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Sample records for bacterial ferric ion

  1. Hydrogen Reduction of Ferric Ions for Use in Copper Electrowinning

    SciTech Connect

    Karl S. Noah; Debby F. Bruhn; John E. Wey; Robert S. Cherry

    2005-01-01

    The conventional copper electrowinning process uses the water hydrolysis reaction as the anodic source of electrons. However this reaction generates acid mist and requires large quantities of energy. In order to improve energy efficiency and avoid acid mist, an alternative anodic reaction of ferrous ion oxidation has been proposed. This reaction does not involve evolution of acid mist and can be carried out at a lower cell voltage than the conventional process. However, because ferrous ions are converted to ferric ions at the anode in this process, there is a need for reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions to continue this process. The most promising method for this reduction is the use of hydrogen gas since the resulting byproduct acid can be used elsewhere in the process and, unlike other reductants, hydrogen does not introduce other species that need subsequent removal. Because the hydrogen reduction technology has undergone only preliminary lab scale testing, additional research is needed to evaluate its commercial potential. Two issues for this research are the potentially low mass transfer rate of hydrogen into the electrolyte stream because of its low solubility in water, and whether other gaseous reductants less expensive than hydrogen, such as natural gas or syngas, might work. In this study various reductants were investigated to carry out the reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions using a simulated electrolyte solution recycled through a trickle bed reactor packed with catalyst. The gases tested as reductants were hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and a 50/50 mixture of H2 and CO. Nitrogen was also tested as an inert control. These gases were tested because they are constituents in either natural gas or syngas. The catalysts tested were palladium and platinum. Two gas flow rates and five electrolyte flow rates were tested. Pure hydrogen was an effective reductant of ferric ion. The rates were similar with both palladium and platinum. The ferric

  2. Inhibitory effect of high concentrations of ferric ions on the activity of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshishige; Inoue, Chihiro; Suto, Koichi; Chida, Tadashi

    2003-01-01

    The influence of high concentrations of ferric ions on the biochemical activity of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans was studied using intact cells. The specific oxidation rate of ferrous ions decreased with increasing ferric ion concentration. Lineweaver-Burk plots revealed typical competitive inhibition kinetics, because the slopes varied with the ferric ion concentration. A linear relationship between the slope and the square of the ferric ion concentration revealed that the iron-oxidizing enzyme system of A. ferrooxidans was competitively inhibited by about two molecules of ferric ion. The kinetic equation based on this inhibition model agreed with the experimental observation at a high ferric ion concentration where the bacterium is usually exposed in bioleaching and biooxidation plants.

  3. ANALYSIS OF FERRIC AND FERROUS IONS IN SOIL EXTRACTS BY ION CHROMATOGRAPHY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A method using ion chromatography (IC) for the analysis of ferrous (Fe 2+) and ferric (Fe 3+) ions in soil extracts has been developed. This method uses an ion exchange column with detection at 520 nm after post-column derivatization. Selectivity is achieved by using an anionic...

  4. U-EXTRACTION--IMPROVEMENTS IN ELIMINATION OF Mo BY USE OF FERRIC ION

    DOEpatents

    Clark, H.M.; Duffey, D.

    1958-06-10

    An improved solvent extraction process is described whereby U may be extracted by a water immiscible organic solvent from an aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate. It has been found that Mo in the presence of phosphate ions appears to form a complex with the phosphate which extracts along with the U. This extraction of Mo may be suppressed by providing ferric ion in the solution prior to the extraction step. The ferric ion is preferably provided in the form of ferric nitrate.

  5. Effects of cupric and ferric ions on in vitro lipid peroxidation of human serum

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, A.; Peng, Y.; Zdunek, T. )

    1991-03-15

    Transition metal ions especially ferric ions can catalytically generate free radicals by the Haber-Weiss reaction and initiate lipid peroxidation. Such processes may contribute to the mechanism of acute toxicity by transition metals. Serum pools were prepared from normal blood donors and incubated with 1mM cupric or ferric ions at 37C for 24h. Lipid peroxidation products were subsequently measured by 2-thiobarbituric acid assay as described by Yagi and the values were expressed as {mu}mol/L malonaldehyde equivalents. In another experiment, lipoproteins were coprecipitated with other proteins by 10% phosphotungstic acid/sulfuric acid and precipitates in aqueous suspension were incubated with 1 mM cupric or ferric ions. When sera were incubated, the authors observed higher concentrations of lipid peroxidation products with cupric ions compared to samples supplemented with ferric ions. The mean value for peroxidation products in control group was 2.5 {mu}mol/L. However, the effect was reversed when protein precipitates were incubated in presence of such ions. Ferric ions also caused more peroxidation of linoleic acid and phosphatidylcholine isolated from egg yolk when compared to cupric ions. Such differential behavior may be attributed to different degree of chelation of ferric and cupric ions with serum proteins.

  6. Mechanistic insights into metal ion activation and operator recognition by the ferric uptake regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zengqin; Wang, Qing; Liu, Zhao; Zhang, Manfeng; Machado, Ana Carolina Dantas; Chiu, Tsu-Pei; Feng, Chong; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Lin; Qi, Lei; Zheng, Jiangge; Wang, Xu; Huo, Xinmei; Qi, Xiaoxuan; Li, Xiaorong; Wu, Wei; Rohs, Remo; Li, Ying; Chen, Zhongzhou

    2015-07-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a key role in the iron homeostasis of prokaryotes, such as bacterial pathogens, but the molecular mechanisms and structural basis of Fur-DNA binding remain incompletely understood. Here, we report high-resolution structures of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1 Fur in four different states: apo-Fur, holo-Fur, the Fur-feoAB1 operator complex and the Fur-Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fur box complex. Apo-Fur is a transition metal ion-independent dimer whose binding induces profound conformational changes and confers DNA-binding ability. Structural characterization, mutagenesis, biochemistry and in vivo data reveal that Fur recognizes DNA by using a combination of base readout through direct contacts in the major groove and shape readout through recognition of the minor-groove electrostatic potential by lysine. The resulting conformational plasticity enables Fur binding to diverse substrates. Our results provide insights into metal ion activation and substrate recognition by Fur that suggest pathways to engineer magnetotactic bacteria and antipathogenic drugs.

  7. Ferric and cupric ions requirement for DNA single-strand breakage by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Tachon, P

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), was able to nick the replicative form of the phage fd, without the addition of a reducing agent or of a metal. This DNA single-strand breakage decreased with an increase of the ionic strength, suggesting that H2O2 reacted with traces of metal bound to DNA. When cupric of ferric ions were added, the rate of DNA single-strand breakage by H2O2 greatly increased and it was 20-30 times faster with cupric than with ferric ions. The addition of EDTA at an equimolar ratio or in excess of metal prevented partially DNA single-strand cleavage by H2O2 in the presence of ferric ions and completely when cupric ions were used. Superoxide dismutase prevented DNA single-strand breakage by H2O2 and ferric ions. On the contrary, with cupric ions and H2O2, the addition of superoxide dismutase increased the rate of DNA single-strand breakage. That superoxide dismutase was acting catalytically was shown by the loss of its effects after heat inactivation of the enzyme. The results of the present study show that besides its involvement in the Fenton reaction, H2O2 is able to reduce the metal bound to DNA, generating the superoxide anion radical or/and its protonated form, the perhydroxyl radical involved in DNA nicking. On the other hand, the ability of cuprous ions unlike ferrous ions to dismutate the superoxide radical may explain some differences observed between iron and copper in the DNA single-strand breakage by H2O2.

  8. Ferric chloride-graphite intercalation compounds as anode materials for Li-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Zhu, Yongchun; Guo, Cong; Zhu, Xiaobo; Liang, Jianwen; Qian, Yitai

    2014-01-01

    Ferric chloride-graphite intercalation compounds (FeCl3 -GICs) with stage 1 and stage 2 structures were synthesized by reacting FeCl3 and expanded graphite (EG) in air in a stainless-steel autoclave. As rechargeable Li-ion batteries, these FeCl3 -GICs exhibit high capacity, excellent cycling stability, and superior rate capability, which could be attributed to their unique intercalation features. This work may enable new possibilities for the fabrication of Li-ion batteries.

  9. Formation of Green Rust and Immobilization of Nickel in Response to Bacterial Reduction of Hydrous Ferric Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Parmar, N.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Beveridge, Terrance J.; Ferris, F G.

    2001-04-01

    This investigation documents the formation of Green Rust (GR) and immobilization of Ni2+ in response to bacterial reduction of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) reduction experiments provided evidence that the solid-phase partitioning of Ni2+ in GR extended from equilibrium solid-solution behavior.

  10. The kinetics of the oxidation of pyrite by ferric ions and dissolved oxygen: An electrochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, P.R.; Crundwell, F.K.

    2000-01-01

    The dissolution of pyrite is important in the geochemical cycling of iron and sulphur, in the formation of acid mine drainage, and in the extraction of metals by bacterial leaching. Many researchers have studied the kinetics of dissolution, and the rate of dissolution has often been found to be half-order in ferric ions or oxygen. Previous work has not adequately explained the kinetics of dissolution of pyrite. The dissolution of pyrite is an oxidation-reduction reaction. The kinetics of the oxidation and reduction half-reactions was studied independently using electrochemical techniques of voltammetry. The kinetics of the overall reaction was studied by the electrochemical technique of potentiometry, which consisted of measuring the mixed potential of a sample of corroding pyrite in solutions of different compositions. The kinetics of the half reactions are related to the kinetics of the overall dissolution reaction by the condition that there is no accumulation of charge. This principle is used to derive expressions for the mixed potential and the rate of dissolution, which successfully describe the mixed potential measurements and the kinetics of dissolution reported in the literature. It is shown that the observations of half-order kinetics and that the oxygen in the sulphate product arises from water are both a direct consequence of the electrochemical mechanism. Thus it is concluded that the electrochemical reaction steps occurring at the mineral-solution interface control the rate of dissolution. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze reaction products formed on the pyrite surface. The results indicated that small amounts of polysulphides form on the surface of the pyrite. However, it was also found that the mixed (corrosion) potential does not change over a 14-day leaching period. This indicates that even though polysulphide material is present on the surface, it does not influence the rate of the reactions occurring at the surface. Measurement of the

  11. Studying Equilibrium in the Chemical Reaction between Ferric and Iodide Ions in Solution Using a Simple and Inexpensive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolaychuk, Pavel Anatolyevich; Kuvaeva, Alyona Olegovna

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment on the study of the chemical equilibrium based on the reaction between ferric and iodide ions in solution with the formation of ferrous ions, free iodine, and triiodide ions is developed. The total concentration of iodide and triiodide ions in the reaction mixture during the reaction is determined by the argentometric…

  12. Bacterial Formation of As(V) and As(III) Ferric Oxyhydroxides in Acid Mine Drainage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, G.; Juillot, F.; Lebrun, S.; Casiot, C.; Elbaz-Poulichet, F.; Bruneel, O.; Personne, J.; Leblanc, M.; Ildefonse, P.; Calas, G.

    2002-12-01

    The oxidation of dissolved Fe(II) which is often promoted by acidophilic bacteria in acid mine drainage (AMD) and some hot springs, leads to the precipitation of Fe(III) oxy-hydroxides which incorporate toxic elements within their structure or adsorb them at their surface, thus limiting their mobility. In such complex natural systems, synchrotron-based techniques as X-ray absorption spectroscopy offer the opportunity to monitor surface/solution interactions as well as redox changes affecting the mobility and toxicity of trace elements as arsenic. Spatial and seasonal variations of the (bio-) oxidation of Fe(II) and As(III), and the subsequent precipitation of As-Fe gels, were followed by XANES, XRD, and SEM along the CarnoulŠs AMD (Gard, France). Chemical and mineralogical data collected on sediments, stromatolite, and bioassay samples showed that some indigenous bacteria living in the As-rich CarnoulŠs water ([As] = up to 350 mg.l-1) play an important role in the nature and composition of the solid phases that sequester arsenic at the site. The formation of nano-crystalline and amorphous As(III) ferric oxy-hydroxides has been related to the presence of bacteria able to oxidize Fe(II) but not As(III), which are only present in winter in the upstream area. A rare ferric arsenite sulfate oxy-hydroxide mineral was discovered in this context. Other types of bacteria, occurring in the downstream area whatever the season, are able to catalyze As(III) to As(V) oxidation and, provided that enough Fe(II) oxidizes, promote the formation of amorphous As(V) rich ferric oxy-hydroxides. These bacterially mediated reactions significantly reduce the concentration of dissolved As(III), which is more toxic and mobile than As(V), and might thus be helpful for designing As-removal processes. This work was supported by the French PEVS and ACI Ecologie Quantitative Programs and the PIRAMID EC program. ?Deceased, 26 October 1999 Juillot F., Ildefonse Ph., Morin G., Calas G., De

  13. The effect of cupric and ferric ions on antioxidant properties of human serum albumi.

    PubMed

    Rezaei Behbehani, Gholamreza; Gonbadi, Katayon; Eslami, Nasrin

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of both ferric (Fe³⁺) and cupric (Cu²⁺) ions with human serum albumin (HSA) was assayed at a temperature of 27°C in aqueous solution using isothermal titration calorimetry. The association equilibrium constant and the molar enthalpy for one binding is 1.7 × 10⁵ M-1 and -31.37 kJ • M⁻¹, respectively. To obtain the binding parameters of metal ion-protein interaction over the whole range of Fe³⁺ concentrations, the extended solvation model was applied. The solvation parameters obtained from this model were attributed to the structural change of HSA. The binding parameters obtained from the extended solvation model indicate that the stability of HSA was decreased as a result of its binding with ferric ions, which cause dampening the antioxidant property of HSA. Cuperic ion increases the stability of HSA considerably, indicating that the antioxidant property of human serum albumin are increased as a result of its interaction with cupric ion.

  14. Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics in the DFT + U formalism: Structure and energetics of solvated ferrous and ferric ions

    SciTech Connect

    Sit, P H L.; Cococcioni, Matteo; Marzari, Nicola N.

    2007-09-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We implemented a rotationally-invariant Hubbard U extension to density-functional theory in the Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics framework, with the goal of bringing the accuracy of the DFT + U approach to finite-temperature simulations, especially for liquids or solids containing transition-metal ions. First, we studied the effects on the Hubbard U on the static equilibrium structure of the hexaaqua ferrous and ferric ions, and the inner-sphere reorganization energy for the electron-transfer reaction between aqueous ferrous and ferric ions. It is found that the reorganization energy is increased, mostly as a result of the Fe–O distance elongation in the hexa-aqua ferrous ion. Second, we performed a first-principles molecular dynamics study of the solvation structure of the two aqueous ferrous and ferric ions. The Hubbard term is found to change the Fe–O radial distribution function for the ferrous ion, while having a negligible effect on the aqueous ferric ion. Moreover, the frequencies of vibrations between Fe and oxygen atoms in the first-solvation shell are shown to be unaffected by the Hubbard corrections for both ferrous and ferric ions.

  15. Ferric ion as a scavenging agent in a solvent extraction process

    DOEpatents

    Bruns, Lester E.; Martin, Earl C.

    1976-01-01

    Ferric ions are added into the aqueous feed of a plutonium scrap recovery process that employs a tributyl phosphate extractant. Radiolytic degradation products of tributyl phosphate such as dibutyl phosphate form a solid precipitate with iron and are removed from the extraction stages via the waste stream. Consequently, the solvent extraction characteristics are improved, particularly in respect to minimizing the formation of nonstrippable plutonium complexes in the stripping stages. The method is expected to be also applicable to the partitioning of plutonium and uranium in a scrap recovery process.

  16. Arsenic removal from high-arsenic water by enhanced coagulation with ferric ions and coarse calcite.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Lopez-Valdivieso, A; Hernandez-Campos, D J; Peng, C; Monroy-Fernandez, M G; Razo-Soto, I

    2006-01-01

    Arsenic removal from high-arsenic water in a mine drainage system has been studied through an enhanced coagulation process with ferric ions and coarse calcite (38-74 microm) in this work. The experimental results have shown that arsenic-borne coagulates produced by coagulation with ferric ions alone were very fine, so micro-filtration (membrane as filter medium) was needed to remove the coagulates from water. In the presence of coarse calcite, small arsenic-borne coagulates coated on coarse calcite surfaces, leading the settling rate of the coagulates to considerably increase. The enhanced coagulation followed by conventional filtration (filter paper as filter medium) achieved a very high arsenic removal (over 99%) from high-arsenic water (5mg/l arsenic concentration), producing a cleaned water with the residual arsenic concentration of 13 microg/l. It has been found that the mechanism by which coarse calcite enhanced the coagulation of high-arsenic water might be due to attractive electrical double layer interaction between small arsenic-borne coagulates and calcite particles, which leads to non-existence of a potential energy barrier between the heterogeneous particles.

  17. Effect of ferrous and ferric ions on copigmentation in model solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunsági-Máté, Sándor; Ortmann, Erika; Kollár, László; Szabó, Kornélia; Nikfardjam, Martin Pour

    2008-11-01

    The thermodynamics of the molecular association process between malvidin-3- O-glucoside and ellagic acid (so-called "copigmentation") was studied in model wine solutions in the presence and absence, respectively, of ferrous and ferric ions. The Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy values of the complexation process were determined by means of a spectrofluorometric method. A combination of the Job's method with the van't Hoff theory was used for data evaluation. The results show the generally exothermic character of the process. The free enthalpy changes obtained during formation of malvidin-3- O-glucoside-ellagic acid complexes increase from -17.8 kJ/mol to -40.5 kJ/mol in the presence of Fe(II) ions. The increased free enthalpy is a consequence of the drastic reduction of entropy change due to the slight "swinging" movement of the interacting malvidin and ellagic acid molecules in the complexes stabilized by the ferrous ions. These results are also supported by the findings of other authors stating that iron ions play an important role in the stabilization of color in the plant kingdom and various plant products.

  18. Characterization of ferric ions diffusion in Fricke gel dosimeters by using inverse problem techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedelago, J.; Quiroga, A.; Valente, M.

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion of ferric ions in ferrous sulfate (Fricke) gels represents one of the main drawbacks of some radiation detectors, such as Fricke gel dosimeters. In practice, this disadvantage can be overcome by prompt dosimeter analysis, and constraining strongly the time between irradiation and analysis, implementing special dedicated protocols aimed at minimizing signal blurring due to diffusion effects. This work presents a novel analytic modeling and numerical calculation approach of diffusion coefficients in Fricke gel radiation sensitive materials. Samples are optically analyzed by means of visible light transmission measurements by capturing images with a charge-coupled device camera provided with a monochromatic filter corresponding to the XO-infused Fricke solution absorbance peak. Dose distributions in Fricke gels are suitably delivered by assessing specific initial conditions further studied by periodical sample image acquisitions. Diffusion coefficient calculations were performed using a set of computational algorithms based on inverse problem formulation. Although 1D approaches to the diffusion equation might provide estimations of the diffusion coefficient, it should be calculated in the 2D framework due to the intrinsic bi-dimensional characteristics of Fricke gel layers here considered as radiation dosimeters. Thus a suitable 2D diffusion model capable of determining diffusion coefficients was developed by fitting the obtained algorithm numerical solutions with the corresponding experimental data. Comparisons were performed by introducing an appropriate functional in order to analyze both experimental and numerical values. Solutions to the second-order diffusion equation are calculated in the framework of a dedicated method that incorporates finite element method. Moreover, optimized solutions can be attained by gradient-type minimization algorithms. Knowledge about diffusion coefficient for a Fricke gel radiation detector is helpful in accounting for

  19. Ferric ion-assisted in situ synthesis of silver nanoplates on polydopamine-coated silk.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jing; Zhang, Huihui; Mao, Cuiping; Wang, Ying; Wang, Ling; Lu, Zhisong

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, a ferric ion (Fe(3+))-assisted in situ synthesis approach was developed to grow silver (Ag) nanoplates on the polydopamine (PDA)-coated silk without the use of additional reductants. The essential role of Fe(3+) in the formation of Ag nanoplates is revealed by comparing the morphologies of Ag nanostructures prepared on the silk-coated PDA film with/without Fe(3+) doping. Scanning electron micrographs show that high-density Ag nanoplates could be synthesized in the reaction system containing 50μg/mL FeCl3 and 50mM AgNO3. The size of the Ag nanoplate could be tuned by adjusting the reaction duration. Based on the data, a mechanism involving the Fe(3+)-selected growth of Ag atoms along the certain crystal faces was proposed to explain the fabrication process. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry indicate that the Ag nanoplates possess good crystalline structures. Raman spectra demonstrate that the nanoplates could strongly enhance the Raman scattering of the PDA molecules. The Ag nanoplate-coated silk could be utilized as a flexible substrate for the development of surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors.

  20. SU-E-T-516: Investigation of a Novel Radiochromic Radiation Reporting System Utilizing the Reduction of Ferric Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H; Alqathami, M; Wang, J; Ibbott, G; Blencowe, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To introduce and characterize a new “reverse-Fricke” radiation reporting system utilizing the reduction of ferric ions (Fe{sup 3+}) to ferrous ions (Fe{sup 2+}). Methods Two formulations of the radiochromic reporting system, referred to as A and B, were prepared for investigation. Formulation-A consisted of 14 mM 1,10-phenanthroline, 42 mM ethanol, and 57 mM ammonium ferric oxalate in water. Formulation-B consisted of 27 mM 1,10-phenanthroline, 42 mM ethanol, and 28 mM ammonium ferric oxalate in water. Solutions were prepared immediately prior to irradiation with a Cobalt-60 unit with radiation doses of 0, 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 Gy. The change in optical density over the visible range of 450–650 nm was measured using a spectrophotometer immediately after irradiation. The effective atomic numbers of the formulations were calculated using Mayneord’s formula. Results Ionizing radiation energy absorbed in the solutions causes the reduction of ferric ions (Fe{sup 3+}) into ferrous ions (Fe{sup 2+}), which then forms a 1:3 red colored complex with 1,10-phenanthroline ([(C{sub 1} {sub 2}H{sub 8}N{sup 2}){sub 3}Fe]{sup 2+}) that can be measured spectrophotometrically. The absorbance spectra of the resulting complex displayed a peak maximum at 512 nm with a greater change in absorbance for Formulation-B after receiving comparable radiation doses. The change in absorbance relative to dose exhibited a linear response up to 25 Gy for both Formulation-A (R{sup 2} = 0.98) and Formulation-B (R{sup 2} = 0.97). The novel formulations were also nearly water equivalent (Zeff = 7.42) with effective atomic numbers of 7.65 and 7.52 and mass densities within 0.2% of water. Conclusion Both formulations displayed visible Fe{sup 2+} complex formation with 1,10-phenanthroline after irradiation using a Cobalt-60 source. The higher sensitivity measured for Formulation-B is attributed to the increase in 1,10-phenanthroline concentration and the increase in the 1

  1. [Effects of bromide and ferric ions on formation of tri-halomethanes during disinfection of drinking water by chlorine].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Wang, Jing; Ge, Yuan-Xin; Ma, Hong-Mei; Zhao, Jian-Fu

    2007-06-01

    Effects of bromide and ferric ions on the formation and distribution of tri-halomethanes (THMs) have been investigated. As disinfection by-product (DBP) model precursors of natural water, humic acid solutions were used and a series of experiments were conducted. The results showed that bromide in this reaction system not only contributed to the increase of brominated species, but also the total tri-halomethanes. When the concentration of Br(-) was 1.0 mg/L, the total amount of produced THMs reached to 270% of that without bromide ions. In the presence of bromide, ferric ions decreased the production of THMs at pH 6, but increased the production of THMs at pH 8, especially for the amount of tri-bromomethanes. When the concentration of Fe3+ was 5 mg/L, the amount of produced tri-bromomethanes had an increment of 54% (from 51.7 microg/L to 79.4 microg/L), and the total amount of THMs increased from 113.49 microg/L to 162.09 microg/L. Bromide ions had a significant effect on carcinogenicity risk in disinfection of drinking water by chlorine, and the co-existence of ferric ion and bromide in alkalescent environment can result in the biggest challenge on carcinogenicity risk. Under the condition of 0.2 mg/L Br(-), 5 mg/L Fe3+ and pH 6, the carcinogenicity risk increased 2.5 times than that without Br(-) and Fe3+, and much higher increment of 5.1 times appeared when pH was 8.

  2. Molecular characteristics of a fluorescent chemosensor for the recognition of ferric ion based on photoresponsive azobenzene derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zhen; Ran, Xia; Shi, Lili; Lou, Jie; Kuang, Yanmin; Guo, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Metal ion recognition is of great significance in biological and environmental detection. So far, there is very few research related to the ferric ion sensing based on photoresponsive azobenzene derivatives. In this work, we report a highly selective fluorescent ;turn-off; sensor for Fe3 + ions and the molecular sensing characteristics based on an azobenzene derivative, N-(3,4,5-octanoxyphenyl)-N‧-4-[(4-hydroxyphenyl)azophenyl]1,3,4-oxadiazole (AOB-t8). The binding association constant was determined to be 6.07 × 103 M- 1 in ethanol and the stoichiometry ratio of 2:2 was obtained from Job's plot and MS spectra. The AOB-t8 might be likely to form the dimer structure through the chelation of ferric ion with the azobenzene moiety. Meanwhile, it was found that the photoisomerization property of AOB-t8 was regulated by the binding with Fe3 +. With the chelation of Fe3 +, the regulated molecular rigidity and the perturbed of electronic state and molecular geometry was suggested to be responsible for the accelerated isomerization of AOB-t8 to UV irradiation and the increased fluorescence lifetime of both trans- and cis-AOB-t8-Fe(III). Moreover, the reversible sensing of AOB-t8 was successfully observed by releasing the iron ion from AOB-t8-Fe(III) with the addition of citric acid.

  3. A least-squares error minimization approach in the determination of ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-infused dosimeter gels

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Y.J.; Huang, S.-C.; Chu, W.C.

    2005-04-01

    A least-squares error minimization approach was adopted to assess ferric ion diffusion coefficient of Fricke-agarose gels. Ferric ion diffusion process was modeled as a Gaussian-shaped degradation kernel operating on an initial concentration distribution. Diffusion coefficient was iteratively determined by minimizing the error function defined as the difference between the theoretically calculated and the experimentally measured dose distributions. A rapid MR image-based differential gel dosimetry technique that time resolves the evolution of the ferric ion diffusion process minimizes smearing of the dose distribution. Our results showed that for a Fricke-agarose gel contained 1 mM ammonium ferrous sulfate, 1% agarose, 1 mM sodium chloride, and 50 mM sulfuric acid, its ferric ion diffusion coefficient is (1.59{+-}0.28)x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} at room temperature. This value falls within the 1.00-2.00x10{sup -2} cm{sup 2} h{sup -1} range previously reported under varying gelling ingredients and concentrations. This method allows a quick, nondestructive evaluation of the ferric ion diffusion coefficient that can be used in conjunction with the in situ gel dosimetry experiment to provide a practical diffusion characterization of the dosimeter gel.

  4. Analysis of spatial diffusion of ferric ions in PVA-GTA gel dosimeters through magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrale, Maurizio; Collura, Giorgio; Gallo, Salvatore; Nici, Stefania; Tranchina, Luigi; Abbate, Boris Federico; Marineo, Sandra; Caracappa, Santo; d'Errico, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    This work focused on the analysis of the temporal diffusion of ferric ions through PVA-GTA gel dosimeters. PVA-GTA gel samples, partly exposed with 6 MV X-rays in order to create an initial steep gradient, were mapped using magnetic resonance imaging on a 7T MRI scanner for small animals. Multiple images of the gels were acquired over several hours after irradiation and were analyzed to quantitatively extract the signal profile. The spatial resolution achieved is 200 μm and this makes this technique particularly suitable for the analysis of steep gradients of ferric ion concentration. The results obtained with PVA-GTA gels were compared with those achieved with agarose gels, which is a standard dosimetric gel formulation. The analysis showed that the diffusion process is much slower (more than five times) for PVA-GTA gels than for agarose ones. Furthermore, it is noteworthy that the diffusion coefficient value obtained through MRI analysis is significantly consistent with that obtained in separate study Marini et al. (Submitted for publication) using a totally independent method such as spectrophotometry. This is a valuable result highlighting that the good dosimetric features of this gel matrix not only can be reproduced but also can be measured through independent experimental techniques based on different physical principles.

  5. Breadboard wash water renovation system. [using ferric chloride and ion exchange resins to remove soap and dissolved salts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    A total wash water renovation system concept was developed for removing objectionable materials from spacecraft wash water in order to make the water reusable. The breadboard model system described provides for pretreatment with ferric chloride to remove soap by chemical precipitation, carbon adsorption to remove trace dissolved organics, and ion exchange for removal of dissolved salts. The entire system was put into continuous operation and carefully monitored to assess overall efficiency and equipment maintenance problems that could be expected in actual use. In addition, the capacity of the carbon adsorbers and the ion-exchange resin was calculated and taken into consideration in the final evaluation of the system adequacy. The product water produced was well within the Tentative Wash Water Standards with regard to total organic carbon, conductivity, urea content, sodium chloride content, color, odor, and clarity.

  6. Copper nanoclusters as a highly sensitive and selective fluorescence sensor for ferric ions in serum and living cells by imaging.

    PubMed

    Cao, Haiyan; Chen, Zhaohui; Zheng, Huzhi; Huang, Yuming

    2014-12-15

    A simple, one-step facile route for preparation of water soluble and fluorescent Cu nanoclusters (NCs) stabilized by tannic acid (TA) is described. The as-prepared TA capped Cu NCs (TA-Cu NCs) are characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, luminescence, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The TA-Cu NCs show luminescence properties having excitation and emission maxima at 360 nm and 430 nm, respectively, with a quantum yield of about 14%. The TA-Cu NCs are very stable even in 0.3 M NaCl, and their luminescent properties show pH independent. The fluorescence (FL) of Cu NCs is strongly quenched by Fe(3+) through an electron transfer mechanism, but not by other metal ions. Furthermore, the FL of the TA-Cu NCs shows no changes with the addition of Fe(2+) or H2O2 individually. On this basis, a facile chemosensor was developed for rapid, reliable, sensitive, and selective sensing of Fe(3+) ions with detection limit as low as 10 nM and a dynamic range from 10 nM to 10 μM. The proposed sensor was successfully used for the determination of iron contents in serum samples. Importantly, the Cu NCs-based FL probe showed long-term stability, good biocompatibility and very low cytotoxicity. It was successfully used for imaging ferric ions in living cells, suggesting the potential application of Cu NCs fluorescent probe in clinical analysis and cell imaging.

  7. Performance evaluation of ALCAN-AASF50-ferric coated activated alumina and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) for arsenic removal in the presence of competitive ions in an active well :Kirtland field trial - initial studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Neidel, Linnah L.; Krumhansl, James Lee; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Khandaker, Nadim Reza

    2006-01-01

    This report documents a field trial program carried out at Well No.15 located at Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico, to evaluate the performance of two relatively new arsenic removal media, ALCAN-AASF50 (ferric coated activated alumina) and granular ferric hydroxide (US Filter-GFH). The field trial program showed that both media were able to remove arsenate and meet the new total arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) in drinking water of 10 {micro}g/L. The arsenate removal capacity was defined at a breakthrough effluent concentration of 5 {micro}g/L arsenic (50% of the arsenic MCL of 10 {micro}g/L). At an influent pH of 8.1 {+-} 0.4, the arsenate removal capacity of AASF50 was 33.5 mg As(V)/L of dry media (29.9 {micro}g As(V)/g of media on a dry basis). At an influent pH of 7.2 {+-} 0.3, the arsenate removal capacity of GFH was 155 mg As(V)/L of wet media (286 {micro}g As(V)/g of media on a dry basis). Silicate, fluoride, and bicarbonate ions are removed by ALCAN AASF50. Chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions were not removed by AASF50. The GFH media also removed silicate and bicarbonate ions; however, it did not remove fluoride, chloride, nitrate, and sulfate ions. Differences in the media performance partly reflect the variations in the feed-water pH between the 2 tests. Both the exhausted AASF50 and GFH media passed the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test with respect to arsenic and therefore could be disposed as nonhazardous waste.

  8. Bacterial cells enhance laser driven ion acceleration

    PubMed Central

    Dalui, Malay; Kundu, M.; Trivikram, T. Madhu; Rajeev, R.; Ray, Krishanu; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2014-01-01

    Intense laser produced plasmas generate hot electrons which in turn leads to ion acceleration. Ability to generate faster ions or hotter electrons using the same laser parameters is one of the main outstanding paradigms in the intense laser-plasma physics. Here, we present a simple, albeit, unconventional target that succeeds in generating 700 keV carbon ions where conventional targets for the same laser parameters generate at most 40 keV. A few layers of micron sized bacteria coating on a polished surface increases the laser energy coupling and generates a hotter plasma which is more effective for the ion acceleration compared to the conventional polished targets. Particle-in-cell simulations show that micro-particle coated target are much more effective in ion acceleration as seen in the experiment. We envisage that the accelerated, high-energy carbon ions can be used as a source for multiple applications. PMID:25102948

  9. Biological regeneration of ferric (Fe3+) solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams: effect of nutrients and support material.

    PubMed

    Mulopo, Jean; Schaefer, L

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the biological regeneration of ferric Fe3+ solution during desulphurisation of gaseous streams. Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is absorbed into aqueous ferric sulphate solution and oxidised to elemental sulphur, while ferric ions Fe3+ are reduced to ferrous ions Fe2+. During the industrial regeneration of Fe3+, nutrients and trace minerals usually provided in a laboratory setup are not present and this depletion of nutrients may have a negative impact on the bacteria responsible for ferrous iron oxidation and may probably affect the oxidation rate. In this study, the effect of nutrients and trace minerals on ferrous iron oxidation have been investigated and the results showed that the presence of nutrients and trace minerals affects the efficiency of bacterial Fe2+oxidation. The scanning electron microscopy analysis of the geotextile support material was also conducted and the results showed that the iron precipitate deposits appear to play a direct role on the bacterial biofilm formation.

  10. A novel calix[4]arene thiol functionalized silver nanoprobe for selective recognition of ferric ion with nanomolar sensitivity via DLS selectivity in human biological fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Alok; Sutariya, Pinkesh G.; Lodha, Anand; Menon, Shobhana K.

    2013-02-01

    A high concern for human health and safety has motivated dynamic research on the potential impact of transition metal ions and their toxic effects, thus it is very challenging to design transition-metal ion detection devices that are cost-effective, rapid and applicable to the biological milieus. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of Fe3+ from blood samples, we report a highly selective and ultrasensitive calix[4]arene modified silver nanoprobe for Fe3+ recognition at the 9.4 nM level from aqueous solution with excellent discrimination against other heavy metals and biomolecules. The assembly was characterized by TEM (transmission electron microscopy), DLS (dynamic light scattering), UV-Vis, FT-IR, ESI-MS and 1H NMR spectrometry, which demonstrate the higher binding affinity for Fe3+. The biosensor has been successfully applied to estimate the ferric ion in human blood serum as well as in human hemoglobin.A high concern for human health and safety has motivated dynamic research on the potential impact of transition metal ions and their toxic effects, thus it is very challenging to design transition-metal ion detection devices that are cost-effective, rapid and applicable to the biological milieus. Driven by the need to detect trace amounts of Fe3+ from blood samples, we report a highly selective and ultrasensitive calix[4]arene modified silver nanoprobe for Fe3+ recognition at the 9.4 nM level from aqueous solution with excellent discrimination against other heavy metals and biomolecules. The assembly was characterized by TEM (transmission electron microscopy), DLS (dynamic light scattering), UV-Vis, FT-IR, ESI-MS and 1H NMR spectrometry, which demonstrate the higher binding affinity for Fe3+. The biosensor has been successfully applied to estimate the ferric ion in human blood serum as well as in human hemoglobin. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Supplementary materials of the synthesis procedure associated with this article can be

  11. Mechanism of bacterial pyrite oxidation.

    PubMed

    Silverman, M P

    1967-10-01

    The oxidation by Ferrobacillus ferrooxidans of untreated pyrite (FeS(2)) as well as HCl-pretreated pyrite (from which most of the acid-soluble iron species were removed) was studied manometrically. Oxygen uptake was linear during bacterial oxidation of untreated pyrite, whereas with HCl-pretreated pyrite both a decrease in oxygen uptake at 2 hr and nonlinear oxygen consumption were observed. Ferric sulfate added to HCl-pretreated pyrite restored approximately two-thirds of the decrease in total bacterial oxygen uptake and caused oxygen uptake to revert to nearly linear kinetics. Ferric sulfate also oxidized pyrite in the absence of bacteria and O(2); recovery of ferric and ferrous ions was in excellent agreement with the reaction Fe(2)(SO(4))(3) + FeS(2) = 3FeSO(4) + 2S, but the elemental sulfur produced was negligible. Neither H(2)S nor S(2)O(3) (2-) was a product of the reaction. It is probable that two mechanisms of bacterial pyrite oxidation operate concurrently: the direct contact mechanism which requires physical contact between bacteria and pyrite particles for biological pyrite oxidation, and the indirect contact mechanism according to which the bacteria oxidize ferrous ions to the ferric state, thereby regenerating the ferric ions required for chemical oxidation of pyrite.

  12. Sodium Ferric Gluconate Injection

    MedlinePlus

    Sodium ferric gluconate injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of ... are also receiving the medication epoetin (Epogen, Procrit). Sodium ferric gluconate injection is in a class of ...

  13. Role of ferric and ferrous ions in the enhancement of the heterogeneous solar photocatalytic degradation of combined mixture of chlorophenols.

    PubMed

    Abeish, Abdulbasit M; Ang, H Ming; Znad, Hussein

    2015-01-01

    The solar photocatalytic degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) and 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) was investigated individually and combined in the presence of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions. The results revealed that both Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions enhanced the heterogeneous photocatalytic degradation. Fe3+ ions rapidly converted to Fe2+ ions as soon as the irradiation started. The intermediates formed during the degradation of 4-CP/2,4-DCP were also monitored and identified. Three main intermediates were observed, hydroquinone, phenol, and 4-chlorocatechol with traces of benzoquinone. The results support a new trend of research by utilising other cheap iron ion sources in the photocatalytic degradation.

  14. Ferric ions accumulate in the walls of metabolically inactivating Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and are reductively mobilized during reactivation.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Joshua D; Park, Jinkyu; McCormick, Sean P; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A

    2016-07-13

    Mössbauer and EPR spectra of fermenting yeast cells before and after cell wall (CW) digestion revealed that CWs accumulated iron as cells transitioned from exponential to post-exponential growth. Most CW iron was mononuclear nonheme high-spin (NHHS) Fe(III), some was diamagnetic and some was superparamagnetic. A significant portion of CW Fe was removable by EDTA. Simulations using an ordinary-differential-equations-based model suggested that cells accumulate Fe as they become metabolically inactive. When dormant Fe-loaded cells were metabolically reactivated in Fe-deficient bathophenanthroline disulfonate (BPS)-treated medium, they grew using Fe that had been mobilized from their CWs AND using trace amounts of Fe in the Fe-deficient medium. When grown in Fe-deficient medium, Fe-starved cells contained the lowest cellular Fe concentrations reported for a eukaryotic cell. During metabolic reactivation of Fe-loaded dormant cells, Fe(III) ions in the CWs of these cells were mobilized by reduction to Fe(II), followed by release from the CW and reimport into the cell. BPS short-circuited this process by chelating mobilized and released Fe(II) ions before reimport; the resulting Fe(II)(BPS)3 complex adsorbed on the cell surface. NHHS Fe(II) ions appeared transiently during mobilization, suggesting that these ions were intermediates in this process. In the presence of chelators and at high pH, metabolically inactive cells leached CW Fe; this phenomenon probably differs from metabolic mobilization. The iron regulon, as reported by Fet3p levels, was not expressed during post-exponential conditions; Fet3p was maximally expressed in exponentially growing cells. Decreased expression of the iron regulon and metabolic decline combine to promote CW Fe accumulation.

  15. Improved wet bonding of methyl methacrylate-tri-n-butylborane resin to dentin etched with ten percent phosphoric acid in the presence of ferric ions.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yasuhiko; Toida, Tetsuya; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the influence of dissolved dentinal substances in demineralized dentin on the hybridization of resin for bonding to dentin. It was hypothesized that these substances, including polyelectrolytes, significantly change the substrates, which could then be assessed by the addition of Na(+), Ca(2+), or Fe(3+) in 10% phosphoric acid. Bovine dentin specimens were etched for 10 s with a solution of 10% phosphoric acid (control) or of 22.0 mM dissolved sodium chloride (10P-Na), calcium chloride (10P-Ca), or ferric chloride (10P-Fe). The specimens were then rinsed, blot-dried, and primed three times with 5% 4-methacryloyloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride in acetone for 60 s. Methyl methacrylate-tri-n-butylborane resin was then applied. The tensile bond strength of each of the dumbbell-shaped specimens was then measured. The fractured surfaces and modified cross-sections were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The cross-sections were soaked in 6N HCl for 10 s and then in 1% sodium hypochlorite for 30 min to determine the resin content in the hybridized specimens. Shrinkage of the demineralized dentins upon drying was assessed by atomic force microscopy. The tensile bond strengths were 10.8 +/- 4.5 (control), 15.0 +/- 7.0 (10P-Na), 19.3 +/- 5.5 (10P-Ca), and 27.8 +/- 8.1 (10P-Fe) MPa. The atomic force microscopy studies showed that Fe(3+) minimized the shrinkage by drying for 10 s but Ca(2+) and Na(+) did not decrease the shrinkage the same as the control. The results support the hypothesis that the monomer permeability of wet demineralized dentin is effectively improved by dissolving ferric ions in the phosphoric acid, resulting in a greater bond strength and higher resin content in the hybridized dentin. The dissolved dentinal substances, including the polyelectrolytes, had a significant influence on the characteristics of the demineralized dentin, changing the degree of hybridization and bonding.

  16. Photocatalytic activity of ferric oxide/titanium dioxide nanocomposite films on stainless steel fabricated by anodization and ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Wei-ting; Ni, Hong-wei; Chen, Rong-sheng; Yue, Gao; Tai, Jun-kai; Wang, Zi-yang

    2013-08-01

    A simple surface treatment was used to develop photocatalytic activity for stainless steel. AISI 304 stainless steel specimens after anodization were implanted by Ti ions at an extracting voltage of 50 kV with an implantation dose of 3 × 1015 atoms·cm-2 and then annealed in air at 450°C for 2 h. The morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. The microstructure was characterized by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue solution was carried out under ultraviolet light. The corrosion resistance of the stainless steel was evaluated in NaCl solution (3.5 wt%) by electrochemical polarization curves. It is found that the Ti ions depth profile resembles a Gaussian distribution in the implanted layer. The nanostructured Fe2O3/TiO2 composite film exhibits a remarkable enhancement in photocatalytic activity referenced to the mechanically polished specimen and anodized specimen. Meanwhile, the annealed Ti-implanted specimen remains good corrosion resistance.

  17. Identification and characterization of a bacterial hydrosulphide ion channel

    SciTech Connect

    Czyzewski, Bryan K.; Wang, Da-Neng

    2012-10-26

    The hydrosulphide ion (HS{sup -}) and its undissociated form, hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S), which are believed to have been critical to the origin of life on Earth, remain important in physiology and cellular signalling. As a major metabolite in anaerobic bacterial growth, hydrogen sulphide is a product of both assimilatory and dissimilatory sulphate reduction. These pathways can reduce various oxidized sulphur compounds including sulphate, sulphite and thiosulphate. The dissimilatory sulphate reduction pathway uses this molecule as the terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, in which process it produces excess amounts of H{sub 2}S. The reduction of sulphite is a key intermediate step in all sulphate reduction pathways. In Clostridium and Salmonella, an inducible sulphite reductase is directly linked to the regeneration of NAD{sup +}, which has been suggested to have a role in energy production and growth, as well as in the detoxification of sulphite. Above a certain concentration threshold, both H{sub 2}S and HS{sup -} inhibit cell growth by binding the metal centres of enzymes and cytochrome oxidase, necessitating a release mechanism for the export of this toxic metabolite from the cell. Here we report the identification of a hydrosulphide ion channel in the pathogen Clostridium difficile through a combination of genetic, biochemical and functional approaches. The HS{sup -} channel is a member of the formate/nitrite transport family, in which about 50 hydrosulphide ion channels form a third subfamily alongside those for formate (FocA) and for nitrite (NirC). The hydrosulphide ion channel is permeable to formate and nitrite as well as to HS{sup -} ions. Such polyspecificity can be explained by the conserved ion selectivity filter observed in the channel's crystal structure. The channel has a low open probability and is tightly regulated, to avoid decoupling of the membrane proton gradient.

  18. Ferric sulfates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the possible existence of ferric sulfato complexes and hydroxo ferric sulfate minerals in the permafrost of Mars. A sequential combination of ten unique conditions during the cooling history of Mars is suggested which is believed to have generated an environment within Martian permafrost that has stabilized Fe(3+)-SO4(2-)-bearing species. It is argued that minerals belonging to the jarosite and copiapite groups could be present in Martian regolith analyzed in the Viking XRF measurements at Chryse and Utopia, and that maghemite suspected to be coating the Viking magnet arrays is a hydrolysate of dissolved ferric sulfato complexes from exposed Martian permafrost.

  19. Identification and characterization of a bacterial hydrosulfide ion channel

    PubMed Central

    Czyzewski, Bryan K.; Wang, Da-Neng

    2013-01-01

    Believed to have been critical to the origin of life on Earth 1, the hydrosulfide ion (HS−) and its undissociated form, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), continue to play a prominent role in physiology and cellular signaling 2. As a major metabolite in anaerobic bacterial growth, hydrogen sulfide is a product of both assimilatory and dissimilatory sulfate reduction 2–4. These pathways can reduce various oxidized sulfur compounds including sulfate, sulfite and thiosulfate. The dissimilatory sulfate reduction pathway uses this molecule as the terminal electron acceptor for anaerobic respiration, where it produces excess amounts of H2S4. The reduction of sulfite is a key intermediate step in all sulfate reduction pathways. In Clostridium and Salmonella, an inducible sulfite reductase is directly linked to the regeneration of NAD+, which has been suggested to play a role in energy production and growth, as well as in the detoxification of sulfite 3. Above a certain concentration threshold, both H2S and HS− nhibit cell growth by binding the metal centers of enzymes and cytochrome oxidase5, necessitating a release mechanism for the export of this toxic metabolite from the cell 5–9. Through a combination of genetic, biochemical and functional approaches, we have identified a hydrosulfide ion channel (HSC) in the pathogen Clostridium difficile. The HS− channel is a member of the formate-nitrite-transport (FNT) family, in which ~50 HSC genes form a third subfamily alongside those for formate (FocA) 10,11 and for nitrite (NirC) 12. In addition to HS− ions, HSC is also permeable to formate and nitrite. Such polyspecificity can be explained by the conserved ion selectivity filter observed in the HSC crystal structure. The channel has a low open probability and is tightly regulated, to avoid decoupling of the membrane proton gradient. PMID:22407320

  20. Ferric ion-specific sequestering agents. 7. Synthesis, iron-exchange kinetics, and stability constants of N-substituted, sulfonated catechoylamide analogs of enterobactin

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, Vincent L.; Weit, Frederick L.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    1981-08-01

    For treatment of chronic iron overload (as occurs in Cooley's anemia), ferric ion sequestering agents with specific properties are necessary. Two analogues of enterobactin [a microbial chelating agent with the greatest stability constant known for an Fe(III) complex] are reported which exhibit: i) hydrolytic stability; ii) water solubility; iii) N-substitution to block peptidase hydrolysis. The first compound, N,N',N"- trimethyl-N,N',N"-tris(2,3-dihydroxysulfobenzoyl)1,3,5-triaminomethyl- benzene, [Me3MECAMS, 6] was prepared from the amide of trimesloyl chloride (1) and MeNH2. The resulting amide was reduced to the triamine (3) and converted in three steps to the final product 6 in 6% overall yield. The proton-dependent formation constant (log K*) for the reaction: Fe3+ + H3L6- = FeL6- + 3H+ is 4.87, which gives an equilibrium concentration of [Fe3+] at pH 7.4 of 2 x 10-27 M for 10-5 M L (6) and 10-6 M total Fe3+. The estimated formation constant (log β110) is 40. At low pH the FeL6- complex undergoes a series of three, one-proton reactions which probably gives a tris-salicylate complex formed by the carbonyl and ortho-catechol oxygen of the 2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl units (the same reaction that occurs with ferric enterobactin). After six hours in the presence of 6 mM ascorbate, Me3MECAMS (6.0 mM) removed 3.7% of the ferric ion initially sequestered by the iron storage protein, ferritin. The human iron transport protein transferrin gives up iron to Me3MECAMS with a pseudo first-order rate constant of 1.9 x 10-3min-1 (ligand concentration 2 X 10-4 M). This rate is comparable to that of enterobactin and other catechoyl amide sequestering agents, and greatly exceeds that of desferrioxamine B (Desferal®), the current drug of choice in treating iron overload. Two

  1. A biosensor for ferric ion.

    PubMed

    Barrero, J M; Morino-Bondi, M C; Pérez-Conde, M C; Cámara, C

    1993-11-01

    A new biosensor for monitoring iron has been developed. The active solid phase is pyoverdin, a natural fluorescent pigment biosynthesized by Pseudomonas fluorescens immobilized on controlled pore glass (CPG) and packed in a quartz flow-through cell. The biosensor is very selective for iron(III) and can be easily regenerated in about 2 min by passing 1M HCl through the cell. The optimum conditions and analytical characteristics (detection limit, precision and linear range) for the new sensor in solution (DL = 10 ng/ml) and in immobilized form (DL = 3 ng/ml) are reported. The biosensor has good stability and can be used continuously over a period for at least 3 months (over 1000 determinations). The sensor was successfully applied to determine iron in different water samples. There were no significant differences between the new method and the Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) reference method at the 95% confidence level.

  2. Ferric Tourmaline from Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mason, B; Donnay, G; Hardie, L A

    1964-04-03

    Dark brown crystals, up to 10 mm long, occur in rhyolite at Mexquitic, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. They are short prismatic, showing {1120}, {3030}, {1011}, {0221}, with c/a 0.4521, measured with a goniometer, and distinct {1120} cleavage. With an unusual combination of cell dimensions, high density, high refractive indices, and extreme birefringence, this tourmaline falls outside the known elbaite-schorl and schorl-dravite series. A chemical analysis, recalculated on the basis of cell volume and density, gives close to the theoretical 150 atoms per cell, whether the iron is ferrous or ferric, but the physical properties indicate a ferric tourmaline.

  3. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L. D.; Sangwijit, K.; Prakrajang, K.; Phanchaisri, B.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Thopan, P.; Singkarat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-05-01

    As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10-20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence.

  4. Engineering bacterial two-component system PmrA/PmrB to sense lanthanide ions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Haihua; Deng, Xin; Bosscher, Mike; Ji, Quanjiang; Jensen, Mark P; He, Chuan

    2013-02-13

    The Salmonella PmrA/PmrB two-component system uses an iron(III)-binding motif on the cell surface to sense the environmental or host ferric level and regulate PmrA-controlled gene expression. We replaced the iron(III)-binding motif with a lanthanide-binding peptide sequence that is known to selectively recognize trivalent lanthanide ions. The newly engineered two-component system (PmrA/PmrB) can effectively sense lanthanide ion and regulate gene expression in E. coli . This work not only provides the first known lanthanide-based sensing and response in live cells but also demonstrates that the PmrA/PmrB system is a suitable template for future synthetic biology efforts to construct bacteria that can sense and respond to other metal ions in remediation or sequestration.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS... treating ferric oxide or ferric hydroxide with sulfuric acid. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1307 - Ferric sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1307 Ferric sulfate. (a) Ferric sulfate (iron (III) sulfate, Fe2(SO4)3 CAS... treating ferric oxide or ferric hydroxide with sulfuric acid. (b) The ingredient must be of a...

  7. Evolution of the Ferric Reductase Domain (FRD) Superfamily: Modularity, Functional Diversification, and Signature Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Xenarios, Ioannis; Soldati, Thierry; Boeckmann, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    A heme-containing transmembrane ferric reductase domain (FRD) is found in bacterial and eukaryotic protein families, including ferric reductases (FRE), and NADPH oxidases (NOX). The aim of this study was to understand the phylogeny of the FRD superfamily. Bacteria contain FRD proteins consisting only of the ferric reductase domain, such as YedZ and short bFRE proteins. Full length FRE and NOX enzymes are mostly found in eukaryotic cells and all possess a dehydrogenase domain, allowing them to catalyze electron transfer from cytosolic NADPH to extracellular metal ions (FRE) or oxygen (NOX). Metazoa possess YedZ-related STEAP proteins, possibly derived from bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. Phylogenetic analyses suggests that FRE enzymes appeared early in evolution, followed by a transition towards EF-hand containing NOX enzymes (NOX5- and DUOX-like). An ancestral gene of the NOX(1-4) family probably lost the EF-hands and new regulatory mechanisms of increasing complexity evolved in this clade. Two signature motifs were identified: NOX enzymes are distinguished from FRE enzymes through a four amino acid motif spanning from transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) to TM4, and YedZ/STEAP proteins are identified by the replacement of the first canonical heme-spanning histidine by a highly conserved arginine. The FRD superfamily most likely originated in bacteria. PMID:23505460

  8. Ferric Iron Content of Nakhlite Hydrothermal Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, L. J.; Bridges, J. C.; Gurman, S. J.

    2012-03-01

    Fe-K XANES absorption edge positions are correlated with ferric-ferrous ratios. This allows us to determine the oxidation state of the phyllosilicate (mixed ferric and ferrous) and amorphous gel (ferric) in the Lafayette nakhlite.

  9. Stochastic pumping of ions based on colored noise in bacterial channels under acidic stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, M. Lidón; Queralt-Martín, María; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Fluctuation-driven ion transport can be obtained in bacterial channels with the aid of different types of colored noise including the biologically relevant Lorentzian one. Using the electrochemical rectification of the channel current as a ratchet mechanism we observe transport of ions up to their concentration gradient under conditions similar to that met in vivo, namely moderate pH gradients and asymmetrically charged lipid membranes. We find that depending on the direction of the concentration gradient the channel can pump either cations or anions from the diluted side to the concentrated one. We discuss the possible relevance of this phenomenon for the pH homeostasis of bacterial cells.Fluctuation-driven ion transport can be obtained in bacterial channels with the aid of different types of colored noise including the biologically relevant Lorentzian one. Using the electrochemical rectification of the channel current as a ratchet mechanism we observe transport of ions up to their concentration gradient under conditions similar to that met in vivo, namely moderate pH gradients and asymmetrically charged lipid membranes. We find that depending on the direction of the concentration gradient the channel can pump either cations or anions from the diluted side to the concentrated one. We discuss the possible relevance of this phenomenon for the pH homeostasis of bacterial cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02638a

  10. Mutagenic effect of accelerated heavy ions on bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2011-11-01

    The heavy ion accelerators of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research were used to study the regularities and mechanisms of formation of different types of mutations in prokaryote cells. The induction of direct (lac-, ton B-, col B) mutations for Esherichia coli cells and reverse his- → His+ mutations of Salmonella typhimurium, Bacillus subtilis cells under the action of radiation in a wide range of linear energy transfer (LET) was studied. The regularities of formation of gene and structural (tonB trp-) mutations for Esherichia coli bacteria under the action of accelerated heavy ions were studied. It was demonstrated that the rate of gene mutations as a function of the dose under the action of Γ rays and accelerated heavy ions is described by linear-quadratic functions. For structural mutations, linear "dose-effect" dependences are typical. The quadratic character of mutagenesis dose curves is determined by the "interaction" of two independent "hitting" events in the course of SOS repair of genetic structures. The conclusion made was that gene mutations under the action of accelerated heavy ions are induced by δ electron regions of charged particle tracks. The methods of SOS chromotest, SOS lux test, and λ prophage induction were used to study the regularities of SOS response of cells under the action of radiations in a wide LET range. The following proposition was substantiated: the molecular basis for formation of gene mutations are cluster single-strand DNA breaks, and that for structural mutations, double-strand DNA breaks. It was found out that the LET dependence of the relative biological efficiency of accelerated ions is described by curves with a local maximum. It was demonstrated that the biological efficiency of ionizing radiations with different physical characteristics on cells with different genotype, estimated by the lethal action, induction of gene and deletion mutations, precision excision of transposons, is determined by the specific

  11. MinION nanopore sequencing identifies the position and structure of a bacterial antibiotic resistance island.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Philip M; Nair, Satheesh; Dallman, Tim; Rubino, Salvatore; Rabsch, Wolfgang; Mwaigwisya, Solomon; Wain, John; O'Grady, Justin

    2015-03-01

    Short-read, high-throughput sequencing technology cannot identify the chromosomal position of repetitive insertion sequences that typically flank horizontally acquired genes such as bacterial virulence genes and antibiotic resistance genes. The MinION nanopore sequencer can produce long sequencing reads on a device similar in size to a USB memory stick. Here we apply a MinION sequencer to resolve the structure and chromosomal insertion site of a composite antibiotic resistance island in Salmonella Typhi Haplotype 58. Nanopore sequencing data from a single 18-h run was used to create a scaffold for an assembly generated from short-read Illumina data. Our results demonstrate the potential of the MinION device in clinical laboratories to fully characterize the epidemic spread of bacterial pathogens.

  12. Turn-off fluorescence sensor for the detection of ferric ion in water using green synthesized N-doped carbon dots and its bio-imaging.

    PubMed

    Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Atchudan, Raji; Shim, Jae-Jin; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Ahn, Byeong-Cheol; Lee, Yong Rok

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports turn-off fluorescence sensor for Fe(3+) ion in water using fluorescent N-doped carbon dots as a probe. A simple and efficient hydrothermal carbonization of Prunus avium fruit extract for the synthesis of fluorescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots (N-CDs) is described. This green approach proceeds quickly and provides good quality N-CDs. The mean size of synthesized N-CDs was approximately 7nm calculated from the high-resolution transmission electron microscopic images. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the presence of -OH, -NH2, -COOH, and -CO functional groups over the surface of CDs. The N-CDs showed excellent fluorescent properties, and emitted blue fluorescence at 411nm upon excitation at 310nm. The calculated quantum yield of the synthesized N-CDs is 13% against quinine sulfate as a reference fluorophore. The synthesized N-CDs were used as a fluorescent probe towards the selective and sensitive detection of biologically important Fe(3+) ions in water by fluorescence spectroscopy and for bio-imaging of MDA-MB-231 cells. The limit of detection (LOD) and the Stern-Volmer quenching constant for the synthesized N-CDs were 0.96μM and 2.0958×10(3)M of Fe(3+) ions. The green synthesized N-CDs are efficiently used as a promising candidate for the detection of Fe(3+) ions and bio-imaging.

  13. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, Fe... from one to four molecules of water of hydration. It is prepared by reaction of sodium phosphate...

  14. Ion Selectivity Mechanism in a Bacterial Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsch, Sebastian M; Ivanov, Ivaylo N; Wang, Hailong; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    The proton-gated ion channel from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) is a prokaryotic homolog of the eukaryotic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) that responds to the binding of neurotransmitter acetylcholine and mediates fast signal transmission. Recent emergence of a high resolution crystal structure of GLIC captured in a potentially open state allowed detailed, atomic-level insight into ion conduction and selectivity mechanisms in these channels. Herein, we have examined the barriers to ion conduction and origins of ion selectivity in the GLIC channel by the construction of potential of mean force (PMF) profiles for sodium and chloride ions inside the transmembrane region. Our calculations reveal that the GLIC channel is open for a sodium ion to transport, but presents a ~10 kcal/mol free energy barrier for a chloride ion, which arises primarily from the unfavorable interactions with a ring of negatively charged glutamate residues (E-2 ) at the intracellular end and a ring of hydrophobic residues (I9 ) in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Our collective findings further suggest that the charge selection mechanism can, to a large extent, be attributed to the narrow intracellular end and a ring of glutamate residues in this position their strong negative electrostatics and ability to bind cations. By contrast, E19 at the extracellular entrance only plays a minor role in ion selectivity of GLIC. In addition to electrostatics, both ion hydration and protein dynamics are found to be crucial for ion conduction as well, which explains why a chloride ion experiences a much greater barrier than a sodium ion in the hydrophobic region of the pore.

  15. Ion Selectivity Mechanism in a Bacterial Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsch, Sebastian; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Wang, Hailong; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2010-01-01

    The proton-gated ion channel from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) is a prokaryotic homolog of the eukaryotic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor that responds to the binding of neurotransmitter acetylcholine and mediates fast signal transmission. Recent emergence of a high-resolution crystal structure of GLIC captured in a potentially open state allowed detailed, atomic-level insight into ion conduction and selectivity mechanisms in these channels. Herein, we have examined the barriers to ion conduction and origins of ion selectivity in the GLIC channel by the construction of potential-of-mean-force profiles for sodium and chloride ions inside the transmembrane region. Our calculations reveal that the GLIC channel is open for a sodium ion to transport, but presents a 11 kcal/mol free energy barrier for a chloride ion. Our collective findings identify three distinct contributions to the observed preference for the permeant ions. First, there is a substantial contribution due to a ring of negatively charged glutamate residues (E-2 ) at the narrow intracellular end of the channel. The negative electrostatics of this region and the ability of the glutamate side chains to directly bind cations would strongly favor the passage of sodium ions while hindering translocation of chloride ions. Second, our results imply a significant hydrophobic contribution to selectivity linked to differences in the desolvation penalty for the sodium versus chloride ions in the central hydrophobic region of the pore. This hydrophobic contribution is evidenced by the large free energy barriers experienced by Cl in the middle of the pore for both GLIC and the E-2 A mutant. Finally, there is a distinct contribution arising from the overall negative electrostatics of the channel.

  16. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwijit, K.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Pitakrattananukool, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 1012 to 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  17. Simultaneous determination of adenine and guanine in ruminant bacterial pellets by ion-pair HPLC.

    PubMed

    García del Moral, Pilar; Arín, María Jesús; Resines, José Antonio; Díez, María Teresa

    2005-11-05

    An ion-pair reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with gradient elution and UV detection was used to measure adenine (A) and guanine (G) in lyophilized bacterial pellets from ruminants using allopurinol as internal standard. The separation was performed on a Symmetry C18 column and the detection was monitored at 280 nm. Calibration curves were found to be linear in the concentration range from 5 to 50 mg/l with correlation coefficients (r2)>0.999. Mean recoveries of A and G standards added to bacterial samples were 102.2 and 98.2, respectively. The method proposed yielded sharp, well-resolved peaks within 25 min and was successfully applied for the determination of A and G in bacterial pellets.

  18. Analysis of bacterial communities and bacterial pathogens in a biogas plant by the combination of ethidium monoazide, PCR and Ion Torrent sequencing.

    PubMed

    Luo, Gang; Angelidaki, Irini

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigated the changes of bacterial community composition including bacterial pathogens along a biogas plant, i.e. from the influent, to the biogas reactor and to the post-digester. The effects of post-digestion temperature and time on the changes of bacterial community composition and bacterial pathogens were also studied. Microbial analysis was made by Ion Torrent sequencing of the PCR amplicons from ethidium monoazide treated samples, and ethidium monoazide was used to cleave DNA from dead cells and exclude it from PCR amplification. Both similarity and taxonomic analysis showed that the bacterial community composition in the influent was changed after anaerobic digestion. Firmicutes were dominant in all the samples, while Proteobacteria decreased in the biogas reactor compared with the influent. Variations of bacterial community composition in the biogas reactor with time were also observed. This could be attributed to varying composition of the influent. Batch experiments showed that the methane recovery from the digested residues (obtained from biogas reactor) was mainly related with post-digestion temperature. However, post-digestion time rather than temperature had a significant effect on the changes of bacterial community composition. The changes of bacterial community composition were also reflected in the changes of relative abundance of bacterial pathogens. The richness and relative abundance of bacterial pathogens were reduced after anaerobic digestion in the biogas reactor. It was found in batch experiments that bacterial pathogens showed the highest relative abundance and richness after 30 days' post-digestion. Streptococcus bovis was found in all the samples. Our results showed that special attention should be paid to the post-digestion since the increase in relative abundance of bacterial pathogens after post-digestion might reflect regrowth of bacterial pathogens and limit biosolids disposal vectors.

