, Serena; Lembo, Claudio; Patruno, Cataldo; Balato, Anna; Balato, Nicola; Ayala, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Contact eczema to foods, spices, and food additives can occur in occupational and nonoccupational settings in those who grow, handle, prepare, or cook food. Pizza is one of the most eaten foods in every continent, and pizza making is a common work in many countries. We aimed to evaluate the occurrence and the causes of contact dermatitis in pizza makers in Naples. We performed an observational study in 45 pizza makers: all the enrolled subjects had to answer a questionnaire designed to detect personal history of respiratory or cutaneous allergy, atopy; work characteristics and timing were also investigated. Every subject attended the dermatology clinic for a complete skin examination, and when needed, patients were patch tested using the Italian baseline series of haptens integrated with an arbitrary pizza makers series. Our results reported that 13.3% of the enrolled pizza makers (6/45) presented hand eczema, and that 8.9% (4/45) were affected by occupational allergic contact dermatitis. Diallyl disulfide and ammonium persulfate were the responsible substances. Performing patch tests in pizza makers and food handlers affected by hand contact dermatitis is useful. We propose a specific series of haptens for this wide working category.

  12. Systemic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Marcella; Rosner, Greg

    2018-05-15

    Systemic contact dermatitis (SCD) traditionally refers to a skin condition where an individual who is cutaneously sensitized to an allergen will subsequently react to that same allergen or a cross reacting allergen via a different route. It occurs to allergens including metals, medications, and foods. The exact pathophysiology underlying this disease remains unknown, although it appears to be mediated by type 4 hypersensitivity reactions and possibly type 3 hypersensitivity reactions. The p-I concept (pharmacologic interaction with immunoreceptors) hypothesized that drugs are able to bind directly to a T cell receptor without first being presented by MHC (major histocompatibility complex) molecules and without prior metabolism, which would help explain why SCD can be seen on first exposure to medications. Nomenclature remains a challenge as SCD can be subcategorized using terms such as ACDS (allergic contact dermatitis syndrome) and its four clinical stages, Baboon syndrome, and SDRIFE (symmetrical drug-related intertriginous and flexural exanthema), which share many overlapping features. Food allergens may be responsible for uncontrolled or persistent symptoms in patients with contact dermatitis who do not respond to topical avoidance. With medications, symptoms may be induced by topical application versus systemic administration. Patch testing (PT) may be beneficial in diagnosing SCD caused by metals and many topical medications including corticosteroids, antimicrobials (ampicillin, bacitracin, erythromycin, neomycin, nystatin), NSAIDs (diclofenac, ibuprofen), anesthetics, and antihistamines (chlorphenamine, piperazine). Current treatment options include topical steroids and oral antihistamines for symptom relief and dietary avoidance to causative foods or metals.

  13. Putative Malassezia dermatitis in six goats.

    PubMed

    Eguchi-Coe, Yuko; Valentine, Beth A; Gorman, Elena; Villarroel, Aurora

    2011-12-01

    Histopathology submissions from 28 goats with dermatological disease were identified in an archival search of pathology files. Microscopic sections of skin biopsy specimens were examined for the presence of Malassezia spp. organisms. Six cases with many Malassezia yeasts were identified histopathologically. Based on the extent of clinical disease, three cases were regarded as localized and three were generalized infections. Clinical findings included alopecia with dry seborrhoea (four cases), greasy seborrhoea (one case), and no clinical findings specific to localized Malassezia infection when concurrent bacterial infection was present (one case). Mild pruritus was reported in two cases of generalized infection. No breed predilection was apparent. Three cases were male and three were female. Malassezia dermatitis occurred in goats from 10 months to 13 years of age. Three of six cases had concurrent bacterial infection. Skin lesions resolved following topical antifungal therapy in the two goats that were treated. Histopathological findings in all cases were severe follicular and epidermal orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis with minimal epithelial change and mild superficial perivascular to interstitial nonsuppurative inflammation. Numerous budding yeasts were visible within the stratum corneum of all cases; however, Malassezia was not isolated in the three cases in which culture was attempted. Based upon these findings, the authors suggest that the diagnosis Malassezia dermatitis in goats is most likely to be made by cytological examination of skin impressions or by examination of skin biopsy samples. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Dermatology. © 2011 ESVD and ACVD.

  14. Contact dermatitis to training toilet seat (potty seat dermatitis).

    PubMed

    Dorfman, Claire O; Barros, Mark A; Zaenglein, Andrea L

    2018-05-29

    Allergic contact dermatitis from various components of toilet seats has been well described. We report a case of a young boy presenting with an atypical pattern of dermatitis who was found to be allergic to his training toilet seat. This case highlights the importance of recognizing this diagnosis and the role of potty seats as the causative factor. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Impact of neonatal intensive care bed configuration on rates of late-onset bacterial sepsis and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization

    PubMed Central

    Julian, Samuel; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Sellenriek, Patricia; Shannon, William D.; Hamvas, Aaron; Tarr, Phillip I.; Warner, Barbara B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Infections cause significant morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The association between nursery design and nosocomial infections has not been delineated. We hypothesized that rates of colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), late-onset sepsis, and mortality are reduced in single-patient rooms. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting NICU in a tertiary referral center. Methods Our NICU is organized into single-patient and open-unit rooms. Clinical datasets including bed location and microbiology results were examined over a 29-month period. Differences in outcomes between bed configurations were determined by Chi-square and Cox regression. Patients All NICU patients. Results Among 1823 patients representing 55,166 patient-days, single-patient and open-unit models had similar incidences of MRSA colonization and MRSA colonization-free survival times. Average daily census was associated with MRSA colonization rates only in single-patient rooms (hazard ratio 1.31, p=0.039), while hand hygiene compliance on room entry and exit was associated with lower colonization rates independent of bed configuration (hazard ratios 0.834 and 0.719 per 1% higher compliance, respectively). Late-onset sepsis rates were similar in single-patient and open-unit models as were sepsis-free survival and the combined outcome of sepsis or death. After controlling for demographic, clinical and unit-based variables, multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that bed configuration had no effect on MRSA colonization, late-onset sepsis, or mortality. Conclusions MRSA colonization rate was impacted by hand hygiene compliance, regardless of room configuration, while average daily census only affected infants in single-patient rooms. Single-patient rooms did not reduce the rates of MRSA colonization, late-onset sepsis or death. PMID:26108888

  16. Intracellular Biosynthesis of Fluorescent CdSe Quantum Dots in Bacillus subtilis: A Strategy to Construct Signaling Bacterial Probes for Visually Detecting Interaction Between Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng-Yu; Ai, Xiao-Xia; Su, Yi-Long; Liu, Xin-Ying; Shan, Xiao-Hui; Wu, Sheng-Mei

    2016-02-01

    In this work, fluorescent Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis) cells were developed as probes for imaging applications and to explore behaviorial interaction between B. subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). A novel biological strategy of coupling intracellular biochemical reactions for controllable biosynthesis of CdSe quantum dots by living B. subtilis cells was demonstrated, through which highly luminant and photostable fluorescent B. subtilis cells were achieved with good uniformity. With the help of the obtained fluorescent B. subtilis cells probes, S. aureus cells responded to co-cultured B. subtilis and to aggregate. The degree of aggregation was calculated and nonlinearly fitted to a polynomial model. Systematic investigations of their interactions implied that B. subtilis cells inhibit the growth of neighboring S. aureus cells, and this inhibition was affected by both the growth stage and the amount of surrounding B. subtilis cells. Compared to traditional methods of studying bacterial interaction between two species, such as solid culture medium colony observation and imaging mass spectrometry detection, the procedures were more simple, vivid, and photostable due to the efficient fluorescence intralabeling with less influence on the cells' surface, which might provide a new paradigm for future visualization of microbial behavior.

  17. Lung pathology in response to repeated exposure to Staphylococcus aureus in congenic residual function cystic fibrosis mice does not increase in response to decreased CFTR levels or increased bacterial load.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Donald J; Webb, Sheila; Teague, Peter; Govan, John R W; Dorin, Julia R

    2004-01-01

    To establish the role of defects in murine Cftr in the susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus lung disease using mouse models of cystic fibrosis (CF), congenic or inbred strains. We describe the histopathological analyses of CF mice repeatedly exposed by aerosolisation to a CF isolate of S. aureus, using residual function Cftr mice and compound heterozygotes generated by intercrossing these with Cftr 'null' mice, all congenic on the C57Bl6/N background. We demonstrate that mice congenic on the C57Bl/6 background develop significantly more severe lung pathology than non-CF littermates in response to repeated exposure to the most frequent early CF lung pathogen S. aureus. Furthermore, reducing the level of Cftr by half in compound heterozygote mice does not impact upon disease severity, even in response to an increased bacterial dose. These results are consistent with an airway clearance defect, or abnormal inflammatory response secondary to Cftr mutation. These studies confirm the primary role for Cftr mutation in the development of this lung phenotype. In addition, these results demonstrate that a further 50% decrease in residual wild-type Cftr mRNA levels in this model does not impact the severity of the histopathological response to S. aureus, suggesting a critical threshold level for functional CFTR. Copyright 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel

  18. Linoleic acid salt with ultrapure soft water as an antibacterial combination against dermato-pathogenic Staphylococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Jang, H; Makita, Y; Jung, K; Ishizaka, S; Karasawa, K; Oida, K; Takai, M; Matsuda, H; Tanaka, A

    2016-02-01

    Skin colonization of Staphylococcus spp. critically affects the severity of dermatitis in humans and animals. We examined different types of fatty acid salts for their antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus spp. when used in ultrapure soft water (UPSW). We also evaluated their therapeutic effect on a spontaneous canine model of dermatitis. UPSW, in which Ca(++) and Mg(++) were replaced with Na(+) , was generated using a water softener with cation-exchange resin. Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. aureus), Staphylococcus intermedius (Staph. intermedius), and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (Staph. pseudintermedius) were incubated with various fatty acid salts in distilled water (DW) or UPSW and the number of bacteria was counted. Among the fatty acids, oleic acid salt and linoleic acid (LA) salt reduced the number of these bacteria. Also, UPSW enhanced the antibacterial effect of LA on Staph. spp. In spontaneously developed itchy dermatitis in companion dogs, shampoo treatment with liquid soap containing 10% LA in UPSW improved skin conditions. LA salt showed antibacterial activity against Staph. spp. Treatment with soap containing LA with UPSW reduced clinical conditions in dogs with dermatitis. Because colonization of Staph. spp. on the skin exacerbates dermatitis, the use of LA-containing soap in UPSW may reduce unpleasant clinical symptoms of the skin. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Park, Michelle E; Zippin, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis caused by cosmetic products is an increasing concern given the continual creation and introduction of new cosmetics to the public. This article presents an overview of how to evaluate a patient for patch testing, including common areas for cosmetic-induced dermatitis, common cosmetic allergens, and proper management. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Dermatoglyphics in dermatitis herpetiformis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, D F; Abdullah, N; Marks, J; Shuster, S

    1978-12-01

    In a dermatoglyphic study of 101 patients with dermatitis herpetiformis, comparison was made with their normal relatives and several random normal series. The results of the several comparisons are quite consistent, considering the nature of the data, for the all point to an attenuation of qualitative and quantitative digital and palmar traits in the patients. It is argued that these differences are associated with the disease itself, and that some of the female relatives have an inherited tendency to the disorder, but do not express it. The findings suggest the involvement of genetic factors in the aetiology, and possibly intrauterine environmental influences as well.

  1. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Detrixhe, A; Nikkels, A F; Dezfoulian, B

    2017-11-01

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) is an exceptional condition affecting young women of childbearing age with a high prevalence during the third decade of life. The diagnosis should be confirmed using an intradermal skin test to progesterone, during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. APD represents an early manifestation of autoimmune disease. A case of APD is presented who after curative treatment did not develop other autoimmune diseases during a 6-year follow-up. Dermatologists, gynecologists and obstetricians should be aware of this rare but highly invalidating entity.

  2. Algal dermatitis in cichlids.

    PubMed

    Yanong, Roy P E; Francis-Floyd, Ruth; Curtis, Eric; Klinger, Ruth Ellen; Cichra, Mary E; Berzins, Ilze K

    2002-05-01

    Three varieties of a popular African cichlid aquarium species, Pseudotropheus zebra, from 2 tropical fish farms in east central Florida were submitted for diagnostic evaluation because of the development of multifocal green lesions. The percentage of infected fish in these populations varied from 5 to 60%. Fish were otherwise clinically normal. Microscopic examination of fresh and fixed lesions confirmed algal dermatitis, with light invasion of several internal organs in each group. A different alga was identified from each farm. Fish from farm A were infected with Chlorochytrium spp, whereas fish from farm B were infected with Scenedesmus spp. Because of the numbers of fish involved, bath treatments to remove the algae from affected fish from farm B were attempted, with different dosages of several common algaecides including copper sulfate pentahydrate, diuron, and sodium chloride. However, none of these treatments were successful, possibly because of the location of the algae under the scales and within the dermis, and also because of the sequestering effect of the granulomatous response. To our knowledge, this is the first report of algal dermatitis in ornamental cichlids, as well as the first report of Scenedesmus spp infection in any fish.

  3. Shiitake Mushroom Dermatitis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Stephany, Mathew Paul; Chung, Stella; Handler, Marc Zachary; Handler, Nancy Stefanie; Handler, Glenn A; Schwartz, Robert A

    2016-10-01

    Shiitake mushroom dermatitis is a cutaneous reaction caused by the consumption of raw or undercooked shiitake mushrooms. Symptoms include linear erythematous eruptions with papules, papulovesicles or plaques, and severe pruritus. It is likely caused by lentinan, a heat-inactivated beta-glucan polysaccharide. Cases were initially reported in Japan but have now been documented in other Asian countries, North America, South America, and Europe, as this mushroom is now cultivated and consumed worldwide. Shiitake mushroom dermatitis may result from mushroom ingestion or from handling, which can result in an allergic contact dermatitis.

  4. Conctact dermatitis: some important topics.

    PubMed

    Pigatto, P D

    2015-11-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is a type IV delayed hypersensitivity reaction. The gold standard for diagnosis is patch testing. The prevalence of positive patch tests in referred patients with suspected ACD ranges from 27 to 95.6%. The relationship between ACD and atopic dermatitis (AD) is complicated with conflicting reports of prevalence in the literature; however, in a patient with dermatitis not responding to traditional therapies, or with new areas of involvement, ACD should be considered as part of the work-up.

  5. Efficiency of vanilla, patchouli and ylang ylang essential oils stabilized by iron oxide@C14 nanostructures against bacterial adherence and biofilms formed by Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains.

    PubMed

    Bilcu, Maxim; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai; Oprea, Alexandra Elena; Popescu, Roxana Cristina; Mogoșanu, George Dan; Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, George A; Mihailescu, Dan Florin; Lazar, Veronica; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen

    2014-11-04

    Biofilms formed by bacterial cells are associated with drastically enhanced resistance against most antimicrobial agents, contributing to the persistence and chronicization of the microbial infections and to therapy failure. The purpose of this study was to combine the unique properties of magnetic nanoparticles with the antimicrobial activity of three essential oils to obtain novel nanobiosystems that could be used as coatings for catheter pieces with an improved resistance to Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains adherence and biofilm development. The essential oils of ylang ylang, patchouli and vanilla were stabilized by the interaction with iron oxide@C14 nanoparticles to be further used as coating agents for medical surfaces. Iron oxide@C14 was prepared by co-precipitation of Fe+2 and Fe+3 and myristic acid (C14) in basic medium. Vanilla essential oil loaded nanoparticles pelliculised on the catheter samples surface strongly inhibited both the initial adherence of S. aureus cells (quantified at 24 h) and the development of the mature biofilm quantified at 48 h. Patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils inhibited mostly the initial adherence phase of S. aureus biofilm development. In the case of K. pneumoniae, all tested nanosystems exhibited similar efficiency, being active mostly against the adherence K. pneumoniae cells to the tested catheter specimens. The new nanobiosystems based on vanilla, patchouli and ylang-ylang essential oils could be of a great interest for the biomedical field, opening new directions for the design of film-coated surfaces with anti-adherence and anti-biofilm properties.

  6. Boeravinone B, A Novel Dual Inhibitor of NorA Bacterial Efflux Pump of Staphylococcus aureus and Human P-Glycoprotein, Reduces the Biofilm Formation and Intracellular Invasion of Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Singh, Samsher; Kalia, Nitin P; Joshi, Prashant; Kumar, Ajay; Sharma, Parduman R; Kumar, Ashok; Bharate, Sandip B; Khan, Inshad A

    2017-01-01

    This study elucidated the role of boeravinone B, a NorA multidrug efflux pump inhibitor, in biofilm inhibition. The effects of boeravinone B plus ciprofloxacin, a NorA substrate, were evaluated in NorA-overexpressing, wild-type, and knocked-out Staphylococcus aureus (SA-1199B, SA-1199, and SA-K1758, respectively). The mechanism of action was confirmed using the ethidium bromide accumulation and efflux assay. The role of boeravinone B as a human P -glycoprotein ( P -gp) inhibitor was examined in the LS-180 (colon cancer) cell line. Moreover, its role in the inhibition of biofilm formation and intracellular invasion of S. aureus in macrophages was studied. Boeravinone B reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ciprofloxacin against S. aureus and its methicillin-resistant strains; the effect was stronger in SA-1199B. Furthermore, time-kill kinetics revealed that boeravinone B plus ciprofloxacin, at subinhibitory concentration (0.25 × MIC), is as equipotent as that at the MIC level. This combination also had a reduced mutation prevention concentration. Boeravinone B reduced the efflux of ethidium bromide and increased the accumulation, thus strengthening the role as a NorA inhibitor. Biofilm formation was reduced by four-eightfold of the minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin, effectively preventing bacterial entry into macrophages. Boeravinone B effectively inhibited P -gp with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) of 64.85 μM. The study concluded that boeravinone B not only inhibits the NorA-mediated efflux of fluoroquinolones but also considerably inhibits the biofilm formation of S. aureus. Its P -gp inhibition activity demonstrates its potential as a bioavailability and bioefficacy enhancer.

  7. Boeravinone B, A Novel Dual Inhibitor of NorA Bacterial Efflux Pump of Staphylococcus aureus and Human P-Glycoprotein, Reduces the Biofilm Formation and Intracellular Invasion of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Samsher; Kalia, Nitin P.; Joshi, Prashant; Kumar, Ajay; Sharma, Parduman R.; Kumar, Ashok; Bharate, Sandip B.; Khan, Inshad A.

    2017-01-01

    This study elucidated the role of boeravinone B, a NorA multidrug efflux pump inhibitor, in biofilm inhibition. The effects of boeravinone B plus ciprofloxacin, a NorA substrate, were evaluated in NorA-overexpressing, wild-type, and knocked-out Staphylococcus aureus (SA-1199B, SA-1199, and SA-K1758, respectively). The mechanism of action was confirmed using the ethidium bromide accumulation and efflux assay. The role of boeravinone B as a human P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor was examined in the LS-180 (colon cancer) cell line. Moreover, its role in the inhibition of biofilm formation and intracellular invasion of S. aureus in macrophages was studied. Boeravinone B reduced the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ciprofloxacin against S. aureus and its methicillin-resistant strains; the effect was stronger in SA-1199B. Furthermore, time–kill kinetics revealed that boeravinone B plus ciprofloxacin, at subinhibitory concentration (0.25 × MIC), is as equipotent as that at the MIC level. This combination also had a reduced mutation prevention concentration. Boeravinone B reduced the efflux of ethidium bromide and increased the accumulation, thus strengthening the role as a NorA inhibitor. Biofilm formation was reduced by four–eightfold of the minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin, effectively preventing bacterial entry into macrophages. Boeravinone B effectively inhibited P-gp with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 64.85 μM. The study concluded that boeravinone B not only inhibits the NorA-mediated efflux of fluoroquinolones but also considerably inhibits the biofilm formation of S. aureus. Its P-gp inhibition activity demonstrates its potential as a bioavailability and bioefficacy enhancer. PMID:29046665

  8. Experimental Transmission of Bovine Digital Dermatitis to Sheep: Development of an Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Welder, Jennifer H; Nally, Jarlath E; Alt, David P; Palmer, Mitchell V; Coatney, John; Plummer, Paul

    2018-03-01

    Digital dermatitis is an infectious cause of lameness primarily affecting cattle but also described in sheep, goats, and wild elk. Digital dermatitis is a polymicrobial infection, involving several Treponema species and other anaerobic bacteria. Although the exact etiology has not been demonstrated, a number of bacterial, host, and environmental factors are thought to contribute to disease development. To study host-bacterial interactions, a reproducible laboratory model of infection is required. The objective of this study was to demonstrate key aspects of bovine digital dermatitis lesions in an easy-to-handle sheep model. Crossbred sheep were obtained from a flock free of hoof disease. Skin between the heel bulb and dewclaw was abraded before wrapping to emulate a moist, anaerobic environment. After 3 days, abraded areas were inoculated with macerated lesion material from active bovine digital dermatitis and remained wrapped. By 2 weeks postinoculation, experimentally inoculated feet developed erosive, erythematous lesions. At 4 weeks postinoculation, microscopic changes in the dermis and epidermis were consistent with those described for bovine digital dermatitis, including erosion, ulceration, hyperkeratosis, ballooning degeneration of keratinocytes, and the presence of neutrophilic infiltrates. Silver staining of lesion biopsy sections confirmed that spirochetes had penetrated the host epidermis. The model was then perpetuated by passaging lesion material from experimentally infected sheep into naïve sheep. This model of bovine digital dermatitis will allow for future novel insights into pathogenic mechanisms of infection, as well as the development of improved diagnostic methods and therapeutics for all affected ruminants.

  9. Stretch Garment Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mihan, Richard; Ayres, Samuel

    1968-01-01

    A disease of the skin, not hitherto described, is caused by pressure or tension on the skin from the wearing of tight-fitting stretch garments such as “stretch bras,” “stretch girdles” and “stretch socks.” The condition is not due to chemical sensitization of fabrics, dyes or other additives but is of mechanical origin. The eruption may assume various clinical forms and may be characterized by a nondescript erythematous and eczematous appearance or may consist of an exaggeration, in the areas covered by the stretch garment, of already existing dermatosis such as lichen planus, psoriasis, acne vulgaris, discoid lupus erythematosus or atopic dermatitis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:5639939

  10. Sulfur spring dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chieh-Chi; Wu, Yu-Hung

    2014-11-01

    Thermal sulfur baths are a form of balneotherapy promoted in many cultures for improvement of skin conditions; however, certain uncommon skin problems may occur after bathing in hot sulfur springs. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with multiple confluent, punched-out, round ulcers with peripheral erythema on the thighs and shins after bathing in a hot sulfur spring. Histopathologic examination revealed homogeneous coagulation necrosis of the epidermis and papillary dermis. Tissue cultures showed no evidence of a microbial infection. The histopathologic findings and clinical course were consistent with a superficial second-degree burn. When patients present with these findings, sulfur spring dermatitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Moreover, the patient's clinical history is crucial for correct diagnosis.

  11. Comorbidity in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Eric L

    2012-03-01

    The negative impact of atopic dermatitis (AD) often extends beyond the skin. Children with AD experience increased rates of infectious, mental health, and allergic diseases compared to their non-atopic peers. The mechanisms underlying these associations remain elusive. New insights from genetic and epidermal research pinpoint the skin barrier as a primary initiator of AD. Epicutaneous sensitization represents an intriguing new model which links a disrupted skin barrier to the later development of IgE-mediated diseases in patients with AD. Recent epidemiological studies have identified new comorbidities linked to AD as well, including several mental health disorders and obesity. This manuscript reviews the recent literature regarding both classic and newly described AD comorbidities.

  12. Efficacy and safety of sodium hypochlorite (bleach) baths in patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Su-ming; Ng, Ting Guan; Baba, Roshidah

    2013-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is frequently found in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and contributes to disease exacerbation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of bleach baths as an adjunctive treatment in AD patients. Patients between 2 and 30 years old with moderate to severe AD were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Patients soaked in diluted bleach or distilled water baths for 10 min, twice a week for 2 months. Efficacy assessments included the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) scores and S. aureus density was determined using quantitative bacterial cultures. Patients in the treatment group showed significant reductions in EASI scores. A 41.9% reduction in S. aureus density from baseline was seen at 1 month further reducing to 53.3% at 2 months. Equal numbers of patients in both groups experienced mild side-effects. This study demonstrates that diluted bleach baths clinically improved AD in as little as 1 month. No patient withdrew from the treatment arm because of intolerance to the baths. © 2013 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Staphylococcus aureus (Staph Infection) In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having ... risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to staphylococcus aureus may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  14. Silver-loaded seaweed-based cellulosic fiber improves epidermal skin physiology in atopic dermatitis: safety assessment, mode of action and controlled, randomized single-blinded exploratory in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Fluhr, Joachim W; Breternitz, Maria; Kowatzki, Doreen; Bauer, Andrea; Bossert, Joerg; Elsner, Peter; Hipler, Uta-Christina

    2010-08-01

    The epidermal part of the skin is the major interface between the internal body and the external environment. The skin has a specific physiology and is to different degrees adapted for protection against multiple exogenous stress factors. Clothing is the material with the longest and most intensive contact to human skin. It plays a critical role especially in inflammatory dermatoses or skin conditions with an increased susceptibility of bacterial and fungal infections like atopic dermatitis. Previously, we have shown a dose-dependent antibacterial and antifungal activity of silver-loaded seaweed-based cellulosic fibres. We studied the mode of action of silver-loaded seaweed-based cellulosic fiber and performed a broad safety assessment. The principal aim was to analyse the effects of wearing the textile on epidermal skin physiology in 37 patients with atopic dermatitis in a controlled, randomized single-blinded in vivo study. Furthermore, the sensitization potential was tested in a patch test in 111 panellists. We could demonstrate in vitro a dose-dependent scavenging of induced reactive oxygen species by silver-loaded seaweed-based cellulosic fibers. Safety assessment of these fibres showed no detectable release of silver ions. Furthermore, ex vivo assessment after 24 h application both in healthy volunteers and patients with atopic dermatitis by sequential tape stripping and subsequently raster electron microscopy and energy dispersive microanalysis analysis revealed no detectable amounts of silver in any of stratum corneum layers. Serum analysis of silver showed no detectable levels. The in vivo patch testing of 111 volunteers revealed no sensitization against different SeaCell Active (SeaCell GmbH, Rudolstadt, Germany) containing fabrics. The in vivo study on 37 patients with known atopic dermatitis and mild-to-moderate eczema on their arms were randomly assigned to either silver-loaded seaweed fibre T-shirts or to cotton T-shirts for 8 weeks. A significant

  15. Gangrenous dermatitis in chickens and turkeys.

    PubMed

    Gornatti-Churria, Carlos D; Crispo, Manuela; Shivaprasad, H L; Uzal, Francisco A

    2018-03-01

    Gangrenous dermatitis (GD) is a disease of chickens and turkeys that causes severe economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. Clostridium septicum, Clostridium perfringens type A, and occasionally Clostridium sordellii are considered the main causes of GD, although Staphylococcus aureus and other aerobic bacteria may also be involved in some cases of the disease. GD has become one of the most significant diseases of commercial turkeys in the United States. Several infectious and/or environmental immunosuppressive factors can predispose to GD. Skin lesions are considered to be the main portal of entry of the microorganism(s) involved. GD is characterized by acute onset of mortality associated with gross skin and subcutaneous tissue lesions consisting of variable amounts of serosanguineous exudate together with emphysema and hemorrhages. The underlying skeletal muscle can also be involved. Ulceration of the epidermis may be also noticed in cases complicated with S. aureus. Microscopically, necrosis of the epidermis and dermis, and subcutaneous edema and emphysema are commonly observed. Gram-positive rods can be identified within the subcutis and skeletal muscles, usually associated with minimal inflammatory infiltrate. A presumptive diagnosis of GD can be made based on history, clinical signs, and gross anatomic and microscopic lesions. However, confirmation should be based on demonstration of the causative agents by culture, PCR, immunohistochemistry, and/or fluorescent antibody tests.

  16. Pharmacophysiology of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hanifin, J M

    1986-02-01

    Atopic dermatitis is clearly characterized by altered cutaneous physiologic responses. There is a tendency to acral vasoconstriction. Rubbing causes skin pallor and white dermographism. Vascular instability is demonstrated by responses to cholinergic agents, histamine, and nicotinates. Psychophysiologic studies demonstrate exaggerated vasodilator responses to emotional stress with consequent pruritus and scratching. The itch threshold is low, duration is prolonged, and nighttime scratching movements may be frequent or almost continuous. Regardless of the inciting trigger factors, the scratching causes the damage and the severe dermatitis. Thermal as well as emotional stimuli to sweating cause severe itching in AD, yet the concept of a miliaria-type, poral occlusion mechanism remains unproven. Some studies suggest actually increased sweating along with erythema and pruritus during acute flares of AD. The concept of sweat-borne allergens causing skin reactions during sweating is interesting but has never been proven. Studies of sweat responses to pharmacologic agents have produced conflicting data, and attempts to link these responses to Szentivanyi's beta-adrenergic blockade theory are not convincing. The numerous variables of climate, season, sex, age, and habitus affect sweating greatly. Future studies must carefully control for each of these factors before pharmacologically induced sweat responses can be interpreted clearly. A number of lines of evidence suggest involvement of histamine and other mediators in the evolution of erythema, pruritus, and scratching in AD. Flares of the condition have been reproducibly evoked by only two incitants: experimental emotional stress interviews and specific food challenge in selected sensitive individuals. In the latter, increased plasma histamine has been demonstrated, presumably generated by antigen/IgE stimulated degranulation of mast cells in the gut and/or skin. The demonstrated increased histamine releasability of

  17. A Rare Case of Oestrogen Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bourgeault, Emilie; Bujold, Janie; Doucet, Marie-Eve

    Oestrogen dermatitis is a rare disorder characterised by cyclical eruptions in association with a woman's menstrual cycle. A 43-year-old woman with an 8-year history of cyclical inguinal dermatitis, with a negative patch test, was tested with intradermal progesterone and oestrogen. Intradermal testing was positive for oestrogen only. In a female patient with cyclical dermatitis, it is important to consider oestrogen or progesterone dermatitis in the differential diagnosis.

  18. Pediatric "pet consort dermatitis"-Allergic contact dermatitis from transfer of bronopol from a pet cat.

    PubMed

    Hamann, Dathan; Ridpath, Alyson; Fernandez Faith, Esteban

    2018-06-26

    Consort dermatitis refers to an allergic contact dermatitis caused by transfer from an intimate contact to a sensitized patient. Although close contact with other humans most commonly provokes consort dermatitis, pets have been the source in a minority of cases. We present a unique case of transfer dermatitis from a patient's cat litter to her forearms. Pediatric dermatologists should be aware of the possibility of consort or "transfer" allergic contact dermatitis from pets. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. In Vitro Activity of Delafloxacin and Microbiological Response against Fluoroquinolone-Susceptible and Nonsusceptible Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Two Phase 3 Studies of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, L.; Quintas, M.; Woosley, L.; Flamm, R.; Tseng, C.; Cammarata, S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Delafloxacin is an investigational anionic fluoroquinolone antibiotic with broad-spectrum in vitro activity, including activity against Gram-positive organisms, Gram-negative organisms, atypical organisms, and anaerobes. The in vitro activity of delafloxacin and the percent microbiological response in subjects infected with fluoroquinolone-susceptible and nonsusceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates were determined from two global phase 3 studies of delafloxacin versus vancomycin plus aztreonam in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). Patients from 23 countries, predominately the United States but also Europe, South America, and Asia, were enrolled. The microbiological intent-to-treat (MITT) population included 1,042 patients from which 685 S. aureus isolates were submitted for identification and susceptibility testing per CLSI guidelines at the central laboratory (JMI Laboratories, North Liberty, IA). The comparator fluoroquinolone antibiotics included levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Nonsusceptibility to these antibiotics was determined using CLSI breakpoints. S. aureus isolates were 33.7% levofloxacin nonsusceptible (LVX-NS). The delafloxacin MIC90 values against levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates were all 0.25 μg/ml. Delafloxacin demonstrated high rates of microbiological response against LVX-NS isolates as well as isolates with documented mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). S. aureus was eradicated or presumed eradicated in 98.4% (245/249) of delafloxacin-treated patients. Similar eradication rates were observed for delafloxacin-treated subjects with levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. aureus isolates (80/81; 98.8%) and MRSA isolates (70/71; 98.6%). Microbiological response rates of 98.6% were observed with delafloxacin-treated subjects with S. aureus isolates with the S84L mutation in gyrA and the S

  20. In Vitro Activity of Delafloxacin and Microbiological Response against Fluoroquinolone-Susceptible and Nonsusceptible Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Two Phase 3 Studies of Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections.

    PubMed

    McCurdy, S; Lawrence, L; Quintas, M; Woosley, L; Flamm, R; Tseng, C; Cammarata, S

    2017-09-01

    Delafloxacin is an investigational anionic fluoroquinolone antibiotic with broad-spectrum in vitro activity, including activity against Gram-positive organisms, Gram-negative organisms, atypical organisms, and anaerobes. The in vitro activity of delafloxacin and the percent microbiological response in subjects infected with fluoroquinolone-susceptible and nonsusceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates were determined from two global phase 3 studies of delafloxacin versus vancomycin plus aztreonam in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI). Patients from 23 countries, predominately the United States but also Europe, South America, and Asia, were enrolled. The microbiological intent-to-treat (MITT) population included 1,042 patients from which 685 S. aureus isolates were submitted for identification and susceptibility testing per CLSI guidelines at the central laboratory (JMI Laboratories, North Liberty, IA). The comparator fluoroquinolone antibiotics included levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin. Nonsusceptibility to these antibiotics was determined using CLSI breakpoints. S. aureus isolates were 33.7% levofloxacin nonsusceptible (LVX-NS). The delafloxacin MIC 90 values against levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. aureus , methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates were all 0.25 μg/ml. Delafloxacin demonstrated high rates of microbiological response against LVX-NS isolates as well as isolates with documented mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). S. aureus was eradicated or presumed eradicated in 98.4% (245/249) of delafloxacin-treated patients. Similar eradication rates were observed for delafloxacin-treated subjects with levofloxacin-nonsusceptible S. aureus isolates (80/81; 98.8%) and MRSA isolates (70/71; 98.6%). Microbiological response rates of 98.6% were observed with delafloxacin-treated subjects with S. aureus isolates with the S84L mutation in gyrA and the S80Y

  1. Occupational carprofen photoallergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kerr, A C; Muller, F; Ferguson, J; Dawe, R S

    2008-12-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug carprofen was used in humans in the 1980s, before its withdrawal due to adverse effects. It re-emerged for veterinary uses, for which it is still widely prescribed, in the 1990s. There has been one previous report published of photoallergic contact dermatitis (PACD) in a pharmaceutical factory worker exposed to carprofen. Investigation of carprofen as a cause of PACD in pharmaceutical factory workers presenting with facial dermatitis. Photopatch testing to carprofen dilutions in two pharmaceutical factory workers and three healthy volunteer controls using the European consensus methodology. This was followed by testing of eight further employees, referred by occupational health services, in the same factory. The index patient suspected a problem with carprofen and was found to have PACD to carprofen. The second patient presented with a widespread, although especially photoexposed site, dermatitis and was initially labelled as having an 'unclassified dermatitis'. Only subsequently was her exposure (indirect; she did not work in the packaging section of the factory like the first patient) to carprofen recognized and testing confirmed both contact allergy and PACD to carprofen. One of three healthy volunteer controls had an active photoallergy sensitization event to carprofen starting 10 days after photopatch testing. Three of eight factory employees subsequently referred because of skin problems had carprofen PACD. Carprofen is a potent photoallergen. These cases emphasize the importance of photopatch testing, and considering agents not included in standard series, when investigating patients presenting with a photoexposed site dermatitis.

  2. Malassezia species and seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Zisova, Lilia G

    2009-01-01

    Malassezia spp. are medically important dimorphic, lipophilic yeasts that form part of the normal cutaneous microflora of human. Seborrheic dermatitis is a multifactor disease that needs endogenous and exogenous predisposing factors for its development. Presence of these factors leads to reproduction of the saprophytic opportunistic pathogen Malassezia spp. and development of a disease. The inflammatory reaction against the yeast Malassezia is considered basic in the etiology of the seborrheic dermatitis. The pathogenesis and exact mechanisms via which these yeasts cause inflammation are still not fully elucidated. They are rather complex and subject of controversy in literature. Most probably Malassezia spp. cause seborrheic dermatitis by involving and combining both nonummune and immune mechanisms (nonspecific and specific). Which of these mechanisms will dominate in any single case depends on the number and virulence of the yeasts as well as on the microorganism reactivity. In the recent years a great interest have been aroused by the epidemiological investigations. Depending on the geographical place of the countries different Malassezia species in seborrheic dermatitis dominate in the different countries. In view of the etiology and pathogenesis of the seborrheic dermatitis comprehensive antifungal preparations have been recently introduced and are nowadays the basic therapeutic resource in the treatment of this disease.

  3. Bullous dermatitis artefacta.

    PubMed

    Sokumbi, Olayemi; Comfere, Nneka I; McEvoy, Marian T; Peters, Margot S

    2013-02-01

    Bullous artefactual dermatoses are rare and may be induced by various techniques, including chemicals, heat, or electrical current. Proving a factitial etiology and identifying the mechanism of injury may be difficult. We describe the clinical features and histopathology of 2 patients with bullous disease induced by electrical current or heat. Physical examination in both patients demonstrated geometrically shaped tense bullae. Skin biopsies revealed epidermal necrosis overlying a pauci-inflammatory subepidermal cleft, with homogenization of underlying superficial dermal collagen. In 1 of the 2 patients, there was prominent vertical elongation of keratinocyte nuclei and also of cytoplasmic processes. Direct immunofluorescence study of skin plus testing of serum by indirect immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for BP180 and BP230 antibodies revealed no evidence for immunobullous disease in either patient. Vertical elongation of keratinocyte nuclei, often attributed to a polarization effect of electrical current, is characteristic of electrical burn but also may be induced by thermal injury. These 2 patients highlight the importance of histopathology in confirming a diagnosis of bullous dermatitis artefacta.

  4. Can atopic dermatitis be prevented?

    PubMed

    Gómez-de la Fuente, E

    2015-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis has become a health problem in our setting due to its rising prevalence, impact on quality of life, associated costs, and role in the progression to other atopic diseases. Furthermore, atopic dermatitis has no definitive cure and therefore preventive measures are important. In this article, we review the latest advances in both primary prevention (reduction of the incidence of atopic dermatitis) and secondary prevention (reduction of associated morbidity and reduction of the atopic march). We analyze the different preventive strategies available, including modification of the immune system through microbial exposure, induction of immune tolerance through antigen exposure, and restoration of skin barrier function to halt the atopic march. Dermatologists need to be familiar with these strategies in order to apply them where necessary and to accurately inform patients and their relatives to prevent misguided or inappropriate actions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  5. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Long, D; Thiboutot, D M; Majeski, J T; Vasily, D B; Helm, K F

    1996-06-01

    Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis is an uncommon systemic disorder involving the cutaneous and musculoskeletal systems. The eruption may mimic other dermatoses including granuloma annulare, erythema chronicum migrans, and the inflammatory stage of morphea. Key histopathologic characteristics, along with clinical correlation, allow accurate diagnosis. We describe the clinical, serologic, and histologic features in three patients with interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis. Skin biopsy specimens were examined and correlated with the clinical and laboratory findings. Erythematous, annular, indurated plaques on the extremities were present in two women. An erythematous, papular eruption on the head and neck was present in a third patient. All patients had myalgia and migratory polyarthralgias of the extremities along with various serologic abnormalities. Histologic examination revealed a dense lymphohistiocytic interstitial infiltrate involving primarily the reticular dermis. Foci of necrobiotic collagen were present. Vasculitis was absent. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis with arthritis is unique multisystem disease with variable cutaneous expression. Abnormal serologic findings indicate a possible connection to collagen vascular disease.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis infections on implants.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, W F; Silva, P M S; Silva, R C S; Silva, G M M; Machado, G; Coelho, L C B B; Correia, M T S

    2018-02-01

    Infections are one of the main reasons for removal of implants from patients, and usually need difficult and expensive treatments. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis are the most frequently detected pathogens. We reviewed the epidemiology and pathogenesis of implant-related infections. Relevant studies were identified by electronic searching of the following databases: PubMed, ScienceDirect, Academic Google, and CAPES Journal Portal. This review reports epidemiological studies of implant infections caused by S. aureus and S. epidermidis. We discuss some methodologies used in the search for new compounds with antibiofilm activity and the main strategies for biomaterial surface modifications to avoid bacterial plaque formation and consequent infection. S. aureus and S. epidermidis are frequently involved in infections in catheters and orthopaedic/breast implants. Different methodologies have been used to test the potential antibiofilm properties of compounds; for example, crystal violet dye is widely used for in-vitro biofilm quantification due to its low cost and good reproducibility. Changes in the surface biomaterials are necessary to prevent biofilm formation. Some studies have investigated the immobilization of antibiotics on the surfaces of materials used in implants. Other approaches have been used as a way to avoid the spread of bacterial resistance to antimicrobials, such as the functionalization of these surfaces with silver and natural compounds, as well as the electrical treatment of these substrates. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. [Allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics].

    PubMed

    Laguna, C; de la Cuadra, J; Martín-González, B; Zaragoza, V; Martínez-Casimiro, L; Alegre, V

    2009-01-01

    Contact dermatitis to cosmetics is a common problem in the general population, although its prevalence appears to be underestimated. We reviewed cases of allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics diagnosed in our dermatology department over a 7-year period with a view to identifying the allergens responsible, the frequency of occurrence of these allergens, and the cosmetic products implicated. Using the database of the skin allergy department, we undertook a search of all cases of allergic contact dermatitis to cosmetics diagnosed in our department from January 2000 through October 2007. In this period, patch tests were carried out on 2,485 patients, of whom 740 were diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis and the cause was cosmetics in 202 of these patients (170 women and 32 men), who accounted for 27.3 % of all cases. A total of 315 positive results were found for 46 different allergens. Allergens most often responsible for contact dermatitis in a cosmetics user were methylisothiazolinone (19 %), paraphenylenediamine (15.2 %), and fragrance mixtures (7.8 %). Acrylates were the most common allergens in cases of occupational disease. Half of the positive results were obtained with the standard battery of the Spanish Group for Research Into Dermatitis and Skin Allergies (GEIDAC). The cosmetic products most often implicated among cosmetics users were hair dyes (18.5 %), gels/soaps (15.7 %), and moisturizers (12.7 %). Most patients affected were women. Preservatives, paraphenylenediamine, and fragrances were the most frequently detected cosmetic allergens, in line with previous reports in the literature. Finally, in order to detect new cosmetic allergens, cooperation between physicians and cosmetics producers is needed.

  8. [Atopic dermatitis and domestic animals].

    PubMed

    Song, M

    2000-09-01

    Several arguments are raised attributing to aeroallergens an important role in atopic dermatitis. The aeroallergens that penetrate the epidermis could be fixed by IgE on the Langerhans cells and then induce a cellular mediator reaction comparable to that of allergic contact eczema. Patch tests have been developed to evaluate the role of aeroallergens (dust mites, animal dander, etc.). Preventive anti-dust mites measures in the home of atopic patients are recommended. Eviction of domestic animals (cat, dog, etc.) or avoidance measures for animal dander in the home can produce improvement in atopic dermatitis. Oral specific immunotherapy is being validated as a treatment for this disease.

  9. Crystal deodorant dermatitis: irritant dermatitis to alum-containing deodorant.

    PubMed

    Gallego, H; Lewis, E J; Crutchfield, C E

    1999-07-01

    Two patients developed an irritant dermatitis of the axillae shortly after using an over-the-counter "natural deodorant crystal" product containing alum. We discuss this previously unreported, untoward reaction to alum, an ancient agent with newfound popularity as an alternative health product.

  10. Is dermatitis palmaris sicca an irritant contact dermatitis?

    PubMed

    Chen, Fu-Juan; Liu, Zhen; Zhou, Ying; Chen, Yong-Hua; Fan, Yi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Dermatitis palmaris sicca (DPS) is a common dry-fissured palmar dermatitis in Asian women. It may be an irritant contact dermatitis, but the immunophenotype of the cells in its infiltrate is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of inflammatory cells in the pathogenesis of DPS. Patch testing was done in 68 patients with DPS, 87 subjects with hand eczema, and 31 healthy subjects. Immunophenotyping of cutaneous inflammatory cells was performed in 8 patients with DPS, 10 subjects with hand eczema, and 8 healthy individuals. Positive patch rates were higher in patients with DPS and those with hand eczema compared with healthy controls, but strong positive (++ or +++) reactions in DPS were fewer compared with hand eczema. Density of CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD68 cells in skin lesions of DPS and hand eczema was significantly higher than that in normal skin. Sparse CD20 cells were present only in hand eczema. Compared with hand eczema, the number of CD3, CD8, CD68, and dermal CD1a cells decreased, but epidermal CD1a cells and CD4/CD8 ratio increased in DPS. The absolute lack of CD20 cells and relative scarcity of dermal CD8 and CD1a cells in skin lesions might be insufficient to induce contact hypersensitivity, so DPS may be an irritant but not allergic contact dermatitis.

