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Sample records for bacterial protein family

  1. A widespread family of bacterial cell wall assembly proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Yoshikazu; Marles-Wright, Jon; Cleverley, Robert M; Emmins, Robyn; Ishikawa, Shu; Kuwano, Masayoshi; Heinz, Nadja; Bui, Nhat Khai; Hoyland, Christopher N; Ogasawara, Naotake; Lewis, Richard J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Daniel, Richard A; Errington, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Teichoic acids and acidic capsular polysaccharides are major anionic cell wall polymers (APs) in many bacteria, with various critical cell functions, including maintenance of cell shape and structural integrity, charge and cation homeostasis, and multiple aspects of pathogenesis. We have identified the widespread LytR–Cps2A–Psr (LCP) protein family, of previously unknown function, as novel enzymes required for AP synthesis. Structural and biochemical analysis of several LCP proteins suggest that they carry out the final step of transferring APs from their lipid-linked precursor to cell wall peptidoglycan (PG). In Bacillus subtilis, LCP proteins are found in association with the MreB cytoskeleton, suggesting that MreB proteins coordinate the insertion of the major polymers, PG and AP, into the cell wall. PMID:21964069

  2. Molecular evolution of the bacterial pseudouridine-5'-phosphate glycosidase protein family.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Keshav; Oja, Terhi; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko

    2014-10-01

    Pseudouridine is a noncanonical C-nucleoside commonly present in RNA, which is not metabolized in mammals, but can be recycled by the unique enzyme family of bacterial pseudouridine glycosidases such as YeiN from Escherichia coli. Here, we present rigorous bioinformatic and biochemical analyses of the protein family in order to find sequences that might code for nonpseudouridine glycosidase activities. To date, the only other function reported for the enzyme family occurs during the biosynthesis of the antibiotic alnumycin A in Streptomyces species, where AlnA functions as an unusual C-glycosynthase. Bioinformatics analysis of 755 protein sequences identified one group of sequences that were unlikely to harbour pseudouridine glycosidase activities. This observation was confirmed in vitro with one representative protein, IdgA from Streptomyces albus, which was unable to synthesize pseudouridine monophosphate, but was able to attach d-ribose-5-phosphate to juglone. Furthermore, our analyses provide evidence for horizontal gene transfer of pseudouridine glycosidases that may have occurred in Streptomyces and Doria species. Inspection of the genomic loci in the vicinity of pseudouridine glycosidases revealed that in 77% of the strains a kinase gene putatively involved in the phosphorylation of pseudouridine was found nearby, whereas the sequences encoding nonpseudouridine glycosidases coexisted with a phosphatase of the haloacid dehalogenase enzyme family. The investigation suggested that these unknown sequences might be involved in the biosynthesis of soluble blue pigments because of the presence of genes homologous to nonribosomal peptide synthetases.

  3. The Bacterial Intimins and Invasins: A Large and Novel Family of Secreted Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jennifer C.; Yen, Ming-Ren; Castillo, Rostislav; Leyton, Denisse L.; Henderson, Ian R.; Saier, Milton H.

    2010-01-01

    Based on our in silico analyses we present a model for the biogenesis of these proteins. This study is the first of its kind to describe this unusual family of bacterial adhesins. PMID:21203509

  4. Novel cyclic di-GMP effectors of the YajQ protein family control bacterial virulence.

    PubMed

    An, Shi-qi; Caly, Delphine L; McCarthy, Yvonne; Murdoch, Sarah L; Ward, Joseph; Febrer, Melanie; Dow, J Maxwell; Ryan, Robert P

    2014-10-01

    Bis-(3',5') cyclic di-guanylate (cyclic di-GMP) is a key bacterial second messenger that is implicated in the regulation of many critical processes that include motility, biofilm formation and virulence. Cyclic di-GMP influences diverse functions through interaction with a range of effectors. Our knowledge of these effectors and their different regulatory actions is far from complete, however. Here we have used an affinity pull-down assay using cyclic di-GMP-coupled magnetic beads to identify cyclic di-GMP binding proteins in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). This analysis identified XC_3703, a protein of the YajQ family, as a potential cyclic di-GMP receptor. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that the purified XC_3703 protein bound cyclic di-GMP with a high affinity (K(d)∼2 µM). Mutation of XC_3703 led to reduced virulence of Xcc to plants and alteration in biofilm formation. Yeast two-hybrid and far-western analyses showed that XC_3703 was able to interact with XC_2801, a transcription factor of the LysR family. Mutation of XC_2801 and XC_3703 had partially overlapping effects on the transcriptome of Xcc, and both affected virulence. Electromobility shift assays showed that XC_3703 positively affected the binding of XC_2801 to the promoters of target virulence genes, an effect that was reversed by cyclic di-GMP. Genetic and functional analysis of YajQ family members from the human pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia showed that they also specifically bound cyclic di-GMP and contributed to virulence in model systems. The findings thus identify a new class of cyclic di-GMP effector that regulates bacterial virulence.

  5. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins. PMID:26774272

  6. Biochemical Roles for Conserved Residues in the Bacterial Fatty Acid-binding Protein Family.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Tyler C; Miller, Darcie J; Jackson, Pamela; Nourse, Amanda; White, Stephen W; Rock, Charles O

    2016-03-18

    Fatty acid kinase (Fak) is a ubiquitous Gram-positive bacterial enzyme consisting of an ATP-binding protein (FakA) that phosphorylates the fatty acid bound to FakB. In Staphylococcus aureus, Fak is a global regulator of virulence factor transcription and is essential for the activation of exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids. The 1.2-Å x-ray structure of S. aureus FakB2, activity assays, solution studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and in vivo complementation were used to define the functions of the five conserved residues that define the FakB protein family (Pfam02645). The fatty acid tail is buried within the protein, and the exposed carboxyl group is bound by a Ser-93-fatty acid carboxyl-Thr-61-His-266 hydrogen bond network. The guanidinium of the invariant Arg-170 is positioned to potentially interact with a bound acylphosphate. The reduced thermal denaturation temperatures of the T61A, S93A, and H266A FakB2 mutants illustrate the importance of the hydrogen bond network in protein stability. The FakB2 T61A, S93A, and H266A mutants are 1000-fold less active in the Fak assay, and the R170A mutant is completely inactive. All FakB2 mutants form FakA(FakB2)2 complexes except FakB2(R202A), which is deficient in FakA binding. Allelic replacement shows that strains expressing FakB2 mutants are defective in fatty acid incorporation into phospholipids and virulence gene transcription. These conserved residues are likely to perform the same critical functions in all bacterial fatty acid-binding proteins.

  7. Comparative biology and expression of TENP, an egg protein related to the bacterial permeability-increasing family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Whenham, Natasha; Wilson, Peter W; Bain, Maureen M; Stevenson, Lynn; Dunn, Ian C

    2014-03-15

    The 'transiently expressed in neural precursors' (TENP) gene product is a member of the bacterial/permeability-increasing (BPI) family of antimicrobial proteins but was first identified as having a role in an early neurological event occurring in post-mitotic cells. However, recent characterisation of the egg white proteome has shown that TENP is an important egg component constituting ~0.1-0.5% of the total protein and suggesting it is expressed in the adult oviduct. In this study we confirmed quantitatively that the expression of TENP is largely confined to the tubular glands of the magnum of the oviduct, where egg white synthesis occurs, with around 10,000 times more expression than in the embryo where TENP was first identified. TENP expression is significantly increased with the administration of oestrogen or progesterone (P<0.001) and is reduced in regressed oviducts (P<0.001) demonstrating gonadal steroid control, typical of an oviduct and egg specific gene. A putative translational start site for TENP has been characterised and the evidence indicates that it is expressed as one predominant transcript. In comparison with the published sequence, insertion and deletion events have been identified causing a partial frame-shift that results in an altered amino acid sequence to that previously documented. TENP is conserved across divergent avian species being found in chicken, turkey, duck and zebra finch and its expression profile confirmed in both chicken and duck. Similarity searches have shown homology with the BPI-like family of innate immune genes, particularly with palate, lung and nasal epithelial clone (PLUNC) members of this family. We therefore believe that at least in adults the role of TENP is as a major component of egg, particularly the white and it is probable that it contributes to its antimicrobial function.

  8. Two ancient bacterial-like PPP family phosphatases from Arabidopsis are highly conserved plant proteins that possess unique properties.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2011-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by the opposing actions of protein kinases and phosphatases, is a cornerstone of cellular signaling and regulation. Since their discovery, protein phosphatases have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with specificity that rivals their counteracting kinase partners. However, despite years of focused characterization in mammalian and yeast systems, many protein phosphatases in plants remain poorly or incompletely characterized. Here, we describe a bioinformatic, biochemical, and cellular examination of an ancient, Bacterial-like subclass of the phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP) family designated the Shewanella-like protein phosphatases (SLP phosphatases). The SLP phosphatase subcluster is highly conserved in all plants, mosses, and green algae, with members also found in select fungi, protists, and bacteria. As in other plant species, the nucleus-encoded Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) SLP phosphatases (AtSLP1 and AtSLP2) lack genetic redundancy and phylogenetically cluster into two distinct groups that maintain different subcellular localizations, with SLP1 being chloroplastic and SLP2 being cytosolic. Using heterologously expressed and purified protein, the enzymatic properties of both AtSLP1 and AtSLP2 were examined, revealing unique metal cation preferences in addition to a complete insensitivity to the classic serine/threonine PPP protein phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and microcystin. The unique properties and high conservation of the plant SLP phosphatases, coupled to their exclusion from animals, red algae, cyanobacteria, archaea, and most bacteria, render understanding the function(s) of this new subclass of PPP family protein phosphatases of particular interest.

  9. Properties and Phylogeny of 76 Families of Bacterial and Eukaryotic Organellar Outer Membrane Pore-Forming Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Bhaskara L.; Saier, Milton H.

    2016-01-01

    We here report statistical analyses of 76 families of integral outer membrane pore-forming proteins (OMPPs) found in bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. 47 of these families fall into one superfamily (SFI) which segregate into fifteen phylogenetic clusters. Families with members of the same protein size, topology and substrate specificities often cluster together. Virtually all OMPP families include only proteins that form transmembrane pores. Nine such families, all of which cluster together in the SFI phylogenetic tree, contain both α- and β-structures, are multi domain, multi subunit systems, and transport macromolecules. Most other SFI OMPPs transport small molecules. SFII and SFV homologues derive from Actinobacteria while SFIII and SFIV proteins derive from chloroplasts. Three families of actinobacterial OMPPs and two families of eukaryotic OMPPs apparently consist primarily of α-helices (α-TMSs). Of the 71 families of (putative) β-barrel OMPPs, only twenty could not be assigned to a superfamily, and these derived primarily from Actinobacteria (1), chloroplasts (1), spirochaetes (8), and proteobacteria (10). Proteins were identified in which two or three full length OMPPs are fused together. Family characteristic are described and evidence agrees with a previous proposal suggesting that many arose by adjacent β-hairpin structural unit duplications. PMID:27064789

  10. Properties and Phylogeny of 76 Families of Bacterial and Eukaryotic Organellar Outer Membrane Pore-Forming Proteins.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Bhaskara L; Saier, Milton H

    2016-01-01

    We here report statistical analyses of 76 families of integral outer membrane pore-forming proteins (OMPPs) found in bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. 47 of these families fall into one superfamily (SFI) which segregate into fifteen phylogenetic clusters. Families with members of the same protein size, topology and substrate specificities often cluster together. Virtually all OMPP families include only proteins that form transmembrane pores. Nine such families, all of which cluster together in the SFI phylogenetic tree, contain both α- and β-structures, are multi domain, multi subunit systems, and transport macromolecules. Most other SFI OMPPs transport small molecules. SFII and SFV homologues derive from Actinobacteria while SFIII and SFIV proteins derive from chloroplasts. Three families of actinobacterial OMPPs and two families of eukaryotic OMPPs apparently consist primarily of α-helices (α-TMSs). Of the 71 families of (putative) β-barrel OMPPs, only twenty could not be assigned to a superfamily, and these derived primarily from Actinobacteria (1), chloroplasts (1), spirochaetes (8), and proteobacteria (10). Proteins were identified in which two or three full length OMPPs are fused together. Family characteristic are described and evidence agrees with a previous proposal suggesting that many arose by adjacent β-hairpin structural unit duplications. PMID:27064789

  11. Evolution of a family of metazoan active-site-serine enzymes from penicillin-binding proteins: a novel facet of the bacterial legacy

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Bacterial penicillin-binding proteins and β-lactamases (PBP-βLs) constitute a large family of serine proteases that perform essential functions in the synthesis and maintenance of peptidoglycan. Intriguingly, genes encoding PBP-βL homologs occur in many metazoan genomes including humans. The emerging role of LACTB, a mammalian mitochondrial PBP-βL homolog, in metabolic signaling prompted us to investigate the evolutionary history of metazoan PBP-βL proteins. Results Metazoan PBP-βL homologs including LACTB share unique structural features with bacterial class B low molecular weight penicillin-binding proteins. The amino acid residues necessary for enzymatic activity in bacterial PBP-βL proteins, including the catalytic serine residue, are conserved in all metazoan homologs. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that metazoan PBP-βL homologs comprise four alloparalogus protein lineages that derive from α-proteobacteria. Conclusion While most components of the peptidoglycan synthesis machinery were dumped by early eukaryotes, a few PBP-βL proteins were conserved and are found in metazoans including humans. Metazoan PBP-βL homologs are active-site-serine enzymes that probably have distinct functions in the metabolic circuitry. We hypothesize that PBP-βL proteins in the early eukaryotic cell enabled the degradation of peptidoglycan from ingested bacteria, thereby maximizing the yield of nutrients and streamlining the cell for effective phagocytotic feeding. PMID:18226203

  12. A new family of bacterial condensins

    PubMed Central

    Petrushenko, Zoya M.; She, Weifeng; Rybenkov, Valentin V.

    2011-01-01

    Condensins play a central role in global chromatin organization. In bacteria, two families of condensins have been identified, the MukBEF and SMC-ScpAB complexes. Only one of the two complexes is usually found in a given species, giving rise to a paradigm that a single condensin organizes bacterial chromosomes. Using sequence analysis, we identified a third family of condensins, MksBEF (MukBEF-like SMC proteins), which is broadly present in diverse bacteria. The proteins appear distantly related to MukBEF, have a similar operon organization and similar predicted secondary structures albeit with notably shorter coiled coils. All three subunits of MksBEF exhibit significant sequence variation and can be divided into a series of overlapping subfamilies. MksBEF often coexists with the SMC-ScpAB, MukBEF and, sometimes, other MksBEFs. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, both SMC and MksB contribute to faithful chromosome partitioning, with their inactivation leading to increased frequencies of anucleate cells. Moreover, MksBEF can complement anucleate cell formation in SMC-deficient cells. Purified PaMksB showed activities typical for condensins including ATP-modulated DNA binding and condensation. Notably, DNA binding by MksB is negatively regulated by ATP, which sets it apart from other known SMC proteins. Thus, several specialized condensins might be involved in organization of bacterial chromosomes. PMID:21752107

  13. Expanding the family of collagen proteins: Recombinant bacterial collagens of varying composition form triple-helices of similar stability

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chunying; Yu, Zhuoxin; Inouye, Masayori; Brodsky, Barbara; Mirochnitchenko, Oleg

    2010-01-01

    The presence of the (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)n open reading frames in different bacteria predicts the existence of an expanded family of collagen-like proteins. To further explore the triple-helix motif and stabilization mechanisms in the absence of hydroxyproline (Hyp), predicted novel collagen-like proteins from Gram-positive and -negative bacteria were expressed in Escherichia coli and characterized. Soluble proteins capable of successful folding and in vitro refolding were observed for collagen proteins from Methylobacterium sp 4-46, Rhodopseudomonas palustris and Solibacter usitatus. In contrast, all protein constructs from Clostridium perfringens were found predominantly in inclusion bodies. However, attachment of a heterologous N-terminal or C-terminal non-collagenous folding domain induced the Clostridium perfringens collagen domain to fold and become soluble. The soluble constructs from different bacteria had typical collagen triple-helical features and showed surprisingly similar thermal stabilities despite diverse amino acid compositions. These collagen-like proteins provide a resource for the development of biomaterials with new properties. PMID:20025291

  14. Bacterial Ice Crystal Controlling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lorv, Janet S. H.; Rose, David R.; Glick, Bernard R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  15. Bacterial ice crystal controlling proteins.

    PubMed

    Lorv, Janet S H; Rose, David R; Glick, Bernard R

    2014-01-01

    Across the world, many ice active bacteria utilize ice crystal controlling proteins for aid in freezing tolerance at subzero temperatures. Ice crystal controlling proteins include both antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins. Antifreeze proteins minimize freezing damage by inhibiting growth of large ice crystals, while ice nucleation proteins induce formation of embryonic ice crystals. Although both protein classes have differing functions, these proteins use the same ice binding mechanisms. Rather than direct binding, it is probable that these protein classes create an ice surface prior to ice crystal surface adsorption. Function is differentiated by molecular size of the protein. This paper reviews the similar and different aspects of bacterial antifreeze and ice nucleation proteins, the role of these proteins in freezing tolerance, prevalence of these proteins in psychrophiles, and current mechanisms of protein-ice interactions. PMID:24579057

  16. Bacterial-like PPP protein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Kerk, David; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B

    2013-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation is a widespread modification affecting the great majority of eukaryotic cellular proteins, and whose effects influence nearly every cellular function. Protein phosphatases are increasingly recognized as exquisitely regulated contributors to these changes. The PPP (phosphoprotein phosphatase) family comprises enzymes, which catalyze dephosphorylation at serine and threonine residues. Nearly a decade ago, “bacterial-like” enzymes were recognized with similarity to proteins from various bacterial sources: SLPs (Shewanella-like phosphatases), RLPHs (Rhizobiales-like phosphatases), and ALPHs (ApaH-like phosphatases). A recent article from our laboratory appearing in Plant Physiology characterizes their extensive organismal distribution, abundance in plant species, predicted subcellular localization, motif organization, and sequence evolution. One salient observation is the distinct evolutionary trajectory followed by SLP genes and proteins in photosynthetic eukaryotes vs. animal and plant pathogens derived from photosynthetic ancestors. We present here a closer look at sequence data that emphasizes the distinctiveness of pathogen SLP proteins and that suggests that they might represent novel drug targets. A second observation in our original report was the high degree of similarity between the bacterial-like PPPs of eukaryotes and closely related proteins of the “eukaryotic-like” phyla Myxococcales and Planctomycetes. We here reflect on the possible implications of these observations and their importance for future research. PMID:24675170

  17. A growing family: the expanding universe of the bacterial cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Ingerson-Mahar, Michael; Gitai, Zemer

    2012-01-01

    Cytoskeletal proteins are important mediators of cellular organization in both eukaryotes and bacteria. In the past, cytoskeletal studies have largely focused on three major cytoskeletal families, namely the eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament (IF) proteins and their bacterial homologs MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin. However, mounting evidence suggests that these proteins represent only the tip of the iceberg, as the cellular cytoskeletal network is far more complex. In bacteria, each of MreB, FtsZ, and crescentin represents only one member of large families of diverse homologs. There are also newly identified bacterial cytoskeletal proteins with no eukaryotic homologs, such as WACA proteins and bactofilins. Furthermore, there are universally conserved proteins, such as the metabolic enzyme CtpS, that assemble into filamentous structures that can be repurposed for structural cytoskeletal functions. Recent studies have also identified an increasing number of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins that are unrelated to actin, tubulin, and IFs, such that expanding our understanding of cytoskeletal proteins is advancing the understanding of the cell biology of all organisms. Here, we summarize the recent explosion in the identification of new members of the bacterial cytoskeleton and describe a hypothesis for the evolution of the cytoskeleton from self-assembling enzymes.

  18. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Milano, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average) that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs). Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups. PMID:27446613

  19. A Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals a Group of MocR Bacterial Transcriptional Regulators Linked to a Family of Genes Coding for Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Milano, Teresa; Angelaccio, Sebastiana; Tramonti, Angela; Di Salvo, Martino Luigi; Contestabile, Roberto; Pascarella, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators are characterized by an N-terminal domain, 60 residues long on average, possessing the winged-helix-turn-helix (wHTH) architecture responsible for DNA recognition and binding, linked to a large C-terminal domain (350 residues on average) that is homologous to fold type-I pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes like aspartate aminotransferase (AAT). These regulators are involved in the expression of genes taking part in several metabolic pathways directly or indirectly connected to PLP chemistry, many of which are still uncharacterized. A bioinformatics analysis is here reported that studied the features of a distinct group of MocR regulators predicted to be functionally linked to a family of homologous genes coding for integral membrane proteins of unknown function. This group occurs mainly in the Actinobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria phyla. An analysis of the multiple sequence alignments of their wHTH and AAT domains suggested the presence of specificity-determining positions (SDPs). Mapping of SDPs onto a homology model of the AAT domain hinted at possible structural/functional roles in effector recognition. Likewise, SDPs in wHTH domain suggested the basis of specificity of Transcription Factor Binding Site recognition. The results reported represent a framework for rational design of experiments and for bioinformatics analysis of other MocR subgroups. PMID:27446613

  20. The Hedgehog protein family.

    PubMed

    Bürglin, Thomas R

    2008-01-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is one of the fundamental signal transduction pathways in animal development and is also involved in stem-cell maintenance and carcinogenesis. The hedgehog (hh) gene was first discovered in Drosophila, and members of the family have since been found in most metazoa. Hh proteins are composed of two domains, an amino-terminal domain HhN, which has the biological signal activity, and a carboxy-terminal autocatalytic domain HhC, which cleaves Hh into two parts in an intramolecular reaction and adds a cholesterol moiety to HhN. HhC has sequence similarity to the self-splicing inteins, and the shared region is termed Hint. New classes of proteins containing the Hint domain have been discovered recently in bacteria and eukaryotes, and the Hog class, of which Hh proteins comprise one family, is widespread throughout eukaryotes. The non-Hh Hog proteins have carboxy-terminal domains (the Hog domain) highly similar to HhC, although they lack the HhN domain, and instead have other amino-terminal domains. Hog proteins are found in many protists, but the Hh family emerged only in early metazoan evolution. HhN is modified by cholesterol at its carboxyl terminus and by palmitate at its amino terminus in both flies and mammals. The modified HhN is released from the cell and travels through the extracellular space. On binding its receptor Patched, it relieves the inhibition that Patched exerts on Smoothened, a G-protein-coupled receptor. The resulting signaling cascade converges on the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci), or its mammalian counterparts, the Gli proteins, which activate or repress target genes.

  1. Identification and characterization of a novel bacterial virulence factor that shares homology with mammalian Toll/interleukin-1 receptor family proteins.

    PubMed

    Newman, Ruchi M; Salunkhe, Prabhakar; Godzik, Adam; Reed, John C

    2006-01-01

    Many important bacterial virulence factors act as mimics of mammalian proteins to subvert normal host cell processes. To identify bacterial protein mimics of components of the innate immune signaling pathway, we searched the bacterial genome database for proteins with homology to the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain of the mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and their adaptor proteins. A previously uncharacterized gene, which we have named tlpA (for TIR-like protein A), was identified in the Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis genome that is predicted to encode a protein resembling mammalian TIR domains, We show that overexpression of TlpA in mammalian cells suppresses the ability of mammalian TIR-containing proteins TLR4, IL-1 receptor, and MyD88 to induce the transactivation and DNA-binding activities of NF-kappaB, a downstream target of the TIR signaling pathway. In addition, TlpA mimics the previously characterized Salmonella virulence factor SipB in its ability to induce activation of caspase-1 in a mammalian cell transfection model. Disruption of the chromosomal tlpA gene rendered a virulent serovar Enteritidis strain defective in intracellular survival and IL-1beta secretion in a cell culture infection model using human THP1 macrophages. Bacteria with disrupted tlpA also displayed reduced lethality in mice, further confirming an important role for this factor in pathogenesis. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the bacterial TIR-like protein TlpA is a novel prokaryotic modulator of NF-kappaB activity and IL-1beta secretion that contributes to serovar Enteritidis virulence.

  2. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide increases tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins and opens the paracellular pathway in lung microvascular endothelia through TLR4, TRAF6, and src family kinase activation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: LPS is a key mediator in vascular leak syndromes associated with Gram-negative bacterial infections and opens the pulmonary vascular endothelial paracellular pathway through protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activation. We asked which PTKs and signaling molecules mediate LPS-induced endothel...

  3. Rho-modifying bacterial protein toxins.

    PubMed

    Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Rho proteins are targets of numerous bacterial protein toxins, which manipulate the GTP-binding proteins by covalent modifications, including ADP ribosylation, glycosylation, adenylylation, proteolytic cleavage and deamidation. Bacterial toxins are important virulence factors but are also potent and efficient pharmacological tools to study the physiological functions of their eukaryotic targets. Recent studies indicate that amazing variations exist in the molecular mechanisms by which toxins attack Rho proteins, which are discussed here.

  4. Bacterial Microcompartment Organelles: Protein Shell Structure and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Yeates, Todd O.; Crowley, Christopher S.; Tanaka, Shiho

    2012-01-01

    Some bacteria contain organelles or microcompartments consisting of a large virion-like protein shell encapsulating sequentially acting enzymes. These organized microcompartments serve to enhance or protect key metabolic pathways inside the cell. The variety of bacterial microcompartments provide diverse metabolic functions, ranging from CO2 fixation to the degradation of small organic molecules. Yet they share an evolutionarily related shell, which is defined by a conserved protein domain that is widely distributed across the bacterial kingdom. Structural studies on a number of these bacterial microcompartment shell proteins are illuminating the architecture of the shell and highlighting its critical role in controlling molecular transport into and out of microcompartments. Current structural, evolutionary, and mechanistic ideas are discussed, along with genomic studies for exploring the function and diversity of this family of bacterial organelles. PMID:20192762

  5. The protein shells of bacterial microcompartment organelles

    PubMed Central

    Yeates, Todd O.; Thompson, Michael C.; Bobik, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Details are emerging on the structure and function of a remarkable class of capsid-like protein assemblies that serve as simple metabolic organelles in many bacteria. These bacterial microcompartments consist of a few thousand shell proteins, which encapsulate two or more sequentially acting enzymes in order to enhance or sequester certain metabolic pathways, particularly those involving toxic or volatile intermediates. Genomic data indicate that bacterial microcompartment shell proteins are present in a wide range of bacterial species, where they encapsulate varied reactions. Crystal structures of numerous shell proteins from distinct types of microcompartments have provided keys for understanding how the shells are assembled and how they conduct molecular transport into and out of microcompartments. The structural data emphasize a high level of mechanistic sophistication in the protein shell, and point the way for further studies on this fascinating but poorly appreciated class of subcellular structures. PMID:21315581

  6. The coronin family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Clemen, Christoph S; Rybakin, Vasily; Eichinger, Ludwig

    2008-01-01

    The coronins, first described in Dictyostelium discoideum in 1991, have meanwhile been detected in all eukaryotes except plants. They belong to the superfamily of WD40-repeat proteins and represent a large family of proteins, which are often involved in cytoskeletal functions. Phylogenetic studies clearly distinguish 12 subfamilies of which six exclusively occur in vertebrates. In the present book we have made a sincere attempt to provide a comprehensive overview on all aspects of coronin proteins including history, structure, subcellular localization and function in different organisms. In addition, we also included a general overview on the WD40 family of proteins and the structurally related Kelch family. The book should be of interest for scientists outside the field, but is more importantly intended as a fast and competent guide for newcomers as well as doctoral and postdoctoral scientists to coronin research in all its facets.

  7. Protein families in multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Copley, R R; Schultz, J; Ponting, C P; Bork, P

    1999-06-01

    The complete sequence of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans contains the genetic machinery that is required to undertake the core biological processes of single cells. However, the genome also encodes proteins that are associated with multicellularity, as well as others that are lineage-specific expansions of phylogenetically widespread families and yet more that are absent in non-nematodes. Ongoing analysis is beginning to illuminate the similarities and differences among human proteins and proteins that are encoded by the genomes of the multicellular worm and the unicellular yeast, and will be essential in determining the reliability of transferring experimental data among phylogenetically distant species. PMID:10361098

  8. The Pfam protein families database.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Alex; Birney, Ewan; Cerruti, Lorenzo; Durbin, Richard; Etwiller, Laurence; Eddy, Sean R; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Howe, Kevin L; Marshall, Mhairi; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2002-01-01

    Pfam is a large collection of protein multiple sequence alignments and profile hidden Markov models. Pfam is available on the World Wide Web in the UK at http://www.sanger.ac.uk/Software/Pfam/, in Sweden at http://www.cgb.ki.se/Pfam/, in France at http://pfam.jouy.inra.fr/ and in the US at http://pfam.wustl.edu/. The latest version (6.6) of Pfam contains 3071 families, which match 69% of proteins in SWISS-PROT 39 and TrEMBL 14. Structural data, where available, have been utilised to ensure that Pfam families correspond with structural domains, and to improve domain-based annotation. Predictions of non-domain regions are now also included. In addition to secondary structure, Pfam multiple sequence alignments now contain active site residue mark-up. New search tools, including taxonomy search and domain query, greatly add to the functionality and usability of the Pfam resource.

  9. Fluorescent sensors based on bacterial fusion proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prats Mateu, Batirtze; Kainz, Birgit; Pum, Dietmar; Sleytr, Uwe B.; Toca-Herrera, José L.

    2014-06-01

    Fluorescence proteins are widely used as markers for biomedical and technological purposes. Therefore, the aim of this project was to create a fluorescent sensor, based in the green and cyan fluorescent protein, using bacterial S-layers proteins as scaffold for the fluorescent tag. We report the cloning, expression and purification of three S-layer fluorescent proteins: SgsE-EGFP, SgsE-ECFP and SgsE-13aa-ECFP, this last containing a 13-amino acid rigid linker. The pH dependence of the fluorescence intensity of the S-layer fusion proteins, monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, showed that the ECFP tag was more stable than EGFP. Furthermore, the fluorescent fusion proteins were reassembled on silica particles modified with cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes. Zeta potential measurements confirmed the particle coatings and indicated their colloidal stability. Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that the fluorescence of the fusion proteins was pH dependent and sensitive to the underlying polyelectrolyte coating. This might suggest that the fluorescent tag is not completely exposed to the bulk media as an independent moiety. Finally, it was found out that viscosity enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the three fluorescent S-layer proteins.

  10. Pfam: the protein families database

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Robert D.; Bateman, Alex; Clements, Jody; Coggill, Penelope; Eberhardt, Ruth Y.; Eddy, Sean R.; Heger, Andreas; Hetherington, Kirstie; Holm, Liisa; Mistry, Jaina; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Tate, John; Punta, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Pfam, available via servers in the UK (http://pfam.sanger.ac.uk/) and the USA (http://pfam.janelia.org/), is a widely used database of protein families, containing 14 831 manually curated entries in the current release, version 27.0. Since the last update article 2 years ago, we have generated 1182 new families and maintained sequence coverage of the UniProt Knowledgebase (UniProtKB) at nearly 80%, despite a 50% increase in the size of the underlying sequence database. Since our 2012 article describing Pfam, we have also undertaken a comprehensive review of the features that are provided by Pfam over and above the basic family data. For each feature, we determined the relevance, computational burden, usage statistics and the functionality of the feature in a website context. As a consequence of this review, we have removed some features, enhanced others and developed new ones to meet the changing demands of computational biology. Here, we describe the changes to Pfam content. Notably, we now provide family alignments based on four different representative proteome sequence data sets and a new interactive DNA search interface. We also discuss the mapping between Pfam and known 3D structures. PMID:24288371

  11. The Pfam protein families database

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Robert D.; Mistry, Jaina; Tate, John; Coggill, Penny; Heger, Andreas; Pollington, Joanne E.; Gavin, O. Luke; Gunasekaran, Prasad; Ceric, Goran; Forslund, Kristoffer; Holm, Liisa; Sonnhammer, Erik L. L.; Eddy, Sean R.; Bateman, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Pfam is a widely used database of protein families and domains. This article describes a set of major updates that we have implemented in the latest release (version 24.0). The most important change is that we now use HMMER3, the latest version of the popular profile hidden Markov model package. This software is ∼100 times faster than HMMER2 and is more sensitive due to the routine use of the forward algorithm. The move to HMMER3 has necessitated numerous changes to Pfam that are described in detail. Pfam release 24.0 contains 11 912 families, of which a large number have been significantly updated during the past two years. Pfam is available via servers in the UK (http://pfam.sanger.ac.uk/), the USA (http://pfam.janelia.org/) and Sweden (http://pfam.sbc.su.se/). PMID:19920124

  12. Tools for Characterizing Bacterial Protein Synthesis Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Skylar; Kaushal, Bindiya; Almutairi, Mashal M.; Liu, Haipeng; Ochabowicz, Anna; Quan, Selwyn; Pham, Van Cuong; Squires, Catherine L.; Murphy, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Many antibiotics inhibit the growth of sensitive bacteria by interfering with ribosome function. However, discovery of new protein synthesis inhibitors is curbed by the lack of facile techniques capable of readily identifying antibiotic target sites and modes of action. Furthermore, the frequent rediscovery of known antibiotic scaffolds, especially in natural product extracts, is time-consuming and expensive and diverts resources that could be used toward the isolation of novel lead molecules. In order to avoid these pitfalls and improve the process of dereplication of chemically complex extracts, we designed a two-pronged approach for the characterization of inhibitors of protein synthesis (ChIPS) that is suitable for the rapid identification of the site and mode of action on the bacterial ribosome. First, we engineered antibiotic-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strains that contain only one rRNA operon. These strains are used for the rapid isolation of resistance mutants in which rRNA mutations identify the site of the antibiotic action. Second, we show that patterns of drug-induced ribosome stalling on mRNA, monitored by primer extension, can be used to elucidate the mode of antibiotic action. These analyses can be performed within a few days and provide a rapid and efficient approach for identifying the site and mode of action of translation inhibitors targeting the bacterial ribosome. Both techniques were validated using a bacterial strain whose culture extract, composed of unknown metabolites, exhibited protein synthesis inhibitory activity; we were able to rapidly detect the presence of the antibiotic chloramphenicol. PMID:24041905

  13. Novel receptors for bacterial protein toxins.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Gudula; Papatheodorou, Panagiotis; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    While bacterial effectors are often directly introduced into eukaryotic target cells by various types of injection machines, toxins enter the cytosol of host cells from endosomal compartments or after retrograde transport via Golgi from the ER. A first crucial step of toxin-host interaction is receptor binding. Using optimized protocols and new methods novel toxin receptors have been identified, including metalloprotease ADAM 10 for Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin, laminin receptor Lu/BCAM for Escherichia coli cytotoxic necrotizing factor CNF1, lipolysis stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR) for Clostridium difficile transferase CDT and low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) 1 for Clostridium perfringens TpeL toxin.

  14. Molecular characterization of pepper germin-like protein as the novel PR-16 family of pathogenesis-related proteins isolated during the resistance response to viral and bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Chang-Jin; An, Jong-Min; Shin, Yun-Chul; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Lee, Boo-Ja; Paek, Kyung-Hee

    2004-09-01

    To understand the molecular defense mechanism controlling the hypersensitive response (HR) better, we examined the hot pepper plant (Capsicum annuum L. cv. Bugang), which exhibits an HR in response to infection by Tobacco mosaic virus pathotype P0 (TMV-P0). A full-length cDNA clone was isolated by differential screening of a cDNA library that was constructed with mRNA extracted from hot pepper leaves during the resistance response to TMV-P0. The predicted amino acid sequence of the cDNA clone exhibited a high sequence similarity to germin-like protein (GLP). The CaGLP1 (Capsicum annuum GLP1) cDNA contains a single open reading frame of 660 bp encoding 220 amino acid residues. Upon inoculation with TMV or Xanthomonas, CaGLP1 transcripts were specifically accumulated in the incompatible interaction but not in the compatible interaction. In plants treated with salicylic acid (SA) or ethephon, which are signal molecules in the defense-related signal transduction pathway, CaGLP1 transcripts were accumulated rapidly. As far as we know, this is the first report that plant GLPs can be specifically induced during a defense response against viral infection. These data suggest that in the hot pepper plant CaGLP1 may be involved in the defense response to viral pathogens, and thus be classified as a new family of PR proteins, 'PR-16'.

  15. New Functions for the Ancient DedA Membrane Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Sikdar, Rakesh; Kumar, Sujeet; Boughner, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The DedA protein family is a highly conserved and ancient family of membrane proteins with representatives in most sequenced genomes, including those of bacteria, archaea, and eukarya. The functions of the DedA family proteins remain obscure. However, recent genetic approaches have revealed important roles for certain bacterial DedA family members in membrane homeostasis. Bacterial DedA family mutants display such intriguing phenotypes as cell division defects, temperature sensitivity, altered membrane lipid composition, elevated envelope-related stress responses, and loss of proton motive force. The DedA family is also essential in at least two species of bacteria: Borrelia burgdorferi and Escherichia coli. Here, we describe the phylogenetic distribution of the family and summarize recent progress toward understanding the functions of the DedA membrane protein family. PMID:23086209

  16. Bacterial proteins and peptides in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Ananda M; Bernardes, Nuno; Fialho, Arsenio M

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most deadly diseases worldwide. In the last three decades many efforts have been made focused on understanding how cancer grows and responds to drugs. The dominant drug-development paradigm has been the “one drug, one target.” Based on that, the two main targeted therapies developed to combat cancer include the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies. Development of drug resistance and side effects represent the major limiting factors for their use in cancer treatment. Nowadays, a new paradigm for cancer drug discovery is emerging wherein multi-targeted approaches gain ground in cancer therapy. Therefore, to overcome resistance to therapy, it is clear that a new generation of drugs is urgently needed. Here, regarding the concept of multi-targeted therapy, we discuss the challenges of using bacterial proteins and peptides as a new generation of effective anti-cancer drugs. PMID:24875003

  17. Bacterial histone-like proteins: roles in stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ge; Maier, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Histone-like proteins (HLPs) are small and basic bacterial proteins that are associated with a nucleoid and play roles in maintaining DNA architecture and regulating DNA transactions such as replication, recombination/repair and transcription. The studies on HLPs from a variety of bacterial species in recent years are summarized in this mini-review. A recent study reported a novel DNA-binding protein (HP119) in Helicobacter pylori that shows some HLP features. It plays a large role in aiding bacterial stress resistance. We provide herein additional evidence that HP119 is a nucleoid-associated protein, and present some perspectives for future study.

  18. NAIP proteins are required for cytosolic detection of specific bacterial ligands in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Isabella; Tenthorey, Jeannette L; Nichols, Randilea D; Al Moussawi, Khatoun; Kang, James J; Kang, Chulho; Kazmierczak, Barbara I; Vance, Russell E

    2016-05-01

    NLRs (nucleotide-binding domain [NBD] leucine-rich repeat [LRR]-containing proteins) exhibit diverse functions in innate and adaptive immunity. NAIPs (NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory proteins) are NLRs that appear to function as cytosolic immunoreceptors for specific bacterial proteins, including flagellin and the inner rod and needle proteins of bacterial type III secretion systems (T3SSs). Despite strong biochemical evidence implicating NAIPs in specific detection of bacterial ligands, genetic evidence has been lacking. Here we report the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to generate Naip1(-/-) and Naip2(-/-) mice, as well as Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice lacking all functional Naip genes. By challenging Naip1(-/-) or Naip2(-/-) mice with specific bacterial ligands in vivo, we demonstrate that Naip1 is uniquely required to detect T3SS needle protein and Naip2 is uniquely required to detect T3SS inner rod protein, but neither Naip1 nor Naip2 is required for detection of flagellin. Previously generated Naip5(-/-) mice retain some residual responsiveness to flagellin in vivo, whereas Naip1-6(Δ/Δ) mice fail to respond to cytosolic flagellin, consistent with previous biochemical data implicating NAIP6 in flagellin detection. Our results provide genetic evidence that specific NAIP proteins function to detect specific bacterial proteins in vivo. PMID:27045008

  19. Discovery of an archetypal protein transport system in bacterial outer membranes.

    PubMed

    Selkrig, Joel; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Webb, Chaille T; Belousoff, Matthew J; Perry, Andrew J; Wells, Timothy J; Morris, Faye; Leyton, Denisse L; Totsika, Makrina; Phan, Minh-Duy; Celik, Nermin; Kelly, Michelle; Oates, Clare; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Ramarathinam, Sri Harsha; Purcell, Anthony W; Schembri, Mark A; Strugnell, Richard A; Henderson, Ian R; Walker, Daniel; Lithgow, Trevor

    2012-05-01

    Bacteria have mechanisms to export proteins for diverse purposes, including colonization of hosts and pathogenesis. A small number of archetypal bacterial secretion machines have been found in several groups of bacteria and mediate a fundamentally distinct secretion process. Perhaps erroneously, proteins called 'autotransporters' have long been thought to be one of these protein secretion systems. Mounting evidence suggests that autotransporters might be substrates to be secreted, not an autonomous transporter system. We have discovered a new translocation and assembly module (TAM) that promotes efficient secretion of autotransporters in proteobacteria. Functional analysis of the TAM in Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli showed that it consists of an Omp85-family protein, TamA, in the outer membrane and TamB in the inner membrane of diverse bacterial species. The discovery of the TAM provides a new target for the development of therapies to inhibit colonization by bacterial pathogens.

  20. Genetic functions of the NAIP family of inflammasome receptors for bacterial ligands in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shi, Xuyan; Wang, Yupeng; Wang, Fengchao; Shao, Feng

    2016-05-01

    Biochemical studies suggest that the NAIP family of NLR proteins are cytosolic innate receptors that directly recognize bacterial ligands and trigger NLRC4 inflammasome activation. In this study, we generated Naip5(-/-), Naip1(-/-), and Naip2(-/-) mice and showed that bone marrow macrophages derived from these knockout mice are specifically deficient in detecting bacterial flagellin, the type III secretion system needle, and the rod protein, respectively. Naip1(-/-), Naip2(-/-), and Naip5(-/-) mice also resist lethal inflammasome activation by the corresponding ligand. Furthermore, infections performed in the Naip-deficient macrophages have helped to define the major signal in Legionella pneumophila, Salmonella Typhimurium and Shigella flexneri that is detected by the NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasome. Using an engineered S. Typhimurium infection model, we demonstrate the critical role of NAIPs in clearing bacterial infection and protecting mice from bacterial virulence-induced lethality. These results provide definitive genetic evidence for the important physiological function of NAIPs in antibacterial defense and inflammatory damage-induced lethality in mice. PMID:27114610

  1. Computational Study on Hemoglobin Protein Family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craciun, Dana; Isvoran, Adriana; Avram, Nicolae M.

    2009-05-01

    We have analyzed 19 proteins belonging to hemoglobin protein family: 3 for plants, 4 for invertebrates and the others for vertebrates. For every protein we have determined the following parameters: the fractal dimension of its backbone, the fractal dimension of its surface, the radius of gyration, the area of its molecular surface and the area of the surface of its cavities. At global level, we did not notice significant differences for the fractal parameters for proteins belonging to different organisms and it underlines that all these proteins perform the same biological function. We have obtained different values of the local and global surface fractal dimensions reflecting distinct roughness of protein pockets in comparison to the entire surface, also in good correlation with the biological function. The geometric characteristics are distinct for the three investigated families of proteins.

  2. [Systematics, differentiation, and detection of bacterial infections-- the family Mycobacteriaceae].

    PubMed

    Böttger, E C

    1991-10-01

    Comparative 16S rRNA sequencing allows to infer natural relationships among bacteria, to characterize and identify microorganisms at a molecular level and to develop DNA probes specific at any desired taxonomic level (e.g. family, genus, species). Probes targeted at ribosomal RNA are suitable for in situ hybridization of whole, intact bacterial cells as well as in polymerase-chain-reaction techniques for sensitive detection and identification of bacteria. Comparative 16S rRNA sequencing provided the basis for a systematic phylogenetic analysis of the genus Mycobacterium. Certain growth characteristics, i.e. thermotolerance and growth rate correspond to natural relationships among the mycobacteria. However, the phylogenetic relatedness within the slow-growing species did not reflect the Runyon classification of photochromogenic, scotochromogenic and nonphotochromogenic mycobacteria. The use of oligonucleotides targeted at highly or semi-conserved regions within the 16S rRNA molecule allows a universal procedure for amplification and rapid sequence determination of 16S rDNA-gene fragments from any virtually bacterial organism. This method of amplification of 16S rDNA-gene fragments was used to identify a novel, uncultured pathogen and opens new perspectives for other infectious diseases of unknown cause.

  3. The lipocalin protein family: structure and function.

    PubMed Central

    Flower, D R

    1996-01-01

    The lipocalin protein family is a large group of small extracellular proteins. The family demonstrates great diversity at the sequence level; however, most lipocalins share three characteristic conserved sequence motifs, the kernel lipocalins, while a group of more divergent family members, the outlier lipocalins, share only one. Belying this sequence dissimilarity, lipocalin crystal structures are highly conserved and comprise a single eight-stranded continuously hydrogen-bonded antiparallel beta-barrel, which encloses an internal ligand-binding site. Together with two other families of ligand-binding proteins, the fatty-acid-binding proteins (FABPs) and the avidins, the lipocalins form part of an overall structural superfamily: the calycins. Members of the lipocalin family are characterized by several common molecular-recognition properties: the ability to bind a range of small hydrophobic molecules, binding to specific cell-surface receptors and the formation of complexes with soluble macromolecules. The varied biological functions of the lipocalins are mediated by one or more of these properties. In the past, the lipocalins have been classified as transport proteins; however, it is now clear that the lipocalins exhibit great functional diversity, with roles in retinol transport, invertebrate cryptic coloration, olfaction and pheromone transport, and prostaglandin synthesis. The lipocalins have also been implicated in the regulation of cell homoeostasis and the modulation of the immune response, and, as carrier proteins, to act in the general clearance of endogenous and exogenous compounds. PMID:8761444

  4. NAIPs: building an innate immune barrier against bacterial pathogens. NAIPs function as sensors that initiate innate immunity by detection of bacterial proteins in the host cell cytosol.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Eric M; Vance, Russell E

    2012-07-01

    The innate immune system of mammals encodes several families of immune detector proteins that monitor the cytosol for signs of pathogen invasion. One important but poorly understood family of cytosolic immunosurveillance proteins is the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing) proteins. Recent work has demonstrated that one subfamily of NLRs, the NAIPs (NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory proteins), are activated by specific interaction with bacterial ligands, such as flagellin. NAIP activation leads to assembly of a large multiprotein complex called the inflammasome, which initiates innate immune responses by activation of the Caspase-1 protease. NAIPs therefore appear to detect pathogen molecules via a simple and direct receptor-ligand mechanism. Interestingly, other NLR family members appear to detect pathogens indirectly, perhaps by responding to host cell "stress" caused by the pathogen. Thus, the NLR family may have evolved surprisingly diverse mechanisms for detecting pathogens. PMID:22513803

  5. Serum amyloid A is a retinol binding protein that transports retinol during bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Derebe, Mehabaw G; Zlatkov, Clare M; Gattu, Sureka; Ruhn, Kelly A; Vaishnava, Shipra; Diehl, Gretchen E; MacMillan, John B; Williams, Noelle S; Hooper, Lora V

    2014-07-29

    Retinol plays a vital role in the immune response to infection, yet proteins that mediate retinol transport during infection have not been identified. Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are strongly induced in the liver by systemic infection and in the intestine by bacterial colonization, but their exact functions remain unclear. Here we show that mouse and human SAAs are retinol binding proteins. Mouse and human SAAs bound retinol with nanomolar affinity, were associated with retinol in vivo, and limited the bacterial burden in tissues after acute infection. We determined the crystal structure of mouse SAA3 at a resolution of 2 Å, finding that it forms a tetramer with a hydrophobic binding pocket that can accommodate retinol. Our results thus identify SAAs as a family of microbe-inducible retinol binding proteins, reveal a unique protein architecture involved in retinol binding, and suggest how retinol is circulated during infection.

  6. Sensory properties of the PII signalling protein family.

    PubMed

    Forchhammer, Karl; Lüddecke, Jan

    2016-02-01

    PII signalling proteins constitute one of the largest families of signalling proteins in nature. An even larger superfamily of trimeric sensory proteins with the same architectural principle as PII proteins appears in protein structure databases. Large surface-exposed flexible loops protrude from the intersubunit faces, where effector molecules are bound that tune the conformation of the loops. Via this mechanism, PII proteins control target proteins in response to cellular ATP/ADP levels and the 2-oxoglutarate status, thereby coordinating the cellular carbon/nitrogen balance. The antagonistic (ATP versus ADP) and synergistic (2-oxoglutarate and ATP) mode of effector molecule binding is further affected by PII -receptor interaction, leading to a highly sophisticated signalling network organized by PII . Altogether, it appears that PII is a multitasking information processor that, depending on its interaction environment, differentially transmits information on the energy status and the cellular 2-oxoglutarate level. In addition to the basic mode of PII function, several bacterial PII proteins may transmit a signal of the cellular glutamine status via covalent modification. Remarkably, during the evolution of plant chloroplasts, glutamine signalling by PII proteins was re-established by acquisition of a short sequence extension at the C-terminus. This plant-specific C-terminus makes the interaction of plant PII proteins with one of its targets, the arginine biosynthetic enzyme N-acetyl-glutamate kinase, glutamine-dependent.

  7. Bacterial protein toxins in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Rosadi, Francesca; Fiorentini, Carla; Fabbri, Alessia

    2016-02-01

    Many bacteria causing persistent infections produce toxins whose mechanisms of action indicate that they could have a role in carcinogenesis. Some toxins, like CDT and colibactin, directly attack the genome by damaging DNA whereas others, as for example CNF1, CagA and BFT, impinge on key eukaryotic processes, such as cellular signalling and cell death. These bacterial toxins, together with other less known toxins, mimic carcinogens and tumour promoters. The aim of this review is to fulfil an up-to-date analysis of toxins with carcinogenic potential that have been already correlated to human cancers. Bacterial toxins-induced carcinogenesis represents an emerging aspect in bacteriology, and its significance is increasingly recognized.

  8. Protein quality control in the bacterial periplasm.

    PubMed

    Merdanovic, Melisa; Clausen, Tim; Kaiser, Markus; Huber, Robert; Ehrmann, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Protein quality control involves sensing and treatment of defective or incomplete protein structures. Misfolded or mislocalized proteins trigger dedicated signal transduction cascades that upregulate the production of protein quality-control factors. Corresponding proteases and chaperones either degrade or repair damaged proteins, thereby reducing the level of aggregation-prone molecules. Because the periplasm of gram-negative bacteria is particularly exposed to environmental changes and respective protein-folding stresses connected with the presence of detergents, low or high osmolarity of the medium, elevated temperatures, and the host's immune response, fine-tuned protein quality control systems are essential for survival under these unfavorable conditions. This review discusses recent advances in the identification and characterization of the key cellular factors and the emerging general principles of the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:21639788

  9. The SYSTERS Protein Family Database in 2005.

    PubMed

    Meinel, Thomas; Krause, Antje; Luz, Hannes; Vingron, Martin; Staub, Eike

    2005-01-01

    The SYSTERS project aims to provide a meaningful partitioning of the whole protein sequence space by a fully automatic procedure. A refined two-step algorithm assigns each protein to a family and a superfamily. The sequence data underlying SYSTERS release 4 now comprise several protein sequence databases derived from completely sequenced genomes (ENSEMBL, TAIR, SGD and GeneDB), in addition to the comprehensive Swiss-Prot/TrEMBL databases. The SYSTERS web server (http://systers.molgen.mpg.de) provides access to 158 153 SYSTERS protein families. To augment the automatically derived results, information from external databases like Pfam and Gene Ontology are added to the web server. Furthermore, users can retrieve pre-processed analyses of families like multiple alignments and phylogenetic trees. New query options comprise a batch retrieval tool for functional inference about families based on automatic keyword extraction from sequence annotations. A new access point, PhyloMatrix, allows the retrieval of phylogenetic profiles of SYSTERS families across organisms with completely sequenced genomes.

  10. Chemical inhibition of bacterial protein tyrosine phosphatase suppresses capsule production.

    PubMed

    Standish, Alistair J; Salim, Angela A; Zhang, Hua; Capon, Robert J; Morona, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Capsule polysaccharide is a major virulence factor for a wide range of bacterial pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae. The biosynthesis of Wzy-dependent capsules in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria is regulated by a system involving a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) and a protein tyrosine kinase. However, how the system functions is still controversial. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, a major human pathogen, the system is present in all but 2 of the 93 serotypes found to date. In order to study this regulation further, we performed a screen to find inhibitors of the phosphatase, CpsB. This led to the observation that a recently discovered marine sponge metabolite, fascioquinol E, inhibited CpsB phosphatase activity both in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that did not affect the growth of the bacteria. This inhibition resulted in decreased capsule synthesis in D39 and Type 1 S. pneumoniae. Furthermore, concentrations of Fascioquinol E that inhibited capsule also lead to increased attachment of pneumococci to a macrophage cell line, suggesting that this compound would inhibit the virulence of the pathogen. Interestingly, this compound also inhibited the phosphatase activity of the structurally unrelated gram-negative PTP, Wzb, which belongs to separate family of protein tyrosine phosphatases. Furthermore, incubation with Klebsiella pneumoniae, which contains a homologous phosphatase, resulted in decreased capsule synthesis. Taken together, these data provide evidence that PTPs are critical for Wzy-dependent capsule production across a spectrum of bacteria, and as such represents a valuable new molecular target for the development of anti-virulence antibacterials.

  11. Bacterial expansins and related proteins from the world of microbes.

    PubMed

    Georgelis, Nikolaos; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Cosgrove, Daniel J

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of microbial expansins emerged from studies of the mechanism of plant cell growth and the molecular basis of plant cell wall extensibility. Expansins are wall-loosening proteins that are universal in the plant kingdom and are also found in a small set of phylogenetically diverse bacteria, fungi, and other organisms, most of which colonize plant surfaces. They loosen plant cell walls without detectable lytic activity. Bacterial expansins have attracted considerable attention recently for their potential use in cellulosic biomass conversion for biofuel production, as a means to disaggregate cellulosic structures by nonlytic means ("amorphogenesis"). Evolutionary analysis indicates that microbial expansins originated by multiple horizontal gene transfers from plants. Crystallographic analysis of BsEXLX1, the expansin from Bacillus subtilis, shows that microbial expansins consist of two tightly packed domains: the N-terminal domain D1 has a double-ψ β-barrel fold similar to glycosyl hydrolase family-45 enzymes but lacks catalytic residues usually required for hydrolysis; the C-terminal domain D2 has a unique β-sandwich fold with three co-linear aromatic residues that bind β-1,4-glucans by hydrophobic interactions. Genetic deletion of expansin in Bacillus and Clavibacter cripples their ability to colonize plant tissues. We assess reports that expansin addition enhances cellulose breakdown by cellulase and compare expansins with distantly related proteins named swollenin, cerato-platanin, and loosenin. We end in a speculative vein about the biological roles of microbial expansins and their potential applications. Advances in this field will be aided by a deeper understanding of how these proteins modify cellulosic structures. PMID:25833181

  12. Bacterial expansins and related proteins from the world of microbes

    PubMed Central

    Georgelis, Nikolaos; Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of microbial expansins emerged from studies of the mechanism of plant cell growth and the molecular basis of plant cell wall extensibility. Expansins are wall-loosening proteins that are universal in the plant kingdom and are also found in a small set of phylogenetically diverse bacteria, fungi, and other organisms, most of which colonize plant surfaces. They loosen plant cell walls without detectable lytic activity. Bacterial expansins have attracted considerable attention recently for their potential use in cellulosic biomass conversion for biofuel production, as a means to disaggregate cellulosic structures by non-lytic means (‘amorphogenesis’). Evolutionary analysis indicates that microbial expansins originated by multiple horizontal gene transfers from plants. Crystallographic analysis of BsEXLX1, the expansin from Bacillus subtilis, shows that microbial expansins consist of two tightly-packed domains: the N-terminal domain D1 has a double-ψ β-barrel fold similar to glycosyl hydrolase family-45 enzymes, but lacks catalytic residues usually required for hydrolysis; the C-terminal domain D2 has a unique β-sandwich fold with three co-linear aromatic residues that bind β-1,4-glucans by hydrophobic interactions. Genetic deletion of expansin in Bacillus and Clavibacter cripples their ability to colonize plant tissues. We assess reports that expansin addition enhances cellulose breakdown by cellulase and compare expansins with distantly related proteins named swollenin, cerato-platanin and loosenin. We end in a speculative vein about the biological roles of microbial expansins and their potential applications. Advances in this field will be aided by a deeper understanding of how these proteins modify cellulosic structures. PMID:25833181

  13. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-08-27

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  14. Human NAIP and mouse NAIP1 recognize bacterial type III secretion needle protein for inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jieling; Zhao, Yue; Shi, Jianjin; Shao, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Inflammasome mediated by central nucleotide-binding and oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) protein is critical for defense against bacterial infection. Here we show that type III secretion system (T3SS) needle proteins from several bacterial pathogens, including Salmonella typhimurium, enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Burkholderia spp., can induce robust inflammasome activation in both human monocyte-derived and mouse bone marrow macrophages. Needle protein activation of human NRL family CARD domain containing 4 (NLRC4) inflammasome requires the sole human neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (hNAIP). Among the seven mouse NAIPs, NAIP1 functions as the mouse counterpart of hNAIP. We found that NAIP1 recognition of T3SS needle proteins was more robust in mouse dendritic cells than in bone marrow macrophages. Needle proteins, as well as flagellin and rod proteins from five different bacteria, exhibited differential and cell type-dependent inflammasome-stimulating activity. Comprehensive profiling of the three types of NAIP ligands revealed that NAIP1 sensing of the needle protein dominated S. flexneri-induced inflammasome activation, particularly in dendritic cells. hNAIP/NAIP1 and NAIP2/5 formed a large oligomeric complex with NLRC4 in the presence of corresponding bacterial ligands, and could support reconstitution of the NLRC4 inflammasome in a ligand-specific manner. PMID:23940371

  15. Homologs of the Acinetobacter baumannii AceI Transporter Represent a New Family of Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Henderson, Peter J. F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multidrug efflux systems are a major cause of resistance to antimicrobials in bacteria, including those pathogenic to humans, animals, and plants. These proteins are ubiquitous in these pathogens, and five families of bacterial multidrug efflux systems have been identified to date. By using transcriptomic and biochemical analyses, we recently identified the novel AceI (Acinetobacter chlorhexidine efflux) protein from Acinetobacter baumannii that conferred resistance to the biocide chlorhexidine, via an active efflux mechanism. Proteins homologous to AceI are encoded in the genomes of many other bacterial species and are particularly prominent within proteobacterial lineages. In this study, we expressed 23 homologs of AceI and examined their resistance and/or transport profiles. MIC analyses demonstrated that, like AceI, many of the homologs conferred resistance to chlorhexidine. Many of the AceI homologs conferred resistance to additional biocides, including benzalkonium, dequalinium, proflavine, and acriflavine. We conducted fluorimetric transport assays using the AceI homolog from Vibrio parahaemolyticus and confirmed that resistance to both proflavine and acriflavine was mediated by an active efflux mechanism. These results show that this group of AceI homologs represent a new family of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps, which we have designated the proteobacterial antimicrobial compound efflux (PACE) family of transport proteins. PMID:25670776

  16. Type II protein secretion and its relationship to bacterial type IV pili and archaeal flagella.

    PubMed

    Peabody, Christopher R; Chung, Yong Joon; Yen, Ming-Ren; Vidal-Ingigliardi, Dominique; Pugsley, Anthony P; Saier, Milton H

    2003-11-01

    Homologues of the protein constituents of the Klebsiella pneumoniae (Klebsiella oxytoca) type II secreton (T2S), the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pilus/fimbrium biogenesis machinery (T4P) and the Methanococcus voltae flagellum biogenesis machinery (Fla) have been identified. Known constituents of these systems include (1). a major prepilin (preflagellin), (2). several minor prepilins (preflagellins), (3). a prepilin (preflagellin) peptidase/methylase, (4). an ATPase, (5). a multispanning transmembrane (TM) protein, (6). an outer-membrane secretin (lacking in Fla) and (7). several functionally uncharacterized envelope proteins. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses led to the conclusion that, although many of the protein constituents are probably homologous, extensive sequence divergence during evolution clouds this homology so that a common ancestry can be established for all three types of systems for only two constituents, the ATPase and the TM protein. Sequence divergence of the individual T2S constituents has occurred at characteristic rates, apparently without shuffling of constituents between systems. The same is probably also true for the T4P and Fla systems. The family of ATPases is much larger than the family of TM proteins, and many ATPase homologues function in capacities unrelated to those considered here. Many phylogenetic clusters of the ATPases probably exhibit uniform function. Some of these have a corresponding TM protein homologue although others probably function without one. It is further shown that proteins that compose the different phylogenetic clusters in both the ATPase and the TM protein families exhibit unique structural characteristics that are of probable functional significance. The TM proteins are shown to have arisen by at least two dissimilar intragenic duplication events, one in the bacterial kingdom and one in the archaeal kingdom. The archaeal TM proteins are twice as large as the bacterial TM proteins, suggesting an oligomeric

  17. The bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and the interferon family: type I, type II and type III interferons.

    PubMed

    Dussurget, Olivier; Bierne, Hélène; Cossart, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are secreted proteins of the cytokine family that regulate innate and adaptive immune responses to infection. Although the importance of IFNs in the antiviral response has long been appreciated, their role in bacterial infections is more complex and is currently a major focus of investigation. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the role of these cytokines in host defense against the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes and highlights recent discoveries on the molecular mechanisms evolved by this intracellular bacterium to subvert IFN responses.

  18. FIGfams : yet another set of protein families.

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, F.; Overbeek, R.; Rodriguez, A.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Chicago; Fellowship for the Interpretation of Genomes

    2009-11-01

    We present FIGfams, a new collection of over 100,000 protein families that are the product of manual curation and close strain comparison. Using the Subsystem approach the manual curation is carried out, ensuring a previously unattained degree of throughput and consistency. FIGfams are based on over 950,000 manually annotated proteins and across many hundred Bacteria and Archaea. Associated with each FIGfam is a two-tiered, rapid, accurate decision procedure to determine family membership for new proteins. FIGfams are freely available under an open source license. These can be downloaded at ftp://ftp.theseed.org/FIGfams/. The web site for FIGfams is http://www.theseed.org/wiki/FIGfams/.

  19. Electronic structure of bacterial surface protein layers

    SciTech Connect

    Maslyuk, Volodymyr V.; Mertig, Ingrid; Bredow, Thomas; Mertig, Michael; Vyalikh, Denis V.; Molodtsov, Serguei L.

    2008-01-15

    We report an approach for the calculation of the electronic density of states of the dried two-dimensional crystalline surface protein layer (S layer) of the bacterium Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602. The proposed model is based on the consideration of individual amino acids in the corresponding conformation of the peptide chain which additively contribute to the electronic structure of the entire protein complex. The derived results agree well with the experimental data obtained by means of photoemission (PE), resonant PE, and near-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  20. Bacterial microcompartment shells of diverse functional types possess pentameric vertex proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Nicole M; Gidaniyan, Soheil D; Liu, Yuxi; Cascio, Duilio; Yeates, Todd O

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are large proteinaceous structures comprised of a roughly icosahedral shell and a series of encapsulated enzymes. MCPs carrying out three different metabolic functions have been characterized in some detail, while gene expression and bioinformatics studies have implicated other types, including one believed to perform glycyl radical-based metabolism of 1,2-propanediol (Grp). Here we report the crystal structure of a protein (GrpN), which is presumed to be part of the shell of a Grp-type MCP in Rhodospirillum rubrum F11. GrpN is homologous to a family of proteins (EutN/PduN/CcmL/CsoS4) whose members have been implicated in forming the vertices of MCP shells. Consistent with that notion, the crystal structure of GrpN revealed a pentameric assembly. That observation revived an outstanding question about the oligomeric state of this protein family: pentameric forms (for CcmL and CsoS4A) and a hexameric form (for EutN) had both been observed in previous crystal structures. To clarify these confounding observations, we revisited the case of EutN. We developed a molecular biology-based method for accurately determining the number of subunits in homo-oligomeric proteins, and found unequivocally that EutN is a pentamer in solution. Based on these convergent findings, we propose the name bacterial microcompartment vertex for this special family of MCP shell proteins. PMID:23456886

  1. On the Entropy of Protein Families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, John P.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Cocco, Simona; Jacquin, Hugo; Monasson, Rémi

    2016-03-01

    Proteins are essential components of living systems, capable of performing a huge variety of tasks at the molecular level, such as recognition, signalling, copy, transport, ... The protein sequences realizing a given function may largely vary across organisms, giving rise to a protein family. Here, we estimate the entropy of those families based on different approaches, including Hidden Markov Models used for protein databases and inferred statistical models reproducing the low-order (1- and 2-point) statistics of multi-sequence alignments. We also compute the entropic cost, that is, the loss in entropy resulting from a constraint acting on the protein, such as the mutation of one particular amino-acid on a specific site, and relate this notion to the escape probability of the HIV virus. The case of lattice proteins, for which the entropy can be computed exactly, allows us to provide another illustration of the concept of cost, due to the competition of different folds. The relevance of the entropy in relation to directed evolution experiments is stressed.

  2. TIGRFAMS: The TIGRFAMs database of protein families

    DOE Data Explorer

    TIGRFAMs are protein families based on Hidden Markov Models or HMMs. Use this page to see the curated seed alignmet for each TIGRFam, the full alignment of all family members and the cutoff scores for inclusion in each of the TIGRFAMs. Also use this page to search through the TIGRFAMs and HMMs for text in the TIGRFAMs Text Search or search for specific sequences in the TIGRFAMs Sequence Search.[Copied from the Overview at http://www.jcvi.org/cms/research/projects/tigrfams/overview/] See also TIGRFAMs ordered by the roles they play at http://cmr.jcvi.org/tigr-scripts/CMR/shared/EvidenceList.cgi?ev_type=TIGRFAM&order_type=role.

  3. The Extended Family of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Andrés; Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Bayón, Yolanda; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the Tyr phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from the coordinated action of Protein Tyrosine Kinases (PTKs) and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs have emerged as highly regulated enzymes with diverse substrate specificity, and proteins with Tyr-dephosphorylation or Tyr-dephosphorylation-like properties can be clustered as the PTPome. This includes proteins from the PTP superfamily, which display a Cys-based catalytic mechanism, as well as enzymes from other gene families (Asp-based phosphatases, His-based phosphatases) that have converged in protein Tyr-dephosphorylation-related functions by using non-Cys-based catalytic mechanisms. Within the Cys-based members of the PTPome, classical PTPs dephosphorylate specific phosphoTyr (pTyr) residues from protein substrates, whereas VH1-like dual-specificity PTPs dephosphorylate pTyr, pSer, and pThr residues, as well as nonproteinaceous substrates, including phosphoinositides and phosphorylated carbohydrates. In addition, several PTPs have impaired catalytic activity as a result of amino acid substitutions at their active sites, but retain regulatory functions related with pTyr signaling. As a result of their relevant biological activity, many PTPs are linked to human disease, including cancer, neurodevelopmental, and metabolic diseases, making these proteins important drug targets and molecular markers in the clinic. Here, a brief overview on the biochemistry and physiology of the different groups of proteins that belong to the mammalian PTPome is presented. PMID:27514797

  4. Nickel recognition by bacterial importer proteins.

    PubMed

    Chivers, Peter T

    2015-04-01

    Nickel supports the growth of microbes from a variety of very different growth environments that affect nickel speciation. The mechanisms of nickel uptake and the molecular bases for the selectivity of this process are emerging. The recent surge of Ni-importer protein structures provides an understanding of Ni-recognition in the initial binding step of the import process. This review compares the structural basis for Ni-recognition in the complexes (ABC and ECF-type) that dominate primary (ATP-dependent) transport, with a focus on how the structures suggest mechanisms for Ni selectivity. The structures raise key questions about the mechanisms of nickel-transfer reactions involved in import. There is also a discussion of key experimental approaches necessary to help establish the physiological importance of these structures.