  19. Bottom-up electrochemical preparation of solid-state carbon nanodots directly from nitriles/ionic liquids using carbon-free electrodes and the applications in specific ferric ion detection and cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Fushuang; Xu, Yuanhong; Liu, Mengli; Sun, Jing; Guo, Pengran; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-03-01

    Carbon nanodots (C-dots), a new type of potential alternative to conventional semiconductor quantum dots, have attracted numerous attentions in various applications including bio-chemical sensing, cell imaging, etc., due to their chemical inertness, low toxicity and flexible functionalization. Various methods including electrochemical (EC) methods have been reported for the synthesis of C-dots. However, complex procedures and/or carbon source-containing electrodes are often required. Herein, solid-state C-dots were simply prepared by bottom-up EC carbonization of nitriles (e.g. acetonitrile) in the presence of an ionic liquid [e.g. 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMIMPF6)], using carbon-free electrodes. Due to the positive charges of BMIM+ on the C-dots, the final products presented in a precipitate form on the cathode, and the unreacted nitriles and BMIMPF6 can be easily removed by simple vacuum filtration. The as-prepared solid-state C-dots can be well dispersed in an aqueous medium with excellent photoluminescence properties. The average size of the C-dots was found to be 3.02 +/- 0.12 nm as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy. Other techniques such as UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were applied for the characterization of the C-dots and to analyze the possible generation mechanism. These C-dots have been successfully applied in efficient cell imaging and specific ferric ion detection.Carbon nanodots (C-dots), a new type of potential alternative to conventional semiconductor quantum dots, have attracted numerous attentions in various applications including bio-chemical sensing, cell imaging, etc., due to their chemical inertness, low toxicity and flexible functionalization. Various methods including electrochemical (EC) methods have been reported for the synthesis of C-dots. However, complex procedures and/or carbon source-containing electrodes are often

  20. Plasma-based fluorine ion implantation into dental materials for inhibition of bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nurhaerani; Arita, Kenji; Shinonaga, Yukari; Nishino, Mizuho

    2006-12-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the fluorine depth profiles of pure titanium (Ti), stainless steel (SUS), and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) modified by plasma-based fluorine ion implantation and the effects of fluorine ion implantation on contact angle, fluoride ion release, and S. mutans adhesion. Fluorine-based gases used were Ar+F2 and CF4. By means of SIMS, it was found that the peak count of PMMA was the lowest while that of Ti was the highest. Then, up to one minute after Ar sputtering, the presence of fluorine and chromic fluoride could be detected by XPS in the surface and subsurface layer. As for the effects of using CF4 gas for fluorine ion implantation into SUS substrate, the results were: contact angle was significantly increased; no fluoride ion release was detected; antibacterial activity was significantly increased while initial adhesion was decreased. These findings thus indicated that plasma-based fluorine ion implantation into SUS with CF4 gas provided surface antibacterial activity which was useful in inhibiting bacterial adhesion.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08... hexahydrate, FeC13. 6H20, CAS Reg. No. 10025-77-1) is readily formed when ferric chloride is exposed...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1298 Ferric citrate. (a) Ferric citrate (iron (III) citrate, C6H5FeO7, CAS Reg. No. 2338-05-8) is prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1298 - Ferric citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1298 Ferric citrate. (a) Ferric citrate (iron (III) citrate, C6H5FeO7, CAS Reg. No. 2338-05-8) is prepared from reaction of citric acid with ferric hydroxide. It is a compound of indefinite ratio of citric acid and iron. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for...

  8. Adverse Reactions of Ferric Carboxymaltose

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Navin; Shenoy, Smita; Bairy, K L; Sarma, Yashdeep

    2014-01-01

    The author reports a 55-year-old female diagnosed of chronic kidney disease grade-5 with associated co-morbidities like type 2 diabetes mellitus, diabetic retinopathy and hypothyroidism was admitted for arteriovenous fistula construction. She was started on ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of anaemia. She was given a test dose before administering the drug intravenously and she did not develop any reaction. The drug ferric carboxymaltose was then administered over a period of one hour. About half an hour after drug administration, the patient developed breathlessness and myalgia. After half hour of the above episode of breathlessness and myalgia she also developed vomiting (one episode). Patient was managed with oxygen therapy, IV fluids and other drugs like corticosteroids, phenaramine maleate and nalbuphine which controlled the above symptoms. PMID:25478369

  9. A novel type bacterial flagellar motor that can use divalent cations as a coupling ion

    PubMed Central

    Imazawa, Riku; Takahashi, Yuka; Aoki, Wataru; Sano, Motohiko; Ito, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a sophisticated nanomachine embedded in the cell envelope and powered by an electrochemical gradient of H+, Na+, or K+across the cytoplasmic membrane. Here we describe a new member of the bacterial flagellar stator channel family (MotAB1 of Paenibacillus sp. TCA20 (TCA-MotAB1)) that is coupled to divalent cations (Ca2+and Mg2+). In the absence of divalent cations of alkaline earth metals, no swimming was observed in Paenibacillus sp. TCA20, which grows optimally in Ca2+-rich environments. This pattern was confirmed by swimming assays of a stator-free Bacillus subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1. Both a stator-free and major Mg2+uptake system-deleted B. subtilis mutant expressing TCA-MotAB1 complemented both growth and motility deficiency under low Mg2+conditions and exhibited [Mg2+]in identical to that of the wild-type. This is the first report of a flagellar motor that can use Ca2+and Mg2+as coupling ions. These findings will promote the understanding of the operating principles of flagellar motors and molecular mechanisms of ion selectivity. PMID:26794857

  10. Decreased bacterial growth on titanium nanoscale topographies created by ion beam assisted evaporation

    PubMed Central

    Stolzoff, Michelle; Burns, Jason E; Aslani, Arash; Tobin, Eric J; Nguyen, Congtin; De La Torre, Nicholas; Golshan, Negar H; Ziemer, Katherine S; Webster, Thomas J

    2017-01-01

    Titanium is one of the most widely used materials for orthopedic implants, yet it has exhibited significant complications in the short and long term, largely resulting from poor cell–material interactions. Among these many modes of failure, bacterial infection at the site of implantation has become a greater concern with the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Nanostructured surfaces have been found to prevent bacterial colonization on many surfaces, including nanotextured titanium. In many cases, specific nanoscale roughness values and resulting surface energies have been considered to be “bactericidal”; here, we explore the use of ion beam evaporation as a novel technique to create nanoscale topographical features that can reduce bacterial density. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between the roughness and titanium nanofeature shapes and sizes, in which smaller, more regularly spaced nanofeatures (specifically 40–50 nm tall peaks spaced ~0.25 μm apart) were found to have more effect than surfaces with high roughness values alone. PMID:28223804

  11. Leaching of Zinc Sulfide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: Experiments with a Controlled Redox Potential Indicate No Direct Bacterial Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, T. A.; Crundwell, F. K.

    1998-01-01

    The role of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in bacterial leaching of mineral sulfides is controversial. Much of the controversy is due to the fact that the solution conditions, especially the concentrations of ferric and ferrous ions, change during experiments. The role of the bacteria would be more easily discernible if the concentrations of ferric and ferrous ions were maintained at set values throughout the experimental period. In this paper we report results obtained by using the constant redox potential apparatus described previously (P. I. Harvey and F. K. Crundwell, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 63:2586–2592, 1997). This apparatus is designed to control the redox potential in the leaching compartment of an electrolytic cell by reduction or oxidation of dissolved iron. By controlling the redox potential the apparatus maintains the concentrations of ferrous and ferric ions at their initial values. Experiments were conducted in the presence of T. ferrooxidans and under sterile conditions. Analysis of the conversion of zinc sulfide in the absence of the bacteria and analysis of the conversion of zinc sulfate in the presence of the bacteria produced the same results. This indicates that the only role of the bacteria under the conditions used is regeneration of ferric ions in solution. In this work we found no evidence that there is a direct mechanism for bacterial leaching. PMID:9758769

  12. Analysis of bacterial spore permeability to water and ions using Nano-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (NanoSIMS)

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosal, S; Fallon, S; Leighton, T; Wheeler, K; Hutcheon, I; Weber, P K

    2005-11-17

    Regulation of bacterial spore solvent and solute permeability is a fundamental feature of dormancy but is poorly understood. Here we present a new technique, nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) that allows the direct visualization and quantification of chemical gradients within spores. Using NanoSIMS, we demonstrate the penetration of water and a simple ionic salt, LiF, into the core of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis (Bti) spores. The results demonstrate chemical gradients spanning the outer coat to the inner spore core that are driven by concentration-dependent ionic fluxes. Using deuterated water (D{sub 2}O), we have shown that external water is either retained or exchanged with water contained within the spore. Hydration and exchange are rapid, on a timescale of < 1 minute. Our results suggest a permeation mechanism by which short-time scale diffusion into and out of the spore can occur along hydration pathways. Additional studies are in progress to define the flux rates and mechanisms controlling these processes.

  13. Freestanding bacterial cellulose-graphene oxide composite membranes with high mechanical strength for selective ion permeation

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qile; Zhou, Xufeng; Deng, Wei; Zheng, Zhi; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) based membranes have been widely applied in molecular separation based on the size exclusion effect of the nanochannels formed by stacked GO sheets. However, it’s still a challenge to prepare a freestanding GO-based membrane with high mechanical strength and structural stability which is prerequisite for separation application in aqueous solution. Here, a freestanding composite membrane based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and GO is designed and prepared. BC network provides a porous skeleton to spread GO sheets and uniformly incorporates into the GO layers, which endows the BC + GO composite membrane with well water-stability, excellent tensile strength, as well as improved toughness, guaranteeing its separation applicability in water environment. The resulting BC + GO membrane exhibits obviously discrepant permeation properties for different inorganic/organic ions with different size, and in particular, it can quickly separate ions in nano-scale from angstrom-scale. Therefore, this novel composite membrane is considered to be a promising candidate in the applications of water purification, food industry, biomedicine, and pharmaceutical and fuel separation. PMID:27615451

  14. Freestanding bacterial cellulose-graphene oxide composite membranes with high mechanical strength for selective ion permeation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Qile; Zhou, Xufeng; Deng, Wei; Zheng, Zhi; Liu, Zhaoping

    2016-09-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) based membranes have been widely applied in molecular separation based on the size exclusion effect of the nanochannels formed by stacked GO sheets. However, it’s still a challenge to prepare a freestanding GO-based membrane with high mechanical strength and structural stability which is prerequisite for separation application in aqueous solution. Here, a freestanding composite membrane based on bacterial cellulose (BC) and GO is designed and prepared. BC network provides a porous skeleton to spread GO sheets and uniformly incorporates into the GO layers, which endows the BC + GO composite membrane with well water-stability, excellent tensile strength, as well as improved toughness, guaranteeing its separation applicability in water environment. The resulting BC + GO membrane exhibits obviously discrepant permeation properties for different inorganic/organic ions with different size, and in particular, it can quickly separate ions in nano-scale from angstrom-scale. Therefore, this novel composite membrane is considered to be a promising candidate in the applications of water purification, food industry, biomedicine, and pharmaceutical and fuel separation.

  15. A bacterial view of the periodic table: genes and proteins for toxic inorganic ions.

    PubMed

    Silver, Simon; Phung, Le T

    2005-12-01

    Essentially all bacteria have genes for toxic metal ion resistances and these include those for Ag+, AsO2-, AsO4(3-), Cd2+ Co2+, CrO4(2-), Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, TeO3(2-), Tl+ and Zn2+. The largest group of resistance systems functions by energy-dependent efflux of toxic ions. Fewer involve enzymatic transformations (oxidation, reduction, methylation, and demethylation) or metal-binding proteins (for example, metallothionein SmtA, chaperone CopZ and periplasmic silver binding protein SilE). Some of the efflux resistance systems are ATPases and others are chemiosmotic ion/proton exchangers. For example, Cd2+-efflux pumps of bacteria are either inner membrane P-type ATPases or three polypeptide RND chemiosmotic complexes consisting of an inner membrane pump, a periplasmic-bridging protein and an outer membrane channel. In addition to the best studied three-polypeptide chemiosmotic system, Czc (Cd2+, Zn2+, and Co2), others are known that efflux Ag+, Cu+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Resistance to inorganic mercury, Hg2+ (and to organomercurials, such as CH3Hg+ and phenylmercury) involve a series of metal-binding and membrane transport proteins as well as the enzymes mercuric reductase and organomercurial lyase, which overall convert more toxic to less toxic forms. Arsenic resistance and metabolizing systems occur in three patterns, the widely-found ars operon that is present in most bacterial genomes and many plasmids, the more recently recognized arr genes for the periplasmic arsenate reductase that functions in anaerobic respiration as a terminal electron acceptor, and the aso genes for the periplasmic arsenite oxidase that functions as an initial electron donor in aerobic resistance to arsenite.

  16. Metal-responsive promoter DNA compaction by the ferric uptake regulator

    PubMed Central

    Roncarati, Davide; Pelliciari, Simone; Doniselli, Nicola; Maggi, Stefano; Vannini, Andrea; Valzania, Luca; Mazzei, Luca; Zambelli, Barbara; Rivetti, Claudio; Danielli, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Short-range DNA looping has been proposed to affect promoter activity in many bacterial species and operator configurations, but only few examples have been experimentally investigated in molecular detail. Here we present evidence for a metal-responsive DNA condensation mechanism controlled by the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator (Fur), an orthologue of the widespread Fur family of prokaryotic metal-dependent regulators. H. pylori Fur represses the transcription of the essential arsRS acid acclimation operon through iron-responsive oligomerization and DNA compaction, encasing the arsR transcriptional start site in a repressive macromolecular complex. A second metal-dependent regulator NikR functions as nickel-dependent anti-repressor at this promoter, antagonizing the binding of Fur to the operator elements responsible for the DNA condensation. The results allow unifying H. pylori metal ion homeostasis and acid acclimation in a mechanistically coherent model, and demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of a selective metal-responsive DNA compaction mechanism controlling bacterial transcriptional regulation. PMID:27558202

  17. 21 CFR 73.1299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric ferrocyanide. 73.1299 Section 73.1299 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity. (1)...

  18. 21 CFR 73.1299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric ferrocyanide. 73.1299 Section 73.1299 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity. (1)...

  19. 21 CFR 73.1299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric ferrocyanide. 73.1299 Section 73.1299 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity. (1)...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1297 Ferric chloride. (a) Ferric chloride (iron (III) chloride, FeC13, CAS... (III) chloride hexahydrate, FeC13. 6H20, CAS Reg. No. 10025-77-1) is readily formed when...

  1. Ferric sulfate montmorillonites as Mars soil analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that Fe(3+)-doped smectites prepared in the laboratory exhibit important similarities to the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band-strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. Ferric - sulfate - montmorillonite samples have been prepared more recently because they are a good compositional match with the surface material on Mars as measured by Viking. Reflectance spectra of montmorillonite doped with ferric sulfate in the interlayer regions include a strong 3 micron band that persists under dry conditions. This is in contrast to spectra of similarly prepared ferric-doped montmorillonites, which exhibit a relatively weaker 3 micron band under comparable dry environmental conditions. Presented here are reflectance spectra of a suite of ferric-sulfate exchanged montmorillonites prepared with variable ferric sulfate concentrations and variable pH conditions.

  2. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  3. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  4. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  5. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Identity. (1) The color additive ferric ammonium ferrocyanide is the blue pigment obtained by oxidizing... product is filtered, washed, and dried. The pigment consists principally of ferric ammonium...

  6. A ZnS(4) structural zinc site in the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Sylvia; Fauquant, Caroline; Lascoux, David; Schauer, Kristine; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle

    2009-06-23

    The ferric uptake regulator, Fur, is a global bacterial transcriptional regulator using iron as a cofactor to bind to specific DNA sequences. This paper describes the biochemical characterization of the native ferric uptake regulator from Helicobacter pylori (HpFur): oligomeric state, metal content, and characterization of a structural metal-binding site. HpFur contains six cysteines with two CxxC motifs, which makes it closer to Bacillus subtilis PerR (BsPerR) than to Escherichia coli Fur (EcFur). Chemical modifications of cysteine residues using iodoacetamide followed by mass spectrometry after enzymatic digestion strongly suggest that these two CxxC motifs containing cysteines 102-105 and 142-145 are involved in zinc binding in a ZnS(4) metal site. The other two cysteines (78 and 150) are not essential for DNA binding activity and do not perturb metal binding as demonstrated with the characterization of a FurC78SC150S double mutant. Chelating agent such as EDTA disrupts the dimeric structure into monomer which did not contain zinc anymore. Reconstitution of dimer from monomer requires reduction and Zn(2+) binding. Cadmium(II) substitution allows also dimer formation from monomer, and Cd(II)-substituted FurC78SC150S mutant presents a characteristic absorption of a Cd(II)Cys(4) metal-binding site. These results establish that coordination of the zinc ion in HpFur is ZnCys(4), therefore closer to the zinc site in BsPerR than in EcFur. Furthermore, the redox state of the cysteines and the zinc binding are essential to hold the H. pylori Fur in a dimeric state.

  7. A rotating disk study of silver dissolution with thiourea in the presence of ferric sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesic, Batric; Seal, Thom

    1990-06-01

    The rotating disk technique was used to study silver dissolution with thiourea as a function of sulfuric acid, ferric sulfate, and thiourea concentrations. The effect of many foreign ions (Mn, Cu, Co, Ca, Na, etc.) and various additives was also examined. The dissolution of silver was zero order with sulfuric acid, first order with ferric sulfate, and second order with thiourea. Among the foreign ions, copper had a dramatically negative effect. The strong oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide and manganese dioxide were also detrimental for silver dissolution. According to the temperature effect studied (5 °C to 35 °C), the activation energy was 22.6 kJ/ mole. Silver does not dissolve with thiourea in the absence of ferric ions. Sulfuric acid does not participate in the dissolution reaction. The most important parameter for silver dissolution is the ferric sulfate/thiourea ratio. In excess ferric sulfate, a solid silver-thiourea complex is formed, which precludes transfer of silver into solution. In excess thiourea, the free thiourea reacts with formed solid silver-thiourea complex, and silver goes into the solution, predominantly as the dimers of AgTU+ 3 complexes. The solid silver-thiourea complex in question was characterized by various spectroscopic, microscopic, and chemical analysis techniques. According to chemical composition, it corresponds to Ag2SO2·3TUH2O compound.

  8. A mathematical model for the bacterial oxidation of a sulfide ore concentrate.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, S; Dahlstrom, D; Oolman, T

    1994-03-05

    The effect of dilution rate and feed solids concentration on the bacterial leaching of a pyrite/arsenopyrite ore concentrate was studied. A mathematical model was developed for the process based on the steady-state data collected over the range of dilution rates (20 to 110 h) and feed solids concentrations (6 to 18% w/v) studied. A modified Monod model with inhibition by arsenic was used to model bacterial ferrous ion oxidation rates. The model assumes that (i) pyrite and arsenopyrite leaching occurs solely by the action of ferric iron produced from the bacterial oxidation of ferrous iron and (ii) bacterial growth rates are proportional to ferrous ion oxidation rate. The equilibrium among the various ionic species present in the leach solution that are likely to have a significant effect on the bioleach process were included in the model. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  10. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  11. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  12. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  13. 21 CFR 73.2299 - Ferric ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2299 Ferric ferrocyanide. (a) Identity and... coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the area of the eye, in...

  14. Synthesis and characterization of akaganeite-like ferric oxyhydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Linehan, J.C.; Darab, J.G.; Matson, D.W.; Chen, X.; Amonette, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    Iron-based powders have been used as catalytic and stoichiometric reactants in a variety of organic reactions and are receiving additional attention as ion exchange materials or once-through adsorbents for clean-up of toxic or radioactive waste streams. Recent efforts have been directed toward the design of iron-based products, in particular iron sulfides, capable of performing as hydrocracking catalysts for coal liquefaction and heavy crude or resid cracking. Here the authors present structural studies of new materials having akaganeite-like structures and of their use as hydrocracking catalyst precursors. Akaganeite, {beta}-FeOOH, a natural ferric oxyhydroxide mineral, has a structure containing tunnel-like cavities in which chloride ions reside. Analogs of akaganeite in which carbonate or sulfate groups replace the chloride ions have also been synthesized. Both akaganeite and its substituted analogs are known to be precursors for active hydrocracking catalysts. The authors present powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) data confirming the synthesis of new ferric oxyhydroxides having structures similar to akaganeite, but contain molybdate and tungstate oxy-anions. They also present a new hydrothermal method to prepare this family of materials.

  15. Colour and stability assessment of blue ferric anthocyanin chelates in liquid pectin-stabilised model systems.

    PubMed

    Buchweitz, M; Brauch, J; Carle, R; Kammerer, D R

    2013-06-01

    The formation of blue coloured ferric anthocyanin chelates and their colour stability during storage and thermal treatment were monitored in a pH range relevant to food (3.6-5.0). Liquid model systems were composed of different types of Citrus pectins, juices (J) and the respective phenolic extracts (E) from elderberry (EB), black currant (BC), red cabbage (RC) and purple carrot (PC) in the presence of ferric ions. For EB, BC and PC, pure blue colours devoid of a violet tint were exclusively observed for the phenolic extracts and at pH values ≥ 4.5 in model systems containing high methoxylated and amidated pectins, respectively. Colour and its stability strongly depended on the amount of ferric ions and the plant source; however, colour decay could generally be described as a pseudo-first-order kinetics. Despite optimal colour hues for RC-E and RC-J, storage and heat stabilities were poor. Highest colour intensities and best stabilities were observed for model systems containing PC-E at a molar anthocyanin:ferric ion ratio of 1:2. Ascorbic and lactic acids interfered with ferric ions, thus significantly affecting blue colour evolution and stability. Colour loss strongly depended on heat exposure with activation energies ranging between 60.5 and 78.4 kJ/mol. The comprehensive evaluation of the interrelationship of pigment source, pH conditions and pectin type on chelate formation and stability demonstrated that ferric anthocyanin chelates are promising natural blue food colourants.

  16. Hydrolysis of ferric chloride in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Lussiez, G.; Beckstead, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Detox{trademark} process uses concentrated ferric chloride and small amounts of catalysts to oxidize organic compounds. It is under consideration for oxidizing transuranic organic wastes. Although the solution is reused extensively, at some point it will reach the acceptable limit of radioactivity or maximum solubility of the radioisotopes. This solution could be cemented, but the volume would be increased substantially because of the poor compatibility of chlorides and cement. A process has been developed that recovers the chloride ions as HCl and either minimizes the volume of radioactive waste or permits recycling of the radioactive chlorides. The process involves a two-step hydrolysis at atmospheric pressure, or preferably under a slight vacuum, and relatively low temperature, about 200{degrees}C. During the first step of the process, hydrolysis occurs according to the reaction below: FeCl{sub 3 liquid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} FeOCl{sub solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas} During the second step, the hot, solid, iron oxychloride is sprayed with water or placed in contact with steam, and hydrolysis proceeds to the iron oxide according to the following reaction: 2 FeOCl{sub solid} + H{sub 2}O {r_arrow} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3 solid} + 2 HCl{sub gas}. The iron oxide, which contains radioisotopes, can then be disposed of by cementation or encapsulation. Alternately, these chlorides can be washed off of the solids and can then either be recycled or disposed of in some other way.

  17. Reaction mechanism for the ferric chloride leaching of sphalerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, G. W.; Henein, H.; Jin, Zuo-Mei

    1985-12-01

    Reaction mechanisms for the ferric chloride leaching of sphalerite are proposed based on data obtained in leaching and dual cell experiments presented in this work and in a previous study. The results from the leaching experiments show that at low concentrations the rate is proportional to [Fe3+]T 0.5 and [Cl-]T 0.43 but at higher concentrations the reaction order with respect to both [Fe3+]T and [Cl-]T decreases. Using dual cell experiments which allow the half cell reactions to be separated, increased rates are observed when NaCl is added to the anolyte and to the catholyte. The increase in rate is attributed to a direct, anodic electrochemical reaction of Cl- with the mineral. When NaCl is added only to the catholyte, a decrease in the rate is observed due to a decrease in the E 0 of the cathode which is attributed to the formation of ferric-chloro complexes. Several possible electrochemical mechanisms and mathematical models based on the Butler-Volmer relation are delineated, and of these, one model is selected which accounts for the experimentally observed changes in reaction order for both Fe3+ and Cl-. This analysis incorporates a charge transfer process for each ion and an adsorption step for ferric and chloride ions. The inhibiting effect of Fe2+ noted by previous investigators is also accounted for through a similar model which includes back reaction kinetics for Fe2+. The proposed models successfully provide a theoretical basis for describing the role of Cl-, Fe3+, and Fe2+ as well as their interrelationship in zinc sulfide leaching reactions. Possible applications of these results to chloride leaching systems involving other sulfides or complex sulfides are considered.

  18. Modification of anti-bacterial surface properties of textile polymers by vacuum arc ion source implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Yushkov, G. Yu.; Oks, E. M.; Oztarhan, A.; Akpek, A.; Hames-Kocabas, E.; Urkac, E. S.; Brown, I. G.

    2014-08-01

    Ion implantation provides an important technology for the modification of material surface properties. The vacuum arc ion source is a unique instrument for the generation of intense beams of metal ions as well as gaseous ions, including mixed metal-gas beams with controllable metal:gas ion ratio. Here we describe our exploratory work on the application of vacuum arc ion source-generated ion beams for ion implantation into polymer textile materials for modification of their biological cell compatibility surface properties. We have investigated two specific aspects of cell compatibility: (i) enhancement of the antibacterial characteristics (we chose to use Staphylococcus aureus bacteria) of ion implanted polymer textile fabric, and (ii) the "inverse" concern of enhancement of neural cell growth rate (we chose Rat B-35 neuroblastoma cells) on ion implanted polymer textile. The results of both investigations were positive, with implantation-generated antibacterial efficiency factor up to about 90%, fully comparable to alternative conventional (non-implantation) approaches and with some potentially important advantages over the conventional approach; and with enhancement of neural cell growth rate of up to a factor of 3.5 when grown on suitably implanted polymer textile material.

  19. Preliminary toxicological study of ferric acetyl acetonate

    SciTech Connect

    London, J.E.; Smith, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    The calculated acute oral LD/sub 50//sup 30/ (lethal does for 50% of the animals occuring with 30 days after compound administration) values for ferric acetyl acetonate were 584 mg/kg in mice and 995 mg/kg in rats. According to classical guidelines, this compound would be considered slightly toxic in both species. Skin application studies in the rabbit demonstrated the compound to be irritating. The eye irritation study disclosed the compound to be a severe irritant causing permanent damage to the cornea (inflammation and scarring resulting in blindness). The sensitization study in the guinea pig did not show ferric acetyl acetonate to be deleterious in this regard.

  20. Removal of nickel and cadmium from battery waste by a chemical method using ferric sulphate.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Umesh U; Hocheng, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The removal of nickel (Ni) and cadmium (Cd) from spent batteries was studied by the chemical method. A novel leaching system using ferric sulphate hydrate was introduced to dissolve heavy metals in batteries. Ni-Cd batteries are classified as hazardous waste because Ni and Cd are suspected carcinogens. More efficient technologies are required to recover metals from spent batteries to minimize capital outlay, environmental impact and to respond to increased demand. The results obtained demonstrate that optimal conditions, including pH, concentration of ferric sulphate, shaking speed and temperature for the metal removal, were 2.5, 60 g/L, 150 rpm and 30 degrees C, respectively. More than 88 (+/- 0.9) and 84 (+/- 2.8)% of nickel and cadmium were recovered, respectively. These results suggest that ferric ion oxidized Ni and Cd present in battery waste. This novel process provides a possibility for recycling waste Ni-Cd batteries in a large industrial scale.

  1. Understanding Nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) reactions with ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Rodrigo Javier; Farrell, James

    2017-05-01

    Phosphonate compounds are used in a wide variety of industrial and agricultural applications, and are commonly found in surface and ground waters. Adsorption to ferric hydroxide can have a significant effect on the transport and fate of phosphonate compounds in the environment. This research used density functional theory modeling to investigate the adsorption mechanisms of nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) on ferric hydroxide. Standard Gibbs free energies of reaction (ΔGr(o)) and reaction activation barriers (Ea) were calculated for different possible adsorption mechanisms. Physical adsorption of NTMP to ferric hydroxide was promoted by negative charge assisted hydrogen bonding, and had ΔGr(o) ranging from -2.7 to -7.4 kcal/mol. NTMP was found to form three different types of inner sphere complexes, monodentate, bidentate mononuclear and bidentate binuclear. For the monodentate complexes, ΔGr(o) ranged from -8.0 to -13.7 kcal/mol, for the bidentate complexes ΔGr(o) ranged from -15.3 to -28.9 kcal/mol. Complexation with Ca(2+) decreased the energy for physical adsorption but increased the binding energies for mono- and bidentate complexes. Complexation with Ca(2+) also allowed formation of a tridentate ternary surface complex, whereby the Ca(2+) ion formed a bridge between three FeO(-) and three PO(-) groups. Physical adsorption had Ea = 0, but mono- and bidentate complex formation had Ea values ranging from 36 to 53 kcal/mol. Formation of tridentate ternary surface complexes involving Ca(2+) had the lowest activation barriers of 8 and 10 kcal/mol. The different activation barriers for different modes of adsorption may explain previous experimental observations of unusual kinetic behavior for adsorption and desorption of NTMP.

  2. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  3. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  4. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  5. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  7. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  9. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  10. 21 CFR 582.5304 - Ferric pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric pyrophosphate. 582.5304 Section 582.5304 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and... hexahydrate (iron (III) chloride hexahydrate, FeC13. 6H20, CAS Reg. No. 10025-77-1) is readily formed...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and... hexahydrate (iron (III) chloride hexahydrate, FeC13. 6H20, CAS Reg. No. 10025-77-1) is readily formed...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1297 - Ferric chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., FeC13, CAS Reg. No. 7705-08-0) may be prepared from iron and chlorine or from ferric oxide and... hexahydrate (iron (III) chloride hexahydrate, FeC13. 6H20, CAS Reg. No. 10025-77-1) is readily formed...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5306 Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. (a) Product. Ferric sodium pyrophosphate....

  16. Putative resolution of the EEEE selectivity paradox in L-type Ca2+ and bacterial Na+ biological ion channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, I. Kh; Luchinsky, D. G.; Gibby, W. A. T.; McClintock, P. V. E.; Eisenberg, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    The highly selective permeation of ions through biological ion channels can be described and explained in terms of fluctuational dynamics under the influence of powerful electrostatic forces. Hence valence selectivity, e.g. between Ca2+ and Na+ in calcium and sodium channels, can be described in terms of ionic Coulomb blockade, which gives rise to distinct conduction bands and stop-bands as the fixed negative charge Q f at the selectivity filter of the channel is varied. This picture accounts successfully for a wide range of conduction phenomena in a diversity of ion channels. A disturbing anomaly, however, is that what appears to be the same electrostatic charge and structure (the so-called EEEE motif) seems to select Na+ conduction in bacterial channels but Ca2+ conduction in mammalian channels. As a possible resolution of this paradox it is hypothesised that an additional charged protein residue on the permeation path of the mammalian channel increases |{{Q}f}| by e, thereby altering the selectivity from Na+ to Ca2+. Experiments are proposed that will enable the hypothesis to be tested.

  17. Dynamical scaling in ferric oxide spin glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, G. M.

    1995-06-01

    A stochastic relaxation model for the Mössbauer spectra of ferric oxide spin glasses was used to analyze the spectra for the mixed spinel Mg1+tFe2-2tTitO4 with composition t=0.70. The results compare favorably with previously published results on the system BaSnxTi2-xFe4O11 with compositions x=0.40 and x=0.80, and suggest empirical scaling laws for the spin-order parameter defined as q=/S and the spin correlation time τc in these ferric oxide spin glasses. It was found that the quantity τcTG versus T/TG follows a scaling curve with approximately a power-law dependence below the glass temperature. The order parameter follows a scaling curve q=1-(T/TG)β, with a value β=2.48+/-0.19.

  18. Heteromultimerization of prokaryotic bacterial cyclic nucleotide-gated (bCNG) ion channels, members of the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance (MscS) superfamily.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Hannah R; Heo, Yoon-Young; Elmore, Donald E; Maurer, Joshua A

    2014-12-30

    Traditionally, prokaryotic channels are thought to exist as homomultimeric assemblies, while many eukaryotic ion channels form complex heteromultimers. Here we demonstrate that bacterial cyclic nucleotide-gated channels likely form heteromultimers in vivo. Heteromultimer formation is indicated through channel modeling, pull-down assays, and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. Our observations demonstrate that prokaryotic ion channels can display complex behavior and regulation akin to that of their eukaryotic counterparts.

  19. Analysis of Bacterial Lipooligosaccharides by MALDI-TOF MS with Traveling Wave Ion Mobility.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nancy J; John, Constance M; Jarvis, Gary A

    2016-07-01

    Lipooligosaccharides (LOS) are major microbial virulence factors displayed on the outer membrane of rough-type Gram-negative bacteria. These amphipathic glycolipids are comprised of two domains, a core oligosaccharide linked to a lipid A moiety. Isolated LOS samples are generally heterogeneous mixtures of glycoforms, with structural variability in both domains. Traditionally, the oligosaccharide and lipid A components of LOS have been analyzed separately following mild acid hydrolysis, although important acid-labile moieties can be cleaved. Recently, an improved method was introduced for analysis of intact LOS by MALDI-TOF MS using a thin layer matrix composed of 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) and nitrocellulose. In addition to molecular ions, the spectra show in-source "prompt" fragments arising from regiospecific cleavage between the lipid A and oligosaccharide domains. Here, we demonstrate the use of traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) for IMS-MS and IMS-MS/MS analyses of intact LOS from Neisseria spp. ionized by MALDI. Using IMS, the singly charged prompt fragments for the oligosaccharide and lipid A domains of LOS were readily separated into resolved ion plumes, permitting the extraction of specific subspectra, which led to increased confidence in assigning compositions and improved detection of less abundant ions. Moreover, IMS separation of precursor ions prior to collision-induced dissociation (CID) generated time-aligned, clean MS/MS spectra devoid of fragments from interfering species. Incorporating IMS into the profiling of intact LOS by MALDI-TOF MS exploits the unique domain structure of the molecule and offers a new means of extracting more detailed information from the analysis. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  20. Analysis of Bacterial Lipooligosaccharides by MALDI-TOF MS with Traveling Wave Ion Mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Nancy J.; John, Constance M.; Jarvis, Gary A.

    2016-07-01

    Lipooligosaccharides (LOS) are major microbial virulence factors displayed on the outer membrane of rough-type Gram-negative bacteria. These amphipathic glycolipids are comprised of two domains, a core oligosaccharide linked to a lipid A moiety. Isolated LOS samples are generally heterogeneous mixtures of glycoforms, with structural variability in both domains. Traditionally, the oligosaccharide and lipid A components of LOS have been analyzed separately following mild acid hydrolysis, although important acid-labile moieties can be cleaved. Recently, an improved method was introduced for analysis of intact LOS by MALDI-TOF MS using a thin layer matrix composed of 2,4,6-trihydroxyacetophenone (THAP) and nitrocellulose. In addition to molecular ions, the spectra show in-source "prompt" fragments arising from regiospecific cleavage between the lipid A and oligosaccharide domains. Here, we demonstrate the use of traveling wave ion mobility spectrometry (TWIMS) for IMS-MS and IMS-MS/MS analyses of intact LOS from Neisseria spp. ionized by MALDI. Using IMS, the singly charged prompt fragments for the oligosaccharide and lipid A domains of LOS were readily separated into resolved ion plumes, permitting the extraction of specific subspectra, which led to increased confidence in assigning compositions and improved detection of less abundant ions. Moreover, IMS separation of precursor ions prior to collision-induced dissociation (CID) generated time-aligned, clean MS/MS spectra devoid of fragments from interfering species. Incorporating IMS into the profiling of intact LOS by MALDI-TOF MS exploits the unique domain structure of the molecule and offers a new means of extracting more detailed information from the analysis.

  1. Nonequivalence of membrane voltage and ion-gradient as driving forces for the bacterial flagellar motor at low load.

    PubMed

    Lo, Chien-Jung; Leake, Mark C; Pilizota, Teuta; Berry, Richard M

    2007-07-01

    Many bacterial species swim using flagella. The flagellar motor couples ion flow across the cytoplasmic membrane to rotation. Ion flow is driven by both a membrane potential (V(m)) and a transmembrane concentration gradient. To investigate their relation to bacterial flagellar motor function we developed a fluorescence technique to measure V(m) in single cells, using the dye tetramethyl rhodamine methyl ester. We used a convolution model to determine the relationship between fluorescence intensity in images of cells and intracellular dye concentration, and calculated V(m) using the ratio of intracellular/extracellular dye concentration. We found V(m) = -140 +/- 14 mV in Escherichia coli at external pH 7.0 (pH(ex)), decreasing to -85 +/- 10 mV at pH(ex) 5.0. We also estimated the sodium-motive force (SMF) by combining single-cell measurements of V(m) and intracellular sodium concentration. We were able to vary the SMF between -187 +/- 15 mV and -53 +/- 15 mV by varying pH(ex) in the range 7.0-5.0 and extracellular sodium concentration in the range 1-85 mM. Rotation rates for 0.35-microm- and 1-microm-diameter beads attached to Na(+)-driven chimeric flagellar motors varied linearly with V(m). For the larger beads, the two components of the SMF were equivalent, whereas for smaller beads at a given SMF, the speed increased with sodium gradient and external sodium concentration.

  2. Transcriptional regulation by Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) in pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Bryan; Hassan, Hosni M

    2013-01-01

    In the ancient anaerobic environment, ferrous iron (Fe(2+)) was one of the first metal cofactors. Oxygenation of the ancient world challenged bacteria to acquire the insoluble ferric iron (Fe(3+)) and later to defend against reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the Fenton chemistry. To acquire Fe(3+), bacteria produce low-molecular weight compounds, known as siderophores, which have extremely high affinity for Fe(3+). However, during infection the host restricts iron from pathogens by producing iron- and siderophore-chelating proteins, by exporting iron from intracellular pathogen-containing compartments, and by limiting absorption of dietary iron. Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) is a transcription factor which utilizes Fe(2+) as a corepressor and represses siderophore synthesis in pathogens. Fur, directly or indirectly, controls expression of enzymes that protect against ROS damage. Thus, the challenges of iron homeostasis and defense against ROS are addressed via Fur. Although the role of Fur as a repressor is well-documented, emerging evidence demonstrates that Fur can function as an activator. Fur activation can occur through three distinct mechanisms (1) indirectly via small RNAs, (2) binding at cis regulatory elements that enhance recruitment of the RNA polymerase holoenzyme (RNAP), and (3) functioning as an antirepressor by removing or blocking DNA binding of a repressor of transcription. In addition, Fur homologs control defense against peroxide stress (PerR) and control uptake of other metals such as zinc (Zur) and manganese (Mur) in pathogenic bacteria. Fur family members are important for virulence within bacterial pathogens since mutants of fur, perR, or zur exhibit reduced virulence within numerous animal and plant models of infection. This review focuses on the breadth of Fur regulation in pathogenic bacteria.

  3. Prolonged anti-bacterial activity of ion-complexed doxycycline for the treatment of osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Se Heang; Nam, Bo Ra; Lee, In Soo; Lee, Jin Ho

    2016-01-01

    The main purposes of the present study are the fabrication of an ion-complexed antibiotic which allows for the continuous release of the drug for sufficient periods of time without any additional matrix leading to unfavorable tissue responses, and the feasibility study of the ion-complexed antibiotic as a therapeutic system for osteomyelitis using an animal model. An ion-complexed doxycycline (icDX) as an antibiotic was prepared by simple mixing of positively charged doxycycline hyclate (DX) and negatively charged multivalent Na2HPO4 (2Na(+) HPO4(2-)) aqueous solutions. The icDX showed a controlled release of the DX up to 6 weeks. From the in vivo feasibility study using an osteomyelitis rat model, the icDX group showed a more effective therapeutic effect for the osteomyelitis, at 3 and 6 weeks, compared to the non-treated control and free DX groups. This was due to the sustained release of DX from the icDX in the osteomyelitis bone (medullary cavity) without migration. These findings suggest that the icDX may be a promising local delivery system in the clinical field for the treatment of the osteomyelitis.

  4. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers derived from polypyrrole coated bacterial cellulose as high-performance electrode materials for supercapacitors and Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Wen; Han, Lili; Xuan, Cuijuan; Lin, Ruoqian; Liu, Hongfang; Xin, Huolin L.; Wang, Deli

    2016-05-24

    Here, nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (NDCN) was synthesized via carbonization of polypyrrole (PPy) coated bacterial cellulose (BC) composites, where BC serves as templates as well as precursor, and PPy serves as the nitrogen source. The synthesized NDCN was employed as electrode for both supercapacitors and Li-ion batteries. The large surface area exposed to electrolyte resulting from the 3D carbon networks leads to sufficient electrode/electrolyte interface and creates shorter transport paths of electrolyte ions and Li+ ion. Besides, the three types of N dopants in NDCN improve the electronic conductivity, as well as superior electrochemical performance.

  5. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanofibers derived from polypyrrole coated bacterial cellulose as high-performance electrode materials for supercapacitors and Li-ion batteries

    DOE PAGES

    Lei, Wen; Han, Lili; Xuan, Cuijuan; ...

    2016-05-24

    Here, nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (NDCN) was synthesized via carbonization of polypyrrole (PPy) coated bacterial cellulose (BC) composites, where BC serves as templates as well as precursor, and PPy serves as the nitrogen source. The synthesized NDCN was employed as electrode for both supercapacitors and Li-ion batteries. The large surface area exposed to electrolyte resulting from the 3D carbon networks leads to sufficient electrode/electrolyte interface and creates shorter transport paths of electrolyte ions and Li+ ion. Besides, the three types of N dopants in NDCN improve the electronic conductivity, as well as superior electrochemical performance.

  6. Effect of Fe-chelating complexes on a novel M2FC performance with ferric chloride and ferricyanide catholytes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyungmi; Lee, Ilgyu; Han, Jong-In

    2012-01-01

    As an effort to better utilize the microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology, we previously proposed an innovative MFC system named M2FC consisting of ferric-based MFC part and ferrous-based fuel cell (FC) part. In this reactor, ferric ion, the catholyte in the MFC part, was efficiently regenerated by the FC part with the generation of additional electricity. When both units were operated separately, the ferric-based MFC part produced approximately 1360 mW m(-2) of power density with FeCl(3) as catholyte and Fe-citrate as anolyte. The ferrous-based FC part with FeCl(3) as catholyte and Fe-EDTA as anolyte displayed the highest power density (1500 mW m(-2)), while that with ferricyanide as catholyte and Fe-noligand as anolyte had the lowest power density (380 mW m(-2)). The types of catholytes and chelating complexes as anolyte were found to play important roles in the reduction of ferric ions and oxidation of ferrous ion. Linear sweep voltammetry results supported that the cathode electrolytes were electrically active and these agreed well with the M2FC reactor performance. These results clearly showed that ligands played critical role in the efficiency and rate for recycling iron ion and thus the M2FC performance.

  7. Removal and Recovery of Toxic Silver Ion Using Deep-Sea Bacterial Generated Biogenic Manganese Oxides

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Yuanjun; Chen, Xiao; Xiong, Dandan; Liao, Shuijiao; Wang, Gejiao

    2013-01-01

    Products containing silver ion (Ag+) are widely used, leading to a large amount of Ag+-containing waste. The deep-sea manganese-oxidizing bacterium Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9 efficiently oxidizes Mn2+ to generate biogenic Mn oxide (BMO). The potential of BMO for recovering metal ions by adsorption has been investigated for some ions but not for Ag+. The main aim of this study was to develop effective methods for adsorbing and recovering Ag using BMO produced by Marinobacter sp. MnI7-9. In addition, the adsorption mechanism was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, specific surface area analysis, adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics. The results showed that BMO had a higher adsorption capacity for Ag+ compared to the chemical synthesized MnO2 (CMO). The isothermal absorption curves of BMO and CMO both fit the Langmuir model well and the maximum adsorption capacities at 28°C were 8.097 mmol/g and 0.787 mmol/g, for BMO and CMO, respectively. The change in enthalpy (ΔHθ) for BMO was 59.69 kJ/mol indicating that it acts primarily by chemical adsorption. The change in free energy (ΔGθ) for BMO was negative, which suggests that the adsorption occurs spontaneously. Ag+ adsorption by BMO was driven by entropy based on the positive ΔSθ values. The Ag+ adsorption kinetics by BMO fit the pseudo-second order model and the apparent activation energy of Ea is 21.72 kJ/mol. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that 15.29% Ag+ adsorbed by BMO was transferred to Ag(0) and meant that redox reaction had happened during the adsorption. Desorption using nitric acid and Na2S completely recovered the Ag. The results show that BMO produced by strain MnI7-9 has potential for bioremediation and reutilization of Ag+-containing waste. PMID:24312566

  8. Inactivation, DNA double strand break induction and their rejoining in bacterial cells irradiated with heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, M.; Zimmermann, H.; Schmitz, C.

    1994-01-01

    Besides inactivation one of the major interests in our experiments is to study the primary damage in the DNA double strand breaks (DSB) after heavy ion irradiation. These damages lead not only to cell death but also under repair activities to mutations. In further experiments we have investigated the inactivation with two different strains of Deinococcus radiodurans (R1, Rec 30) and the induction of DSB as well as the rejoining of DSB in stationary cells of E. coli (strain B/r) irradiated with radiations of different quality. In the latter case irradiations were done so that the cell survival was roughly at the same level. We measured the DSB using the pulse field gelelectrophoresis which allows to separate between intact (circular) and damaged (linear) DNA. The irradiated cells were transferred to NB medium and incubated for different times to allow rejoining.

  9. Absorption of iron from ferric hydroxypyranone complexes.

    PubMed

    Maxton, D G; Thompson, R P; Hider, R C

    1994-02-01

    The absorption of 59Fe from preparations of FeSO4 and the ferric hydroxypyranone complexes maltol and ethyl maltol was studied by whole-body counting in normal subjects and patients with Fe deficiency. Fe in the Fe3+ complexes was in general absorbed almost as well as Fe2+. It is concluded that the absorption of Fe3+ from hydroxypyranone complexes is much greater than that from simple Fe3+ salts; this may prove an efficient and less toxic form of Fe for the treatment of deficiency.

  10. Ferric carboxymaltose: a review of its use in iron deficiency.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2015-01-01

    Ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject(®), Injectafer(®)) is an intravenous iron preparation approved in numerous countries for the treatment of iron deficiency. A single high dose of ferric carboxymaltose (up to 750 mg of iron in the US and 1,000 mg of iron in the EU) can be infused in a short time frame (15 min). Consequently, fewer doses of ferric carboxymaltose may be needed to replenish iron stores compared with some other intravenous iron preparations (e.g. iron sucrose). Ferric carboxymaltose improved self-reported patient global assessment, New York Heart Association functional class and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure and iron deficiency in two randomized, placebo-controlled trials (FAIR-HF and CONFIRM-HF). In other randomized controlled trials, ferric carboxymaltose replenished iron stores and corrected anaemia in various populations with iron-deficiency anaemia, including patients with chronic kidney disease, inflammatory bowel disease or heavy uterine bleeding, postpartum iron-deficiency anaemia and perioperative anaemia. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose was generally well tolerated, with a low risk of hypersensitivity reactions. It was generally better tolerated than oral ferrous sulfate, mainly reflecting a lower incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects. The most common laboratory abnormality seen in ferric carboxymaltose recipients was transient, asymptomatic hypophosphataemia. The higher acquisition cost of ferric carboxymaltose appeared to be offset by lower costs for other items, with the potential for cost savings. In conclusion, ferric carboxymaltose is an important option for the treatment of iron deficiency.

  11. Corrosion characteristics of ferric and austenitic stainless steels for dental magnetic attachment.

    PubMed

    Endo, K; Suzuki, M; Ohno, H

    2000-03-01

    The corrosion behaviors of four ferric stainless steels and two austenitic stainless steels were examined in a simulated physiological environment (0.9% NaCl solution) to obtain basic data for evaluating the appropriate composition of stainless steels for dental magnetic attachments. The corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical techniques and the analysis of released metal ions by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The surface of the stainless steels was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The breakdown potential of ferric stainless steels increased and the total amount of released metal ions decreased linearly with increases in the sum of the Cr and Mo contents. The corrosion rate of the ferric stainless steels increased 2 to 6 times when they were galvanically coupled with noble metal alloys but decreased when coupled with commercially pure Ti. For austenitic stainless steels, the breakdown potential of high N-bearing stainless steel was approximately 500 mV higher than that of SUS316L, which is currently used as a component in dental magnetic attachments. The enriched nitrogen at the alloy/passive film interface may be effective in improving the localized corrosion resistance.

  12. Bioproduction of ferric sulfate used during heavy metals removal from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Drogui, Patrick; Mercier, Guy; Blais, Jean-François

    2005-01-01

    Toxic metals removal from wastewater sewage sludge can be achieved through microbial processes involving Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The oxidation of ferrous ions by A. ferrooxidans, cultured in sewage sludge filtrate, was studied in both batch and continuous flow stirred tank reactors. Sewage sludge filtrate containing natural nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen) was recovered as effluent following the dehydration of a primary and secondary sludge mixture. Batch and continuous flow stirred tank reactor tests demonstrated that A. ferrooxidans were able to grow and completely oxidize ferrous iron in a culture medium containing more than 80% (v v(-1)) sewage sludge filtrate with 10 g Fe(II) L(-1) added. Toxic levels were reached when total organic carbon in the sewage sludge filtrate exceeded 250 mg L(-1). The ferric iron solution produced in the sludge filtrate by A. ferrooxidans was used to solubilize heavy metals in primary and secondary sludge. The solubilization of Cu, Cr, and Zn yielded 71, 49, and 80%, respectively. This is comparable with the yield percentages obtained using a FeCl(3) solution. The cost of treating wastewater sewage sludge by bioproducing a ferric ion solution from sewage sludge is three times less expensive than the conventional method requiring a commercial ferric chloride solution.

  13. The fate of iron on Mars: Mechanism of oxidation of basaltic minerals to ferric-bearing assemblages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Roger G.

    1992-01-01

    Perhaps the most conspicuous indication that chemical weathering has occurred on the surface of Mars is the overall color of the red planet and the spectroscopic features that identify ferric-bearing assemblages in the martian regolith. Apparently, Fe(2+) ions in primary minerals in parent igneous rocks on the martian surface have been oxidized to ferric iron, which occurs in degradation products that now constitute the regolith. The mineralogy of the unweathered igneous rocks prior to weathering on the martian surface is reasonably well constrained, mainly as a result of petrographic studies of the SNC meteorites. However, the alteration products resulting from oxidative weathering of these rocks are less well-constrained. The topics covered include the following: primary rocks subjected to chemical weathering; dissolution processes; oxidation of dissolved Fe(2+); mechanism of polymerization of hydrous ferric oxides; terrestrial occurrences of ferromagnesian smectites; and dehydroxylated Mg-Fe smectites on Mars.

  14. Leaching of zinc sulfide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: Bacterial oxidation of the sulfur product layer increases the rate of zinc sulfide dissolution at high concentrations of ferrous ions

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, T.A.; Crundwell, F.K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports the results of leaching experiments conducted with and without Thiobacillus ferroxidans at the same conditions in solution. The extent of leaching of ZnS with Bacteria is significantly higher than that without bacteria at high concentrations of ferrous ions. A porous layer of elemental sulfur is present on the surfaces of the chemically leached particles, which no sulfur is present on the surfaces of the bacterially leached particles. The analysis of the data using the shrinking-core model shows that the chemical leaching of ZnS is limited by the diffusion of ferrous ions through the sulfur product layer at high concentrations of ferrous ions. The analysis of the data shows that diffusion through the product layer does not limit the rate of dissolution when bacteria are present. This suggests that the action of T.ferroxidans in oxidizing the sulfur formed on the particle surface is to remove the barrier to diffusion by ferrous ions.

  15. Leaching of Zinc Sulfide by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans: Bacterial Oxidation of the Sulfur Product Layer Increases the Rate of Zinc Sulfide Dissolution at High Concentrations of Ferrous Ions

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, T. A.; Crundwell, F. K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports the results of leaching experiments conducted with and without Thiobacillus ferrooxidans at the same conditions in solution. The extent of leaching of ZnS with bacteria is significantly higher than that without bacteria at high concentrations of ferrous ions. A porous layer of elemental sulfur is present on the surfaces of the chemically leached particles, while no sulfur is present on the surfaces of the bacterially leached particles. The analysis of the data using the shrinking-core model shows that the chemical leaching of ZnS is limited by the diffusion of ferrous ions through the sulfur product layer at high concentrations of ferrous ions. The analysis of the data shows that diffusion through the product layer does not limit the rate of dissolution when bacteria are present. This suggests that the action of T. ferrooxidans in oxidizing the sulfur formed on the particle surface is to remove the barrier to diffusion by ferrous ions. PMID:10583978

  16. Synthesis and evaluation of ferric-ion specific sequestering agents

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of a number of polycatecholate and polyhydroxamate ligands capable of complexing Fe(III) is presented. Using a biomimetic approach, the design of these ligands was modeled on the microbial produced iron chelating agents, the siderophores. The potential use of these ligands for the chelation therapy of iron overload and plutonium decorporation is described. The synthesis of the two catechoyl derivatives of the trihydroamate siderophore, desferrioxamine B is presented. Their kinetics of iron removal from transferrin, have been measured. The results of their ability to remove Fe(III) and Pu(IV) in vivo suggest that they are promising candidates for clinical evaluation. The Fe(III) coordination chemistry of one of these ligands (DFOCAM-C) is presented. The synthesis of two trihydroxamate analogues of the siderophore, ferrichrome, is described. Using similar procedures, a linear dihydroxamate and semisynthetic tetrahydroxamate ligand were synthesized. The coordination chemistry of one ligand (TRENDROX) with Fe(III) was explored. The high dilution synthesis of a number of endocyclic polycatecholate ligands is presented. The macrocyclic structures of these ligands were confirmed by /sup 1/H-NMR, /sup 13/C-NMR and FAB-mass spectra. The synthesis of a monocapped and a bicapped tricatecholamide ligand, where the capping moiety is TREN (tris(2-aminoethyl)amine) is presented. Preliminary studies of the Fe(III) coordination chemistries of these two ligands are presented.

  17. In-tank hydrogen-ferric ion recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selverston, S.; Savinell, R. F.; Wainright, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    An H2sbnd Fe3+ recombination method is being developed for all-iron flow batteries. Working principles are described and a proof-of-concept in-tank reactor is demonstrated. A membrane-less galvanic reactor is characterized using potential, polarization and impedance measurements at hydrogen partial pressures ranging from 0.3 to 11.3 psig. Through a vertical reactor geometry, hydrogen recombination rates of up to 60 mA cm-2 were measured at PH2 = 4.5 psig for a reactor with a platinum loading of 3.2 mg cm-2, based on the geometric catalyzed area. This is equivalent to over 375 mA cm-2 with respect to the cross sectional area of the reactor at the waterline. This rate is sufficient that the reactor will readily fit inside the positive reservoir of a flow battery. The reactor was found to be resistant to degradation by flooding or catalyst loss.

  18. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  19. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  20. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  1. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  2. 46 CFR 151.50-75 - Ferric chloride solution.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ferric chloride solution. 151.50-75 Section 151.50-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES BARGES CARRYING BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-75 Ferric chloride...

  3. 21 CFR 73.1298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... solutions of ferrous sulfate and sodium ferrocyanide in the presence of ammonium sulfate. The oxidized... with smaller amounts of ferric ferrocyanide and ferric sodium ferrocyanide. (2) Color additive mixtures... subpart as safe and suitable for use in color additive mixtures for coloring drugs. (b)...

  4. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity....

  5. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity....

  6. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity....

  7. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity....

  8. 21 CFR 73.1025 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric ammonium citrate. 73.1025 Section 73.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1025 Ferric ammonium citrate. (a) Identity....

  9. Soluble microbial products decrease pyrite oxidation by ferric iron at pH < 2.

    PubMed

    Yacob, Tesfayohanes; Pandey, Sachin; Silverstein, Joann; Rajaram, Harihar

    2013-08-06

    Research on microbial activity in acid mine drainage (AMD) has focused on transformations of iron and sulfur. However, carbon cycling, including formation of soluble microbial products (SMP) from cell growth and decay, is an important biogeochemical component of the AMD environment. Experiments were conducted to study the interaction of SMP with soluble ferric iron in acidic conditions, particularly the formation of complexes that inhibit its effectiveness as the primary oxidant of pyrite during AMD generation. The rate of pyrite oxidation by ferric iron in sterile suspensions at pH 1.8 was reduced by 87% in the presence of SMP produced from autoclaved cells at a ratio of 0.3 mg DOC per mg total soluble ferric iron. Inhibition of pyrite oxidation by SMP was shown to be comparable to, but weaker than, the effect of a chelating synthetic siderophore, DFAM. Two computational models incorporating SMP complexation were fitted to experimental results. Results suggest that bacterially produced organic matter can play a role in slowing pyrite oxidation.

  10. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Nanakorn, W.; Yu, L. D.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-05-01

    This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

  11. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions.

    PubMed

    Root, Robert A; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-11-19

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 days, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially coprecipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75-81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53-68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multienergy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide coprecipitate formation.

  12. Microscale speciation of arsenic and iron in ferric-based sorbents subjected to simulated landfill conditions

    PubMed Central

    Root, Robert A.; Fathordoobadi, Sahar; Alday, Fernando; Ela, Wendell; Chorover, Jon

    2013-01-01

    During treatment for potable use, water utilities generate arsenic-bearing ferric wastes that are subsequently dispatched to landfills. The biogeochemical weathering of these residuals in mature landfills affects the potential mobilization of sorbed arsenic species via desorption from solids subjected to phase transformations driven by abundant organic matter and bacterial activity. Such processes are not simulated with the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) currently used to characterize hazard. To examine the effect of sulfate on As retention in landfill leachate, columns of As(V) loaded amorphous ferric hydroxide were reacted biotically at two leachate sulfate concentrations (0.064 mM and 2.1 mM). After 300 d, ferric sorbents were reductively dissolved. Arsenic released to porewaters was partially co-precipitated in mixed-valent secondary iron phases whose speciation was dependent on sulfate concentration. As and Fe XAS showed that, in the low sulfate column, 75–81% of As(V) was reduced to As(III), and 53–68% of the Fe(III) sorbent was transformed, dominantly to siderite and green rust. In the high sulfate column, Fe(III) solids were reduced principally to FeS(am), whereas As(V) was reduced to a polymeric sulfide with local atomic structure of realgar. Multi-energy micro-X-ray fluorescence (ME-μXRF) imaging at Fe and As K-edges showed that As formed surface complexes with ferrihydrite > siderite > green rust in the low sulfate column; while discrete realgar-like phases formed in the high sulfate systems. Results indicate that landfill sulfur chemistry exerts strong control over the potential mobilization of As from ferric sorbent residuals by controlling secondary As and Fe sulfide co-precipitate formation. PMID:24102155

  13. The ferric enterobactin transporter Fep is required for persistent Salmonella enterica serovar typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Toni A; Moreland, Sarah M; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene; Detweiler, Corrella S

    2013-11-01

    Most bacterial pathogens require iron to grow and colonize host tissues. The Gram-negative bacterium Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium causes a natural systemic infection of mice that models acute and chronic human typhoid fever. S. Typhimurium resides in tissues within cells of the monocyte lineage, which limit pathogen access to iron, a mechanism of nutritional immunity. The primary ferric iron import system encoded by Salmonella is the siderophore ABC transporter FepBDGC. The Fep system has a known role in acute infection, but it is unclear whether ferric iron uptake or the ferric iron binding siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required for persistent infection. We defined the role of the Fep iron transporter and siderophores in the replication of Salmonella in macrophages and in mice that develop acute followed by persistent infections. Replication of wild-type and iron transporter mutant Salmonella strains was quantified in cultured macrophages, fecal pellets, and host tissues in mixed- and single-infection experiments. We show that deletion of fepB attenuated Salmonella replication and colonization within macrophages and mice. Additionally, the genes required to produce and transport enterobactin and salmochelin across the outer membrane receptors, fepA and iroN, are needed for colonization of all tissues examined. However, salmochelin appears to be more important than enterobactin in the colonization of the spleen and liver, both sites of dissemination. Thus, the FepBDGC ferric iron transporter and the siderophores enterobactin and salmochelin are required by Salmonella to evade nutritional immunity in macrophages and cause persistent infection in mice.

  14. Enhanced Electrochemical Performance of Layered Lithium-Rich Cathode Materials by Constructing Spinel-Structure Skin and Ferric Oxide Islands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shi; Zheng, Yu; Lu, Yun; Su, Yuefeng; Bao, Liying; Li, Ning; Li, Yitong; Wang, Jing; Chen, Renjie; Wu, Feng

    2017-03-15

    Layered lithium-rich cathode materials have been considered as competitive candidates for advanced lithium-ion batteries because they are environmentally benign, high capacity (more than 250 mAh·g(-1)), and low cost. However, they still suffer from poor rate capability and modest cycling performance. To address these issues, we have proposed and constructed a spinel-structure skin and ferric oxide islands on the surface of layered lithium-rich cathode materials through a facile wet chemical method. During the surface modification, Li ions in the surface area of pristine particles could be partially extracted by H(+), along with the depositing process of ferric hydrogen. After calcination, the surface structure transformed to spinel structure, and ferric hydrogen was oxidized to ferric oxide. The as-designed surface structure was verified by EDX, HRTEM, XPS, and CV. The experimental results demonstrated that the rate performance and capacity retentions were significantly enhanced after such surface modification. The modified sample displayed a high discharge capacity of 166 mAh·g(-1) at a current density of 1250 mA·g(-1) and much more stable capacity retention of 84.0% after 50 cycles at 0.1C rate in contrast to 60.6% for pristine material. Our surface modification strategy, which combines the advantages of spinel structure and chemically inert ferric oxide nanoparticles, has been shown to be effective for realizing the layered lithium-rich cathodes with surface construction of fast ion diffusing capability as well as robust electrolyte corroding durability.

  15. Natural and ion-exchanged illite clays reduce bacterial burden and inflammation in cutaneous meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in mice

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Caitlin C.; Kilbourne, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-01

    Discoveries associated with antibacterial activity of hydrated clays necessitate assessments of in vivo efficacy, practical use and safety. Surface properties of clays can lead to variations in the composition and abundance of bound compounds or ions, thus affecting antibacterial activity. Since exchangeable metal ions released from the clay surface are responsible for in vitro antibacterial activity, we evaluated the in vivo antibacterial efficacy of four natural clays (one illite clay, two montmorillonite clays and one kaolinite clay) and three ion-exchanged, antibacterial clays against superficial, cutaneous meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in mice. Superficial, cutaneous wounds on the back of SKH1-Elite mice were generated and subsequently infected with MRSA. Following twice daily applications of a hydrated clay poultice to infected wounds for 7 days, we observed significant differences in the in vivo antibacterial efficacy between different types of clays. The natural and ion-exchanged illite clays performed best, as measured by bacterial load, inflammatory response and gross wound morphology with significant decreases in bacterial viability and dermatitis. Topical application of kaolinite clay was the least effective, resulting in the lowest decrease in bacterial load and exhibiting severe dermatitis. These data suggest that specific types of clays may offer a complementary and integrative strategy for topically treating MRSA and other cutaneous infections. However, since natural clays exhibit in vitro antibacterial variability and vary vastly in surface chemistries, adsorptive/absorptive characteristics and structural composition, the properties and characteristics of illite clays could aid in the development of standardized and customized aluminosilicates for topical infections. PMID:26508716

  16. Fibrous materials on polyhydroxybutyrate and ferric iron (III)-based porphyrins basis: physical-chemical and antibacterial properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhov, A.; Lobanov, A.; Staroverova, O.; Tyubaeva, P.; Zykova, A.; Pantyukhov, P.; Popov, A.; Iordanskii, A.

    2017-02-01

    Ferric iron (III)-based complexes with porphyrins are the homogenous catalysts of auto-oxidation of several biogenic substances. The most perspective carrier for functional low-molecular substances is the polymer fibers with nano-dimensional parameters. Application of natural polymers, poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) or polylactic acid for instance, makes possible to develop fiber and matrice systems to solve ecological problem in biomedicine The aim of the article is to obtain fibrous material on poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) and ferric iron (III)-based porphyrins basis and to examine its physical-chemical and antibacterial properties. The work is focused on possibility to apply such material to biomedical purposes. Microphotographs of obtained material showed that addition of 1% wt. ferric iron (III)-based porphyrins to PHB led to increased average diameter and disappeared spindly structures in comparison with initial PHB. Biological tests of nonwoven fabrics showed that fibers, containing ferric iron (III)-based tetraphenylporphyrins, were active in relation to bacterial test-cultures. It was found that materials on polymer and metal complexes with porphyrins basis can be applied to production of decontamination equipment in relation to pathogenic and opportunistic microorganisms.

  17. Fe-heme conformations in ferric myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Della Longa, S; Pin, S; Cortès, R; Soldatov, A V; Alpert, B

    1998-12-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra of ferric myoglobin from horse heart have been acquired as a function of pH (between 5.3 and 11.3). At pH = 11.3 temperature-dependent spectra (between 20 and 293 K) have been collected as well. Experimental data solve three main conformations of the Fe-heme: the first, at low pH, is related to high-spin aquomet-myoglobin (Mb+OH2). The other two, at pH 11.3, are related to hydroxymet-myoglobin (Mb+OH-), and are in thermal equilibrium, corresponding to high- and low-spin Mb+OH-. The structure of the three Fe-heme conformations has been assigned according to spin-resolved multiple scattering simulations and fitting of the XANES data. The chemical transition between Mb+OH2 and high-spin Mb+OH-, and the spin transition of Mb+OH-, are accompanied by changes of the Fe coordination sphere due to its movement toward the heme plane, coupled to an increase of the axial asymmetry.