  11. Treatment of atopic dermatitis eczema with a high concentration of Lactobacillus salivarius LS01 associated with an innovative gelling complex: a pilot study on adults.

    PubMed

    Drago, Lorenzo; De Vecchi, Elena; Toscano, Marco; Vassena, Christian; Altomare, Gianfranco; Pigatto, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of a highly concentrated Lactobacillus salivarius preparation containing a gelling complex formed by Streptococcus thermophilus ST10 and tara gum in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD). Previous studies have demonstrated an improvement in AD symptoms after administration of the probiotic strain L. salivarius LS01. S. thermophilus ST10 and tara gum create a gelling complex that adheres to intestinal mucus and improves barrier function. A prospective, controlled pilot trial was carried out to evaluate how the association of S. thermophilus ST10 and tara gum could improve the activity of L. salivarius LS01 administered at high doses to adults with AD. Twenty-five patients were included into the study: 13 were treated for 1 month with the active formulation, whereas 12 represented the placebo group. Scoring Atopic Dermatitis index was determined before and at the end of probiotic administration. Fecal samples were also collected to evaluate changes in bacterial counts of Staphylococcus aureus and clostridia. A significant improvement in SCORAD index was observed in the probiotic group after 1 month of treatment, whereas no significant changes occurred in placebo patients. A slight decrease in fecal S. aureus count was observed in probiotic-treated patients. Data obtained in this study suggest a potential role for L. salivarius LS01 in the treatment of AD. The addition of tara gum and S. thermophilus ST10 seems to improve the overall efficacy of the probiotic strain, in particular shortening the time required for the onset of the positive effects. Further studies to investigate the activity of this preparation are advisable.

  12. Atopic Dermatitis in Children: Clinical Features, Pathophysiology and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Jonathan J.; Milner, Joshua D.; Stone, Kelly D.

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing, highly pruritic skin condition resulting from disruption of the epithelial barrier and associated immune dysregulation in the skin of genetically predisposed hosts. AD generally develops in early childhood, has a characteristic age-dependent distribution and is commonly associated with elevated IgE, peripheral eosinophilia and other allergic diseases. Staphylococcus aureus colonization is common and may contribute to disease progression and severity. Targeted therapies to restore both impaired skin barrier and control inflammation are required for optimal outcomes for patients with moderate to severe disease. Pruritus is universal among patients with AD and has a dominant impact on diminishing quality of life. Medications such as anti-histamines have demonstrated poor efficacy in controlling AD-associated itch. Education of patients regarding the primary underlying defects and provision of a comprehensive skin care plan is essential for disease maintenance and management of flares. PMID:25459583

  13. Milia after allergic contact dermatitis from poison ivy: two cases.

    PubMed

    Berk, David R; Hurt, Mark A; Reese, Lester T; Wagner, Laura; Bayliss, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    Milia have rarely been reported as a complication of severe allergic contact dermatitis. To our knowledge, milia have not previously been associated with poison ivy dermatitis. We present two cases of milia after allergic contact dermatitis to poison ivy.

  14. Pigmented and hyperkeratotic napkin dermatitis: a liquid detergent irritant dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Patrizi, A; Neri, I; Marzaduri, S; Fiorillo, L

    1996-01-01

    Napkin or diaper dermatitis (DD) is an inflammatory cutaneous eruption limited to the diaper area and common in the first 2 years of life. A number of clinical variants of DD have been identified. We report a new variant of DD characterized by papyraceous skin, brownish discoloration and predilection for the depth of folds. 15 infants and toddlers affected by this peculiar type of DD were evaluated regarding duration, localization, morphology and evolution of their dermatosis. This variant of DD was mainly confined to the depth of inguinal and gluteal folds and invariably associated with severe xerosis with papyraceous and glazed skin. The patients were healthy and asymptomatic and all laboratory investigations performed were normal. All patients were frequently changed and thoroughly washed with synthetic detergents with acid pH. DD improved rapidly with reduced frequency of washing and discontinuation of liquid detergents. We conclude that this condition is a type of irritant contact dermatitis from excessive use of lipid acid detergents.

  15. Staphylococcus aureus infection dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pollitt, Eric J G; Szkuta, Piotr T; Burns, Nicola; Foster, Simon J

    2018-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a human commensal that can also cause systemic infections. This transition requires evasion of the immune response and the ability to exploit different niches within the host. However, the disease mechanisms and the dominant immune mediators against infection are poorly understood. Previously it has been shown that the infecting S. aureus population goes through a population bottleneck, from which very few bacteria escape to establish the abscesses that are characteristic of many infections. Here we examine the host factors underlying the population bottleneck and subsequent clonal expansion in S. aureus infection models, to identify underpinning principles of infection. The bottleneck is a common feature between models and is independent of S. aureus strain. Interestingly, the high doses of S. aureus required for the widely used "survival" model results in a reduced population bottleneck, suggesting that host defences have been simply overloaded. This brings into question the applicability of the survival model. Depletion of immune mediators revealed key breakpoints and the dynamics of systemic infection. Loss of macrophages, including the liver Kupffer cells, led to increased sensitivity to infection as expected but also loss of the population bottleneck and the spread to other organs still occurred. Conversely, neutrophil depletion led to greater susceptibility to disease but with a concomitant maintenance of the bottleneck and lack of systemic spread. We also used a novel microscopy approach to examine abscess architecture and distribution within organs. From these observations we developed a conceptual model for S. aureus disease from initial infection to mature abscess. This work highlights the need to understand the complexities of the infectious process to be able to assign functions for host and bacterial components, and why S. aureus disease requires a seemingly high infectious dose and how interventions such as a vaccine may be

  16. Identification and treatment of poison ivy dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Briant, D; Brouder, G

    1983-01-01

    Poison ivy dermatitis is an acute self-limiting problem of two or three weeks' duration that can cause significant discomfort. Poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac cause more cases of allergic contact dermatitis than all the other contact allergens combined. Treatment of poison ivy dermatitis depends on the severity of the reaction. The nurse practitioner can manage the majority of poison ivy cases. However, if there is systemic involvement, a physician consultation is necessary. The patient can best be assisted by assessing the severity of the dermatitis, prescribing an appropriate supportive therapy and teaching preventive measures.

  17. Allergic contact dermatitis: Patient management and education.

    PubMed

    Mowad, Christen M; Anderson, Bryan; Scheinman, Pamela; Pootongkam, Suwimon; Nedorost, Susan; Brod, Bruce

    2016-06-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common diagnosis resulting from exposure to a chemical or chemicals in a patient's personal care products, home, or work environment. Once patch testing has been performed, the education and management process begins. After the causative allergens have been identified, patient education is critical to the proper treatment and management of the patient. This must occur if the dermatitis is to resolve. Detailed education is imperative, and several resources are highlighted. Photoallergic contact dermatitis and occupational contact dermatitis are other considerations a clinician must keep in mind. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Dermatitis associated with Cheyletiella infestation in cats.

    PubMed

    McKeever, P J; Allen, S K

    1979-04-01

    Cheyletiella sp mites were isolated from 8 cats with pruritic dermatitis characterized by erythematous papules or increased scaling. Lesions cleared after treatments with malathion (dips) or pyrethrin (shampoos).

  19. Alkyl Glucosides in Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Loranger, Camille; Alfalah, Maisa; Ferrier Le Bouedec, Marie-Christine; Sasseville, Denis

    Ecologically sound because they are synthesized from natural and renewable sources, the mild surfactants alkyl glucosides are being rediscovered by the cosmetic industry. They are currently found in rinse-off products such as shampoos, liquid cleansers, and shower gels, but also in leave-on products that include moisturizers, deodorants, and sunscreens. During the past 15 years, numerous cases of allergic contact dermatitis have been published, mostly to lauryl and decyl glucosides, and these compounds are considered emergent allergens. Interestingly, the sunscreen Tinosorb M contains decyl glucoside as a hidden allergen, and most cases of allergic contact dermatitis reported to this sunscreen ingredient are probably due to sensitization to decyl glucoside. This article will review the chemistry of alkyl glucosides, their sources of exposure, as well as their cutaneous adverse effects reported in the literature and encountered in various patch testing centers.

  20. Contact dermatitis caused by preservatives.

    PubMed

    Yim, Elizabeth; Baquerizo Nole, Katherine L; Tosti, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    Preservatives are biocidal chemicals added to food, cosmetics, and industrial products to prevent the growth of microorganisms. They are usually nontoxic and inexpensive and have a long shelf life. Unfortunately, they commonly cause contact dermatitis. This article reviews the most important classes of preservatives physicians are most likely to encounter in their daily practice, specifically isothiazolinones, formaldehyde and formaldehyde-releasers, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, methyldibromoglutaronitrile, and parabens. For each preservative mentioned, the prevalence of sensitization, clinical presentation of contact dermatitis, patch testing concentrations, cross reactions, and related legislation will be discussed. Mandatory labeling of preservatives is required in some countries, but not required in others. Until policies are made, physicians and patients must be proactive in identifying potential sensitizers and removing their use. We hope that this article will serve as a guide for policy makers in creating legislation and future regulations on the use and concentration of certain preservatives in cosmetics and industrial products.

  1. The history of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Owen N; Strom, Mark A; Ladizinski, Barry; Lio, Peter A

    Fred Wise (1881-1950) and Marion Sulzberger (1895-1983) are often credited with introducing the term atopic dermatitis to dermatology in 1933. This definition was based on atopy, a term first created by Arthur Coca (1875-1959) and Robert Cooke (1880-1960) in 1923, when they recognized an association between allergic rhinitis and asthma. Despite its recent introduction into our medical lexicon, historical precursors of atopic dermatitis date back to at least as early as 69-140 ce. In this contribution, we highlight both the prominent individuals credited with shaping the disorder into our current interpretation and the suspected historical precursors of this disease and reported treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sensory deprivation in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Maite; García, Begoña; Valle, Jaione; Rapún, Beatriz; Ruiz de Los Mozos, Igor; Solano, Cristina; Martí, Miguel; Penadés, José R; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Lasa, Iñigo

    2018-02-06

    Bacteria use two-component systems (TCSs) to sense and respond to environmental changes. The core genome of the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus encodes 16 TCSs, one of which (WalRK) is essential. Here we show that S. aureus can be deprived of its complete sensorial TCS network and still survive under growth arrest conditions similarly to wild-type bacteria. Under replicating conditions, however, the WalRK system is necessary and sufficient to maintain bacterial growth, indicating that sensing through TCSs is mostly dispensable for living under constant environmental conditions. Characterization of S. aureus derivatives containing individual TCSs reveals that each TCS appears to be autonomous and self-sufficient to sense and respond to specific environmental cues, although some level of cross-regulation between non-cognate sensor-response regulator pairs occurs in vivo. This organization, if confirmed in other bacterial species, may provide a general evolutionarily mechanism for flexible bacterial adaptation to life in new niches.

  3. Diaper area skin microflora of normal children and children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Keswick, B H; Seymour, J L; Milligan, M C

    1987-01-01

    In vitro studies established that neither cloth nor disposable diapers demonstrably contributed to the growth of Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Staphylococcus aureus, or Candida albicans when urine was present as a growth medium. In a clinical study of 166 children, the microbial skin flora of children with atopic dermatitis was compared with the flora of children with normal skin to determine the influence of diaper type. No biologically significant differences were detected between groups wearing disposable or cloth diapers in terms of frequency of isolation or log mean recovery of selected skin flora. Repeated isolation of S. aureus correlated with atopic dermatitis. The log mean recovery of S. aureus was higher in the atopic groups. The effects of each diaper type on skin microflora were equivalent in the normal and atopic populations. PMID:3546360

  4. Recent considerations in the use of recombinant interferon gamma for biological therapy of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Brar, Kanwaljit; Leung, Donald Y M

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease in the general population. There are different endophenotypes of AD that likely have a unique immune and molecular basis, such as those who are predisposed to eczema herpeticum, or Staphylococcus aureus infections. In this review, we highlight the endophenotypes of AD where reduced interferon gamma expression may be playing a role. Additionally, we review the potential role of recombinant interferon gamma therapy in the treatment of atopic dermatitis and the particular phenotypes that may benefit from this treatment. Recombinant interferon gamma treatment will likely benefit the pediatric population with AD, as well as those with susceptibilities for skin infections. Future studies are needed to elucidate whether IFN-γ may reduce the prevalence of skin infection in AD.

  5. Staphylococcal dermatitis in quail with a parakeratotic hyperkeratotic dermatosis suggestive of pantothenic acid deficiency.

    PubMed

    Raidal, S R

    1995-09-01

    This report describes an outbreak of Staphylococcal dermatitis which occurred in commercial Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) with a history and clinico-pathological evidence suggestive of pantothenic acid deficiency. The flock had a low hatchability rate (40 to 43%) and a high percentage (50%) of dead-in-shell embryos. Approximately 5 to 15% of the grower flock developed crusty facial scabs and conjunctivitis from 4 days of age. Culture of eyelid skin yielded pure growths of non-haemolytic, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. Histological examination revealed a generalised hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis of feathers, feather follicles and non-follicular skin. There was invasion of feather follicles by cocci and focal areas of suppurative exudative dermatitis and subcutaneous abscesses particularly in the eyelids and commissures of the beak. Clinical signs were alleviated by treatment with amoxycillin and a change in ration formulation.

  6. [Medicolegal aspects of occupational dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Frimat, P; Fantoni-Quinton, S

    2009-01-01

    Occupational dermatitis is very common with considerable social and economic implications. Routine screening for occupational factors is essential since it may be necessary to introduce preventive measures and compensation could be due to the patient. The general practitioner may be assisted either by the occupational therapist or by specialised services to help the patient take the administrative steps necessary in order to identify a professional disease.

  7. Immunotherapy of allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Spiewak, Radoslaw

    2011-08-01

    The term 'immunotherapy' refers to treating diseases by inducing, enhancing or suppressing immune responses. As allergy is an excessive, detrimental immune reaction to otherwise harmless environmental substances, immunotherapy of allergic disease is aimed at the induction of tolerance toward sensitizing antigens. This article focuses on the historical developments, present state and future outlook for immunotherapy with haptens as a therapeutic modality for allergic contact dermatitis. Inspired by the effectiveness of immunotherapy in respiratory allergies, attempts were undertaken at curing allergic contact dermatitis by means of controlled administration of the sensitizing haptens. Animal and human experiments confirmed that tolerance to haptens can be induced most effectively when the induction of tolerance precedes attempted sensitization. In real life, however, therapy is sought by people who are already sensitized and an effective reversal of hypersensitivity seems more difficult to achieve. Decades of research on Rhus hypersensitivity led to a conclusion that immunotherapy can suppress Rhus dermatitis, however, only to a limited degree, for a short period of time, and at a high risk of side effects, which makes this method therapeutically unprofitable. Methodological problems with most available studies of immunotherapy of contact allergy to nickel make any definite conclusions impossible at this stage.

  8. The mPEG-PCL Copolymer for Selective Fermentation of Staphylococcus lugdunensis Against Candida parapsilosis in the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ming-Shan; Wang, Yanhan; Marito, Shinta; Huang, Stephen; Lin, Wan-Zhen; Gangoiti, Jon A; Barshop, Bruce A; Hyun, Choi; Lee, Woan-Ruah; Sanford, James A; Gallo, Richard L; Ran, Yuping; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Huang, Chun-Jen; Hsieh, Ming-Fa; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Many human skin diseases, such as seborrheic dermatitis, potentially occur due to the over-growth of fungi. It remains a challenge to develop fungicides with a lower risk of generating resistant fungi and non-specifically killing commensal microbes. Our probiotic approaches using a selective fermentation initiator of skin commensal bacteria, fermentation metabolites or their derivatives provide novel therapeutics to rein in the over-growth of fungi. Staphylococcus lugdunensis (S. lugdunensis) bacteria and Candida parapsilosis (C. parapsilosis) fungi coexist in the scalp microbiome. S. lugdunensis interfered with the growth of C. parapsilosis via fermentation. A methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) (mPEG-PCL) copolymer functioned as a selective fermentation initiator of S. lugdunensis, selectively triggering the S. lugdunensis fermentation to produce acetic and isovaleric acids. The acetic acid and its pro-drug diethyleneglycol diacetate (Ac-DEG-Ac) effectively suppressed the growth of C. parapsilosis in vitro and impeded the fungal expansion in the human dandruff. We demonstrate for the first time that S. lugdunensis is a skin probiotic bacterium that can exploit mPEG-PCL to yield fungicidal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). The concept of bacterial fermentation as a part of skin immunity to re-balance the dysbiotic microbiome warrants a novel avenue for studying the probiotic function of the skin microbiome in promoting health. PMID:28111598

  9. Rapid detection and differentiation of Staphylococcus colonies using an optical scattering technology.

    PubMed

    Alsulami, Tawfiq S; Zhu, Xingyue; Abdelhaseib, Maha Usama; Singh, Atul K; Bhunia, Arun K

    2018-05-24

    Staphylococcus species are a major pathogen responsible for nosocomial infections and foodborne illnesses. We applied a laser-based BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology) for rapid colony screening and detection of Staphylococcus on an agar plate and differentiate these from non-Staphylococcus spp. Among the six growth media tested, phenol red mannitol agar (PRMA) was found most suitable for building the Staphylococcus species scatter image libraries. Scatter image library for Staphylococcus species gave a high positive predictive value (PPV 87.5-100%) when tested against known laboratory strains of Staphylococcus spp., while the PPV against non-Staphylococcus spp. was 0-38%. A total of nine naturally contaminated bovine raw milk and ready-to-eat chicken salad samples were tested, and BARDOT detected Staphylococcus including Staphylococcus aureus with 80-100% PPV. Forty-five BARDOT-identified bacterial isolates from naturally contaminated foods were further confirmed by tuf and nuc gene-specific PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequence. This label-free, non-invasive on-plate colony screening technology can be adopted by the food industries, biotechnology companies, and public health laboratories for Staphylococcus species detection including S. aureus from various samples for food safety and public health management. Graphical abstract.

  10. Preparation of 8-hydroxyquinoline derivatives as potential antibiotics against Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lam, Kim-Hung; Gambari, Roberto; Lee, Kenneth Ka-Ho; Chen, Yi-Xin; Kok, Stanton Hon-Lung; Wong, Raymond Siu-Ming; Lau, Fung-Yi; Cheng, Chor-Hing; Wong, Wai-Yeung; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Chan, Albert Sun-Chi; Tang, Johnny Cheuk-On; Chui, Chung-Hin

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the preparation of quinoline compounds as possible anti-bacterial agents. The synthesized quinoline derivatives show anti-bacterial activity towards Staphylococcus aureus. It is interesting to observe that the synthetic 5,7-dibromo-2-methylquinolin-8-ol (4) shows a similar minimum inhibitory concentration of 6.25μg/mL as compared to that of methicillin (3.125μg/mL) against Staphylococcus aureus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Occupational poison ivy and oak dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Epstein, W L

    1994-07-01

    Among the growing and diverse groups of outdoor and environmental workers, poison ivy and poison oak continue to be the major cause of occupational contact dermatitis. This article reviews the practical and theoretic means to prevent poison ivy and poison oak dermatitis in workers occupationally exposed to these weeds.

  12. Flagellate dermatitis after consumption of Shiitake mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Kreft, Burkhard; Marsch, Wolfgang Ch.

    2014-01-01

    Flagellate dermatitis occurs in patients who have eaten Shiitake mushrooms. We are reporting on a 55-year-old man, who developed whiplash-striped, severely itching efflorescences on the trunk 3 days after eating Lentinula edodes. Flagellate dermatitis is also known as a cutaneous side effect of bleomycin therapy. PMID:25097492

  13. Cheyletiella dermatitis: a report of fourteen cases.

    PubMed

    Lee, B W

    1991-02-01

    Cheyletiella dermatitis is an infrequently reported eruption caused by an ectoparasite whose normal hosts are household pets. Fourteen cases, documented over an eight-year period, are reported. All cases were found in one practice in a small community. Typical patients are female, aged forty years or younger, who experience pruritic papules in the winter months. Cheyletiella dermatitis is not a rare problem.

  14. Advances in understanding and managing atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Michael; Sidbury, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic, pruritic skin disease characterized by an improperly functioning skin barrier and immune dysregulation. We review proposed atopic dermatitis pathomechanisms, emphasizing how these impact current perspectives on natural history, role of allergic sensitization, and future therapeutic targets. PMID:26918129

  15. Hand dermatitis/eczema: current management strategy.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Sharma, Alpna D

    2010-07-01

    Ever since its inception a couple of centuries ago, hand dermatitis/eczema has been in the reckoning. Idiosyncrasies continued to loom large thereafter, till it acquired its appropriate position. Dermatitis/eczema are synonymous, often used to indicate a polymorphic pattern of the inflammation of the skin, characterized by pruritus, erythema and vesiculation. A spectrum delineated into acute sub-acute and chronic dermatitis of the hands. Pompholyx, recurrent focal palmer peeling, ring, wear and tear and fingertip eczema, apron, discoid eczema, chronic acral dermatitis, gut and patchy papulosquamous eczema are its clinical variants. Occupational dermatitis/eczema may be contributory. Etiological definitions are clinched by detailed history of exogenous and endogenous factors. However, scientific confirmation of the entity is through patch testing by using available antigens.

  16. Contact Dermatitis for the Practicing Allergist.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, David I

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an overview of important practice recommendations from the recently updated Contact Dermatitis Practice Parameter. This updated parameter provides essential recommendations pertaining to clinical history, physical examination, and patch testing evaluation of patients suspected of allergic contact dermatitis. In addition to providing guidance for performing and interpreting closed patch testing, the updated parameter provides concrete recommendations for assessing metal hypersensitivity in patients receiving prosthetic devices, for evaluating workers with occupational contact dermatitis, and also for addressing allergic contact dermatitis in children. Finally, the document provides practical recommendations useful for educating patients regarding avoidance of exposure to known contact sensitizers in the home and at work. The Contact Dermatitis Parameter is designed as a practical, evidence-based clinical tool to be used by allergists and dermatologists who routinely are called upon to evaluate patients with skin disorders. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Allergic contact dermatitis to fragrances: part 2.

    PubMed

    Arribas, M P; Soro, P; Silvestre, J F

    2013-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis due to fragrances usually manifests as subacute or chronic dermatitis because fragrances are found in a wide range of products to which patients are repeatedly exposed. The typical patient is a middle-aged woman with dermatitis on her hands and face, although other sites may be affected depending on the allergen and the product in which it is found. The standard patch test series of the Spanish Contact Dermatitis and Skin Allergy Research Group (GEIDAC) contains 4 fragrance markers: balsam of Peru, fragrance mix i, fragrance mix ii, and lyral. Testing with a specific fragrance series is recommended in patients with a positive result to any of these 4 markers. The use of a specific fragrance series and new legislation obliging manufacturers to specify the fragrances used in their products, will help to improve the management of allergic contact dermatitis due to fragrances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute radiation dermatitis in breast cancer patients: challenges and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kole, Adam J; Kole, Lauren; Moran, Meena S

    2017-01-01

    Nearly all women who receive radiotherapy (RT) for breast cancer experience some degree of radiation dermatitis. However, evidence describing the appropriate management of radiation dermatitis is often lacking or contradictory. Here, we summarize the available literature regarding radiation dermatitis causes, the presentation and timing of symptoms, methods for dermatitis assessment and prevention, and review evidence-based management strategies. PMID:28503074

  19. Follicular contact dermatitis revisited: A review emphasizing neomycin-associated follicular contact dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip R

    2014-01-01

    Follicular contact dermatitis clinically presents as individual papules that include a central hair follicle. Pathologic features involve the follicle and the surrounding dermis: spongiosis and vesicle formation of the follicular epithelium associated with perifollicular and perivascular lymphocytic inflammation. Using the PubMed database, an extensive literature search was performed on follicular contact dermatitis and neomycin. Relevant papers were reviewed and the clinical and pathologic features, the associated chemicals (including a more detailed description of neomycin), the hypothesized pathogenesis, and the management of follicular contact dermatitis were described. Several agents-either as allergens or irritants-have been reported to elicit follicular contact dermatitis. Several hypotheses have been suggested for the selective involvement of the follicles in follicular contact dermatitis: patient allergenicity, characteristics of the agent, vehicle containing the agent, application of the agent, and external factors. The differential diagnosis of follicular contact dermatitis includes not only recurrent infundibulofolliculitis, but also drug eruption, mite infestation, viral infection, and dermatoses that affect hair follicles. The primary therapeutic intervention for follicular contact dermatitis is withdrawal of the causative agent; treatment with a topical corticosteroid preparation may also promote resolution of the dermatitis. In conclusion, follicular contact dermatitis may be secondary to allergens or irritants; topical antibiotics, including neomycin, may cause this condition. Several factors may account for the selective involvement of the hair follicle in this condition. Treatment of the dermatitis requires withdrawal of the associated topical agent; in addition, topical corticosteroids may be helpful to promote resolution of lesions. PMID:25516854

  20. Eradication of bacterial species via photosensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golding, Paul S.; Maddocks, L.; King, Terence A.; Drucker, D. B.

    1999-02-01

    Photosensitization and inactivation efficacy of three bacterial species: Prevotella nigrescens, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli have been investigated. Samples of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were treated with the triphenylmethane dye malachite green isothiocyanate and exposed to light from a variety of continuous and pulsed light sauces at a wavelength of approximately 630 nm. Inactivation of the Gram-positive species Staphylococcus aureus was found to increase with radiation dose, whilst Gram-negative Escherichia coli was resistant to such treatment. Samples of the pigmented species Prevotella nigrescens were found to be inactivated by exposure to light alone. The mechanism of photosensitization and inactivation of Staphylococcus aureus with malachite green isothiocyanate is addressed. The possible roles of the excited triplet state of the photosensitizer, the involvement of molecular oxygen, and the bacterial cell wall are discussed. Photosensitization may provide a way of eliminating naturally pigmented species responsible for a variety of infections, including oral diseases such as gingivitis and periodontitis.

  1. [Malassezia species in patients with seborrheic dermatitis and atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Tajima, Mami

    2005-01-01

    Malassezia species, organisms normally colonizing the skin surface, are thought to play a role as either the cause or an exacerbating factor in a number of skin conditions, including pityriasis versicolor, Malassezia folliculitis, seborrheic dermatitis (SD) and atopic dermatitis (AD). Using a non-cultural PCR method, we analyzed Malassezia spp. extracted from the skin surface of SD and AD patients. The species most commonly detected in both patient groups were M. globosa and M. restricta, and the number of Malassezia spp. In these patients was higher than in healthy subjects. After a topical application of 2% ketoconazole cream, changes in the population of Malassezia spp. in 20 intractable cases of AD were recorded. The addition of the 2% ketoconazole cream to the standard topical treatments was found to have reduced the Malassezia spp. population by 90%, and showed a clinical efficacy rate of 70%. Furthermore, a combination of azole agents and tacrolimus produced a synergistic anti-fungal effect against Malassezia spp. in vitro. A clinical trial using this drug combination conducted on the face and neck of patients with intractable AD showed a 66.6% efficacy rate in both the reduction of the flora and in clinical improvement. From these results it was evident that Malassezia is one of the factors exacerbating AD, and that removal of the organism results in an improvement in the clinical condition of the patient.

  2. Photoallergic contact dermatitis to oxybenzone.

    PubMed

    Collins, P; Ferguson, J

    1994-07-01

    A 21-year-old woman developed an erythematous papulovesicular eruption of photo-exposed sites, following the use of an oxybenzone-containing sunscreen. Patch testing, photopatch testing, phototesting, and histology produced findings strongly suggestive of oxybenzone photoallergy. Photopatch testing with a monochromator source showed abnormal UVA responses, with evidence of immediate urticaria, and delayed-onset dermatitis. Sun-barrier use is associated with a risk of the development of contact or photocontact allergic reactions. The benzophenones are frequently used in high-protection factor sun-barrier preparations, and appear to have a particular ability to induce such responses.

  3. Atopic Dermatitis (Eczema): An Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Arthur L.

    1962-01-01

    Atopic (spontaneous) allergies and nonatopic (induced) allergies are often confused. The meaning of these terms is definite, but the occurrence of either (in a given individual) may depend upon his autonomic nervous system control. The evidence that allergens produce the cutaneous changes in atopic dermatitis is flimsy, and neurodermatitis would be a more appropriate term since the entity falls into that pattern of skin changes. Treatment carried out, from infancy sometimes to old age, consists of careful management of the patient in the physical and emotional spheres, avoidance of external irritation and the use of a multiplicity of anti-pruritic, anti-inflammatory and sedative agents. PMID:13955448

  4. Munchausen Syndrome as Dermatitis Simulata

    PubMed Central

    Hariharasubramony, Ambika; Chankramath, Sujatha; Srinivasa, Seema

    2012-01-01

    Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with many dermatological disorders. It may be the cause for skin problem or may be the effect of a skin problem as skin being a visual organ. A 28-year-old female presented with multiple red lesions on the skin with unusual morphology and was diagnosed as dermatitis simulata. She gave history of multiple episodes of similar illnesses with admissions in various hospitals and being evaluated and dropping off in between treatments. After detailed psychological evaluation, patient was diagnosed as case of Munchausen syndrome. PMID:22661819

  5. Isolation and identification of Staphylococcus sp. in powdered infant milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palilu, Prayolga Toban; Budiarso, Tri Yahya

    2017-05-01

    Staphylococcus sp. is one of the most dangerous bacteria that could cause food poisoning. It is a pathogenic bacterium which is able to produce enterotoxin in foods. Milk is an ideal growth medium for Staphylococcus sp., that may cause problem if it is to be consumed, especially by infant. It is the objective of this research to detect the presence of Staphylococcus sp. in powdered infant milk. As many as 14 samples obtained from market were used as samples for bacterial isolation. The isolation were done by employing enrichment step on BHI-broth, continued with Baird-Parker Agar which will produce a typical colony. It is then picked and grown on Mannitol Salt Agar, and gram staining, coagulase assay, and fermentation tests. The confirmation step was done by using API-Staph which gives the identification of Staphylococcus hemoliticus, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, with a percentage of identity ranging from 65.9-97.7%. Two isolates with the highest identification similarity values were then picked for molecular detection. A PCR primer pair targeting gene coding for enterotoxin A was used, and it gives positive result for the two isolates being tested. It is then concluded that the two isolates belong to Staphylococcus sp., and further research need to be done to correctly identify these isolates.

  6. An Improved Medium for Growing Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-19

    implantitis, chronic wound infections , chronic rhinosinusitis, endocarditis , and ocular infections (Archer et al., 2011). In addition, emerging evidence...causes of human bacterial infections , Staphylococcus aureus, a gram positive organism, is a ubiquitous oppor tunistic pathogen that commonly colonizes...resistant to antibiotic therapy. It has been shown that S. aureus biofilms are involved in oste omyelitis; indwelling medical device infections ; and peri

  7. Japanese guideline for atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ichiro; Kohno, Yoichi; Akiyama, Kazuo; Ikezawa, Zenro; Kondo, Naomi; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Kouro, Osamu

    2011-03-01

    Given the importance of appropriate diagnosis and appropriate assessment of cutaneous symptoms in treatment of atopic dermatitis, the basics of treatment in this guideline are composed of (1) investigation and countermeasures of causes and exacerbating factors, (2) correction of skin dysfunctions (skin care), and (3) pharmacotherapy, as three mainstays. These are based on the disease concept that atopic dermatitis is a inflammatory cutaneous disease with eczema by atopic diathesis, multi-factorial in onset and aggravation, and accompanied by skin dysfunctions. These three points are equally important and should be appropriately combined in accordance with the symptoms of each patient. In treatment, it is important to transmit the etiological, pathological, physiological, or therapeutic information to the patient to build a favorable partnership with the patient or his/her family so that they may fully understand the treatment. This guideline discusses chiefly the basic therapy in relation to the treatment of this disease. The goal of treatment is to enable patients to lead an uninterrupted social life and to control their cutaneous symptoms so that their quality of life (QOL) may meet a satisfactory level.

  8. Evolving Concepts in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Sidbury, Robert; Khorsand, Kate

    2017-07-01

    Tremendous advances have been made in the field of atopic dermatitis in the past 5 years. We will explore developments in burden of disease, co-morbidities, pathogenesis, prevention, and management. The tremendous burden moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD) places on families from a medical, psychosocial, and financial perspective has been characterized. Epidemiologic studies have identified intriguing new associations beyond the well-characterized "atopic march" of food allergies, asthma, and hay fever. Studies of primary prevention have gained traction including the remarkable impacts of early emollient therapy. Basic advances have simultaneously elucidated the nature of atopic inflammation, setting the stage for an explosion of new potential therapeutic targets. After a fallow period of nearly 15 years without a substantial therapeutic advance, this year has already seen two new FDA-approved treatments for AD. AD has a tremendous impact on quality of life with an underappreciated burden of disease; there are important newly described co-morbidities including ADHD and anemia; new insights into etio-pathogenesis have paved the way for novel topical therapies like crisaborole, and new systemic interventions like dupilumab.

  9. Molecular aspects of allergens in atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Campana, Raffaela; Dzoro, Sheron; Mittermann, Irene; Fedenko, Elena; Elisyutina, Olga; Khaitov, Musa; Karaulov, Alexander; Valenta, Rudolf

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Molecular allergology uses pure, mainly recombinant and structurally defined allergen molecules and allergen-derived epitopes to study mechanisms of IgE-associated allergy, to diagnose, and even predict the development of allergic manifestations and to treat and prevent IgE-associated allergies. Atopic dermatitis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease is almost always associated with IgE sensitization to allergens. However, also non-IgE-mediated pathomechanisms seem to be operative in atopic dermatitis and it is often difficult to identify the disease-causing allergens. Here we review recent work showing the usefulness of molecular allergology to study mechanisms of atopic dermatitis, for diagnosis and eventually for treatment and prevention of atopic dermatitis. Recent findings IgE sensitization to airborne, food-derived, microbial allergens, and autoallergens has been found to be associated with atopic dermatitis. Using defined allergen molecules and non-IgE-reactive allergen derivatives, evidence could be provided for the existence of IgE- and non-IgE-mediated mechanisms of inflammation in atopic dermatitis. Furthermore, effects of epicutaneous allergen administration on systemic allergen-specific immune responses have been studied. Multi-allergen tests containing micro-arrayed allergen molecules have been shown to be useful for the identification of culprit allergens in atopic dermatitis and may improve the management of atopic dermatitis by allergen-specific immunotherapy, allergen avoidance, and IgE-targeting therapies in a personalized medicine approach. Summary Molecular allergology allows for dissection of the pathomechanisms of atopic dermatitis, provides new forms of allergy diagnosis for identification of disease-causing allergens, and opens the door to new forms of management by allergen-specific and T cells-targeting or IgE-targeting interventions in a personalized medicine approach. PMID:28622169

  10. Toxicodendron dermatitis: poison ivy, oak, and sumac.

    PubMed

    Gladman, Aaron C

    2006-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis caused by the Toxicodendron (formerly Rhus) species-poison ivy, poison oak, and poison sumac-affects millions of North Americans every year. In certain outdoor occupations, for example, agriculture and forestry, as well as among many outdoor enthusiasts, Toxicodendron dermatitis presents a significant hazard. This review considers the epidemiology, identification, immunochemistry, pathophysiology, clinical features, treatment, and prevention of this common dermatologic problem. Recent research in prevention is emphasized, and resources to help in the identification of plants are provided in the bibliography. The literature was searched using a MEDLINE query for "Toxicodendron dermatitis", and the identified article bibliographies were searched as well.

  11. Collembola are Unlikely to Cause Human Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, CSH; Lim, SL; Chew, FT; Ong, TC; Deharveng, L

    2009-01-01

    There have been several unconfirmed case reports of dermatitis caused by Collembola (springtails). We recently investigated two nurses with dermatitis suspected to be caused by Drepanura Schött (Collembola: Entomobryidae). IgE antibodies to Collembola proteins were not detected in sera from the nurses and skin tests with the Collembola extract and crushed whole Collembola were negative in both the nurses and volunteers. This study suggests that the springtail Drepanura may not cause human dermatitis and that other organisms and organic matter that are also found in the moist environment inhabited by Collembola might instead be responsible. PMID:19611235

  12. Atopic and Contact Dermatitis of the Vulva.

    PubMed

    Pichardo-Geisinger, Rita

    2017-09-01

    Pruritus, or itch, is a common vulvar complaint that is often treated empirically as a yeast infection; however, yeast infections are just one of the many conditions that can cause vulvar itch. Ignoring other conditions can prolong pruritus unnecessarily. Atopic dermatitis, irritant contact dermatitis, and allergic contact dermatitis are extremely common noninfectious causes of vulvar itch that are often underdiagnosed by nondermatologists. Identifying these conditions and treating them appropriately can significantly improve a patient's quality of life and appropriately decrease health care expenditures by preventing unnecessary additional referrals or follow-up visits and decreasing pharmaceutical costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An update on airborne contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Huygens, S; Goossens, A

    2001-01-01

    This review is an update of 2 previously published articles on airborne contact dermatoses. Because reports in the literature often omit the term 'airborne', 18 volumes of Contact Dermatitis (April 1991-June 2000), 8 volumes of the American Journal of Contact Dermatitis (1992 1999) and 4 volumes of La Lettre du Gerda (1996-1999) were screened, and the cases cited were classified as to history, lesion locations, sensitization sources, and other factors. Reports on airborne dermatitis are increasingly being published, sometimes in relation to specific occupational areas.

  14. Staphylococcus aureus recovery from cotton towels.

    PubMed

    Oller, Anna R; Mitchell, Ashley

    2009-04-30

    Staphylococcus aureus is an emerging pathogen afflicting healthy individuals without known risk factors, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been shown to colonize multiple family members sharing households. Because household items such as towels are often shared by family members, this study investigated whether cotton towel absorbency or washing conditions affect Staphylococcus aureus cell viability or cell retention, and whether the levels may be sufficient for person-to-person transmission. Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 was added to a 48 mm(2) template area on three cotton towel types (terry, pima, and Egyptian), and subjected to hand washing, without manual wringing, in three conditions (water only, bleach addition, or liquid detergent addition). Serial dilutions plated onto mannitol salt plates quantified bacteria for inoculations, pre- and post-wash water samples, towel surfaces, and hand transfer. Hand transfer of bacteria was determined on towels immediately, one, 24, and 48 hours post inoculation. Bleach (p < or = .05) was the most effective at reducing bacterial viability on all towel types compared to detergent and water. Although not statistically significant, more Staphylococcus colonies were recovered from higher absorbency towels and from inside directly inoculated template areas. A paired t-test showed a difference between immediate and one-hour CFUs versus 24- and 48-hour recoveries (0.0002) for hand transfers. Cell viability decreased for over 48 hours on towels, but sufficient quantities may remain for colonization. More absorbent towels may harbor more Staphylococci than less absorbent ones, and may serve as a transmission mechanism for the bacterium.

  15. Atopic dermatitis and the hygiene hypothesis revisited.

    PubMed

    Flohr, Carsten; Yeo, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    We published a systematic review on atopic dermatitis (AD) and the hygiene hypothesis in 2005. Since then, the body of literature has grown significantly. We therefore repeated our systematic review to examine the evidence from population-based studies for an association between AD risk and specific infections, childhood immunizations, the use of antibiotics and environmental exposures that lead to a change in microbial burden. Medline was searched from 1966 until June 2010 to identify relevant studies. We found an additional 49 papers suitable for inclusion. There is evidence to support an inverse relationship between AD and endotoxin, early day care, farm animal and dog exposure in early life. Cat exposure in the presence of skin barrier impairment is positively associated with AD. Helminth infection at least partially protects against AD. This is not the case for viral and bacterial infections, but consumption of unpasteurized farm milk seems protective. Routine childhood vaccinations have no effect on AD risk. The positive association between viral infections and AD found in some studies appears confounded by antibiotic prescription, which has been consistently associated with an increase in AD risk. There is convincing evidence for an inverse relationship between helminth infections and AD but no other pathogens. The protective effect seen with early day care, endotoxin, unpasteurized farm milk and animal exposure is likely to be due to a general increase in exposure to non-pathogenic microbes. This would also explain the risk increase associated with the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Future studies should assess skin barrier gene mutation carriage and phenotypic skin barrier impairment, as gene-environment interactions are likely to impact on AD risk. Copyright © 041_ S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Topical antifungals for seborrhoeic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Okokon, Enembe O; Verbeek, Jos H; Ruotsalainen, Jani H; Ojo, Olumuyiwa A; Bakhoya, Victor Nyange

    2015-01-01

    Background Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is distributed worldwide. It commonly affects the scalp, face and flexures of the body. Treatment options include antifungal drugs, steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, keratolytic agents and phototherapy. Objectives To assess the effects of antifungal agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face and scalp in adolescents and adults. A secondary objective is to assess whether the same interventions are effective in the management of seborrhoeic dermatitis in patients with HIV/AIDS. Search methods We searched the following databases up to December 2014: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2014, Issue 11), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (from 1982). We also searched trials registries and checked the bibliographies of published studies for further trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of topical antifungals used for treatment of seborrhoeic dermatitis in adolescents and adults, with primary outcome measures of complete clearance of symptoms and improved quality of life. Data collection and analysis Review author pairs independently assessed eligibility for inclusion, extracted study data and assessed risk of bias of included studies. We performed fixed-effect meta-analysis for studies with low statistical heterogeneity and used a random-effects model when heterogeneity was high. Main results We included 51 studies with 9052 participants. Of these, 45 trials assessed treatment outcomes at five weeks or less after commencement of treatment, and six trials assessed outcomes over a longer time frame. We believe that 24 trials had some form of conflict of interest, such as funding by pharmaceutical companies. Among the included studies were 12 ketoconazole trials (N = 3253), 11 ciclopirox trials (N = 3029), two lithium trials (N = 141

  17. Atopic dermatitis phenotypes and the need for personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cabanillas, Beatriz; Brehler, Ann-Christin; Novak, Natalija

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe recent developments in therapies which target the molecular mechanisms in atopic dermatitis. Recent findings Current advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of atopic dermatitis are leading to the stratification of different atopic dermatitis phenotypes. New therapies offer the option to target-specific molecules involved in the pathophysiology of atopic dermatitis. Current new therapies under investigation aim to modulate specific inflammatory pathways associated with distinctive atopic dermatitis phenotypes, which would potentially translate into the development of personalized, targeted-specific treatments of atopic dermatitis. Summary Despite the unmet need for well tolerated, effective, and personalized treatment of atopic dermatitis, the current standard treatments of atopic dermatitis do not focus on the individual pathogenesis of the disease. The development of targeted, phenotype-specific therapies has the potential to open a new promising era of individualized treatment of atopic dermatitis. PMID:28582322

  18. Contact hypersensitivity in hand dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin-feng; Wang, Jing

    2002-10-01

    Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in hand dermatitis (HD) was studied by patch testing (PT) 105 consecutive adult HD patients and 361 cases of suspected non-hand allergic contact dermatitis (NHD). The suspected offending agents were also investigated by a questionnaire. Age and sex distribution was no different between the 2 groups. The total positivity rate of PT in the HD group was much lower than in the control group (46.7% versus 63.2%, p < 0.01, chi2-test). The most common allergens in HD were rubber mix(17.1%), p-phenylenediamine (PPD) (14.3%), fragrance mix (9.5%), nickel (9.5%), colophonium (6.7%) and potassium dichromate (2.9%), while those in the control group, in sequence, were nickel (20.5%), rubber mix (16.9%), PPD (14.1%), fragrance mix (12.7%), potassium dichromate (5.5%) and colophonium (5.0%). The positivity rate to nickel was lower in the HD group (9.5% versus 20.5%, p < 0.05, chi2-test), while there was no significant difference for the other allergens. HD was divided arbitrarily into 5 groups: (1) vesicular form, in which fine papules and vesicles can be detected. 65.7% of the HD was vesicular form and 55.1% of them were PT positive; (2) fissured form, in which dry skin with fine fissures or desquamation is seen. 8.6% of the HD was fissured form and 30% of them were PT positive; (3) hyperkeratotic form, in which the lesions are thick, hyperkeratotic plaques - 6.7% of the HD was this form and no positive reaction was found; (4) hand and foot dermatitis (HFD) - 12.4% of HD was HFD and 53.8% of them were PT positive; (5) pompholyx - 6.7% of the patients had pompholyx and one positive result to nickel was detected. The suspected offending agents were reported in only 13 (12.4%) patients. These results suggest that CHS is less common in HD than in NHD and that other factors, such as skin irritation, may play more of a role in HD. Nickel allergy is less common in HD than in NHD. CHS may play a role in more than 1/2 of vesicular form HD, HFD and in some

  19. Cow's Milk Allergy Is a Major Contributor in Recurrent Perianal Dermatitis of Infants.

    PubMed

    El-Hodhod, Mostafa Abdel-Aziz; Hamdy, Ahmad Mohamed; El-Deeb, Marwa Talaat; Elmaraghy, Mohamed O

    2012-01-01

    Background. Recurrent perianal inflammation has great etiologic diversity. A possible cause is cow's milk allergy (CMA). The aim was to assess the magnitude of this cause. Subjects and Methods. This follow up clinical study was carried out on 63 infants with perianal dermatitis of more than 3 weeks with history of recurrence. Definitive diagnosis was made for each infant through medical history taking, clinical examination and investigations including stool analysis and culture, stool pH and reducing substances, perianal swab for different cultures and staining for Candida albicans. Complete blood count and quantitative determination of cow's milk-specific serum IgE concentration were done for all patients. CMA was confirmed through an open withdrawal-rechallenge procedure. Serum immunoglobulins and CD markers as well as gastrointestinal endoscopies were done for some patients. Results. Causes of perianal dermatitis included CMA (47.6%), bacterial dermatitis (17.46%), moniliasis (15.87%), enterobiasis (9.52%) and lactose intolerance (9.5%). Predictors of CMA included presence of bloody and/or mucoid stool, other atopic manifestations, anal fissures, or recurrent vomiting. Conclusion. We can conclude that cow's milk allergy is a common cause of recurrent perianal dermatitis. Mucoid or bloody stool, anal fissures or ulcers, vomiting and atopic manifestations can predict this etiology.