  5. Effect of Dietary Protein Levels on Composition of Odorous Compounds and Bacterial Ecology in Pig Manure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sungback; Hwang, Okhwa; Park, Sungkwon

    2015-09-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of different levels of dietary crude protein (CP) on composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities in pig manure. A total of 48 male pigs (average initial body weight 45 kg) fed diets containing three levels of dietary CP (20%, 17.5%, and 15%) and their slurry samples were collected from the pits under the floor every week for one month. Changes in composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities were analyzed by gas chromatography and 454 FLX titanium pyrosequencing systems, respectively. Levels of phenols, indoles, short chain fatty acid and branched chain fatty acid were lowest (p<0.05) in CP 15% group among three CP levels. Relative abundance of Bacteroidetes phylum and bacterial genera including Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Atopostipes, Peptonphilus, Ruminococcaceae_uc, Bacteroides, and Pseudomonas was lower (p<0.05) in CP 15% than in CP 20% group. There was a positive correlation (p<0.05) between odorous compounds and bacterial genera: phenol, indole, iso-butyric acid, and iso-valeric acid with Atopostipes, p-cresol and skatole with Bacteroides, acetic acid and butyric acid with AM982595_g of Porphyromonadaceae family, and propionic acid with Tissierella. Taken together, administration of 15% CP showed less production of odorous compounds than 20% CP group and this result might be associated with the changes in bacterial communities especially whose roles in protein metabolism. PMID:26194219

  6. Effect of Dietary Protein Levels on Composition of Odorous Compounds and Bacterial Ecology in Pig Manure

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sungback; Hwang, Okhwa; Park, Sungkwon

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of different levels of dietary crude protein (CP) on composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities in pig manure. A total of 48 male pigs (average initial body weight 45 kg) fed diets containing three levels of dietary CP (20%, 17.5%, and 15%) and their slurry samples were collected from the pits under the floor every week for one month. Changes in composition of odorous compounds and bacterial communities were analyzed by gas chromatography and 454 FLX titanium pyrosequencing systems, respectively. Levels of phenols, indoles, short chain fatty acid and branched chain fatty acid were lowest (p<0.05) in CP 15% group among three CP levels. Relative abundance of Bacteroidetes phylum and bacterial genera including Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Atopostipes, Peptonphilus, Ruminococcaceae_uc, Bacteroides, and Pseudomonas was lower (p<0.05) in CP 15% than in CP 20% group. There was a positive correlation (p<0.05) between odorous compounds and bacterial genera: phenol, indole, iso-butyric acid, and iso-valeric acid with Atopostipes, p-cresol and skatole with Bacteroides, acetic acid and butyric acid with AM982595_g of Porphyromonadaceae family, and propionic acid with Tissierella. Taken together, administration of 15% CP showed less production of odorous compounds than 20% CP group and this result might be associated with the changes in bacterial communities especially whose roles in protein metabolism. PMID:26194219

  7. Bacterial collagen-like proteins that form triple-helical structures

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhuoxin; An, Bo; Ramshaw, John A.M.; Brodsky, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A large number of collagen-like proteins have been identified in bacteria during the past ten years, principally from analysis of genome databases. These bacterial collagens share the distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating amino acid sequence of animal collagens which underlies their unique triple-helical structure. A number of the bacterial collagens have been expressed in E. coli, and they all adopt a triple-helix conformation. Unlike animal collagens, these bacterial proteins do not contain the post-translationally modified amino acid, hydroxyproline, which is known to stabilize the triple-helix structure and may promote self-assembly. Despite the absence of collagen hydroxylation, the triple-helix structures of the bacterial collagens studied exhibit a high thermal stability of 35–39 °C, close to that seen for mammalian collagens. These bacterial collagens are readily produced in large quantities by recombinant methods, either in the original amino acid sequence or in genetically manipulated sequences. This new family of recombinant, easy to modify collagens could provide a novel system for investigating structural and functional motifs in animal collagens and could also form the basis of new biomedical materials with designed structural properties and functions. PMID:24434612

  8. Diversity and evolution of the small multidrug resistance protein family

    PubMed Central

    Bay, Denice C; Turner, Raymond J

    2009-01-01

    Background Members of the small multidrug resistance (SMR) protein family are integral membrane proteins characterized by four α-helical transmembrane strands that confer resistance to a broad range of antiseptics and lipophilic quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) in bacteria. Due to their short length and broad substrate profile, SMR proteins are suggested to be the progenitors for larger α-helical transporters such as the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and drug/metabolite transporter (DMT) superfamily. To explore their evolutionary association with larger multidrug transporters, an extensive bioinformatics analysis of SMR sequences (> 300 Bacteria taxa) was performed to expand upon previous evolutionary studies of the SMR protein family and its origins. Results A thorough annotation of unidentified/putative SMR sequences was performed placing sequences into each of the three SMR protein subclass designations, namely small multidrug proteins (SMP), suppressor of groEL mutations (SUG), and paired small multidrug resistance (PSMR) using protein alignments and phylogenetic analysis. Examination of SMR subclass distribution within Bacteria and Archaea taxa identified specific Bacterial classes that uniquely encode for particular SMR subclass members. The extent of selective pressure acting upon each SMR subclass was determined by calculating the rate of synonymous to non-synonymous nucleotide substitutions using Syn-SCAN analysis. SUG and SMP subclasses are maintained under moderate selection pressure in comparison to integron and plasmid encoded SMR homologues. Conversely, PSMR sequences are maintained under lower levels of selection pressure, where one of the two PSMR pairs diverges in sequence more rapidly than the other. SMR genomic loci surveys identified potential SMR efflux substrates based on its gene association to putative operons that encode for genes regulating amino acid biogenesis and QAC-like metabolites. SMR subclass protein transmembrane domain

  9. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    PubMed

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane. PMID:26621472

  10. Structural Aspects of Bacterial Outer Membrane Protein Assembly.

    PubMed

    Calmettes, Charles; Judd, Andrew; Moraes, Trevor F

    2015-01-01

    The outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is predominantly populated by β-Barrel proteins and lipid anchored proteins that serve a variety of biological functions. The proper folding and assembly of these proteins is essential for bacterial viability and often plays a critical role in virulence and pathogenesis. The β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex is responsible for the proper assembly of β-barrels into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, whereas the localization of lipoproteins (Lol) system is required for proper targeting of lipoproteins to the outer membrane.

  11. Co-translational protein targeting to the bacterial membrane

    PubMed Central

    Saraogi, Ishu; Shan, Shu-ou

    2013-01-01

    Co-translational protein targeting by the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP) is an essential cellular pathway that couples the synthesis of nascent proteins to their proper cellular localization. The bacterial SRP, which contains the minimal ribonucleoprotein core of this universally conserved targeting machine, has served as a paradigm for understanding the molecular basis of protein localization in all cells. In this review, we highlight recent biochemical and structural insights into the molecular mechanisms by which fundamental challenges faced by protein targeting machineries are met in the SRP pathway. Collectively, these studies elucidate how an essential SRP RNA and two regulatory GTPases in the SRP and SRP receptor (SR) enable this targeting machinery to recognize, sense and respond to its biological effectors, i.e. the cargo protein, the target membrane and the translocation machinery, thus driving efficient and faithful co-translational protein targeting. PMID:24513458

  12. Bacterial GRAS domain proteins throw new light on gibberellic acid response mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dapeng; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M.; Aravind, L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Gibberellic acids (GAs) are key plant hormones, regulating various aspects of growth and development, which have been at the center of the ‘green revolution’. GRAS family proteins, the primary players in GA signaling pathways, remain poorly understood. Using sequence-profile searches, structural comparisons and phylogenetic analysis, we establish that the GRAS family first emerged in bacteria and belongs to the Rossmann fold methyltransferase superfamily. All bacterial and a subset of plant GRAS proteins are likely to function as small-molecule methylases. The remaining plant versions have lost one or more AdoMet (SAM)-binding residues while preserving their substrate-binding residues. We predict that GRAS proteins might either modify or bind small molecules such as GAs or their derivatives. Contact: aravind@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary Information: Supplementary Material for this article is available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22829623

  13. Targeting functional motifs of a protein family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadola, Pradeep; Deo, Nivedita

    2016-10-01

    The structural organization of a protein family is investigated by devising a method based on the random matrix theory (RMT), which uses the physiochemical properties of the amino acid with multiple sequence alignment. A graphical method to represent protein sequences using physiochemical properties is devised that gives a fast, easy, and informative way of comparing the evolutionary distances between protein sequences. A correlation matrix associated with each property is calculated, where the noise reduction and information filtering is done using RMT involving an ensemble of Wishart matrices. The analysis of the eigenvalue statistics of the correlation matrix for the β -lactamase family shows the universal features as observed in the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE). The property-based approach captures the short- as well as the long-range correlation (approximately following GOE) between the eigenvalues, whereas the previous approach (treating amino acids as characters) gives the usual short-range correlations, while the long-range correlations are the same as that of an uncorrelated series. The distribution of the eigenvector components for the eigenvalues outside the bulk (RMT bound) deviates significantly from RMT observations and contains important information about the system. The information content of each eigenvector of the correlation matrix is quantified by introducing an entropic estimate, which shows that for the β -lactamase family the smallest eigenvectors (low eigenmodes) are highly localized as well as informative. These small eigenvectors when processed gives clusters involving positions that have well-defined biological and structural importance matching with experiments. The approach is crucial for the recognition of structural motifs as shown in β -lactamase (and other families) and selectively identifies the important positions for targets to deactivate (activate) the enzymatic actions.

  14. Correlated rigid modes in protein families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striegel, D. A.; Wojtowicz, D.; Przytycka, T. M.; Periwal, V.

    2016-04-01

    A great deal of evolutionarily conserved information is contained in genomes and proteins. Enormous effort has been put into understanding protein structure and developing computational tools for protein folding, and many sophisticated approaches take structure and sequence homology into account. Several groups have applied statistical physics approaches to extracting information about proteins from sequences alone. Here, we develop a new method for sequence analysis based on first principles, in information theory, in statistical physics and in Bayesian analysis. We provide a complete derivation of our approach and we apply it to a variety of systems, to demonstrate its utility and its limitations. We show in some examples that phylogenetic alignments of amino-acid sequences of families of proteins imply the existence of a small number of modes that appear to be associated with correlated global variation. These modes are uncovered efficiently in our approach by computing a non-perturbative effective potential directly from the alignment. We show that this effective potential approaches a limiting form inversely with the logarithm of the number of sequences. Mapping symbol entropy flows along modes to underlying physical structures shows that these modes arise due to correlated compensatory adjustments. In the protein examples, these occur around functional binding pockets.

  15. Bacterial Vegetative Insecticidal Proteins (Vip) from Entomopathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Chakroun, Maissa; Banyuls, Núria; Bel, Yolanda; Escriche, Baltasar; Ferré, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Entomopathogenic bacteria produce insecticidal proteins that accumulate in inclusion bodies or parasporal crystals (such as the Cry and Cyt proteins) as well as insecticidal proteins that are secreted into the culture medium. Among the latter are the Vip proteins, which are divided into four families according to their amino acid identity. The Vip1 and Vip2 proteins act as binary toxins and are toxic to some members of the Coleoptera and Hemiptera. The Vip1 component is thought to bind to receptors in the membrane of the insect midgut, and the Vip2 component enters the cell, where it displays its ADP-ribosyltransferase activity against actin, preventing microfilament formation. Vip3 has no sequence similarity to Vip1 or Vip2 and is toxic to a wide variety of members of the Lepidoptera. Its mode of action has been shown to resemble that of the Cry proteins in terms of proteolytic activation, binding to the midgut epithelial membrane, and pore formation, although Vip3A proteins do not share binding sites with Cry proteins. The latter property makes them good candidates to be combined with Cry proteins in transgenic plants (Bacillus thuringiensis-treated crops [Bt crops]) to prevent or delay insect resistance and to broaden the insecticidal spectrum. There are commercially grown varieties of Bt cotton and Bt maize that express the Vip3Aa protein in combination with Cry proteins. For the most recently reported Vip4 family, no target insects have been found yet. PMID:26935135

  16. Inactivation of indispensable bacterial proteins by early proteins of bacteriophages: implication in antibacterial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sau, S; Chattoraj, P; Ganguly, T; Chanda, P K; Mandal, N C

    2008-06-01

    Bacteriophages utilize host bacterial cellular machineries for their own reproduction and completion of life cycles. The early proteins that phage synthesize immediately after the entry of their genomes into bacterial cells participate in inhibiting host macromolecular biosynthesis, initiating phage-specific replication and synthesizing late proteins. Inhibition of synthesis of host macromolecules that eventually leads to cell death is generally performed by the physical and/or chemical modification of indispensable host proteins by early proteins. Interestingly, most modified bacterial proteins were shown to take part actively in phage-specific transcription and replication. Research on phages in last nine decades has demonstrated such lethal early proteins that interact with or chemically modify indispensable host proteins. Among the host proteins inhibited by lethal phage proteins, several are not inhibited by any chemical inhibitor available today. Under the context of widespread dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria in recent years, the information of lethal phage proteins and cognate host proteins could be extremely invaluable as they may lead to the identification of novel antibacterial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about some early phage proteins, their cognate host proteins and their mechanism of action and also describe how the above interacting proteins had been exploited in antibacterial drug discovery. PMID:18537683

  17. Mining the bacterial unknown proteome: identification and characterization of a novel family of highly conserved protective antigens in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Schluepen, Christina; Malito, Enrico; Marongiu, Ambra; Schirle, Markus; McWhinnie, Elisabeth; Lo Surdo, Paola; Biancucci, Marco; Falugi, Fabiana; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Marchi, Sara; Fontana, Maria Rita; Lombardi, Benedetta; De Falco, Maria Grazia; Rinaudo, C Daniela; Spraggon, Glen; Nissum, Mikkel; Bagnoli, Fabio; Grandi, Guido; Bottomley, Matthew J; Liberatori, Sabrina

    2013-11-01

    In the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, there exists an enormous diversity of proteins containing DUFs (domains of unknown function). In the present study, we characterized the family of conserved staphylococcal antigens (Csa) classified as DUF576 and taxonomically restricted to Staphylococci. The 18 Csa paralogues in S. aureus Newman are highly similar at the sequence level, yet were found to be expressed in multiple cellular locations. Extracellular Csa1A was shown to be post-translationally processed and released. Molecular interaction studies revealed that Csa1A interacts with other Csa paralogues, suggesting that these proteins are involved in the same cellular process. The structures of Csa1A and Csa1B were determined by X-ray crystallography, unveiling a peculiar structure with limited structural similarity to other known proteins. Our results provide the first detailed biological characterization of this family and confirm the uniqueness of this family also at the structural level. We also provide evidence that Csa family members elicit protective immunity in in vivo animal models of staphylococcal infections, indicating a possible important role for these proteins in S. aureus biology and pathogenesis. These findings identify the Csa family as new potential vaccine candidates, and underline the importance of mining the bacterial unknown proteome to identify new targets for preventive vaccines.

  18. Gibbs motif sampling: detection of bacterial outer membrane protein repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A. F.; Liu, J. S.; Lawrence, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The detection and alignment of locally conserved regions (motifs) in multiple sequences can provide insight into protein structure, function, and evolution. A new Gibbs sampling algorithm is described that detects motif-encoding regions in sequences and optimally partitions them into distinct motif models; this is illustrated using a set of immunoglobulin fold proteins. When applied to sequences sharing a single motif, the sampler can be used to classify motif regions into related submodels, as is illustrated using helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. Other statistically based procedures are described for searching a database for sequences matching motifs found by the sampler. When applied to a set of 32 very distantly related bacterial integral outer membrane proteins, the sampler revealed that they share a subtle, repetitive motif. Although BLAST (Altschul SF et al., 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410) fails to detect significant pairwise similarity between any of the sequences, the repeats present in these outer membrane proteins, taken as a whole, are highly significant (based on a generally applicable statistical test for motifs described here). Analysis of bacterial porins with known trimeric beta-barrel structure and related proteins reveals a similar repetitive motif corresponding to alternating membrane-spanning beta-strands. These beta-strands occur on the membrane interface (as opposed to the trimeric interface) of the beta-barrel. The broad conservation and structural location of these repeats suggests that they play important functional roles. PMID:8520488

  19. Interactions of Bacterial Proteins with Host Eukaryotic Ubiquitin Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Perrett, Charlotte Averil; Lin, David Yin-Wei; Zhou, Daoguo

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification in which one or more 76 amino acid polypeptide ubiquitin molecules are covalently linked to the lysine residues of target proteins. Ubiquitination is the main pathway for protein degradation that governs a variety of eukaryotic cellular processes, including the cell-cycle, vesicle trafficking, antigen presentation, and signal transduction. Not surprisingly, aberrations in the system have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many diseases including inflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. Recent studies have revealed that viruses and bacterial pathogens exploit the host ubiquitination pathways to gain entry and to aid their survival/replication inside host cells. This review will summarize recent developments in understanding the biochemical and structural mechanisms utilized by bacterial pathogens to interact with the host ubiquitination pathways. PMID:21772834

  20. Protein-lipid interactions in the purple bacterial reaction centre.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael R; Fyfe, Paul K; Roszak, Aleksander W; Isaacs, Neil W; Cogdell, Richard J

    2002-10-11

    The purple bacterial reaction centre uses the energy of sunlight to power energy-requiring reactions such as the synthesis of ATP. During the last 20 years, a combination of X-ray crystallography, spectroscopy and mutagenesis has provided a detailed insight into the mechanism of light energy transduction in the bacterial reaction centre. In recent years, structural techniques including X-ray crystallography and neutron scattering have also been used to examine the environment of the reaction centre. This mini-review focuses on recent studies of the surface of the reaction centre, and briefly discusses the importance of the specific protein-lipid interactions that have been resolved for integral membrane proteins.

  1. Pathogenic Leptospira species express surface-exposed proteins belonging to the bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, James; Barocchi, Michele A; Croda, Julio; Young, Tracy A; Sanchez, Yolanda; Siqueira, Isadora; Bolin, Carole A; Reis, Mitermayer G; Riley, Lee W; Haake, David A; Ko, Albert I

    2003-08-01

    Proteins with bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains, such as the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis invasin and Escherichia coli intimin, are surface-expressed proteins that mediate host mammalian cell invasion or attachment. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a new family of Big domain proteins, referred to as Lig (leptospiral Ig-like) proteins, in pathogenic Leptospira. Screening of L. interrogans and L. kirschneri expression libraries with sera from leptospirosis patients identified 13 lambda phage clones that encode tandem repeats of the 90 amino acid Big domain. Two lig genes, designated ligA and ligB, and one pseudogene, ligC, were identified. The ligA and ligB genes encode amino-terminal lipoprotein signal peptides followed by 10 or 11 Big domain repeats and, in the case of ligB, a unique carboxy-terminal non-repeat domain. The organization of ligC is similar to that of ligB but contains mutations that disrupt the reading frame. The lig sequences are present in pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira species. LigA and LigB are expressed by a variety of virulent leptospiral strains. Loss of Lig protein and RNA transcript expression is correlated with the observed loss of virulence during culture attenuation of pathogenic strains. High-pressure freeze substitution followed by immunocytochemical electron microscopy confirmed that the Lig proteins were localized to the bacterial surface. Immunoblot studies with patient sera found that the Lig proteins are a major antigen recognized during the acute host infection. These observations demonstrate that the Lig proteins are a newly identified surface protein of pathogenic Leptospira, which by analogy to other bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily virulence factors, may play a role in host cell attachment and invasion during leptospiral pathogenesis. PMID:12890019

  2. Rho-modifying bacterial protein toxins from Photorhabdus species.

    PubMed

    Jank, Thomas; Lang, Alexander E; Aktories, Klaus

    2016-06-15

    Photorhabdus bacteria live in symbiosis with entomopathogenic nematodes. The nematodes invade insect larvae, where they release the bacteria, which then produce toxins to kill the insects. Recently, the molecular mechanisms of some toxins from Photorhabdus luminescens and asymbiotica have been elucidated, showing that GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family are targets. The tripartite Tc toxin PTC5 from P. luminescens activates Rho proteins by ADP-ribosylation of a glutamine residue, which is involved in GTP hydrolysis, while PaTox from Photorhabdus asymbiotica inhibits the activity of GTPases by N-acetyl-glucosaminylation at tyrosine residues and activates Rho proteins indirectly by deamidation of heterotrimeric G proteins.

  3. Co-evolution of Bacterial Ribosomal Protein S15 with Diverse mRNA Regulatory Structures

    PubMed Central

    Slinger, Betty L.; Newman, Hunter; Lee, Younghan; Pei, Shermin; Meyer, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions are critical in many biological processes, yet how such interactions affect the evolution of both partners is still unknown. RNA and protein structures are impacted very differently by mechanisms of genomic change. While most protein families are identifiable at the nucleotide level across large phylogenetic distances, RNA families display far less nucleotide similarity and are often only shared by closely related bacterial species. Ribosomal protein S15 has two RNA binding functions. First, it is a ribosomal protein responsible for organizing the rRNA during ribosome assembly. Second, in many bacterial species S15 also interacts with a structured portion of its own transcript to negatively regulate gene expression. While the first interaction is conserved in most bacteria, the second is not. Four distinct mRNA structures interact with S15 to enable regulation, each of which appears to be independently derived in different groups of bacteria. With the goal of understanding how protein-binding specificity may influence the evolution of such RNA regulatory structures, we examine whether examples of these mRNA structures are able to interact with, and regulate in response to, S15 homologs from organisms containing distinct mRNA structures. We find that despite their shared RNA binding function in the rRNA, S15 homologs have distinct RNA recognition profiles. We present a model to explain the specificity patterns observed, and support this model by with further mutagenesis. After analyzing the patterns of conservation for the S15 protein coding sequences, we also identified amino acid changes that alter the binding specificity of an S15 homolog. In this work we demonstrate that homologous RNA-binding proteins have different specificity profiles, and minor changes to amino acid sequences, or to RNA structural motifs, can have large impacts on RNA-protein recognition. PMID:26675164

  4. Investigating Bacterial Protein Synthesis Using Systems Biology Approaches.

    PubMed

    Gagarinova, Alla; Emili, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is essential for bacterial growth and survival. Its study in Escherichia coli helped uncover features conserved among bacteria as well as universally. The pattern of discovery and the identification of some of the longest-known components of the protein synthesis machinery, including the ribosome itself, tRNAs, and translation factors proceeded through many stages of successively more refined biochemical purifications, finally culminating in the isolation to homogeneity, identification, and mapping of the smallest unit required for performing the given function. These early studies produced a wealth of information. However, many unknowns remained. Systems biology approaches provide an opportunity to investigate protein synthesis from a global perspective, overcoming the limitations of earlier ad hoc methods to gain unprecedented insights. This chapter reviews innovative systems biology approaches, with an emphasis on those designed specifically for investigating the protein synthesis machinery in E. coli.

  5. A versatile nano display platform from bacterial spore coat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wu, I-Lin; Narayan, Kedar; Castaing, Jean-Philippe; Tian, Fang; Subramaniam, Sriram; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S.

    2015-01-01

    Dormant bacterial spores are encased in a thick protein shell, the ‘coat', which contains ∼70 different proteins. The coat protects the spore from environmental insults, and is among the most durable static structures in biology. Owing to extensive cross-linking among coat proteins, this structure has been recalcitrant to detailed biochemical analysis, so molecular details of how it assembles are largely unknown. Here, we reconstitute the basement layer of the coat atop spherical membranes supported by silica beads to create artificial spore-like particles. We report that these synthetic spore husk-encased lipid bilayers (SSHELs) assemble and polymerize into a static structure, mimicking in vivo basement layer assembly during sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. In addition, we demonstrate that SSHELs may be easily covalently modified with small molecules and proteins. We propose that SSHELs may be versatile display platforms for drugs and vaccines in clinical settings, or for enzymes that neutralize pollutants for environmental remediation. PMID:25854653

  6. Sequence analysis of the AAA protein family.

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, A.

    1997-01-01

    The AAA protein family, a recently recognized group of Walker-type ATPases, has been subjected to an extensive sequence analysis. Multiple sequence alignments revealed the existence of a region of sequence similarity, the so-called AAA cassette. The borders of this cassette were localized and within it, three boxes of a high degree of conservation were identified. Two of these boxes could be assigned to substantial parts of the ATP binding site (namely, to Walker motifs A and B); the third may be a portion of the catalytic center. Phylogenetic trees were calculated to obtain insights into the evolutionary history of the family. Subfamilies with varying degrees of intra-relatedness could be discriminated; these relationships are also supported by analysis of sequences outside the canonical AAA boxes: within the cassette are regions that are strongly conserved within each subfamily, whereas little or even no similarity between different subfamilies can be observed. These regions are well suited to define fingerprints for subfamilies. A secondary structure prediction utilizing all available sequence information was performed and the result was fitted to the general 3D structure of a Walker A/GTPase. The agreement was unexpectedly high and strongly supports the conclusion that the AAA family belongs to the Walker superfamily of A/GTPases. PMID:9336829

  7. A large family of anti‐activators accompanying XylS/AraC family regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Michael B.; Tran, Minh; Wright, Nathan; Luzader, Deborah H.; Kendall, Melissa M.; Ruiz‐Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Summary AraC Negative Regulators (ANR) suppress virulence genes by directly down‐regulating AraC/XylS members in Gram‐negative bacteria. In this study, we sought to investigate the distribution and molecular mechanisms of regulatory function for ANRs among different bacterial pathogens. We identified more than 200 ANRs distributed in diverse clinically important gram negative pathogens, including Vibrio spp., Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia spp., Citrobacter spp., enterotoxigenic (ETEC) and enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), and members of the Pasteurellaceae. By employing a bacterial two hybrid system, pull down assays and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analysis, we demonstrate that Aar (AggR‐activated regulator), a prototype member of the ANR family in EAEC, binds with high affinity to the central linker domain of AraC‐like member AggR. ANR‐AggR binding disrupted AggR dimerization and prevented AggR‐DNA binding. ANR homologs of Vibrio cholerae, Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella enterica and ETEC were capable of complementing Aar activity by repressing aggR expression in EAEC strain 042. ANR homologs of ETEC and Vibrio cholerae bound to AggR as well as to other members of the AraC family, including Rns and ToxT. The predicted proteins of all ANR members exhibit three highly conserved predicted α‐helices. Site‐directed mutagenesis studies suggest that at least predicted α‐helices 2 and 3 are required for Aar activity. In sum, our data strongly suggest that members of the novel ANR family act by directly binding to their cognate AraC partners. PMID:27038276

  8. Protein–protein interactions and the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial outer membrane proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kleanthous, Colin; Rassam, Patrice; Baumann, Christoph G

    2015-01-01

    It has until recently been unclear whether outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Gram-negative bacteria are organized or distributed randomly. Studies now suggest promiscuous protein–protein interactions (PPIs) between β-barrel OMPs in Escherichia coli govern their local and global dynamics, engender spatiotemporal patterning of the outer membrane into micro-domains and are the basis of β-barrel protein turnover. We contextualize these latest advances, speculate on areas of bacterial cell biology that might be influenced by the organization of OMPs into supramolecular assemblies, and highlight the new questions and controversies this revised view of the bacterial outer membrane raises. PMID:26629934

  9. Packaging protein drugs as bacterial inclusion bodies for therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Antonio; García-Fruitós, Elena; Rinas, Ursula; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Kosoy, Ana; Corchero, José Luis; Vazquez, Esther

    2012-01-01

    A growing number of insights on the biology of bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) have revealed intriguing utilities of these protein particles. Since they combine mechanical stability and protein functionality, IBs have been already exploited in biocatalysis and explored for bottom-up topographical modification in tissue engineering. Being fully biocompatible and with tuneable bio-physical properties, IBs are currently emerging as agents for protein delivery into mammalian cells in protein-replacement cell therapies. So far, IBs formed by chaperones (heat shock protein 70, Hsp70), enzymes (catalase and dihydrofolate reductase), grow factors (leukemia inhibitory factor, LIF) and structural proteins (the cytoskeleton keratin 14) have been shown to rescue exposed cells from a spectrum of stresses and restore cell functions in absence of cytotoxicity. The natural penetrability of IBs into mammalian cells (reaching both cytoplasm and nucleus) empowers them as an unexpected platform for the controlled delivery of essentially any therapeutic polypeptide. Production of protein drugs by biopharma has been traditionally challenged by IB formation. However, a time might have arrived in which recombinant bacteria are to be engineered for the controlled packaging of therapeutic proteins as nanoparticulate materials (nanopills), for their extra- or intra-cellular release in medicine and cosmetics.

  10. Direct and Indirect Targeting of PP2A by Conserved Bacterial Type-III Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lin; Ham, Jong Hyun; Hage, Rosemary; Zhao, Wanying; Soto-Hernández, Jaricelis; Lee, Sang Yeol; Paek, Seung-Mann; Kim, Min Gab; Boone, Charles; Coplin, David L.; Mackey, David

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial AvrE-family Type-III effector proteins (T3Es) contribute significantly to the virulence of plant-pathogenic species of Pseudomonas, Pantoea, Ralstonia, Erwinia, Dickeya and Pectobacterium, with hosts ranging from monocots to dicots. However, the mode of action of AvrE-family T3Es remains enigmatic, due in large part to their toxicity when expressed in plant or yeast cells. To search for targets of WtsE, an AvrE-family T3E from the maize pathogen Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii, we employed a yeast-two-hybrid screen with non-lethal fragments of WtsE and a synthetic genetic array with full-length WtsE. Together these screens indicate that WtsE targets maize protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) heterotrimeric enzyme complexes via direct interaction with B’ regulatory subunits. AvrE1, another AvrE-family T3E from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strain DC3000 (Pto DC3000), associates with specific PP2A B’ subunit proteins from its susceptible host Arabidopsis that are homologous to the maize B’ subunits shown to interact with WtsE. Additionally, AvrE1 was observed to associate with the WtsE-interacting maize proteins, indicating that PP2A B’ subunits are likely conserved targets of AvrE-family T3Es. Notably, the ability of AvrE1 to promote bacterial growth and/or suppress callose deposition was compromised in Arabidopsis plants with mutations of PP2A genes. Also, chemical inhibition of PP2A activity blocked the virulence activity of both WtsE and AvrE1 in planta. The function of HopM1, a Pto DC3000 T3E that is functionally redundant to AvrE1, was also impaired in specific PP2A mutant lines, although no direct interaction with B’ subunits was observed. These results indicate that sub-component specific PP2A complexes are targeted by bacterial T3Es, including direct targeting by members of the widely conserved AvrE-family. PMID:27191168

  11. Bacterial Protein Synthesis as a Target for Antibiotic Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Stefan; Wilson, Daniel N

    2016-01-01

    Protein synthesis occurs on macromolecular machines, called ribosomes. Bacterial ribosomes and the translational machinery represent one of the major targets for antibiotics in the cell. Therefore, structural and biochemical investigations into ribosome-targeting antibiotics provide not only insight into the mechanism of action and resistance of antibiotics, but also insight into the fundamental process of protein synthesis. This review summarizes the recent advances in our understanding of protein synthesis, particularly with respect to X-ray and cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures of ribosome complexes, and highlights the different steps of translation that are targeted by the diverse array of known antibiotics. Such findings will be important for the ongoing development of novel and improved antimicrobial agents to combat the rapid emergence of multidrug resistant pathogenic bacteria. PMID:27481773

  12. Rho-modifying bacterial protein toxins from Photorhabdus species.

    PubMed

    Jank, Thomas; Lang, Alexander E; Aktories, Klaus

    2016-06-15

    Photorhabdus bacteria live in symbiosis with entomopathogenic nematodes. The nematodes invade insect larvae, where they release the bacteria, which then produce toxins to kill the insects. Recently, the molecular mechanisms of some toxins from Photorhabdus luminescens and asymbiotica have been elucidated, showing that GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family are targets. The tripartite Tc toxin PTC5 from P. luminescens activates Rho proteins by ADP-ribosylation of a glutamine residue, which is involved in GTP hydrolysis, while PaTox from Photorhabdus asymbiotica inhibits the activity of GTPases by N-acetyl-glucosaminylation at tyrosine residues and activates Rho proteins indirectly by deamidation of heterotrimeric G proteins. PMID:26026623

  13. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Popa, Crina M.; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding. PMID:27489796

  14. Modification of Bacterial Effector Proteins Inside Eukaryotic Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Popa, Crina M; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Valls, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria manipulate their hosts by delivering a number of virulence proteins -called effectors- directly into the plant or animal cells. Recent findings have shown that such effectors can suffer covalent modifications inside the eukaryotic cells. Here, we summarize the recent reports where effector modifications by the eukaryotic machinery have been described. We restrict our focus on proteins secreted by the type III or type IV systems, excluding other bacterial toxins. We describe the known examples of effectors whose enzymatic activity is triggered by interaction with plant and animal cell factors, including GTPases, E2-Ubiquitin conjugates, cyclophilin and thioredoxins. We focus on the structural interactions with these factors and their influence on effector function. We also review the described examples of host-mediated post-translational effector modifications which are required for proper subcellular location and function. These host-specific covalent modifications include phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, and lipidations such as prenylation, fatty acylation and phospholipid binding.

  15. Bacterial Delivery of TALEN Proteins for Human Genome Editing

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Ting; Wu, Donghai; Yang, Lijun; Terada, Naohiro; Wu, Weihui; Jin, Shouguang

    2014-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) are a novel class of sequence-specific nucleases that have recently gained prominence for its ease of production and high efficiency in genome editing. A TALEN pair recognizes specific DNA sequences and introduce double-strand break in the target site, triggering non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination. Current methods of TALEN delivery involves introduction of foreign genetic materials, such as plasmid DNA or mRNA, through transfection. Here, we show an alternative way of TALEN delivery, bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) mediated direct injection of the TALEN proteins into human cells. Bacterially injected TALEN was shown to efficiently target host cell nucleus where it persists for almost 12 hours. Using a pair of TALENs targeting venus gene, such injected nuclear TALENs were shown functional in introducing DNA mutation in the target site. Interestingly, S-phase cells seem to show greater sensitivity to the TALEN mediated target gene modification. Accordingly, efficiency of such genome editing can easily be manipulated by the infection dose, number of repeated infections as well as enrichment of S phase cells. This work further extends the utility of T3SS in the delivery of functional proteins into mammalian cells to alter their characters for biomedical applications. PMID:24618838

  16. Bacterial delivery of TALEN proteins for human genome editing.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jingyue; Jin, Yongxin; Bian, Ting; Wu, Donghai; Yang, Lijun; Terada, Naohiro; Wu, Weihui; Jin, Shouguang

    2014-01-01

    Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) are a novel class of sequence-specific nucleases that have recently gained prominence for its ease of production and high efficiency in genome editing. A TALEN pair recognizes specific DNA sequences and introduce double-strand break in the target site, triggering non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination. Current methods of TALEN delivery involves introduction of foreign genetic materials, such as plasmid DNA or mRNA, through transfection. Here, we show an alternative way of TALEN delivery, bacterial type III secretion system (T3SS) mediated direct injection of the TALEN proteins into human cells. Bacterially injected TALEN was shown to efficiently target host cell nucleus where it persists for almost 12 hours. Using a pair of TALENs targeting venus gene, such injected nuclear TALENs were shown functional in introducing DNA mutation in the target site. Interestingly, S-phase cells seem to show greater sensitivity to the TALEN mediated target gene modification. Accordingly, efficiency of such genome editing can easily be manipulated by the infection dose, number of repeated infections as well as enrichment of S phase cells. This work further extends the utility of T3SS in the delivery of functional proteins into mammalian cells to alter their characters for biomedical applications. PMID:24618838

  17. Bap: a family of surface proteins involved in biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lasa, Iñigo; Penadés, José R

    2006-03-01

    A group of surface proteins sharing several structural and functional features is emerging as an important element in the biofilm formation process of diverse bacterial species. The first member of this group of proteins was identified in a Staphylococcus aureus mastitis isolate and was named Bap (biofilm-associated protein). As common structural features, Bap-related proteins: (i) are present on the bacterial surface; (ii) show a high molecular weight; (iii) contain a core domain of tandem repeats; (iv) confer upon bacteria the capacity to form a biofilm; (v) play a relevant role in bacterial infectious processes; and (vi) can occasionally be contained in mobile elements. This review summarizes recent studies that have identified and assigned roles to Bap-related proteins in biofilm biology and virulence.

  18. Two novel human members of an emerging mammalian gene family related to mono-ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Koch-Nolte, F.; Haag, F.; Braren, R.

    1997-02-01

    Mono-ADP-ribosylation is one of the posttranslational protein modifications regulating cellular metabolism, e.g., nitrogen fixation, in prokaryotes. Several bacterial toxins mono-ADP-ribosylate and inactivate specific proteins in their animal hosts. Recently, two mammalian GPI-anchored cell surface enzymes with similar activities were cloned (designated ART1 and ART2). We have now identified six related expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the public database and cloned the two novel human genes from which these are derived (designated ART3 and ART4). The deduced amino acid sequences of the predicted gene products show 28% sequence identity to one another and 32-41% identity vs the muscle and T cell enzymes. They contain signal peptide sequences characteristic of GPI anchorage. Southern Zoo blot analyses suggest the presence of related genes in other mammalian species. By PCR screening of somatic cell hybrids and by in situ hybridization, we have mapped the two genes to human chromosomes 4p14-p15.l and 12q13.2- q13.3. Northern blot analyses show that these genes are specifically expressed in testis and spleen, respectively. Comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences reveals a conserved exon/intron structure, with an unusually large exon encoding the predicted mature membrane proteins. Secondary structure prediction analyses indicate conserved motifs and amino acid residues consistent with a common ancestry of this emerging mammalian enzyme family and bacterial mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferases. It is possible that the four human gene family members identified so far represent the {open_quotes}tip of an iceberg,{close_quote} i.e., a larger family of enzymes that influences the function of target proteins via mono-ADP-ribosylation. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  19. The peripheral myelin protein 22 and epithelial membrane protein family.

    PubMed

    Jetten, A M; Suter, U

    2000-01-01

    The peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) and the epithelial membrane proteins (EMP-1, -2, and -3) comprise a subfamily of small hydrophobic membrane proteins. The putative four-transmembrane domain structure as well as the genomic structure are highly conserved among family members. PMP22 and EMPs are expressed in many tissues, and functions in cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis have been reported. EMP-1 is highly up-regulated during squamous differentiation and in certain tumors, and a role in tumorigenesis has been proposed. PMP22 is most highly expressed in peripheral nerves, where it is localized in the compact portion of myelin. It plays a crucial role in normal physiological and pathological processes in the peripheral nervous system. Progress in molecular genetics has revealed that genetic alterations in the PMP22 gene, including duplications, deletions, and point mutations, are responsible for several forms of hereditary peripheral neuropathies, including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A), Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DDS), and hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). The natural mouse mutants Trembler and Trembler-J contain a missense mutation in different hydrophobic domains of PMP22, resulting in demyelination and Schwann cell proliferation. Transgenic mice carrying many copies of the PMP22 gene and PMP22-null mice display a variety of defects in the initial steps of myelination and/or maintenance of myelination, whereas no pathological alterations are detected in other tissues normally expressing PMP22. Further characterization of the interactions of PMP22 and EMPs with other proteins as well as their regulation will provide additional insight into their normal physiological function and their roles in disease and possibly will result in the development of therapeutic tools. PMID:10697408

  20. Evolutionary bases of carbohydrate recognition and substrate discrimination in the ROK protein family.

    PubMed

    Conejo, Maria S; Thompson, Steven M; Miller, Brian G

    2010-06-01

    The ROK (repressor, open reading frame, kinase) protein family (Pfam 00480) is a large collection of bacterial polypeptides that includes sugar kinases, carbohydrate responsive transcriptional repressors, and many functionally uncharacterized gene products. ROK family sugar kinases phosphorylate a range of structurally distinct hexoses including the key carbon source D: -glucose, various glucose epimers, and several acetylated hexosamines. The primary sequence elements responsible for carbohydrate recognition within different functional categories of ROK polypeptides are largely unknown due to a limited structural characterization of this protein family. In order to identify the structural bases for substrate discrimination in individual ROK proteins, and to better understand the evolutionary processes that led to the divergent evolution of function in this family, we constructed an inclusive alignment of 227 representative ROK polypeptides. Phylogenetic analyses and ancestral sequence reconstructions of the resulting tree reveal a discrete collection of active site residues that dictate substrate specificity. The results also suggest a series of mutational events within the carbohydrate-binding sites of ROK proteins that facilitated the expansion of substrate specificity within this family. This study provides new insight into the evolutionary relationship of ROK glucokinases and non-ROK glucokinases (Pfam 02685), revealing the primary sequence elements shared between these two protein families, which diverged from a common ancestor in ancient times. PMID:20512568

  1. Bacterial flagellar capping proteins adopt diverse oligomeric states

    PubMed Central

    Postel, Sandra; Deredge, Daniel; Bonsor, Daniel A; Yu, Xiong; Diederichs, Kay; Helmsing, Saskia; Vromen, Aviv; Friedler, Assaf; Hust, Michael; Egelman, Edward H; Beckett, Dorothy; Wintrode, Patrick L; Sundberg, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    Flagella are crucial for bacterial motility and pathogenesis. The flagellar capping protein (FliD) regulates filament assembly by chaperoning and sorting flagellin (FliC) proteins after they traverse the hollow filament and exit the growing flagellum tip. In the absence of FliD, flagella are not formed, resulting in impaired motility and infectivity. Here, we report the 2.2 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of FliD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the first high-resolution structure of any FliD protein from any bacterium. Using this evidence in combination with a multitude of biophysical and functional analyses, we find that Pseudomonas FliD exhibits unexpected structural similarity to other flagellar proteins at the domain level, adopts a unique hexameric oligomeric state, and depends on flexible determinants for oligomerization. Considering that the flagellin filaments on which FliD oligomers are affixed vary in protofilament number between bacteria, our results suggest that FliD oligomer stoichiometries vary across bacteria to complement their filament assemblies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18857.001 PMID:27664419

  2. Interactions of Dnd proteins involved in bacterial DNA phosphorothioate modification

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Zhao, Gong; Yu, Hao; He, Xinyi

    2015-01-01

    DNA phosphorothioation (PT) is the first discovered physiological DNA backbone modification, in which a non-bridging oxygen atom of the phosphodiester bond is replaced with a sulfur atom in Rp (rectus for plane) configuration. PT modification is governed by a highly conserved gene cluster dndA/iscS-dndBCDE that is widespread across bacterial and archaeal species. However, little is known about how these proteins coordinately react with each other to perform oxygen–sulfur swap. We here demonstrated that IscS, DndC, DndD and DndE form a protein complex of which the molecular ratio for four proteins in the complex is approximate 1:1:1:1. DndB here displayed little or weak affinity to the complex and the constructs harboring dndACDE can confer the host in vivo PT modification. Using co-purification and pull down strategy, we demonstrated that the four proteins assemble into a pipeline in collinear to its gene organization, namely, IscS binding to DndC, DndC binding to DndD, and DndD binding to DndE. Moreover, weak interactions between DndE and IscS, DndE and DndC were also identified. PMID:26539172

  3. Aphids evolved novel secreted proteins for symbiosis with bacterial endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Shigenobu, Shuji; Stern, David L

    2013-01-01

    Aphids evolved novel cells, called bacteriocytes, that differentiate specifically to harbour the obligatory mutualistic endosymbiotic bacteria Buchnera aphidicola. The genome of the host aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum contains many orphan genes that display no similarity with genes found in other sequenced organisms, prompting us to hypothesize that some of these orphan genes are related to lineage-specific traits, such as symbiosis. We conducted deep sequencing of bacteriocytes mRNA followed by whole mount in situ hybridizations of over-represented transcripts encoding aphid-specific orphan proteins. We identified a novel class of genes that encode small proteins with signal peptides, which are often cysteine-rich, that are over-represented in bacteriocytes. These genes are first expressed at a developmental time point coincident with the incorporation of symbionts strictly in the cells that contribute to the bacteriocyte and this bacteriocyte-specific expression is maintained throughout the aphid's life. The expression pattern suggests that recently evolved secretion proteins act within bacteriocytes, perhaps to mediate the symbiosis with beneficial bacterial partners, which is reminiscent of the evolution of novel cysteine-rich secreted proteins of leguminous plants that regulate nitrogen-fixing endosymbionts.

  4. Vaccine potential of bacterial macrophage infectivity potentiator (MIP)-like peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) proteins.

    PubMed

    Humbert, María Victoria; Almonacid Mendoza, Hannia L; Jackson, Alexandra C; Hung, Miao-Chiu; Bielecka, Magdalena K; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2015-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases) are a superfamily of proteins ubiquitously distributed among living organisms, which function primarily to assist the folding and structuring of unfolded and partially folded polypeptide chains and proteins. In this review, we focus specifically on the Macrophage Infectivity Potentiator (MIP)-like PPIases, which are members of the immunophilin family of FK506-binding proteins (FKBP). MIP-like PPIases have accessory roles in virulence and are candidates for inclusion in vaccines protective against both animal and human bacterial pathogens. A structural vaccinology approach obviates any issues over molecular mimicry and potential cross-reactivity with human FKBP proteins and studies with a representative antigen, the Neisseria meningitidis-MIP, support this strategy. Moreover, a dual approach of vaccination and drug targeting could be considered for controlling bacterial infectious diseases of humans and animals.

  5. Holo- And Apo- Structures of Bacterial Periplasmic Heme Binding Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, W.W.; Li, H.; Eakanunkul, S.; Tong, Y.; Wilks, A.; Guo, M.; Poulos, T.L.

    2009-06-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an 'in' position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an 'out' orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg{sup 228} in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg{sup 228}, and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B{sub 12}-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B{sub 12}, compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  6. UGT-29 protein expression and localization during bacterial infection in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Rui-Rui; Lee, Song-Hua; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is routinely used as an animal model to delineate complex molecular mechanisms involved in the host response to pathogen infection. Following up on an earlier study on host-pathogen interaction, we constructed a ugt-29::GFP transcriptional fusion transgenic worm strain to examine UGT-29 protein expression and localization upon bacterial infection. UGT-29 orthologs can be found in higher organisms including humans and is proposed as a member of the UDP-Glucoronosyl Transferase family of proteins which are involved in phase II detoxification of compounds detrimental to the host organism. Under uninfected conditions, UGT-29::GFP fusion protein was highly expressed in the C. elegans anterior pharynx and intestine, two major organs involved in detoxification. We further evaluated the localization of the enzyme in worms infected with the bacterial pathogen, Burkholderia pseudomallei. The infected ugt-29::GFP transgenic strain exhibited increased fluorescence in the pharynx and intestine with pronounced fluorescence also extending to body wall muscle. This transcriptional fusion GFP transgenic worm is a convenient and direct tool to provide information on UGT detoxification enzyme gene expression and could be a useful tool for a number of diverse applications.

  7. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents.

  8. OmpA family proteins and Pmp-like autotransporter: new adhesins of Waddlia chondrophila.

    PubMed

    Kebbi-Beghdadi, Carole; Domröse, Andreas; Becker, Elisabeth; Cisse, Ousmane H; Hegemann, Johannes H; Greub, Gilbert

    2015-08-01

    Waddlia chondrophila is a obligate intracellular bacterium belonging to the Chlamydiales order, a clade that also includes the well-known classical Chlamydia responsible for a number of severe human and animal diseases. Waddlia is an emerging pathogen associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes in humans and abortion in ruminants. Adhesion to the host cell is an essential prerequisite for survival of every strict intracellular bacteria and, in classical Chlamydia, this step is partially mediated by polymorphic outer membrane proteins (Pmps), a family of highly diverse autotransporters that represent about 15% of the bacterial coding capacity. Waddlia chondrophila genome however only encodes one putative Pmp-like protein. Using a proteomic approach, we identified several bacterial proteins potentially implicated in the adhesion process and we characterized their expression during the replication cycle of the bacteria. In addition, we demonstrated that the Waddlia Pmp-like autotransporter as well as OmpA2 and OmpA3, two members of the extended Waddlia OmpA protein family, exhibit adhesive properties on epithelial cells. We hypothesize that the large diversity of the OmpA protein family is linked to the wide host range of these bacteria that are able to enter and multiply in various host cells ranging from protozoa to mammalian and fish cells.

  9. Identification of protein secretion systems in bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Abby, Sophie S.; Cury, Jean; Guglielmini, Julien; Néron, Bertrand; Touchon, Marie; Rocha, Eduardo P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria with two cell membranes (diderms) have evolved complex systems for protein secretion. These systems were extensively studied in some model bacteria, but the characterisation of their diversity has lagged behind due to lack of standard annotation tools. We built online and standalone computational tools to accurately predict protein secretion systems and related appendages in bacteria with LPS-containing outer membranes. They consist of models describing the systems’ components and genetic organization to be used with MacSyFinder to search for T1SS-T6SS, T9SS, flagella, Type IV pili and Tad pili. We identified ~10,000 candidate systems in bacterial genomes, where T1SS and T5SS were by far the most abundant and widespread. All these data are made available in a public database. The recently described T6SSiii and T9SS were restricted to Bacteroidetes, and T6SSii to Francisella. The T2SS, T3SS, and T4SS were frequently encoded in single-copy in one locus, whereas most T1SS were encoded in two loci. The secretion systems of diderm Firmicutes were similar to those found in other diderms. Novel systems may remain to be discovered, since some clades of environmental bacteria lacked all known protein secretion systems. Our models can be fully customized, which should facilitate the identification of novel systems. PMID:26979785

  10. New dimension in therapeutic targeting of BCL-2 family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Besbes, Samaher; Mirshahi, Massoud; Pocard, Marc; Billard, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Proteins of the BCL-2 family control the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Targeting these proteins proves to be an attractive strategy for anticancer therapy. The biological context is based on the fact that BH3-only members of the family are specific antagonists of prosurvival members. This prompted the identification of “BH3 mimetic” compounds. These small peptides or organic molecules indeed mimic the BH3 domain of BH3-only proteins: by selectively binding and antagonizing prosurvival proteins, they can induce apoptosis in malignant cells. Some small-molecule inhibitors of prosurvival proteins have already entered clinical trials in cancer patients and two of them have shown significant therapeutic effects. The latest developments in the field of targeting BCL-2 family proteins highlight several new antagonists of prosurvival proteins as well as direct activators of proapoptotic proteins. These compounds open up novel prospects for the development of BH3 mimetic anticancer drugs. PMID:25970783

  11. PIRSF family classification system for protein functional and evolutionary analysis.

    PubMed

    Nikolskaya, Anastasia N; Arighi, Cecilia N; Huang, Hongzhan; Barker, Winona C; Wu, Cathy H

    2006-01-01

    The PIRSF protein classification system (http://pir.georgetown.edu/pirsf/) reflects evolutionary relationships of full-length proteins and domains. The primary PIRSF classification unit is the homeomorphic family, whose members are both homologous (evolved from a common ancestor) and homeomorphic (sharing full-length sequence similarity and a common domain architecture). PIRSF families are curated systematically based on literature review and integrative sequence and functional analysis, including sequence and structure similarity, domain architecture, functional association, genome context, and phyletic pattern. The results of classification and expert annotation are summarized in PIRSF family reports with graphical viewers for taxonomic distribution, domain architecture, family hierarchy, and multiple alignment and phylogenetic tree. The PIRSF system provides a comprehensive resource for bioinformatics analysis and comparative studies of protein function and evolution. Domain or fold-based searches allow identification of evolutionarily related protein families sharing domains or structural folds. Functional convergence and functional divergence are revealed by the relationships between protein classification and curated family functions. The taxonomic distribution allows the identification of lineage-specific or broadly conserved protein families and can reveal horizontal gene transfer. Here we demonstrate, with illustrative examples, how to use the web-based PIRSF system as a tool for functional and evolutionary studies of protein families.

  12. Defining the Protein-Protein Interaction Network of the Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Family.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu; Tran, Kim My; Aziz, Kathryn E; Sorokin, Alexey V; Chen, Junjie; Wang, Wenqi

    2016-09-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation, which plays a vital role in a variety of human cellular processes, is coordinated by protein tyrosine kinases and protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Genomic studies provide compelling evidence that PTPs are frequently mutated in various human cancers, suggesting that they have important roles in tumor suppression. However, the cellular functions and regulatory machineries of most PTPs are still largely unknown. To gain a comprehensive understanding of the protein-protein interaction network of the human PTP family, we performed a global proteomic study. Using a Minkowski distance-based unified scoring environment (MUSE) for the data analysis, we identified 940 high confidence candidate-interacting proteins that comprise the interaction landscape of the human PTP family. Through a gene ontology analysis and functional validations, we connected the PTP family with several key signaling pathways or cellular functions whose associations were previously unclear, such as the RAS-RAF-MEK pathway, the Hippo-YAP pathway, and cytokinesis. Our study provides the first glimpse of a protein interaction network for the human PTP family, linking it to a number of crucial signaling events, and generating a useful resource for future studies of PTPs.

  13. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Volkman, B.F.

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a {open_quote}receiver domain{close_quote} in the family of {open_quote}two-component{close_quote} regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  14. Annotation extension through protein family annotation coherence metrics

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Hugo P.; Clarke, Luka A.; Couto, Francisco M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein functional annotation consists in associating proteins with textual descriptors elucidating their biological roles. The bulk of annotation is done via automated procedures that ultimately rely on annotation transfer. Despite a large number of existing protein annotation procedures the ever growing protein space is never completely annotated. One of the facets of annotation incompleteness derives from annotation uncertainty. Often when protein function cannot be predicted with enough specificity it is instead conservatively annotated with more generic terms. In a scenario of protein families or functionally related (or even dissimilar) sets this leads to a more difficult task of using annotations to compare the extent of functional relatedness among all family or set members. However, we postulate that identifying sub-sets of functionally coherent proteins annotated at a very specific level, can help the annotation extension of other incompletely annotated proteins within the same family or functionally related set. As an example we analyse the status of annotation of a set of CAZy families belonging to the Polysaccharide Lyase class. We show that through the use of visualization methods and semantic similarity based metrics it is possible to identify families and respective annotation terms within them that are suitable for possible annotation extension. Based on our analysis we then propose a semi-automatic methodology leading to the extension of single annotation terms within these partially annotated protein sets or families. PMID:24130572

  15. Census and consensus in bacterial ecosystems: the LuxR-LuxI family of quorum-sensing transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Fuqua, C; Winans, S C; Greenberg, E P

    1996-01-01

    The importance of accurate demographic information is reflected in the United States Constitution, Article 1, which provides for a decennial census of this country's human population. Bacteria also conduct a census of their population and do so more frequently, more efficiently, and as far we know, with little if any of the political contentiousness caused by human demographers. Many examples have been found of particular bacterial genes, operons, or regulons that are expressed preferentially at high cell densities. Many of these are regulated by proteins related to the LuxR and LuxI proteins of Vibrio fischeri, and by a diffusible pheromone called an autoinducer. LuxR and LuxI and their cognate autoinducer (3-oxohexanoyl homoserine lactone, designated VAI-1) provide an important model to describe the functions of this family of proteins. LuxR is a VAI-1 receptor and a VAI-1-dependent transcriptional activator, and LuxI directs the synthesis of VAI-1. VAI-1 diffuses across the bacterial envelope, and intracellular concentrations of it are therefore strongly increased by nearby VAI-1-producing bacteria. Similar systems regulate pathogenesis factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Erwinia spp., as well as T1 plasmid conjugal transfer in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and many other genes in numerous genera of gram-negative bacteria. Genetic analyses of these systems have revealed a high degree of functional conservation, while also uncovering features that are unique to each.

  16. Sphingomonas paucimobilis beta-glucosidase Bgl1: a member of a new bacterial subfamily in glycoside hydrolase family 1.

    PubMed

    Marques, Ana Rita; Coutinho, Pedro M; Videira, Paula; Fialho, Arsénio M; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2003-03-15

    The Sphingomonas paucimobilis beta-glucosidase Bgl1 is encoded by the bgl1 gene, associated with an 1308 bp open reading frame. The deduced protein has a potential signal peptide of 24 amino acids in the N-terminal region, and experimental evidence is consistent with the processing and export of the Bgl1 protein through the inner membrane to the periplasmic space. A His(6)-tagged 44.3 kDa protein was over-produced in the cytosol of Escherichia coli from a recombinant plasmid, which contained the S. paucimobilis bgl1 gene lacking the region encoding the putative signal peptide. Mature beta-glucosidase Bgl1 is specific for aryl-beta-glucosides and has no apparent activity with oligosaccharides derived from cellulose hydrolysis and other saccharides. A structure-based alignment established structural relations between S. paucimobilis Bgl1 and other members of the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 1 enzymes. At subsite -1, the conserved residues required for catalysis by GH1 enzymes are present in Bgl1 with only minor differences. Major differences are found at subsite +1, the aglycone binding site. This alignment seeded a sequence-based phylogenetic analysis of GH1 enzymes, revealing an absence of horizontal transfer between phyla. Bootstrap analysis supported the definition of subfamilies and revealed that Bgl1, the first characterized beta-glucosidase from the genus Sphingomonas, represents a very divergent bacterial subfamily, closer to archaeal subfamilies than to others of bacterial origin.

  17. The family of major royal jelly proteins and its evolution.

    PubMed

    Albert, S; Bhattacharya, D; Klaudiny, J; Schmitzová, J; Simúth, J

    1999-08-01

    A cDNA encoding a new member of the gene family of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) from the honeybee, Apis mellifera, was isolated and sequenced. Royal jelly (RJ) is a secretion of the cephalic glands of nurse bees. The origin and biological function of the protein component (12.5%, w/w) of RJ is unknown. We show that the MRJP gene family encodes a group of closely related proteins that share a common evolutionary origin with the yellow protein of Drosophila melanogaster. Yellow protein functions in cuticle pigmentation in D. melanogaster. The MRJPs appear to have evolved a novel nutritional function in the honeybee.

  18. Essential bacterial helicases that counteract the toxicity of recombination proteins.

    PubMed

    Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ehrlich, Dusko

    2002-06-17

    PcrA, Rep and UvrD are three closely related bacterial helicases with a DExx signature. PcrA is encoded by Gram-positive bacteria and is essential for cell growth. Rep and UvrD are encoded by Gram-negative bacteria, and mutants lacking both helicases are also not viable. To understand the non-viability of the helicase mutants, we characterized spontaneous extragenic suppressors of a Bacillus subtilis pcrA null mutation. Here we report that one of these suppressors maps in recF and that previously isolated mutations in B.subtilis recF, recL, recO and recR, which belong to the same complementation group, all suppress the lethality of a pcrA mutation. Similarly, recF, recO or recR mutations suppress the lethality of the Escherichia coli rep uvrD double mutant. We conclude that RecFOR proteins are toxic in cells devoid of PcrA in Gram-positive bacteria, or Rep and UvrD in Gram-negative bacteria, and propose that the RecFOR proteins interfere with an essential cellular process, possibly replication, when DExx helicases PcrA, or Rep and UvrD are absent. PMID:12065426

  19. Ribosome reinitiation at leader peptides increases translation of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Korolev, Semen A; Zverkov, Oleg A; Seliverstov, Alexandr V; Lyubetsky, Vassily A

    2016-04-16

    Short leader genes usually do not encode stable proteins, although their importance in expression control of bacterial genomes is widely accepted. Such genes are often involved in the control of attenuation regulation. However, the abundance of leader genes suggests that their role in bacteria is not limited to regulation. Specifically, we hypothesize that leader genes increase the expression of protein-coding (structural) genes via ribosome reinitiation at the leader peptide in the case of a short distance between the stop codon of the leader gene and the start codon of the structural gene. For instance, in Actinobacteria, the frequency of leader genes at a distance of 10-11 bp is about 70 % higher than the mean frequency within the 1 to 65 bp range; and it gradually decreases as the range grows longer. A pronounced peak of this frequency-distance relationship is also observed in Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetales, Acidobacteria, the Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Planctomycetes. In contrast, this peak falls to the distance of 15-16 bp and is not very pronounced in Firmicutes; and no such peak is observed in cyanobacteria and tenericutes. Generally, this peak is typical for many bacteria. Some leader genes located close to a structural gene probably play a regulatory role as well.

  20. Structural Insights into Protein-Protein Interactions Involved in Bacterial Cell Wall Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Laddomada, Federica; Miyachiro, Mayara M.; Dessen, Andréa

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell wall is essential for survival, and proteins that participate in its biosynthesis have been the targets of antibiotic development efforts for decades. The biosynthesis of its main component, the peptidoglycan, involves the coordinated action of proteins that are involved in multi-member complexes which are essential for cell division (the “divisome”) and/or cell wall elongation (the “elongasome”), in the case of rod-shaped cells. Our knowledge regarding these interactions has greatly benefitted from the visualization of different aspects of the bacterial cell wall and its cytoskeleton by cryoelectron microscopy and tomography, as well as genetic and biochemical screens that have complemented information from high resolution crystal structures of protein complexes involved in divisome or elongasome formation. This review summarizes structural and functional aspects of protein complexes involved in the cytoplasmic and membrane-related steps of peptidoglycan biosynthesis, with a particular focus on protein-protein interactions whereby disruption could lead to the development of novel antibacterial strategies. PMID:27136593

  1. RTX proteins: a highly diverse family secreted by a common mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Linhartová, Irena; Bumba, Ladislav; Mašín, Jiří; Basler, Marek; Osička, Radim; Kamanová, Jana; Procházková, Kateřina; Adkins, Irena; Hejnová-Holubová, Jana; Sadílková, Lenka; Morová, Jana; Šebo, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Repeats-in-toxin (RTX) exoproteins of Gram-negative bacteria form a steadily growing family of proteins with diverse biological functions. Their common feature is the unique mode of export across the bacterial envelope via the type I secretion system and the characteristic, typically nonapeptide, glycine- and aspartate-rich repeats binding Ca2+ ions. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge on the organization of rtx loci and on the biological and biochemical activities of therein encoded proteins. Applying several types of bioinformatic screens on the steadily growing set of sequenced bacterial genomes, over 1000 RTX family members were detected, with the biological functions of most of them remaining to be characterized. Activities of the so far characterized RTX family members are then discussed and classified according to functional categories, ranging from the historically first characterized pore-forming RTX leukotoxins, through the large multifunctional enzymatic toxins, bacteriocins, nodulation proteins, surface layer proteins, up to secreted hydrolytic enzymes exhibiting metalloprotease or lipase activities of industrial interest. PMID:20528947

  2. Bcl-2 family proteins: master regulators of cell survival.

    PubMed

    Hatok, Jozef; Racay, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The most prominent function of proteins of the Bcl-2 family is regulation of the initiation of intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathways of apoptosis. However, recent research has revealed that in addition to regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis, proteins of the Bcl-2 family play important roles in regulating other cellular pathways with a strong impact on cell survival like autophagy, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, intracellular calcium dynamics, cell cycle progression, mitochondrial dynamics and energy metabolism. This review summarizes the recent knowledge about functions of Bcl-2 family proteins that are related to cell survival. PMID:27505095

  3. Genome Pool Strategy for Structural Coverage of Protein Families

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroszewski, L.; Slabinski, L.; Wooley, J.; Deacon, A.M.; Lesley, S.A.; Wilson, I.A.; Godzik, A.

    2009-05-18

    Even closely homologous proteins often have different crystallization properties and propensities. This observation can be used to introduce an additional dimension into crystallization trials by simultaneous targeting multiple homologs in what we call a 'genome pool' strategy. We show that this strategy works because protein physicochemical properties correlated with crystallization success have a surprisingly broad distribution within most protein families. There are also easy and difficult families where this distribution is tilted in one direction. This leads to uneven structural coverage of protein families, with more easy ones solved. Increasing the size of the genome pool can improve chances of solving the difficult ones. In contrast, our analysis does not indicate that any specific genomes are easy or difficult. Finally, we show that the group of proteins with known 3D structures is systematically different from the general pool of known proteins and we assess the structural consequences of these differences.

  4. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  5. Conserved Features in the Structure, Mechanism, and Biogenesis of the Inverse Autotransporter Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Eva; Stubenrauch, Christopher J.; Grinter, Rhys; Croft, Nathan P.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Strugnell, Richard A.; Dougan, Gordon; Lithgow, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial cell surface proteins intimin and invasin are virulence factors that share a common domain structure and bind selectively to host cell receptors in the course of bacterial pathogenesis. The β-barrel domains of intimin and invasin show significant sequence and structural similarities. Conversely, a variety of proteins with sometimes limited sequence similarity have also been annotated as “intimin-like” and “invasin” in genome datasets, while other recent work on apparently unrelated virulence-associated proteins ultimately revealed similarities to intimin and invasin. Here we characterize the sequence and structural relationships across this complex protein family. Surprisingly, intimins and invasins represent a very small minority of the sequence diversity in what has been previously the “intimin/invasin protein family”. Analysis of the assembly pathway for expression of the classic intimin, EaeA, and a characteristic example of the most prevalent members of the group, FdeC, revealed a dependence on the translocation and assembly module as a common feature for both these proteins. While the majority of the sequences in the grouping are most similar to FdeC, a further and widespread group is two-partner secretion systems that use the β-barrel domain as the delivery device for secretion of a variety of virulence factors. This comprehensive analysis supports the adoption of the “inverse autotransporter protein family” as the most accurate nomenclature for the family and, in turn, has important consequences for our overall understanding of the Type V secretion systems of bacterial pathogens. PMID:27190006

  6. [Advances in the research of LuxR family protein in quorum-sensing system of gram-negative bacteria].