  18. Organic functionalisation of graphene catalysed by ferric perchlorate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; He, Junpo

    2014-12-25

    We have developed a method to prepare covalently functionalised graphene using ferric perchlorate as the catalyst. The resulting functionalised graphene was characterised by Raman spectroscopy, TGA, XPS, AFM, and dispersibility tests in organic or aqueous media.

  19. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  20. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  1. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  2. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  3. 21 CFR 73.2298 - Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2298 Ferric ammonium ferrocyanide. (a... ferrocyanide is safe for use in coloring externally applied cosmetics, including cosmetics applied to the...

  4. Hydrogen and Ferric Iron in Mars Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyar, Melinda D.

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of oxygen and hydrogen fugacity is of paramount importance in constraining phase equilibria and crystallization processes of melts, as well as understanding the partitioning of elements between the cope and silicate portions of terrestrial planets. H and Fe(3+) must both be analyzed in order to reconstruct hydrogen and oxygen fugacities on Mars. To date, SIMS data have elucidated D/H and H contents of hydrous phases in SNC meteorites, but until now anhydrous martian minerals have not been systematically examined for trace hydrogen. Ferric iron has been quantified using XANES in many martian phases, but integrated studies of both Fe(3+) and H on the same spots are really needed to address the H budget. Finally, the effects of shock on both Fe(3+) and H in hydrous and anhydrous phases must be quantified. Thus, the overall goal of this research was to understand the oxygen and hydrogen fugacities under which martian samples crystallized. In this research one-year project, we approached this problem by 1) characterizing Fe(3+) and H contents of SNC meteorites using both bulk (Mossbauer spectroscopy and uranium extraction, respectively) and microscale (synchrotron micro-XANES and SIMS) methods; 2) relating Fe(3+) and H contents of martian minerals to their oxygen and hydrogen fugacities through analysis of experimentally equilibrated phases (for pyroxene) and through study of volcanic rocks in which the oxygen and hydrogen fugacities can be independently constrained (for feldspar); and 3) studying the effects of shock processes on Fe(3+) and H contents of the phases of interest. Results have been used to assess quantitatively the distribution of H and Fe(3+) among phases in the martian interior, which will better constrain the geodynamic processes of the interior, as well as the overall hydrogen and water budgets on Mars. There were no inventions funded by this research.

  5. Ferric and cupric reductase activities by iron-limited cells of the green alga Chlorella kessleri: quantification via oxygen electrode.

    PubMed

    Weger, Harold G; Walker, Crystal N; Fink, Michael B

    2007-10-01

    The colorimetric Fe2+ indicators bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid (BPDS) and 3-(2-pyridyl)-5,6-bis(4-phenylsulfonic acid)-1,2,4-triazine (FZ) are routinely used to assay for plasma membrane ferric reductase activity in iron-limited algal cells and also in roots from iron-limited plants. Ferric reductase assays using these colorimetric indicators must take into account the fact that Fe3+ chelators (e.g. ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) can also in general bind Fe2+ and may therefore compete with the colorimetric Fe2+ indicators, leading to the potential for underestimation of the ferric reduction rate. Conversely, the presence of BPDS or FZ may also facilitate the reduction of Fe3+ chelates, potentially leading to overestimation of ferric reduction rates. Last, both BPDS and FZ have non-negligible affinities for Fe3+ in addition to their well-known affinities for Fe2+; this leads to potential difficulties in ascertaining whether free and/or chelated Fe3+ are potential substrates for the ferric reductase. Similar issues arise when assaying for cupric reductase activity using the colorimetric Cu+ indicator bathocuproinedisulfonic acid (BCDS). In this paper, we describe an oxygen-electrode-based assay (conducted in darkness) for both ferric and cupric reductase activities that does not use colorimetric indicators. Using this assay system, we show that the plasma membrane metal reductase activity of iron-limited cells of the green alga Chlorella kessleri reduced complexed Fe3+ (i.e. Fe3+ chelates) but did not reduce free (non-chelated) Fe3+, and also reduced free Cu2+ to Cu+, but did not reduce Cu2+ that was part of Cu2+ chelates. We suggest that the potential for reduction of free Fe3+ cannot be adequately assayed using colorimetric assays. As well, the BPDS-based assay system consistently yielded similar estimates of ferric reductase activity compared with the O2-electrode-based assays at relatively low Fe3+ concentration, but higher estimates at higher Fe3

  6. Viewing the Valence Electronic Structure of Ferric and Ferrous Hexacyanide in Solution from the Fe and Cyanide Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Zhang, Wenkai; Delcey, Mickaël G; Pinjari, Rahul V; Miedema, Piter S; Schreck, Simon; Quevedo, Wilson; Schröder, Henning; Föhlisch, Alexander; Gaffney, Kelly J; Lundberg, Marcus; Odelius, Michael; Wernet, Philippe

    2016-07-28

    The valence-excited states of ferric and ferrous hexacyanide ions in aqueous solution were mapped by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the Fe L2,3 and N K edges. Probing of both the central Fe and the ligand N atoms enabled identification of the metal- and ligand-centered excited states, as well as ligand-to-metal and metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excited states. Ab initio calculations utilizing the RASPT2 method were used to simulate the Fe L2,3-edge RIXS spectra and enabled quantification of the covalencies of both occupied and empty orbitals of π and σ symmetry. We found that π back-donation in the ferric complex is smaller than that in the ferrous complex. This is evidenced by the relative amounts of Fe 3d character in the nominally 2π CN(-) molecular orbital of 7% and 9% in ferric and ferrous hexacyanide, respectively. Utilizing the direct sensitivity of Fe L3-edge RIXS to the Fe 3d character in the occupied molecular orbitals, we also found that the donation interactions are dominated by σ bonding. The latter was found to be stronger in the ferric complex, with an Fe 3d contribution to the nominally 5σ CN(-) molecular orbitals of 29% compared to 20% in the ferrous complex. These results are consistent with the notion that a higher charge at the central metal atom increases donation and decreases back-donation.

  7. Kinetics of iron acquisition from ferric siderophores by Paracoccus denitrificans

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, R.J.; Weimar, W.R. )

    1990-05-01

    The kinetics of iron accumulation by iron-starved Paracoccus denitrificans during the first 2 min of exposure to 55Fe-labeled ferric siderophore chelates is described. Iron is acquired from the ferric chelate of the natural siderophore L-parabactin in a process exhibiting biphastic kinetics by Lineweaver-Burk analysis. The kinetic data for 1 microM less than (Fe L-parabactin) less than 10 microM fit a regression line which suggests a low-affinity system (Km = 3.9 +/- 1.2 microM, Vmax = 494 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1), whereas the data for 0.1 microM less than or equal to (Fe L-parabactin) less than or equal to 1 microM fit another line consistent with a high-affinity system (Km = 0.24 +/- 0.06 microM, Vmax = 108 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1). The Km of the high-affinity uptake is comparable to the binding affinity we had previously reported for the purified ferric L-parabactin receptor protein in the outer membrane. In marked contrast, ferric D-parabactin data fit a single regression line corresponding to a simple Michaelis-Menten process with comparatively low affinity (Km = 3.1 +/- 0.9 microM, Vmax = 125 pg-atoms of 55Fe min-1 mg of protein-1). Other catecholamide siderophores with an intact oxazoline ring derived from L-threonine (L-homoparabactin, L-agrobactin, and L-vibriobactin) also exhibit biphasic kinetics with a high-affinity component similar to ferric L-parabactin. Circular dichroism confirmed that these ferric chelates, like ferric L-parabactin, exist as the lambda enantiomers.

  8. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  9. Distinct interactions of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} ions with the selectivity filter of the bacterial sodium channel Na{sub V}Ab

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Song; Zangerl, Eva-Maria; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► Ca{sup 2+} translocates slowly in the filter, due to lack of “loose” knock-on mechanism. ► Identification of a high affinity binding site in Na{sub V}Ab selectivity filter. ► Changes of EEEE locus triggered by electrostatic interactions with Ca{sup 2+} ions. -- Abstract: Rapid and selective ion transport is essential for the generation and regulation of electrical signaling pathways in living organisms. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations to investigate how the bacterial sodium channel Na{sub V}Ab (Arcobacter butzleri) differentiates between Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} ions. Multiple nanosecond molecular dynamics simulations revealed distinct binding patterns for these two cations in the selectivity filter and suggested a high affinity calcium binding site formed by backbone atoms of residues Leu-176 and Thr-175 (S{sub CEN}) in the sodium channel selectivity filter.

  10. Box-Behnken experimental design for chromium(VI) ions removal by bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites.

    PubMed

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin Ion; Mihalache, Nicoleta; Botez, Adriana; Matei, Cristian; Berger, Daniela; Damian, Celina Maria; Ionita, Valentin

    2016-10-01

    In this study bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites were synthesised for the removal of chromium(VI) from aqueous solutions. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the bacterial cellulose-magnetite composites and to reveal the uniform dispersion of nanomagnetite in the BC matrix. Magnetic properties were also measured to confirm the magnetite immobilization on bacterial cellulose membrane. The effects of initial Cr(VI) concentration, solution pH and solid/liquid ratio upon chromium removal were examined using the statistical Box-Behnken Design. Because of the possibility of magnetite dissolution during chromium(VI) adsorption, the degree of iron leaching was also analysed in the same conditions as Cr(VI) adsorption. From the factors affecting chromium(VI) adsorption the most important was solution pH. The highest Cr(VI) removal efficiency was observed at pH 4, accompanied by the lowest iron leaching in the solution. The adsorption experiments also indicated that the adsorption process of chromium(VI) is well described by Freundlich adsorption model. Our results proved that the BC-magnetite composites could be used for an efficient removal of chromium(VI) from diluted solutions with a minimum magnetite dissolution during operation.

  11. A two-state model for the dynamics of the pyrophosphate ion release in bacterial RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Da, Lin-Tai; Pardo Avila, Fátima; Wang, Dong; Huang, Xuhui

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of the PPi release during the transcription elongation of bacterial RNA polymerase and its effects on the Trigger Loop (TL) opening motion are still elusive. Here, we built a Markov State Model (MSM) from extensive all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the mechanism of the PPi release. Our MSM has identified a simple two-state mechanism for the PPi release instead of a more complex four-state mechanism observed in RNA polymerase II (Pol II). We observed that the PPi release in bacterial RNA polymerase occurs at sub-microsecond timescale, which is ∼3-fold faster than that in Pol II. After escaping from the active site, the (Mg-PPi)(2-) group passes through a single elongated metastable region where several positively charged residues on the secondary channel provide favorable interactions. Surprisingly, we found that the PPi release is not coupled with the TL unfolding but correlates tightly with the side-chain rotation of the TL residue R1239. Our work sheds light on the dynamics underlying the transcription elongation of the bacterial RNA polymerase.

  12. Enhanced dark hydrogen fermentation by addition of ferric oxide nanoparticles using Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Liu, Min; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2016-05-01

    Ferric oxide nanoparticles (FONPs) were used to facilitate dark hydrogen fermentation using Enterobacter aerogenes. The hydrogen yield of glucose increased from 164.5±2.29 to 192.4±1.14mL/g when FONPs concentration increased from 0 to 200mg/L. SEM images of E. aerogenes demonstrated the existence of bacterial nanowire among cells, suggesting FONPs served as electron conduits to enhance electron transfer. TEM showed cellular internalization of FONPs, indicating hydrogenase synthesis and activity was potentially promoted due to the released iron element. When further increasing FONPs concentration to 400mg/L, the hydrogen yield of glucose decreased to 147.2±2.54mL/g. Soluble metabolic products revealed FONPs enhanced acetate pathway of hydrogen production, but weakened ethanol pathway. This shift of metabolic pathways allowed more nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide for reducing proton to hydrogen.

  13. A functional ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein in the fish pathogen Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Almarza, Oscar; Valderrama, Katherine; Ayala, Manuel; Segovia, Cristopher; Santander, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Piscirickettsia salmonis, a Gram-negative fastidious facultative intracellular pathogen, is the causative agent of the salmonid rickettsial septicemia (SRS). The P. salmonis iron acquisition mechanisms and its molecular regulation are unknown. Iron is an essential element for bacterial pathogenesis. Typically, genes that encode for the iron acquisition machinery are regulated by the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein. P. salmonis fur sequence database reveals a diversity of fur genes without functional verification. Due to the fastidious nature of this bacterium, we evaluated the functionality of P. salmonis fur in the Salmonella Δfur heterologous system. Although P. salmonis fur gene strongly differed from the common Fur sequences, it restored the regulatory mechanisms of iron acquisition in Salmonella. We concluded that P. salmonis LF-89 has a conserved functional Fur protein, which reinforces the importance of iron during fish infection. [Int Microbiol 2016; 49-55].

  14. Precision and sensitivity of the measurement of 15N enrichment in D-alanine from bacterial cell walls using positive/negative ion mass spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunlid, A.; Odham, G.; Findlay, R. H.; White, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Sensitive detection of cellular components from specific groups of microbes can be utilized as 'signatures' in the examination of microbial consortia from soils, sediments or biofilms. Utilizing capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and stereospecific derivatizing agents, D-alanine, a component localized in the prokaryotic (bacterial) cell wall, can be detected reproducibly. Enrichments of D-[15N]alanine determined in E. coli grown with [15N]ammonia can be determined with precision at 1.0 atom%. Chemical ionization with methane gas and the detection of negative ions (M - HF)- and (M - F or M + H - HF)- formed from the heptafluorobutyryl D-2 butanol ester of D-alanine allowed as little as 8 pg (90 fmol) to be detected reproducibly. This method can be utilized to define the metabolic activity in terms of 15N incorporation at the level of 10(3)-10(4) cells, as a function of the 15N-14N ratio.

  15. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5306 - Ferric sodium pyrophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric sodium pyrophosphate. 582.5306 Section 582.5306 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients...

  19. Use of Ferric Sulfate to Control Hepatic Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Saeed; Sharif, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Controlling parenchymal hemorrhage, especially in liver parenchyma, despite all the progress in surgical science, is still one of the challenges surgeons face. Therefore, search for an effective method to control hepatic bleeding is an important research priority. Objectives: This study attempted to determine the haemostatic effect of ferric sulfate and compare it with the standard method (suturing technique). Materials and Methods: In this animal model study, 60 male Wistar rats were used. An incision (2 cm in length and 1/2 cm in depth) was made on each rat’s liver and the hemostasis time was measured using ferric sulfate with different concentrations (5%, 10%, 15%, 25%, and 50%) and then using simple suturing. The liver tissue was assessed for pathological changes. Results: In all the groups, complete hemostasis occurred. Hemostasis times of different concentrations of ferric sulfate were significantly less than those of the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Ferric sulfate was effective in controlling hepatic bleeding in rats. PMID:25825702

  20. DEMONSTRATION OF A BIOAVAILABLE FERRIC IRON TEST KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioavailable ferric iron (BAFeIII) is used by iron-reducing bacteria as an electron acceptor during the oxidation of various organic contaminants such as vinyl chloride and benzene. Quantification of BAFeIII is important with respect to characterizing candidate natural attenuati...

  1. ESTCP DEMONSTRATION OF A BIOAVAILABLE FERRIC IRON TEST KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioavailable ferric iron (BAFeIII) is used by iron-reducing bacteria as an electron acceptor during the oxidation of various organic contaminants such as vinyl chloride and benzene. Quantification of BAFeIII is important with respect to characterizing candidate natural attenuati...

  2. The Effect of Ferric Chloride on Superficial Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Saeed; Sharif, Mohammad Reza; Sahba, Sare

    2015-01-01

    Background: Controlling superficial bleeding, despite all the progress in surgical science, is still a challenge in some settings. Objectives: This study assesses the hemostatic effects of ferric chloride and compares it with the standard method (suturing technique) to control superficial bleeding. Materials and Methods: In this animal model study, 60 male Wistar rats were used. An incision, 2 cm long and 0.5 cm deep was made on rat skin and the hemostasis time was recorded using ferric chloride at different concentrations (5%, 10%, 15%, 25%, and 50%) and then using a control (i.e. control of bleeding by suturing). The skin tissue was examined for pathological changes. Finally, the obtained data were entered into SPSS (ver. 16) and analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney, Kolmogorov-Smirnov, and Wilcoxon signed ranks test. Results: The hemostasis time for the ferric chloride concentration group was significantly less than for the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Ferric chloride may be an effective hemostatic agent to control superficial bleeding in rats. PMID:25825694

  3. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE... brown or garnet red scales or granules or as a brownish-yellowish powder. (2) Ferric ammonium citrate... occurs as thin transparent green scales, as granules, as a powder, or as transparent green crystals....

  4. 21 CFR 184.1296 - Ferric ammonium citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) DIRECT FOOD SUBSTANCES AFFIRMED AS GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE... brown or garnet red scales or granules or as a brownish-yellowish powder. (2) Ferric ammonium citrate... occurs as thin transparent green scales, as granules, as a powder, or as transparent green crystals....

  5. Comparison of bacterial genome assembly software for MinION data and their applicability to medical microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Martin; Reuter, Sandra; Tracey, Alan; Quail, Michael A.; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2016-01-01

    Translating the Oxford Nanopore MinION sequencing technology into medical microbiology requires on-going analysis that keeps pace with technological improvements to the instrument and release of associated analysis software. Here, we use a multidrug-resistant Enterobacter kobei isolate as a model organism to compare open source software for the assembly of genome data, and relate this to the time taken to generate actionable information. Three software tools (PBcR, Canu and miniasm) were used to assemble MinION data and a fourth (SPAdes) was used to combine MinION and Illumina data to produce a hybrid assembly. All four had a similar number of contigs and were more contiguous than the assembly using Illumina data alone, with SPAdes producing a single chromosomal contig. Evaluation of the four assemblies to represent the genome structure revealed a single large inversion in the SPAdes assembly, which also incorrectly integrated a plasmid into the chromosomal contig. Almost 50 %, 80 % and 90 % of MinION pass reads were generated in the first 6, 9 and 12 h, respectively. Using data from the first 6 h alone led to a less accurate, fragmented assembly, but data from the first 9 or 12 h generated similar assemblies to that from 48 h sequencing. Assemblies were generated in 2 h using Canu, indicating that going from isolate to assembled data is possible in less than 48 h. MinION data identified that genes responsible for resistance were carried by two plasmids encoding resistance to carbapenem and to sulphonamides, rifampicin and aminoglycosides, respectively. PMID:28348876

  6. Bacillus anthracis inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase in action: the first bacterial series of structures of phosphate ion-, substrate-, and product-bound complexes.

    PubMed

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Wu, Ruiying; Wilton, Rosemarie; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R; Wang, Ximi K; Zhang, Rongguang; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Mack, Jamey C; Maltseva, Natalia; Mulligan, Rory; Binkowski, T Andrew; Gornicki, Piotr; Kuhn, Misty L; Anderson, Wayne F; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-08-07

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the first unique step of the GMP branch of the purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway. This enzyme is found in organisms of all three kingdoms. IMPDH inhibitors have broad clinical applications in cancer treatment, as antiviral drugs and as immunosuppressants, and have also displayed antibiotic activity. We have determined three crystal structures of Bacillus anthracis IMPDH, in a phosphate ion-bound (termed "apo") form and in complex with its substrate, inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), and product, xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). This is the first example of a bacterial IMPDH in more than one state from the same organism. Furthermore, for the first time for a prokaryotic enzyme, the entire active site flap, containing the conserved Arg-Tyr dyad, is clearly visible in the structure of the apoenzyme. Kinetic parameters for the enzymatic reaction were also determined, and the inhibitory effect of XMP and mycophenolic acid (MPA) has been studied. In addition, the inhibitory potential of two known Cryptosporidium parvum IMPDH inhibitors was examined for the B. anthracis enzyme and compared with those of three bacterial IMPDHs from Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium perfringens, and Vibrio cholerae. The structures contribute to the characterization of the active site and design of inhibitors that specifically target B. anthracis and other microbial IMPDH enzymes.

  7. Bioleaching of copper from waste printed circuit boards by bacterial consortium enriched from acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yun; Wu, Pingxiao; Zhu, Nengwu; Zhang, Ting; Liu, Wen; Wu, Jinhua; Li, Ping

    2010-12-15

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the solubility of copper in waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) by bacterial consortium enriched from natural acid mine drainage, and to determine optimum conditions of bioleaching copper from PCBs. The results indicated that the extraction of copper was mainly accomplished indirectly through oxidation by ferric ions generated from ferrous ion oxidation bacteria. The initial pH and Fe(2+) concentration played an important role in copper extraction and precipitate formation. The leaching rate of copper was generally higher at lower PCB powder dosage. Moreover, a two-step process was extremely necessary for bacterial growth and obtaining an appropriate Fe(2+) oxidation rate; a suitable time when 6.25 g/L of Fe(2+) remained in the solution was suggested for adding PCB powder. The maximum leaching rate of copper was achieved 95% after 5 days under the conditions of initial pH 1.5, 9 g/L of initial Fe(2+), and 20 g/L of PCB powder. All findings demonstrated that copper could be efficiently solubilized from waste PCBs by using bacterial consortium, and the leaching period was shortened remarkably from about 12 days to 5 days.

  8. Bioavailability of iron from ferric choline citrate and a ferric copper cobalt choline citrate complex for young pigs.

    PubMed

    Miller, E R; Parsons, M J; Ullrey, D E; Ku, P K

    1981-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the bioavailability for young pigs of Fe from ferric choline citrate or from a commercial mixture of Fe, Cu and Co choline citrate salts. Relative biological value of Fe from either source with a standard of 100 for FeSO4 x 7H20 was about 140 by both hemoglobin regeneration and Fe retention methods.

  9. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  10. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  11. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  12. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  13. 40 CFR 180.1191 - Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ferric phosphate; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1191 Ferric phosphate; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An..., ferric phosphate (FePO4, CAS No. 11045-86-0) in or on all food commodities....

  14. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges and to...

  15. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges and to...

  16. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges and to...

  17. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges and to...

  18. 40 CFR 415.380 - Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ferric chloride production subcategory. 415.380 Section 415.380 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Ferric Chloride Production Subcategory § 415.380 Applicability; description of the ferric chloride production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges and to...

  19. 76 FR 17556 - Sodium Ferric Ethylenediaminetetraacetate; Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Sodium Ferric Ethylenediaminetetraacetate; Exemption From the Requirement of a... establishes an exemption from the requirement of a tolerance for residues of sodium ferric... regulation eliminates the need to establish a maximum permissible level for residues of sodium ferric...

  20. Mechanosensitive behavior of bacterial cyclic nucleotide gated (bCNG) ion channels: Insights into the mechanism of channel gating in the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance superfamily.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Hannah R; Elmore, Donald E; Maurer, Joshua A

    2012-01-20

    We have recently identified and characterized the bacterial cyclic nucleotide gated (bCNG) subfamily of the larger mechanosensitive channel of small conductance (MscS) superfamily of ion channels. The channel domain of bCNG channels exhibits significant sequence homology to the mechanosensitive subfamily of MscS in the regions that have previously been used as a hallmark for channels that gate in response to mechanical stress. However, we have previously demonstrated that three of these channels are unable to rescue Escherichiacoli from osmotic downshock. Here, we examine an additional nine bCNG homologues and further demonstrate that the full-length bCNG channels are unable to rescue E. coli from hypoosmotic stress. However, limited mechanosensation is restored upon removal of the cyclic nucleotide binding domain. This indicates that the C-terminal domain of the MscS superfamily can drive channel gating and further highlight the ability of a superfamily of ion channels to be gated by multiple stimuli.

  1. Contact Killing of Bacteria on Copper Is Suppressed if Bacterial-Metal Contact Is Prevented and Is Induced on Iron by Copper Ions

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Salima; Hans, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria are rapidly killed on copper surfaces, and copper ions released from the surface have been proposed to play a major role in the killing process. However, it has remained unclear whether contact of the bacteria with the copper surface is also an important factor. Using laser interference lithography, we engineered copper surfaces which were covered with a grid of an inert polymer which prevented contact of the bacteria with the surface. Using Enterococcus hirae as a model organism, we showed that the release of ionic copper from these modified surfaces was not significantly reduced. In contrast, killing of bacteria was strongly attenuated. When E. hirae cells were exposed to a solid iron surface, the loss of cell viability was the same as on glass. However, exposing cells to iron in the presence of 4 mM CuSO4 led to complete killing in 100 min. These experiments suggest that contact killing proceeds by a mechanism whereby the metal-bacterial contact damages the cell envelope, which, in turn, makes the cells susceptible to further damage by copper ions. PMID:23396344

  2. Room temperature synthesis of hydrated nickel(III) oxide and study of its effect on Cr(VI) ions removal and bacterial culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Sayan; Bhattacharjee, Swarupananda; Bose, Raj Shekhar; Ghosh, Chandan Kr.

    2015-06-01

    Cr(VI) ion is a toxic inorganic affluent that causes carcinogenic effects on the human body. Another problem that requires immediate attention is the fouling of water borne metal surface by micro-organisms. The present study aims to suggest the synthesis of Ni2O3·H2O nanoparticles and to investigate its heavy metal adsorption capacity and bacteriotoxicity in order to address the current global problems. Stable Ni2O3·H2O nanoparticles having various particle sizes were synthesized using active halogenation of nickel(II) precursor at different temperatures. Phase purity was investigated by X-ray diffraction technique. Due to high surface area, surface heterogeneity and surface polarity, they show excellent adsorption affinity (up to 73.9 % removal capacity) of heavy metal ions like Cr(VI). Adsorption isotherms (Freundlich and Langmuir) are plotted for them. Kinetics of the adsorption process reveals it to be pseudo-first-order kinetic in nature. They are also found to be fairly toxic to bacterial subcultures. Maximum value of the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were found to be ~0.54 and 0.58 mg/l for particles synthesized at 70 °C. It was observed that Cr(VI) adsorption highly depends on the surface heterogeneity, while the bactericidal effect depends on the size of the nanoparticles so-prepared. Hence, the prepared particles could be used as a potential material for Cr(VI) ion removal and as an antifouling agent.

  3. Ferric saponite and serpentine in the nakhlite martian meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, L. J.; Bridges, J. C.; Gurman, S. J.

    2014-07-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and Fe-K X-ray absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine structure and ferric content of the secondary phase mineral assemblages in the nakhlite martian meteorites, NWA 998, Lafayette, Nakhla, GV, Y 000593, Y 000749, MIL 03346, NWA 817, and NWA 5790. The secondary phases are a rapidly cooled, metastable assemblage that has preserved Mg# and Ca fractionation related to distance from the fluid source, for most of the nakhlites, though one, NWA 5790, appears not to have experienced a fluid pathway. All nine nakhlite samples have also been analysed with scanning electron microscopy, electron probe micro analysis, Bright Field high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and selected area electron diffraction. By measuring the energy position of the Fe-K XANES 1s → 3d pre-edge transition centroid we calculate the ferric content of the minerals within the nakhlite meteorites. The crystalline phyllosilicates and amorphous silicate of the hydrothermal deposits filling the olivine fractures are found to have variable Fe3+/ΣFe values ranging from 0.4 to 0.9. In Lafayette, the central silicate gel parts of the veins are more ferric than the phyllosilicates around it, showing that the fluid became increasingly oxidised. The mesostasis of Lafayette and NWA 817 also have phyllosilicate, which have a higher ferric content than the olivine fracture deposits, with Fe3+/ΣFe values of up to 1.0. Further study, via TEM analyses, reveal the Lafayette and NWA 817 olivine phyllosilicates to have 2:1 T-O-T lattice structure with a the d001-spacing of 0.96 nm, whereas the Lafayette mesostasis phyllosilicates have 1:1 T-O structure with d001-spacings of 0.7 nm. Based on our analyses, the phyllosilicate found within the Lafayette olivine fractures is trioctahedral ferric saponite (Ca0.2K0.1)∑0.3(Mg2.6Fe2+1.3Fe3+1.7Mn0.1)∑5.7[(Si6.7AlIV0.9Fe3+0.4)∑8.0O20](OH)4·nH2O, and that found in the mesostasis fractures is an Fe

  4. Ferric sulphate catalysed esterification of free fatty acids in waste cooking oil.

    PubMed

    Gan, Suyin; Ng, Hoon Kiat; Ooi, Chun Weng; Motala, Nafisa Osman; Ismail, Mohd Anas Farhan

    2010-10-01

    In this work, the esterification of free fatty acids (FFA) in waste cooking oil catalysed by ferric sulphate was studied as a pre-treatment step for biodiesel production. The effects of reaction time, methanol to oil ratio, catalyst concentration and temperature on the conversion of FFA were investigated on a laboratory scale. The results showed that the conversion of FFA reached equilibrium after an hour, and was positively dependent on the methanol to oil molar ratio and temperature. An optimum catalyst concentration of 2 wt.% gave maximum FFA conversion of 59.2%. For catalyst loadings of 2 wt.% and below, this catalysed esterification was proposed to follow a pseudo-homogeneous pathway akin to mineral acid-catalysed esterification, driven by the H(+) ions produced through the hydrolysis of metal complex [Fe(H(2)O)(6)](3+) (aq).

  5. Iron(III) complexation by Vanchrobactin, a siderophore of the bacterial fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Emilia; Brandariz, Isabel; Jiménez, Carlos; Soengas, Raquel G

    2011-05-01

    The bacterial fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum serotype O2 strain RV22 produces the mono catecholate siderophore Vanchrobactin (Vb) under conditions of iron deficiency. Vb contains two potential bidentate coordination sites: catecholate and salicylate groups. The iron(III) coordination properties of Vb is investigated in aqueous solutions using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The stepwise equilibrium constants (log K) for successive addition of Vb dianion to a ferric ion are 19.9; 13.3, and 9.5, respectively, for an overall association constant of 42.7. Based on the previous results, we estimated the equilibrium concentration of free iron(III) under physiological conditions for pH 7.4 solution containing 10(-6) M total iron and 10(-5) M total Vb as pFe = 20 (=-log[Fe(3+)]). The Vb model compounds catechol (Cat) and 2,4-dihydroxy-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)benzamide (Dhb) have also been examined, and the obtained results show that the interaction of the whole system of Vb that contains the ferric-chelating groups of both Dhb and Cat, is synergically greater than the separate parts; i.e. Vb is the best chelating agent either in acid or basic media. In summary, bacteria employing Vb-mediated iron transport thus are able to compete effectively for iron with other microorganisms within which they live.

  6. The substitution of Fe2+ ions by Ni2+ ions in green rust one compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refait, Ph.; Drissi, H.; Marie, Y.; Génin, J.-M. R.

    1994-12-01

    The oxidation of Fe(OH)2 in the presence of Cl- or CO{3/2-} ions leads, in the first stage of the reaction, to chloride-containing green rust one (GR1), 3Fe(OH)2· Fe(OH)2Cl· nH2O, or carbonate-containing GR1, 4Fe(OH)2·Fe2(OH)4CO3·nH2O, respectively. These GR1 compounds give the ferric oxyhydroxides by further oxidation. If a hydroxide Ni x Fe1- x (OH)2 is initially precipitated, the reaction leads to a nickelous-ferric compound isomorphous to the ferrous-ferric GR1, but stable with respect to the oxidizing action of air. Similarly, the oxidation of a nickelous-ferrous hydroxide, in the presence of excess OH- ions, leads to a nickelous-ferric GR1, a layered hydroxide with anionic interlayers made of OH- ions and water molecules. The Mössbauer spectra of these nickelousferric GR1 display two ferric doublets, D0 with IS=0.34 mm/s and QS=0.45 mm/s and D1 with IS=0.36 mm/s and QS=0.86 mm/s. The existence of a ferrous-ferric GR1 incorporating OH- ions, a compound never observed so far, is strongly suspected.

  7. Paracoccidioides spp. ferrous and ferric iron assimilation pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bailão, Elisa Flávia L. C.; Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Silva-Bailão, Mirelle G.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Kosman, Daniel J.; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for almost all organisms, including fungi. Usually, fungi can uptake iron through receptor-mediated internalization of a siderophore or heme, and/or reductive iron assimilation (RIA). Traditionally, the RIA pathway consists of ferric reductases (Fres), ferroxidase (Fet3) and a high-affinity iron permease (Ftr1). Paracoccidioides spp. genomes do not present an Ftr1 homolog. However, this fungus expresses zinc regulated transporter homologs (Zrts), members of the ZIP family of membrane transporters that are able in some organisms to transport zinc and iron. A 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC)-overlay assay indicates that both Pb01 and Pb18 express a ferric reductase activity; however, 59Fe uptake assays indicate that only in Pb18 is this activity coupled to a reductase-dependent iron uptake pathway. In addition, Zrts are up-regulated in iron deprivation, as indicated by RNAseq and qRT-PCR using Pb01 transcripts. RNAseq strategy also demonstrated that transcripts related to siderophore uptake and biosynthesis are up-regulated in iron-deprived condition. The data suggest that the fungus could use both a non-classical RIA, comprising ferric reductases and Fe/Zn permeases (Zrts), and siderophore uptake pathways under iron-limited conditions. The study of iron metabolism reveals novel surface molecules that could function as accessible targets for drugs to block iron uptake and, consequently, inhibit pathogen's proliferation. PMID:26441843

  8. Magnetotactic bacteria form magnetite from a phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide via nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Jens; Morin, Guillaume; Menguy, Nicolas; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Cosmidis, Julie; Faivre, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The iron oxide mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) is produced by various organisms to exploit magnetic and mechanical properties. Magnetotactic bacteria have become one of the best model organisms for studying magnetite biomineralization, as their genomes are sequenced and tools are available for their genetic manipulation. However, the chemical route by which magnetite is formed intracellularly within the so-called magnetosomes has remained a matter of debate. Here we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures and transmission electron microscopic imaging techniques to chemically characterize and spatially resolve the mechanism of biomineralization in those microorganisms. We show that magnetite forms through phase transformation from a highly disordered phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide phase, consistent with prokaryotic ferritins, via transient nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates within the magnetosome organelle. This pathway remarkably resembles recent results on synthetic magnetite formation and bears a high similarity to suggested mineralization mechanisms in higher organisms. PMID:23980143

  9. Magnetotactic bacteria form magnetite from a phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide via nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Jens; Morin, Guillaume; Menguy, Nicolas; Perez Gonzalez, Teresa; Widdrat, Marc; Cosmidis, Julie; Faivre, Damien

    2013-09-10

    The iron oxide mineral magnetite (Fe3O4) is produced by various organisms to exploit magnetic and mechanical properties. Magnetotactic bacteria have become one of the best model organisms for studying magnetite biomineralization, as their genomes are sequenced and tools are available for their genetic manipulation. However, the chemical route by which magnetite is formed intracellularly within the so-called magnetosomes has remained a matter of debate. Here we used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at cryogenic temperatures and transmission electron microscopic imaging techniques to chemically characterize and spatially resolve the mechanism of biomineralization in those microorganisms. We show that magnetite forms through phase transformation from a highly disordered phosphate-rich ferric hydroxide phase, consistent with prokaryotic ferritins, via transient nanometric ferric (oxyhydr)oxide intermediates within the magnetosome organelle. This pathway remarkably resembles recent results on synthetic magnetite formation and bears a high similarity to suggested mineralization mechanisms in higher organisms.

  10. Enhanced bioaccumulation of heavy metal ions by bacterial cells due to surface display of short metal binding peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Kotrba, P.; Ruml, T.; Doleckova, L.; Lorenzo, V. de

    1999-03-01

    Metal binding peptides of sequences Gly-His-His-Pro-His-Gly (named HP) and Gly-Cys-Gly-Cys-Pro-Cys-Gly-Cys-Gly (named CP) were genetically engineered into LamB protein and expressed in Escherichia coli. The Cd{sup 2+}-to-HP and Cd{sup 2+}-to-CP stoichiometries of peptides were 1:1 and 3:1, respectively. Hybrid LamB proteins were found to be properly folded in the outer membrane of E. coli. Isolated cell envelopes of E. coli bearing newly added metal binding peptides showed an up to 1.8-fold increase in Cd{sup 2+} binding capacity. The bioaccumulation of Cd{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}, and Zn{sup 2+} by E. coli was evaluated. Surface display of CP multiplied the ability of E. coli to bind Cd{sup 2+} from growth medium fourfold. Display of HP peptide did not contribute to an increase in the accumulation of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. However, Cu{sup 2+} ceased contribution of HP for Cd{sup 2+} accumulation, probably due to the strong binding of Cu{sup 2+} to HP. Thus, considering the cooperation of cell structures with inserted peptides, the relative affinities of metal binding peptide and, for example, the cell wall to metal ion should be taken into account in the rational design of peptide sequences possessing specificity for a particular metal.

  11. Pros and Cons of Ion-Torrent Next Generation Sequencing versus Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism T-RFLP for Studying the Rumen Bacterial Community

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Gabriel; Belanche, Alejandro; Girwood, Susan E.; Pinloche, Eric; Wilkinson, Toby; Newbold, C. Jamie

    2014-01-01

    The development of next generation sequencing has challenged the use of other molecular fingerprinting methods used to study microbial diversity. We analysed the bacterial diversity in the rumen of defaunated sheep following the introduction of different protozoal populations, using both next generation sequencing (NGS: Ion Torrent PGM) and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). Although absolute number differed, there was a high correlation between NGS and T-RFLP in terms of richness and diversity with R values of 0.836 and 0.781 for richness and Shannon-Wiener index, respectively. Dendrograms for both datasets were also highly correlated (Mantel test = 0.742). Eighteen OTUs and ten genera were significantly impacted by the addition of rumen protozoa, with an increase in the relative abundance of Prevotella, Bacteroides and Ruminobacter, related to an increase in free ammonia levels in the rumen. Our findings suggest that classic fingerprinting methods are still valuable tools to study microbial diversity and structure in complex environments but that NGS techniques now provide cost effect alternatives that provide a far greater level of information on the individual members of the microbial population. PMID:25051490

  12. Analysis of S-adenosylmethionine and related sulfur metabolites in bacterial isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (BAA-47) by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization coupled to a hybrid linear quadrupole ion trap and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Bianco, Giuliana; Abate, Salvatore; Mattia, Daniela

    2009-11-01

    A comprehensive and highly selective method for detecting in bacterial supernatants a modified sulfur nucleoside, S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM), and its metabolites, i.e., S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH), adenosine (Ado), 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA), adenine (Ade), S-adenosyl-methioninamine (dcSAM), homocysteine (Hcy) and methionine (Met), was developed. The method is based on reversed-phase liquid chromatography with positive electrospray ionization (ESI+) coupled to a hybrid linear quadrupole ion trap (LTQ) and 7-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS). A gradient elution was employed with a binary solvent of 0.05 M ammonium formate at pH 4 and acetonitrile. The assay involves a simultaneous cleanup of cell-free bacterial broths by solid-phase extraction and trace enrichment of metabolites with a 50-fold concentration factor by using immobilized phenylboronic and anion-exchange cartridges. While the quantitative determination of SAM was performed using stable-isotope-labeled SAM-d3 as an internal standard, in the case of Met and Ade, Met-13C and Ade-15N2 were employed as isotope-labeled internal standards, respectively. This method enabled the identification of SAM and its metabolites in cell-free culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa grown in Davis minimal broth (formulation without sulphur organic compounds), with routine sub-ppm mass accuracies (-0.27 +/- 0.68 ppm). The resulting contents of S(C)S(S)-SAM, S(S)-dcSAM, MTA, Ado and Met in the free-cell supernatant of P. aeruginosa was 56.4 +/- 2.1 nM, 32.2 +/- 2.2 nM, 0.91 +/- 0.10 nM, 19.6 +/- 1.2 nM and 1.93 +/- 0.02 microM (mean +/- SD, n = 4 extractions), respectively. We report also the baseline separation (Rs > or = 1.5) of both diastereoisomeric forms of SAM (S(C)S(S) and S(C)R(S)) and dcSAM (S(S) and R(S)), which can be very useful to establish the relationship between the biologically active versus the inactive species, S(C)S(S)/S(C)R(S) and S(S)/R(S) of SAM and dc

  13. Thermodynamic modeling of ferric phosphate precipitation for phosphorus removal and recovery from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Ding, Lili; Ren, Hongqiang; Guo, Zhitao; Tan, Jing

    2010-04-15

    Phosphorus removal and recovery by ferric phosphate (FePO(4) x 2 H(2)O) precipitation has been considered as an effective technology. In the present study, we examined chemical precipitation thermodynamic modeling of the PHREEQC program for phosphorus removal and recovery from wastewater. The objective of this research was to employ thermodynamic modeling to evaluate the effect of solution factors on FePO(4) x 2 H(2)O precipitation. In order to provide comparison, with the evaluation of thermodynamic modeling, the case study of phosphate removal from anaerobic supernatant was studied. The results indicated that the saturation-index (SI) of FePO(4) x 2 H(2)O followed a polynomial function of pH, and the solution pH influenced the ion activities of ferric iron salts and phosphate. The SI of FePO(4) x 2 H(2)O increased with a logarithmic function of Fe(3+):PO(4)(3-) molar ratio (Fe/P) and initial PO(4)(3-) concentration, respectively. Furthermore, the SI of FePO(4) x 2 H(2)O decreased with a logarithmic function of alkalinity and ionic strength, respectively. With an increase in temperature, the SI at pH 6.0 and 9.0 decreased with a linear function, and the SI at pH 4.0 followed a polynomial function. For the case study of phosphate removal from anaerobic supernatant, the phosphate removal trend at different pH and Fe/P was closer to the predictions of thermodynamic modeling. The results indicated that the thermodynamic modeling of FePO(4) x 2 H(2)O precipitation could be utilized to predict the technology parameters for phosphorus removal and recovery.

  14. In vitro assessments on bacterial adhesion and corrosion performance of TiN coating on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy synthesized by multi-arc ion plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Naiming; Huang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiangyu; Fan, Ailan; Qin, Lin; Tang, Bin

    2012-07-01

    TiN coating was synthesized on Ti6Al4V titanium alloy surface by multi-arc ion plating (MIP) technique. Surface morphology, cross sectional microstructure, elemental distributions and phase compositions of the obtained coating were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), optical microscope (OM), glow discharge optical emission spectroscope (GDOES) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Bacterial adhesion and corrosion performance of Ti6Al4V and the TiN coating were assessed via in vitro bacterial adhesion tests and corrosion experiments, respectively. The results indicated that continuous and compact coating which was built up by pure TiN with a typical columnar crystal structure has reached a thickness of 1.5 μm. This TiN coating could significantly reduce the bacterial adhesion and enhance the corrosion resistance of Ti6Al4V substrate.

  15. Some problems of bacterial mineralization and sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanov, Alexei Y.

    2003-01-01

    Owing to the latest investigations in bacterial paleontology and geomicrobiology a number of minerals known to be formed with the participation of micro-organisms increases continuously. 12 - 15 years ago we know nearly 20 minerals: carbonates (calcite, aragonite, monohydrocalcite), phosphates (dalite, francolite, struvite, vivianite, and some other), sulfates (jarosite), ferric oxides (magnetite, ferrohydrite), sulfides (pyrite, hydrotroilite, sphalerite, wurtzite, and some others) (Lowernstan, Weiner, 1989). Now their number is several times greater. Quartz cristobalite, pyrolusite, silicates (including layer ones), and feldspars are of special interest (Geomicrobiology..., 1997; Tazaki et al., 1997; Geptner et al., 1997; Bacterial paleontology, 2002).

  16. Corynebactin and a Serine Trilactone Based Analogue-Chirality and Molecular Modeling of ferric Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Martin E.; Hay, Benjamin P.; Kim, Sangoo S.; Dertz, Emily A.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2002-09-14

    The chirality of ferric siderophore complexes is a determinant for their cellular recognition and transport. Corynebactin (first isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium) contains L-threonine, unlike the closely related enterobactin, which contains L-serine. Also unlike enterobactin, ferric corynebactin is preferentially L at the iron center. Experimental (circular dichroism spectra and synthesis of a corynebactin/enterobactin hybrid) and theoretical (MM3 and density functional theory calculations) results explain ferric corynebactin's properties.

  17. Ferric chloride graphite intercalation compounds prepared from graphite fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1994-01-01

    The reaction between graphite fluoride and ferric chloride was observed in the temperature range of 300 to 400 C. The graphite fluorides used for this reaction have an sp3 electronic structure and are electrical insulators. They can be made by fluorinating either carbon fibers or powder having various degrees of graphitization. Reaction is fast and spontaneous and can occur in the presence of air. The ferric chloride does not have to be predried. The products have an sp2 electronic structure and are electrical conductors. They contain first stage FeCl3 intercalated graphite. Some of the products contain FeCl2*2H2O, others contain FeF3 in concentrations that depend on the intercalation condition. The graphite intercalated compounds (GIC) deintercalated slowly in air at room temperature, but deintercalated quickly and completely at 370 C. Deintercalation is accompanied by the disappearing of iron halides and the formation of rust (hematite) distributed unevenly on the fiber surface. When heated to 400 C in pure N2 (99.99 vol %), this new GIC deintercalates without losing its molecular structure. However, when the compounds are heated to 800 C in quartz tube, they lost most of its halogen atoms and formed iron oxides (other than hematite), distributed evenly in or on the fiber. This iron-oxide-covered fiber may be useful in making carbon-fiber/ceramic-matrix composites with strong bonding at the fiber-ceramic interface.

  18. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia.

    PubMed

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15mg/kg; maximum of 1000mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia.

  19. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia

    PubMed Central

    Friedrisch, João Ricardo; Cançado, Rodolfo Delfini

    2015-01-01

    Nutritional iron deficiency anemia is the most common deficiency disorder, affecting more than two billion people worldwide. Oral iron supplementation is usually the first choice for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia, but in many conditions, oral iron is less than ideal mainly because of gastrointestinal adverse events and the long course needed to treat the disease and replenish body iron stores. Intravenous iron compounds consist of an iron oxyhydroxide core, which is surrounded by a carbohydrate shell made of polymers such as dextran, sucrose or gluconate. The first iron product for intravenous use was the high molecular weight iron dextran. However, dextran-containing intravenous iron preparations are associated with an elevated risk of anaphylactic reactions, which made physicians reluctant to use intravenous iron for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia over many years. Intravenous ferric carboxymaltose is a stable complex with the advantage of being non-dextran-containing and a very low immunogenic potential and therefore not predisposed to anaphylactic reactions. Its properties permit the administration of large doses (15 mg/kg; maximum of 1000 mg/infusion) in a single and rapid session (15-minute infusion) without the requirement of a test dose. The purpose of this review is to discuss some pertinent issues in relation to the history, pharmacology, administration, efficacy, and safety profile of ferric carboxymaltose in the treatment of patients with iron deficiency anemia. PMID:26670403

  20. Functional characterization of the chloroplast ferric chelate oxidoreductase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Solti, Adám; Müller, Brigitta; Czech, Viktória; Sárvári, Éva; Fodor, Ferenc

    2014-05-01

    Iron (Fe) has an essential role in the biosynthesis of chlorophylls and redox cofactors, and thus chloroplast iron uptake is a process of special importance. The chloroplast ferric chelate oxidoreductase (cFRO) has a crucial role in this process but it is poorly characterized. To study the localization and mechanism of action of cFRO, sugar beet (Beta vulgaris cv Orbis) chloroplast envelope fractions were isolated by gradient ultracentrifugation, and their purity was tested by western blotting against different marker proteins. The ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activity of envelope fractions was studied in the presence of NAD(P)H (reductants) and FAD coenzymes. Reduction of Fe(III)-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid was monitored spectrophotometrically by the Fe(II)-bathophenanthroline disulfonate complex formation. FCR activity, that is production of free Fe(II) for Fe uptake, showed biphasic saturation kinetics, and was clearly associated only to chloroplast inner envelope (cIE) vesicles. The reaction rate was > 2.5 times higher with NADPH than with NADH, which indicates the natural coenzyme preference of cFRO activity and its dependence on photosynthesis. FCR activity of cIE vesicles isolated from Fe-deficient plants also showed clear biphasic kinetics, where the KM of the low affinity component was elevated, and thus this component was down-regulated.

  1. Solubility products of amorphous ferric arsenate and crystalline scorodite (FeAsO 4 · 2H 2O) and their application to arsenic behavior in buried mine tailings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmuir, Donald; Mahoney, John; Rowson, John

    2006-06-01

    Published solubility data for amorphous ferric arsenate and scorodite have been reevaluated using the geochemical code PHREEQC with a modified thermodynamic database for the arsenic species. Solubility product calculations have emphasized measurements obtained under conditions of congruent dissolution of ferric arsenate (pH < 3), and have taken into account ion activity coefficients, and ferric hydroxide, ferric sulfate, and ferric arsenate complexes which have association constants of 10 4.04 (FeH 2AsO 42+), 10 9.86 (FeHAsO 4+), and 10 18.9 (FeAsO 4). Derived solubility products of amorphous ferric arsenate and crystalline scorodite (as log Ksp) are -23.0 ± 0.3 and -25.83 ± 0.07, respectively, at 25 °C and 1 bar pressure. In an application of the solubility results, acid raffinate solutions (molar Fe/As = 3.6) from the JEB uranium mill at McClean Lake in northern Saskatchewan were neutralized with lime to pH 2-8. Poorly crystalline scorodite precipitated below pH 3, removing perhaps 98% of the As(V) from solution, with ferric oxyhydroxide (FO) phases precipitated starting between pH 2 and 3. Between pH 2.18 and 7.37, the apparent log Ksp of ferric arsenate decreased from -22.80 to -24.67, while that of FO (as Fe(OH) 3) increased from -39.49 to -33.5. Adsorption of As(V) by FO can also explain the decrease in the small amounts of As(V)(aq) that remain in solution above pH 2-3. The same general As(V) behavior is observed in the pore waters of neutralized tailings buried for 5 yr at depths of up to 32 m in the JEB tailings management facility (TMF), where arsenic in the pore water decreases to 1-2 mg/L with increasing age and depth. In the TMF, average apparent log Ksp values for ferric arsenate and ferric hydroxide are -25.74 ± 0.88 and -37.03 ± 0.58, respectively. In the laboratory tests and in the TMF, the increasing crystallinity of scorodite and the amorphous character of the coexisting FO phase increases the stability field of scorodite relative to that of

  2. The mechanism of bacterial action in the leaching of pyrite by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans. An electrochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, P.R.; Fowler, T.A.; Crundwell, F.K.

    1999-08-01

    In many of the experiments reported in the literature on the leaching of pyrite by Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, the concentrations of ferric and ferrous ions in the presence of bacteria differ significantly from experiments conducted in their absence. In addition, these concentrations change throughout the course of the experiment. This makes it difficult to determine whether the presence of bacteria increases the rate of leaching above that for chemical leaching at the same solution conditions. The authors have designed an experimental apparatus to overcome this problem. This apparatus controls the redox potential in one compartment of an electrolytic cell by manipulating the current to the cell. In this manner, the concentrations of ferrous and ferric ions are maintained at their initial values for the duration of the experiment. Two types of experiments are reported in this paper. In the first, pyrite electrodes were exposed to solutions of the same bulk conditions in the presence and absence of bacteria, and their mixed potentials were determined. In the second, particulate pyrite was leached with and without bacteria to determine the effect that bacteria have on the rate of leaching. The mixed potential of bacterially dissolved pyrite decreases as microcolonies and biofilms form on the surface of pyrite electrode over a 14 day period. On the other hand, the mixed potential of chemically dissolved pyrite is constant over the same period. The results of the leaching experiments show that Thiobacillus ferrooxidans enhances the rate of leaching above that found in the absence of bacteria at the same conditions in solution. An electrochemical model of pyrite dissolution is derived that describes the mixed potential and the kinetics of pyrite leaching. This analysis indicates that the decrease in mixed potential and the increase in the leaching rate in the presence of bacteria are due to an increase in the pH at the surface.

  3. The Regulatory Role of Ferric Uptake Regulator (Fur) during Anaerobic Respiration of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xin-Wei; He, Ying; Xu, Jun; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Feng-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is a global regulator that controls bacterial iron homeostasis. In this study, a fur deletion mutant of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was constructed. Physiological studies revealed that the growth rate of this mutant under aerobic conditions was only slightly lower than that of wild type (WT), but severe growth defects were observed under anaerobic conditions when different electron acceptors (EAs) were provided. Comparative transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that Fur is involved not only in classical iron homeostasis but also in anaerobic respiration. Fur exerted pleiotropic effects on the regulation of anaerobic respiration by controlling anaerobic electron transport, the heme biosynthesis system, and the cytochrome c maturation system. Biochemical assays demonstrated that levels of c-type cytochromes were lower in the fur mutant, consistent with the transcriptional profiling. Transcriptomic analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed a primary regulation network for Fur in WP3. These results suggest that Fur may act as a sensor for anoxic conditions to trigger and influence the anaerobic respiratory system. PMID:24124499

  4. The regulatory role of ferric uptake regulator (Fur) during anaerobic respiration of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin-Wei; He, Ying; Xu, Jun; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Feng-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is a global regulator that controls bacterial iron homeostasis. In this study, a fur deletion mutant of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was constructed. Physiological studies revealed that the growth rate of this mutant under aerobic conditions was only slightly lower than that of wild type (WT), but severe growth defects were observed under anaerobic conditions when different electron acceptors (EAs) were provided. Comparative transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that Fur is involved not only in classical iron homeostasis but also in anaerobic respiration. Fur exerted pleiotropic effects on the regulation of anaerobic respiration by controlling anaerobic electron transport, the heme biosynthesis system, and the cytochrome c maturation system. Biochemical assays demonstrated that levels of c-type cytochromes were lower in the fur mutant, consistent with the transcriptional profiling. Transcriptomic analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed a primary regulation network for Fur in WP3. These results suggest that Fur may act as a sensor for anoxic conditions to trigger and influence the anaerobic respiratory system.

  5. Comparison of ferric sulfate, formocresol, and a combination of ferric sulfate/formocresol in primary tooth vital pulpotomies: a retrospective radiographic survey.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Spence; Walker, Jerry

    2002-01-01

    Studies have suggested that formocresol has toxic and carcinogenic potential. A search for an alternative medicament for primary tooth pulpotomies has led to ferric sulfate as a possible alternative. A retrospective study was done in a multipractitioner IHS (Indian Health Service) clinic. Radiographic success or failure was determined for 202 primary tooth pulpotomies performed with either formocresol, ferric sulfate, or a combination procedure of formocresol and ferric sulfate. The post-operative period for the pulpotomies ranged from one month to thirty-six plus months. There was no statistical difference in radiographic failure rates between formocresol, ferric sulfate, or the combination procedure when results were analyzed regardless of post-op period. However, when post-op periods were considered, formocresol performed better at > 36 months and the combination procedure showed significantly more failures at > 36 months.

  6. Ferric Uptake Regulator and Its Role in the Pathogenesis of Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Estevan A.; Szelestey, Blake R.; Newsom, David E.; White, Peter; Mason, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) is a commensal microorganism of the human nasopharynx, and yet is also an opportunistic pathogen of the upper and lower respiratory tracts. Host microenvironments influence gene expression patterns, likely critical for NTHi persistence. The host sequesters iron as a mechanism to control microbial growth, and yet iron limitation influences gene expression and subsequent production of proteins involved in iron homeostasis. Careful regulation of iron uptake, via the ferric uptake regulator Fur, is essential in multiple bacteria, including NTHi. We hypothesized therefore that Fur contributes to iron homeostasis in NTHi, is critical for bacterial persistence, and likely regulates expression of virulence factors. Toward this end, fur was deleted in the prototypic NTHi clinical isolate, 86-028NP, and we assessed gene expression regulated by Fur. As expected, expression of the majority of genes that encode proteins with predicted roles in iron utilization was repressed by Fur. However, 14 Fur-regulated genes encode proteins with no known function, and yet may contribute to iron utilization or other biological functions. In a mammalian model of human otitis media, we determined that Fur was critical for bacterial persistence, indicating an important role for Fur-mediated iron homeostasis in disease progression. These data provide a profile of genes regulated by Fur in NTHi and likely identify additional regulatory pathways involved in iron utilization. Identification of such pathways will increase our understanding of how this pathogen can persist within host microenvironments, as a common commensal and, importantly, as a pathogen with significant clinical impact. PMID:23381990

  7. Ferric and cobaltous hydroacid complexes for forward osmosis (FO) processes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Qingchun; Fu, Fengjiang; Chung, Tai-Shung

    2014-07-01

    Cupric and ferric hydroacid complexes have proven their advantages as draw solutes in forward osmosis in terms of high water fluxes, negligible reverse solute fluxes and easy recovery (Ge and Chung, 2013. Hydroacid complexes: A new class of draw solutes to promote forward osmosis (FO) processes. Chemical Communications 49, 8471-8473.). In this study, cobaltous hydroacid complexes were explored as draw solutes and compared with the ferric hydroacid complex to study the factors influencing their FO performance. The solutions of the cobaltous complexes produce high osmotic pressures due to the presence of abundant hydrophilic groups. These solutes are able to dissociate and form a multi-charged anion and Na(+) cations in water. In addition, these complexes have expanded structures which lead to negligible reverse solute fluxes and provide relatively easy approaches in regeneration. These characteristics make the newly synthesized cobaltous complexes appropriate as draw solutes. The FO performance of the cobaltous and ferric-citric acid (Fe-CA) complexes were evaluated respectively through cellulose acetate membranes, thin-film composite membranes fabricated on polyethersulfone supports (referred as TFC-PES), and polybenzimidazole and PES dual-layer (referred as PBI/PES) hollow fiber membranes. Under the conditions of DI water as the feed and facing the support layer of TFC-PES FO membranes (PRO mode), draw solutions at 2.0 M produced relatively high water fluxes of 39-48 LMH (L m(-2) hr(-1)) with negligible reverse solute fluxes. A water flux of 17.4 LMH was achieved when model seawater of 3.5 wt.% NaCl replaced DI water as the feed and 2.0 M Fe-CA as the draw solution under the same conditions. The performance of these hydroacid complexes surpasses those of the synthetic draw solutes developed in recent years. This observation, along with the relatively easy regeneration, makes these complexes very promising as a novel class of draw solutes.

  8. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction

    PubMed Central

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires’ disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, ‘model’ organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria. PMID:26000653

  9. An update on iron acquisition by Legionella pneumophila: new pathways for siderophore uptake and ferric iron reduction.

    PubMed

    Cianciotto, Nicholas P

    2015-01-01

    Iron acquisition is critical for the growth and pathogenesis of Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila utilizes two main modes of iron assimilation, namely ferrous iron uptake via the FeoB system and ferric iron acquisition through the action of the siderophore legiobactin. This review highlights recent studies concerning the mechanism of legiobactin assimilation, the impact of c-type cytochromes on siderophore production, the importance of legiobactin in lung infection and a newfound role for a bacterial pyomelanin in iron acquisition. These data demonstrate that key aspects of L. pneumophila iron acquisition are significantly distinct from those of long-studied, 'model' organisms. Indeed, L. pneumophila may represent a new paradigm for a variety of other intracellular parasites, pathogens and under-studied bacteria.

  10. Functional analysis of the ferric uptake requlator gene, fur, in Xanthomonas vesicatoria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the f...

  11. QTL analysis of ferric reductase activity in the model legume lotus japonicus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological and molecular studies have demonstrated that iron accumulation from the soil into Strategy I plants can be limited by ferric reductase activity. An initial study of Lotus japonicus ecotypes Miyakojima MG-20 and Gifu B-129 identified significant leaf chlorosis and ferric reductase activ...

  12. Ferric oxide quantum dots in stable phosphate glass system and their magneto-optical study

    SciTech Connect

    Garaje, Sunil N.; Apte, Sanjay K.; Kumar, Ganpathy; Panmand, Rajendra P.; Naik, Sonali D.; Mahajan, Satish M.; Chand, Ramesh; Kale, Bharat B.

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: We report synthesis of ferric oxide embedded low melting phosphate glass nanocomposite and also the effect of ferric oxide nanoparticles (NCs) content on the optical and magneto-optical properties of the glasses. Faraday rotation of the glass nanocomposites was measured and showed variation in Verdet constant with concentration of ferric oxide. Interestingly, the host glass itself showed fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm) and there is a threefold enhancement in the Verdet constant of ferric oxide quantum dot-glass nanocomposite. Highlights: ► We synthesize ferric oxide embedded low melting stable phosphate glass nanocomposite. ► Glasses doped with 0.25 and 2% ferric oxide show particle size in the range of 4–12 nm. ► The host phosphate glass itself shows fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm). ► Glasses doped with 0.25% ferric oxide show high Verdet constant (30.525°/T cm). ► The as synthesis glasses may have potential application in magneto optical devices. -- Abstract: Herein, we report the synthesis of ferric oxide embedded low melting phosphate glass nanocomposite and also the effect of ferric oxide nanoparticles content on the optical and magneto-optical properties of the glasses. The optical study clearly showed red shift in optical cut off with increasing ferric oxide concentration. The band gap of the host glass was observed to be 3.48 eV and it shifted to 3.14 eV after doping with ferric oxide. The glasses doped with 0.25 and 2% ferric oxide showed particle size of 4–6 nm and 8–12 nm, respectively. Faraday rotation of the glass nanocomposites was measured and showed variation in the Verdet constant as per increasing concentration of ferric oxide. Interestingly, the host glass itself showed fairly good Verdet constant (11.5°/T cm) and threefold enhancement was observed in the Verdet constant of ferric oxide quantum dot-glass nanocomposite.

  13. Predicting anion breakthrough in granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) adsorption filters.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Alexander; Schimmelpfennig, Sebastian; Baumgarten, Benno; Genz, Arne; Amy, Gary; Worch, Eckhard; Jekel, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Adsorption of arsenate, phosphate, salicylic acid, and groundwater DOC onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) was studied in batch and column experiments. Breakthrough curves were experimentally determined and modelled using the homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM) and two of its derivatives, the constant pattern homogeneous surface diffusion model (CPHSDM) and the linear driving force model (LDF). Input parameters, the Freundlich isotherm constants, and mass transfer coefficients for liquid- and solid-phase diffusion were determined and analysed for their influence on the shape of the breakthrough curve. HSDM simulation results predict the breakthrough of all investigated substances satisfactorily, but LDF and CPHSDM could not describe arsenate breakthrough correctly. This is due to a very slow intraparticle diffusion and hence higher Biot numbers. Based on this observation, limits of applicability were defined for LDF and CPHSDM. When designing fixed-bed adsorbers, model selection based on known or estimated Biot and Stanton numbers is possible.

  14. Ferric human neuroglobin scavenges superoxide to form oxy adduct.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Taku; Hafsi, Leila; Masuda, Eri; Tsujino, Hirofumi; Uno, Tadayuki

    2014-01-01

    Neuroglobin (Ngb) is the third member of the vertebrate globin family, and the structure was solved as a typical globin fold with a b-type heme. Although it has been proposed that Ngb could be involved in neuroprotection against oxidative stress, the protective mechanism has not been fully identified yet. In order to clarify functions under hypoxic condition, in this study, we focused on the scavenger activity of human Ngb (hNgb) against superoxide. The activity of hNgb for superoxide was evaluated to be 7.4 µM for IC50, the half maximal inhibitory concentration. The result indicates that hNgb can be an anti-oxidant, and the value was almost the same as that of ascorbic acid. In addition, we characterized oxidation states of a heme iron in superoxide-treated hNgb with spectroscopic measurements. Superoxide-treated hNgb in the ferric form was readily converted to the oxygenated ferrous form, and the result suggested that ferric hNgb could scavenge superoxide by change of an oxidation state in a heme iron. Moreover, mutational experiments were performed, and the each variant mutated at 46 and 55 positions suggested a disulfide bond between Cys46 and Cys55 could be essential to be sensors for oxidative stress with the direct binding of superoxide. As a consequence, we concluded that redox changes of the heme iron and the disulfide bond could regulate neuroprotective functions of hNgb, and it suggests that hNgb can afford protection against hypoxic and ischemic stress in the brain.

  15. Low-temperature carbonization and more effective degradation of carbohydrates induced by ferric trichloride.

    PubMed

    Xia, Juan; Song, Le Xin; Dang, Zheng

    2012-07-05

    The present work is devoted to an attempt to understand the effect of an inorganic salt such as ferric trichloride (FeCl(3)) on the carbonization and degradation of carbohydrates such as β-cyclodextrin (CD), amylose, and cellulose. Our data revealed two important observations. First, the presence of FeCl(3) led to the occurrence of a low carbonization temperature of 373 K. This is a rare phenomenon, in which carbonization improvement is present even if a small amount of FeCl(3) was added. Experimental results had provided evidence for the fact that a redox process was started during the low-temperature carbonization of β-CD, causing the reduction of FeCl(3) to ferrous chloride (FeCl(2)) by carbon materials formed in the carbonization process in air. However, the reduction process of FeCl(3) produced the in situ composite nanomaterial of Fe-FeCl(2) combination in nitrogen. Second, a molecule-ion interaction emerged between FeCl(3) and the carbohydrates in aqueous solution, resulting in a more effective degradation of the carbohydrates. Moreover, our results demonstrated that FeCl(3) played the role of a catalyst during the degradation of the carbohydrates in solution. We believe that the current work not only has a significant potential application in disposal of waste carbohydrates but also could be helpful in many fields such as environmental protection, biomass energy development, and inorganic composite nanomaterials.