  20. Stasis Dermatitis: Pathophysiology, Evaluation, and Management.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, Swaminathan; Migden, Michael R; Silapunt, Sirunya

    2017-06-01

    Stasis dermatitis commonly occurs in older age. It is caused by venous hypertension resulting from retrograde flow due to incompetent venous valves, valve destruction, or obstruction of the venous system. Further tissue changes arise from an inflammatory process mediated by metalloproteinases, which are up-regulated by ferric ion from extravasated red blood cells. Stasis dermatitis presents initially as poorly demarcated erythematous plaques of the lower legs bilaterally, classically involving the medial malleolus. It is one of the spectrum of cutaneous findings that may result from chronic venous insufficiency. Its mimics include cellulitis, contact dermatitis, and pigmented purpuric dermatoses. Duplex ultrasound is useful in demonstrating venous reflux when the clinical diagnosis of stasis dermatitis is inadequate. Conservative treatment involves the use of compression therapy directed at improving ambulatory venous pressure. Interventional therapy currently includes minimally invasive techniques such as endovenous thermal ablation and ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy, which have supplanted the use of open surgical techniques.

  1. Photocontact dermatitis on the hand (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This person is sensitive to chemicals used in perfumes, and now develops a rash when the area is exposed to light (photocontact dermatitis). These perfumes include Oil of Bergamot, an oil also found ...

  2. Protein contact dermatitis: allergens, pathogenesis, and management.

    PubMed

    Levin, Cheryl; Warshaw, Erin

    2008-01-01

    Protein contact dermatitis is an allergic skin reaction induced principally by proteins of either animal or plant origin. The clinical presentation is that of a chronic dermatitis, and it is often difficult to differentiate between allergic contact dermatitis and other eczematous dermatoses. One distinguishing clinical feature is that acute flares of pruritus, urticaria, edema, or vesiculation are noted minutes after contact with the causative substances. Additionally, the patch-test result is typically negative, and the scratch- or prick-test result is positive. The pathogenesis of protein contact dermatitis is unclear but may involve a type I (immunoglobulin E [IgE], immediate) hypersensitivity reaction, type IV (cell-mediated delayed) hypersensitivity reaction, and/or a delayed reaction due to IgE-bearing Langerhans' cells. Management involves avoidance of the allergen.

  3. Impact of regulation on contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Daniel; Ledet, Johnathan J

    2009-07-01

    Contact dermatitis is a serious public health and dermatologic concern. The prevalence of contact dermatitis in the United States was estimated to be 13.6 per 1000 population according to the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey using physical examinations by dermatologists of a selected sample of Americans. The American Medical Care Survey estimated that for all American physicians dermatitis is the second most common dermatologic diagnosis proffered. It is essential that government, industry, and dermatologists work together to enhance regulatory methods to control and prevent contact allergy epidemics. Increased knowledge and awareness of occupational skin diseases by dermatologists and other health care professionals will assist in achieving national public health goals. This article reviews governmental regulations-some helpful for patients and workers and some not helpful for dermatologists in their quest to assist patients with contact dermatitis.

  4. Atopic dermatitis in the domestic dog.

    PubMed

    Pucheu-Haston, Cherie M

    2016-01-01

    Dogs may develop a syndrome of spontaneous, inflammatory, pruritic dermatitis that shares many features with human atopic dermatitis, including a young age of onset, characteristic lesion distribution, immunoglobulin E sensitization to common environmental allergen sources, and evidence of epidermal barrier dysfunction. There are also several important differences between canine and human atopic dermatitis. Although dogs may suffer from multiple-organ hypersensitivity syndromes, there is no evidence that this species experiences the progressive evolution from cutaneous to respiratory allergy characteristic of the human atopic march. Despite the presence of epidermal barrier derangement, there is no significant association between canine atopic dermatitis and mutations in filaggrin. Finally, treatment of canine disease relies much less heavily on topical therapy than does its human counterpart, while allergy testing and allergen-specific immunotherapy provide an often essential component of effective clinical management of affected dogs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytopathology of parasitic dermatitis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sood, N K; Mekkib, Berhanu; Singla, L D; Gupta, K

    2012-04-01

    Out of 44 cases of dermatitis in dogs, 11 cases of parasitic origin were analyzed by cytopathology. Histopathologic examination of punch biopsies was also done for correlation with cytologic findings. Sarcoptic dermatitis was recorded in six cases, wherein, besides sarcoptic mites, neutrophils, macrophages, and plasma cells and keratinizing epithelial cells were also seen. Hematology revealed a relative neutrophilia and mild eosinophilia. Four cases of severe and generalized demodicosis complicated with bacteria and/or Malassezia sp. infection were also recorded. Histopathologically numerous Demodex sp. mites in varying stage of maturation were found damaging the hair follicles along with associated pathological changes and foreign body granulomas in one case. In addition, flea allergy dermatitis was also observed in one dog. In nutshell, cytology was found to be unequivocally effective in diagnosing parasitic dermatitis.

  6. Jet Fuel-Associated Occupational Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Contestable, James J

    2017-03-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis is a ubiquitous problem. Sailors onboard U.S. Navy vessels are at high risk given the multitude of potential workplace exposures. Solvents, petrochemicals, and fuels are abundant and can cause irritant or allergic contact dermatitis. Symptoms of contact dermatitis can cause inability to work and, if chronic, may require a change in rating or job. Prevention of this issue requires patient education about the risks and correct personnel protective equipment. Even with preventative strategies in place, exposures and cases of contact dermatitis will occur. Treatment consists of topical steroids and immunomodulators, as well as barrier creams and emollients. The goal of treatment is to fully restore the skin's natural barrier and prevent further exposure. A classic case of jet fuel-associated contact dermatitis is reviewed. A literature review utilizing PubMed, Google Scholar, and Google Search was conducted to elucidate our understanding of this issue, current occupational health guidelines, preventative approaches, and treatments. This case report provides guidance and recommendations for providers who encounter contact dermatitis related to petrochemicals, such as jet fuel. The literature review revealed limited knowledge surrounding in vivo human skin effects of jet fuel, specifically JP-5. Even larger gaps were found in our understanding of, and guidelines for, protective modalities against jet fuel exposure and dermatitis. A case is presented to facilitate recognition of jet fuel contact dermatitis and guidance for treatment and prevention. Given our current limited knowledge and guidelines concerning protective equipment and skin protectants, multiple proposals for future studies are suggested. Reprint & Copyright © 2017 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  7. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis to nitromethane.

    PubMed

    Webb, Kelli G; Fowler, Joseph F

    2002-12-01

    Nitromethane has wide industrial and commercial application as a polar solvent for adhesives and acrylics as well as explosive fuel. Allergic contact dermatitis to this chemical has not been described previously. The authors documented allergic contact hand dermatitis in 4 coworkers who similarly handled an adhesive solvent containing nitromethane. All 4 cases were confirmed by patch testing and resolved after allergen avoidance. Copyright 2002, Elsevier Science (USA)

  8. Ciclopirox shampoo for treating seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Bluhm, R

    2004-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease, affecting between 1% and 3% of immunocompetent adults. While its cause is unknown, a number of predisposing factors have been reported, including the implications of Malassezia yeasts. Various treatment options are available, such as ciclopirox shampoo, which combines anti-Malassezia activity with an anti-inflammatory action. This agent has been shown to be an effective and safe treatment for seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp.

  9. Chromate dermatitis from a boiler lining.

    PubMed

    Rycroft, R J; Calnan, C D

    1977-08-01

    Chromate dermatitis is described in a mechanical fitter working inside boiler combustion chambers. A source of hexavalent chromate is traced to the action of the heat and alkaline fuel ash on trivalent chrome ore in parts of the refractory lining. Removal of the patient from this contact has resulted in almost complete clearing of his dermatitis, without any relapse, during a 9-month follow-up period.

  10. Difficult to control atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Difficult to control atopic dermatitis (AD) presents a therapeutic challenge and often requires combinations of topical and systemic treatment. Anti-inflammatory treatment of severe AD most commonly includes topical glucocorticosteroids and topical calcineurin antagonists used for exacerbation management and more recently for proactive therapy in selected cases. Topical corticosteroids remain the mainstay of therapy, the topical calcineurin inhibitors tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are preferred in certain locations. Systemic anti-inflammatory treatment is an option for severe refractory cases. Microbial colonization and superinfection contribute to disease exacerbation and thus justify additional antimicrobial / antiseptic treatment. Systemic antihistamines (H1) may relieve pruritus but do not have sufficient effect on eczema. Adjuvant therapy includes UV irradiation preferably of UVA1 wavelength. “Eczema school” educational programs have been proven to be helpful. PMID:23663504

  11. Ceramidastin, a novel bacterial ceramidase inhibitor, produced by Penicillium sp. Mer-f17067.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Someno, Tetsuya; Kato, Taira; Kumagai, Hiroyuki; Kawada, Manabu; Ikeda, Daishiro

    2009-02-01

    Decrease of ceramide in the skin is one of the aggravating factors of atopic dermatitis. The skin is often infected by ceramidase-producing bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bacterial ceramidase then degrades ceramide in the skin. To develop anti-atopic dermatitis drugs, we searched for ceramidase inhibitors, which led to the discovery of ceramidastin, a novel inhibitor of bacterial ceramidase, from the culture broth of Penicillium sp. Mer-f17067. Ceramidastin inhibited the bacterial ceramidase with an IC(50) value of 6.25 microg ml(-1). Here we describe the isolation, physicochemical properties, structure determination and biological activity of ceramidastin.

  12. Influences of Environmental Chemicals on Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangmi

    2015-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition including severe pruritus, xerosis, visible eczematous skin lesions that mainly begin early in life. Atopic dermatitis exerts a profound impact on the quality of life of patients and their families. The estimated lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis has increased 2~3 fold during over the past 30 years, especially in urban areas in industrialized countries, emphasizing the importance of life-style and environment in the pathogenesis of atopic diseases. While the interplay of individual genetic predisposition and environmental factors contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis, the recent increase in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis might be attributed to increased exposure to various environmental factors rather than alterations in human genome. In recent decades, there has been an increasing exposure to chemicals from a variety of sources. In this study, the effects of various environmental chemicals we face in everyday life - air pollutants, contact allergens and skin irritants, ingredients in cosmetics and personal care products, and food additives - on the prevalence and severity of atopic dermatitis are reviewed.

  13. Influences of Environmental Chemicals on Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition including severe pruritus, xerosis, visible eczematous skin lesions that mainly begin early in life. Atopic dermatitis exerts a profound impact on the quality of life of patients and their families. The estimated lifetime prevalence of atopic dermatitis has increased 2~3 fold during over the past 30 years, especially in urban areas in industrialized countries, emphasizing the importance of life-style and environment in the pathogenesis of atopic diseases. While the interplay of individual genetic predisposition and environmental factors contribute to the development of atopic dermatitis, the recent increase in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis might be attributed to increased exposure to various environmental factors rather than alterations in human genome. In recent decades, there has been an increasing exposure to chemicals from a variety of sources. In this study, the effects of various environmental chemicals we face in everyday life - air pollutants, contact allergens and skin irritants, ingredients in cosmetics and personal care products, and food additives - on the prevalence and severity of atopic dermatitis are reviewed. PMID:26191377

  14. Easter egg hunt dermatitis: systemic allergic contact dermatitis associated with chocolate ingestion.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; Hamann, Dathan; Goldenberg, Alina; Connelly, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric systemic allergic contact dermatitis to nickel has previously been reported in association with cocoa. We present four clinical cases of hypersensitivity temporally associated with chocolate consumption at Easter. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for foods high in nickel to provoke patients with known nickel sensitivity and systemic dermatitis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Comparative study on nutrient depletion-induced lipidome adaptations in Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu; Javed, Muhammad Afzal; Deneer, Harry

    2018-02-05

    Staphylococcus species are emerging opportunistic pathogens that cause outbreaks of hospital and community-acquired infections. Some of these bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are difficult to treat due to their resistance to multiple antibiotics. We carried out a comparative study on the lipidome adaptations in response to starvation in the two most common coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species: a S. epidermidis strain sensitive to ampicillin and erythromycin and a S. haemolyticus strain resistant to both. The predominant fatty acid composition in glycerolipids was (17:0-15:0) in both bacteria. During the exponential phase, the two bacterial lipidomes were similar. Both were dominated by diacylglycerol (DAG), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol (Lysyl-PG) and Diglucosyl-diacylglycerol (DGDG). Alanyl-PG was detected in small amounts in both bacterial lipids. N-succinyl-lysyl-PG was detected only in S. haemolyticus, while lysyl-DAG only in S. epidermidis. As the two bacteria entered stationary phase, both lipidomes became essentially nitrogen-free. Both bacteria accumulated large amounts of free fatty acids. Strikingly, the lipidome of S. epidermidis became dominated by cardiolipin (CL), while that of S. haemolyticus was simplified to DGDG and PG. The S. epidermidis strain also produced acyl-phosphatidylglycerol (APG) in the stationary phase.

  16. Risk factors for dermatitis in submariners during a submerged patrol: an observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Flaxman, Amy; Allen, Elizabeth; Lindemann, Claudia; Yamaguchi, Yuko; O'Shea, Matthew K; Fallowfield, Joanne L; Lindsay, Michael; Gunner, Frances; Knox, Kyle; Wyllie, David H

    2016-06-02

    The aim of this pilot study was to determine risk factors, including Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage, for dermatitis in submariners during a submarine patrol. 36 submariners undertaking a submerged 6-week patrol participated in the study. Severity of dermatitis and its impact was assessed using visual analogue scales and questionnaires at baseline and weekly throughout the patrol. S. aureus carriage levels in submariners were determined by nasal swabbing at baseline and shortly before disembarking the submarine. Occurrence of any skin or soft tissue infections (SSTI) were reported to the medical officer and swabs of the area were taken for subsequent analysis. S. aureus carriers were significantly more likely than non-carriers to have previously received treatment for a cutaneous abscess (39% vs 5%, OR=13 (95% CI 1.3 to 130)) with a trend to being submariners longer (p=0.051). Skin scores at baseline and on patrol were not significantly associated with carriage status. Higher dermatitis scores were observed in those who had been submariners longer (p=0.045). Smoking and allergies were not found to be linked to carriage status or skin health score in this cohort. This small pilot study investigates S. aureus carriage status and skin health in submariners. Length of submarine service but not S. aureus carriage was identified as a risk factor for worsening skin health in this small cohort during a 6-week patrol. This does not support S. aureus decolonisation to improve skin health in this population. Further investigation into causes of dermatitis in submariners is required. This data supports a better understanding of the potential impact of exposure to environmental factors that could affect skin health in submariners. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Mental Health Comorbidity in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Yaghmaie, Pouya; Koudelka, Caroline W.; Simpson, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent data, primarily from Europe, suggest children with atopic dermatitis may be at increased risk of developing mental health disorders. Objective We aimed to quantify the mental health burden associated with pediatric atopic dermatitis in the United States. Methods A cross-sectional study design was used analyzing data from the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health – a survey reporting on the health status of 92,642 non-institutionalized children ages 0-17. The lifetime prevalence of various provider-diagnosed mental health conditions was calculated for those with and without a history of atopic dermatitis. Results The odds of having attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder was significantly increased in children with atopic dermatitis compared to non-atopic dermatitis controls, OR 1.87 (95% CI 1.54, 2.27) even after controlling for known confounders. The adjusted odds ratios for depression, anxiety, conduct disorder, and autism were 1.81 (95% CI 1.33,2.46) , 1.77 (95% CI 1.36, 2.29), 1.87 (1.46, 2.39), and 3.04 (95% CI 2.13, 4.34), respectively, and these estimates were all statistically significant. A clear dose-dependent relationship was observed between the prevalence of a mental health disorder and the reported severity of the skin disease. Conclusions Our data reveal a striking association between mental health disorders and atopic dermatitis in the U.S. pediatric population. The severity of the skin disease alters the strength of the association. Prospective cohort studies are needed to verify these associations and to explore underlying mechanisms. Strategies to prevent atopic dermatitis or to aggressively treat early skin inflammation may modify the risk of developing mental health disorders in at-risk children. PMID:23245818

  18. Scalp Psoriasis vs. Seborrheic Dermatitis: What's the Difference?

    MedlinePlus

    ... dermatitis of the scalp? Answers from Lawrence E. Gibson, M.D. Your doctor can usually tell whether ... bring psoriasis under better control. With Lawrence E. Gibson, M.D. Sasseville D. Seborrheic dermatitis in adolescents ...

  19. Black-spot poison ivy dermatitis. An acute irritant contact dermatitis superimposed upon an allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, R M; Rivera, H P; Guin, J D

    1984-08-01

    A black spot in the epidermis over a blister of poison ivy dermatitis is an uncommon finding. Four patients with the phenomenon are described. Histologic and histochemical studies were made on biopsy material and the blackish deposit on the skin surface was compared with black deposits in and on leaves of the species of poison ivy. This examination revealed a yellow, amorphous substance on the stratum corneum of the lesions and a similar substance in and on leaves of the poison ivy plant, Toxicodendron radicans ssp. negundo. Associated with the pigmentary deposits there were distinct changes of acute irritant contact dermatitis superimposed upon allergic contact dermatitis. Our findings support the view that the black material is the oleoresin of the plant, and that this substance behaves both as an irritant and an allergen.

  20. Fiberglass dermatitis: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Wang, B J; Lee, J Y; Wang, R C

    1993-08-01

    Fiberglass is widely used for insulation and as a reinforcement filling material. Handling fiberglass products may induce contact dermatitis. We report on the first two cases of fiberglass dermatitis reported in Taiwan. The first patient suffered from a severe pruritic eruption two hours after repairing a roof with wave-form ceiling boards. Erythematous maculopapules were present on both hands and finger webs. The second patient was a quality controller of printed circuit boards (PRCBs). She presented with erythematous maculopapules on the face and excoriated papules and lichenified plaques on the trunk and forearms, which had been present for two years. Scrapings of the skin lesions from both patients showed fiberglass spicules of 7.5 to 8 microns in diameter. Similar fibers were detected in scrapings from the wave-form ceiling board and PRCB. Histopathology of the second case revealed spongiotic psoriasiform dermatitis. Patch tests in case 2 with the plastics and glues series, epoxy resin and scrapings from the PRCBs were all negative. Fiberglass dermatitis may be easily misdiagnosed. Clinically, it may resemble scabies, eczematous dermatitis, folliculitis, petechiae and urticaria. A high index of suspicion is essential for a correct diagnosis.

  1. Occupational protein contact dermatitis in food handlers.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, N; Roed-Petersen, J

    1976-02-01

    The preparation of food in restaurant kitchens carries a high risk of occupational dermatoses. Analysis of 33 cases revealed four different etiological types. Simple irritant dermatitis was rare (2 cases), plain contact dermatitis was more common (6 cases). Fifteen patients had relevant patch tests and scratch tests; ten had positive scratch tests only to explain the cause of their dermatitis. The last type was termed protein contact dermatitis. The major type IV allergens incriminated were metals, onion and garlic. The major proteinaceous allergens indicated by history and test results were fish and shell-fish. Open patch tests with the incriminated foods may cause erythema or oedema on normal skin after 20 minutes. Previously eczematous, now normal looking, skin often responds with a crop of dyshidrotic vesicles preceded by erythema and itching 30 minutes after the application of an open test. Examination for specific IgE is not always positive in such cases. Inhalant allergy was rare. The results indicate that food handlers are sensitized by the protein they touch, and then react to later contact with the proteins. Protein contact dermatitis is similarly common among veterinary surgeons, while the importance in other occupational groups remains to be studied.

  2. Chemokine RANTES in atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Glück, J; Rogala, B

    1999-01-01

    Chemokines play a key role in inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to estimate chemokine RANTES in the sera of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) and to analyze the correlation between RANTES serum level and the immunological and clinical parameters of the disease. Serum levels of RANTES (ELISA; R&D Systems), total IgE and specific IgE (FEIA; Pharmacia CAP System) were estimated in 24 patients with AD, 28 patients with pollinosis (PL) and 22 healthy nonatopic subjects (HC). The division of the AD group into a pure AD (pAD) subgroup, without a coexisting respiratory allergy, and a subgroup of patients with AD and a respiratory allergy (AD+AO) was done according to Wütrich. Levels of RANTES were higher in the AD group than in the HC group and the PL group. RANTES levels did not differ among subgroups with various clinical scores and between the pAD and AD+AO subgroups. There were no correlations between levels of RANTES and total IgE. Significant positive correlations between serum levels of RANTES and Dermatophagoides farinae and cat dander-specific IgE were found in the AD group. We conclude that the serum level of chemokine RANTES differs patients with AD from patients with PL. The increase of RANTES concentration in the serum of patients with AD depends neither on a clinical picture nor an IgE system.

  3. Recent advances in occupational dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Holness, Dorothy Linn

    2013-04-01

    This review examined recent advances in occupational contact dermatitis (OCD). Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to OCD. There is continuing growth in our understanding of the genetic factors, particularly related to filaggrin mutations. In spite of increased understanding of irritant exposures, the prevalence of hand eczema in workers with wet work exposures remains high at approximately 20%. Patch test database surveillance systems have documented reductions in the occurrence of sensitivity to some allergens such as chromium wherein regulatory efforts have reduced workplace exposures. These surveillance data have also documented increases in sensitivity to several allergens in particular trades, serving as an effective system to identify new exposure situations or new allergens. The impact of OCD on quality of life and mental health conditions, employment and financial aspects is increasingly documented. Progress in understanding the underreporting of OCD and the underlying reasons continues. Several groups have developed robust multidisciplinary secondary and tertiary prevention programmes and the evaluations demonstrate promise. Although several recent systematic reviews have documented the evidence for various prevention strategies, there is increasing understanding of the gaps in prevention practices in actual workplaces. Understanding of the underlying genetic and environmental agents contributing to OCD is increasing. In spite of progress with reducing exposure to some allergens, the prevalence of OCD continues to be high, particularly related to wet work. New prevention programmes are being developed and evaluated and hold promise for improved outcomes.

  4. The Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus Eye Infections

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen of the eye able to infect the tear duct, eyelid, conjunctiva, cornea, anterior and posterior chambers, and the vitreous chamber. Of these infections, those involving the cornea (keratitis) or the inner chambers of the eye (endophthalmitis) are the most threatening because of their potential to cause a loss in visual acuity or even blindness. Each of these ocular sites is protected by the constitutive expression of a variety of antimicrobial factors and these defenses are augmented by a protective host response to the organism. Such infections often involve a predisposing factor that weakens the defenses, such as the use of contact lenses prior to the development of bacterial keratitis or, for endophthalmitis, the trauma caused by cataract surgery or intravitreal injection. The structural carbohydrates of the bacterial surface induce an inflammatory response able to reduce the bacterial load, but contribute to the tissue damage. A variety of bacterial secreted proteins including alpha-toxin, beta-toxin, gamma-toxin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin and other two-component leukocidins mediate tissue damage and contribute to the induction of the inflammatory response. Quantitative animal models of keratitis and endophthalmitis have provided insights into the S. aureus virulence and host factors active in limiting such infections. PMID:29320451

  5. Occupational contact allergic dermatitis in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Mikov, Ivan; Turkalj, Ivan; Jovanović, Marina

    2011-06-01

    Dental professionals may be at increased risk of developing occupational allergic diseases specially to methacrylates that can permeate protective disposable gloves. We presented a case of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in a 28-year-old dental technician. The patient had complained of itching and cracking of fingers for 6 months. The dermatitis improved over weekends. Skin erythema and scaling were present with primarily involvement of the fingertips. Patch testing with dental series gave positive vesicular reaction to methyl methacrylate. Follow-up after 6 months of allergen avoidance showed a complete regression of dermatitis. Methacrylates serve as bases for acrylic resins which are used in prosthetics. Methyl methacrylate as a small molecular acrylate can permeate thin protective disposable gloves. Using adequate personal protective equipment, like nitrile rubber gloves, is the most important preventive measure in this occupation. Health practitioners should recognize possible occupational hazards in dentistry and implement appropriate preventive measures to protect health of workers.

  6. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis 2014.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ichiro; Kohno, Yoichi; Akiyama, Kazuo; Aihara, Michiko; Kondo, Naomi; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shoji, Shunsuke; Yamada, Hidekazu; Nakamura, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of appropriate diagnosis and appropriate assessment of cutaneous symptoms in treatment of atopic dermatitis, the basics of treatment in this guideline are composed of (1) investigation and coun- termeasures of causes and exacerbating factors, (2) correction of skin dysfunctions (skin care), and (3) pharmacotherapy, as three mainstays. These are based on the disease concept that atopic dermatitis is a inflammatory cutaneous disease with eczema by atopic diathesis, multi-factorial in onset and aggravation, and accompanied by skin dysfunctions. These three points are equally important and should be appropriately combined in accordance with the symptoms of each patient. In treatment, it is important to transmit the etiological, pathological, physiological, or therapeutic information to the patient to build a favorable partnership with the patient or his/her family so that they may fully understand the treatment. This guideline discusses chiefly the basic therapy in relation to the treatment of this disease. The goal of treatment is to enable patients to lead an uninterrupted social life and to control their cutaneous symptoms so that their quality of life (QOL) may meet a satisfactory level. The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2012 (ADGL2012)" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2013" together with those for other allergic diseases. © 2014 Japanese Society of Allergology.

  7. Japanese Guideline for Atopic Dermatitis 2014.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ichiro; Kohno, Yoichi; Akiyama, Kazuo; Aihara, Michiko; Kondo, Naomi; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shoji, Shunsuke; Yamada, Hidekazu; Nakamura, Koichiro

    2014-09-01

    Given the importance of appropriate diagnosis and appropriate assessment of cutaneous symptoms in treatment of atopic dermatitis, the basics of treatment in this guideline are composed of (1) investigation and countermeasures of causes and exacerbating factors, (2) correction of skin dysfunctions (skin care), and (3) pharmacotherapy, as three mainstays. These are based on the disease concept that atopic dermatitis is a inflammatory cutaneous disease with eczema by atopic diathesis, multi-factorial in onset and aggravation, and accompanied by skin dysfunctions. These three points are equally important and should be appropriately combined in accordance with the symptoms of each patient. In treatment, it is important to transmit the etiological, pathological, physiological, or therapeutic information to the patient to build a favorable partnership with the patient or his/her family so that they may fully understand the treatment. This guideline discusses chiefly the basic therapy in relation to the treatment of this disease. The goal of treatment is to enable patients to lead an uninterrupted social life and to control their cutaneous symptoms so that their quality of life (QOL) may meet a satisfactory level. The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2012 (ADGL2012)" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2013" together with those for other allergic diseases.

  8. Japanese guidelines for atopic dermatitis 2017.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Ichiro; Aihara, Michiko; Ohya, Yukihiro; Saeki, Hidehisa; Shimojo, Naoki; Shoji, Shunsuke; Taniguchi, Masami; Yamada, Hidekazu

    2017-04-01

    Given the importance of appropriate diagnosis and appropriate assessment of cutaneous symptoms in treatment of atopic dermatitis, the basics of treatment in this guideline are composed of (1) investigation and countermeasures of causes and exacerbating factors, (2) correction of skin dysfunctions (skin care), and (3) pharmacotherapy, as three mainstays. These are based on the disease concept that atopic dermatitis is an inflammatory cutaneous disease with eczema by atopic diathesis, multi-factorial in onset and aggravation, and accompanied by skin dysfunctions. These three points are equally important and should be appropriately combined in accordance with the symptoms of each patient. In treatment, it is important to transmit the etiological, pathological, physiological, or therapeutic information to the patient to build a favorable partnership with the patient or his/her family so that they may fully understand the treatment. This guideline discusses chiefly the basic therapy in relation to the treatment of this disease. The goal of treatment is to enable patients to lead an uninterrupted social life and to control their cutaneous symptoms so that their quality of life (QOL) may meet a satisfactory level. The basics of treatment discussed in this guideline are based on the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis 2008" prepared by the Health and Labour Sciences Research and the "Guidelines for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis 2015 (ADGL2015)" prepared by the Atopic Dermatitis Guidelines Advisory Committee, Japanese Society of Allergology in principle. The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis are summarized in the "Japanese Guideline for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Allergic Disease 2016" together with those for other allergic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Survival of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius in modified Romanowsky staining solutions.

    PubMed

    Misan, Angus; Chan, Wei Yee; Trott, Darren; Hill, Peter B

    2017-08-01

    Stains that are used regularly for patient-side diagnosis to rapidly identify bacterial and fungal infections could become contaminated by common pathogens, such as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius, during slide immersion. To determine whether the inoculation of S. pseudintermedius into modified Romanowsky type stains (Quick Dip ® ) results in viable bacterial contamination and whether this is influenced by the addition of organic debris (canine hair and skin). A clinical isolate of S. pseudintermedius was inoculated into clean and organically contaminated Quick Dip ® solutions (methanol fixative, eosin, methylene blue), and positive (broth) and negative (bleach) controls. Each solution was tested for the presence of viable bacteria by counting the number of colony forming units (CFU/mL) at various time points. Solutions also were examined under high power microscopy to count the number of visible bacteria at each time point. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius was able to survive in the clean and contaminated Quick Dip ® stains for at least one hour, but by 24 h no viable bacteria remained. Survival of the bacteria was not supported in the fixative at any time point. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius remained visible under high power microscopy for up to 2 weeks in all organically contaminated solutions of the Quick Dip ® set. Staphylococcus pseudintermedius only remains viable in eosin and methylene blue for short periods of time, but the prolonged visibility of dead organisms could theoretically lead to the misdiagnosis of cytology samples. © 2017 ESVD and ACVD.

  10. Poison ivy dermatitis. Nuances in treatment.

    PubMed

    Williford, P M; Sheretz, E F

    1994-02-01

    Acute allergic contact dermatitis due to poison ivy or poison oak is a common presenting complaint in the practices of many primary care physicians. While the clinical features are well described, reported treatment regimens vary in both topical and systemic therapies. We review herein the variability of presenting morphologic features of the disease and common treatment regimens, with attention given to complications of therapy. We also comment on the correct botanical designation, incidence, and immune mechanisms of the disease state and review measures to avoid allergic contact dermatitis due to poison ivy and poison oak.

  11. A woman with dermatitis and dissociative periods.

    PubMed

    Wise, T N; Reading, A J

    1975-01-01

    A nineteen year old female with pustular eczema and dissociative spells is presented. The patient has a three year history of severe dermatitis beginning shortly after her marriage. Central dynamic issues appear to be difficulty separating from her mother and an ambivalent identification with a hostile father. The patient also describes fugue-like episodes which occur with emerging aggressive feelings. Psychological testing supported these hypotheses. The relevant literature describing the correlation between aggression and skin disease is reviewed. A final uniform formulation was tentatively proposed that this patient, in addition to a strong genetic component for atopic dermatitis, had her illness abetted by inability to cope with aggressive affects.

  12. [Inpatient rehabilitation of adults with atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Breuer, K; Kapp, A

    2006-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease which often persists until adulthood. In severe cases, eczematous lesions and pruritus are resistant to therapy and result in depression, impairment of professional activities and social withdrawal. The goal of inpatient rehabilitation measures is to keep the patient involved and active in professional and social activities. Rehabilitative measures include diagnostics and medical therapy according to current guidelines, instruction in basic medical information, psychological intervention (relaxation techniques, improvement of self-confidence), dietetic measures, exercise, and social advice. Patients with atopic dermatitis often have work-related problems which should be identified as early as possible during rehabilitation.

  13. Appropriate glove use in dermatitis prevention.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Rose; Sunley, Kim

    Work-related skin problems in nursing staff have risen in recent years, and inspections by the Health and Safety Executive in 2011 found a number of NHS trusts failing in their duties to prevent and manage the risks of work-related dermatitis. In response, the Royal College of Nursing issued guidelines on glove use and the prevention of contact dermatitis in nursing (RCN, 2012). These involved close collaboration between the professional and trade union parts of the RCN because failure to prevent and manage skin problems affects the safety of both staff and patients.

  14. Resin Dermatitis in a Car Factory

    PubMed Central

    Engel, H. O.; Calnan, C. D.

    1966-01-01

    An outbreak of dermatitis in a car assembly factory is described; it affected 50 workers who handled rubber weatherstrips coated with an adhesive. The adhesive was found to contain para-tertiary butyl phenol (P.T.B.P.) formaldehyde resin. Of those patch tested 70% gave positive reactions to the adhesive and 65% to the resin. Improved methods of handling and personal protection succeeded in arresting the occurrence of dermatitis. Barrier creams gave no protection in these circumstances. The episode illustrates the different preventive control methods which have to be tried when dealing with a simple skin hazard which cannot be abolished. Images PMID:5904100

  15. Neutrophil evasion strategies by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Megan L; Surewaard, Bas G J

    2018-03-01

    Humans are well equipped to defend themselves against bacteria. The innate immune system employs diverse mechanisms to recognize, control and initiate a response that can destroy millions of different microbes. Microbes that evade the sophisticated innate immune system are able to escape detection and could become pathogens. The pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are particularly successful due to the development of a wide variety of virulence strategies for bacterial pathogenesis and they invest significant efforts towards mechanisms that allow for neutrophil evasion. Neutrophils are a primary cellular defense and can rapidly kill invading microbes, which is an indispensable function for maintaining host health. This review compares the key features of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in epidemiology, with a specific focus on virulence mechanisms utilized to evade neutrophils in bacterial pathogenesis. It is important to understand the complex interactions between pathogenic bacteria and neutrophils so that we can disrupt the ability of pathogens to cause disease.

  16. Topical tacrolimus for atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Cury Martins, Jade; Martins, Ciro; Aoki, Valeria; Gois, Aecio F T; Ishii, Henrique A; da Silva, Edina M K

    2015-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) (or atopic eczema) is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that affects children and adults and has an important impact on quality of life. Topical corticosteroids (TCS) are the first-line therapy for this condition; however, they can be associated with significant adverse effects when used chronically. Tacrolimus ointment (in its 2 manufactured strengths of 0.1% and 0.03%) might be an alternative treatment. Tacrolimus, together with pimecrolimus, are drugs called topical calcineurin inhibitors (TCIs). To assess the efficacy and safety of topical tacrolimus for moderate and severe atopic dermatitis compared with other active treatments. We searched the following databases up to 3 June 2015: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in the Cochrane Library (Issue 5, 2015), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), LILACS (from 1982), and the Global Resource of Eczema Trials (GREAT database). We searched six trials registers and checked the bibliographies of included studies for further references to relevant trials. We contacted specialists in the field for unpublished data.A separate search for adverse effects of topical tacrolimus was undertaken in MEDLINE and EMBASE on 30 July 2013. We also scrutinised the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) websites for adverse effects information. All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (both children and adults) using topical tacrolimus at any dose, course duration, and follow-up time compared with other active treatments. Two authors independently screened and examined the full text of selected studies for compliance with eligibility criteria, risk of bias, and data extraction. Our three prespecified primary outcomes were physician's assessment, participant's self-assessment of improvement, and adverse effects. Our secondary outcomes included assessment of improvement of the disease by validated or objective measures, such as

  17. A prospective study on canine atopic dermatitis and food-induced allergic dermatitis in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Picco, F; Zini, E; Nett, C; Naegeli, C; Bigler, B; Rüfenacht, S; Roosje, P; Gutzwiller, M E Ricklin; Wilhelm, S; Pfister, J; Meng, E; Favrot, C

    2008-06-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis sensu stricto and food-induced allergic dermatitis are common canine skin conditions, which are often considered clinically undistinguishable. Several attempts have been made to describe populations of atopic dogs and determine breed predisposition but the results were often biased by the use of hospital populations as control group. The present study aims to describe a population of Swiss atopic and food-allergic dogs and to compare it with a data set representing more than 85% of all Swiss dogs. The study, which was carried out during 1 year in several practices and teaching hospital in Switzerland, describes a group of 259 allergic dogs, determines breed predisposition for atopic dermatitis and food-induced allergic dermatitis, compares the clinical signs and features of both conditions, and outlines the clinical picture of five frequently affected breeds.

  18. New drugs for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an update.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Krishan; Chopra, Sidharth

    2013-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) remains a leading cause of bacterial infections worldwide, with a dwindling repertoire of effective antimicrobials active against it. This review aims to provide an update on novel anti-MRSA molecules currently under pre-clinical and clinical development, with emphasis on their mechanism of action. This review is limited to molecules that target the pathogen directly and does not detail immunomodulatory anti-infectives.

  19. Activity of nadifloxacin (OPC-7251) and seven other antimicrobial agents against aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria isolated from bacterial skin infections.

    PubMed

    Nenoff, P; Haustein, U-F; Hittel, N

    2004-10-01

    The in vitro activity of nadifloxacin (OPC-7251), a novel topical fluoroquinolone, was assessed and compared with those of ofloxacin, oxacillin, flucloxacillin, cefotiam, erythromycin, clindamycin, and gentamicin against 144 Gram-positive bacteria: 28 Staphylococcus aureus, 10 Streptococcus spp., 68 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS), 36 Propionibacterium acnes, and 2 Propionibacterium granulosum strains. All strains originated from bacterial-infected skin disease and were isolated from patients with impetigo, secondary infected wounds, folliculitis and sycosis vulgaris, and impetiginized dermatitis. In vitro susceptibility of all clinical isolates was tested by agar dilution procedure and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined. Nadifloxacin was active against all aerobic and anaerobic isolates. MIC(90) (MIC at which 90% of the isolates are inhibited) was 0.1 microg/ml for S. aureus, 0.78 microg/ml for both Streptococcus spp. and CNS, and 0.39 microg/ml for Propionibacterium spp. On the other hand, resistant strains with MICs exceeding 12.5 mug/ml were found in tests with the other antibiotics. For both CNS and Propionibacterium acnes, MIC(90) values > or =100 microg/ml were demonstrated for erythromycin. Ofloxacin, cefotiam, erythromycin, clindamycin and gentamicin exhibited MIC(90) values < or =1 microg/ml for some bacterial species tested. Both oxacillin and flucloxacillin were active against all investigated bacterial species with MIC(90) values < or =1 microg/ml. In summary, nadifloxacin, a topical fluoroquinolone, was found to be highly active against aerobic and anaerobic bacteria isolated from patients with infected skin disease, and seems to be a new alternative for topical antibiotic treatment in bacterial skin infections.

  20. In Vitro Pharmacodynamics of AZD5206 against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kai-Tai; Yang, Zhen; Newman, Joseph; Hu, Ming

    2013-01-01

    AZD5206 is a novel antimicrobial agent with potent in vitro activity against Staphylococcus aureus. We evaluated the in vitro pharmacodynamics of AZD5206 against a standard wild-type methicillin-susceptible strain (ATCC 29213) and a clinical strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (SA62). Overall, bacterial killing against a low baseline inoculum was more remarkable. Low dosing exposures and/or high baseline inoculum resulted in early reduction in bacterial burden, followed by regrowth and selective amplification of the resistant population. PMID:23229481

  1. Bacterial Identification Using Light Scattering Measurements: a Preliminary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkins, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    The light scattering properties of single bacterial cells were examined as a possible means of identification. Three species were studied with streptococcus faecalis exhibiting a unique pattern; the light-scattering traces for staphylococcus aureus and escherichia coli were quite similar although differences existed. Based on preliminary investigations, the light scattering approach appeared promising with additional research needed to include a wide variety of bacterial species, computer capability to handle and analyze data, and expansion of light scattering theory to include bacterial cells.

  2. Avian schistosomes and outbreaks of cercarial dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Horák, Petr; Mikeš, Libor; Lichtenbergová, Lucie; Skála, Vladimír; Soldánová, Miroslava; Brant, Sara Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer's itch) is a condition caused by infective larvae (cercariae) of a species-rich group of mammalian and avian schistosomes. Over the last decade, it has been reported in areas that previously had few or no cases of dermatitis and is thus considered an emerging disease. It is obvious that avian schistosomes are responsible for the majority of reported dermatitis outbreaks around the world, and thus they are the primary focus of this review. Although they infect humans, they do not mature and usually die in the skin. Experimental infections of avian schistosomes in mice show that in previously exposed hosts, there is a strong skin immune reaction that kills the schistosome. However, penetration of larvae into naive mice can result in temporary migration from the skin. This is of particular interest because the worms are able to migrate to different organs, for example, the lungs in the case of visceral schistosomes and the central nervous system in the case of nasal schistosomes. The risk of such migration and accompanying disorders needs to be clarified for humans and animals of interest (e.g., dogs). Herein we compiled the most comprehensive review of the diversity, immunology, and epidemiology of avian schistosomes causing cercarial dermatitis. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Hot Tub Rash (Pseudomonas Dermatitis/Folliculitis)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español [PDF – 1 page] “Hot Tub Rash” ( Pseudomonas Dermatitis / Folliculitis) If contaminated water comes in contact with a person’s skin for a long period ... rash spread at recreational water venues? Hot tub rash can occur if contaminated water comes in contact with skin for a long period of time. ...

  4. Avian Schistosomes and Outbreaks of Cercarial Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mikeš, Libor; Lichtenbergová, Lucie; Skála, Vladimír; Soldánová, Miroslava; Brant, Sara Vanessa

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cercarial dermatitis (swimmer's itch) is a condition caused by infective larvae (cercariae) of a species-rich group of mammalian and avian schistosomes. Over the last decade, it has been reported in areas that previously had few or no cases of dermatitis and is thus considered an emerging disease. It is obvious that avian schistosomes are responsible for the majority of reported dermatitis outbreaks around the world, and thus they are the primary focus of this review. Although they infect humans, they do not mature and usually die in the skin. Experimental infections of avian schistosomes in mice show that in previously exposed hosts, there is a strong skin immune reaction that kills the schistosome. However, penetration of larvae into naive mice can result in temporary migration from the skin. This is of particular interest because the worms are able to migrate to different organs, for example, the lungs in the case of visceral schistosomes and the central nervous system in the case of nasal schistosomes. The risk of such migration and accompanying disorders needs to be clarified for humans and animals of interest (e.g., dogs). Herein we compiled the most comprehensive review of the diversity, immunology, and epidemiology of avian schistosomes causing cercarial dermatitis. PMID:25567226

  5. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by cocamide diethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Mertens, Sarien; Gilissen, Liesbeth; Goossens, An

    2016-07-01

    Cocamide DEA (CAS no. 68603-42-9) is a non-ionic surfactant frequently used in industrial, household and cosmetic products for its foam-producing and stabilizing properties. Contact allergy has been reported quite rarely in the past, but recently several cases were published, raising the question of an increase in the frequency of allergic dermatitis caused by this substance. To describe cocamide DEA-allergic patients and their characteristics observed in our department. Medical charts of patients, investigated between 1990 and December 2015, were retrospectively reviewed for cocamide DEA-allergy. Demographic characteristics and patch test results were analyzed. Out of 1767 patients tested, 18 (1%) presented with an allergic reaction to cocamide DEA, all of them at least with hand dermatitis. Twelve patients had (past) occupational exposure to cocamide DEA. Out of the 18 patients, 15 showed (most often) multiple positive reactions and 7 also suffered from atopic dermatitis. Cocamide DEA allergy is relatively rare, despite frequent use, and an increasing trend was not observed. Reactions to cocamidopropyl betaine and cocamide MEA only occurred in some of the subjects tested. Shampoos and liquid hand soaps/cleansers dominated as sources of exposure. All patients presented with an impaired skin barrier due to atopic and/or previous contact dermatitis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Seborrheic dermatitis: a clinical practice snapshot.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jennifer A

    2011-08-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic, recurring skin disorder that has no cure.Current clinical research has implicated Malassezia yeast in the etiology. Using a clear, concise clinical picture and a thorough patient history, even the novice NP can formulate an effective treatment plan.