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Xiang, J

    2016-09-20

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-density-dependent method for information transmission among bacteria, as well as a mechanism for the bacteria to adapt to environment. LuxR family protein plays a key role in gram-negative bacterial QS system as a kind of transcription regulators and participates in a variety of biological behaviors with LuxI protein and signal molecules, such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation, virulence factors production, and so on. The advances in the research of LuxR family protein in QS system of gram-negative bacteria were summarized in this review. PMID:27647069

  7. CPDadh: A new peptidase family homologous to the cysteine protease domain in bacterial MARTX toxins

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Jimin; Lupardus, Patrick J; Garcia, K Christopher; Grishin, Nick V

    2009-01-01

    A cysteine protease domain (CPD) has been recently discovered in a group of multifunctional, autoprocessing RTX toxins (MARTX) and Clostridium difficile toxins A and B. These CPDs (referred to as CPDmartx) autocleave the toxins to release domains with toxic effects inside host cells. We report identification and computational analysis of CPDadh, a new cysteine peptidase family homologous to CPDmartx. CPDadh and CPDmartx share a Rossmann-like structural core and conserved catalytic residues. In bacteria, domains of the CPDadh family are present at the N-termini of a diverse group of putative cell-cell interaction proteins and at the C-termini of some RHS (recombination hot spot) proteins. In eukaryotes, catalytically inactive members of the CPDadh family are found in cell surface protein NELF (nasal embryonic LHRH factor) and some putative signaling proteins. PMID:19309740

  8. Systematic Analysis of Bacterial Effector-Postsynaptic Density 95/Disc Large/Zonula Occludens-1 (PDZ) Domain Interactions Demonstrates Shigella OspE Protein Promotes Protein Kinase C Activation via PDLIM Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chae-ryun; Allen, John E.; Russo, Brian; Lee, Soo Young; Heindl, Jason E.; Baxt, Leigh A.; Herrera, Bobby Brooke; Kahoud, Emily; MacBeath, Gavin; Goldberg, Marcia B.

    2014-01-01

    Diseases caused by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens depend on the activities of bacterial effector proteins that are delivered into eukaryotic cells via specialized secretion systems. Effector protein function largely depends on specific subcellular targeting and specific interactions with cellular ligands. PDZ domains are common domains that serve to provide specificity in protein-protein interactions in eukaryotic systems. We show that putative PDZ-binding motifs are significantly enriched among effector proteins delivered into mammalian cells by certain bacterial pathogens. We use PDZ domain microarrays to identify candidate interaction partners of the Shigella flexneri effector proteins OspE1 and OspE2, which contain putative PDZ-binding motifs. We demonstrate in vitro and in cells that OspE proteins interact with PDLIM7, a member of the PDLIM family of proteins, which contain a PDZ domain and one or more LIM domains, protein interaction domains that participate in a wide variety of functions, including activation of isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). We demonstrate that activation of PKC during S. flexneri infection is attenuated in the absence of PDLIM7 or OspE proteins and that the OspE PDZ-binding motif is required for wild-type levels of PKC activation. These results are consistent with a model in which binding of OspE to PDLIM7 during infection regulates the activity of PKC isoforms that bind to the PDLIM7 LIM domain. PMID:25124035

  9. Systematic analysis of bacterial effector-postsynaptic density 95/disc large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) domain interactions demonstrates Shigella OspE protein promotes protein kinase C activation via PDLIM proteins.

    PubMed

    Yi, Chae-ryun; Allen, John E; Russo, Brian; Lee, Soo Young; Heindl, Jason E; Baxt, Leigh A; Herrera, Bobby Brooke; Kahoud, Emily; MacBeath, Gavin; Goldberg, Marcia B

    2014-10-24

    Diseases caused by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens depend on the activities of bacterial effector proteins that are delivered into eukaryotic cells via specialized secretion systems. Effector protein function largely depends on specific subcellular targeting and specific interactions with cellular ligands. PDZ domains are common domains that serve to provide specificity in protein-protein interactions in eukaryotic systems. We show that putative PDZ-binding motifs are significantly enriched among effector proteins delivered into mammalian cells by certain bacterial pathogens. We use PDZ domain microarrays to identify candidate interaction partners of the Shigella flexneri effector proteins OspE1 and OspE2, which contain putative PDZ-binding motifs. We demonstrate in vitro and in cells that OspE proteins interact with PDLIM7, a member of the PDLIM family of proteins, which contain a PDZ domain and one or more LIM domains, protein interaction domains that participate in a wide variety of functions, including activation of isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). We demonstrate that activation of PKC during S. flexneri infection is attenuated in the absence of PDLIM7 or OspE proteins and that the OspE PDZ-binding motif is required for wild-type levels of PKC activation. These results are consistent with a model in which binding of OspE to PDLIM7 during infection regulates the activity of PKC isoforms that bind to the PDLIM7 LIM domain.

  10. The KP4 killer protein gene family

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Killer protein 4 (KP4) is a well studied toxin secreted by the maize smut fungus Ustilago maydis that kills sensitive Ustilago strains as well as inhibits Fusarium and plant root growth. This small, cysteine rich protein is encoded by a virus that depends on host survival for replication. KP4 functi...

  11. TSEMA: interactive prediction of protein pairings between interacting families.

    PubMed

    Izarzugaza, José M G; Juan, David; Pons, Carles; Ranea, Juan A G; Valencia, Alfonso; Pazos, Florencio

    2006-07-01

    An entire family of methodologies for predicting protein interactions is based on the observed fact that families of interacting proteins tend to have similar phylogenetic trees due to co-evolution. One application of this concept is the prediction of the mapping between the members of two interacting protein families (which protein within one family interacts with which protein within the other). The idea is that the real mapping would be the one maximizing the similarity between the trees. Since the exhaustive exploration of all possible mappings is not feasible for large families, current approaches use heuristic techniques which do not ensure the best solution to be found. This is why it is important to check the results proposed by heuristic techniques and to manually explore other solutions. Here we present TSEMA, the server for efficient mapping assessment. This system calculates an initial mapping between two families of proteins based on a Monte Carlo approach and allows the user to interactively modify it based on performance figures and/or specific biological knowledge. All the explored mappings are graphically shown over a representation of the phylogenetic trees. The system is freely available at http://pdg.cnb.uam.es/TSEMA. Standalone versions of the software behind the interface are available upon request from the authors.

  12. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Analyses Using Protein Family Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Cuncong; Yooseph, Shibu

    2016-01-01

    Analyses of metagenome data (MG) and metatranscriptome data (MT) are often challenged by a paucity of complete reference genome sequences and the uneven/low sequencing depth of the constituent organisms in the microbial community, which respectively limit the power of reference-based alignment and de novo sequence assembly. These limitations make accurate protein family classification and abundance estimation challenging, which in turn hamper downstream analyses such as abundance profiling of metabolic pathways, identification of differentially encoded/expressed genes, and de novo reconstruction of complete gene and protein sequences from the protein family of interest. The profile hidden Markov model (HMM) framework enables the construction of very useful probabilistic models for protein families that allow for accurate modeling of position specific matches, insertions, and deletions. We present a novel homology detection algorithm that integrates banded Viterbi algorithm for profile HMM parsing with an iterative simultaneous alignment and assembly computational framework. The algorithm searches a given profile HMM of a protein family against a database of fragmentary MG/MT sequencing data and simultaneously assembles complete or near-complete gene and protein sequences of the protein family. The resulting program, HMM-GRASPx, demonstrates superior performance in aligning and assembling homologs when benchmarked on both simulated marine MG and real human saliva MG datasets. On real supragingival plaque and stool MG datasets that were generated from healthy individuals, HMM-GRASPx accurately estimates the abundances of the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene families and enables accurate characterization of the resistome profiles of these microbial communities. For real human oral microbiome MT datasets, using the HMM-GRASPx estimated transcript abundances significantly improves detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes. Finally, HMM-GRASPx was used to

  13. Metagenome and Metatranscriptome Analyses Using Protein Family Profiles.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Cuncong; Edlund, Anna; Yang, Youngik; McLean, Jeffrey S; Yooseph, Shibu

    2016-07-01

    Analyses of metagenome data (MG) and metatranscriptome data (MT) are often challenged by a paucity of complete reference genome sequences and the uneven/low sequencing depth of the constituent organisms in the microbial community, which respectively limit the power of reference-based alignment and de novo sequence assembly. These limitations make accurate protein family classification and abundance estimation challenging, which in turn hamper downstream analyses such as abundance profiling of metabolic pathways, identification of differentially encoded/expressed genes, and de novo reconstruction of complete gene and protein sequences from the protein family of interest. The profile hidden Markov model (HMM) framework enables the construction of very useful probabilistic models for protein families that allow for accurate modeling of position specific matches, insertions, and deletions. We present a novel homology detection algorithm that integrates banded Viterbi algorithm for profile HMM parsing with an iterative simultaneous alignment and assembly computational framework. The algorithm searches a given profile HMM of a protein family against a database of fragmentary MG/MT sequencing data and simultaneously assembles complete or near-complete gene and protein sequences of the protein family. The resulting program, HMM-GRASPx, demonstrates superior performance in aligning and assembling homologs when benchmarked on both simulated marine MG and real human saliva MG datasets. On real supragingival plaque and stool MG datasets that were generated from healthy individuals, HMM-GRASPx accurately estimates the abundances of the antimicrobial resistance (AMR) gene families and enables accurate characterization of the resistome profiles of these microbial communities. For real human oral microbiome MT datasets, using the HMM-GRASPx estimated transcript abundances significantly improves detection of differentially expressed (DE) genes. Finally, HMM-GRASPx was used to

  14. An Evolutionary Strategy for All-Atom Folding of the 60-Amino-Acid Bacterial Ribosomal Protein L20

    PubMed Central

    Schug, A.; Wenzel, W.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated an evolutionary algorithm for de novo all-atom folding of the bacterial ribosomal protein L20. We report results of two simulations that converge to near-native conformations of this 60-amino-acid, four-helix protein. We observe a steady increase of “native content” in both simulated ensembles and a large number of near-native conformations in their final populations. We argue that these structures represent a significant fraction of the low-energy metastable conformations, which characterize the folding funnel of this protein. These data validate our all-atom free-energy force field PFF01 for tertiary structure prediction of a previously inaccessible structural family of proteins. We also compare folding simulations of the evolutionary algorithm with the basin-hopping technique for the Trp-cage protein. We find that the evolutionary algorithm generates a dynamic memory in the simulated population, which leads to faster overall convergence. PMID:16565067

  15. Structural and Energetic Characterization of the Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Parra, R. Gonzalo; Espada, Rocío; Verstraete, Nina; Ferreiro, Diego U.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyrin repeat containing proteins are one of the most abundant solenoid folds. Usually implicated in specific protein-protein interactions, these proteins are readily amenable for design, with promising biotechnological and biomedical applications. Studying repeat protein families presents technical challenges due to the high sequence divergence among the repeating units. We developed and applied a systematic method to consistently identify and annotate the structural repetitions over the members of the complete Ankyrin Repeat Protein Family, with increased sensitivity over previous studies. We statistically characterized the number of repeats, the folding of the repeat-arrays, their structural variations, insertions and deletions. An energetic analysis of the local frustration patterns reveal the basic features underlying fold stability and its relation to the functional binding regions. We found a strong linear correlation between the conservation of the energetic features in the repeat arrays and their sequence variations, and discuss new insights into the organization and function of these ubiquitous proteins. PMID:26691182

  16. Protein folds and families: sequence and structure alignments.

    PubMed

    Holm, L; Sander, C

    1999-01-01

    Dali and HSSP are derived databases organizing protein space in the structurally known regions. We use an automatic structure alignment program (Dali) for the classification of all known 3D structures based on all-against-all comparison of 3D structures in the Protein Data Bank. The HSSP database associates 1D sequences with known 3D structures using a position-weighted dynamic programming method for sequence profile alignment (MaxHom). As a result, the HSSP database not only provides aligned sequence families, but also implies secondary and tertiary structures covering 36% of all sequences in Swiss-Prot. The structure classification by Dali and the sequence families in HSSP can be browsed jointly from a web interface providing a rich network of links between neighbours in fold space, between domains and proteins, and between structures and sequences. In particular, this results in a database of explicit multiple alignments of protein families in the twilight zone of sequence similarity. The organization of protein structures and families provides a map of the currently known regions of the protein universe that is useful for the analysis of folding principles, for the evolutionary unification of protein families and for maximizing the information return from experimental structure determination. The databases are available from http://www.embl-ebi.ac.uk/dali/

  17. Yeast Mitochondria as a Model System to Study the Biogenesis of Bacterial β-Barrel Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Thomas; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Rapaport, Doron

    2015-01-01

    Beta-barrel proteins are found in the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. The evolutionary conservation in the biogenesis of these proteins allows mitochondria to assemble bacterial β-barrel proteins in their functional form. In this chapter, we describe exemplarily how the capacity of yeast mitochondria to process the trimeric autotransporter YadA can be used to study the role of bacterial periplasmic chaperones in this process. PMID:26427673

  18. The host antimicrobial peptide Bac71-35 binds to bacterial ribosomal proteins and inhibits protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Mardirossian, Mario; Grzela, Renata; Giglione, Carmela; Meinnel, Thierry; Gennaro, Renato; Mergaert, Peter; Scocchi, Marco

    2014-12-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are molecules from innate immunity with high potential as novel anti-infective agents. Most of them inactivate bacteria through pore formation or membrane barrier disruption, but others cross the membrane without damages and act inside the cells, affecting vital processes. However, little is known about their intracellular bacterial targets. Here we report that Bac71-35, a proline-rich AMP belonging to the cathelicidin family, can reach high concentrations (up to 340 μM) inside the E. coli cytoplasm. The peptide specifically and completely inhibits in vitro translation in the micromolar concentration range. Experiments of incorporation of radioactive precursors in macromolecules with E. coli cells confirmed that Bac71-35 affects specifically protein synthesis. Ribosome coprecipitation and crosslinking assays showed that the peptide interacts with ribosomes, binding to a limited subset of ribosomal proteins. Overall, these results indicate that the killing mechanism of Bac71-35 is based on a specific block of protein synthesis.

  19. The effect of temperature and bacterial growth phase on protein extraction by means of electroporation.

    PubMed

    Haberl-Meglič, Saša; Levičnik, Eva; Luengo, Elisa; Raso, Javier; Miklavčič, Damijan

    2016-12-01

    Different chemical and physical methods are used for extraction of proteins from bacteria, which are used in variety of fields. But on a large scale, many methods have severe drawbacks. Recently, extraction by means of electroporation showed a great potential to quickly obtain proteins from bacteria. Since many parameters are affecting the yield of extracted proteins, our aim was to investigate the effect of temperature and bacterial growth phase on the yield of extracted proteins. At the same time bacterial viability was tested. Our results showed that the temperature has a great effect on protein extraction, the best temperature post treatment being 4°C. No effect on bacterial viability was observed for all temperatures tested. Also bacterial growth phase did not affect the yield of extracted proteins or bacterial viability. Nevertheless, further experiments may need to be performed to confirm this observation, since only one incubation temperature (4°C) and one incubation time before and after electroporation (0.5 and 1h) were tested for bacterial growth phase. Based on our results we conclude that temperature is a key element for bacterial membrane to stay in a permeabilized state, so more proteins flow out of bacteria into surrounding media. PMID:27561651

  20. An iron-containing dodecameric heptosyltransferase family modifies bacterial autotransporters in pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiuhe; Yao, Qing; Xu, Yue; Li, Lin; Li, Shan; Liu, Yanhua; Gao, Wenqing; Niu, Miao; Sharon, Michal; Ben-Nissan, Gili; Zamyatina, Alla; Liu, Xiaoyun; Chen, She; Shao, Feng

    2014-09-10

    Autotransporters deliver virulence factors to the bacterial surface by translocating an effector passenger domain through a membrane-anchored barrel structure. Although passenger domains are diverse, those found in enteric bacteria autotransporters, including AIDA-I in diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (DAEC) and TibA in enterotoxigenic E. coli, are commonly glycosylated. We show that AIDA-I is heptosylated within the bacterial cytoplasm by autotransporter adhesin heptosyltransferase (AAH) and its paralogue AAH2. AIDA-I heptosylation determines DAEC adhesion to host cells. AAH/AAH2 define a bacterial autotransporter heptosyltransferase (BAHT) family that contains ferric ion and adopts a dodecamer assembly. Structural analyses of the heptosylated TibA passenger domain reveal 35 heptose conjugates forming patterned and solenoid-like arrays on the surface of a β helix. Additionally, CARC, the AIDA-like autotransporter from Citrobacter rodentium, is essential for colonization in mice and requires heptosylation by its cognate BAHT. Our study establishes a bacterial glycosylation system that regulates virulence and is essential for pathogenesis. PMID:25211077

  1. Protein families: implications for allergen nomenclature, standardisation and specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Breiteneder, Heimo

    2009-01-01

    Allergens are embedded into the protein universe as members of large families and superfamilies of related proteins which is a direct consequence of their shared evolution. The classification of allergens by protein families offers a valuable frame of reference that allows the design of experiments to study cross-reactivity and allergenic potency of proteins. Information on protein family membership also complements the current official IUIS allergen nomenclature. All presently known allergens belong to one of 140 (1.4%) of the 10,340 protein families currently described by version 23.0 of the Pfam database. This is indicative of a strong bias among allergens towards certain protein architectures that are able to induce an IgE response in an atopic immune system. However, even small variations in the structure of a protein alter its immunological characteristics. Various isoforms of the major birch pollen allergen Bet v 1 were shown to possess highly variant immunogenic and allergenic properties. Ber e 1 and SFA8, two 2S albumins, were revealed to display differential capacities to polarise an immune response. Such data will be exploited in the future for the design of allergy vaccines.

  2. Increased coverage of protein families with the blocks database servers.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, J G; Greene, E A; Pietrokovski, S; Henikoff, S

    2000-01-01

    The Blocks Database WWW (http://blocks.fhcrc.org ) and Email (blocks@blocks.fhcrc.org ) servers provide tools to search DNA and protein queries against the Blocks+ Database of multiple alignments, which represent conserved protein regions. Blocks+ nearly doubles the number of protein families included in the database by adding families from the Pfam-A, ProDom and Domo databases to those from PROSITE and PRINTS. Other new features include improved Block Searcher statistics, searching with NCBI's IMPALA program and 3D display of blocks on PDB structures.

  3. Quinone-reactive proteins devoid of haem b form widespread membrane-bound electron transport modules in bacterial respiration.

    PubMed

    Simon, Jörg; Kern, Melanie

    2008-10-01

    Many quinone-reactive enzyme complexes that are part of membrane-integral eukaryotic or prokaryotic respiratory electron transport chains contain one or more haem b molecules embedded in the membrane. In recent years, various novel proteins have emerged that are devoid of haem b but are thought to fulfil a similar function in bacterial anaerobic respiratory systems. These proteins are encoded by genes organized in various genomic arrangements and are thought to form widespread membrane-bound quinone-reactive electron transport modules that exchange electrons with redox partner proteins located at the outer side of the cytoplasmic membrane. Prototypic representatives are the multihaem c-type cytochromes NapC, NrfH and TorC (NapC/NrfH family), the putative iron-sulfur protein NapH and representatives of the NrfD/PsrC family. Members of these protein families vary in the number of their predicted transmembrane segments and, consequently, diverse quinone-binding sites are expected. Only a few of these enzymes have been isolated and characterized biochemically and high-resolution structures are limited. This mini-review briefly summarizes predicted and experimentally demonstrated properties of the proteins in question and discusses their role in electron transport and bioenergetics of anaerobic respiration.

  4. Histone-Like Proteins of the Dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii Have Homologies to Bacterial DNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wong, J. T. Y.; New, D. C.; Wong, J. C. W.; Hung, V. K. L.

    2003-01-01

    The dinoflagellates have very large genomes encoded in permanently condensed and histoneless chromosomes. Sequence alignment identified significant similarity between the dinoflagellate chromosomal histone-like proteins of Crypthecodinium cohnii (HCCs) and the bacterial DNA-binding and the eukaryotic histone H1 proteins. Phylogenetic analysis also supports the origin of the HCCs from histone-like proteins of bacteria. PMID:12796310

  5. Hemoglobin: a newly recognized binding protein for bacterial endotoxins (LPS).

    PubMed

    Roth, R I; Kaca, W; Levin, J

    1994-01-01

    Administration of purified hemoglobin (Hb) as a cell-free resuscitation fluid is associated with multiple organ toxicities. Many of these toxicities are characteristic of the pathophysiological effects of bacterial endotoxins (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). To better understand the potential role of LPS in the observed in vivo toxicities of Hb, we examined mixtures of Hb and LPS for evidence of LPS-Hb complex formation. LPS-Hb complexes were demonstrated by three techniques: ultrafiltration through 300 kDa cut-off membranes, which distinguished LPS in complexes (87-89% < 300 kDa) from LPS alone (90% > 300 kDa); density centrifugation through sucrose, which distinguished denser LPS alone from LPS-Hb complexes; and precipitation by 67% ethanol, which demonstrated 2-3 fold increased precipitability of Hb in complexes compared to Hb alone. Interaction of LPS with Hb was also associated with markedly increased biological activity of LPS, as manifested by enhancement of LPS activation of Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL), increased release of human mononuclear cell tissue factor, and enhanced production of human endothelial cell tissue factor. These results demonstrated that hemoglobin can serve as an endotoxin binding protein, and that this interaction results in the alteration of several of the physical characteristics of LPS and enhancement of the biological activities of LPS. These findings suggest that a mechanism for the toxicity of infused Hb in vivo may involve potentiation of the biological effects of LPS. In addition, these observations suggest a mechanism by which LPS-related morbidity during sepsis could be enhanced by erythrocyte hemolysis.

  6. Dynamic Filament Formation by a Divergent Bacterial Actin-Like ParM Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brzoska, Anthony J.; Jensen, Slade O.; Barton, Deborah A.; Davies, Danielle S.; Overall, Robyn L.; Skurray, Ronald A.; Firth, Neville

    2016-01-01

    Actin-like proteins (Alps) are a diverse family of proteins whose genes are abundant in the chromosomes and mobile genetic elements of many bacteria. The low-copy-number staphylococcal multiresistance plasmid pSK41 encodes ParM, an Alp involved in efficient plasmid partitioning. pSK41 ParM has previously been shown to form filaments in vitro that are structurally dissimilar to those formed by other bacterial Alps. The mechanistic implications of these differences are not known. In order to gain insights into the properties and behavior of the pSK41 ParM Alp in vivo, we reconstituted the parMRC system in the ectopic rod-shaped host, E. coli, which is larger and more genetically amenable than the native host, Staphylococcus aureus. Fluorescence microscopy showed a functional fusion protein, ParM-YFP, formed straight filaments in vivo when expressed in isolation. Strikingly, however, in the presence of ParR and parC, ParM-YFP adopted a dramatically different structure, instead forming axial curved filaments. Time-lapse imaging and selective photobleaching experiments revealed that, in the presence of all components of the parMRC system, ParM-YFP filaments were dynamic in nature. Finally, molecular dissection of the parMRC operon revealed that all components of the system are essential for the generation of dynamic filaments. PMID:27310470

  7. Strategies for the recovery of active proteins through refolding of bacterial inclusion body proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Luis Felipe; Rinas, Ursula

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in generating active proteins through refolding of bacterial inclusion body proteins are summarized in conjunction with a short overview on inclusion body isolation and solubilization procedures. In particular, the pros and cons of well-established robust refolding techniques such as direct dilution as well as less common ones such as diafiltration or chromatographic processes including size exclusion chromatography, matrix- or affinity-based techniques and hydrophobic interaction chromatography are discussed. Moreover, the effect of physical variables (temperature and pressure) as well as the presence of buffer additives on the refolding process is elucidated. In particular, the impact of protein stabilizing or destabilizing low- and high-molecular weight additives as well as micellar and liposomal systems on protein refolding is illustrated. Also, techniques mimicking the principles encountered during in vivo folding such as processes based on natural and artificial chaperones and propeptide-assisted protein refolding are presented. Moreover, the special requirements for the generation of disulfide bonded proteins and the specific problems and solutions, which arise during process integration are discussed. Finally, the different strategies are examined regarding their applicability for large-scale production processes or high-throughput screening procedures. PMID:15345063

  8. Multiple degradation pathways for Fos family proteins.

    PubMed

    Acquaviva, Claire; Bossis, Guillaume; Ferrara, Patrizia; Brockly, Frederique; Jariel-Encontre, Isabelle; Piechaczyk, Marc

    2002-11-01

    c-Fos protooncoprotein is a short-lived transcription factor with oncogenic potential. It is massively degraded by the proteasome in vivo under various experimental conditions. Those include consititutive expression in exponentially growing cells and transient induction in cells undergoing the G0/G1 phase transition upon stimulation by serum. Though there is evidence that c-Fos can be ubiquitinylated in vitro, the unambigous demonstration that prior ubiquitinylation is necessary for degradation by the proteasome in vivo is still lacking. c-Jun, one of the main dimerization partners of c-Fos within the AP-1 transcription complex, is also an unstable protein. Its degradation is clearly proteasome dependent. However, several lines of evidence indicate that the mechanisms by which it addresses the proteasome are different from those operating on c-Fos. Moreover, genetic analysis has indicated that c-Fos is addressed to the proteasome via pathways that differ depending on the conditions of expression. c-Fos has been transduced by two murine osteosarcomatogenic retroviruses in mutated forms, which are more stable and more oncogenic. The stabilization is not simply accounted for by simple deletion of one of the main c-Fos destabilizers but, rather, by a complex balance between opposing destabilizing and stabilizing mutations. However, although viral Fos proteins have acquired full resistance to proteasomal degradation, stabilization is limited because the mutations they have accumulated, during or after c-fos gene transduction, confer sensitivity to an unidentified proteolytic system(s). This observation is consistent with the idea that fos-expressing viruses have evolved expression machineries to ensure controlled protein levels in order to maintain an optimal balance between prooncogenic and proapoptotic activities of v-Fos proteins.

  9. Roles of Hcp family proteins in the pathogenesis of the porcine extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli type VI secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Wang, Xiangru; Shou, Jin; Zong, Bingbing; Zhang, Yanyan; Tan, Jia; Chen, Jing; Hu, Linlin; Zhu, Yongwei; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Hcp (hemolysin-coregulated protein) is considered a vital component of the functional T6SS (Type VI Secretion System), which is a newly discovered secretion system. Our laboratory has previously sequenced the whole genome of porcine extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) strain PCN033, and identified an integrated T6SS encoding three different hcp family genes. In this study, we first identified a functional T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and demonstrated that the Hcp family proteins were involved in bacterial competition and the interactions with other cells. Interestingly, the three Hcp proteins had different functions. Hcp2 functioned predominantly in bacterial competition; all three proteins were involved in the colonization of mice; and Hcp1 and Hcp3 were predominantly contributed to bacterial-eukaryotic cell interactions. We showed an active T6SS in porcine ExPEC strain PCN033, and the Hcp family proteins had different functions in their interaction with other bacteria or host cells. PMID:27229766

  10. Functions and Regulation of the APOBEC Family of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Harold C.; Bennett, Ryan P.; Kizilyer, Ayse; McDougall, William M.; Prohaska, Kimberly M.

    2012-01-01

    APOBEC1 is a cytidine deaminase that edits messenger RNAs and was the first enzyme in the APOBEC family to be functionally characterized. Under appropriate conditions APOBEC1 also deaminates deoxycytidine in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The other ten members of the APOBEC family have not been fully characterized however several have deoxycytidine deaminase activity on ssDNAs. Despite the nucleic acid substrate preferences of different APOBEC proteins, a common feature appears to be their intrinsic ability to bind to RNA as well as to ssDNA. RNA binding to APOBEC proteins together with protein-protein interactions, post-translation modifications and subcellular localization serve as biological modulators controlling the DNA mutagenic activity of these potentially genotoxic proteins. PMID:22001110

  11. The neuronal calcium sensor family of Ca2+-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Burgoyne, R D; Weiss, J L

    2001-01-01

    Ca(2+) plays a central role in the function of neurons as the trigger for neurotransmitter release, and many aspects of neuronal activity, from rapid modulation to changes in gene expression, are controlled by Ca(2+). These actions of Ca(2+) must be mediated by Ca(2+)-binding proteins, including calmodulin, which is involved in Ca(2+) regulation, not only in neurons, but in most other cell types. A large number of other EF-hand-containing Ca(2+)-binding proteins are known. One family of these, the neuronal calcium sensor (NCS) proteins, has a restricted expression in retinal photoreceptors or neurons and neuroendocrine cells, suggesting that they have specialized roles in these cell types. Two members of the family (recoverin and guanylate cyclase-activating protein) have established roles in the regulation of phototransduction. Despite close sequence similarities, the NCS proteins have distinct neuronal distributions, suggesting that they have different functions. Recent work has begun to demonstrate the physiological roles of members of this protein family. These include roles in the modulation of neurotransmitter release, control of cyclic nucleotide metabolism, biosynthesis of polyphosphoinositides, regulation of gene expression and in the direct regulation of ion channels. In the present review we describe the known sequences and structures of the NCS proteins, information on their interactions with target proteins and current knowledge about their cellular and physiological functions. PMID:11115393

  12. Space- and time-resolved protein dynamics in single bacterial cells observed on a chip.

    PubMed

    Greif, Dominik; Pobigaylo, Nataliya; Frage, Benjamin; Becker, Anke; Regtmeier, Jan; Anselmetti, Dario

    2010-09-15

    Life cell imaging of bacterial cells over long times is very challenging because of the small dimensions and the need for a liquid environment assuring cell viability. In order to obtain space- and time-resolved information about protein dynamics, high resolution time-lapse fluorescence images (TLFI) of single bacterial cells were recorded in a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microfluidic chip. A new gradient coating technique was applied to ensure cell loading. As a proof-of-concept, we monitored the evenly distributed cytoplasmic protein GcrA as well as the asymmetric localization of the DivK protein in cells of S. meliloti over at least two division cycles. Localization of DivK was characterized by dividing each bacterial cell into 4 sections with dimensions closely above the optical limit of resolution. This approach of generating spatio-temporal resolved information of protein dynamics in single bacterial cells is applicable to many problems.

  13. Chloroplast division in higher plants requires members of two functionally divergent gene families with homology to bacterial ftsZ.

    PubMed Central

    Osteryoung, K W; Stokes, K D; Rutherford, S M; Percival, A L; Lee, W Y

    1998-01-01

    The division of plastids is critical for viability in photosynthetic eukaryotes, but the mechanisms associated with this process are still poorly understood. We previously identified a nuclear gene from Arabidopsis encoding a chloroplast-localized homolog of the bacterial cell division protein FtsZ, an essential cytoskeletal component of the prokaryotic cell division apparatus. Here, we report the identification of a second nuclear-encoded FtsZ-type protein from Arabidopsis that does not contain a chloroplast targeting sequence or other obvious sorting signals and is not imported into isolated chloroplasts, which strongly suggests that it is localized in the cytosol. We further demonstrate using antisense technology that inhibiting expression of either Arabidopsis FtsZ gene (AtFtsZ1-1 or AtFtsZ2-1) in transgenic plants reduces the number of chloroplasts in mature leaf cells from 100 to one, indicating that both genes are essential for division of higher plant chloroplasts but that each plays a distinct role in the process. Analysis of currently available plant FtsZ sequences further suggests that two functionally divergent FtsZ gene families encoding differentially localized products participate in chloroplast division. Our results provide evidence that both chloroplastic and cytosolic forms of FtsZ are involved in chloroplast division in higher plants and imply that important differences exist between chloroplasts and prokaryotes with regard to the roles played by FtsZ proteins in the division process. PMID:9836740

  14. BCL-2 family proteins as regulators of mitochondria metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gross, Atan

    2016-08-01

    The BCL-2 family proteins are major regulators of apoptosis, and one of their major sites of action are the mitochondria. Mitochondria are the cellular hubs for metabolism and indeed selected BCL-2 family proteins also possess roles related to mitochondria metabolism and dynamics. Here we discuss the link between mitochondrial metabolism/dynamics and the fate of stem cells, with an emphasis on the role of the BID-MTCH2 pair in regulating this link. We also discuss the possibility that BCL-2 family proteins act as metabolic sensors/messengers coming on and off of mitochondria to "sample" the cytosol and provide the mitochondria with up-to-date metabolic information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  15. Expression and localization of X11 family proteins in neurons.

    PubMed

    Motodate, Rika; Saito, Yuhki; Hata, Saori; Suzuki, Toshiharu

    2016-09-01

    The X11/Mint family of proteins comprises X11/X11α/Mint1, X11L/X11β/Mint2, and X11L2/X11γ/Mint3. Each of these molecules is an adaptor protein that contains a phosphotyrosine interaction/binding (PI/PTB) and two PDZ domains in its carboxy-terminal region. X11/Mint family members associate with a broad spectrum of membrane proteins, including Alzheimer's β-amyloid precursor protein (APP), alcadeins, and low density lipoprotein receptor proteins, as well as various cytoplasmic proteins including Arf, kalirin-7, and Munc18. In particular, X11 and X11L are thought to play various roles in the regulation of neural functions in brain. Nevertheless, the protein levels and respective localization of individual family members remain controversial. We analyzed the protein levels of X11 and X11L in the corresponding single- and double-knockout mice. X11 and X11L did not exhibit obvious changes of their protein levels when the other was absent, especially in cerebrum in which they were widely co-expressed. In cerebellum, X11 and X11L localized in characteristic patterns in various types of neurons, and X11 protein level increased without an obvious ectopic localization in X11L-knockout mice. Interestingly, only X11L protein existed specifically in brain, whereas, contrary to the accepted view, X11 protein was detected at the highest levels in brain but was also strongly detected in pancreas, testis, and paranephros. Together, our results indicate that both X11 and X11L exert largely in brain neurons, but X11 may also function in peripheral tissues. PMID:27268412

  16. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Graether, Steffen P.; Boddington, Kelly F.

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (dehydrins) are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y-, and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggests multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins. PMID:25400646

  17. Disorder and function: a review of the dehydrin protein family.

    PubMed

    Graether, Steffen P; Boddington, Kelly F

    2014-01-01

    Dehydration proteins (dehydrins) are group 2 members of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family. The protein architecture of dehydrins can be described by the presence of three types of conserved sequence motifs that have been named the K-, Y-, and S-segments. By definition, a dehydrin must contain at least one copy of the lysine-rich K-segment. Abiotic stresses such as drought, cold, and salinity cause the upregulation of dehydrin mRNA and protein levels. Despite the large body of genetic and protein evidence of the importance of these proteins in stress response, the in vivo protective mechanism is not fully known. In vitro experimental evidence from biochemical assays and localization experiments suggests multiple roles for dehydrins, including membrane protection, cryoprotection of enzymes, and protection from reactive oxygen species. Membrane binding by dehydrins is likely to be as a peripheral membrane protein, since the protein sequences are highly hydrophilic and contain many charged amino acids. Because of this, dehydrins in solution are intrinsically disordered proteins, that is, they have no well-defined secondary or tertiary structure. Despite their disorder, dehydrins have been shown to gain structure when bound to ligands such as membranes, and to possibly change their oligomeric state when bound to ions. We review what is currently known about dehydrin sequences and their structures, and examine the various ligands that have been shown to bind to this family of proteins. PMID:25400646

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF NICOTINAMIDE MONONUCLEOTIDE DEAMIDASE OF THE BACTERIAL PYRIDINE NUCLEOTIDE CYCLE REVEALS A NOVEL BROADLY CONSERVED AMIDOHYDROLASE FAMILY

    SciTech Connect

    Galeazzi, Luca; Bocci, Paolo; Amici, Adolfo; Brunetti, Lucia; Ruggieri, Silverio; Romine, Margaret F.; Reed, Samantha B.; Osterman, Andrei; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2011-09-27

    The pyridine nucleotide cycle (PNC) is a network of salvage and recycling routes maintaining homeostasis of NAD(P) cofactor pool in the cell. Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) deamidase (EC 3.5.1.42), one of the key enzymes of the bacterial PNC was originally described in Enterobacteria, but the corresponding gene eluded identification for over 30 years. A genomics-based reconstruction of NAD metabolism across hundreds bacterial species suggested that NMN deamidase reaction is the only possible way of nicotinamide salvage in the marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. This prediction was verified via purification of native NMN deamidase from S. oneidensis followed by the identification of the respective gene, termed pncC. Enzymatic characterization of the PncC protein, as well as phenotype analysis of deletion mutants, confirmed its proposed biochemical and physiological function in S. oneidensis. Of the three PncC homologs present in E. coli, NMN deamidase activity was confirmed only for the recombinant purified product of the ygaD gene. A comparative analysis at the level of sequence and three dimensional structure, which is available for one of the PncC family member, shows no homology with any previously described amidohydrolases. Multiple alignment analysis of functional and non functional PncC homologs, together with NMN docking experiments, allowed us to tentatively identify the active site area and conserved residues therein. An observed broad phylogenomic distribution of predicted functional PncCs in bacterial kingdom is consistent with a possible role in detoxification of NMN, resulting from NAD utilization by DNA ligase.

  19. Identification of nicotinamide mononucleotide deamidase of the bacterial pyridine nucleotide cycle reveals a novel broadly conserved amidohydrolase family.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, Luca; Bocci, Paola; Amici, Adolfo; Brunetti, Lucia; Ruggieri, Silverio; Romine, Margaret; Reed, Samantha; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A; Sorci, Leonardo; Raffaelli, Nadia

    2011-11-18

    The pyridine nucleotide cycle is a network of salvage and recycling routes maintaining homeostasis of NAD(P) cofactor pool in the cell. Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) deamidase (EC 3.5.1.42), one of the key enzymes of the bacterial pyridine nucleotide cycle, was originally described in Enterobacteria, but the corresponding gene eluded identification for over 30 years. A genomics-based reconstruction of NAD metabolism across hundreds of bacterial species suggested that NMN deamidase reaction is the only possible way of nicotinamide salvage in the marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. This prediction was verified via purification of native NMN deamidase from S. oneidensis followed by the identification of the respective gene, termed pncC. Enzymatic characterization of the PncC protein, as well as phenotype analysis of deletion mutants, confirmed its proposed biochemical and physiological function in S. oneidensis. Of the three PncC homologs present in Escherichia coli, NMN deamidase activity was confirmed only for the recombinant purified product of the ygaD gene. A comparative analysis at the level of sequence and three-dimensional structure, which is available for one of the PncC family member, shows no homology with any previously described amidohydrolases. Multiple alignment analysis of functional and nonfunctional PncC homologs, together with NMN docking experiments, allowed us to tentatively identify the active site area and conserved residues therein. An observed broad phylogenomic distribution of predicted functional PncCs in the bacterial kingdom is consistent with a possible role in detoxification of NMN, resulting from NAD utilization by DNA ligase.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv0899 defines a family of membrane proteins widespread in nitrogen-fixing bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Marassi, Francesca M.

    2011-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis membrane protein Rv0899 confers adaptation of the bacterium to acidic environments. Due to strong sequence homology of its C-terminus to bacterial OmpA-like domains, Rv0899 has been proposed to constitute an outer membrane porin of M. tuberculosis. However, OmpA-like domains are widespread in a wide variety of bacterial proteins with different functions. Furthermore, the three-dimensional structure of Rv0899 does not contain a transmembrane β-barrel, and recent evidence demonstrates that it does not have porin activity. Instead, the rv0899 gene is part of an operon (rv0899-rv0901) that is required for fast ammonia secretion, pH neutralization and growth of M. tuberculosis in acidic environments. The mechanism whereby these functions are accomplished is not known. To gain further functional insights, a targeted search of the genomic databases was performed for proteins with sequence similarity beyond the OmpA-like C-terminus. The results presented here, show that Rv0899-like proteins are widespread in bacteria with functions in nitrogen metabolism, adaptation to nutrient poor environments, and/or establishing symbiosis with the host organism, and appear to form a protein family. These findings suggest that M. tuberculosis Rv0899 may also assist similar processes and lend further support to its role in ammonia secretion and M. tuberculosis adaptation to the host environment. PMID:21905117

  1. Integration of bacterial expansin-like proteins into cellulosome promotes the cellulose degradation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Cui, Zhenling; Song, Xiangfei; Liu, Ya-Jun; Cui, Qiu; Feng, Yingang

    2016-03-01

    Cellulosomes are multi-enzyme complexes assembled by cellulases and hemicellulases through dockerin-cohesin interactions, which are the most efficient system for the degradation of lignocellulosic resources in nature. Recent genomic analysis of a cellulosome-producing anaerobe Clostridium clariflavum DSM 19732 revealed that two expansin-like proteins, Clocl_1298 and Clocl_1862, contain a dockerin module, which suggests that they are components of the cellulosome. Bacterial expansin-like proteins do not have hydrolytic activities, but can facilitate the degradation of cellulosic biomass via synergistic effects with cellulases. In this study, the synergistic effect of the expansin-like proteins with both native and designer cellulosomes was investigated. The free expansin-like proteins, including expansin-like domains of Clocl_1298 and Clocl_1862, as well as a well-studied bacterial expansin-like protein BsEXLX1 from Bacillus subtilis, promoted the cellulose degradation by native cellulosomes, indicating the cellulosomal expansin-like proteins have the synergistic function. When they were integrated into a trivalent designer cellulosome, the synergistic effect was further amplified. The sequence and structure analyses indicated that these cellulosomal expansin-like proteins share the conserved functional mechanism with other bacterial expansin-like proteins. These results indicated that non-catalytic expansin-like proteins in the cellulosome can enhance the activity of the cellulosome in lignocellulose degradation. The involvement of functional expansin-like proteins in the cellulosome also implies new physiological functions of bacterial expansin-like proteins and cellulosomes.

  2. DAZ Family Proteins, Key Players for Germ Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xia-Fei; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Wang, Lin-Qing; Yin, Shen; De Felici, Massimo; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    DAZ family proteins are found almost exclusively in germ cells in distant animal species. Deletion or mutations of their encoding genes usually severely impair either oogenesis or spermatogenesis or both. The family includes Boule (or Boll), Dazl (or Dazla) and DAZ genes. Boule and Dazl are situated on autosomes while DAZ, exclusive of higher primates, is located on the Y chromosome. Deletion of DAZ gene is the most common causes of infertility in humans. These genes, encoding for RNA binding proteins, contain a highly conserved RNA recognition motif and at least one DAZ repeat encoding for a 24 amino acids sequence able to bind other mRNA binding proteins. Basically, Daz family proteins function as adaptors for target mRNA transport and activators of their translation. In some invertebrate species, BOULE protein play a pivotal role in germline specification and a conserved regulatory role in meiosis. Depending on the species, DAZL is expressed in primordial germ cells (PGCs) and/or pre-meiotic and meiotic germ cells of both sexes. Daz is found in fetal gonocytes, spermatogonia and spermatocytes of adult testes. Here we discuss DAZ family genes in a phylogenic perspective, focusing on the common and distinct features of these genes, and their pivotal roles during gametogenesis evolved during evolution. PMID:26327816

  3. Bacterial cell wall biogenesis is mediated by SEDS and PBP polymerase families functioning semi-autonomously.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongbaek; Wivagg, Carl N; Kapoor, Mrinal; Barry, Zachary; Rohs, Patricia D A; Suh, Hyunsuk; Marto, Jarrod A; Garner, Ethan C; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2016-01-01

    Multi-protein complexes organized by cytoskeletal proteins are essential for cell wall biogenesis in most bacteria. Current models of the wall assembly mechanism assume that class A penicillin-binding proteins (aPBPs), the targets of penicillin-like drugs, function as the primary cell wall polymerases within these machineries. Here, we use an in vivo cell wall polymerase assay in Escherichia coli combined with measurements of the localization dynamics of synthesis proteins to investigate this hypothesis. We find that aPBP activity is not necessary for glycan polymerization by the cell elongation machinery, as is commonly believed. Instead, our results indicate that cell wall synthesis is mediated by two distinct polymerase systems, shape, elongation, division, sporulation (SEDS)-family proteins working within the cytoskeletal machines and aPBP enzymes functioning outside these complexes. These findings thus necessitate a fundamental change in our conception of the cell wall assembly process in bacteria. PMID:27643381

  4. Current Overview of Allergens of Plant Pathogenesis Related Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Mau; Singh, Rashmi Prabha; Kushwaha, Gajraj Singh; Iqbal, Naseer; Singh, Avinash; Kaushik, Sanket; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenesis related (PR) proteins are one of the major sources of plant derived allergens. These proteins are induced by the plants as a defense response system in stress conditions like microbial and insect infections, wounding, exposure to harsh chemicals, and atmospheric conditions. However, some plant tissues that are more exposed to environmental conditions like UV irradiation and insect or fungal attacks express these proteins constitutively. These proteins are mostly resistant to proteases and most of them show considerable stability at low pH. Many of these plant pathogenesis related proteins are found to act as food allergens, latex allergens, and pollen allergens. Proteins having similar amino acid sequences among the members of PR proteins may be responsible for cross-reactivity among allergens from diverse plants. This review analyzes the different pathogenesis related protein families that have been reported as allergens. Proteins of these families have been characterized in regard to their biological functions, amino acid sequence, and cross-reactivity. The three-dimensional structures of some of these allergens have also been evaluated to elucidate the antigenic determinants of these molecules and to explain the cross-reactivity among the various allergens. PMID:24696647

  5. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan; Ribardo, Deborah A; Brennan, Caitlin A; Ruby, Edward G; Jensen, Grant J; Hendrixson, David R

    2016-03-29

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  6. Diverse high-torque bacterial flagellar motors assemble wider stator rings using a conserved protein scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Ribardo, Deborah A.; Brennan, Caitlin A.; Ruby, Edward G.; Jensen, Grant J.; Hendrixson, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Although it is known that diverse bacterial flagellar motors produce different torques, the mechanism underlying torque variation is unknown. To understand this difference better, we combined genetic analyses with electron cryo-tomography subtomogram averaging to determine in situ structures of flagellar motors that produce different torques, from Campylobacter and Vibrio species. For the first time, to our knowledge, our results unambiguously locate the torque-generating stator complexes and show that diverse high-torque motors use variants of an ancestrally related family of structures to scaffold incorporation of additional stator complexes at wider radii from the axial driveshaft than in the model enteric motor. We identify the protein components of these additional scaffold structures and elucidate their sequential assembly, demonstrating that they are required for stator-complex incorporation. These proteins are widespread, suggesting that different bacteria have tailored torques to specific environments by scaffolding alternative stator placement and number. Our results quantitatively account for different motor torques, complete the assignment of the locations of the major flagellar components, and provide crucial constraints for understanding mechanisms of torque generation and the evolution of multiprotein complexes. PMID:26976588

  7. Bacterial expression systems for recombinant protein production: E. coli and beyond.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli expression system continues to dominate the bacterial expression systems and remain to be the preferred system for laboratory investigations and initial development in commercial activities or as a useful benchmark for comparison among various expression platforms. Some new developments in overcoming its shortcomings are reviewed in this paper, including antibiotics-free selection plasmids, extracellular production, and posttranslational modifications. The ability for E. coli to make mg glycosylated proteins promises even broader applications of the E. coli system in the future. Significant progresses have also been made over the past few years in alternative bacterial expression systems. Notably, the Lactoccocus lactis system has proven to be a viable choice for membrane proteins. Additionally, several Pseudomonas systems were developed and achieved product titers comparable to E. coli systems. Other bacterial systems such as Streptomyces, coryneform bacteria, and halophilic bacteria offer advantages in some niche areas, providing more choices of bacterial expression systems for recalcitrant proteins.

  8. Data presenting a modified bacterial expression vector for expressing and purifying Nus solubility-tagged proteins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Nidhi; Wu, Heng; Terman, Jonathan R

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria are the predominant source for producing recombinant proteins but while many exogenous proteins are expressed, only a fraction of those are soluble. We have found that a new actin regulatory enzyme Mical is poorly soluble when expressed in bacteria but the use of a Nus fusion protein tag greatly increases its solubility. However, available vectors containing a Nus tag have been engineered in a way that hinders the separation of target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. We have now used recombinant DNA approaches to overcome these issues and reengineer a Nus solubility tag-containing bacterial expression vector. The data herein present a modified bacterial expression vector useful for expressing proteins fused to the Nus solubility tag and separating such target proteins from the Nus tag during protein purification. PMID:27547802

  9. Inactivation of CRISPR-Cas systems by anti-CRISPR proteins in diverse bacterial species.

    PubMed

    Pawluk, April; Staals, Raymond H J; Taylor, Corinda; Watson, Bridget N J; Saha, Senjuti; Fineran, Peter C; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems provide sequence-specific adaptive immunity against foreign nucleic acids(1,2). They are present in approximately half of all sequenced prokaryotes(3) and are expected to constitute a major barrier to horizontal gene transfer. We previously described nine distinct families of proteins encoded in Pseudomonas phage genomes that inhibit CRISPR-Cas function(4,5). We have developed a bioinformatic approach that enabled us to discover additional anti-CRISPR proteins encoded in phages and other mobile genetic elements of diverse bacterial species. We show that five previously undiscovered families of anti-CRISPRs inhibit the type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems of both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pectobacterium atrosepticum, and a dual specificity anti-CRISPR inactivates both type I-F and I-E CRISPR-Cas systems. Mirroring the distribution of the CRISPR-Cas systems they inactivate, these anti-CRISPRs were found in species distributed broadly across the phylum Proteobacteria. Importantly, anti-CRISPRs originating from species with divergent type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems were able to inhibit the two systems we tested, highlighting their broad specificity. These results suggest that all type I-F CRISPR-Cas systems are vulnerable to inhibition by anti-CRISPRs. Given the widespread occurrence and promiscuous activity of the anti-CRISPRs described here, we propose that anti-CRISPRs play an influential role in facilitating the movement of DNA between prokaryotes by breaching the barrier imposed by CRISPR-Cas systems. PMID:27573108

  10. Key residues approach to the definition of protein families and analysis of sparse family signatures.

    PubMed

    Ison, J C; Blades, M J; Bleasby, A J; Daniel, S C; Parish, J H; Findlay, J B

    2000-08-01

    We extend the concept of the motif as a tool for characterizing protein families and explore the feasibility of a sparse "motif" that is the length of the protein sequence itself. The type of motif discussed is a sparse family signature consisting of a set of N key residue positions (A1, A2...AN) preceded by gaps (G) thus G1A1G2A2. ...GNAN. Both a residue and gap can be variable. A signature is matched to a protein sequence and scored using a dynamic programming algorithm which permits variability in gap distance and residue type. Generating a signature involves identifying residues associated with points of contact in interactions between secondary structure elements. A raw signature consists of a set of positions with potential key structural roles sampled from a sequence alignment constructed with reference to this contact data. Raw signatures are refined by sampling different gap-residue pairs until the specificity of a signature for the family cannot be further improved. We summarize signatures for nine families of protein of diverse fold and function and present results of scans against the OWL protein sequence database. The implications of such signatures are discussed.

  11. Transcriptional abundance is not the single force driving the evolution of bacterial proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite rapid progress in understanding the mechanisms that shape the evolution of proteins, the relative importance of various factors remain to be elucidated. In this study, we have assessed the effects of 16 different biological features on the evolutionary rates (ERs) of protein-coding sequences in bacterial genomes. Results Our analysis of 18 bacterial species revealed new correlations between ERs and constraining factors. Previous studies have suggested that transcriptional abundance overwhelmingly constrains the evolution of yeast protein sequences. This transcriptional abundance leads to selection against misfolding or misinteractions. In this study we found that there was no single factor in determining the evolution of bacterial proteins. Not only transcriptional abundance (codon adaptation index and expression level), but also protein-protein associations (PPAs), essentiality (ESS), subcellular localization of cytoplasmic membrane (SLM), transmembrane helices (TMH) and hydropathicity score (HS) independently and significantly affected the ERs of bacterial proteins. In some species, PPA and ESS demonstrate higher correlations with ER than transcriptional abundance. Conclusions Different forces drive the evolution of protein sequences in yeast and bacteria. In bacteria, the constraints are involved in avoiding a build-up of toxic molecules caused by misfolding/misinteraction (transcriptional abundance), while retaining important functions (ESS, PPA) and maintaining the cell membrane (SLM, TMH and HS). Each of these independently contributes to the variation in protein evolution. PMID:23914835

  12. HOMSTRAD: a database of protein structure alignments for homologous families.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, K; Deane, C M; Blundell, T L; Overington, J P

    1998-11-01

    We describe a database of protein structure alignments for homologous families. The database HOMSTRAD presently contains 130 protein families and 590 aligned structures, which have been selected on the basis of quality of the X-ray analysis and accuracy of the structure. For each family, the database provides a structure-based alignment derived using COMPARER and annotated with JOY in a special format that represents the local structural environment of each amino acid residue. HOMSTRAD also provides a set of superposed atomic coordinates obtained using MNYFIT, which can be viewed with a graphical user interface or used for comparative modeling studies. The database is freely available on the World Wide Web at: http://www-cryst.bioc.cam. ac.uk/-homstrad/, with search facilities and links to other databases.

  13. Six Subgroups and Extensive Recent Duplications Characterize the Evolution of the Eukaryotic Tubulin Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Findeisen, Peggy; Mühlhausen, Stefanie; Dempewolf, Silke; Hertzog, Jonny; Zietlow, Alexander; Carlomagno, Teresa; Kollmar, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Tubulins belong to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotes providing the backbone for many cellular substructures like the mitotic and meiotic spindles, the intracellular cytoskeletal network, and the axonemes of cilia and flagella. Homologs have even been reported for archaea and bacteria. However, a taxonomically broad and whole-genome-based analysis of the tubulin protein family has never been performed, and thus, the number of subfamilies, their taxonomic distribution, and the exact grouping of the supposed archaeal and bacterial homologs are unknown. Here, we present the analysis of 3,524 tubulins from 504 species. The tubulins formed six major subfamilies, α to ζ. Species of all major kingdoms of the eukaryotes encode members of these subfamilies implying that they must have already been present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor. The proposed archaeal homologs grouped together with the bacterial TubZ proteins as sister clade to the FtsZ proteins indicating that tubulins are unique to eukaryotes. Most species contained α- and/or β-tubulin gene duplicates resulting from recent branch- and species-specific duplication events. This shows that tubulins cannot be used for constructing species phylogenies without resolving their ortholog–paralog relationships. The many gene duplicates and also the independent loss of the δ-, ε-, or ζ-tubulins, which have been shown to be part of the triplet microtubules in basal bodies, suggest that tubulins can functionally substitute each other. PMID:25169981

  14. Six subgroups and extensive recent duplications characterize the evolution of the eukaryotic tubulin protein family.

    PubMed

    Findeisen, Peggy; Mühlhausen, Stefanie; Dempewolf, Silke; Hertzog, Jonny; Zietlow, Alexander; Carlomagno, Teresa; Kollmar, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Tubulins belong to the most abundant proteins in eukaryotes providing the backbone for many cellular substructures like the mitotic and meiotic spindles, the intracellular cytoskeletal network, and the axonemes of cilia and flagella. Homologs have even been reported for archaea and bacteria. However, a taxonomically broad and whole-genome-based analysis of the tubulin protein family has never been performed, and thus, the number of subfamilies, their taxonomic distribution, and the exact grouping of the supposed archaeal and bacterial homologs are unknown. Here, we present the analysis of 3,524 tubulins from 504 species. The tubulins formed six major subfamilies, α to ζ. Species of all major kingdoms of the eukaryotes encode members of these subfamilies implying that they must have already been present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor. The proposed archaeal homologs grouped together with the bacterial TubZ proteins as sister clade to the FtsZ proteins indicating that tubulins are unique to eukaryotes. Most species contained α- and/or β-tubulin gene duplicates resulting from recent branch- and species-specific duplication events. This shows that tubulins cannot be used for constructing species phylogenies without resolving their ortholog-paralog relationships. The many gene duplicates and also the independent loss of the δ-, ε-, or ζ-tubulins, which have been shown to be part of the triplet microtubules in basal bodies, suggest that tubulins can functionally substitute each other.

  15. Evidence for a bacterial lipopolysaccharide-recognizing G-protein-coupled receptor in the bacterial engulfment by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Matthew T; Agbedanu, Prince N; Zamanian, Mostafa; Day, Tim A; Carlson, Steve A

    2013-11-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amoebic dysentery, a worldwide protozoal disease that results in approximately 100,000 deaths annually. The virulence of E. histolytica may be due to interactions with the host bacterial flora, whereby trophozoites engulf colonic bacteria as a nutrient source. The engulfment process depends on trophozoite recognition of bacterial epitopes that activate phagocytosis pathways. E. histolytica GPCR-1 (EhGPCR-1) was previously recognized as a putative G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) used by Entamoeba histolytica during phagocytosis. In the present study, we attempted to characterize EhGPCR-1 by using heterologous GPCR expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered that bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an activator of EhGPCR-1 and that LPS stimulates EhGPCR-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, we demonstrated that Entamoeba histolytica prefers to engulf bacteria with intact LPS and that this engulfment process is sensitive to suramin, which prevents the interactions of GPCRs and G-proteins. Thus, EhGPCR-1 is an LPS-recognizing GPCR that is a potential drug target for treatment of amoebiasis, especially considering the well-established drug targeting to GPCRs.

  16. Tet family proteins and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li; Shi, Yujiang Geno

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few decades, DNA methylation at the 5-position of cytosine (5-methylcytosine, 5mC) has emerged as an important epigenetic modification that plays essential roles in development, aging and disease. However, the mechanisms controlling 5mC dynamics remain elusive. Recent studies have shown that ten-eleven translocation (Tet) proteins can catalyze 5mC oxidation and generate 5mC derivatives, including 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). The exciting discovery of these novel 5mC derivatives has begun to shed light on the dynamic nature of 5mC, and emerging evidence has shown that Tet family proteins and 5hmC are involved in normal development as well as in many diseases. In this Primer we provide an overview of the role of Tet family proteins and 5hmC in development and cancer. PMID:22569552

  17. Ferritin family proteins and their use in bionanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    He, Didi; Marles-Wright, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Ferritin family proteins are found in all kingdoms of life and act to store iron within a protein cage and to protect the cell from oxidative damage caused by the Fenton reaction. The structural and biochemical features of the ferritins have been widely exploited in bionanotechnology applications: from the production of metal nanoparticles; as templates for semi-conductor production; and as scaffolds for vaccine design and drug delivery. In this review we first discuss the structural properties of the main ferritin family proteins, and describe how their organisation specifies their functions. Second, we describe materials science applications of ferritins that rely on their ability to sequester metal within their cavities. Finally, we explore the use of ferritin as a container for drug delivery and as a scaffold for the production of vaccines. PMID:25573765

  18. Molecular modeling of pathogenesis-related proteins of family 5.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Claudia E; Fernandes, Cláudia L; de Souza, Osmar N; Salzano, Francisco M; Bonatto, Sandro L; Freitas, Loreta B

    2006-01-01

    The family of pathogenesis-related (PR) 5 proteins have diverse functions, and some of them are classified as thaumatins, osmotins, and inhibitors of alpha-amylase or trypsin. Although the specific function of many PR5 in plants is unknown, they are involved in the acquired systemic resistance and response to biotic stress, causing the inhibition of hyphal growth and reduction of spore germination, probably by a membrane permeabilization mechanism or by interaction with pathogen receptors. We have constructed three-dimensional models of four proteins belonging to the Rosaceae and Fagaceae botanical families by using the technique of comparative molecular modelling by homology. There are four main structural differences between all the PR5, corresponding to regions with replacements of amino acids. Folding and the secondary structures are very similar for all of them. However, the isoelectric point and charge distributions differ for each protein.

  19. Diversity and Evolution of Bacterial Twin Arginine Translocase Protein, TatC, Reveals a Protein Secretion System That Is Evolving to Fit Its Environmental Niche

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Domenico; Bay, Denice C.; Leach, Thorin; Turner, Raymond J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The twin-arginine translocation (Tat) protein export system enables the transport of fully folded proteins across a membrane. This system is composed of two integral membrane proteins belonging to TatA and TatC protein families and in some systems a third component, TatB, a homolog of TatA. TatC participates in substrate protein recognition through its interaction with a twin arginine leader peptide sequence. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of this study was to explore TatC diversity, evolution and sequence conservation in bacteria to identify how TatC is evolving and diversifying in various bacterial phyla. Surveying bacterial genomes revealed that 77% of all species possess one or more tatC loci and half of these classes possessed only tatC and tatA genes. Phylogenetic analysis of diverse TatC homologues showed that they were primarily inherited but identified a small subset of taxonomically unrelated bacteria that exhibited evidence supporting lateral gene transfer within an ecological niche. Examination of bacilli tatCd/tatCy isoform operons identified a number of known and potentially new Tat substrate genes based on their frequent association to tatC loci. Evolutionary analysis of these Bacilli isoforms determined that TatCy was the progenitor of TatCd. A bacterial TatC consensus sequence was determined and highlighted conserved and variable regions within a three dimensional model of the Escherichia coli TatC protein. Comparative analysis between the TatC consensus sequence and Bacilli TatCd/y isoform consensus sequences revealed unique sites that may contribute to isoform substrate specificity or make TatA specific contacts. Synonymous to non-synonymous nucleotide substitution analyses of bacterial tatC homologues determined that tatC sequence variation differs dramatically between various classes and suggests TatC specialization in these species. Conclusions/Significance TatC proteins appear to be diversifying within particular bacterial

  20. Cellular uptake and intracellular fate of protein releasing bacterial amyloids in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejandro; Garcia-Fruitós, Elena; Vázquez, Esther; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-04-14

    Bacterial Inclusion Bodies (IBs) are amyloidal protein deposits that functionally mimic secretory granules from the endocrine system. When formed by therapeutically relevant proteins, they complement missing intracellular activities in jeopardized cell cultures, offering an intriguing platform for protein drug delivery in substitutive therapies. Despite the therapeutic potential of IBs, their capability to interact with eukaryotic cells, cross the cell membrane and release their functional building blocks into the cytosolic space remains essentially unexplored. We have systematically dissected the process by which bacterial amyloids interact with mammalian cells. An early and tight cell membrane anchorage of IBs is followed by cellular uptake of single or grouped IBs of variable sizes by macropinocytosis. Although an important fraction of the penetrating particles is led to lysosomal degradation, biologically significant amounts of protein are released into the cytosol. In addition, our data suggest the involvement of the bacterial cell folding modulator DnaK in the release of functional proteins from these amyloidal reservoirs. The mechanisms supporting the internalization of disintegrable protein nanoparticles revealed here offer clues to implement novel approaches for protein drug delivery based on controlled protein packaging as bacterial IBs.

  1. Broad Spectrum Activity of a Lectin-Like Bacterial Serine Protease Family on Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Lujan, Jorge Luis; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei; Smith, Rachel; Santiago, Araceli E.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system. PMID:25251283

  2. The APOBEC Protein Family: United by Structure, Divergent in Function.

    PubMed

    Salter, Jason D; Bennett, Ryan P; Smith, Harold C

    2016-07-01

    The APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like) family of proteins have diverse and important functions in human health and disease. These proteins have an intrinsic ability to bind to both RNA and single-stranded (ss) DNA. Both function and tissue-specific expression varies widely for each APOBEC protein. We are beginning to understand that the activity of APOBEC proteins is regulated through genetic alterations, changes in their transcription and mRNA processing, and through their interactions with other macromolecules in the cell. Loss of cellular control of APOBEC activities leads to DNA hypermutation and promiscuous RNA editing associated with the development of cancer or viral drug resistance, underscoring the importance of understanding how APOBEC proteins are regulated. PMID:27283515

  3. A novel family of small proteins that affect plant development

    SciTech Connect

    John Charles Walker

    2011-04-29

    The DVL genes represent a new group of plant proteins that influence plant growth and development. Overexpression of DVL1, and other members of the DVL family, causes striking phenotypic changes. The DVL proteins share sequence homology in their C-terminal half. Point mutations in the C-terminal domain show it is necessary and deletion studies demonstrate the C-terminal domain is sufficient to confer the overexpression phenotypes. The phenotypes observed, and the conservation of the protein sequence in the plant kingdom, does suggest the DVL proteins have a role in modulating plant growth and development. Our working hypothesis is the DVL proteins function as regulators of cellular signaling pathways that control growth and development.

  4. The APOBEC Protein Family: United by Structure, Divergent in Function.

    PubMed

    Salter, Jason D; Bennett, Ryan P; Smith, Harold C

    2016-07-01

    The APOBEC (apolipoprotein B mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-like) family of proteins have diverse and important functions in human health and disease. These proteins have an intrinsic ability to bind to both RNA and single-stranded (ss) DNA. Both function and tissue-specific expression varies widely for each APOBEC protein. We are beginning to understand that the activity of APOBEC proteins is regulated through genetic alterations, changes in their transcription and mRNA processing, and through their interactions with other macromolecules in the cell. Loss of cellular control of APOBEC activities leads to DNA hypermutation and promiscuous RNA editing associated with the development of cancer or viral drug resistance, underscoring the importance of understanding how APOBEC proteins are regulated.