  16. Ferric citrate decreases ruminal hydrogen sulphide concentrations in feedlot cattle fed diets high in sulphate.

    PubMed

    Drewnoski, Mary E; Doane, Perry; Hansen, Stephanie L

    2014-01-28

    Dissimilatory reduction of sulphate by sulphate-reducing bacteria in the rumen produces sulphide, which can lead to a build-up of the toxic gas hydrogen sulphide (H2S) in the rumen when increased concentrations of sulphate are consumed by ruminants. We hypothesised that adding ferric Fe would competitively inhibit ruminal sulphate reduction. The effects of five concentrations and two sources (ferric citrate or ferric ammonium citrate) of ferric Fe were examined in vitro (n 6 per treatment). Rumen fluid was collected from a steer that was adapted to a high-concentrate, high-sulphate diet (0·51 % S). The addition of either source of ferric Fe decreased (P< 0·01) H2S concentrations without affecting gas production (P= 0·38), fluid pH (P= 0·80) or in vitro DM digestibility (P= 0·38) after a 24 h incubation. An in vivo experiment was conducted using eight ruminally fistulated steers (543 (sem 12) kg) in a replicated Latin square with four periods and four treatments. The treatments included a high-concentrate, high-sulphate control diet (0·46 % S) or the control diet plus ferric ammonium citrate at concentrations of 200, 300 or 400 mg Fe/kg diet DM. The inclusion of ferric Fe did not affect DM intake (P= 0·21). There was a linear (P< 0·01) decrease in the concentration of ruminal H2S as the addition of ferric Fe concentrations increased. Ferric citrate appears to be an effective way to decrease ruminal H2S concentrations, which could allow producers to safely increase the inclusion of ethanol co-products.

  17. Growth, spectroscopic and physicochemical properties of bis mercury ferric chloride tetra thiocyanate: A nonlinear optical crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, V.; Shihabuddeen Syed, A.; Jagannathan, K.; Rajarajan, K.

    2013-05-01

    Single crystal of bis mercury ferric chloride tetra thiocyanate [Hg2FeCl3(SCN)4; (MFCTC)] was grown from ethanol-water (3:1) mixed solvent using slow evaporation solvent technique (SEST) for the first time. The cell parameters of the grown crystal were confirmed by single crystal XRD. The coordination of transition metal ions with the SCN ligand is well-identified using FT-IR spectral analysis. The chemical composition of MFCTC was confirmed using CHNS elemental test. The ESR spectral profile of MFCTC was recorded from 298 K to 110 K, which strongly suggests the incorporation of Fe3+ ion and its environment with respect to SCN ligand. The HPLC chromatogram of MFCTC highlights the purity of the compound. The UV-Vis-NIR studies revealed the ultra violet cut-off wavelength of MFCTC in ethanol as 338 nm. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss of the sample were studied as a function of frequency and temperature. The TGA-DTA and DSC thermal analysis show that the sample is thermally stable up to 234.31 °C, which is comparatively far better than the thermal stability of Hg3CdCl2(SCN)6; (171.3 °C) and other metal-organic coordination complex crystals such as CdHg(SCN)4 (198.5 °C), Hg(N2H4CS)4Mn(SCN)4 (199.06 °C) and Hg(N2H4CS)4Zn(SCN)4 (185 °C). The SHG conversion efficiency of MFCTC is found to be higher than KDP.

  18. [Sorption characteristics of tea waste modified by hydrated ferric oxide toward Pb(II) in water].

    PubMed

    Wan, Shun-Li; Xue, Yao; Ma, Zhao-Zhao; Liu, Guo-Bin; Yu, Yan-Xia; Ma, Ming-Hai

    2014-10-01

    Hydrated ferric oxide was successfully impregnated onto tea waste by precipitation to obtain a new sorbent named HFO-TW, the adsorption characteristics of which toward Pb(II) in aqueous solution was investigated by evaluating the effects of pH value, contact time, coexisting ion, temperature, and initial concentration of Pb(II). The Pb(II) sorption onto HFO-TW was pH- dependent, and the higher pH value was more helpful for Pb(II) adsorption onto HFO-TW in the pH range of 2.5-7. Lead sorption speed was quick and could reach equilibrium within 100 min, and the kinetics curve could be fitted well by both pseudo-first and pseudo-second models. The related coefficient was 98.8%. HFO-TW exhibited highly selective lead retention and the adsorption capacity of Pb(II) onto HFO-TW was declined by only 12.1 mg · g(-1) and 8.1 mg · g(-1) in the presence of competing Ca(II), Mg(II) at 50 times of the target ion. In addition, Pb(II) sorption onto HFO-TW could be described satisfactorily by Langmuir model, and the maximal sorption capacity calculated by Langmuir equation was 89.43 mg · g(-1), which was much higher than the unmodified tea waste and other bio-sorbents. All the results validated that HFO-TW was a promising sorbent for removal of lead from waters.

  19. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  20. Mössbauer and infrared spectroscopy as a diagnostic tool for the characterization of ferric tannates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, Juan A.; Navarro, César

    2009-07-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy are use for the characterization and qualitative analysis of hydrolysable and condensed tannates. The two classes of tannates may be differentiated from the characteristic IR pattern. Mössbauer proof that a mixture of mono- and bis-type ferric tannate complexes, and an iron(II)-tannin complex are obtained from the interaction of hydrolysable tannins (tannic acid and chestnut tannin) and condensed tannins (mimosa and quebracho) with a ferric nitrate solution. At pH 7, a partially hydrolyzed ferric tannate complex was also obtained.

  1. Current Progress of Capacitive Deionization for Removal of Pollutant Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Mahendra S.; Balomajumder, Chandrajit

    2016-08-01

    A mini review of a recently developing water purification technology capacitive deionization (CDI) applied for removal of pollutant ions is provided. The current progress of CDI for removal of different pollutant ions such as arsenic, fluoride, boron, phosphate, lithium, copper, cadmium, ferric, and nitrate ions is presented. This paper aims at motivating new research opportunities in capacitive deionization technology for removal of pollutant ions from polluted water.

  2. Bacterial Sialidase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Data shows that elevated sialidase in bacterial vaginosis patients correlates to premature births in women. Bacterial sialidase also plays a significant role in the unusual colonization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis patients. Crystals of Salmonella sialidase have been reproduced and are used for studying the inhibitor-enzyme complexes. These inhibitors may also be used to inhibit a trans-sialidase of Trypanosome cruzi, a very similar enzyme to bacterial sialidase, therefore preventing T. cruzi infection, the causitive agent of Chagas' disease. The Center for Macromolecular Crystallography suggests that inhibitors of bacterial sialidases can be used as prophylactic drugs to prevent bacterial infections in these critical cases.

  3. Ferric carboxymaltose: a review of its use in iron-deficiency anaemia.

    PubMed

    Lyseng-Williamson, Katherine A; Keating, Gillian M

    2009-01-01

    Ferric carboxymaltose (Ferinject(R)), a novel iron complex that consists of a ferric hydroxide core stabilized by a carbohydrate shell, allows for controlled delivery of iron to target tissues. Administered intravenously, it is effective in the treatment of iron-deficiency anaemia, delivering a replenishment dose of up to 1000 mg of iron during a minimum administration time of ferric carboxymaltose rapidly improves haemoglobin levels and replenishes depleted iron stores in various populations of patients with iron-deficiency anaemia, including those with inflammatory bowel disease, heavy uterine bleeding, postpartum iron-deficiency anaemia or chronic kidney disease. It was well tolerated in clinical trials. Ferric carboxymaltose is, therefore, an effective option in the treatment of iron-deficiency anaemia in patients for whom oral iron preparations are ineffective or cannot be administered. Ferric carboxymaltose is a macromolecular ferric hydroxide carbohydrate complex, which allows for controlled delivery of iron within the cells of the reticuloendothelial system and subsequent delivery to the iron-binding proteins ferritin and transferrin, with minimal risk of release of large amounts of ionic iron in the serum. Intravenous administration of ferric carboxymaltose results in transient elevations in serum iron, serum ferritin and transferrin saturation, and, ultimately, in the correction of haemoglobin levels and replenishment of depleted iron stores. The total iron concentration in the serum increased rapidly in a dose-dependent manner after intravenous administration of ferric carboxymaltose. Ferric carboxymaltose is rapidly cleared from the circulation and is distributed primarily to the bone marrow ( approximately 80%) and also to the liver and spleen. Repeated weekly administration of ferric carboxymaltose does not result in accumulation of transferrin iron in

  4. Distribution of ferric iron in larval lampreys, Petromyzon marinus L.

    PubMed

    Hall, S J; Youson, J H

    1988-01-01

    The distribution and abundance of ferric iron in larval lampreys (Petromyzon marinus L.) were investigated using light microscopy and the Prussian blue stain. Animals from various watersheds contained different concentrations of iron, although the sites of deposition were the same for all animals. A major portion of iron is within adipose tissue, while the liver, and cartilage contain predominantly low to trace amounts of iron, respectively. Iron is associated with fibrous connective tissue in several places in the body, and this association may have particular significance in the inner ear. Iron is also located in cells of the meninges. The presence of iron in the epithelial cells of the posterior intestine may reflect elimination of the metal through the extrusion of iron-loaded cells into the intestinal lumen. Iron within mucous cells of the epidermis, suggest elimination of iron during mucous secretion. Iron-loaded cells of bipolar shape are also present in the epidermis, but are particularly prominent around the branchiopore. Low concentrations of iron are observed within in melanin-containing macrophages (melano-macrophages) in regions of iron absorption, erythrophagocytosis, and haemopoiesis. High levels of iron in the epithelia and lumina of pronephric tubules are concomitant with degeneration of this organ. These data are evidence of the wide spread distribution of iron in lamprey tissues and additional evidence for the potential value of lampreys for the study of iron metabolism in vertebrates.

  5. Toxicity of ferric chloride sludge to aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Sotero-Santos, Rosana B; Rocha, Odete; Povinelli, Jurandyr

    2007-06-01

    Iron-rich sludge from a drinking water treatment plant (DWTP) was investigated regarding its toxicity to aquatic organisms and physical and chemical composition. In addition, the water quality of the receiving stream near the DWTP was evaluated. Experiments were carried out in August 1998, February 1999 and May 1999. Acute toxicity tests were carried out on a cladoceran (Daphnia similis), a midge (Chironomus xanthus) and a fish (Hyphessobrycon eques). Chronic tests were conducted only on D. similis. Acute sludge toxicity was not detected using any of the aquatic organisms, but chronic effects were observed upon the fecundity of D. similis. Although there were relatively few sample dates, the results suggested that the DWTP sludge had a negative effect on the receiving body as here was increased suspended matter, turbidity, conductivity, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and hardness in the water downstream of the DWTP effluent discharge. The ferric chloride sludge also exhibited high heavy metal concentrations revealing a further potential for pollution and harmful chronic effects on the aquatic biota when the sludge is disposed of without previous treatment.

  6. Exfoliation of Hexagonal Boron Nitride via Ferric Chloride Intercalation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-cheh; Hurst, Janet; Santiago, Diana; Rogers, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF) was used as an activation agent to successfully intercalate ferric chloride (FeCl3) into hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). This reaction caused the hBN mass to increase by approx.100 percent, the lattice parameter c to decrease from 6.6585 to between 6.6565 and 6.6569 ?, the x-ray diffraction (XRD) (002) peak to widen from 0.01deg to 0.05deg of the full width half maximum value, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum's broad band (1277/cm peak) to change shape, and new FTIR bands to emerge at 3700 to 2700 and 1600/cm. This indicates hBN's structural and chemical properties are significantly changed. The intercalated product was hygroscopic and interacted with moisture in the air to cause further structural and chemical changes (from XRD and FTIR). During a 24-h hold at room temperature in air with 100 percent relative humidity, the mass increased another 141 percent. The intercalated product, hydrated or not, can be heated to 750 C in air to cause exfoliation. Exfoliation becomes significant after two intercalation-air heating cycles, when 20-nm nanosheets are commonly found. Structural and chemical changes indicated by XRD and FTIR data were nearly reversed after the product was placed in hydrochloric acid (HCl), resulting in purified, exfoliated, thin hBN products.

  7. Ferric chloride based downstream process for microalgae based biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yeong Hwan; Sung, Mina; Kim, Bohwa; Oh, You-Kwan; Kim, Dong Yeon; Han, Jong-In

    2015-04-01

    In this study, ferric chloride (FeCl3) was used to integrate downstream processes (harvesting, lipid extraction, and esterification). At concentration of 200 mg/L and at pH 3, FeCl3 exhibited an expected degree of coagulation and an increase in cell density of ten times (170 mg/10 mL). An iron-mediated oxidation reaction, Fenton-like reaction, was used to extract lipid from the harvested biomass, and efficiency of 80% was obtained with 0.5% H2O2 at 90 °C. The iron compound was also employed in the esterification step, and converted free fatty acids to fatty acid methyl esters under acidic conditions; thus, the fatal problem of saponification during esterification with alkaline catalysts was avoided, and esterification efficiency over 90% was obtained. This study clearly showed that FeCl3 in the harvesting process is beneficial in all downstream steps and have a potential to greatly reduce the production cost of microalgae-originated biodiesel.

  8. Dietary bioavailability of Cu adsorbed to colloidal hydrous ferric oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, Daniel J.; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The dietary bioavailability of copper (Cu) adsorbed to synthetic colloidal hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was evaluated from the assimilation of 65Cu by two benthic grazers, a gastropod and a larval mayfly. HFO was synthesized, labeled with 65Cu to achieve a Cu/Fe ratio comparable to that determined in naturally formed HFO, and then aged. The labeled colloids were mixed with a food source (the diatom Nitzschia palea) to yield dietary 65Cu concentrations ranging from 211 to 2204 nmol/g (dry weight). Animals were pulse fed the contaminated diet and assimilation of 65Cu from HFO was determined following 1–3 days of depuration. Mass transfer of 65Cu from HFO to the diatom was less than 1%, indicating that HFO was the source of 65Cu to the grazers. Estimates of assimilation efficiency indicated that the majority of Cu ingested as HFO was assimilated (values >70%), implying that colloidal HFO potentially represents a source of dietary Cu to benthic grazers, especially where there is active formation and infiltration of these particles into benthic substrates.

  9. Iron fortification of flour with a complex ferric orthophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Hallberg, L.; Rossander-Hulthen, L.; Gramatkovski, E.

    1989-07-01

    The unexpectedly low bioavailability in humans of elemental iron powder prompted us to search for other Fe compounds suitable for Fe fortification of flour that fulfill the two requirements of insolubility in water (due to high water content of flour) and good bioavailability in humans. Systematic studies of compatibility, solubility, and bioavailability led to this study of a microcrystalline complex ferric orthophosphate (CFOP), Fe/sub 3/H/sub 8/(NH/sub 4/)-(PO/sub 4/)6.6H/sub 2/O, a well-defined compound. This compound was labeled with /sup 59/Fe, and the native Fe in meals was labeled with /sup 55/FeCl3. The ratio of absorbed /sup 59/Fe to absorbed /sup 55/Fe is a direct measure of the fraction of CFOP that joins the nonheme Fe pool and that is made potentially available for absorption. The relative bioavailability of CFOP varied from 30% to 60% when labeled wheat rolls were served with different meals. The CFOP meets practical requirements of an Fe fortificant for flour well, with regard to both compatibility and bioavailability in humans.

  10. Total X-ray scattering, EXAFS, and Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses of amorphous ferric arsenate and amorphous ferric phosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikutta, Christian; Schröder, Christian; Marc Michel, F.

    2014-09-01

    Amorphous ferric arsenate (AFA, FeAsO4·xH2O) is an important As precipitate in a range of oxic As-rich environments, especially acidic sulfide-bearing mine wastes. Its structure has been proposed to consist of small polymers of single corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra (rFe-Fe ∼3.6 Å) to which arsenate is attached as a monodentate binuclear 2C complex ('chain model'). Here, we analyzed the structure of AFA and analogously prepared amorphous ferric phosphates (AFP, FePO4·xH2O) by a combination of high-energy total X-ray scattering, Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of total X-ray scattering data revealed that the coherently scattering domain size of AFA and AFP is about 8 Å. The PDFs of AFA lacked Fe-Fe pair correlations at r ∼3.6 Å indicative of single corner-sharing FeO6 octahedra, which strongly supports a local scorodite (FeAsO4·2H2O) structure. Likewise, the PDFs and Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure data of AFP were consistent with a local strengite (FePO4·2H2O) structure of isolated FeO6 octahedra being corner-linked to PO4 tetrahedra (rFe-P = 3.25(1) Å). Mössbauer spectroscopy analyses of AFA and AFP indicated a strong superparamagnetism. While AFA only showed a weak onset of magnetic hyperfine splitting at 5 K, magnetic ordering of AFP was completely absent at this temperature. Mössbauer spectroscopy may thus offer a convenient way to identify and quantify AFA and AFP in mineral mixtures containing poorly crystalline Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides. In summary, our results imply a close structural relationship between AFA and AFP and suggest that these amorphous materials serve as templates for the formation of scorodite and strengite (phosphosiderite) in strongly acidic low-temperature environments.

  11. Utilization of iron-catecholamine complexes involving ferric reductase activity in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Coulanges, V; Andre, P; Ziegler, O; Buchheit, L; Vidon, D J

    1997-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a ubiquitous potentially pathogenic organism requiring iron for growth and virulence. Although it does not produce siderophores, L. monocytogenes is able to obtain iron by using either exogenous siderophores produced by various microorganisms or natural catechol compounds widespread in the environment. In the presence of tropolone, an iron-chelating agent, growth of L. monocytogenes is completely inhibited. However, the growth inhibition can be relieved by the addition of dopamine or norepinephrine under their different isomeric forms, while the catecholamine derivatives 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylglycol and normetanephrine did not relieve the inhibitory effect of tropolone. Preincubation of L. monocytogenes with chlorpromazine and yohimbine did not antagonize the growth-promoting effect of catecholamines in iron-complexed medium. In addition, norepinephrine stimulated the growth-promoting effect induced by human transferrin in iron-limited medium. Furthermore, dopamine and norepinephrine allowed 55Fe uptake by iron-deprived bacterial cells. The uptake of iron was energy dependent, as indicated by inhibition of 55Fe uptake at 0 degrees C as well as by preincubating the bacteria with KCN. Inhibition of 55Fe uptake by L. monocytogenes was also observed in the presence of Pt(II). Moreover, when assessed by a whole-cell ferric reductase assay, reductase activity of L. monocytogenes was inhibited by Pt(II). These data demonstrate that dopamine and norepinephrine can function as siderophore-like compounds in L. monocytogenes owing to their ortho-diphenol function and that catecholamine-mediated iron acquisition does not involve specific catecholamine receptors but acts through a cell-bound ferrireductase activity. PMID:9199450

  12. The Campylobacter jejuni Ferric Uptake Regulator Promotes Acid Survival and Cross-Protection against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Askoura, Momen; Sarvan, Sabina; Couture, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. The mechanisms by which C. jejuni survives stomach acidity remain undefined. In the present study, we demonstrated that the C. jejuni ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays an important role in C. jejuni acid survival and acid-induced cross-protection against oxidative stress. A C. jejuni Δfur mutant was more sensitive to acid than the wild-type strain. Profiling of the acid stimulon of the C. jejuni Δfur mutant allowed us to uncover Fur-regulated genes under acidic conditions. In particular, Fur was found to upregulate genes involved in flagellar and cell envelope biogenesis upon acid stress, and mutants with deletions of these genes were found to be defective in surviving acid stress. Interestingly, prior acid exposure of C. jejuni cross-protected against oxidative stress in a catalase (KatA)- and Fur-dependent manner. Western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed increased expression of KatA upon acid stress. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) demonstrated that the binding affinity between Fur and the katA promoter is reduced in vitro under conditions of low pH, rationalizing the higher levels of expression of katA under acidic conditions. Strikingly, the Δfur mutant exhibited reduced virulence in both human epithelial cells and the Galleria mellonella infection model. Altogether, this is the first study showing that, in addition to its role in iron metabolism, Fur is an important regulator of C. jejuni acid responses and this function cross-protects against oxidative stress. Moreover, our results clearly demonstrate Fur's important role in C. jejuni pathogenesis. PMID:26883589

  13. Granulation and ferric oxides loading enable biochar derived from cotton stalk to remove phosphate from water.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jing; Li, Nan; Li, Lei; An, Jing-Kun; Zhao, Lin; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2015-02-01

    Granulation of biochar powder followed by immobilization of ferric oxides on the macroporous granular biochar (Bg-FO-1) substantially enhanced phosphate removal from water. BET analysis confirmed that both granulation and ferric oxides loading can increase the surface areas and pore volumes effectively. Bg-FO-1 was proven to be a favorable adsorbent for phosphate. The phosphate adsorption capacity was substantially increased from 0 mg/g of raw biochar powder to 0.963 mg/g (Bg-FO-1). When the ferric oxides loading was prior to granulation, the adsorption capacity was decreased by 59-0.399 mg/g, possibly due to the decrease of micropore and mesopore area as well as the overlaying of binders to the activated sites produced by ferric oxides.

  14. Method of treating inflammatory diseases using a radiolabeled ferric hydroxide calloid

    DOEpatents

    Atcher, Robert W.; Hines, John J.

    1992-01-01

    A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

  15. Ferric gluconate reduces epoetin requirements in hemodialysis patients with elevated ferritin.

    PubMed

    Kapoian, Toros; O'Mara, Neeta B; Singh, Ajay K; Moran, John; Rizkala, Adel R; Geronemus, Robert; Kopelman, Robert C; Dahl, Naomi V; Coyne, Daniel W

    2008-02-01

    The Dialysis Patients Response to IV Iron with Elevated Ferritin (DRIVE) study demonstrated the efficacy of intravenous ferric gluconate to improve hemoglobin levels in anemic hemodialysis patients who were receiving adequate epoetin doses and who had ferritin levels between 500 and 1200 ng/ml and transferrin saturation (TSAT) < or = 25%. The DRIVE-II study reported here was a 6-wk observational extension designed to investigate how ferric gluconate impacted epoetin dosage after DRIVE. During DRIVE-II, treating nephrologists and anemia managers adjusted doses of epoetin and intravenous iron as clinically indicated. By the end of observation, patients in the ferric gluconate group required significantly less epoetin than their DRIVE dose (mean change of -7527 +/- 18,021 IU/wk, P = 0.003), whereas the epoetin dose essentially did not change for patients in the control group (mean change of 649 +/- 19,987 IU/wk, P = 0.809). Mean hemoglobin, TSAT, and serum ferritin levels remained higher in the ferric gluconate group than in the control group (P = 0.062, P < 0.001, and P = 0.014, respectively). Over the entire 12-wk study period (DRIVE plus DRIVE-II), the control group experienced significantly more serious adverse events than the ferric gluconate group (incidence rate ratio = 1.73, P = 0.041). In conclusion, ferric gluconate maintains hemoglobin and allows lower epoetin doses in anemic hemodialysis patients with low TSAT and ferritin levels up to 1200 ng/ml.

  16. Dissolution behaviour of ferric pyrophosphate and its mixtures with soluble pyrophosphates: Potential strategy for increasing iron bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Blanco, Elena; Smoukov, Stoyan K; Velev, Orlin D; Velikov, Krassimir P

    2016-10-01

    Ferric pyrophosphate (FePP) is a widely used iron source in food fortification and in nutritional supplements, due to its white colour, that is very uncommon for insoluble Fe salts. Although its dissolution is an important determinant of Fe adsorption in human body, the solubility characteristics of FePP are complex and not well understood. This report is a study on the solubility of FePP as a function of pH and excess of pyrophosphate ions. FePP powder is sparingly soluble in the pH range of 3-6 but slightly soluble at pH<2 and pH>8. In the presence of pyrophosphate ions the solubility of FePP strongly increases at pH 5-8.5 due to formation a soluble complex between Fe(III) and pyrophosphate ions, which leads to an 8-10-fold increase in the total ionic iron concentration. This finding is beneficial for enhancing iron bioavailability, which important for the design of fortified food, beverages, and nutraceutical products.

  17. Comparing polyaluminum chloride and ferric chloride for antimony removal.

    PubMed

    Kang, Meea; Kamei, Tasuku; Magara, Yasumoto

    2003-10-01

    Antimony has been one of the contaminants required to be regulated, however, only limited information has been collected to date regarding antimony removal by polyaluminium chloride (PACl) and ferric chloride (FC). Accordingly, the possible use of coagulation by PACl or FC for antimony removal was investigated. Jar tests were used to determine the effects of solution pH, coagulant dosage, and pre-chlorination on the removal of various antimony species. Although high-efficiency antimony removal by aluminum coagulation has been expected because antimony is similar to arsenic in that both antimony and arsenic are a kind of metalloid in group V of the periodic chart, this study indicated: (1) removal density (arsenic or antimony removed per mg coagulant) for antimony by PACl was about one forty-fifth as low as observed for As(V); (2) although the removal of both Sb(III) and Sb(V) by coagulation with FC was much higher than that of PACl, a high coagulant dose of 10.5mg of FeL(-1) at optimal pH of 5.0 was still not sufficient to meet the standard antimony level of 2 microg as SbL(-1) for drinking water when around 6 microg as SbL(-1) were initially present. Consequently, investigation of a more appropriate treatment process is necessary to develop economical Sb reduction; (3) although previous studies concluded that As(V) is more effectively removed than As(III), this study showed that the removal of Sb(III) by coagulation with FC was much more pronounced than that of Sb(V); (4) oxidation of Sb(III) with chlorine decreased the ability of FC to remove antimony. Accordingly, natural water containing Sb(III) under anoxic condition should be coagulated without pre-oxidation.

  18. [Study of infrared spectra of polyaluminum ferric chloride].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-hua; Zhou, Li-yun; Tang, Min

    2002-02-01

    Mid-IR spectra of polyaluminum ferric chloride (PAFC) with different Al/Fe molar ratio were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Some vibration bands were assigned. In the range of Al/Fe molar ratio < 3:7 and > 6:4, the delta bending vibration frequencies at 850-880 cm-1 of [formula: see text] and 930-970 cm-1 of [formula: see text] in PAFC vs Al/Fe molar ratio are linearly relalional. It shows that Fe(III) and Al(III) were taken place each other in [formula: see text] and [formula: see text], and these were the evidences for the presence of [formula: see text]. When Al/Fe molar ratio was close, [formula: see text] and [formula: see text] Al bulk bending vibration bands at 680 cm-1 and 625 cm-1 respectively became an overlapped and broad band at 640 cm-1. Correspondingly, the [formula: see text] and [formula: see text] delta bending vibration bands were weak markedly or even disappear. And these were the evidences for the presence of co-aggragation of Fe(III) and Al(III) hydroxyl polymers (Aluminous ferrihydrite). Intensity and frequency change of H-OH delta vibrations bands at 1,610-1,630 cm-1 vs Al/Fe molar ratio show: the amounts of coordinating water in Al-Fe hydroxyl co-aggragation compounds of PAFC are the highest and no longer change, as well as, the force of banding of coordinating water with center atoms is increasing when Al/Fe molar ratio > 6:4. These suggested that there are species structural Al-Fe hydroxyl co-aggragatin compounds and this is one of the causes that stability of PAFC solution can be keeped for a long time.

  19. Synthesis and phase transformations involving scorodite, ferric arsenate and arsenical ferrihydrite: Implications for arsenic mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paktunc, Dogan; Dutrizac, John; Gertsman, Valery

    2008-06-01

    Scorodite, ferric arsenate and arsenical ferrihydrite are important arsenic carriers occurring in a wide range of environments and are also common precipitates used by metallurgical industries to control arsenic in effluents. Solubility and stability of these compounds are controversial because of the complexities in their identification and characterization in heterogeneous media. To provide insights into the formation of scorodite, ferric arsenate and ferrihydrite, series of synthesis experiments were carried out at 70 °C and pH 1, 2, 3 and 4.5 from 0.2 M Fe(SO 4) 1.5 solutions also containing 0.02-0.2 M Na 2HAsO 4. The precipitates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption fine structure techniques. Ferric arsenate, characterized by two broad diffuse peaks on the XRD pattern and having the structural formula of FeAsO 4·4-7H 2O, is a precursor to scorodite formation. As defined by As XAFS and Fe XAFS, the local structure of ferric arsenate is profoundly different than that of scorodite. It is postulated that the ferric arsenate structure is made of single chains of corner-sharing Fe(O,OH) 6 octahedra with bridging arsenate tetrahedra alternating along the chains. Scorodite was precipitated from solutions with Fe/As molar ratios of 1 over the pH range of 1-4.5. The pH strongly controls the kinetics of scorodite formation and its transformation from ferric arsenate. The scorodite crystallite size increased from 7 to 33 nm by ripening and aggregation. Precipitates, resulting from continuous synthesis at pH 4.5 from solutions having Fe/As molar ratios ranging from 1 to 4 and resembling the compounds referred to as ferric arsenate, arsenical ferrihydrite and As-rich hydrous ferric oxide in the literature, represent variable mixtures of ferric arsenate and ferrihydrite. When the Fe/As ratio increases, the proportion of ferrihydrite increases at the expense of ferric arsenate. Arsenate adsorption appears to retard

  20. Structure and regulon of Campylobacter jejuni ferric uptake regulator Fur define apo-Fur regulation.

    PubMed

    Butcher, James; Sarvan, Sabina; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Couture, Jean-François; Stintzi, Alain

    2012-06-19

    The full regulatory potential of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family of proteins remains undefined despite over 20 years of study. We report herein an integrated approach that combines both genome-wide technologies and structural studies to define the role of Fur in Campylobacter jejuni (Cj). CjFur ChIP-chip assays identified 95 genomic loci bound by CjFur associated with functions as diverse as iron acquisition, flagellar biogenesis, and non-iron ion transport. Comparative analysis with transcriptomic data revealed that CjFur regulation extends beyond solely repression and also includes both gene activation and iron-independent regulation. Computational analysis revealed the presence of an elongated holo-Fur repression motif along with a divergent holo-Fur activation motif. This diversity of CjFur DNA-binding elements is supported by the crystal structure of CjFur, which revealed a unique conformation of its DNA-binding domain and the absence of metal in the regulatory site. Strikingly, our results indicate that the apo-CjFur structure retains the canonical V-shaped dimer reminiscent of previously characterized holo-Fur proteins enabling DNA interaction. This conformation stems from a structurally unique hinge domain that is poised to further contribute to CjFur's regulatory functions by modulating the orientation of the DNA-binding domain upon binding of iron. The unique features of the CjFur crystal structure rationalize the binding sequence diversity that was uncovered during ChIP-chip analysis and defines apo-Fur regulation.

  1. Structural studies of ion permeation and Ca2+ blockage of a bacterial channel mimicking the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel pore

    PubMed Central

    Derebe, Mehabaw G.; Zeng, Weizhong; Li, Yang; Alam, Amer; Jiang, Youxing

    2011-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels play an essential role in the visual and olfactory sensory systems and are ubiquitous in eukaryotes. Details of their underlying ion selectivity properties are still not fully understood and are a matter of debate in the absence of high-resolution structures. To reveal the structural mechanism of ion selectivity in CNG channels, particularly their Ca2+ blockage property, we engineered a set of mimics of CNG channel pores for both structural and functional analysis. The mimics faithfully represent the CNG channels they are modeled after, permeate Na+ and K+ equally well, and exhibit the same Ca2+ blockage and permeation properties. Their high-resolution structures reveal a hitherto unseen selectivity filter architecture comprising three contiguous ion binding sites in which Na+ and K+ bind with different ion-ligand geometries. Our structural analysis reveals that the conserved acidic residue in the filter is essential for Ca2+ binding but not through direct ion chelation as in the currently accepted view. Furthermore, structural insight from our CNG mimics allows us to pinpoint equivalent interactions in CNG channels through structure-based mutagenesis that have previously not been predicted using NaK or K+ channel models. PMID:21187429

  2. Cost-Minimization Analysis Favours Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose over Ferric Sucrose for the Ambulatory Treatment of Severe Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Calvet, Xavier; Ruíz, Miquel Àngel; Dosal, Angelina; Moreno, Laura; López, Maria; Figuerola, Ariadna; Suarez, David; Miquel, Mireia; Villoria, Albert; Gené, Emili

    2012-01-01

    Objective Intravenous iron is widely used to treat iron deficiency in day-care units. Ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) allows administration of larger iron doses than iron sucrose (IS) in each infusion (1000 mg vs. 200 mg). As FCM reduces the number of infusions required but is more expensive, we performed a cost-minimization analysis to compare the cost impact of the two drugs. Materials and Methods The number of infusions and the iron dose of 111 consecutive patients who received intravenous iron at a gastrointestinal diseases day-care unit from 8/2007 to 7/2008 were retrospectively obtained. Costs of intravenous iron drugs were obtained from the Spanish regulatory agencies. The accounting department of the Hospital determined hospital direct and indirect costs for outpatient iron infusion. Non-hospital direct costs were calculated on the basis of patient interviews. In the pharmacoeconomic model, base case mean costs per patient were calculated for administering 1000 mg of iron per infusion using FCM or 200 mg using IS. Sensitivity analysis and Monte Carlo simulation were performed. Results Under baseline assumptions, the estimated cost of iron infusion per patient and year was €304 for IS and €274 for FCM, a difference of €30 in favour of FCM. Adding non-hospital direct costs to the model increased the difference to €67 (€354 for IS vs. €287 for FCM). A Monte Carlo simulation taking into account non-hospital direct costs favoured the use of FCM in 97% of simulations. Conclusion In this pharmacoeconomic analysis, FCM infusion reduced the costs of iron infusion at a gastrointestinal day-care unit. PMID:23029129

  3. Effect of natural dissolved organic carbon on phosphate removal by ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate treatment of wetland waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qualls, Robert G.; Sherwood, Lindsay J.; Richardson, Curtis J.

    2009-09-01

    The use of wetlands for the removal of excess N and P has become widespread. Some sensitive P-limited ecosystems, however, may require additional reductions in the concentration of P entering the system. It has been proposed that the treatment of wetlands through addition of ferric chloride or aluminum sulfate can augment the natural P removal mechanisms. However, high concentrations of natural dissolved organic matter may interfere with the removal of P by metal addition. We evaluated the doses of ferric chloride and aluminum sulfate necessary to reduce total P concentrations below 0.32 μM (10 μg/L) in water from the Northern Everglades, and we determined the effect of various concentrations (21, 38, and 60 mg/L) of natural dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the removal of PO4 and total P. High concentrations of natural DOC inhibited both the short-term removal of PO4 and the longer-term removal of total P from the water column. Similar results were observed using 15 μM citric acid in an experiment to determine whether citric acid could effectively mimic the inhibition of phosphorus removal associated with natural DOC. Stoichiometry of these experiments indicates that the mechanism of natural DOC interference was not complexation of the metal ions by the DOC; we hypothesize that it could be adsorption to the terminal hydroxyl groups on a polynuclear Fe or Al colloid, effectively blocking the adsorption sites from a phosphate molecule. Also, the ability of citric acid to mimic the inhibitory effects also suggests that the results of the study are broadly applicable to wetland and other waters with high natural organic acid concentrations.

  4. Electronic Properties of Ferric Chloride Intercalated Graphite Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Robert E., Jr.

    This dissertation reports electronic transport measurements on ferric chloride (FeCl_3) graphite intercalation compounds (GIC's). The c-axis conductivity is measured as a function of temperature from 1K to 293K in various stages of FeCl _3 acceptor GIC's and there are marked changes in the behavior of the conductivity as a function of stage. An attempt is made to explain these results on the basis of current theories of c-axis conduction in GIC's, notably the various hopping mechanisms assisted by phonons and impurities in parallel with band conduction. The in-plane resistivity of various stages of FeCl_3 GIC's at temperatures from 1K to 293K is measured and it is found that the absolute conductivity is enhanced from that of highly-oriented pyrolytic graphite and that the temperature behavior is metal-like and stage dependent. The hall effect and magnetoresistance of the samples are measured at low and high applied magnetic fields (up to 20T) and at various fixed point temperatures (1K, 4K, 77K, and 293K). Besides qualitative features obtained from these measurements such as the sign of the predominant carrier and the shape of the fermi surface, the Lorentz -Drude Single Carrier Model is used to obtain the carrier densities and mobilities as a function of stage. Shubnikov-deHaas (SdH) oscillations are observed in the samples at high field and at various temperatures from 1K to about 30K. The data are used to determine the effective carrier masses, relaxation times, and mobilities for some stages. DeHaas-VanAlphen oscillations are also observed in the AC susceptibility in independently measured samples. The frequencies observed are comparable to those observed in the SdH measurements but in the cases of both types of measurements, frequencies which are present in some samples are not found in others. The data is in good agreement with previous preliminary measurements by other investigators. ftn*All degree requirements completed in 1993, but degree will be granted

  5. Quantitative determination of cesium binding to ferric hexacyanoferrate: Prussian blue.

    PubMed

    Faustino, Patrick J; Yang, Yongsheng; Progar, Joseph J; Brownell, Charles R; Sadrieh, Nakissa; May, Joan C; Leutzinger, Eldon; Place, David A; Duffy, Eric P; Houn, Florence; Loewke, Sally A; Mecozzi, Vincent J; Ellison, Christopher D; Khan, Mansoor A; Hussain, Ajaz S; Lyon, Robbe C

    2008-05-12

    Ferric hexacyanoferrate (Fe4III[FeII(CN)6]3), also known as insoluble Prussian blue (PB) is the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) of the drug product, Radiogardase. Radiogardase is the first FDA approved medical countermeasure for the treatment of internal contamination with radioactive cesium (Cs) or thallium in the event of a major radiological incident such as a "dirty bomb". A number of pre-clinical and clinical studies have evaluated the use of PB as an investigational decorporation agent to enhance the excretion of metal cations. There are few sources of published in vitro data that detail the binding capacity of cesium to insoluble PB under various chemical and physical conditions. The study objective was to determine the in vitro binding capacity of PB APIs and drug products by evaluating certain chemical and physical factors such as medium pH, particle size, and storage conditions (temperature). In vitro experimental conditions ranged from pH 1 to 9, to cover the range of pH levels that PB may encounter in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans. Measurements of cesium binding were made between 1 and 24h, to cover gastric and intestinal tract residence time using a validated atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) method. The results indicated that pH, exposure time, storage temperature (affecting moisture content) and particle size play significant roles in the cesium binding to both the PB API and the drug product. The lowest cesium binding was observed at gastric pH of 1 and 2, whereas the highest cesium binding was observed at physiological pH of 7.5. It was observed that dry storage conditions resulted in a loss of moisture from PB, which had a significant negative effect on the PB cesium binding capacity at time intervals consistent with gastric residence. Differences were also observed in the binding capacity of PB with different particle sizes. Significant batch to batch differences were also observed in the binding capacity of some PB API and

  6. Perianth bottom-specific blue color development in Tulip cv. Murasakizuisho requires ferric ions.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Kazuaki; Miki, Naoko; Nakajima, Noriyuki; Momonoi, Kazumi; Kato, Chiharu; Yoshida, Kumi

    2007-02-01

    The entire flower of Tulipa gesneriana cv. Murasakizuisho is purple, except the bottom, which is blue. To elucidate the mechanism of the different color development in the same petal, we prepared protoplasts from the purple and blue epidermal regions and measured the flavonoid composition by HPLC, the vacuolar pH by a proton-selective microelectrode, and element contents by the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) method. Chemical analyses revealed that the anthocyanin and flavonol compositions in both purple and blue colored protoplasts were the same; delphinidin 3-O-rutinoside (1) and major three flavonol glycosides, manghaslin (2), rutin (3) and mauritianin (4). The vacuolar pH values of the purple and blue protoplasts were 5.5 and 5.6, respectively, without any significant difference. However, the Fe(3+) content in the blue protoplast was approximately 9.5 mM, which was 25 times higher than that in the purple protoplasts. We could reproduce the purple solution by mixing 1 with two equimolar concentrations of flavonol with lambda(vismax) = 539 nm, which was identical to that of the purple protoplasts. Furthermore, addition of Fe(3+) to the mixture of 1-4 gave the blue solution with lambda(vismax) = 615 nm identical to that of the blue protoplasts. We have established that Fe(3+) is essential for blue color development in the tulip.

  7. Reflectance spectroscopy of ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites as Mars soil analog materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, J. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Burns, R. G.; Edwards, J. O.; Mancinelli, R. L.; Froschl, H.

    1995-01-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that smectites enhanced in the laboratory with additional ferric species exhibit important similarities to those of the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these chemically treated smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. New samples have been prepared with sulfate as well, because S was found by Viking to be a major component in the surface material on Mars. A suite of ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites, prepared with variable Fe3+ and S concentrations and variable pH conditions, has been analyzed using reflectance spectroscopy in the visible and infrared regions, Mossbauer spectroscopy at room temperature and 4 K, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. These analyses support the formation of ferrihydrite of variable crystallinity in the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonites and a combination of schwertmannite and ferrihydrite in the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites. Small quantities of poorly crystalline or nanophase forms of other ferric materials may also be present in these samples. The chemical formation conditions of the ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites influence the character of the low temperature Mossbauer sextets and the visible reflectance spectra. An absorption minimum is observed at 0.88-0.89 micrometers in spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing samples, and at 0.89-0.92 micrometers in spectra of the ferrihydrate-bearing montmorillonites. Mossbauer spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites indicate variable concentrations of ferrihydrite and schwertmannite in the interlaminar spaces and along grain surfaces. Dehydration under reduced atmospheric pressure conditions induces a greater effect on the adsorbed and interlayer water in ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite than on the water

  8. Reflectance spectroscopy of ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites as Mars soil analog materials.

    PubMed

    Bishop, J L; Pieters, C M; Burns, R G; Edwards, J O; Mancinelli, R L; Fröschl, H

    1995-09-01

    Spectroscopic analyses have shown that smectites enhanced in the laboratory with additional ferric species exhibit important similarities to those of the soils on Mars. Ferrihydrite in these chemically treated smectites has features in the visible to near-infrared region that resemble the energies and band strengths of features in reflectance spectra observed for several bright regions on Mars. New samples have been prepared with sulfate as well, because S was found by Viking to be a major component in the surface material on Mars. A suite of ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites, prepared with variable Fe3+ and S concentrations and variable pH conditions, has been analyzed using reflectance spectroscopy in the visible and infrared regions, Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature and 4 K, differential thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. These analyses support the formation of ferrihydrite of variable crystallinity in the ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonites and a combination of schwertmannite and ferrihydrite in the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites. Small quantities of poorly crystalline or nanophase forms of other ferric materials may also be present in these samples. The chemical formation conditions of the ferrihydrite-bearing and ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites influence the character of the low temperature Mössbauer sextets and the visible reflectance spectra. An absorption minimum is observed at 0.88-0.89 micrometers in spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing samples, and at 0.89-0.92 micrometers in spectra of the ferrihydrate-bearing montmorillonites. Mössbauer spectra of the ferric sulfate-bearing montmorillonites indicate variable concentrations of ferrihydrite and schwertmannite in the interlaminar spaces and along grain surfaces. Dehydration under reduced atmospheric pressure conditions induces a greater effect on the adsorbed and interlayer water in ferrihydrite-bearing montmorillonite than on the

  9. Interaction of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with brain nerve terminals and blood platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Sivko, Roman; Borisov, Arseniy

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles of ferric oxide are the components of Lunar and Martian soil simulants. The observations suggest that exposure to Lunar soli simulant can be deleterious to human physiology and the components of lunar soil may be internalized by lung epithelium and may overcome the blood-brain barrier. The study focused on the effects of nanoparticles of ferric oxide on the functional state of rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and rabbit blood platelets. Using photon correlation spectroscopy, we demonstrated the binding of nanoparticles of ferric oxide with nerve terminals and platelets. Nanoparticles did not depolarize the plasma membrane of nerve terminals and platelets that was shown by fluorimetry with potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G. Using pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, we revealed that the acidification of synaptic vesicles of nerve terminals and secretory granules of platelets did not change in the presence of nanoparticles. The initial velocity of uptake of excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate was not influenced by nanoparticles of ferric oxide, whereas glutamate binding to nerve terminals was altered. Thus, it was suggested that nanoparticles of ferric oxide might disturb glutamate transport in the mammalian CNS.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of γ-ferric oxide nanoparticles and their effect on Solanum lycopersicum.

    PubMed

    Pavani, Tambur; Rao, K Venkateswara; Chakra, Ch Shilpa; Prabhu, Y T

    2016-05-01

    γ-Ferric oxide nanoparticles are synthesized through modern and facile ayurvedic route followed by normal and special purification steps, which are both cost-effective and eco-friendly. These synthesized γ-ferric oxide nanoparticles were applied on Solanum lycopersicum to search the effect on chlorophyll content. This process involves multiple filtration and calcination steps. The synthesized samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM), and particle size analysis (PSA) to identify the purification step's influence on the structural, optical, morphological, magnetic, and particle size properties of ferric oxide nanoparticles (γ-phase). X-ray diffraction has revealed that ferric oxide nanoparticles have rhombohedral structure of α-phase (hematite) in initial purification process later transformed into cubic structure γ-phase (maghemite). UV-vis spectroscopy analysis has clearly shown that by repetitive purification steps, λmax has increased from 230 to 340 nm. TEM result has an intercorrelation with XRD results. γ-Ferric oxide nanoparticles were tested on Solanum lycopersicum (tomato seeds). The changes in the contents of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and total carotene were studied using spectral measurements at two different dosages-0.5 and 2 M. As a result, at 0.5-M concentration, magnetic nanoparticles exhibit fruitful results by increasing the crop yield and being more resistant to chlorosis.

  11. Evaluation of Ferric and Ferrous Iron Therapies in Women with Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Ilhami; Erkurt, Mehmet Ali; Aydogdu, Ismet; Kuku, Irfan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Different ferric and ferrous iron preparations can be used as oral iron supplements. Our aim was to compare the effects of oral ferric and ferrous iron therapies in women with iron deficiency anaemia. Methods. The present study included 104 women diagnosed with iron deficiency anaemia after evaluation. In the evaluations performed to detect the aetiology underlying the iron deficiency anaemia, it was found and treated. After the detection of the iron deficiency anaemia aetiology and treatment of the underlying aetiology, the ferric group consisted of 30 patients treated with oral ferric protein succinylate tablets (2 × 40 mg elemental iron/day), and the second group consisted of 34 patients treated with oral ferrous glycine sulphate tablets (2 × 40 mg elemental iron/day) for three months. In all patients, the following laboratory evaluations were performed before beginning treatment and after treatment. Results. The mean haemoglobin and haematocrit increases were 0.95 g/dL and 2.62% in the ferric group, while they were 2.25 g/dL and 5.91% in the ferrous group, respectively. A significant difference was found between the groups regarding the increase in haemoglobin and haematocrit values (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Data are submitted on the good tolerability, higher efficacy, and lower cost of the ferrous preparation used in our study. PMID:25006339

  12. A spin crossover ferrous complex with ordered magnetic ferric anions.

    PubMed

    Roubeau, Olivier; Evangelisti, Marco; Natividad, Eva

    2012-08-07

    The first tetrahaloferrate spin crossover compound, [Fe(Metz)(6)](FeBr(4))(2) (Metz = 1-methyltetrazole), is reported. The FeBr(4)(-) ions form ferromagnetically coupled 1D stacks and exhibit an antiferromagnetic order at 2.2 K, which coexists with the gradual spin crossover centred at 165 K.

  13. Assimilation of metal ions bound to porphyrins or porphyrin-peptides by vibrio vulnificus, a human pathogen inhabiting estuarine and marine environments.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Shin-ichi; Sasaki, Tomoko; Kaku, Nahoko; Inoue, Takaharu; Uozumi, Natsuki; Maehara, Yoko; Nakao, Hiroshi

    2010-03-01

    Vibrio vulnificus, a ubiquitous microorganism in aquatic environments, causes serious septicemia to the immunocompromised host. In addition to protoheme, this species can utilize Fe-TCPP [ferric tetrakis (4-carboxyphenyl) porphine] as an iron source. In the present study, heme c bound covalently to the protein in cytochrome c, as well as the Fe-TCPP complex formed with a nanopeptide with a high affinity, was found to be useful iron sources for V. vulnificus. This bacterium was also revealed to use Zn-TCPP as a single zinc source. However, other metalloporphyrins such as Mn-TCPP and Pt-TCPP delayed the bacterial growth in the broth containing Fe-TCPP, suggesting interference in the iron assimilation. These results indicate that V. vulnificus may acquire metal ions from both free and peptide-bound metalloporphyrins.

  14. Surface characterization of three marine bacterial strains by Fourier transform IR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry, correlation with adhesion on stainless steel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Pradier, C M; Rubio, C; Poleunis, C; Bertrand, P; Marcus, P; Compère, C

    2005-05-19

    Adhesion of bacterial strains on solid substrates is likely related to the properties of the outer shell of the micro-organisms. Aiming at a better understanding and control of the biofilm formation in seawater, the surface chemical composition of three marine bacterial strains was investigated by combining Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and time-of-flight secondary-ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). The D41 strain surface showed evidence of proteins, as deduced from the NH2 and NCO XPS and ToF-SIMS fingerprints; this strain was found to adhere to stainless steel, glass, or Teflon surfaces in a much higher quantity (2 orders of magnitude) than the two other ones, DA and D01. The latter are either enriched in COOH or sulfates, and this makes them more hydrophilic and less adherent to all substrates. Correlations with physicochemical properties and adhesion seem to demonstrate the role of the external layer composition, in particular the role of proteins more than that of hydrophobicity, on their adhesion abilities.

  15. Bacterial Tracheitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a complication of croup (see Croup ) or endotracheal intubation (insertion of a plastic breathing tube through the ... irregularities that distinguish bacterial tracheitis from croup. Treatment Endotracheal intubation Antibiotics With treatment, most children recover completely. Very ...

  16. Ferritin Protein Nanocage Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tosha, Takehiko; Behera, Rabindra K.; Ng, Ho-Leung; Bhattasali, Onita; Alber, Tom; Theil, Elizabeth C.

    2012-01-01

    Ferritin protein nanocages, self-assembled from four-α-helix bundle subunits, use Fe2+ and oxygen to synthesize encapsulated, ferric oxide minerals. Ferritin minerals are iron concentrates stored for cell growth. Ferritins are also antioxidants, scavenging Fenton chemistry reactants. Channels for iron entry and exit consist of helical hairpin segments surrounding the 3-fold symmetry axes of the ferritin nanocages. We now report structural differences caused by amino acid substitutions in the Fe2+ ion entry and exit channels and at the cytoplasmic pores, from high resolution (1.3–1.8 Å) protein crystal structures of the eukaryotic model ferritin, frog M. Mutations that eliminate conserved ionic or hydrophobic interactions between Arg-72 and Asp-122 and between Leu-110 and Leu-134 increase flexibility in the ion channels, cytoplasmic pores, and/or the N-terminal extensions of the helix bundles. Decreased ion binding in the channels and changes in ordered water are also observed. Protein structural changes coincide with increased Fe2+ exit from dissolved, ferric minerals inside ferritin protein cages; Fe2+ exit from ferritin cages depends on a complex, surface-limited process to reduce and dissolve the ferric mineral. High concentrations of bovine serum albumin or lysozyme (protein crowders) to mimic the cytoplasm restored Fe2+ exit in the variants to wild type. The data suggest that fluctuations in pore structure control gating. The newly identified role of the ferritin subunit N-terminal extensions in gating Fe2+ exit from the cytoplasmic pores strengthens the structural and functional analogies between ferritin ion channels in the water-soluble protein assembly and membrane protein ion channels gated by cytoplasmic N-terminal peptides. PMID:22362775

  17. Sequence diversity and enzyme activity of ferric-chelate reductase LeFRO1 in tomato.

    PubMed

    Kong, Danyu; Chen, Chunlin; Wu, Huilan; Li, Ye; Li, Junming; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2013-11-20

    Ferric-chelate reductase which functions in the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron on root surface is a critical protein for iron homeostasis in strategy I plants. LeFRO1 is a major ferric-chelate reductase involved in iron uptake in tomato. To identify the natural variations of LeFRO1 and to assess their effect on the ferric-chelate reductase activity, we cloned the coding sequences of LeFRO1 from 16 tomato varieties collected from different regions, and detected three types of LeFRO1 (LeFRO1(MM), LeFRO1(Ailsa) and LeFRO1(Monita)) with five amino acid variations at the positions 21, 24, 112, 195 and 582. Enzyme activity assay revealed that the three types of LeFRO1 possessed different ferric-chelate reductase activity (LeFRO1(Ailsa) > LeFRO1(MM) > LeFRO1(Monita)). The 112th amino acid residue Ala of LeFRO1 is critical for maintaining the high activity of ferric-chelate reductase, because modification of this amino acid resulted in a significant reduction of enzyme activity. Further, we showed that the combination of the amino acid residue Ile at the site 24 with Lys at the site 582 played a positive role in the enzyme activity of LeFRO1. In conclusion, the findings are helpful to understand the natural adaptation mechanisms of plants to iron-limiting stress, and may provide new knowledge to select and manipulate LeFRO1 for improving the iron deficiency tolerance in tomato.

  18. Investigations of Ferric Heme Cyanide Photodissociation in Myoglobin and Horseradish Peroxidase

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Weiqiao; Sun, Yuhan; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Champion, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    The photodissociation of cyanide from ferric myoglobin (MbCN) and horseradish peroxidase (HRPCN) has been definitively observed. This has implications for the interpretation of ultrafast IR (Helbing et al. Biophys. J. 2004, 87, 1881–1891) and optical (Gruia et al. Biophys. J. 2008, 94, 2252–2268) studies that had previously suggested the Fe-CN bond was photostable in MbCN. The photolysis of ferric MbCN takes place with a quantum yield of ~75% and the resonance Raman spectrum of the photoproduct observed in steady-state experiments as a function of laser power and sample spinning rate is identical to that of ferric Mb (metMb). The data are quantitatively analyzed using a simple model where cyanide is photodissociated and, although geminate rebinding with a rate kBA ≈ (3.6 ps)−1 is the dominant process, some CN− exits from the distal heme pocket and is replaced by water. Using independently determined values for the CN− association rate, we find that the CN− escape rate from the ferric myoglobin pocket to the solution at 293 K is kout ≈ 1–2 × 107 s−1. This value is very similar to, but slightly larger than, the histidine gated escape rate of CO from Mb (1.1×107 s−1) under the same conditions. The analysis leads to an escape probability kout/(kout+kBA) ~ 10−4, which is unobservable in most time domain kinetic measurements. However, the photolysis is surprisingly easy to detect in Mb using cw resonance Raman measurements. This is due to the anomalously slow CN− bimolecular association rate (170 M−1s−1), which arises from the need for water to exchange at the ferric heme binding site of Mb. In contrast, ferric HRP does not have a heme bound water molecule and its CN− bimolecular association rate is larger by ~103 making the CN− photolysis more difficult to observe. PMID:23472676

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Ferric Pyrophosphate Citrate, a Novel Iron Salt, Administered Intravenously to Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Swinkels, Dorine W.; Ikizler, T. Alp; Gupta, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ferric pyrophosphate citrate (Triferic) is a water‐soluble iron salt that is administered via dialysate to maintain iron balance and hemoglobin in hemodialysis patients. This double‐blind, randomized, placebo‐controlled, single‐, ascending‐dose study was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of intravenous ferric pyrophosphate citrate in 48 healthy iron‐replete subjects (drug, n = 36; placebo, n = 12). Single doses of 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, or 10 mg of ferric pyrophosphate citrate or placebo were administered over 4 hours, and single doses of 15 or 20 mg of ferric pyrophosphate citrate or placebo were administered over 12 hours via intravenous infusion. Serum total iron (sFetot), transferrin‐bound iron (TBI), hepcidin‐25, and biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation were determined using validated assays. Marked diurnal variation in sFetot was observed in placebo‐treated subjects. Concentrations of sFetot and TBI increased rapidly after drug administration, with maximum serum concentrations (Cmax) reached at the end of infusion. Increases in baseline‐corrected Cmax and area under the concentration‐time curve from 0 to the time of the last quantifiable concentration (AUC0‐t) were dose proportional up to 100% transferrin saturation. Iron was rapidly cleared (apparent terminal phase half‐life 1.2‐2 hours). No significant changes from baseline in serum hepcidin‐25 concentration were observed at end of infusion for any dose. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation were unaffected. Intravenous doses of ferric pyrophosphate citrate were well tolerated. These results demonstrate that intravenous ferric pyrophosphate citrate is rapidly bound to transferrin and cleared from the circulation without increasing serum hepcidin levels or biomarkers of oxidative stress or inflammation. PMID:27557937

  20. A Versatile Strategy for Production of Membrane Proteins with Diverse Topologies: Application to Investigation of Bacterial Homologues of Human Divalent Metal Ion and Nucleoside Transporters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cheng; Hao, Zhenyu; Huysmans, Gerard; Lesiuk, Amelia; Bullough, Per; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Phillips, Simon E; Young, James D; Goldman, Adrian; Baldwin, Stephen A; Postis, Vincent L G

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in many biological processes, from acquisition of nutrients to neurotransmission, and are targets for more than 50% of current therapeutic drugs. However, their investigation is hampered by difficulties in their production and purification on a scale suitable for structural studies. In particular, the nature and location of affinity tags introduced for the purification of recombinant membrane proteins can greatly influence their expression levels by affecting their membrane insertion. The extent of such effects typically depends on the transmembrane topologies of the proteins, which for proteins of unknown structure are usually uncertain. For example, attachment of oligohistidine tags to the periplasmic termini of membrane proteins often interferes with folding and drastically impairs expression in Escherichia coli. To circumvent this problem we have employed a novel strategy to enable the rapid production of constructs bearing a range of different affinity tags compatible with either cytoplasmic or periplasmic attachment. Tags include conventional oligohistidine tags compatible with cytoplasmic attachment and, for attachment to proteins with a periplasmic terminus, either tandem Strep-tag II sequences or oligohistidine tags fused to maltose binding protein and a signal sequence. Inclusion of cleavage sites for TEV or HRV-3C protease enables tag removal prior to crystallisation trials or a second step of purification. Together with the use of bioinformatic approaches to identify members of membrane protein families with topologies favourable to cytoplasmic tagging, this has enabled us to express and purify multiple bacterial membrane transporters. To illustrate this strategy, we describe here its use to purify bacterial homologues of human membrane proteins from the Nramp and ZIP families of divalent metal cation transporters and from the concentrative nucleoside transporter family. The proteins are expressed in E. coli in a

  1. DBAR investigation on films of polypyrrole incorporated polyvinylalcohol doped with ferric chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Blaise; Baraker, B. M.; Hammannavar, P. B.; Bhajantri, R. F.; Ranganath, M. R.; Hurkadli, M.; Ravindrachary, V.

    2015-06-01

    Flexible films of pyrrole(Py) sorbed, ferric chloride (FeCl3) doped polyvinylalcohol(PVA) were prepared by solution casting. The films were characterized by XRD, UV-Visible spectrometry, Thermal Analysis (DSC, DTA/TGA), FTIR and electrical measurements. In this paper, the results of Doppler Broadening of Annihilation Radiation (DBAR) spectra in the doping range, from 4 wt% up to 18 wt%, are discussed. The XRD and DSC scans complement the DBAR results. The computed S- parameter and W -parameter reflect changes in the degree of crystallinity and the average crystallite size, respectively, of polypyrrole(PPy) incorporated PVA samples doped with ferric chloride.

  2. Direct inhibition by nitric oxide of the transcriptional ferric uptake regulation protein via nitrosylation of the iron

    PubMed Central

    D'Autréaux, Benoît; Touati, Danièle; Bersch, Beate; Latour, Jean-Marc; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle

    2002-01-01

    Ferric uptake regulation protein (Fur) is a bacterial global regulator that uses iron as a cofactor to bind to specific DNA sequences. The function of Fur is not limited to iron homeostasis. A wide variety of genes involved in various mechanisms such as oxidative and acid stresses are under Fur control. Flavohemoglobin (Hmp) is an NO-detoxifying enzyme induced by NO and nitrosothiol compounds. Fur recently was found to regulate hmp in Salmonella typhimurium, and in Escherichia coli, the iron-chelating agent 2,2′-dipyridyl induces hmp expression. We now establish direct inhibition of E. coli Fur activity by NO. By using chromosomal Fur-regulated lacZ reporter fusion in E. coli, Fur activity is switched off by NO at micromolar concentration. In vitro Fur DNA-binding activity, as measured by protection of restriction site in aerobactin promoter, is directly sensitive to NO. NO reacts with FeII in purified FeFur protein to form a S = 1/2 low-spin FeFur–NO complex with a g = 2.03 EPR signal. Appearance of the same EPR signal in NO-treated cells links nitrosylation of the iron with Fur inhibition. The nitrosylated Fur protein is still a dimer and is stable in anaerobiosis but slowly decays in air. This inhibition probably arises from a conformational switch, leading to an inactive dimeric protein. These data establish a link between control of iron metabolism and the response to NO effects. PMID:12475930

  3. Microbial reduction of ferric iron oxyhydroxides as a way for remediation of grey forest soils heavily polluted with toxic metals by infiltration of acid mine drainage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, Plamen; Groudev, Stoyan; Spasova, Irena; Nicolova, Marina

    2015-04-01

    The abandoned uranium mine Curilo is a permanent source of acid mine drainage (AMD) which steadily contaminated grey forest soils in the area. As a result, the soil pH was highly acidic and the concentration of copper, lead, arsenic, and uranium in the topsoil was higher than the relevant Maximum Admissible Concentration (MAC) for soils. The leaching test revealed that approximately half of each pollutant was presented as a reducible fraction as well as the ferric iron in horizon A was presented mainly as minerals with amorphous structure. So, the approach for remediation of the AMD-affected soils was based on the process of redoxolysis carried out by iron-reducing bacteria. Ferric iron hydroxides reduction and the heavy metals released into soil solutions was studied in the dependence on the source of organic (fresh or silage hay) which was used for growth and activity of soil microflora, initial soil pH (3.65; 4.2; and 5.1), and the ion content of irrigation solutions. The combination of limestone (2.0 g/ kg soil), silage addition (at rate of 45 g dry weight/ kg soil) in the beginning and reiterated at 6 month since the start of soil remediation, and periodical soil irrigation with slightly acidic solutions containing CaCl2 was sufficient the content of lead and arsenic in horizon A to be decreased to concentrations similar to the relevant MAC. The reducible, exchangeable, and carbonate mobile fractions were phases from which the pollutants was leached during the applied soil remediation. It determined the higher reduction of the pollutants bioavailability also as well as the process of ferric iron reduction was combined with neutralization of the soil acidity to pH (H2O) 6.2.

  4. Bacterial rheotaxis.

    PubMed

    Marcos; Fu, Henry C; Powers, Thomas R; Stocker, Roman

    2012-03-27

    The motility of organisms is often directed in response to environmental stimuli. Rheotaxis is the directed movement resulting from fluid velocity gradients, long studied in fish, aquatic invertebrates, and spermatozoa. Using carefully controlled microfluidic flows, we show that rheotaxis also occurs in bacteria. Excellent quantitative agreement between experiments with Bacillus subtilis and a mathematical model reveals that bacterial rheotaxis is a purely physical phenomenon, in contrast to fish rheotaxis but in the same way as sperm rheotaxis. This previously unrecognized bacterial taxis results from a subtle interplay between velocity gradients and the helical shape of flagella, which together generate a torque that alters a bacterium's swimming direction. Because this torque is independent of the presence of a nearby surface, bacterial rheotaxis is not limited to the immediate neighborhood of liquid-solid interfaces, but also takes place in the bulk fluid. We predict that rheotaxis occurs in a wide range of bacterial habitats, from the natural environment to the human body, and can interfere with chemotaxis, suggesting that the fitness benefit conferred by bacterial motility may be sharply reduced in some hydrodynamic conditions.

  5. RATES OF HYDROUS FERRIC OXIDE CRYSTALLIZATION AND THE INFLUENCE ON COPRECIPITATED ARSENATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenate coprecipitated with hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was stabilized against dissolution during transformation of HFO to more crystalline iron (hydr)oxides. The rate of arsenate stabilization approximately coincided with the rate of HFO transformation at pH 6 and 40 ?C. Compa...

  6. Martian weathering/alteration scenarios from spectral studies of ferric and ferrous minerals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James F., III; Adams, John B.; Morris, Richard V.

    1992-01-01

    We review the major aspects of our current knowledge of martian ferric and ferrous mineralogy based on the available ground-based telescopic and spacecraft data. What we know and what we don't know are used to constrain various weathering/alteration models and to identify key future measurements and techniques that can distinguish between these models.