  7. Dermatitis in a rubber tyre factory.

    PubMed

    Zina, A M; Bedello, P G; Cane, D; Bundino, S; Benedetto, A

    1987-07-01

    An outbreak of occupational dermatitis in a rubber tyre factory is reported. An unusual clinical picture was recognized. Patch tests revealed a high sensitization rate to the MBT derivative used: 2-(2'-4'dinitrophenylthio)benzothiazole. Since tests with MBT mix and dinitrophenol were negative; sensitization to a contaminant was suspected. DNCB was traced as the substance responsible.

  8. Dermatitis neglecta: a challenging diagnosis in psychodermatology.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Sofia; Vide, Júlia; Antunes, Isabel; Azevedo, Filomena

    2018-06-01

    Dermatitis neglecta is a condition affecting the skin caused by a lack of hygiene. It may be related to psychiatric and neurological disturbances. The appearance of skin lesions results from neglect, which helps distinguish this condition from other similar clinical entities. Resolution of the lesions with adequate cleansing aids a definitive diagnosis.

  9. The histopathologic features of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis.

    PubMed

    James, Travis; Ghaferi, Jessica; LaFond, Ann

    2017-01-01

    The histologic features of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) are generally non-specific and have been described only in brief case reports. We present a case of APD and review the literature with a focus on the histologic findings described. A review of the English literature on APD was performed using PubMed and MEDLINE. A total of 39 patients, including our patient are included in this review. The most consistent histologic finding reported was a perivascular inflammatory infiltrate, being seen in 72% of cases. A non-specific or interstitial inflammatory infiltrate was described in 31% of the cases, with 41% having an eosinophilic component and 21% having a neutrophilic component mixed with the predominant lymphocytic infiltrate. Interface dermatitis was the second most common finding with 36% showing a mild to exaggerated interface dermatitis. Although histopathologic changes are non-specific, perivascular dermatitis with eosinophils and interface changes are common in APD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Hand dermatitis in auto mechanics and machinists.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Jeffrey C H; Kudla, Irena; Holness, D Linn

    2007-09-01

    Auto mechanics and machinists presenting with suspected allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) have traditionally been patch-tested with a standard screening tray and a specialty tray such as the Oil and Cooling Fluid Series. While this has proven useful for patch-testing the machinist, there is a need for the development of a more specific allergen testing tray for the auto mechanic. The objective of the study was to compare clinical features and patch-test results of auto mechanics and machinists with hand dermatitis to evaluate differences in allergen profiles. We performed a chart review of 33 auto mechanics and 24 machinists referred to our Occupational Contact Dermatitis Clinic from 2002 to 2005 for evaluation of hand dermatitis. With a panel of 84 allergens, 52 positive reactions were detected in 17 cases of ACD in mechanics. The profiles were different from the cases of ACD diagnosed in 10 of 24 machinists. Mechanics and machinists differ in the spectrum of occupational exposures. Patch testing with greater numbers of allergens likely identifies a larger proportion of mechanics with occupationally relevant ACD. Further study is needed to determine the most appropriate allergens to include in a clinically useful "mechanic's tray."

  11. Allergic contact hobby dermatitis from turpentine.

    PubMed

    Barchino-Ortiz, L; Cabeza-Martínez, R; Leis-Dosil, V M; Suárez-Fernández, R M; Lázaro-Ochaita, P

    2008-01-01

    Turpentine is an oleoresin obtained from various species of pine. It contains a volatile oil (oil of turpentine) which is responsible for its properties and this is the form generally used. Opportunity for contact with turpentine is widespread. It is universally used as a solvent to dissolve and thin lacquers, varnishes and paints. It is also an ingredient in many liniments and cold remedies. Turpentine is regarded as both a local irritant and a sensitizer. Cases of allergic contact dermatitis in painters, mechanics, shoe repairers and home decorators have been reported. We report a case of a non-professional painter who developed a contact allergic dermatitis due to his exposure to turpentine while doing oil-painting as a hobby. Dermatitis is one of the biggest dangers of working with art materials and occupational contact dermatitis is often detected on the hands of the painters. Solvents are indispensable and turpentine is the most important and the traditional one used in oil-painting. Contact allergy to oil of turpentine was reported to have become rare in Europe but over the last few years, increased rates of turpentine sensitization have been reported.

  12. Granulomatous dermatitis due to Malassezia sympodialis.

    PubMed

    Desai, Harsha B; Perkins, Philip L; Procop, Gary W

    2011-09-01

    A 67-year-old man, with multiple skin lesions that appeared over 2 years, had biopsies that disclosed granulomatous dermatitis with associated small yeasts. The urinary antigen test results were negative for Histoplasma infection; cultures from the biopsies did not grow any fungi or other potential pathogens. The chest roentgenogram results were normal. Morphologic examination revealed features of a Malassezia species. Broad-range fungal polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing disclosed that the infecting fungus was Malassezia sympodialis , a lipid-dependent yeast. This report supports one other case report that Malassezia species may cause granulomatous dermatitis; in the previous case, the etiologic agent was Malassezia pachydermatis , a nonlipid-dependent species. We recommend the use of lipid-supplemented culture media for specimens from patients with granulomatous dermatitis because several Malassezia species are dependent on lipid; the absence of lipid supplementation in routine cultures likely explains the negative culture results for this patient. This, to our knowledge, is the first report of granulomatous dermatitis caused by M sympodialis.

  13. Management of Itch in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Judith; Buddenkotte, Joerg; Berger, Timothy G.; Steinhoff, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common, pruritic, inflammatory skin disorder. Chronic, localized, or even generalized pruritus is the diagnostic hallmark of atopic dermatitis, and its management remains a challenge for physicians. The threshold for itch and alloknesis is markedly reduced in these patients, and infections can promote exacerbation and thereby increase the itch. Modern management consists of anti-inflammatory, occasionally antiseptic, as well as antipruritic therapies to address the epidermal barrier as well as immunomodulation or infection. Mild forms of atopic dermatitis may be controlled with topical therapies, but moderate-to-severe forms often require a combination of systemic treatments consisting of antipruritic and immunosuppressive drugs, phototherapy, and topical compounds. In addition, patient education and a therapeutic regimen to help the patient cope with the itch and eczema are important adjuvant strategies for optimized long-term management. This review highlights various topical, systemic, and complementary and alternative therapies, as well as provide a therapeutic ladder for optimized long-term control of itch in atopic dermatitis. PMID:21767767

  14. Phenazine antibiotic inspired discovery of potent bromophenazine antibacterial agents against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Borrero, Nicholas V; Bai, Fang; Perez, Cristian; Duong, Benjamin Q; Rocca, James R; Jin, Shouguang; Huigens, Robert W

    2014-02-14

    Nearly all clinically used antibiotics have been (1) discovered from microorganisms (2) using phenotype screens to identify inhibitors of bacterial growth. The effectiveness of these antibiotics is attributed to their endogenous roles as bacterial warfare agents against competing microorganisms. Unfortunately, every class of clinically used antibiotic has been met with drug resistant bacteria. In fact, the emergence of resistant bacterial infections coupled to the dismal pipeline of new antibacterial agents has resulted in a global health care crisis. There is an urgent need for innovative antibacterial strategies and treatment options to effectively combat drug resistant bacterial pathogens. Here, we describe the implementation of a Pseudomonas competition strategy, using redox-active phenazines, to identify novel antibacterial leads against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. In this report, we describe the chemical synthesis and evaluation of a diverse 27-membered phenazine library. Using this microbial warfare inspired approach, we have identified several bromophenazines with potent antibacterial activities against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The most potent bromophenazine analogue from this focused library demonstrated a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.78-1.56 μM, or 0.31-0.62 μg mL(-1), against S. aureus and S. epidermidis and proved to be 32- to 64-fold more potent than the phenazine antibiotic pyocyanin in head-to-head MIC experiments. In addition to the discovery of potent antibacterial agents against S. aureus and S. epidermidis, we also report a detailed structure-activity relationship for this class of bromophenazine small molecules.

  15. Contact dermatitis: facts and controversies.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Ronni; Orion, Edith; Ruocco, Eleonora; Baroni, Adone; Ruocco, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    The history of contact dermatitis (CD) is inseparable from the history of the patch test, and the patch test is inseparable from the pioneer in the field, Josef Jadassohn (1860-1936). Despite the fact that we have been diagnosing, treating, and investigating the condition for more than 100 years, there are still many unsolved questions and controversies, which show no signs of coming to an end in the foreseeable future. This contribution reviews and highlights some of the disagreements and discrepancies associated with CD. For example: • What is the real sensitizer in balsam of Peru, one of the most common allergens, and what, if any, is the value of a low-balsam diet? • Is benzalkonium chloride, which has well-known and undisputed irritant properties, a contact allergen as well? • Is cocamidopropyl betaine (CABP) a common contact allergen and what is the actual sensitizer in CABP allergy the molecule itself, or impurities, or intermediaries in its synthesis? • How can the significant differences in the prevalence of sensitization of formaldehyde (FA, a common cause of contact allergy) between the United States (8%-9%) and Europe (2%-3%) be explained? • What is the relationship between formaldehyde releasers (FRs) allergy and an FA allergy? Should we recommend that FA-allergic patients also avoid FRs, and, if so, to what extent? • What is the true frequency of lanolin allergy? This issue remains enigmatic despite the expenditure of thousands of dollars and the innumerable hours spent investigating this subject. • What is the basis behind the so-called "lanolin paradox"? This label was coined in 1996 and is still a matter of controversy. • Is there such a thing as systemic CD from nickel, and, if so, to what extent? Is there a cross-reactivity or concomitant sensitization between nickel and cobalt?These are some of the controversial problems discussed. We have selected the ones that we consider to be of special interest and importance to the

  16. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  17. Atopic Dermatitis: A Disease of Altered Skin Barrier and Immune Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Boguniewicz, Mark; Leung, Donald YM

    2011-01-01

    Summary Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an important chronic or relapsing inflammatory skin disease that often precedes asthma and allergic disorders. New insights into the genetics and pathophysiology of AD point to an important role of structural abnormalities in the epidermis as well as immune dysregulation not only for this skin disease but also for the development of asthma and allergies. Patients with AD have a unique predisposition to colonization or infection by microbial organisms, most notably Staphylococcus aureus and herpes simplex virus. Measures directed at healing and protecting the skin barrier and addressing the immune dysregulation are essential in the treatment of patients with AD and early intervention may improve outcomes for both the skin disease as well as other target organs. PMID:21682749

  18. Prevalence and clinical features of adult atopic dermatitis in tertiary hospitals of China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Shi, Xiao-Dong; Li, Lin-Feng; Zhou, Ping; Shen, Yi-Wei; Song, Qing-Kun

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD) has increased substantially. Previous studies have focused mostly on pediatric patients, while epidemiological investigation on adult AD has been very limited.The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical features of adult AD in outpatients with dermatitis and eczema in China mainland.A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted among outpatients with eczema or dermatitis from 39 tertiary hospitals of 15 provinces in China from July 1 to September 30, 2014.Of 8758 patients, 407 were adult AD. Compared with adults with other types of dermatitis, the mean age (41.8 ± 14.3 vs 42.04 ± 15.38 years, P < 0.05) and onset age (35.2 ± 11.2 vs 39.2 ± 14.0 years, P < 0.001) of adult AD were younger, and mean disease duration was longer (5.3 ± 7.1 vs 2.8 ± 4.9 years, P < 0.001). About 53.3% adult AD involved 3 or more body locations, higher than adults with other types of dermatitis (34.4%, P < 0.001), but lower than those with pediatric and adolescent AD (73.8%, P < 0.001). History of asthma (19.2% vs 6.9%, P < 0.001) or allergic conjunctivitis (21.9% vs 14.9%, P < 0.05) was more common in adult AD than pediatric/adolescent AD. Suspected bacterial infection was more frequently in adult AD than adults with other types of dermatitis (24.3% vs 14.6%, P < 0.001) and pediatric/adolescent AD (24.3% vs 14.9%, P < 0.001). More severe itching was observed in 31.4% of adult AD, higher than that of adults with other types of dermatitis (15.4%, P < 0.001), whereas similar to that of pediatric/adolescent AD (28.7%, P > 0.05). The highest (8.7%) and lowest prevalence (3.7%) of adult AD were in 25°N to 30°N and 35°N to 40°N latitude region.A substantial part of adult outpatients with eczema or dermatitis is adult AD. Middle age, more body location involvement, more suspected bacterial infection, and severe itching are the main clinical feathers of

  19. Occurrence and clinical features of sensitization to Pityrosporum orbiculare and other allergens in children with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, L; Wahlgren, C F; Johansson, S G; Wiklund, I; Nordvall, S L

    1995-07-01

    One hundred and nineteen consecutive cases of children with atopic dermatitis aged 4-16 years (73 girls) from a pediatric dermatology outpatient clinic were included in a study of atopic sensitization. Structured interviews and clinical investigations were performed. IgE antibodies to common inhalant allergens, Pityrosporum orbiculare, Candida albicans, Tricophyton rubrum and Staphylococcus aureus were detected. Specific IgE antibodies frequently occurred to pollens, animal epithelia, C. albicans, house dust mites and moulds, whereas specific IgE antibodies to potential skin allergens were less prevalent. Twenty-six children (21.8%) had IgE antibodies to P. orbiculare, 14 (11.8%) to T. rubrum and 3 (2.5%) to S. aureus. Atopic dermatitis in children with one or several RAST positivities was worse, with a more chronic course, higher total eczema score, more frequent distribution in the head-neck-face regions and more itch compared to the children without serum detectable IgE antibodies. Severe itch disturbing nightly sleep was the only clinical feature that characterised P. orbiculare-positive cases. Allergy to P. orbiculare appears to be of little importance in early childhood atopic dermatitis but is likely to carry a poor prognosis.

  20. Biotic Interactions Shape the Ecological Distributions of Staphylococcus Species.

    PubMed

    Kastman, Erik K; Kamelamela, Noelani; Norville, Josh W; Cosetta, Casey M; Dutton, Rachel J; Wolfe, Benjamin E

    2016-10-18

    Many metagenomic sequencing studies have observed the presence of closely related bacterial species or genotypes in the same microbiome. Previous attempts to explain these patterns of microdiversity have focused on the abiotic environment, but few have considered how biotic interactions could drive patterns of microbiome diversity. We dissected the patterns, processes, and mechanisms shaping the ecological distributions of three closely related Staphylococcus species in cheese rind biofilms. Paradoxically, the most abundant species (S. equorum) is the slowest colonizer and weakest competitor based on growth and competition assays in the laboratory. Through in vitro community reconstructions, we determined that biotic interactions with neighboring fungi help resolve this paradox. Species-specific stimulation of the poor competitor by fungi of the genus Scopulariopsis allows S. equorum to dominate communities in vitro as it does in situ Results of comparative genomic and transcriptomic experiments indicate that iron utilization pathways, including a homolog of the S. aureus staphyloferrin B siderophore operon pathway, are potential molecular mechanisms underlying Staphylococcus-Scopulariopsis interactions. Our integrated approach demonstrates that fungi can structure the ecological distributions of closely related bacterial species, and the data highlight the importance of bacterium-fungus interactions in attempts to design and manipulate microbiomes. Decades of culture-based studies and more recent metagenomic studies have demonstrated that bacterial species in agriculture, medicine, industry, and nature are unevenly distributed across time and space. The ecological processes and molecular mechanisms that shape these distributions are not well understood because it is challenging to connect in situ patterns of diversity with mechanistic in vitro studies in the laboratory. Using tractable cheese rind biofilms and a focus on coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CNS

  1. Molecular coordination of Staphylococcus aureus cell division

    PubMed Central

    Cotterell, Bryony E; Walther, Christa G; Fenn, Samuel J; Grein, Fabian; Wollman, Adam JM; Leake, Mark C; Olivier, Nicolas; Cadby, Ashley; Mesnage, Stéphane; Jones, Simon

    2018-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is essential for viability, but despite its ability to withstand internal turgor must remain dynamic to permit growth and division. Peptidoglycan is the major cell wall structural polymer, whose synthesis requires multiple interacting components. The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is a prolate spheroid that divides in three orthogonal planes. Here, we have integrated cellular morphology during division with molecular level resolution imaging of peptidoglycan synthesis and the components responsible. Synthesis occurs across the developing septal surface in a diffuse pattern, a necessity of the observed septal geometry, that is matched by variegated division component distribution. Synthesis continues after septal annulus completion, where the core division component FtsZ remains. The novel molecular level information requires re-evaluation of the growth and division processes leading to a new conceptual model, whereby the cell cycle is expedited by a set of functionally connected but not regularly distributed components. PMID:29465397

  2. Mobile genetic elements of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Malachowa, Natalia; DeLeo, Frank R

    2010-09-01

    Bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus are successful as commensal organisms or pathogens in part because they adapt rapidly to selective pressures imparted by the human host. Mobile genetic elements (MGEs) play a central role in this adaptation process and are a means to transfer genetic information (DNA) among and within bacterial species. Importantly, MGEs encode putative virulence factors and molecules that confer resistance to antibiotics, including the gene that confers resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Inasmuch as MRSA infections are a significant problem worldwide and continue to emerge in epidemic waves, there has been significant effort to improve diagnostic assays and to develop new antimicrobial agents for treatment of disease. Our understanding of S. aureus MGEs and the molecules they encode has played an important role toward these ends and has provided detailed insight into the evolution of antimicrobial resistance mechanisms and virulence.

  3. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Thomer, Lena; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus , a Gram-positive bacterium colonizing nares, skin, and the gastrointestinal tract, frequently invades the skin, soft tissues, and bloodstreams of humans. Even with surgical and antibiotic therapy, bloodstream infections are associated with significant mortality. The secretion of coagulases, proteins that associate with and activate the host hemostatic factor prothrombin, and the bacterial surface display of agglutinins, proteins that bind polymerized fibrin, are key virulence strategies for the pathogenesis of S. aureus bloodstream infections, which culminate in the establishment of abscess lesions. Pathogen-controlled processes, involving a wide spectrum of secreted factors, are responsible for the recruitment and destruction of immune cells, transforming abscess lesions into purulent exudate, with which staphylococci disseminate to produce new infectious lesions or to infect new hosts. Research on S. aureus bloodstream infections is a frontier for the characterization of protective vaccine antigens and the development of immune therapeutics aiming to prevent disease or improve outcomes. PMID:26925499

  4. The T Cell Response to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bröker, Barbara M.; Mrochen, Daniel; Péton, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a dangerous pathogen and a leading cause of both nosocomial and community acquired bacterial infection worldwide. However, on the other hand, we are all exposed to this bacterium, often within the first hours of life, and usually manage to establish equilibrium and coexist with it. What does the adaptive immune system contribute toward lifelong control of S. aureus? Will it become possible to raise or enhance protective immune memory by vaccination? While in the past the S. aureus-specific antibody response has dominated this discussion, the research community is now coming to appreciate the role that the cellular arm of adaptive immunity, the T cells, plays. There are numerous T cell subsets, each with differing functions, which together have the ability to orchestrate the immune response to S. aureus and hence to tip the balance between protection and pathology. This review summarizes the state of the art in this dynamic field of research. PMID:26999219

  5. Diagnosing Allergic Contact Dermatitis Through Elimination, Perception, Detection and Deduction.

    PubMed

    Pongpairoj, Korbkarn; Puangpet, Pailin; Thaiwat, Supitchaya; McFadden, John P

    2017-10-01

    Several authors have commented upon the skills of detection required in making a diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis. Here, we emphasise the search for clues in a systematic manner. We describe four stages as part of a systematic method for diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis. Firstly, elimination (or inclusion) of non-allergic diagnoses. Secondly, perception: the pre-patch test diagnosis and the 'three scenarios' principle. Thirdly, detection: optimising the sensitivity of the patch test process. Fourthly, deduction: diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis by associating the dermatitis with the allergen exposure. We further compare and contrast the pre-patch test history and examination with the markedly different one ('microhistory' and 'microexamination') used after patch testing. The importance of knowledge of contact dermatitis literature is emphasised with a review of recent publications. Finally, we also highlight the use of contact allergy profiling as an investigative tool in the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis.

  6. [Clinical symptomps, diagnosis and therapy of feline allergic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Favrot, C; Rostaher, A; Fischer, N

    2014-07-01

    Allergies are often suspected in cats and they are mainly hypersensitivity reactions against insect bites, food- or environmental allergens. Cats, with non flea induced atopic dermatitis, normally present with one oft he following reaction patterns: miliary dermatitis, eosinophilic dermatitis, selfinduced alopecia or head and neck excoriations. None of these reaction patterns is nevertheless pathognomonic for allergic dermatitis, therefore the diagnosis is based on the one hand on the exclusion of similar diseases on the other hand on the successful response on a certain therapy. Recently a study on the clinical presentation of cats with non flea induced atopic dermatitis was published. In this study certain criteria for diagnosing atopy in cats were proposed. For therapy of allergic cats cyclosporin, glucocorticoids, antihistamines, hypoallergenic diets and allergen specific immunotherapy are used. This article should provide a recent overview on the clinical symptoms, diagnosis and therapy of feline allergic dermatitis.

  7. [Contact dermatitis: an approach used by a medical officer].

    PubMed

    Vologzhanin, D A; Bozhchenko, A A; Bala, A M

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with contact dermatitis issues, that are of interest not only for dermatologists and specialists in professional pathology, but as well as for general practitioners. Issues of contact dermatitis classification, pathogenic peculiarities of the disease main forms and their basic causes are discussed. Clinical manifestations of irritative and allergic contact dermatitis are described in detail, aspects of differential diagnostics analysed. A detailed consideration is given to allergic diagnostics of contact dermatitis using application test-systems with the most common contact allergens. Main principles of contact dermatitis treatment are outlined in the article. The necessity of a complex approach to this disease therapy that requires not only external therapy, but the compliance with an appropriate treatment regimen, diet as well as application of a particular system therapy is shown. Recommendations for contact dermatitis prophylaxis are given.

  8. Bacterial Biofilms in Jones Tubes.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Eric S; Hauck, Matthew J; Kirk Harris, Jonathan; Robertson, Charles E; Dailey, Roger A

    To investigate the presence and microbiology of bacterial biofilms on Jones tubes (JTs) by direct visualization with scanning electron microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of representative JTs, and to correlate these findings with inflammation and/or infection related to the JT. In this study, prospective case series were performed. JTs were recovered from consecutive patients presenting to clinic for routine cleaning or recurrent irritation/infection. Four tubes were processed for scanning electron microscopy alone to visualize evidence of biofilms. Two tubes underwent PCR alone for bacterial quantification. One tube was divided in half and sent for scanning electron microscopy and PCR. Symptoms related to the JTs were recorded at the time of recovery. Seven tubes were obtained. Five underwent SEM, and 3 out of 5 showed evidence of biofilms (60%). Two of the 3 biofilms demonstrated cocci and the third revealed rods. Three tubes underwent PCR. The predominant bacteria identified were Pseudomonadales (39%), Pseudomonas (16%), and Staphylococcus (14%). Three of the 7 patients (43%) reported irritation and discharge at presentation. Two symptomatic patients, whose tubes were imaged only, revealed biofilms. The third symptomatic patient's tube underwent PCR only, showing predominantly Staphylococcus (56%) and Haemophilus (36%) species. Two of the 4 asymptomatic patients also showed biofilms. All symptomatic patients improved rapidly after tube exchange and steroid antibiotic drops. Bacterial biofilms were variably present on JTs, and did not always correlate with patients' symptoms. Nevertheless, routine JT cleaning is recommended to treat and possibly prevent inflammation caused by biofilms.

  9. Pustular irritant contact dermatitis caused by dexpanthenol in a child.

    PubMed

    Gulec, Ali Ihsan; Albayrak, Hulya; Uslu, Esma; Başkan, Elife; Aliagaoglu, Cihangir

    2015-03-01

    Pustular irritant contact dermatitis is rare and unusual clinic form of contact dermatitis. Dexpanthenol is the stable alcoholic analogue of pantothenic acid. It is widely used in cosmetics and topical medical products for several purposes. We present the case of 8-year-old girl with pustules over erythematous and eczematous areas on the face and neck. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported that is diagnosed as pustular irritant contact dermatitis caused by dexpanthenol.

  10. Adhesion force of staphylococcus aureus on various biomaterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Alam, Fahad; Balani, Kantesh

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises of more than half of all pathogens in orthopedic implant infections and they can cause major bone infection which can result in destruction of joint and bone. In the current study, adhesion force of bacteria on the surface of various biomaterial surfaces is measured using atomic force microscope (AFM). Staphylococcus aureus was immobilized on an AFM tipless cantilever as a force probe to measure the adhesion force between bacteria and biomaterials (viz. ultra-high molecular weight poly ethylene (UHMWPE), stainless steel (SS), Ti-6Al-4V alloy, hydroxyapatite (HA)). At the contact time of 10s, UHMWPE shows weak adhesion force (~4nN) whereas SS showed strong adhesion force (~15nN) due to their surface energy and surface roughness. Bacterial retention and viability experiment (3M™ petrifilm test, agar plate) dictates that hydroxyapatite shows the lowest vaibility of bacteria, whereas lowest bacterial retention is observed on UHMWPE surface. Similar results were obtained from live/dead staining test, where HA shows 65% viability, whereas on UHMWPE, SS and Ti-6Al-4V, the bacterial viability is 78%, 94% and 97%, respectively. Lower adhesion forces, constrained pull-off distance (of bacterial) and high antibacterial resistance of bioactive-HA makes it a potential biomaterial for bone-replacement arthroplasty. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Treatment of canine atopic dermatitis: 2010 clinical practice guidelines from the International Task Force on Canine Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Olivry, Thierry; DeBoer, Douglas J; Favrot, Claude; Jackson, Hilary A; Mueller, Ralf S; Nuttall, Tim; Prélaud, Pascal

    2010-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common chronic relapsing pruritic skin disease of dogs for which treatment has varied over time and geographical location. Recent high quality randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews have established which drugs are likely to offer consistent benefit. The International Task Force for Canine AD currently recommends a multi-faceted approach to treat dogs with AD. Acute flares should be treated with a combination of nonirritating baths and topical glucocorticoids, once an attempt has been made to identify and remove the suspected causes of the flare. Oral glucocorticoids and antimicrobial therapy must be added when needed. In dogs with chronic AD, a combination of interventions should be considered. Again, factors that trigger flares of AD must be identified and, if possible, avoided. Currently recognized flare factors include food, flea and environmental allergens, Staphylococcus bacteria and Malassezia yeast. Skin and coat hygiene and care must be improved by bathing with nonirritating shampoos and dietary supplementation with essential fatty acids. The severity of pruritus and skin lesions can be reduced with a combination of anti-inflammatory drugs. Currently, medications with good evidence of high efficacy include topical and oral glucocorticoids, and calcineurin inhibitors such as oral ciclosporin and topical tacrolimus. The dose and frequency of administration of these drugs should be tailored to each patient considering each drug's efficacy, adverse effects and cost. Allergen-specific immunotherapy should be offered, whenever feasible, in an attempt to prevent recurrence of clinical signs upon further exposure to environmental allergens to which the patient is hypersensitive.

  12. Hand dermatitis--differential diagnoses, diagnostics, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Mahler, Vera

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hand dermatitis is multifactorial, and includes factors such as genetic predisposition and exposure. A high incidence rate is associated with female gender, contact allergy, atopic dermatitis, and wet work. The most important risk factors for the persistence of hand dermatitis include its extent, contact allergic or atopic etiology, childhood dermatitis, and early onset (before the age of 20). The cost of illness of hand dermatitis corresponds to this seen in moderate to severe psoriasis. The diagnostic workup of hand dermatitis and its differential diagnoses requires a detailed assessment of occupational and recreational exposure. In case of possible work-related triggers, early notification of the accident insurer should be sought (via the dermatologist's report). Exposure to a contact allergen is a contributing factor in one-half of all cases of hand dermatitis. It is therefore imperative that all patients with hand dermatitis persisting for more than three months undergo patch testing. Successful and sustainable treatment of hand dermatitis starts with the proper identification and elimination of individual triggers, including the substitution of identified contact allergens and irritants, as well as optimizing preventive measures. Graded therapy taking the clinical severity into account is essential. Validated instruments may be used to monitor therapeutic efficacy. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Economic Impact of Atopic Dermatitis in Korean Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chulmin; Park, Kui Young; Ahn, Seohee; Kim, Dong Ha; Li, Kapsok; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Moon-Beom; Jo, Sun-Jin; Yim, Hyeon Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis is a global public health concern owing to its increasing prevalence and socioeconomic burden. However, few studies have assessed the economic impact of atopic dermatitis in Korea. Objective We conducted a cost analysis of atopic dermatitis and evaluated its economic impacts on individual annual disease burden, quality of life, and changes in medical expenses with respect to changes in health related-quality of life. Methods The cost analysis of atopic dermatitis was performed by reviewing the home accounting records of 32 patients. The economic impact of the disease was evaluated by analyzing questionnaires. To handle uncertainties, we compared the results with the data released by the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Board on medical costs claimed by healthcare facilities. Results The direct cost of atopic dermatitis per patient during the 3-month study period was 541,280 Korean won (KRW), and expenditures on other atopic dermatitis-related products were 120,313 KRW. The extrapolated annual direct cost (including expenditures on other atopic dermatitis-related products) per patient was 2,646,372 KRW. The estimated annual indirect cost was 1,507,068 KRW. Thus, the annual cost of illness of atopic dermatitis (i.e., direct+indirect costs) was estimated to be 4,153,440 KRW. Conclusion The annual total social cost of atopic dermatitis on a national level is estimated to be 5.8 trillion KRW. PMID:26082587

  14. Ciclopirox 1% shampoo for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Nicol, Karyn A

    2006-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic superficial fungal infection of the skin, particularly affecting sites rich in sebaceous glands. Although the precise etiology of seborrheic dermatitis is uncertain, yeasts of the genus Malassezia are known to play a causative role. Ciclopirox is a broad-spectrum, hydroxypyridone-derived, synthetic antifungal agent, which also has anti-inflammatory properties. Ciclopirox is effective both in vitro and in vivo against Malassezia yeasts, making it a valuable option for the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. Varying frequencies and concentrations of ciclopirox shampoo have been shown to be effective and safe in the treatment of seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp.

  15. [Burden of atopic dermatitis in adults].

    PubMed

    Misery, L

    2017-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis may have a very important impact on adults. Visible lesions, but especially near-permanent pruritus or sometimes pain for decades, necessarily have consequences on all aspects of everyday life, including sleep, and professional, social, family and emotional life. Financial consequences are also possible. Poorly known, stigmatisation can be real. Treatments can be very demanding. Thus, the quality of life can be greatly altered and atopic dermatitis could be a heavy burden. The psychological consequences can be major. Co-morbidity appears more and more as a major problem. Patients can therefore be caught in an infernal circle, consequences of the disease aggravating the disease. The best way out is probably to have very effective and well-tolerated treatments. © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés.

  16. Occupational contact dermatitis due to essential oils.

    PubMed

    Trattner, Akiva; David, Michael; Lazarov, Aneta

    2008-05-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis induced by the occupational use of products containing essential oils has not been studied comprehensively. The aim of the present report was to describe the characteristics, diagnosis, and outcome of 5 patients with occupational contact dermatitis because of essential oils attending our outpatient dermatology clinics over a 2-year period. These patients are added to the 11 cases reported thus far in the literature. The research shows that for proper diagnosis, patch tests with the standard series and the fragrance series should be performed, in addition to tests with the specific oils to which the patients were exposed. Patients should be instructed to avoid the allergens identified. Sensitization to essential oils has important implications for the occupational future of affected individuals.

  17. [Contact dermatitis caused by acetazolamide under occlusion].

    PubMed

    Daveluy, Amélie; Vial, Thierry; Marty, Laurine; Miremont-Salamé, Ghada; Moore, Nicholas; Haramburu, Françoise

    2007-12-01

    Acetazolamide is a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor used topically for local secondary treatment of posttraumatic or postoperative edema. Two women had contact dermatitis, secondarily extensive, after local cutaneous use of acetazolamide under a compression panty after liposuction. The eruption disappeared after acetazolamide was stopped and local treatment administered. Cutaneous tests were positive for acetazolamide. Local allergic reactions are mentioned in the monograph on topical acetazolamide. Cases of contact dermatitis from this drug have not so far been published, but French adverse drug reaction reporting data include 10 other cases of eczema or rash at the application site. In one of these, a positive reaction was observed on readministration, and in 2 cases allergy skin tests were positive. The application of the drug under occlusion, which is contraindicated, may have contributed to spreading the lesions. Cases have also been described with another carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, dorzolamide, used in ophthalmology.

  18. Periocular dermatitis: a report of 401 patients.

    PubMed

    Temesvári, E; Pónyai, G; Németh, I; Hidvégi, B; Sas, A; Kárpáti, S

    2009-02-01

    Periocular contact dermatitis may appear as contact conjunctivitis, contact allergic and/or irritative eyelid and periorbital dermatitis, or a combination of these symptoms. The clinical symptoms may be induced by several environmental and therapeutic contact allergens. The aim of the present study was to map the eliciting contact allergens in 401 patients with periocular dermatitis (PD) by patch testing with environmental and ophthalmic contact allergens. Following the methodics of international requirements, 401 patients were tested with contact allergens of the standard environmental series, 133 of 401 patients with the Brial ophthalmic basic and supplementary series as well. Contact hypersensitivity was detected in 34.4% of the patients. Highest prevalence was seen in cases of PD without other symptoms (51.18%), in patients of PD associated with ophthalmic complaints (OC; 30.4%), and PD associated with atopic dermatitis (AD; 27.9%). In the subgroup of PD associated with seborrhoea (S) and rosacea (R), contact hypersensitivity was confirmed in 17.6%. Most frequent sensitisers were nickel sulphate (in 8.9% of the tested 401 patients), fragrance mix I (4.5%), balsam of Peru (4.0%), paraphenylendiamine (PPD) (3.7%), and thiomersal (3.5%). By testing ophthalmic allergens, contact hypersensitivity was observed in nine patients (6.7% of the tested 133 patients). The most common confirmed ophthalmic allergens were cocamidopropyl betaine, idoxuridine, phenylephrine hydrochloride, Na chromoglycinate, and papaine. Patients with symptoms of PD were tested from 1996 to 2006. The occurence of contact hypersensitivity in PD patients was in present study 34.4%. A relatively high occurrence was seen in cases of PD without other symptoms, in PD + OC and in PD + AD patients. The predominance of environmental contact allergens was remarkable: most frequent sensitizers were nickel sulphate, fragrance mix I, balsam of Peru, thiomersal, and PPD. The prevalence of contact

  19. Irritant contact dermatitis from an ornamental Euphorbia.

    PubMed

    Worobec, S M; Hickey, T A; Kinghorn, A D; Soejarto, D D; West, D

    1981-01-01

    An ornamental succulent plant sold in many plant stores in the Chicago area has been identified as Euphorbia hermentiana Lem. Open and closed patch testing using undiluted latex from this species was performed on five Caucasian volunteers. Open testing on flexor forearms resulted in irritant follicular dermatitis, while closed testing to the flexor surfaces of both upper arms in each subject produced bullae and vesiculation with residual desquamation and hyperpigmentation. Dermatological signs persisted for over a week following latex application.

  20. Management of bacterial corneal ulcers.

    PubMed Central

    Maske, R; Hill, J C; Oliver, S P

    1986-01-01

    A prospective microbiological study of 48 patients with corneal ulcers due to bacterial infection was performed. Positive cultures of corneal ulcer samples were obtained in 60% of all patients; about half of these patients had received antimicrobial treatment prior to sampling. A relatively high incidence of Staphylococcus epidermidis was isolated from ulcer patients (27%) compared with normal controls (10%). Gram stains of ulcer samples were positive for organisms in only 27% of all patients and were not considered useful in determining initial therapy in this series. We concluded that treatment should be started with a broad combination of antibiotics while awaiting the culture results. PMID:3082352

  1. 21 CFR 524.1005 - Furazolidone aerosol powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... infection of superficial wounds, abrasions, lacerations, and pyogenic dermatitis. (ii) Horses. For treatment or prevention of bacterial infection of superficial wounds, abrasions, lacerations, and following... bacterial infection of superficial wounds, abrasions, and lacerations caused by Staphylococcus aureus...

  2. 21 CFR 524.1005 - Furazolidone aerosol powder.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... infection of superficial wounds, abrasions, lacerations, and pyogenic dermatitis. (ii) Horses. For treatment or prevention of bacterial infection of superficial wounds, abrasions, lacerations, and following... bacterial infection of superficial wounds, abrasions, and lacerations caused by Staphylococcus aureus...

  3. Atopic dermatitis results in intrinsic barrier and immune abnormalities: Implications for contact dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gittler, Julia K.; Krueger, James G.; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), as well as irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), are common skin diseases. These diseases are characterized by skin inflammation mediated by activated innate immunity or acquired immune mechanisms. Although AD, ICD, and ACD can be encountered in pure forms by allergists and dermatologists, patients with AD often present with increased frequency of ICD and ACD. Although a disturbed barrier alone could potentiate immune reactivity in patients with AD through increased antigen penetration, additional immune mechanisms might explain the increased susceptibility of atopic patients to ICD and ACD. This review discusses cellular pathways associated with increased skin inflammation in all 3 conditions and presents mechanisms that might contribute to the increased rate of ICD and ACD in patients with AD. PMID:22939651

  4. Silver nanoparticles toxicity against airborne strains of Staphylococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Wolny-Koładka, Katarzyna A; Malina, Dagmara K

    2017-11-10

    The aim of this study was to explore the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized by chemical reduction method assessment with regard to airborne strains of Staphylococcus spp. The first step of the experiment was the preparation of silver nanoparticle suspension. The suspension was obtained by a fast and simple chemical method involving the reduction of silver ions through a reducing factor in the presence of the suitable stabilizer required to prevent the aggregation. In the second stage, varied instrumental techniques were used for the analysis and characterization of the obtained nanostructures. Third, the bacteria of the Staphylococcus genus were isolated from the air under stable conditions with 47 sports and recreational horses, relatively. Next, isolated strains were identified using biochemical and spectrophotometric methods. The final step was the evaluation of the Staphylococcus genus sensitivity to nanosilver using the disk diffusion test. It has been proven that prepared silver nanoparticles exhibit strong antibacterial properties. The minimum inhibitory concentration for tested isolates was 30 μg/mL. It has been found that the sensitivity of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from six identified species differs considerably. The size distribution of bacterial growth inhibition zones indicates that resistance to various nanosilver concentrations is an individual strain feature, and has no connection with belonging to a specific species.

  5. [L forms of Staphylococcus aureus. Behavior of coagulase, hemolytic and desoxyribonuclease activities and antibiotic sensitivity].

    PubMed

    Loschiavo, F; Giarrizzo, S

    1977-01-01

    L Forms derived from strains of coagulase positive Staphylococcus aureus, have, on the whole, preserved their DNAsic, haemolitic and coagulastic activities. L. forms showed high resistence to antibiotics acting on the bacterial cell-wall. The sensibility to other antibiotics was, roughly, analogous for the L forms as well as for the bacterial strains ones, with the exception of the clortetraciclin and the diidrostreptomicin, ehich proved to be comparatively more active on the L forms.

  6. Increased concentration of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus sp. in small animals exposed to aerospace environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guthrie, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of increased concentrations of PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA AND STAPHYLOCOCCUS in the total bacterial flora of small animals exposed to simulated spacecraft environments were evaluated. Tests to detect changes in infectivity, effects of antibiotic treatments, immune responses to bacterial antigens, and effectiveness of immune responses in the experimental environment were conducted. The most significant results appear to be the differences in immune responses at simulated altitudes and the production of infection in the presence of a specific antibody.

  7. Advances in pediatric asthma and atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Shabnam; Thyagarajan, Ananth; Stone, Kelly D

    2005-10-01

    Allergic diseases, including asthma, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, food allergy, and urticaria are common in general pediatric practice. This review highlights several significant advances in pediatric allergy over the past year, focusing on asthma and atopic dermatitis. With increasing options for the treatment of allergic diseases, much work is now focused on methods for individualizing treatments to a patient's phenotype and genotype. Progress over the past year includes the characterization of effects of regular albuterol use in patients with genetic variations in the beta-adrenergic receptor. Maintenance asthma regimens for children in the first years of life are also an ongoing focus. The relation between upper airway allergic inflammation and asthma has continued to accumulate support and now extends to the middle ear. Environmental influences on asthma and interventions have been described, including environmental controls for asthma and the role of air pollution on lung development in children. Finally, concerns have been raised regarding the use of topical immunomodulators in young children with atopic dermatitis. Progress continues in the care of children with atopic diseases. Attention to treatment with appropriate medications, patient-individualized environmental controls, and extensive education are the keys to successfully treating atopic children. This review highlights several recent advances but is not intended to be a comprehensive review.

  8. Footwear contact dermatitis from dimethyl fumarate.

    PubMed

    Švecová, Danka; Šimaljakova, Maria; Doležalová, Anna

    2013-07-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective inhibitor of mold growth. In very low concentrations, DMF is a potent sensitizer that can cause severe allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). It has been identified as the agent responsible for furniture contact dermatitis in Europe. The aim of this study was to evaluate patients in Slovakia with footwear ACD associated with DMF, with regard to clinical manifestations, patch test results, and results of chemical analysis of their footwear. Nine patients with suspected footwear contact dermatitis underwent patch testing with the following allergens: samples of their own footwear, commercial DMF, the European baseline, shoe screening, textile and leather dye screening, and industrial biocides series. The results were recorded according to international guidelines. The content of DMF in footwear and anti-mold sachets was analyzed using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Acute ACD was observed in nine Caucasian female patients. All patients developed delayed sensitization, as demonstrated by positive patch testing using textile footwear lining. Seven patients were patch tested with 0.1% DMF, and all seven were positive. Chemical analysis of available footwear showed that DMF was present in very high concentrations (25-80 mg/Kg). Dimethyl fumarate is a new footwear allergen and was responsible for severe ACD in our patients. To avoid an increase in the number of cases, the already approved European preventive measures should be accepted and commonly employed. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  9. Autoimmune estrogen dermatitis in an infertile female.

    PubMed

    Elcin, Gonca; Gülseren, Duygu; Bayraktar, Miyase; Gunalp, Serdar; Gurgan, Timur

    2017-06-01

    Autoimmune estrogen dermatitis is a cyclical cutaneous eruption that occurs premenstrually and goes to the rapid resolution within a few days of menstrual cycles. The disorder has variable clinical manifestations consisting of macules, papules, vesicles, urticarial lesions, bullae, eczematous plaques, and erythema multiforme-like lesions. Herein, we present a case of a 30-year-old woman with attacks of edema and erosions involving the oral and genital mucosal sites on every first day of her menstruation period. She had also multiple endocrinological problems such as hypotroidism and infertility. To determine the sex hormon sensitivity, intradermal skin tests were performed. Based on her personal history and skin test findings, a diagnosis of autoimmune estrogen dermatitis was made. After the oophorectomy, she was free from the skin and mucosal symptoms. We propose that it is important to suspect the diagnosis of autoimmune estrogen dermatitis in patients who present with recurrent cylic eruptions and it must be kept in mind that these patients might have a concomitant infertility.

  10. Local Inflammation Exacerbates the Severity of Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Christopher P.; Daniels, Melvin D.; Zhao, Fan; Spellberg, Brad; Chong, Anita S.; Daum, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of skin infections. In a mouse model of S. aureus skin infection, we found that lesion size did not correlate with bacterial burden. Athymic nude mice had smaller skin lesions that contained lower levels of myeloperoxidase, IL-17A, and CXCL1, compared with wild type mice, although there was no difference in bacterial burden. T cell deficiency did not explain the difference in lesion size, because TCR βδ (-/-) mice did not have smaller lesions, and adoptive transfer of congenic T cells into athymic nude mice prior to infection did not alter lesion size. The differences observed were specific to the skin, because mortality in a pneumonia model was not different between wild type and athymic nude mice. Thus, the clinical severity of S. aureus skin infection is driven by the inflammatory response to the bacteria, rather than bacterial burden, in a T cell independent manner. PMID:23861974

  11. Bacterial Toxins—Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B

    PubMed Central

    FRIES, BETTINA C.; VARSHNEY, AVANISH K.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin B is one of the most potent bacterial superantigens that exerts profound toxic effects upon the immune system, leading to stimulation of cytokine release and inflammation. It is associated with food poisoning, nonmenstrual toxic shock, atopic dermatitis, asthma, and nasal polyps in humans. Currently, there is no treatment or vaccine available. Passive immunotherapy using monoclonal antibodies made in several different species has shown significant inhibition in in vitro studies and reduction in staphylococcal enterotoxin B-induced lethal shock in in vivo studies. This should encourage future endeavors to develop these antibodies as therapeutic reagents. PMID:26184960

  12. [Bacterial meningitis].