  5. Biochemical Characterization of a Family 15 Carbohydrate Esterase from a Bacterial Marine Arctic Metagenome

    PubMed Central

    De Santi, Concetta; Willassen, Nils Peder

    2016-01-01

    Background The glucuronoyl esterase enzymes of wood-degrading fungi (Carbohydrate Esterase family 15; CE15) form part of the hemicellulolytic and cellulolytic enzyme systems that break down plant biomass, and have possible applications in biotechnology. Homologous enzymes are predicted in the genomes of several bacteria, however these have been much less studied than their fungal counterparts. Here we describe the recombinant production and biochemical characterization of a bacterial CE15 enzyme denoted MZ0003, which was identified by in silico screening of a prokaryotic metagenome library derived from marine Arctic sediment. MZ0003 has high similarity to several uncharacterized gene products of polysaccharide-degrading bacterial species, and phylogenetic analysis indicates a deep evolutionary split between these CE15s and fungal homologs. Results MZ0003 appears to differ from previously-studied CE15s in some aspects. Some glucuronoyl esterase activity could be measured by qualitative thin-layer chromatography which confirms its assignment as a CE15, however MZ0003 can also hydrolyze a range of other esters, including p-nitrophenyl acetate, which is not acted upon by some fungal homologs. The structure of MZ0003 also appears to differ as it is predicted to have several large loop regions that are absent in previously studied CE15s, and a combination of homology-based modelling and site-directed mutagenesis indicate its catalytic residues deviate from the conserved Ser-His-Glu triad of many fungal CE15s. Taken together, these results indicate that potentially unexplored diversity exists among bacterial CE15s, and this may be accessed by investigation of the microbial metagenome. The combination of low activity on typical glucuronoyl esterase substrates, and the lack of glucuronic acid esters in the marine environment suggest that the physiological substrate of MZ0003 and its homologs is likely to be different from that of related fungal enzymes. PMID:27433797

  6. A structural mechanism for bacterial autotransporter glycosylation by a dodecameric heptosyltransferase family

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qing; Lu, Qiuhe; Wan, Xiaobo; Song, Feng; Xu, Yue; Hu, Mo; Zamyatina, Alla; Liu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Niu; Zhu, Ping; Shao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    A large group of bacterial virulence autotransporters including AIDA-I from diffusely adhering E. coli (DAEC) and TibA from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) require hyperglycosylation for functioning. Here we demonstrate that TibC from ETEC harbors a heptosyltransferase activity on TibA and AIDA-I, defining a large family of bacterial autotransporter heptosyltransferases (BAHTs). The crystal structure of TibC reveals a characteristic ring-shape dodecamer. The protomer features an N-terminal β-barrel, a catalytic domain, a β-hairpin thumb, and a unique iron-finger motif. The iron-finger motif contributes to back-to-back dimerization; six dimers form the ring through β-hairpin thumb-mediated hand-in-hand contact. The structure of ADP-D-glycero-β-D-manno-heptose (ADP-D,D-heptose)-bound TibC reveals a sugar transfer mechanism and also the ligand stereoselectivity determinant. Electron-cryomicroscopy analyses uncover a TibC–TibA dodecamer/hexamer assembly with two enzyme molecules binding to one TibA substrate. The complex structure also highlights a high efficient hyperglycosylation of six autotransporter substrates simultaneously by the dodecamer enzyme complex. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03714.001 PMID:25310236

  7. A structural mechanism for bacterial autotransporter glycosylation by a dodecameric heptosyltransferase family.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qing; Lu, Qiuhe; Wan, Xiaobo; Song, Feng; Xu, Yue; Hu, Mo; Zamyatina, Alla; Liu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Niu; Zhu, Ping; Shao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    A large group of bacterial virulence autotransporters including AIDA-I from diffusely adhering E. coli (DAEC) and TibA from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) require hyperglycosylation for functioning. Here we demonstrate that TibC from ETEC harbors a heptosyltransferase activity on TibA and AIDA-I, defining a large family of bacterial autotransporter heptosyltransferases (BAHTs). The crystal structure of TibC reveals a characteristic ring-shape dodecamer. The protomer features an N-terminal β-barrel, a catalytic domain, a β-hairpin thumb, and a unique iron-finger motif. The iron-finger motif contributes to back-to-back dimerization; six dimers form the ring through β-hairpin thumb-mediated hand-in-hand contact. The structure of ADP-D-glycero-β-D-manno-heptose (ADP-D,D-heptose)-bound TibC reveals a sugar transfer mechanism and also the ligand stereoselectivity determinant. Electron-cryomicroscopy analyses uncover a TibC-TibA dodecamer/hexamer assembly with two enzyme molecules binding to one TibA substrate. The complex structure also highlights a high efficient hyperglycosylation of six autotransporter substrates simultaneously by the dodecamer enzyme complex. PMID:25310236

  8. Routine phenotypic identification of bacterial species of the family Pasteurellaceae isolated from animals.

    PubMed

    Dousse, Florence; Thomann, Andreas; Brodard, Isabelle; Korczak, Bozena M; Schlatter, Yvonne; Kuhnert, Peter; Miserez, Raymond; Frey, Joachim

    2008-11-01

    Pasteurellaceae are bacteria with an important role as primary or opportunistic, mainly respiratory, pathogens in domestic and wild animals. Some species of Pasteurellaceae cause severe diseases with high economic losses in commercial animal husbandry and are of great diagnostic concern. Because of new data on the phylogeny of Pasteurellaceae, their taxonomy has recently been revised profoundly, thus requiring an improved phenotypic differentiation procedure to identify the individual species of this family. A new and simplified procedure to identify species of Actinobacillus, Avibacterium, Gallibacterium, Haemophilus, Mannheimia, Nicoletella, and Pasteurella, which are most commonly isolated from clinical samples of diseased animals in veterinary diagnostic laboratories, is presented in the current study. The identification procedure was evaluated with 40 type and reference strains and with 267 strains from routine diagnostic analysis of various animal species, including 28 different bacterial species. Type, reference, and field strains were analyzed by 16S ribosomal RNA (rrs) and rpoB gene sequencing for unambiguous species determination as a basis to evaluate the phenotypic differentiation schema. Primary phenotypic differentiation is based on beta-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (beta-NAD) dependence and hemolysis, which are readily determined on the isolation medium. The procedure divides the 28 species into 4 groups for which particular biochemical reactions were chosen to identify the bacterial species. The phenotypic identification procedure allowed researchers to determine the species of 240 out of 267 field strains. The procedure is an easy and cost-effective system for the rapid identification of species of the Pasteurellaceae family isolated from clinical specimens of animals. PMID:18987220

  9. Analysis of Known Bacterial Protein Vaccine Antigens Reveals Biased Physical Properties and Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Mayers, Carl; Rowe, Sonya; Miller, Julie; Lingard, Bryan; Hayward, Sarah; Titball, Richard W.

    2003-01-01

    Many vaccines have been developed from live attenuated forms of bacterial pathogens or from killed bacterial cells. However, an increased awareness of the potential for transient side-effects following vaccination has prompted an increased emphasis on the use of sub-unit vaccines, rather than those based on whole bacterial cells. The identification of vaccine sub-units is often a lengthy process and bioinformatics approaches have recently been used to identify candidate protein vaccine antigens. Such methods ultimately offer the promise of a more rapid advance towards preclinical studies with vaccines. We have compared the properties of known bacterial vaccine antigens against randomly selected proteins and identified differences in the make-up of these two groups. A computer algorithm that exploits these differences allows the identification of potential vaccine antigen candidates from pathogenic bacteria on the basis of their amino acid composition, a property inherently associated with sub-cellular location. PMID:18629010

  10. A knot in the protein structure - probing the near-infrared fluorescent protein iRFP designed from a bacterial phytochrome.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Olesya V; Bublikov, Grigory S; Stepanenko, Olga V; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Turoverov, Konstantin K; Kuznetsova, Irina M

    2014-05-01

    The possibility of engineering near-infrared fluorescent proteins and biosensors from bacterial phytochrome photoreceptors (BphPs) has led to substantial interest in this family of proteins. The near-infrared fluorescent proteins have allowed non-invasive bio-imaging of deep tissues and whole organs in living animals. BphPs and derived near-infrared fluorescent proteins contain a structural element, called a knot, in their polypeptide chains. The formation of knot structures in proteins was refuted for a long time. Here, we studied the denaturation and renaturation processes of the near-infrared fluorescent probe iRFP, engineered from RpBphP2, which utilizes a heme-derived tetrapyrrole compound biliverdin as a chromophore. iRFP contains a unique figure-of-eight knot. The denaturation and renaturation curves of the iRFP apoform coincided well, suggesting efficient refolding. However, the iRFP holoform exhibited irreversible unfolding and aggregation associated with the bound chromophore. The knot structure in the apoform did not prevent subsequent binding of biliverdin, resulting in the functional iRFP holoform. We suggest that the irreversibility of protein unfolding is caused by post-translational protein modifications, such as chromophore binding, rather than the presence of the knot. These results are essential for future design of BphP-based near-infrared probes, and add important features to our knowledge of protein folding.

  11. Evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G protein families.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Arunkumar; Mustafa, Arshi; Almén, Markus Sällman; Fredriksson, Robert; Williams, Michael J; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins perform a crucial role as molecular switches controlling various cellular responses mediated by G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling pathway. Recent data have shown that the vertebrate-like G protein families are found across metazoans and their closest unicellular relatives. However, an overall evolutionary hierarchy of vertebrate-like G proteins, including gene family annotations and in particular mapping individual gene gain/loss events across diverse holozoan lineages is still incomplete. Here, with more expanded invertebrate taxon sampling, we have reconstructed phylogenetic trees for each of the G protein classes/families and provide a robust classification and hierarchy of vertebrate-like heterotrimeric G proteins. Our results further extend the evidence that the common ancestor (CA) of holozoans had at least five ancestral Gα genes corresponding to all major vertebrate Gα classes and contain a total of eight genes including two Gβ and one Gγ. Our results also indicate that the GNAI/O-like gene likely duplicated in the last CA of metazoans to give rise to GNAI- and GNAO-like genes, which are conserved across invertebrates. Moreover, homologs of GNB1-4 paralogon- and GNB5 family-like genes are found in most metazoans and that the unicellular holozoans encode two ancestral Gβ genes. Similarly, most bilaterian invertebrates encode two Gγ genes which include a representative of the GNG gene cluster and a putative homolog of GNG13. Interestingly, our results also revealed key evolutionary events such as the Drosophila melanogaster eye specific Gβ subunit that is found conserved in most arthropods and several previously unidentified species specific expansions within Gαi/o, Gαs, Gαq, Gα12/13 classes and the GNB1-4 paralogon. Also, we provide an overall proposed evolutionary scenario on the expansions of all G protein families in vertebrate tetraploidizations. Our robust classification/hierarchy is essential to further

  12. Regulation of bacterial RecA protein function.

    PubMed

    Cox, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    The RecA protein is a recombinase functioning in recombinational DNA repair in bacteria. RecA is regulated at many levels. The expression of the recA gene is regulated within the SOS response. The activity of the RecA protein itself is autoregulated by its own C-terminus. RecA is also regulated by the action of other proteins. To date, these include the RecF, RecO, RecR, DinI, RecX, RdgC, PsiB, and UvrD proteins. The SSB protein also indirectly affects RecA function by competing for ssDNA binding sites. The RecO and RecR, and possibly the RecF proteins, all facilitate RecA loading onto SSB-coated ssDNA. The RecX protein blocks RecA filament extension, and may have other effects on RecA activity. The DinI protein stabilizes RecA filaments. The RdgC protein binds to dsDNA and blocks RecA access to dsDNA. The PsiB protein, encoded by F plasmids, is uncharacterized, but may inhibit RecA in some manner. The UvrD helicase removes RecA filaments from RecA. All of these proteins function in a network that determines where and how RecA functions. Additional regulatory proteins may remain to be discovered. The elaborate regulatory pattern is likely to be reprised for RecA homologues in archaeans and eukaryotes. PMID:17364684

  13. Protein Modification: Bacterial Effectors Rewrite the Rules of Ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Berk, Jason M; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2016-07-11

    A family of virulence factors from the bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila has been discovered to modify human Rab GTPases with ubiquitin. Surprisingly, this modification occurs via a non-canonical mechanism that uses nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as a cofactor. PMID:27404243

  14. In-silico characterization of Formin Binding Protein 4 Family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Das, Amit; Bhattacharya, Simanti; Bagchi, Angshuman; Dasgupta, Rakhi

    2015-03-01

    Members of the Formin Binding Protein 4 Family or the FNBP4 were indirectly reported to be associated with many of the biological processes. These proteins possess two WW domains. So far there are practically no reports regarding the characterization and classification of the protein by any means. Keeping in mind the importance of the proteins from this FNBP4 family, we have tried an in silico approach to come up with a comprehensive analysis of the proteins. We have analyzed the proteins by considering their sequence conservation, their phylogenetic distributions among the different organisms. We have also investigated the functional properties of the WW domains in the proteins. Finally, we have made an attempt to elucidate the structural details of the domains and predicted the possible modes of their interactions. Our findings show that FNBP4 is eukaryotic in its distribution and follows a trend of evolution where animal and plant homologues have evolved in an independent manner. While the WW domain is the only common motif present across the FNBP4 family of proteins, there are different classes (mainly two) of WW domains that are found among different FNBP4 proteins. Structure function predictions indicate a possible role of FNBP4 in either protein stabilization control or transcript processing. Our study on FNBP4 may therefore open up new avenues to generate new interest in this highly important but largely unexplored class of proteins. Future studies with proteins from this family may answer many important questions of protein-protein interactions in different biologically important processes.

  15. Specificity of botulinum protease for human VAMP family proteins.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Hideyuki; Ida, Tomoaki; Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Mori, Masatoshi; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Kohda, Tomoko; Mukamoto, Masafumi; Goshima, Naoki; Kozaki, Shunji; Ihara, Hideshi

    2012-04-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin light chain (BoNT-LC) is a zinc-dependent metalloprotease that cleaves neuronal SNARE proteins such as SNAP-25, VAMP2, and Syntaxin1. This cleavage interferes with the neurotransmitter release of peripheral neurons and results in flaccid paralysis. SNAP, VAMP, and Syntaxin are representative of large families of proteins that mediate most membrane fusion reactions, as well as both neuronal and non-neuronal exocytotic events in eukaryotic cells. Neuron-specific SNARE proteins, which are target substrates of BoNT, have been well studied; however, it is unclear whether other SNARE proteins are also proteolyzed by BoNT. Herein, we define the substrate specificity of BoNT-LC/B, /D, and /F towards recombinant human VAMP family proteins. We demonstrate that LC/B, /D, and /F are able to cleave VAMP1, 2, and 3, but no other VAMP family proteins. Kinetic analysis revealed that all LC have higher affinity and catalytic activity for the non-neuronal SNARE isoform VAMP3 than for the neuronal VAMP1 and 2 isoforms. LC/D in particular exhibited extremely low catalytic activity towards VAMP1 relative to other interactions, which we determined through point mutation analysis to be a result of the Ile present at residue 48 of VAMP1. We also identified the VAMP3 cleavage sites to be at the Gln 59-Phe 60 (LC/B), Lys 42-Leu 43 (LC/D), and Gln 41-Lys 42 (LC/F) peptide bonds, which correspond to those of VAMP1 or 2. Understanding the substrate specificity and kinetic characteristics of BoNT towards human SNARE proteins may aid in the development of novel therapeutic uses for BoNT.

  16. The APSES family proteins in fungi: Characterizations, evolution and functions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Su, Hao; Zhou, Jing; Feng, Huihua; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Yang, Jinkui

    2015-08-01

    The APSES protein family belongs to transcriptional factors of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) class, the originally described members (APSES: Asm1p, Phd1p, Sok2p, Efg1p and StuAp) are used to designate this group of proteins, and they have been identified as key regulators of fungal development and other biological processes. APSES proteins share a highly conserved DNA-binding domain (APSES domain) of about 100 amino acids, whose central domain is predicted to form a typical bHLH structure. Besides APSES domain, several APSES proteins also contain additional domains, such as KilA-N and ankyrin repeats. In recent years, an increasing number of APSES proteins have been identified from diverse fungi, and they involve in numerous biological processes, such as sporulation, cellular differentiation, mycelial growth, secondary metabolism and virulence. Most fungi, including Aspergillus fumigatus, Aspergillus nidulans, Candida albicans, Fusarium graminearum, and Neurospora crassa, contain five APSES proteins. However, Cryptococcus neoformans only contains two APSES proteins, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains six APSES proteins. The phylogenetic analysis showed the APSES domains from different fungi were grouped into four clades (A, B, C and D), which is consistent with the result of homologous alignment of APSES domains using DNAman. The roles of APSES proteins in clade C have been studied in detail, while little is known about the roles of other APSES proteins in clades A, B and D. In this review, the biochemical properties and functional domains of APSES proteins are predicted and compared, and the phylogenetic relationship among APSES proteins from various fungi are analyzed based on the APSES domains. Moreover, the functions of APSES proteins in different fungi are summarized and discussed.

  17. Macin Family of Antimicrobial Proteins Combines Antimicrobial and Nerve Repair Activities*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sascha; Sönnichsen, Frank D.; Hung, Chien-Wen; Tholey, Andreas; Boidin-Wichlacz, Céline; Haeusgen, Wiebke; Gelhaus, Christoph; Desel, Christine; Podschun, Rainer; Waetzig, Vicki; Tasiemski, Aurélie; Leippe, Matthias; Grötzinger, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    The tertiary structures of theromacin and neuromacin confirmed the macin protein family as a self-contained family of antimicrobial proteins within the superfamily of scorpion toxin-like proteins. The macins, which also comprise hydramacin-1, are antimicrobially active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Despite high sequence identity, the three proteins showed distinct differences with respect to their biological activity. Neuromacin exhibited a significantly stronger capacity to permeabilize the cytoplasmic membrane of Bacillus megaterium than theromacin and hydramacin-1. Accordingly, it is the only macin that displays pore-forming activity and that was potently active against Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, neuromacin and hydramacin-1 led to an aggregation of bacterial cells that was not observed with theromacin. Analysis of the molecular surface properties of macins allowed confirmation of the barnacle model as the mechanistic model for the aggregation effect. Besides being antimicrobially active, neuromacin and theromacin, in contrast to hydramacin-1, were able to enhance the repair of leech nerves ex vivo. Notably, all three macins enhanced the viability of murine neuroblastoma cells, extending their functional characteristics. As neuromacin appears to be both a functional and structural chimera of hydramacin-1 and theromacin, the putative structural correlate responsible for the nerve repair capacity in leech was located to a cluster of six amino acid residues using the sequence similarity of surface-exposed regions. PMID:22396551

  18. Multiple oligomeric structures of a bacterial small heat shock protein

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Nandini; Bhandari, Spraha; Moreno, Rodolfo; Hu, Liya; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Suguna, Kaza

    2016-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that form the first line of defence against the detrimental effects of cellular stress. Under conditions of stress they undergo drastic conformational rearrangements in order to bind to misfolded substrate proteins and prevent cellular protein aggregation. Owing to the dynamic nature of small heat shock protein oligomers, elucidating the structural basis of chaperone action and oligomerization still remains a challenge. In order to understand the organization of sHSP oligomers, we have determined crystal structures of a small heat shock protein from Salmonella typhimurium in a dimeric form and two higher oligomeric forms: an 18-mer and a 24-mer. Though the core dimer structure is conserved in all the forms, structural heterogeneity arises due to variation in the terminal regions. PMID:27053150

  19. Ribosomal Protein S3: A Multifunctional Target of Attaching/Effacing Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xiaofei; Hardwidge, Philip R.

    2011-01-01

    The extraribosomal functions of ribosomal proteins have drawn significant recent attention. Ribosomal protein S3 (RPS3), a component of the eukaryotic 40S ribosomal subunit, is a multifunctional protein that regulates DNA repair, apoptosis, and the innate immune response to bacterial infection. Here we the review the latest findings about RPS3 extraribosomal functions, with special emphasis on their relation to microbial pathogenesis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. PMID:21738525

  20. Vaccinia Virus N1l Protein Resembles a B Cell Lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) Family Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi, M.; Zhai, D.; Jin, C.; Aleshin, A.E.; Stec, B.; Reed, J.C.; Liddington, R.C.; /Burnham Inst.

    2007-07-03

    Poxviruses encode immuno-modulatory proteins capable of subverting host defenses. The poxvirus vaccinia expresses a small 14-kDa protein, N1L, that is critical for virulence. We report the crystal structure of N1L, which reveals an unexpected but striking resemblance to host apoptotic regulators of the B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) family. Although N1L lacks detectable Bcl-2 homology (BH) motifs at the sequence level, we show that N1L binds with high affinity to the BH3 peptides of pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins in vitro, consistent with a role for N1L in modulating host antiviral defenses.

  1. Identification of novel members of the bacterial azoreductase family in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Crescente, Vincenzo; Holland, Sinead M; Kashyap, Sapna; Polycarpou, Elena; Sim, Edith; Ryan, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Azoreductases are a family of diverse enzymes found in many pathogenic bacteria as well as distant homologues being present in eukarya. In addition to having azoreductase activity, these enzymes are also suggested to have NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activity which leads to a proposed role in plant pathogenesis. Azoreductases have also been suggested to play a role in the mammalian pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In view of the importance of P. aeruginosa as a pathogen, we therefore characterized recombinant enzymes following expression of a group of putative azoreductase genes from P. aeruginosa expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzymes include members of the arsenic-resistance protein H (ArsH), tryptophan repressor-binding protein A (WrbA), modulator of drug activity B (MdaB) and YieF families. The ArsH, MdaB and YieF family members all show azoreductase and NQO activities. In contrast, WrbA is the first enzyme to show NQO activity but does not reduce any of the 11 azo compounds tested under a wide range of conditions. These studies will allow further investigation of the possible role of these enzymes in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. PMID:26621870

  2. Nitric oxide-sensing H-NOX proteins govern bacterial communal behavior.

    PubMed

    Plate, Lars; Marletta, Michael A

    2013-11-01

    Heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding (H-NOX) domains function as sensors for the gaseous signaling agent nitric oxide (NO) in eukaryotes and bacteria. Mammalian NO signaling is well characterized and involves the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. In bacteria, H-NOX proteins interact with bacterial signaling proteins in two-component signaling systems or in cyclic-di-GMP metabolism. Characterization of several downstream signaling processes has shown that bacterial H-NOX proteins share a common role in controlling important bacterial communal behaviors in response to NO. The H-NOX pathways regulate motility, biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and symbiosis. Here, we review the latest structural and mechanistic studies that have elucidated how H-NOX domains selectively bind NO and transduce ligand binding into conformational changes that modulate activity of signaling partners. Furthermore, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the physiological function and biochemical details of the H-NOX signaling pathways.

  3. Argonaute Family Protein Expression in Normal Tissue and Cancer Entities

    PubMed Central

    Bruckmann, Astrid; Hauptmann, Judith; Deutzmann, Rainer; Meister, Gunter; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The members of the Argonaute (AGO) protein family are key players in miRNA-guided gene silencing. They enable the interaction between small RNAs and their respective target mRNA(s) and support the catalytic destruction of the gene transcript or recruit additional proteins for downstream gene silencing. The human AGO family consists of four AGO proteins (AGO1-AGO4), but only AGO2 harbors nuclease activity. In this study, we characterized the expression of the four AGO proteins in cancer cell lines and normal tissues with a new mass spectrometry approach called AGO-APP (AGO Affinity Purification by Peptides). In all analyzed normal tissues, AGO1 and AGO2 were most prominent, but marked tissue-specific differences were identified. Furthermore, considerable changes during development were observed by comparing fetal and adult tissues. We also identified decreased overall AGO expression in melanoma derived cell lines compared to other tumor cell lines and normal tissues, with the largest differences in AGO2 expression. The experiments described in this study suggest that reduced amounts of AGO proteins, as key players in miRNA processing, have impact on several cellular processes. Deregulated miRNA expression has been attributed to chromosomal aberrations, promoter regulation and it is known to have a major impact on tumor development and progression. Our findings will further increase our basic understanding of the molecular basis of miRNA processing and its relevance for disease. PMID:27518285

  4. Characterization of the Roco protein family in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    van Egmond, Wouter N; van Haastert, Peter J M

    2010-05-01

    The Roco family consists of multidomain Ras-GTPases that include LRRK2, a protein mutated in familial Parkinson's disease. The genome of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum encodes 11 Roco proteins. To study the functions of these proteins, we systematically knocked out the roco genes. Previously described functions for GbpC, Pats1, and QkgA (Roco1 to Roco3) were confirmed, while novel developmental defects were identified in roco4- and roco11-null cells. Cells lacking Roco11 form larger fruiting bodies than wild-type cells, while roco4-null cells show strong developmental defects during the transition from mound to fruiting body; prestalk cells produce reduced levels of cellulose, leading to unstable stalks that are unable to properly lift the spore head. Detailed phylogenetic analysis of four slime mold species reveals that QkgA and Roco11 evolved relatively late by duplication of an ancestor roco4 gene (later than approximately 300 million years ago), contrary to the situation with other roco genes, which were already present before the split of the common ancestor of D. discoideum and Polysphondylium pallidum (before approximately 600 million years ago). Together, our data show that the Dictyostelium Roco proteins serve a surprisingly diverse set of functions and highlight Roco4 as a key protein for proper stalk cell formation. PMID:20348387

  5. Bacterial origin of a diverse family of UDP-glycosyltransferase genes in the Tetranychus urticae genome.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Seung-Joon; Dermauw, Wannes; Wybouw, Nicky; Heckel, David G; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) catalyze the conjugation of a variety of small lipophilic molecules with uridine diphosphate (UDP) sugars, altering them into more water-soluble metabolites. Thereby, UGTs play an important role in the detoxification of xenobiotics and in the regulation of endobiotics. Recently, the genome sequence was reported for the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, a polyphagous herbivore damaging a number of agricultural crops. Although various gene families implicated in xenobiotic metabolism have been documented in T. urticae, UGTs so far have not. We identified 80 UGT genes in the T. urticae genome, the largest number of UGT genes in a metazoan species reported so far. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that lineage-specific gene expansions increased the diversity of the T. urticae UGT repertoire. Genomic distribution, intron-exon structure and structural motifs in the T. urticae UGTs were also described. In addition, expression profiling after host-plant shifts and in acaricide resistant lines supported an important role for UGT genes in xenobiotic metabolism. Expanded searches of UGTs in other arachnid species (Subphylum Chelicerata), including a spider, a scorpion, two ticks and two predatory mites, unexpectedly revealed the complete absence of UGT genes. However, a centipede (Subphylum Myriapoda) and a water flea and a crayfish (Subphylum Crustacea) contain UGT genes in their genomes similar to insect UGTs, suggesting that the UGT gene family might have been lost early in the Chelicerata lineage and subsequently re-gained in the tetranychid mites. Sequence similarity of T. urticae UGTs and bacterial UGTs and their phylogenetic reconstruction suggest that spider mites acquired UGT genes from bacteria by horizontal gene transfer. Our findings show a unique evolutionary history of the T. urticae UGT gene family among other arthropods and provide important clues to its functions in relation to detoxification and thereby host

  6. Nonagonal cadherins: A new protein family found within the Stramenopiles.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Kyle I G; van West, Pieter; Gachon, Claire M M

    2016-11-15

    Cadherins, a group of molecules typically associated with planar cell polarity and Wnt signalling, have been little reported outside of the animal kingdom. Here, we identify a new family of cadherins in the Stramenopiles, termed Nonagonal after their 9 transmembrane passes, which contrast to the one or seven passes found in other known cadherin families. Manual curation and experimental validation reveal two subclasses of nonagonal cadherins, depending on the number of uninterrupted extracellular cadherin (EC) modules presented. Firstly, shorter mono-exonic, unimodular, protein models, with 3 to 12 EC domains occur as duplicate paralogs in the saprotrophic Labyrinthulomycetes Aurantiochytrium limanicum and Schizochytrium aggregatum, the gastrointestinal Blastocystis hominis (Blastocystae) and as a single copy gene in the autotrophic Pelagophyte Aureococcus anophagefferens. Larger, single copy, multi-exonal, tri-modular protein models, with up to 72 EC domain in total, are found in the Oomycete genera Albugo, Phytophthora, Pythium and Eurychasma. No homolog was found in the closely related autotrophic Phaeophyceae (brown algae) or Bacillariophyceae (diatoms), nor in several genera of plant and animal pathogenic oomycetes (Aphanomyces, Saprolegnia and Hyaloperonospora). This potential absence was further investigated by synteny analysis of the genome regions flanking the cadherin gene models, which are found to be highly variable. Novel to this new cadherin family is the presence of intercalated laminin and putative carbohydrate binding in tri-modular oomycete cadherins and at the N-terminus of thraustochytrid proteins. As we were unable to detect any homologs of proteins involved in signalling pathways where other cadherin families are involved, we present a conceptual hypothesis on the function of nonagonal cadherin based around the presence of putative carbohydrate binding domains. PMID:27498181

  7. Identification of secreted bacterial proteins by noncanonical amino acid tagging

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Alborz; Szychowski, Janek; Ngo, John T.; Sweredoski, Michael J.; Graham, Robert L. J.; Hess, Sonja; Schneewind, Olaf; Mazmanian, Sarkis K.; Tirrell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes have evolved complex secretion systems to deliver virulence factors into host cells. Identification of these factors is critical for understanding the infection process. We report a powerful and versatile approach to the selective labeling and identification of secreted pathogen proteins. Selective labeling of microbial proteins is accomplished via translational incorporation of azidonorleucine (Anl), a methionine surrogate that requires a mutant form of the methionyl-tRNA synthetase for activation. Secreted pathogen proteins containing Anl can be tagged by azide-alkyne cycloaddition and enriched by affinity purification. Application of the method to analysis of the type III secretion system of the human pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica enabled efficient identification of secreted proteins, identification of distinct secretion profiles for intracellular and extracellular bacteria, and determination of the order of substrate injection into host cells. This approach should be widely useful for the identification of virulence factors in microbial pathogens and the development of potential new targets for antimicrobial therapy. PMID:24347637

  8. The latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein (LTBP) family.

    PubMed Central

    Oklü, R; Hesketh, R

    2000-01-01

    The transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) cytokines are a multi-functional family that exert a wide variety of effects on both normal and transformed mammalian cells. The secretion and activation of TGFbetas is regulated by their association with latency-associated proteins and latent TGFbeta binding proteins (LTBPs). Over the past few years, three members of the LTBP family have been identified, in addition to the protoype LTBP1 first sequenced in 1990. Three of the LTBP family are expressed in a variety of isoforms as a consequence of alternative splicing. This review summarizes the differences between the isoforms in terms of the effects on domain structure and hence possible function. The close identity between LTBPs and members of the fibrillin family, mutations in which have been linked directly to Marfan's syndrome, suggests that anomalous expression of LTBPs may be associated with disease. Recent data indicating that differential expression of LTBP1 isoforms occurs during the development of coronary heart disease is considered, together with evidence that modulation of LTBP function, and hence of TGFbeta activity, is associated with a variety of cancers. PMID:11104663

  9. Role of the prion protein family in the gonads

    PubMed Central

    Allais-Bonnet, Aurélie; Pailhoux, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The prion-gene family comprises four members named PRNP (PRPc), PRND (Doppel), PRNT (PRT), and SPRN (Shadoo). According to species, PRND is located 16–52 kb downstream from the PRNP locus, whereas SPRN is located on another chromosome. The fourth prion-family gene, PRNT, belongs to the same genomic cluster as PRNP and PRND in humans and bovidae. PRNT and PRND possibly resulted from a duplication event of PRND and PRNP, respectively, that occurred early during eutherian species divergence. Although most of the studies concerning the prion-family has been done on PRPc and its involvement in transmissible neurodegenerative disorders, different works report some potential roles of these proteins in the reproductive function of both sexes. Among them, a clear role of PRND, that encodes for the Doppel protein, in male fertility has been demonstrated through gene targeting studies in mice. In other species, Doppel seems to play a role in testis and ovary development but its cellular localization is variable according to the gonadal developmental stage and to the mammalian species considered. For the other three genes, their roles in reproductive function appear ill-defined and/or controversial. The present review aimed to synthesize all the available data on these prion-family members and their relations with reproductive processes, mainly in the gonad of both sexes. PMID:25364761

  10. Characterization of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Mutations in Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenoma Families

    PubMed Central

    Igreja, Susana; Chahal, Harvinder S; King, Peter; Bolger, Graeme B; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Guasti, Leonardo; Chapple, J Paul; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Gueorguiev, Maria; Guegan, Katie; Stals, Karen; Khoo, Bernard; Kumar, Ajith V; Ellard, Sian; Grossman, Ashley B; Korbonits, Márta

    2010-01-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) is an autosomal dominant condition with variable genetic background and incomplete penetrance. Germline mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene have been reported in 15–40% of FIPA patients. Limited data are available on the functional consequences of the mutations or regarding the regulation of the AIP gene. We describe a large cohort of FIPA families and characterize missense and silent mutations using minigene constructs, luciferase and β-galactosidase assays, as well as in silico predictions. Patients with AIP mutations had a lower mean age at diagnosis (23.6±11.2 years) than AIP mutation-negative patients (40.4±14.5 years). A promoter mutation showed reduced in vitro activity corresponding to lower mRNA expression in patient samples. Stimulation of the protein kinase A-pathway positively regulates the AIP promoter. Silent mutations led to abnormal splicing resulting in truncated protein or reduced AIP expression. A two-hybrid assay of protein–protein interaction of all missense variants showed variable disruption of AIP-phosphodiesterase-4A5 binding. In summary, exonic, promoter, splice-site, and large deletion mutations in AIP are implicated in 31% of families in our FIPA cohort. Functional characterization of AIP changes is important to identify the functional impact of gene sequence variants. Hum Mutat 31:1–11, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20506337

  11. Methyl-accepting protein associated with bacterial sensory phodopsin I

    SciTech Connect

    Spudich, E.N.; Hasselbacher, C.A. ); Spudich, J.L. )

    1988-09-01

    In vivo radiolabeling of Halaobacterium halobium phototaxis mutants and revertants with L-(methyl-{sup 3}H) methionine implicated seven methyl-accepting protein bands with apparent molecular masses from 65 to 150 kilodaltons (kDa) in adaptation of the organism to chemo and photo stimuli, and one of these (94 kDa) was specifically implicated in photoaxis. The lability of the radiolabeled bands to mild base treatment indicated the the methyl linkages are carboxylmethylesters, as is the case in the eubacterial chemotaxis receptor-transducers. The 94-kDa protein was present in increased amounts in an overproducer of the apoprotein of sensory rhodopsin I, one of two retinal-containing photoaxis receptors in H. halobium. It was absent in a strain the contained sensory rhodopsin II and that lacked sensory rhodopsin I and was also absent in a mutant that lacked both photoreceptors. Based in the role of methyl-accepting proteins in chemotaxis in other bacteria, we suggest that the 94-kDa protein is the signal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. By ({sup 3}H)retinal labeling studies, we previously identified a 25-kDa retinal-binding polypeptide that was derived from photochemically reactive sensory rhodopsin I. When H. halobium membranes containing sensory rhodopsin I were treated by a procedure that stably reduced ({sup 3}H) retinal onto the 25-kDa apoprotein, a 94-kDa protein was also found to be radiolabeled. Protease digestion confirmed that the 94-kDa retinal-labeled protein was the same as the methyl-accepting protein that was suggested above to be the siginal transducer for sensory rhodopsin I. Possible models are that the 25- and 94-kDa proteins are tightly interacting components of the photosensory signaling machinery or that both are forms of sensory rhodopsin I.

  12. Behind the lines–actions of bacterial type III effector proteins in plant cells

    PubMed Central

    Büttner, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenicity of most Gram-negative plant-pathogenic bacteria depends on the type III secretion (T3S) system, which translocates bacterial effector proteins into plant cells. Type III effectors modulate plant cellular pathways to the benefit of the pathogen and promote bacterial multiplication. One major virulence function of type III effectors is the suppression of plant innate immunity, which is triggered upon recognition of pathogen-derived molecular patterns by plant receptor proteins. Type III effectors also interfere with additional plant cellular processes including proteasome-dependent protein degradation, phytohormone signaling, the formation of the cytoskeleton, vesicle transport and gene expression. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular functions of type III effector proteins with known plant target molecules. Furthermore, plant defense strategies for the detection of effector protein activities or effector-triggered alterations in plant targets are discussed. PMID:27526699

  13. The Bacterial Phosphoenolpyruvate:Carbohydrate Phosphotransferase System: Regulation by Protein Phosphorylation and Phosphorylation-Dependent Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aké, Francine Moussan Désirée; Derkaoui, Meriem; Zébré, Arthur Constant; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Bouraoui, Houda; Kentache, Takfarinas; Mokhtari, Abdelhamid; Milohanic, Eliane; Joyet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The bacterial phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP):carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PTS) carries out both catalytic and regulatory functions. It catalyzes the transport and phosphorylation of a variety of sugars and sugar derivatives but also carries out numerous regulatory functions related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphate metabolism, to chemotaxis, to potassium transport, and to the virulence of certain pathogens. For these different regulatory processes, the signal is provided by the phosphorylation state of the PTS components, which varies according to the availability of PTS substrates and the metabolic state of the cell. PEP acts as phosphoryl donor for enzyme I (EI), which, together with HPr and one of several EIIA and EIIB pairs, forms a phosphorylation cascade which allows phosphorylation of the cognate carbohydrate bound to the membrane-spanning EIIC. HPr of firmicutes and numerous proteobacteria is also phosphorylated in an ATP-dependent reaction catalyzed by the bifunctional HPr kinase/phosphorylase. PTS-mediated regulatory mechanisms are based either on direct phosphorylation of the target protein or on phosphorylation-dependent interactions. For regulation by PTS-mediated phosphorylation, the target proteins either acquired a PTS domain by fusing it to their N or C termini or integrated a specific, conserved PTS regulation domain (PRD) or, alternatively, developed their own specific sites for PTS-mediated phosphorylation. Protein-protein interactions can occur with either phosphorylated or unphosphorylated PTS components and can either stimulate or inhibit the function of the target proteins. This large variety of signal transduction mechanisms allows the PTS to regulate numerous proteins and to form a vast regulatory network responding to the phosphorylation state of various PTS components. PMID:24847021

  14. An oxysterol-binding protein family identified in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Anniss, Angela M; Apostolopoulos, Jim; Dworkin, Sebastian; Purton, Louise E; Sparrow, Rosemary L

    2002-08-01

    Oxysterols are oxygenated derivatives of cholesterol. They have been shown to influence a variety of biological functions including sterol metabolism, lipid trafficking, and apoptosis. Recently, 12 human OSBP-related genes have been identified. In this study, we have identified a family of 12 oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related proteins (ORPs) in the mouse. A high level of amino acid identity (88-97%) was determined between mouse and human ORPs, indicating a very high degree of evolutionary conservation. All proteins identified contained the conserved OSBP amino acid sequence signature motif "EQVSHHPP," and most contained a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. Using RT-PCR, each mouse ORP gene was found to exhibit a unique tissue distribution with many showing high expression in testicular, brain, and heart tissues. Interestingly, the tissue distribution of ORP-4 and ORP-10 were the most selective within the family. Expression of the various ORP genes was also investigated, specifically in highly purified populations of hemopoietic precursor cells defined by the lin(-) c-kit(+) Sca-1(+) (LKS(+)) and lin(-) c-kit(+) Sca-1(-) (LKS(-)) immunophenotype. Most ORP genes were expressed in both LKS(+) and LKS(-) populations, although ORP-4 appeared to be more highly expressed in the primitive, stem-cell enriched LKS(+) population, whereas ORP-10 was more highly expressed by maturing LKS(-) cells. The identification of a family of ORP proteins in the mouse, the frequently preferred animal model for in vivo studies, should further our understanding of the function of these proteins and their interactions with each other.

  15. The PIN-FORMED (PIN) protein family of auxin transporters

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Summary The PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are secondary transporters acting in the efflux of the plant signal molecule auxin from cells. They are asymmetrically localized within cells and their polarity determines the directionality of intercellular auxin flow. PIN genes are found exclusively in the genomes of multicellular plants and play an important role in regulating asymmetric auxin distribution in multiple developmental processes, including embryogenesis, organogenesis, tissue differentiation and tropic responses. All PIN proteins have a similar structure with amino- and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic, membrane-spanning domains separated by a central hydrophilic domain. The structure of the hydrophobic domains is well conserved. The hydrophilic domain is more divergent and it determines eight groups within the protein family. The activity of PIN proteins is regulated at multiple levels, including transcription, protein stability, subcellular localization and transport activity. Different endogenous and environmental signals can modulate PIN activity and thus modulate auxin-distribution-dependent development. A large group of PIN proteins, including the most ancient members known from mosses, localize to the endoplasmic reticulum and they regulate the subcellular compartmentalization of auxin and thus auxin metabolism. Further work is needed to establish the physiological importance of this unexpected mode of auxin homeostasis regulation. Furthermore, the evolution of PIN-based transport, PIN protein structure and more detailed biochemical characterization of the transport function are important topics for further studies. PMID:20053306

  16. UBXD Proteins: A Family of Proteins with Diverse Functions in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Khosrow

    2016-01-01

    The UBXD family is a diverse group of UBX (ubiquitin-regulatory X) domain-containing proteins in mammalian cells. Members of this family contain a UBX domain typically located at the carboxyl-terminal of the protein. In contrast to the UBX domain shared by all members of UBXD family, the amino-terminal domains are diverse and appear to carry out different roles in a subcellular localization-dependent manner. UBXD proteins are principally associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where they positively or negatively regulate the ER-associated degradation machinery (ERAD). The distinct protein interaction networks of UBXD proteins allow them to have specific functions independent of the ERAD pathway in a cell type- and tissue context-dependent manner. Recent reports have illustrated that a number of mammalian members of the UBXD family play critical roles in several proliferation and apoptosis pathways dysregulated in selected types of cancer. This review covers recent advances that elucidate the therapeutic potential of selected members of the UBXD family that can contribute to tumor growth. PMID:27754413

  17. Protein Oxidation Implicated as the Primary Determinant of Bacterial Radioresistance

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, E.; Matrosova, V.; Vasilenko, A.; Zhai, M.; leapman, Richard D.; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Li, Shu-Mei W.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2007-04-02

    In the hierarchy of cellular targets damaged by ionizing radiation (IR), classical models of radiation toxicity place DNA at the top. Yet, many prokaryotes are killed by doses of IR that cause little DNA damage. Here we have probed the nature of manganese-facilitated IR resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans, which together with other extremely IR resistant bacteria have high intracellular Mn/Fe concentration ratios compared to IR sensitive bacteria. For in vitro and in vivo irradiation, we demonstrate a mechanistic link between Mn(II) ions and protection of proteins from oxidative modifications which introduce carbonyl groups. Conditions which inhibited Mn-accumulation or Mn redox-cycling rendered D. radiodurans radiation sensitive and highly susceptible to protein oxidation. X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe analysis showed that Mn is globally distributed in D. radiodurans, but Fe is sequestered in a region between dividing cells. For a group of phylogenetically diverse IR resistant and sensitive bacteria, our findings support that the degree of resistance is determined by the level of oxidative protein damage caused during irradiation. We present the case that protein, rather than DNA, is the principal target of the biological action of IR in sensitive bacteria, and extreme resistance in Mn-accumulating bacteria is based on protein protection.

  18. Bacterial glycosyltransferase toxins.

    PubMed

    Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-12-01

    Mono-glycosylation of host proteins is a common mechanism by which bacterial protein toxins manipulate cellular functions of eukaryotic target host cells. Prototypic for this group of glycosyltransferase toxins are Clostridium difficile toxins A and B, which modify guanine nucleotide-binding proteins of the Rho family. However, toxin-induced glycosylation is not restricted to the Clostridia. Various types of bacterial pathogens including Escherichia coli, Yersinia, Photorhabdus and Legionella species produce glycosyltransferase toxins. Recent studies discovered novel unexpected variations in host protein targets and amino acid acceptors of toxin-catalysed glycosylation. These findings open new perspectives in toxin as well as in carbohydrate research.

  19. REVIEW ARTICLE: DNA protein interactions and bacterial chromosome architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavans, Joel; Oppenheim, Amos

    2006-12-01

    Bacteria, like eukaryotic organisms, must compact the DNA molecule comprising their genome and form a functional chromosome. Yet, bacteria do it differently. A number of factors contribute to genome compaction and organization in bacteria, including entropic effects, supercoiling and DNA-protein interactions. A gamut of new experimental techniques have allowed new advances in the investigation of these factors, and spurred much interest in the dynamic response of the chromosome to environmental cues, segregation, and architecture, during both exponential and stationary phases. We review these recent developments with emphasis on the multifaceted roles that DNA-protein interactions play.

  20. Regulation of intestinal microbiota by the NLR protein family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a diverse microbial community consisting of a large number of bacteria and other micro-organisms that have co-evolved with the host intestinal immune system. During this process, microbiota and the host immune system shape one another by various mechanisms to achieve a successful symbiotic relationship. An increasing amount of evidence suggests that dysbiosis—the breakdown of such harmonized colonization—may result in infectious and inflammatory disorders, and recent advances in our studies indicate that receptors such as Toll-like receptors and NLR (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor; or nucleotide-binding domain- and leucine-rich repeat-containing receptor) proteins that detect micro-organisms and their products play a critical role in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. In this review, we summarize the role of NLR proteins in the regulation of intestinal microbiota. NLR proteins belong to a diverse family of cytoplasmic microbial sensors, mutations of which are involved in various disorders, including inflammatory bowel diseases. Understanding of the different roles of NLR family proteins in the intestine is, therefore, an important step towards the development of therapeutics against digestive diseases. PMID:23325116

  1. Bcl-2 family proteins as regulators of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Susnow, Nathan; Zeng, Liyun; Margineantu, Daciana; Hockenbery, David M

    2009-02-01

    The Bcl-2 family of proteins includes pro- and anti-apoptotic factors acting at mitochondrial and microsomal membranes. An impressive body of published studies, using genetic and physical reconstitution experiments in model organisms and cell lines, supports a view of Bcl-2 proteins as the critical arbiters of apoptotic cell death decisions in most circumstances (excepting CD95 death receptor signaling in Type I cells). Evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer [Hanahan D, Weinberg RA. The hallmarks of cancer. Cell 2000;100:57-70], relevant to tumorigenesis as well as resistance to cytotoxic drugs, and deregulation of Bcl-2 proteins is observed in many cancers [Manion MK, Hockenbery DM. Targeting BCL-2-related proteins in cancer therapy. Cancer Biol Ther. 2003;2:S105-14; Olejniczak ET, Van Sant C, Anderson MG, Wang G, Tahir SK, Sauter G, et al. Integrative genomic analysis of small-cell lung carcinoma reveals correlates of sensitivity to bcl-2 antagonists and uncovers novel chromosomal gains. Mol Cancer Res. 2007;5:331-9]. The rekindled interest in aerobic glycolysis as a cancer trait raises interesting questions as to how metabolic changes in cancer cells are integrated with other essential alterations in cancer, e.g. promotion of angiogenesis and unbridled growth signals. Apoptosis induced by multiple different signals involves loss of mitochondrial homeostasis, in particular, outer mitochondrial membrane integrity, releasing cytochrome c and other proteins from the intermembrane space. This integrative process, controlled by Bcl-2 family proteins, is also influenced by the metabolic state of the cell. In this review, we consider the role of reactive oxygen species, a metabolic by-product, in the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, and the relationships between Bcl-2 functions and oxidative stress. PMID:19138742

  2. Phylogenetic distribution and membrane topology of the LytR-CpsA-Psr protein family

    PubMed Central

    Hübscher, Judith; Lüthy, Lucas; Berger-Bächi, Brigitte; Stutzmann Meier, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Background The bacterial cell wall is the target of many antibiotics and cell envelope constituents are critical to host-pathogen interactions. To combat resistance development and virulence, a detailed knowledge of the individual factors involved is essential. Members of the LytR-CpsA-Psr family of cell envelope-associated attenuators are relevant for β-lactam resistance, biofilm formation, and stress tolerance, and they are suggested to play a role in cell wall maintenance. However, their precise function is still unknown. This study addresses the occurrence as well as sequence-based characteristics of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins. Results A comprehensive list of LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins was established, and their phylogenetic distribution and clustering into subgroups was determined. LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins were present in all Gram-positive organisms, except for the cell wall-deficient Mollicutes and one strain of the Clostridiales. In contrast, the majority of Gram-negatives did not contain LytR-CpsA-Psr family members. Despite high sequence divergence, the LytR-CpsA-Psr domains of different subclusters shared a highly similar, predicted mixed a/β-structure, and conserved charged residues. PhoA fusion experiments, using MsrR of Staphylococcus aureus, confirmed membrane topology predictions and extracellular location of its LytR-CpsA-Psr domain. Conclusion The LytR-CpsA-Psr domain is unique to bacteria. The presence of diverse subgroups within the LytR-CpsA-Psr family might indicate functional differences, and could explain variations in phenotypes of respective mutants reported. The identified conserved structural elements and amino acids are likely to be important for the function of the domain and will help to guide future studies of the LytR-CpsA-Psr proteins. PMID:19099556

  3. Engineering bacterial microcompartment shells: chimeric shell proteins and chimeric carboxysome shells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Fei; Sutter, Markus; Bernstein, Susan L; Kinney, James N; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2015-04-17

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are self-assembling organelles composed entirely of protein. Depending on the enzymes they encapsulate, BMCs function in either inorganic carbon fixation (carboxysomes) or organic carbon utilization (metabolosomes). The hallmark feature of all BMCs is a selectively permeable shell formed by multiple paralogous proteins, each proposed to confer specific flux characteristics. Gene clusters encoding diverse BMCs are distributed broadly across bacterial phyla, providing a rich variety of building blocks with a predicted range of permeability properties. In theory, shell permeability can be engineered by modifying residues flanking the pores (symmetry axes) of hexameric shell proteins or by combining shell proteins from different types of BMCs into chimeric shells. We undertook both approaches to altering shell properties using the carboxysome as a model system. There are two types of carboxysomes, α and β. In both, the predominant shell protein(s) contain a single copy of the BMC domain (pfam00936), but they are significantly different in primary structure. Indeed, phylogenetic analysis shows that the two types of carboxysome shell proteins are more similar to their counterparts in metabolosomes than to each other. We solved high resolution crystal structures of the major shell proteins, CsoS1 and CcmK2, and the presumed minor shell protein CcmK4, representing both types of cyanobacterial carboxysomes and then tested the interchangeability. The in vivo study presented here confirms that both engineering pores to mimic those of other shell proteins and the construction of chimeric shells is feasible.

  4. Rv0216, a Conserved Hypothetical Protein from Myocbacterium Tuberculosis that is Essential for Bacterial Survival During Infection, has a Double Hotdog Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Castell,A.; Johansson, P.; Unge, T.; Jones, T.; Backbro, K.

    2005-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome contains about 4000 genes, of which approximately a third code for proteins of unknown function or are classified as conserved hypothetical proteins. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of one of these, the rv0216 gene product, which has been shown to be essential for M. tuberculosis growth in vivo. The structure exhibits the greatest similarity to bacterial and eukaryotic hydratases that catalyse the R-specific hydration of 2-enoyl coenzyme A. However, only part of the catalytic machinery is conserved in Rv0216 and it showed no activity for the substrate crotonyl-CoA. The structure of Rv0216 allows us to assign new functional annotations to a family of seven other M. tuberculosis proteins, a number if which are essential for bacterial survival during infection and growth.

  5. Niobium Uptake and Release by Bacterial Ferric Ion Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yanbo; Harvey, Ian; Campopiano, Dominic; Sadler, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Ferric ion binding proteins (Fbps) transport FeIII across the periplasm and are vital for the virulence of many Gram negative bacteria. Iron(III) is tightly bound in a hinged binding cleft with octahedral coordination geometry involving binding to protein side chains (including tyrosinate residues) together with a synergistic anion such as phosphate. Niobium compounds are of interest for their potential biological activity, which has been little explored. We have studied the binding of cyclopentadienyl and nitrilotriacetato NbV complexes to the Fbp from Neisseria gonorrhoeae by UV-vis spectroscopy, chromatography, ICP-OES, mass spectrometry, and Nb K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These data suggest that NbV binds strongly to Fbp and that a dinuclear NbV centre can be readily accommodated in the interdomain binding cleft. The possibility of designing niobium-based antibiotics which block iron uptake by pathogenic bacteria is discussed. PMID:20445753

  6. Exploiting Bacterial Operons To Illuminate Human Iron-Sulfur Proteins.

    PubMed

    Andreini, Claudia; Banci, Lucia; Rosato, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Organisms from all kingdoms of life use iron-sulfur proteins (FeS-Ps) in a multitude of functional processes. We applied a bioinformatics approach to investigate the human portfolio of FeS-Ps. Sixty-one percent of human FeS-Ps bind Fe4S4 clusters, whereas 39% bind Fe2S2 clusters. However, this relative ratio varies significantly depending on the specific cellular compartment. We compared the portfolio of human FeS-Ps to 12 other eukaryotes and to about 700 prokaryotes. The comparative analysis of the organization of the prokaryotic homologues of human FeS-Ps within operons allowed us to reconstruct the human functional networks involving the conserved FeS-Ps common to prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These functional networks have been maintained during evolution and thus presumably represent fundamental cellular processes. The respiratory chain and the ISC machinery for FeS-P biogenesis are the two conserved processes that involve the majority of human FeS-Ps. Purine metabolism is another process including several FeS-Ps, in which BOLA proteins possibly have a regulatory role. The analysis of the co-occurrence of human FeS-Ps with other proteins highlighted numerous links between the iron-sulfur cluster machinery and the response mechanisms to cell damage, from repair to apoptosis. This relationship probably relates to the production of reactive oxygen species within the biogenesis and degradation of FeS-Ps.

  7. Natural Products at Work: Structural Insights into Inhibition of the Bacterial Membrane Protein MraY.

    PubMed

    Koppermann, Stefan; Ducho, Christian

    2016-09-19

    Natural(ly) fit: The X-ray crystal structure of the bacterial membrane protein MraY in complex with its natural product inhibitor muraymycin D2 is discussed. MraY catalyzes one of the membrane-associated steps in peptidoglycan biosynthesis and, therefore, represents a promising target for novel antibiotics. Structural insights derived from the protein-inhibitor complex might now pave the way for the development of new antimicrobial drugs. PMID:27511599

  8. Bacterial type III secretion systems: specialized nanomachines for protein delivery into target cells.

    PubMed

    Galán, Jorge E; Lara-Tejero, Maria; Marlovits, Thomas C; Wagner, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of bacterial pathogenesis in recent years is the discovery that many pathogens utilize complex nanomachines to deliver bacterially encoded effector proteins into target eukaryotic cells. These effector proteins modulate a variety of cellular functions for the pathogen's benefit. One of these protein-delivery machines is the type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SSs are widespread in nature and are encoded not only by bacteria pathogenic to vertebrates or plants but also by bacteria that are symbiotic to plants or insects. A central component of T3SSs is the needle complex, a supramolecular structure that mediates the passage of the secreted proteins across the bacterial envelope. Working in conjunction with several cytoplasmic components, the needle complex engages specific substrates in sequential order, moves them across the bacterial envelope, and ultimately delivers them into eukaryotic cells. The central role of T3SSs in pathogenesis makes them great targets for novel antimicrobial strategies.

  9. Bacterial type III secretion systems: specialized nanomachines for protein delivery into target cells

    PubMed Central

    Galán, Jorge E.; Lara-Tejero, Maria; Marlovits, Thomas C.; Wagner, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    One of the most exciting developments in the field of bacterial pathogenesis in recent years is the discovery that many pathogens utilized complex nanomachines to deliver bacterially encoded effector proteins into target eukaryotic cells. These effector proteins modulate a variety of cellular functions for the pathogen’s benefit. One of these protein-delivery machines is the type III secretion system (T3SS). T3SSs are widespread in nature and are encoded not only by bacteria pathogenic to vertebrates or plants, but also by bacteria that are symbiotic to plants or insects. A central component of T3SSs is the needle complex, a supramolecular structure that mediates the passage of the secreted proteins across the bacterial envelope. Working in conjunction with several cytoplasmic components, the needle complex engages specific substrates in sequential order, moves them across the bacterial envelope, and ultimately delivers them into eukaryotic cells. The central role of T3SSs in pathogenesis makes them great targets for novel antimicrobial strategies. PMID:25002086

  10. A Versatile Strategy for Production of Membrane Proteins with Diverse Topologies: Application to Investigation of Bacterial Homologues of Human Divalent Metal Ion and Nucleoside Transporters.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cheng; Hao, Zhenyu; Huysmans, Gerard; Lesiuk, Amelia; Bullough, Per; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Phillips, Simon E; Young, James D; Goldman, Adrian; Baldwin, Stephen A; Postis, Vincent L G

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in many biological processes, from acquisition of nutrients to neurotransmission, and are targets for more than 50% of current therapeutic drugs. However, their investigation is hampered by difficulties in their production and purification on a scale suitable for structural studies. In particular, the nature and location of affinity tags introduced for the purification of recombinant membrane proteins can greatly influence their expression levels by affecting their membrane insertion. The extent of such effects typically depends on the transmembrane topologies of the proteins, which for proteins of unknown structure are usually uncertain. For example, attachment of oligohistidine tags to the periplasmic termini of membrane proteins often interferes with folding and drastically impairs expression in Escherichia coli. To circumvent this problem we have employed a novel strategy to enable the rapid production of constructs bearing a range of different affinity tags compatible with either cytoplasmic or periplasmic attachment. Tags include conventional oligohistidine tags compatible with cytoplasmic attachment and, for attachment to proteins with a periplasmic terminus, either tandem Strep-tag II sequences or oligohistidine tags fused to maltose binding protein and a signal sequence. Inclusion of cleavage sites for TEV or HRV-3C protease enables tag removal prior to crystallisation trials or a second step of purification. Together with the use of bioinformatic approaches to identify members of membrane protein families with topologies favourable to cytoplasmic tagging, this has enabled us to express and purify multiple bacterial membrane transporters. To illustrate this strategy, we describe here its use to purify bacterial homologues of human membrane proteins from the Nramp and ZIP families of divalent metal cation transporters and from the concentrative nucleoside transporter family. The proteins are expressed in E. coli in a

  11. A Versatile Strategy for Production of Membrane Proteins with Diverse Topologies: Application to Investigation of Bacterial Homologues of Human Divalent Metal Ion and Nucleoside Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Huysmans, Gerard; Lesiuk, Amelia; Bullough, Per; Wang, Yingying; Bartlam, Mark; Phillips, Simon E.; Young, James D.; Goldman, Adrian; Postis, Vincent L. G.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane proteins play key roles in many biological processes, from acquisition of nutrients to neurotransmission, and are targets for more than 50% of current therapeutic drugs. However, their investigation is hampered by difficulties in their production and purification on a scale suitable for structural studies. In particular, the nature and location of affinity tags introduced for the purification of recombinant membrane proteins can greatly influence their expression levels by affecting their membrane insertion. The extent of such effects typically depends on the transmembrane topologies of the proteins, which for proteins of unknown structure are usually uncertain. For example, attachment of oligohistidine tags to the periplasmic termini of membrane proteins often interferes with folding and drastically impairs expression in Escherichia coli. To circumvent this problem we have employed a novel strategy to enable the rapid production of constructs bearing a range of different affinity tags compatible with either cytoplasmic or periplasmic attachment. Tags include conventional oligohistidine tags compatible with cytoplasmic attachment and, for attachment to proteins with a periplasmic terminus, either tandem Strep-tag II sequences or oligohistidine tags fused to maltose binding protein and a signal sequence. Inclusion of cleavage sites for TEV or HRV-3C protease enables tag removal prior to crystallisation trials or a second step of purification. Together with the use of bioinformatic approaches to identify members of membrane protein families with topologies favourable to cytoplasmic tagging, this has enabled us to express and purify multiple bacterial membrane transporters. To illustrate this strategy, we describe here its use to purify bacterial homologues of human membrane proteins from the Nramp and ZIP families of divalent metal cation transporters and from the concentrative nucleoside transporter family. The proteins are expressed in E. coli in a

  12. A Bacterial Pathogen Targets a Host Rab-Family GTPase Defense Pathway with a GAP.

    PubMed

    Spanò, Stefania; Gao, Xiang; Hannemann, Sebastian; Lara-Tejero, María; Galán, Jorge E

    2016-02-10

    Cell-autonomous defense mechanisms are potent strategies that protect individual cells against intracellular pathogens. The Rab-family GTPase Rab32 was previously shown to restrict the intracellular human pathogen Salmonella Typhi, but its potential broader role in antimicrobial defense remains unknown. We show that Rab32 represents a general cell-autonomous, antimicrobial defense that is counteracted by two Salmonella effectors. Mice lacking Rab-32 or its nucleotide exchange factor BLOC-3 are permissive to S. Typhi infection and exhibit increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium. S. Typhimurium counters this defense pathway by delivering two type III secretion effectors, SopD2, a Rab32 GAP, and GtgE, a specific Rab32 protease. An S. Typhimurium mutant strain lacking these two effectors exhibits markedly reduced virulence, which is fully restored in BLOC-3-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that a cell-autonomous, Rab32-dependent host defense pathway plays a central role in the defense against vacuolar pathogens and describe a mechanism evolved by a bacterial pathogen to counter it.

  13. Crystal structure analysis of a bacterial aryl acylamidase belonging to the amidase signature enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Lee, Saeyoung; Park, Eun-Hye; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Bang, Won Gi; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2015-11-13

    The atomic structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13; AAA) is reported and structural features are investigated to better understand the catalytic profile of this enzyme. Structures of AAA were determined in its native form and in complex with the analgesic acetanilide, p-acetaminophenol, at 1.70 Å and 1.73 Å resolutions, respectively. The overall structural fold of AAA was identified as an α/β fold class, exhibiting an open twisted β-sheet core surrounded by α-helices. The asymmetric unit contains one AAA molecule and the monomeric form is functionally active. The core structure enclosing the signature sequence region, including the canonical Ser-cisSer-Lys catalytic triad, is conserved in all members of the Amidase Signature enzyme family. The structure of AAA in a complex with its ligand reveals a unique organization in the substrate-binding pocket. The binding pocket consists of two loops (loop1 and loop2) in the amidase signature sequence and one helix (α10) in the non-amidase signature sequence. We identified two residues (Tyr(136) and Thr(330)) that interact with the ligand via water molecules, and a hydrogen-bonding network that explains the catalytic affinity over various aryl acyl compounds. The optimum activity of AAA at pH > 10 suggests that the reaction mechanism employs Lys(84) as the catalytic base to polarize the Ser(187) nucleophile in the catalytic triad.

  14. Crystal structure analysis of a bacterial aryl acylamidase belonging to the amidase signature enzyme family.

    PubMed

    Lee, Saeyoung; Park, Eun-Hye; Ko, Hyeok-Jin; Bang, Won Gi; Kim, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Choi, In-Geol

    2015-11-13

    The atomic structure of a bacterial aryl acylamidase (EC 3.5.1.13; AAA) is reported and structural features are investigated to better understand the catalytic profile of this enzyme. Structures of AAA were determined in its native form and in complex with the analgesic acetanilide, p-acetaminophenol, at 1.70 Å and 1.73 Å resolutions, respectively. The overall structural fold of AAA was identified as an α/β fold class, exhibiting an open twisted β-sheet core surrounded by α-helices. The asymmetric unit contains one AAA molecule and the monomeric form is functionally active. The core structure enclosing the signature sequence region, including the canonical Ser-cisSer-Lys catalytic triad, is conserved in all members of the Amidase Signature enzyme family. The structure of AAA in a complex with its ligand reveals a unique organization in the substrate-binding pocket. The binding pocket consists of two loops (loop1 and loop2) in the amidase signature sequence and one helix (α10) in the non-amidase signature sequence. We identified two residues (Tyr(136) and Thr(330)) that interact with the ligand via water molecules, and a hydrogen-bonding network that explains the catalytic affinity over various aryl acyl compounds. The optimum activity of AAA at pH > 10 suggests that the reaction mechanism employs Lys(84) as the catalytic base to polarize the Ser(187) nucleophile in the catalytic triad. PMID:26454172

  15. PipeAlign: A new toolkit for protein family analysis.

    PubMed

    Plewniak, Frédéric; Bianchetti, Laurent; Brelivet, Yann; Carles, Annaick; Chalmel, Frédéric; Lecompte, Odile; Mochel, Thiebaut; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Arnaud; Muller, Jean; Prigent, Veronique; Ripp, Raymond; Thierry, Jean-Claude; Thompson, Julie D; Wicker, Nicolas; Poch, Olivier

    2003-07-01

    PipeAlign is a protein family analysis tool integrating a five step process ranging from the search for sequence homologues in protein and 3D structure databases to the definition of the hierarchical relationships within and between subfamilies. The complete, automatic pipeline takes a single sequence or a set of sequences as input and constructs a high-quality, validated MACS (multiple alignment of complete sequences) in which sequences are clustered into potential functional subgroups. For the more experienced user, the PipeAlign server also provides numerous options to run only a part of the analysis, with the possibility to modify the default parameters of each software module. For example, the user can choose to enter an existing multiple sequence alignment for refinement, validation and subsequent clustering of the sequences. The aim is to provide an interactive workbench for the validation, integration and presentation of a protein family, not only at the sequence level, but also at the structural and functional levels. PipeAlign is available at http://igbmc.u-strasbg.fr/PipeAlign/.

  16. Bacterial mimetics of endocrine secretory granules as immobilized in vivo depots for functional protein drugs

    PubMed Central

    Céspedes, María Virtudes; Fernández, Yolanda; Unzueta, Ugutz; Mendoza, Rosa; Seras-Franzoso, Joaquin; Sánchez-Chardi, Alejando; Álamo, Patricia; Toledo-Rubio, Verónica; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Vázquez, Esther; Schwartz, Simó; Abasolo, Ibane; Corchero, José Luis; Mangues, Ramon; Villaverde, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In the human endocrine system many protein hormones including urotensin, glucagon, obestatin, bombesin and secretin, among others, are supplied from amyloidal secretory granules. These granules form part of the so called functional amyloids, which within the whole aggregome appear to be more abundant than formerly believed. Bacterial inclusion bodies (IBs) are non-toxic, nanostructured functional amyloids whose biological fabrication can be tailored to render materials with defined biophysical properties. Since under physiological conditions they steadily release their building block protein in a soluble and functional form, IBs are considered as mimetics of endocrine secretory granules. We have explored here if the in vivo implantation of functional IBs in a given tissue would represent a stable local source of functional protein. Upon intratumoral injection of bacterial IBs formed by a potent protein ligand of CXCR4 we have observed high stability and prevalence of the material in absence of toxicity, accompanied by apoptosis of CXCR4+ cells and tumor ablation. Then, the local immobilization of bacterial amyloids formed by therapeutic proteins in tumors or other tissues might represent a promising strategy for a sustained local delivery of protein drugs by mimicking the functional amyloidal architecture of the mammals’ endocrine system. PMID:27775083

  17. NMR studies of a new family of DNA binding proteins: the THAP proteins.

    PubMed

    Gervais, Virginie; Campagne, Sébastien; Durand, Jade; Muller, Isabelle; Milon, Alain

    2013-05-01

    The THAP (THanatos-Associated Protein) domain is an evolutionary conserved C2CH zinc-coordinating domain shared with a large family of cellular factors (THAP proteins). Many members of the THAP family act as transcription factors that control cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, apoptosis and epigenetic gene silencing. They recognize specific DNA sequences in the promoters of target genes and subsequently recruit effector proteins. Recent structural and functional studies have allowed getting better insight into the nuclear and cellular functions of some THAP members and the molecular mechanisms by which they recognize DNA. The present article reviews recent advances in the knowledge of the THAP domains structures and their interaction with DNA, with a particular focus on NMR. It provides the solution structure of the THAP domain of THAP11, a recently characterized human THAP protein with important functions in transcription and cell growth in colon cancer. PMID:23306615

  18. Proteinaceous determinants of surface colonization in bacteria: bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation from a protein secretion perspective

    PubMed Central

    Chagnot, Caroline; Zorgani, Mohamed A.; Astruc, Thierry; Desvaux, Mickaël

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial colonization of biotic or abiotic surfaces results from two quite distinct physiological processes, namely bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Broadly speaking, a biofilm is defined as the sessile development of microbial cells. Biofilm formation arises following bacterial adhesion but not all single bacterial cells adhering reversibly or irreversibly engage inexorably into a sessile mode of growth. Among molecular determinants promoting bacterial colonization, surface proteins are the most functionally diverse active components. To be present on the bacterial cell surface, though, a protein must be secreted in the first place. Considering the close association of secreted proteins with their cognate secretion systems, the secretome (which refers both to the secretion systems and their protein substrates) is a key concept to apprehend the protein secretion and related physiological functions. The protein secretion systems are here considered in light of the differences in the cell-envelope architecture between diderm-LPS (archetypal Gram-negative), monoderm (archetypal Gram-positive) and diderm-mycolate (archetypal acid-fast) bacteria. Besides, their cognate secreted proteins engaged in the bacterial colonization process are regarded from single protein to supramolecular protein structure as well as the non-classical protein secretion. This state-of-the-art on the complement of the secretome (the secretion systems and their cognate effectors) involved in the surface colonization process in diderm-LPS and monoderm bacteria paves the way for future research directions in the field. PMID:24133488

  19. A bacterial type III secretion-based protein delivery tool for broad applications in cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Ittig, Simon J.; Schmutz, Christoph; Kasper, Christoph A.; Amstutz, Marlise; Schmidt, Alexander; Sauteur, Loïc; Vigano, M. Alessandra; Low, Shyan Huey; Affolter, Markus; Cornelis, Guy R.; Nigg, Erich A.