  7. THE QUANTUM YIELD OF OXYGEN PRODUCTION BY CHLOROPLASTS SUSPENDED IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING FERRIC OXALATE

    PubMed Central

    French, C. S.; Rabideau, G. S.

    1945-01-01

    1. The quantum yield of oxygen liberation by spinach and Tradescantia chloroplasts suspended in solutions containing ferric oxalate and potassium ferricyanide varied from 0.013 to 0.080. 2. It was concluded that the nature of this oxygen liberation reaction is not fundamentally different from the formation of oxygen in normal photosynthesis, with respect to its light efficiency. PMID:19873423

  8. ELECTRODE MEASUREMENT OF REDOX POTENTIAL IN ANAEROBIC FERRIC/FERROUS CHLORIDE SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The behaviour of two inert redox electrodes (Pt and wax-impregnated graphite) was investigated in anaerobic ferrous and ferric chloride solutions in order to establish if these electrodes respond to the Fe3+/Fe2+ couple in a Nernstian manner. A new method fo...

  9. TRANSFORMATION AND MOBILIZATION OF ARSENIC ADSORBED ON GRANULAR FERRIC HYDROXIDE UNDER BIO-REDUCTIVE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biotic and abiotic reduction of arsenic (V) and iron (III) influences the partioning of arsenic (As) between the solid and aqueous phases in soils, sediments and wastes. In this study, laboratory experiments on arsenic adsorbed on granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) was performed to ...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1302 - Sodium Ferric Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1302 Section 180.1302 Protection of... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of sodium ferric EDTA in or on all food commodities when applied as...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1302 - Sodium Ferric Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1302 Section 180.1302 Protection of... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of sodium ferric EDTA in or on all food commodities when applied as...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1302 - Sodium Ferric Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1302 Section 180.1302 Protection of... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of sodium ferric EDTA in or on all food commodities when applied as...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1302 - Sodium Ferric Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1302 Section 180.1302 Protection of... Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA); exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of sodium ferric EDTA in or on all food commodities when applied as...

  14. Critical conditions for ferric chloride-induced flocculation of freshwater algae.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Nicholas B; Gloe, Lindsey M; Brady, Patrick V; Hewson, John C; Grillet, Anne M; Hankins, Matthew G; Pohl, Phillip I

    2012-02-01

    The effects of algae concentration, ferric chloride dose, and pH on the flocculation efficiency of the freshwater algae Chlorella zofingiensis can be understood by considering the nature of the electrostatic charges on the algae and precipitate surfaces. Two critical conditions are identified which, when met, result in flocculation efficiencies in excess of 90% for freshwater algae. First, a minimum concentration of ferric chloride is required to overcome the electrostatic stabilization of the algae and promote bridging of algae cells by hydroxide precipitates. At low algae concentrations, the minimum amount of ferric chloride required increases linearly with algae concentration, characteristic of flocculation primarily through electrostatic bridging by hydroxide precipitates. At higher algae concentrations, the minimum required concentration of ferric chloride for flocculation is independent of algae concentration, suggesting a change in the primary flocculation mechanism from bridging to sweep flocculation. Second, the algae must have a negative surface charge. Experiments and surface complexation modeling show that the surface charge of C. zofingiensis is negative above a pH of 4.0 ± 0.3 which agrees well with the minimum pH required for effective flocculation. These critical flocculation criteria can be extended to other freshwater algae to design effective flocculation systems.

  15. Microbial acquisition of iron from ferric iron bearing minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Hersman, L.E.; Sposito, G.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Iron is a universal requirement for all life forms. Although the fourth most abundant element in the geosphere, iron is virtually insoluble at physiological pH in oxidizing environments, existing mainly as very insoluble oxides and hydroxides. Currently it is not understood how iron is solubilized and made available for biological use. This research project addressed this topic by conducting a series of experiments that utilized techniques from both soil microbiology and mineral surface geochemistry. Microbiological analysis consisted of the examination of metabolic and physiological responses to mineral iron supplements. At the same time mineral surfaces were examined for structural changes brought about by microbially mediated dissolution. The results of these experiments demonstrated that (1) bacterial siderophores were able to promote the dissolution of iron oxides, (2) that strict aerobic microorganisms may use anaerobic processes to promote iron oxide dissolution, and (3) that it is possible to image the surface of iron oxides undergoing microbial dissolution.

  16. Magnetic phases in lunar fines - Metallic Fe or ferric oxides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsay, F.-D.; Manatt, S. L.; Chan, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    The ferromagnetic resonance observed for the Apollo 11 and 12 lunar fines is characterized by an asymmetric lineshape with a narrower appearance on the high field side. This asymmetry together with an anisotropy energy which varies from +640 to +500 G over the temperature range of 80 to 298 K indicate that the ferromagnetic resonance arises from metallic Fe having the body-centered cubic structure and not from hematite, magnetite or other Fe(3+) ions in magnetite-like phases. The g-value, the lineshape asymmetry, and the temperature dependence of the linewidth for the Apollo 14 and 15 fines as reported by other workers are found to be essentially similar to those observed for the Apollo 11 and 12 fines.

  17. Thermodynamics and kinetics of aqueous ferric phosphate complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmy, R.B.; Patel, R.C.; Matijevic, E.

    1985-09-25

    The equilibria and kinetics of complexation of iron(III) with phosphoric acid (at pH < 2) were studied at 25 and 50/sup 0/C at ionic strength ..mu.. = 2.5 M by using spectrophotometric and stopped-flow techniques. The results are consistent with the formation of two complexes, FeH/sub 2/PO/sub 4//sup 2 +/ and Fe(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2//sup +/. The second species could only be detected by the analysis of kinetic data. The equilibrium constants, extinction coefficients, rate constants, and activation parameters for the formation of these complexes are given. A mechanism is proposed to account for the observed hydrogen ion dependency of the apparent forward rate constants. 35 references, 8 figures, 6 tables.

  18. Safe administration of iron sucrose in a patient with a previous hypersensitivity reaction to ferric gluconate.

    PubMed

    Sane, Radhika; Baribeault, David; Rosenberg, Carol L

    2007-04-01

    A 67-year-old woman with iron deficiency anemia required parenteral iron therapy and was treated with intravenous ferric gluconate. She tolerated the first dose, but after the second dose, she developed a tingling feeling all over her body, along with swelling in her hands and feet, and a rash with hives over most of her body. It was thought that she had likely experienced a hypersensitivity reaction to ferric gluconate. The decision was made to continue therapy; however, two modifications were made. The patient was given dexamethasone, diphenhydramine, and ibuprofen 1 hour before administering the third dose, and the infusion time was prolonged by 1 hour. Approximately 45 minutes after the infusion was completed, the patient developed hives on her arms and legs. At the patient's next clinic visit, it was decided that continuation of parenteral iron repletion was necessary, and the decision was made to attempt a challenge with iron sucrose. The patient was given dexamethasone 8 mg to be taken the night before and the morning of treatment. She successfully completed the iron repletion therapy with iron sucrose. Three parenteral iron products are available in the United States: iron dextran, sodium ferric gluconate complex, and iron sucrose. Iron dextran, the oldest of these products, carries the highest risk for hypersensitivity reactions. Available data suggest that either iron sucrose or ferric gluconate can be safely administered to patients with known hypersensitivity to iron dextran. Our patient's experience implies that it may be possible to safely administer iron sucrose to a patient with hypersensitivity to ferric gluconate. This finding has clinical implications and warrants confirmation in a larger population.

  19. Visible Wavelength Spectroscopy of Ferric Minerals: A Key Tool for Identification of Ancient Martian Aqueous Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Bell, J. F., III; Morris, Richard V.

    2000-01-01

    The mineralogic signatures of past aqueous alteration of a basaltic Martian crust may include iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, zeolites, carbonates, phyllosilicates, and silica. The identities, relative abundances, and crystallinities of the phases formed in a particular environment depend on physicochemical conditions. At one extreme, hot spring environments may be characterized by smectite-chlorite to talc-kaolinite silicate assemblages, plus crystalline ferric oxides dominated by hematite. However, most environments, including cold springs, pedogenic layers, and ponded surface water, are expected to deposit iron oxides and oxyhydroxides, carbonates, and smectite-dominated phyllosilicates. A substantial fraction of the ferric iron is expected to occur in nanophase form, with the exact mineralogy strongly influenced by Eh-pH conditions. Detection of these phases has been an objective of a large body of terrestrial telescopic, Mars orbital, and landed spectral investigations and in situ compositional measurements. However, clear identifications of many of these phases is lacking. Neither carbonate nor silica has been unequivocally detected by any method. Although phyllosilicates may occur near the limit of detection by remote sensing, in general they appear to occur in only poorly crystalline form. In contrast, compelling evidence for ferric iron minerals has been gathered by recent telescopic investigations, the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP), and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS). These data yield two crucial findings: (1) In the global, high spatial resolution TES data set, highly crystalline ferric iron (as coarse-grained 'gray' hematite) has been recognized but with only very limited spatial occurrence and (2) Low-resolution telescopic reflectance spectroscopy, very limited orbital reflectance spectroscopy, and landed multispectral imaging provide strong indications that at least two broad classes of ferric iron minerals

  20. Binding of heavy metal ions in aggregates of microbial cells, EPS and biogenic iron minerals measured in-situ using metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Likai; Guo, Yuan; Byrne, James M.; Zeitvogel, Fabian; Schmid, Gregor; Ingino, Pablo; Li, Jianli; Neu, Thomas R.; Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Kappler, Andreas; Obst, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Aggregates consisting of bacterial cells, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and Fe(III) minerals formed by Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria are common at bulk or microscale chemical interfaces where Fe cycling occurs. The high sorption capacity and binding capacity of cells, EPS, and minerals controls the mobility and fate of heavy metals. However, it remains unclear to which of these component(s) the metals will bind in complex aggregates. To clarify this question, the present study focuses on 3D mapping of heavy metals sorbed to cells, glycoconjugates that comprise the majority of EPS constituents, and Fe(III) mineral aggregates formed by the phototrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) in combination with metal- and glycoconjugates-specific fluorophores. The present study evaluated the influence of glycoconjugates, microbial cell surfaces, and (biogenic) Fe(III) minerals, and the availability of ferrous and ferric iron on heavy metal sorption. Analyses in this study provide detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution of metal ions in the aggregates at the sub-μm scale, which is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of microbe-mineral-metal interactions. The heavy metals (Au3+, Cd2+, Cr3+, CrO42-, Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pd2+, tributyltin (TBT) and Zn2+) were found mainly sorbed to cell surfaces, present within the glycoconjugates matrix, and bound to the mineral surfaces, but not incorporated into the biogenic Fe(III) minerals. Statistical analysis revealed that all ten heavy metals tested showed relatively similar sorption behavior that was affected by the presence of sorbed ferrous and ferric iron. Results in this study showed that in addition to the mineral surfaces, both bacterial cell surfaces and the glycoconjugates provided most of sorption sites for heavy metals. Simultaneously, ferrous and ferric iron ions competed with the heavy metals for sorption sites on the organic

  1. Oxidation of calprotectin by hypochlorous acid prevents chelation of essential metal ions and allows bacterial growth: Relevance to infections in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Magon, Nicholas J; Turner, Rufus; Gearry, Richard B; Hampton, Mark B; Sly, Peter D; Kettle, Anthony J

    2015-09-01

    Calprotectin provides nutritional immunity by sequestering manganese and zinc ions. It is abundant in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis but fails to prevent their recurrent infections. Calprotectin is a major protein of neutrophils and composed of two monomers, S100A8 and S100A9. We show that the ability of calprotectin to limit growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa is exquisitely sensitive to oxidation by hypochlorous acid. The N-terminal cysteine residue on S100A9 was highly susceptible to oxidation which resulted in cross-linking of the protein monomers. The N-terminal methionine of S100A8 was also readily oxidized by hypochlorous acid, forming both the methionine sulfoxide and the unique product dehydromethionine. Isolated human neutrophils formed these modifications on calprotectin when their myeloperoxidase generated hypochlorous acid. Up to 90% of the N-terminal amine on S100A8 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from young children with cystic fibrosis was oxidized. Oxidized calprotectin was higher in children with cystic fibrosis compared to disease controls, and further elevated in those patients with infections. Our data suggest that oxidative stress associated with inflammation in cystic fibrosis will stop metal sequestration by calprotectin. Consequently, strategies aimed at blocking extracellular myeloperoxidase activity should enable calprotectin to provide nutritional immunity within the airways.

  2. Effects of metal ions on disinfection byproduct formation during chlorination of natural organic matter and surrogates.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Yang, Hong-wei; Liu, Shi-ting; Tang, Shun; Wang, Xiao-mao; Xie, Yuefeng F

    2016-02-01

    The effects of calcium, cupric, ferrous and ferric ions on the formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) were investigated using natural organic matter (NOM), small molecular weight NOM surrogates and natural water samples. The results showed that the effects were greatly dependent on the disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursor structure and molecular weight, and metal ions species. While using NOM as precursors, addition of 4.00 mM calcium ions increased the formation of THMs, dihaloacetic acids (DHAAs) and trihaloacetic acids (THAAs) by 24-47%, 51-61% and 15-25%, respectively. Addition of cupric ions at 0.02 mM increased the formation of THMs and DHAAs by 74-83% and 90-100%, respectively, but decreased the formation of THAAs by 26-27%. Similar effect was not observed when 0.04 mM ferrous or ferric ions were added. The effects of calcium and cupric ions on DBP formation were generally more evident for the NOM surrogates than that for NOM. The primary catalytic effect of calcium ions was due to complexation and less sensitive to molecular structure or weight, while that of cupric ions was attributed to redox reactions and greatly dependent on molecular structure. Both ferric and ferrous iron had substantial effects on the DBP formation of surrogates (citric acid and catechol in particular), which implied that the catalytic effects of ferric and ferrous iron mainly depended on molecular weight. The catalytic effect of cupric ions was also observed on natural water samples, while the effects of calcium, ferrous and ferric ions on natural water samples were not evident.

  3. The Differential Effects of Anesthetics on Bacterial Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Matthew; Koutsogiannaki, Sophia; Schaefers, Matthew; Babazada, Hasan; Liu, Renyu; Yuki, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    Volatile anesthetics have been in clinical use for a long period of time and are considered to be promiscuous by presumably interacting with several ion channels in the central nervous system to produce anesthesia. Because ion channels and their existing evolutionary analogues, ion transporters, are very important in various organisms, it is possible that volatile anesthetics may affect some bacteria. In this study, we hypothesized that volatile anesthetics could affect bacterial behaviors. We evaluated the impact of anesthetics on bacterial growth, motility (swimming and gliding) and biofilm formation of four common bacterial pathogens in vitro. We found that commonly used volatile anesthetics isoflurane and sevoflurane affected bacterial motility and biofilm formation without any effect on growth of the common bacterial pathogens studied here. Using available Escherichia coli gene deletion mutants of ion transporters and in silico molecular docking, we suggested that these altered behaviors might be at least partly via the interaction of volatile anesthetics with ion transporters. PMID:28099463

  4. Mid-infrared and near-infrared spectroscopic study of selected magnesium carbonate minerals containing ferric iron-Implications for the geosequestration of greenhouse gases.

    PubMed

    Frost, Ray L; Reddy, B Jagannadha; Bahfenne, Silmarilly; Graham, Jessica

    2009-04-01

    The proposal to remove greenhouse gases by pumping liquefied CO(2) several kilometres below the ground implies that many carbonate containing minerals will be formed. Among these minerals brugnatellite and coalingite are probable. Two ferric ion bearing minerals brugnatellite and coalingite with a hydrotalcite-like structure have been characterised by a combination of infrared and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. The infrared spectra of the OH stretching region are characterised by OH and water stretching vibrations. Both the first and second fundamental overtones of these bands are observed in the NIR spectra in the 7030-7235 cm(-1) and 10,490-10,570 cm(-1) regions. Intense (CO(3))(2-) symmetric and antisymmetric stretching vibrations support the concept that the carbonate ion is distorted. The position of the water bending vibration indicates the water is strongly hydrogen bonded in the mineral structure. Split NIR bands at around 8675 and 11,100 cm(-1) indicate that some replacement of magnesium ions by ferrous ions in the mineral structure has occurred. Near-infrared spectroscopy is ideal for the assessment of the formation of carbonate minerals.

  5. Functional Analysis of the Ferric Uptake Regulator Gene fur in Xanthomonas vesicatoria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huiqin; Dong, Chunling; Zhao, Tingchang; Han, Jucai; Wang, Tieling; Wen, Xiangzhen; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the function of the fur gene in Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Xv), we generated a fur mutant strain, fur-m, by site-directed mutagenesis. Whereas siderophore production increased in the Xv fur mutant, extracellular polysaccharide production, biofilm formation, swimming ability and quorum sensing signals were all significantly decreased. The fur mutant also had significantly reduced virulence in tomato leaves. The above-mentioned phenotypes significantly recovered when the Xv fur mutation allele was complemented with a wild-type fur gene. Thus, Fur either negatively or positively regulates multiple important physiological functions in Xv.

  6. Using Crystal Structure Groups to Understand Mössbauer parameters of Ferric Sulfates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knutson, J.; Dyar, M. D.; Sklute, E. C.; Lane, M. D.; Bishop, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    A Mössbauer doublet assigned to ferric sulfate (Fe3D2) was identified in Paso Robles, Mars, spectra by Morris et al. (2006), who noted that its parameters are not diagnostic of any specific mineral because a number of different sulfates with varying parageneses might be responsible for this doublet. Work by Lane et al. (2008) used a multi-instrument approach based on Fe3+ sulfate spectra acquired with VNIR and midinfrared reflectance, mid-infrared emission and Mössbauer spectrometers to narrow down the possible ferric sulfate phases present at Paso Robles to ferricopiapite possibly mixed with other ferric sulfates such as butlerite, parabutlerite, fibroferrite, or metahomanite. Thus, we explore here the crystal-chemical rationale behind these interpretations of the Mössbauer results, using similarities and difference among mineral structures to explore which phases might have similar coordination polyhedra around the Fe atoms in sulfates. Work by Hawthorne et al. (2000) organizes the sulfate minerals into groups with analogous crystal structures. Mössbauer doublets assigned to ferric sulfates ubiquitously have isomer shifts (IS) of 0.40-53 mm/s so that IS is non-diagnostic. However, quadrupole splitting of doublets in these mineral groups has a wide range (0-1.4 mm/s) and the variation can be systematically correlated with different structure types. Members of the hydration series Fe2(SO4)3 · n H2O, which includes quenstedtite, coquimbite, paracoquimbite, kornelite, and lausenite have Mössbauer spectra that closely resemble singlets because of their near-zero QS. These minerals share structures involving finite clusters of sulfate tetrahedral and Fe octahedral or chains of depolymerized clusters, and all mineral species with these structures share similar Mössbauer parameters. At the other extreme, ferric sulfates with structures based on infinite sheets (hydrotalcite, alunite, jarosite), tend to have large electric field gradients at the nucleus of the Fe3

  7. Flocculation properties of several microalgae and a cyanobacterium species during ferric chloride, chitosan and alkaline flocculation.

    PubMed

    Lama, Sanjaya; Muylaert, Koenraad; Karki, Tika Bahadur; Foubert, Imogen; Henderson, Rita K; Vandamme, Dries

    2016-11-01

    Flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for microalgae biomass production. Three flocculation methods (ferric chloride, chitosan, and alkaline flocculation) were compared in this study for the harvesting of 9 different freshwater and marine microalgae and one cyanobacterium species. Ferric chloride resulted in a separation efficiency greater than 90% with a concentration factor (CF) higher than 10 for all species. Chitosan flocculation worked generally very well for freshwater microalgae, but not for marine species. Alkaline flocculation was most efficient for harvesting of Nannochloropsis, Chlamydomonas and Chlorella sp. The concentration factor was highly variable between microalgae species. Generally, minimum flocculant dosages were highly variable across species, which shows that flocculation may be a good harvesting method for some species but not for others. This study shows that microalgae and cyanobacteria species should not be selected solely based on their productivity but also on their potential for low-cost separation.

  8. Functional Analysis of the Ferric Uptake Regulator Gene fur in Xanthomonas vesicatoria

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiqin; Dong, Chunling; Zhao, Tingchang; Han, Jucai; Wang, Tieling; Wen, Xiangzhen; Huang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Iron is essential for the growth and survival of many organisms. Intracellular iron homeostasis must be maintained for cell survival and protection against iron toxicity. The ferric uptake regulator protein (Fur) regulates the high-affinity ferric uptake system in many bacteria. To investigate the function of the fur gene in Xanthomonas vesicatoria (Xv), we generated a fur mutant strain, fur-m, by site-directed mutagenesis. Whereas siderophore production increased in the Xv fur mutant, extracellular polysaccharide production, biofilm formation, swimming ability and quorum sensing signals were all significantly decreased. The fur mutant also had significantly reduced virulence in tomato leaves. The above-mentioned phenotypes significantly recovered when the Xv fur mutation allele was complemented with a wild-type fur gene. Thus, Fur either negatively or positively regulates multiple important physiological functions in Xv. PMID:26910324

  9. Repeat radiation synovectomy with dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates in rheumatoid knees unresponsive to initial injection

    SciTech Connect

    Vella, M.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Shortkroff, S.; Venkatesan, P.; Sledge, C.B.

    1988-06-01

    Because of failure to fully respond to an initial intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates, 17 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis underwent repeat radiation synovectomy using this agent. Of the 13 patients who were evaluated 1 year later, 54% (7 knees) had good results, 31% (4 knees) had fair results, and 15% (2 knees) had poor results. The initial lack of significant benefit from radiation synovectomy did not appear to preclude a favorable response to a second injection.

  10. Phosphorous removal in batch systems using ferric chloride in the presence of activated sludges.

    PubMed

    Caravelli, Alejandro H; Contreras, Edgardo M; Zaritzky, Noemí E

    2010-05-15

    The objectives of this work were: (a) to analyze the effect of alkalinity, pH and initial Fe:P molar ratio (Fe(0):P(0)) on the precipitation of orthophosphate using ferric chloride in the presence of activated sludge in order to represent conditions of simultaneous precipitation, and in exhausted wastewater to simulate conditions of post-precipitation, (b) to compare the experimental results with predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium model, and (c) to propose a mechanistic model to determine the dose of coagulant required to achieve a given orthophosphate removal degree at constant pH. Results showed that the presence of biomass did not affect the orthophosphate precipitation; however, addition of ferric chloride caused a drop of pH to values not compatible with the normal activity of activated sludges. For this reason, the wastewater was supplemented with NaHCO(3); when 1gL(-1) NaHCO(3) was added, orthophosphate removals higher than 97% and pH above 6.2 were obtained using Fe(0):P(0)=1.9. Precipitation assays at constant pH showed that Fe(III) hydrolysis and FePO(4) precipitation reaction compete with each other. Calculations using a chemical equilibrium model (CHEAQS) predicted that ferric phosphate precipitation should not take place if pH is higher than about 7.8. However, experimental results showed that ferric phosphate precipitation occurred even at pH 9. For this reason, a mechanistic model was proposed to predict orthophosphate concentrations as a function of Fe(0):P(0) at constant pH. The model can be applied to calculate the minimum Fe(III) concentration required to achieve a given discharge limit for orthophosphate as a function of its initial concentration and pH.

  11. Genetic and Physiologic Characterization of Ferric/Cupric Reductase Constitutive Mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Nyhus, Karin J.; Jacobson, Eric S.

    1999-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a pathogenic yeast that causes meningitis in immunocompromised patients. Because iron acquisition is critical for growth of a pathogen in a host, we studied the regulation of the ferric reductase and ferrous uptake system of this organism. We isolated 18 mutants, representing four independent loci, with dysregulated ferric reductase. The mutant strains had >10-fold higher than wild-type WT reductase activity in the presence of iron. Two of the strains also had >7-fold higher than WT iron uptake in the presence of iron but were not markedly iron sensitive. Both were sensitive to the oxidative stresses associated with superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. One strain exhibited only 23% of the WT level of iron uptake in the absence of iron and grew poorly without iron supplementation of the medium, phenotypes consistent with an iron transport deficiency; it was sensitive to superoxide but not to hydrogen peroxide. The fourth strain had high reductase activity but normal iron uptake; it was not very sensitive to oxidative stress. We also demonstrated that the ferric reductase was regulated by copper and could act as a cupric reductase. Sensitivity to oxidants may be related to iron acquisition by a variety of mechanisms and may model the interaction of the yeast with the immune system. PMID:10225895

  12. Low temperature aqueous ferric sulfate solutions on the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrier, Vincent F.; Altheide, Travis S.

    2008-11-01

    We have studied the low-temperature properties of ferric sulfate Fe2(SO4)3 solutions as a model for potential liquid brines on the surface of Mars. Geochemical modeling demonstrates that concentrated ferric sulfate brines form through sulphur-rich acidic evaporation processes in cold oxidizing environments. Experiments and thermodynamic calculations show that the Fe2(SO4)3 eutectic temperature is 205 +/- 1 K for 48 +/- 2 wt% concentration. As a result of low water activity, these solutions exhibit evaporation rates ranging from 0.42 mm h-1 (29.1 wt%) to 0.03 mm h-1 (58.2 wt%), thus down to 20 times lower than pure water. The combination of extremely low eutectic temperature and evaporation rates allow subsurface liquids to be stable at high latitudes, where the majority of gullies and viscous flow features are located. Therefore, we conclude that episodic releases of highly concentrated ferric sulfate brines are a potential agent for the formation of recent and present-day gullies on Mars.

  13. Carbonated ferric green rust as a new material for efficient phosphate removal.

    PubMed

    Barthélémy, K; Naille, S; Despas, C; Ruby, C; Mallet, M

    2012-10-15

    Phosphate uptake from aqueous solutions by a recently discovered ferric oxyhydroxide is investigated. Carbonated ferric green rust {GR(CO(3)(2-))*} is prepared by varying two synthesis parameters, which are (1) the aging period after the ferrous-ferric green rust {GR(CO(3)(2-))} synthesis step and (2) the rate of the hydrogen peroxide addition to oxidize GR(CO(3)(2-)) into GR(CO(3)(2-))*. These two parameters permit the control of the size, morphology and cristallinity of the synthesized particles. As prepared GR* samples are then evaluated, in batch experiments, as possible low-cost efficient phosphate removal materials. Firstly, kinetic experiments reveal that a fast sorption step initially occurs and equilibrium is reached at ~500 min. The adsorption kinetics data at pH=7 can be adequately fitted to a pseudo-second order model. Secondly, the Freundlich model provides the best correlation and effectively describes phosphate sorption isotherms for all GR(CO(3)(2-))* samples synthesized. Finally, the phosphate adsorption capacity decreases when pH increases. The highest adsorption capacity is 64.8 mg g(-1) at pH=4 and corresponds to the GR(CO(3)(2-))* sample displaying the smallest and least crystallized particles thus reflecting the importance of the synthesis conditions. Overall, all sorption capacities are higher than the main iron oxide minerals, making GR(CO(3)(2-))* a potentially attractive phosphate adsorbent.

  14. A combined treatment of landfill leachate using calcium oxide, ferric chloride and clinoptilolite.

    PubMed

    Orescanin, Visnja; Ruk, Damir; Kollar, Robert; Mikelic, Ivanka Lovrencic; Nad, Karlo; Mikulic, Nenad

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research was development of appropriate procedure for treatment of landfill leachate taken from old sanitary landfill Piskornica (Koprivnica, Croatia). Due to complex nature of the effluent a combined treatment approach was applied. Samples were treated with calcium oxide followed by ferric chloride and finally with clinoptilolite. The optimum amount of treating agents and contact time were determined. Application of calcium oxide (25 g/L, 20 min. contact time) resulted in the reduction of color, turbidity, suspended solids and ammonia for 94.50%, 96.55%, 95.66% and 21.60%, respectively, while the removal efficiency of Cr (VI), Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn and Pb was 75.00%, 95.34%, 56.52%, 78.72%, 73.02% and 100.00%, respectively. After addition of ferric chloride (570 mg Fe(3+)/L, 20 min. contact time) removal efficiency of color, turbidity, suspended solids and ammonia increased to 96.04%, 99.27%, 98.61%, and 43.20%, respectively. Removal of ammonia (81.60%) increased significantly after final adsorption onto clinoptilolite (25 g/L, 4 h contact time). Removal of COD after successive treatment with calcium oxide, ferric chloride and clinoptilolite was 64.70%, 77.40% and 81.00%, respectively.

  15. Ferric coagulant recovered from coagulation sludge and its recycle in chemically enhanced primary treatment.

    PubMed

    Xu, G R; Yan, Z C; Wang, N; Li, G B

    2009-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to study the feasibility of ferric coagulant recovery from chemical sludge and its recycle in chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) to make the process more cost-effective, as well as reduce sludge volume. The optimum conditions and efficiency of the acidification for ferric coagulant recovery from coagulation sludge were investigated. Experimental results showed that the recovered coagulants can be used in CEPT and the pollutants removal efficiency is similar to that of fresh coagulant, and for some aspects the effect of recovered coagulants is better than that of fresh ones, such as turbidity removal. Although some substances will be enriched during recycle, they have little effect on treated wastewater quality. Acidification condition also had significant influence on reduction of sludge volume. The efficiency of coagulant recovery had a linear relationship with sludge reduction. Experiments verify that it would be a sustainable and cost-effective way to recover ferric coagulant from coagulation sludge in water treatment and chemical wastewater treatment, and then recycle it to CEPT, as well as reduce sludge volume.

  16. Potential of Alginate Encapsulated Ferric Saccharate Microemulsions to Ameliorate Iron Deficiency in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mukhija, Kimmi; Singhal, Kirti; Angmo, Stanzin; Yadav, Kamalendra; Yadav, Hariom; Sandhir, Rajat; Singhal, Nitin Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the most prominent mineral deficiencies around the world, which especially affects large population of women and children. Development of new technologies to combat iron deficiency is on high demand. Therefore, we developed alginate microcapsule with encapsulated iron that had better oral iron bioavailability. Microcapsules containing iron with varying ratios of sodium alginate ferric(III)-saccharide were prepared using emulsification method. In vitro studies with Caco-2 cells suggested that newly synthesized microemulsions had better iron bioavailability as compared to commercially available iron dextran formulations. Ferrozine in vitro assay showed that alginate-encapsulated ferric galactose microemulsion (AFGM) had highest iron bioavailability in comparison to other four ferric saccharate microemulsions, namely AFGlM, AFMM, AFSM, and AFFM synthesized in our laboratory. Mice studies also suggested that AFGM showed higher iron absorption as indicated by increased serum iron, hemoglobin, and other hematopoietic measures with almost no toxicity at tested doses. Development of iron-loaded microemulsions leads to higher bioavailability of iron and can provide alternative strategies to treat iron deficiency.

  17. Graphene oxide/ferric hydroxide composites for efficient arsenate removal from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Dwivedi, Vineet; Chi, Chunyan; Wu, Jishan

    2010-10-15

    A series of novel composites based on graphene oxide (GO) cross-linked with ferric hydroxide was developed for effective removal of arsenate from contaminated drinking water. GO, which was used as a supporting matrix here, was firstly treated with ferrous sulfate. Then, the ferrous compound cross-linked with GO was in situ oxidized to ferric compound by hydrogen peroxide, followed by treating with ammonium hydroxide. The morphology and composition of the composites were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The ferric hydroxide was found to be homogenously impregnated onto GO sheets in amorphous form. These composites were evaluated as absorbents for arsenate removal from contaminated drinking water. For the water with arsenate concentration at 51.14 ppm, more than 95% of arsenate was absorbed by composite GO-Fe-5 with an absorption capacity of 23.78 mg arsenate/g of composite. Effective arsenate removal occurred in a wide range of pH from 4 to 9. However, the efficiency of arsenate removal was decreased when pH was increased to higher than 8.

  18. Highly covalent ferric-thiolate bonds exhibit surprisingly low mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peng; Li, Hongbin

    2011-05-04

    Depending on their nature, different chemical bonds show vastly different stability with covalent bonds being the most stable ones that rupture at forces above nanonewton. Studies have revealed that ferric-thiolate bonds are highly covalent and are conceived to be of high mechanical stability. Here, we used single molecule force spectroscopy techniques to directly determine the mechanical strength of such highly covalent ferric-thiolate bonds in rubredoxin. We observed that the ferric-thiolate bond ruptures at surprisingly low forces of ∼200 pN, significantly lower than that of typical covalent bonds, such as C-Si, S-S, and Au-thiolate bonds, which typically ruptures at >1.5 nN. And the mechanical strength of Fe-thiolate bonds is observed to correlate with the covalency of the bonds. Our results indicated that highly covalent Fe-thiolate bonds are mechanically labile and display features that clearly distinguish themselves from typical covalent bonds. Our study not only opens new avenues to investigating this important class of chemical bonds, but may also shed new lights on our understanding of the chemical nature of these metal thiolate bonds.

  19. Experimental determination of the phase boundary between kornelite and pentahydrated ferric sulfate at 0.1MPa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kong, W.G.; Wang, A.; Chou, I.-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings of various ferric sulfates on Mars emphasize the importance of understanding the fundamental properties of ferric sulfates at temperatures relevant to that of Martian surface. In this study, the phase boundary between kornelite (Fe2(SO4)3.7H2O) and pentahydrated ferric sulfate (Fe2(SO4)3.5H2O) was experimentally determined using the humidity-buffer technique together with gravimetric measurements and Raman spectroscopy at 0.1MPa in the 36-56??C temperature range. Through the thermodynamic analysis of our experimental data, the enthalpy change (-290.8??0.3kJ/mol) and the Gibbs free energy change (-238.82??0.02kJ/mol) for each water molecule of crystallization in the rehydration of pentahydrated ferric sulfate to kornelite were obtained. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Hydrous ferric oxide precipitation in the presence of nonmetabolizing bacteria: Constraints on the mechanism of a biotic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rancourt, Denis G.; Thibault, Pierre-Jean; Mavrocordatos, Denis; Lamarche, Gilles

    2005-02-01

    We have used room temperature and cryogenic 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (pXRD), mineral magnetometry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to study the synthetic precipitation of hydrous ferric oxides (HFOs) prepared either in the absence (abiotic, a-HFO) or presence (biotic, b-HFO) of nonmetabolizing bacterial cells ( Bacillus subtilis or Bacillus licheniformis, ˜10 8 cells/mL) and under otherwise identical chemical conditions, starting from Fe(II) (10 -2, 10 -3, or 10 -4 mol/L) under open oxic conditions and at different pH (6-9). We have also performed the first Mössbauer spectroscopy measurements of bacterial cell wall ( Bacillus subtilis) surface complexed Fe, where Fe(III) (10 -3.5-10 -4.5 mol/L) was added to a fixed concentration of cells (˜10 8 cells/mL) under open oxic conditions and at various pH (2.5-4.3). We find that non-metabolic bacterial cell wall surface complexation of Fe is not passive in that it affects Fe speciation in at least two ways: (1) it can reduce Fe(III) to sorbed-Fe 2+ by a proposed steric and charge transfer effect and (2) it stabilizes Fe(II) as sorbed-Fe 2+ against ambient oxidation. The cell wall sorption of Fe occurs in a manner that is not compatible with incorporation into the HFO structure (different coordination environment and stabilization of the ferrous state) and the cell wall-sorbed Fe is not chemically bonded to the HFO particle when they coexist (the sorbed Fe is not magnetically polarized by the HFO particle in its magnetically ordered state). This invalidates the concept that sorption is the first step in a heterogeneous nucleation of HFO onto bacterial cell walls. Both the a-HFOs and the b-HFOs are predominantly varieties of ferrihydrite (Fh), often containing admixtures of nanophase lepidocrocite (nLp), yet they show significant abiotic/biotic differences: Biotic Fh has less intraparticle (including surface region) atomic order (Mössbauer quadrupole splitting), smaller primary

  1. Over or under: hydride attack at the metal versus the coordinated nitrosyl ligand in ferric nitrosyl porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Abucayon, E G; Khade, R L; Powell, D R; Shaw, M J; Zhang, Y; Richter-Addo, G B

    2016-11-15

    Hydride attack at a ferric heme-NO to give an Fe-HNO intermediate is a key step in the global N-cycle. We demonstrate differential reactivity when six- and five-coordinate ferric heme-NO models react with hydride. Although Fe-HNO formation is thermodynamically favored from this reaction, Fe-H formation is kinetically favored for the 5C case.

  2. Reduction of costs for anemia-management drugs associated with the use of ferric citrate

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anila; Peterson, Leif E

    2014-01-01

    Background Ferric citrate is a novel phosphate binder which has the potential to reduce usage of erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs) and intravenous (IV) iron used for anemia management during hemodialysis (HD) among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Currently, the potential health care cost savings on a national scale due to the use of ferric citrate in ESRD are undetermined. Methods Per-patient-per-year costs of ESAs (Epogen® and Aranesp® [Amgen Inc., CA, USA]) and IV iron (Venofer® [American Regent, Inc., NY, USA] and Ferrlecit® [Sanofi US, Bridgewater, NJ, USA]) were based on RED BOOK™ (Truven Health Analytics New York, NY, USA) costs combined with the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) base rate and actual usage in 2011 for the four drugs. The annual number of outpatients undergoing HD in the US was based on frequencies reported by the USRDS (United States Renal Data System). Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis was performed to determine total annual costs and cost reduction based on ferric citrate usage. Results Total annual cost of ESAs and IV iron for anemia management in ESRD determined by Monte Carlo analysis assuming CMS base rate value was 5.127 (3.664–6.260) billion USD. For actual utilization in 2011, total annual cost of ESAs and IV iron was 3.981 (2.780–4.930) billion USD. If ferric citrate usage reduced ESA utilization by 20% and IV iron by 40%, then total cost would be reduced by 21.2% to 4.038 (2.868–4.914) billion USD for the CMS base rate, and by 21.8% to 3.111 (2.148–3.845) billion USD, based on 2011 actual utilization. Conclusion It is likely that US health care costs for anemia-management drugs associated with ESRD among HD patients can be reduced by using ferric citrate as a phosphate binder. PMID:24899820

  3. Bacterial Hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria predate plants and animals by billions of years. Today, they are the world's smallest cells, yet they represent the bulk of the world's biomass and the main reservoir of nutrients for higher organisms. Most bacteria can move on their own, and the majority of motile bacteria are able to swim in viscous fluids using slender helical appendages called flagella. Low-Reynolds number hydrodynamics is at the heart of the ability of flagella to generate propulsion at the micrometer scale. In fact, fluid dynamic forces impact many aspects of bacteriology, ranging from the ability of cells to reorient and search their surroundings to their interactions within mechanically and chemically complex environments. Using hydrodynamics as an organizing framework, I review the biomechanics of bacterial motility and look ahead to future challenges.

  4. Bactericidal properties of hydrogen peroxide and copper or iron-containing complex ions in relation to leukocyte function.

    PubMed

    Elzanowska, H; Wolcott, R G; Hannum, D M; Hurst, J K

    1995-03-01

    Various combinations of hydrogen peroxide, reductant (ascorbic acid and superoxide ion), and copper or iron salts and their coordination complexes were examined to determine their cytotoxicity toward several bacteria with diverse metabolic capabilities and cell envelope structures. Four sets of bactericidal conditions were identified, comprising: (1) high concentration levels (5-100 mM) of H2O2 in the absence of exogenous metal ions and reductant; (2) ferrous or ferric coordination complexes plus enzymatically generated O2.- and H2O2 at relatively low steady-state concentration levels; (3) cupric ion plus low concentration levels of H2O2 (1 microM-1 mM) and ascorbate (10 microM-4 mM); (4) cuprous ion (or cupric ion plus ascorbate) in the absence of O2 and H2O2. Rates of losses in viabilities increased proportionately with increases in the concentration of H2O2 in metal-free environments and with each of the components in the Cu2+/ascorbate/H2O2 bactericidal assay system. Oxidant levels required for equivalent killing increased with increasing cell densities of the bacterial suspensions over the range investigated (2 x 10(7)-2 x 10(9) cfu/ml). Other experimental conditions or other combinations of reagents, most notably Fe3+/ascorbate/H2O2 systems, did not generate bactericidal environments. The patterns of response of the three organisms tested, Streptococcus lactis, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were similar, suggesting common bactericidal mechanisms. However, preliminary evidence suggests that the lethal lesions caused by the various bactericidal conditions are distinct: As discussed, each of the four bactericidal conditions could conceivably be attained within the phagosomes of leukocytes, although none has as yet been identified.

  5. Electrospray ionization collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry: a tool to characterize synthetic polyaminocarboxylate ferric chelates used as fertilizers.

    PubMed

    Orera, Irene; Orduna, Jesús; Abadía, Javier; Alvarez-Fernández, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Fertilizers based on synthetic polyaminocarboxylate ferric chelates have been known since the 1950s to be successful in supplying Fe to plants. In commercial Fe(III)-chelate fertilizers, a significant part of the water-soluble Fe-fraction consists of still uncharacterized Fe byproducts, whose agronomical value is unknown. Although collision-induced dissociation (CID) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) is a valuable tool for the identification of such compounds, no fragmentation data have been reported for most Fe(III)-chelate fertilizers. The aim of this study was to characterize the CID-MS(2) fragmentation patterns of the major synthetic Fe(III)-chelates used as Fe-fertilizers, and subsequently use this technique for the characterization of commercial fertilizers. Quadrupole-time-of-flight (QTOF) and spherical ion trap mass analyzers equipped with an electrospray ionization (ESI) source were used. ESI-CID-MS(2) spectra obtained were richer when using the QTOF device. Specific differences were found among Fe(III)-chelate fragmentation patterns, even in the case of positional isomers. The analysis of a commercial Fe(III)-chelate fertilizer by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to ESI-MS(QTOF) revealed two previously unknown, Fe-containing compounds, that were successfully identified by a comprehensive comparison of the ESI-CID-MS(2)(QTOF) spectra with those of pure chelates. This shows that HPLC/ESI-CID-MS(2)(QTOF), along with the Fe(III)-chelate fragmentation patterns, could be a highly valuable tool to directly characterize the water-soluble Fe fraction in Fe(III)-chelate fertilizers. This could be of great importance in issues related to crop Fe-fertilization, both from an agricultural and an environmental point of view.

  6. Apparatus and method for automated monitoring of airborne bacterial spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus and method for automated monitoring of airborne bacterial spores. The apparatus is provided with an air sampler, a surface for capturing airborne spores, a thermal lysis unit to release DPA from bacterial spores, a source of lanthanide ions, and a spectrometer for excitation and detection of the characteristic fluorescence of the aromatic molecules in bacterial spores complexed with lanthanide ions. In accordance with the method: computer-programmed steps allow for automation of the apparatus for the monitoring of airborne bacterial spores.

  7. Mechanism of Bacterial Oligosaccharyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Sabina; Lizak, Christian; Michaud, Gaëlle; Bucher, Monika; Darbre, Tamis; Aebi, Markus; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Locher, Kaspar P.

    2013-01-01

    N-Linked glycosylation is an essential post-translational protein modification in the eukaryotic cell. The initial transfer of an oligosaccharide from a lipid carrier onto asparagine residues within a consensus sequon is catalyzed by oligosaccharyltransferase (OST). The first X-ray structure of a complete bacterial OST enzyme, Campylobacter lari PglB, was recently determined. To understand the mechanism of PglB, we have quantified sequon binding and glycosylation turnover in vitro using purified enzyme and fluorescently labeled, synthetic peptide substrates. Using fluorescence anisotropy, we determined a dissociation constant of 1.0 μm and a strict requirement for divalent metal ions for consensus (DQNAT) sequon binding. Using in-gel fluorescence detection, we quantified exceedingly low glycosylation rates that remained undetected using in vivo assays. We found that an alanine in the −2 sequon position, converting the bacterial sequon to a eukaryotic one, resulted in strongly lowered sequon binding, with in vitro turnover reduced 50,000-fold. A threonine is preferred over serine in the +2 sequon position, reflected by a 4-fold higher affinity and a 1.2-fold higher glycosylation rate. The interaction of the +2 sequon position with PglB is modulated by isoleucine 572. Our study demonstrates an intricate interplay of peptide and metal binding as the first step of protein N-glycosylation. PMID:23382388

  8. Evidence for regulatory control of iron uptake from ferric maltol across the small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Barrand, M. A.; Callingham, B. A.

    1991-01-01

    1. 59Fe absorption from the novel iron compound, ferric maltol, was studied in rats pretreated twice daily for two weeks with non-radioactive ferric maltol in oral doses containing 7 mg elemental iron. Tissue accumulation of 59Fe 2 h after administration of radioactive ferric maltol into the stomach was significantly lower in iron pretreated animals than in saline-treated controls. 2. 59Fe uptake from ferric maltol into isolated fragments of ileum and of duodenum was of similar magnitude in control animals but in iron-treated animals, duodenal uptake was significantly lower than that of the ileum. 3. Absorption of 59Fe was also investigated in anaesthetized rats after intestinal perfusion with saline (controls) or with 5 mM chenodeoxycholate to render the intestines more permeable. 4. Changes in permeability of the small intestine were monitored by estimating the amount of [14C]-mannitol absorbed and fluid secreted with reference to the non-absorbable [3H]-inulin in the perfusate effluents. 5. Despite the increased permeability of the intestines after bile salt treatment, there was little difference from control in the tissue accumulation of 59Fe from ferric maltol 2 h after intraduodenal administration. However 59Fe absorption from ferrous sulphate was significantly increased after bile salt treatment. 6. Gel filtration profiles of plasma made 5 and 60 min after intraduodenal administration of [59Fe]-ferric [3H]-maltol demonstrated that metal and ligand do not enter the circulation as the complex even when intestinal permeability is increased. 7. Uptake of 59Fe was investigated in isolated fragments of rat small intestine after saline or bile salt perfusion. Although 59Fe uptake from ferric maltol was somewhat greater in the bile salt-treated intestinal fragments, saturable kinetics were still observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:2015422

  9. Ferric citrate.

    PubMed

    Cada, Dennis J; Cong, Jasen; Baker, Danial E

    2015-02-01

    Each month, subscribers to The Formulary Monograph Service receive 5 to 6 well-documented monographs on drugs that are newly released or are in late phase 3 trials. The monographs are targeted to Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committees. Subscribers also receive monthly 1-page summary monographs on agents that are useful for agendas and pharmacy/nursing in-services. A comprehensive target drug utilization evaluation/medication use evaluation (DUE/MUE) is also provided each month. With a subscription, the monographs are sent in print and are also available on-line. Monographs can be customized to meet the needs of a facility. A drug class review is now published monthly with The Formulary Monograph Service. Through the cooperation of The Formulary, Hospital Pharmacy publishes selected reviews in this column. For more information about The Formulary Monograph Service, call The Formulary at 800-322-4349. The February 2015 monograph topics are netupitant/palonosetron, naltrxone SR/bupropion SR, nintedanib, pirfenidone, and ivabradine. The Safety MUE is on netupitant/palonosetron.

  10. Ferric Citrate

    PubMed Central

    Cada, Dennis J.; Cong, Jasen; Baker, Danial E.

    2015-01-01

    Each month, subscribers to The Formulary Monograph Service receive 5 to 6 well-documented monographs on drugs that are newly released or are in late phase 3 trials. The monographs are targeted to Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committees. Subscribers also receive monthly 1-page summary monographs on agents that are useful for agendas and pharmacy/nursing in-services. A comprehensive target drug utilization evaluation/medication use evaluation (DUE/MUE) is also provided each month. With a subscription, the monographs are sent in print and are also available on-line. Monographs can be customized to meet the needs of a facility. A drug class review is now published monthly with The Formulary Monograph Service. Through the cooperation of The Formulary, Hospital Pharmacy publishes selected reviews in this column. For more information about The Formulary Monograph Service, call The Formulary at 800-322-4349. The February 2015 monograph topics are netupitant/palonosetron, naltrxone SR/bupropion SR, nintedanib, pirfenidone, and ivabradine. The Safety MUE is on netupitant/palonosetron. PMID:25717210

  11. Addition of citrate to Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans cultures enables precipitate-free growth at elevated pH and reduces ferric inhibition.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaozheng; Mercado, Roel; Kernan, Timothy; West, Alan C; Banta, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans is an acidophilic chemolithoautotroph that is important in biomining and other biotechnological operations. The cells are able to oxidize inorganic iron, but the insolubility and product inhibition by Fe(3+) complicates characterization of these cultures. Here we explore the growth kinetics of A. ferrooxidans in iron-based medium in a pH range from 1.6 to 2.2. It was found that as the pH was increased from 1.6 to 2.0, the maintenance coefficient decreased while both the growth kinetics and maximum cell yield increased in the precipitate-free, low Fe(2+) concentration medium. In higher iron media a similar trend was observed at low pH, but the formation of precipitates at higher pH (2.0) hampered cell growth and lowered the specific growth rate and maximum cell yield. In order to eliminate ferric precipitates, chelating agents were introduced into the medium. Citric acid was found to be relatively non-toxic and did not appear to interfere with iron oxidation at a maximum concentration of 70 mM. Inclusion of citric acid prevented precipitation and A. ferrooxidans growth parameters resumed their trends as a function of pH. The addition of citrate also decreased the apparent substrate saturation constant (KS ) indicating a reduction in the competitive inhibition of growth by ferric ions. These results indicate that continuous cultures of A. ferrooxidans in the presence of citrate at elevated pH will enable enhanced cell yields and productivities. This will be critical as these cells are used in the development of new biotechnological applications such as electrofuel production.

  12. Bacterial vaginosis.

    PubMed Central

    Spiegel, C A

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is the most common of the vaginitides affecting women of reproductive age. It appears to be due to an alteration in the vaginal ecology by which Lactobacillus spp., the predominant organisms in the healthy vagina, are replaced by a mixed flora including Prevotella bivia, Prevotella disiens, Porphyromonas spp., Mobiluncus spp., and Peptostreptococcus spp. All of these organisms except Mobiluncus spp. are also members of the endogenous vaginal flora. While evidence from treatment trials does not support the notion that BV is sexually transmitted, recent studies have shown an increased risk associated with multiple sexual partners. It has also been suggested that the pathogenesis of BV may be similar to that of urinary tract infections, with the rectum serving as a reservoir for some BV-associated flora. The organisms associated with BV have also been recognized as agents of female upper genital tract infection, including pelvic inflammatory disease, and the syndrome BV has been associated with adverse outcome of pregnancy, including premature rupture of membranes, chorioamnionitis, and fetal loss; postpartum endometritis; cuff cellulitis; and urinary tract infections. The mechanisms by which the BV-associated flora causes the signs of BV are not well understood, but a role for H2O2-producing Lactobacillus spp. in protecting against colonization by catalase-negative anaerobic bacteria has been recognized. These and other aspects of BV are reviewed. PMID:1747864

  13. Pulp response to ferric sulfate, diluted formocresol and IRM in pulpotomized primary baboon teeth.

    PubMed

    Fuks, A B; Eidelman, E; Cleaton-Jones, P; Michaeli, Y

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the pulp response to a 15.5 percent ferric sulfate solution (FS) and a 20 percent dilution of formocresol (DFC) in pulpotomized primary teeth of baboons, after four and eight weeks. Pulpotomies were performed in seventy-nine primary teeth of 4 baboons. After coronal pulp resection, the pulp stumps were painted with ferric sulfate for fifteen seconds, in thirty-two teeth (group 1); in another thirty-two teeth, a cotton pellet moistened with dilution of formocresol was placed over the pulp stumps for five minutes, and removed (group 2). In fifteen teeth, IRM was placed directly over the pulp stumps after hemostasis (group 3--control). The teeth of all groups were sealed with IRM, and examined for inflammatory changes under a microscope by two blinded examiners. Seventy-seven teeth were assessed. Mild or no inflammation was found in 58 percent (18/31) of the teeth of group 1, in 48 percent (15/31) of those of group 2, and in 73 percent (11/15) of those of group 3. Severe inflammation was found in 35 percent (11/31) of group 1, 29 percent (9/31) of group 2, and in 7 percent (1/15) of group 3. No statistically significant difference between the three groups was observed for degree of inflammation, periradicular or interradicular abscess or inflammatory root resorption (chi-square p > 0.05). Dentin bridges were observed in 52 percent (16/31) of the teeth in group 1, 52 percent (16/31) of those of group 2, and in 73 percent (11/15) of those of group 3. No difference was found between the experimental and control groups for the presence of dentin bridge, (p > 0.05). Ferric sulfate produced pulp responses that compared favorably to those of diluted formocresol.

  14. Ferric ammonium citrate decomposition--a taxonomic tool for gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Szentmihályi, A; Lányi, B

    1986-01-01

    The iron uptake test of Szabó and Vandra has been modified and used for the differentiation of Gram-negative bacteria. Nutrient agar containing 20 g per litre of ferric ammonium citrate was distributed into narrow tubes and solidified so as to form butts and slants. Considering the localization of the rusty-brown coloration produced after seeding and incubation, 2367 strains were classified into four groups. (1) Unchanged medium: Escherichia coli, Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Hafnia alvei and Morganella morganii 100% each, Klebsiella spp., 50%, Enterobacter cloacae 37%, Proteus vulgaris 59%, Acinetobacter spp. 42%, Pseudomonas fluorescens 19%, some other bacteria 2-12%. (2) Rusty-brown slant, unchanged butt: Salmonella subgenera II, III and IV 98%, Citrobacter freundii 65%, E. cloacae 55%, P. vulgaris 41%, Proteus mirabilis 98%, Providencia rettgeri 100%, urease-negative Providencia 96%, Acinetobacter spp. 58%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 100%, P. fluorescens 81%, UFP (unclassified fluorescent pseudomonads) 100%, other Pseudomonas spp. 55%. (3) Unchanged slant, brown butt: S. typhi 88%, Salmonella subgenus I 3%, Klebsiella spp. 31%, some other bacteria 2-3%. (4) Rusty-brown slant, brown butt: Salmonella subgenus I 75%, C. freundii 20%, Klebsiella spp. 12%, some other bacteria 1-5%. Colour reactions in ferric ammonium citrate agar are associated with the accumulation of ferric hydroxide: bacteria giving positive reactions on the slant took up as an average, 63 times more iron than those with negative test. The localization of colour reaction correlated partly with aerobic and anaerobic citrate utilization or decomposition in Simmons' minimal and in Kauffmann's peptone water medium.

  15. Size fractionation characterisation of removed organics in reverse osmosis concentrates by ferric chloride.

    PubMed

    Bagastyo, A Y; Keller, J; Batstone, D J

    2011-01-01

    Reverse osmosis membrane separation is the leading method for manufacturing potable purified water. It also produces a concentrate stream, namely reverse osmosis concentrates (ROC), with 10-20% of the water, and almost all other compounds. One method for further treating this stream is by coagulation with ferric chloride. This study evaluates removed organics in ROC treated with ferric chloride. Fractionation with ultrafiltration membranes allows separation of organics based on a nominal molecular weight. A stirred cell system was applied for serial fractionation to classify organic compounds into six groups of < 0.5 kDa, 0.5-1 kDa, 1-3 kDa, 3-5 kDa, 5-10 kDa and > 10 kDa. The study found that raw ROC is rich in low molecular weight compounds (< 1 kDa) with almost 50% of the organics. These compounds include soluble microbial products (SMPs) and smaller humic and fulvic acids as indicated by fluorescence scanning. Conversely, colour was mostly contributed by medium to large molecules of humic and fulvic acids (> 0.5 kDa). Organics and colour were reduced in all molecular groups at an optimum treatment dose 1.48 mM FeCl3 and a pH of 5. However, ferric seemed to effectively remove colour in all size ranges while residual nitrogen was found mostly in the < 1 kDa sizes. Further, the fluorescence indicated that larger humic and fulvic acids were removed with considerable SMPs remaining in the < 0.5 kDa.

  16. Small bowel bacterial overgrowth

    MedlinePlus

    Overgrowth - intestinal bacteria; Bacterial overgrowth - intestine; Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth; SIBO ... intestine does not have a high number of bacteria. Excess bacteria in the small intestine may use ...

  17. The comparative safety of intravenous iron dextran, iron saccharate, and sodium ferric gluconate.

    PubMed

    Fishbane, S; Kowalski, E A

    2000-01-01

    Intravenous iron treatment is an important component of anemia therapy for patients on dialysis. Until recently iron dextran was the only parenteral form of iron available in the United States. This drug has been associated with occasional serious adverse reactions, including full-blown anaphylaxis. In 1999 the Food and Drug Administration approved a second form of iron for intravenous administration, sodium ferric gluconate in sucrose. It is expected that by the time of this publication, a third agent, iron saccharate will also be approved. In this review the comparative safety of these three agents is critically evaluated.

  18. Electromagnetism of Bacterial Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ainiwaer, Ailiyasi

    2011-10-01

    There has been increasing concern from the public about personal health due to the significant rise in the daily use of electrical devices such as cell phones, radios, computers, GPS, video games and television. All of these devices create electromagnetic (EM) fields, which are simply magnetic and electric fields surrounding the appliances that simultaneously affect the human bio-system. Although these can affect the human system, obstacles can easily shield or weaken the electrical fields; however, magnetic fields cannot be weakened and can pass through walls, human bodies and most other objects. The present study was conducted to examine the possible effects of bacteria when exposed to magnetic fields. The results indicate that a strong causal relationship is not clear, since different magnetic fields affect the bacteria differently, with some causing an increase in bacterial cells, and others causing a decrease in the same cells. This phenomenon has yet to be explained, but the current study attempts to offer a mathematical explanation for this occurrence. The researchers added cultures to the magnetic fields to examine any effects to ion transportation. Researchers discovered ions such as potassium and sodium are affected by the magnetic field. A formula is presented in the analysis section to explain this effect.

  19. Retrospective Case Reports of Anemic Pregnant Women Receiving Intravenous Ferric Carboxymaltose: Experience from a Tertiary Hospital in Spain

    PubMed Central

    García Montero, Mariola; Lorente Aporta, Jose Pablo; Gallego Luque, Carolina; Chacón Mayor, Alfonso; Aragón Ruiz, Jose; Torres Degayón, Virginia; García Jimenez, Claudia; Sanchez Sanchez, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy call for safe treatment options that raise maternal hemoglobin levels and counterbalance iron demand and blood volume expansion while minimizing risks for the growing fetus. This retrospective study describes experience with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose given to pregnant women in a tertiary hospital in Spain. In a 5-year period, 95 pregnant women who had pretreatment hemoglobin <10 g/dL and at least one time of ferric carboxymaltose administration during pregnancy were included. Main outcome measures were week of pregnancy at iron administration, Hb levels before and after treatment, neonatal 5-minute Apgar scores, and birth weight. The majority received one dose of ferric carboxymaltose (1000 mg iron) during advanced pregnancy (median 31 weeks; interquartile range [IQR]: 27; 37 weeks) with minor to no adverse outcomes. Overall, median Hb increased from 8.5 g/dL (8.1; 8.9 g/dL) before treatment to 11.0 g/dL (9.9; 11.7 g/dL) after treatment. Normal Apgar scores were observed in all 97 infants (median birth weights 3560 g, 3270, and 3798 g). Four women received ferric carboxymaltose in the first trimester and twenty-eight during the second trimester without adverse outcomes for mother or child. These cases add to the evidence that ferric carboxymaltose administration during pregnancy is effective and safe. PMID:27840641

  20. Kinetic and equilibrium constants of phytic acid and ferric and ferrous phytate derived from nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Heighton, Lynne; Schmidt, Walter F; Siefert, Ronald L

    2008-10-22

    Inositol phosphates are metabolically derived organic phosphates (P) that increasingly appear to be an important sink and source of P in the environment. Salts of myo-inositol hexakisdihydrogen phosphate (IHP) or more commonly phytate are the most common inositol phosphates in the environment. IHP resists acidic dephosphorylation and enzymatic dephosphorylation as ferric or ferrous IHP. Mobility of IHP iron complexes is potentially pH and redox responsive, making the time scale and environmental fate and transport of the P associated with the IHP of interest to the mass balance of phosphorus. Ferric and ferrous complexes of IHP were investigated by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( (1)H NMR) and enzymatic dephosphorylation. Ferrous IHP was found to form quickly and persist for a longer period then ferric IHP. Dissociation constants derived from (1)H NMR experiments of chemically exchanging systems at equilibrium were 1.11 and 1.19 and formation constants were 0.90 and 0.84 for ferric and ferrous IHP, respectively. The recovery of P from enzymatic dephosphorylation of ferric and ferrous IHP was consistent with the magnitude of the kinetic and equilibrium rate constants.

  1. Change of pH and Iron Ion Concentration During Photodegradation of TCE with Ferrioxalate/UVvis Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareyama, Wataru; Suto, Koichi; Inoue, Chihiro; Chida, Tadashi; Nakazawa, Hiroshi

    2006-05-01

    Recently, some studies show various organic compounds such as pesticides and dyes degraded with the irradiation of ultraviolet light and visible light in the presence of oxalic acid and ferric ion (ferrioxalate/UVvis process). The process has much advance than other technologies because it can utilize the wavelength of 300˜450nm and also under the condition of neutral pH. Chlorinated organic compounds such as trichloroethene (TCE), which have caused ground water pollution on a lot of sites, have never been applied by photodegradation with this process. In this study, we showed the degradation of TCE in the presence of oxalic acid and iron ion and the change of pH, ferric and ferrous ion concentration during the photodegradation of TCE with ferrioxalate/UV-vis process. TCE was degraded in the presence of oxalic acid and iron ion. In the reactions, the equilibrium of oxalate ion and iron ion is important since it determines the amount of ferrioxalate complex which absorbs light and induces the reactions of the degradation of TCE. Thus, the pH value and iron ion concentration are the important factors which determine the amount of ferrioxalate complex. The pH is nearly constant during the photodegradation of TCE. The ferrous ion concentration was decreased as soon as beginning photodegradation of TCE, and then the ferrous ion concentration and ferric ion concentration became constant.

  2. Treatment of rheumatoid synovitis of the knee with intraarticular injection of dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Atcher, R.W.; Shortkroff, S.; Lionberger, D.R.; Rose, H.A.; Hurson, B.J.; Lankenner, P.A. Jr.; Anderson, R.J.

    1986-02-01

    One hundred eight knees of 93 patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with an intraarticular injection of 270 mCi of dysprosium 165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregate. Leakage of radioactivity from the injected joint was minimal. Mean leakage to the venous blood 3 hours after injection was 0.11% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean whole body dose of 0.2 rads. Mean leakage to the liver 24 hours after injection was 0.64% of the injected dose; this corresponds to a mean liver dose of 3.2 rads. In 7 additional patients examined, there was negligible or near negligible activity found in the draining inguinal lymph nodes. One-year followup was possible for 74 knees (63 patients). Sixty-one percent of the knees had good results, 23% had fair results, and 16% had poor results. There was a direct correlation between the radiographic stage and response to treatment. In knees with stage I radiographic changes, 72% showed good results; 93% showed improvement. In knees with stage II changes, 59% showed good results; 81% showed improvement. These preliminary results indicate that dysprosium 165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for radiation synovectomy. The low leakage rates observed offer a definite advantage over agents previously used.

  3. Synovectomy of the rheumatoid knee using intra-articular injection of dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Sledge, C.B.; Zuckerman, J.D.; Shortkroff, S.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Venkatesan, P.; Snyder, M.A.; Barrett, W.P.

    1987-09-01

    One hundred and eleven patients who had seropositive rheumatoid arthritis and persistent synovitis of the knee were treated with intra-articular injection of 270 millicuries of dysprosium-165 bound to ferric hydroxide macroaggregates. A two-year follow-up was available for fifty-nine of the treated knees. Thirty-nine had a good result; nine, a fair result; and eleven, a poor result. Of the twenty-five knees that had Stage-I radiographic changes, nineteen had a good result. Of the thirty-four knees that had Stage-II radiographic changes, twenty showed a good result. Systemic spread of the radioactivity from the injected joint was minimum. The mean whole-body dose was calculated to be 0.3 rad and that to the liver twenty-four hours after injection, 3.2 rads. The results indicated that dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregate is an effective agent for performing radiation synovectomy, particularly in knees that have Stage-I radiographic changes. Because of the minimum rate of systemic spread of the dysprosium-165, it offers a definite advantage over agents that previously have been used.