    PubMed

    Brouwer, M C; van de Beek, D

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a severe disease which affects 35.000 Europeans each year and has a mortality rate of about 20%. During the past 25 years the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis has changed significantly due to the implementation of vaccination against Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningtidis group C and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Due to these vaccines, meningitis is now predominantly a disease occurring in adults, caused especially by Streptococcus pneumoniae, while it was formerly a child disease which was largely caused by Haemophilus influenzae. Bacterial meningitis is often difficult to recognize since the classical presentation with neck stiffness, reduced awareness and fever occurs in less than half of the patients. The only way to diagnose or exclude bacterial meningitis is by performing low-threshold cerebrospinal fluid examination with a suspicion of bacterial meningitis. The treatment consists of the prescription of antibiotics and dexamethasone.

  13. Case for diagnosis. Infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1: differential diagnosis of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lorena Maria Lima de; Souza, Marcos Vilela de; Guedes, Antonio Carlos Martins; Araújo, Marcelo Grossi

    2017-01-01

    Infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH) is the main cutaneous marker of HTLV-1 infection. This disease occurs primarily in children and should be differentiated from other eczemas, especially from atopic dermatitis. The largest series of IDH are from Jamaica and Brazil. There are an estimated 15 to 20 million infected people in the world, and Brazil is one of the endemic regions. Studies suggest that IDH in children may be a marker for the development of T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) or myelopathy associated with HTLV-1/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM / TSP) in adulthood.

  14. [Investigation of biofilm formation properties of staphylococcus isolates].

    PubMed

    Öcal, Duygu Nilüfer; Dolapçı, İştar; Karahan, Zeynep Ceren; Tekeli, Alper

    2017-01-01

    Biofilm production is an important virulence factor which allows staphylococci to adhere to medical devices. The principal component of biofilm is a "polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA)" which is composed of a beta-1,6-N-acetylglucosamine polymer synthesized by an enzyme (N-acetylglucosamine transferase) encoded by the ica operon found on the bacterial chromosome. This operon is composed of four genes (A, B, C, and D), and a transposable element IS256. In this study, we aimed to determine the biofilm production characteristics of invasive/non-invasive staphylococcus isolates and different staphylococcus species. Biofilm production of 166 staphylococci was phenotypically investigated on Congo Red Agar (CRA); the presence of icaA, icaD and IS256 genes were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 74 of the isolates (44.6%) were identified as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), 25 (15.1%) as methicillin sensitive S.aureus (MSSA), 25 (37.3%) as Staphylococcus hominis, 20 (12%) as S.epidermidis, ten (15%) as Staphylococcus haemolyticus, nine (13.4%) as Staphylococcus capitis, two (3%) Staphylococcus saprophyticus and one (1.5%) as Staphylococcus warnerii. Of the MRSA strains, 52 were isolated from blood and 22 from nose; all MSSA strains were isolated from nose cultures. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) strains were composed of invasive and non-invasive strains isolated from nose, catheter tip and blood cultures from patients with catheter. Production with CRA method was found to be statistically significant in invasive isolates (p< 0.001). It is concluded that; as the biofilm formation capacity of invasive isolates can cause refractory infections and the importance of carriage and hospital infections of these bacteria, it is important to prevent the spread of these isolates. A combination of phenotypic and genotypic tests is recommended for the investigation of biofilm formation in staphylococci. 40.3% of the CoNS isolates, and 85

  15. The papain inhibitor (SPI) of Streptomyces mobaraensis inhibits bacterial cysteine proteases and is an antagonist of bacterial growth.

    PubMed

    Zindel, Stephan; Kaman, Wendy E; Fröls, Sabrina; Pfeifer, Felicitas; Peters, Anna; Hays, John P; Fuchsbauer, Hans-Lothar

    2013-07-01

    A novel papain inhibitory protein (SPI) from Streptomyces mobaraensis was studied to measure its inhibitory effect on bacterial cysteine protease activity (Staphylococcus aureus SspB) and culture supernatants (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacillus anthracis). Further, growth of Bacillus anthracis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Vibrio cholerae was completely inhibited by 10 μM SPI. At this concentration of SPI, no cytotoxicity was observed. We conclude that SPI inhibits bacterial virulence factors and has the potential to become a novel therapeutic treatment against a range of unrelated pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Microorganism-induced exacerbations in atopic dermatitis: a possible preventive role for vitamin D?

    PubMed

    Benetti, Cecilia; Piacentini, Giorgio L; Capristo, Carlo; Boner, Attilio L; Peroni, Diego G

    2015-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disease characterized by a complex pathogenesis not completely understood despite numerous studies to date. The clinical patterns result from interactions between genetic disorders determining abnormalities in the epidermis differentiation complex, modification of the cutaneous barrier, and dysfunction of immune responses. Several studies have shown that an alteration of the skin barrier combined with immune dysfunction is important for the onset, maintenance, and risk of exacerbations of the disease. In recent years, new aspects regarding the pathogenesis of the disease, such as the effects of vitamin D (VD) on immunity at the skin level and the role of certain microorganisms (particularly Staphylococcus and Malassezia species) on eczema exacerbations, have been evaluated. This article provides an overview of the evidences supporting the link between VD (deficiency) and microorganisms (skin colonization/sensitization) in AD pathogenesis, based on comprehensive review of the literature. By considering different aspects of disease, it might be possible to improve our understanding, particularly in those patients refractory to conventional treatments. An electronic research strategy was used to search in Medline Pub-Med Library using as research words AD, exacerbation, VD, Staphylococcus aureus (SA), and Malassezia. The results were downloaded and analyzed for systematic review. Few studies actually consider the relationship between VD deficiency (VDD), AD, and SA and Malassezia, but many suggest a correlation between these factors. VDs play a major role against microorganisms in the development of AD and should be considered when treating patients.

  17. Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" on Campus: A New Challenge to College Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiner, H. Richard

    2008-01-01

    As new drugs to control bacterial pathogens are developed, the organisms evolve to survive. "Staphylococcus aureus", a common organism, has steadily developed resistance to antibiotics. For more than 40 years, resistant "S. aureus" presented a formidable problem to hospitalized patients; in the past decade, however, it has begun to appear outside…

  18. Antibacterial mechanism of fraxetin against Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HAITING; ZOU, DAN; XIE, KUNPEING; XIE, MINGJIE

    2014-01-01

    Fraxetin is one of the main constituents of the traditional medicinal plant Fraxinus rhynchophylla. The inhibitory effect of fraxetin on various bacterial strains has been extensively reported, however, its mechanism of action on bacterial cells remains to be elucidated. In the present study, the antibacterial mechanism of fraxetin on Staphylococcus aureus was systematically investigated by examining its effect on cell membranes, protein synthesis, nucleic acid content and topoisomerase activity. The results indicated that fraxetin increased the permeability of the cell membrane but did not render it permeable to macromolecules, such as DNA and RNA. Additionally, the quantity of protein, DNA and RNA decreased to 55.74, 33.86 and 48.96%, respectively following treatment with fraxetin for 16 h. The activity of topoisomerase I and topoisomerase II were also markedly inhibited as fraxetin concentration increased. The result of the ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry demonstrated that the DNA characteristics exhibited a blue shift and hypochromic effect following treatment with fraxetin. These results indicated that fraxetin had a marked inhibitory effect on S.aureus proliferation. Further mechanistic studies showed that fraxetin could disrupt nucleic acid and protein synthesis by preventing topoisomerase from binding to DNA. PMID:25189268

  19. Changes of Antimicrobial Resistance among Staphylococcus Aureus Isolated in 8 Consecutive Years in the First Bethune Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei; Zhou, Qi; Yang, Chunguang; Yao, Hanxin; Xu, Jiancheng

    This study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated in 8 consecutive years in the First Bethune Hospital. Disk diffusion test was used to study the antimicrobial resistance. The data were analyzed by WHONET 5 software according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Most of 1469 strains of Staphylococcus aureus were collected from sputum 705 (18.0%), secretions 206 (14.0%), pus 177 (12.0%) during the past 8 years. The rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were between 50.8% and 83.3% during the past 8 years, respectively. In recent 8 years, the antimicrobial resistance of Staphylococcus aureus had increased. Monitoring the antimicrobial resistance to Staphylococcus aureus should be strengthened. The change of the antimicrobial resistance should be investigated in order to direct rational drug usage in the clinic and prevent bacterial strain of drug resistance from being transmitted.

  20. Communications of Staphylococcus aureus and non-aureus Staphylococcus species from bovine intramammary infections and teat apex colonization.

    PubMed

    Mahmmod, Yasser S; Klaas, Ilka Christine; Svennesen, Line; Pedersen, Karl; Ingmer, Hanne

    2018-05-16

    The role of non-aureus staphylococci (NAS) in the risk of acquisition of intramammary infections with Staphylococcus aureus is vague and still under debate. The objectives of this study were to (1) investigate the distribution patterns of NAS species from milk and teat skin in dairy herds with automatic milking systems, and (2) examine if the isolated NAS influences the expression of S. aureus virulence factors controlled by the accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing system. In 8 herds, 14 to 20 cows with elevated somatic cell count were randomly selected for teat skin swabbing and aseptic quarter foremilk samples from right hind and left front quarters. Teat skin swabs were collected using the modified wet-dry method and milk samples were taken aseptically for bacterial culture. Colonies from quarters with suspicion of having NAS in milk or teat skin samples (or both) were subjected to MALDI-TOF assay for species identification. To investigate the interaction between S. aureus and NAS, 81 isolates NAS were subjected to a qualitative β-galactosidase reporter plate assay. In total, 373 NAS isolates were identified representing 105 from milk and 268 from teat skin of 284 quarters (= 142 cows). Sixteen different NAS species were identified, 15 species from teat skin and 10 species from milk. The most prevalent NAS species identified from milk were Staphylococcus epidermidis (50%), Staphylococcus haemolyticus (15%), and Staphylococcus chromogenes (11%), accounting for 76%. Meanwhile, the most prevalent NAS species from teat skin were Staphylococcus equorum (43%), S. haemolyticus (16%), and Staphylococcus cohnii (14%), accounting for 73%. Using reporter gene fusions monitoring transcriptional activity of key virulence factors and regulators, we found that out of 81 supernatants of NAS isolates, 77% reduced expression of hla, encoding a-hemolysin, 70% reduced expression of RNAIII, the key effector molecule of agr, and 61% reduced expression of spa encoding

  1. Bacterial prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Gill, Bradley C; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2016-02-01

    The review provides the infectious disease community with a urologic perspective on bacterial prostatitis. Specifically, the article briefly reviews the categorization of prostatitis by type and provides a distillation of new findings published on bacterial prostatitis over the past year. It also highlights key points from the established literature. Cross-sectional prostate imaging is becoming more common and may lead to more incidental diagnoses of acute bacterial prostatitis. As drug resistance remains problematic in this condition, the reemergence of older antibiotics such as fosfomycin, has proven beneficial. With regard to chronic bacterial prostatitis, no clear clinical risk factors emerged in a large epidemiological study. However, bacterial biofilm formation has been associated with more severe cases. Surgery has a limited role in bacterial prostatitis and should be reserved for draining of a prostatic abscess or the removal of infected prostatic stones. Prostatitis remains a common and bothersome clinical condition. Antibiotic therapy remains the basis of treatment for both acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Further research into improving prostatitis treatment is indicated.

  2. Normal bacterial flora from vaginas of Criollo Limonero cows.

    PubMed

    Zambrano-Nava, Sunny; Boscán-Ocando, Julio; Nava, Jexenia

    2011-02-01

    In order to describe the normal bacterial flora in vaginas of Criollo Limonero cows, 51 healthy multiparous cows, at least 90-day postpartum, were selected. Duplicated swabs (N = 102) were taken from the vaginal fornix of cows to perform aerobic and anaerobic cultures as well as conventional biochemical tests. Out of 102 swabs, bacterial growth was obtained in 55 (53.9%) while the remaining 47 (46.1%) did not exhibited any bacterial growth. Of the 55 bacterial growths, 23 (41.8%) were aerobic whereas 32 (58.1%) were anaerobic. Likewise, 29 (52.72%) of bacterial growths were pure and 26 (47.27%) were mixed. Under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, Gram positive bacteria were predominant (81.82% and 73.08%, respectively) over Gram negative bacteria (18.18% and 26.92%, respectively). Isolated bacteria were Arcanobacterium pyogenes (22.92%), Staphylococcus aureus (15.63%), Staphylococcus coagulase negative (17.71%), Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (6.25%), Bacteroides spp. (13.54%), and Peptostreptococcus spp. (7.29%). In conclusion, normal vaginal bacterial flora of Criollo Limonero cows was predominantly Gram positive and included A. pyogenes, S. aureus, coagulase negative Staphylococcus, E. rhusiopathiae, Bacteroides spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. In Criollo Limonero cattle, adaptive aspects such as development of humoral and physical mechanisms for defense, and bacterial adaptation to host deserve research attention.

  3. Oral Administration of the Broad-Spectrum Antibiofilm Compound Toremifene Inhibits Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    De Cremer, Kaat; Delattin, Nicolas; De Brucker, Katrijn; Peeters, Annelies; Kucharíková, Soña; Gerits, Evelien; Verstraeten, Natalie; Michiels, Jan; Van Dijck, Patrick; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-01-01

    We here report on the in vitro activity of toremifene to inhibit biofilm formation of different fungal and bacterial pathogens, including Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida dubliniensis, Candida krusei, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. We validated the in vivo efficacy of orally administered toremifene against C. albicans and S. aureus biofilm formation in a rat subcutaneous catheter model. Combined, our results demonstrate the potential of toremifene as a broad-spectrum oral antibiofilm compound. PMID:25288093

  4. Laboratory studies on biomachining of copper using Staphylococcus sp.

    PubMed

    Shikata, Shinji; Sreekumari, Kurissery R; Nandakumar, Kanavillil; Ozawa, Mazayoshi; Kikuchi, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of using bacteria to drill metallic surfaces has been demonstrated using Staphylococcus sp., a facultative anaerobic bacterium, isolated from corroded copper piping. The experiment involved exposure of copper coupons (25 mm x 15 mm x 3 mm) to a culture of Staphylococcus sp. for a maximum period of 7 days. Coupons exposed to sterile bacterial growth medium were used as controls. Exposed coupons were removed intermittently and observed microscopically for the extent of drilling. The total pit area and volume on these coupons were determined using image analysis. The results showed that both the biomachined area and volume increased with the duration of coupon exposure. In the drilling experiment, a copper thin film 2 microm thick was perforated by this bacterium within a period of 7 days. In conclusion, the results suggested that bacteria can be used as a tool for machining metallic surfaces.

  5. Reactive Granulomatous Dermatitis: A Review of Palisaded Neutrophilic and Granulomatous Dermatitis, Interstitial Granulomatous Dermatitis, Interstitial Granulomatous Drug Reaction, and a Proposed Reclassification.

    PubMed

    Rosenbach, Misha; English, Joseph C

    2015-07-01

    The terms "palisaded neutrophilic and granulomatous dermatitis," "interstitial granulomatous dermatitis," and the subset "interstitial granulomatous drug reaction" are a source of confusion. There exists substantial overlap among the entities with few strict distinguishing features. We review the literature and highlight areas of distinction and overlap, and propose a streamlined diagnostic workup for patients presenting with this cutaneous reaction pattern. Because the systemic disease associations and requisite workup are similar, and the etiopathogenesis is poorly understood but likely similar among these entities, we propose the simplified unifying term "reactive granulomatous dermatitis" to encompass these entities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Serum Vitamin D Levels Not Associated with Atopic Dermatitis Severity.

    PubMed

    Robl, Renata; Uber, Marjorie; Abagge, Kerstin Taniguchi; Lima, Monica Nunes; Carvalho, Vânia Oliveira

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine the relationship between serum vitamin D levels and the severity of atopic dermatitis (AD) in a Brazilian population. This was a cross-sectional study of patients younger than 14 years of age seen from April to November 2013. All patients fulfilled the Hanifin and Rajka Diagnostic Criteria for AD diagnosis. Disease severity was determined using the SCORing Atopic Dermatitis index and classified as mild (<25), moderate (25-50), or severe (>50). Serum vitamin D levels were classified as sufficient (≥30 ng/mL), insufficient (29-21 ng/mL), or deficient (≤20 ng/mL). A total of 105 patients met the inclusion criteria. Mild AD was diagnosed in 58 (55.2%) children, moderate in 24 (22.8%), and severe in 23 (21.9%). Vitamin D deficiency was observed in 45 individuals (42.9%). Of these, 24 (53.3%) had mild AD, 13 (28.9%) moderate, and 8 (17.7%) severe. Insufficient vitamin D levels were found in 45 (42.9%) individuals; 24 (53.3%) had mild AD, 9 (20.0%) moderate, and 12 (26.7%) severe. Of the 15 individuals (14.2%) with sufficient vitamin D levels, 10 (60.7%) had mild AD, 2 (13.3%) moderate, and 3 (20.0%) severe. The mean vitamin D level was 22.1 ± 7.3 ng/mL in individuals with mild AD, 20.8 ± 6.5 ng/mL in those with moderate AD, and 21.9 ± 9.3 ng/mL in those with severe AD. Variables such as sex, age, skin phototype, season of the year, and bacterial infection were not significantly associated with vitamin D levels. Levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D were deficient or insufficient in 85% of the children, but serum vitamin D concentrations were not significantly related to AD severity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Methotrexate use in allergic contact dermatitis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ashaki; Burns, Erin; Burkemper, Nicole M

    2018-03-01

    Methotrexate, a folate antimetabolite, is used to treat atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although methotrexate's therapeutic efficacy has been noted in the literature, there are few data on the efficacy of methotrexate treatment for allergic contact dermatitis. To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of methotrexate in treating allergic contact dermatitis at a single institution, and also to assess methotrexate efficacy in patients with chronic, unavoidable allergen exposure. We performed a retrospective chart review of 32 patients diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis by positive patch test reactions, and who received treatment with methotrexate from November 2010 to November 2014. Demographic and treatment-associated data were collected from electronic medical records. Ten patients were identified as allergen non-avoiders secondary to their occupation, and were subgrouped as such. Seventy-eight per cent (25/32) of patients showed either a partial or a complete response. Methotrexate had a comparable efficacy rate in the allergen non-avoiders subset, at 10 of 10. Of the 32 patients, 23% (5/22) had complete clearance of their dermatitis, and 1/10 of allergen non-avoiders had complete clearance of their dermatitis. Methotrexate is a well-tolerated and effective treatment for allergic contact dermatitis, and shows comparable efficacy to immunomodulatory agents such as cyclosporine and azathioprine, with robust efficacy despite persistent allergen exposure in patients with allergic contact dermatitis. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Prevalence of Suicidal Ideation in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimata, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of suicidal ideation in patients with mild, moderate, and severe atopic dermatitis between the age of 15 to 49 years were 0.21%, 6%, and 19.6%, respectively. In addition, the prevalence of homicide-suicidal ideation in mothers or fathers of patients (aged 0-14 years) with mild, moderate, and severe atopic dermatitis were 0.11%,…

  9. Results of patch testing in 10 patients with peristomal dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Landis, Megan N; Keeling, James H; Yiannias, James A; Richardson, Donna M; Nordberg Linehan, Diane L; Davis, Mark D P

    2012-09-01

    Peristomal dermatitis is a common problem in patients with ostomies that is a source of considerable morbidity. Irritant contact dermatitis is most common, but allergic contact dermatitis can also occur. Because of the lack of published reports on patch testing for this indication, we undertook a retrospective study of patch testing results in patients with suspected peristomal allergic contact dermatitis. We sought to describe our patch testing experience with patients referred with peristomal dermatitis. This was a retrospective review of medical records of patients with ostomies and peristomal dermatitis who underwent patch testing in the Mayo Clinic Departments of Dermatology in Jacksonville, FL; Rochester, MN; and Scottsdale, AZ, during a 10-year period (2000-2010). Ten patients with peristomal dermatitis were referred for patch testing (6 in Minnesota, 2 in Florida, and 2 in Arizona). Patients were patch tested to the materials used in their stoma devices, to the standard series, and in some cases to supplemental series. All 10 had at least one allergic patch test reaction, most commonly to stoma paste (3 of 10 patients). Retrospective nature of study via chart review is a limitation. Patch testing is a useful tool for identification of allergens in patients with peristomal dermatitis. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Atopic dermatitis: current treatment guidelines. Statement of the experts of the Dermatological Section, Polish Society of Allergology, and the Allergology Section, Polish Society of Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Nowicki, Roman; Trzeciak, Magdalena; Wilkowska, Aleksandra; Sokołowska-Wojdyło, Małgorzata; Ługowska-Umer, Hanna; Barańska-Rybak, Wioletta; Kaczmarski, Maciej; Kowalewski, Cezary; Kruszewski, Jerzy; Maj, Joanna; Silny, Wojciech; Śpiewak, Radosław; Petranyuk, Andriy

    2015-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a condition frequently encountered in medical practices across the country. More than 60% of children with AD are at risk to develop allergic rhinitis or asthma (the atopic march). Patients with AD have a unique predisposition to colonization or infection by Staphylococcus aureus. Treatments for AD need to rapidly control symptoms of the disease, improve quality of life and prevent exacerbations. Given the chronic and relapsing nature of the disease, therapies need to encourage good compliance and be well tolerated.

  11. Bacterial contamination of computer touch screens.

    PubMed

    Gerba, Charles P; Wuollet, Adam L; Raisanen, Peter; Lopez, Gerardo U

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the occurrence of opportunistic bacterial pathogens on the surfaces of computer touch screens used in hospitals and grocery stores. Opportunistic pathogenic bacteria were isolated on touch screens in hospitals; Clostridium difficile and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus and in grocery stores; methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Enteric bacteria were more common on grocery store touch screens than on hospital computer touch screens. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Making contact for contact dermatitis: a survey of the membership of the American Contact Dermatitis Society.

    PubMed

    Nezafati, Kaveh A; Carroll, Bryan; Storrs, Frances J; Cruz, Ponciano D

    2013-01-01

    The American Contact Dermatitis Society (ACDS) is the principal organization representing the subspecialty of contact dermatitis in the United States. The aim of this study was to characterize ACDS members with respect to demographic characteristics, patch-test practices, and sentiments regarding the Society and its journal Dermatitis. We conducted cross-sectional postal and online surveys of ACDS members. More than a third of ACDS members responded to the survey, 92% of whom practice dermatology, and most of whom are community practitioners. Responders manage patients with allergic and irritant dermatitis at a similar frequency. On average, they patch test 4 patients per week using 66 allergens per patient, which often include customized trays. Almost half of these practitioners learned patch testing from their residency programs. Most of the responders read and value the Society journal, value the Contact Allergen Management Program database, and attend society meetings. The ACDS is comprised overwhelmingly of dermatologists who are primarily community-based, young relative to the start of their practices, and use the Society's resources for continuing education.

  13. The Role of Malassezia spp. in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Glatz, Martin; Bosshard, Philipp P.; Hoetzenecker, Wolfram; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Malassezia spp. is a genus of lipophilic yeasts and comprises the most common fungi on healthy human skin. Despite its role as a commensal on healthy human skin, Malassezia spp. is attributed a pathogenic role in atopic dermatitis. The mechanisms by which Malassezia spp. may contribute to the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis are not fully understood. Here, we review the latest findings on the pathogenetic role of Malassezia spp. in atopic dermatitis (AD). For example, Malassezia spp. produces a variety of immunogenic proteins that elicit the production of specific IgE antibodies and may induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, Malassezia spp. induces auto-reactive T cells that cross-react between fungal proteins and their human counterparts. These mechanisms contribute to skin inflammation in atopic dermatitis and therefore influence the course of this disorder. Finally, we discuss the possible benefit of an anti-Malassezia spp. treatment in patients with atopic dermatitis. PMID:26239555

  14. An update on airborne contact dermatitis: 2001-2006.

    PubMed

    Santos, Raquel; Goossens, An

    2007-12-01

    Reports on airborne dermatoses are mainly published in the context of occupational settings. Hence, in recent years, dermatologists and also occupational physicians have become increasingly aware of the airborne source of contact dermatitis, resulting mainly from exposure to irritants or allergens. However, their occurrence is still underestimated, because reports often omit the term 'airborne' in relation to dust or volatile allergens. For the present update, we screened the journals 'Contact Dermatitis' (July 2000 to December 2006); 'Dermatitis', formerly named 'American Journal of Contact Dermatitis'; 'La Lettre du Gerda' (January 2000 to December 2006); and also included relevant articles from other journals published during the same period. This resulted in an updated list of airborne dermatitis causes.

  15. Bacterial Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Bacterial Meningitis Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend ... can also be associated with another serious illness, sepsis . Sepsis is the body’s overwhelming and life-threatening ...

  16. Bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Heckenberg, Sebastiaan G B; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a neurologic emergency. Vaccination against common pathogens has decreased the burden of disease. Early diagnosis and rapid initiation of empiric antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy are vital. Therapy should be initiated as soon as blood cultures have been obtained, preceding any imaging studies. Clinical signs suggestive of bacterial meningitis include fever, headache, meningismus, and an altered level of consciousness but signs may be scarce in children, in the elderly, and in meningococcal disease. Host genetic factors are major determinants of susceptibility to meningococcal and pneumococcal disease. Dexamethasone therapy has been implemented as adjunctive treatment of adults with pneumococcal meningitis. Adequate and prompt treatment of bacterial meningitis is critical to outcome. In this chapter we review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and management of bacterial meningitis. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Workplace screening for hand dermatitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nichol, K; Copes, R; Spielmann, S; Kersey, K; Eriksson, J; Holness, D L

    2016-01-01

    Health care workers (HCWs) are at increased risk for developing occupational skin disease (OSD) such as dermatitis primarily due to exposure to wet work. Identification of risk factors and workplace screening can help early detection of OSD to avoid the condition becoming chronic. To determine risk factors and clinical findings for hand dermatitis using a workplace screening tool. Employees at a large teaching hospital in Toronto, Canada, were invited to complete a two-part hand dermatitis screening tool. Part 1 inquired about hand hygiene practices and Part 2 comprised a visual assessment of participants' hands by a health professional and classification as (i) normal, (ii) mild dermatitis or (iii) moderate/severe dermatitis. Risk factors were determined using chi-square and Cochran-Armitage analysis on a dichotomous variable, where Yes represented either a mild or moderate/severe disease classification. There were 183 participants out of 643 eligible employees; response rate 28%. Mild or moderate/severe dermatitis was present in 72% of participants. These employees were more likely to work directly with patients, have worked longer in a health care setting, wash hands and change gloves more frequently, wear gloves for more hours per day, have a history of eczema or dermatitis and report a current rash on the hands or rash in the past 12 months. There was a high percentage of HCWs with dermatitis and risk factors for dermatitis. These findings argue for increased attention to prevention and early identification of hand dermatitis and support further testing of the workplace screening tool. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Rosmarinus officinalis L. as cause of contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Miroddi, M; Calapai, G; Isola, S; Minciullo, P L; Gangemi, S

    2014-01-01

    Because of the widespread use of botanicals, it has become crucial for health professionals to improve their knowledge about safety problems. Several herbal medicines contain chemicals with allergenic properties responsible for contact dermatitis. Among these, one is Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), a plant used since ancient times in folk medicine; at the present time it is used worldwide as a spice and flavouring agent, as a preservative and for medicinal and cosmetic purposes. The present article aims to revise and summarise scientific literature reporting cases of contact dermatitis caused by the use of R. officinalis as a raw material or as herbal preparations. Published case reports were researched on the following databases and search engines: PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, Scopus. The used keywords were: R. officinalis and rosemary each alone or combined with the words allergy, contact dermatitis, allergic contact dermatitis, sensitisation and occupational dermatitis. The published case reports show that both rosemary extracts and raw material can be responsible for allergic contact dermatitis. Two cases related to contact dermatitis caused by cross-reactivity between rosemary and thyme were also commented. The diterpene carnosol, a chemical constituent of this plant, has been imputed as a common cause for this reaction. The incidence of contact dermatitis caused by rosemary is not common, but it could be more frequent with respect to the supposed occurrence. It seems plausible that cases of contact dermatitis caused by rosemary are more frequent with respect to the supposed occurrence, because they could be misdiagnosed. For this reason, this possibility should be carefully considered in dermatitis differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Contact dermatitis to Vicks VapoRub.

    PubMed

    Noiles, Kristin; Pratt, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Vicks VapoRub (VVR) is a commonly used inhalant ointment that helps relieve symptoms of upper respiratory tract infections. It contains several plant substances, including turpentine oil, eucalyptus oil, and cedar leaf oil, which can potentially irritate or sensitize the skin, as well as camphor, menthol, nutmeg oil, and thymol. Although many reports describe allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) to the various constituents in VVR ointment, there are no cases of VVR directly causing ACD. We present a case of a patient who developed an ACD secondary to application of her VVR.

  20. Defining intrinsic vs. extrinsic atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Karimkhani, Chante; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2015-06-16

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin condition characterized by eczematous lesions, i.e. ill-demarcated erythematous patches and plaques. AD is commonly associated with elevated immunoglobulin E (IgE) and atopic disorders, such as asthma, hay fever, and food allergies. Rackemann and Mallory were some of the first to distinguish between asthma based on the presence ("extrinsic") or absence ("intrinsic") of allergy. This distinction has subsequently been applied to AD based on the presence ("extrinsic") or absence ("intrinsic") of increased IgE and atopic disease. Although the distinction between intrinsic and extrinsic AD is widely used, it remains controversial.

  1. Prevention and treatment of diaper dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kanti, Varvara

    2018-03-01

    Diaper dermatitis (DD) is one of the most common skin conditions that infants suffer from and their caregivers manage in the first months post-birth. As such, questions of effective prevention and treatment of the condition often arise. Nonmedical skincare practices that support healthy skin barrier function can prevent DD manifestation or alleviate the condition in many cases. The usage of barrier emollients and improved diaper technology contributes to keeping moisture and irritants away from an infant's delicate skin. This paper addresses facts behind commonly asked questions from caregivers regarding DD and discusses effective measures to prevent and treat the condition. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. New and developing therapies for atopic dermatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Hajar, Tamar; Gontijo, João Renato Vianna; Hanifin, Jon M

    2018-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease. New understanding in disease pathogenesis has led to a considerable number of promising new drugs in development. New topical agents can be especially helpful for children, providing an alternative to the need for chronic topical corticosteroid use. While many patients with mild or moderate disease can be managed with topical treatments, there are unmet needs for recalcitrant and severe cases. New and developing therapies hold promise for real advances in management of this complex disease. PMID:29641707

  3. Anti-bacterial activity of some Brazilian medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Maria Raquel Ferreira; de Souza Luna, Josiane; dos Santos, Aldenir Feitosa; de Andrade, Maria Cristina Caño; Sant'Ana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Genet, Jean-Pierre; Marquez, Béatrice; Neuville, Luc; Moreau, Nicole

    2006-04-21

    Extracts from various organs of 25 plants of Brazilian traditional medicine were assayed with respect to their anti-bacterial activities against Escherichia coli, a susceptible strain of Staphylococcus aureus and two resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus harbouring the efflux pumps NorA and MsrA. Amongst the 49 extracts studied, 14 presented anti-bacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, including the ethanolic extracts from the rhizome of Jatropha elliptica, from the stem barks of Schinus terebinthifolius and Erythrina mulungu, from the stems and leaves of Caesalpinia pyramidalis and Serjania lethalis, and from the stem bark and leaves of Lafoensia pacari. The classes of compounds present in the active extracts were determined as a preliminary step towards their bioactivity-guided separation. No extracts were active against Escherichia coli.

  4. Bacteriostatic influence of red laser light on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and photodynamic enhancement of this effect with Photoditazine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, A. V.; Brill, G. E.; Bugaeva, I. O.; Tuchina, E. S.; Ponomaryov, G. V.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2018-04-01

    The influence of red laser irradiation on the growth of colonies of Staphylococcus aureus and photodynamic effect of the photosensitizer Photoditazine were performed. It was established that the emission of red laser light caused an inhibition of bacterial growth. This effect on standard strain of Staphylococcus aureus was evident only when relatively high doses of radiation (180 j/cm2). Photosensitivity of the methicillin-resistant strains was much higher: bacteriostatic effect of red light was observed already at the dose of 60 j/cm2 . Pre-treatment of bacterial cells by Photoditazine significantly enhances the inhibitory effect of the laser light.

  5. Oral administration of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subspecies bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 suppresses inflammation by decreasing interleukin-6 responses in a murine model of atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kano, Hiroshi; Kita, Junko; Makino, Seiya; Ikegami, Shuji; Itoh, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-01

    The oral intake of Lactobacillus spp. can provide beneficial effects to the host by modulating the immune response. Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an allergic inflammatory disease mediated by various immune responses. In this study, we examined the effect of a Lactobacillus strain, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus OLL1073R-1 (OLL1073R-1), on AD development in a murine model of AD that was developed by the topical application of mite antigen in NC/Nga mice. The oral intake of heat-killed OLL1073R-1 cells inhibited both the development of dermatitis and the elevation of an acute inflammation marker, serum amyloid A. Another bacterial strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus OLL2984, exerted no inhibitory effects on dermatitis. The oral intake of heat-killed OLL1073R-1 cells also attenuated secretion of IL-6 from lymph node cells in response to mite antigen and reduced IL-6 levels in inflamed tissues, such as auricles. Production of IFN-γ or IL-4 was not influenced by OLL1073R-1 intake. We also found that inhibition of IL-6 signaling by gp130-Fc (a fusion protein consisting of the extracellular portion of glycoprotein 130 fused to the Fc region of human IgG1) markedly decreased the severity of dermatitis in NC/Nga mice. Moreover, secretion of IL-6 by lymph node cells was augmented in NC/Nga mice compared with that in BALB/c mice. These results indicate that IL-6 plays an essential role in the development of dermatitis in the NC/Nga mouse model of AD, and that OLL1073R-1 inhibits dermatitis, at least in part, by suppressing the IL-6 response. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Bacterial diskospondylitis in juvenile mink from 2 Ontario mink farms

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Jorge; Vidaña, Beatriz; Cruz-Arambulo, Robert; Slavic, Durda; Tapscott, Brian; Brash, Marina L.

    2013-01-01

    Nine juvenile mink with hind-limb paresis/paralysis from 2 Ontario farms were submitted for necropsy. Diagnostic tests revealed spinal compression and severe thoracic diskospondylitis with intralesional Gram-positive coccoid bacterial colonies. Streptococcus canis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, and hemolytic Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from vertebral lesions. PMID:24155490

  7. Bacterial diskospondylitis in juvenile mink from 2 Ontario mink farms.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Jorge; Vidaña, Beatriz; Cruz-Arambulo, Robert; Slavic, Durda; Tapscott, Brian; Brash, Marina L

    2013-09-01

    Nine juvenile mink with hind-limb paresis/paralysis from 2 Ontario farms were submitted for necropsy. Diagnostic tests revealed spinal compression and severe thoracic diskospondylitis with intralesional Gram-positive coccoid bacterial colonies. Streptococcus canis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, and hemolytic Staphylococcus spp. were isolated from vertebral lesions.

  8. Wound-Related Allergic/Irritant Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Alavi, Afsaneh; Sibbald, R Gary; Ladizinski, Barry; Saraiya, Ami; Lee, Kachiu C; Skotnicki-Grant, Sandy; Maibach, Howard

    2016-06-01

    To provide information from a literature review about the prevention, recognition, and treatment for contact dermatitis. This continuing education activity is intended for physicians and nurses with an interest in skin and wound care. After participating in this educational activity, the participant should be better able to:1. Identify signs and symptoms of and diagnostic measures for contact dermatitis.2. Identify causes and risks for contact dermatitis.3. Select appropriate treatment for contact dermatitis and its prevention. Contact dermatitis to wound care products is a common, often neglected problem. A review was conducted to identify articles relevant to contact dermatitis.A PubMed English-language literature review was conducted for appropriate articles published between January 2000 and December 2015.Contact dermatitis is both irritant (80% of cases) or allergic (20% of cases). Frequent use of potential contact allergens and impaired barrier function of the skin can lead to rising sensitization in patients with chronic wounds. Common known allergens to avoid in wound care patients include fragrances, colophony, lanolin, and topical antibiotics.Clinicians should be cognizant of the allergens in wound care products and the potential for sensitization. All medical devices, including wound dressings, adhesives, and bandages, should be labeled with their complete ingredients, and manufacturers should be encouraged to remove common allergens from wound care products, including topical creams, ointments, and dressings.

  9. Atopic Dermatitis and Comorbidities: Added Value of Comprehensive Dermatoepidemiology.

    PubMed

    Nijsten, Tamar

    2017-05-01

    Atopic dermatitis is common and in its severe form is devastating. This chronic inflammatory dermatosis is part of the atopic syndrome, which includes asthma, food allergies, and hay fever and is known to be associated with mental health disorders. In line with psoriasis, several recent observational studies using national survey and linkage data have suggested a link between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease. The atopic dermatitis field can benefit from the past experiences in psoriasis research and should not follow the same path, but, rather, aim for a more comprehensive approach from the beginning. A recent German consortium studying links between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease first screened a large claims database, followed by analyses of more deeply phenotyped (birth) cohorts with longitudinal data. In addition, genetic and metabolic analyses assessing the predisposition of patients with atopic dermatitis for cardiovascular disease were performed. Overall, the association between atopic dermatitis and cardiovascular disease was at most modest, but in more refined cohorts the cardiovascular risk profile and genetic architecture was comparable. A more integrated approach could create clarity about the clinical relevance of cardiovascular disease in individuals with atopic dermatitis sooner, avoid speculation that affects patient care, and save scientific resources. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  11. Contagious ovine digital dermatitis: an emerging disease.

    PubMed

    Duncan, J S; Angell, J W; Carter, S D; Evans, N J; Sullivan, L E; Grove-White, D H

    2014-09-01

    The novel sheep disease, contagious ovine digital dermatitis (CODD) was first described in the UK in 1997. The disease is characterised by severe lameness associated with initial inflammation at the coronary band, followed by progressive separation of the hoof capsule from the underlying tissue. On microbiological examination, treponeme bacteria have been frequently isolated from cases of CODD, including treponemes phylogenetically identical to those associated with bovine digital dermatitis (BDD). Dichelobacter nodosus and Fusobacterium necrophorum have also been isolated from CODD lesions although their role in the pathogenesis remains uncertain. While epidemiological data indicate that the prevalence of CODD is increasing in the UK, the routes of transmission and associated risk factors have not been clearly elucidated. Evidenced-based treatment trials indicate that parenteral administration of long-acting amoxicillin is an efficacious treatment for CODD, while anecdotal evidence suggests other antibiotics, given locally and/or parenterally, may also be beneficial. Further microbiological and epidemiological research is urgently required to develop sustainable control strategies, including the development of vaccines and appropriate biosecurity and farm management protocols. In this review current knowledge of the clinical, aetiological, and epidemiological aspects of CODD is assessed as well as approaches to its control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry Inaugural Case Data.

    PubMed

    Goldenberg, Alina; Mousdicas, Nico; Silverberg, Nanette; Powell, Douglas; Pelletier, Janice L; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Zippin, Jonathan; Fonacier, Luz; Tosti, Antonella; Lawley, Leslie; Wu Chang, Mary; Scheman, Andrew; Kleiner, Gary; Williams, Judith; Watsky, Kalman; Dunnick, Cory A; Frederickson, Rachel; Matiz, Catalina; Chaney, Keri; Estes, Tracy S; Botto, Nina; Draper, Michelle; Kircik, Leon; Lugo-Somolinos, Aida; Machler, Brian; Jacob, Sharon E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in US children. More widespread diagnostic confirmation through epicutaneous patch testing is needed. The aim was to quantify patch test results from providers evaluating US children. The study is a retrospective analysis of deidentified patch test results of children aged 18 years or younger, entered by participating providers in the Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry, during the first year of data collection (2015-2016). One thousand one hundred forty-two cases from 34 US states, entered by 84 providers, were analyzed. Sixty-five percent of cases had one or more positive patch test (PPT), with 48% of cases having 1 or more relevant positive patch test (RPPT). The most common PPT allergens were nickel (22%), fragrance mix I (11%), cobalt (9.1%), balsam of Peru (8.4%), neomycin (7.2%), propylene glycol (6.8%), cocamidopropyl betaine (6.4%), bacitracin (6.2%), formaldehyde (5.7%), and gold (5.7%). This US database provides multidisciplinary information on pediatric ACD, rates of PPT, and relevant RPPT reactions, validating the high rates of pediatric ACD previously reported in the literature. The registry database is the largest comprehensive collection of US-only pediatric patch test cases on which future research can be built. Continued collaboration between patients, health care providers, manufacturers, and policy makers is needed to decrease the most common allergens in pediatric consumer products.

  13. [Latex gloves dermatitis in health care workers].

    PubMed

    Mattei, O; Di Martino, T; Ferraro, P

    2007-01-01

    With regard to health care workers the irritative contact dermatitis represents about the 80% of all the dermopathies in sanitary staff whereas the allergic contact dermatitis covers approximately the 20% of the professional dermatoses. In our study 4 cases of allergy to latex in hospital nurses are presented; the clinical history is described for each of them as well as the resulting judgment of suitability to the specific work. In general population the allergy to latex is estimated to be approximately 1-6%; in sanitary staff it rises to 5-12%. We have to observe that not all the sensitive subjects show symptoms of allergy. Actually the 4 cases described represent less than 1% of the surveyed group. The sensitization is likely to be so reduced also thanks to the application of preventive guide-lines such as the one proposed by NIOSH. In Italy the criteria in preventing allergic reactions to latex are illustrated in a consensus document issued by a study-team from Italian Association of the Health Workers.

  14. Novel Therapeutic Approaches to Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Osinka, Katarzyna; Dumycz, Karolina; Kwiek, Bartłomiej; Feleszko, Wojciech

    2018-06-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is one of the most common inflammatory skin diseases. The number of people affected by AD is relatively high and seems to be rising. Although mild and moderate forms of the disease can be well controlled by the use of emollients, topical corticosteroids, and topical calcineurin inhibitors, treatment of severe is still a huge challenge. The new hope is biologic drugs, magic bullets in allergy, targeted at different points of the complex pathomechanism of inflammation in AD. In this review, novel biologic therapies are discussed, including recombinant monoclonal antibodies directed against various interleukin pathways (such as IL-4, IL-13, TSLP, IL-31, and IL-12/23), on immunoglobulin E, molecules acting as T cells, B cells, etc. Of biological drugs, the most promising seems to be anti-IL-4/IL-13 therapy (dupilumab-the biological agent) and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor (crisaborole-a small molecule). A deep understanding of the AD pathomechanism provides a new perspective for tailor-made treatment of severe atopic dermatitis.

  15. Feline atopic dermatitis: a retrospective study of 45 cases (2001-2012).

    PubMed

    Ravens, Philippa A; Xu, Bei J; Vogelnest, Linda J

    2014-04-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is recognized as a common cause of pruritus in cats, but it remains incompletely characterized. The aim of the study was to evaluate cases of confirmed feline AD. Fourty-five cats from a dermatology referral practice (2001-2012). A retrospective case record review was carried out using strict diagnostic criteria, including exclusion of flea-bite hypersensitivity and adverse food reaction. Disease prevalence was 12.5%, with domestic mixed (n = 24), Abyssinian (n = 6) and Devon rex (n = 3) cat breeds predisposed. Median age of onset was 2 years (62% <3 years; 22% >7 years; range 3 months to 12 years). Common presentations were severe (82%), nonseasonal (82%), waxing/waning (36%) pruritus, with alopecia/crusting/excoriations and/or erosions/ulceration (73%). Miliary dermatitis (20%) and eosinophilic granuloma complex lesions (27%) occurred. The face/head (71%), ventral abdomen (51%), neck (51%), limbs (38%), pinnae (31%), dorsum/rump (31%) and feet (16%) were frequently affected sites; lesions were restricted to the head/neck in only five cats (11%). Concurrent otitis externa (16%), superficial bacterial pyoderma (49%), Malassezia dermatitis (7%), flea-bite hypersensitivity (24%) and adverse food reaction (13%) occurred. Strong reactions on intradermal allergen testing were common (68%; 19 of 30), most frequently to pollens (61%) and/or insects (46%). Good response to ciclosporin (100%; 10 of 10), systemic glucocorticoids (55%; 22 of 40) and allergen-specific immunotherapy (57%; 13 of 23) and good/partial response to antihistamines (67%; 22 of 33) were reported. The prevalence of feline AD was higher than previously suggested, and breed predispositions were confirmed. Severe nonseasonal pruritus was most common, with a varied spectrum of lesions affecting a range of body areas. © 2014 ESVD and ACVD.