    2015-01-01

    Methods enabling the delivery of proteins into eukaryotic cells are essential to address protein functions. Here we propose broad applications to cell biology for a protein delivery tool based on bacterial type III secretion (T3S). We show that bacterial, viral, and human proteins, fused to the N-terminal fragment of the Yersinia enterocolitica T3S substrate YopE, are effectively delivered into target cells in a fast and controllable manner via the injectisome of extracellular bacteria. This method enables functional interaction studies by the simultaneous injection of multiple proteins and allows the targeting of proteins to different subcellular locations by use of nanobody-fusion proteins. After delivery, proteins can be freed from the YopE fragment by a T3S-translocated viral protease or fusion to ubiquitin and cleavage by endogenous ubiquitin proteases. Finally, we show that this delivery tool is suitable to inject proteins in living animals and combine it with phosphoproteomics to characterize the systems-level impact of proapoptotic human truncated BID on the cellular network. PMID:26598622

  20. Regulation of the Adaptive Immune Response by the IκB Family Protein Bcl-3

    PubMed Central

    Herrington, Felicity D.; Nibbs, Robert J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Bcl-3 is a member of the IκB family of proteins and an important regulator of Nuclear Factor (NF)-κB activity. The ability of Bcl-3 to bind and regulate specific NF-κB dimers has been studied in great depth, but its physiological roles in vivo are still not fully understood. It is, however, becoming clear that Bcl-3 is essential for the proper development, survival and activity of adaptive immune cells. Bcl-3 dysregulation can be observed in a number of autoimmune pathologies, and Bcl3-deficient animals are more susceptible to bacterial and parasitic infection. This review will describe our current understanding of the roles played by Bcl-3 in the development and regulation of the adaptive immune response, including lymphoid organogenesis, immune tolerance, lymphocyte function and dendritic cell biology. PMID:27023613

  1. Allosteric Coupling in the Bacterial Adhesive Protein FimH*

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Victoria B.; Kidd, Brian A.; Interlandi, Gianluca; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Sokurenko, Evgeni V.; Thomas, Wendy E.

    2013-01-01

    The protein FimH is expressed by the majority of commensal and uropathogenic strains of Escherichia coli on the tips of type 1 fimbriae and mediates adhesion via a catch bond to its ligand mannose. Crystal structures of FimH show an allosteric conformational change, but it remains unclear whether all of the observed structural differences are part of the allosteric mechanism. Here we use the protein structural analysis tool RosettaDesign combined with human insight to identify and synthesize 10 mutations in four regions that we predicted would stabilize one of the conformations of that region. The function of each variant was characterized by measuring binding to the ligand mannose, whereas the allosteric state was determined using a conformation-specific monoclonal antibody. These studies demonstrated that each region investigated was indeed part of the FimH allosteric mechanism. However, the studies strongly suggested that some regions were more tightly coupled to mannose binding and others to antibody binding. In addition, we identified many FimH variants that appear locked in the low affinity state. Knowledge of regulatory sites outside the active and effector sites as well as the ability to make FimH variants locked in the low affinity state may be crucial to the future development of novel antiadhesive and antimicrobial therapies using allosteric regulation to inhibit FimH. PMID:23821547

  2. Classification epitopes in groups based on their protein family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The humoral immune system response is based on the interaction between antibodies and antigens for the clearance of pathogens and foreign molecules. The interaction between these proteins occurs at specific positions known as antigenic determinants or B-cell epitopes. The experimental identification of epitopes is costly and time consuming. Therefore the use of in silico methods, to help discover new epitopes, is an appealing alternative due the importance of biomedical applications such as vaccine design, disease diagnostic, anti-venoms and immune-therapeutics. However, the performance of predictions is not optimal been around 70% of accuracy. Further research could increase our understanding of the biochemical and structural properties that characterize a B-cell epitope. Results We investigated the possibility of linear epitopes from the same protein family to share common properties. This hypothesis led us to analyze physico-chemical (PCP) and predicted secondary structure (PSS) features of a curated dataset of epitope sequences available in the literature belonging to two different groups of antigens (metalloproteinases and neurotoxins). We discovered statistically significant parameters with data mining techniques which allow us to distinguish neurotoxin from metalloproteinase and these two from random sequences. After a five cross fold validation we found that PCP based models obtained area under the curve values (AUC) and accuracy above 0.9 for regression, decision tree and support vector machine. Conclusions We demonstrated that antigen's family can be inferred from properties within a single group of linear epitopes (metalloproteinases or neurotoxins). Also we discovered the characteristics that represent these two epitope groups including their similarities and differences with random peptides and their respective amino acid sequence. These findings open new perspectives to improve epitope prediction by considering the specific antigen

  3. A method for in vivo identification of bacterial small RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Jonathan; Djapgne, Louise; Tran, Bao Quoc; Goo, Young Ah; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2014-12-01

    Small bacterial regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) have gained immense appreciation over the last decade for their roles in mediating posttranscriptional gene regulation of numerous physiological processes. Several proteins contribute to sRNA stability and regulation, most notably the Hfq RNA-binding protein. However, not all sRNAs rely on Hfq for their stability. It is therefore likely that other proteins contribute to the stability and function of certain bacterial sRNAs. Here, we describe a methodology for identifying in vivo-binding proteins of sRNAs, developed using the iron-responsive PrrF and PrrH sRNAs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. RNA was isolated from iron-depleted cultures, which were irradiated to cross-link nucleoprotein complexes. Subsequently, PrrF- and PrrH-protein complexes were enriched using cDNA "bait", and enriched RNA-protein complexes were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry to identify PrrF and PrrH associated proteins. This method identified Hfq as a potential PrrF- and PrrH-binding protein. Interestingly, Hfq was identified more often in samples probed with the PrrF cDNA "bait" as compared to the PrrH cDNA "bait", suggesting Hfq has a stronger binding affinity for the PrrF sRNAs in vivo. Hfq binding to the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs was validated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified Hfq protein from P. aeruginosa. As such, this study demonstrates that in vivo cross-linking coupled with sequence-specific affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (SSAC-MS/MS) is an effective methodology for unbiased identification of bacterial sRNA-binding proteins.

  4. A method for in vivo identification of bacterial small RNA-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Jonathan; Djapgne, Louise; Tran, Bao Quoc; Goo, Young Ah; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2014-01-01

    Small bacterial regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) have gained immense appreciation over the last decade for their roles in mediating posttranscriptional gene regulation of numerous physiological processes. Several proteins contribute to sRNA stability and regulation, most notably the Hfq RNA-binding protein. However, not all sRNAs rely on Hfq for their stability. It is therefore likely that other proteins contribute to the stability and function of certain bacterial sRNAs. Here, we describe a methodology for identifying in vivo-binding proteins of sRNAs, developed using the iron-responsive PrrF and PrrH sRNAs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. RNA was isolated from iron-depleted cultures, which were irradiated to cross-link nucleoprotein complexes. Subsequently, PrrF- and PrrH-protein complexes were enriched using cDNA “bait”, and enriched RNA-protein complexes were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry to identify PrrF and PrrH associated proteins. This method identified Hfq as a potential PrrF- and PrrH-binding protein. Interestingly, Hfq was identified more often in samples probed with the PrrF cDNA “bait” as compared to the PrrH cDNA “bait”, suggesting Hfq has a stronger binding affinity for the PrrF sRNAs in vivo. Hfq binding to the PrrF and PrrH sRNAs was validated by electrophoretic mobility shift assays with purified Hfq protein from P. aeruginosa. As such, this study demonstrates that in vivo cross-linking coupled with sequence-specific affinity chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (SSAC-MS/MS) is an effective methodology for unbiased identification of bacterial sRNA-binding proteins. PMID:25351924

  5. Quantification of protein copy number in single mitochondria: The Bcl-2 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chaoxiang; Zhang, Xiang; Zhang, Shuyue; Zhu, Shaobin; Xu, Jingyi; Zheng, Yan; Han, Jinyan; Zeng, Jin-Zhang; Yan, Xiaomei

    2015-12-15

    Bcl-2 family proteins, represented by antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and proapoptotic protein Bax, are key regulators of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis pathway. To build a quantitative model of how Bcl-2 family protein interactions control mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and subsequent cytochrome c release, it is essential to know the number of proteins in individual mitochondria. Here, we report an effective method to quantify the copy number and distribution of proteins in single mitochondria via immunofluorescent labeling and sensitive detection by a laboratory-built high sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM). Mitochondria isolated from HeLa cells were stained with Alexa Fluor 488 (AF488)-labeled monoclonal antibodies specifically targeting Bcl-2 or Bax and with nucleic acid dye. A series of fluorescent nanospheres with fluorescence intensity calibrated in the unit of molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrome (MESF)-AF488 were used to construct a calibration curve for converting the immunofluorescence of a single mitochondrion to the number of antibodies bound to it and then to the number of proteins per mitochondrion. Under the normal condition, the measured mean copy numbers were 1300 and 220 per mitochondrion for Bcl-2 and Bax, respectively. A significant variation in protein copy number was identified, which ranged from 130 to 6000 (2.5-97.5%) for Bcl-2 and from 65 to 700 (2.5-97.5%) for Bax, respectively. We observed an approximately 4.4 fold increase of Bax copy number per mitochondrion upon 9h of apoptosis stimulation while the abundance of Bcl-2 remained almost unchanged. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Bcl-2 family protein copy number and variance in single mitochondria. Collectively, we demonstrate that the HSFCM-based immunoassay provides a rapid and sensitive method for determining protein copy number distribution in single mitochondria.

  6. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response.

    PubMed

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO.

  7. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response.

    PubMed

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO. PMID:27435260

  8. The bacterial DNA repair protein Mfd confers resistance to the host nitrogen immune response

    PubMed Central

    Guillemet, Elisabeth; Leréec, Alain; Tran, Seav-Ly; Royer, Corinne; Barbosa, Isabelle; Sansonetti, Philippe; Lereclus, Didier; Ramarao, Nalini

    2016-01-01

    Production of reactive nitrogen species (NO) is a key step in the immune response following infections. NO induces lesions to bacterial DNA, thus limiting bacterial growth within hosts. Using two pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus cereus and Shigella flexneri, we show that the DNA-repair protein Mfd (Mutation-Frequency-Decline) is required for bacterial resistance to the host-NO-response. In both species, a mutant deficient for mfd does not survive to NO, produced in vitro or by phagocytic cells. In vivo, the ∆mfd mutant is avirulent and unable to survive the NO-stress. Moreover, NO induces DNA-double-strand-breaks and point mutations in the Δmfd mutant. In overall, these observations demonstrate that NO damages bacterial DNA and that Mfd is required to maintain bacterial genomic integrity. This unexpected discovery reveals that Mfd, a typical housekeeping gene, turns out to be a true virulence factor allowing survival and growth of the pathogen in its host, due to its capacity to protect the bacterium against NO, a key molecule of the innate immune defense. As Mfd is widely conserved in the bacterial kingdom, these data highlight a mechanism that may be used by a large spectrum of bacteria to overcome the host immune response and especially the mutagenic properties of NO. PMID:27435260

  9. Expression and crystallization of a bacterial glycoside hydrolase family 116 β-glucosidase from Thermoanaerobacterium xylanolyticum.

    PubMed

    Sansenya, Sompong; Mutoh, Risa; Charoenwattanasatien, Ratana; Kurisu, Genji; Ketudat Cairns, James R

    2015-01-01

    The Thermoanaerobacterium xylanolyticum gene product TxGH116, a glycoside hydrolase family 116 protein of 806 amino-acid residues sharing 37% amino-acid sequence identity over 783 residues with human glucosylceramidase 2 (GBA2), was expressed in Escherichia coli. Purification by heating, immobilized metal-affinity and size-exclusion chromatography produced >90% pure TxGH116 protein with an apparent molecular mass of 90 kDa on SDS-PAGE. The purified TxGH116 enzyme hydrolyzed the p-nitrophenyl (pNP) glycosides pNP-β-D-glucoside, pNP-β-D-galactoside and pNP-N-acetyl-β-D-glucopyranoside, as well as cellobiose and cellotriose. The TxGH116 protein was crystallized using a precipitant consisting of 0.6 M sodium citrate tribasic, 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 7.0 by vapour diffusion with micro-seeding to form crystals with maximum dimensions of 120×25×5 µm. The TxGH116 crystals diffracted X-rays to 3.15 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2(1). Structure solution will allow a structural explanation of the effects of human GBA2 mutations.

  10. Exploring Bacterial Organelle Interactomes: A Model of the Protein-Protein Interaction Network in the Pdu Microcompartment

    PubMed Central

    Jorda, Julien; Liu, Yu; Bobik, Thomas A.; Yeates, Todd O.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are protein-bound organelles that carry out diverse metabolic pathways in a wide range of bacteria. These supramolecular assemblies consist of a thin outer protein shell, reminiscent of a viral capsid, which encapsulates sequentially acting enzymes. The most complex MCP elucidated so far is the propanediol utilizing (Pdu) microcompartment. It contains the reactions for degrading 1,2-propanediol. While several experimental studies on the Pdu system have provided hints about its organization, a clear picture of how all the individual components interact has not emerged yet. Here we use co-evolution-based methods, involving pairwise comparisons of protein phylogenetic trees, to predict the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network governing the assembly of the Pdu MCP. We propose a model of the Pdu interactome, from which selected PPIs are further inspected via computational docking simulations. We find that shell protein PduA is able to serve as a “universal hub” for targeting an array of enzymes presenting special N-terminal extensions, namely PduC, D, E, L and P. The varied N-terminal peptides are predicted to bind in the same cleft on the presumptive luminal face of the PduA hexamer. We also propose that PduV, a protein of unknown function with remote homology to the Ras-like GTPase superfamily, is likely to localize outside the MCP, interacting with the protruding β-barrel of the hexameric PduU shell protein. Preliminary experiments involving a bacterial two-hybrid assay are presented that corroborate the existence of a PduU-PduV interaction. This first systematic computational study aimed at characterizing the interactome of a bacterial microcompartment provides fresh insight into the organization of the Pdu MCP. PMID:25646976

  11. Flexibility in targeting and insertion during bacterial membrane protein biogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bloois, Edwin van; Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M. ten; Luirink, Joen

    2007-10-26

    The biogenesis of Escherichia coli inner membrane proteins (IMPs) is assisted by targeting and insertion factors such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the Sec-translocon and YidC with translocation of (large) periplasmic domains energized by SecA and the proton motive force (pmf). The use of these factors and forces is probably primarily determined by specific structural features of an IMP. To analyze these features we have engineered a set of model IMPs based on endogenous E. coli IMPs known to follow distinct targeting and insertion pathways. The modified model IMPs were analyzed for altered routing using an in vivo protease mapping approach. The data suggest a facultative use of different combinations of factors.

  12. Flexibility in targeting and insertion during bacterial membrane protein biogenesis.

    PubMed

    van Bloois, Edwin; ten Hagen-Jongman, Corinne M; Luirink, Joen

    2007-10-26

    The biogenesis of Escherichia coli inner membrane proteins (IMPs) is assisted by targeting and insertion factors such as the signal recognition particle (SRP), the Sec-translocon and YidC with translocation of (large) periplasmic domains energized by SecA and the proton motive force (pmf). The use of these factors and forces is probably primarily determined by specific structural features of an IMP. To analyze these features we have engineered a set of model IMPs based on endogenous E. coli IMPs known to follow distinct targeting and insertion pathways. The modified model IMPs were analyzed for altered routing using an in vivo protease mapping approach. The data suggest a facultative use of different combinations of factors.

  13. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores

    PubMed Central

    Bickel, Perry E.; Tansey, John T.; Welte, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kiloDaltons (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  14. PAT proteins, an ancient family of lipid droplet proteins that regulate cellular lipid stores.

    PubMed

    Bickel, Perry E; Tansey, John T; Welte, Michael A

    2009-06-01

    The PAT family of lipid droplet proteins includes 5 members in mammals: perilipin, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP), tail-interacting protein of 47 kDa (TIP47), S3-12, and OXPAT. Members of this family are also present in evolutionarily distant organisms, including insects, slime molds and fungi. All PAT proteins share sequence similarity and the ability to bind intracellular lipid droplets, either constitutively or in response to metabolic stimuli, such as increased lipid flux into or out of lipid droplets. Positioned at the lipid droplet surface, PAT proteins manage access of other proteins (lipases) to the lipid esters within the lipid droplet core and can interact with cellular machinery important for lipid droplet biogenesis. Genetic variations in the gene for the best-characterized of the mammalian PAT proteins, perilipin, have been associated with metabolic phenotypes, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity. In this review, we discuss how the PAT proteins regulate cellular lipid metabolism both in mammals and in model organisms. PMID:19375517

  15. Crystal structure of the YajQ-family protein XC_3703 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhixin; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As an important bacterial second messenger, bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylate (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in numerous biological activities, including biofilm formation, motility, survival and virulence. These processes are manipulated by the binding of c-di-GMP to its receptors. XC_3703 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which belongs to the YajQ family of proteins, has recently been identified as a potential c-di-GMP receptor. XC_3703, together with XC_2801, functions as a transcription factor activating virulence-related genes, which can be reversed by the binding of c-di-GMP to XC_3703. However, the structural basis of how c-di-GMP regulates XC_3703 remains elusive. In this study, the structure of XC_3703 was determined to 2.1 Å resolution using the molecular-replacement method. The structure of XC_3703 consists of two domains adopting the same topology, which is similar to that of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM). Arg65, which is conserved among the c-di-GMP-binding subfamily of the YajQ family of proteins, together with Phe80 in domain II, forms a putative c-di-GMP binding site. PMID:27599864

  16. Crystal structure of the YajQ-family protein XC_3703 from Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhixin; Wu, Zhen; Zhang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    As an important bacterial second messenger, bis-(3',5')-cyclic diguanylate (cyclic di-GMP or c-di-GMP) has been implicated in numerous biological activities, including biofilm formation, motility, survival and virulence. These processes are manipulated by the binding of c-di-GMP to its receptors. XC_3703 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, which belongs to the YajQ family of proteins, has recently been identified as a potential c-di-GMP receptor. XC_3703, together with XC_2801, functions as a transcription factor activating virulence-related genes, which can be reversed by the binding of c-di-GMP to XC_3703. However, the structural basis of how c-di-GMP regulates XC_3703 remains elusive. In this study, the structure of XC_3703 was determined to 2.1 Å resolution using the molecular-replacement method. The structure of XC_3703 consists of two domains adopting the same topology, which is similar to that of the RNA-recognition motif (RRM). Arg65, which is conserved among the c-di-GMP-binding subfamily of the YajQ family of proteins, together with Phe80 in domain II, forms a putative c-di-GMP binding site.

  17. Jun N-Terminal Protein Kinase Enhances Middle Ear Mucosal Proliferation during Bacterial Otitis Media▿

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Masayuki; Ebmeyer, Jörg; Pak, Kwang; Austin, Darrell A.; Melhus, Åsa; Webster, Nicholas J. G.; Ryan, Allen F.

    2007-01-01

    Mucosal hyperplasia is a characteristic component of otitis media. The present study investigated the participation of signaling via the Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) mitogen-activated protein kinase in middle ear mucosal hyperplasia in animal models of bacterial otitis media. Otitis media was induced by the inoculation of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae into the middle ear cavity. Western blotting revealed that phosphorylation of JNK isoforms in the middle ear mucosa preceded but paralleled mucosal hyperplasia in this in vivo rat model. Nuclear JNK phosphorylation was observed in many cells of both the mucosal epithelium and stroma by immunohistochemistry. In an in vitro model of primary rat middle ear mucosal explants, bacterially induced mucosal growth was blocked by the Rac/Cdc42 inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin B, the mixed-lineage kinase inhibitor CEP11004, and the JNK inhibitor SP600125. Finally, the JNK inhibitor SP600125 significantly inhibited mucosal hyperplasia during in vivo bacterial otitis media in guinea pigs. Inhibition of JNK in vivo resulted in a diminished proliferative response, as shown by a local decrease in proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein expression by immunohistochemistry. We conclude that activation of JNK is a critical pathway for bacterially induced mucosal hyperplasia during otitis media, influencing tissue proliferation. PMID:17325051

  18. Effects of fluoride on bacterial growth and its gene/protein expression.

    PubMed

    Ma, Haili; Wu, Xiaohu; Yang, Meng; Wang, Jianmei; Wang, Jinming; Wang, Jundong

    2014-04-01

    To determine the effects of fluoride on bacterial growth, as well as upon its gene/protein expression, we grew Escherichia coli expressing GFPuv (E. coli-GFPuv) in Luria Bertani medium at different concentrations of NaF, 0, 0.1 mM, 1 mM, 10 mM and 100 mM. Results showed that E. coli-pGFPuv growth and expression of mRNA and protein of GFPuv were increased at 0.1 and 1 mM, but were inhibited at 10 and 100 mM, which demonstrated that fluoride has a classic rise/fall response of inducing E. coli-GFPuv growth and gene and protein expression of GFPuv at 1 mM. Our observation suggests that the effect of fluoride on bacterial growth may be from regulation of mRNA expression.

  19. A phage protein that inhibits the bacterial ATPase required for type IV pilus assembly.

    PubMed

    Chung, In-Young; Jang, Hye-Jeong; Bae, Hee-Won; Cho, You-Hee

    2014-08-01

    Type IV pili (TFPs) are required for bacterial twitching motility and for phage infection in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we describe a phage-encoded protein, D3112 protein gp05 (hereafter referred to as Tip, representing twitching inhibitory protein), whose expression is necessary and sufficient to mediate the inhibition of twitching motility. Tip interacts with and blocks the activity of bacterial-encoded PilB, the TFP assembly/extension ATPase, at an internal 40-aa region unique to PilB. Tip expression results in the loss of surface piliation. Based on these observations and the fact that many P. aeruginosa phages require TFPs for infection, Tip-mediated twitching inhibition may represent a generalized strategy for superinfection exclusion. Moreover, because TFPs are required for full virulence, PilB may be an attractive target for the development of novel antiinfectives. PMID:25049409

  20. Channel crossing: how are proteins shipped across the bacterial plasma membrane?

    PubMed Central

    Collinson, Ian; Corey, Robin A.; Allen, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the first protein-conducting channel was determined more than a decade ago. Today, we are still puzzled by the outstanding problem of protein translocation—the dynamic mechanism underlying the consignment of proteins across and into membranes. This review is an attempt to summarize and understand the energy transducing capabilities of protein-translocating machines, with emphasis on bacterial systems: how polypeptides make headway against the lipid bilayer and how the process is coupled to the free energy associated with ATP hydrolysis and the transmembrane protein motive force. In order to explore how cargo is driven across the membrane, the known structures of the protein-translocation machines are set out against the background of the historic literature, and in the light of experiments conducted in their wake. The paper will focus on the bacterial general secretory (Sec) pathway (SecY-complex), and its eukaryotic counterpart (Sec61-complex), which ferry proteins across the membrane in an unfolded state, as well as the unrelated Tat system that assembles bespoke channels for the export of folded proteins. PMID:26370937

  1. The Golgin Family of Coiled-Coil Tethering Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Witkos, Tomasz M.; Lowe, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The golgins are a family of predominantly coiled-coil proteins that are localized to the Golgi apparatus. Golgins are present in all eukaryotes, suggesting an evolutionary conserved function. Golgins are anchored to the Golgi membrane by their carboxy terminus and are predicted to adopt an extended conformation that projects into the surrounding cytoplasm. This arrangement is ideal for the capture or tethering of nearby membranes or cytoskeletal elements. Golgin-mediated tethering is thought to be important for vesicular traffic at the Golgi apparatus, the maintenance of Golgi architecture, as well as the positioning of the Golgi apparatus within cells. In addition to acting as tethers, some golgins can also sequester various factors at the Golgi membrane, allowing for the spatiotemporal regulation of downstream cellular functions. Although it is now established that golgins are membrane and cytoskeleton tethers, the mechanisms underlying tethering remain poorly defined. Moreover, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering in a physiological context remains to be fully explored. This review will describe our current understanding of golgin function, highlighting recent progress that has been made, and goes on to discuss outstanding questions and potential avenues for future research with regard to this family of conserved Golgi-associated proteins. PMID:26793708

  2. Docking validation resources: protein family and ligand flexibility experiments.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sudipto; Balius, Trent E; Rizzo, Robert C

    2010-11-22

    A database consisting of 780 ligand-receptor complexes, termed SB2010, has been derived from the Protein Databank to evaluate the accuracy of docking protocols for regenerating bound ligand conformations. The goal is to provide easily accessible community resources for development of improved procedures to aid virtual screening for ligands with a wide range of flexibilities. Three core experiments using the program DOCK, which employ rigid (RGD), fixed anchor (FAD), and flexible (FLX) protocols, were used to gauge performance by several different metrics: (1) global results, (2) ligand flexibility, (3) protein family, and (4) cross-docking. Global spectrum plots of successes and failures vs rmsd reveal well-defined inflection regions, which suggest the commonly used 2 Å criteria is a reasonable choice for defining success. Across all 780 systems, success tracks with the relative difficulty of the calculations: RGD (82.3%) > FAD (78.1%) > FLX (63.8%). In general, failures due to scoring strongly outweigh those due to sampling. Subsets of SB2010 grouped by ligand flexibility (7-or-less, 8-to-15, and 15-plus rotatable bonds) reveal that success degrades linearly for FAD and FLX protocols, in contrast to RGD, which remains constant. Despite the challenges associated with FLX anchor orientation and on-the-fly flexible growth, success rates for the 7-or-less (74.5%) and, in particular, the 8-to-15 (55.2%) subset are encouraging. Poorer results for the very flexible 15-plus set (39.3%) indicate substantial room for improvement. Family-based success appears largely independent of ligand flexibility, suggesting a strong dependence on the binding site environment. For example, zinc-containing proteins are generally problematic, despite moderately flexible ligands. Finally, representative cross-docking examples, for carbonic anhydrase, thermolysin, and neuraminidase families, show the utility of family-based analysis for rapid identification of particularly good or bad

  3. Self-assembling, protein-based intracellular bacterial organelles: emerging vehicles for encapsulating, targeting and delivering therapeutical cargoes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many bacterial species contain intracellular nano- and micro-compartments consisting of self-assembling proteins that form protein-only shells. These structures are built up by combinations of a reduced number of repeated elements, from 60 repeated copies of one unique structural element self-assembled in encapsulins of 24 nm to 10,000-20,000 copies of a few protein species assembled in a organelle of around 100-150 nm in cross-section. However, this apparent simplicity does not correspond to the structural and functional sophistication of some of these organelles. They package, by not yet definitely solved mechanisms, one or more enzymes involved in specific metabolic pathways, confining such reactions and sequestering or increasing the inner concentration of unstable, toxics or volatile intermediate metabolites. From a biotechnological point of view, we can use the self assembling properties of these particles for directing shell assembling and enzyme packaging, mimicking nature to design new applications in biotechnology. Upon appropriate engineering of the building blocks, they could act as a new family of self-assembled, protein-based vehicles in Nanomedicine to encapsulate, target and deliver therapeutic cargoes to specific cell types and/or tissues. This would provide a new, intriguing platform of microbial origin for drug delivery. PMID:22046962

  4. Analysis of membrane proteins in metagenomics: networks of correlated environmental features and protein families.

    PubMed

    Patel, Prianka V; Gianoulis, Tara A; Bjornson, Robert D; Yip, Kevin Y; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark B

    2010-07-01

    Recent metagenomics studies have begun to sample the genomic diversity among disparate habitats and relate this variation to features of the environment. Membrane proteins are an intuitive, but thus far overlooked, choice in this type of analysis as they directly interact with the environment, receiving signals from the outside and transporting nutrients. Using global ocean sampling (GOS) data, we found nearly approximately 900,000 membrane proteins in large-scale metagenomic sequence, approximately a fifth of which are completely novel, suggesting a large space of hitherto unexplored protein diversity. Using GPS coordinates for the GOS sites, we extracted additional environmental features via interpolation from the World Ocean Database, the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis, and empirical models of dust occurrence. This allowed us to study membrane protein variation in terms of natural features, such as phosphate and nitrate concentrations, and also in terms of human impacts, such as pollution and climate change. We show that there is widespread variation in membrane protein content across marine sites, which is correlated with changes in both oceanographic variables and human factors. Furthermore, using these data, we developed an approach, protein families and environment features network (PEN), to quantify and visualize the correlations. PEN identifies small groups of covarying environmental features and membrane protein families, which we call "bimodules." Using this approach, we find that the affinity of phosphate transporters is related to the concentration of phosphate and that the occurrence of iron transporters is connected to the amount of shipping, pollution, and iron-containing dust.

  5. Single-molecule studies of kinesin family motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fordyce, Polly

    Kinesin family motor proteins drive many essential cellular processes, including cargo transport and mitotic spindle assembly and regulation. They accomplish these tasks by converting the chemical energy released from the hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) directly into mechanical motion along microtubules in cells. Optical traps allow us to track and apply force to individual motor proteins, and have already revealed many details of the movement of conventional kinesin, although the precise mechanism by which chemical energy is converted into mechanical motion is unclear. Other kinesin family members remain largely uncharacterized. This dissertation details the use of a novel optical-trapping assay to study Eg5, a Kinesin-5 family member involved in both spindle assembly and pole separation during mitosis. We demonstrate that individual Eg5 dimers are relatively slow and force-insensitive motors that take about 8 steps, on average, before detaching from the microtubule. Key differences in processivity and force-response between Eg5 and conventional kinesin suggest ways in which the two motors might have evolved to perform very different tasks in cells. This dissertation also details efforts to unravel how chemical energy is converted into mechanical motion by simultaneously measuring mechanical transitions (with an optical trap) and nucleotide binding and release (with single-molecule fluorescence) for individual conventional kinesin motors. We constructed a combined instrument, demonstrated its capabilities by unzipping fluorescently-labeled DNA duplexes, and used this instrument to record the motion of individual conventional kinesin motors powered by the hydrolysis of fluorescent nucleotides. Preliminary data reveal the challenges inherent in such measurements and guide proposals for future experimental approaches. Finally, this dissertation includes several chapters intended to serve as practical guides to understanding, constructing, and maintaining

  6. Correlation of gene and protein structures in the FXYD family proteins.

    PubMed

    Franzin, Carla M; Yu, Jinghua; Thai, Khang; Choi, Jungyuen; Marassi, Francesca M

    2005-12-01

    The FXYD family proteins are auxiliary subunits of the Na,K-ATPase, expressed primarily in tissues that specialize in fluid or solute transport, or that are electrically excitable. These proteins range in size from about 60 to 160 amino acid residues, and share a core homology of 35 amino acid residues in and around a single transmembrane segment. Despite their relatively small sizes, they are all encoded by genes with six to nine small exons. We show that the helical secondary structures of three FXYD family members, FXYD1, FXYD3, and FXYD4, determined in micelles by NMR spectroscopy, reflect the structures of their corresponding genes. The coincidence of helical regions, and connecting segments, with the positions of intron-exon junctions in the genes, support the hypothesis that the FXYD proteins may have been assembled from discrete structural modules through exon shuffling. PMID:16288923

  7. Modulating Salmonella Typhimurium's Response to a Changing Environment through Bacterial Enhancer-Binding Proteins and the RpoN Regulon

    PubMed Central

    Hartman, Christine E.; Samuels, David J.; Karls, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Transcription sigma factors direct the selective binding of RNA polymerase holoenzyme (Eσ) to specific promoters. Two families of sigma factors determine promoter specificity, the σ70 (RpoD) family and the σ54 (RpoN) family. In transcription controlled by σ54, the Eσ54-promoter closed complex requires ATP hydrolysis by an associated bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) for the transition to open complex and transcription initiation. Given the wide host range of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, it is an excellent model system for investigating the roles of RpoN and its bEBPs in modulating the lifestyle of bacteria. The genome of S. Typhimurium encodes 13 known or predicted bEBPs, each responding to a unique intracellular or extracellular signal. While the regulons of most alternative sigma factors respond to a specific environmental or developmental signal, the RpoN regulon is very diverse, controlling genes for response to nitrogen limitation, nitric oxide stress, availability of alternative carbon sources, phage shock/envelope stress, toxic levels of zinc, nucleic acid damage, and other stressors. This review explores how bEBPs respond to environmental changes encountered by S. Typhimurium during transmission/infection and influence adaptation through control of transcription of different components of the S. Typhimurium RpoN regulon. PMID:27583250

  8. Modulating Salmonella Typhimurium's Response to a Changing Environment through Bacterial Enhancer-Binding Proteins and the RpoN Regulon.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Christine E; Samuels, David J; Karls, Anna C

    2016-01-01

    Transcription sigma factors direct the selective binding of RNA polymerase holoenzyme (Eσ) to specific promoters. Two families of sigma factors determine promoter specificity, the σ(70) (RpoD) family and the σ(54) (RpoN) family. In transcription controlled by σ(54), the Eσ(54)-promoter closed complex requires ATP hydrolysis by an associated bacterial enhancer-binding protein (bEBP) for the transition to open complex and transcription initiation. Given the wide host range of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, it is an excellent model system for investigating the roles of RpoN and its bEBPs in modulating the lifestyle of bacteria. The genome of S. Typhimurium encodes 13 known or predicted bEBPs, each responding to a unique intracellular or extracellular signal. While the regulons of most alternative sigma factors respond to a specific environmental or developmental signal, the RpoN regulon is very diverse, controlling genes for response to nitrogen limitation, nitric oxide stress, availability of alternative carbon sources, phage shock/envelope stress, toxic levels of zinc, nucleic acid damage, and other stressors. This review explores how bEBPs respond to environmental changes encountered by S. Typhimurium during transmission/infection and influence adaptation through control of transcription of different components of the S. Typhimurium RpoN regulon. PMID:27583250

  9. A protein relational database and protein family knowledge bases to facilitate structure-based design analyses.

    PubMed

    Mobilio, Dominick; Walker, Gary; Brooijmans, Natasja; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Denny, R Aldrin; Dejoannis, Jason; Feyfant, Eric; Kowticwar, Rupesh K; Mankala, Jyoti; Palli, Satish; Punyamantula, Sairam; Tatipally, Maneesh; John, Reji K; Humblet, Christine

    2010-08-01

    The Protein Data Bank is the most comprehensive source of experimental macromolecular structures. It can, however, be difficult at times to locate relevant structures with the Protein Data Bank search interface. This is particularly true when searching for complexes containing specific interactions between protein and ligand atoms. Moreover, searching within a family of proteins can be tedious. For example, one cannot search for some conserved residue as residue numbers vary across structures. We describe herein three databases, Protein Relational Database, Kinase Knowledge Base, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, containing protein structures from the Protein Data Bank. In Protein Relational Database, atom-atom distances between protein and ligand have been precalculated allowing for millisecond retrieval based on atom identity and distance constraints. Ring centroids, centroid-centroid and centroid-atom distances and angles have also been included permitting queries for pi-stacking interactions and other structural motifs involving rings. Other geometric features can be searched through the inclusion of residue pair and triplet distances. In Kinase Knowledge Base and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, the catalytic domains have been aligned into common residue numbering schemes. Thus, by searching across Protein Relational Database and Kinase Knowledge Base, one can easily retrieve structures wherein, for example, a ligand of interest is making contact with the gatekeeper residue.

  10. Clinical Prognosis in Neonatal Bacterial Meningitis: The Role of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Dongying; Ren, Fang; Luo, Zhongcheng; Zhang, Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Neonates are at high risk of meningitis and of resulting neurologic complications. Early recognition of neonates at risk of poor prognosis would be helpful in providing timely management. From January 2008 to June 2014, we enrolled 232 term neonates with bacterial meningitis admitted to 3 neonatology departments in Shanghai, China. The clinical status on the day of discharge from these hospitals or at a postnatal age of 2.5 to 3 months was evaluated using the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS). Patients were classified into two outcome groups: good (167 cases, 72.0%, GOS = 5) or poor (65 cases, 28.0%, GOS = 1–4). Neonates with good outcome had less frequent apnea, drowsiness, poor feeding, bulging fontanelle, irritability and more severe jaundice compared to neonates with poor outcome. The good outcome group also had less pneumonia than the poor outcome group. Besides, there were statistically significant differences in hemoglobin, mean platelet volume, platelet distribution width, C-reaction protein, procalcitonin, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose and CSF protein. Multivariate logistic regression analyses suggested that poor feeding, pneumonia and CSF protein were the predictors of poor outcome. CSF protein content was significantly higher in patients with poor outcome. The best cut-offs for predicting poor outcome were 1,880 mg/L in CSF protein concentration (sensitivity 70.8%, specificity 86.2%). After 2 weeks of treatment, CSF protein remained higher in the poor outcome group. High CSF protein concentration may prognosticate poor outcome in neonates with bacterial meningitis. PMID:26509880

  11. Protein, cell and bacterial response to atmospheric pressure plasma grafted hyaluronic acid on poly(methylmethacrylate).

    PubMed

    D'Sa, Raechelle A; Raj, Jog; Dickinson, Peter J; McMahon, M Ann S; McDowell, David A; Meenan, Brian J

    2015-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been immobilised on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces using a novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma process for the purposes of repelling protein, cellular and bacterial adhesion in the context of improving the performance of ophthalmic devices. Grafting was achieved by the following steps: (1) treatment of the PMMA with a DBD plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, (2) amine functionalisation of the activated polymer surface by exposure to a 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) linker molecule and (3) reaction of HA with the surface bound amine. The mechanism and effectiveness of the grafting process was verified by surface analysis. XPS data indicates that the APTMS linker molecule binds to PMMA via the Si-O chemistry and has the required pendant amine moiety. The carboxylic acid moiety on HA then binds with this -NH2 group via standard carbodiimide chemistry. ToF-SIMS confirms the presence of a coherent HA layer the microstructure of which is verified by AFM. The plasma grafted HA coating surfaces showed a pronounced decrease in protein and cellular adhesion when tested with bovine serum albumin and human corneal epithelial cells, respectively. The ability of these coatings to resist bacterial adhesion was established using Staphylococcus aureus NTC8325. Interestingly, the coatings did not repel bacterial adhesion, indicating that the mechanism of adhesion of bacterial cells is different to that for the surface interactions of mammalian cells. It is proposed that this difference is a consequence of the specific HA conformation that occurs under the conditions employed here. Hence, it is apparent that the microstructure/architecture of the HA coatings is an important factor in fabricating surfaces intended to repel proteins, mammalian and bacterial cells.

  12. Protein, cell and bacterial response to atmospheric pressure plasma grafted hyaluronic acid on poly(methylmethacrylate).

    PubMed

    D'Sa, Raechelle A; Raj, Jog; Dickinson, Peter J; McMahon, M Ann S; McDowell, David A; Meenan, Brian J

    2015-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) has been immobilised on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces using a novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma process for the purposes of repelling protein, cellular and bacterial adhesion in the context of improving the performance of ophthalmic devices. Grafting was achieved by the following steps: (1) treatment of the PMMA with a DBD plasma operating at atmospheric pressure, (2) amine functionalisation of the activated polymer surface by exposure to a 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane (APTMS) linker molecule and (3) reaction of HA with the surface bound amine. The mechanism and effectiveness of the grafting process was verified by surface analysis. XPS data indicates that the APTMS linker molecule binds to PMMA via the Si-O chemistry and has the required pendant amine moiety. The carboxylic acid moiety on HA then binds with this -NH2 group via standard carbodiimide chemistry. ToF-SIMS confirms the presence of a coherent HA layer the microstructure of which is verified by AFM. The plasma grafted HA coating surfaces showed a pronounced decrease in protein and cellular adhesion when tested with bovine serum albumin and human corneal epithelial cells, respectively. The ability of these coatings to resist bacterial adhesion was established using Staphylococcus aureus NTC8325. Interestingly, the coatings did not repel bacterial adhesion, indicating that the mechanism of adhesion of bacterial cells is different to that for the surface interactions of mammalian cells. It is proposed that this difference is a consequence of the specific HA conformation that occurs under the conditions employed here. Hence, it is apparent that the microstructure/architecture of the HA coatings is an important factor in fabricating surfaces intended to repel proteins, mammalian and bacterial cells. PMID:26449450

  13. [Interconnection between architecture of protein globule and disposition of conformational conservative oligopeptides in proteins from one protein family].

    PubMed

    Batianovskiĭ, A V; Filatov, I V; Namiot, V A; Esipova, N G; Volotovskiĭ, I D

    2012-01-01

    It was shown that selective interactions between helical segments of macromolecules can realize in globular proteins in the segments characterized by the same periodicities of charge distribution i.e. between conformationally conservative oligopeptides. It was found that in the macromolecules of alpha-helical proteins conformationally conservative oligopeptides are disposed at a distance being characteristic of direct interactions. For representatives of many structural families of alpha-type proteins specific disposition of conformationally conservative segments is observed. This disposition is inherent to a particular structural family. Disposition of conformationally conservative segments is not related to homology of the amino acid sequence but reflects peculiarities of native 3D-architectures of protein globules.

  14. Structural and Functional Characterization of the VQ Protein Family and VQ Protein Variants from Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Xinjian; Chi, Yingjun; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing the FxxxVQxhTG or VQ motif interact with WRKY transcription factors. Although VQ proteins have been reported in several plants, knowledge about their structures, functions and evolution is still very limited. Here, we report structural and functional analysis of the VQ protein family from soybean. Like Arabidopsis homologues, soybean VQ proteins bind only Group I and IIc WRKY proteins and a substantial number of their genes are responsive to stress-associated phytohormones. Overexpression of some soybean VQ genes in Arabidopsis had strong effects on plant growth, development, disease resistance and heat tolerance. Phylogenetic analysis, sequence alignment and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the region immediately upstream of the FxxxVQxhTG motif also affects binding to WRKY proteins. Consistent with a larger WRKY-binding VQ domain, soybean VQ22 protein from cultivated soybean contains a 4-amino acid deletion in the region preceding its VQ motif that completely abolishes its binding to WRKY proteins. By contrast, the 4-amino acid deletion is absent in the VQ22 protein from wild soybean species (Glycine soja). Overexpression of wild soybean VQ22 in cultivated soybean inhibited growth, particularly after cold treatment. Thus, the mutation of soybean VQ22 is associated with advantageous phenotypes and may have been positively selected during evolution. PMID:27708406

  15. A novel protein tightly bound to bacterial magnetic particles in Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, Atsushi; Webb, John; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2003-03-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize magnetite crystals with species-dependent morphologies. The molecular mechanisms that control nano-sized magnetite crystal formation and the generation of diverse morphologies are not well understood. From the analysis of magnetite crystal-associated proteins, several low molecular mass proteins tightly bound to bacterial magnetite were obtained from Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1. These proteins showed common features in their amino acid sequences, which contain hydrophobic N-terminal and hydrophilic C-terminal regions. The C-terminal regions in Mms5, Mms6, Mms7, and Mms13 contain dense carboxyl and hydroxyl groups that bind iron ions. Nano-sized magnetic particles similar to those in magnetic bacteria were prepared by chemical synthesis of magnetite in the presence of the acidic protein Mms6. These proteins may be directly involved in biological magnetite crystal formation in magnetic bacteria.

  16. The bacterial virulence factor NleA inhibits cellular protein secretion by disrupting mammalian COPII function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinoh; Thanabalasuriar, Ajitha; Chaworth-Musters, Tessa; Fromme, J Chris; Frey, Elizabeth A; Lario, Paula I; Metalnikov, Pavel; Rizg, Keyrillos; Thomas, Nikhil A; Lee, Sau Fung; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Hardwidge, Philip R; Pawson, Tony; Strynadka, Natalie C; Finlay, B Brett; Schekman, Randy; Gruenheid, Samantha

    2007-09-13

    Enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EHEC and EPEC) maintain an extracellular lifestyle and use a type III secretion system to translocate effector proteins into the host cytosol. These effectors manipulate host pathways to favor bacterial replication and survival. NleA is an EHEC/EPEC- and related species-specific translocated effector protein that is essential for bacterial virulence. However, the mechanism by which NleA impacts virulence remains undetermined. Here we demonstrate that NleA compromises the Sec23/24 complex, a component of the mammalian COPII protein coat that shapes intracellular protein transport vesicles, by directly binding Sec24. Expression of an NleA-GFP fusion protein reduces the efficiency of cellular secretion by 50%, and secretion is inhibited in EPEC-infected cells. Direct biochemical experiments show that NleA inhibits COPII-dependent protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum. Collectively, these findings indicate that disruption of COPII function in host cells contributes to the virulence of EPEC and EHEC.

  17. A Novel Plant Major Intrinsic Protein in Physcomitrella patens Most Similar to Bacterial Glycerol Channels1

    PubMed Central

    Gustavsson, Sofia; Lebrun, Anne-Sophie; Nordén, Kristina; Chaumont, François; Johanson, Urban

    2005-01-01

    A gene encoding a novel fifth type of major intrinsic protein (MIP) in plants has been identified in the moss Physcomitrella patens. Phylogenetic analyses show that this protein, GlpF-like intrinsic protein (GIP1;1), is closely related to a subclass of glycerol transporters in bacteria that in addition to glycerol are highly permeable to water. A likely explanation of the occurrence of this bacterial-like MIP in P. patens is horizontal gene transfer. The expressed P. patens GIP1;1 gene contains five introns and encodes a unique C-loop extension of approximately 110 amino acid residues that has no obvious similarity with any other known protein. Based on alignments and structural comparisons with other MIPs, GIP1;1 is suggested to have retained the permeability for glycerol but not for water. Studies on heterologously expressed GIP1;1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirm the predicted substrate specificity. Interestingly, proteins of one of the plant-specific subgroups of MIPs, the NOD26-like intrinsic proteins, are also facilitating the transport of glycerol and have previously been suggested to have evolved from a horizontally transferred bacterial gene. Further studies on localization and searches for GIP1;1 homologs in other plants will clarify the function and significance of this new plant MIP. PMID:16113222

  18. [The roles of epigenetics and protein post-translational modifications in bacterial antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Xie, Longxiang; Yu, Zhaoxiao; Guo, Siyao; Li, Ping; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    The increasing antibiotic resistance is now threatening to take us back to a pre-antibiotic era. Bacteria have evolved diverse resistance mechanisms, on which in-depth research could help the development of new strategies to control antibiotic-resistant infections. Epigenetic alterations and protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) play important roles in multiple cellular processes such as metabolism, signal transduction, protein degradation, DNA replication regulation and stress response. Recent studies demonstrated that epigenetics and PTMs also play vital roles in bacterial antibiotic resistance. In this review, we summarize the regulatory roles of epigenetic factors including DNA methylation and regulatory RNAs as well as PTMs such as phosphorylation and succinylation in bacterial antibiotic resistance, which may provide innovative perspectives on selecting antibacterial targets and developing antibiotics. PMID:26266782

  19. Brillouin spectroscopy as a new method of screening for increased CSF total protein during bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Steelman, Zachary; Meng, Zhaokai; Traverso, Andrew J; Yakovlev, Vladislav V

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a disease of pronounced clinical significance, especially in the developing world. Immediate treatment with antibiotics is essential, and no single test can provide a conclusive diagnosis. It is well established that elevated total protein in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is associated with bacterial meningitis. Brillouin spectroscopy is a widely used optical technique for noninvasive determination of the elastic moduli of materials. We found that elevated protein levels in CSF alter the fluid elasticity sufficiently to be measurable by Brillouin spectroscopy, with model healthy and diseased fluids distinguishable to marked significance (P = 0.014), which increases with sample concentration by dialysis. Typical raw output of a 2-stage VIPA Brillouin spectrometer: inelastically scattered Brillouin peaks (arrows) and elastically scattered incident radiation (center cross).

  20. An optimized system for expression and purification of secreted bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Geisbrecht, Brian V; Bouyain, Samuel; Pop, Mihai

    2006-03-01

    In this report, we describe an optimized system for the efficient overexpression, purification, and refolding of secreted bacterial proteins. Candidate secreted proteins were produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli as Tobacco Etch Virus protease-cleavable hexahistidine-c-myc eptiope fusion proteins. Without regard to their initial solubility, recombinant fusion proteins were extracted from whole cells with guanidium chloride, purified under denaturing conditions by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, and refolded by rapid dilution into a solution containing only Tris buffer and sodium chloride. Following concentration on the same resin under native conditions, each protein was eluted for further purification and/or characterization. Preliminary studies on a test set of 12 secreted proteins ranging in size from 13 to 130 kDa yielded between 10 and 50 mg of fusion protein per liter of induced culture at greater than 90% purity, as judged by Coomassie-stained SDS-PAGE. Of the nine proteins further purified, analytical gel filtration chromatography indicated that each was a monomer in solution and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that each had adopted a well-defined secondary structure. While there are many potential applications for this system, the results presented here suggest that it will be particularly useful for investigators employing structural approaches to understand protein function, as attested to by the crystal structures of three proteins purified using this methodology (B.V. Geisbrecht, B.Y. Hamaoka, B. Perman, A. Zemla, D.J. Leahy, J. Biol. Chem. 280 (2005) 17243-17250). PMID:16260150

  1. Modulation of Hippocampal Neuroplasticity by Fas/CD95 Regulatory Protein 2 (Faim2) in the Course of Bacterial Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Harms, Kristian; Falkenburger, Björn; Weis, Joachim; Sellhaus, Bernd; Nau, Roland; Schulz, Jörg B.; Reich, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fas-apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (Faim2) is a neuron-specific membrane protein and a member of the evolutionary conserved lifeguard apoptosis regulatory gene family. Its neuroprotective effect in acute neurological diseases has been demonstrated in an in vivo model of focal cerebral ischemia. Here we show that Faim2 is physiologically expressed in the human brain with a changing pattern in cases of infectious meningoencephalitis.In Faim2-deficient mice, there was increased caspase-associated hippocampal apoptotic cell death and an increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase pattern during acute bacterial meningitis induced by subarachnoid infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. However, after rescuing the animals by antibiotic treatment, Faim2 deficiency led to increased hippocampal neurogenesis at 7 weeks after infection. This was associated with improved performance of Faim2-deficient mice compared to wild-type littermates in the Morris water maze, a paradigm for hippocampal spatial learning and memory. Thus, Faim2 deficiency aggravated degenerative processes in the acute phase but induced regenerative processes in the repair phase of a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Hence, time-dependent modulation of neuroplasticity by Faim2 may offer a new therapeutic approach for reducing hippocampal neuronal cell death and improving cognitive deficits after bacterial meningitis. PMID:24335530

  2. Modulation of hippocampal neuroplasticity by Fas/CD95 regulatory protein 2 (Faim2) in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Simone C; Harms, Kristian; Falkenburger, Björn; Weis, Joachim; Sellhaus, Bernd; Nau, Roland; Schulz, Jörg B; Reich, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Fas-apoptotic inhibitory molecule 2 (Faim2) is a neuron-specific membrane protein and a member of the evolutionary conserved lifeguard apoptosis regulatory gene family. Its neuroprotective effect in acute neurological diseases has been demonstrated in an in vivo model of focal cerebral ischemia. Here we show that Faim2 is physiologically expressed in the human brain with a changing pattern in cases of infectious meningoencephalitis.In Faim2-deficient mice, there was increased caspase-associated hippocampal apoptotic cell death and an increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase pattern during acute bacterial meningitis induced by subarachnoid infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae type 3 strain. However, after rescuing the animals by antibiotic treatment, Faim2 deficiency led to increased hippocampal neurogenesis at 7 weeks after infection. This was associated with improved performance of Faim2-deficient mice compared to wild-type littermates in the Morris water maze, a paradigm for hippocampal spatial learning and memory. Thus, Faim2 deficiency aggravated degenerative processes in the acute phase but induced regenerative processes in the repair phase of a mouse model of pneumococcal meningitis. Hence, time-dependent modulation of neuroplasticity by Faim2 may offer a new therapeutic approach for reducing hippocampal neuronal cell death and improving cognitive deficits after bacterial meningitis.

  3. Structure of the Bacterial Sex F Pilus Reveals an Assembly of a Stoichiometric Protein-Phospholipid Complex.

    PubMed

    Costa, Tiago R D; Ilangovan, Aravindan; Ukleja, Marta; Redzej, Adam; Santini, Joanne M; Smith, Terry K; Egelman, Edward H; Waksman, Gabriel

    2016-09-01

    Conjugative pili are widespread bacterial appendages that play important roles in horizontal gene transfer, in spread of antibiotic resistance genes, and as sites of phage attachment. Among conjugative pili, the F "sex" pilus encoded by the F plasmid is the best functionally characterized, and it is also historically the most important, as the discovery of F-plasmid-mediated conjugation ushered in the era of molecular biology and genetics. Yet, its structure is unknown. Here, we present atomic models of two F family pili, the F and pED208 pili, generated from cryoelectron microscopy reconstructions at 5.0 and 3.6 Å resolution, respectively. These structures reveal that conjugative pili are assemblies of stoichiometric protein-phospholipid units. We further demonstrate that each pilus type binds preferentially to particular phospholipids. These structures provide the molecular basis for F pilus assembly and also shed light on the remarkable properties of conjugative pili in bacterial secretion and phage infection. PMID:27610568

  4. Dentin noncollagenous matrix proteins in familial hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, Céline; Boukpessi, Tchilalo; Septier, Dominique; Jehan, Frédéric; Rowe, Peter S; Garabédian, Michèle; Goldberg, Michel; Chaussain-Miller, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Familial hypophosphatemic rickets is transmitted in most cases as an X-linked dominant trait and results from the mutation of the PHEX gene predominantly expressed in osteoblast and odontoblast. Patients with rickets have been reported to display important dentin defects. Our purpose was to explore the structure, composition and distribution of noncollagenous proteins (NCPs) of hypophosphatemic dentin. We collected teeth from 10 hypophosphatemic patients whose mineralization occurred either in a hypophosphatemic environment or in a corrected phosphate and vitamin environment. Teeth were examined by scanning electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. An abnormal distribution (accumulation in interglobular spaces) and cleavage of the NCPs and particularly of matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein were observed in deciduous dentin. In contrast, it was close to normal in permanent dentin mineralized under corrected conditions. In conclusion, dentin mineralization in a corrected phosphate and vitamin D environment compensates the adverse effect of PHEX mutation.

  5. Molecular characterization and tissue distribution of a novel member of the S100 family of EF-hand proteins.

    PubMed

    Gribenko, A V; Hopper, J E; Makhatadze, G I

    2001-12-25

    We have isolated from a human prostate cDNA library a cDNA encoding a novel member of the S100 family of EF-hand proteins. The encoded 99-amino acid protein, designated S100Z, is capable of interacting with another member of the family, S100P. S100Z cDNA was cloned into a bacterial expression system, and the S100Z protein was purified to homogeneity from bacterial lysates by a combination of hydrophobic column and gel-filtration chromatography. Direct amino acid sequencing of the 20 N-terminal amino acids confirmed that the sequence of the recombinant protein is identical to the sequence deduced from the cDNA. Low-resolution structural data have been obtained using circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopies, and equilibrium analytical centrifugation. These results show that S100Z is a dimeric, predominantly alpha-helical protein. Addition of calcium to a solution of S100Z changes the fluorescence intensity of the protein, indicating that S100Z is capable of binding calcium ions. Analysis of the calcium-binding isotherm indicates the existence of two calcium-binding sites with apparent affinities on the order of 5 x 10(6) and 10(2) M(-1). Binding of calcium results in conformational changes and exposure of hydrophobic surfaces on the protein. Using a PCR-based assay, we have detected differences in the expression level of S100Z mRNA in various tissues. The highest levels were found in spleen and leukocytes. S100Z gene expression appears to be deregulated in some tumor tissues, compared to expression in their normal counterparts. PMID:11747429

  6. Nitric Oxide-Sensing H-NOX Proteins Govern Bacterial Communal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Plate, Lars; Marletta, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Heme-Nitric oxide/Oxygen binding (H-NOX) domains function as sensors for the gaseous signaling agent nitric oxide (NO) in eukaryotes and bacteria. Mammalian NO signaling is well characterized and involves the H-NOX domain of soluble guanylate cyclase. In bacteria, H-NOX proteins interact with bacterial signaling proteins in two-component signaling systems or in cyclic-di-GMP metabolism. Characterization of several downstream signaling processes has shown that bacterial H-NOX proteins share a common role in controlling important bacterial communal behaviors in response to NO. The H-NOX pathways regulate motility, biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and symbiosis. Here, we review the latest structural and mechanistic studies that have elucidated how H-NOX domains selectively bind NO and transduce ligand binding into conformational changes that modulate activity of signaling partners. Furthermore, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the physiological function and biochemical details of the H-NOX signaling pathways. PMID:24113192

  7. Multi-species protein similarity clustering reveals novel expanded immune gene families in the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Ian C; Modak, Tejashree H; Lane, Chris E; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta

    2016-06-01

    Comparative genomics research in non-model species has highlighted how invertebrate hosts possess complex diversified repertoires of immune molecules. The levels of diversification in particular immune gene families appear to differ between invertebrate lineages and even between species within lineages, reflecting differences not only in evolutionary histories, but also in life histories, environmental niches, and pathogen exposures. The goal of this research was to identify immune-related gene families experiencing high levels of diversification in eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica. Families containing 1) transcripts differentially expressed in eastern oysters in response to bacterial challenge and 2) a larger number of transcripts compared to other species included those coding for the C1q and C-type lectin domain containing proteins (C1qDC and CTLDC), GTPase of the immune-associated proteins (GIMAP), scavenger receptors (SR), fibrinogen-C domain containing proteins (also known as FREPs), dopamine beta-hydrolase (DBH), interferon-inducible 44 (IFI44), serine protease inhibitors, apextrin, and dermatopontin. Phylogenetic analysis of two of the families significantly expanded in bivalves, IFI44 and GIMAP, showed a patchy distribution within both protostomes and deuterostomes, suggesting multiple independent losses and lineage-specific expansions. Increased availability of genomic information for a broader range of non-model species broadly distributed through vertebrate and invertebrate phyla will likely lead to improved knowledge on mechanisms of immune-gene diversification. PMID:27033806

  8. A Network Synthesis Model for Generating Protein Interaction Network Families

    PubMed Central

    Sahraeian, Sayed Mohammad Ebrahim; Yoon, Byung-Jun

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we introduce a novel network synthesis model that can generate families of evolutionarily related synthetic protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks. Given an ancestral network, the proposed model generates the network family according to a hypothetical phylogenetic tree, where the descendant networks are obtained through duplication and divergence of their ancestors, followed by network growth using network evolution models. We demonstrate that this network synthesis model can effectively create synthetic networks whose internal and cross-network properties closely resemble those of real PPI networks. The proposed model can serve as an effective framework for generating comprehensive benchmark datasets that can be used for reliable performance assessment of comparative network analysis algorithms. Using this model, we constructed a large-scale network alignment benchmark, called NAPAbench, and evaluated the performance of several representative network alignment algorithms. Our analysis clearly shows the relative performance of the leading network algorithms, with their respective advantages and disadvantages. The algorithm and source code of the network synthesis model and the network alignment benchmark NAPAbench are publicly available at http://www.ece.tamu.edu/bjyoon/NAPAbench/. PMID:22912671

  9. ArnT proteins that catalyze the glycosylation of lipopolysaccharide share common features with bacterial N-oligosaccharyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Tavares-Carreón, Faviola; Fathy Mohamed, Yasmine; Andrade, Angel; Valvano, Miguel A

    2016-03-01

    ArnT is a glycosyltransferase that catalyzes the addition of 4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose (l-Ara4N) to the lipid A moiety of the lipopolysaccharide. This is a critical modification enabling bacteria to resist killing by antimicrobial peptides. ArnT is an integral inner membrane protein consisting of 13 predicted transmembrane helices and a large periplasmic C-terminal domain. We report here the identification of a functional motif with a canonical consensus sequence DEXRYAX(5)MX(3)GXWX(9)YFEKPX(4)W spanning the first periplasmic loop, which is highly conserved in all ArnT proteins examined. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated the contribution of this motif in ArnT function, suggesting that these proteins have a common mechanism. We also demonstrate that the Burkholderia cenocepacia and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium ArnT C-terminal domain is required for polymyxin B resistance in vivo. Deletion of the C-terminal domain in B. cenocepacia ArnT resulted in a protein with significantly reduced in vitro binding to a lipid A fluorescent substrate and unable to catalyze lipid A modification with l-Ara4N. An in silico predicted structural model of ArnT strongly resembled the tertiary structure of Campylobacter lari PglB, a bacterial oligosaccharyltransferase involved in protein N-glycosylation. Therefore, distantly related oligosaccharyltransferases from ArnT and PglB families operating on lipid and polypeptide substrates, respectively, share unexpected structural similarity that could not be predicted from direct amino acid sequence comparisons. We propose that lipid A and protein glycosylation enzymes share a conserved catalytic mechanism despite their evolutionary divergence.

  10. The macro domain protein family: structure, functions, and their potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Han, Weidong; Li, Xiaolei; Fu, Xiaobing

    2011-01-01

    Macro domains are ancient, highly evolutionarily conserved domains that are widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life. The 'macro fold' is roughly 25kDa in size and is composed of a mixed α-β fold with similarity to the P loop-containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolases. They function as binding modules for metabolites of NAD(+), including poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which is synthesized by PAR polymerases (PARPs). Although there is a high degree of sequence similarity within this family, particularly for residues that might be involved in catalysis or substrates binding, it is likely that the sequence variation that does exist among macro domains is responsible for the specificity of function of individual proteins. Recent findings have indicated that macro domain proteins are functionally promiscuous and are implicated in the regulation of diverse biological functions, such as DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation. Significant advances in the field of macro domain have occurred in the past few years, including biological insights and the discovery of novel signaling pathways. To provide a framework for understanding these recent findings, this review will provide a comprehensive overview of the known and proposed biochemical, cellular and physiological roles of the macro domain family. Recent data that indicate a critical role of macro domain regulation for the proper progression of cellular differentiation programs will be discussed. In addition, the effect of dysregulated expression of macro domain proteins will be considered in the processes of tumorigenesis and bacterial pathogenesis. Finally, a series of observations will be highlighted that should be addressed in future efforts to develop macro domains as effective therapeutic targets.

  11. Type III Protein Secretion Systems in Bacterial Pathogens of Animals and Plants

    PubMed Central

    Hueck, Christoph J.

    1998-01-01

    Various gram-negative animal and plant pathogens use a novel, sec-independent protein secretion system as a basic virulence mechanism. It is becoming increasingly clear that these so-called type III secretion systems inject (translocate) proteins into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells, where the translocated proteins facilitate bacterial pathogenesis by specifically interfering with host cell signal transduction and other cellular processes. Accordingly, some type III secretion systems are activated by bacterial contact with host cell surfaces. Individual type III secretion systems direct the secretion and translocation of a variety of unrelated proteins, which account for species-specific pathogenesis phenotypes. In contrast to the secreted virulence factors, most of the 15 to 20 membrane-associated proteins which constitute the type III secretion apparatus are conserved among different pathogens. Most of the inner membrane components of the type III secretion apparatus show additional homologies to flagellar biosynthetic proteins, while a conserved outer membrane factor is similar to secretins from type II and other secretion pathways. Structurally conserved chaperones which specifically bind to individual secreted proteins play an important role in type III protein secretion, apparently by preventing premature interactions of the secreted factors with other proteins. The genes encoding type III secretion systems are clustered, and various pieces of evidence suggest that these systems have been acquired by horizontal genetic transfer during evolution. Expression of type III secretion systems is coordinately regulated in response to host environmental stimuli by networks of transcription factors. This review comprises a comparison of the structure, function, regulation, and impact on host cells of the type III secretion systems in the animal pathogens Yersinia spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Shigella flexneri, Salmonella typhimurium, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

  12. PATtyFams: Protein Families for the Microbial Genomes in the PATRIC Database

    PubMed Central

    Davis, James J.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Yoo, Hyunseung

    2016-01-01

    The ability to build accurate protein families is a fundamental operation in bioinformatics that influences comparative analyses, genome annotation, and metabolic modeling. For several years we have been maintaining protein families for all microbial genomes in the PATRIC database (Pathosystems Resource Integration Center, patricbrc.org) in order to drive many of the comparative analysis tools that are available through the PATRIC website. However, due to the burgeoning number of genomes, traditional approaches for generating protein families are becoming prohibitive. In this report, we describe a new approach for generating protein families, which we call PATtyFams. This method uses the k-mer-based function assignments available through RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) to rapidly guide family formation, and then differentiates the function-based groups into families using a Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL). This new approach for generating protein families is rapid, scalable and has properties that are consistent with alignment-based methods. PMID:26903996

  13. Identification of a Novel Bacterial Outer Membrane Interleukin-1Β-Binding Protein from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Annamari; Ahlstrand, Tuuli; Nuutila, Jari; Navickaite, Indre; Lahti, Maria; Tuominen, Heidi; Välimaa, Hannamari; Lamminmäki, Urpo; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Ihalin, Riikka

    2013-01-01

    Aggregatibacteractinomycetemcomitans is a gram-negative opportunistic oral pathogen. It is frequently associated with subgingival biofilms of both chronic and aggressive periodontitis, and the diseased sites of the periodontium exhibit increased levels of the proinflammatory mediator interleukin (IL)-1β. Some bacterial species can alter their physiological properties as a result of sensing IL-1β. We have recently shown that this cytokine localizes to the cytoplasm of A. actinomycetemcomitans in co-cultures with organotypic gingival mucosa. However, current knowledge about the mechanism underlying bacterial IL-1β sensing is still limited. In this study, we characterized the interaction of A. actinomycetemcomitans total membrane protein with IL-1β through electrophoretic mobility shift assays. The interacting protein, which we have designated bacterial interleukin receptor I (BilRI), was identified through mass spectrometry and was found to be Pasteurellaceae specific. Based on the results obtained using protein function prediction tools, this protein localizes to the outer membrane and contains a typical lipoprotein signal sequence. All six tested biofilm cultures of clinical A. actinomycetemcomitans strains expressed the protein according to phage display-derived antibody detection. Moreover, proteinase K treatment of whole A. actinomycetemcomitans cells eliminated BilRI forms that were outer membrane specific, as determined through immunoblotting. The protein was overexpressed in Escherichia coli in both the outer membrane-associated form and a soluble cytoplasmic form. When assessed using flow cytometry, the BilRI-overexpressing E. coli cells were observed to bind 2.5 times more biotinylated-IL-1β than the control cells, as detected with avidin-FITC. Overexpression of BilRI did not cause binding of a biotinylated negative control protein. In a microplate assay, soluble BilRI bound to IL-1β, but this binding was not specific, as a control protein for IL-1

  14. Changes in protein abundance are observed in bacterial isolates from a natural host

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Megan A.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Coppel, Ross L.; Smith, Alexander I.; Kleifeld, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial proteomic studies frequently use strains cultured in synthetic liquid media over many generations. It is uncertain whether bacterial proteins expressed under these conditions will be the same as the repertoire found in natural environments, or when bacteria are infecting a host organism. Thus, genomic and proteomic characterization of bacteria derived from the host environment in comparison to reference strains grown in the lab, should aid understanding of pathogenesis. Isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis were obtained from the lymph nodes of three naturally infected sheep and compared to a laboratory reference strain using bottom-up proteomics, after whole genome sequencing of each of the field isolates. These comparisons were performed following growth in liquid media that allowed us to reach the required protein amount for proteomic analysis. Over 1350 proteins were identified in the isolated strains, from which unique proteome features were revealed. Several of the identified proteins demonstrated a significant abundance difference in the field isolates compared to the reference strain even though there were no obvious differences in the DNA sequence of the corresponding gene or in nearby non-coding DNA. Higher abundance in the field isolates was observed for proteins related to hypoxia and nutrient deficiency responses as well as to thiopeptide biosynthesis. PMID:26528441

  15. Bacterial conjugation protein MobA mediates integration of complex DNA structures into plant cells.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Angel, A M; Gloeckler, V; Hohn, B; Tinland, B

    1999-09-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens transfers T-DNA to plant cells, where it integrates into the genome, a property that is ensured by bacterial proteins VirD2 and VirE2. Under natural conditions, the protein MobA mobilizes its encoding plasmid, RSF1010, between different bacteria. A detailed analysis of MobA-mediated DNA mobilization by Agrobacterium to plants was performed. We compared the ability of MobA to transfer DNA and integrate it into the plant genome to that of pilot protein VirD2. MobA was found to be about 100-fold less efficient than VirD2 in conducting the DNA from the pTi plasmid to the plant cell nucleus. However, interestingly, DNAs transferred by the two proteins were integrated into the plant cell genome with similar efficiencies. In contrast, most of the integrated DNA copies transferred from a MobA-containing strain were truncated at the 5' end. Isolation and analysis of the most conserved 5' ends revealed patterns which resulted from the illegitimate integration of one transferred DNA within another. These complex integration patterns indicate a specific deficiency in MobA. The data conform to a model according to which efficiency of T-DNA integration is determined by plant enzymes and integrity is determined by bacterial proteins. PMID:10482518

  16. Bacterial adhesion to protein-coated surfaces: An AFM and QCM-D study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strauss, Joshua; Liu, Yatao; Camesano, Terri A.