  4. Siderophore Cephalosporin Cefiderocol Utilizes Ferric Iron Transporter Systems for Antibacterial Activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Toru; Yoshizawa, Hidenori; Sato, Takafumi; Nakamura, Rio; Tsuji, Masakatsu; Yamano, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Cefiderocol (S-649266) is a novel parenteral siderophore cephalosporin conjugated with a catechol moiety at the third-position side chain. The in vitro activity of cefiderocol against Pseudomonas aeruginosa was enhanced under iron-depleted conditions, whereas that of ceftazidime was not affected. The monitoring of [thiazole-14C]cefiderocol revealed the increased intracellular accumulation of cefiderocol in P. aeruginosa cells incubated under iron-depleted conditions compared with those incubated under iron-sufficient conditions. Cefiderocol was shown to have potent chelating activity with ferric iron, and extracellular iron was efficiently transported into P. aeruginosa cells in the presence of cefiderocol as well as siderophores, while enhanced transport of extracellular ferric iron was not observed when one of the hydroxyl groups of the catechol moiety of cefiderocol was replaced with a methoxy group. We conclude that cefiderocol forms a chelating complex with iron, which is actively transported into P. aeruginosa cells via iron transporters, resulting in potent antibacterial activity of cefiderocol against P. aeruginosa. PMID:27736756

  5. Ferric sulfate as pulpotomy agent in primary teeth: twenty month clinical follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ibricevic, H; al-Jame, Q

    2000-01-01

    Seventy primary molar teeth, carious exposed, symptom free, without any sign of root resorption in children aged from 3 to 6 years (main age 4.3 yr) were treated with conventional pulpotomy procedures. Ferric sulfate 15.5% solution (applied for 15 second for 35 teeth) and formocresol solution (five minute procedure of Buckley's formula for next 35 teeth) have been used as pulpotomy agents. In both groups, pulp stumps were covered with zinc-oxide eugenol paste. Permanent restorations were stainless steel crowns. Clinical check up was every three-months and radiographic follow-up time was six and twenty months after treatment. Our results within this period revealed 100% clinical success rate in both groups. Radiographic success rate was in both groups 97.2%, while in 2.8% cases has shown internal root resorption. On the basis of these results, we can recommend ferric sulfate as a pulpotomy agent in primary teeth in substitution for formocresol at the moment.

  6. Heme-assisted S-Nitrosation Desensitizes Ferric Soluble Guanylate Cyclase to Nitric Oxide*

    PubMed Central

    Fernhoff, Nathaniel B.; Derbyshire, Emily R.; Underbakke, Eric S.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) signaling regulates key processes in cardiovascular physiology, specifically vasodilation, platelet aggregation, and leukocyte rolling. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the mammalian NO sensor, transduces an NO signal into the classical second messenger cyclic GMP (cGMP). NO binds to the ferrous (Fe2+) oxidation state of the sGC heme cofactor and stimulates formation of cGMP several hundred-fold. Oxidation of the sGC heme to the ferric (Fe3+) state desensitizes the enzyme to NO. The heme-oxidized state of sGC has emerged as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. Here, we investigate the molecular mechanism of NO desensitization and find that sGC undergoes a reductive nitrosylation reaction that is coupled to the S-nitrosation of sGC cysteines. We further characterize the kinetics of NO desensitization and find that heme-assisted nitrosothiol formation of β1Cys-78 and β1Cys-122 causes the NO desensitization of ferric sGC. Finally, we provide evidence that the mechanism of reductive nitrosylation is gated by a conformational change of the protein. These results yield insights into the function and dysfunction of sGC in cardiovascular disease. PMID:23093402

  7. Combining Ferric Salt and Cactus Mucilage for Arsenic Removal from Water.

    PubMed

    Fox, Dawn I; Stebbins, Daniela M; Alcantar, Norma A

    2016-03-01

    New methods to remediate arsenic-contaminated water continue to be studied, particularly to fill the need for accessible methods that can significantly impact developing communities. A combination of cactus mucilage and ferric (Fe(III)) salt was investigated as a flocculation-coagulation system to remove arsenic (As) from water. As(V) solutions, ferric nitrate, and mucilage suspensions were mixed and left to stand for various periods of time. Visual and SEM observations confirmed the flocculation action of the mucilage as visible flocs formed and settled to the bottom of the tubes within 3 min. The colloidal suspensions without mucilage were stable for up to 1 week. Sample aliquots were tested for dissolved and total arsenic by ICP-MS and HGAFS. Mucilage treatment improved As removal (over Fe(III)-only treatment); the system removed 75-96% As in 30 min. At neutral pH, removal was dependent on Fe(III) and mucilage concentration and the age of the Fe(III) solution. The process is fast, achieving maximum removal in 30 min, with the majority of As removed in 10-15 min. Standard jar tests with 1000 μg/L As(III) showed that arsenic removal and settling rates were pH-dependent; As removal was between 52% (high pH) and 66% (low pH).

  8. Evaluation of density functional theory methods for studying chemisorption of arsenite on ferric hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nianliu; Blowers, Paul; Farrell, James

    2005-07-01

    Understanding adsorption of arsenic on ferric hydroxide surfaces is important for predicting the fate of arsenic in the environment and in designing treatment systems for removing arsenic from potable water. This research investigated the binding of arsenite to ferric hydroxide clusters using several density functional theory methods. Comparison of calculated and experimentally measured As-O and As-Fe bond distances indicated that As(III) forms both bidentate and monodentante corner-sharing complexes with Fe(III) octahedra. Edge-sharing As(III) complexes were less energetically favorable and had As-O and As-Fe distances that deviated more from experimentally measured values than corner-sharing complexes. The hydrated bidentate complex was the most energetically favorable in the vacuum phase, while the monodentate complex was most favored in the aqueous phase. Structures optimized using the Harris and Perdew-Wang local functionals were close to both experimental data and structures optimized using the nonlocal Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) functional. Binding energies calculated with the gradient-corrected BLYP functional were only weakly dependent on the method used for geometry optimization. The approach of using low-level structures coupled with higher level single-point energies was found to reduce computational time by 75% with no loss in accuracy of the computed binding energies.

  9. Synthesis of waste cooking oil based biodiesel via ferric-manganese promoted molybdenum oxide / zirconia nanoparticle solid acid catalyst: influence of ferric and manganese dopants.

    PubMed

    Alhassan, Fatah H; Rashid, Umer; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of ferric-manganese promoted molybdenum oxide/zirconia (Fe-Mn- MoO3/ZrO2) (FMMZ) solid acid catalyst for production of biodiesel was demonstrated. FMMZ is produced through impregnation reaction followed by calcination at 600°C for 3 h. The characterization of FMMZ had been done using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), temperature programmed desorption of NH3 (TPD-NH3), transmission electron microscopy(TEM) and Brunner-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area measurement. The effect of waste cooking oil methyl esters (WCOME's) yield on the reactions variables such as reaction temperature, catalyst loading, molar ratio of methanol/oil and reusability were also assessed. The catalyst was used to convert the waste cooking oil into corresponding methyl esters (95.6%±0.15) within 5 h at 200℃ reaction temperature, 600 rpm stirring speed, 1:25 molar ratio of oil to alcohol and 4% w/w catalyst loading. The reported catalyst was successfully recycled in six connective experiments without loss in activity. Moreover, the fuel properties of WCOME's were also reported using ASTM D 6751 methods.

  10. Dissociation of a ferric maltol complex and its subsequent metabolism during absorption across the small intestine of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Barrand, M. A.; Callingham, B. A.; Dobbin, P.; Hider, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    1. The fate and disposition of [59Fe]-ferric [3H]-maltol after intravenous administration were investigated in anaesthetized rats. Immediate dissociation of ferric iron from maltol took place in the circulation even with high doses of ferric maltol (containing 1 mg elemental iron). In plasma samples withdrawn within 1 min of injection and subjected to gel filtration, 59Fe eluted with the high molecular weight proteins whilst the tritium was associated with low molecular weight material. 2. The rates of elimination of 59Fe and of tritium from the plasma and their ultimate fate were very different. The half life for 59Fe in the plasma was around 70 min and 59Fe appeared mainly in the bone marrow and liver. There was an initial rapid exit of tritium from the plasma with a half life of around 12 min. This was followed either by a plateau or by a rise in tritium levels, involving entry of maltol metabolites into the circulation. These metabolites could be recovered in the urine. 3. Entry of 59Fe and of tritium into the blood plasma after intraduodenal administration of [59Fe]-ferric [3H]-maltol was also very different. At low doses of ferric maltol (containing 100 micrograms elemental iron), the tritium appeared in the plasma in highest amounts within seconds and then decreased whilst there was a slow rise in 59Fe levels. At higher doses of ferric maltol (containing 7 mg elemental iron), levels of 59Fe in the plasma were highest at 5 min and then fell whereas tritium levels rose steadily. Mucosal processing of 59Fe prevented further entry of iron at high dose into the circulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1364845

  11. Effect of ionic strength on ligand exchange kinetics between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and siderophore desferrioxamine B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Fujii, Manabu; Masago, Yoshifumi; Waite, T. David; Omura, Tatsuo

    2015-04-01

    The effect of ionic strength (I) on the ligand exchange reaction between a mononuclear ferric citrate complex and the siderophore, desferrioxamine B (DFB), was examined in the NaCl concentration range of 0.01-0.5 M, particularly focusing on the kinetics and mechanism of ligand exchange under environmentally relevant conditions. Overall ligand exchange rate constants were determined by spectrophotometrically measuring the time course of ferrioxamine B formation at a water temperature of 25 °C, pH 8.0, and citrate/Fe molar ratios of 500-5000. The overall ligand exchange rate decreased by 2-11-fold (depending on the citrate/Fe molar ratios) as I increased from approximately 0.01 to 0.5 M. In particular, a relatively large decrease was observed at lower I (<0.1 M). A ligand exchange model describing the effect of I on the ligand exchange rate via disjunctive and adjunctive pathways was developed by considering the pseudo-equilibration of ferric citrate complexes and subsequent ferrioxamine formation on the basis of the Eigen-Wilkins metal-ligand complexation theory. The model and experimental data consistently suggest that the adjunctive pathway (i.e., direct association of DFB with ferric mono- and di-citrate complexes following dissociation of citrate from the parent complexes) dominates in ferrioxamine formation under the experimental conditions used. The model also predicts that the higher rate of ligand exchange at lower I is associated with the decrease in the ferric dicitrate complex stability because of the relatively high electrical repulsion between ferric monocitrate and free citrate at lower I (note that the reactivity of ferric dicitrate with DFB is smaller than that for the monocitrate complex). Overall, the findings of this study contribute to the understanding of the potential effect of I on ligand exchange kinetics in natural waters and provide fundamental knowledge on iron transformation and bioavailability.

  12. Indirect voltammetric detection of fluoride ions in toothpaste on a comb-shaped interdigitated microelectrode array.

    PubMed

    Cernanská, Monika; Tomcík, Peter; Jánosíková, Zuzana; Rievaj, Miroslav; Bustin, Dusan

    2011-02-15

    A novel technique based on dynamic electrochemistry for the detection of fluoride ions was developed. It is based on its strong complexation with ferric ion. Formed fluoroferric complex is cathodically inactive at the potential of the reduction of free ferric aquo ion. The voltammetric and amperometric response of platinum comb-shaped interdigitated microelectrode array is decreased after fluoride addition. This decrease serves for the quantification of fluoride ions added to the solution. The detection limit of 4.5×10(-5) mol dm(-3) was achieved when one of the segments of interdigitated microelectrode array (IDA) was used as an indicating electrode. The detection limit is about one order of magnitude lower than in the case of conventional platinum macroelectrode. In comparison with ISE electrodes this method is faster and also avoiding large error resulting from the antilogarithmization of ISE Nerstian response. The method was applied to the analysis of toothpaste.

  13. Reactions of metal ions at surfaces of hydrous iron oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Cu, Ag and Cr concentrations in natural water may be lowered by mild chemical reduction involving ferric hydroxide-ferrous ion redox processes. V and Mo solubilities may be controlled by precipitation of ferrous vanadate or molybdate. Concentrations as low as 10-8.00 or 10-9.00 M are readily attainable for all these metals in oxygen-depleted systems that are relatively rich in Fe. Deposition of manganese oxides such as Mn3O4 can be catalyzed in oxygenated water by coupling to ferrous-ferric redox reactions. Once formed, these oxides may disproportionate, giving Mn4+ oxides. This reaction produces strongly oxidizing conditions at manganese oxide surfaces. The solubility of As is significantly influenced by ferric iron only at low pH. Spinel structures such as chromite or ferrites of Cu, Ni, and Zn, are very stable and if locally developed on ferric hydroxide surfaces could bring about solubilities much below 10-9.00 M for divalent metals near neutral pH. Solubilities calculated from thermodynamic data are shown graphically and compared with observed concentrations in some natural systems. ?? 1977.

  14. Suboxic Deposition of Ferric Iron by Bacteria in Opposing Gradients of Fe(II) and Oxygen at Circumneutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Sobolev, Dmitri; Roden, Eric E.

    2001-01-01

    The influence of lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria on patterns of ferric oxide deposition in opposing gradients of Fe(II) and O2 was examined at submillimeter resolution by use of an O2 microelectrode and diffusion microprobes for iron. In cultures inoculated with lithotrophic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria, the majority of Fe(III) deposition occurred below the depth of O2 penetration. In contrast, Fe(III) deposition in abiotic control cultures occurred entirely within the aerobic zone. The diffusion microprobes revealed the formation of soluble or colloidal Fe(III) compounds during biological Fe(II) oxidation. The presence of mobile Fe(III) in diffusion probes from live cultures was verified by washing the probes in anoxic water, which removed ca. 70% of the Fe(III) content of probes from live cultures but did not alter the Fe(III) content of probes from abiotic controls. Measurements of the amount of Fe(III) oxide deposited in the medium versus the probes indicated that ca. 90% of the Fe(III) deposited in live cultures was formed biologically. Our findings show that bacterial Fe(II) oxidation is likely to generate reactive Fe(III) compounds that can be immediately available for use as electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration and that biological Fe(II) oxidation may thereby promote rapid microscale Fe redox cycling at aerobic-anaerobic interfaces. PMID:11229928

  15. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri surface proteome by 2D-DIGE: Ferric enterobactin receptor and other outer membrane proteins potentially involved in citric host interaction.

    PubMed

    Carnielli, Carolina Moretto; Artier, Juliana; de Oliveira, Julio Cezar Franco; Novo-Mansur, Maria Teresa Marques

    2017-01-16

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (XAC) is the causative agent of citrus canker, a disease of great economic impact around the world. Understanding the role of proteins on XAC cellular surface can provide new insights on pathogen-plant interaction. Surface proteome was performed in XAC grown in vivo (infectious) and in vitro (non-infectious) conditions, by labeling intact cells followed by cellular lysis and direct 2D-DIGE analysis. Seventy-nine differential spots were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Highest relative abundance for in vivo condition was observed for spots containing DnaK protein, 60kDa chaperonin, conserved hypothetical proteins, malate dehydrogenase, phosphomannose isomerase, and ferric enterobactin receptors. Elongation factor Tu, OmpA-related proteins, Oar proteins and some Ton-B dependent receptors were found in spots decreased in vivo. Some proteins identified on XAC's surface in infectious condition and predicted to be cytoplasmic, such as DnaK and 60KDa chaperonin, have also been previously found at cellular surface in other microorganisms. This is the first study on XAC surface proteome and results point to mediation of molecular chaperones in XAC-citrus interaction. The approach utilized here can be applied to other pathogen-host interaction systems and help to achieve new insights in bacterial pathogenicity toward promising targets of biotechnological interest.

  16. Labeling of the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus with gold or ferric oxide-core nanoparticles highlights new capabilities for investigation of host-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Depke, Maren; Surmann, Kristin; Hildebrandt, Petra; Jehmlich, Nico; Michalik, Stephan; Stanca, Sarmiza E; Fritzsche, Wolfgang; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2014-02-01

    Throughout the world, infections caused by bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In order to gain some understanding of the complicated physiological link between host and pathogen, modern techniques such as confocal microscopy and sophisticated OMICs technologies are suitable. However, labeling of pathogens such as S. aureus with green fluorescent protein, for example, or the generation of a reliable antibody, which are prerequisites for the application of reproducible isolation techniques, does not always succeed. Here, we present a universal approach for monitoring pathogen traffic after internalization into host cells by fluorescence microscopy and for isolation of bacteria from host-pathogen interaction assays using gold or ferric oxide-core, poly(vinyl alcohol) coated, and fluorescence-labeled nanoparticles (NP). The incubation of S. aureus HG001 with those NP had only minor effects on the bacterial growth in vitro. Quantitative proteome analysis after 24 h of NP incubation revealed that presence of NP provoked only marginal changes in the proteome pattern. The method presented enabled us to investigate the behavior of S. aureus HG001 during infection of S9 human epithelial cells by means of fluorescence microscopy and proteomics using magnetic separation or cell sorting.

  17. Observation of a ferric hydroperoxide complex during the non-heme iron catalysed oxidation of alkenes and alkanes by O2.

    PubMed

    He, Yu; Goldsmith, Christian R

    2012-11-04

    A non-heme iron complex catalyses the oxidation of allylic, benzylic, and aliphatic C-H bonds by O(2). During this reactivity, a ferric hydroperoxide species is observed. The kinetic analysis of this complex's formation may suggest a ferric superoxo species as the initial metal-based oxidant.

  18. Selective removal of arsenic and monovalent ions from brackish water reverse osmosis concentrate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Pei; Capito, Marissa; Cath, Tzahi Y

    2013-09-15

    Concentrate disposal and management is a considerable challenge for the implementation of desalination technologies, especially for inland applications where concentrate disposal options are limited. This study has focused on selective removal of arsenic and monovalent ions from brackish groundwater reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate for beneficial use and safe environmental disposal using in situ and pre-formed hydrous ferric oxides/hydroxides adsorption, and electrodialysis (ED) with monovalent permselective membranes. Coagulation with ferric salts is highly efficient at removing arsenic from RO concentrate to meet a drinking water standard of 10 μg/L. The chemical demand for ferric chloride however is much lower than ferric sulfate as coagulant. An alternative method using ferric sludge from surface water treatment plant is demonstrated as an efficient adsorbent to remove arsenic from RO concentrate, providing a promising low cost, "waste treat waste" approach. The monovalent permselective anion exchange membranes exhibit high selectivity in removing monovalent anions over di- and multi-valent anions. The transport of sulfate and phosphate through the anion exchange membranes was negligible over a broad range of electrical current density. However, the transport of divalent cations such as calcium and magnesium increases through monovalent permselective cation exchange membranes with increasing current density. Higher overall salt concentration reduction is achieved around limiting current density while higher normalized salt removal rate in terms of mass of salt per membrane area and applied energy is attained at lower current density because the energy unitization efficiency decreases at higher current density.

  19. In situ measurement of ferric iron in lunar glass beads using Fe-XAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCanta, Molly C.; Dyar, M. Darby; Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Sutton, Stephen R.; Thomson, Bradley J.

    2017-03-01

    Through use of a new X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) calibration for Fe3+ analysis in silicate glasses, the first direct measurements of ferric iron in natural lunar picritic glasses are presented. Lunar glass beads from the Apollo sample collection contain up to 60.0% Fe3+. No correlation with melt chemical properties, such as Mg# or weight % TiO2, or physical properties, such as bead diameter, was observed. Fe3+/ΣFe is negatively correlated with NBO/T. These elevated Fe3+/ΣFe values reflect eruption and post-eruption oxidation due to magmatic degassing of H or OH. Glass beads observed to be zoned to lower Fe3+/ΣFe rims may represent a subsequent reduction in the lunar vacuum prior to cooling through the glass transition temperature.

  20. A high-throughput screening strategy for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes based on ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry.

    PubMed

    He, Yu-Cai; Ma, Cui-Luan; Xu, Jian-He; Zhou, Li

    2011-02-01

    Nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes (nitrilase or nitrile hydratase/amidase) have been widely used in the pharmaceutical industry for the production of carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and it is important to build a method for screening for nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes. In this paper, a simple, rapid, and high-throughput screening method based on the ferric hydroxamate spectrophotometry has been proposed. To validate the accuracy of this screening strategy, the nitrilases from Rhodococcus erythropolis CGMCC 1.2362 and Alcaligenes sp. ECU0401 were used for evaluating the method. As a result, the accuracy for assaying aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids was as high as the HPLC-based method. Therefore, the method may be potentially used in the selection of microorganisms or engineered proteins with nitrile-hydrolyzing enzymes.

  1. Treatment of antigen-induced arthritis in rabbits with dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, J.D.; Sledge, C.B.; Shortkroff, S.; Venkatesan, P.

    1989-01-01

    Dysprosium-165-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates (/sup 165/Dy-FHMA) was used as an agent of radiation synovectomy in an antigen-induced arthritis model in New Zealand white rabbits. Animals were killed up to 6 months after treatment. /sup 165/Dy-FHMA was found to have a potent but temporary antiinflammatory effect on synovium for up to 3 months after treatment. Treated knees also showed significant preservation of articular cartilage architecture and proteoglycan content compared with untreated controls, but only during the first 3 months after treatment. In animals killed 3 and 6 months after treatment there were only minimal differences between the treated and untreated knees, indicating that the antiinflammatory effects on synovial tissue and articular cartilage preservation were not sustained.

  2. Fayalite Oxidation Processes: Experimental Evidence for the Stability of Pure Ferric Fayalite?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A. M.; Righter, K.; Keller, L. P.; Medard, E.; Devouard, B.; Rahman, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Olivine is one of the most important minerals in Earth and planetary sciences. Fayalite Fe2(2+)SiO4, the ferrous end-member of olivine, is present in some terrestrial rocks and primitive meteorites (CV3 chondrites). A ferric fayalite (or ferri-fayalite), Fe(2+) Fe2(3+)(SiO4)2 laihunite, has been reported in Earth samples (magnetite ore, metamorphic and volcanic rocks...) and in Martian meteorites (nakhlites). Laihunite was also synthesized at 1 atmosphere between 400 and 700 C. We show evidence for the stability of a pure ferrifayalite end-member and for potential minerals with XFe(3+) between 2/3 and 1.

  3. Sodium ferric gluconate complex in the treatment of iron deficiency for patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Fishbane, S; Wagner, J

    2001-05-01

    Intravenous iron has been found to be an important adjunctive therapy in the treatment of anemia for patients on dialysis. In the United States, iron dextran had been the only form available for parenteral use until 1999. This agent has been associated with a concerning number of severe adverse reactions, in some cases resulting in patients' deaths. Recently, a form of iron used for many years in Europe, sodium ferric gluconate complex in sucrose, was approved for intravenous use in the United STATES: Because this agent does not contain the immunogenic dextran component of iron dextran, it is expected that the safety profile of this drug should be superior to that of iron dextran. The purpose of this review is to critically appraise the relevant literature and to synthesize the information into a strategy for clinical use of this drug.

  4. Moessbauer search for ferric oxide phases in lunar materials and simulated lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forester, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    Moessbauer studies were carried out on lunar fines and on simulated lunar glasses containing magnetic-like precipitates with the primary objective of determining how much, if any, ferric oxide is present in the lunar soils. Although unambiguous evidence of lunar Fe(3+) phases was not obtained, an upper limit was estimated from different portions of the Moessbauer spectra to be between 0.1 and 0.4 wt.% (as Fe3O4). A smaller than 62 microns fraction of 15021,118 showed 0.5 wt.% ferromagnetic iron at 300 K in as-returned condition. After heating to 650 C in an evacuated, sealed quartz tube for 1400 hours, the same sample exhibited 1 wt.% ferromagnetic iron at room temperature. An accompanying decrease in excess absorption area near zero velocity was noted. Thus, the result of the vacuum heat treatment was to convert fine grained iron to larger particles, apparently without the oxidation effects commonly reported.

  5. Structure and kinetics of formation of catechol complexes of ferric soybean lipoxygenase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.J.; Brennan, B.A.; Chase, D.B. |

    1995-11-21

    Ferric soybean lipoxygenase forms stable complexes with 4-substituted catechols. The structure of the complex between the enzyme and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile has been studied by resonance Raman, electron paramagnetic resonance, visible, and X-ray spectroscopies. It is a bidentate iron-catecholate complex with at least one water ligand. The kinetics of formation of complexes between lipoxygenase and 3,4-dihydroxybenzonitrile and 3,4-dihydroxyacetophenone have been studied by stopped-flow spectroscopy. The data are consistent with two kinetically distinct, reversible steps. The pH dependence of the first step suggests that the substrate for the reaction is the catechol monoanion. When these results are combined, plausible mechanisms for the complexation reaction are suggested. 51 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on Freshly Prepared Ferric Hydroxide (FeOxHy).

    PubMed

    He, Zan; Liu, Ruiping; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-02-01

    This study prepared fresh ferric hydroxide (in-situ FeOxHy) by the enhanced hydrolysis of Fe(3+) ions, and investigates its adsorptive behaviors toward Sb(III) and Sb(V) through laboratory and pilot-scale studies. A contact time of 120-min was enough to achieve adsorption equilibrium for Sb(III) and Sb(V) on the in-situ FeOxHy, and the Elovich model was best to describe the adsorption kinetics of Sb(III) and Sb(V). The Freundlich model was better than Langmuir model to describe the adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on the in-situ FeOxHy, and the maximum adsorption capacity of Sb(III) and Sb(V) was determined to be 12.77 and 10.21 mmol/g the in-situ FeOxHy as Fe, respectively. Adsorption of Sb(V) decreased whereas that of Sb(III) increased with elevated pH over pH 3-10, owing to the different electrical properties of Sb(III) and Sb(V). Adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) was slightly affected by ionic strength, and thus indicated the formation of inner sphere complexes between Sb and the adsorbent. Sulfate and carbonate showed little effect on the adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V). Phosphate significantly inhibited the adsorption of Sb(V), whereas slightly effected that of Sb(III) due to its similar chemical structure to Sb(V). Pilot-scale continuous experiment indicated the feasibility of using in-situ FeOxHy to remove Sb(V), and equilibrium adsorption capacity at the equilibrium Sb(V) concentration of 10 μg/L was determined to be 0.11, 0.07, 0.07, 0.11, and 0.12 mg/g the in-situ FeOxHy as Fe at equilibrium pH of 7.5-7.7, 6.9-7.0, 6.3-6.6, 5.9-6.4, and 5.2-5.9, respectively.

  7. The Formation, Structure, and Ageing of As-Rich Hydrous Ferric Oxide at the Abandoned Sb Deposit Pezinok (Slovakia)

    SciTech Connect

    Majzlan,J.; Lalinska, B.; Chovan, M.; Jurkovic, L.; Milovska, S.; Gottlicher, J.

    2007-01-01

    The abandoned Sb deposit Pezinok in Slovakia is a significant source of As and Sb pollution that can be traced in the upper horizons of soils kilometers downstream. The source of the metalloids are two tailing impoundments which hold {approx}380,000 m{sup 3} of mining waste. The tailings and the discharged water have circumneutral pH values (7.0 {+-} 0.6) because the acidity generated by the decomposition of the primary sulfides (pyrite, FeS{sub 2}; arsenopyrite, FeAsS; berthierite, FeSb{sub 2}S{sub 4}) is rapidly neutralized by the abundant carbonates. The weathering rims on the primary sulfides are iron oxides which act as very efficient scavengers of As and Sb (with up to 19.2 wt% As and 23.7 wt% Sb). In-situ {mu}-XANES experiments indicate that As in the weathering rims is fully oxidized (As{sup 5+}). The pore solutions in the impoundment body contain up to 81 ppm As and 2.5 ppm Sb. Once these solutions are discharged from the impoundments, they precipitate or deposit masses of As-rich hydrous ferric oxide (As-HFO) with up to 28.3 wt% As{sub 2}O{sub 5} and 2.7 wt% Sb. All As-HFO samples are amorphous to X-rays. They contain Fe and As in their highest oxidation state and in octahedral and tetrahedral coordination, respectively, as suggested by XANES and EXAFS studies on Fe K and As K edges. The iron octahedra in the As-HFO share edges to form short single chains and the chains polymerize by sharing edges or corners with the adjacent units. The arsenate ions attach to the chains in a bidentate-binuclear and monodentate fashion. In addition, hydrogen-bonded complexes may exist to satisfy the bonding requirements of all oxygen atoms in the first coordination sphere of As{sup 5+}. Structural changes in the As-HFO samples were traced by chemical analyses and Fe EXAFS spectroscopy during an ageing experiment. As the samples age, As becomes more easily leachable. EXAFS spectra show a discernible trend of increasing number of Fe-Fe pairs at a distance of 3

  8. Adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on Freshly Prepared Ferric Hydroxide (FeOxHy)

    PubMed Central

    He, Zan; Liu, Ruiping; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study prepared fresh ferric hydroxide (in-situ FeOxHy) by the enhanced hydrolysis of Fe3+ ions, and investigates its adsorptive behaviors toward Sb(III) and Sb(V) through laboratory and pilot-scale studies. A contact time of 120-min was enough to achieve adsorption equilibrium for Sb(III) and Sb(V) on the in-situ FeOxHy, and the Elovich model was best to describe the adsorption kinetics of Sb(III) and Sb(V). The Freundlich model was better than Langmuir model to describe the adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) on the in-situ FeOxHy, and the maximum adsorption capacity of Sb(III) and Sb(V) was determined to be 12.77 and 10.21 mmol/g the in-situ FeOxHy as Fe, respectively. Adsorption of Sb(V) decreased whereas that of Sb(III) increased with elevated pH over pH 3–10, owing to the different electrical properties of Sb(III) and Sb(V). Adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V) was slightly affected by ionic strength, and thus indicated the formation of inner sphere complexes between Sb and the adsorbent. Sulfate and carbonate showed little effect on the adsorption of Sb(III) and Sb(V). Phosphate significantly inhibited the adsorption of Sb(V), whereas slightly effected that of Sb(III) due to its similar chemical structure to Sb(V). Pilot-scale continuous experiment indicated the feasibility of using in-situ FeOxHy to remove Sb(V), and equilibrium adsorption capacity at the equilibrium Sb(V) concentration of 10 μg/L was determined to be 0.11, 0.07, 0.07, 0.11, and 0.12 mg/g the in-situ FeOxHy as Fe at equilibrium pH of 7.5–7.7, 6.9–7.0, 6.3–6.6, 5.9–6.4, and 5.2–5.9, respectively. PMID:25741175

  9. Viscosity of liquid ferric sulfate solutions and application to the formation of gullies on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrier, Vincent F.; Ulrich, Richard; Altheide, Travis S.

    2009-06-01

    We studied the viscosity of ferric sulfate Fe2(SO4)3 solutions as a model for low-temperature liquids on the surface of Mars and their implication in the formation of gullies. Viscosity varies with temperature and concentration, ranging from 7.0 × 10-3 Pa s for 38.8 wt % at 285.15 K to 4.6 Pa s for 58.2 wt % at 260.15 K. Using the experimental results, we built a semiempirical equation of viscosity as a function of temperature and salt concentration, which was combined with a numerical model to estimate the effect of these solutions on the formation of gullies. Calculated fluid velocities ranged from 0.5 to 14 m s-1, in accordance with estimates from image analyses. Turbulent flow occurs in the majority of the conditions and is characterized by a constant velocity (˜8.5 m s-1). At very low temperature and high concentration, the laminar regime shows reduced velocities (down to ˜0.5 m s-1). In between, a transitional regime presents high velocities, up to 14 m s-1. Using the velocities, we determined the size threshold for boulders to be moved by the liquid flow. Depending on the regime, boulders of diameter inferior to 3 m (turbulent), 4 m (transition), and down to 0.5 m (laminar) are displaced. Since laminar flow occurs only in an extremely limited range of conditions, for low temperatures (<240 K) and supersaturated solutions, the abundance of small boulders (˜0.5 m) in gully channels requires lower velocities and higher viscosities than ferric sulfate solution or any other water-based liquid can reach. This suggests an important participation of debris mixed with the liquid phase.

  10. Structural characterization of ferric hemoglobins from three antarctic fish species of the suborder notothenioidei.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Alessandro; Franzese, Marisa; Merlino, Antonello; Vitagliano, Luigi; Verde, Cinzia; di Prisco, Guido; Lee, H Caroline; Peisach, Jack; Mazzarella, Lelio

    2007-10-15

    Spontaneous autoxidation of tetrameric Hbs leads to the formation of Fe (III) forms, whose physiological role is not fully understood. Here we report structural characterization by EPR of the oxidized states of tetrameric Hbs isolated from the Antarctic fish species Trematomus bernacchii, Trematomus newnesi, and Gymnodraco acuticeps, as well as the x-ray crystal structure of oxidized Trematomus bernacchii Hb, redetermined at high resolution. The oxidation of these Hbs leads to formation of states that were not usually detected in previous analyses of tetrameric Hbs. In addition to the commonly found aquo-met and hydroxy-met species, EPR analyses show that two distinct hemichromes coexist at physiological pH, referred to as hemichromes I and II, respectively. Together with the high-resolution crystal structure (1.5 A) of T. bernacchii and a survey of data available for other heme proteins, hemichrome I was assigned by x-ray crystallography and by EPR as a bis-His complex with a distorted geometry, whereas hemichrome II is a less constrained (cytochrome b5-like) bis-His complex. In four of the five Antartic fish Hbs examined, hemichrome I is the major form. EPR shows that for HbCTn, the amount of hemichrome I is substantially reduced. In addition, the concomitant presence of a penta-coordinated high-spin Fe (III) species, to our knowledge never reported before for a wild-type tetrameric Hb, was detected. A molecular modeling investigation demonstrates that the presence of the bulkier Ile in position 67beta in HbCTn in place of Val as in the other four Hbs impairs the formation of hemichrome I, thus favoring the formation of the ferric penta-coordinated species. Altogether the data show that ferric states commonly associated with monomeric and dimeric Hbs are also found in tetrameric Hbs.

  11. Application of ferric sludge to immobilize leachable mercury in soils and concrete.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, J Ming; Walsh, T; Lam, T; Boulter, D

    2003-11-01

    A Hg-contaminated site in B.C. Province, Canada was caused by the previous operation of Hg-cell in chlor-alkali process for over 25 years. The soils and groundwater at the site are highly contaminated with mercury. An analysis of groundwater at the site has shown that most of the mercury is bonded with humic and fulvic acids (HFA) in colloidal form. The Hg-HFA colloids can be completely removed from the groundwater with ferric chloride treatment under optimized process conditions to form ferric sludge (FS), which is rendered non-leachable by standard TCLP (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure) test. The effluent discharged from a clarifier has achieved mercury levels of < 0.5 microkg l(-1). The studies of mercury adsorption characteristics of FS show it has low mercury leachability by TCLP, and great mercury adsorption capability. This feature is the basis for the application of FS to immobilization of leachable Hg-contaminants in solid wastes. Full-scale stabilization tests of Hg-contaminated soil have been carried out, and the time-based stability of the treated soil has been monitored by TCLP over a period of 60 days. All the results have shown a small variation in TCLP mercury levels within a range of 10-40 microg l(-1). Based on these results and with the approval of the B.C. Ministry of the Environment, 1850 tons of Hg-contaminated soils and 260 tons of Hg-contaminated concrete fines have been treated, stabilized with FS, and disposed in a non-hazardous waste disposal site.

  12. Ameliorative effect of butylated hydroxyanisole against ferric nitrilotriacetate-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Ansar, S; Iqbal, M

    2015-11-01

    Ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) is a known renal carcinogen and has been shown to adversely induce oxidative stress and tissue toxicity after both acute and chronic exposure. Present studies were designed to study the hepatoprotective and antioxidant potential of butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), a phenolic antioxidant used in foods on ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA) induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Male albino rats of Wistar strain (4-6 weeks old) weighing 125-150 g were used in this study. Animals were given a single dose of Fe-NTA (9 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneal) after a week's treatment with BHA. BHA was administered orally once daily for 7 days at doses of 1 and 2 mg/animal/day. The hepatoprotective activity was assessed using various biochemical parameters as serum transaminases (alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST)) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Fe-NTA treatment increased ALT, AST, and LDH levels significantly when compared to the corresponding saline-treated group (p < 0.001). Fe-NTA also depleted the levels of glutathione and the activities of antioxidant enzymes namely glutathione reductase and glutathione-S-tranferase (p < 0.05). Pretreatment with BHA significantly decreased ALT, AST and LDH levels in a dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05). BHA also increased antioxidant enzymes level and decreased lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide generation to 1.3-1.5-fold as compared to Fe-NTA-treated group. The results show the strong hepatoprotective activity of BHA which could be due to its potent antioxidant effects.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of a new family of bi-, tri-, tetra-, and pentanuclear ferric complexes.

    PubMed

    Boskovic, Colette; Sieber, Andreas; Chaboussant, Grégory; Güdel, Hans U; Ensling, Jürgen; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Neels, Antonia; Labat, Gael; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen; Janssen, Stefan

    2004-08-09

    Nine members of a new family of polynuclear ferric complexes have been synthesized and characterized. The reaction of Fe(O(2)CMe)(2) with polydentate Schiff base proligands (H(2)L) derived from salicylidene-2-ethanolamine, followed in some cases by reaction with carboxylic acids, has afforded new complexes of general formulas [Fe(2)(pic)(2)(L)(2)] (where pic(-) is the anion of 2-picolinic acid), [Fe(3)(O(2)CMe)(3)(L)(3)], [Fe(4)(OR)(2)(O(2)CMe)(2)(L)(4)], and [Fe(5)O(OH)(O(2)CR)(4)(L)(4)]. The tri-, tetra-, and pentanuclear complexes all possess unusual structures and novel core topologies. Mössbauer spectroscopy confirms the presence of high-spin ferric centers in the tri- and pentanuclear complexes. Variable-temperature magnetic measurements suggest spin ground states of S = 0, 1/2, 0, and 5/2 for the bi-, tri-, tetra-, and pentanuclear complexes, respectively. Fits of the magnetic susceptibility data have provided the magnitude of the exclusively antiferromagnetic exchange interactions. In addition, an easy-axis-type magnetic anisotropy has been observed for the pentanuclear complexes, with D values of approximately -0.4 cm(-)(1) determined from modeling the low-temperature magnetization data. A low-temperature micro-SQUID study of one of the pentanuclear complexes reveals magnetization hysteresis at nonzero field. This is attributed to an anisotropy-induced energy barrier to magnetization reversal that is of molecular origin. Finally, an inelastic neutron scattering study of one of the trinuclear complexes has revealed that the magnetic behavior arises from two distinct species.

  14. Sorption of Ferric Iron from Ferrioxamine B to Synthetic and Biogenic Layer Type Manganese Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, O.; John, B.; Sposito, G.

    2006-12-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments to increase the bioavailablity of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but no information appears to be available about the effect of solid-phase Mn(IV). To probe the effects of predominantly Mn(IV) oxides, we studied the sorption reaction of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB+, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] with two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III, IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida MnB1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB+ over at pH 8. After 72 hours equilibration time, the sorption behavior for the synthetic birnessites could be accurately described by a Langmuir isotherm; for the biogenic oxide, a Freundlich isotherm was best utilized to model the sorption data. To study the molecular nature of the interaction between the Fe(III)HDFOB+ complex and the oxide surface, Fe K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was employed. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra indicated that Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to into the mineral structure at multiple sites with no evidence of DFOB complexation, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that manganese oxides, including biominerals, may strongly sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes and thus may play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  15. Sorption of ferric iron from ferrioxamine B to synthetic and biogenic layer type manganese oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckworth, Owen W.; Bargar, John R.; Sposito, Garrison

    2008-07-01

    Siderophores are biogenic chelating agents produced in terrestrial and marine environments that increase the bioavailability of ferric iron. Recent work has suggested that both aqueous and solid-phase Mn(III) may affect siderophore-mediated iron transport, but scant information appears to be available about the potential roles of layer type manganese oxides, which are relatively abundant in soils and the oligotrophic marine water column. To probe the effects of layer type manganese oxides on the stability of aqueous Fe-siderophore complexes, we studied the sorption of ferrioxamine B [Fe(III)HDFOB +, an Fe(III) chelate of the trihydroxamate siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFOB)] to two synthetic birnessites [layer type Mn(III,IV) oxides] and a biogenic birnessite produced by Pseudomonas putida GB-1. We found that all of these predominantly Mn(IV) oxides greatly reduced the aqueous concentration of Fe(III)HDFOB + at pH 8. Analysis of Fe K-edge EXAFS spectra indicated that a dominant fraction of Fe(III) associated with the Mn(IV) oxides is not complexed by DFOB as in solution, but instead Fe(III) is specifically adsorbed to the mineral structure at multiple sites, thus indicating that the Mn(IV) oxides displaced Fe(III) from the siderophore complex. These results indicate that layer type manganese oxides, including biogenic minerals, may sequester iron from soluble ferric complexes. We conclude that the sorption of iron-siderophore complexes may play a significant role in the bioavailability and biogeochemical cycling of iron in marine and terrestrial environments.

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Aluminum Sulfate and Ferric Sulfate-Induced Coagulations as Pretreatment of Microfiltration for Treatment of Surface Water

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yali; Dong, Bingzhi; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Two coagulants, aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride, were tested to reduce natural organic matter (NOM) as a pretreatment prior to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration (MF) membranes for potable water treatment. The results showed that the two coagulants exhibited different treatment performance in NOM removal. Molecular weight (MW) distributions of NOM in the tested surface raw water were concentrated at 3–5 kDa and approximately 0.2 kDa. Regardless of the coagulant species and dosages, the removal of 0.2 kDa NOM molecules was limited. In contrast, NOM at 3–5 kDa were readily removed with increasing coagulant dosages. In particular, aluminum sulfate favorably removed NOM near 5 kDa, whereas ferric chloride tended to reduce 3 kDa organic substances. Although aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride could improve the flux of the ensuing MF treatment, the optimal coagulant dosages to achieve effective pretreatment were different: 2–30 mg/L for aluminum sulfate and >15 mg/L for ferric chloride. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of the membrane-filtered coagulated raw water showed that coagulation efficiency dramatically affected membrane flux and that good coagulation properties can reduce membrane fouling. PMID:26075726

  17. Comparative Evaluation of Aluminum Sulfate and Ferric Sulfate-Induced Coagulations as Pretreatment of Microfiltration for Treatment of Surface Water.

    PubMed

    Song, Yali; Dong, Bingzhi; Gao, Naiyun; Deng, Yang

    2015-06-12

    Two coagulants, aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride, were tested to reduce natural organic matter (NOM) as a pretreatment prior to polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microfiltration (MF) membranes for potable water treatment. The results showed that the two coagulants exhibited different treatment performance in NOM removal. Molecular weight (MW) distributions of NOM in the tested surface raw water were concentrated at 3-5 kDa and approximately 0.2 kDa. Regardless of the coagulant species and dosages, the removal of 0.2 kDa NOM molecules was limited. In contrast, NOM at 3-5 kDa were readily removed with increasing coagulant dosages. In particular, aluminum sulfate favorably removed NOM near 5 kDa, whereas ferric chloride tended to reduce 3 kDa organic substances. Although aluminum sulfate and ferric chloride could improve the flux of the ensuing MF treatment, the optimal coagulant dosages to achieve effective pretreatment were different: 2-30 mg/L for aluminum sulfate and >15 mg/L for ferric chloride. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) image of the membrane-filtered coagulated raw water showed that coagulation efficiency dramatically affected membrane flux and that good coagulation properties can reduce membrane fouling.

  18. Involvement of superoxide radical in extracellular ferric reduction by iron-deficient bean roots. [Phadeolus vulgaris L. var Prelude

    SciTech Connect

    Cakmak, I.; van de Wetering, D.A.M.; Marschner, H.; Bienfait, H.F.

    1987-09-01

    The recent proposal of Tipton and Thowsen that iron-deficient plants reduce ferric chelates in cell walls by a system dependent on the leakage of malate from root cells was tested. Results are presented showing that this mechanism could not be responsible for the high rates of ferric reduction shown by roots of iron-deficient bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. var Prelude) plants. The role of O/sub 2/ in the reduction of ferric chelates by roots of iron-deficient bean plants was also tested. The rate of Fe(III) reduction was the same in the presence and in the absence of O/sub 2/. However, in the presence of O/sub 2/ the reaction was partially inhibited by superoxide dismutase (SOD), which indicates a role for the superoxide radical, O/sub 2//sup -/, as a facultative intermediate electron carrier. The inhibition by SOD increased with substrate pH and with decrease in concentration of the ferrous scavenger bathophenanthroline-disulfonate. The results are consistent with a mechanism for transmembrane electron in which a flavin or quinone is the final electron carrier in the plasma membrane. The results are discussed in relation to the ecological importance that O/sub 2//sup -/ may have in the acquisition of ferric iron by dicotyledonous plants.

  19. Shewanella spp. Use Acetate as an Electron Donor for Denitrification but Not Ferric Iron or Fumarate Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sukhwan; Sanford, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Lactate but not acetate oxidation was reported to support electron acceptor reduction by Shewanella spp. under anoxic conditions. We demonstrate that the denitrifiers Shewanella loihica strain PV-4 and Shewanella denitrificans OS217 utilize acetate as an electron donor for denitrification but not for fumarate or ferric iron reduction. PMID:23396327

  20. A bipolar membrane combined with ferric iron reduction as an efficient cathode system in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ter Heijne, Annemiek; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; De Wilde, Vinnie; Rozendal, René A; Buisman, Cees J N

    2006-09-01

    There is a need for alternative catalysts for oxygen reduction in the cathodic compartment of a microbial fuel cell (MFC). In this study, we show that a bipolar membrane combined with ferric iron reduction on a graphite electrode is an efficient cathode system in MFCs. A flat plate MFC with graphite felt electrodes, a volume of 1.2 L and a projected surface area of 290 cm2 was operated in continuous mode. Ferric iron was reduced to ferrous iron in the cathodic compartment according to Fe(3+) + e(-) --> Fe2+ (E0 = +0.77 V vs NHE, normal hydrogen electrode). This reversible electron transfer reaction considerably reduced the cathode overpotential. The low catholyte pH required to keep ferric iron soluble was maintained by using a bipolar membrane instead of the commonly used cation exchange membrane. For the MFC with cathodic ferric iron reduction, the maximum power density was 0.86 W/m2 at a current density of 4.5 A/m2. The Coulombic efficiency and energy recovery were 80-95% and 18-29% respectively.

  1. Identification of an additional ferric-siderophore uptake gene clustered with receptor, biosynthesis, and fur-like regulatory genes in fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain M114.

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, D J; Morris, J; O'Gara, F

    1990-01-01

    Five cosmid clones with insert sizes averaging 22.6 kilobases (kb) were isolated after complementation of 22 Tn5-induced Sid- mutants of Pseudomonas sp. strain M114. One of these plasmids (pMS639) was also shown to encode ferric-siderophore receptor and dissociation functions. The receptor gene was located on this plasmid since introduction of the plasmid into three wild-type fluorescent pseudomonads enabled them to utilize the ferric-siderophore from strain M114. The presence of an extra iron-regulated protein in the outer membrane profile of one of these strains was detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A ferric-siderophore dissociation gene was attributed to pMS639 since it complemented the ferric-siderophore uptake mutation in strain M114FR2. This mutant was not defective in the outer membrane receptor for ferric-siderophore but apparently accumulated ferric-siderophore internally. Since ferric-citrate alleviated the iron stress of the mutant, there was no defect in iron metabolism subsequent to release of iron from the ferric-siderophore complex. Consequently, this mutant was defective in ferric-siderophore dissociation. A fur-like regulatory gene also present on pMS639 was subcloned to a 7.0-kb BglII insert of pCUP5 and was located approximately 7.3 kb from the receptor region. These results established that the 27.2-kb insert of pMS639 encoded at least two siderophore biosynthesis genes, ferric-siderophore receptor and dissociation genes, and a fur-like regulatory gene from the biocontrol fluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain M114. Images PMID:2143887

  2. High-spin ferric ions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae vacuoles are reduced to the ferrous state during adenine-precursor detoxification.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinkyu; McCormick, Sean P; Cockrell, Allison L; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Lindahl, Paul A

    2014-06-24

    The majority of Fe in Fe-replete yeast cells is located in vacuoles. These acidic organelles store Fe for use under Fe-deficient conditions and they sequester it from other parts of the cell to avoid Fe-associated toxicity. Vacuolar Fe is predominantly in the form of one or more magnetically isolated nonheme high-spin (NHHS) Fe(III) complexes with polyphosphate-related ligands. Some Fe(III) oxyhydroxide nanoparticles may also be present in these organelles, perhaps in equilibrium with the NHHS Fe(III). Little is known regarding the chemical properties of vacuolar Fe. When grown on adenine-deficient medium (A↓), ADE2Δ strains of yeast such as W303 produce a toxic intermediate in the adenine biosynthetic pathway. This intermediate is conjugated with glutathione and shuttled into the vacuole for detoxification. The iron content of A↓ W303 cells was determined by Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies. As they transitioned from exponential growth to stationary state, A↓ cells (supplemented with 40 μM Fe(III) citrate) accumulated two major NHHS Fe(II) species as the vacuolar NHHS Fe(III) species declined. This is evidence that vacuoles in A↓ cells are more reducing than those in adenine-sufficient cells. A↓ cells suffered less oxidative stress despite the abundance of NHHS Fe(II) complexes; such species typically promote Fenton chemistry. Most Fe in cells grown for 5 days with extra yeast-nitrogen-base, amino acids and bases in minimal medium was HS Fe(III) with insignificant amounts of nanoparticles. The vacuoles of these cells might be more acidic than normal and can accommodate high concentrations of HS Fe(III) species. Glucose levels and rapamycin (affecting the TOR system) affected cellular Fe content. This study illustrates the sensitivity of cellular Fe to changes in metabolism, redox state and pH. Such effects broaden our understanding of how Fe and overall cellular metabolism are integrated.

  3. Measurement of Ferric Ion Diffusion Coefficient in Fricke-Infused Agarose Gel From MR Image Intensity Changes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Coefficient in Fricke-Infused Agarose Gel From MR Image Intensity Changes Contract Number Grant Number Program Element Number Author( s ) Project Number Task...Number Work Unit Number Performing Organization Name( s ) and Address(es) Institutes of Biomedical Engineering and Radiological Sciences National...Yang Ming University Pei-Tou Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. Performing Organization Report Number Sponsoring/Monitoring Agency Name( s ) and Address(es) US

  4. Method and apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for detecting and quantifying bacterial spores on a surface. In accordance with the method: a matrix including lanthanide ions is provided on the surface containing the bacterial spores; functionalized aromatic molecules are released from the bacterial spores on the surface; a complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is formed on the surface; the complex of the lanthanide ion and the aromatic molecule is excited to generate a characteristic luminescence of the complex on the surface; and the bacterial spores exhibiting the luminescence of the complex on the surface are detected and quantified.

  5. Bacterial Silicification: An Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toporski, J.; Steele, A.; Westall, F.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; McKay, D.

    2002-05-01

    Evidence of life on Earth in form of silicified microorganisms is reported from throughout the geological record as early as 3.5 Ga ago to recent hot spring environments. Silicified microfossils are resistant to weathering which renders them readily preservable over long time spans. This is of particular interest in astropalaeontological research as if microbial life once was present outside Earth its traces may have become silicified. To better understand the mechanisms involved in silicification, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate silicification of bacterial biofilms. These were exposed to Si solution to test the influence of exposure time and Si ion concentration on silicification. The bacterial biofilms were subsequently analysed using Transmission Electron Microscopy/TEM in combination with Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis. It was found that silicification commences after 24h in Si solution and high ion availability results in better preservation of cellular detail; the concentration of Si thus is more important than exposure time. Cells became permineralised and no amorphous silica precipitation was observed. High-resolution TEM studies revealed the presence of nanometer-sized crystallites in highly silicified cell walls. The design of this study will be used to monitor molecular alteration due to silicification to better understand biomarker formation.

  6. Ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.

    1984-01-01

    A magnetic filter for an ion source reduces the production of undesired ion species and improves the ion beam quality. High-energy ionizing electrons are confined by the magnetic filter to an ion source region, where the high-energy electrons ionize gas molecules. One embodiment of the magnetic filter uses permanent magnets oriented to establish a magnetic field transverse to the direction of travel of ions from the ion source region to the ion extraction region. In another embodiment, low energy 16 eV electrons are injected into the ion source to dissociate gas molecules and undesired ion species into desired ion species.

  7. Five- and six-coordinate adducts of nitrosamines with ferric porphyrins: structural models for the Type II interactions of nitrosamines with ferric cytochrome P450.

    PubMed

    Xu, Nan; Goodrich, Lauren E; Lehnert, Nicolai; Powell, Douglas R; Richter-Addo, George B

    2010-05-17

    Nitrosamines are well-known for their toxic and carcinogenic properties. The metabolic activation of nitrosamines occurs via interaction with the heme-containing cytochrome P450 enzymes. We report the preparation and structural characterization of a number of nitrosamine adducts of synthetic iron porphyrins. The reactions of the cations [(por)Fe(THF)(2)]ClO(4) (por = TPP, TTP, OEP) with dialkylnitrosamines (R(2)NNO; R(2) = Me(2), Et(2), (cyclo-CH(2))(4), (cyclo-CH(2))(5), (PhCH(2))(2)) in toluene generate the six-coordinate high-spin (S = 5/2) [(por)Fe(ONNR(2))(2)]ClO(4) compounds and a five-coordinate intermediate-spin (S = 3/2) [(OEP)Fe(ONNMe(2))]ClO(4) derivative in 57-72% yields (TPP = 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrinato dianion, TTP = 5,10,15,20-tetra-p-tolylporphyrinato dianion, OEP = 2,3,7,8,12,13,17,18-octaethylporphyrinato dianion). The N-O and N-N vibrations of the coordinated nitrosamine groups in [(por)Fe(ONNR(2))(2)]ClO(4) occur in the 1239-1271 cm(-1) range. Three of the six-coordinate [(por)Fe(ONNR(2))(2)]ClO(4) compounds and one five-coordinate [(OEP)Fe(ONNMe(2))]ClO(4) compound have been characterized by single crystal X-ray crystallography. All the nitrosamine ligands in these complexes bind to the ferric centers via a sole eta(1)-O binding mode. No arylnitrosamine adducts were obtained from the reactions of the precursor compounds [(por)Fe(THF)(2)]ClO(4) with three arylnitrosamines (Ph(2)NNO, Ph(Me)NNO, Ph(Et)NNO). However, prolonged exposure of [(por)Fe(THF)(2)]ClO(4) to these arylnitrosamines resulted in the formation of the known five-coordinate (por)Fe(NO) derivatives. The latter (por)Fe(NO) compounds were obtained more readily by the reactions of the three arylnitrosamines with the four-coordinate (por)Fe(II) precursors.

  8. Ferric reductase activity of low molecular weight human milk fraction is associated with enhanced iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Pullakhandam, Raghu; Nair, Madhavan Krishnapillai; Kasula, Sunanda; Kilari, Sreenivasulu; Thippande, Tippeswamy Gowda

    2008-09-19

    It is known that the fractional absorption of extrinsic iron from human milk is higher in infants and adults. A low molecular weight milk fraction has been proposed to increase the bioavailability of iron from human milk. Nevertheless, the mechanisms remained elusive. Here in we demonstrate ferric reductase activity (Km7.73x10(-6)M) in low molecular weight human milk fraction (10kF, filtrate derived from ultra filtration of milk whey through 10kDa cutoff membrane), which increased ferric iron solubility and iron uptake in Caco-2 cells. The 10kF fraction was as effective as ascorbic acid (1:20 iron to ascorbic acid) in increasing the ferric iron solubility and uptake in Caco-2 cells. Further, gel filtration chromatography on peptide column led to co-elution of ferric reductase and iron solubilization activities at an apparent molecular mass of <1500Da. Interestingly, only these fractions containing ferric reductase activity also stimulated the uptake of iron in Caco-2 cells. Thus, it is concluded that human milk possesses ferric reductase activity and is associated with ferric iron solubilization and enhanced absorption.

  9. Shallow-water hydrothermal system and sedimentation of the ferric deposit in the Nagahama-bay, Satsuma Iwo-jima Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninomiya, T.; Kiyokawa, S.; Koge, S.; Oguri, K.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Ito, T.; Ikehara, M.

    2008-12-01

    Satsuma Iwo-jima Island, located 40km south of Kyushu, Japan, has characteristic hydrothermal activities surrounding its active volcano Iwo-dake. Along the shoreline, hydrothermal fluids discharge and they cause discoloration of the seawater. At Nagahama-bay, iron ion in carbonated spring is oxidized to iron hydroxide precipitate by mixing with the sea water and the water takes on red color(Kamada, 1964). To understand the relationships among the ferric deposits, hydrothermal ventings, and the sea tide in the bay, we conducted the following studies; (a) naked eye observation at seafloor by SCUBA diving and the measurements of temperature and sediment distributions, (b) time-series in situ observation of the sesafloor by OGURI-View system (an automatic underwater digital camera system; Oguri et al., 2006), (c) time-series observation of color changes in the surface water by automatic acquisition system modified from OGURI-View, (d) geochemical analysis of the sea water collected in spring and fall 2007 and summer 2008, (e) coring to find the components in the sediment, and (f) six months-long sediment trap to estimate total mass flux in the bay. On the seafloor, numerous hot vents were found in the eastern part of the bay at 4m in depth. Soft sediment was also formed around the vents up to 1.5m thick. Temperature of the surface sediment ranged from 30 to 55 degree Celsius; the highest temperature was observed near those vents. The time-series images taken by OGURI-View system showed that turbidness of the bottom of the sea water changed daily. The turbidity data in the bay indicated that their daily changes occurred by tidal currents and sometimes by unusual mixing induced by strong typhoon. The sediment of 83cm core sample consisted of clay-sized reddish ferric oxides, quartz, volcanic ashes, rock fragments, and very fine to fine sand. From the sediment trap experiment, total mass accumulation rate was estimated to 0.12-0.18g/cm2/day. This high rate may be one

  10. Inhibiting bacterial toxins by channel blockage.

    PubMed

    Bezrukov, Sergey M; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M

    2016-03-01

    Emergent rational drug design techniques explore individual properties of target biomolecules, small and macromolecule drug candidates, and the physical forces governing their interactions. In this minireview, we focus on the single-molecule biophysical studies of channel-forming bacterial toxins that suggest new approaches for their inhibition. We discuss several examples of blockage of bacterial pore-forming and AB-type toxins by the tailor-made compounds. In the concluding remarks, the most effective rationally designed pore-blocking antitoxins are compared with the small-molecule inhibitors of ion-selective channels of neurophysiology.

  11. Torque-induced precession of bacterial flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogonya, Yuji; Sawano, Yoichiro; Wakebe, Hiromichi; Inoue, Yuichi; Ishijima, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is an ion-driven rotary machine in the cell envelope of bacteria. Using a gold nanoparticle as a probe, we observed the precession of flagella during rotation. Since the mechanism of flagella precession was unknown, we investigated it using a combination of full simulations, theory, and experiments. The results show that the mechanism can be well explained by fluid mechanics. The validity of our theory was confirmed by our full simulation, which was utilized to predict both the filament tilt angle and motor torque from experimental flagellar precession data. The knowledge obtained is important in understanding mechanical properties of the bacterial motor and hook.

  12. Torque-induced precession of bacterial flagella.

    PubMed

    Shimogonya, Yuji; Sawano, Yoichiro; Wakebe, Hiromichi; Inoue, Yuichi; Ishijima, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-12-22

    The bacterial flagellar motor is an ion-driven rotary machine in the cell envelope of bacteria. Using a gold nanoparticle as a probe, we observed the precession of flagella during rotation. Since the mechanism of flagella precession was unknown, we investigated it using a combination of full simulations, theory, and experiments. The results show that the mechanism can be well explained by fluid mechanics. The validity of our theory was confirmed by our full simulation, which was utilized to predict both the filament tilt angle and motor torque from experimental flagellar precession data. The knowledge obtained is important in understanding mechanical properties of the bacterial motor and hook.

  13. Inhibiting bacterial toxins by channel blockage

    PubMed Central

    Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.

    2015-01-01

    Emergent rational drug design techniques explore individual properties of target biomolecules, small and macromolecule drug candidates, and the physical forces governing their interactions. In this minireview, we focus on the single-molecule biophysical studies of channel-forming bacterial toxins that suggest new approaches for their inhibition. We discuss several examples of blockage of bacterial pore-forming and AB-type toxins by the tailor-made compounds. In the concluding remarks, the most effective rationally designed pore-blocking antitoxins are compared with the small-molecule inhibitors of ion-selective channels of neurophysiology. PMID:26656888

  14. Possible Association of Ferrous Phosphates and Ferric Sulfates in S-rich Soil on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, J.; Schroeder, C.; Haderlein, S.

    2012-12-01

    NASA Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit explored Gusev Crater to look for signs of ancient aqueous activity, assess past environmental conditions and suitability for life. Spirit excavated light-toned, S-rich soils at several locations. These are likely of hydrothermal, possibly fumarolic origin. At a location dubbed Paso Robles the light-toned soil was also rich in P - a signature from surrounding rock. While S is mainly bound in ferric hydrated sulfates [1], the mineralogy of P is ill-constrained [2]. P is a key element for life and its mineralogy constrains its availability. Ferrous phases observed in Paso Robles Mössbauer spectra may represent olivine and pyroxene from surrounding basaltic soil [1] or ferrous phosphate minerals [3]. Phosphate is well-known to complex and stabilize Fe 2+ against oxidation to Fe 3+ . Schröder et al. [3] proposed a formation pathway of ferrous phosphate/ferric sulfate associations: sulfuric acid reacts with basalt containing apatite, forming CaSO4 and phosphoric acid. The phosphoric and/or excess sulfuric acid reacts with olivine, forming Fe2+-phosphate and sulfate. The phosphate is less soluble and precipitates. Ferrous sulfate remains in solution and is oxidized as pH increases. To verify this pathway, we dissolved Fe2+-chloride and Na-phosphate salts in sulfuric acid inside an anoxic glovebox. The solution was titrated to pH 6 by adding NaOH when a first precipitate formed, which was ferrous phosphate according to Mössbauer spectroscopy (MB). At that point the solution was removed from the glovebox and allowed to evaporate in the presence of atmospheric oxygen, leading to the oxidation of Fe2+. The evaporation rate was controlled by keeping the suspensions at different temperatures; pH was monitored during the evaporation process. The final precipitates were analyzed by MB and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), comparable to MER MB and Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer instrument datasets, and complementary techniques such as X

  15. Extraction of copper from an oxidized (lateritic) ore using bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution.

    PubMed

    Nancucheo, Ivan; Grail, Barry M; Hilario, Felipe; du Plessis, Chris; Johnson, D Barrie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidized lateritic ore which contained 0.8 % (by weight) copper was bioleached in pH- and temperature-controlled stirred reactors under acidic reducing conditions using pure and mixed cultures of the acidophilic chemolithotrophic bacterium Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. Sulfur was provided as the electron donor for the bacteria, and ferric iron present in goethite (the major ferric iron mineral present in the ore) acted as electron acceptor. Significantly more copper was leached by bacterially catalysed reductive dissolution of the laterite than in aerobic cultures or in sterile anoxic reactors, with up to 78 % of the copper present in the ore being extracted. This included copper that was leached from acid-labile minerals (chiefly copper silicates) and that which was associated with ferric iron minerals in the lateritic ore. In the anaerobic bioreactors, soluble iron in the leach liquors was present as iron (II) and copper as copper (I), but both metals were rapidly oxidized (to iron (III) and copper (II)) when the reactors were aerated. The number of bacteria added to the reactors had a critical role in dictating the rate and yield of copper solubilised from the ore. This work has provided further evidence that reductive bioprocessing, a recently described approach for extracting base metals from oxidized deposits, has the potential to greatly extend the range of metal ores that can be biomined.

  16. Ion channels in microbes

    PubMed Central

    Martinac, Boris; Saimi, Yoshiro; Kung, Ching

    2008-01-01

    Summary Studies of ion channels have for long been dominated by the animalcentric, if not anthropocentric view of physiology. The structures and activities of ion channels had, however, evolved long before the appearance of complex multicellular organisms on Earth. The diversity of ion channels existing in cellular membranes of prokaryotes is a good example. Though at first it may appear as a paradox that most of what we know about the structure of eukaryotic ion channels is based on the structure of bacterial channels, this should not be surprising given the evolutionary relatedness of all living organisms and suitability of microbial cells for structural studies of biological macromolecules in a laboratory environment. Genome sequences of the human as well as various microbial, plant and animal organisms unambiguously established the evolutionary links, whereas crystallographic studies of the structures of major types of ion channels published over the last decade clearly demonstrated the advantage of using microbes as experimental organisms. The purpose of this review is not only to provide an account of acquired knowledge on microbial ion channels but also to show that the study of microbes and their ion channels may also hold a key to solving unresolved molecular mysteries in the future. PMID:18923187

  17. Application of granular ferric hydroxides for removal elevated concentrations of arsenic from mine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szlachta, Małgorzata; Włodarczyk, Paweł; Wójtowicz, Patryk

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic is naturally occurring element in the environment. Over three hundred minerals are known to contain some form of arsenic and among them arsenopyrite is the most common one. Arsenic-bearing minerals are frequently associated with ores containing mined metals such as copper, tin, nickel, lead, uranium, zinc, cobalt, platinum and gold. In the aquatic environment arsenic is typically present in inorganic forms, mainly in two oxidation states (+5, +3). As(III) is dominant in more reduced conditions, whereas As(V) is mostly present in an oxidizing environment. However, due to certain human activities the elevated arsenic levels in aquatic ecosystems are arising to a serious environmental problem. High arsenic concentrations found in surface and groundwaters, in some regions originate from mining activities and ore processing. Therefore, the major concern of mining industry is to maintain a good quality of effluents discharged in large volumes. This requires constant monitoring of effluents quality that guarantee the efficient protection of the receiving waters and reacting to possible negative impact of contamination on local communities. A number of proven technologies are available for arsenic removal from waters and wastewaters. In the presented work special attention is given to the adsorption method as a technically feasible, commonly applied and effective technique for the treatment of arsenic rich mine effluents. It is know that arsenic has a strong affinity towards iron rich materials. Thus, in this study the granular ferric hydroxides (CFH 12, provided by Kemira Oyj, Finland) was applied to remove As(III) and As(V) from aqueous solutions. The batch adsorption experiments were carried out to assess the efficiency of the tested Fe-based material under various operating parameters, including composition of treated water, solution pH and temperature. The results obtained from the fixed bed adsorption tests demonstrated the benefits of applying granular

  18. Contribution of ferric iron to the absorption by chromophoric dissolved matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Y. H.; Sara-aho, T.; Vähätalo, A. V.