  16. Determinants of acquisition and carriage of Staphylococcus aureus in infancy.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Sharon J; Justice, Anita; Griffiths, D; de Silva, G D I; Kantzanou, M N; Crook, Derrick; Sleeman, Karen; Day, Nicholas P J

    2003-12-01

    Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus is a major risk factor for invasive S. aureus disease. The aim of this study was to define factors associated with carriage. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal community-based study of infants and their mothers for a period of 6 months following delivery. The epidemiology of carriage was examined for 100 infant-mother pairs. Infant carriage varied significantly with age, falling from 40 to 50% during the first 8 weeks to 21% by 6 months. Determinants of infant S. aureus carriage included maternal carriage, breastfeeding, and number of siblings. Bacterial typing of S. aureus was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing. The majority of individuals carried a single strain of S. aureus over time, and the mother was the usual source for colonizing isolates in infants. The effect of other components of the normal nasal flora on the development of S. aureus carriage was examined in 157 consecutive infants. Negative associations (putative bacterial interference) between S. aureus and other species occurred early in infancy but were not sustained. An increasing antistaphylococcal effect observed over time was not attributable to bacterial interference. S. aureus carriage in infants is likely to be determined by a combination of host, environmental, and bacterial factors, but bacterial interference does not appear to be an ultimate determinant of carrier status.

  17. Epidemiology of occupational contact dermatitis in a North Italian population.

    PubMed

    Lodi, A; Mancini, L L; Ambonati, M; Coassini, A; Ravanelli, G; Crosti, C

    2000-03-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis (OCD) is a very important skin disease both for its high frequency and for its social and economic implications. The aim of our work is to evaluate the epidemiology of occupational contact dermatitis in a north-Italian population and the possibility of a correct etiological diagnosis using the patch test standard series of GIRDCA (Italian Group of Resarch on Contact Dermatitis). We patch tested 1,565 out-patients affected by dermatitis with standard series GIRDCA and with other specific professional haptens. The manifestations were suspected of being of occupational origin by a dermatologist on the basis of clinical and anamnestic data. Of all the recorded professions we have considered only the more numerically significant: food industry, building industry, textile industry, employees, cleaners, hospital personnel, hairdressers, housewives, mechanics and metallurgists. Sixty-nine percent of contact dermatitis was found in women, the hairdressers had the greatest number of patients in the younger group (68.7% in the 11-20 years age group) and the textile industry workers in older group (100% in the 41-50 years age group). A positive allergological anamnesis emerged in 32.3% of allergic contact dermatitis. Irritant contact dermatitis (10.6%) was more frequent than allergic contact dermatitis (8.4%). The hands are the most common localization (94. 4%). The allergen with the highest frequency of positive reactions is p-phenylenediamine (25.3%). We discuss the frequency of positives to various groups of allergens in each profession and the principal means of contact. Because of the frequency of this type of occupational skin disease, we stress the importance of prevention. The standard series GIRDCA was found to be adequate for recognizing occupational contact dermatitis in most of our patients (74%).

  18. Synergistic action between sisomicin and mezlocillin against gram-negative bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Soares, L A; Trabulsi, L R

    1979-01-01

    The combined effect of sisomicin and 6-[(R)-2-[3-methylsulfonyl-2-oxo-imidazolidine-1-carboxamido]-2-phenyl-acetamido-a1-penicillanic acid sodium salt (mezlocillin, Baypen) was studied against 50 bacterial strains, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus spp. Klebsiella-Enterobacter, E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus. No antagonism or indifference was detected with the strains studied. Both antibiotics were synergistic against 62% of the strains, and partially synergistic against 38%. Out of the bacteria studied, Staphylococcus aureus was the most susceptible to the combined action of sisomicin and mezlocillin.

  19. Occupational Airborne Contact Dermatitis From Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    DeKoven, Joel G; Yu, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Few published reports have described occupational contact dermatitis from proton pump inhibitor (PPI) exposure in the literature. We present an additional case of a 58-year-old male pharmaceutical worker with an occupational airborne allergic contact dermatitis to PPIs confirmed by patch testing. This is a novel report of workplace exposure to dexlansoprazole and esomeprazole PPIs with resultant clinical contact allergy and relevant positive patch test results to these 2 agents. A literature review of all previously reported cases of occupational contact dermatitis to PPI is summarized. The case also emphasizes the importance of even minute exposures when considering workplace accommodation.

  20. AIRBORNE CONTACT DERMATITIS – CURRENT PERSPECTIVES IN ETIOPATHOGENESIS AND MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Sanjeev; De, Dipankar; Mahajan, Rahul

    2011-01-01

    The increasing recognition of occupational origin of airborne contact dermatitis has brought the focus on the variety of irritants, which can present with this typical morphological picture. At the same time, airborne allergic contact dermatitis secondary to plant antigens, especially to Compositae family, continues to be rampant in many parts of the world, especially in the Indian subcontinent. The recognition of the contactant may be difficult to ascertain and the treatment may be even more difficult. The present review focuses on the epidemiological, clinical and therapeutic issues in airborne contact dermatitis. PMID:22345774

  1. [Inpatient rehabilitation of chronic dermatoses illustrated by atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Nürnberg, W

    2005-07-01

    Atopic dermatitis is defined as a chronically relapsing skin disease resulting from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. It usually occurs during early childhood and shows typical clinical manifestations, depending on the patient's age. In cases of chronic atopic dermatitis, negative effects on professional and social activities and participation have to be expected. To counteract or overcome these threatening impairments in the different facets of life, prescribing inpatient rehabilitative measures should be considered early. Dermatological rehabilitation according to guidelines guarantees an interdisciplinary and multimodal treatment of atopic dermatitis.

  2. [Atopic dermatitis in children: general principles of management].

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Yusuke Leo; Christen-Zaech, Stéphanie

    2013-04-03

    Atopic dermatitis is the most frequent dermatosis in childhood. Numerous studies underscored the central role of skin barrier alterations in the pathogenesis of the inflammatory skin lesions. The management of atopic dermatitis has to be multidimensional. It combines among others some daily local care and a sporadic topical anti-inflammatory treatment during the acute flare-ups. The objective of this article is to summarize, in light of the recent European guidelines, the general principles of management of atopic dermatitis, for the general practitioner.

  3. Microbiota Analysis of an Environmental Slurry and Its Potential Role as a Reservoir of Bovine Digital Dermatitis Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Klitgaard, Kirstine; Strube, Mikael L; Isbrand, Anastasia; Jensen, Tim K; Nielsen, Martin W

    2017-06-01

    At present, very little information exists regarding what role the environmental slurry may play as an infection reservoir and/or route of transmission for bovine digital dermatitis (DD), a disease which is a global problem in dairy herds. To investigate whether DD-related bacteria belong to the indigenous microbiota of the dairy herd environment, we used deep amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene in 135 slurry samples collected from different sites in 22 dairy farms, with and without DD-infected cows. Both the general bacterial populations and digital dermatitis-associated Treponema were targeted in this study. The results revealed significant differences in the bacterial communities between the herds, with only 12 bacterial taxa shared across at least 80% of all the individual samples. These differences in the herd microbiota appeared to reflect mainly between-herd variation. Not surprisingly, the slurry was dominated by ubiquitous gastrointestinal bacteria, such as Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae Despite the low relative abundance of spirochetes, which ranged from 0 to 0.6%, we were able to detect small amounts of bacterial DNA from DD-associated treponemes in the slurry. However, the DD-associated Treponema spp. were detected only in samples from herds with reported DD problems. These data indicate that treponemes involved in the pathogenesis of DD are not part of the normal environmental microflora in dairy herds without clinical DD and, consequently, that slurry is not a primary reservoir of infection. IMPORTANCE Bovine digital dermatitis (DD), a dermal disease which causes lameness in dairy cattle, is a serious problem worldwide. To control this disease, the infection reservoirs and transmission routes of DD pathogens need to be clarified. The dairy herd slurry may be a pathogen reservoir of DD-associated bacteria. The rationale for the present study was, therefore, to examine whether DD-associated bacteria are always present in slurry or if they are

  4. Comparison on conjunctival sac bacterial flora of the seniors with dry eye in Ganzi autonomous prefecture

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Liu, Zhi-Rong; Chen, Hui; Fan, Ying-Chuan; Duo, Ji; Zheng, Hong; Wang, Guang-Jin; Li, Yu-Chan; Jiachu, Dan-Ba; Zewang, Ge-Ma

    2013-01-01

    AIM To compare the bacterial flora in palpebral conjunctiva of xerophthalmia seniors of Tibetan, Yi and Han, and analyze the differences and similarities of the bacteria. METHODS The test subjects were selected from 2 Tibetan, 2 Yi and 3 Han populated places, respectively. Total 222 seniors (444 eyes) with dry eye were examined. Secretion was collected from the palpebral conjunctiva of the subjects and then inoculated onto a blood agar plate. After 48h of incubation, the bacteria were examined for the differences and similarities between different ethnics. RESULTS There was no significant difference (P>0.05) of Gram stain characterization, dominant bacteria and number of the bacterial species present in oxrophthalmia patients among Tibetan, Yi and Han nationalities. The bacteria presented in all groups include staphylococcus epidermidis, corynebacterium, micrococcus luteu, intracellular bacteria sphingomonas, pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bacteria detected from the two of three ethnic groups were staphylococcus aureus, staphylococcus haemolyticus, escherichia coli, kytococcus sedentarius, streptococcus angina, micrococcus lylae, and staphylococcus heads. The incidence rate of bacteria-associated dry eye in Tibetan population was significantly lower than that of Han and Yi population. CONCLUSION There is no significant difference in the bacteria flora of palpebral conjunctiva observed among dry eye elder populations of Tibetan, Yi and Han people. All of staphylococcus epidermidis, corynebacterium, micrococcus luteu, intracellular bacteria sphingomonas, pseudomonas aeruginosa, staphylococcus aureus, staphylococcus haemolyticus, escherichia coli, kytococcus sedentarius, streptococcus angina, micrococcus lylae and staphylococcus heads are common bacteria flora of the three nationalities inhibiting in this area. PMID:23991377

  5. An outbreak of mud-wrestling-induced pustular dermatitis in college students. Dermatitis palaestrae limosae.

    PubMed

    Adler, A I; Altman, J

    1993-01-27

    To investigate an outbreak of gram-negative folliculitis in relation to a common exposure, mud wrestling, and identify risk factors for dermatitis among those who mud wrestled. Case-control study. University of Washington, Seattle. Two college-residence groups of students. Cultures from affected students and from mud similar to that used for wrestling yielded Enterobacteriaceae. The odds ratio associated with mud wrestling was 79.5 (95% confidence interval, 13.9 to 895.4). Increased time spent wrestling was associated with increased risk. Skin trauma during wrestling or immersion in the mud increased the risk of infection (odds ratio, 23.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.7 to 1440.4). Mud wrestling is one cause of pustular follicular dermatitis. Trauma to the skin may be a necessary cofactor for the development of infection.

  6. Vitamin D in Atopic Dermatitis, Chronic Urticaria and Allergic Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Quirk, Shannon K; Rainwater, Ellecia; Shure, Anna K; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vitamin D influences allergen-induced pathways in the innate and adaptive immune system, and its potential immunomodulatory role in allergic skin disorders has been explored. This comprehensive review article provides an overview of the role of vitamin D in three common dermatologic conditions: atopic dermatitis (AD), chronic urticaria, and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). Whereas the literature regarding vitamin D and AD has resulted in mixed findings, several studies have described an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and AD severity, and improvement in AD with vitamin D supplementation. Similarly, several studies report an inverse relationship between vitamin D levels and severity of chronic urticaria. Although current research in humans remains limited, an increased likelihood of ACD has been demonstrated in vitamin D-deficient mice. Additional well-designed clinical trials will be necessary to determine whether vitamin D supplementation should be recommended for prevention or adjuvant treatment of these common dermatologic conditions. PMID:27014952

  7. Live bee acupuncture (Bong-Chim) dermatitis: dermatitis due to live bee acupuncture therapy in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Joon Soo; Lee, Min Jung; Chung, Ki Hun; Ko, Dong Kyun; Chung, Hyun

    2013-12-01

    Live bee acupuncture (Bong-Chim) dermatitis is an iatrogenic disease induced by so-called live bee acupuncture therapy, which applies the honeybee (Apis cerana) stinger directly into the lesion to treat various diseases in Korea. We present two cases of live bee acupuncture dermatitis and review previously published articles about this disease. We classify this entity into three stages: acute, subacute, and chronic. The acute stage is an inflammatory reaction, such as anaphylaxis or urticaria. In the chronic stage, a foreign body granuloma may develop from the remaining stingers, similar to that of a bee sting reaction. However, in the subacute stage, unlike bee stings, we see the characteristic histological "flame" figures resulting from eosinophilic stimulation induced by excessive bee venom exposure. We consider this stage to be different from the adverse skin reaction of accidental bee sting. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  8. Evolution of Staphylococcus aureus during human colonization and infection.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J Ross

    2014-01-01

    The diversification of bacterial pathogens during infection is central to their capacity to adapt to different anatomical niches, evade the host immune system, and overcome therapeutic challenges. For example, antimicrobial treatment may fail due to the development of resistance during infection, which is often accompanied by transition to a less virulent state during chronic, persistent infection. In this review, the adaptation of the major human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus to its host environment during infection will be discussed, particularly in the context of new sequencing technologies which have opened a gateway towards understanding of the molecular processes underlying those adaptations. We now have the capacity to address previously intractable questions regarding bacterial diversification during infection which will ultimately lead to enhanced understanding of pathogenesis and the nature of epidemics, and will inform the design of effective therapeutic measures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of Dupilumab in Patients ≥12 to <18 Years of Age, With Moderate-to-Severe Atopic Dermatitis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-12-18

    Moderate-to-Severe Atopic Dermatitis; Dermatitis, Dermatitis Atopic; Eczema, Skin Diseases, Skin; Diseases Genetic, Genetic; Diseases Inborn, Skin; Disease, Eczematous Skin; Hypersensitivity, Immediate; Hypersensitivity, Immune System Diseases; Dermatitis, Atopic

  10. Gentle cleansing and moisturizing for patients with atopic dermatitis and sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Wai Kwong

    2009-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a common condition characterized by pruritus, inflammation, and dryness of the skin. Inflammation disrupts the barrier function of the stratum corneum, predisposing the skin to be dry, and increases susceptibility to irritants and secondary bacterial infection. Sensitive skin is common, reported by 40-50% of women and 30% of men in the US, Europe, and Japan. Basic requirements in managing eczema and sensitive skin include effective cleansers that do not compromise skin barrier integrity, alleviation of skin dryness, and restoration of skin barrier function through the use of therapeutic moisturizers. The selection of a skin cleanser is therefore an important part of managing these conditions. Studies have reported clinical improvement with the use of soap-free cleansers in combination with topical treatments. While topical corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents are mainstays of treatment for atopic dermatitis, therapeutic moisturizers are important adjuncts. Moisturizers improve skin hydration, reduce susceptibility to irritation, restore the integrity of the stratum corneum, and enhance the efficacy of topical corticosteroids.

  11. Laser Capture Microdissection of Feline Streptomyces spp Pyogranulomatous Dermatitis and Cellulitis.

    PubMed

    Traslavina, R P; Reilly, C M; Vasireddy, R; Samitz, E M; Stepnik, C T; Outerbridge, C; Affolter, V K; Byrne, B A; Lowenstine, L J; White, S D; Murphy, B

    2015-11-01

    Suspected Streptomyces spp infections were identified in 4 cats at UC Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital between 1982 and 2011. Three had ulcerated, dark red mycetomas involving the dermis, subcutis, and fascia with fistulous tracts and/or regional lymphadenopathy. One cat had pyogranulomatous mesenteric lymphadenitis. Granulomatous inflammation in all cats contained colonies of Gram-positive, non-acid-fast organisms. All 4 cats failed to respond to aggressive medical and surgical treatment and were euthanized. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to selectively harvest DNA from the affected formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues. Cloned amplicons from LCM-derived tissue confirmed the presence of Streptomyces spp in the dermatitis cases. Amplicons from the remaining cat with peritoneal involvement aligned with the 16S ribosomal RNA gene for Actinomycetales. Usually considered a contaminant, Streptomyces spp can be associated with refractory pyogranulomatous dermatitis and cellulitis in cats with outdoor access. LCM is useful in the diagnosis of bacterial diseases where contamination may be an issue. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Contact urticaria, allergic contact dermatitis, and photoallergic contact dermatitis from oxybenzone.

    PubMed

    Landers, Maeran; Law, Sandra; Storrs, Frances J

    2003-03-01

    There is little literature regarding conventional patch tests and photopatch tests to oxybenzone resulting in both immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. A patient was patch-tested and photopatch-tested to various sunscreen chemicals. Both immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions were observed with oxybenzone. The positive patch tests were also photoaccentuated. Oxybenzone, a common sunscreen allergen, can result in both contact urticaria and delayed-type hypersensitivity on both conventional patch testing and photopatch testing. Allergic contact dermatitis to sunscreen chemicals has traditionally included contact urticaria, allergic contact dermatitis, and photoallergic contact dermatitis. Due to the recognition of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and its esters as sensitizers, the presence of benzophenones in "PABA-free" sunscreens has become more prevalent, especially in sunscreens with a sun protection factor (SPF) greater than 8. In our patient, immediate- and delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions were seen to oxybenzone (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzophenone, 2-benzoyl-5-methoxyphenol, benzophenone-3, Eusolex 4360, Escalol 567, EUSORB 228, Spectra-Sorb UV-9, Uvinul M-40) upon conventional patch testing and photopatch testing.

  13. Occupational dermatitis in health care workers evaluated for suspected allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kadivar, Salmon; Belsito, Donald V

    2015-01-01

    Contact dermatitides occur commonly among health care workers (HCWs). To contrast the atopic status and incidence, location, and final diagnosis of skin diseases afflicting HCWs versus non-HCWs (NHCWs) evaluated for suspicion of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD); and among the population diagnosed with ACD, to compare the incidence and occupational relatedness of allergens found in HCWs with the rates observed in NHCWs. Between July 1, 1994, and May 30, 2014, 2611 patients underwent patch testing by the senior author. Of these, 165 were classified as HCWs based on their primary occupation. Statistical analysis was done using a χ test. Health care workers were more likely than NHCWs to be women and to have hand dermatitis. Women, but not men, HCWs suffered more irritant contact dermatitis. Health care workers had significantly more work-related ACD, especially to formaldehyde, quaternium-15, 2-bromo-2-nitropropane-1,3-diol, cocamide diethanolamine (DEA), thiuram mix, carba mix, thimerosal, benzalkonium chloride, glutaraldehyde, and bacitracin. Only patients suspected of having ACD were tested. Our population was geographically limited to metropolitan Kansas City, MO and metropolitan New York, NY. Health care workers suffer more from occupational ACD, especially of the hands, than do NHCWs, including to allergens not present on available standard allergen series.

  14. Recombination-Mediated Host Adaptation by Avian Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Susan; Pascoe, Ben; Méric, Guillaume; Mageiros, Leonardos; Yahara, Koji; Hitchings, Matthew D.; Friedmann, Yasmin; Wilkinson, Thomas S.; Gormley, Fraser J.; Mack, Dietrich; Bray, James E.; Lamble, Sarah; Bowden, Rory; Jolley, Keith A.; Maiden, Martin C.J.; Wendlandt, Sarah; Schwarz, Stefan; Corander, Jukka; Fitzgerald, J. Ross

    2017-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus are globally disseminated among farmed chickens causing skeletal muscle infections, dermatitis, and septicaemia. The emergence of poultry-associated lineages has involved zoonotic transmission from humans to chickens but questions remain about the specific adaptations that promote proliferation of chicken pathogens. We characterized genetic variation in a population of genome-sequenced S. aureus isolates of poultry and human origin. Genealogical analysis identified a dominant poultry-associated sequence cluster within the CC5 clonal complex. Poultry and human CC5 isolates were significantly distinct from each other and more recombination events were detected in the poultry isolates. We identified 44 recombination events in 33 genes along the branch extending to the poultry-specific CC5 cluster, and 47 genes were found more often in CC5 poultry isolates compared with those from humans. Many of these gene sequences were common in chicken isolates from other clonal complexes suggesting horizontal gene transfer among poultry associated lineages. Consistent with functional predictions for putative poultry-associated genes, poultry isolates showed enhanced growth at 42 °C and greater erythrocyte lysis on chicken blood agar in comparison with human isolates. By combining phenotype information with evolutionary analyses of staphylococcal genomes, we provide evidence of adaptation, following a human-to-poultry host transition. This has important implications for the emergence and dissemination of new pathogenic clones associated with modern agriculture. PMID:28338786

  15. BACTERIAL CONTAMINATION OF STETHOSCOPES

    PubMed Central

    Bukharie, Huda A.; Al-Zahrani, Hussain; Rubaish, Abdullah M.; Abdulmohsen, Mohammed F.

    2004-01-01

    Background: A stethoscope, an essential tool of the medical profession, can become a source of nosocomial infection. Objective: To determine the frequency of bacterial contamination of stethoscopes as well as the practices used for cleaning them. Methods: Cultures were taken from 100 stethoscopes used by different medical personnel in different hospital services. The stethoscopes were collected while the staff filled in a questionnaire. Results: Thirty (30%) out of the 100 stethoscopes surveyed were contaminated with microorganisms. The majority of organisms isolated were gram-positive bacteria (gram positive bacilli 12%, gram-negative bacteria 9%, gram-positive cocci 9%). None of the stethoscopes grew methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus. Overall, 21% of the health personnel cleaned their stethoscopes daily, 47% weekly, and 32% yearly. None of the health care workers cleaned their stethoscopes after every patient. Nurses cleaned their stethoscopes more often than physicians and medical students. Conclusion: Stethoscopes may be important in the spread of infectious agents. Their regular disinfection after use on each patient should be considered, particularly in such areas of the hospital, as the critical care units, and oncology units which house many patients with antibiotic-resistant organisms. PMID:23012043

  16. Red, Itchy Rash? Get the Skinny on Dermatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... poison ivy. The stems and leaves of these plants produce a chemical that’s likely to cause allergies. ... even pets—that come into contact with these plants. Mild cases of allergic contact dermatitis usually disappear ...

  17. Gallate Contact Dermatitis: Product Update and Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Holcomb, Zachary E; Van Noord, Megan G; Atwater, Amber Reck

    Allergic contact dermatitis related to cosmetic use can result from allergens not routinely evaluated by standard patch test protocols. Propyl, octyl, and dodecyl gallates are commonly used antioxidant preservatives with reports of associated allergic contact dermatitis in the literature. The objectives of this review were to investigate the role of gallates in allergic contact dermatitis and to explore products containing these preservatives. A systematic review of the literature through April 2016 was performed to explore cases of reported gallate allergy. Food and cosmetic product databases were searched for products containing gallates. Seventy-four cases of gallate contact allergy have been reported. In addition, a variety of commercially available cosmetic products and foods contain gallate chemicals. Propyl gallate is the most commonly reported gallate contact allergen and often causes facial and/or hand dermatitis.

  18. An outbreak of gangrenous dermatitis in commerical broiler chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Gangrenous dermatitis (GD) is an emerging disease with increasing economic importance. This experiment was undertaken to describe symptoms, patholgocial changes and diagnosis of GD and to study their immunopathology and cytokine expression alterations. In addition to description of symptoms, pathol...

  19. Cinnamon Sugar Scrub Dermatitis: "Natural" Is Not Always Best.

    PubMed

    Admani, Shehla; Hill, Hannah; Jacob, Sharon E

    2017-01-01

    Children are at risk of developing allergic contact dermatitis to fragrances. Personal hygiene products, even those labeled hypoallergenic or considered all natural, may be a significant source of fragrance exposure in this population. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a serious pathogen in periprosthetic joint infections: comparison to Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Lourtet-Hascoët, J; Bicart-See, A; Félicé, M P; Giordano, G; Bonnet, E

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis and to compare these to the characteristics of PJI due to Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. A retrospective multicentre study including all consecutive cases of S. lugdunensis PJI (2000-2014) was performed. Eighty-eight cases of staphylococcal PJI were recorded: 28 due to S. lugdunensis, 30 to S. aureus, and 30 to S. epidermidis, as identified by Vitek 2 or API Staph (bioMérieux). Clinical symptoms were more often reported in the S. lugdunensis group, and the median delay between surgery and infection was shorter for the S. lugdunensis group than for the S. aureus and S. epidermidis groups. Regarding antibiotic susceptibility, the S. lugdunensis strains were susceptible to antibiotics and 61% of the patients could be treated with levofloxacin + rifampicin. The outcome of the PJI was favourable for 89% of patients with S. lugdunensis, 83% with S. aureus, and 97% with S. epidermidis. S. lugdunensis is an emerging pathogen with a pathogenicity quite similar to that of S. aureus. This coagulase-negative Staphylococcus must be identified precisely in PJI, in order to select the appropriate surgical treatment and antibiotics . Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Biotic Interactions Shape the Ecological Distributions of Staphylococcus Species

    PubMed Central

    Kastman, Erik K.; Kamelamela, Noelani; Norville, Josh W.; Cosetta, Casey M.; Dutton, Rachel J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many metagenomic sequencing studies have observed the presence of closely related bacterial species or genotypes in the same microbiome. Previous attempts to explain these patterns of microdiversity have focused on the abiotic environment, but few have considered how biotic interactions could drive patterns of microbiome diversity. We dissected the patterns, processes, and mechanisms shaping the ecological distributions of three closely related Staphylococcus species in cheese rind biofilms. Paradoxically, the most abundant species (S. equorum) is the slowest colonizer and weakest competitor based on growth and competition assays in the laboratory. Through in vitro community reconstructions, we determined that biotic interactions with neighboring fungi help resolve this paradox. Species-specific stimulation of the poor competitor by fungi of the genus Scopulariopsis allows S. equorum to dominate communities in vitro as it does in situ. Results of comparative genomic and transcriptomic experiments indicate that iron utilization pathways, including a homolog of the S. aureus staphyloferrin B siderophore operon pathway, are potential molecular mechanisms underlying Staphylococcus-Scopulariopsis interactions. Our integrated approach demonstrates that fungi can structure the ecological distributions of closely related bacterial species, and the data highlight the importance of bacterium-fungus interactions in attempts to design and manipulate microbiomes. PMID:27795388

  2. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yucheng; Dai, Tianhong; Gu, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Background: With the increasing emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial strains, there is a pressing need for the development of alternative treatment for infections. Antimicrobial blue light (aBL) has provided a simple and effective approach. Methods: We first investigated the effectiveness of aBL (415 nm) inactivation of USA300 LAClux (a communityacquired Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain) both in the planktonic and biofilm forms. The survival of the bacteria in suspensions was determined by serial dilution and that of the biofilm-embedded bacteria was determined by bioluminescence quantification. Using a mouse model of thermal burn infected with USA300 LAClux, we further assessed the effectiveness of aBL for treating localized infections. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time bacterial viability in vivo. Results: In vitro study showed that, for the planktonic counterpart of the bacteria or the 24-h-old biofilms, an irradiance of 55 mW/cm2 for 60 min resulted in a 4.61 log10 or 2.56 log10 inactivation, respectively. In vivo study using infected mouse burns demonstrated that a 2.56-log10 inactivation was achieved after 100-mW/cm2 irradiation for 62 min. Conclusions: aBL is a potential alternative approach for treating Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

  3. American Contact Dermatitis Society Core Allergen Series: 2017 Update.

    PubMed

    Schalock, Peter C; Dunnick, Cory A; Nedorost, Susan; Brod, Bruce; Warshaw, Erin; Mowad, Christen

    The American Contact Dermatitis Society Core Allergen Series was introduced in 2012. After 4 years of use, changes in our recommended allergens are necessary. For the updated series, we have reordered the first 4 panels to approximately mirror the current TRUE Test and removed parthenolide, triclosan, glutaraldehyde, and jasmine. Polymyxin B, lavender, sodium benzoate, ethylhexylglycerin, and benzoic acid are new additions to the American Contact Dermatitis Society series.

  4. [Toxic ulcerative contact dermatitis due to prefabricated concrete (cement burns)].

    PubMed

    Bandmann, H J; Agathos, M

    1977-01-01

    In the present report the case of a toxic ulcerous contact dermatitis (cement burns) by pre-fabricated concrete is described. This can be clearly distinguished by anamnesis, findings and development from the allergic and cumulative-toxic contact dermatitis caused by cement and related substances. It is pointed out, that in the few cases of "cement burns" made known up to now, pre-fabricated concrete was always the triggering agent.

  5. Parents' reported preference scores for childhood atopic dermatitis disease states

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Joëlle Y; Reed, Shelby D; Weinfurt, Kevin P; Kahler, Kristijan H; Walter, Emmanuel B; Schulman, Kevin A

    2004-01-01

    Background We sought to elicit preference weights from parents for health states corresponding to children with various levels of severity of atopic dermatitis. We also evaluated the hypothesis that parents with children who had been diagnosed with atopic dermatitis would assign different preferences to the health state scenarios compared with parents who did not have a child with atopic dermatitis. Methods Subjects were parents of children aged 3 months to 18 years. The sample was derived from the General Panel, Mommies Sub-Panel, and Chronic Illness Sub-Panel of Harris Interactive. Participants rated health scenarios for atopic dermatitis, asthma, and eyeglasses on a visual analog scale, imagining a child was experiencing the described state. Results A total of 3539 parents completed the survey. Twenty-nine percent had a child with a history of atopic dermatitis. Mean preference scores for atopic dermatitis were as follows: mild, 91 (95% confidence interval [CI], 90.7 to 91.5); mild/moderate, 84 (95%CI, 83.5 to 84.4); moderate, 73 (95%CI, 72.5 to 73.6); moderate/severe, 61 (95%CI, 60.6 to 61.8); severe, 49 (95% CI, 48.7 to 50.1); asthma, 58 (95%CI, 57.4 to 58.8); and eyeglasses, 87(95%CI, 86.3 to 87.4). Conclusions Parents perceive that atopic dermatitis has a negative effect on quality of life that increases with disease severity. Estimates of parents' preferences can provide physicians with insight into the value that parents place on their children's treatment and can be used to evaluate new medical therapies for atopic dermatitis. PMID:15491500

  6. Irritant contact dermatitis in warehouse employees.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, J; Rycroft, R J; Waddy, R S; Irvine, D

    1993-02-01

    A detailed survey of skin complaints amongst 114 airline employees working in a new warehouse revealed 26 cases of skin problems which originated during the 2 1/2 year operation. A clinical survey of broadly the same population confirmed 14 cases from 98 employees as chronic irritant contact dermatitis of the hands. The work involved the reception, unpackaging, inspection, repackaging and dispatch of aircraft parts. The source of the skin irritation was not to be found in the work itself. Rather, the presence among the employees of two severe cases of non-occupational eczema, combined with the idea that incoming aircraft parts from foreign countries might be 'dirty' in some way, had caused a heightened perception of a risk of skin disease, and the frequency of hand washing had increased as a result. Over-frequent hand washing in a few employees had resulted in precisely what the warehouse staff had been trying to avoid.

  7. Seborrheic Dermatitis and Dandruff: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Borda, Luis J.; Wikramanayake, Tongyu C.

    2016-01-01

    Seborrheic Dermatitis (SD) and dandruff are of a continuous spectrum of the same disease that affects the seborrheic areas of the body. Dandruff is restricted to the scalp, and involves itchy, flaking skin without visible inflammation. SD can affect the scalp as well as other seborrheic areas, and involves itchy and flaking or scaling skin, inflammation and pruritus. Various intrinsic and environmental factors, such as sebaceous secretions, skin surface fungal colonization, individual susceptibility, and interactions between these factors, all contribute to the pathogenesis of SD and dandruff. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on SD and dandruff, including epidemiology, burden of disease, clinical presentations and diagnosis, treatment, genetic studies in humans and animal models, and predisposing factors. Genetic and biochemical studies and investigations in animal models provide further insight on the pathophysiology and strategies for better treatment. PMID:27148560

  8. Allergic contact dermatitis from shellac in mascara.

    PubMed

    Le Coz, Christophe-J; Leclere, Jean-Marie; Arnoult, Elisabeth; Raison-Peyron, Nadia; Pons-Guiraud, Annick; Vigan, Martine

    2002-03-01

    We report 6 cases of allergic contact dermatitis of the eyelids due to mascara. Allergy occurred in women aged 17-34 years, between September 1999 and June 2001. The main ingredient responsible for allergy was shellac, which gave positive patch test reactions in 5/5 patients. This resinous substance is mainly used in cosmetics, food and industry. The exact nature of the hapten remains unknown, and its presence and level in shellac can vary with the source and the treatments applied to it. One patient was also sensitized to quaternium-22, a quaternary ammonium compound in the cosmetic. These reports underline the rôle of networks, such as REVIDAL-GERDA, in monitoring the emergence of contact allergens and disseminating such information among the medical community.

  9. Current status of atopic dermatitis in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Takahito; Takeuchi, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, chronic or chronically relapsing, severely pruritic, eczematous skin disease. AD is the second most frequently observed skin disease in dermatology clinics in Japan. Prevalence of childhood AD is 12-13% in mainland Japan; however, it is only half that (about 6%) in children from Ishigaki Island, Okinawa. Topical steroids and tacrolimus are the mainstay of treatment. However, the adverse effects and emotional fear of long-term use of topical steroids have induced a "topical steroid phobia" in patients throughout the world. Undertreatment can exacerbate facial/periocular lesions and lead to the development of atopic cataract and retinal detachment due to repeated scratching/rubbing/patting. Overcoming topical steroid phobia is a key issue for the successful treatment of AD through education, understanding and cooperation of patients and their guardians. PMID:22053299

  10. Vitamin D and Atopic Dermatitis in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Vestita, Michelangelo; Filoni, Angela; Congedo, Maurizio; Foti, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D features immunomodulatory effects on both the innate and adaptive immune systems, which may explain the growing evidence connecting vitamin D to allergic diseases. A wealth of studies describing a beneficial effect of vitamin D on atopic dermatitis (AD) prevalence and severity are known. However, observations linking high vitamin D levels to an increased risk of developing AD have also been published, effectively creating a controversy. In this paper, we review the existing literature on the association between AD and vitamin D levels, focusing on childhood. As of today, the role of vitamin D in AD is far from clear; additional studies are particularly needed in order to confirm the promising therapeutic role of vitamin D supplementation in childhood AD. PMID:25973433

  11. Allergic contact dermatitis caused by cosmetic products.

    PubMed

    González-Muñoz, P; Conde-Salazar, L; Vañó-Galván, S

    2014-11-01

    Contact dermatitis due to cosmetic products is a common dermatologic complaint that considerably affects the patient's quality of life. Diagnosis, treatment, and preventive strategies represent a substantial cost. This condition accounts for 2% to 4% of all visits to the dermatologist, and approximately 60% of cases are allergic in origin. Most cases are caused by skin hygiene and moisturizing products, followed by cosmetic hair and nail products. Fragrances are the most common cause of allergy to cosmetics, followed by preservatives and hair dyes; however, all components, including natural ingredients, should be considered potential sensitizers. We provide relevant information on the most frequent allergens in cosmetic products, namely, fragrances, preservatives, antioxidants, excipients, surfactants, humectants, emulsifiers, natural ingredients, hair dyes, sunscreens, and nail cosmetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  12. TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HERPESVIRAL DERMATITIS IN A CAPTIVE CHEETAH (ACINONYX JUBATUS) IN NAMIBIA.

    PubMed

    Flacke, Gabriella L; Schmidt-Küntzel, Anne; Marker, Laurie

    2015-09-01

    A 9-yr-old male cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) housed at the Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia developed cutaneous lesions consisting of alopecia, erythema, ulceration, and crusting on the left fore and hind limbs. Histopathology of skin biopsies in conjunction with indirect fluorescent antibody and polymerase chain reaction testing confirmed a diagnosis of feline herpesvirus-1 dermatitis; microbial culture indicated secondary bacterial infection. Therapy included targeted systemic antimicrobial and antiviral treatment, topical medications, and repeated cryotherapy. Lesions exhibited varying degrees of clinical improvement but, overall, progressed in extent, size, and severity during the subsequent 2.5 yr of intense treatment. The cheetah was ultimately euthanized due to a guarded prognosis and concerns about poor quality of life. Potential factors initiating or contributing (or both) to the severity and nonhealing nature of the cutaneous lesions include chronic unidentified stress, altered immune system function, and other environmental influences.

  13. Polysensitization and individual susceptibility to allergic contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gosnell, Amy L; Schmotzer, Brian; Nedorost, Susan T

    2015-01-01

    Patients with allergic contact dermatitis to 1 antigen have been shown to be at increased risk of developing delayed type hypersensitivity reactions to additional antigens. Both environmental and genetic factors likely influence the risk of sensitization. The aim of this study was to determine whether polysensitization occurs at a higher frequency than would be expected based on chance and whether polysensitization occurs more often in subsets of patients with hand involvement and atopic dermatitis. From a database of patch test results from a single practitioner, the probability of having positive reactions to 3 or more unrelated allergens was calculated under the assumption that positive reactions are independent and compared with the observed proportion having positive reactions to 3 or more unrelated allergens. The analysis was repeated excluding patients with leg involvement as a proxy for venous insufficiency dermatitis. The proportion of patients from the polysensitized and nonpolysensitized cohorts with either hand involvement or a history of atopic dermatitis was also calculated. Polysensitization occurs more often than expected based on chance. Polysensitized patients were more likely to have hand dermatitis. Atopic dermatitis was not significantly associated with polysensitization in this analysis. Polysensitized individuals may represent a phenotype with increased genetic susceptibility to sensitization.

  14. Epidermal multinucleated keratinocytes: a histopathologic clue to dermatitis artefacta.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Schowalter, Michael K; Piliang, Melissa P; Fernandez, Anthony P

    2016-10-01

    Dermatitis artefacta is a psycho-cutaneous disorder characterized by self-inflicted cutaneous injuries, often in association with an underlying psychiatric disorder or as a response to external stressors. Cutaneous lesions suggestive of dermatitis artefacta are dependent on the means of injury and thus may be morphologically variable, but typically have geometric shapes, spare hard-to-reach anatomic areas, and are present in variable stages of evolution at any specific time. Although a dermatologist may be suspicious of dermatitis artefacta in a given patient, making a definitive diagnosis is extremely challenging. Patients often clinically evade questioning and deny creating skin lesions, and histopathologic evaluation of lesional biopsies usually reveals non-specific epidermal and dermal changes and inflammation. Thus, identification of clues that lend support to a diagnosis of dermatitis artefacta would be welcomed by both clinicians and pathologists. Here we present a case of dermatitis artefacta with a unique, yet previously reported, histopathological finding of multinucleated keratinocytes within the epidermis. Although probably uncommon and dependent on the etiology of cutaneous injury, we believe this finding is important for dermatopathologists to be aware of as a potential diagnostic clue when evaluating biopsies in patients suspected to have dermatitis artefacta. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Less common clinical manifestations of atopic dermatitis: prevalence by age.

    PubMed

    Julián-Gónzalez, Rolando Elias; Orozco-Covarrubias, Luz; Durán-McKinster, Carola; Palacios-Lopez, Carolina; Ruiz-Maldonado, Ramon; Sáez-de-Ocariz, Marimar

    2012-01-01

    The common manifestations of atopic dermatitis (AD) appear sequentially with involvement of the cheeks in infancy, flexural extremities in childhood, and hands in adulthood. Although less common clinical manifestations are well described, they have not been the subject of epidemiologic studies to describe their prevalence in specific age groups. This observational, cross-sectional, comparative study included 131 children younger than 18 of both sexes with AD who attended the clinics of the Dermatology Department of the National Institute of Pediatrics in Mexico City. Patients were examined to determine the presence of infrequent clinical manifestations of AD during infancy, preschool and school age, and adolescence and stratified according to sex, age, and number of clinical signs. A chi-square test was used to detect differences according to age and sex. Logistic regression analysis was also performed. The main findings according to age were genital dermatitis and papular-lichenoid dermatitis variant in infants; atopic feet, prurigo-like, nummular pattern, and erythroderma in preschool and school-aged children; and eyelid eczema and nipple dermatitis in adolescents. The risk of development of nipple dermatitis and eyelid eczema increased with age, and the development of genital dermatitis decreased with age. The knowledge of the prevalence of less common clinical manifestations of AD according to age in different populations might be helpful in diagnosing incipient cases of AD. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. [Bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Romero Herrero, Daniel; Andreu Domingo, Antonia

    2016-07-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the main cause of vaginal dysbacteriosis in the women during the reproductive age. It is an entity in which many studies have focused for years and which is still open for discussion topics. This is due to the diversity of microorganisms that cause it and therefore, its difficult treatment. Bacterial vaginosis is probably the result of vaginal colonization by complex bacterial communities, many of them non-cultivable and with interdependent metabolism where anaerobic populations most likely play an important role in its pathogenesis. The main symptoms are an increase of vaginal discharge and the unpleasant smell of it. It can lead to serious consequences for women, such as an increased risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including human immunodeficiency virus and upper genital tract and pregnancy complications. Gram stain is the gold standard for microbiological diagnosis of BV, but can also be diagnosed using the Amsel clinical criteria. It should not be considered a sexually transmitted disease but it is highly related to sex. Recurrence is the main problem of medical treatment. Apart from BV, there are other dysbacteriosis less characterized like aerobic vaginitis of which further studies are coming slowly but are achieving more attention and consensus among specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Converting a Staphylococcus aureus toxin into effective cyclic pseudopeptide antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Solecki, Olivia; Mosbah, Amor; Baudy Floc'h, Michèle; Felden, Brice

    2015-03-19

    Staphylococcus aureus produces peptide toxins that it uses to respond to environmental cues. We previously characterized PepA1, a peptide toxin from S. aureus, that induces lytic cell death of both bacterial and host cells. That led us to suggest that PepA1 has an antibacterial activity. Here, we demonstrate that exogenously provided PepA1 has activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. We also see that PepA1 is significantly hemolytic, thus limiting its use as an antibacterial agent. To overcome these limitations, we converted PepA1 into nonhemolytic derivatives. Our most promising derivative is a cyclic heptapseudopeptide with inconsequential toxicity to human cells, enhanced stability in human sera, and sharp antibacterial activity. Mechanistically, linear and helical PepA1 derivatives form pores at the bacterial and erythrocyte surfaces, while the cyclic peptide induces bacterial envelope reorganization, with insignificant action on the erythrocytes. Our work demonstrates that bacterial toxins might be an attractive starting point for antibacterial drug development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Phenotypic and Molecular Aspects of Staphylococcus spp. Isolated from Hospitalized Patients and Beef in the Brazilian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Pieri, Fabio A; Vargas, Taise F; Galvão, Newton N; Nogueira, Paulo A; Orlandi, Patrícia P

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and compare Staphylococcus spp. isolated from hospitalized patients and beef marketed in the city of Porto Velho-RO, Brazil. The isolates were subjected to antibiogram tests, adherence capacity tests, detection of the mecA gene, and epidemiological investigation by the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique, using the primers M13 and H12. Among the 123 Staphylococcus spp. isolates, 50 were identified as S. aureus and 73 as coagulase-negative Staphylococcus; among the latter, 7 species were identified. It was observed that the coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolates showed greater adhesion ability than S. aureus. The profile of antimicrobial susceptibility was different among isolates, all of which were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid, and had high penicillin resistance rates, varying according to the bacterial class and the source. In this study, all strains were negative for mecA gene detection; however, 36% of S. aureus and 17% of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus were resistant to oxacillin. The genetic relationship of these bacteria, analyzed by RAPD, was able to discriminate the species of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus strains of S. aureus along its origin. It was concluded that the isolates of Staphylococcus spp. derived from beef and human infections differ genetically. Thus, it is suggested that isolates from beef, which were grouped within hospital isolates, were probably carried via contact with beef in hospital professionals or patients.

  19. AzaSite® inhibits Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus biofilm formation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wu, Eric C; Kowalski, Regis P; Romanowski, Eric G; Mah, Francis S; Gordon, Y Jerold; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of azithromycin (AZM) 1% ophthalmic solution in DuraSite® (AzaSite®) on biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci in vitro. Susceptible and resistant clinical strains (n = 8) of S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci were challenged with serial dilutions of AzaSite® and its components: AZM, benzalkonium chloride (BAK), and the DuraSite drug delivery vehicle. After 20 h of incubation, bacterial growth was quantified using a spectrophotometer (A = 600 nm). Plates were stained with crystal violet and biofilm formation was quantified spectrophotometrically at A = 590 nm. AzaSite® and AZM inhibited bacterial growth (P < 0.05) and biofilm formation (P < 0.05) in AZM-susceptible strains at all studied dilutions. AZM-resistant strains treated with AzaSite® exhibited a significant reduction in biofilm formation (P < 0.05) at subinhibitory concentrations (1.25%-5%). AZM had no effect on bacterial growth in resistant strains but conferred a small reduction in biofilm formation at concentrations from 1.25 to 10 mg/mL in most strains. DuraSite® inhibited biofilm formation at concentrations between 10% and 2.5% in all studied strains (P < 0.05), without affecting bacterial growth. BAK inhibited bacterial growth and biofilm formation in all strains between concentrations of 0.042 and 0.375 mg/mL (P < 0.05). AzaSite®, AZM, or BAK prevented biofilm formation by inhibiting growth of AZM-susceptible strains. AzaSite®, AZM, and DuraSite® also reduced biofilm formation at subinhibitory concentrations for growth. Our data indicate that AZM has a moderate inhibitory effect on biofilm formation, whereas DuraSite® appears to play a greater role in the inhibition of staphylococcal biofilm formation by AzaSite®.