    2009-09-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials, mineral surfaces, or other industrial surfaces is strongly controlled by the way bacteria interact with protein layers or organic matter and other biomolecules that coat the materials. Despite this knowledge, many studies of bacterial adhesion are performed under clean conditions, instead of in the presence of proteins or organic molecules. We chose fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a model protein, and prepared FBS films on quartz crystals. The thickness of the FBS layer was characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging under liquid and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Next, we characterized how the model biomaterial surface would interact with the nocosomial pathogen Staphylococcus epidermidis. An AFM probe was coated with S. epidermidis cells and used to probe a gold slide that had been coated with FBS or another protein, fibronectin (FN). These experiments show that AFM and QCM-D can be used in complementary ways to study the complex interactions between bacteria, proteins, and surfaces.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv2179c protein establishes a new exoribonuclease family with broad phylogenetic distribution.

    PubMed

    Abendroth, Jan; Ollodart, Anja; Andrews, Emma S V; Myler, Peter J; Staker, Bart L; Edwards, Thomas E; Arcus, Vickery L; Grundner, Christoph

    2014-01-24

    Ribonucleases (RNases) maintain the cellular RNA pool by RNA processing and degradation. In many bacteria, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the enzymes mediating several central RNA processing functions are still unknown. Here, we identify the hypothetical Mtb protein Rv2179c as a highly divergent exoribonuclease. Although the primary sequence of Rv2179c has no detectable similarity to any known RNase, the Rv2179c crystal structure reveals an RNase fold. Active site residues are equivalent to those in the DEDD family of RNases, and Rv2179c has close structural homology to Escherichia coli RNase T. Consistent with the DEDD fold, Rv2179c has exoribonuclease activity, cleaving the 3' single-strand overhangs of duplex RNA. Functional orthologs of Rv2179c are prevalent in actinobacteria and found in bacteria as phylogenetically distant as proteobacteria. Thus, Rv2179c is the founding member of a new, large RNase family with hundreds of members across the bacterial kingdom. PMID:24311791

  18. Identification and Characterization of an Antigen I/II Family Protein Produced by Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shizhen; Green, Nicole M.; Sitkiewicz, Izabela; LeFebvre, Rance B.; Musser, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a gram-positive human bacterial pathogen that causes infections ranging in severity from pharyngitis to life-threatening invasive disease, such as necrotizing fasciitis. Serotype M28 strains are consistently isolated from invasive infections, particularly puerperal sepsis, a severe infection that occurs during or after childbirth. We recently sequenced the genome of a serotype M28 GAS strain and discovered a novel 37.4-kb foreign genetic element designated region of difference 2 (RD2). RD2 is similar in gene content and organization to genomic islands found in group B streptococci (GBS), the major cause of neonatal infections. RD2 encodes seven proteins with conventional gram-positive secretion signal sequences, six of which have not been characterized. Herein, we report that one of these six proteins (M28_Spy1325; Spy1325) is a member of the antigen I/II family of cell surface-anchored molecules produced by oral streptococci. PCR and DNA sequence analysis found that Spy1325 is very well conserved in GAS strains of distinct M protein serotypes. As assessed by real-time TaqMan quantitative PCR, the Spy1325 gene was expressed in vitro, and Spy1325 protein was present in culture supernatants and on the GAS cell surface. Western immunoblotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays indicated that Spy1325 was produced by GAS in infected mice and humans. Importantly, the immunization of mice with recombinant Spy1325 fragments conferred protection against GAS-mediated mortality. Similar to other antigen I/II proteins, recombinant Spy1325 bound purified human salivary agglutinin glycoprotein. Spy1325 may represent a shared virulence factor among GAS, GBS, and oral streptococci. PMID:16790795

  19. Reconstitution of a nanomachine driving the assembly of proteins into bacterial outer membranes

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Belousoff, Matthew J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Lu, Jingxiong; Holt, Stephen A.; Tan, Khershing; Selkrig, Joel; Webb, Chaille T.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    In biological membranes, various protein secretion devices function as nanomachines, and measuring the internal movements of their component parts is a major technological challenge. The translocation assembly module (the TAM) is a nanomachine required for virulence of bacterial pathogens. We have reconstituted a membrane containing the TAM onto a gold surface for characterization by Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Magnetic Contrast Neutron Reflectrometry (MCNR). The MCNR studies provided structural resolution down to 1Å, enabling accurate measurement of protein domains projecting from the membrane layer. Here, we show that dynamic movements within the TamA component of the TAM are initiated in the presence of a substrate protein, Ag43, and that these movements recapitulate an initial stage in membrane protein assembly. The reconstituted system provides a powerful new means to study molecular movements in biological membranes, and the technology is widely applicable to studying the dynamics of diverse cellular nanomachines. PMID:25341963

  20. Selective molecular transport through the protein shell of a bacterial microcompartment organelle.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Chiranjit; Chun, Sunny; Pang, Allan; Sawaya, Michael R; Sinha, Sharmistha; Yeates, Todd O; Bobik, Thomas A

    2015-03-10

    Bacterial microcompartments are widespread prokaryotic organelles that have important and diverse roles ranging from carbon fixation to enteric pathogenesis. Current models for microcompartment function propose that their outer protein shell is selectively permeable to small molecules, but whether a protein shell can mediate selective permeability and how this occurs are unresolved questions. Here, biochemical and physiological studies of structure-guided mutants are used to show that the hexameric PduA shell protein of the 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu) microcompartment forms a selectively permeable pore tailored for the influx of 1,2-propanediol (the substrate of the Pdu microcompartment) while restricting the efflux of propionaldehyde, a toxic intermediate of 1,2-propanediol catabolism. Crystal structures of various PduA mutants provide a foundation for interpreting the observed biochemical and phenotypic data in terms of molecular diffusion across the shell. Overall, these studies provide a basis for understanding a class of selectively permeable channels formed by nonmembrane proteins.

  1. Reconstitution of a nanomachine driving the assembly of proteins into bacterial outer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hsin-Hui; Leyton, Denisse L.; Shiota, Takuya; Belousoff, Matthew J.; Noinaj, Nicholas; Lu, Jingxiong; Holt, Stephen A.; Tan, Khershing; Selkrig, Joel; Webb, Chaille T.; Buchanan, Susan K.; Martin, Lisandra L.; Lithgow, Trevor

    2014-10-01

    In biological membranes, various protein secretion devices function as nanomachines, and measuring the internal movements of their component parts is a major technological challenge. The translocation and assembly module (TAM) is a nanomachine required for virulence of bacterial pathogens. We have reconstituted a membrane containing the TAM onto a gold surface for characterization by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and magnetic contrast neutron reflectrometry (MCNR). The MCNR studies provided structural resolution down to 1 Å, enabling accurate measurement of protein domains projecting from the membrane layer. Here we show that dynamic movements within the TamA component of the TAM are initiated in the presence of a substrate protein, Ag43, and that these movements recapitulate an initial stage in membrane protein assembly. The reconstituted system provides a powerful new means to study molecular movements in biological membranes, and the technology is widely applicable to studying the dynamics of diverse cellular nanomachines.

  2. Nme family of proteins--clues from simple animals.

    PubMed

    Ćetković, Helena; Perina, Dragutin; Harcet, Matija; Mikoč, Andreja; Herak Bosnar, Maja

    2015-02-01

    Nucleoside-diphosphate kinases (Nme/Nm23/NDPK) are evolutionarily conserved enzymes involved in many biological processes in vertebrates. The biochemical mechanisms of these processes are still largely unknown. The Nme family consists of ten members in humans of which Nme1/2 have been extensively studied in the context of carcinogenesis, especially metastasis formation. Lately, it has been proven that the majority of genes linked to human diseases were already present in species distantly related to humans. Most of cancer-related protein domains appeared during the two main evolutionary transitions-the emergence of unicellular eukaryotes and the transition to multicellular metazoans. In spite of these recent insights, current knowledge about cancer and status of cancer-related genes in simple animals is limited. One possible way of studying human diseases relies on analyzing genes/proteins that cause a certain disease by using model organism that represent the evolutionary level at which these genes have emerged. Therefore, basal metazoans are ideal model organisms for gaining a clearer picture how characteristics and functions of Nme genes changed in the transition to multicellularity and increasing complexity in animals, giving us exciting new evidence of their possible functions in potential pathological conditions in humans. PMID:25042404

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of the Argonaute protein family in platyhelminths.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yadong

    2013-03-01

    Argonaute proteins (AGOs) are mediators of gene silencing via recruitment of small regulatory RNAs to induce translational regression or degradation of targeted molecules. Platyhelminths have been reported to express microRNAs but the diversity of AGOs in the phylum has not been explored. Phylogenetic relationships of members of this protein family were studied using data from six platyhelminth genomes. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all cestode and trematode AGOs, along with some triclad planarian AGOs, were grouped into the Ago subfamily and its novel sister clade, here referred to as Cluster 1. These were very distant from Piwi and Class 3 subfamilies. By contrast, a number of planarian Piwi-like AGOs formed a novel sister clade to the Piwi subfamily. Extensive sequence searching revealed the presence of an additional locus for AGO2 in the cestode Echinococcus granulosus and exon expansion in this species and E. multilocularis. The current study suggests the absence of the Piwi subfamily and Class 3 AGOs in cestodes and trematodes and the Piwi-like AGO expansion in a free-living triclad planarian and the occurrence of exon expansion prior to or during the evolution of the most-recent common ancestor of the Echinococcus species studied.

  4. STUDIES ON THE BACTERIOPHAGE OF D'HERELLE : IX. EVIDENCE OF HYDROLYSIS OF BACTERIAL PROTEIN DURING LYSIS.

    PubMed

    Hetler, D M; Bronfenbrenner, J

    1928-07-31

    1. During the process of lysis by bacteriophage, there is an appreciable increase in the amount of free amino acid present in the culture. 2. The increase of free amino acid is due to hydrolysis of bacterial protein.

  5. Meat, dairy and plant proteins alter bacterial composition of rat gut bacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Zhao, Fan; Shi, Xuebin; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Zhu, Weiyun; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Lu, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2015-01-01

    Long-term consumption of red meat has been considered a potential risk to gut health, but this is based on clinic investigations, excessive intake of fat, heme and some injurious compounds formed during cooking or additions to processed meat products. Whether intake of red meat protein affects gut bacteria and the health of the host remains unclear. In this work, we compared the composition of gut bacteria in the caecum, by sequencing the V4-V5 region of 16S ribosomal RNA gene, obtained from rats fed with proteins from red meat (beef and pork), white meat (chicken and fish) and other sources (casein and soy). The results showed significant differences in profiles of gut bacteria between the six diet groups. Rats fed with meat proteins had a similar overall structure of caecal bacterial communities separated from those fed non-meat proteins. The beneficial genus Lactobacillus was higher in the white meat than in the red meat or non-meat protein groups. Also, rats fed with meat proteins and casein had significantly lower levels of lipopolysaccharide-binding proteins, suggesting that the intake of meat proteins may maintain a more balanced composition of gut bacteria, thereby reducing the antigen load and inflammatory response in the host. PMID:26463271

  6. Biochemical characterization and bacterial expression of an odorant-binding protein from Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Ban, L; Scaloni, A; D'Ambrosio, C; Zhang, L; Yahn, Y; Pelosi, P

    2003-02-01

    Analysis of soluble proteins from different body parts of Locusta migratoria revealed a fast-migrating component in native electrophoresis, unique to antennae of both sexes. N-terminal sequence analysis and cloning identified this protein as a member of the insect odorant-binding proteins, carrying a well-conserved six-cysteine motif. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the occurrence of two distinct polypeptide species determined by nucleotide sequencing and demonstrated that the cysteine residues are paired in an interlocked fashion. The protein was expressed in a bacterial system with yields of about 10 mg/l of culture, mostly present as inclusion bodies. However, this recombinant product was solubilized after disulfide reduction. Air oxidation yielded a species with all disulfides spontaneously formed as in the native counterpart. Both native and recombinant proteins migrated as a dimer in gel filtration chromatography. Ligand binding was measured, using N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine as the fluorescent probe; the affinity of other ligands was measured in competitive binding assays. The protein exhibited great resistance to thermal denaturation even following prolonged treatment at 100 degrees C. A structural model for this dimeric species was generated on the basis of its sequence homology with Bombyx mori pheromone-binding protein, whose three-dimensional structure has been resolved as an unbound species and in complex with its physiological ligand. This is the first report of an odorant-binding protein identified and characterized from Orthoptera. PMID:12678502

  7. A new family of highly variable proteins in the Chlamydophila pneumoniae genome

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Eduardo P. C.; Pradillon, Olivier; Bui, Hung; Sayada, Chalom; Denamur, Erick

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydiaceae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens characterized by a wide range of vertebrate host, tissue tropism and spectrum of diseases. To get insights into the biological mechanisms involved in these differences, we have put forward a computational and experimental procedure to identify the genome recombination hotspots, as frequent sequence variation allows rapid adaptation to environmental changes. We find a larger potential for recombination in Chlamydophila pneumoniae genomes as compared with Chlamydia trachomatis or Chlamydia muridarum. Such potential is mostly concentrated in a family of seven previously uncharacterized species-specific elements that we named ppp for C.pneumoniae polymorphic protein genes, which have the potential to vary by homologous recombination and slipped-mispair. Experimen tally, we show that these sequences are indeed highly polymorphic among a collection of nine C.pneumoniae strains of very diverse geographical and pathological origins, mainly by slippage of a poly(C) tract. We also show that most elements are transcribed during infection. In silico analyses suggest that Ppps correspond to outer membrane proteins. Given their species specificity, their putative location in the outer membrane and their extreme polymorphism, Ppps are most likely to be important in the pathogenesis of C.pneumoniae and could represent targets for future vaccine development. PMID:12384581

  8. Object-adapted trapping and shape-tracking to probe a bacterial protein chain motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Julian; Koch, Matthias; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The helical bacterium Spiroplasma is a motile plant and anthropod pathogen which swims by propagating pairs of kinks along its cell body. As a well suited model system for bacterial locomotion, understanding the cell's molecular motor is of vital interest also regarding the combat of bacterial diseases. The extensive deformations related to these kinks are caused by a contractile cytoskeletal protein ribbon representing a linear motor in contrast to common rotary motors as, e.g., flagella. We present new insights into the working of this motor through experiments with object-adapted optical traps and shape-tracking techniques. We use the given laser irradiation from the optical trap to hinder bacterial energy (ATP) production through the production of O2 radicals. The results are compared with experiments performed under the influence of an O2-Scavenger and ATP inhibitors, respectively. Our results show clear dependences of the kinking properties on the ATP concentration inside the bacterium. The experiments are supported by a theoretical model which we developed to describe the switching of the ribbon's protein subunits.

  9. A dynamin-like protein involved in bacterial cell membrane surveillance under environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Prachi; Eissenberger, Kristina; Karier, Laurence; Mascher, Thorsten; Bramkamp, Marc

    2016-09-01

    In ever-changing natural environments, bacteria are continuously challenged with numerous biotic and abiotic stresses. Accordingly, they have evolved both specific and more general mechanisms to counteract stress-induced damage and ensure survival. In the soil habitat of Bacillus subtilis, peptide antibiotics and bacteriophages are among the primary stressors that affect the integrity of the cytoplasmic membrane. Dynamin-like proteins (DLPs) play a major role in eukaryotic membrane re-modelling processes, including antiviral activities, but the function of the corresponding bacterial homologues was so far poorly understood. Here, we report on the protective function of a bacterial DLP, DynA from B. subtilis. We provide evidence that DynA plays an important role in a membrane surveillance system that counteracts membrane pore formation provoked by antibiotics and phages. In unstressed cells, DynA is a highly dynamic membrane-associated protein. Upon membrane damage, DynA localizes into large and static assemblies, where DynA acts locally to counteract stress-induced pores, presumably by inducing lipid bilayer fusion and sealing membrane gaps. Thus, lack of DynA increases the sensitivity to antibiotic exposure and phage infection. Taken together, our work suggests that DynA, and potentially other bacterial DLPs, contribute to the innate immunity of bacteria against membrane stress.

  10. Proteasomal Degradation of Nod2 Protein Mediates Tolerance to Bacterial Cell Wall Components*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Biswas, Amlan; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system serves as the first line of defense by detecting microbes and initiating inflammatory responses. Although both Toll-like receptor (TLR) and nucleotide binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins are important for this process, their excessive activation is hazardous to hosts; thus, tight regulation is required. Endotoxin tolerance is refractory to repeated lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation and serves as a host defense mechanism against septic shock caused by an excessive TLR4 response during Gram-negative bacterial infection. Gram-positive bacteria as well as their cell wall components also induce shock. However, the mechanism underlying tolerance is not understood. Here, we show that activation of Nod2 by its ligand, muramyl dipeptide (MDP) in the bacterial cell wall, induces rapid degradation of Nod2, which confers MDP tolerance in vitro and in vivo. Nod2 is constitutively associated with a chaperone protein, Hsp90, which is required for Nod2 stability and protects Nod2 from degradation. Upon MDP stimulation, Hsp90 rapidly dissociates from Nod2, which subsequently undergoes ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The SOCS-3 protein induced by Nod2 activation further facilitates this degradation process. Therefore, Nod2 protein stability is a key factor in determining responsiveness to MDP stimulation. This indicates that TLRs and NLRs induce a tolerant state through distinct molecular mechanisms that protect the host from septic shock. PMID:23019338

  11. Protein-serine/threonine/tyrosine kinases in bacterial signaling and regulation.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Charlotte; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Pagot, Yves; Poncet, Sandrine; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2013-09-01

    In this review, we address some recent developments in the field of bacterial protein phosphorylation, focusing specifically on serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. We present an overview of recent studies outlining the scope of physiological processes that are regulated by phosphorylation, ranging from cell cycle, growth, cell morphology, to metabolism, developmental phenomena, and virulence. Specific emphasis is placed on Mycobacterium tuberculosis as a showcase organism for serine/threonine kinases, and Bacillus subtilis to illustrate the importance of protein phosphorylation in developmental processes. We argue that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases have a distinctive feature of phosphorylating multiple substrates and might thus represent integration nodes in the signaling network. Some open questions regarding the evolutionary benefits of relaxed substrate selectivity of these kinases are treated, as well as the notion of nonfunctional 'background' phosphorylation of cellular proteins. We also argue that phosphorylation events for which an immediate regulatory effect is not clearly established should not be dismissed as unimportant, as they may have a role in cross-talk with other post-translational modifications. Finally, recently developed methods for studying protein phosphorylation networks in bacteria are briefly discussed.

  12. A 28,000-dalton protein of normal mouse serum binds specifically to the inner core region of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Brade, L; Brade, H

    1985-12-01

    Normal mouse serum was found to contain a protein, referred to here as factor, which binds to the inner core region of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of various bacterial families. Since factor-LPS interactions resulted in activation of guinea pig complement, factor activity could be assayed by a passive hemolysis test with sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS or lipid A from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (which was found earlier to bind particularly well to factor). Factor was purified by G-50 and hydroxyapatite chromatography whereby the specific hemolytic activity was enriched 1,675-fold. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions revealed the presence of a 28,000-dalton protein as the main band. The identity of this band was determined by absorption experiments with LPS-coated sheep erythrocytes or latex beads, whereby the 28,000-dalton band disappeared after specific absorption and could be recovered from the absorbent. The binding specificity of factor was determined in a passive hemolysis inhibition assay with defined oligosaccharides representative for the inner core region of LPS. Thus, the di- and trisaccharides alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosyl-(1----5)-2-keto-3-deoxy-D-mannoocto nic acid and alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosyl-(1----3)-alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosy l-(1----5)-2- keto-3-deoxy-D-mannooctonic acid, respectively, were able to inhibit binding of factor to LPS. The results are in accordance with our earlier observation that the heptose-2-keto-3-deoxy-D-mannooctonic acid region represents a common antigen of bacterial LPS. Rabbit hyperimmune serum directed against this common antigen and purified factor was found to exhibit the same specificity for LPS. Factor activity was followed in mice in vivo after injection of LPS; it disappeared completely 15 min after the injection of LPS and reappeared within 1 h.

  13. A 28,000-dalton protein of normal mouse serum binds specifically to the inner core region of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Brade, L; Brade, H

    1985-01-01

    Normal mouse serum was found to contain a protein, referred to here as factor, which binds to the inner core region of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) of various bacterial families. Since factor-LPS interactions resulted in activation of guinea pig complement, factor activity could be assayed by a passive hemolysis test with sheep erythrocytes coated with LPS or lipid A from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (which was found earlier to bind particularly well to factor). Factor was purified by G-50 and hydroxyapatite chromatography whereby the specific hemolytic activity was enriched 1,675-fold. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions revealed the presence of a 28,000-dalton protein as the main band. The identity of this band was determined by absorption experiments with LPS-coated sheep erythrocytes or latex beads, whereby the 28,000-dalton band disappeared after specific absorption and could be recovered from the absorbent. The binding specificity of factor was determined in a passive hemolysis inhibition assay with defined oligosaccharides representative for the inner core region of LPS. Thus, the di- and trisaccharides alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosyl-(1----5)-2-keto-3-deoxy-D-mannoocto nic acid and alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosyl-(1----3)-alpha-D-mannoheptopyranosy l-(1----5)-2- keto-3-deoxy-D-mannooctonic acid, respectively, were able to inhibit binding of factor to LPS. The results are in accordance with our earlier observation that the heptose-2-keto-3-deoxy-D-mannooctonic acid region represents a common antigen of bacterial LPS. Rabbit hyperimmune serum directed against this common antigen and purified factor was found to exhibit the same specificity for LPS. Factor activity was followed in mice in vivo after injection of LPS; it disappeared completely 15 min after the injection of LPS and reappeared within 1 h. Images PMID:4066028

  14. Mechanisms of Host-Pathogen Protein Complex Formation and Bacterial Immune Evasion of Streptococcus suis Protein Fhb.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueqin; Liu, Peng; Gan, Shuzhen; Zhang, Chunmao; Zheng, Yuling; Jiang, Yongqiang; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-08-12

    Streptococcus suis serotype 2 (S. suis 2)-induced sepsis and meningitis are often accompanied by bacteremia. The evasion of polymorphonuclear leukocyte-mediated phagocytic clearance is central to the establishment of bacteremia caused by S. suis 2 and is facilitated by the ability of factor H (FH)-binding protein (Fhb) to bind FH on the bacterial surface, thereby impeding alternative pathway complement activation and phagocytic clearance. Here, C3b/C3d was found to bind to Fhb, along with FH, forming a large immune complex. The formation of this immune complex was mediated by domain II of Fhb via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, which, to our knowledge, is a new type of interaction. Interestingly, Fhb was found to be associated with the cell envelope and also present in the culture supernatant, where secreted Fhb inhibited complement activation via interactions with domain II, thereby enhancing antiphagocytic clearance by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Thus, Fhb is a multifunctional bacterial protein, which binds host complement component C3 as well as FH and interferes with innate immune recognition in a secret protein manner. S. suis 2 therefore appears to have developed a new strategy to combat host innate immunity and enhance survival in host blood. PMID:27342778

  15. ABC transporters: bacterial exporters.

    PubMed Central

    Fath, M J; Kolter, R

    1993-01-01

    The ABC transporters (also called traffic ATPases) make up a large superfamily of proteins which share a common function and a common ATP-binding domain. ABC transporters are classified into three major groups: bacterial importers (the periplasmic permeases), eukaryotic transporters, and bacterial exporters. We present a comprehensive review of the bacterial ABC exporter group, which currently includes over 40 systems. The bacterial ABC exporter systems are functionally subdivided on the basis of the type of substrate that each translocates. We describe three main groups: protein exporters, peptide exporters, and systems that transport nonprotein substrates. Prototype exporters from each group are described in detail to illustrate our current understanding of this protein family. The prototype systems include the alpha-hemolysin, colicin V, and capsular polysaccharide exporters from Escherichia coli, the protease exporter from Erwinia chrysanthemi, and the glucan exporters from Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Rhizobium meliloti. Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-binding domains from 29 bacterial ABC exporters indicates that the bacterial ABC exporters can be divided into two primary branches. One branch contains the transport systems where the ATP-binding domain and the membrane-spanning domain are present on the same polypeptide, and the other branch contains the systems where these domains are found on separate polypeptides. Differences in substrate specificity do not correlate with evolutionary relatedness. A complete survey of the known and putative bacterial ABC exporters is included at the end of the review. PMID:8302219

  16. Uncoupling proteins--a new family of proteins with unknown function.

    PubMed

    Erlanson-Albertsson, Charlotte

    2002-02-01

    Uncoupling proteins are inner mitochondrial membrane proteins, which dissipate the proton gradient, releasing the stored energy as heat. Five proteins have been cloned, named UCP1, UCP2, UCP3, UCP4 and UCP5/BMCP1. These proteins are structurally related but differ in tissue expression. UCP1 is expressed uniquely in the brown adipose tissue, while UCP2 is widely distributed, UCP3 is mainly restricted to skeletal muscle and UCP4 and UCP5/BMCP1 expressed in the brain. The properties and regulation of the uncoupling proteins and their exact function has been the focus of an intense research during recent years. This review briefly summarizes the actual knowledge of the properties and function of this new family of proteins. While UCP1 has a clear role in energy homeostasis, the newcomers UCP2-UCP5 may have more delicate physiological importance acting as free radical oxygen scavengers and in the regulation of ATP-dependent processes, such as secretion.

  17. Chirality Switching by Martensitic Transformation in Protein Cylindrical Crystals: Application to Bacterial Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komai, Ricardo Kiyohiro

    Martensitic transformations provide unique engineering properties that, when designed properly, become important parts of new technology. Martensitic transformations have been studied for many years in traditional alloys (iron, steel, titanium, etc.), however there is still much to be learned in regards to these transformations in biological materials. Olson and Hartman showed in 1982 that these transformations are also observed in bacterial flagella and T4 bacteriophage viral sheaths, allowing for propulsion of bacteria in a fluid environment and, for the virus, is responsible for the infection mechanism. This work demonstrates, using the bacterial flagella as an example, that these transformations can be modelled using thermodynamic methods that are also used to model the transformations in alloys. This thesis work attempts to explain the transformations that occur in bacterial flagella, which are capable of small strain, highly reversible martensitic transformations. The first stress/temperature phase diagrams of these flagella were created by adding the mechanical energy of the transformation of the flagella to limited chemical thermodynamics information of the transformation. Mechanical energy is critical to the transformation process because the bacterial body applies a torque to the radius of the flagella. Finally, work has begun and will be completed in regards to understanding the kinetics of the transformation of the flagella. The motion of the transformation interface can be predicted by using a Landau-Ginzburg model. The crystallography of the transformation in bacterial flagella is also being computed to determine the invariant lines of transformation that occur within this cylindrical crystal. This work has shown that it is possible to treat proteins in a similar manner that alloys are treated when using thermodynamic modelling. Much can be learned from translating what is known regarding phase transformations in hard material systems to soft, organic

  18. Membrane Proteases in the Bacterial Protein Secretion and Quality Control Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Proteolytic cleavage of proteins that are permanently or transiently associated with the cytoplasmic membrane is crucially important for a wide range of essential processes in bacteria. This applies in particular to the secretion of proteins and to membrane protein quality control. Major progress has been made in elucidating the structure-function relationships of many of the responsible membrane proteases, including signal peptidases, signal peptide hydrolases, FtsH, the rhomboid protease GlpG, and the site 1 protease DegS. These enzymes employ very different mechanisms to cleave substrates at the cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic membrane surfaces or within the plane of the membrane. This review highlights the different ways that bacterial membrane proteases degrade their substrates, with special emphasis on catalytic mechanisms and substrate delivery to the respective active sites. PMID:22688815

  19. Protein hydrolysates and associated bacterial contaminants as oviposition attractants for the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus.

    PubMed

    Beehler, J W; Millar, J G; Mulla, M S

    1994-10-01

    Six protein or protein hydrolysate solutions were tested for activity as attractants for ovipositing Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in the laboratory. Four of these solutions (egg albumin, lactalbumin hydrolysate, casein hydrolysate and yeast hydrolysate) were attractive to ovipositing females at varying concentrations, when compared to distilled water controls. Soy hydrolysate was repellent at 1%, but not significantly attractive or repellent at lower concentrations. 'Nulure', a tephritid fly bait containing protein hydrolysate, also had no significant effect on oviposition behaviour. Gravid females mostly oviposited within the first 4 h of the scotophase, regardless of the presence or absence of an oviposition attractant. Lactalbumin hydrolysate 1% solution, with or without 0.1% neomycin antibiotic, was attractive to Cx quinquefasciatus. This effect was reduced by the presence of neomycin which, alone, had no effect on oviposition. Hence both lactalbumin hydrolysate and bacterial contaminants were shown to be attractive to gravid Cx quinquefasciatus.

  20. Unveiling molecular mechanisms of bacterial surface proteins: Streptococcus pneumoniae as a model organism for structural studies.

    PubMed

    Jedrzejas, M J

    2007-11-01

    Bacteria present a variety of molecules either on their surface or in a cell-free form. These molecules take part in numerous processes in the interactions with their host, with its tissues and other molecules. These molecules are essential to bacterial pathogenesis either during colonization or the spread/invasion stages, and most are virulence factors. This review is focused on such molecules using Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Gram-positive bacterium, as an example. Selected surface proteins are introduced, their structure described, and, whenever available, their mechanisms of function on an atomic level are explained. Such mechanisms for hyaluronate lyase, pneumococcal surface protein A, pneumolysin, histidine-triad and fibronectin-binding proteins are discussed. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms of virulence factors is essential for the understanding of bacteria and their functional properties. Structural biology appears pivotal for these studies, as structural and mechanistic insights facilitate rational approach to the development of new treatments.

  1. Actions of Rho family small G proteins and p21-activated protein kinases on mitogen-activated protein kinase family members.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Xu, S; Hutchison, M R; Marcus, S; Cobb, M H

    1996-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases that are regulated by distinct extracellular stimuli. The currently known members include extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 (ERK1), ERK2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), and p38 MAP kinases. We find that overexpression of the Ste20-related enzymes p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and PAK2 in 293 cells is sufficient to activate JNK/SAPK and to a lesser extent p38 MAP kinase but not ERK2. Rat MAP/ERK kinase kinase 1 can stimulate the activity of each of these MAP kinases. Although neither activated Rac nor the PAKs stimulate ERK2 activity, overexpression of either dominant negative Rac2 or the N-terminal regulatory domain of PAK1 inhibits Ras-mediated activation of ERK2, suggesting a permissive role for Rac in the control of the ERK pathway. Furthermore, constitutively active Rac2, Cdc42hs, and RhoA synergize with an activated form of Raf to increase ERK2 activity. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized connection between Rho family small G proteins and the ERK pathway. PMID:8668187

  2. Human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J.; Gunning, P.; Kedes, L.

    1982-06-01

    The authors characterized nine human actin genes that they isolated from a library of cloned human DNA. Measurements of the thermal stability of hybrids formed between each cloned actin gene and ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-, and ..gamma..-actin mRNA demonstrated that only one of the clones is most homologous to sarcomeric actin mRNA, whereas the remaining eight clones are most homologous to cytoplasmic actin mRNA. By the following criteria they show that these nine clones represent nine different actin gene loci rather than different alleles or different parts of a single gene: (i) the restriction enzyme maps of the coding regions are dissimilar; (ii) each clone contains sufficient coding region to encode all or most of an entire actin gene; and (iii) each clone contains sequences homologous to both the 5' and 3' ends of the coding region of a cloned chicken ..beta..-actin cDNA. They conclude, therefore, that the human cytoplasmic actin proteins are encoded by a multigene family.

  3. The prion protein family: a view from the placenta

    PubMed Central

    Makzhami, Samira; Passet, Bruno; Halliez, Sophie; Castille, Johan; Moazami-Goudarzi, Katayoun; Duchesne, Amandine; Vilotte, Marthe; Laude, Hubert; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie; Béringue, Vincent; Vaiman, Daniel; Vilotte, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Based on its developmental pattern of expression, early studies suggested the implication of the mammalian Prion protein PrP, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored ubiquitously expressed and evolutionary conserved glycoprotein encoded by the Prnp gene, in early embryogenesis. However, gene invalidation in several species did not result in obvious developmental abnormalities and it was only recently that it was associated in mice with intra-uterine growth retardation and placental dysfunction. A proposed explanation for this lack of easily detectable developmental-related phenotype is the existence in the genome of one or more gene (s) able to compensate for the absence of PrP. Indeed, two other members of the Prnp gene family have been recently described, Doppel and Shadoo, and the consequences of their invalidation alongside that of PrP tested in mice. No embryonic defect was observed in mice depleted for Doppel and PrP. Interestingly, the co-invalidation of PrP and Shadoo in two independent studies led to apparently conflicting observations, with no apparent consequences in one report and the observation of a developmental defect of the ectoplacental cone that leads to early embryonic lethality in the other. This short review aims at summarizing these recent, apparently conflicting data highlighting the related biological questions and associated implications in terms of animal and human health. PMID:25364742

  4. Food proteins from different allergen families sensitize Balb/c mice to family-specific immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Sun, Na; Zhou, Cui; Zhou, Xin; Lu, Jing; Wang, Cuiyan; Che, Huilian

    2014-01-01

    The classification of food allergens based on the structure and function of proteins contributes to the study of the relationship between bioinformatics and potential allergenicity of allergens. Food allergens always share sequence similarity with the allergens in the same allergen families. For that reason, food proteins from different allergen families may induce different patterns of immune responses in animal models. Female Balb/c mice (3-4-weeks-old) were sensitized with food proteins once per week for 4 weeks, and then challenged 2 weeks later (on Day 42 of study). Blood was collected (to obtain serum levels of histamine and protein-specific IgG1 and IgE antibodies) and measures of vascular permeability were performed 20 min after the challenge. Five food proteins (11S globulin, OVA [ovalbumin], HAS [human serum albumin] and LRP [lysine-responsive storage protein] of different allergen families, and Cry 1Ab/Ac [crystal protein]) were used to assess patterns of immune responses for each allergen family and then bioinformatics and digestive stability in simulated gastric fluid were employed to assess the overall utility of the Balb/c. The assay results indicated that, in this model, histamine and protein-specific IgE antibody levels and vascular permeability could be used to identify allergenicity of 11S globulin, OVA, and PAP (potato acid phosphatase) only. However, the results of the protein-specific IgG1 measures could only distinguish allergic food proteins with negative control. Based on bioinformatic analyses, the five different food proteins clearly induced distinct patterns of immune responses in the Balb/c model.

  5. Expression of lysozymes from Erwinia amylovora phages and Erwinia genomes and inhibition by a bacterial protein.

    PubMed

    Müller, Ina; Gernold, Marina; Schneider, Bernd; Geider, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Genes coding for lysozyme-inhibiting proteins (Ivy) were cloned from the chromosomes of the plant pathogens Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae. The product interfered not only with activity of hen egg white lysozyme, but also with an enzyme from E. amylovora phage ΦEa1h. We have expressed lysozyme genes from the genomes of three Erwinia species in Escherichia coli. The lysozymes expressed from genes of the E. amylovora phages ΦEa104 and ΦEa116, Erwinia chromosomes and Arabidopsis thaliana were not affected by Ivy. The enzyme from bacteriophage ΦEa1h was fused at the N- or C-terminus to other peptides. Compared to the intact lysozyme, a His-tag reduced its lytic activity about 10-fold and larger fusion proteins abolished activity completely. Specific protease cleavage restored lysozyme activity of a GST-fusion. The bacteriophage-encoded lysozymes were more active than the enzymes from bacterial chromosomes. Viral lyz genes were inserted into a broad-host range vector, and transfer to E. amylovora inhibited cell growth. Inserted in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the ΦEa1h-lysozyme was secreted and also inhibited by Ivy. Here we describe expression of unrelated cloned 'silent' lyz genes from Erwinia chromosomes and a novel interference of bacterial Ivy proteins with a viral lysozyme.

  6. Viability of adhered bacterial cells: tracking MinD protein oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Matt; Colville, Keegan; Schultz-Nielsen, Chris; Jericho, Manfred; Dutcher, John

    2010-03-01

    To study bacterial cells using atomic force microscopy, it is necessary to immobilize the cells on a substrate. Because bacterial cells and common substrates such as glass and mica have a net negative charge, positively charged polymers such as poly-L-lysine (PLL) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) are commonly used as adhesion layers. However, the use of adhesion polymers could stress the cell and even render it inviable. Viable E. coli cells use oscillations of Min proteins along the axis of the rod-shaped cells to ensure accurate cell division. By tagging MinD proteins with GFP, oscillations can be observed using fluorescence microscopy. For a healthy cell in an ideal environment, the oscillation period is measured to be ˜40 s. Prior experiments have shown that PLL increases the oscillation period significantly (up to 80%). In the present study, we have used epifluorescence and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) to track MinD protein oscillations in E. coli bacteria adhered to a variety of positively charged polymers on mica as a function of polymer surface coverage.

  7. Growth performance and carcase quality in broiler chickens fed on bacterial protein grown on natural gas.

    PubMed

    Øverland, M; Schøyen, H F; Skrede, A

    2010-10-01

    1. The effects of increasing concentrations (0, 40, 80 or 120 g/kg) of bacterial protein meal (BPM) and bacterial protein autolysate (BPA) grown on natural gas on growth performance and carcase quality in broiler chickens were examined. 2. Adding BPM to diets reduced feed intake and improved gain: feed from 0 to 21 d and overall to 35 d, but did not significantly affect weight gain compared to the soybean meal based control diet. 3. Increasing concentrations of BPA significantly reduced growth rate, feed intake, gain: feed, carcase weight and dressing percentage, but significantly increased carcase dry matter, fat and energy content. 4. Adding BPM to diets had no effect on viscosity of diets and jejunal digesta, and minor effects on litter quality, whereas BPA increased the viscosity of diets and jejunal digesta, improved litter quality at 21 d, but decreased litter quality at 32 d. 5. To conclude, broiler chickens performed better on a BPM product with intact proteins than on an autolysate with ruptured cell walls and a high content of free amino acids and low molecular-weight peptides.

  8. Internal organization of large protein families: relationship between the sequence, structure and function based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xiao-hui; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The protein universe can be organized in families that group proteins sharing common ancestry. Such families display variable levels of structural and functional divergence, from homogenous families, where all members have the same function and very similar structure, to very divergent families, where large variations in function and structure are observed. For practical purposes of structure and function prediction, it would be beneficial to identify sub-groups of proteins with highly similar structures (iso-structural) and/or functions (iso-functional) within divergent protein families. We compared three algorithms in their ability to cluster large protein families and discuss whether any of these methods could reliably identify such iso-structural or iso-functional groups. We show that clustering using profile-sequence and profile-profile comparison methods closely reproduces clusters based on similarities between 3D structures or clusters of proteins with similar biological functions. In contrast, the still commonly used sequence-based methods with fixed thresholds result in vast overestimates of structural and functional diversity in protein families. As a result, these methods also overestimate the number of protein structures that have to be determined to fully characterize structural space of such families. The fact that one can build reliable models based on apparently distantly related templates is crucial for extracting maximal amount of information from new sequencing projects. PMID:21671455

  9. Overexpression of the Eggplant (Solanum melongena) NAC Family Transcription Factor SmNAC Suppresses Resistance to Bacterial Wilt.

    PubMed

    Na, Chen; Shuanghua, Wu; Jinglong, Fu; Bihao, Cao; Jianjun, Lei; Changming, Chen; Jin, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial wilt (BW) is a serious disease that affects eggplant (Solanum melongena) production. Although resistance to this disease has been reported, the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we identified a NAC family transcription factor (SmNAC) from eggplant and characterized its expression, its localization at the tissue and subcellular levels, and its role in BW resistance. To this end, transgenic eggplant lines were generated in which the expression of SmNAC was constitutively up regulated or suppressed using RNAi. The results indicated that overexpression of SmNAC decreases resistance to BW. Moreover, SmNAC overexpression resulted in the reduced accumulation of the plant immune signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) and reduced expression of ICS1 (a gene that encode isochorismate synthase 1, which is involved in SA biosynthesis). We propose that reduced SA content results in increased bacterial wilt susceptibility in the transgenic lines. Our results provide important new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of bacterial wilt resistance in eggplant. PMID:27528282

  10. Overexpression of the Eggplant (Solanum melongena) NAC Family Transcription Factor SmNAC Suppresses Resistance to Bacterial Wilt

    PubMed Central

    Na, Chen; Shuanghua, Wu; Jinglong, Fu; Bihao, Cao; Jianjun, Lei; Changming, Chen; Jin, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial wilt (BW) is a serious disease that affects eggplant (Solanum melongena) production. Although resistance to this disease has been reported, the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we identified a NAC family transcription factor (SmNAC) from eggplant and characterized its expression, its localization at the tissue and subcellular levels, and its role in BW resistance. To this end, transgenic eggplant lines were generated in which the expression of SmNAC was constitutively up regulated or suppressed using RNAi. The results indicated that overexpression of SmNAC decreases resistance to BW. Moreover, SmNAC overexpression resulted in the reduced accumulation of the plant immune signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) and reduced expression of ICS1 (a gene that encode isochorismate synthase 1, which is involved in SA biosynthesis). We propose that reduced SA content results in increased bacterial wilt susceptibility in the transgenic lines. Our results provide important new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of bacterial wilt resistance in eggplant. PMID:27528282

  11. Overexpression of the Eggplant (Solanum melongena) NAC Family Transcription Factor SmNAC Suppresses Resistance to Bacterial Wilt.

    PubMed

    Na, Chen; Shuanghua, Wu; Jinglong, Fu; Bihao, Cao; Jianjun, Lei; Changming, Chen; Jin, Jiang

    2016-08-16

    Bacterial wilt (BW) is a serious disease that affects eggplant (Solanum melongena) production. Although resistance to this disease has been reported, the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we identified a NAC family transcription factor (SmNAC) from eggplant and characterized its expression, its localization at the tissue and subcellular levels, and its role in BW resistance. To this end, transgenic eggplant lines were generated in which the expression of SmNAC was constitutively up regulated or suppressed using RNAi. The results indicated that overexpression of SmNAC decreases resistance to BW. Moreover, SmNAC overexpression resulted in the reduced accumulation of the plant immune signaling molecule salicylic acid (SA) and reduced expression of ICS1 (a gene that encode isochorismate synthase 1, which is involved in SA biosynthesis). We propose that reduced SA content results in increased bacterial wilt susceptibility in the transgenic lines. Our results provide important new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of bacterial wilt resistance in eggplant.

  12. A Simple and Rapid Method for Preparing a Cell-Free Bacterial Lysate for Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kaduri, Maya; Shainsky-Roitman, Janna; Goldfeder, Mor; Ivanir, Eran; Benhar, Itai; Shoham, Yuval; Schroeder, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) systems are important laboratory tools that are used for various synthetic biology applications. Here, we present a simple and inexpensive laboratory-scale method for preparing a CFPS system from E. coli. The procedure uses basic lab equipment, a minimal set of reagents, and requires less than one hour to process the bacterial cell mass into a functional S30-T7 extract. BL21(DE3) and MRE600 E. coli strains were used to prepare the S30-T7 extract. The CFPS system was used to produce a set of fluorescent and therapeutic proteins of different molecular weights (up to 66 kDa). This system was able to produce 40–150 μg-protein/ml, with variations depending on the plasmid type, expressed protein and E. coli strain. Interestingly, the BL21-based CFPS exhibited stability and increased activity at 40 and 45°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most rapid and affordable lab-scale protocol for preparing a cell-free protein synthesis system, with high thermal stability and efficacy in producing therapeutic proteins. PMID:27768741

  13. Familial prion protein mutants inhibit Hrd1-mediated retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins by depleting misfolded protein sensor BiP.

    PubMed

    Peters, Sarah L; Déry, Marc-André; LeBlanc, Andrea C

    2016-03-01

    Similar to many proteins trafficking through the secretory pathway, cellular prion protein (PrP) partly retrotranslocates from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol through the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway in an attempt to alleviate accumulation of cellular misfolded PrP. Surprisingly, familial PrP mutants fail to retrotranslocate and simultaneously block normal cellular PrP retrotranslocation. That impairments in retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins could lead to global disruptions in cellular homeostasis prompted further investigations into PrP mutant retrotranslocation defects. A gain- and loss-of-function approach identified human E3 ubiquitin ligase, Hrd1, as a critical regulator of PrP retrotranslocation in mammalian cells. Expression of familial human PrP mutants, V210I(129V) and M232R(129V), not only abolished PrP retrotranslocation, but also that of Hrd1-dependent ERAD substrates, transthyretin TTR(D18G) and α1-anti-trypsin A1AT(NHK). Mutant PrP expression decreased binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) levels by 50% and attenuated ER stress-induced BiP by increasing BiP turnover 6-fold. Overexpression of BiP with PrP mutants rescued retrotranslocation of PrP, TTR(D18G) and A1AT(NHK). PrP mutants-induced cell death was also rescued by co-expression of BiP. These results show that PrP mutants highjack the Hrd1-dependent ERAD pathway, an action that would result in misfolded protein accumulation especially in terminally differentiated neurons. This could explain the age-dependent neuronal degeneration in familial prion diseases. PMID:26740554

  14. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons.

    PubMed

    Gennaris, Alexandra; Ezraty, Benjamin; Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-12-17

    The reactive species of oxygen and chlorine damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine is converted to methionine sulfoxide, which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with methionine sulfoxide residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts. Here we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing proteins containing methionine sulfoxide in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the reactive species of oxygen and chlorine generated by the host defence mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a haem-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid, a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from methionine oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both rectus (R-) and sinister (S-) diastereoisomers of methionine sulfoxide, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting methionine residues from oxidation should prompt a search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum.

  15. Two apextrin-like proteins mediate extracellular and intracellular bacterial recognition in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guangrui; Huang, Shengfeng; Yan, Xinyu; Yang, Ping; Li, Jun; Xu, Weiya; Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Ruihua; Yu, Yingcai; Yuan, Shaochun; Chen, Shangwu; Luo, Guangbin; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-16

    Animals exploit different germ-line-encoded proteins with various domain structures to detect the signature molecules of pathogenic microbes. These molecules are known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and the host proteins that react with PAMPs are called pattern recognition proteins (PRPs). Here, we present a novel type of protein domain structure capable of binding to bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) and the minimal PGN motif muramyl dipeptide (MDP). This domain is designated as apextrin C-terminal domain (ApeC), and its presence was confirmed in several invertebrate phyla and subphyla. Two apextrin-like proteins (ALP1 and ALP2) were identified in a basal chordate, the Japanese amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum (bj). bjALP1 is a mucosal effector secreted into the gut lumen to agglutinate the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus via PGN binding. Neutralization of secreted bjALP1 by anti-bjALP1 monoclonal antibodies caused serious damage to the gut epithelium and rapid death of the animals after bacterial infection. bjALP2 is an intracellular PGN sensor that binds to TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and prevents TRAF6 from self-ubiquitination and hence from NF-κB activation. MDP was found to compete with TRAF6 for bjALP2, which released TRAF6 to activate the NF-κB pathway. BjALP1 and bjALP2 therefore play distinct and complementary functions in amphioxus gut mucosal immunity. In conclusion, discovery of the ApeC domain and the functional analyses of amphioxus ALP1 and ALP2 allowed us to define a previously undocumented type of PRP that is represented across different animal phyla.

  16. Two apextrin-like proteins mediate extracellular and intracellular bacterial recognition in amphioxus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guangrui; Huang, Shengfeng; Yan, Xinyu; Yang, Ping; Li, Jun; Xu, Weiya; Zhang, Lingling; Wang, Ruihua; Yu, Yingcai; Yuan, Shaochun; Chen, Shangwu; Luo, Guangbin; Xu, Anlong

    2014-09-16

    Animals exploit different germ-line-encoded proteins with various domain structures to detect the signature molecules of pathogenic microbes. These molecules are known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and the host proteins that react with PAMPs are called pattern recognition proteins (PRPs). Here, we present a novel type of protein domain structure capable of binding to bacterial peptidoglycan (PGN) and the minimal PGN motif muramyl dipeptide (MDP). This domain is designated as apextrin C-terminal domain (ApeC), and its presence was confirmed in several invertebrate phyla and subphyla. Two apextrin-like proteins (ALP1 and ALP2) were identified in a basal chordate, the Japanese amphioxus Branchiostoma japonicum (bj). bjALP1 is a mucosal effector secreted into the gut lumen to agglutinate the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus via PGN binding. Neutralization of secreted bjALP1 by anti-bjALP1 monoclonal antibodies caused serious damage to the gut epithelium and rapid death of the animals after bacterial infection. bjALP2 is an intracellular PGN sensor that binds to TNF receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and prevents TRAF6 from self-ubiquitination and hence from NF-κB activation. MDP was found to compete with TRAF6 for bjALP2, which released TRAF6 to activate the NF-κB pathway. BjALP1 and bjALP2 therefore play distinct and complementary functions in amphioxus gut mucosal immunity. In conclusion, discovery of the ApeC domain and the functional analyses of amphioxus ALP1 and ALP2 allowed us to define a previously undocumented type of PRP that is represented across different animal phyla. PMID:25187559

  17. Repairing oxidized proteins in the bacterial envelope using respiratory chain electrons

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Camille; Agrebi, Rym; Vergnes, Alexandra; Oheix, Emmanuel; Bos, Julia; Leverrier, Pauline; Espinosa, Leon; Szewczyk, Joanna; Vertommen, Didier; Iranzo, Olga; Collet, Jean-François; Barras, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    The reactive species of oxygen (ROS) and chlorine (RCS) damage cellular components, potentially leading to cell death. In proteins, the sulfur-containing amino acid methionine (Met) is converted to methionine sulfoxide (Met-O), which can cause a loss of biological activity. To rescue proteins with Met-O residues, living cells express methionine sulfoxide reductases (Msrs) in most subcellular compartments, including the cytosol, mitochondria and chloroplasts 1-3. Here, we report the identification of an enzymatic system, MsrPQ, repairing Met-O containing proteins in the bacterial cell envelope, a compartment particularly exposed to the ROS and RCS generated by the host defense mechanisms. MsrP, a molybdo-enzyme, and MsrQ, a heme-binding membrane protein, are widely conserved throughout Gram-negative bacteria, including major human pathogens. MsrPQ synthesis is induced by hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a powerful antimicrobial released by neutrophils. Consistently, MsrPQ is essential for the maintenance of envelope integrity under bleach stress, rescuing a wide series of structurally unrelated periplasmic proteins from Met oxidation, including the primary periplasmic chaperone SurA. For this activity, MsrPQ uses electrons from the respiratory chain, which represents a novel mechanism to import reducing equivalents into the bacterial cell envelope. A remarkable feature of MsrPQ is its capacity to reduce both R- and S- diastereoisomers of Met-O, making this oxidoreductase complex functionally different from previously identified Msrs. The discovery that a large class of bacteria contain a single, non-stereospecific enzymatic complex fully protecting Met residues from oxidation should prompt search for similar systems in eukaryotic subcellular oxidizing compartments, including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). PMID:26641313

  18. Monoubiquitination of Tob/BTG family proteins competes with degradation-targeting polyubiquitination

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toru; Kim, Minsoo; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Watanabe, Masato; Oyama, Masaaki; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2011-05-27

    Highlights: {yields} Tob/BTG family proteins are monoubiquitinated in the absence of E3s in vitro. {yields} Monoubiquitination sites of Tob are identified by mass spectrometry. {yields} The monoubiquitination event correlates with lower levels of polyubiquitination. -- Abstract: Tob belongs to the anti-proliferative Tob/BTG protein family. The expression level of Tob family proteins is strictly regulated both transcriptionally and through post-translational modification. Ubiquitin (Ub)/proteosome-dependent degradation of Tob family proteins is critical in controlling cell cycle progression and DNA damage responses. Various Ub ligases (E3s) are responsible for degradation of Tob protein. Here, we show that Tob family proteins undergo monoubiquitination even in the absence of E3s in vitro. Determination of the ubiquitination site(s) in Tob by mass spectrometric analysis revealed that two lysine residues (Lys48 and Lys63) located in Tob/BTG homology domain are ubiquitinated. A mutant Tob, in which both Lys48 and Lys63 are substituted with alanine, is more strongly polyubiquitinated than wild-type Tob in vivo. These data suggest that monoubiquitination of Tob family proteins confers resistance against polyubiquitination, which targets proteins for degradation. The strategy for regulating the stability of Tob family proteins suggests a novel role for monoubiquitination.

  19. Generation of novel bacterial regulatory proteins that detect priority pollutant phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, A.A.; Kuske, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    The genetic systems of bacteria that have the ability to use organic pollutants as carbon and energy sources can be adapted to create bacterial biosensors for the detection of industrial pollution. The creation of bacterial biosensors is hampered by a lack of information about the genetic systems that control production of bacterial enzymes that metabolize pollutants. The authors have attempted to overcome this problem through modification of DmpR, a regulatory protein for the phenol degradation pathway of Pseudomonas sp. strain CF600. The phenol detection capacity of DmpR was altered by using mutagenic PCR targeted to the DmpR sensor domain. DmpR mutants were identified that both increased sensitivity to the phenolic effectors of wild-type DmpR and increased the range of molecules detected. The phenol detection characteristics of seven DmpR mutants were demonstrated through their ability to activate transcription of a lacZ reporter gene. Effectors of the DmpR derivatives included phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2-nitrophenol, and 4-nitrophenol.

  20. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  1. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  2. Putative protein partners for the human CPI-17 protein revealed by bacterial two-hybrid screening.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung-mi; Adyshev, Djanybek M; Kása, Anita; Zemskov, Evgeny A; Kolosova, Irina A; Csortos, Csilla; Verin, Alexander D

    2013-07-01

    We have previously demonstrated that PKC-potentiated inhibitory protein of protein phosphatase-1 (CPI-17) is expressed in lung endothelium. CPI-17, a specific inhibitor of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), is involved in the endothelial cytoskeletal and barrier regulation. In this paper, we report the identification of fourteen putative CPI-17 interacting proteins in the lung using BacterioMatch Two-Hybrid System. Five of them: plectin 1 isoform 1, alpha II spectrin, OK/SW-CL.16, gelsolin isoform a, and junction plakoglobin are involved in actin cytoskeleton organization and cell adhesion, suggesting possible significance of these binding partners in CPI-17-mediated cytoskeletal reorganization of endothelial cells. Furthermore, we confirmed the specific interaction between plakoglobin and CPI-17, which is affected by the phosphorylation status of CPI-17 in human lung microvascular endothelial cells. PMID:23583905

  3. Bacterial ApbC Protein Has Two Biochemical Activities That Are Required for in Vivo Function*

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Jeffrey M.; Sondelski, Jamie L.; Downs, Diana M.

    2009-01-01

    The ApbC protein has been shown previously to bind and rapidly transfer iron-sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters to an apoprotein (Boyd, J. M., Pierik, A. J., Netz, D. J., Lill, R., and Downs, D. M. (2008) Biochemistry 47, 8195–8202. This study utilized both in vivo and in vitro assays to examine the function of variant ApbC proteins. The in vivo assays assessed the ability of ApbC proteins to function in pathways with low and high demand for [Fe-S] cluster proteins. Variant ApbC proteins were purified and assayed for the ability to hydrolyze ATP, bind [Fe-S] cluster, and transfer [Fe-S] cluster. This study details the first kinetic analysis of ATP hydrolysis for a member of the ParA subfamily of “deviant” Walker A proteins. Moreover, this study details the first functional analysis of mutant variants of the ever expanding family of ApbC/Nbp35 [Fe-S] cluster biosynthetic proteins. The results herein show that ApbC protein needs ATPase activity and the ability to bind and rapidly transfer [Fe-S] clusters for in vivo function. PMID:19001370

  4. The UlaG protein family defines novel structural and functional motifs grafted on an ancient RNase fold

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bacterial populations are highly successful at colonizing new habitats and adapting to changing environmental conditions, partly due to their capacity to evolve novel virulence and metabolic pathways in response to stress conditions and to shuffle them by horizontal gene transfer (HGT). A common theme in the evolution of new functions consists of gene duplication followed by functional divergence. UlaG, a unique manganese-dependent metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) enzyme involved in L-ascorbate metabolism by commensal and symbiotic enterobacteria, provides a model for the study of the emergence of new catalytic activities from the modification of an ancient fold. Furthermore, UlaG is the founding member of the so-called UlaG-like (UlaGL) protein family, a recently established and poorly characterized family comprising divalent (and perhaps trivalent) metal-binding MBLs that catalyze transformations on phosphorylated sugars and nucleotides. Results Here we combined protein structure-guided and sequence-only molecular phylogenetic analyses to dissect the molecular evolution of UlaG and to study its phylogenomic distribution, its relatedness with present-day UlaGL protein sequences and functional conservation. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that UlaGL sequences are present in Bacteria and Archaea, with bona fide orthologs found mainly in mammalian and plant-associated Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The incongruence between the UlaGL tree and known species trees indicates exchange by HGT and suggests that the UlaGL-encoding genes provided a growth advantage under changing conditions. Our search for more distantly related protein sequences aided by structural homology has uncovered that UlaGL sequences have a common evolutionary origin with present-day RNA processing and metabolizing MBL enzymes widespread in Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. This observation suggests an ancient origin for the UlaGL family within the broader trunk of the MBL superfamily by

  5. Protein families, natural history and biotechnological aspects of spider silk.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, D; Oliveira, P F; Prosdocimi, F; Rech, E L

    2012-01-01

    Spiders are exceptionally diverse and abundant organisms in terrestrial ecosystems and their evolutionary success is certainly related to their capacity to produce different types of silks during their life cycle, making a specialized use on each of them. Presenting particularly tandemly arranged amino acid repeats, silk proteins (spidroins) have mechanical properties superior to most synthetic or natural high-performance fibers, which makes them very promising for biotechnology industry, with putative applications in the production of new biomaterials. During the evolution of spider species, complex behaviors of web production and usage have been coupled with anatomical specialization of spinning glands. Spiders retaining ancestral characters, such as the ones belonging to the Mygalomorph group, present simpler sorts of webs used mainly to build burrows and egg sacs, and their silks are produced by globular undifferentiated spinning glands. In contrast, Araneomorphae spiders have a complex spinning apparatus, presenting up to seven morphologically distinct glands, capable to produce a more complex set of silk polymers with different degrees of rigidness and elasticity associated with distinct behaviors. Aiming to provide a discussion involving a number of spider silks' biological aspects, in this review we present descriptions of members from each family of spidroin identified from five spider species of the Brazilian biodiversity, and an evolutionary study of them in correlation with the anatomical specialization of glands and spider's spinning behaviors. Due to the biotechnological importance of spider silks for the production of new biomaterials, we also discuss about the new possible technical and biomedical applications of spider silks and the current status of it. PMID:22911606

  6. Protein families, natural history and biotechnological aspects of spider silk.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, D; Oliveira, P F; Prosdocimi, F; Rech, E L

    2012-01-01

    Spiders are exceptionally diverse and abundant organisms in terrestrial ecosystems and their evolutionary success is certainly related to their capacity to produce different types of silks during their life cycle, making a specialized use on each of them. Presenting particularly tandemly arranged amino acid repeats, silk proteins (spidroins) have mechanical properties superior to most synthetic or natural high-performance fibers, which makes them very promising for biotechnology industry, with putative applications in the production of new biomaterials. During the evolution of spider species, complex behaviors of web production and usage have been coupled with anatomical specialization of spinning glands. Spiders retaining ancestral characters, such as the ones belonging to the Mygalomorph group, present simpler sorts of webs used mainly to build burrows and egg sacs, and their silks are produced by globular undifferentiated spinning glands. In contrast, Araneomorphae spiders have a complex spinning apparatus, presenting up to seven morphologically distinct glands, capable to produce a more complex set of silk polymers with different degrees of rigidness and elasticity associated with distinct behaviors. Aiming to provide a discussion involving a number of spider silks' biological aspects, in this review we present descriptions of members from each family of spidroin identified from five spider species of the Brazilian biodiversity, and an evolutionary study of them in correlation with the anatomical specialization of glands and spider's spinning behaviors. Due to the biotechnological importance of spider silks for the production of new biomaterials, we also discuss about the new possible technical and biomedical applications of spider silks and the current status of it.

  7. The surface location of individual residues in a bacterial S-layer protein.

    PubMed

    Kinns, Helen; Howorka, Stefan

    2008-03-21

    Bacterial surface layer (S-layer) proteins self-assemble into large two-dimensional crystalline lattices that form the outermost cell-wall component of all archaea and many eubacteria. Despite being a large class of self-assembling proteins, little is known about their molecular architecture. We investigated the S-layer protein SbsB from Geobacillus stearothermophilus PV72/p2 to identify residues located at the subunit-subunit interface and to determine the S-layer's topology. Twenty-three single cysteine mutants, which were previously mapped to the surface of the SbsB monomer, were subjected to a cross-linking screen using the photoactivatable, sulfhydryl-reactive reagent N-[4-(p-azidosalicylamido)butyl]-3'-(2'-pyridyldithio)propionamide. Gel electrophoretic analysis on the formation of cross-linked dimers indicated that 8 out of the 23 residues were located at the interface. In combination with surface accessibility data for the assembled protein, 10 residues were assigned to positions at the inner, cell-wall-facing lattice surface, while 5 residues were mapped to the outer, ambient-exposed lattice surface. In addition, the cross-linking screen identified six positions of intramolecular cross-linking within the assembled protein but not in the monomeric S-layer protein. Most likely, these intramolecular cross-links result from conformational changes upon self-assembly. The results are an important step toward the further structural elucidation of the S-layer protein via, for example, X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy. Our approach of identifying the surface location of residues is relevant to other planar supramolecular protein assemblies. PMID:18262545

  8. Recognition of the bacterial avirulence protein AvrBs3 occurs inside the host plant cell.

    PubMed

    Van den Ackerveken, G; Marois, E; Bonas, U

    1996-12-27

    The molecular mechanism by which bacterial avirulence genes mediate recognition by resistant host plants has been enigmatic for more than a decade. In this paper we provide evidence that the Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria avirulence protein AvrBs3 is recognized inside the plant cell. Transient expression of avrBs3 in pepper leaves, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens for gene delivery, results in hypersensitive cell death, specifically on plants carrying the resistance gene Bs3. In addition, for its intracellular recognition, AvrBs3 requires nuclear localization signals that are present in the C-terminal region of the protein. We propose that AvrBs3 is translocated into plant cells via the Xanthomonas Hrp type III secretion system and that nuclear factors are involved in AvrBs3 perception. PMID:8980236

  9. Localization of a bacterial group II intron-encoded protein in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Reinoso-Colacio, Mercedes; García-Rodríguez, Fernando Manuel; García-Cañadas, Marta; Amador-Cubero, Suyapa; Pérez, José Luis García; Toro, Nicolás

    2015-01-01

    Group II introns are mobile retroelements that self-splice from precursor RNAs to form ribonucleoparticles (RNP), which can invade new specific genomic DNA sites. This specificity can be reprogrammed, for insertion into any desired DNA site, making these introns useful tools for bacterial genetic engineering. However, previous studies have suggested that these elements may function inefficiently in eukaryotes. We investigated the subcellular distribution, in cultured human cells, of the protein encoded by the group II intron RmInt1 (IEP) and several mutants. We created fusions with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and with a FLAG epitope. We found that the IEP was localized in the nucleus and nucleolus of the cells. Remarkably, it also accumulated at the periphery of the nuclear matrix. We were also able to identify spliced lariat intron RNA, which co-immunoprecipitated with the IEP, suggesting that functional RmInt1 RNPs can be assembled in cultured human cells. PMID:26244523

  10. Single-stranded DNA bound to bacterial cold-shock proteins: preliminary crystallographic and Raman analysis.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Ralf; Zeeb, Markus; Dostál, Lubomir; Feske, Anette; Magg, Christine; Max, Klaas; Welfle, Heinz; Balbach, Jochen; Heinemann, Udo

    2004-04-01

    The cold-shock response has been described for several bacterial species. It is characterized by distinct changes in intracellular protein patterns whereby a set of cold-shock-inducible proteins become abundant. The major cold-shock proteins of Bacillus subtilis (Bs-CspB) and Bacillus caldolyticus (Bc-Csp) are small oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB) fold proteins that have been described as binding single-stranded nucleic acids. Bs-CspB (Mr = 7365) and Bc-Csp (Mr = 7333) were crystallized in the presence of the deoxyhexanucleotide (dT)6. Crystals of (dT)6 with Bs-CspB grew in the orthorhombic space group C222(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 49.0, b = 53.2, c = 77.0 A. Crystals with Bc-Csp grew in the primitive orthorhombic space group P2(1)2(1)2, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.3, b = 64.9, c = 31.2 A. These crystals diffract to maximal resolutions of 1.78 and 1.29 A, respectively. The presence of protein and DNA in the crystals was demonstrated by Raman spectroscopy.