    2012-04-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a major absorber of ultraviolet and visible radiation in surface waters. CDOM consists primarily of humic substances (HS), which can adsorb inorganic cations such as ferric iron. Often more than 99% of dissolved iron is complexed by CDOM in natural waters. Our study assessed the contribution of ferric iron to the absorption of CDOM by mixing dissolved humic substance (HS) standards with iron(III) in acidic conditions and later adjusting the pH to 8. The maximum iron-binding capacities for Suwannee River humic acid, Suwannee River fulvic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid were 13.0, 13.5 and 7.64 μmol iron [mg C]-1, respectively, suggesting higher iron-binding capacity for terrestrial- than microbial-derived CDOM. Iron(III) associated with HS increased the absorption coefficient by CDOM by 1.73-5.33 times (λ=254-550 nm). Inorganic iron, thus, contributed up to 4/5 of the absorption by CDOM (λ=550 nm). In other words, only less than 1/5 of the absorption by CDOM-iron mixture was generated by organic chromophores. The associated iron decreased spectral slope coefficients of HS. This finding indicates that changes of the spectral slope by CDOM can be solely caused by inorganic interference (e.g. iron). The increase of absorption by associated iron(III) was always spectrally similar among different HS standards. We calculated a specific absorption spectrum for iron associated with dissolved HS standards. This spectrum allows estimates for the absorption by iron associated with HS in circum neutral natural waters. For Löytynlähde spring water, iron contributed over 1/10 (ca. 0.108, λ=400 nm) to the total absorption. The contribution of iron to total absorption increased with wavelength. In typical CDOM absorption measurement, water samples are filtered for the removal of particulate constituents but no attempts are implemented for separating the organic chromophores from inorganic chromophores. Our findings show that

  19. How the Ferric Iron Proportion in Basalts Changes Towards the Iceland Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorttle, O.; Moussallam, Y.; Hartley, M. E.; Edmonds, M.; Maclennan, J.; Murton, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Planetary differentiation has been driven by the Earth's giant convective system, which has been redistributing heat, volatile elements and myriad other chemical species for 4.5 billion years. A key exchange in this transport process is between the mantle and the atmosphere through the volcanic degassing of sulfur, carbon and hydrogen from silicate melts forming in the deep Earth. The speciation and mobility of volatile elements during silicate melting is modulated by the oceanic mantle's oxygen fugacity (fO2), which away from subduction zones has long been considered uniform. However, a recent study has challenged this paradigm with new measurements of ferric iron proportions (Fe3+/Fe) in glasses from mid-ocean ridge basalts (Cottrell & Kelley, 2013). These new results suggest mantle domains containing material recycled from the Earth's surface are more reducing than ambient mantle and contain high concentrations of carbon. The pervasive mantle heterogeneity well documented in other geochemical indices may therefore be systematically associated with changes in oxidation state In this study we have produced a dataset of combined XANES, volatile element (C, S, F, Cl, H, B) and boron isotope analyses of 65 basalts from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge south of Iceland. These samples form a transect from 1000 km south of the Iceland plume to within 300 km of the plume centre, crossing into the zone experiencing the greatest geophysical and geochemical influence from the plume. Accordingly there are major changes in the isotopic and trace element composition of the basalts in this sample set, driven by both an increase in the proportion of recycled oceanic crustal components towards Iceland and a shift to a plume driven flow field. This suite of basalts therefore form an excellent test of the global correlations observed by Cottrell & Kelley (2013), where ferric iron contents anti-correlated with isotopic enrichment, with a high resolution regional dataset. By combining major

  20. The Phosphate Binder Ferric Citrate and Mineral Metabolism and Inflammatory Markers in Maintenance Dialysis Patients: Results From Prespecified Analyses of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Buren, Peter N.; Lewis, Julia B.; Dwyer, Jamie P.; Greene, Tom; Middleton, John; Sika, Mohammed; Umanath, Kausik; Abraham, Josephine D.; Arfeen, Shahabul S.; Bowline, Isai G.; Chernin, Gil; Fadem, Stephen Z.; Goral, Simin; Koury, Mark; Sinsakul, Marvin V.; Weiner, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Phosphate binders are the cornerstone of hyperphosphatemia management in dialysis patients. Ferric citrate is an iron-based oral phosphate binder that effectively lowers serum phosphorus levels. Study Design 52-week, open-label, phase 3, randomized, controlled trial for safety-profile assessment. Setting & Participants Maintenance dialysis patients with serum phosphorus levels ≥6.0 mg/dL after washout of prior phosphate binders. Intervention 2:1 randomization to ferric citrate or active control (sevelamer carbonate and/or calcium acetate). Outcomes Changes in mineral bone disease, protein-energy wasting/inflammation, and occurrence of adverse events after 1 year. Measurements Serum calcium, intact parathyroid hormone, phosphorus, aluminum, white blood cell count, percentage of lymphocytes, serum urea nitrogen, and bicarbonate. Results There were 292 participants randomly assigned to ferric citrate, and 149, to active control. Groups were well matched. For mean changes from baseline, phosphorus levels decreased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (−2.04 ± 1.99 [SD] vs −2.18 ± 2.25 mg/dL, respectively; P = 0.9); serum calcium levels increased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (0.22 ± 0.90 vs 0.31 ± 0.95 mg/dL; P = 0.2). Hypercalcemia occurred in 4 participants receiving calcium acetate. Parathyroid hormone levels decreased similarly in the ferric citrate and active control groups (−167.1 ± 399.8 vs −152.7 ± 392.1 pg/mL; P = 0.8). Serum albumin, bicarbonate, serum urea nitrogen, white blood cell count and percentage of lymphocytes, and aluminum values were similar between ferric citrate and active control. Total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were lower in participants receiving sevelamer than those receiving ferric citrate and calcium acetate. Fewer participants randomly assigned to ferric citrate had serious adverse events compared with active control. Limitations Open

  1. Differential responses of soil nematode community to pig manure application levels in Ferric Acrisols

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Ru; Li, Xiao-Gang; Zhou, Zhi-Gao; Zhang, Tao-Lin; Wang, Xing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive pig manure application probably degrades arable soil quality in some intensive pig farming areas. The responses of the nematode community to dosages of pig manure were investigated in Ferric Acrisols under 3-season peanut monoculture. Varying dosages of manure (1.75, 3.5, 7, 14 and 28 t·ha−1·yr−1) in combination with chemical fertilizer were applied to field plots, and chemical fertilizer alone was also applied as a control. With increasing manure application, the abundance of bacterivores and omnivores-predators increased, the abundance of plant parasites decreased, and fungivores abundance exhibited hump-shaped variation. Simpson diversity index and plant parasite index/maturity index of the nematode communities increased to a maximum level at a manure application rate of 3.5 t·ha−1·yr−1 and then sharply decreased. The changes in the soil nematode community were further determined to be correlated with chemical properties; available phosphorus had the strongest quadratic correlation with the two indices, implying that available phosphorus had a better indicative effect than other soil properties to nematode community. Available phosphorus in soil was deduced from 49 to 64 mg·kg−1 with the best nematode communities. Our results emphasized the importance of regular applications of manure in agriculture field to balance nematode diversity and build healthy agro-ecosystems. PMID:27734955

  2. Enhanced removal of As (V) from aqueous solution using modified hydrous ferric oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Lijuan; Zeng, Xibai; Su, Shiming; Bai, Lingyu; Wang, Yanan

    2017-01-01

    Hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) is most effective with high treatment capacity on arsenate [As(V)] sorption although its transformation and aggregation nature need further improvement. Here, HFO nanoparticles with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) or starch as modifier was synthesized for the purpose of stability improvement and As(V) removal from water. Comparatively, CMC might be the optimum stabilizer for HFO nanoparticles because of more effective physical and chemical stability. The large-pore structure, high surface specific area, and the non-aggregated nature of CMC-HFO lead to increased adsorption sites, and thus high adsorption capacities of As(V) without pre-treatment (355 mg·g−1), which is much greater than those reported in previous studies. Second-order equation and dual-mode isotherm model could be successfully used to interpret the sorption kinetics and isotherms of As(V), respectively. FTIR, XPS and XRD analyses suggested that precipitation and surface complexation were primary mechanisms for As(V) removal by CMC modified HFO nanoparticles. A surface complexation model (SCM) was used to simulate As adsorption over pH 2.5–10.4. The predominant adsorbed arsenate species were modeled as bidentate binuclear surface complexes at low pH and as monodentate complexes at high pH. The immobilized arsenic remained stable when aging for 270 d at room temperature. PMID:28098196

  3. Breakthrough behavior of granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) fixed-bed adsorption filters: modeling and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Alexander; Werner, Arne; Genz, Arne; Amy, Gary; Worch, Eckhard; Jekel, Martin

    2005-03-01

    Breakthrough curves (BTC) for the adsorption of arsenate and salicylic acid onto granulated ferric hydroxide (GFH) in fixed-bed adsorbers were experimentally determined and modeled using the homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM). The input parameters for the HSDM, the Freundlich isotherm constants and mass transfer coefficients for film and surface diffusion, were experimentally determined. The BTC for salicylic acid revealed a shape typical for trace organic compound adsorption onto activated carbon, and model results agreed well with the experimental curves. Unlike salicylic acid, arsenate BTCs showed a non-ideal shape with a leveling off at c/c0 approximately 0.6. Model results based on the experimentally derived parameters over-predicted the point of arsenic breakthrough for all simulated curves, lab-scale or full-scale, and were unable to catch the shape of the curve. The use of a much lower surface diffusion coefficient D(S) for modeling led to an improved fit of the later stages of the BTC shape, pointing on a time-dependent D(S). The mechanism for this time dependence is still unknown. Surface precipitation was discussed as one possible removal mechanism for arsenate besides pure adsorption interfering the determination of Freundlich constants and D(S). Rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCT) proved to be a powerful experimental alternative to the modeling procedure for arsenic.

  4. Chemical reduction of odour in fresh sewage sludge in the presence of ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Su, Lianghu; Zhao, Youcai

    2013-01-01

    To assess the potential of ferric hydroxide (FH) to reduce odour emission from dewatered sewage sludge with a moisture of approximately 86%, odour reduction was evaluated using an electronic nose and measurements of odorous compounds (hydrogen sulphide, ammonia and volatile fatty acids (VFAs)). The sulphur species including sulphate, acid-volatile sulphide (AVS), Cr(II)-reducible sulphide (CRS) and elemental sulphur (ES), were analysed by a modified cold diffusion sequential extraction method before and after anaerobic incubation. Within 32 days, 69.3, 83.8 and 88.6% of the odour (or 81.3, 93.7 and 97.5% of hydrogen sulphide) were eliminated, respectively, at the rates of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.25% (wt) of FH. The sulphur species analysis indicated that FeS, FeS2 and a small portion of S0 were formed by FH-sulphide reaction. This study also found that the relationship between odour and H2S concentrations could be well expressed by Steven's law. We believe that FH can be a cost-effective reagent for sludge odour control in sewage treatment processes.

  5. Overproduction in Escherichia coli and Characterization of a Soybean Ferric Leghemoglobin Reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Ji, L.; Becana, M.; Sarath, G.; Shearman, L.; Klucas, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    We previously cloned and sequenced a cDNA encoding soybean ferric leghemoglobin reductase (FLbR), an enzyme postulated to play an important role in maintaining leghemoglobin in a functional ferrous state in nitrogen-fixing root nodules. This cDNA was sub-cloned into an expression plasmid, pTrcHis C, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant FLbR protein, which was purified by two steps of column chromatography, was catalytically active and fully functional. The recombinant FLbR cross-reacted with antisera raised against native FLbR purified from soybean root nodules. The recombinant FLbR, the native FLbR purified from soybean (Glycine max L.) root nodules, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases from pig heart and yeast had similar but not identical ultraviolet-visible absorption and fluorescence spectra, cofactor binding, and kinetic properties. FLbR shared common structural features in the active site and prosthetic group binding sites with other pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductases such as dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases, but displayed different microenvironments for the prosthetic groups. PMID:12232320

  6. Analysis of a ferric uptake regulator (Fur) knockout mutant in Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Ebanks, Roger O; Goguen, Michel; Knickle, Leah; Dacanay, Andrew; Leslie, Andrew; Ross, Neil W; Pinto, Devanand M

    2013-03-23

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is the etiological agent of furunculosis; a serious infectious disease in aquaculture raised salmonids. Iron acquisition has been shown to be critical for the survival of pathogenic bacteria during the course of infection. Previous work has demonstrated that A. salmonicida expresses iron-repressible IROMP proteins, suggesting the presence of iron acquisition systems that are under the control of a ferric uptake regulator (Fur). In this study, the A. salmonicida fur has been sequenced and a fur deletion strain generated. The A. salmonicida fur gene has an open reading frame of 428 bp, coding for a protein of 143 amino acids, and with high homology to previously described Fur proteins. The Fur protein product had a 94% sequence identity and 96% sequence similarity to the Aeromonas hydrophila Fur protein product. Transcription of the A. salmonicida fur gene was not regulated by the iron status of the bacterium and is not autoregulated, as in Escherichia coli. Proteomic analysis of the A. salmonicida fur mutant, fails to repress iron-regulated outer membrane proteins in the presence of iron. The A. salmonicida fur::KO mutant shows significantly reduced pathogenicity compared to the wild-type parental strain. In addition, the A. salmonicida fur mutant provides an important tool for further investigation of the iron acquisition mechanisms utilized by A. salmonicida.

  7. The structure of the Helicobacter pylori ferric uptake regulator Fur reveals three functional metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Dian, Cyril; Vitale, Sylvia; Leonard, Gordon A; Bahlawane, Christelle; Fauquant, Caroline; Leduc, Damien; Muller, Cécile; de Reuse, Hilde; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle; Terradot, Laurent

    2011-03-01

    Fur, the ferric uptake regulator, is a transcription factor that controls iron metabolism in bacteria. Binding of ferrous iron to Fur triggers a conformational change that activates the protein for binding to specific DNA sequences named Fur boxes. In Helicobacter pylori, HpFur is involved in acid response and is important for gastric colonization in model animals. Here we present the crystal structure of a functionally active HpFur mutant (HpFur2M; C78S-C150S) bound to zinc. Although its fold is similar to that of other Fur and Fur-like proteins, the crystal structure of HpFur reveals a unique structured N-terminal extension and an unusual C-terminal helix. The structure also shows three metal binding sites: S1 the structural ZnS₄ site previously characterized biochemically in HpFur and the two zinc sites identified in other Fur proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis and spectroscopy analyses of purified wild-type HpFur and various mutants show that the two metal binding sites common to other Fur proteins can be also metallated by cobalt. DNA protection and circular dichroism experiments demonstrate that, while these two sites influence the affinity of HpFur for DNA, only one is absolutely required for DNA binding and could be responsible for the conformational changes of Fur upon metal binding while the other is a secondary site.

  8. Success Rates of Ankaferd Blood Stopper and Ferric Sulfate as Pulpotomy Agents in Primary Molars.

    PubMed

    Cantekin, Kenan; Gümüş, Hüsniye

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiographic findings of treatments using a new hemostatic agent (Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS)), as compared to ferric sulfate (FS), when used as a pulpotomy medicament in primary teeth. Materials and Methods. The primary molars (70) were selected from 35 children aged 4 to 6 years. The teeth were randomized into two groups for pulpotomy with the ABS (n = 35) and the FS (n = 35) agents. The patients were recalled for clinical and radiographic evaluation at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month intervals. Results. At the 3- and 6-month clinical and radiographic evaluations, total success rates of 100% were observed in each group. In ABS and FS groups, the clinical success rates, however, reduced to 90.9% and 93.9% at the 9-month examination and 84,8% and 90.9% at the 12-month examination, respectively. Similarly, the teeth in the ABS and FS groups had radiographic success rates of 90.9% and 93.9% at 9 months and 84.8% and 87.8% at 12 moths, respectively. Conclusion. Although the findings indicated that ABS agents may be useful agents for pulpotomy medicament, further long-term and comprehensive histological investigations of ABS treatments are necessary.

  9. Evaluation of formocresol, calcium hydroxide, ferric sulfate, and MTA primary molar pulpotomies

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Esma; Tosun, Gul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate four different pulpotomy medicaments in primary molars. Materials and Methods: A total of 147 primary molars with deep caries were treated with four different pulpotomy medicaments (FC: formocresol, FS: ferric sulfate, CH: calcium hydroxide, and MTA: mineral trioxide aggregate) in this study. The criteria for tooth selection for inclusion were no clinical and radiographic evidence of pulp pathology. During 30 months of follow-up at 6-month intervals, clinical and radiographic success and failures were recorded. The differences between the groups were statistically analyzed using the Chi-square test and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results: At 30 months, clinical success rates were 100%, 95.2%, 96.4%, and 85% in the FC, FS, MTA, and CH groups, respectively. In radiographic analysis, the MTA group had the highest (96.4%), and the CH group had the lowest success rate (85%). There were no clinical and radiographic differences between materials (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Although there were no differences between materials, only in the CH group did three teeth require extraction due to further clinical symptoms of radiographic failures during the 30-month follow-up period. None of the failed teeth in the other groups required extraction during the 30-month follow-up period. PMID:24966776

  10. Success Rates of Ankaferd Blood Stopper and Ferric Sulfate as Pulpotomy Agents in Primary Molars

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Gümüş, Hüsniye

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiographic findings of treatments using a new hemostatic agent (Ankaferd blood stopper (ABS)), as compared to ferric sulfate (FS), when used as a pulpotomy medicament in primary teeth. Materials and Methods. The primary molars (70) were selected from 35 children aged 4 to 6 years. The teeth were randomized into two groups for pulpotomy with the ABS (n = 35) and the FS (n = 35) agents. The patients were recalled for clinical and radiographic evaluation at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month intervals. Results. At the 3- and 6-month clinical and radiographic evaluations, total success rates of 100% were observed in each group. In ABS and FS groups, the clinical success rates, however, reduced to 90.9% and 93.9% at the 9-month examination and 84,8% and 90.9% at the 12-month examination, respectively. Similarly, the teeth in the ABS and FS groups had radiographic success rates of 90.9% and 93.9% at 9 months and 84.8% and 87.8% at 12 moths, respectively. Conclusion. Although the findings indicated that ABS agents may be useful agents for pulpotomy medicament, further long-term and comprehensive histological investigations of ABS treatments are necessary. PMID:27437463

  11. Factors influencing the mechanism of surfactant catalyzed reaction of vitamin C-ferric chloride hexahydrate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrukh, Muhammad Akhyar; Kauser, Robina; Adnan, Rohana

    2013-09-01

    The kinetics of vitamin C by ferric chloride hexahydrate has been investigated in the aqueous ethanol solution of basic surfactant viz. octadecylamine (ODA) under pseudo-first order conditions. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) of surfactant was determined by surface tension measurement. The effect of pH (2.5-4.5) and temperature (15-35°C) in the presence and absence of surfactant were investigated. Activation parameters, Δ E a, Δ H #, Δ S #, Δ G ≠, for the reaction were calculated by using Arrhenius and Eyring plot. Surface excess concentration (Γmax), minimum area per surfactant molecule ( A min), average area occupied by each molecule of surfactant ( a), surface pressure at the CMC (Πmax), Gibb's energy of micellization (Δ G M°), Gibb's energy of adsorption (Δ G ad°), were calculated. It was found that the reaction in the presence of surfactant showed faster oxidation rate than the aqueous ethanol solution. Reaction mechanism has been deduced in the presence and absence of surfactant.

  12. Adsorption of phosphonate antiscalant from reverse osmosis membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide.

    PubMed

    Boels, Luciaan; Keesman, Karel J; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2012-09-04

    Adsorptive removal of antiscalants offers a promising way to improve current reverse osmosis (RO) concentrate treatment processes and enables the reuse of the antiscalant in the RO desalination process. This work investigates the adsorption and desorption of the phosphonate antiscalant nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) from RO membrane concentrate onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH), a material that consists predominantly of akaganéite. The kinetics of the adsorption of NTMP onto GFH was predicted fairly well with two models that consider either combined film-pore or combined film-surface diffusion as the main mechanism for mass transport. It is also demonstrated that NTMP is preferentially adsorbed over sulfate by GFH at pH 7.85. The presence of calcium causes a transformation in the equilibrium adsorption isotherm from a Langmuir type to a Freundlich type with much higher adsorption capacities. Furthermore, calcium also increases the rate of adsorption substantially. GFH is reusable after regeneration with sodium hydroxide solution, indicating that NTMP can be potentially recovered from the RO concentrate. This work shows that GFH is a promising adsorbent for the removal and recovery of NTMP antiscalant from RO membrane concentrates.

  13. The effect on structural and solvent water molecules of substrate binding to ferric horseradish peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Niall; Adamczyk, Katrin; Hithell, Gordon; Shaw, Daniel J; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Parker, Anthony W; Hunt, Neil T

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast, multi-dimensional infrared spectroscopy, in the form of 2D-IR and pump-probe measurements, has been employed to investigate the effect of substrate binding on the structural dynamics of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP) enzyme. Using nitric oxide bound to the ferric haem of HRP as a sensitive probe of local dynamics, we report measurements of the frequency fluctuations (spectral diffusion) and vibrational lifetime of the NO stretching mode with benzohydroxamic acid (BHA) located in the substrate-binding position at the periphery of the haem pocket, in both D2O and H2O solvents. The results reveal that, with BHA bound to the enzyme, the local structural dynamics are insensitive to H/D exchange. These results are in stark contrast to those found in studies of the substrate-free enzyme, which demonstrated that the local chemical and dynamic environment of the haem ligand is influenced by water molecules. In light of the large changes in solvent accessibility caused by substrate binding, we discuss the potential for varying roles for the solvent in the haem pocket of HRP at different stages along the reaction coordinate of the enzymatic mechanism.

  14. Ferric Carboxymaltose-Mediated Attenuation of Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity in an Iron Deficiency Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Rivas, Carlos; Cao, Gabriel; Giani, Jorge Fernando; Dominici, Fernando Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Since anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (AIC), a complication of anthracycline-based chemotherapies, is thought to involve iron, concerns exist about using iron for anaemia treatment in anthracycline-receiving cancer patients. This study evaluated how intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) modulates the influence of iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) and doxorubicin (3–5 mg per kg body weight [BW]) on oxidative/nitrosative stress, inflammation, and cardiorenal function in spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone (SHR-SP) rats. FCM was given as repeated small or single total dose (15 mg iron per kg BW), either concurrent with or three days after doxorubicin. IDA (after dietary iron restriction) induced cardiac and renal oxidative stress (markers included malondialdehyde, catalase, Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase), nitrosative stress (inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitrotyrosine), inflammation (tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6), and functional/morphological abnormalities (left ventricle end-diastolic and end-systolic diameter, fractional shortening, density of cardiomyocytes and capillaries, caveolin-1 expression, creatinine clearance, and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin) that were aggravated by doxorubicin. Notably, iron treatment with FCM did not exacerbate but attenuated the cardiorenal effects of IDA and doxorubicin independent of the iron dosing regimen. The results of this model suggest that intravenous FCM can be used concomitantly with an anthracycline-based chemotherapy without increasing signs of AIC. PMID:24876963

  15. CORRELATION BETWEEN THE OPTICAL AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF FERRIC N-ACETYLATED HEME OCTAPEPTIDE COMPLEXES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, E.K.; Sauer, K.

    1980-05-01

    The room temperature magnetic susceptibility of the complexes of the ferric N-acetylated heme octapeptide (N-H8PT) from horse heart cytochrome c is known to be generally consistent with the absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of these complexes. However, the N-acetylated methionine complex of the N-H8PT, which has axial coordination identical to that of the parent molecule, is found to exhibit a thermal mixture of high spin (S=5/2) and low spin (S=1/2) states. The temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility of the N-acetylmethionine complex yields {Delta}H{sup 0} = -7.6kca1/mole and {Delta}S° = -25.9 e.u. for a high to low spin transition. The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum of the N-acetylmethionine complex indicates a low spin ground state, with g values at 1.51, 2.31, and 2.91, which are distinct from those of cytochrome c. The axial ({Delta}) and rhombic (V) distortion parameters of the {sup 2}T{sub 2g} state correspond to 2.96{lambda} and 1.94{lambda}, respectively, where {lambda} is the spin-orbit coupling constant. A model is proposed to account for the uniqueness of the N-acetylmethionine complex: a change in the Fe-S distance may play a role in regulating the redox properties of cytochrome c.

  16. Clarification of municipal sewage with ferric chloride: the nature of coagulant species.

    PubMed

    El Samrani, A G; Lartiges, B S; Montargès-Pelletier, E; Kazpard, V; Barrès, O; Ghanbaja, J

    2004-02-01

    The nature of coagulant species formed in the system ferric chloride/municipal sewage was explored with Transmission Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (TEM-EDXS) and Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption spectroscopy. Jar-test data combined with chemical analysis of supernatant (dissolved organic carbon, iron, and phosphorus) and Fourier-Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) of freeze-dried sediment, provided a detailed description of sewage clarification. The results showed that the nature of coagulant species evolves with Fe concentration. Up to the optimum turbidity removal, mainly iron dimers linked with one phosphate anion are detected. At higher dosages, polymers of hydrolyzed Fe appear even though PO(4) still participates in the formation of coagulant species. TEM observation of freeze-dried sediments corroborates such an evolution of Fe speciation. EDXS analyses reveal that minute amounts of sulfur, silicon, aluminum, and calcium, are associated with the coagulant species. Even though the coagulant species change with Fe concentration, the destabilization mechanism, inferred from electrophoretic mobility of aggregates and the evolution of floc size under cyclic changes of stirring conditions, is equivalent with a charge neutralization of sewage colloids in the whole range of coagulant concentration.

  17. CIPK23 is involved in iron acquisition of Arabidopsis by affecting ferric chelate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qiuying; Zhang, Xinxin; Yang, An; Wang, Tianzuo; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-05-01

    Iron deficiency is one of the major limiting factors affecting quality and production of crops in calcareous soils. Numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors have been demonstrated to play a regulatory role in adaptation of plants to iron deficiency. However, the mechanisms underlying the iron deficiency-induced physiological processes remain to be fully dissected. Here, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CIPK23 was involved in iron acquisition. Lesion of CIPK23 rendered Arabidopsis mutants hypersensitive to iron deficiency, as evidenced by stronger chlorosis in young leaves and lower iron concentration than wild-type plants under iron-deficient conditions by down-regulating ferric chelate reductase activity. We found that iron deficiency evoked an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and the elevated Ca(2+) would bind to CBL1/CBL9, leading to activation of CIPK23. These novel findings highlight the involvement of calcium-dependent CBL-CIPK23 complexes in the regulation of iron acquisition. Moreover, mutation of CIPK23 led to changes in contents of mineral elements, suggesting that CBL-CIPK23 complexes could be as "nutritional sensors" to sense and regulate the mineral homeostasis in Arabisopsis.

  18. Differential responses of soil nematode community to pig manure application levels in Ferric Acrisols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi-Ru; Li, Xiao-Gang; Zhou, Zhi-Gao; Zhang, Tao-Lin; Wang, Xing-Xiang

    2016-10-01

    Excessive pig manure application probably degrades arable soil quality in some intensive pig farming areas. The responses of the nematode community to dosages of pig manure were investigated in Ferric Acrisols under 3-season peanut monoculture. Varying dosages of manure (1.75, 3.5, 7, 14 and 28 t·ha‑1·yr‑1) in combination with chemical fertilizer were applied to field plots, and chemical fertilizer alone was also applied as a control. With increasing manure application, the abundance of bacterivores and omnivores-predators increased, the abundance of plant parasites decreased, and fungivores abundance exhibited hump-shaped variation. Simpson diversity index and plant parasite index/maturity index of the nematode communities increased to a maximum level at a manure application rate of 3.5 t·ha‑1·yr‑1 and then sharply decreased. The changes in the soil nematode community were further determined to be correlated with chemical properties; available phosphorus had the strongest quadratic correlation with the two indices, implying that available phosphorus had a better indicative effect than other soil properties to nematode community. Available phosphorus in soil was deduced from 49 to 64 mg·kg‑1 with the best nematode communities. Our results emphasized the importance of regular applications of manure in agriculture field to balance nematode diversity and build healthy agro-ecosystems.

  19. Preparation and Thermal Analysis of Ferric Doped PVA-PVP-PPy Composite Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ravikumar V.; Ranganath, M. R.; Lobo, Blaise

    2011-12-01

    The preparation and thermal analysis of flexible blend films of pyrrole (Py) polymerized in aqueous solution of poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) is described. In-situ polymerization of pyrrole in aqueous solution of PVA and PVP containing ferric chloride (FeCl3) was achieved through vapor sorption, and the films obtained were studied using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA). No melting endotherm is seen in the DSC and DTA scans of the composite films, indicating that the sample is amorphous. Degradation of the sample is found to occur at lower temperatures, with increase in doping level (wt% of FeCl3). DSC study was performed between 40 °C and 400 °C. Below 1.2 wt % DL, degradation of the sample occurs in two stages, the first at 310 °C and the second at 440 °C, as seen from DTA and TGA scans. The broad endotherm between 80 °C and 120 °C is due to volatization of moisture (water) absorbed by the sample. Multiple endotherms are observed in DSC and DTA scans of the composite films, for FeCl3 doping levels above 3.8 wt %, and the sample degrades in many different stages at lower temperature, with increase in doping level, as revealed by weight losses in the TGA curve.

  20. Enhanced removal of As (V) from aqueous solution using modified hydrous ferric oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Lijuan; Zeng, Xibai; Su, Shiming; Bai, Lingyu; Wang, Yanan

    2017-01-01

    Hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) is most effective with high treatment capacity on arsenate [As(V)] sorption although its transformation and aggregation nature need further improvement. Here, HFO nanoparticles with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) or starch as modifier was synthesized for the purpose of stability improvement and As(V) removal from water. Comparatively, CMC might be the optimum stabilizer for HFO nanoparticles because of more effective physical and chemical stability. The large-pore structure, high surface specific area, and the non-aggregated nature of CMC-HFO lead to increased adsorption sites, and thus high adsorption capacities of As(V) without pre-treatment (355 mg·g‑1), which is much greater than those reported in previous studies. Second-order equation and dual-mode isotherm model could be successfully used to interpret the sorption kinetics and isotherms of As(V), respectively. FTIR, XPS and XRD analyses suggested that precipitation and surface complexation were primary mechanisms for As(V) removal by CMC modified HFO nanoparticles. A surface complexation model (SCM) was used to simulate As adsorption over pH 2.5–10.4. The predominant adsorbed arsenate species were modeled as bidentate binuclear surface complexes at low pH and as monodentate complexes at high pH. The immobilized arsenic remained stable when aging for 270 d at room temperature.

  1. Development of Leptospirillum ferriphilum dominated consortium for ferric iron regeneration and metal bioleaching under extreme stresses.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhargav C; Tipre, Devayani R; Dave, Shailesh R

    2012-08-01

    Activated iron oxidizing consortium SR-BH-L enriched from Rajpardi lignite mine soil sample gave iron oxidation rate 1954 mg/L/h. Developed novel polystress resistant consortium oxidized ferrous iron under 11cP viscosity, 7.47 M ionic strength, 2.3 pH and g/L of 0.50 cadmium, 3.75 copper, 0.20 lead, 92.00 zinc, 6.4 sodium, 5.5 chloride, 154 sulphate and 393.8 TDS. The developed consortium showed 78.0% and 70.0% copper and zinc extraction from polymetallic bulk concentrate in monophasic bioleaching process. The bioregenerated ferric by the consortium in leachate showed 80.81% and 54.0% copper and zinc leaching in only 30 and 90 min. The DGGE analysis indicated the presence of 11 OTUs in the consortium. 16S rRNA gene sequence (JN797729) of the dominant band on DGGE shared >99% similarity with Leptospirillum ferriphilum. RE digestion analysis of the total 16S rRNA gene also illustrated the dominance of L. ferriphilum in the consortium.

  2. Cytochrome c peroxidase. Interconversion of chemically and enzymatically reactive and unreactive forms of the ferric protein.

    PubMed

    Mathews, R A; Wittenberg, J B

    1979-07-10

    Ferric yeast cytochrome c peroxidase in the presence of different anions may assume a number of forms which differ in optical spectra and chemical properties. In solutions whose only anion is acetate, two spectral forms are present together in an equilibrium. Each of these spectral species is believed to bear bound acetate anion. A form characterized by an intense absorption maximum at 620 nm is unreactive enzymatically and does not react with hydrogen peroxide or with dithionite. A form characterized by a less intense absorption near 645 nm is enzymatically and chemically reactive. Increasing temperature and increasing pH displace the equilibrium toward the 645 nm form. Increasing cytochrome c peroxidase concentration favors the 620 nm form. In kinetic experiments in which the 645 nm form is removed by rapid reaction with H2O2 or dithionite, the 620 nm form is converted in a first order reaction (k = 0.36 s-1, 15 degrees C) to the 645 nm form. In solutions whose sole anion is phosphate a 645 nm form is the only demonstrable spectral species. The enzymatic activity and rates of chemical reaction of 645 nm spectral forms occurring in acetate and in phosphate buffers are the same.

  3. The Enzyme-mimic Activity of Ferric Nano-Core Residing in Ferritin and Its Biosensing Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Zhiwen; Wu, Hong J.; Zhang, Youyu; Li, Zhaohui; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-15

    Ferritins are nano-scale globular protein cages encapsulating a ferric core. They widely exist in animals, plants, and microbes, playing indispensable roles in iron homeostasis. Interestingly, our study clearly demonstrates that ferritin has an enzyme-mimic activity derived from its ferric nano-core, but not the protein cage. Further study revealed that the mimic-enzyme activity of ferritin is more thermally stable and pH-tolerant compared with horseradish peroxidase. Considering the abundance of ferritin in numerous organisms, this finding may indicate a new role of ferritin in antioxidant and detoxification metabolisms. In addition, as a natural protein-caged nanoparticle with an enzyme-mimic activity, ferritin is readily conjugated with biomolecules to construct nano-biosensors, thus holds promising potential for facile and biocompatible labeling for sensitive and robust bioassays in biomedical applications.

  4. Comparison of the Hemostatic Activity of Quercus persica Jaub. & Spach. (Oak) With Ferric Sulfate in Bony Crypts.

    PubMed

    Nabavizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Zargaran, Arman; Moazami, Fariborz; Askari, Fatemeh; Sahebi, Safoora; Farhadpoor, Alireza; Faridi, Pouya

    2016-01-01

    Effective tissue hemostasis in periapical surgical site is important in the procedures. Plants with large amount of tannins may act as a local hemostatic agent. We aimed to compare the hemostatic effect of the extract of Quercus persica with one of the common hemostatic material used in periapical surgery. Six standardized bone holes were prepared in the calvaria of 5 Burgundy rabbits. Two hemostatic medicaments were tested for their hemostatic effect and were compared with control defects: Group 1, cotton pellet soaked in 15.5% ferric sulfate solution; Group 2, cotton pellet soaked in pure ethanolic extract of Q. persica. Bleeding score between the groups was compared. The ferric sulfate group exhibited significantly less bleeding than the other 2 groups. Q. persica was found to cause more hemostasis than the control group at 4 and 5 minutes but there were no significant differences between normal saline and Q. persica extract in bleeding control.

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of exogenous anion exchange in FeFbpA-NTA: significance of periplasmic anion lability and anion binding activity of ferric binding protein A.

    PubMed

    Heymann, Jared J; Gabricević, Mario; Mietzner, Timothy A; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2010-02-01

    The bacterial transferrin ferric binding protein A (FbpA) requires an exogenous anion to facilitate iron sequestration, and subsequently to shuttle the metal across the periplasm to the cytoplasmic membrane. In the diverse conditions of the periplasm, numerous anions are known to be present. Prior in vitro experiments have demonstrated the ability of multiple anions to fulfill the synergistic iron-binding requirement, and the identity of the bound anion has been shown to modulate important physicochemical properties of iron-bound FbpA (FeFbpA). Here we address the kinetics and mechanism of anion exchange for the FeFbpA-nitrilotriacetate (NTA) assembly with several biologically relevant anions (citrate, oxalate, phosphate, and pyrophosphate), with nonphysiologic NTA serving as a representative synergistic anion/chelator. The kinetic data are consistent with an anion-exchange process that occurs in multiple steps, dependent on the identity of both the entering anion and the leaving anion. The exchange mechanism may proceed either as a direct substitution or through an intermediate FeFbpA-X* assembly based on anion (X) identity. Our kinetic results further develop an understanding of exogenous anion lability in the periplasm, as well as address the final step of the iron-free FbpA (apo-FbpA)/Fe(3+) sequestration mechanism. Our results highlight the kinetic significance of the FbpA anion binding site, demonstrating a correlation between apo-FbpA/anion affinity and the FeFbpA rate of anion exchange, further supporting the requirement of an exogenous anion to complete tight sequestration of iron by FbpA, and developing a mechanism for anion exchange within FeFbpA that is dependent on the identity of both the entering anion and the leaving anion.

  6. Evaluation of ferric oxalate as an agent for use during surgery to prevent post-operative root hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, H L; Yeh, C T; Smith, F; Burgett, F G; Richards, P; Shyr, Y; O'Neal, R

    1993-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 6% ferric oxalate solution applied during periodontal surgery to prevent post-operative tooth hypersensitivity. Twenty-five adult patients with similar bilateral periodontal defects participated in this study. Data were collected at baseline (1 week prior to surgery) and 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks following surgery. Sensitivity level was determined using the visual analog scale (VAS) with the following stimuli: 1) mechanical stimulation with a No. 23 dental explorer; 2) water at 50 degrees C; 3) ice; and 4) electric pulp tester (EPT). Teeth were randomly assigned to either test (6% ferric oxalate in 0.9% saline) or control (0.9% saline) groups. Solutions were applied to the exposed root surfaces for 1 minute during surgery. Data were analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA, paired t-test, and Pearson's correlation test. Results from this study demonstrated statistically significant reduction in the responses to thermal stimuli, especially cold, between groups treated with ferric oxalate as compared to those treated with saline. For the cold test the difference increased with time from baseline to 6 weeks. Statistically significant (P < 0.05) differences in sensitivity to heat between groups were also observed, but only at 2 and 4 weeks following surgery. There were no differences at any time period between the test and control groups when tactile or EPT techniques were used. In addition, there was no correlation between sensitivity and other clinical parameters. It was concluded from this study that 6% ferric oxalate was effective in reducing post-surgical cold sensitivity when applied during periodontal surgical procedures.

  7. [Study on the hydrolysis distribution of ferric saline by infrared spectrophotometry and single crystal X-ray diffraction method].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huai-Li; Xie, Li-Guo; Gao, Chao-Yong; Sun, Xiu-Ping; Yang, You; Tang, Xue

    2009-02-01

    The hydrolytic stability of Fe(a), Fe(b) and Fe(c) in different pH values of poly-ferric-flocculants was studied by using Fe-ferron time by time complexation colorimetry. The research results showed that Fe(b) was unstable, and all Fe(b) was transformed to Fe(c) after 10-15 d placement. The content of Fe(c) tended towards stability after 10-15 d. Also, the content of Fe(a) tended towards stability after 10 d. The single crystal was synthesized by the method of direct crystallization in Fe(III)-SO4(2-) water solution at normal temperature and its structure characteristic was studied by single crystal X ray diffraction method and IR (infrared spectrophotometry). The research results showed that there was no group of Fe-OH-Fe, Fe-OH and binary ferric complexed with two hydroxyl groups in the single crystal synthesized from the ferric aqueous solution in low pH (pH was about 0.5). The form of Fe in single crystal was all Fe(III). The chemical formula of the single crystal was Fe(H2O)6 (SO4)2NH4 x 6H2O when the ammonia water was used as the alkalinizing agent. One reason was that with the evaporation of water, these single crystals were synthesized at pH 0. 5 despite of different initial pH and different initial alkalinizing agents. Another reason was that the hydrolysis distribution of ferric saline was unstable. Therefore, it was not easy to obtain the single crystal of Fe(III)-hydroxy complexes or Fe(III)-polymer at low pH value. The study showed that infrared spectrophotometry and single crystal X ray diffraction method have a good prospect in the research on hydrolysis distribution of flocculants.

  8. Ion-Ion Neutralization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-31

    plasma were identified using a downstream quadrupole mass spectrometer. In these experimento it is a simple matter to establish H+(H 2 0):f as the...pressure as predicted by the Thomson t2rnary mechanism whicK hzr been suownr to be valid experimentally at hiTh rrsurs (,han and Peron, 1:EI4 hereafter t...of NO , NO2 ions in various gases and the ternary recombination coefficients of these ions in the higher pres:;ure ( Thomson ) re"ie. Equation (5) cr>n

  9. Overexpression of the FRO2 ferric chelate reductase confers tolerance to growth on low iron and uncovers posttranscriptional control.

    PubMed

    Connolly, Erin L; Campbell, Nathan H; Grotz, Natasha; Prichard, Charis L; Guerinot, Mary Lou

    2003-11-01

    The Arabidopsis FRO2 gene encodes the low-iron-inducible ferric chelate reductase responsible for reduction of iron at the root surface. Here, we report that FRO2 and IRT1, the major transporter responsible for high-affinity iron uptake from the soil, are coordinately regulated at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. FRO2 and IRT1 are induced together following the imposition of iron starvation and are coordinately repressed following iron resupply. Steady-state mRNA levels of FRO2 and IRT1 are also coordinately regulated by zinc and cadmium. Like IRT1, FRO2 mRNA is detected in the epidermal cells of roots, consistent with its proposed role in iron uptake from the soil. FRO2 mRNA is detected at high levels in the roots and shoots of 35S-FRO2 transgenic plants. However, ferric chelate reductase activity is only elevated in the 35S-FRO2 plants under conditions of iron deficiency, indicating that FRO2 is subject to posttranscriptional regulation, as shown previously for IRT1. Finally, the 35S-FRO2 plants grow better on low iron as compared with wild-type plants, supporting the idea that reduction of ferric iron to ferrous iron is the rate-limiting step in iron uptake.

  10. Evidence of Nitrogen Loss from Anaerobic Ammonium Oxidation Coupled with Ferric Iron Reduction in an Intertidal Wetland.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaofei; Hou, Lijun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Yanling; Yin, Guoyu; Lin, Xianbiao; Cheng, Lv; Li, Ye; Hu, Xiaoting

    2015-10-06

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with nitrite reduction is an important microbial pathway of nitrogen removal in intertidal wetlands. However, little is known about the role of anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with ferric iron reduction (termed Feammox) in intertidal nitrogen cycling. In this study, sediment slurry incubation experiments were combined with an isotope-tracing technique to examine the dynamics of Feammox and its association with tidal fluctuations in the intertidal wetland of the Yangtze Estuary. Feammox was detected in the intertidal wetland sediments, with potential rates of 0.24-0.36 mg N kg(-1) d(-1). The Feammox rates in the sediments were generally higher during spring tides than during neap tides. The tidal fluctuations affected the growth of iron-reducing bacteria and reduction of ferric iron, which mediated Feammox activity and the associated nitrogen loss from intertidal wetlands to the atmosphere. An estimated loss of 11.5-18 t N km(-2) year(-1) was linked to Feammox, accounting for approximately 3.1-4.9% of the total external inorganic nitrogen transported into the Yangtze Estuary wetland each year. Overall, the co-occurrence of ferric iron reduction and ammonium oxidation suggests that Feammox can act as an ammonium removal mechanism in intertidal wetlands.

  11. Stability of ferric complexes with 3-hydroxyflavone (flavonol), 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin), and 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Mark D; Hutcheson, Ryan; Cheng, I Francis

    2005-04-20

    The acid dissociation and ferric stability constants for complexation by the flavonoids 3-hydroxyflavone (flavonol), 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin), and 3',4'-dihydroxyflavone in 50:50 (v/v) ethanol/water are determined by pH potentiometric and spectrophotometric titrations and the linear least-squares curve-fitting program Hyperquad. Over the entire range of pH and reagent concentrations spanning the titration experiments, the stoichiometry for iron-flavonoid complex formation was 1:1 for all three flavonoids examined. The three flavonoids were chosen for their hydroxy substitution pattern, with each possessing one of the three most commonly suggested sites for metal binding by the flavonoids. On the basis of the calculated stability constants, the intraflavonoid-binding site competition is illustrated as a function of pH via speciation curves. The curves indicate that the binding site comprised of the 3',4'-hydroxy substitutions, the catecholic site, is most influential for ferric complexation at the physiological pH of 7.4. The possibility for antioxidant activity by flavonoid chelation of ferric iron in the presence of other competitive physiological complexing agents is demonstrated through additional speciation calculations.

  12. Demonstrating Bacterial Flagella.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes an effective laboratory method for demonstrating bacterial flagella that utilizes the Proteus mirabilis organism and a special harvesting technique. Includes safety considerations for the laboratory exercise. (MDH)

  13. Ferric Maltol Is Effective in Correcting Iron Deficiency Anemia in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Results from a Phase-3 Clinical Trial Program

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Tariq; Tulassay, Zsolt; Baumgart, Daniel C.; Bokemeyer, Bernd; Büning, Carsten; Howaldt, Stefanie; Stallmach, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is frequently seen in inflammatory bowel disease. Traditionally, oral iron supplementation is linked to extensive gastrointestinal side effects and possible disease exacerbation. This multicenter phase-3 study tested the efficacy and safety of ferric maltol, a complex of ferric (Fe3+) iron with maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4-pyrone), as a novel oral iron therapy for IDA. Methods: Adult patients with quiescent or mild-to-moderate ulcerative colitis or Crohn's disease, mild-to-moderate IDA (9.5–12.0 g/dL and 9.5–13.0 g/dL in females and males, respectively), and documented failure on previous oral ferrous products received oral ferric maltol capsules (30 mg twice a day) or identical placebo for 12 weeks according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design. The primary efficacy endpoint was change in hemoglobin (Hb) from baseline to week 12. Safety and tolerability were assessed. Results: Of 329 patients screened, 128 received randomized therapy (64 ferric maltol-treated and 64 placebo-treated patients) and comprised the intent-to-treat efficacy analysis: 55 ferric maltol patients (86%) and 53 placebo patients (83%) completed the trial. Significant improvements in Hb were observed with ferric maltol versus placebo at weeks 4, 8, and 12: mean (SE) 1.04 (0.11) g/dL, 1.76 (0.15) g/dL, and 2.25 (0.19) g/dL, respectively (P < 0.0001 at all time-points; analysis of covariance). Hb was normalized in two-thirds of patients by week 12. The safety profile of ferric maltol was comparable with placebo, with no impact on inflammatory bowel disease severity. Conclusions: Ferric maltol provided rapid clinically meaningful improvements in Hb and showed a favorable safety profile, suggesting its possible use as an alternative to intravenous iron in IDA inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25545376

  14. Ferric haem forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase probed by EPR spectroscopy: Their stability and interplay with pH.

    PubMed

    Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Worrall, Jonathan A R; Chugh, Snehpriya B; Haigh, Sarah C; Ghiladi, Reza A; Nicholls, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Low temperature EPR spectroscopy was used to characterise Mycobacterium tuberculosis catalase-peroxidase in its resting ferric haem state. Several high spin ferric haem forms and no low spin forms were found in the enzyme samples frozen in methanol on dry ice. The EPR spectra depended not only on the pH but also on the buffer type. As a general trend, the higher the pH, the greater the 'rhombic' fraction of the high spin ferric haem that was observed. The rhombic form was characterised by well separated two lines in the g = 6 region whereas in the 'axial' form the two lines overlap. This pH dependence of the equilibrium of axial and rhombic ferric haem forms is also seen in rapidly freeze-quenched samples. Different high spin ferric haem forms were monitored during a 3 week storage of the enzyme at 4 °C. For some forms, extremal dependences, i.e. those progressing via maxima or minima over storage time, were found. This indicates that the mechanism of the time-dependent transition from one high spin ferric haem form to another must be more complex than a simple single site oxidation.

  15. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, V. S.; Derbenev, Ya. S.; Harwood, L.; Hutton, A.; Lin, F.; Pilat, F.; Zhang, Y.; Cai, Y.; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, M.; Wang, M-H; Wienands, U.; Gerity, J.; Mann, T.; McIntyre, P.; Pogue, N. J.; Satttarov, A.

    2015-07-14

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated superconducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  16. Status of the MEIC ion collider ring design

    SciTech Connect

    Morozov, Vasiliy; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Harwood, Leigh; Hutton, Andrew; Lin, Fanglei; Pilat, Fulvia; Zhang, Yuhong; Cai, Yunhai; Nosochkov, Y. M.; Sullivan, Michael; Wang, M.-H.; Wienands, Uli; Gerity, James; Mann, Thomas; McIntyre, Peter; Pogue, Nathaniel; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-09-01

    We present an update on the design of the ion collider ring of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) proposed by Jefferson Lab. The design is based on the use of super-ferric magnets. It provides the necessary momentum range of 8 to 100 GeV/c for protons and ions, matches the electron collider ring design using PEP-II components, fits readily on the JLab site, offers a straightforward path for a future full-energy upgrade by replacing the magnets with higher-field ones in the same tunnel, and is more cost effective than using presently available current-dominated super-conducting magnets. We describe complete ion collider optics including an independently-designed modular detector region.

  17. Comparative study of using different materials as bacterial carriers to treat hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiling; Sun, Tonghua; Zhu, Nanwen; Cao, Xinde; Jia, Jinping

    2008-12-01

    The use of support media for the immobilization of microorganisms is widely known to provide a surface for microbial growth and protect the microorganisms from inhibitory compounds. In this study, molecular sieve, granular porous carbon, and ferric oxide desulfurizer, immobilized with autotrophic bacteria capable of oxidizing ferrous iron to ferric iron, were developed to treat hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S). Their corresponding bioreactors were referred to as BMS, BPC, and BFO, respectively. H(2)S loading, gas retention time, hydrogen ion, and aluminous, ferric, and ferrous iron concentrations of recycling effluents were evaluated. Thermogravimetric analysis, Brauner-Emmett-Teller method, and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize packing materials. Results showed that the elimination capacity was in the order of BFO > BPC > BMS. This study suggested that the material characteristics progressively influenced the deodorization capacities of bioreactors. H(2)S was oxidized into elemental sulfur and oxidized sulfur species, according to differences of carriers. Furthermore, this study revealed the potential application of simultaneously treating of H(2)S under extremely acidic conditions.

  18. Formation of ferric iron crusts in Quaternary sediments of Lake Baikal, Russia, and implications for paleoclimate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deike, R.G.; Granina, L.; Callender, E.; McGee, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Phosphate-bearing, ferric iron and siliceous crusts ranging in age from Recent to approximately 65,000 yr B.P. are observed in sediments of Lake Baikal. In younger sediments the crusts are at the base of a spectrum of secondary iron and manganese oxides that accumulate near the sediment/water interface in the zone of positive oxidation potential beneath an oxygenated water column. In areas where the average Quaternary sedimentation rates have been slow (e.g. 0.026 mm/yr), the crusts are more common, and span a wider range of ages. No crusts have been found where the Quaternary sedimentation mode has been deltaic and rapid (0.15 mm/yr). Independent core correlation based on magnetic properties of the sediment suggests that crusts can be correlated over most of Academician Ridge, an area that is particularly sensitive to climatic events affecting the concentration of suspended sediment. These crusts may be indicative of periods of low suspended sediment concentration, which occur during sustained transitions from glacial periods of high detrital input, to interglacial periods of high diatom sedimentation. The crusts are dominated by iron-rich and siliceous amorphous mineral phases, with an FeO:SiO2 by weight of 3:1. Regardless of age or location in the lake the Fe phase always includes Ca, P and Mn. Extensive microprobe data for these four elements recast as normalized elemental weight percent reveal linear trends of Ca:P and Fe:P. With increasing P, Ca also increases such that the two elements maintain a linear relationship passing very close to the origin and with a mean molar Ca:P=0.3 (too low for well-characterized apatite). Conversely, with increasing P, Fe decreases (mean molar Fe:P=3.4). There is no correlation between Mn and P. Molar Fe:P ratios for vivianite (an Fe(II) phosphate mineral observed in sediments closely below some crusts) are clustered around a stoichiometric composition. The covariant increase in Ca:P and the corresponding decrease in Fe:P may

  19. Prevention of Acid Mine Drainage Through Complexation of Ferric Iron by Soluble Microbial Growth Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, S.; Yacob, T. W.; Silverstein, J.; Rajaram, H.; Minchow, K.; Basta, J.

    2011-12-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a widespread environmental problem with deleterious impacts on water quality in streams and watersheds. AMD is generated largely by the oxidation of metal sulfides (i.e. pyrite) by ferric iron. This abiotic reaction is catalyzed by conversion of ferrous to ferric iron by iron and sulfur oxidizing microorganisms. Biostimulation is currently being investigated as an attempt to inhibit the oxidation of pyrite and growth of iron oxidizing bacteria through addition of organic carbon. This may stimulate growth of indigenous communities of acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria to compete for oxygen. The goal of this research is to investigate a secondary mechanism associated with carbon addition: complexation of free Fe(III) by soluble microbial growth products (SMPs) produced by microorganisms growing in waste rock. Exploratory research at the laboratory scale examined the effect of soluble microbial products (SMPs) on the kinetics of oxidation of pure pyrite during shaker flask experiments. The results confirmed a decrease in the rate of pyrite oxidation that was dependent upon the concentration of SMPs in solution. We are using these data to verify results from a pyrite oxidation model that accounts for SMPs. This reactor model involves differential-algebraic equations incorporating total component mass balances and mass action laws for equilibrium reactions. Species concentrations determined in each time step are applied to abiotic pyrite oxidation rate expressions from the literature to determine the evolution of total component concentrations. The model was embedded in a parameter estimation algorithm to determine the reactive surface area of pyrite in an abiotic control experiment, yielding an optimized value of 0.0037 m2. The optimized model exhibited similar behavior to the experiment for this case; the root mean squared of residuals for Fe(III) was calculated to be 7.58 x 10-4 M, which is several orders of magnitude less than the actual

  20. Vimentin in Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tim N.; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Despite well-studied bacterial strategies to target actin to subvert the host cell cytoskeleton, thus promoting bacterial survival, replication, and dissemination, relatively little is known about the bacterial interaction with other components of the host cell cytoskeleton, including intermediate filaments (IFs). IFs have not only roles in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell, but they are also involved in many cellular processes including cell adhesion, immune signaling, and autophagy, processes that are important in the context of bacterial infections. Here, we summarize the knowledge about the role of IFs in bacterial infections, focusing on the type III IF protein vimentin. Recent studies have revealed the involvement of vimentin in host cell defenses, acting as ligand for several pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system. Two main aspects of bacteria-vimentin interactions are presented in this review: the role of vimentin in pathogen-binding on the cell surface and subsequent bacterial invasion and the interaction of cytosolic vimentin and intracellular pathogens with regards to innate immune signaling. Mechanistic insight is presented involving distinct bacterial virulence factors that target vimentin to subvert its function in order to change the host cell fate in the course of a bacterial infection. PMID:27096872

  1. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth.

    PubMed

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Downing, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Comolli, Luis R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-02-01

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III)-bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Furthermore, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA, close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated two- and three-dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The outer membranes of most cells were decorated with aggregates up to 150 nm in diameter composed of ∼3 nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well-studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L(2,3) absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed-valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  2. Determination of ferric iron chelators by high-performance liquid chromatography using luminol chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Tomoko; Imura, Yuki; Suzuki, Michio; Yoshimura, Etsuro

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential element for higher plants, and its acquisition and transportation is one of the greatest limiting factors for plant growth because of its low solubility in normal soil pHs. Higher plants biosynthesize ferric iron [Fe(III)] chelator (FIC), which solubilizes the iron and transports it to the rhizosphere. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) post-column method has been developed for the analysis of FICs using the luminol/H2O2 system for chemiluminescence (CL) detection. A size-exclusion column was the most suited in terms of column efficiency and CL detection efficiency. Mixing of the luminol with H2O2 in a post-column reaction was feasible, and a two-pump system was used to separately deliver the luminol and H2O2 solutions. The luminol and H2O2 concentrations were optimized using Fe(III)-EDTA and Fe(III)-citrate (Cit) solutions as analytes. A strong CL intensity was obtained for Fe(III)-Cit when EDTA was added to the luminol solution, probably because of an exchange of Cit with EDTA after separation on the HPLC column; CL efficiency was much higher for Fe(III)-EDTA than for Fe(III)-Cit with the luminol/H2O2 system. The present method can detect minute levels of Fe(III)-FICs; the detection limits of Fe(III)-EDTA, Fe(III)-Cit and Fe(III)-nicotianamine were 0.77, 2.3 and 1.1pmol, respectively.

  3. [Characteristics of orthophosphate adsorption on ferric-alum residuals (FARs) from drinking water treatment plant].

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Hui; Pei, Yuan-Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Batch tests have been used to investigate the characteristics of orthophosphate adsorption on ferric-alum residuals (FARs) from drinking water treatment plant. ICP, SEM and XRD analyses confirm that the FARs enriched in Fe and Al elements and presented amorphism structure. Orthophosphate sorption by the FARs can be described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics equation. Fine adsorption effects of the FARs were found under lower pH values, particularly a 40.13% drop of the adsorptive capacity from pH 4.6 to pH 7.6. The FARs with grain sizes of 0.6-0.9 mm had the highest adsorption capacity of orthophosphate. Experimental data could be better fitted by the isotherm models of Langmuir (R2 = 0.9736) and Freundlich (R2 = 0.9916). The maximal adsorptive capacity reached 45.45 mg x g(-1) estimated from Langmuir isotherm model. Compared with other natural and industrial materials, FARs has relatively higher adsorption capacity. Under similar testing conditions, it was found that only about 10% orthophosphate could be desorbed from the FARs. Further study demonstrated that the mean energy of orthophosphate sorption on the FARs was 13.36 kJ x mol(-1) and the deltaH0 > 0, deltaS0 > 0 and deltaG0 < 0, which indicated that orthophosphate sorption on the FARs was a spontaneously endothermic chemical reaction. It can be therefore highly valued that the FARs may be applied to phosphate removal from wastewater and surface water.

  4. A method for preparing ferric activated carbon composites adsorbents to remove arsenic from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao Li; Lin, Y C; Chen, X; Gao, Nai Yun

    2007-09-30

    Iron oxide/activated carbon (FeO/AC) composite adsorbent material, which was used to modify the coal-based activated carbon (AC) 12 x 40, was prepared by the special ferric oxide microcrystal in this study. This composite can be used as the adsorbent to remove arsenic from drinking water, and Langmuir isotherm adsorption equation well describes the experimental adsorption isotherms. Then, the arsenic desorption can subsequently be separated from the medium by using a 1% aqueous NaOH solution. The apparent characters and physical chemistry performances of FeO/AC composite were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Batch and column adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate and compare the arsenic removal capability of the prepared FeO/AC composite material and virgin activated carbon. It can be concluded that: (1) the main phase present in this composite are magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)), maghemite (gamma-Fe(2)O(3)), hematite (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) and goethite (alpha-FeO(OH)); (2) the presence of iron oxides did not significantly affect the surface area or the pore structure of the activated carbon; (3) the comparisons between the adsorption isotherms of arsenic from aqueous solution onto the composite and virgin activated carbon showed that the FeO/AC composite behave an excellent capacity of adsorption arsenic than the virgin activated carbon; (4) column adsorption experiments with FeO/AC composite adsorbent showed that the arsenic could be removed to below 0.01 mg/L within 1250 mL empty bed volume when influent concentration was 0.5mg/L.

  5. Hydrogen sulfide attenuates ferric chloride-induced arterial thrombosis in rats.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yi-Ren; You, Shou-Jiang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qian; Wang, Xian-Hui; Wang, Fen; Hu, Li-Fang; Liu, Chun-Feng

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gaseous transmitter, regulating a multitude of biological processes in the cardiovascular and other systems. However, it remains unclear whether it exerts any effect on arterial thrombosis. In this study, we examined the effect of H2S on ferric chloride (FeCl3)-induced thrombosis in the rat common carotid artery (CCA). The results revealed a decrease of the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) expression and H2S production that persisted until 48 h after FeCl3 application. Intriguingly, administration with NaHS at appropriate regimen reduced the thrombus formation and enhanced the blood flow, accompanied with the alleviation of CSE and CD31 downregulation, and endothelial cell apoptosis in the rat CCA following FeCl3 application. Moreover, the antithrombotic effect of H2S was also observed in Rose Bengal photochemical model in which the development of thrombosis is contributed by oxidative injury to the endothelium. The in vitro study demonstrated that the mRNA and protein expression of CSE, as well as H2S production, was decreased in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-treated endothelial cells. Exogenous supplement of NaHS and CSE overexpression consistently alleviated the increase of cleaved caspase-3 and endothelial cell damage caused by H2O2. Taken together, our findings suggest that endogenous H2S generation in the endothelium may be impaired during arterial thrombosis and that modulation of H2S, either exogenous supplement or boost of endogenous production, may become a potential venue for arterial thrombosis therapy.

  6. Emergency do not consume/do not use concentrations for ferric chloride in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Willhite, C C; Ball, G L; Bhat, V S

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Congress [PL 107-188] amended the Safe Drinking Water Act and required each community water system serving more than 3,000 people to conduct vulnerability assessments. These assessments address potential circumstances that could compromise the safety and reliability of municipal water. Ferric chloride is used in coagulation and flocculation, and it is used to treat raw water with high viral loads, elevated dissolved solids or high bromide. Iron is an essential nutrient, but elevated concentrations of FeCl3 are corrosive as a result of hydrolysis to HCl. Based on a no-observed-adverse effect level (NOAEL) of 0.5% FeCl3 • 6H2O administered in drinking water to male and female F344 rats for up to 2 years, a do not consume concentration of 200 mg FeCl3 /L can be derived. Since instillation of 0.3 M (48.7 g/L) FeCl3 in saline to rodent vagina failed to elicit damage, a topical do not use concentration of 2000 mg FeCl3/L (600 mg Fe/L) can be assigned. The only FeCl3 data available to quantify ocular toxicity involved a pH 1 solution in rabbit eyes, but HCl instillation (pH 2.5) to rabbit eyes found permanent corneal ulceration after 10 min. The pH of FeCl3 in water at the do not use limit (2.4-2.6) is near the pH (2.0) considered corrosive by regulatory agencies. As direct eye contact with water at pH 4.5 or below increases complaints of ocular discomfort, emergency response plans that address FeCl3 in drinking water must account for Fe levels and the pH of the affected water.