  20. A localized flare of dermatitis may render patch tests uninterpretable in some patients with recently controlled widespread dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Magembe, Anna J; Davis, Mark D P; Richardson, Donna M

    2009-01-01

    Patch testing rarely is confounded by localized dermatitis induced in the area being tested (usually the back). Its occurrence renders the interpretation of patch tests impossible. To review our experience of the circumstances in which this phenomenon occurs during patch testing. We retrospectively reviewed patients with this phenomenon who underwent patch testing from January 1, 2002, through June 30, 2006. Of the 3,569 patients tested, 12 (0.34% [9 men and 3 women]) had development of this phenomenon. All patients previously had recent widespread dermatitis that was suppressed temporarily with topical corticosteroids and wet dressings at the time of patch testing. The period between control of the dermatitis and the initiation of patch testing was less than 1 week for all patients. Three patients (25%) had recently discontinued therapy with systemic corticosteroids (less than 1 week earlier). In patients with irritable skin either immediately after widespread dermatitis is controlled or after the cessation of systemic corticosteroid treatment, a flare of dermatitis induced by patch testing may render patch tests unreadable and therefore uninterpretable. To avoid this confounding occurrence, a waiting period between control of widespread dermatitis and initiation of patch testing is advised.

  1. Bacteriophage Transduction in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Olson, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    The genetic manipulation of Staphylococcus aureus for molecular experimentation is a valuable tool for assessing gene function and virulence. Genetic variability between strains coupled with difficult laboratory techniques for strain construction is a frequent roadblock in S. aureus research. Bacteriophage transduction greatly increases the speed and ease of S. aureus studies by allowing movement of chromosomal markers and plasmids between strains. This technique enables the S. aureus research community to focus investigations on clinically relevant isolates.

  2. Isolation, Identification and Antibacterial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus spp. Associated with the Mobile Phones of University Students.

    PubMed

    Furuhata, Katsunori; Ishizaki, Naoto; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Kawakami, Yasushi; Lee, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Masahiro; Fukuyama, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    From May 2014 to February 2015, 319 university students (male, n=173; female n=146) of 18 to 24 years of age who carried mobile phones or computer tablets were selected as subjects. Staphylococcus spp. were detected in 101 of 319 samples (31.7%). In the present study, 11 strains of S. aureus were isolated and identified, not all of which were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Overall, 14 species were identified, with 11 strains (10.9%) of S. xylosus being isolated at the highest frequency. Following this were eight strains (7.9%) of S. cohnii and seven strains (6.9%) each of S. capitis and S. haemolyticus. Staphylococcus spp. isolation was performed with bacterial samples obtained from the mobile phones of 22 specific subjects (males, n=12; females, n=10). Staphylococcus spp. isolation was performed on days -1, 7 and 30 of the experiment. Staphylococcus spp. were positively detected one or more times in 12 subjects (54.5%). In one subject (8.3%), all three tests were positive. Furthermore, two tests were positive in three (25.0%). In the eight remaining subjects (66.7%) Staphylococcus spp. were detected only once. For the three abovementioned tests, we investigated the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns of the strains derived from the mobile phone and from the fingers of three subjects in whom the same bacterial species were isolated twice. From the cases with similarities between strains derived from the fingers and the mobile phones and cases, with consistency in the strains derived from the mobile phone at different times, commonality was observed in the strains derived from the fingers and mobile phones along with chronological uniformity in the strains derived from the mobile phones. A total of 101 Staphylococcus spp. strains were isolated from mobile phones. According to drug susceptibility tests, 99 strains (98.0%) were found to have some degree of resistance to drugs (excluding one strain each of S. aureus and S. haemolyticus

  3. ANTIBIOTICS IN MANAGEMENT OF STAPHYLOCOCCAL ENDOCARDITIS—With Special Reference to Increasing Bacterial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, David C.; Griffith, George C.; Pearson, Harold E.

    1951-01-01

    Eighteen patients with staphylococcal endocarditis were observed at the Los Angeles County Hospital over a 3-year period (1947-49, inclusive). Twelve died. Bacterial sensitivity studies were carried out in 15 of the cases, and there was resistance to penicillin in ten. Aureomycin was effective in two cases of Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis in which there was no response to penicillin therapy. In one case of Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis the organism was resistant to penicillin and developed increasing resistance to aureomycin. PMID:14812349

  4. Bacterial Survival in Laundered Fabrics

    PubMed Central

    Walter, William G.; Schillinger, John E.

    1975-01-01

    Bacterial survival was determined in linens (i) inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus (ii), taken from hospital isolation patients' beds, and (iii) used by students in their homes. Two different washers using temperatures of 38, 49, 54 and 60 C, respectively, for different times were employed along with a commercial tumbler dryer. Findings, after macerating the linens in a Waring blender and enumerating on nonselective media, indicate that acceptable levels of survivors can be achieved in motel and hotel linens by an 8- to 10-min wash cycle at 54 C followed by adequate drying. However, it is recommended that a wash cycle with 60 C for 10 to 13 min be employed for linens in health care factilities. The microbial significance of various laundering practices is discussed. PMID:1090256

  5. Staphylococcus argenteus from rabbits in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Indrawattana, Nitaya; Pumipuntu, Natapol; Suriyakhun, Nawarat; Jangsangthong, Arunee; Kulpeanprasit, Suphang; Chantratita, Narisara; Sookrung, Nitat; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Buranasinsup, Shutipen

    2018-06-21

    Staphylococcus argenteus, a novel species of the genus Staphylococcus or a member of the S. aureus complex, is closely related to S. aureus and is usually misidentified. In this study, the presence of S. argenteus in isolated S. aureus was investigated in 67 rabbits with abscess lesions during 2014-2016. Among 19 S. aureus complex isolates, three were confirmed to be S. argenteus by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, nonribosomal peptide synthetase gene amplification, and multilocus sequence type. All S. aureus complex isolates, including the S. aureus isolates, were examined for their antimicrobial resistance phenotype by disk diffusion and for their resistance genotype by PCR assays. Among the S. argenteus isolates, one was susceptible to all antimicrobial drugs and the other two were resistant to penicillin and doxycycline. In contrast, most S. aureus isolates were resistant to penicillin (37.5%), and gentamicin (12.5%). Moreover, S. aureus isolates harbored the blaZ, mecA, aacA-aphD, and mrs(A) as well as mutations of gyrA and grlA, but S. argenteus isolates carried solely the blaZ. S. argenteus isolates were investigated for enterotoxin (sea-sed) and virulence genes by PCR. One isolate carried sea, sec, and sed, whereas the other two isolates carried only sea or sed. No isolate carried seb and see. All three S. argenteus isolates carried hla, hlb, and clfA, followed by pvl, whereas coa, spa (IgG-binding region), and spa (x region) were not detected in the three isolates. This paper presents the first identification of S. argenteus from rabbits in Thailand. S. argenteus might be pathogenic because the isolates carried virulence genes. Moreover, antimicrobial resistance was observed. Investigations of this new bacterial species should be conducted in other animal species as well as in humans. © 2018 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Endocarditis in adults with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Marjolein J; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2013-05-21

    Endocarditis may precede or complicate bacterial meningitis, but the incidence and impact of endocarditis in bacterial meningitis are unknown. We assessed the incidence and clinical characteristics of patients with meningitis and endocarditis from a nationwide cohort study of adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis in the Netherlands from 2006 to 2012. Endocarditis was identified in 24 of 1025 episodes (2%) of bacterial meningitis. Cultures yielded Streptococcus pneumoniae in 13 patients, Staphylococcus aureus in 8 patients, and Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Streptococcus salivarius in 1 patient each. Clues leading to the diagnosis of endocarditis were cardiac murmurs, persistent or recurrent fever, a history of heart valve disease, and S aureus as the causative pathogen of bacterial meningitis. Treatment consisted of prolonged antibiotic therapy in all patients and surgical valve replacement in 10 patients (42%). Two patients were treated with oral anticoagulants, and both developed life-threatening intracerebral hemorrhage. Systemic (70%) and neurological (54%) complications occurred frequently, leading to a high proportion of patients with unfavorable outcome (63%). Seven of 24 patients (29%) with meningitis and endocarditis died. Endocarditis is an uncommon coexisting condition in bacterial meningitis but is associated with a high rate of unfavorable outcome.

  7. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed. PMID:26244150

  8. Strategy for improving extracellular lipolytic activities by a novel thermotolerant Staphylococcus sp. strain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Extracellular bacterial lipases received much attention for their substrate specificity and their ability to function under extreme environments (pH, temperature...). Many staphylococci produced lipases which were released into the culture medium. Reports of extracellular thermostable lipases from Staphylococcus sp. and active in alkaline conditions are not previously described. Results This study focused on novel strategies to increase extracellular lipolytic enzyme production by a novel Staphylococcus sp. strain ESW. The microorganism needed neutral or alkaline pH values between 7.0 and 12.0 for growth. For pH values outside this range, cell growth seemed to be significantly inhibited. Staphylococcus sp. culture was able to grow within a wide temperature range (from 30 to 55°C). The presence of oils in the culture medium leaded to improvements in cells growth and lipolytic enzyme activity. On the other hand, although chemical surfactants leaded to an almost complete inhibition of growth and lipolytic enzyme production, their addition along the culture could affect the location of the enzyme. In addition, our results showed that this novel Staphylococcus sp. strain produced biosurfactants simultaneously with lipolytic activity, when soapstock (The main co-product of the vegetable oil refining industry), was used as the sole carbon source. Conclusion A simultaneous biosurfactant and extracellular lipolytic enzymes produced bacterial strain with potential application in soap stock treatment PMID:22078466

  9. Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccine Enhances Colonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Michael J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Klugman, Keith P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community interactions at mucosal surfaces between viruses, like influenza virus, and respiratory bacterial pathogens are important contributors toward pathogenesis of bacterial disease. What has not been considered is the natural extension of these interactions to live attenuated immunizations, and in particular, live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs). Using a mouse-adapted LAIV against influenza A (H3N2) virus carrying the same mutations as the human FluMist vaccine, we find that LAIV vaccination reverses normal bacterial clearance from the nasopharynx and significantly increases bacterial carriage densities of the clinically important bacterial pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae (serotypes 19F and 7F) and Staphylococcus aureus (strains Newman and Wright) within the upper respiratory tract of mice. Vaccination with LAIV also resulted in 2- to 5-fold increases in mean durations of bacterial carriage. Furthermore, we show that the increases in carriage density and duration were nearly identical in all aspects to changes in bacterial colonizing dynamics following infection with wild-type (WT) influenza virus. Importantly, LAIV, unlike WT influenza viruses, had no effect on severe bacterial disease or mortality within the lower respiratory tract. Our findings are, to the best of our knowledge, the first to demonstrate that vaccination with a live attenuated viral vaccine can directly modulate colonizing dynamics of important and unrelated human bacterial pathogens, and does so in a manner highly analogous to that seen following wild-type virus infection. PMID:24549845

  10. Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry Data on Contact Allergy in Children With Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Sharon E.; McGowan, Maria; Silverberg, Nanette B.; Pelletier, Janice L.; Fonacier, Luz; Mousdicas, Nico; Powell, Doug; Scheman, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Importance Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) have a dynamic relationship not yet fully understood. Investigation has been limited thus far by a paucity of data on the overlap of these disorders in pediatric patients. Objective To use data from the Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry to elucidate the associations and sensitizations among patients with concomitant AD and ACD. Design, Setting, and Participants This retrospective case review examined 1142 patch test cases of children younger than 18 years, who were registered between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2015, by 84 health care providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) from across the United States. Data were gathered electronically from multidisciplinary providers within outpatient clinics throughout the United States on pediatric patients (ages 0-18 years). Exposures All participants were patch-tested to assess sensitizations to various allergens; history of AD was noted by the patch-testing providers. Main Outcomes and Measures Primary outcomes were sensitization rates to various patch-tested allergens. Results A total of 1142 patients were evaluated: 189 boys (34.2%) and 363 girls (65.8%) in the AD group and 198 boys (36.1%) and 350 girls (63.9%) in the non-AD group (data on gender identification were missing for 17 patients). Compared with those without AD, patch-tested patients with AD were 1.3 years younger (10.5 vs 11.8 years; P < .001) and had longer history of dermatitis (3.5 vs 1.8 years; P < .001). Patch-tested patients designated as Asian or African American were more likely to have concurrent AD (odds ratio [OR], 1.92; 95% CI, 1.20-3.10; P = .008; and OR, 4.09; 95% CI, 2.70-6.20; P <.001, respectively). Patients with AD with generalized distribution were the most likely to be patch tested (OR, 4.68; 95% CI, 3.50-6.30; P < .001). Patients with AD had different reaction profiles than those without AD, with increased

  11. Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry Data on Contact Allergy in Children With Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Sharon E; McGowan, Maria; Silverberg, Nanette B; Pelletier, Janice L; Fonacier, Luz; Mousdicas, Nico; Powell, Doug; Scheman, Andrew; Goldenberg, Alina

    2017-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) have a dynamic relationship not yet fully understood. Investigation has been limited thus far by a paucity of data on the overlap of these disorders in pediatric patients. To use data from the Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry to elucidate the associations and sensitizations among patients with concomitant AD and ACD. This retrospective case review examined 1142 patch test cases of children younger than 18 years, who were registered between January 1, 2015, and December 31, 2015, by 84 health care providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants) from across the United States. Data were gathered electronically from multidisciplinary providers within outpatient clinics throughout the United States on pediatric patients (ages 0-18 years). All participants were patch-tested to assess sensitizations to various allergens; history of AD was noted by the patch-testing providers. Primary outcomes were sensitization rates to various patch-tested allergens. A total of 1142 patients were evaluated: 189 boys (34.2%) and 363 girls (65.8%) in the AD group and 198 boys (36.1%) and 350 girls (63.9%) in the non-AD group (data on gender identification were missing for 17 patients). Compared with those without AD, patch-tested patients with AD were 1.3 years younger (10.5 vs 11.8 years; P < .001) and had longer history of dermatitis (3.5 vs 1.8 years; P < .001). Patch-tested patients designated as Asian or African American were more likely to have concurrent AD (odds ratio [OR], 1.92; 95% CI, 1.20-3.10; P = .008; and OR, 4.09; 95% CI, 2.70-6.20; P <.001, respectively). Patients with AD with generalized distribution were the most likely to be patch tested (OR, 4.68; 95% CI, 3.50-6.30; P < .001). Patients with AD had different reaction profiles than those without AD, with increased frequency of reactions to cocamidopropyl betaine, wool alcohol, lanolin, tixocortol pivalate, and

  12. Relationships among plasma granzyme B level, pruritus and dermatitis in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Yayoi; Kimura, Utako; Matsuda, Hironori; Tengara, Suhandy; Kamo, Atsuko; Umehara, Yoshie; Iizumi, Kyoichi; Kawasaki, Hiroaki; Suga, Yasushi; Ogawa, Hideoki; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Takamori, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease characterized by skin barrier dysfunction, allergic inflammation and intractable pruritus resistant to conventional antipruritic treatments, including H 1 -antihistamines. Granzymes (Gzms) are a family of serine proteases expressed by cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells that have been shown to modulate inflammation. However, the relationship between Gzms and pathology in AD remains unclear. This study assessed the correlation between plasma GzmB levels and severity of pruritus and dermatitis, in AD patients. Plasma was collected from 46 patients with AD, 24 patients with psoriasis, and 30 healthy controls. AD severity was assessed with the scoring atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) index, psoriasis severity with the psoriasis area and severity index (PASI), and degree of pruritus by visual analogue scale (VAS) score. GzmA, GzmB and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Plasma GzmB concentrations were significantly higher in patients with AD and psoriasis than in healthy controls. Correlation analyses showed that plasma GzmB concentrations positively correlated with SCORAD and serum levels of severity markers such as thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, and lactate dehydrogenase in AD patients. Moreover, plasma levels of GRP, an itch-related peptide, were higher in patients with AD, positively correlating with VAS score and plasma GzmB level. In addition, plasma GzmB concentration was significantly lower in the treatment group than the untreated group with AD. Meanwhile, there were no correlations among GzmB levels, VAS score and PASI score in patients with psoriasis. In contrast to the results of plasma GzmB, plasma GzmA levels were unchanged among AD, psoriasis and healthy groups, and showed no correlations with VAS score and SCORAD index in patients with AD. Plasma GzmB levels may reflect the degree of pruritus and dermatitis in

  13. Therapeutic Implications of a Barrier-Based Pathogenesis of Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, Joan S.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive Th2 cell signaling and IgE production play key roles in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis (AD). Yet, recent information suggests that the inflammation in AD instead is initiated by inherited insults to the barrier, including a strong association between mutations in FILAGGRIN and SPINK5 in Netherton syndrome, the latter of which provides an important clue that AD is provoked by excess serine protease activity. But acquired stressors to the barrier may also be required to initiate inflammation in AD, and in addition, microbial colonization by Staphylococcus aureus both amplifies inflammation, but also further stresses the barrier in AD. Therapeutic implications of these insights are as follows: While current therapy has been largely directed toward ameliorating Th2-mediated inflammation and/or pruritus, these therapies are fraught with short-term and potential long-term risks. In contrast, “barrier repair” therapy, with a ceramide-dominant triple-lipid mixture of stratum corneum lipids, is more logical, of proven efficacy, and it provides a far-improved safety profile. PMID:21174234

  14. Novel antibacterial and emollient effects of coconut and virgin olive oils in adult atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Verallo-Rowell, Vermén M; Dillague, Kristine M; Syah-Tjundawan, Bertha S

    2008-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) skin is dry and readily colonized by Staphylococcus aureus (SA). Coconut and olive oils are traditionally used to moisturize and treat skin infections. To compare virgin coconut oil (VCO) and virgin olive oil (VOO) in moisturizing dryness and removing SA from colonized AD skin. This was a double-blind controlled trial in two outpatient dermatology clinics with adult AD patients who were diagnosed by history, pattern, evolution, and skin lesions and who were randomized to apply VCO or VOO twice daily at two noninfected sites. SA cultures, photography, and objective-SCORAD severity index (O-SSI) scoring were done at baseline and after 4 weeks. Twenty-six subjects each received VCO or VOO. Of those on VCO, 20 were positive for SA colonies at baseline versus 12 on VOO. Post intervention, only 1 (5%) VCO subject remained positive versus 6 (50%) of those on VOO. Relative risk for VCO was 0.10, significantly superior to that for VOO (10:1, p = .0028; 95% CI, 0.01-0.73); thus, the number needed to treat was 2.2. For the O-SSI, the difference was not significant at baseline (p = .15) but was significantly different post treatment (p = .004); this was reduced for both oils (p < .005) but was greater with VCO. VCO and monolaurin's O-SSI reduction and in vitro broad-spectrum activity against SA (given clinical validity here), fungi, and viruses may be useful in the proactive treatment of AD colonization.

  15. Deciphering the Complexities of Atopic Dermatitis: Shifting Paradigms in Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Donald Y. M.; Guttman-Yassky, Emma

    2014-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease. It often precedes the development of food allergy and asthma. Recent insights into AD reveal abnormalities in terminal differentiation of the epidermal epithelium leading to a defective stratum corneum, which allows enhanced allergen penetration and systemic IgE sensitization. Atopic skin is also predisposed to colonization or infection by pathogenic microbes, most notably Staphylococcus aureus and herpes simplex virus (HSV). Causes of this abnormal skin barrier are complex and driven by a combination of genetic, environmental and immunologic factors. These factors likely account for the heterogeneity of AD onset, severity and natural history of this skin disease. Recent studies suggest prevention of AD can be achieved by early interventions protecting the skin barrier. Onset of lesional AD requires effective control of local and systemic immune activation for optimal management. Early intervention may improve long term outcomes for AD and reduce the systemic allergen sensitization leading to associated allergic diseases in the gastrointestinal and respiratory tract. PMID:25282559

  16. Case report of a pustular dermatitis outbreak in sheep: Clinical and food safety considerations

    PubMed Central

    Roccaro, Mariana; Piva, Silvia; Scagliarini, Alessandra; Giacometti, Federica; Serraino, Andrea; Merialdi, Giuseppe; Frasnelli, Matteo; Romano, Angelo; Bellio, Alberto; Decastelli, Lucia; Peli, Angelo

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this report is to describe an outbreak of pustular dermatitis in a flock of about 200 sheep, its clinical evolution and food safety implications. The onset of the symptoms was sudden and the lesions spread very quickly from ewe to ewe, so that in about 3 days almost all of the lactating sheep were stricken. Pustules from 5 different animals, six milk samples, two cheese samples, teat cup samples from the milking machine and farmer’s hands were analysed. A pure culture of Staphylococcus aureus, producing staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) C, was isolated from pustules. Milk and cheese showed a contamination by coagulase positive staphylococci <15 and 30 colony forming units respectively and the absence of SE. Farmer’s hands and teat cups samples resulted negative for coagulase positive staphylococci. Therapy with daily topical medicaments was prescribed and a prophylactic intervention was suggested by the administration of an autovaccine. The low level of milk and cheese contamination and the absence of SE in cheese supported the decision to not advise the farmer to recall cheese produced with milk from affected animals. PMID:29732332

  17. Case report of a pustular dermatitis outbreak in sheep: Clinical and food safety considerations.

    PubMed

    Roccaro, Mariana; Piva, Silvia; Scagliarini, Alessandra; Giacometti, Federica; Serraino, Andrea; Merialdi, Giuseppe; Frasnelli, Matteo; Romano, Angelo; Bellio, Alberto; Decastelli, Lucia; Peli, Angelo

    2018-03-31

    The objective of this report is to describe an outbreak of pustular dermatitis in a flock of about 200 sheep, its clinical evolution and food safety implications. The onset of the symptoms was sudden and the lesions spread very quickly from ewe to ewe, so that in about 3 days almost all of the lactating sheep were stricken. Pustules from 5 different animals, six milk samples, two cheese samples, teat cup samples from the milking machine and farmer's hands were analysed. A pure culture of Staphylococcus aureus , producing staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) C, was isolated from pustules. Milk and cheese showed a contamination by coagulase positive staphylococci <15 and 30 colony forming units respectively and the absence of SE. Farmer's hands and teat cups samples resulted negative for coagulase positive staphylococci. Therapy with daily topical medicaments was prescribed and a prophylactic intervention was suggested by the administration of an autovaccine. The low level of milk and cheese contamination and the absence of SE in cheese supported the decision to not advise the farmer to recall cheese produced with milk from affected animals.

  18. Allergic Contact Dermatitis to Ophthalmic Medications: Relevant Allergens and Alternative Testing Methods.

    PubMed

    Grey, Katherine R; Warshaw, Erin M

    Allergic contact dermatitis is an important cause of periorbital dermatitis. Topical ophthalmic agents are relevant sensitizers. Contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications can be challenging to diagnose and manage given the numerous possible offending agents, including both active and inactive ingredients. Furthermore, a substantial body of literature reports false-negative patch test results to ophthalmic agents. Subsequently, numerous alternative testing methods have been described. This review outlines the periorbital manifestations, causative agents, and alternative testing methods of allergic contact dermatitis to ophthalmic medications.

  19. [Behavior of different strains of Staphylococcus aureus against root canal filling cements].

    PubMed

    Pumarola, J; Berástegui, E; Canalda, C; Brau, E

    1991-01-01

    The mean goal of this study is the determination of the conduct of 120 strains of Staphylococcus aureus against seven root canal sealers: Traitement Spad, Endométhasone, N2 Universal, AH26 with silver, Diaket-A, Tubli Seal and Sealapex. The agar diffusion test was employed in the determination of its bacterial growth inhibition. The results obtained have demonstrated values very different between the tested strains. Therefore we recommended to employ strains with reference in the investigation of the bacterial growth inhibition in order to repeat equal experimentation conditions.

  20. The Collagen-Binding Adhesin Is a Virulence Factor in Staphylococcus aureus Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Rhem, Marcus N.; Lech, Elizabeth M.; Patti, Joseph M.; McDevitt, Damien; Höök, Magnus; Jones, Dan B.; Wilhelmus, Kirk R.

    2000-01-01

    A collagen-binding strain of Staphylococcus aureus produced suppurative inflammation in a rabbit model of soft contact lens-associated bacterial keratitis more often than its collagen-binding-negative isogenic mutant. Reintroduction of the cna gene on a multicopy plasmid into the mutant helped it regain its corneal adherence and infectivity. The topical application of a collagen-binding peptide before bacterial challenge decreased S. aureus adherence to deepithelialized corneas. These data suggest that the collagen-binding adhesin is involved in the pathogenesis of S. aureus infection of the cornea. PMID:10816547

  1. Bullous cryothermic dermatitis artefacta induced by deodorant spray abuse.

    PubMed

    Jacobi, A; Bender, A; Hertl, M; König, A

    2011-08-01

    Dermatitis artefacta belongs to a broad spectrum of factitious diseases of lesions usually self-induced by patients. Here we report a surprisingly effective induction of blisters and thermic dermatitis by excessive abuse of common deodorant sprays. We evaluated the clinical course and outcome in three patients with dermatitis artefacta induced by deodorant spray. A 12-year-old boy only admitted the abuse of deodorant spray after psychiatric intervention. Two adults (21-year-old and 37-year-old women) had borderline personality disorder and frankly reported the urge to induce pain by spraying for at least 100 s at a short distance. Bullous dermatitis was the acute presenting sign in all patients. The bullae were found on the extensor surfaces of the extremities, with a distribution of older lesions showing erosions and scarring and fresh lesions with intact bullae with a diameter of 3-15 cm. After searching for the causative agent and removal of the deodorant spray, clinical outcome showed a healing without and with scars. Cryo-damage by abuse of common deodorant sprays seems to become a popular mechanism by which an impressive bullous dermatitis can be artificially induced. Dermatologists and psychiatrist should be aware of this method of injury. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2010 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  2. Contact Dermatitis to Personal Sporting Equipment in Youth.

    PubMed

    Marzario, Barbara; Burrows, Dianne; Skotnicki, Sandy

    2016-07-01

    Contact dermatitis to personal sporting equipment in youth is poorly studied. To review the results of patch testing 6 youth to their sporting equipment in a dermatology general private practice from 2006 to 2011. A retrospective analysis of 6 youth aged 11 to 14 who were evaluated for chronic and persistent dermatitis occurring in relation to sports equipment was conducted. All patients were subjected to epicutaneous (patch) testing, which included some or all of the following: North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACGD) series, textile series, rubber series, corticosteroid series, and raw material from the patients' own personal equipment. All cases had 1 or more positive patch test reactions to an allergen within the aforementioned series, and 3 subjects tested positive to their personal equipment in raw form. Allergic contact dermatitis, not irritant, was deemed the relevant cause of chronic dermatitis in 4 of the 6 patients due to positive reactions to epicutaneous tests and/or personal equipment. The utility of testing to patients' own sporting equipment was shown to be of additional value and should be considered when patch testing for contact allergy to sporting equipment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Occupational Contact Dermatitis in the Canadian Aircraft Industry.

    PubMed

    Loranger, Camille; Moreau, Linda; Sasseville, Denis

    Aircraft building exposes workers to irritant and sensitizing products. The aim of this article was to study occupational dermatoses among aircraft workers over 25 years. The files of aerospace workers referred between 1990 and 2015 were extracted from the database of the McGill University Health Centre contact dermatitis clinic. These were subdivided according to demographics, type of work, patch testing results, and final diagnosis. Of 305 workers, 58% were 40 years or younger; one third were women. Onset of dermatitis varied from 2 months to 25 years, but 120 cases (39%) occurred during the first 3 years. Fifty-one percent of the cases involved assemblers, and 27% were composite material technicians, which were overrepresented as they constitute 10% of the workforce. Of the 305 workers, 152 suffered from allergic contact dermatitis, and 96 had irritant contact dermatitis. Of those with allergic contact dermatitis, 124 reacted to epoxy-based workplace products, but only 48 had positive patch tests to commercially available epoxy allergens. More than 60% of the cases of epoxy allergy would have been missed without testing with workplace products.

  4. Patch test results of the dental personnel with contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Oguzhan; Gul, Ulker

    2014-12-01

    Dental personnel have high risk of occupational contact dermatitis. The aim of this study is to detect the materials which cause contact sensitization and the frequency of contact dermatitis by using patch tests with European standard series and dental screening series in dental personnel. Between August 2008 and July 2009, 461 dental personnel working in Ankara (Turkey) were examined and age, gender, previous history of dermatitis, area of the skin affected and clinical diagnosis were noted. About 198 (43%) of the dental personnel were diagnosed contact dermatitis. Sixty-five of the dental personnel accepted to be patch tested. Dental technicians, dentists and dental nurses constitute 69.2%, 24.6% and 6.2% of patch tested 65 patients, respectively. Positive reactions to at least one allergen were detected with European standard series at 20% and with dental series at 10.8% among the dental personnel. The most common allergens were nickel sulfate (12.3%), acrylates (6.1%) and para-tertiary-butylphenol-formaldehyde resin (4.6%). The most common acrylate was ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (3.1%). We believe our study will be helpful to dermatologists about frequency of contact dermatitis among dental personnel and allergens that cause contact sensitivity for developing new methods to protect the personnel in dentistry against sensitization.

  5. [Role of IgE-dependent reactions in atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Dynowski, Jarosław; Wasowska-Królikowska, Krystyna; Modzelewska-Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Tomaszewska, Monika; Funkowicz, Marzena

    2007-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis is a disease of multifactorial pathogenesis. of the study was to establish the most common allergens responsible for development of atopic symptoms in children with atopic dermatitis. the study complied 36 children aged 4 months - 3 years treated in the Department of Children Allergology, Gastroenterology and Nutrition because of atopic dermatitis. With each case the patient and family history of atopy was collected and basic laboratory tests were conducted (including total IgE and specific IgE using Polly Check system). eosinophilia was found in 11/36 children, elevated total IgE level in 16/36 and specific IgE were present in 14/36 patients. 6 patients proved to have sIgE for more then one allergen. The most commonly found allergens were animal hair, and food allergens. In 22 cases in spite of obvious clinical symptoms requiring therapy at hospital, all sIgE were negative for all tested allergens. although estimating sIgE is commonly used in diagnosing atopic dermatitis, it may not be sufficient to establish complete diagnosis. It seems that animal hair and food allergens are mainly responsible for development of atopic dermatitis.

  6. 21 CFR 520.88a - Amoxicillin trihydrate film-coated tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... tissues (abscesses, lacerations, wounds), caused by susceptible strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and bacterial dermatitis caused by S. aureus... infections caused by susceptible organisms as follows: upper respiratory tract due to S. aureus...

  7. 21 CFR 520.88a - Amoxicillin trihydrate film-coated tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... tissues (abscesses, lacerations, wounds), caused by susceptible strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and bacterial dermatitis caused by S. aureus... infections caused by susceptible organisms as follows: upper respiratory tract due to S. aureus...

  8. 21 CFR 520.88a - Amoxicillin trihydrate film-coated tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... tissues (abscesses, lacerations, wounds), caused by susceptible strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and bacterial dermatitis caused by S. aureus... infections caused by susceptible organisms as follows: upper respiratory tract due to S. aureus...

  9. Fibrinogen Is at the Interface of Host Defense and Pathogen Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Flick, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Fibrinogen not only plays a pivotal role in hemostasis but also serves key roles in antimicrobial host defense. As a rapidly assembled provisional matrix protein, fibrin(ogen) can function as an early line of host protection by limiting bacterial growth, suppressing dissemination of microbes to distant sites, and mediating host bacterial killing. Fibrinogen-mediated host antimicrobial activity occurs predominantly through two general mechanisms, namely, fibrin matrices functioning as a protective barrier and fibrin(ogen) directly or indirectly driving host protective immune function. The potential of fibrin to limit bacterial infection and disease has been countered by numerous bacterial species evolving and maintaining virulence factors that engage hemostatic system components within vertebrate hosts. Bacterial factors have been isolated that simply bind fibrinogen or fibrin, promote fibrin polymer formation, or promote fibrin dissolution. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic gram-positive bacterium, the causative agent of a wide range of human infectious diseases, and a prime example of a pathogen exquisitely sensitive to host fibrinogen. Indeed, current data suggest fibrinogen serves as a context-dependent determinant of host defense or pathogen virulence in Staphylococcus infection whose ultimate contribution is dictated by the expression of S. aureus virulence factors, the path of infection, and the tissue microenvironment. PMID:27056151

  10. Management of Atopic Dermatitis in Japan.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Hidehisa

    2017-01-01

    The guidelines for the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) issued by the Japanese Dermatological Association (JDA), which are basically designed for dermatologists, were first prepared in 2000 and revised in 2016. The guidelines for AD of the Japanese Society of Allergology (JSA), which are basically designed for allergologists, including internists, otorhinolaryngologists, ophthalmologists, and dermatologists, were first prepared in 2009 and revised in 2014. In this article, I review the definition, pathophysiology, etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, severity classification, examination for diagnosis and severity assessment, and treatments for AD in Japan according to these two guidelines for AD (JDA and JSA). Based on the definition and diagnostic criteria for AD of the JDA, patients meeting three basic criteria, 1) pruritus, 2) typical morphology and distribution of the eczema, and 3) chronic or chronically relapsing course, are regarded as having AD. Treatment measures for AD basically consist of drug therapy, skin care, and elimination of exacerbating factors. Drugs that potently reduce AD-related inflammation in the skin are topical corticosteroids and tacrolimus. It is most important to promptly and accurately reduce inflammation related to AD by using these topical anti-inflammatory drugs. Proactive therapy refers to a treatment method in which, after inducing remission, a topical corticosteroid or tacrolimus ointment is intermittently applied to the skin in addition to skin care with moisturizers in order to maintain remission.

  11. Persistence of mild to moderate Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Jacob S; Abuabara, Katrina; Bilker, Warren; Hoffstad, Ole; Margolis, David J

    2015-01-01

    Importance Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common illness of childhood Objective The goal of this study was to evaluate the natural history of AD and determine the persistence of symptoms over time. Design A cross-sectional and cohort study. Setting A nation-wide long-term registry of children with AD. Participants Children enrolled in the Pediatric Eczema Elective Registry (PEER). Main outcome Self-reported outcome of whether or not a child’s skin was AD symptom-free for 6 months at 6 month intervals. Results 7,157 subjects were enrolled in the PEER study for a total of 22, 550 person-years. At least 2 years of follow-up was observed for 4,248 and at least 5 years of follow-up was observed for 2,416 children. Multiple demographic and exposure variables were associated with more persistent AD. At every age (i.e. 2 to 26 years), more than 80% of PEER subjects had symptoms of AD and/or were using medication to treat their AD. It was not until age 20 years that 50% of subjects had at least one lifetime six-month symptom and treatment free period. Conclusions and Relevance Based on this large longitudinal cohort study, symptoms associated with AD appear to persist well into the second decade of a child’s life and likely longer. AD is likely a life-long illness. PMID:24696036

  12. Malassezia furfur in infantile seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Wananukul, Siriwan; Chindamporn, Ariya; Yumyourn, Poomjit; Payungporn, Sunchai; Samathi, Chanchuree; Poovorawan, Yong

    2005-01-01

    Our objective was to study both incidence and various strains of Malassezia in infantile seborrheic dermatitis (ISD). Sixty infants between 2 weeks and 2 years old with clinical diagnosis of ISD at the Department of Pediatrics, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital from May 2002 to April 2003 were recruited. Malassezia spp. were isolated from cultured skin samples of the patients, genomic DNA was extracted and the ITS1 rDNA region was amplified. The PCR product was examined by agarose gel electrophoresis and DNA sequences were determined. The ITS1 sequences were also subjected to phylogenetic analysis and species identification. ISD is most commonly found in infants below the age of 2 months (64%), followed by those between 2 and 4 months (28%) old. Cultures yielded yeast-like colonies in 15 specimens. PCR yielded 200-bp products (Candida) in 3 patients and 300-bp products (Malassezia furfur) in 12 patients (18%). Sugar fermentation using API 20C aux performed on the three 200-bp PCR products yielded Candida species. M. furfur was the only Malassezia recovered from skin scrapings of children with ISD.

  13. Molecular Genetic of Atopic dermatitis: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shobaili, Hani A.; Ahmed, Ahmed A.; Alnomair, Naief; Alobead, Zeiad Abdulaziz; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic multifactorial inflammatory skin disease. The pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, but the disease results from dysfunctions of skin barrier and immune response, where both genetic and environmental factors play a key role. Recent studies demonstrate the substantial evidences that show a strong genetic association with AD. As for example, AD patients have a positive family history and have a concordance rate in twins. Moreover, several candidate genes have now been suspected that play a central role in the genetic background of AD. In last decade advanced procedures similar to genome-wide association (GWA) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) have been applied on different population and now it has been clarified that AD is significantly associated with genes of innate/adaptive immune systems, human leukocyte antigens (HLA), cytokines, chemokines, drug-metabolizing genes or various other genes. In this review, we will highlight the recent advancements in the molecular genetics of AD, especially on possible functional relevance of genetic variants discovered to date. PMID:27004062

  14. Probiotics and Atopic Dermatitis: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Rather, Irfan A; Bajpai, Vivek K; Kumar, Sanjay; Lim, Jeongheui; Paek, Woon K; Park, Yong-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common, recurrent, chronic inflammatory skin disease that is a cause of considerable economic and social burden. Its prevalence varies substantially among different countries with an incidence rate proclaimed to reach up to 20% of children in developed countries and continues to escalate in developing nations. This increased rate of incidence has changed the focus of research on AD toward epidemiology, prevention, and treatment. The effects of probiotics in the prevention and treatment of AD remain elusive. However, evidence from different research groups show that probiotics could have positive effect on AD treatment, if any, that depend on multiple factors, such as specific probiotic strains, time of administration (onset time), duration of exposure, and dosage. However, till date we still lack strong evidence to advocate the use of probiotics in the treatment of AD, and questions remain to be answered considering its clinical use in future. Based on updated information, the processes that facilitate the development of AD and the topic of the administration of probiotics are addressed in this review.

  15. [Atopic dermatitis - risk factors and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zaleska, Martyna; Trojacka, Ewelina; Savitskyi, Stepan; Terlikowska-Brzósko, Agnieszka; Galus, Ryszard

    2017-08-21

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by severe itching and eczematic skin lesions. In Poland from 1.5 to 2.5 million people suffer from AD. The pathophysiologic complexity and the wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes cause diagnostic and therapeutic problems and this is the basis for the division of the disease into subtypes. Heterogeneity of the disease is also confirmed in the study of the genotype of the disease. In relation with AZS more than 1000 loci in chromosomes were demonstrated. The roles of certain genes and the pathophysiology of lesions caused by their polymorphism were described. Wide spectrums of AD risk factors are: cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption during pregnancy, obesity and high and low birth weight. The quality of life in patients with AD is impaired, the disease disrupts family and professional relationships. Biological medical products are an example of an individual approach to the treatment of AD. It seems, individual approach to disease and treatment can be a successive solution to the problem.

  16. Topical betamethasone for prevention of radiation dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Omidvari, Shapour; Saboori, Hojjatollah; Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Ahmadloo, Niloofar; Mosleh-Shirazi, Mohammad Amin; Jowkar, Farideh; Namaz, Soha

    2007-01-01

    Although acute radiation dermatitis (ARD) is a common side-effect of radiotherapy (RT), currently there is no general consensus about its prevention or treatment of choice. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether prophylactic use of topical betamethasone 0.1% can prevent ARD caused by chest wall irradiation. Fifty-one patients who underwent modified radical mastectomy for breast cancer and were going to receive RT, were randomly assigned to receive topical betamethasone 0.1%, petrolatum or none during RT. The frequency and severity of ARD (measured using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria) were recorded at the end of each week during RT and two weeks after its completion. Clinical outcomes were analyzed by relevant statistical methods. All patients developed some degree of ARD, the frequency and severity of which increased with time and reached the maximum at the end of the seventh week for all groups. Patients receiving betamethasone had less severe ARD than the other two groups throughout the course of the study, but this difference was significant only at the end of the third week (p = 0.027). No significant difference was observed between the petrolatum and control arms. Prophylactic and ongoing use of topical betamethasone 0.1% during chest wall RT for breast cancer delays occurrence of ARD but does not prevent it. Petrolatum has no effect on the prevention of ARD in these patients.

  17. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... day. (ii) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial dermatitis due to Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp. (iii...

  18. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... day. (ii) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial dermatitis due to Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp. (iii...

  19. 21 CFR 520.88f - Amoxicillin trihydrate tablets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... day. (ii) Indications for use. Treatment of bacterial dermatitis due to Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., and Escherichia coli; and soft tissue infections (abscesses, wounds, lacerations) due to S. aureus, Streptococcus spp., E. coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Staphylococcus spp. (iii...

  20. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  1. Bacterial Actins.

    PubMed

    Izoré, Thierry; van den Ent, Fusinita

    2017-01-01

    A diverse set of protein polymers, structurally related to actin filaments contributes to the organization of bacterial cells as cytomotive or cytoskeletal filaments. This chapter describes actin homologs encoded by bacterial chromosomes. MamK filaments, unique to magnetotactic bacteria, help establishing magnetic biological compasses by interacting with magnetosomes. Magnetosomes are intracellular membrane invaginations containing biomineralized crystals of iron oxide that are positioned by MamK along the long-axis of the cell. FtsA is widespread across bacteria and it is one of the earliest components of the divisome to arrive at midcell, where it anchors the cell division machinery to the membrane. FtsA binds directly to FtsZ filaments and to the membrane through its C-terminus. FtsA shows altered domain architecture when compared to the canonical actin fold. FtsA's subdomain 1C replaces subdomain 1B of other members of the actin family and is located on the opposite side of the molecule. Nevertheless, when FtsA assembles into protofilaments, the protofilament structure is preserved, as subdomain 1C replaces subdomain IB of the following subunit in a canonical actin filament. MreB has an essential role in shape-maintenance of most rod-shaped bacteria. Unusually, MreB filaments assemble from two protofilaments in a flat and antiparallel arrangement. This non-polar architecture implies that both MreB filament ends are structurally identical. MreB filaments bind directly to membranes where they interact with both cytosolic and membrane proteins, thereby forming a key component of the elongasome. MreB filaments in cells are short and dynamic, moving around the long axis of rod-shaped cells, sensing curvature of the membrane and being implicated in peptidoglycan synthesis.

  2. Antimicrobial effect against different bacterial strains and bacterial adaptation to essential oils used as feed additives.

    PubMed

    Melo, Antonio Diego Brandão; Amaral, Amanda Figueiredo; Schaefer, Gustavo; Luciano, Fernando Bittencourt; de Andrade, Carla; Costa, Leandro Batista; Rostagno, Marcos Horácio

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the essential oils derived from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree), Cinnamomum cassia (cassia), and Thymus vulgaris (white thyme) against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The study also investigated the ability of these different bacterial strains to develop adaptation after repetitive exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of these essential oils. The MBC of the essential oils studied was determined by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. All essential oils showed antimicrobial effect against all bacterial strains. In general, the development of adaptation varied according to the bacterial strain and the essential oil (tea tree > white thyme > oregano). Therefore, it is important to use essential oils at efficient bactericidal doses in animal feed, food, and sanitizers, since bacteria can rapidly develop adaptation when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of these oils.

  3. Antimicrobial effect against different bacterial strains and bacterial adaptation to essential oils used as feed additives

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Antonio Diego Brandão; Amaral, Amanda Figueiredo; Schaefer, Gustavo; Luciano, Fernando Bittencourt; de Andrade, Carla; Costa, Leandro Batista; Rostagno, Marcos Horácio

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity and determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the essential oils derived from Origanum vulgare (oregano), Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree), Cinnamomum cassia (cassia), and Thymus vulgaris (white thyme) against Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. The study also investigated the ability of these different bacterial strains to develop adaptation after repetitive exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of these essential oils. The MBC of the essential oils studied was determined by disc diffusion and broth dilution methods. All essential oils showed antimicrobial effect against all bacterial strains. In general, the development of adaptation varied according to the bacterial strain and the essential oil (tea tree > white thyme > oregano). Therefore, it is important to use essential oils at efficient bactericidal doses in animal feed, food, and sanitizers, since bacteria can rapidly develop adaptation when exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of these oils. PMID:26424908

  4. Effect of Ultraviolet Light Irradiation Combined with Riboflavin on Different Bacterial Pathogens from Ocular Surface Infection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jing; Liang, Qingfeng; Su, Guanyu; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Zhiqun; Liang, Hong; Baudouin, Christophe; Labbé, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    In order to study Staphylococcus epidermis and Staphylococcus aureus in vitro viability after the exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light and riboflavin, twelve strains of Staphylococcus epidermis and twelve strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from patients with bacterial keratitis. The growth situation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus under different experimental conditions was qualitatively observed. The number of colonies surviving bacteria was counted under different UV light power and different exposure time. The experiment showed that there was no inhibition effect on the growth of bacteria using riboflavin alone. In UV alone group and UV-riboflavin group, inhibition effect on the bacteria growth was found. The UV-riboflavin combination had better inhibition effect on bacteria than UV irradiation alone. The amount of bacteria in the UV-riboflavin group was decreased by 99.1%~99.5% and 54.8%~64.6% in the UV alone group, when the UV light power was 10.052 mW/cm 2 and the irradiation time was 30 min. Moreover, with the increase of the UV power or irradiation time, the survival rates of bacteria were rapidly reduced. Compared with Staphylococcus aureus , Staphylococcus epidermis was more easily to be killed under the action of UV light combined with riboflavin.