  11. Automated Structure- and Sequence-Based Design of Proteins for High Bacterial Expression and Stability.

    PubMed

    Goldenzweig, Adi; Goldsmith, Moshe; Hill, Shannon E; Gertman, Or; Laurino, Paola; Ashani, Yacov; Dym, Orly; Unger, Tamar; Albeck, Shira; Prilusky, Jaime; Lieberman, Raquel L; Aharoni, Amir; Silman, Israel; Sussman, Joel L; Tawfik, Dan S; Fleishman, Sarel J

    2016-07-21

    Upon heterologous overexpression, many proteins misfold or aggregate, thus resulting in low functional yields. Human acetylcholinesterase (hAChE), an enzyme mediating synaptic transmission, is a typical case of a human protein that necessitates mammalian systems to obtain functional expression. We developed a computational strategy and designed an AChE variant bearing 51 mutations that improved core packing, surface polarity, and backbone rigidity. This variant expressed at ∼2,000-fold higher levels in E. coli compared to wild-type hAChE and exhibited 20°C higher thermostability with no change in enzymatic properties or in the active-site configuration as determined by crystallography. To demonstrate broad utility, we similarly designed four other human and bacterial proteins. Testing at most three designs per protein, we obtained enhanced stability and/or higher yields of soluble and active protein in E. coli. Our algorithm requires only a 3D structure and several dozen sequences of naturally occurring homologs, and is available at http://pross.weizmann.ac.il. PMID:27425410

  12. Stoichiometry and turnover of the bacterial flagellar switch protein FliN.

    PubMed

    Delalez, Nicolas J; Berry, Richard M; Armitage, Judith P

    2014-07-01

    Some proteins in biological complexes exchange with pools of free proteins while the complex is functioning. Evidence is emerging that protein exchange can be part of an adaptive mechanism. The bacterial flagellar motor is one of the most complex biological machines and is an ideal model system to study protein dynamics in large multimeric complexes. Recent studies showed that the copy number of FliM in the switch complex and the fraction of FliM that exchanges vary with the direction of flagellar rotation. Here, we investigated the stoichiometry and turnover of another switch complex component, FliN, labeled with the fluorescent protein CyPet, in Escherichia coli. Our results confirm that, in vivo, FliM and FliN form a complex with stoichiometry of 1:4 and function as a unit. We estimated that wild-type motors contained 120 ± 26 FliN molecules. Motors that rotated only clockwise (CW) or counterclockwise (CCW) contained 114 ± 17 and 144 ± 26 FliN molecules, respectively. The ratio of CCW-to-CW FliN copy numbers was 1.26, very close to that of 1.29 reported previously for FliM. We also measured the exchange of FliN molecules, which had a time scale and dependence upon rotation direction similar to those of FliM, consistent with an exchange of FliM-FliN as a unit. Our work confirms the highly dynamic nature of multimeric protein complexes and indicates that, under physiological conditions, these machines might not be the stable, complete structures suggested by averaged fixed methodologies but, rather, incomplete rings that can respond and adapt to changing environments. Importance: The flagellum is one of the most complex structures in a bacterial cell, with the core motor proteins conserved across species. Evidence is now emerging that turnover of some of these motor proteins depends on motor activity, suggesting that turnover is important for function. The switch complex transmits the chemosensory signal to the rotor, and we show, by using single

  13. Conserved synteny at the protein family level reveals genes underlying Shewanella species' cold tolerance and predicts their novel phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Karpinets, Tatiana V; Obraztsova, Anna Y; Wang, Yanbin; Schmoyer, Denise D; Kora, Guruprasad H; Kothe, T Brett; Serres, Margrethe H.; Romine, Margaret F; Fredrickson, Jim K; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Uberbacher, Edward C; Land, Miriam L

    2009-01-01

    In spite of a rapid growth in the number of sequenced bacteria and significant progress in the annotation of their genomes, current computational technologies are limited in their capability to associate the genotype of a sequenced bacterial organism with its phenotypic traits. We evaluated two novel, complimentary approaches that can facilitate this task. They are based on correlation between the numbers of the trait-specific protein families or Pfam domains and a quantitative characteristic of the phenotypic trait among different bacterial species. Our first, a top-down approach, involves quantification and comparison of a higher-level characteristic, a bacterial phenotype, to reveal genomic characteristics and specific genes related to the phenotype. The second, a bottom-up approach, predicts phenotypes by quantification of molecular functions in the genomes of closely related bacterial species and by following pair-wise correlation of the molecular functions enrichments and their network clustering. The approach is implemented using network analysis tools. The approaches were validated by a comparison of 19 sequenced Shewanella species. Using the first approach, we were able to identify specific domains and gene clusters associated with cold tolerance of these mesophilic species and to predict some novel cellular mechanisms underlying the phenotype. We find that in three tested species both cold and salt tolerance relate to presence in their genome of a specific Na+/H+ antiporter. By using the second approach we identified genomic clusters predicting several environmentally relevant phenotypes in the newly sequenced Shewanella species including degradation of aromatic compounds by an aerobic hybrid pathway, utilization of ethanolamine, and arsenic and copper resistance. Results of the study confirm validity of the approaches and their utility for (i) computational predictions of phenotypic traits in the sequenced organisms, (ii) revealing genomic determinants

  14. [Usefulness of C-reactive protein for the diagnosis of bacterial infections in children. A review].

    PubMed

    Herrera, Patricio; Duffau, Gaston

    2005-05-01

    Although C-Reactive protein (CRP) was described more than 70 years ago and it still is commonly used in practice, studies exploring its usefulness persist while some propose its replacement by other inflammatory acute-phase-mediators. The aim of this clinical review is to answer the question if CRP measurement warrant clinical decisions for febrile children because it discriminates between bacterial from non bacterial etiologies. We made a systematic search by means of MEDLINE, SciELO and LILACS with the following MESH terms: "C-reactive protein", "bacterial", "infection", "children", "diagnosis" or "detection", besides the Haynes selector for articles on diagnosis, between 1950 and 2004. Selection data extraction and critical appraisal were independently made by the two authors, following standard criteria. We selected 7 primary articles, 3 clinical reviews and two randomized clinical trials. There was no disagreement between reviewers. Only one of the clinical reviews followed standard guidelines; two reviews concluded that no isolated CRP values would warrant to make decisions on starting or withholding antimicrobial therapy in febrile children. All primary articles showed methodological flaws in basic validity criteria. Both randomized clinical trials showed that CRP results did not change either doctor's decisions about antimicrobial prescriptions nor the studied patients' prognosis. We did not find evidences that could warrant the use of CRP for the defined problem in Pediatrics. Main problems affecting validity of studies on CRP as diagnostic resource are the lack of laboratory methods uniformity--including the gold standard make up--the heterogeneity of cut off points, clinical spectrum inappropriateness of study groups as well as the resulting diversity of the fixed indexes values. Moreover, no validation of this test in children population has been made so far.

  15. Motion of single MreB bacterial actin proteins in Caulobacter show treadmilling in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moerner, W. E.; Kim, Soyeon; Gitai, Zemer; Kinkhabwala, Anika; McAdams, Harley; Shapiro, Lucy

    2006-03-01

    Ensemble imaging of a bacterial actin homologue, the MreB protein, suggests that the MreB proteins form a dynamic filamentous spiral along the long axis of the cell in Caulobacter crescentus. MreB contracts and expands along the cell axis and plays an important role in cell shape and polarity maintenance, as well as chromosome segregation and translocation of the origin of replication during cell division. In this study we investigated the real-time polymerization of MreB in Caulobacter crescentus using single-molecule fluorescence imaging. With time-lapse imaging, polymerized MreB could be distinguished from cytoplasmic MreB monomers, because single monomeric MreB showed fast motion characteristic of Brownian diffusion, while single polymerized MreB displayed slow, directed motion. This directional movement of labeled MreB in the growing polymer implies that treadmilling is the predominant mechanism in MreB filament formation. These single-molecule imaging experiments provide the first available information on the velocity of bacterial actin polymerization in a living cell.

  16. The participation of outer membrane proteins in the bacterial sensitivity to nanosilver.

    PubMed

    Kędziora, Anna; Krzyżewska, Eva; Dudek, Bartłomiej; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela

    2016-06-13

    The presented study is to analyze the participation of outer membrane proteins of Gram- negative bacteria in sensitivity to silver nanomaterials. The mechanism of interaction of silver with the bacterial cell is best described in this group of microorganisms. There are several theories regarding the effectiveness of antimicrobial ions and nanosilver, and at the indicated differences in the way they work. Outer membrane proteins of Gram-negative bacteria are involved in the procurement of silver from the environment and contribute to the development mechanisms of resistance to nanometals. They are measurable parameter in the field of cell phenotypic response to the presence of Gram-negative bacteria in the environment silver nanoforms: its properties, chemical composition, content or times of action. Proteomic methods (including two dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI‑TOF MS) are therefore relevant techniques for determining the susceptibility of bacteria to silver and the changes taking place in the outer membrane under the influence: uptime/exposure and physical and chemical parameters of silver nanomaterials. Many products containing nanosilver is still in the research phase in terms of physico‑chemical characteristics and biological activity, others have been already implemented in many industries. During the very fast nanotechnology developing and introduction to the market products based on the nanosilver the bacterial answer to nanosilver is needed.

  17. Perturbation of bacterial ice nucleation activity by a grass antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Tomalty, Heather E; Walker, Virginia K

    2014-09-26

    Certain plant-associating bacteria produce ice nucleation proteins (INPs) which allow the crystallization of water at high subzero temperatures. Many of these microbes are considered plant pathogens since the formed ice can damage tissues, allowing access to nutrients. Intriguingly, certain plants that host these bacteria synthesize antifreeze proteins (AFPs). Once freezing has occurred, plant AFPs likely function to inhibit the growth of large damaging ice crystals. However, we postulated that such AFPs might also serve as defensive mechanisms against bacterial-mediated ice nucleation. Recombinant AFP derived from the perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne (LpAFP) was combined with INP preparations originating from the grass epiphyte, Pseudomonas syringae. The presence of INPs had no effect on AFP activity, including thermal hysteresis and ice recrystallization inhibition. Strikingly, the ice nucleation point of the INP was depressed up to 1.9°C in the presence of LpAFP, but a recombinant fish AFP did not lower the INP-imposed freezing point. Assays with mutant LpAFPs and the visualization of bacterially-displayed fluorescent plant AFP suggest that INP and LpAFP can interact. Thus, we postulate that in addition to controlling ice growth, plant AFPs may also function as a defensive strategy against the damaging effects of ice-nucleating bacteria.

  18. Perturbation of bacterial ice nucleation activity by a grass antifreeze protein.

    PubMed

    Tomalty, Heather E; Walker, Virginia K

    2014-09-26

    Certain plant-associating bacteria produce ice nucleation proteins (INPs) which allow the crystallization of water at high subzero temperatures. Many of these microbes are considered plant pathogens since the formed ice can damage tissues, allowing access to nutrients. Intriguingly, certain plants that host these bacteria synthesize antifreeze proteins (AFPs). Once freezing has occurred, plant AFPs likely function to inhibit the growth of large damaging ice crystals. However, we postulated that such AFPs might also serve as defensive mechanisms against bacterial-mediated ice nucleation. Recombinant AFP derived from the perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne (LpAFP) was combined with INP preparations originating from the grass epiphyte, Pseudomonas syringae. The presence of INPs had no effect on AFP activity, including thermal hysteresis and ice recrystallization inhibition. Strikingly, the ice nucleation point of the INP was depressed up to 1.9°C in the presence of LpAFP, but a recombinant fish AFP did not lower the INP-imposed freezing point. Assays with mutant LpAFPs and the visualization of bacterially-displayed fluorescent plant AFP suggest that INP and LpAFP can interact. Thus, we postulate that in addition to controlling ice growth, plant AFPs may also function as a defensive strategy against the damaging effects of ice-nucleating bacteria. PMID:25193694

  19. De novo generation of infectious prions with bacterially expressed recombinant prion protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Fei; Wang, Xinhe; Xu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Huaiyi; Yu, Guohua; Yuan, Chonggang; Ma, Jiyan

    2013-12-01

    The prion hypothesis is strongly supported by the fact that prion infectivity and the pathogenic conformer of prion protein (PrP) are simultaneously propagated in vitro by the serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA). However, due to sPMCA's enormous amplification power, whether an infectious prion can be formed de novo with bacterially expressed recombinant PrP (rPrP) remains to be satisfactorily resolved. To address this question, we performed unseeded sPMCA with rPrP in a laboratory that has never been exposed to any native prions. Two types of proteinase K (PK)-resistant and self-perpetuating recombinant PrP conformers (rPrP-res) with PK-resistant cores of 17 or 14 kDa were generated. A bioassay revealed that rPrP-res(17kDa) was highly infectious, causing prion disease in wild-type mice with an average survival time of about 172 d. In contrast, rPrP-res(14kDa) completely failed to induce any disease. Our findings reveal that sPMCA is sufficient to initiate various self-perpetuating PK-resistant rPrP conformers, but not all of them possess in vivo infectivity. Moreover, generating an infectious prion in a prion-free environment establishes that an infectious prion can be formed de novo with bacterially expressed rPrP.

  20. Structural Insights into Higher Order Assembly and Function of the Bacterial Microcompartment Protein PduA*

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Allan; Frank, Stefanie; Brown, Ian; Warren, Martin J.; Pickersgill, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments are large proteinaceous assemblies that are found in the cytoplasm of some bacteria. These structures consist of proteins constituting a shell that houses a number of enzymes involved in specific metabolic processes. The 1,2-propanediol-utilizing microcompartment is assembled from seven different types of shell proteins, one of which is PduA. It is one of the more abundant components of the shell and intriguingly can form nanotubule-like structures when expressed on its own in the cytoplasm of Escherichia coli. We propose a model that accounts for the size and appearance of these PduA structures and underpin our model using a combinatorial approach. Making strategic mutations at Lys-26, Val-51, and Arg-79, we targeted residues predicted to be important for PduA assembly. We present the effect of the amino acid residue substitution on the phenotype of the PduA higher order assemblies (transmission electron microscopy) and the crystal structure of the K26D mutant with one glycerol molecule bound to the central pore. Our results support the view that the hexamer-hexamer interactions seen in PduA crystals persist in the cytoplasmic structures and reveal the profound influence of the two key amino acids, Lys-26 and Arg-79, on tiling, not only in the crystal lattice but also in the bacterial cytoplasm. Understanding and controlling PduA assemblies is valuable in order to inform manipulation for synthetic biology and biotechnological applications. PMID:24873823

  1. YcgC represents a new protein deacetylase family in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shun; Guo, Shu-Juan; Chen, Chien-Sheng; Liu, Cheng-Xi; Jiang, He-Wei; Ge, Feng; Deng, Jiao-Yu; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Czajkowsky, Daniel M; Li, Yang; Qi, Bang-Ruo; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Cole, Philip A; Zhu, Heng; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2015-01-01

    Reversible lysine acetylation is one of the most important protein posttranslational modifications that plays essential roles in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, only a few lysine deacetylases (KDACs) have been identified in prokaryotes, perhaps in part due to their limited sequence homology. Herein, we developed a ‘clip-chip’ strategy to enable unbiased, activity-based discovery of novel KDACs in the Escherichia coli proteome. In-depth biochemical characterization confirmed that YcgC is a serine hydrolase involving Ser200 as the catalytic nucleophile for lysine deacetylation and does not use NAD+ or Zn2+ like other established KDACs. Further, in vivo characterization demonstrated that YcgC regulates transcription by catalyzing deacetylation of Lys52 and Lys62 of a transcriptional repressor RutR. Importantly, YcgC targets a distinct set of substrates from the only known E. coli KDAC CobB. Analysis of YcgC’s bacterial homologs confirmed that they also exhibit KDAC activity. YcgC thus represents a novel family of prokaryotic KDACs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05322.001 PMID:26716769

  2. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling Expedition: Expanding theUniverse of Protein Families

    SciTech Connect

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B.; Halpern,Aaron L.; Williamson, Shannon J.; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Heidelberg, Karla B.; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S.; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A.; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael,Benjamin J.; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E.; Godzik,Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E.; Taylor, Susan S.; Strausberg,Robert L.; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J.Craig

    2006-03-23

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  3. The Sorcerer II Global Ocean Sampling expedition: expanding the universe of protein families.

    PubMed

    Yooseph, Shibu; Sutton, Granger; Rusch, Douglas B; Halpern, Aaron L; Williamson, Shannon J; Remington, Karin; Eisen, Jonathan A; Heidelberg, Karla B; Manning, Gerard; Li, Weizhong; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Miller, Christopher S; Li, Huiying; Mashiyama, Susan T; Joachimiak, Marcin P; van Belle, Christopher; Chandonia, John-Marc; Soergel, David A; Zhai, Yufeng; Natarajan, Kannan; Lee, Shaun; Raphael, Benjamin J; Bafna, Vineet; Friedman, Robert; Brenner, Steven E; Godzik, Adam; Eisenberg, David; Dixon, Jack E; Taylor, Susan S; Strausberg, Robert L; Frazier, Marvin; Venter, J Craig

    2007-03-01

    Metagenomics projects based on shotgun sequencing of populations of micro-organisms yield insight into protein families. We used sequence similarity clustering to explore proteins with a comprehensive dataset consisting of sequences from available databases together with 6.12 million proteins predicted from an assembly of 7.7 million Global Ocean Sampling (GOS) sequences. The GOS dataset covers nearly all known prokaryotic protein families. A total of 3,995 medium- and large-sized clusters consisting of only GOS sequences are identified, out of which 1,700 have no detectable homology to known families. The GOS-only clusters contain a higher than expected proportion of sequences of viral origin, thus reflecting a poor sampling of viral diversity until now. Protein domain distributions in the GOS dataset and current protein databases show distinct biases. Several protein domains that were previously categorized as kingdom specific are shown to have GOS examples in other kingdoms. About 6,000 sequences (ORFans) from the literature that heretofore lacked similarity to known proteins have matches in the GOS data. The GOS dataset is also used to improve remote homology detection. Overall, besides nearly doubling the number of current proteins, the predicted GOS proteins also add a great deal of diversity to known protein families and shed light on their evolution. These observations are illustrated using several protein families, including phosphatases, proteases, ultraviolet-irradiation DNA damage repair enzymes, glutamine synthetase, and RuBisCO. The diversity added by GOS data has implications for choosing targets for experimental structure characterization as part of structural genomics efforts. Our analysis indicates that new families are being discovered at a rate that is linear or almost linear with the addition of new sequences, implying that we are still far from discovering all protein families in nature.

  4. Differential repair of etheno-DNA adducts by bacterial and human AlkB proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zdżalik, Daria; Domańska, Anna; Prorok, Paulina; Kosicki, Konrad; van den Born, Erwin; Falnes, Pål Ø.; Rizzo, Carmelo J.; Guengerich, F. Peter; Tudek, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    AlkB proteins are evolutionary conserved Fe(II)/2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, which remove alkyl and highly promutagenic etheno (ε)-DNA adducts, but their substrate specificity has not been fully determined. We developed a novel assay for the repair of ε-adducts by AlkB enzymes using oligodeoxynucleotides with a single lesion and specific DNA glycosylases and AP-endonuclease for identification of the repair products. We compared the repair of three ε-adducts, 1,N6-ethenoadenine (εA), 3,N4-ethenocytosine (εC) and 1,N2-ethenoguanine (1,N2-εG) by nine bacterial and two human AlkBs, representing four different structural groups defined on the basis of conserved amino acids in the nucleotide recognition lid, engaged in the enzyme binding to the substrate. Two bacterial AlkB proteins, MT-2B (from Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and SC-2B (Streptomyces coelicolor) did not repair these lesions in either double-stranded (ds) or single-stranded (ss) DNA. Three proteins, RE-2A (Rhizobium etli), SA-2B (Streptomyces avermitilis), and XC-2B (Xanthomonas campestris) efficiently removed all three lesions from the DNA substrates. Interestingly, XC-2B and RE-2A are the first AlkB proteins shown to be specialized for ε-adducts, since they do not repair methylated bases. Three other proteins, EcAlkB (Escherichia coli), SA-1A, and XC-1B removed εA and εC from ds and ssDNA but were inactive toward 1,N2-εG. SC-1A repaired only εA with the preference for dsDNA. The human enzyme ALKBH2 repaired all three ε-adducts in dsDNA, while only εA and εC in ssDNA and repair was less efficient in ssDNA. ALKBH3 repaired only εC in ssDNA Altogether, we have shown for the first time that some AlkB proteins, namely ALKBH2, RE-2A, SA-2B and XC-2B can repair 1,N2-εG and that ALKBH3 removes only εC from ssDNA. Our results also suggest that the nucleotide recognition lid is not the sole determinant of the substrate specificity of AlkB proteins. PMID:25797601

  5. Bacterial promoter repression by DNA looping without protein-protein binding competition.

    PubMed

    Becker, Nicole A; Greiner, Alexander M; Peters, Justin P; Maher, L James

    2014-05-01

    The Escherichia coli lactose operon provides a paradigm for understanding gene control by DNA looping where the lac repressor (LacI) protein competes with RNA polymerase for DNA binding. Not all promoter loops involve direct competition between repressor and RNA polymerase. This raises the possibility that positioning a promoter within a tightly constrained DNA loop is repressive per se, an idea that has previously only been considered in vitro. Here, we engineer living E. coli bacteria to measure repression due to promoter positioning within such a tightly constrained DNA loop in the absence of protein-protein binding competition. We show that promoters held within such DNA loops are repressed ∼100-fold, with up to an additional ∼10-fold repression (∼1000-fold total) dependent on topological positioning of the promoter on the inner or outer face of the DNA loop. Chromatin immunoprecipitation data suggest that repression involves inhibition of both RNA polymerase initiation and elongation. These in vivo results show that gene repression can result from tightly looping promoter DNA even in the absence of direct competition between repressor and RNA polymerase binding. PMID:24598256

  6. Two Novel Heat-Soluble Protein Families Abundantly Expressed in an Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals. PMID:22937162

  7. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  8. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals. PMID:22937162

  9. Interaction of Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) with septin family proteins in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hosono, Mayu; Shinoda, Yo; Hirano, Touko; Ishizaki, Yasuki; Furuichi, Teiichi; Sadakata, Tetsushi

    2016-03-23

    The Ca(2+)-dependent activator protein for secretion 1 (CAPS1) protein plays a regulatory role in the dense-core vesicle exocytosis pathway. To clarify the functions of this protein in the brain, we searched for novel interaction partners of CAPS1 by mass spectrometry. We identified a specific interaction of CAPS1 with septin family proteins. We also demonstrated that the C-terminal region of the CAPS1 protein binds to part of the deduced GTP-binding domain of septin proteins. It is possible that a tertiary complex of septin, CAPS, and syntaxin contributes to dense-core vesicle trafficking and exocytosis in neurons.

  10. Discovery and Analysis of 4H-Pyridopyrimidines, a Class of Selective Bacterial Protein Synthesis Inhibitors▿

    PubMed Central

    Ribble, Wendy; Hill, Walter E.; Ochsner, Urs A.; Jarvis, Thale C.; Guiles, Joseph W.; Janjic, Nebojsa; Bullard, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial protein synthesis is the target for numerous natural and synthetic antibacterial agents. We have developed a poly(U) mRNA-directed aminoacylation/translation protein synthesis system composed of phenyl-tRNA synthetases, ribosomes, and ribosomal factors from Escherichia coli. This system, utilizing purified components, has been used for high-throughput screening of a small-molecule chemical library. We have identified a series of compounds that inhibit protein synthesis with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) ranging from 3 to 14 μM. This series of compounds all contained the same central scaffold composed of tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ol (e.g., 4H-pyridopyrimidine). All analogs contained an ortho pyridine ring attached to the central scaffold in the 2 position and either a five- or a six-member ring tethered to the 6-methylene nitrogen atom of the central scaffold. These compounds inhibited the growth of E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis, with MICs ranging from 0.25 to 32 μg/ml. Macromolecular synthesis (MMS) assays with E. coli and S. aureus confirmed that antibacterial activity resulted from specific inhibition of protein synthesis. Assays were developed for the steps performed by each component of the system in order to ascertain the target of the compounds, and the ribosome was found to be the site of inhibition. PMID:20696870

  11. Discovery and analysis of 4H-pyridopyrimidines, a class of selective bacterial protein synthesis inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ribble, Wendy; Hill, Walter E; Ochsner, Urs A; Jarvis, Thale C; Guiles, Joseph W; Janjic, Nebojsa; Bullard, James M

    2010-11-01

    Bacterial protein synthesis is the target for numerous natural and synthetic antibacterial agents. We have developed a poly(U) mRNA-directed aminoacylation/translation protein synthesis system composed of phenyl-tRNA synthetases, ribosomes, and ribosomal factors from Escherichia coli. This system, utilizing purified components, has been used for high-throughput screening of a small-molecule chemical library. We have identified a series of compounds that inhibit protein synthesis with 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) ranging from 3 to 14 μM. This series of compounds all contained the same central scaffold composed of tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]pyrimidin-4-ol (e.g., 4H-pyridopyrimidine). All analogs contained an ortho pyridine ring attached to the central scaffold in the 2 position and either a five- or a six-member ring tethered to the 6-methylene nitrogen atom of the central scaffold. These compounds inhibited the growth of E. coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Moraxella catarrhalis, with MICs ranging from 0.25 to 32 μg/ml. Macromolecular synthesis (MMS) assays with E. coli and S. aureus confirmed that antibacterial activity resulted from specific inhibition of protein synthesis. Assays were developed for the steps performed by each component of the system in order to ascertain the target of the compounds, and the ribosome was found to be the site of inhibition.

  12. The Tzs protein and exogenous cytokinin affect virulence gene expression and bacterial growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Yang, Fong-Jhih; Cheng, Tun-Fang; Chen, Yi-Chun; Lee, Ying-Ling; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lai, Erh-Min

    2013-09-01

    The soil phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease in a wide range of plant species. The neoplastic growth at the infection sites is caused by transferring, integrating, and expressing transfer DNA (T-DNA) from A. tumefaciens into plant cells. A trans-zeatin synthesizing (tzs) gene is located in the nopaline-type tumor-inducing plasmid and causes trans-zeatin production in A. tumefaciens. Similar to known virulence (Vir) proteins that are induced by the vir gene inducer acetosyringone (AS) at acidic pH 5.5, Tzs protein is highly induced by AS under this growth condition but also constitutively expressed and moderately upregulated by AS at neutral pH 7.0. We found that the promoter activities and protein levels of several AS-induced vir genes increased in the tzs deletion mutant, a mutant with decreased tumorigenesis and transient transformation efficiencies, in Arabidopsis roots. During AS induction and infection of Arabidopsis roots, the tzs deletion mutant conferred impaired growth, which could be rescued by genetic complementation and supplementing exogenous cytokinin. Exogenous cytokinin also repressed vir promoter activities and Vir protein accumulation in both the wild-type and tzs mutant bacteria with AS induction. Thus, the tzs gene or its product, cytokinin, may be involved in regulating AS-induced vir gene expression and, therefore, affect bacterial growth and virulence during A. tumefaciens infection. PMID:23593941

  13. [Protein display onto nano-sized bacterial magnetic particles for receptor analysis].

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Tomoko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2009-11-01

    Magnetic particles offer vast potential in ushering new techniques, especially in biomedical applications, as they can be easily manipulated by magnetic force. Magnetotactic bacteria synthesize nano-sized biomagnetites, otherwise known as bacterial magnetic particles (BacMPs) that are individually enveloped by a lipid bilayer membrane. BacMPs are ultrafine magnetite crystals (50-100 nm diameters) with uniform morphology produced by Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Based on our elucidations on the molecular mechanism of BacMP formation in M. magneticum AMB-1, functional nanomaterials have been designed. Through genetic engineering, functional proteins such as enzymes, antibodies, and receptors were successfully displayed onto BacMPs. Here, display techniques of functional proteins onto nano-sized BacMPs and its applications to ligand binding assays were described. Dopamine receptor, which is a member of G protein-coupled receptors, was successfully displayed onto BacMPs. This system makes possible the convenient acquisition of the native conformation of membrane proteins without the need for detergent solubilization, purification and reconstitution after cell disruption. Furthermore, estrogen receptor, which is one of nuclear receptors, was also displayed onto BacMPs. The assay using BacMPs displaying estrogen receptor could discriminate full agonists, partial agonists, or antagonists. The elucidation of the mechanism of BacMP synthesis has provided a roadmap for the design of novel nano-biomaterials that would play a useful role in multidisciplinary fields.

  14. Allosteric effects of chromophore interaction with dimeric near-infrared fluorescent proteins engineered from bacterial phytochromes

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Baloban, Mikhail; Bublikov, Grigory S.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes attract attention as probes for in vivo imaging due to their near-infrared (NIR) spectra and use of available in mammalian cells biliverdin (BV) as chromophore. We studied spectral properties of the iRFP670, iRFP682 and iRFP713 proteins and their mutants having Cys residues able to bind BV either in both PAS (Cys15) and GAF (Cys256) domains, in one of these domains, or without these Cys residues. We show that the absorption and fluorescence spectra and the chromophore binding depend on the location of the Cys residues. Compared with NIR FPs in which BV covalently binds to Cys15 or those that incorporate BV noncovalently, the proteins with BV covalently bound to Cys256 have blue-shifted spectra and higher quantum yield. In dimeric NIR FPs without Cys15, the covalent binding of BV to Сys256 in one monomer allosterically inhibits the covalent binding of BV to the other monomer, whereas the presence of Cys15 allosterically promotes BV binding to Cys256 in both monomers. The NIR FPs with both Cys residues have the narrowest blue-shifted spectra and the highest quantum yield. Our analysis resulted in the iRFP713/Val256Cys protein with the highest brightness in mammalian cells among available NIR FPs. PMID:26725513

  15. The Tzs protein and exogenous cytokinin affect virulence gene expression and bacterial growth of Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Yang, Fong-Jhih; Cheng, Tun-Fang; Chen, Yi-Chun; Lee, Ying-Ling; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lai, Erh-Min

    2013-09-01

    The soil phytopathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes crown gall disease in a wide range of plant species. The neoplastic growth at the infection sites is caused by transferring, integrating, and expressing transfer DNA (T-DNA) from A. tumefaciens into plant cells. A trans-zeatin synthesizing (tzs) gene is located in the nopaline-type tumor-inducing plasmid and causes trans-zeatin production in A. tumefaciens. Similar to known virulence (Vir) proteins that are induced by the vir gene inducer acetosyringone (AS) at acidic pH 5.5, Tzs protein is highly induced by AS under this growth condition but also constitutively expressed and moderately upregulated by AS at neutral pH 7.0. We found that the promoter activities and protein levels of several AS-induced vir genes increased in the tzs deletion mutant, a mutant with decreased tumorigenesis and transient transformation efficiencies, in Arabidopsis roots. During AS induction and infection of Arabidopsis roots, the tzs deletion mutant conferred impaired growth, which could be rescued by genetic complementation and supplementing exogenous cytokinin. Exogenous cytokinin also repressed vir promoter activities and Vir protein accumulation in both the wild-type and tzs mutant bacteria with AS induction. Thus, the tzs gene or its product, cytokinin, may be involved in regulating AS-induced vir gene expression and, therefore, affect bacterial growth and virulence during A. tumefaciens infection.

  16. A functional interaction between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 within the bacterial ribosome.

    PubMed

    Robert, Francis; Brakier-Gingras, Léa

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we used site-directed mutagenesis to disrupt an interaction that had been detected between ribosomal proteins S7 and S11 in the crystal structure of the bacterial 30 S subunit. This interaction, which is located in the E site, connects the head of the 30 S subunit to the platform and is involved in the formation of the exit channel through which passes the 30 S-bound messenger RNA. Neither mutations in S7 nor mutations in S11 prevented the incorporation of the proteins into the 30 S subunits but they perturbed the function of the ribosome. In vivo assays showed that ribosomes with either mutated S7 or S11 were altered in the control of translational fidelity, having an increased capacity for frameshifting, readthrough of a nonsense codon and codon misreading. Toeprinting and filter-binding assays showed that 30 S subunits with either mutated S7 or S11 have an enhanced capacity to bind mRNA. The effects of the S7 and S11 mutations can be related to an increased flexibility of the head of the 30 S, to an opening of the mRNA exit channel and to a perturbation of the proposed allosteric coupling between the A and E sites. Altogether, our results demonstrate that S7 and S11 interact in a functional manner and support the notion that protein-protein interactions contribute to the dynamics of the ribosome.

  17. Selective molecular transport through the protein shell of a bacterial microcompartment organelle.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Chiranjit; Chun, Sunny; Pang, Allan; Sawaya, Michael R; Sinha, Sharmistha; Yeates, Todd O; Bobik, Thomas A

    2015-03-10

    Bacterial microcompartments are widespread prokaryotic organelles that have important and diverse roles ranging from carbon fixation to enteric pathogenesis. Current models for microcompartment function propose that their outer protein shell is selectively permeable to small molecules, but whether a protein shell can mediate selective permeability and how this occurs are unresolved questions. Here, biochemical and physiological studies of structure-guided mutants are used to show that the hexameric PduA shell protein of the 1,2-propanediol utilization (Pdu) microcompartment forms a selectively permeable pore tailored for the influx of 1,2-propanediol (the substrate of the Pdu microcompartment) while restricting the efflux of propionaldehyde, a toxic intermediate of 1,2-propanediol catabolism. Crystal structures of various PduA mutants provide a foundation for interpreting the observed biochemical and phenotypic data in terms of molecular diffusion across the shell. Overall, these studies provide a basis for understanding a class of selectively permeable channels formed by nonmembrane proteins. PMID:25713376

  18. The General Phosphotransferase System Proteins Localize to Sites of Strong Negative Curvature in Bacterial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Sutharsan; Elisha, Yair; Nevo-Dinur, Keren; Amster-Choder, Orna

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The bacterial cell poles are emerging as subdomains where many cellular activities take place, but the mechanisms for polar localization are just beginning to unravel. The general phosphotransferase system (PTS) proteins, enzyme I (EI) and HPr, which control preferential use of carbon sources in bacteria, were recently shown to localize near the Escherichia coli cell poles. Here, we show that EI localization does not depend on known polar constituents, such as anionic lipids or the chemotaxis receptors, and on the cell division machinery, nor can it be explained by nucleoid occlusion or localized translation. Detection of the general PTS proteins at the budding sites of endocytotic-like membrane invaginations in spherical cells and their colocalization with the negative curvature sensor protein DivIVA suggest that geometric cues underlie localization of the PTS system. Notably, the kinetics of glucose uptake by spherical and rod-shaped E. coli cells are comparable, implying that negatively curved “pole-like” sites support not only the localization but also the proper functioning of the PTS system in cells with different shapes. Consistent with the curvature-mediated localization model, we observed the EI protein from Bacillus subtilis at strongly curved sites in both B. subtilis and E. coli. Taken together, we propose that changes in cell architecture correlate with dynamic survival strategies that localize central metabolic systems like the PTS to subcellular domains where they remain active, thus maintaining cell viability and metabolic alertness. PMID:24129255

  19. Expanded microbial genome coverage and improved protein family annotation in the COG database

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.; Makarova, Kira S.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial genome sequencing projects produce numerous sequences of deduced proteins, only a small fraction of which have been or will ever be studied experimentally. This leaves sequence analysis as the only feasible way to annotate these proteins and assign to them tentative functions. The Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs) database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/COG/), first created in 1997, has been a popular tool for functional annotation. Its success was largely based on (i) its reliance on complete microbial genomes, which allowed reliable assignment of orthologs and paralogs for most genes; (ii) orthology-based approach, which used the function(s) of the characterized member(s) of the protein family (COG) to assign function(s) to the entire set of carefully identified orthologs and describe the range of potential functions when there were more than one; and (iii) careful manual curation of the annotation of the COGs, aimed at detailed prediction of the biological function(s) for each COG while avoiding annotation errors and overprediction. Here we present an update of the COGs, the first since 2003, and a comprehensive revision of the COG annotations and expansion of the genome coverage to include representative complete genomes from all bacterial and archaeal lineages down to the genus level. This re-analysis of the COGs shows that the original COG assignments had an error rate below 0.5% and allows an assessment of the progress in functional genomics in the past 12 years. During this time, functions of many previously uncharacterized COGs have been elucidated and tentative functional assignments of many COGs have been validated, either by targeted experiments or through the use of high-throughput methods. A particularly important development is the assignment of functions to several widespread, conserved proteins many of which turned out to participate in translation, in particular rRNA maturation and tRNA modification. The new version of the

  20. Ultrastructural and molecular characterization of a bacterial symbiosis in the ecologically important scale insect family Coelostomidiidae.

    PubMed

    Dhami, Manpreet K; Turner, Adrian P; Deines, Peter; Beggs, Jacqueline R; Taylor, Michael W

    2012-09-01

    Scale insects are important ecologically and as agricultural pests. The majority of scale insect taxa feed exclusively on plant phloem sap, which is carbon rich but deficient in essential amino acids. This suggests that, as seen in the related aphids and psyllids, scale insect nutrition might also depend upon bacterial symbionts, yet very little is known about scale insect-bacteria symbioses. We report here the first identification and molecular characterization of symbiotic bacteria associated with the New Zealand giant scale Coelostomidia wairoensis, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and 16S rRNA gene-based analysis. Dissection and FISH confirmed the location of the bacteria in large, paired, multilobate organs in the abdominal region of the insect. TEM indicated that the dominant pleomorphic bacteria were confined to bacteriocytes in the sheath-enclosed bacteriome. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of three distinct bacterial types, the bacteriome-associated B-symbiont (Bacteroidetes), an Erwinia-related symbiont (Gammaproteobacteria) and Wolbachia sp. (Alphaproteobacteria). This study extends the current knowledge of scale insect symbionts and is the first microbiological investigation of the ecologically important coelostomidiid scales.

  1. Re-Evaluation of a Bacterial Antifreeze Protein as an Adhesin with Ice-Binding Activity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shuaiqi; Garnham, Christopher P.; Whitney, John C.; Graham, Laurie A.; Davies, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    A novel role for antifreeze proteins (AFPs) may reside in an exceptionally large 1.5-MDa adhesin isolated from an Antarctic Gram-negative bacterium, Marinomonas primoryensis. MpAFP was purified from bacterial lysates by ice adsorption and gel electrophoresis. We have previously reported that two highly repetitive sequences, region II (RII) and region IV (RIV), divide MpAFP into five distinct regions, all of which require mM Ca2+ levels for correct folding. Also, the antifreeze activity is confined to the 322-residue RIV, which forms a Ca2+-bound beta-helix containing thirteen Repeats-In-Toxin (RTX)-like repeats. RII accounts for approximately 90% of the mass of MpAFP and is made up of ∼120 tandem 104-residue repeats. Because these repeats are identical in DNA sequence, their number was estimated here by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Structural homology analysis by the Protein Homology/analogY Recognition Engine (Phyre2) server indicates that the 104-residue RII repeat adopts an immunoglobulin beta-sandwich fold that is typical of many secreted adhesion proteins. Additional RTX-like repeats in RV may serve as a non-cleavable signal sequence for the type I secretion pathway. Immunodetection shows both repeated regions are uniformly distributed over the cell surface. We suggest that the development of an AFP-like domain within this adhesin attached to the bacterial outer surface serves to transiently bind the host bacteria to ice. This association would keep the bacteria within the upper reaches of the water column where oxygen and nutrients are potentially more abundant. This novel envirotactic role would give AFPs a third function, after freeze avoidance and freeze tolerance: that of transiently binding an organism to ice. PMID:23144980

  2. Diverse eukaryotes have retained mitochondrial homologues of the bacterial division protein FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Kiefel, Ben R; Gilson, Paul R; Beech, Peter L

    2004-03-01

    Mitochondrial fission requires the division of both the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes. Dynamin-related proteins operate in division of the outer membrane of probably all mitochondria, and also that of chloroplasts--organelles that have a bacterial origin like mitochondria. How the inner mitochondrial membrane divides is less well established. Homologues of the major bacterial division protein, FtsZ, are known to reside inside mitochondria of the chromophyte alga Mallomonas, a red alga, and the slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum, where these proteins are likely to act in division of the organelle. Mitochondrial FtsZ is, however, absent from the genomes of higher eukaryotes (animals, fungi, and plants), even though FtsZs are known to be essential for the division of probably all chloroplasts. To begin to understand why higher eukaryotes have lost mitochondrial FtsZ, we have sampled various diverse protists to determine which groups have retained the gene. Database searches and degenerate PCR uncovered genes for likely mitochondrial FtsZs from the glaucocystophyte Cyanophora paradoxa, the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, two haptophyte algae, and two diatoms--one being Thalassiosira pseudonana, the draft genome of which is now available. From Thalassiosira we also identified two chloroplast FtsZs, one of which appears to be undergoing a C-terminal shortening that may be common to many organellar FtsZs. Our data indicate that many protists still employ the FtsZ-based ancestral mitochondrial division mechanism, and that mitochondrial FtsZ has been lost numerous times in the evolution of eukaryotes.

  3. A family of major royal jelly proteins of the honeybee Apis mellifera L.

    PubMed

    Schmitzová, J; Klaudiny, J; Albert, S; Schröder, W; Schreckengost, W; Hanes, J; Júdová, J; Simúth, J

    1998-09-01

    The characterization of major proteins of honeybee larval jelly (49-87 kDa) was performed by the sequencing of new complementary DNAs (cDNAs) obtained from a honeybee head cDNA library, by the determination of N-terminal sequences of the proteins, and by analyses of the newly obtained and known sequence data concerning the proteins. It was found that royal jelly (RJ) and worker jelly (WJ) contain identical major proteins and that all the proteins belong to one protein family designated MRJP (from Major Royal Jelly Proteins). The family consists of five main members (MRJP1, MRJP2, MRJP3, MRJP4, MRJP5). The proteins MRJP3 and MRJP5 are polymorphic. MRJPs account for 82 to 90% of total larval jelly protein, and they contain a relatively high amount of essential amino acids. These findings support the idea that MRJPs play an important role in honeybee nutrition.

  4. A simple model for DNA bridging proteins and bacterial or human genomes: bridging-induced attraction and genome compaction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, J; Brackley, C A; Cook, P R; Marenduzzo, D

    2015-02-18

    We present computer simulations of the phase behaviour of an ensemble of proteins interacting with a polymer, mimicking non-specific binding to a piece of bacterial DNA or eukaryotic chromatin. The proteins can simultaneously bind to the polymer in two or more places to create protein bridges. Despite the lack of any explicit interaction between the proteins or between DNA segments, our simulations confirm previous results showing that when the protein-polymer interaction is sufficiently strong, the proteins come together to form clusters. Furthermore, a sufficiently large concentration of bridging proteins leads to the compaction of the swollen polymer into a globular phase. Here we characterise both the formation of protein clusters and the polymer collapse as a function of protein concentration, protein-polymer affinity and fibre flexibility. PMID:25563801

  5. A simple model for DNA bridging proteins and bacterial or human genomes: bridging-induced attraction and genome compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J.; Brackley, C. A.; Cook, P. R.; Marenduzzo, D.

    2015-02-01

    We present computer simulations of the phase behaviour of an ensemble of proteins interacting with a polymer, mimicking non-specific binding to a piece of bacterial DNA or eukaryotic chromatin. The proteins can simultaneously bind to the polymer in two or more places to create protein bridges. Despite the lack of any explicit interaction between the proteins or between DNA segments, our simulations confirm previous results showing that when the protein-polymer interaction is sufficiently strong, the proteins come together to form clusters. Furthermore, a sufficiently large concentration of bridging proteins leads to the compaction of the swollen polymer into a globular phase. Here we characterise both the formation of protein clusters and the polymer collapse as a function of protein concentration, protein-polymer affinity and fibre flexibility.

  6. Overexpression of EVE1, a novel ubiquitin family protein, arrests inflorescence stem development in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Hoyeun; Jeong, Young-Min; Choi, Monica Y; Lee, So-Young; Kim, Sang-Gu

    2011-08-01

    In Arabidopsis, inflorescence stem formation is a critical process in phase transition from the vegetative to the reproductive state. Although inflorescence stem development has been reported to depend on the expression of a variety of genes during floral induction and repression, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in the control of inflorescence stem formation. By activation T-DNA tagging mutagenesis of Arabidopsis, a dominant gain-of-function mutation, eve1-D (eternally vegetative phase1-Dominant), which has lost the ability to form an inflorescence stem, was isolated. The eve1-D mutation exhibited a dome-shaped primary shoot apical meristem (SAM) in the early vegetative stage, similar to that seen in the wild-type SAM. However, the SAM in the eve1-D mutation failed to transition into an inflorescence meristem (IM) and eventually reached senescence without ever leaving the vegetative phase. The eve1-D mutation also displayed pleiotropic phenotypes, including lobed and wavy rosette leaves, short petioles, and an increased number of rosette leaves. Genetic analysis indicated that the genomic location of the EVE1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana corresponded to a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) F4C21 from chromosome IV at ∼17cM which encoded a novel ubiquitin family protein (At4g03350), consisting of a single exon. The EVE1 protein is composed of 263 amino acids, contains a 52 amino acid ubiquitin domain, and has no glycine residue related to ubiquitin activity at the C-terminus. The eve1-D mutation provides a way to study the regulatory mechanisms that control phase transition from the vegetative to the reproductive state.

  7. PE11, a PE/PPE family protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is involved in cell wall remodeling and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Parul; Rao, Rameshwaram Nagender; Reddy, Jala Ram Chandra; Prasad, RBN; Kotturu, Sandeep Kumar; Ghosh, Sudip; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2016-01-01

    The role of the unique proline-glutamic acid (PE)/proline-proline-glutamic acid (PPE) family of proteins in the pathophysiology and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is not clearly understood. One of the PE family proteins, PE11 (LipX or Rv1169c), specific to pathogenic mycobacteria is found to be over-expressed during infection of macrophages and in active TB patients. In this study, we report that M. smegmatis expressing PE11 (Msmeg-PE11) exhibited altered colony morphology and cell wall lipid composition leading to a marked increase in resistance against various environmental stressors and antibiotics. The cell envelope of Msmeg-PE11 also had greater amount of glycolipids and polar lipids. Msmeg-PE11 was found to have better survival rate in infected macrophages. Mice infected with Msmeg-PE11 had higher bacterial load, showed exacerbated organ pathology and mortality. The liver and lung of Msmeg-PE11-infected mice also had higher levels of IL-10, IL-4 and TNF-α cytokines, indicating a potential role of this protein in mycobacterial virulence. PMID:26902658

  8. PE11, a PE/PPE family protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is involved in cell wall remodeling and virulence.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parul; Rao, Rameshwaram Nagender; Reddy, Jala Ram Chandra; Prasad, R B N; Kotturu, Sandeep Kumar; Ghosh, Sudip; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2016-02-23

    The role of the unique proline-glutamic acid (PE)/proline-proline-glutamic acid (PPE) family of proteins in the pathophysiology and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is not clearly understood. One of the PE family proteins, PE11 (LipX or Rv1169c), specific to pathogenic mycobacteria is found to be over-expressed during infection of macrophages and in active TB patients. In this study, we report that M. smegmatis expressing PE11 (Msmeg-PE11) exhibited altered colony morphology and cell wall lipid composition leading to a marked increase in resistance against various environmental stressors and antibiotics. The cell envelope of Msmeg-PE11 also had greater amount of glycolipids and polar lipids. Msmeg-PE11 was found to have better survival rate in infected macrophages. Mice infected with Msmeg-PE11 had higher bacterial load, showed exacerbated organ pathology and mortality. The liver and lung of Msmeg-PE11-infected mice also had higher levels of IL-10, IL-4 and TNF-α cytokines, indicating a potential role of this protein in mycobacterial virulence.

  9. PE11, a PE/PPE family protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is involved in cell wall remodeling and virulence.

    PubMed

    Singh, Parul; Rao, Rameshwaram Nagender; Reddy, Jala Ram Chandra; Prasad, R B N; Kotturu, Sandeep Kumar; Ghosh, Sudip; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2016-01-01

    The role of the unique proline-glutamic acid (PE)/proline-proline-glutamic acid (PPE) family of proteins in the pathophysiology and virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is not clearly understood. One of the PE family proteins, PE11 (LipX or Rv1169c), specific to pathogenic mycobacteria is found to be over-expressed during infection of macrophages and in active TB patients. In this study, we report that M. smegmatis expressing PE11 (Msmeg-PE11) exhibited altered colony morphology and cell wall lipid composition leading to a marked increase in resistance against various environmental stressors and antibiotics. The cell envelope of Msmeg-PE11 also had greater amount of glycolipids and polar lipids. Msmeg-PE11 was found to have better survival rate in infected macrophages. Mice infected with Msmeg-PE11 had higher bacterial load, showed exacerbated organ pathology and mortality. The liver and lung of Msmeg-PE11-infected mice also had higher levels of IL-10, IL-4 and TNF-α cytokines, indicating a potential role of this protein in mycobacterial virulence. PMID:26902658

  10. Exploring structure and interactions of the bacterial adaptor protein YjbH by crosslinking mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Al-Eryani, Yusra; Ib Rasmussen, Morten; Kjellström, Sven; Højrup, Peter; Emanuelsson, Cecilia; von Wachenfeldt, Claes

    2016-09-01

    Adaptor proteins assist proteases in degrading specific proteins under appropriate conditions. The adaptor protein YjbH promotes the degradation of an important global transcriptional regulator Spx, which controls the expression of hundreds of genes and operons in response to thiol-specific oxidative stress in Bacillus subtilis. Under normal growth conditions, the transcription factor is bound to the adaptor protein and therefore degraded by the AAA+ protease ClpXP. If this binding is alleviated during stress, the transcription factor accumulates and turns on genes encoding stress-alleviating proteins. The adaptor protein YjbH is thus a key player involved in these interactions but its structure is unknown. To gain insight into its structure and interactions we have used chemical crosslinking mass spectrometry. Distance constraints obtained from the crosslinked monomer were used to select and validate a structure model of YjbH and then to probe its interactions with other proteins. The core structure of YjbH is reminiscent of DsbA family proteins. One lysine residue in YjbH (K177), located in one of the α-helices outside the thioredoxin fold, crosslinked to both Spx K99 and Spx K117, thereby suggesting one side of the YjbH for the interaction with Spx. Another lysine residue that crosslinked to Spx was YjbH K5, located in the long and presumably very flexible N-terminal arm of YjbH. Our crosslinking data lend support to a model proposed based on site-directed mutagenesis where the YjbH interaction with Spx can stabilize and present the C-terminal region of Spx for protease recognition and proteolysis. Proteins 2016; 84:1234-1245. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27191337

  11. Effect of pH, salt and chemical rinses on bacterial attachment to extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Zulfakar, Siti Shahara; White, Jason D; Ross, Tom; Tamplin, Mark

    2013-06-01

    Microbial contamination of carcass surfaces occurs during slaughter and post-slaughter processing steps, therefore interventions are needed to enhance meat safety and quality. Although many studies have been done at the macro-level, little is known about specific processes that influence bacterial attachment to carcass surfaces, particularly the role of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In the present study, the effect of pH and salt (NaCl, KCl and CaCl2) on attachment of Escherichia coli and Salmonella isolates to dominant ECM proteins: collagen I, fibronectin, collagen IV and laminin were assessed. Also, the effects of three chemical rinses commonly used in abattoirs (2% acetic acid, 2% lactic acid and 10% trisodium phosphate (TSP)) were tested. Within a pH range of 5-9, there was no significant effect on attachment to ECM proteins, whereas the effect of salt type and concentration varied depending on combination of strain and ECM protein. A concentration-dependant effect was observed with NaCl and KCl (0.1-0.85%) on attachment of E. coli M23Sr, but only to collagen I. One-tenth percent CaCl2 produced the highest level of attachment to ECM proteins for E. coli M23Sr and EC614. In contrast, higher concentrations of CaCl2 increased attachment of E. coli EC473 to collagen IV. Rinses containing TSP produced >95% reduction in attachment to all ECM proteins. These observations will assist in the design of targeted interventions to prevent or disrupt contamination of meat surfaces, thus improving meat safety and quality.

  12. Making novel bio-interfaces through bacterial protein recrystallization on biocompatible polylactide derivative films.

    PubMed

    Lejardi, Ainhoa; López, Aitziber Eleta; Sarasua, José R; Sleytr, U B; Toca-Herrera, José L

    2013-09-28

    Fabrication of novel bio-supramolecular structures was achieved by recrystallizing the bacterial surface protein SbpA on amorphous and semicrystalline polylactide derivatives. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the glass transition temperature (T(g)) for (poly-L-lactide)-PLLA, poly(L,D-lactide)-PDLLA, poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-PLGA and poly(lactide-co-caprolactone)-PLCL was 63 °C, 53 °C, 49 °C and 15 °C, respectively. Tensile stress-strain tests indicated that PLLA, PLGA, and PDLLA had a glassy behaviour when tested below T(g). The obtained Young modulus were 1477 MPa, 1330 MPa, 1306 MPa, and 9.55 MPa for PLLA, PLGA, PDLLA, and PLCL, respectively. Atomic force microscopy results confirmed that SbpA recrystallized on every polymer substrate exhibiting the native S-layer P4 lattice (a = b = 13 nm, γ = 90°). However, the polymer substrate influenced the domain size of the S-protein crystal, with the smallest size for PLLA (0.011 μm(2)), followed by PDLLA (0.034 μm(2)), and PLGA (0.039 μm(2)), and the largest size for PLCL (0.09 μm(2)). quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) measurements indicated that the adsorbed protein mass per unit area (~1800 ng cm(-2)) was independent of the mechanical, thermal, and crystalline properties of the polymer support. The slowest protein adsorption rate was observed for amorphous PLCL (the polymer with the weakest mechanical properties and lowest T(g)). QCM-D also monitored protein self-assembly in solution and confirmed that S-layer formation takes place in three main steps: adsorption, self-assembly, and crystal reorganization. Finally, this work shows that biodegradable polylactide derivatives films are a suitable support to form robust biomimetic S-protein layers.

  13. Translation initiation rate determines the impact of ribosome stalling on bacterial protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hersch, Steven J; Elgamal, Sara; Katz, Assaf; Ibba, Michael; Navarre, William Wiley

    2014-10-10

    Ribosome stalling during translation can be caused by a number of characterized mechanisms. However, the impact of elongation stalls on protein levels is variable, and the reasons for this are often unclear. To investigate this relationship, we examined the bacterial translation elongation factor P (EF-P), which plays a critical role in rescuing ribosomes stalled at specific amino acid sequences including polyproline motifs. In previous proteomic analyses of both Salmonella and Escherichia coli efp mutants, it was evident that not all proteins containing a polyproline motif were dependent on EF-P for efficient expression in vivo. The α- and β-subunits of ATP synthase, AtpA and AtpD, are translated from the same mRNA transcript, and both contain a PPG motif; however, proteomic analysis revealed that AtpD levels are strongly dependent on EF-P, whereas AtpA levels are independent of EF-P. Using these model proteins, we systematically determined that EF-P dependence is strongly influenced by elements in the 5'-untranslated region of the mRNA. By mutating either the Shine-Dalgarno sequence or the start codon, we find that EF-P dependence correlates directly with the rate of translation initiation where strongly expressed proteins show the greatest dependence on EF-P. Our findings demonstrate that polyproline-induced stalls exert a net effect on protein levels only if they limit translation significantly more than initiation. This model can be generalized to explain why sequences that induce pauses in translation elongation to, for example, facilitate folding do not necessarily exact a penalty on the overall production of the protein. PMID:25148683

  14. Holo- and apo-bound structures of bacterial periplasmic heme-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Ho, Winny W; Li, Huiying; Eakanunkul, Suntara; Tong, Yong; Wilks, Angela; Guo, Maolin; Poulos, Thomas L

    2007-12-01

    An essential component of heme transport in Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the periplasmic protein that shuttles heme between outer and inner membranes. We have solved the first crystal structures of two such proteins, ShuT from Shigella dysenteriae and PhuT from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both share a common architecture typical of Class III periplasmic binding proteins. The heme binds in a narrow cleft between the N- and C-terminal binding domains and is coordinated by a Tyr residue. A comparison of the heme-free (apo) and -bound (holo) structures indicates little change in structure other than minor alterations in the heme pocket and movement of the Tyr heme ligand from an "in" position where it can coordinate the heme iron to an "out" orientation where it points away from the heme pocket. The detailed architecture of the heme pocket is quite different in ShuT and PhuT. Although Arg(228) in PhuT H-bonds with a heme propionate, in ShuT a peptide loop partially takes up the space occupied by Arg(228), and there is no Lys or Arg H-bonding with the heme propionates. A comparison of PhuT/ShuT with the vitamin B(12)-binding protein BtuF and the hydroxamic-type siderophore-binding protein FhuD, the only two other structurally characterized Class III periplasmic binding proteins, demonstrates that PhuT/ShuT more closely resembles BtuF, which reflects the closer similarity in ligands, heme and B(12), compared with ligands for FhuD, a peptide siderophore.

  15. Immunological characterization of a bacterial protein isolated from salmonid fish naturally infected with Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Sergio H; Conejeros, Pablo; Zahr, Marcela; Olivares, Jorge; Gómez, Fernando; Cataldo, Patricio; Henríquez, Vitalia

    2007-03-01

    The Salmon Rickettsia syndrome (SRS) remains a major infectious disease in the Chilean aquaculture. A limited number of Piscirickettsia salmonis proteins have been characterized so far for their use as potential candidates for vaccines studies. In this study, we identified and expressed a highly immunogenic protein of P. salmonis extracted by selective hydrophobicity from crude-cell macerates of naturally infected salmonid fish. One and two-D PAGE gels followed by Western blot analysis with a battery of polyclonal anti-P. salmonis antibodies have allowed the isolation of the target protein. Basic local alignment search (BLAST) done after partial sequencing of the pure protein identified it as a member of the heat-shock protein (HSP) family of prokaryotes. The protein, named ChaPs, was cloned as a single open reading frame encoding 545 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 57.3 kDa. The amplicon representing the entire novel gene was expressed in vitro in different heterologous systems: the PurePro Caulobacter crescentus expression system from where most of the characterization was attained, and also in the Escherichia coli BL-21 CodonPlus model for commercially potential purposes. The immunologic potential of ChaPs was determined with serum from naturally infected fish. PMID:17250933

  16. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    SciTech Connect

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-07-01

    Structure–function studies of sialic acid-binding proteins from F. nucleatum, P. multocida, V. cholerae and H. influenzae reveal a conserved network of hydrogen bonds involved in conformational change on ligand binding. Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states.

  17. Immunological characterization of a bacterial protein isolated from salmonid fish naturally infected with Piscirickettsia salmonis.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Sergio H; Conejeros, Pablo; Zahr, Marcela; Olivares, Jorge; Gómez, Fernando; Cataldo, Patricio; Henríquez, Vitalia

    2007-03-01

    The Salmon Rickettsia syndrome (SRS) remains a major infectious disease in the Chilean aquaculture. A limited number of Piscirickettsia salmonis proteins have been characterized so far for their use as potential candidates for vaccines studies. In this study, we identified and expressed a highly immunogenic protein of P. salmonis extracted by selective hydrophobicity from crude-cell macerates of naturally infected salmonid fish. One and two-D PAGE gels followed by Western blot analysis with a battery of polyclonal anti-P. salmonis antibodies have allowed the isolation of the target protein. Basic local alignment search (BLAST) done after partial sequencing of the pure protein identified it as a member of the heat-shock protein (HSP) family of prokaryotes. The protein, named ChaPs, was cloned as a single open reading frame encoding 545 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 57.3 kDa. The amplicon representing the entire novel gene was expressed in vitro in different heterologous systems: the PurePro Caulobacter crescentus expression system from where most of the characterization was attained, and also in the Escherichia coli BL-21 CodonPlus model for commercially potential purposes. The immunologic potential of ChaPs was determined with serum from naturally infected fish.

  18. Metal site occupancy and allosteric switching in bacterial metal sensor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, Alfredo J.; Giedroc, David P.

    2012-01-01

    All prokaryotes encode a panel of metal sensor or metalloregulatory proteins that govern the expression of genes that allows an organism to quickly adapt to toxicity or deprivation of both biologically essential transition metal ions, e.g., Zn, Cu, Fe, and heavy metal pollutants. As such, metal sensor proteins can be considered arbiters of intracellular transition metal bioavailability and thus potentially control the metallation state of the metalloproteins in the cell. Metal sensor proteins are specialized allosteric proteins that regulate transcription as a result direct binding of one or two cognate metal ions, to the exclusion of all others. In most cases, the binding of the cognate metal ion induces a structural change in a protein oligomer that either activates or inhibits operator DNA binding. A quantitative measure of the degree to which a particular metal drives metalloregulation of operator DNA-binding is the allosteric coupling free energy, ΔGc. In this review, we summarize recent work directed toward understanding metal occupancy and metal selectivity of these allosteric switches in selected families of metal sensor proteins and examine the structural origins of ΔGc in the functional context a thermodynamic “set-point” model of intracellular metal homeostasis. PMID:22178748

  19. Avidin related protein 2 shows unique structural and functional features among the avidin protein family

    PubMed Central

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Määttä, Juha AE; Kidron, Heidi; Halling, Katrin K; Hörhä, Jarno; Kulomaa, Tuomas; Nyholm, Thomas KM; Johnson, Mark S; Salminen, Tiina A; Kulomaa, Markku S; Airenne, Tomi T

    2005-01-01

    Background The chicken avidin gene family consists of avidin and several avidin related genes (AVRs). Of these gene products, avidin is the best characterized and is known for its extremely high affinity for D-biotin, a property that is utilized in numerous modern life science applications. Recently, the AVR genes have been expressed as recombinant proteins, which have shown different biotin-binding properties as compared to avidin. Results In the present study, we have employed multiple biochemical methods to better understand the structure-function relationship of AVR proteins focusing on AVR2. Firstly, we have solved the high-resolution crystal structure of AVR2 in complex with a bound ligand, D-biotin. The AVR2 structure reveals an overall fold similar to the previously determined structures of avidin and AVR4. Major differences are seen, especially at the 1–3 subunit interface, which is stabilized mainly by polar interactions in the case of AVR2 but by hydrophobic interactions in the case of AVR4 and avidin, and in the vicinity of the biotin binding pocket. Secondly, mutagenesis, competitive dissociation analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were used to compare and study the biotin-binding properties as well as the thermal stability of AVRs and avidin. These analyses pinpointed the importance of residue 109 for biotin binding and stability of AVRs. The I109K mutation increased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR2, whereas the K109I mutation decreased the biotin-binding affinity of AVR4. Furthermore, the thermal stability of AVR2(I109K) increased in comparison to the wild-type protein and the K109I mutation led to a decrease in the thermal stability of AVR4. Conclusion Altogether, this study broadens our understanding of the structural features determining the ligand-binding affinities and stability as well as the molecular evolution within the protein family. This novel information can be applied to further develop and improve the tools already

  20. Evolution of bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases and their relaxed specificity toward substrates.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Ji, Boyang; Kolar-Znika, Lorena; Boskovic, Ana; Jadeau, Fanny; Combet, Christophe; Grangeasse, Christophe; Franjevic, Damjan; Talla, Emmanuel; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2014-04-01

    It has often been speculated that bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) evolve rapidly and maintain relaxed substrate specificity to quickly adopt new substrates when evolutionary pressure in that direction arises. Here, we report a phylogenomic and biochemical analysis of BY-kinases, and their relationship to substrates aimed to validate this hypothesis. Our results suggest that BY-kinases are ubiquitously distributed in bacterial phyla and underwent a complex evolutionary history, affected considerably by gene duplications and horizontal gene transfer events. This is consistent with the fact that the BY-kinase sequences represent a high level of substitution saturation and have a higher evolutionary rate compared with other bacterial genes. On the basis of similarity networks, we could classify BY kinases into three main groups with 14 subgroups. Extensive sequence conservation was observed only around the three canonical Walker motifs, whereas unique signatures proposed the functional speciation and diversification within some subgroups. The relationship between BY-kinases and their substrates was analyzed using a ubiquitous substrate (Ugd) and some Firmicute-specific substrates (YvyG and YjoA) from Bacillus subtilis. No evidence of coevolution between kinases and substrates at the sequence level was found. Seven BY-kinases, including well-characterized and previously uncharacterized ones, were used for experimental studies. Most of the tested kinases were able to phosphorylate substrates from B. subtilis (Ugd, YvyG, and YjoA), despite originating from very distant bacteria. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that BY-kinases have evolved relaxed substrate specificity and are probably maintained as rapidly evolving platforms for adopting new substrates.

  1. An Entamoeba histolytica ADP-ribosyl transferase from the diphtheria toxin family modifies the bacterial elongation factor Tu.

    PubMed

    Avila, Eva E; Rodriguez, Orlando I; Marquez, Jaqueline A; Berghuis, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    ADP-ribosyl transferases are enzymes involved in the post-translational modification of proteins; they participate in multiple physiological processes, pathogenesis and host-pathogen interactions. Several reports have characterized the functions of these enzymes in viruses, prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, but few studies have reported ADP-ribosyl transferases in lower eukaryotes, such as parasites. The locus EHI_155600 from Entamoeba histolytica encodes a hypothetical protein that possesses a domain from the ADP-ribosylation superfamily; this protein belongs to the diphtheria toxin family according to a homology model using poly-ADP-ribosyl polymerase 12 (PARP12 or ARTD12) as a template. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited in vitro ADP-ribosylation activity that was dependent on the time and temperature. Unlabeled βNAD(+), but not ADP-ribose, competed in the enzymatic reaction using biotin-βNAD(+) as the ADP-ribose donor. The recombinant enzyme, denominated EhToxin-like, auto-ADP-ribosylated and modified an acceptor from E. coli that was identified by MS/MS as the elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify an ADP-ribosyl transferase from the diphtheria toxin family in a protozoan parasite. The known toxins from this family (i.e., the diphtheria toxin, the Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin Exo-A, and Cholix from Vibrio cholerae) modify eukaryotic elongation factor two (eEF-2), whereas the amoeba EhToxin-like modified EF-Tu, which is another elongation factor involved in protein synthesis in bacteria and mitochondria. PMID:27234208

  2. A tomato xylem sap protein represents a new family of small cysteine-rich proteins with structural similarity to lipid transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Rep, Martijn; Dekker, Henk L; Vossen, Jack H; de Boer, Albert D; Houterman, Petra M; de Koster, Chris G; Cornelissen, Ben J C

    2003-01-16

    The coding sequence of a major xylem sap protein of tomato was identified with the aid of mass spectrometry. The protein, XSP10, represents a novel family of extracellular plant proteins with structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins. The XSP10 gene is constitutively expressed in roots and lower stems. The decline of XSP10 protein levels in tomato infected with a fungal vascular pathogen may reflect breakdown or modification by the pathogen.

  3. Structure and evolutionary history of a large family of NLR proteins in the zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Julia; Kondrashov, Fyodor

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes have evolved a range of mechanisms for immune recognition. A widespread family involved in innate immunity are the NACHT-domain and leucine-rich-repeat-containing (NLR) proteins. Mammals have small numbers of NLR proteins, whereas in some species, mostly those without adaptive immune systems, NLRs have expanded into very large families. We describe a family of nearly 400 NLR proteins encoded in the zebrafish genome. The proteins share a defining overall structure, which arose in fishes after a fusion of the core NLR domains with a B30.2 domain, but can be subdivided into four groups based on their NACHT domains. Gene conversion acting differentially on the NACHT and B30.2 domains has shaped the family and created the groups. Evidence of positive selection in the B30.2 domain indicates that this domain rather than the leucine-rich repeats acts as the pathogen recognition module. In an unusual chromosomal organization, the majority of the genes are located on one chromosome arm, interspersed with other large multigene families, including a new family encoding zinc-finger proteins. The NLR-B30.2 proteins represent a new family with diversity in the specific recognition module that is present in fishes in spite of the parallel existence of an adaptive immune system. PMID:27248802

  4. The mystery of BCL2 family: Bcl-2 proteins and apoptosis: an update.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Waseem Ahmad; Ahad, Amjid; Ahsan, Haseeb

    2015-03-01

    Apoptosis is a critically important biological process that plays an essential role in cell fate and homeostasis. An important component of the apoptotic pathway is the family of proteins commonly known as the B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2). The primary role of Bcl-2 family members is the regulation of apoptosis. Although the structure of Bcl-2 family of proteins was reported nearly 10 years ago, however, it still surprises us with its structural and functional complexity and diversity. A number of studies have demonstrated that Bcl-2 family influences many other cellular processes beyond apoptosis which are generally independent of the regulation of apoptosis, suggesting additional roles for Bcl-2. The disruption of the regulation of apoptosis is a causative event in many diseases. Since the Bcl-2 family of proteins is the key regulator of apoptosis, the abnormalities in its function have been implicated in many diseases including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, ischemia and autoimmune diseases. In the past few years, our understanding of the mechanism of action of Bcl-2 family of proteins and its implications in various pathological conditions has enhanced significantly. The focus of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the structure and function of Bcl-2 family of proteins in apoptotic cellular processes. A number of drugs have been developed in the past few years that target different Bcl-2 members. The role of Bcl-2 proteins in the pathogenesis of various diseases and their pharmacological significance as effective molecular therapeutic targets is also discussed.