  7. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    PubMed Central

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C; Williams, Kenneth H; Wilkins, Michael J; Downing, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Comolli, Luis R; Banfield, Jillian F

    2013-01-01

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III)-bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Furthermore, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA, close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated two- and three-dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). The outer membranes of most cells were decorated with aggregates up to 150 nm in diameter composed of ∼3 nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well-studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)–Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed-valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension. PMID:23038172

  8. Optimizing iron delivery in the management of anemia: patient considerations and the role of ferric carboxymaltose

    PubMed Central

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Angerosa, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    With the challenge of optimizing iron delivery, new intravenous (iv) iron–carbohydrate complexes have been developed in the last few years. A good example of these new compounds is ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), which has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in adult patients who are intolerant to oral iron or present an unsatisfactory response to oral iron, and in adult patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD). FCM is a robust and stable complex similar to ferritin, which minimizes the release of labile iron during administration, allowing higher doses to be administered in a single application and with a favorable cost-effective rate. Cumulative information from randomized, controlled, multicenter trials on a diverse range of indications, including patients with chronic heart failure, postpartum anemia/abnormal uterine bleeding, inflammatory bowel disease, NDD-CKD, and those undergoing hemodialysis, supports the efficacy of FCM for iron replacement in patients with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia. Furthermore, as FCM is a dextran-free iron–carbohydrate complex (which has a very low risk for hypersensitivity reactions) with a small proportion of the reported adverse effects in a large number of subjects who received FCM, it may be considered a safe drug. Therefore, FCM appears as an interesting option to apply high doses of iron as a single infusion in a few minutes in order to obtain the quick replacement of iron stores. The present review on FCM summarizes diverse aspects such as pharmacology characteristics and analyzes trials on the efficacy/safety of FCM versus oral iron and different iv iron compounds in multiple clinical scenarios. Additionally, the information on cost effectiveness and data on change in quality of life are also discussed. PMID:25525337

  9. Safety and Efficacy of Ferric Carboxymaltose in Anemic Pregnant Women: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Pels, Anouk; Ganzevoort, Wessel

    2015-01-01

    Background. Anemia during pregnancy is commonly caused by iron deficiency and can have severe consequences for both the mother and the developing fetus. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the safety and efficacy of intravenous ferric carboxymaltose (FCM) in pregnant women. Methods. All women treated with FCM for anemia during pregnancy between 2010 and 2012 at our institution were included. A matched control group was selected, including women who either were nonanemic or had anemia but were not considered for intravenous iron. Main outcome measures were maternal safety and pregnancy outcomes. Results. The study included 128 patients (FCM: 64; control: 64). Median FCM dose was 1000 mg and median gestational age at the time of first treatment was 34 weeks and 6 days. Median Hb increased from 8.4 g/dL (interquartile range 7.7; 8.9 g/dL) at the first FCM administration to 10.7 g/dL (9.8; 11.5 g/dL; n = 46 with available Hb at delivery) at the time of delivery, achieving levels similar to those in the control group (10.8 g/dL [9.8; 11.8 g/dL; n = 48]). No treatment-related adverse events were reported and no statistically significant differences in pregnancy outcomes were observed between groups. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this case control study, FCM was a safe and efficient treatment of anemia during pregnancy. PMID:26688686

  10. Optimizing iron delivery in the management of anemia: patient considerations and the role of ferric carboxymaltose.

    PubMed

    Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Angerosa, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    With the challenge of optimizing iron delivery, new intravenous (iv) iron-carbohydrate complexes have been developed in the last few years. A good example of these new compounds is ferric carboxymaltose (FCM), which has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in adult patients who are intolerant to oral iron or present an unsatisfactory response to oral iron, and in adult patients with non-dialysis-dependent chronic kidney disease (NDD-CKD). FCM is a robust and stable complex similar to ferritin, which minimizes the release of labile iron during administration, allowing higher doses to be administered in a single application and with a favorable cost-effective rate. Cumulative information from randomized, controlled, multicenter trials on a diverse range of indications, including patients with chronic heart failure, postpartum anemia/abnormal uterine bleeding, inflammatory bowel disease, NDD-CKD, and those undergoing hemodialysis, supports the efficacy of FCM for iron replacement in patients with iron deficiency and iron-deficiency anemia. Furthermore, as FCM is a dextran-free iron-carbohydrate complex (which has a very low risk for hypersensitivity reactions) with a small proportion of the reported adverse effects in a large number of subjects who received FCM, it may be considered a safe drug. Therefore, FCM appears as an interesting option to apply high doses of iron as a single infusion in a few minutes in order to obtain the quick replacement of iron stores. The present review on FCM summarizes diverse aspects such as pharmacology characteristics and analyzes trials on the efficacy/safety of FCM versus oral iron and different iv iron compounds in multiple clinical scenarios. Additionally, the information on cost effectiveness and data on change in quality of life are also discussed.

  11. Iron-reducing bacteria accumulate ferric oxyhydroxide nanoparticle aggregates that may support planktonic growth

    SciTech Connect

    Luef, Birgit; Fakra, Sirine C.; Csencsits, Roseann; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Downing, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Comolli, Luis R.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2013-02-04

    Iron-reducing bacteria (FeRB) play key roles in anaerobic metal and carbon cycling and carry out biogeochemical transformations that can be harnessed for environmental bioremediation. A subset of FeRB require direct contact with Fe(III) bearing minerals for dissimilatory growth, yet these bacteria must move between mineral particles. Further, they proliferate in planktonic consortia during biostimulation experiments. Thus, a key question is how such organisms can sustain growth under these conditions. Here we characterized planktonic microbial communities sampled from an aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, USA close to the peak of iron reduction following in situ acetate amendment. Samples were cryo-plunged on site and subsequently examined using correlated 2- and 3- dimensional cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM). Most cells had their outer membranes decorated with up to 150 nm diameter aggregates composed of a few nm wide amorphous, Fe-rich nanoparticles. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of lineage-specific probes applied to rRNA of cells subsequently imaged via cryo-TEM identified Geobacter spp., a well studied group of FeRB. STXM results at the Fe L2,3 absorption edges indicate that nanoparticle aggregates contain a variable mixture of Fe(II)-Fe(III), and are generally enriched in Fe(III). Geobacter bemidjiensis cultivated anaerobically in the laboratory on acetate and hydrous ferric oxyhydroxides also accumulated mixed valence nanoparticle aggregates. In field-collected samples, FeRB with a wide variety of morphologies were associated with nano-aggregates, indicating that cell-surface Fe(III) accumulation may be a general mechanism by which FeRB can grow while in planktonic suspension.

  12. Septins and Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Torraca, Vincenzo; Mostowy, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Septins, a unique cytoskeletal component associated with cellular membranes, are increasingly recognized as having important roles in host defense against bacterial infection. A role for septins during invasion of Listeria monocytogenes into host cells was first proposed in 2002. Since then, work has shown that septins assemble in response to a wide variety of invasive bacterial pathogens, and septin assemblies can have different roles during the bacterial infection process. Here we review the interplay between septins and bacterial pathogens, highlighting septins as a structural determinant of host defense. We also discuss how investigation of septin assembly in response to bacterial infection can yield insight into basic cellular processes including phagocytosis, autophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. PMID:27891501

  13. An iron detection system determines bacterial swarming initiation and biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chuan-Sheng; Tsai, Yu-Huan; Chang, Chih-Jung; Tseng, Shun-Fu; Wu, Tsung-Ru; Lu, Chia-Chen; Wu, Ting-Shu; Lu, Jang-Jih; Horng, Jim-Tong; Martel, Jan; Ojcius, David M.; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Young, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Iron availability affects swarming and biofilm formation in various bacterial species. However, how bacteria sense iron and coordinate swarming and biofilm formation remains unclear. Using Serratia marcescens as a model organism, we identify here a stage-specific iron-regulatory machinery comprising a two-component system (TCS) and the TCS-regulated iron chelator 2-isocyano-6,7-dihydroxycoumarin (ICDH-Coumarin) that directly senses and modulates environmental ferric iron (Fe3+) availability to determine swarming initiation and biofilm formation. We demonstrate that the two-component system RssA-RssB (RssAB) directly senses environmental ferric iron (Fe3+) and transcriptionally modulates biosynthesis of flagella and the iron chelator ICDH-Coumarin whose production requires the pvc cluster. Addition of Fe3+, or loss of ICDH-Coumarin due to pvc deletion results in prolonged RssAB signaling activation, leading to delayed swarming initiation and increased biofilm formation. We further show that ICDH-Coumarin is able to chelate Fe3+ to switch off RssAB signaling, triggering swarming initiation and biofilm reduction. Our findings reveal a novel cellular system that senses iron levels to regulate bacterial surface lifestyle. PMID:27845335

  14. Generation of oxoiron (IV) tetramesitylporphyrin pi-cation radical complexes by m-CPBA oxidation of ferric tetramesitylporphyrin derivatives in butyronitrile at - 78 degrees C. Evidence for the formation of six-coordinate oxoiron (IV) tetramesitylporphyrin pi-cation radical complexes FeIV = O(tmp*)X (X = Cl-, Br-), by Mössbauer and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wolter, T; Meyer-Klaucke, W; Müther, M; Mandon, D; Winkler, H; Trautwein, A X; Weiss, R

    2000-01-30

    The generation of six-coordinate oxoiron (IV) tetramesitylporphyrin pi-caption radical complexes by m-CPBA (meta-chloroperbenzoic acid) oxidation of ferric tetramesitylporphyrin derivatives in butyronitrile at - 78 degrees C was investigated. UV-Vis and EPR spectroscopies indicate that the axial ligand present in the ferric starting derivatives is retained in the high-valent iron complexes. Indirect evidence for the formation of six-coordinate oxoiron (IV) tetramesitylporphyrin complexes FeIV = O(tmp*)X (X=Cl-, Br-) by m-CPBA oxidation of FeX(tmp) (X=Cl-, Br-) in butyronitrile at - 78 degrees C was also obtained by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Direct confirmation of the presence of a halide ion as second axial ligand of iron in these high-valent iron species was obtained by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The EXAFS spectra of the samples obtained by m-CPBA oxidation of FeX(tmp) (X=Cl-, Br-) were refined using two different coordination models including both four porphyrinato-nitrogens and the axial oxo group. The two models include (model I) or exclude (model II) the axial halogen. The statistical tests indicate the presence of a halide ion as second axial ligand of iron in both derivatives. The refinements led to the following bond distances: FeIV=O(tmp*)Cl(3):Fe-O=1.66(1),Fe-Cl=2.39(2) and Fe-Np=1.99(1) A;FeIV=O(tmp*)Br(4):Fe-O=1.65(1),Fe-Br=2.93(2), Fe-Np=2.02(1) A. The lengthening of the Fe-X(X=Cl-, Br-) distances relative to those occurring in the ferric precursor porphyrins is, most probably, related to the strong trans influence of the oxoiron(IV) fragment present in 3 or 4.

  15. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  16. Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Gorby, Yuri A; Yanina, Svetlana; McLean, Jeffrey S; Rosso, Kevin M; Moyles, Dianne; Dohnalkova, Alice; Beveridge, Terry J; Chang, In Seop; Kim, Byung Hong; Kim, Kyung Shik; Culley, David E; Reed, Samantha B; Romine, Margaret F; Saffarini, Daad A; Hill, Eric A; Shi, Liang; Elias, Dwayne A; Kennedy, David W; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ishii, Shun'ichi; Logan, Bruce; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, Jim K

    2006-07-25

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced electrically conductive pilus-like appendages called bacterial nanowires in direct response to electron-acceptor limitation. Mutants deficient in genes for c-type decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA, and those that lacked a functional Type II secretion pathway displayed nanowires that were poorly conductive. These mutants were also deficient in their ability to reduce hydrous ferric oxide and in their ability to generate current in a microbial fuel cell. Nanowires produced by the oxygenic phototrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 and the thermophilic, fermentative bacterium Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum reveal that electrically conductive appendages are not exclusive to dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and may, in fact, represent a common bacterial strategy for efficient electron transfer and energy distribution.

  17. Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Gorby, Yuri A.; Yanina, Svetlana; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Moyles, Dianne; Dohnalkova, Alice; Beveridge, Terry J.; Chang, In Seop; Kim, Byung Hong; Kim, Kyung Shik; Culley, David E.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Hill, Eric A.; Shi, Liang; Elias, Dwayne A.; Kennedy, David W.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Logan, Bruce; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2006-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced electrically conductive pilus-like appendages called bacterial nanowires in direct response to electron-acceptor limitation. Mutants deficient in genes for c-type decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA, and those that lacked a functional Type II secretion pathway displayed nanowires that were poorly conductive. These mutants were also deficient in their ability to reduce hydrous ferric oxide and in their ability to generate current in a microbial fuel cell. Nanowires produced by the oxygenic phototrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 and the thermophilic, fermentative bacterium Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum reveal that electrically conductive appendages are not exclusive to dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and may, in fact, represent a common bacterial strategy for efficient electron transfer and energy distribution. PMID:16849424

  18. The Induction of Oxidative/Nitrosative Stress, Inflammation, and Apoptosis by a Ferric Carboxymaltose Copy Compared to Iron Sucrose in a Non-Clinical Model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Gabriel; Angerosa, Margarita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Ferric carboxymaltose is a next-generation polynuclear iron(III)-hydroxide carbohydrate complex for intravenous iron therapy belonging to the class of so-called non-biological complex drugs. The product characteristics and therapeutic performance of non-biological complex drugs are largely defined by the manufacturing process. A follow-on product, termed herein as ferric carboxymaltose similar, is available in India. Given that non-biological complex drugs may display differences in diverse product properties not characterisable by physico-chemical methods alone. Aim The aim is to assess the effects of this ferric carboxymaltose similar in our non-clinical model in non-anaemic healthy rats. Materials and Methods Non-anaemic rats were treated with intravenous ferric carboxymaltose similar or iron sucrose both at (40 mg iron/kg body weight), or with saline solution (control) for four weeks, after which the animals were sacrificed. Parameters for tissue iron distribution, oxidative stress, nitrosative stress, inflammation and apoptosis were assessed by immunohistomorphometry. Results Ferric carboxymaltose similar resulted in deranged iron distribution versus iron sucrose originator as indicated by increased serum iron, transferrin saturation and tissue iron(III) deposits as well as decreased ferritin deposits in the liver, heart and kidneys versus iron sucrose originator. Ferric carboxymaltose similar also increased significantly oxidative/nitrosative stress, pro-inflammatory, and apoptosis markers in the liver, heart and kidneys versus iron sucrose originator. Conclusion In our rat model, ferric carboxymaltose similar had a less favourable safety profile than iron sucrose originator, adversely affecting iron deposition, oxidative and nitrosative stress, inflammatory responses, with impaired liver and kidney function. PMID:26816915

  19. Bacterial detoxification of diisopropyl fluorophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Attaway, H; Nelson, J O; Baya, A M; Voll, M J; White, W E; Grimes, D J; Colwell, R R

    1987-01-01

    The ability of 18 gram-negative bacterial isolates to detoxify diisopropyl fluorophosphate, a structural analog of the agents soman and sarin, was investigated. Detoxification by both frozen cell sonicates and acetone powders was assayed by two methods, i.e., the hydrolytic release of fluoride, measured by a fluoride-specific ion electrode, and the disappearance of acetylcholinesterase inhibition in vitro. Frozen cell sonicates for all strains exhibited some activity (F- ion release). In general, acetone powder preparations produced higher activity than frozen cell sonicates did, and the highest activities were exhibited by strains with known parathion hydrolase activity. Two ranges in activity were observed, low level, ranging from 0.1 to 7.0 mumol/min per g of protein, and high level, detected only in parathion hydrolase-producing strains, from 47 to greater than 300 mumol/min per g of protein. Results indicate that parathion hydrolase was nonspecific in phosphoesterase activity. Also, it was an effective detoxicant at low concentrations and near-neutral pH. PMID:3662511

  20. Intraparticle diffusion and adsorption of arsenate onto granular ferric hydroxide (GFH).

    PubMed

    Badruzzaman, Mohammad; Westerhoff, Paul; Knappe, Detlef R U

    2004-11-01

    Porous iron oxides are being evaluated and selected for arsenic removal in potable water systems. Granular ferric hydroxide, a typical porous iron adsorbent, is commercially available and frequently considered in evaluation of arsenic removal methods. GFH is a highly porous (micropore volume approximately 0.0394+/-0.0056 cm(3)g(-1), mesopore volume approximately 0.0995+/-0.0096 cm(3)g(-1)) adsorbent with a BET surface area of 235+/-8 m(2)g(-1). The purpose of this paper is to quantify arsenate adsorption kinetics on GFH and to determine if intraparticle diffusion is a rate-limiting step for arsenic removal in packed-bed treatment systems. Data from bottle-point isotherm and differential column batch reactor (DCBR) experiments were used to estimate Freundlich isotherm parameters (K and 1/n) as well as kinetic parameters describing mass transfer resistances due to film diffusion (k(f)) and intraparticle surface diffusion (D(s)). The pseudo-equilibrium (18 days of contact time) arsenate adsorption density at pH 7 was 8 microg As/mg dry GFH at a liquid phase arsenate concentration of 10 microg As/L. The homogeneous surface diffusion model (HSDM) was used to describe the DCBR data. A non-linear relationship (D(S)=3.0(-9) x R(p)(1.4)) was observed between D(s) and GFH particle radius (R(P)) with D(s) values ranging from 2.98 x 10(-12) cm(2)s(-1) for the smallest GFH mesh size (100 x 140) to 64 x 10(-11) cm(2)s(-1) for the largest GFH mesh size (10 x 30). The rate-limiting process of intraparticle surface diffusion for arsenate adsorption by porous iron oxides appears analogous to organic compound adsorption by activated carbon despite differences in adsorption mechanisms (inner-sphere complexes for As versus hydrophobic interactions for organic contaminants). The findings are discussed in the context of intraparticle surface diffusion affecting packed-bed treatment system design and application of rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCTs) to simulate the performance of

  1. IV Ferric Carboxymaltose Vs Oral Iron in the Treatment of Post-partum Iron Deficiency Anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Thunga, Suchitra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Iron deficiency is the most common cause of Post-partum anaemia, reported as 50-60% in India. It is primarily due to inadequate iron intake and due to peripartum blood loss. It has been associated with significant post-partum complications. Therefore, Post-partum iron deficiency warrants greater attention and higher quality care. Oral iron treatment has been considered the standard of care. However, parenteral iron treatment is expected to be advantageous in cases where oral iron therapy is not possible. As a result, there is increased interest in parenteral iron therapy. Recently, a new parenteral iron preparation, Ferric Carboxy Maltose (FCM), was developed to facilitate effective treatment of Iron Deficiency Anaemia (IDA). This study was carried out in women with Post-partum IDA who were expected to benefit from the short treatment period permitted by the larger doses given parenterally. Aim To evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of intra venous FCM compared to oral iron in treating Post-partum IDA patients. Materials and Methods This was a hospital based prospective comparative study. Women with Haemoglobin (Hb) between 7-10 g/dl and peripheral smear showing microcytic hypochromic anaemia on the first Post-partum day were included in the study. These women were randomised to receive either IV FCM (single dose 1000 mg) or oral ferrous ascorbate (100 mg twice daily for 6 weeks). Statistical analysis was done by student’s paired and unpaired t-test and by chi- square test and fischer-exact t-test. Results Ninety patients (45 in each group) were followed at one week and six weeks from the start of treatment and their Hb were estimated. Significant rise in Hb was observed in subjects treated with FCM compared to oral iron. FCM treated subjects were more likely to achieve an Hb rise greater than or equal to 3.0 g/dL. FCM was better tolerated with complete adherence to treatment as compared to oral ferrous ascorbate. Conclusion FCM showed

  2. Experimental Spinel Standards for Ferric Iron (Fe3+) Determination During Peridotite Partial Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenz, M. D.; Sorbadere, F.; Rosenthal, A.; Frost, D. J.; McCammon, C. A.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of ferric iron (Fe3+) in the mantle plays a significant role in the oxygen fugacity (fO2) of the Earth's interior. This has a wide range of implications for Earth related processes ranging from the composition of the atmosphere to magmatic phase relations during melting and crystallization processes [1]. A major source of Earth's mantle magmas is spinel peridotite. Despite its low abundance, spinel (Fe3+/ƩFe = 15-34%, [2]) is the main contributor of Fe3+to the melt upon partial melting. Analyses of Fe3+ on small areas of spinel and melt are required to study the Fe3+ behavior during partial melting of spinel peridotite. Fe K-edge X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) combines both high precision and small beam size, but requires standards with a wide range of Fe3+ content to obtain good calibration. Glasses with varying Fe3+ content are easily synthesized [3, 4]. Spinel, however, presents a challenge for experimental standards due to the low diffusion of Cr and Al preventing compositional homogeneity. Natural spinel standards are often used, but only cover a narrow Fe3+ range. Thus, there is a need for better experimental spinel standards over a wider range of fO2. Our study involves making experimental mantle spinels with variable Fe3+ content. We used a sol-gel auto-combustion method to synthesize our starting material [5]. FMQ-2, FMQ+0, and air fO2 conditions were established using a gas mixing furnace. Piston cylinder experiments were performed at 1.5GPa, and 1310 -1370°C to obtain solid material for XANES. To maintain distinct oxidizing conditions, three capsules were used: graphite for reduced, Re for intermediate and AuPd for oxidized conditions. The spinels were analyzed by Mössbauer spectroscopy. Fe3+/ƩFe ranged from 0.3 to 0.6. These values are consistent with the Fe edge position obtained using XANES analyses, between 7130 and 7132 eV, respectively. Our spinels are thus suitable standards for Fe3+ measurements in peridotite

  3. Antioxidant potential of green and black tea determined using the ferric reducing power (FRAP) assay.

    PubMed

    Langley-Evans, S C

    2000-05-01

    Tea is one of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world and is rich in polyphenolic compounds collectively known as the tea flavonoids. Tea flavonoids possess antioxidant properties in vitro and have been proposed as key protective dietary components, reducing risk of coronary heart disease and some cancers. The present study aimed to evaluate the possible effects of different preparation methods on the antioxidant properties of green and black tea. Antioxidant potentials of tea infusates were assessed using an assay based upon the reduction of ferric chloride linked to a chromophore. Green tea, black leaf tea and black tea in tea bags were infused with water at 90 degrees C for time periods ranging from 0.25 to 15 min. Green tea infusates possessed approximately 2.5-fold greater antioxidant capacity than both types of black tea infusates. Both green and black teas released significant levels of antioxidants into the hot water within 2 min of infusion. Preparation of teas across a range of temperatures between 20 and 90 degrees C revealed that although antioxidants were liberated from the leaves into the water in cooler infusions, increasing the temperature could increase antioxidant potential by 4 to 9.5-fold. Black tea prepared using tea bags had significantly lower antioxidant capacity than black leaf tea at temperatures between 20 and 70 degrees C, suggesting that tea bag materials may prevent some extraction of flavonoids into the tea solution. The addition of milk appeared to diminish the antioxidant potential of black tea preparations. This effect was greatest where whole cow's milk was used and appeared to be primarily related to the fat content of the added milk. These experiments have considered the effects of commonly used domestic methods of preparation on the in vitro antioxidant potential of tea. It is concluded that maximum antioxidant capacity and hence maximal health benefit may be derived from green tea or from black leaf tea prepared by

  4. Ibuprofen Impairs Allosterically Peroxynitrite Isomerization by Ferric Human Serum Heme-Albumin*

    PubMed Central

    Ascenzi, Paolo; di Masi, Alessandra; Coletta, Massimo; Ciaccio, Chiara; Fanali, Gabriella; Nicoletti, Francesco P.; Smulevich, Giulietta; Fasano, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) participates in heme scavenging; in turn, heme endows HSA with myoglobin-like reactivity and spectroscopic properties. Here, the allosteric effect of ibuprofen on peroxynitrite isomerization to NO3− catalyzed by ferric human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) is reported. Data were obtained at 22.0 °C. HSA-heme-Fe(III) catalyzes peroxynitrite isomerization in the absence and presence of CO2; the values of the second order catalytic rate constant (kon) are 4.1 × 105 and 4.5 × 105 m−1 s−1, respectively. Moreover, HSA-heme-Fe(III) prevents peroxynitrite-mediated nitration of free added l-tyrosine. The pH dependence of kon (pKa = 6.9) suggests that peroxynitrous acid reacts preferentially with the heme-Fe(III) atom, in the absence and presence of CO2. The HSA-heme-Fe(III)-catalyzed isomerization of peroxynitrite has been ascribed to the reactive pentacoordinated heme-Fe(III) atom. In the absence and presence of CO2, ibuprofen impairs dose-dependently peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III) and facilitates the nitration of free added l-tyrosine; the value of the dissociation equilibrium constant for ibuprofen binding to HSA-heme-Fe(III) (L) ranges between 7.7 × 10−4 and 9.7 × 10−4 m. Under conditions where [ibuprofen] is ≫L, the kinetics of HSA-heme-Fe(III)-catalyzed isomerization of peroxynitrite is superimposable to that obtained in the absence of HSA-heme-Fe(III) or in the presence of non-catalytic HSA-heme-Fe(III)-cyanide complex and HSA. Ibuprofen binding impairs allosterically peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III), inducing the hexacoordination of the heme-Fe(III) atom. These results represent the first evidence for peroxynitrite isomerization by HSA-heme-Fe(III), highlighting the allosteric modulation of HSA-heme-Fe(III) reactivity by heterotropic interaction(s), and outlining the role of drugs in modulating HSA functions. The present results could be relevant for the drug-dependent protective role

  5. The new generation of intravenous iron: chemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of ferric carboxymaltose.

    PubMed

    Funk, Felix; Ryle, Peter; Canclini, Camillo; Neiser, Susann; Geisser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    An ideal preparation for intravenous iron replacement therapy should balance effectiveness and safety. Compounds that release iron rapidly tend to cause toxicity, while large molecules can induce antibody formation and cause anaphylactic reactions. There is therefore a need for an intravenous iron preparation that delivers appropriate amounts of iron in a readily available form but with minimal side effects and thus with an excellent safety profile. In this paper, a review is given on the chemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of ferric carboxymaltose (FCM, Ferinject), a stable and robust complex formulated as a colloidal solution with a physiological pH. The complex is gradually taken up mainly from the hepatic reticulo-endothelial system (RES), followed by effective delivery of iron to the endogeneous transport system for the haem synthesis in new erythrocytes, as shown in studies on the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics with radio-labelled FCM. Studies with radio-labelled FCM also demonstrated a barrier function of the placenta and a low transfer of iron into the milk of lactating rats. Safety pharmacology studies indicated a favourable profile with regard to cardiovascular, central nervous, respiratory, and renal toxicity. A high maximum non-lethal dose was demonstrated in the single-dose toxicity studies. Furthermore, based on the No-Observed-Adverse-Effect-Levels (NOAELs) found in repeated-dose toxicity studies and on the cumulative doses administered, FCM has good safety margins. Reproductive and developmental toxicity studies did not reveal any direct or indirect harmful effects. No genotoxic potential was found in in vitro or in vivo studies. Moreover, antigenicity studies showed no cross-reactivity of FMC with anti-dextran antibodies and also suggested that FCM does not possess sensitizing potential. Lastly, no evidence of irritation was found in local tolerance studies with FCM. This excellent toxicity profile and the high effectiveness of FCM allow

  6. Kinetic evidence for the existence of a rate-limiting step in the reaction of ferric hemoproteins with anionic ligands.

    PubMed

    Coletta, M; Angeletti, M; De Sanctis, G; Cerroni, L; Giardina, B; Amiconi, G; Ascenzi, P

    1996-01-15

    The kinetics of azide and fluroide binding to various monomeric and tetrameric ferric hemoproteins (sperm whale Mb, isolated alpha and beta chains of human Hb reacted with p-chloromercuribenzoate, dromeday, ox and human Hb) has been investigated (at pH 6.5 and 20 degrees C over a large range (20 microM to 2 M) of ligand concentration. It has been observed that the pseuo-first-order rate constant for azide binding to the hemoproteins investigated does not increase linearly with ligand concentration, but tends to level off toward an asymptomatic concentration-independent value typical for each hemoprotein. This behavior, which has been detected only by an investigation covering an unusually large range of ligand concentrations appears to be independent of the ionic strength, and it underlies the existence of a rate-limiting step in the dynamic pathway of azide binding to ferric hemoproteins, which is detectable whenever the observed pseudo- first-order rate constant becomes faster than a given value characteristic of the specific hemoprotein. Such a behavior is not observed in the case of fluroide binding probably because the pesudo- first-order rate constant for this ligand is much slower and never attains a value faster than that of the rate-limiting step. In general terms, this feature should involve a conformational equilibrium between at least two forms (possibly related to the interaction of H2O with distal histidine and its exchange with the bulk solvent) which modulates the access of the anionic ligand into the heme pocket and its reaction with the ferric iron.

  7. Comparative evaluation of Ferric Sulfate, Electrosurgical and Diode Laser on human primary molars pulpotomy: an “in-vivo” study

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, P; Indushekar, KR; Saraf, BG; Sheoran, N; Sardana, D

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Despite modern advances in the prevention of dental caries and increased understanding of the importance of maintaining the natural primary dentition, many teeth are still lost prematurely. This can lead to malocclusion with aesthetic, phonetic and functional problems that may be transient or permanent. Therefore, maintaining the integrity and health of the oral tissues is the primary objective of pulp treatment. Pulpotomy has remained an acceptable and mainstay treatment in preserving the vitality of primary tooth and prolonging its life till the permanent successor erupts. Various materials and techniques are available for pulpotomy on primary molars; all with some advantages and disadvantages. The present study was carried out on 45 primary molars to evaluate and compare the clinical and radiographic success of diode laser, electrosurgical and ferric sulfate pulpotomy over a period of 9 months. Materials (Subjects) and Methods: The forty five primary molars were randomly and equally divided into three treatment groups which were as follows: Group A: 15 primary molars treated with 15.5% Ferric sulfate Group B: 15 primary molars treated with electrosurgical unit and Group C: 15 primary molars treated with diode laser. All teeth in three categories were followed up clinically and radiographically at 1, 3, 6 and 9 months post treatment and the findings were recorded on the prepared proforma Results: Clinically, 86.6% success rate was found in ferric sulfate group whereas 100% success rate was found in electrosurgical and diode laser groups. Radiographically, 80% success rate was found in all the three groups at the end of 9 months with internal resorption being the most common cause of failure after pulpotomy. Conclusions: Thus, electrosurgery and diode lasers appear to be acceptable alternative to pharmacotherapeutic pulpotomy agents. PMID:24771970

  8. Fe{sup II} induced mineralogical transformations of ferric oxyhydroxides into magnetite of variable stoichiometry and morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Usman, M.; Abdelmoula, M.; Hanna, K.; and others

    2012-10-15

    The Moessbauer spectroscopy was used to monitor the mineralogical transformations of ferrihydrite (F), lepidocrocite (L) and goethite (G) into magnetite as a function of aging time. Ferric oxyhydroxides were reacted with soluble Fe{sup II} and OH{sup -} in stoichiometric amounts to form magnetite at an initial pH of {approx}9.7. Observed transformation extent into magnetite followed the order: F>L>G with almost 30% of untransformed G after 1 month. The departure from stoichiometry, {delta}, of magnetite (Fe{sub 3-{delta}}O{sub 4}) generated from F ({delta}{approx}0.04) and L ({delta}{approx}0.05) was relatively low as compared to that in magnetite from G ({delta}{approx}0.08). The analysis by transmission electron microscopy and BET revealed that generated magnetite was also different in terms of morphology, particle size and surface area depending on the nature of initial ferric oxyhydroxide. This method of preparation is a possible way to form nano-sized magnetite. - Graphical abstract: Moessbauer spectrum of the early stage of magnetite formation formed from the interaction of adsorbed Fe{sup II} species with goethite. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ferric oxides were reacted with hydroxylated Fe{sup II} to form magnetite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetite formation was quantified as a function of aging time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complete transformation of ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite was achieved. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost 70% of initial goethite was transformed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Resulting magnetites have differences in stoichiometry and morphological properties.

  9. Bacterial surface adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utada, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    Biofilms are structured multi-cellular communities that are fundamental to the biology and ecology of bacteria. Parasitic bacterial biofilms can cause lethal infections and biofouling, but commensal bacterial biofilms, such as those found in the gut, can break down otherwise indigestible plant polysaccharides and allow us to enjoy vegetables. The first step in biofilm formation, adaptation to life on a surface, requires a working knowledge of low Reynolds number fluid physics, and the coordination of biochemical signaling, polysaccharide production, and molecular motility motors. These crucial early stages of biofilm formation are at present poorly understood. By adapting methods from soft matter physics, we dissect bacterial social behavior at the single cell level for several prototypical bacterial species, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Vibrio cholerae.

  10. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  11. Mössbauer studies of solid state decomposition of methyl methacrylate-ethyl methacrylate copolymers containing ferric chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapur, G. S.; Brar, A. S.

    1990-07-01

    Methyl methacrylate (MMA)-ethyl methacrylate (EMA) copolymers of different monomer concentrations containing anhydrous ferric chloride were prepared by bulk polymerization at 70°C. TGA studies showed that inclusion of iron salt increases the thermal stability of copolymers by 50°C. Mössbauer spectra of copolymers heated at different temperatures showed the presence of Fe3+ species only, in different environments. The mechanism of thermal stabilization of copolymer has been proposed on the basis of IR, TGA and Mössbauer spectroscopy studies.

  12. Assessment of mapping exposed ferrous and ferric iron compounds using Skylab-EREP data. [Pisgah Crater, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. (Principal Investigator); Wagner, H.; Pillars, W.; Bennett, C.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The S190B color photography is as useful as LANDSAT data for the mapping of color differences in the rocks and soils of the terrain. An S192 ratio of 0.79 - 0.89 and 0.93 - 1.05 micron bands produced an apparently successful delineation of ferrous, ferric, and other materials, in agreement with theory and ratio code studies. From an analysis of S191 data, basalt and dacite were separated on the basis of differences in spectral emissivity in the 8.3 - 12 micron region.

  13. Molecular orbital (MSXα) calculations of s-electron densities of tetrahedrally coordinated ferric iron: Comparison with experimental isomer shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang Kai, A.; Annersten, H.; Ericsson, T.

    1980-04-01

    The MSXα method has been used to calculate the s-electron densities at the nucleus for tetrahedrally coordinated ferric iron, (FeO4)5-, comparing the observed increase in isomer shift values with increasing Fe-O separation. The results give an isomer shift calibration constant of -0.3 (a.u. mm×s-1) assuming a constant ratio for the iron and oxygen sphere radii for the different polyhedra sizes. It is suggested that increasing bonding distances in tetrahedral coordination polyhedra are the dominant factors determining the value of the isomer shifts in Fe-Mg-silicates.

  14. Filamentous hydrous ferric oxide biosignatures in a pipeline carrying acid mine drainage at Iron Mountain Mine, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Amy J.; Alpers, Charles N.; Sumner, Dawn Y.; Campbell, Kate M.

    2017-01-01

    A pipeline carrying acidic mine effluent at Iron Mountain, CA, developed Fe(III)-rich precipitate caused by oxidation of Fe(II)aq. The native microbial community in the pipe included filamentous microbes. The pipe scale consisted of microbial filaments, and schwertmannite (ferric oxyhydroxysulfate, FOHS) mineral spheres and filaments. FOHS filaments contained central lumina with diameters similar to those of microbial filaments. FOHS filament geometry, the geochemical environment, and the presence of filamentous microbes suggest that FOHS filaments are mineralized microbial filaments. This formation of textural biosignatures provides the basis for a conceptual model for the development and preservation of biosignatures in other environments.

  15. Experimental Bacterial Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Durack, David T.; Beeson, Paul B.

    1972-01-01

    A method has been developed for assessing metabolic activity of bacteria in the vegetations of bacterial endocarditis using a labelled metabolite and autoradiography. Evidence provided by this technique suggests that there are different degrees of activity between superficial and more deeply placed bacterial colonies, and that variations in activity also exist within a single group of organisms. The possible relevance of these findings to the antibiotic therapy of endocarditis is discussed. ImagesFigs. 1-3Figs. 4-5 PMID:4111329

  16. [Diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Djukić, Slobodanka; Ćirković, Ivana; Arsić, Biljana; Garalejić, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common, complex clinical syndrome characterized by alterations in the normal vaginal flora. When symptomatic, it is associated with a malodorous vaginal discharge and on occasion vaginal burning or itching. Under normal conditions, lactobacilli constitute 95% of the bacteria in the vagina. Bacterial vaginosis is associated with severe reduction or absence of the normal H2O2-producing lactobacilli and overgrowth of anaerobic bacteria and Gardnerella vaginalis, Atopobium vaginae, Mycoplasma hominis and Mobiluncus species. Most types of infectious disease are diagnosed by culture, by isolating an antigen or RNA/DNA from the microbe, or by serodiagnosis to determine the presence of antibodies to the microbe. Therefore, demonstration of the presence of an infectious agent is often a necessary criterion for the diagnosis of the disease. This is not the case for bacterial vaginosis, since the ultimate cause of the disease is not yet known. There are a variety of methods for the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis but no method can at present be regarded as the best. Diagnosing bacterial vaginosis has long been based on the clinical criteria of Amsel, whereby three of four defined criteria must be satisfied. Nugent's scoring system has been further developed and includes validation of the categories of observable bacteria structures. Up-to-date molecular tests are introduced, and better understanding of vaginal microbiome, a clear definition for bacterial vaginosis, and short-term and long-term fluctuations in vaginal microflora will help to better define molecular tests within the broader clinical context.

  17. Molecular dynamics investigation of ferrous-ferric electron transfer in a hydrolyzing aqueous solution: calculation of the pH dependence of the diabatic transfer barrier and the potential of mean force.

    PubMed

    Rustad, James R; Rosso, Kevin M; Felmy, Andrew R

    2004-04-22

    We present a molecular model for ferrous-ferric electron transfer in an aqueous solution that accounts for electronic polarizability and exhibits spontaneous cation hydrolysis. An extended Lagrangian technique is introduced for carrying out calculations of electron-transfer barriers in polarizable systems. The model predicts that the diabatic barrier to electron transfer increases with increasing pH, due to stabilization of the Fe3+ by fluctuations in the number of hydroxide ions in its first coordination sphere, in much the same way as the barrier would increase with increasing dielectric constant in the Marcus theory. We have also calculated the effect of pH on the potential of mean force between two hydrolyzing ions in aqueous solution. As expected, increasing pH reduces the potential of mean force between the ferrous and ferric ions in the model system. The magnitudes of the predicted increase in diabatic transfer barrier and the predicted decrease in the potential of mean force nearly cancel each other at the canonical transfer distance of 0.55 nm. Even though hydrolysis is allowed in our calculations, the distribution of reorganization energies has only one maximum and is Gaussian to an excellent approximation, giving a harmonic free energy surface in the reorganization energy F(DeltaE) with a single minimum. There is thus a surprising amount of overlap in electron-transfer reorganization energies for Fe(2+)-Fe(H2O)6(3+), Fe(2+)-Fe(OH)(H2O)5(2+), and Fe(2+)-Fe(OH)2(H2O)+ couples, indicating that fluctuations in hydrolysis state can be viewed on a continuum with other solvent contributions to the reorganization energy. There appears to be little justification for thinking of the transfer rate as arising from the contributions of different hydrolysis states. Electronic structure calculations indicate that Fe(H2O)6(2+)-Fe(OH)n(H2O)(6-n)(3-n)+ complexes interacting through H3O2- bridges do not have large electronic couplings.

  18. Molecular dynamics investigation of ferrous-ferric electron transfer in a hydrolyzing aqueous solution: Calculation of the pH dependence of the diabatic transfer barrier and the potential of mean force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, James R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2004-04-01

    We present a molecular model for ferrous-ferric electron transfer in an aqueous solution that accounts for electronic polarizability and exhibits spontaneous cation hydrolysis. An extended Lagrangian technique is introduced for carrying out calculations of electron-transfer barriers in polarizable systems. The model predicts that the diabatic barrier to electron transfer increases with increasing pH, due to stabilization of the Fe3+ by fluctuations in the number of hydroxide ions in its first coordination sphere, in much the same way as the barrier would increase with increasing dielectric constant in the Marcus theory. We have also calculated the effect of pH on the potential of mean force between two hydrolyzing ions in aqueous solution. As expected, increasing pH reduces the potential of mean force between the ferrous and ferric ions in the model system. The magnitudes of the predicted increase in diabatic transfer barrier and the predicted decrease in the potential of mean force nearly cancel each other at the canonical transfer distance of 0.55 nm. Even though hydrolysis is allowed in our calculations, the distribution of reorganization energies has only one maximum and is Gaussian to an excellent approximation, giving a harmonic free energy surface in the reorganization energy F(ΔE) with a single minimum. There is thus a surprising amount of overlap in electron-transfer reorganization energies for Fe2+-Fe(H2O)63+, Fe2+-Fe(OH)(H2O)52+, and Fe2+-Fe(OH)2(H2O)+ couples, indicating that fluctuations in hydrolysis state can be viewed on a continuum with other solvent contributions to the reorganization energy. There appears to be little justification for thinking of the transfer rate as arising from the contributions of different hydrolysis states. Electronic structure calculations indicate that Fe(H2O)62+-Fe(OH)n(H2O)6-n(3-n)+ complexes interacting through H3O2- bridges do not have large electronic couplings.

  19. Molecular dynamics investigation of ferrous–ferric electron transfer in a hydrolyzing aqueous solution: Calculation of the pH dependence of the diabatic transfer barrier and the potential of mean force

    SciTech Connect

    Rustad, James R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2004-04-22

    We present a molecular model for ferrous–ferric electron transfer in an aqueous solution that accounts for electronic polarizability and exhibits spontaneous cation hydrolysis. An extended Lagrangian technique is introduced for carrying out calculations of electron-transfer barriers in polarizable systems. The model predicts that the diabatic barrier to electron transfer increases with increasing pH, due to stabilization of the Fe31 by fluctuations in the number of hydroxide ions in its first coordination sphere, in much the same way as the barrier would increase with increasing dielectric constant in the Marcus theory. We have also calculated the effect of pH on the potential of mean force between two hydrolyzing ions in aqueous solution. As expected, increasing pH reduces the potential of mean force between the ferrous and ferric ions in the model system. The magnitudes of the predicted increase in diabatic transfer barrier and the predicted decrease in the potential of mean force nearly cancel each other at the canonical transfer distance of 0.55 nm. Even though hydrolysis is allowed in our calculations, the distribution of reorganization energies has only one maximum and is Gaussian to an excellent approximation, giving a harmonic free energy surface in the reorganization energy F(DE) with a single minimum. There is thus a surprising amount of overlap in electron-transfer reorganization energies for Fe21– Fe(H2O)6 31, Fe21– Fe(OH)(H2O)521, and Fe21– Fe(OH)2(H2O)1 couples, indicating that fluctuations in hydrolysis state can be viewed on a continuum with other solvent contributions to the reorganization energy. There appears to be little justification for thinking of the transfer rate as arising from the contributions of different hydrolysis states. Electronic structure calculations indicate that Fe(H2O)6 21– Fe(OH)n(H2O)62n (32n)1 complexes interacting through H3O2 2 bridges do not have large electronic couplings.

  20. Ethylene could influence ferric reductase, iron transporter, and H+-ATPase gene expression by affecting FER (or FER-like) gene activity.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Carlos; Waters, Brian M; Romera, F Javier; García, María José; Morales, María; Alcántara, Esteban; Pérez-Vicente, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    In previous works, it has been shown, by using ethylene inhibitors and precursors, that ethylene could participate in the regulation of the enhanced ferric reductase activity of Fe-deficient Strategy I plants. However, it was not known whether ethylene regulates the ferric reductase gene expression or other aspects related to this activity. This paper is a study of the effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the expression of the genes encoding the ferric reductases and iron transporters of Arabidopsis thaliana (FRO2 and IRT1) and Lycopersicon esculentum (=Solanum lycopersicum) (FRO1 and IRT1) plants. The effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the activity of the iron reductase and the iron transporter have been examined in parallel. Also studied were the effects of ethylene inhibitors and precursors on the expression of the H(+)-ATPase genes of cucumber (CsHA1 and CsHA2) and the transcription factor genes of tomato (LeFER) and Arabidopsis (AtFRU or AtFIT1, an LeFER homologue) that regulate ferric reductase, iron transporter, and H(+)-ATPse activity. The results obtained suggest that ethylene participates in the regulation of ferric reductase, the iron transporter, and H(+)-ATPase gene expression by affecting the FER (or FER-like) levels.

  1. A novel role of the ferric reductase Cfl1 in cell wall integrity, mitochondrial function, and invasion to host cells in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qilin; Dong, Yijie; Xu, Ning; Qian, Kefan; Chen, Yulu; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2014-11-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic pathogen, causing both superficial mucosal infections and life-threatening systemic diseases. Iron acquisition is an important factor for pathogen-host interaction and also a significant element for the pathogenicity of this organism. Ferric reductases, which convert ferric iron into ferrous iron, are important components of the high-affinity iron uptake system. Sequence analyses have identified at least 17 putative ferric reductase genes in C. albicans genome. CFL1 was the first ferric reductase identified in C. albicans. However, little is known about its roles in C. albicans physiology and pathogenicity. In this study, we found that disruption of CFL1 led to hypersensitivity to chemical and physical cell wall stresses, activation of the cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway, abnormal cell wall composition, and enhanced secretion, indicating a defect in CWI in this mutant. Moreover, this mutant showed abnormal mitochondrial activity and morphology, suggesting a link between ferric reductases and mitochondrial function. In addition, this mutant displayed decreased ability of adhesion to both the polystyrene microplates and buccal epithelial cells and invasion of host epithelial cells. These findings revealed a novel role of C. albicans Cfl1 in maintenance of CWI, mitochondrial function, and interaction between this pathogen and the host.

  2. Effect of ferric oxyhydroxide grain coatings on the transport of bacteriophage PRD1 and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in saturated porous media

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abudalo, R.A.; Bogatsu, Y.G.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Elimelech, M.

    2005-01-01

    To test the effect of geochemical heterogeneity on microorganism transport in saturated porous media, we measured the removal of two microorganisms, the bacteriophage PRD1 and oocysts of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum, in flow-through columns of quartz sand coated by different amounts of a ferric oxyhydroxide. The experiments were conducted over ranges of ferric oxyhydroxide coating fraction of ?? = 0-0.12 for PRD1 and from ?? = 0-0.32 for the oocysts at pH 5.6-5.8 and 10-4 M ionic strength. To determine the effect of pH on the transport of the oocysts, experiments were also conducted over a pH range of 5.7-10.0 at a coating fraction of ?? = 0.04. Collision (attachment) efficiencies increased as the fraction of ferric oxyhydroxide coated quartz sand increased, from ?? = 0.0071 to 0.13 over ?? = 0-0.12 for PRD1 and from ?? = 0.059 to 0.75 over ?? = 0-0.32 for the oocysts. Increasing the pH from 5.7 to 10.0 resulted in a decrease in the oocyst collision efficiency as the pH exceeded the expected point of zero charge of the ferric oxyhydroxide coatings. The collision efficiencies correlated very well with the fraction of quartz sand coated by the ferric oxyhydroxide for PRD1 but not as well for the oocysts. ?? 2005 American Chemical Society.

  3. Influence of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a ferric oxyhydroxide-coated quartz sand saturated porous medium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abudalo, R.A.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Metge, D.W.; Landkamer, L.

    2010-01-01

    To assess the effect of organic matter on the transport of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in a geochemically heterogeneous saturated porous medium, we measured the breakthrough and collision efficiencies of oocysts as a function of dissolved organic matter concentration in a flow-through column containing ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand. We characterized the surface properties of the oocysts and ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand using microelectrophoresis and streaming potential, respectively, and the amount of organic matter adsorbed on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand as a function of the concentration of dissolved organic matter (a fulvic acid isolated from Florida Everglades water). The dissolved organic matter had no significant effect on the zeta potential of the oocysts. Low concentrations of dissolved organic matter were responsible for reversing the charge of the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand surface from positive to negative. The charge reversal and accumulation of negative charge on the ferric oxyhydroxide-coated sand led to increases in oocyst breakthrough and decreases in oocyst collision efficiency with increasing dissolved organic matter concentration. The increase in dissolved organic matter concentration from 0 to 20 mg L-1 resulted in a two-fold decrease in the collision efficiency. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Resonance Raman spectra of the anion and cation radicals of bacterial photosynthetic pigments

    SciTech Connect

    Diers, J.R.; Bocian, D.F. )

    1994-12-08

    Resonance Raman (RR) spectra are reported for the radical ions of the bacterial photosynthetic pigments bacteriochlorophyll a (BCh) and its metal-free analog bacteriopheophytin a (BPh). The radical anions, BCh[sup [minus

  5. Superconducting racetrack booster for the ion complex of MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Filatov, Yu; Kondratenko, A. M.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kovalenko, A.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Lin, Fanglei; Morozov, Vasiliy S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2016-02-01

    The current design of the Medium-energy Electron-Ion Collider (MEIC) project at Jefferson lab features a single 8 GeV/c figure-8 booster based on super-ferric magnets. Reducing the circumference of the booster by switching to a racetrack design may improve its performance by limiting the space charge effect and lower its cost. We consider problems of preserving proton and deuteron polarizations in a superconducting racetrack booster. We show that using magnets based on hollow high-current NbTi composite superconducting cable similar to those designed at JINR for the Nuclotron guarantees preservation of the ion polarization in a racetrack booster up to 8 GeV/c. The booster operation cycle would be a few seconds that would improve the operating efficiency of the MEIC ion complex.

  6. Preparation of activated carbons from Iris tectorum employing ferric nitrate as dopant for removal of tetracycline from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Li, Gang; Zhang, Dongsheng; Wang, Man; Huang, Ji; Huang, Lihui

    2013-12-01

    Ferric nitrate was employed to modify activated carbon prepared from Iris tectorum during H₃PO₄ activation and ability of prepared activated carbon for removal of tetracycline (TC) was investigated. The properties of the activated carbon samples with or without ferric nitrate, ITAC-Fe and ITAC, were measured by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N₂ adsorption/desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Boehm's titration. The results showed that mixing with iron increased the BET surface area, total pore volume and the adsorption capacity as compared to the original carbon. FTIR and Boehm's titration suggested that ITAC-Fe was characteristic of more acidic functional groups than ITAC. Adsorption of TC on both samples exhibited a strong pH-dependent behavior and adsorption capacity reduced rapidly with the increasing solution pH. The adsorption kinetics agreed well with the pseudo-second-order model and the adsorption isotherms data were well described by Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption capacity of 625.022 mg/g for ITAC and 769.231 mg/g for ITAC-Fe. The present work suggested that ITAC-Fe could be used to remove tetracycline effectively from aqueous solutions.

  7. Properties and coagulation performance of coagulant poly-aluminum-ferric-silicate-chloride in water and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bao-yu; Yue, Qin-yan; Wang, Bing-jian

    2006-01-01

    An efficient inorganic polymer coagulant, poly-aluminum-ferric-silicate-chloride (PAFSC), was developed using two approaches: (i) hydroxylation of the mixture of AlCl3, FeCl3 and fresh polysilicic acid in different Al/Fe/Si molar ratios to obtain PAFSCc and (ii) hydroxylated poly-aluminum-iron-chloride (PAFC) combined with aged polysilicic acid in different Al/Fe/Si ratios to produce PAFSCm. The properties of PAFSC in comparison with polyaluminum silicate chloride (PASC) and polyferric silicate chloride (PAFC) were characterized by various experimental methods. The effect of Al/Fe/Si molar ratio on the hydrolysis-polymerization process of Al (III) and Fe (III) in PAFSC solutions was examined by pH titration, and the effect of Al/Fe/Si molar ratio on electrokinetic mobility of PAFSC was studied by Zeta potential measurement. The laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the PAFSC in comparison with polyaluminum chloride (PAC) for the coagulation of synthetic water samples, actual surface water and wastewater. The results show that interactions exist among aluminum species, ferric species and polysilicic acid, and the Al/Fe/Si molar ratio affects the Zeta potential of the hydrolyzate and the coagulating performance. PAFSC achieved a better water treatment result than PAC. At the same basicity (B) value and Al/Fe/Si ratio, PAFSCc has better coagulation performance than PAFSCm. PAFSC is a new type and high efficiency composite inorganic polymer coagulant.

  8. Bacterial Acclimation Inside an Aqueous Battery

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Dexian; Chen, Baoling; Chen, P.

    2015-01-01

    Specific environmental stresses may lead to induced genomic instability in bacteria, generating beneficial mutants and potentially accelerating the breeding of industrial microorganisms. The environmental stresses inside the aqueous battery may be derived from such conditions as ion shuttle, pH gradient, free radical reaction and electric field. In most industrial and medical applications, electric fields and direct currents are used to kill bacteria and yeast. However, the present study focused on increasing bacterial survival inside an operating battery. Using a bacterial acclimation strategy, both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were acclimated for 10 battery operation cycles and survived in the battery for over 3 days. The acclimated bacteria changed in cell shape, growth rate and colony color. Further analysis indicated that electrolyte concentration could be one of the major factors determining bacterial survival inside an aqueous battery. The acclimation process significantly improved the viability of both bacteria E. coli and B. subtilis. The viability of acclimated strains was not affected under battery cycle conditions of 0.18-0.80 mA cm-2 and 1.4-2.1 V. Bacterial addition within 1.0×1010 cells mL-1 did not significantly affect battery performance. Because the environmental stress inside the aqueous battery is specific, the use of this battery acclimation strategy may be of great potential for the breeding of industrial microorganisms. PMID:26070088

  9. Bacterial Acclimation Inside an Aqueous Battery.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dexian; Chen, Baoling; Chen, P

    2015-01-01

    Specific environmental stresses may lead to induced genomic instability in bacteria, generating beneficial mutants and potentially accelerating the breeding of industrial microorganisms. The environmental stresses inside the aqueous battery may be derived from such conditions as ion shuttle, pH gradient, free radical reaction and electric field. In most industrial and medical applications, electric fields and direct currents are used to kill bacteria and yeast. However, the present study focused on increasing bacterial survival inside an operating battery. Using a bacterial acclimation strategy, both Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis were acclimated for 10 battery operation cycles and survived in the battery for over 3 days. The acclimated bacteria changed in cell shape, growth rate and colony color. Further analysis indicated that electrolyte concentration could be one of the major factors determining bacterial survival inside an aqueous battery. The acclimation process significantly improved the viability of both bacteria E. coli and B. subtilis. The viability of acclimated strains was not affected under battery cycle conditions of 0.18-0.80 mA cm(-2) and 1.4-2.1 V. Bacterial addition within 1.0×10(10) cells mL(-1) did not significantly affect battery performance. Because the environmental stress inside the aqueous battery is specific, the use of this battery acclimation strategy may be of great potential for the breeding of industrial microorganisms.

  10. New family of ferric spin clusters incorporating redox-active ortho-dioxolene ligands.

    PubMed

    Mulyana, Yanyan; Nafady, Ayman; Mukherjee, Arindam; Bircher, Roland; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Bond, Alan M; Abrahams, Brendan F; Boskovic, Colette

    2009-08-17

    undergoes a significant structural rearrangement to convert to complex 6, which appears to be largely driven by the preference for the 3,5-DBSQ(-) ligand to bind in a non-bridging mode. Variable temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements for compounds 3, 4, 5a, 6, 7, and 8a reveal behavior dominated by pairwise antiferromagnetic exchange interactions, giving rise to a poorly isolated S = 0 ground state spin for compound 3, well-isolated S = 0 ground state spins for complexes 4, 5(-), 7 and 8(2-), and a well-isolated S = 1/2 ground state spin for complex 6. The ground state spin values were confirmed by low temperature variable field magnetization measurements. The thermal variation of the magnetic susceptibility for compounds 3, 4, 5a, 6, 7, and 8a were fitted and/or simulated using the appropriate Hamiltonians to derive J values that are consistent with magnetostructural correlations that have been reported previously for alkoxo-bridged ferric complexes.

  11. Soluble ferric iron as an effective protective agent against UV radiation: Implications for early life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Felipe; Aguilera, Angeles; Amils, Ricardo

    2007-11-01

    Some recent MER Rover Opportunity results on ancient sedimentary rocks from Mars describe sandstones originated from the chemical weathering of olivine basalts by acidic waters [Squyres, S.W., Knoll, A.H., 2005. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 240, 1-10]. The absence of protective components in early Mars atmosphere forced any possible primordial life forms to deal with high doses of UV radiation. A similar situation occurred on the primitive Earth during the development of early life in the Archean [Berkner, L.V., Marshall, L.C., 1965. J. Atmos. Sci. 22 (3), 225-261; Kasting, J.F., 1993. Science 259, 920-926]. It is known that some cellular and/or external components can shield organisms from damaging UV radiation or quench its toxic effects [Olson, J.M., Pierson, B.K., 1986. Photosynth. Res. 9, 251-259; García-Pichel, F., 1998. Origins Life Evol. B 28, 321-347; Cockell, C., Rettberg, P., Horneck, G., Scherer, K., Stokes, M.D., 2003. Polar Biol. 26, 62-69]. The effectiveness of iron minerals for UV protection has also been reported [Phoenix, V.R., Konhauser, K.O., Adams, D.G., Bottrell, S.H., 2001. Geology 29 (9), 823-826], but nothing is known about the effect of iron in solution. Here we demonstrate the protective effect of soluble ferric iron against UV radiation on acidophilic photosynthetic microorganisms. These results offer an interesting alternative means of protection for life on the surface of early Mars and Earth, especially in light of the geochemical conditions in which the sedimentary minerals, jarosite and goethite, recently reported by the MER missions, were formed [Squyres, S.W., Arvidson, R.E., Bell III, J.F., Brückner, J., Cabrol, N.A., Calvin, W., Carr, M.H., Christensen, P.R., Clark, B.C., Crumpler, L., Des Marais, D.J., d'Uston, C., Economou, T., Farmer, J., Farrand, W., Folkner, W., Golombek, M., Gorevan, S., Grant, J.A., Greeley, R., Grotzinger, J., Haskin, L., Herkenhoff, K.E., Hviid, S., Johnson, J., Klingelhöfer, G., Knoll, A.H., Landis, G

  12. Effects of phosphate and silicate on the transformation of hydroxycarbonate green rust to ferric oxyhydroxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xionghan; Wang, Xiaoming; Zhu, Mengqiang; Koopal, Luuk K.; Xu, Huanhuan; Wang, Yan; Liu, Fan

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxycarbonate green rust (GR1(CO32-)) was prepared by oxidation of aerated aqueous suspensions of Fe(II) hydroxide, and the presence of light promoted the transformation of GR1(CO32-) by dissolved O2 at pH 7.8 and 25 °C. Further transformation of GR1(CO32-) in the light was conducted in the presence of orthophosphate (P) or silicate (Si) anions, followed by solution analysis and solid product characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Results show that both P and Si anions significantly affect the transformation of GR1(CO32-) through adsorption on the intermediate products. The time required for complete GR1(CO32-) transformation and the phases, crystallinity and morphology of the transformation products all depend on the Fe/anion molar ratio. When compared to the control, the transformation can be promoted by low Si concentrations but retarded by P. With decreasing Fe/P ratio, the products change from acicular goethite (absence of P) to tabular lepidocrocite (Fe/P: 120-48) and to mixed phases of platelets of ferric GR1(CO32-) (EX-GR1) and minor ferrihydrite (Fe/P: 24-3). In terms of Si, the products are goethites when the Fe/Si ratio of 48-12, and with increasing ratio, the goethite crystallinity and particle size decrease and the morphology changes from acicular (absence of Si) to plate-like or isodimensional particles. The goethite morphology at low Fe/Si ratios is comparable to natural goethite samples commonly found in soils. At Fe/Si = 3, the products are EX-GR1 platelets with minor ferrihydrite coexisting. The likely pathway of the oxidative GR1(CO32-) transformation in the control system and in the presence of low concentrations of Si (Fe/Si ⩾ 12) is GR1(CO32-) → amorphous γ-FeOOH-like phase → α-FeOOH via a dissolution-oxidation-precipitation mechanism. In addition, Fe(II) released during dissolution of GR1(CO32-) is adsorbed on the products and the

  13. Synchrotron X-ray-Induced Photoreduction of Ferric Myoglobin Nitrite Crystals Gives the Ferrous Derivative with Retention of the O-bonded Nitrite Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, J.; Orville, A; Skinner, J; Skinner, M; Richter-Addo, G

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of a single crystal of the nitrite adduct of ferric myoglobin (Mb) at 100 K to high-intensity synchrotron X-ray radiation resulted in changes in the UV-vis spectrum that can be attributed to reduction of the ferric compound to the ferrous derivative. We employed correlated single-crystal spectroscopy with crystallography to further characterize this photoproduct. The 1.55 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the photoproduct reveals retention of the O-binding mode for binding of nitrite to the iron center. The data are consistent with cryogenic generation and trapping, at 100 K, of a ferrous d{sup 6} Mb{sup II}(ONO)* complex by photoreduction of the ferric precursor crystals using high-intensity X-ray radiation.

  14. Ion Beam Bombardment of Biological Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangyuenyongpipat, S.; Yu, L. D.; Vilaithong, T.; Phanchaisri, B.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Brown, I. G.

    2003-10-01

    While ion implantation has become a well-established technique for the surface modification of inorganic materials, the ion bombardment of cellular tissue has received little research attention. A program in ion beam bioengineering has been initiated at Chiang Mai University, and the ion beam induced transfer of plasmid DNA molecules into bacterial cells (E. coli) has been demonstrated. Subsequent work has been directed toward exploration of ion beam bombardment of plant cells in an effort to understand the possible mechanisms involved in the DNA transfer. In particular, ion beam bombardment of onion cells was carried out and the effects investigated. Among the novel features observed is the formation of "microcraters" - sub-micron surface features that could provide a pathway for the transfer of large molecules into the interior cell region. Here we describe our onion skin ion bombardment investigations.

  15. Role of Ferric Oxide Surface Area in Propellant Burn Rate Enhancement (First Step Toward Modeling)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-30

    specific surface and catalytic effectiveness indicates that one of the kinetic models used to describe heterogeneous catalysis of chemical reactions may...be described in this manner, equations like No. 2 above are preferred when heterogeneous catalysis is involved. In either case, the constants in these... heterogeneous catalysis . 42/ R-4889 Rocketiyne DM~ion 01% Rockwell International REFERENCES 1. Beckstead, M. W.; I. L. Derr; and C. F. Price: "A Model of

  16. Purification and two-dimensional crystallization of bacterial cytochrome oxidases.

    PubMed

    Warne, A; Wang, D N; Saraste, M

    1995-12-01

    A novel strategy which employes chromatography on an immobilized metal ion has been developed for the purification of bacterial cytochrome c and quinol oxidases. Many bacterial oxidase complexes appear to have a natural affinity to bind to the chelated copper ion. A combination of three different chromatographic principles (anion exchange, metal-affinity and gel filtration) makes an effective tool chest for the preparation of homogeneous and protein-chemically pure bacterial oxidases. These preparations have been used for two-dimensional crystallization. Until now, crystals have been obtained using the Paracococcus denitrificans and Rhodobacter sphaeroides cytochrome aa3 and the Escherichia coli cytochrome bo. The crystals diffract to approximately 2.5 nm in negative stain and have potential for further structural studies.

  17. Ferric Hydrogensulfate [Fe(HSO4)3] As a Reusable Heterogeneous Catalyst for the Synthesis of 5-Substituted-1H-Tetrazoles and Amides

    PubMed Central

    Eshghi, Hossein; Seyedi, Seyed Mohammad; Zarei, Elaheh Rahimi

    2011-01-01

    Ferric hydrogensulfate catalyzed the synthesis of 5-substituted 1H-tetrazoles via [2 + 3] cycloaddition of nitriles and sodium azide. This method has the advantages of high yields, simple methodology, and easy workup. The catalyst can be recovered by simple filtration and reused delivering good yields. Also, ferric hydrogensulfate catalyzed the hydrolysis of nitriles to primary amides under aqueous conditions. Various aliphatic and aromatic nitriles converted to the corresponding amides in good yields without any contamination with carboxylic acids. PMID:24052817

  18. Bacterial transfer RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jennifer; Ibba, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transfer RNA is an essential adapter molecule that is found across all three domains of life. The primary role of transfer RNA resides in its critical involvement in the accurate translation of messenger RNA codons during protein synthesis and, therefore, ultimately in the determination of cellular gene expression. This review aims to bring together the results of intensive investigations into the synthesis, maturation, modification, aminoacylation, editing and recycling of bacterial transfer RNAs. Codon recognition at the ribosome as well as the ever-increasing number of alternative roles for transfer RNA outside of translation will be discussed in the specific context of bacterial cells. PMID:25796611

  19. Ion colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2011-12-01

    Ion colliders are research tools for high-energy nuclear physics, and are used to test the theory of Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD). The collisions of fully stripped high-energy ions create matter of a temperature and density that existed only microseconds after the Big Bang. Ion colliders can reach higher densities and temperatures than fixed target experiments although at a much lower luminosity. The first ion collider was the CERN Intersecting Storage Ring (ISR), which collided light ions [77Asb1, 81Bou1]. The BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is in operation since 2000 and has collided a number of species at numerous energies. The CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started the heavy ion program in 2010. Table 1 shows all previous and the currently planned running modes for ISR, RHIC, and LHC. All three machines also collide protons, which are spin-polarized in RHIC. Ion colliders differ from proton or antiproton colliders in a number of ways: the preparation of the ions in the source and the pre-injector chain is limited by other effects than for protons; frequent changes in the collision energy and particle species, including asymmetric species, are typical; and the interaction of ions with each other and accelerator components is different from protons, which has implications for collision products, collimation, the beam dump, and intercepting instrumentation devices such a profile monitors. In the preparation for the collider use the charge state Z of the ions is successively increased to minimize the effects of space charge, intrabeam scattering (IBS), charge change effects (electron capture and stripping), and ion-impact desorption after beam loss. Low charge states reduce space charge, intrabeam scattering, and electron capture effects. High charge states reduce electron stripping, and make bending and acceleration more effective. Electron stripping at higher energies is generally more efficient. Table 2 shows the charge states and energies in the

  20. Ion mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matteson, S.; Nicolet, M.-A.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental studies of the ion-mixing phenomenon are summarized. Ion mixing is differentiated from ion implantation and shown to be a useful technique for overcoming the sputter-dependent limitations of implantation processes. The fundamental physical principles of ion/solid interactions are explored. The basic experimental configurations currently in use are characterized: bilayered samples, multilayered samples, and samples with a thin marker layer. A table listing the binary systems (metal-semiconductor or metal-metal) which have been investigated using each configuration is presented. Results are discussed, and some sample data are plotted. The prospects for future application of ion mixing to the alteration of solid surface properties are considered. Practical applications are seen as restricted by economic considerations to the production of small, expensive components or to fields (such as the semiconductor industry) which already have facilities for ion implantation.