  5. Transgenic rat model of childhood-onset dermatitis by overexpressing telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT).

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Sato, Atsuko; Hamada, Shun; Yagi, Takeshi; Ohsawa, Ichiro; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Hirabayashi, Masumi; Murakami, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    Childhood-onset dermatitis is one of the most common skin disorders in children. Although various mouse models that mirror aspects of dermatitis have become available, there is still a need for an animal model that develops dermatitis in childhood and is more suitable for performing tissue transplantation experiments. There is emerging evidence that peripheral blood T lymphocytes from patients with dermatitis have significantly increased telomerase activity. Here, we developed telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT)-expressing transgenic (Tg) rats that spontaneously developed eczematous skin inflammation in childhood. Newborn TERT-Tg rats developed visible dermatitis in 56 % of cases, and the skin lesions microscopically showed spongiosis and acanthosis with infiltration of lymphocytes, eosinophils and mast cells. TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis exhibited increased CD4 (2.5-fold) and CD8 (fivefold) T cell numbers compared with dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. Stronger TERT activity was observed in the peripheral lymphocytes of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats than those of dermatitis-free TERT-Tg rats. RT-PCR analysis revealed that IL-4 was markedly elevated in the spleen of dermatitis-positive TERT-Tg rats, and that interferon-gamma was increased in the dermatitis lesions. Moreover, skin grafting of TERT-Tg rats with dermatitis onto T cell-deficient nude rats demonstrated that the inflamed skin lesions could not be maintained. Taken together, the results suggest that TERT activation in T lymphocytes is one of the potential predisposing factors for dermatitis. Moreover, our results demonstrated that the TERT-Tg rats mirror aspects of human childhood-onset dermatitis and that these animals represent a potential animal model system for studying childhood-onset dermatitis.

  6. Follicular contact dermatitis due to coloured permanent-pressed sheets

    PubMed Central

    Panaccio, François; Montgomery, D. C.; Adam, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    A delayed hypersensitivity type of allergic contact dermatitis was observed following exposure to certain brands of 50% cotton, 50% polyester coloured permanent-pressed sheets produced by a particular manufacturer. The dermatitis presented as an extremely pruritic follicular eczema of the body and vesicular edema of the ears and face. Patch testing excluded formalin as the allergen but suggested permanent-pressing chemicals as a possibility. Several washings of the sheets did not prevent the development of the dermatitis. The removal of sheets did not immediately result in improvement: the condition could persist for up to eight weeks after their discontinuance. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4268628

  7. Autoimmune Progesterone Dermatitis Presenting as Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Drayer, Sara M; Laufer, Larry R; Farrell, Maureen E

    2017-10-01

    Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is an uncommon disease presenting with cyclical skin eruptions corresponding with the menstrual cycle luteal phase. Because symptoms are precipitated by rising progesterone levels, treatment relies on hormone suppression. A 22-year-old nulligravid woman presented with symptoms mistaken for Stevens-Johnson syndrome. A cyclic recurrence of her symptoms was noted, and the diagnosis of autoimmune progesterone dermatitis was made by an intradermal progesterone challenge. After 48 months, she remained refractory to medical management and definitive surgical treatment with bilateral oophorectomy was performed. Autoimmune progesterone dermatitis is a challenging diagnosis owing to its rarity and variety of clinical presentations. Treatment centers on suppression of endogenous progesterone and avoidance of exogenous triggers. When these modalities fail, surgical management must be undertaken.

  8. [Nickel contact dermatitis. A ring signal in actual pathology].

    PubMed

    Cherciu, Mirela; Zbranca, Anca

    2004-01-01

    Contact dermatitis produced by nickel is extremely common in women by earrings or other items of jewelry which contain nickel. Areas of involvement are under rings, bracelets, watches, spectacle frames, coins in pockets, jeans studs and other sites of direct contact with the metal. The frequency of nickel dermatitis is increasing in the male population and this may be due of body-piercing or professional contact in the field of metallic constructions. The treatment is difficult because of the presence of nickel in so many substances, things or even food. The management of contact dermatitis include the reduction or elimination of the allergen, the use of topical or systemic steroids, oral desensitisation and use of nickel in selected cases.

  9. [Food hypersensitivity dermatitis in the dog: diagnostic possibilities].

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, S; Favrot, C

    2005-04-01

    Dogs with food hypersensitivity usually develop chronic pruritic dermatoses virtually indistinguishable from atopic dermatitis. These reactions are often called food allergy but the pathogenesis is poorly characterized. Several studies have addressed the incidence of canine adverse reactions to food but the outcomes were conflicting. The gold standard for the diagnosis of such a condition is the restricted dietary trial and the subsequent provocation challenge. Some attempts have been made to develop serological tests but none of these tests accurately predicted canine food sensitivity. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of food hypersensitivity dermatitis and to evaluate a newly developed serological test for the diagnosis of food allergy in dogs. Only 9% of 55 dogs with dermatological signs compatible with food hypersensitivity or atopic dermatitis have been diagnosed as food hypersensitive dogs. The repeatability of the serological test has shown to be insufficient.

  10. Food Allergy and Atopic Dermatitis: Fellow Travelers or Triggers?

    PubMed

    Tom, Wynnis L

    2016-03-01

    Many children with atopic dermatitis also have an allergy to one or more foods, but the presence of these two conditions in an individual does not necessarily indicate a causal link between them. Testing and interpretation, sometimes with specialist consultation, may be required to discern whether food allergy is present in a child with atopic dermatitis and-if it is present-whether the food is triggering or exacerbating signs and symptoms of atopic dermatitis. Recent milestone trials have demonstrated that early introduction of peanuts can reduce the development of peanut allergy in at-risk children. Parents may benefit from education about current revised guidelines that now recommend offering peanut-containing foods to most children at the time he or she is ready for solid food. Semin Cutan Med Surg 36(supp4):S95-S97. 2017 published by Frontline Medical Communications.

  11. Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to reactive discharge gases.

    PubMed

    Traba, Christian; Liang, Jun F

    2011-08-01

    Formation of bacterial biofilms at solid-liquid interfaces creates numerous problems in both industrial and biomedical sciences. In this study, the susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus biofilms to discharge gas generated from plasma was tested. It was found that despite distinct chemical/physical properties, discharge gases from oxygen, nitrogen, and argon demonstrated very potent and almost the same anti-biofilm activity. The bacterial cells in S. aureus biofilms were killed (>99.9%) by discharge gas within minutes of exposure. Under optimal experimental conditions, no bacteria and biofilm re-growth from discharge gas treated biofilms was found. Further studies revealed that the anti-biofilm activity of the discharge gas occurred by two distinct mechanisms: (1) killing bacteria in biofilms by causing severe cell membrane damage, and (2) damaging the extracellular polymeric matrix in the architecture of the biofilm to release biofilm from the surface of the solid substratum. Information gathered from this study provides an insight into the anti-biofilm mechanisms of plasma and confirms the applications of discharge gas in the treatment of biofilms and biofilm related bacterial infections.

  12. Expression of virulence factors by Staphylococcus aureus grown in serum.

    PubMed

    Oogai, Yuichi; Matsuo, Miki; Hashimoto, Masahito; Kato, Fuminori; Sugai, Motoyuki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2011-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces many virulence factors, including toxins, immune-modulatory factors, and exoenzymes. Previous studies involving the analysis of virulence expression were mainly performed by in vitro experiments using bacterial medium. However, when S. aureus infects a host, the bacterial growth conditions are quite different from those in a medium, which may be related to the different expression of virulence factors in the host. In this study, we investigated the expression of virulence factors in S. aureus grown in calf serum. The expression of many virulence factors, including hemolysins, enterotoxins, proteases, and iron acquisition factors, was significantly increased compared with that in bacterial medium. In addition, the expression of RNA III, a global regulon for virulence expression, was significantly increased. This effect was partially restored by the addition of 300 μM FeCl₃ into serum, suggesting that iron depletion is associated with the increased expression of virulence factors in serum. In chemically defined medium without iron, a similar effect was observed. In a mutant with agr inactivated grown in serum, the expression of RNA III, psm, and sec4 was not increased, while other factors were still induced in the mutant, suggesting that another regulatory factor(s) is involved. In addition, we found that serum albumin is a major factor for the capture of free iron to prevent the supply of iron to bacteria grown in serum. These results indicate that S. aureus expresses virulence factors in adaptation to the host environment.

  13. Persister formation in Staphylococcus aureus is associated with ATP depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Conlon, Brian P.; Rowe, Sarah E.; Gandt, Autumn Brown

    Persisters are dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are tolerant to killing by antibiotics1. Persisters are associated with chronic bacterial infection and antibiotic treatment failure. In Escherichia coli, toxin/antitoxin (TA) modules are responsible for persister formation. The mechanism of persister formation in Gram positive bacteria is unknown. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen, responsible for a variety of chronic and relapsing infections such as osteomyelitis, endocarditis and infections of implanted devices. Deleting TA modules in S. aureus did not affect the level of persisters. Here we show that S. aureus persisters are produced due to a stochastic entrancemore » to stationary phase accompanied by a drop in intracellular ATP. Cells expressing stationary state markers are present throughout the growth phase, increasing in frequency with cell density. Cell sorting revealed that expression of stationary markers was associated with a 100-1000 fold increased likelihood of survival to antibiotic challenge. We find that the antibiotic tolerance of these cells is due to a drop in intracellular ATP. The ATP level of the cell is predictive of bactericidal antibiotic efficacy and explains bacterial tolerance to antibiotic treatment.« less

  14. Inhibition of Staphylococcus epidermidis Biofilm by Trimethylsilane Plasma Coating

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yibao; Jones, John E.; Ritts, Andrew C.; Yu, Qingsong

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation on implantable medical devices is a major impediment to the treatment of nosocomial infections and promotes local progressive tissue destruction. Staphylococcus epidermidis infections are the leading cause of biofilm formation on indwelling devices. Bacteria in biofilms are highly resistant to antibiotic treatment, which in combination with the increasing prevalence of antibiotic resistance among human pathogens further complicates treatment of biofilm-related device infections. We have developed a novel plasma coating technology. Trimethylsilane (TMS) was used as a monomer to coat the surfaces of 316L stainless steel and grade 5 titanium alloy, which are widely used in implantable medical devices. The results of biofilm assays demonstrated that this TMS coating markedly decreased S. epidermidis biofilm formation by inhibiting the attachment of bacterial cells to the TMS-coated surfaces during the early phase of biofilm development. We also discovered that bacterial cells on the TMS-coated surfaces were more susceptible to antibiotic treatment than their counterparts in biofilms on uncoated surfaces. These findings suggested that TMS coating could result in a surface that is resistant to biofilm development and also in a bacterial community that is more sensitive to antibiotic therapy than typical biofilms. PMID:22964248

  15. Polyclonality of Staphylococcus epidermidis residing on the healthy ocular surface.

    PubMed

    Ueta, Mayumi; Iida, Tetsuya; Sakamoto, Masako; Sotozono, Chie; Takahashi, Junko; Kojima, Kentaro; Okada, Kazuhisa; Chen, Xiuhao; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Honda, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis is part of the normal bacterial flora on the ocular surface. The chromosomal DNA of bacterial isolates obtained from the conjunctival sac, upper and lower lid margins, and upper and lower Meibomian glands of healthy volunteers was subjected to SmaI digestion and PFGE to study the genetic diversity of the organisms. Multiple colonies were also examined of S. epidermidis derived from the conjunctival sac of the same subjects. Lastly, commensal bacteria were harvested from the ocular surfaces of four healthy subjects once a month for 6 months, and the genetic background of the S. epidermidis isolates was analysed. It was found that bacterial strains not only from different subjects but also from multiple ocular surface sites of the same subject exhibited different PFGE patterns. In five of 42 subjects multiple colonies of S. epidermidis were isolated from the conjunctival sac; three harboured multiple colonies with different PFGE patterns, and two manifested multiple colonies with identical PFGE patterns. S. epidermidis isolated from the conjunctival sac of the same subjects over a 6-month period exhibited varying PFGE patterns. The data demonstrate the polyclonality of S. epidermidis on the healthy ocular surface.

  16. The Bicomponent Pore-Forming Leucocidins of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Alonzo, Francis

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to produce water-soluble proteins with the capacity to oligomerize and form pores within cellular lipid bilayers is a trait conserved among nearly all forms of life, including humans, single-celled eukaryotes, and numerous bacterial species. In bacteria, some of the most notable pore-forming molecules are protein toxins that interact with mammalian cell membranes to promote lysis, deliver effectors, and modulate cellular homeostasis. Of the bacterial species capable of producing pore-forming toxic molecules, the Gram-positive pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most notorious. S. aureus can produce seven different pore-forming protein toxins, all of which are believed to play a unique role in promoting the ability of the organism to cause disease in humans and other mammals. The most diverse of these pore-forming toxins, in terms of both functional activity and global representation within S. aureus clinical isolates, are the bicomponent leucocidins. From the first description of their activity on host immune cells over 100 years ago to the detailed investigations of their biochemical function today, the leucocidins remain at the forefront of S. aureus pathogenesis research initiatives. Study of their mode of action is of immediate interest in the realm of therapeutic agent design as well as for studies of bacterial pathogenesis. This review provides an updated perspective on our understanding of the S. aureus leucocidins and their function, specificity, and potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:24847020

  17. Chronic radiation-induced dermatitis: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Spałek, Mateusz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic radiation dermatitis is a late side effect of skin irradiation, which may deteriorate patients' quality of life. There is a lack of precise data about its incidence; however, several risk factors may predispose to the development of this condition. It includes radiotherapy dose, fractionation, technique, concurrent systemic therapy, comorbidities, and personal and genetic factors. Chronic radiation dermatitis is mostly caused by the imbalance of proinflammatory and profibrotic cytokines. Clinical manifestation includes changes in skin appearance, wounds, ulcerations, necrosis, fibrosis, and secondary cancers. The most severe complication of irradiation is extensive radiation-induced fibrosis (RIF). RIF can manifest in many ways, such as skin induration and retraction, lymphedema or restriction of joint motion. Diagnosis of chronic radiation dermatitis is usually made by clinical examination. In case of unclear clinical manifestation, a biopsy and histopathological examination are recommended to exclude secondary malignancy. The most effective prophylaxis of chronic radiation dermatitis is the use of proper radiation therapy techniques to avoid unnecessary irradiation of healthy skin. Treatment of chronic radiation dermatitis is demanding. The majority of the interventions are based only on clinical practice. Telangiectasia may be treated with pulse dye laser therapy. Chronic postirradiation wounds need special dressings. In case of necrosis or severe ulceration, surgical intervention may be considered. Management of RIF should be complex. Available methods are rehabilitative care, pharmacotherapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and laser therapy. Future challenges include the assessment of late skin toxicity in modern irradiation techniques. Special attention should be paid on genomics and radiomics that allow scientists and clinicians to select patients who are at risk of the development of chronic radiation dermatitis. Novel treatment methods and clinical

  18. [A guide for education programs in atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Barbarot, S; Gagnayre, R; Bernier, C; Chavigny, J-M; Chiaverini, C; Lacour, J-P; Dupre-Goetghebeur, D; Misery, L; Piram, M; Cuny, J-F; Dega, H; Stalder, J-F

    2007-02-01

    Education about therapy applies to many chronic diseases. The aim is to improve patient management through the development of certain skills by patients themselves. Atopic dermatitis is an area amenable to the development of therapeutic education. The purpose of this study was to define the skills required for management of atopic dermatitis suitable for therapeutic education and to bring together these skills in a handbook suitable for use. Thirty caregivers were involved in the drafting of the handbook (dermatologists, a doctor specialising in therapeutic education, a psychologist and nurses), each of whom has experience of therapeutic education in atopic dermatitis. Four age groups were selected (under 5 years, 6 to 10 years, pre-teens/adults, parents of children aged under 5 years). For each age group, different levels of skill were identified for patients or parents of children and suitable learning methods were selected. Skills were classed according to 3 levels: (i) knowledge about the disease, treatments, triggering factors, (ii) knowledge about provision of care by patients or their parents, (iii) knowledge in terms of explaining the disease and treatment methods to family, and knowing who to contact and when. Finally, a 10-question evaluation guide was drawn up. In this paper we report the method of production and content of the handbook of skills for atopic dermatitis patients. The aim is not to impose all skills listed in this work on patients but rather to provide caregivers with a complete handbook covering therapeutic education. The book is intended for patients with moderate to severe forms of atopic dermatitis currently in therapeutic failure. It may be used by anyone treating such patients, whether doctors, nurses or psychologists, depending on the items chosen. It is intended for use as a support for the elaboration, diffusion and evaluation of a therapeutic education programme for atopic dermatitis.

  19. Increased risk of stroke in contact dermatitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Lun; Hsu, Min-Hsien; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chan, Po-Chi; Chang, Ko-Shih; Lee, Ching-Hsiao; Hsu, Chung-Yi; Tsai, Min-Tein; Yeh, Chung-Hsin; Sung, Fung-Chang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Dermatologic diseases are not traditional risk factors of stroke, but recent studies show atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and bullous skin disease may increase the risk of stroke and other cardiovascular diseases. No previous studies have focused on the association between contact dermatitis and stroke. We established a cohort comprised of 48,169 contact dermatitis patients newly diagnosed in 2000–2003 and 96,338 randomly selected subjects without the disorder, frequency matched by sex, age, and diagnosis year, as the comparison cohort. None of them had a history of stroke. Stroke incidence was assessed by the end of 2011 for both cohorts. The incidence stroke was 1.1-fold higher in the contact dermatitis cohort than in the comparison cohort (5.93 vs 5.37 per 1000 person-years, P < 0.01). The multivariable Cox method analyzed adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) were 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–1.19) for all stroke types and 1.12 (95% CI, 1.05–1.20) for ischemic stroke and 1.11 (95% CI, 0.94–1.30) for hemorrhagic stroke. The age-specific aHR of stroke for contact dermatitis cohort increased with age, from 1.14 (95% CI, 1.03–1.27) for 65 to 74 years; to 1.27 (95% CI, 1.15–1.42) for 75 years and older. The aHR of stroke were 1.16 (95% CI, 1.07–1.27) and 1.09 (95% CI, 1.00–1.18) for men and women, respectively. This study suggests that patients with contact dermatitis were at a modestly increased risk of stroke, significant for ischemic stroke but not for hemorrhagic stroke. Comorbidity, particularly hypertension, increased the hazard of stroke further. PMID:28272195

  20. Physicians' perceptions of an eczema action plan for atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Ntuen, Edidiong; Taylor, Sarah L; Kinney, Megan; O'Neill, Jenna L; Krowchuk, Daniel P; Feldman, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    Poor adherence to topical medications in atopic dermatitis may lead to exposure to more costly and potentially toxic systemic agents. Written action plans (WAPs) improve adherence and treatment outcomes in asthma patients and may be useful for children with atopic dermatitis. To assess physicians' perceptions of a WAP for atopic dermatitis and their openness to using it. An Eczema Action Plan (EAP) was modeled from those used in pediatric asthma. A brief survey to assess the perceived practicality and usefulness of the EAP was sent to 48 pediatricians in our local area and to 17 pediatric dermatologists nationally. Survey items included layout, graphics, readability, accuracy, and utility. Qualitative analyses were performed due to small sample sizes. Seventeen pediatricians from five community practices and eight pediatric dermatologists responded (response rates of 35% and 41%, respectively). Layout was rated as excellent by 59% of pediatricians and 43% of pediatric dermatologists, the graphics were rated good (60% and 70%), the readability as good to excellent (100% and 86%), the accuracy as excellent or good (83% and 86%), and usefulness as good to excellent (100% of both groups). Most (71%) of the pediatric dermatologists reported already having their own patient education materials for atopic dermatitis, but none of the pediatricians did. All pediatricians and 60% of pediatric dermatologists reported they were likely to use the EAP in their clinical practices. Limitations included the sample size being small, but it still provided for qualitative assessment of generalists and sub-specialists. We did not assess how the EAP would be perceived by patients or their families. The practice settings of the community and academic physicians are not identical, which may make for weakened comparisons. Pediatricians are open to using an EAP for atopic dermatitis. If an EAP were effective at improving adherence and outcomes in atopic dermatitis, widespread implementation

  1. Effects of scalp dermatitis on chemical property of hair keratin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Shin, Min Kyung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2013-05-01

    The effects of scalp dermatitis (seborrheic dermatitis (SD), psoriasis, and atopic dermatitis (AD)) on chemical properties of hair keratin were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Hairs were collected from lesional regions affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD and non-lesional regions separately. The hairs with SD were taken from patients with ages of 16-80 years. The ages of patients with psoriasis ranged from 8 to 67 years, and all patients exhibited moderate disease. Hairs with AD were taken from the patients with ages of 24-45 years and the average SCORing atopic dermatitis (SCORAD) was 48.75. Hairs from 20 normal adults were collected as a control. The FT-IR absorbance bands were analyzed by the Gaussian model to obtain the center frequency, half width, height, and area of each band. The height and area of all bands in the spectra were normalized to the amide I centered at 1652 cm-1 to quantitatively analyze the chemical composition of keratin. The spectra of hair with scalp dermatitis were different with that of control, the amide A components centered at 3278 cm-1 were smaller than those of the control. The psoriasis hair showed a large difference in the IR absorbance band between lesional and non-lesional hairs indicating good agreement with the morphological changes. The hairs with diseases did not show differences in the content of cystine, which was centered at 1054 cm-1, from the control. The chemical properties of keratin were not significantly different between the hairs affected by SD, psoriasis, and AD. However, the changes induced by scalp dermatitis were different with weathering. Therefore, FT-IR analysis could be used to screen differences between the physiological and pathological conditions of scalp hair.

  2. Chromophore-enhanced bacterial photothermolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huckleby, Jana K.; Morton, Rebecca J.; Bartels, Kenneth E.

    1999-06-01

    The use of chromophore dyes to enhance the bactericidal effect of laser energy was studied as a means to optimize laser treatment for the decontamination of wound. Using an in vitro study, various concentrations of indocyanine green (ICG), carbon black, and fluorescein were mixed with a suspension of bacteria and plated on tryptic soy agar. Plates were exposed to a laser beam of 10-15 watts for times ranging from 0 to 180 seconds, incubated overnight, and colony counts were performed. Bacteria not mixed with chromophore were used as controls. Six bacterial strains encompassing a range of bacterial types were used: Staphylococcus aureau, Streptococcus pyogenes, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus spore suspensions, and Clostridium perfringens. Laser treatment alone had no effect on any of the bacteria. Significant killing of gram-positive bacteria, including spores of Bacillus cereus, was observed only with the use of ICG and diode laser energy. No effect was observed using any of the chromophores on the gram-negative bacteria. The results of this study indicate that successful killing of gram-positive bacteria can be achieved using ICG combined with appropriate laser energy and wavelength. Efforts to enhance the susceptibility of gram-negative bacteria to photothermolysis by laser energy were unsuccessful.

  3. Validating MDS Data about Risk Factors for Perineal Dermatitis by Comparing With Nursing Home Records

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Anna M.; Bliss, Donna Z.; Savik, Kay; Wyman, Jean F.

    2011-01-01

    Perineal dermatitis is one of the main complications of incontinence and increases the cost of health care. The Minimum Data Set (MDS) contains data about factors associated with perineal dermatitis identified in a published conceptual model of perineal dermatitis. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity of MDS data related to perineal dermatitis risk factors by comparing them with data in nursing home chart records. Findings indicate that MDS items defining factors associated with perineal dermatitis were valid and supported use of the MDS in further investigation of a significant, costly, and understudied health problem of nursing home residents. PMID:18512629

  4. [Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Carlos Andrés; Vesga, Omar

    2005-12-01

    The evolution and molecular mechanisms of vancomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus were reviewed. Case reports and research studies on biochemestry, electron microscopy and molecular biology of Staphylococcus aureus were selected from Medline database and summarized in the following review. After almost 40 years of successful treatment of S. aureus with vancomycin, several cases of clinical failures have been reported (since 1997). S. aureus strains have appeared with intermediate susceptibility (MIC 8-16 microg/ml), as well as strains with heterogeneous resistance (global MIC < or =4 microg/ml), but with subpopulations of intermediate susceptibility. In these cases, resistance is mediated by cell wall thickening with reduced cross linking. This traps the antibiotic before it reaches its major target, the murein monomers in the cell membrane. In 2002, a total vancomycin resistant strain (MIC > or =32 microg/ml) was reported with vanA genes from Enterococcus spp. These genes induce the change of D-Ala-D-Ala terminus for D-Ala-D-lactate in the cell wall precursors, leading to loss of affinity for glycopeptides. Vancomycin resistance in S. aureus has appeared; it is mediated by cell wall modifications that trap the antibiotic before it reaches its action site. In strains with total resistance, Enterococcus spp. genes have been acquired that lead to modification of the glycopeptide target.

  5. Effectiveness of 5-Pyrrolidone-2-carboxylic Acid and Copper Sulfate Pentahydrate Association against Drug Resistant Staphylococcus Strains.

    PubMed

    Governa, Paolo; Miraldi, Elisabetta; De Fina, Gianna; Biagi, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial resistance is an ongoing challenge for pharmacotherapy and pharmaceutical chemistry. Staphylococcus aureus is the bacterial species which makes it most difficult to treat skin and soft tissue infections and it is seen in thousands of hospitalization cases each year. Severe but often underrated infectious diseases, such as complicated nasal infections, are primarily caused by MRSA and S. epidermidis too. With the aim of studying new drugs with antimicrobial activity and effectiveness on drug resistant Staphylococcus strains, our attention in this study was drawn on the activity of a new association between two natural products: 5-pyrrolidone-2-carboxylic acid (PCA), naturally produced by certain Lactobacillus species, and copper sulfate pentahydrate (CS). The antimicrobial susceptibility test was conducted taking into account 12 different Staphylococcus strains, comprising 6 clinical isolates and 6 resistant strains. PCA 4%, w/w, and CS 0.002%, w/w, association in distilled water solution was found to have bactericidal activity against all tested strains. Antimicrobial kinetics highlighted that PCA 4%, w/w, and CS 0.002% association could reduce by 5 log10 viable bacterial counts of MRSA and oxacillin resistant S. epidennidis in less than 5 and 3 minutes respectively. Microscopic investigations suggest a cell wall targeting mechanism of action. Being very safe and highly tolerated, the natural product PCA and CS association proved to be a promising antimicrobial agent to treat Staphylococcus related infections.

  6. [Blister dermatitis caused by Epicauta flagellaria (Erichson) (Coleoptera: Meloidae) species].

    PubMed

    Méndez, E; Sáenz, R E; Johnson, C M

    1989-09-01

    This paper is the first published report of vesicular dermatitis due to blister beetles of the family Meloidae in Panamá. A familial outbreak of bullous dermatitis caused by Epicauta flagellaria (Erichson) is described. All previous cases known in the Gorgas Memorial Laboratory were associated with E. isthmica Werner. Bullous lesions are produced when cantharidin, a vesicating toxin contained in the beetle's body, is released at the time the insect is crushed or rubbed upon the exposed skin. Rules for the treatment and prevention of this disease are indicated.

  7. Clinical Perspectives of Digital Dermatitis in Dairy and Beef Cattle.

    PubMed

    Plummer, Paul J; Krull, Adam

    2017-07-01

    Digital dermatitis is a polybacterial disease process of dairy and beef cattle. Lesions are most commonly identified on the plantar aspect of the interdigital cleft of the hind limbs. Treponema spp are routinely present in large numbers of active lesions. Lesions are painful to the touch and can result in clinical lameness. The infectious nature generally results in endemic infection of cattle herds and management requires a comprehensive and integrated multipronged approach. This article provides current perspectives regarding management and treatment of digital dermatitis on dairy and beef cattle operations and provides a review for clinicians dealing with a clinical outbreak. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Management of contact dermatitis due to nickel allergy: an update

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Fernanda; das Graças, Maria; Melo, Mota; Tosti, Antonella

    2009-01-01

    Nickel is the major cause of allergic contact dermatitis in the general population, both among children and adults, as well as in large occupational groups. This metal is used in numerous industrial and consumer products, including stainless steel, magnets, metal plating, coinage, and special alloys, and is therefore almost impossible to completely avoid in daily life. Nickel contact dermatitis can represent an important morbidity, particularly in patients with chronic hand eczema, which can lead to inability to work, a decrease in quality of life and significant healthcare expenses. Therefore, its management is of great importance. This article reviews diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies in this field. PMID:21436967

  9. Allergic contact dermatitis to acrylates in disposable blue diathermy pads.

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, S. K.; Shaw, S.

    1999-01-01

    We report 2 cases of elicitation of allergic contact dermatitis to acrylates from disposable blue diathermy pads used on patients who underwent routine surgery. Their reactions were severe, and took approximately 5 weeks to resolve. Both patients gave a prior history of finger tip dermatitis following the use of artificial sculptured acrylic nails, which is a common, but poorly reported, cause of acrylate allergy. Patch testing subsequently confirmed allergies to multiple acrylates present in both the conducting gel of disposable blue diathermy pads, and artificial sculptured acrylic nails. We advocate careful history taking prior to surgery to avoid unnecessary exposure to acrylates in patients already sensitized. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10364952

  10. Are You at Risk for Contact Dermatitis? | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    You probably don’t give much thought to hand health. Until something goes wrong, almost everyone takes for granted that these crucial appendages will continue working as they always have. But hand health is an important consideration, especially at work. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), allergic contact dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis account for 15–20 percent of all reported occupational diseases, and they cost employers an estimated $1 billion each year in lost workdays and decreased productivity.

  11. Topical Therapy for Atopic Dermatitis: New and Investigational Agents.

    PubMed

    Stein Gold, Linda F; Eichenfield, Lawrence F

    2016-03-01

    Recently a new class of topical medications for mild to moderate atopic dermatitis has been introduced with US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the first new prescription medication for this condition in more than a decade. Crisaborole, the newly approved medication, has relieved pruritus in more than one-third of patients within as little as 48 hours. It also has demonstrated efficacy in patients with skin of color. Topical therapies representing other new approaches to atopic dermatitis, with novel mechanisms of action, have shown promise in clinical development. Semin Cutan Med Surg 36(supp4):S99-S102. 2017 published by Frontline Medical Communications.

  12. Antibacterial activity of Aquilaria crassna leaf extract against Staphylococcus epidermidis by disruption of cell wall

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Aquilaria crassna Pierre ex Lecomte has been traditionally used in Thailand for treatment of infectious diseases such as diarrhoea and skin diseases for a long time. The main objectives of this study were to examine antibacterial activity of the Aquilaria crassna leaf extract against Staphylococcus epidermidis and its underlying mechanism. The antioxidant activity and acute toxicity were studied as well. Methods Antioxidant activities were examined by FRAP, ABTS and DPPH scavenging methods. Antibacterial activity was conducted using disc diffusion assay and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by dilution method. The minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was reported as the lowest concentration producing no growth of microbes in the subcultures. Morphological changes of the microbe were observed by scanning electron microscopy, while an inhibitory effect on biofilm formation was evaluated by phase contrast microscopic analysis. Bacterial cell wall integrity was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Acute toxicity was conducted in accordance with the OECD for Testing of Chemicals (2001) guidelines. Results The extract exhibited considerable antioxidant activity. Staphylococcus epidermidis was susceptible to the extract with the MIC and MBC of 6 and 12 mg/ml, respectively. The extract caused swelling and distortion of bacterial cells and inhibited bacterial biofilm formation. Rupture of bacterial cell wall occurred after treated with the extract for 24 h. Acute toxicity test in mice showed no sign of toxicity or death at the doses of 2,000 and 15,000 mg/kg body weight. Conclusion The aqueous extract of Aquilaria crassna leaves possesses an in vitro antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis, with no sign of acute oral toxicity in mice, probably by interfering with bacterial cell wall synthesis and inhibiting biofilm formation. PMID:23962360

  13. Keratinocytes as sensors and central players in the immune defense against Staphylococcus aureus in the skin.

    PubMed

    Bitschar, Katharina; Wolz, Christiane; Krismer, Bernhard; Peschel, Andreas; Schittek, Birgit

    2017-09-01

    Healthy human skin provides an effective mechanical as well as immunologic barrier against pathogenic microorganisms with keratinocytes as the main cell type in the epidermis actively participating and orchestrating the innate immune response of the skin. As constituent of the outermost layer encountering potential pathogens they have to sense signals from the environment and must be able to initiate a differential immune response to harmless commensals and harmful pathogens. Staphylococci are among the most abundant colonizers of the skin: Whereas Staphylococcus epidermidis is part of the skin microbiota and ubiquitously colonizes human skin, Staphylococcus aureus is only rarely found on healthy human skin, but frequently colonizes the skin of atopic dermatitis (AD) patients. This review highlights recent advances in understanding how keratinocytes as sessile innate immune cells orchestrate an effective defense against S. aureus in healthy skin and the mechanisms leading to an impaired keratinocyte function in AD patients. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Short communication: β-Lactam resistance and vancomycin heteroresistance in Staphylococcus spp. isolated from bovine subclinical mastitis.

    PubMed

    Mello, Priscila Luiza; Pinheiro, Luiza; Martins, Lisiane de Almeida; Brito, Maria Aparecida Vasconcelos Paiva; Ribeiro de Souza da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes

    2017-08-01

    The use of antimicrobial agents has led to the emergence of resistant bacterial strains over a relatively short period. Furthermore, Staphylococcus spp. can produce β-lactamase, which explains the survival of these strains in a focus of infection despite the use of a β-lactam antibiotic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance of Staphylococcus spp. isolated from bovine subclinical mastitis to oxacillin and vancomycin (by minimum inhibitory concentration) and to detect vancomycin heteroresistance by a screening method. We also evaluated β-lactamase production and resistance due to hyperproduction of this enzyme and investigated the mecA and mecC genes and performed staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing. For this purpose, 181 Staphylococcus spp. isolated from mastitis subclinical bovine were analyzed. Using the phenotypic method, 33 (18.2%) of Staphylococcus spp. were resistant to oxacillin. In contrast, all isolates were susceptible to vancomycin, and heteroresistance was detected by the screening method in 13 isolates. Production of β-lactamase was observed in 174 (96%) of the Staphylococcus spp. isolates. The mecA gene was detected in 8 isolates, all of them belonging to the species Staphylococcus epidermidis, and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec typing revealed the presence of type I and type IV isolates. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Contact dermatitis from polyacrylate in TENS electrode].

    PubMed

    Weber-Muller, F; Reichert-Penetrat, S; Schmutz, J-L; Barbaud, A

    2004-05-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is useful for many chronic pains. It induces few serious side effects, but skin reactions are not rare. We report on two cases of contact dermatitis due to TENS electrodes by sensitization to the acrylate in TENS conductive gel. A 50 year-old man suffered from post-traumatic lumbar pair. He developed eczematous lesions on the sites where the TENS electrodes were applied. Patch tests were positive with the TENS gel, with ethylene glycol dimethylacrylate (2 p. 100 petrolatum) and ethyl-acrylate (2 p. 100 petrolatum) on day 2 and 4 readings. A 54 Year-old man had a paralysis of the foot elevator following rupture of an aneurysm. After 2 months, he had an eczema on the sites where the TENS electrodes were applied. Patch tests were negative with the TENS electrodes but positive with 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate (0.1 p. 100 petrolatum), triethyleneglycol diacrylate (0.1 p. 100 petrolatum), 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2 p. 100 petrolatum) and 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (2 p. 100 petrolatum) on day 2 and 4 readings. TENS transmits small electrical currents through the skin that induce the depolarization of the affected sensory nerve endings. They have few serious side effects but skin reactions such as irritation, burns or allergy to propylene glycol in the electrode gel, to the rubber of the electrodes (mercaptobenzothiazole) or to the metallic part of the electrodes, i.e. nickel, are not uncommon. To our knowledge, only one case of an allergy to the polyacrylates of TENS electrode gel has been previously reported in the literature. We emphasize that acrylate could be the main sensitizer in the more recently commercialized TENS electrodes and will propose alternative ways of treating patients sensitized to acrylate and who require treatment with TENS.

  16. Tight Junction Defects in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetto, Anna; Rafaels, Nicholas M.; McGirt, Laura Y.; Ivanov, Andrei I.; Georas, Steve N.; Cheadle, Chris; Berger, Alan E.; Zhang, Kunzhong; Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; Yoshida, Takeshi; Boguniewicz, Mark; Hata, Tissa; Schneider, Lynda C.; Hanifin, Jon M.; Gallo, Richard L.; Novak, Natalija; Weidinger, Stephan; Beaty, Terri H.; Leung, Donald Y.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Beck, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by dry skin and a hyperreactive immune response to allergens, two cardinal features that are caused in part by epidermal barrier defects. Tight junctions (TJ) reside immediately below the stratum corneum and regulate the selective permeability of the paracellular pathway. Objective We evaluated the expression/function of the TJ protein, claudin-1 in epithelium from AD and nonatopic (NA) subjects and screened two American populations for SNPs in CLDN1. Methods Expression profiles of nonlesional epithelium from extrinsic AD, NA and psoriasis subjects were generated using Illumina’s BeadChips. Dysregulated intercellular proteins were validated by tissue staining and qPCR. Bioelectric properties of epithelium were measured in Ussing chambers. Functional relevance of claudin-1 was assessed using a knockdown approach in primary human keratinocytes (PHK). Twenty seven haplotype-tagging SNPs in CLDN1 were screened in two independent AD populations. Results We observed strikingly reduced expression of the TJ proteins claudin-1 and -23 only in AD, which were validated at the mRNA and protein levels. Claudin-1 expression inversely correlated with Th2 biomarkers. We observed a remarkable impairment of the bioelectric barrier function in AD epidermis. In vitro, we confirmed that silencing claudin-1 expression in human keratinocytes diminishes TJ function while enhancing keratinocyte proliferation. Finally, CLDN1 haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms revealed associations with AD in two North American populations. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest that an impaired epidermal TJ is a novel feature of skin barrier dysfunction and immune dysregulation observed in AD, and that CLDN1 may be a new susceptibility gene in this disease. PMID:21163515

  17. [Definition and psychopathology of chronic hand dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Lahfa, M

    2014-06-01

    Psychopathology in patients with DCM is as complex as its clinical forms where the factors are numerous and often intricate. It combines psychophysiological, psychopathological factors, behavioral disorders which can be the cause or the consequence of DCM but also the negative impact on quality of life and the simplest daily activities. DCM affects the quality of life of every patient, regardless of the severity. Women are more affected by the DCM that man older age, male sex, atopy and the existence of a contact sensitization are independent risk factors of severity. Depression may affect up to 10 % of patients, should involve greater attention from dermatologists and general practitioners. Health authorities and all health actors should be aware of interactions between secondary cognitive troubles or inherent to DCM and efforts required in terms of preventive measures. Thus, the presence of psychiatric comorbidity is more common in patients with chronic dermatoses. Today it is considered that the emotional environment, built by the mother - child relationship must be optimal, otherwise the mental stability of body image may be compromised. Diminished self-esteem, affects less well managed and somatic expression of emotional content. Recently, a surprising study showed that most patients with refractory occupational dermatitis were not able to recognize the warning sign of flare or the role of psychological factors in the formation and maintenance of the dermatose. In fact, they rejected their personal responsibility in the occurrence of the new flare. To address this public health problem, health authorities, trainers and caregivers should be aware of the cognitive impact of DCM in these patients and interactions with current means of prevention. The role of obsessive-compulsive washing as part of an anxiety disorder or personality disorder is most likely a contributing or maintaining factor systematically underestimated in the pathogenesis of DCM and in the

  18. Occupational dermatitis in hairdressers - influence of individual and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Carøe, Tanja K; Ebbehøj, Niels E; Agner, Tove

    2017-03-01

    Hairdressers are at risk of developing occupational contact dermatitis because of their intense contact with wet work in combination with chemicals. To perform an analysis of a cohort study of hairdressers with occupational contact dermatitis recognized in the period 2006-2011, focusing on individual and environmental factors associated with the disease. The study was a descriptive, register-based survey including all hairdressers with recognized occupational contact dermatitis in Denmark in the period January 2006 to September 2011. Data were obtained from the Danish National Board of Industrial Injuries. The study comprised 381 patients (373 women and 8 men). The median age was 25 years, 64.8% were apprentices, and 35.2% were fully trained hairdressers. The prevalence of atopic dermatitis was 36.0%, and was significantly higher among apprentices than among fully trained hairdressers (44.9% and 19.4%, respectively) (p < 0.001). Of the patients, 48.3% had their dermatitis recognized as occupational irritant contact dermatitis, 46.7% had their dermatitis recognized as as occupational allergic contact dermatitis or combined allergic and irritant contact dermatitis, and 5.0% were recognized as having occupational contact urticaria. The low median age, the high percentages of atopic dermatitis in apprentices and the fact that more apprentices than fully trained hairdressers had recognized occupational contact dermatitis underlines the importance of early prevention. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Bacterial conjunctivitis in childhood: etiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Leung, Alexander Kc; Hon, Kam Lun; Wong, Alex H C; Wong, Andrew S

    2018-01-29

    Bacterial conjunctivitis is a common reason for children to be seen in pediatric practices A correct diagnosis is important so that appropriate treatment can be instituted. To provide an update on the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of bacterial conjunctivitis in children. A PubMed search was completed in Clinical Queries using the key term "bacterial conjunctivitis". Patents were searched using the key term "bacterial conjunctivitis" from www.freepatentsonline.com and www.google.com/patents. In the neonatal period, bacterial conjunctivitis is rare and the most common cause of organism is Staphylococcus aureus, followed by Chlamydia trachomatis. In infants and older children, bacterial conjunctivitis is most often caused by Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis. Clinically, bacterial conjunctivitis is characterized by a purulent eye discharge, or sticky eyes on awakening, a foreign body sensation and conjunctival injection (pink eye). The diagnosis is made clinically. Cultures are unnecessary. Some authors suggest a watchful observation approach as most cases of bacterial conjunctivitis are self-limited. A Cochrane review suggests the use of antibiotic eye drops is associated with modestly improved rates of clinical and microbiological omission as compared to the use of placebo. Various investigators have also disclosed patents for the treatment of conjunctivitis. The present consensus supports the use of topical antibiotics for bacterial conjunctivitis. Topical antibiotics shorten the course of the disease, reduce discomfort, prevent person-to-person transmission and reduce the rate of reinfection. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Interventions for preventing occupational irritant hand dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Andrea; Rönsch, Henriette; Elsner, Peter; Dittmar, Daan; Bennett, Cathy; Schuttelaar, Marie-Louise A; Lukács, Judit; John, Swen Malte; Williams, Hywel C

    2018-04-30

    Occupational irritant hand dermatitis (OIHD) causes significant functional impairment, disruption of work, and discomfort in the working population. Different preventive measures such as protective gloves, barrier creams and moisturisers can be used, but it is not clear how effective these are. This is an update of a Cochrane review which was previously published in 2010. To assess the effects of primary preventive interventions and strategies (physical and behavioural) for preventing OIHD in healthy people (who have no hand dermatitis) who work in occupations where the skin is at risk of damage due to contact with water, detergents, chemicals or other irritants, or from wearing gloves. We updated our searches of the following databases to January 2018: the Cochrane Skin Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLlNE, and Embase. We also searched five trials registers and checked the bibliographies of included studies for further references to relevant trials. We handsearched two sets of conference proceedings. We included parallel and cross-over randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which examined the effectiveness of barrier creams, moisturisers, gloves, or educational interventions compared to no intervention for the primary prevention of OIHD under field conditions. We used the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary outcomes were signs and symptoms of OIHD developed during the trials, and the frequency of treatment discontinuation due to adverse effects. We included nine RCTs involving 2888 participants without occupational irritant hand dermatitis (OIHD) at baseline. Six studies, including 1533 participants, investigated the effects of barrier creams, moisturisers, or both. Three studies, including 1355 participants, assessed the effectiveness of skin protection education on the prevention of OIHD. No studies were eligible that investigated the effects of protective gloves. Among each type of intervention, there was heterogeneity concerning