  5. Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy and Tracking of Bacterial Flotillin (Reggie) Paralogs Provide Evidence for Defined-Sized Protein Microdomains within the Bacterial Membrane but Absence of Clusters Containing Detergent-Resistant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dempwolff, Felix; Schmidt, Felix K.; Hervás, Ana B.; Stroh, Alex; Rösch, Thomas C.; Riese, Cornelius N.; Dersch, Simon; Heimerl, Thomas; Lucena, Daniella; Hülsbusch, Nikola; Stuermer, Claudia A. O.; Takeshita, Norio; Fischer, Reinhard; Graumann, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes have been proposed to contain microdomains of a specific lipid composition, in which distinct groups of proteins are clustered. Flotillin-like proteins are conserved between pro—and eukaryotes, play an important function in several eukaryotic and bacterial cells, and define in vertebrates a type of so-called detergent-resistant microdomains. Using STED microscopy, we show that two bacterial flotillins, FloA and FloT, form defined assemblies with an average diameter of 85 to 110 nm in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Interestingly, flotillin microdomains are of similar size in eukaryotic cells. The soluble domains of FloA form higher order oligomers of up to several hundred kDa in vitro, showing that like eukaryotic flotillins, bacterial assemblies are based in part on their ability to self-oligomerize. However, B. subtilis paralogs show significantly different diffusion rates, and consequently do not colocalize into a common microdomain. Dual colour time lapse experiments of flotillins together with other detergent-resistant proteins in bacteria show that proteins colocalize for no longer than a few hundred milliseconds, and do not move together. Our data reveal that the bacterial membrane contains defined-sized protein domains rather than functional microdomains dependent on flotillins. Based on their distinct dynamics, FloA and FloT confer spatially distinguishable activities, but do not serve as molecular scaffolds. PMID:27362352

  6. Cell-surface Attachment of Bacterial Multienzyme Complexes Involves Highly Dynamic Protein-Protein Anchors*

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Kate; Najmudin, Shabir; Alves, Victor D.; Bayer, Edward A.; Smith, Steven P.; Bule, Pedro; Waller, Helen; Ferreira, Luís M. A.; Gilbert, Harry J.; Fontes, Carlos M. G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions play a pivotal role in the assembly of the cellulosome, one of nature's most intricate nanomachines dedicated to the depolymerization of complex carbohydrates. The integration of cellulosomal components usually occurs through the binding of type I dockerin modules located at the C terminus of the enzymes to cohesin modules located in the primary scaffoldin subunit. Cellulosomes are typically recruited to the cell surface via type II cohesin-dockerin interactions established between primary and cell-surface anchoring scaffoldin subunits. In contrast with type II interactions, type I dockerins usually display a dual binding mode that may allow increased conformational flexibility during cellulosome assembly. Acetivibrio cellulolyticus produces a highly complex cellulosome comprising an unusual adaptor scaffoldin, ScaB, which mediates the interaction between the primary scaffoldin, ScaA, through type II cohesin-dockerin interactions and the anchoring scaffoldin, ScaC, via type I cohesin-dockerin interactions. Here, we report the crystal structure of the type I ScaB dockerin in complex with a type I ScaC cohesin in two distinct orientations. The data show that the ScaB dockerin displays structural symmetry, reflected by the presence of two essentially identical binding surfaces. The complex interface is more extensive than those observed in other type I complexes, which results in an ultra-high affinity interaction (Ka ∼1012 m). A subset of ScaB dockerin residues was also identified as modulating the specificity of type I cohesin-dockerin interactions in A. cellulolyticus. This report reveals that recruitment of cellulosomes onto the cell surface may involve dockerins presenting a dual binding mode to incorporate additional flexibility into the quaternary structure of highly populated multienzyme complexes. PMID:25855788

  7. Effect of energy metabolism on protein motility in the bacterial outer membrane.

    PubMed

    Winther, Tabita; Xu, Lei; Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine; Brown, Stanley; Oddershede, Lene B

    2009-09-01

    We demonstrate the energy dependence of the motion of a porin, the lambda-receptor, in the outer membrane of living Escherichia coli by single molecule investigations. By poisoning the bacteria with arsenate and azide, the bacterial energy metabolism was stopped. The motility of individual lambda-receptors significantly and rapidly decreased upon energy depletion. We suggest two different causes for the ceased motility upon comprised energy metabolism: One possible cause is that the cell uses energy to actively wiggle its proteins, this energy being one order-of-magnitude larger than thermal energy. Another possible cause is an induced change in the connection between the lambda-receptor and the membrane structure, for instance by a stiffening of part of the membrane structure. Treatment of the cells with ampicillin, which directly targets the bacterial cell wall by inhibiting cross-linking of the peptidoglycan layer, had an effect similar to energy depletion and the motility of the lambda-receptor significantly decreased. Since the lambda-receptor is closely linked to the peptidoglycan layer, we propose that lambda-receptor motility is directly coupled to the constant and dynamic energy-consuming reconstruction of the peptidoglycan layer. The result of this motion could be to facilitate transport of maltose-dextrins through the porin.

  8. Malaria Vaccine Development: Are Bacterial Flagellin Fusion Proteins the Bridge between Mouse and Humans?

    PubMed Central

    Bargieri, Daniel Y.; Soares, Irene S.; Costa, Fabio T. M.; Braga, Catarina J.; Ferreira, Luis C. S.; Rodrigues, Mauricio M.

    2011-01-01

    In the past 25 years, the development of an effective malaria vaccine has become one of the biggest riddles in the biomedical sciences. Experimental data using animal infection models demonstrated that it is possible to induce protective immunity against different stages of malaria parasites. Nonetheless, the vast body of knowledge has generated disappointments when submitted to clinical conditions and presently a single antigen formulation has progressed to the point where it may be translated into a human vaccine. In parallel, new means to increase the protective effects of antigens in general have been pursued and depicted, such as the use of bacterial flagellins as carriers/adjuvants. Flagellins activate pathways in the innate immune system of both mice and humans. The recent report of the first Phase I clinical trial of a vaccine containing a Salmonella flagellin as carrier/adjuvant may fuel the use of these proteins in vaccine formulations. Herein, we review the studies on the use of recombinant flagellins as vaccine adjuvants with malarial antigens in the light of the current state of the art of malaria vaccine development. The available information indicates that bacterial flagellins should be seriously considered for malaria vaccine formulations to the development of effective human vaccines. PMID:21603205

  9. Cross-phosphorylation of bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases on key regulatory residues

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Dobrinic, Paula; Macek, Boris; Franjevic, Damjan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Francoise; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria possess protein serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases which resemble eukaryal kinases in their capacity to phosphorylate multiple substrates. We hypothesized that the analogy might extend further, and bacterial kinases may also undergo mutual phosphorylation and activation, which is currently considered as a hallmark of eukaryal kinase networks. In order to test this hypothesis, we explored the capacity of all members of four different classes of serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases present in the firmicute model organism Bacillus subtilis to phosphorylate each other in vitro and interact with each other in vivo. The interactomics data suggested a high degree of connectivity among all types of kinases, while phosphorylation assays revealed equally wide-spread cross-phosphorylation events. Our findings suggest that the Hanks-type kinases PrkC, PrkD, and YabT exhibit the highest capacity to phosphorylate other B. subtilis kinases, while the BY-kinase PtkA and the two-component-like kinases RsbW and SpoIIAB show the highest propensity to be phosphorylated by other kinases. Analysis of phosphorylated residues on several selected recipient kinases suggests that most cross-phosphorylation events concern key regulatory residues. Therefore, cross-phosphorylation events are very likely to influence the capacity of recipient kinases to phosphorylate substrates downstream in the signal transduction cascade. We therefore conclude that bacterial serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases probably engage in a network-type behavior previously described only in eukaryal cells. PMID:25278935

  10. Upregulation of TMEM16A Protein in Bronchial Epithelial Cells by Bacterial Pyocyanin

    PubMed Central

    Caci, Emanuela; Scudieri, Paolo; Di Carlo, Emma; Morelli, Patrizia; Bruno, Silvia; De Fino, Ida; Bragonzi, Alessandra; Gianotti, Ambra; Sondo, Elvira; Ferrera, Loretta; Palleschi, Alessandro; Santambrogio, Luigi; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Galietta, Luis J. V.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of mucus hypersecretion in the airway epithelium by Th2 cytokines is associated with the expression of TMEM16A, a Ca2+-activated Cl- channel. We asked whether exposure of airway epithelial cells to bacterial components, a condition that mimics the highly infected environment occurring in cystic fibrosis (CF), also results in a similar response. In cultured human bronchial epithelial cells, treatment with pyocyanin or with a P. aeruginosa culture supernatant caused a significant increase in TMEM16A function. The Ca2+-dependent Cl- secretion, triggered by stimulation with UTP, was particularly enhanced by pyocyanin in cells from CF patients. Increased expression of TMEM16A protein and of MUC5AC mucin by bacterial components was demonstrated by immunofluorescence in CF and non-CF cells. We also investigated TMEM16A expression in human bronchi by immunocytochemistry. We found increased TMEM16A staining in the airways of CF patients. The strongest signal was observed in CF submucosal glands. Our results suggest that TMEM16A expression/function is upregulated in CF lung disease, possibly as a response towards the presence of bacteria in the airways. PMID:26121472

  11. Predicting Outcome of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis With a Single Measurement of C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Heikki; Roine, Irmeli; Cruzeiro, Manuel Leite; Bernardino, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, shows high serum levels in invasive bacterial infections. We investigated the potential of a single CRP measurement at different phases of acute childhood bacterial meningitis to predict outcomes. Methods: Using whole-blood finger-prick samples with no centrifugation, CRP was measured quantitatively on arrival and on day 3 or 4 in children participating in 2 prospective, randomized, double-blind treatment studies conducted in Latin America or Angola. The results were compared with patient outcomes. Results: Although initial CRP values from 669 children gave useful prognostic information, the 3rd or 4th day measurements taken from 275 children associated significantly with seizures, slow recovery and low scores on the Glasgow Outcome Scale, with odds ratios for CRP values above the median (62 mg/L) ranging from 2 to 6, 2 to 5, and 3 to 5 (Latin America–Angola), respectively. Hearing impairment, although not full deafness, was 3 to 7 times more likely if CRP was above the median soon after hospitalization. Conclusions: Especially in resource-poor settings, clinicians have few simple-enough tools to identify the child with meningitis who requires maximum attention. CRP is a worthy addition. PMID:26986770

  12. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc1 complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-04-01

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc1 bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ˜0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  13. Communication: Microsecond dynamics of the protein and water affect electron transfer in a bacterial bc{sub 1} complex

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2015-04-28

    Cross-membrane electron transport between cofactors localized in proteins of mitochondrial respiration and bacterial photosynthesis is the source of all biological energy. The statistics and dynamics of nuclear fluctuations in these protein/membrane/water heterogeneous systems are critical for their energetic efficiency. The results of 13 μs of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of the membrane-bound bc{sub 1} bacterial complex are analyzed here. The reaction is affected by a broad spectrum of nuclear modes, with the slowest dynamics in the range of time-scales ∼0.1-1.6 μs contributing half of the reaction reorganization energy. Two reorganization energies are required to describe protein electron transfer due to dynamical arrest of protein conformations on the observation window. This mechanistic distinction allows significant lowering of activation barriers for reactions in proteins.

  14. Poxvirus protein evolution: Family-wide assessment of possible horizontal gene transfer events

    PubMed Central

    Odom, Mary R.; Hendrickson, R. Curtis; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the evolutionary origins of proteins encoded by the Poxviridae family of viruses, we examined all poxvirus protein coding genes using a method of characterizing and visualizing the similarity between these proteins and taxonomic subsets of proteins in GenBank. Our analysis divides poxvirus proteins into categories based on their relative degree of similarity to two different taxonomic subsets of proteins such as all eukaryote vs. all virus (except poxvirus) proteins. As an example, this allows us to identify, based on high similarity to only eukaryote proteins, poxvirus proteins that may have been obtained by horizontal transfer from their hosts. Although this method alone does not definitively prove horizontal gene transfer, it allows us to provide an assessment of the possibility of horizontal gene transfer for every poxvirus protein. Potential candidates can then be individually studied in more detail during subsequent investigation. Results of our analysis demonstrate that in general, proteins encoded by members of the subfamily Chordopoxvirinae exhibit greater similarity to eukaryote proteins than to proteins of other virus families. In addition, our results reiterate the important role played by host gene capture in poxvirus evolution; highlight the functions of many genes poxviruses share with their hosts; and illustrate which host-like genes are present uniquely in poxviruses and which are also present in other virus families. PMID:19464330

  15. Comparative genomics of bacterial zinc regulons: enhanced ion transport, pathogenesis, and rearrangement of ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Panina, Ekaterina M; Mironov, Andrey A; Gelfand, Mikhail S

    2003-08-19

    Zinc is an important component of many proteins, but in large concentrations it is poisonous to the cell. Thus its transport is regulated by zinc repressors ZUR of proteobacteria and Gram-positive bacteria from the Bacillus group and AdcR of bacteria from the Streptococcus group. Comparative computational analysis allowed us to identify binding signals of ZUR repressors GAAATGTTATANTATAACATTTC for gamma-proteobacteria, GTAATGTAATAACATTAC for the Agrobacterium group, GATATGTTATAACATATC for the Rhododoccus group, TAAATCGTAATNATTACGATTTA for Gram-positive bacteria, and TTAACYRGTTAA of the streptococcal AdcR repressor. In addition to known transporters and their paralogs, zinc regulons were predicted to contain a candidate component of the ATP binding cassette, zinT (b1995 in Escherichia coli and yrpE in Bacillus subtilis). Candidate AdcR-binding sites were identified upstream of genes encoding pneumococcal histidine triad (PHT) proteins from a number of pathogenic streptococci. Protein functional analysis of this family suggests that PHT proteins are involved in the invasion process. Finally, repression by zinc was predicted for genes encoding a variety of paralogs of ribosomal proteins. The original copies of all these proteins contain zinc-ribbon motifs and thus likely bind zinc, whereas these motifs are destroyed in zinc-regulated paralogs. We suggest that the induction of these paralogs in conditions of zinc starvation leads to their incorporation in a fraction of ribosomes instead of the original ribosomal proteins; the latter are then degraded with subsequent release of some zinc for the utilization by other proteins. Thus we predict a mechanism for maintaining zinc availability for essential enzymes. PMID:12904577

  16. Vaccinia virus protein A49 is an unexpected member of the B-cell Lymphoma (Bcl)-2 protein family.

    PubMed

    Neidel, Sarah; Maluquer de Motes, Carlos; Mansur, Daniel S; Strnadova, Pavla; Smith, Geoffrey L; Graham, Stephen C

    2015-03-01

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes several proteins that inhibit activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). VACV protein A49 prevents translocation of NF-κB to the nucleus by sequestering cellular β-TrCP, a protein required for the degradation of the inhibitor of κB. A49 does not share overall sequence similarity with any protein of known structure or function. We solved the crystal structure of A49 from VACV Western Reserve to 1.8 Å resolution and showed, surprisingly, that A49 has the same three-dimensional fold as Bcl-2 family proteins despite lacking identifiable sequence similarity. Whereas Bcl-2 family members characteristically modulate cellular apoptosis, A49 lacks a surface groove suitable for binding BH3 peptides and does not bind proapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins Bax or Bak. The N-terminal 17 residues of A49 do not adopt a single well ordered conformation, consistent with their proposed role in binding β-TrCP. Whereas pairs of A49 molecules interact symmetrically via a large hydrophobic surface in crystallo, A49 does not dimerize in solution or in cells, and we propose that this hydrophobic interaction surface may mediate binding to a yet undefined cellular partner. A49 represents the eleventh VACV Bcl-2 family protein and, despite these proteins sharing very low sequence identity, structure-based phylogenetic analysis shows that all poxvirus Bcl-2 proteins are structurally more similar to each other than they are to any cellular or herpesvirus Bcl-2 proteins. This is consistent with duplication and diversification of a single BCL2 family gene acquired by an ancestral poxvirus.

  17. The oral immunogenicity of BioProtein, a bacterial single-cell protein, is affected by its particulate nature.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Hanne R; Larsen, Linea C; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2003-07-01

    The bacterial single-cell protein BioProtein (BP; Norferm Danmark, Odense, Denmark), produced by fermentation of natural gas with methanotrophic bacteria, is a potential protein source for man and animals. For human consumption, removal of the nucleic acid is necessary. Preliminary studies have shown that ingested BP induces a specific immune response. The objective of the present study was to characterize the type of response, its development over time and product-related causative factors. Mice were fed with diets containing 60 g nucleic acid-reduced BP/kg, 240 g nucleic acid-reduced BP/kg, 240 g untreated BP (basic BP)/kg or 240 g casein/kg (control). In another study, mice were fed 240 g basic BP/kg, whole cell-free BP-culture homogenate or control diet. The immune response was monitored using an ELISA for BP-specific immunoglobulin in blood and BP-specific immunoglobulin A in blood and saliva. Ingested BP induced a steady specific mucosal and systemic immune response, characterized by a dose-dependent production of immunoglobulin and immunoglobulin A in blood and immunoglobulin A in saliva. Basic BP and nucleic acid-reduced BP induced identical responses. However, feeding mice BP-culture homogenate induced immunoglobulin A in saliva but there was no systemic response. The antibodies from BP-fed mice cross-reacted with BP-culture homogenate revealing the presence of the same antigenic components in the two products despite the different oral immunogenicity. Thus, ingestion of BP induces a persistent mucosal and systemic immune response of which the systemic response can be avoided by ingesting a BP preparation free of whole cells. This indicates the importance of the non-particulate constitution of single-cell protein products intended for human or animal consumption.

  18. Symmetry and scale orient Min protein patterns in shaped bacterial sculptures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fabai; van Schie, Bas G.C.; Keymer, Juan E.; Dekker, Cees

    2016-01-01

    The boundary of a cell defines the shape and scale for its subcellular organisation. However, the effects of the cell’s spatial boundaries as well as the geometry sensing and scale adaptation of intracellular molecular networks remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that living bacterial cells can be ‘sculpted’ into defined shapes, such as squares and rectangles, which are used to explore the spatial adaptation of Min proteins that oscillate pole-to-pole in rod-shape Escherichia coli to assist cell division. In a wide geometric parameter space, ranging from 2x1x1 to 11x6x1 μm3, Min proteins exhibit versatile oscillation patterns, sustaining rotational, longitudinal, diagonal, stripe, and even transversal modes. These patterns are found to directly capture the symmetry and scale of the cell boundary, and the Min concentration gradients scale in adaptation to the cell size within a characteristic length range of 3–6 μm. Numerical simulations reveal that local microscopic Turing kinetics of Min proteins can yield global symmetry selection, gradient scaling, and an adaptive range, when and only when facilitated by the three-dimensional confinement of cell boundary. These findings cannot be explained by previous geometry-sensing models based on the longest distance, membrane area or curvature, and reveal that spatial boundaries can facilitate simple molecular interactions to result in far more versatile functions than previously understood. PMID:26098227

  19. Symmetry and scale orient Min protein patterns in shaped bacterial sculptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fabai; van Schie, Bas G. C.; Keymer, Juan E.; Dekker, Cees

    2015-08-01

    The boundary of a cell defines the shape and scale of its subcellular organization. However, the effects of the cell's spatial boundaries as well as the geometry sensing and scale adaptation of intracellular molecular networks remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that living bacterial cells can be ‘sculpted’ into defined shapes, such as squares and rectangles, which are used to explore the spatial adaptation of Min proteins that oscillate pole-to-pole in rod-shaped Escherichia coli to assist cell division. In a wide geometric parameter space, ranging from 2 × 1 × 1 to 11 × 6 × 1 μm3, Min proteins exhibit versatile oscillation patterns, sustaining rotational, longitudinal, diagonal, stripe and even transversal modes. These patterns are found to directly capture the symmetry and scale of the cell boundary, and the Min concentration gradients scale with the cell size within a characteristic length range of 3-6 μm. Numerical simulations reveal that local microscopic Turing kinetics of Min proteins can yield global symmetry selection, gradient scaling and an adaptive range, when and only when facilitated by the three-dimensional confinement of the cell boundary. These findings cannot be explained by previous geometry-sensing models based on the longest distance, membrane area or curvature, and reveal that spatial boundaries can facilitate simple molecular interactions to result in far more versatile functions than previously understood.

  20. Structure-to-function relationships of bacterial translocator protein (TSPO): a focus on Pseudomonas.

    PubMed

    Leneveu-Jenvrin, Charlène; Connil, Nathalie; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The translocator protein (TSPO), which was previously designated as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a 3.5 billion year-old evolutionarily conserved protein expressed by most Eukarya, Archae and Bacteria, but its organization and functions differ remarkably. By taking advantage of the genomic data available on TSPO, we focused on bacterial TSPO and attempted to define functions of TSPO in Pseudomonas via in silico approaches. A tspo ortholog has been identified in several fluorescent Pseudomonas. This protein presents putative binding motifs for cholesterol and PK 11195, which is a specific drug ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. While it is a common surface distribution, the sense of insertion and membrane localization differ between α- and γ-proteobacteria. Experimental published data and STRING analysis of common TSPO partners in fluorescent Pseudomonas indicate a potential role of TSPO in the oxidative stress response, iron homeostasis and virulence expression. In these bacteria, TSPO could also take part in signal transduction and in the preservation of membrane integrity.

  1. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals the Role of Protein Arginine Phosphorylation in the Bacterial Stress Response*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Andreas; Trentini, Débora Broch; Spiess, Silvia; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Ammerer, Gustav; Mechtler, Karl; Clausen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Arginine phosphorylation is an emerging protein modification implicated in the general stress response of Gram-positive bacteria. The modification is mediated by the arginine kinase McsB, which phosphorylates and inactivates the heat shock repressor CtsR. In this study, we developed a mass spectrometric approach accounting for the peculiar chemical properties of phosphoarginine. The improved methodology was used to analyze the dynamic changes in the Bacillus subtilis arginine phosphoproteome in response to different stress situations. Quantitative analysis showed that a B. subtilis mutant lacking the YwlE arginine phosphatase accumulated a strikingly large number of arginine phosphorylations (217 sites in 134 proteins), however only a minor fraction of these sites was increasingly modified during heat shock or oxidative stress. The main targets of McsB-mediated arginine phosphorylation comprise central factors of the stress response system including the CtsR and HrcA heat shock repressors, as well as major components of the protein quality control system such as the ClpCP protease and the GroEL chaperonine. These findings highlight the impact of arginine phosphorylation in orchestrating the bacterial stress response. PMID:24263382

  2. Stochastic Self-Assembly of ParB Proteins Builds the Bacterial DNA Segregation Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Aurore; Cattoni, Diego I; Walter, Jean-Charles; Rech, Jérôme; Parmeggiani, Andrea; Nollmann, Marcelo; Bouet, Jean-Yves

    2015-08-26

    Many canonical processes in molecular biology rely on the dynamic assembly of higher-order nucleoprotein complexes. In bacteria, the assembly mechanism of ParABS, the nucleoprotein super-complex that actively segregates the bacterial chromosome and many plasmids, remains elusive. We combined super-resolution microscopy, quantitative genome-wide surveys, biochemistry, and mathematical modeling to investigate the assembly of ParB at the centromere-like sequences parS. We found that nearly all ParB molecules are actively confined around parS by a network of synergistic protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Interrogation of the empirically determined, high-resolution ParB genomic distribution with modeling suggests that instead of binding only to specific sequences and subsequently spreading, ParB binds stochastically around parS over long distances. We propose a new model for the formation of the ParABS partition complex based on nucleation and caging: ParB forms a dynamic lattice with the DNA around parS. This assembly model and approach to characterizing large-scale, dynamic interactions between macromolecules may be generalizable to many unrelated machineries that self-assemble in superstructures. PMID:27135801

  3. Acute phase proteins in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the course of bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Paradowski, M; Lobos, M; Kuydowicz, J; Krakowiak, M; Kubasiewicz-Ujma, B

    1995-08-01

    We carried out estimations of the following acute phase proteins: C-reactive protein (CRP), alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), alpha-2-ceruloplasmin (CER), and alpha-2-haptoglobin (HPT) in serum and in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with bacterial meningitis (BM, n = 30) and viral meningitis (VM, n = 30). We have shown that determinations of concentrations of AAG and CRP in serum and CER in CSF are useful in differentiation between BM and VM. The diagnostic power of these three tests (the areas under their ROC curves equal 0.942, 0.929, and 0.931, respectively) is bigger, though statistically not significantly, than that of traditional parameters of BM in CSF, i.e., total protein concentration and white blood cell count. Determination of AAG, CRP, and AAT in serum is a valuable monitoring marker in the course of BM treatment. Convenience of serum sampling constitutes an advantage over traditional BM parameters in CSF. PMID:8521602

  4. The influence of the synergistic anion on iron chelation by ferric binding protein, a bacterial transferrin.

    PubMed

    Dhungana, Suraj; Taboy, Celine H; Anderson, Damon S; Vaughan, Kevin G; Aisen, Philip; Mietzner, Timothy A; Crumbliss, Alvin L

    2003-04-01

    Although the presence of an exogenous anion is a requirement for tight Fe(3+) binding by the bacterial (Neisseria) transferrin nFbp, the identity of the exogenous anion is not specific in vitro. nFbp was reconstituted as a stable iron containing protein by using a number of different exogenous anions [arsenate, citrate, nitrilotriacetate, pyrophosphate, and oxalate (symbolized by X)] in addition to phosphate, predominantly present in the recombinant form of the protein. Spectroscopic characterization of the Fe(3+)anion interaction in the reconstituted protein was accomplished by UV-visible and EPR spectroscopies. The affinity of the protein for Fe(3+) is anion dependent, as evidenced by the effective Fe(3+) binding constants (K'(eff)) observed, which range from 1 x 10(17) M(-1) to 4 x 10(18) M(-1) at pH 6.5 and 20 degrees C. The redox potentials for Fe(3+)nFbpXFe(2+)nFbpX reduction are also found to depend on the identity of the synergistic anion required for Fe(3+) sequestration. Facile exchange of exogenous anions (Fe(3+)nFbpX + X' --> Fe(3+)nFbpX' + X) is established and provides a pathway for environmental modulation of the iron chelation and redox characteristics of nFbp. The affinity of the iron loaded protein for exogenous anion binding at pH 6.5 was found to decrease in the order phosphate > arsenate approximately pyrophosphate > nitrilotriacetate > citrate approximately oxalate carbonate. Anion influence on the iron primary coordination sphere through iron binding and redox potential modulation may have in vivo application as a mechanism for periplasmic control of iron delivery to the cytosol. PMID:12646708

  5. Cloning of human epidermal growth factor as a bacterial secretory protein, its properties and mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Engler, D.A.; Matsunami, R.K.; Campion, S.R.; Foote, R.S.; Mural, R.J.; Larimer, F.W.; Stevens, A.; Niyogi, S.K.

    1987-05-01

    A chimeric gene, containing the DNA coding for the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) and that for the signal peptide of E. coli alkaline phosphatase, was constructed by the annealing and subsequent ligation of appropriate DNA oligonucleotides synthesized in an automated DNA synthesizer. The gene was then cloned into a bacterial plasmid under the transcriptional control of the E. coli trp-lac (tac) promoter, and then transformed into E. coli. Following induction with isopropylthiogalactoside, the secretion of EGF into the E. coli periplasmic space and some into the growth medium was confirmed by its specific binding to the EGF receptor and stimulation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The size and physicochemical properties of the purified protein mimicked those of authentic human EGF. Studies of structure/function relationships by specific alterations of targeted amino acid residues in the EGF molecule have been initiated by utilizing site-directed mutagenesis.

  6. The triterpene cyclase protein family: a systematic analysis.

    PubMed

    Racolta, Silvia; Juhl, P Benjamin; Sirim, Demet; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Triterpene cyclases catalyze a broad range of cyclization reactions to form polycyclic triterpenes. Triterpene cyclases that convert squalene to hopene are named squalene-hopene cyclases (SHC) and triterpene cyclases that convert oxidosqualene are named oxidosqualene cyclases (OSC). Many sequences have been published, but there is only one structure available for each of SHCs and OSCs. Although they catalyze a similar reaction, the sequence similarity between SHCs and OSCs is low. A family classification based on phylogenetic analysis revealed 20 homologous families which are grouped into two superfamilies, SHCs and OSCs. Based on this family assignment, the Triterpene Cyclase Engineering Database (TTCED) was established. It integrates available information on sequence and structure of 639 triterpene cyclases as well as on structurally and functionally relevant amino acids. Family specific multiple sequence alignments were generated to identify the functionally relevant residues. Based on sequence alignments, conserved residues in SHCs and OSCs were analyzed and compared to experimentally confirmed mutational data. Functional schematic models of the central cavities of OSCs and SHCs were derived from structure comparison and sequence conservation analysis. These models demonstrate the high similarity of the substrate binding cavity of SHCs and OSCs and the equivalences of the respective residues. The TTCED is a novel source for comprehensive information on the triterpene cyclase family, including a compilation of previously described mutational data. The schematic models present the conservation analysis in a readily available fashion and facilitate the correlation of residues to a specific function or substrate interaction.

  7. Bacterial periplasmic sialic acid-binding proteins exhibit a conserved binding site

    PubMed Central

    Gangi Setty, Thanuja; Cho, Christine; Govindappa, Sowmya; Apicella, Michael A.; Ramaswamy, S.

    2014-01-01

    Sialic acids are a family of related nine-carbon sugar acids that play important roles in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. These sialic acids are incorporated/decorated onto lipooligosaccharides as terminal sugars in multiple bacteria to evade the host immune system. Many pathogenic bacteria scavenge sialic acids from their host and use them for molecular mimicry. The first step of this process is the transport of sialic acid to the cytoplasm, which often takes place using a tripartite ATP-independent transport system consisting of a periplasmic binding protein and a membrane transporter. In this paper, the structural characterization of periplasmic binding proteins from the pathogenic bacteria Fusobacterium nucleatum, Pasteurella multocida and Vibrio cholerae and their thermodynamic characterization are reported. The binding affinities of several mutations in the Neu5Ac binding site of the Haemophilus influenzae protein are also reported. The structure and the thermodynamics of the binding of sugars suggest that all of these proteins have a very well conserved binding pocket and similar binding affinities. A significant conformational change occurs when these proteins bind the sugar. While the C1 carboxylate has been identified as the primary binding site, a second conserved hydrogen-bonding network is involved in the initiation and stabilization of the conformational states. PMID:25004958

  8. Functional divergence outlines the evolution of novel protein function in NifH/BchL protein family.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Subarna; Bothra, Asim K; Sen, Arnab

    2013-11-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is accomplished by prokaryotes through the catalytic action of complex metalloenzyme, nitrogenase. Nitrogenase is a two-protein component system comprising MoFe protein (NifD and K) and Fe protein (NifH). NifH shares structural and mechanistic similarities as well as evolutionary relationships with light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase (BchL), a photosynthesis-related metalloenzyme belonging to the same protein family. We performed a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis of the NifH/BchL family in order to elucidate the intrinsic functional diversity and the underlying evolutionary mechanism among the members. To analyse functional divergence in the NifH/ BchL family, we have conducted pair-wise estimation in altered evolutionary rates between the member proteins. We identified a number of vital amino acid sites which contribute to predicted functional diversity. We have also made use of the maximum likelihood tests for detection of positive selection at the amino acid level followed by the structure-based phylogenetic approach to draw conclusion on the ancient lineage and novel characterization of the NifH/BchL protein family. Our investigation provides ample support to the fact that NifH protein and BchL share robust structural similarities and have probably deviated from a common ancestor followed by divergence in functional properties possibly due to gene duplication. PMID:24287653

  9. Bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family proteins: New therapeutic targets in major diseases.

    PubMed

    Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Mathur, Shruti; Manjula, Ramu; Tripathi, Shailesh

    2016-06-01

    The bromodomains and extra-terminal domain (BET) family proteins recognize acetylated chromatin through their bromodomains (BDs) and help in regulating gene expression. BDs are chromatin 'readers': by interacting with acetylated lysines on the histone tails, they recruit chromatin-regulating proteins on the promoter region to regulate gene expression and repression. Extensive efforts have been employed by scientific communities worldwide to identify and develop potential inhibitors of BET family BDs to regulate protein expression by inhibiting acetylated histone (H3/H4) interactions. Several small molecule inhibitors have been reported, which not only have high affinity but also have high specificity to BET BDs. These developments make BET family proteins an important therapeutic targets for major diseases such as cancer, neurological disorders, obesity and inflammation. Here, we review and discuss the structural biology of BET family BDs and their applications in major diseases. PMID:27240990

  10. Identification of two proteins that interact with the Erp virulence factor from Mycobacterium tuberculosis by using the bacterial two-hybrid system

    PubMed Central

    Klepp, Laura I; Soria, Marcelo; Blanco, Federico C; Bianco, María V; Santangelo, María P; Cataldi, Angel A; Bigi, Fabiana

    2009-01-01

    Background The exported repetitive protein (erp) gene encodes a secreted 36-kDa protein with a central domain containing several proline-glycine-leucine-threonine-serine (PGLTS) repeats. It has been demonstrated that erp is a virulence-associated factor since the disruption of this gene impairs the growth of Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice. Results In order to elucidate the function of Erp we searched for Erp-binding proteins from M. tuberculosis by using a bacterial two-hybrid system. Our results indicate that Erp interacts specifically with two putative membrane proteins, Rv1417 and Rv2617c. Further analysis revealed that the latter two interact with each other, indicating that Rv1417, Rv2617c and Erp are connected through multiple interactions. While Rv1417 is disseminated in several Actinomycetales genera, orthologues of Rv2617c are exclusively present in members of the M. tuberculosis complex (MTC). The central and amino-terminal regions of Erp were determined to be involved in the interaction with Rv1417 and Rv2627c. Erp forms from Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium leprae were not able to interact with Rv2617c in two-hybrid assays. Immunolocalization experiments showed that Rv1417 and Rv2617c are found on the cell membrane and Erp on the bacterial cell wall. Finally, comparative genomics and expression studies revealed a possible role of Rv1417 in riboflavin metabolism. Conclusion We identified interactive partners of Erp, an M. tuberculosis protein involved in virulence, which will be the focus of future investigation to decipher the function of the Erp family protein. PMID:19159459

  11. Coordinate synthesis and protein localization in a bacterial organelle by the action of a penicillin-binding-protein

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, H. Velocity; Lisher, John P.; Hardy, Gail G.; Kysela, David T.; Arnold, Randy J.; Giedroc, David P.; Brun, Yves V.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Organelles with specialized form and function occur in diverse bacteria. Within the Alphaproteobacteria, several species extrude thin cellular appendages known as stalks, which function in nutrient uptake, buoyancy and reproduction. Consistent with their specialization, stalks maintain a unique molecular composition compared to the cell body, but how this is achieved remains to be fully elucidated. Here we dissect the mechanism of localization of StpX, a stalk-specific protein in Caulobacter crescentus. Using a forward genetics approach, we identify a penicillin-bindingprotein PbpC, which is required for the localization of StpX in the stalk. We show that PbpC acts at the stalked cell pole to anchor StpX to rigid components of the outer membrane of the elongating stalk, concurrent with stalk synthesis. Stalklocalized StpX in turn functions in cellular responses to copper and zinc, suggesting that the stalk may contribute to metal homeostasis in Caulobacter. Together, these results identify a novel role for a penicillin-binding-protein in compartmentalizing a bacterial organelle it itself helps create, raising the possibility that cell wallsynthetic enzymes may broadly serve not only to synthesize the diverse shapes of bacteria, but also to functionalize them at the molecular level. PMID:24118129

  12. Gut Commensal E. coli Proteins Activate Host Satiety Pathways following Nutrient-Induced Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Breton, Jonathan; Tennoune, Naouel; Lucas, Nicolas; Francois, Marie; Legrand, Romain; Jacquemot, Justine; Goichon, Alexis; Guérin, Charlène; Peltier, Johann; Pestel-Caron, Martine; Chan, Philippe; Vaudry, David; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Liénard, Fabienne; Pénicaud, Luc; Fioramonti, Xavier; Ebenezer, Ivor S; Hökfelt, Tomas; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2016-02-01

    The composition of gut microbiota has been associated with host metabolic phenotypes, but it is not known if gut bacteria may influence host appetite. Here we show that regular nutrient provision stabilizes exponential growth of E. coli, with the stationary phase occurring 20 min after nutrient supply accompanied by bacterial proteome changes, suggesting involvement of bacterial proteins in host satiety. Indeed, intestinal infusions of E. coli stationary phase proteins increased plasma PYY and their intraperitoneal injections suppressed acutely food intake and activated c-Fos in hypothalamic POMC neurons, while their repeated administrations reduced meal size. ClpB, a bacterial protein mimetic of α-MSH, was upregulated in the E. coli stationary phase, was detected in plasma proportional to ClpB DNA in feces, and stimulated firing rate of hypothalamic POMC neurons. Thus, these data show that bacterial proteins produced after nutrient-induced E. coli growth may signal meal termination. Furthermore, continuous exposure to E. coli proteins may influence long-term meal pattern. PMID:26621107

  13. PATtyFams: Protein families for the microbial genomes in the PATRIC database

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Davis, James J.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Yoo, Hyunseung

    2016-02-08

    The ability to build accurate protein families is a fundamental operation in bioinformatics that influences comparative analyses, genome annotation, and metabolic modeling. For several years we have been maintaining protein families for all microbial genomes in the PATRIC database (Pathosystems Resource Integration Center, patricbrc.org) in order to drive many of the comparative analysis tools that are available through the PATRIC website. However, due to the burgeoning number of genomes, traditional approaches for generating protein families are becoming prohibitive. In this report, we describe a new approach for generating protein families, which we call PATtyFams. This method uses the k-mer-based functionmore » assignments available through RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) to rapidly guide family formation, and then differentiates the function-based groups into families using a Markov Cluster algorithm (MCL). In conclusion, this new approach for generating protein families is rapid, scalable and has properties that are consistent with alignment-based methods.« less

  14. The DUF582 Proteins of Chlamydia trachomatis Bind to Components of the ESCRT Machinery, Which Is Dispensable for Bacterial Growth In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Vromman, François; Perrinet, Stéphanie; Gehre, Lena; Subtil, Agathe

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydiae are Gram negative bacteria that develop exclusively inside eukaryotic host cells, within a membrane-bounded compartment. Members of the family Chlamydiaceae, such as Chlamydia trachomatis, are pathogenic species infecting vertebrates. They have a very reduced genome and exploit the capacities of their host for their own development, mainly through the secretion of proteins tailored to interfere with eukaryotic processes, called effector proteins. All Chlamydiaceae possess genes coding for four to five effectors that share a domain of unknown function (DUF582). Here we show that four of these effectors, which represent the conserved set in all Chlamydiaceae, accumulate in the infectious form of C. trachomatis, and are therefore likely involved in an early step of the developmental cycle. The fifth member of the family, CT621, is specific to C. trachomatis, and is secreted during the growth phase. Using a two-hybrid screen in yeast we identified an interaction between the host protein Hrs and the DUF582, which we confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations in co-transfected mammalian cells. Furthermore, we provide biochemical evidence that a second domain of one of the DUF582 proteins, CT619, binds the host protein Tsg101. Hrs and Tsg101 are both implicated in a well conserved machinery of the eukaryotic cell called the ESCRT machinery, which is involved in several cellular processes requiring membrane constriction. Using RNA interference targeting proteins implicated at different stages of ESCRT-driven processes, or inhibition by expression of a dominant negative mutant of VPS4, we demonstrated that this machinery was dispensable for bacterial entry, multiplication and differentiation into infectious progeny, and for uptake of glycogen into the parasitophorous vacuole. In light of these observations we discuss how the DUF582 proteins might target the ESCRT machinery during infection. PMID:27774439

  15. High-resolution diffraction from crystals of a membrane-protein complex: bacterial outer membrane protein OmpC complexed with the antibacterial eukaryotic protein lactoferrin

    SciTech Connect

    Sundara Baalaji, N.; Acharya, K. Ravi; Singh, T. P.; Krishnaswamy, S. E-mail: mkukrishna@rediffmail.com

    2005-08-01

    Crystals of the complex formed between the bacterial membrane protein OmpC and the antibacterial protein lactoferrin suitable for high-resolution structure determination have been obtained. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å. Crystals of the complex formed between the outer membrane protein OmpC from Escherichia coli and the eukaryotic antibacterial protein lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius (camel) have been obtained using a detergent environment. Initial data processing suggests that the crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116.3, c = 152.4 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. This indicated a Matthews coefficient (V{sub M}) of 3.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, corresponding to a possible molecular complex involving four molecules of lactoferrin and two porin trimers in the unit cell (4832 amino acids; 533.8 kDa) with 63% solvent content. A complete set of diffraction data was collected to 3 Å resolution at 100 K. Structure determination by molecular replacement is in progress. Structural study of this first surface-exposed membrane-protein complex with an antibacterial protein will provide insights into the mechanism of action of OmpC as well as lactoferrin.

  16. Effects of prodigiosin family compounds from Pseudoalteromonas sp. 1020R on the activities of protein phosphatases and protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Soliev, Azamjon B; Hosokawa, Kakushi; Enomoto, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 1020R produces prodigiosin and its closely related congeners, which differ in the length of their alkyl side chains. These red-pigmented compounds were found to exhibit cytotoxicity against human leukemia cell lines. The compounds also showed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on protein phosphatase 2A and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), while remaining relatively inactive against protein kinases, including protein tyrosine kinase, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and protein kinases A and C. Comparative studies of the individual pigmented compounds on PTP1B inhibition showed that as the chain length of the alkyl group at the C-3 position of the compound increased, the inhibitory effect on PTP1B decreased. These results suggest that protein phosphatases but not protein kinases might be involved in the cytotoxicity of the prodigiosin family of compounds against malignant cells.

  17. Molecular evolution and expression of the CRAL_TRIO protein family in insects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2015-07-01

    CRAL_TRIO domain proteins are known to bind small lipophilic molecules such as retinal, inositol and Vitamin E and include such gene family members as PINTA, α-tocopherol transfer (ATT) proteins, retinoid binding proteins, and clavesins. In insects, very little is known about either the molecular evolution of this family of proteins or their ligand specificity. Here we characterize insect CRAL_TRIO domain proteins and present the first insect CRAL_TRIO protein phylogeny constructed by performing reciprocal BLAST searches of the reference genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, Tribolium castaneum, Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Danaus plexippus. We find several highly conserved amino acid residues in the CRAL_TRIO domain-containing genes across insects and a gene expansion resulting in more than twice as many gene family members in lepidopterans than in other surveyed insect species, but no lepidopteran homolog of the PINTA gene in Drosophila. In addition, we examined the expression pattern of CRAL_TRIO domain genes in Manduca sexta heads using RNA-Seq data. Of the 42 gene family members found in the M. sexta reference genome, we found 30 expressed in the head tissue with similar expression profiles between males and females. Our results suggest this gene family underwent a large expansion in lepidopteran, making the lepidopteran CRAL_TRIO domain family distinct from other holometabolous insect lineages. PMID:25684408

  18. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    SciTech Connect

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-11-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed.

  19. Molecular evolution and expression of the CRAL_TRIO protein family in insects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gilbert; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2015-07-01

    CRAL_TRIO domain proteins are known to bind small lipophilic molecules such as retinal, inositol and Vitamin E and include such gene family members as PINTA, α-tocopherol transfer (ATT) proteins, retinoid binding proteins, and clavesins. In insects, very little is known about either the molecular evolution of this family of proteins or their ligand specificity. Here we characterize insect CRAL_TRIO domain proteins and present the first insect CRAL_TRIO protein phylogeny constructed by performing reciprocal BLAST searches of the reference genomes of Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, Apis mellifera, Tribolium castaneum, Bombyx mori, Manduca sexta and Danaus plexippus. We find several highly conserved amino acid residues in the CRAL_TRIO domain-containing genes across insects and a gene expansion resulting in more than twice as many gene family members in lepidopterans than in other surveyed insect species, but no lepidopteran homolog of the PINTA gene in Drosophila. In addition, we examined the expression pattern of CRAL_TRIO domain genes in Manduca sexta heads using RNA-Seq data. Of the 42 gene family members found in the M. sexta reference genome, we found 30 expressed in the head tissue with similar expression profiles between males and females. Our results suggest this gene family underwent a large expansion in lepidopteran, making the lepidopteran CRAL_TRIO domain family distinct from other holometabolous insect lineages.

  20. The retinoblastoma family of proteins and their regulatory functions in the mammalian cell division cycle

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins are found in organisms as distantly related as humans, plants, and insects. These proteins play a key role in regulating advancement of the cell division cycle from the G1 to S-phases. This is achieved through negative regulation of two important positive regulators of cell cycle entry, E2F transcription factors and cyclin dependent kinases. In growth arrested cells transcriptional activity by E2Fs is repressed by RB proteins. Stimulation of cell cycle entry by growth factor signaling leads to activation of cyclin dependent kinases. They in turn phosphorylate and inactivate the RB family proteins, leading to E2F activation and additional cyclin dependent kinase activity. This propels the cell cycle irreversibly forward leading to DNA synthesis. This review will focus on the basic biochemistry and cell biology governing the regulation and activity of mammalian RB family proteins in cell cycle control. PMID:22417103

  1. Cloning and expression of heat shock protein 70 gene in the haemocytes of pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata, Gould 1850) responding to bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongliang; Wu, Zaohe; Jian, Jichang; Lu, Yishan

    2009-04-01

    The cDNA of pearl oyster Pinctada fucata Hsp70 (designated PFHsp70) was cloned by EST and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) techniques. The full length of PFHsp70 cDNA was 2376 bp, consisting of a 5'-terminal untranslated region (UTR) of 89 bp, a 3' terminal UTR of 328 bp, and an open reading frame (ORF) of 1959 bp encoding a polypeptide of 652 amino acids with a theoretical molecular weight of 71.42 kDa and an estimated isoelectric point of 5.18. BLAST analysis revealed that the PFHsp70 gene shared high similarity with other Hsp70 genes. PFHsp70 contained all the three classical Hsp70 family signatures. The results indicated that the PFHsp70 was a member of the heat shock protein 70 family. Fluorescent real-time quantitative RT-PCR was used to examine the expression of PFHsp70 gene in haemocytes of P. fucata after the challenge of bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus. There was a clear time-dependent expression pattern of PFHsp70 after bacterial challenge, and the mRNA expression reached a maximum level at 4 h post-challenge, which returned to control level after 32 h. The up-regulated mRNA expression of PFHsp70 in P. fucata after bacterial challenge indicates that the Hsp70 gene is inducible and involved in immune response.

  2. Structural propensities of kinase family proteins from a Potts model of residue co-variation.

    PubMed

    Haldane, Allan; Flynn, William F; He, Peng; Vijayan, R S K; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the conformational propensities of proteins is key to solving many problems in structural biology and biophysics. The co-variation of pairs of mutations contained in multiple sequence alignments of protein families can be used to build a Potts Hamiltonian model of the sequence patterns which accurately predicts structural contacts. This observation paves the way to develop deeper connections between evolutionary fitness landscapes of entire protein families and the corresponding free energy landscapes which determine the conformational propensities of individual proteins. Using statistical energies determined from the Potts model and an alignment of 2896 PDB structures, we predict the propensity for particular kinase family proteins to assume a "DFG-out" conformation implicated in the susceptibility of some kinases to type-II inhibitors, and validate the predictions by comparison with the observed structural propensities of the corresponding proteins and experimental binding affinity data. We decompose the statistical energies to investigate which interactions contribute the most to the conformational preference for particular sequences and the corresponding proteins. We find that interactions involving the activation loop and the C-helix and HRD motif are primarily responsible for stabilizing the DFG-in state. This work illustrates how structural free energy landscapes and fitness landscapes of proteins can be used in an integrated way, and in the context of kinase family proteins, can potentially impact therapeutic design strategies. PMID:27241634

  3. A bacterial view of the periodic table: genes and proteins for toxic inorganic ions.

    PubMed

    Silver, Simon; Phung, Le T

    2005-12-01

    Essentially all bacteria have genes for toxic metal ion resistances and these include those for Ag+, AsO2-, AsO4(3-), Cd2+ Co2+, CrO4(2-), Cu2+, Hg2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, TeO3(2-), Tl+ and Zn2+. The largest group of resistance systems functions by energy-dependent efflux of toxic ions. Fewer involve enzymatic transformations (oxidation, reduction, methylation, and demethylation) or metal-binding proteins (for example, metallothionein SmtA, chaperone CopZ and periplasmic silver binding protein SilE). Some of the efflux resistance systems are ATPases and others are chemiosmotic ion/proton exchangers. For example, Cd2+-efflux pumps of bacteria are either inner membrane P-type ATPases or three polypeptide RND chemiosmotic complexes consisting of an inner membrane pump, a periplasmic-bridging protein and an outer membrane channel. In addition to the best studied three-polypeptide chemiosmotic system, Czc (Cd2+, Zn2+, and Co2), others are known that efflux Ag+, Cu+, Ni2+, and Zn2+. Resistance to inorganic mercury, Hg2+ (and to organomercurials, such as CH3Hg+ and phenylmercury) involve a series of metal-binding and membrane transport proteins as well as the enzymes mercuric reductase and organomercurial lyase, which overall convert more toxic to less toxic forms. Arsenic resistance and metabolizing systems occur in three patterns, the widely-found ars operon that is present in most bacterial genomes and many plasmids, the more recently recognized arr genes for the periplasmic arsenate reductase that functions in anaerobic respiration as a terminal electron acceptor, and the aso genes for the periplasmic arsenite oxidase that functions as an initial electron donor in aerobic resistance to arsenite.

  4. Intermediate filament-like network formed in vitro by a bacterial coiled coil protein.

    PubMed

    Hurme, R; Namork, E; Nurmiaho-Lassila, E L; Rhen, M

    1994-04-01

    The TlpA protein encoded by the virulence plasmid of Salmonella enterica is an alpha-helical 371-amino acid protein possessing characteristics similar to eukaryotic coiled coil proteins (Koski, P., Saarilahti, H., Sukupolvi, S., Taira, S., Rikkonen, P., Osterlund, K., Hurme, R., and Rhen, M. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 12258-12265). In this paper we have investigated inter- and intramolecular associations and the morphology of structures formed by TlpA. Dynamics and temperature stability of TlpA dimers were studied by examining the feasibility and conditions in which TlpA would form an artificial heterodimer with its truncated derivative. Formation of heterodimers, bridged by Cu(2+)-catalyzed air oxidation of adjacent Cys residues, showed that TlpA dimers are dynamic chain exchanging structures at 37 degrees C, whereas they were nonexchanging at room temperature or on ice. Chemical cross-linking suggested higher order interaction between TlpA dimers. Electron microscopy studies revealed two levels of TlpA organization in vitro: thin filaments and rods, 2-5 nm in diameter, and a higher ordered filament network consisting of tonofilament-like formations with a diameter of 8-15 nm. Electron microscopy of thin-sectioned Escherichia coli over-producing TlpA showed an extraordinary intracellular assembly of proteinacious lamellae with a striated appearance and a 38-nm periodicity. This study describes for the first time a bacterial protein capable of organizing itself into an ordered and suspectedly dynamic intermediate filament-like architecture. PMID:8144657

  5. Engineered Bacterial Metal-binding Proteins for Nanoscale Self-assembly and heavy Metal Tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall Sedlak, Ruth Amanda

    Implementing biological principles in material synthesis and assembly is one way to expand our abilities to efficiently assemble nanoscale materials and devices. Specifically, recent advances in identifying peptides that bind inorganic materials with high affinity and specificity has spurred investigation of protein models for nanoscale inorganic assembly. This dissertation presents the results of my studies of several E. coli proteins engineered to bind inorganic materials through simple peptide motifs. I demonstrate that these proteins modulate the self-assembly of DNA-based nanostructures and can introduce heavy metal tolerance into metal-sensitive bacteria. Chapter 2 explores use of the engineered F plasmid DNA relaxase/helicase TraI for the self-assembly of complex DNA-protein-gold nanostructures. The full-length protein is engineered with a gold binding motif at an internal permissive site (TraI369GBP1-7x), while a truncated version of TraI is engineered with the same gold binding motif at the C-terminus (TraI361GBP1-7x). Both constructs bind gold nanoparticles while maintaining their DNA binding activity, and transmission electron microscopy reveals TraI369GBP1-7x utilizes its non-specific DNA binding activity to decorate single-stranded and double-stranded DNA with gold nanoparticles. The self assembly principles demonstrated in this work will be fundamental to constructing higher ordered hybrid nanostructures through DNA-protein-nanoparticle interactions. Chapter 3 studies the effects of expressing inorganic binding peptides within cells. I identified a silver binding peptide that, when fused to the periplasmic maltose binding protein, protects E. coli from silver toxicity in batch culture and reduces silver ions to silver nanoparticles within the bacterial periplasm. Engineered metal-ion tolerant microorganisms such as this E. coli could potentially be used in applications ranging from remediation to interrogation of biomolecule-metal interactions in vivo

  6. The Conserved Candida albicans CA3427 Gene Product Defines a New Family of Proteins Exhibiting the Generic Periplasmic Binding Protein Structural Fold

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Sébastien; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Mouz, Nicolas; Rousselle, Tristan; Maza, Caroline; Monchois, Vincent; Abergel, Chantal

    2011-01-01

    Nosocomial diseases due to Candida albicans infections are in constant rise in hospitals, where they cause serious complications to already fragile intensive care patients. Antifungal drug resistance is fast becoming a serious issue due to the emergence of strains resistant to currently available antifungal agents. Thus the urgency to identify new potential protein targets, the function and structure of which may guide the development of new antifungal drugs. In this context, we initiated a comparative genomics study in search of promising protein coding genes among the most conserved ones in reference fungal genomes. The CA3427 gene was selected on the basis of its presence among pathogenic fungi contrasting with its absence in the non pathogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report the crystal 3D-structure of the Candida albicans CA3427 protein at 2.1 Å resolution. The combined analysis of its sequence and structure reveals a structural fold originally associated with periplasmic binding proteins. The CA3427 structure highlights a binding site located between the two protein domains, corresponding to a sequence segment conserved among fungi. Two crystal forms of CA3427 were found, suggesting that the presence or absence of a ligand at the proposed binding site might trigger a “Venus flytrap” motion, coupled to the previously described activity of bacterial periplasmic binding proteins. The conserved binding site defines a new subfamily of periplasmic binding proteins also found in many bacteria of the bacteroidetes division, in a choanoflagellate (a free-living unicellular and colonial flagellate eukaryote) and in a placozoan (the closest multicellular relative of animals). A phylogenetic analysis suggests that this gene family originated in bacteria before its horizontal transfer to an ancestral eukaryote prior to the radiation of fungi. It was then lost by the Saccharomycetales which include Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:21494601

  7. Co-expression of heat shock protein (HSP) 40 and HSP70 in Pinctada martensii response to thermal, low salinity and bacterial challenges.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Yuehuan; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yang; Xiao, Shu; Yu, Ziniu

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 40 proteins are a family of molecular chaperones that bind to HSP70 through their J-domain and regulate the function of HSP70 by stimulating its adenosine triphosphatase activity. In the present study, a HSP40 homolog named PmHSP40 was cloned from the hemocytes of pearl oyster Pinctada martensii using EST and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) techniques. The full-length cDNA of PmHSP40 was 1251 bp in length, which included a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 75 bp, an open reading frame (ORF) of a 663 bp, and a 3' UTR of 513 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence of PmHSP40 contains a J domain in the N-terminus. In response to thermal and low salinity stress challenges, the expression of PmHSP40 in hemocytes and the gill were inducible in a time-dependent manner. After bacterial challenge, PmHSP40 transcripts in hemocytes increased and peaked at 6 h post injection. In the gill, PmHSP40 expression increased, similar to expression in hemocytes; however, transcript expression of PmHSP40 was significantly up-regulated at 12 h post injection. Furthermore, the transcripts of PmHSP70 showed similar kinetics as that of PmHSP40, with highest induction during thermal, low salinity stress and bacterial challenges. Altogether these results demonstrate that PmHSP40 is an inducible protein under thermal, low salinity and bacterial challenges, suggesting its involvement in both environmental and biological stresses, and in the innate immunity of the pearl oyster.

  8. Role of endometrial cancer abnormal MMR protein in screening Lynch-syndrome families

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qiongxian; Peng, Yong; Tang, Zhirong; Wu, Cailiang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To identify patients with endometrial cancer with potential Lynch-related DNA mismatch repair (MMR) protein expression defects and to explore the role of these defects in screening for LS. Methods: Endometrial cancers from 173 patients recruited to the Nanchong Central Hospital were tested for MMR (MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, and MSH6) protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results: In the 173 tumor tissue samples, the expression loss rates of MSH6, MSH2, PMS2 and MLH1 protein were 16.18% (28/173), 12.14% (21/173), 7.51% (13/173) and 5.78% (10/173), respectively. The total loss rate of MMR protein was 29.89% (27/87). There were 19 patients with a family history of cancer, of which 18 patients demonstrated loss of expression of MMR protein. In the 22 abnormal MMR patients without family history, five families were found to have Lynch-associated cancer (colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, ovarian cancer, stomach cancer) after follow-up for two years. Conclusion: MMR proteins play an important role in the progress of endometrial cancer. The routine testing of MMR proteins in endometrial cancer can contribute to the screening of LS families, especially small families. PMID:25400828

  9. Clustering of protein families into functional subtypes using Relative Complexity Measure with reduced amino acid alphabets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic analysis can be used to divide a protein family into subfamilies in the absence of experimental information. Most phylogenetic analysis methods utilize multiple alignment of sequences and are based on an evolutionary model. However, multiple alignment is not an automated procedure and requires human intervention to maintain alignment integrity and to produce phylogenies consistent with the functional splits in underlying sequences. To address this problem, we propose to use the alignment-free Relative Complexity Measure (RCM) combined with reduced amino acid alphabets to cluster protein families into functional subtypes purely on sequence criteria. Comparison with an alignment-based approach was also carried out to test the quality of the clustering. Results We demonstrate the robustness of RCM with reduced alphabets in clustering of protein sequences into families in a simulated dataset and seven well-characterized protein datasets. On protein datasets, crotonases, mandelate racemases, nucleotidyl cyclases and glycoside hydrolase family 2 were clustered into subfamilies with 100% accuracy whereas acyl transferase domains, haloacid dehalogenases, and vicinal oxygen chelates could be assigned to subfamilies with 97.2%, 96.9% and 92.2% accuracies, respectively. Conclusions The overall combination of methods in this paper is useful for clustering protein families into subtypes based on solely protein sequence information. The method is also flexible and computationally fast because it does not require multiple alignment of sequences. PMID:20718947

  10. Adeno-associated virus protects the retinoblastoma family of proteins from adenoviral-induced functional inactivation.

    PubMed

    Batchu, Ramesh B; Shammas, Masood A; Wang, Jing Yi; Freeman, John; Rosen, Nancy; Munshi, Nikhil C

    2002-05-15

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) is known to inhibit virally mediated oncogenic transformation. One of the early events of adenovirus (Ad) infection is the functional inactivation of cell cycle regulatory retinoblastoma (RB) family of proteins, which consists of retinoblastoma protein (pRB), p107, and p130. In an effort to understand the molecular basis of anti-oncogenic properties of AAV, we studied the effects of AAV expression on these proteins in cells infected with Ad. Western blot analysis showed that AAV interferes with the adenoviral-induced degradation and hyperphosphorylation of the pRB family of proteins in normal human fibroblasts as well as in HeLa and 293 cell lines. RNase protection assay showed enhanced expression of pocket protein gene by AAV expression. We also demonstrate that Rep proteins, the major AAV regulatory proteins, bind to E1A, the immediate early gene of Ad responsible for hyperphosphorylation and dissociation of pRB-E2F complex. This binding of AAV Rep proteins to E1A leads to decreased association between E1A and pRB leading to protection of pocket proteins from degradation, decreased expression of S phase genes and inhibition of cell cycle progression. These results suggest that the antiproliferative activity of AAV against Ad is mediated, at least in part, by effects of AAV Rep proteins on the Rb family of proteins.

  11. Matricellular proteins of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) family and the nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Anna R.; Liszewska, Ewa; Jaworski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Matricellular proteins are secreted proteins that exist at the border of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, instead of playing a role in structural integrity of the ECM, these proteins, that act as modulators of various surface receptors, have a regulatory function and instruct a multitude of cellular responses. Among matricellular proteins are members of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) protein family. These proteins exert their activity by binding directly to integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans and activating multiple intracellular signaling pathways. CCN proteins also influence the activity of growth factors and cytokines and integrate their activity with integrin signaling. At the cellular level, CCN proteins regulate gene expression and cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, senescence, adhesion, and migration. To date, CCN proteins have been extensively studied in the context of osteo- and chondrogenesis, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis, but the expression of these proteins is also observed in a variety of tissues. The role of CCN proteins in the nervous system has not been systematically studied or described. Thus, the major aim of this review is to introduce the CCN protein family to the neuroscience community. We first discuss the structure, interactions, and cellular functions of CCN proteins and then provide a detailed review of the available data on the neuronal expression and contribution of CCN proteins to nervous system development, function, and pathology. PMID:26157362

  12. Matricellular proteins of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) family and the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Malik, Anna R; Liszewska, Ewa; Jaworski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Matricellular proteins are secreted proteins that exist at the border of cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). However, instead of playing a role in structural integrity of the ECM, these proteins, that act as modulators of various surface receptors, have a regulatory function and instruct a multitude of cellular responses. Among matricellular proteins are members of the Cyr61/CTGF/NOV (CCN) protein family. These proteins exert their activity by binding directly to integrins and heparan sulfate proteoglycans and activating multiple intracellular signaling pathways. CCN proteins also influence the activity of growth factors and cytokines and integrate their activity with integrin signaling. At the cellular level, CCN proteins regulate gene expression and cell survival, proliferation, differentiation, senescence, adhesion, and migration. To date, CCN proteins have been extensively studied in the context of osteo- and chondrogenesis, angiogenesis, and carcinogenesis, but the expression of these proteins is also observed in a variety of tissues. The role of CCN proteins in the nervous system has not been systematically studied or described. Thus, the major aim of this review is to introduce the CCN protein family to the neuroscience community. We first discuss the structure, interactions, and cellular functions of CCN proteins and then provide a detailed review of the available data on the neuronal expression and contribution of CCN proteins to nervous system development, function, and pathology.

  13. Fundamental Characteristics of AAA+ Protein Family Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Many complex cellular events depend on multiprotein complexes known as molecular machines to efficiently couple the energy derived from adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis to the generation of mechanical force. Members of the AAA+ ATPase superfamily (ATPases Associated with various cellular Activities) are critical components of many molecular machines. AAA+ proteins are defined by conserved modules that precisely position the active site elements of two adjacent subunits to catalyze ATP hydrolysis. In many cases, AAA+ proteins form a ring structure that translocates a polymeric substrate through the central channel using specialized loops that project into the central channel. We discuss the major features of AAA+ protein structure and function with an emphasis on pivotal aspects elucidated with archaeal proteins. PMID:27703410

  14. Identification of a novel calcium binding motif based on the detection of sequence insertions in the animal peroxidase domain of bacterial proteins.

    PubMed

    Santamaría-Hernando, Saray; Krell, Tino; Ramos-González, María-Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Proteins of the animal heme peroxidase (ANP) superfamily differ greatly in size since they have either one or two catalytic domains that match profile PS50292. The orf PP_2561 of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 that we have called PepA encodes a two-domain ANP. The alignment of these domains with those of PepA homologues revealed a variable number of insertions with the consensus G-x-D-G-x-x-[GN]-[TN]-x-D-D. This motif has also been detected in the structure of pseudopilin (pdb 3G20), where it was found to be involved in Ca(2+) coordination although a sequence analysis did not reveal the presence of any known calcium binding motifs in this protein. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed that a peptide containing this consensus motif bound specifically calcium ions with affinities ranging between 33-79 µM depending on the pH. Microcalorimetric titrations of the purified N-terminal ANP-like domain of PepA revealed Ca(2+) binding with a K(D) of 12 µM and stoichiometry of 1.25 calcium ions per protein monomer. This domain exhibited peroxidase activity after its reconstitution with heme. These data led to the definition of a novel calcium binding motif that we have termed PERCAL and which was abundantly present in animal peroxidase-like domains of bacterial proteins. Bacterial heme peroxidases thus possess two different types of calcium binding motifs, namely PERCAL and the related hemolysin type calcium binding motif, with the latter being located outside the catalytic domains and in their C-terminal end. A phylogenetic tree of ANP-like catalytic domains of bacterial proteins with PERCAL motifs, including single domain peroxidases, was divided into two major clusters, representing domains with and without PERCAL motif containing insertions. We have verified that the recently reported classification of bacterial heme peroxidases in two families (cd09819 and cd09821) is unrelated to these insertions. Sequences matching PERCAL were detected in all kingdoms of life. PMID

  15. Molecular Evidence of RNA Editing in Bombyx Chemosensory Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Xuan, Ning; Bu, Xun; Liu, Yan Yan; Yang, Xue; Liu, Guo Xia; Fan, Zhong Xue; Bi, Yu Ping; Yang, Lian Qun; Lou, Qi Nian; Rajashekar, Balaji; Leppik, Getter; Kasvandik, Sergo; Picimbon, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are small scavenger proteins that are mainly known as transporters of pheromone/odor molecules at the periphery of sensory neurons in the insect antennae and in the producing cells from the moth female pheromone gland. Sequencing cDNAs of RNA encoding CSPs in the antennae, legs, head, pheromone gland and wings from five single individual adult females of the silkworm moth Bombyx mori showed that they differed from genomic sequences by subtle nucleotide replacement (RDD). Both intronless and intronic CSP genes expressed RDDs, although in different rates. Most interestingly, in our study the degree of RDDs in CSP genes were found to be tissue-specific. The proportion of CSP-RDDs was found to be significantly much higher in the pheromone gland. In addition, Western blot analysis of proteins in different tissues showed existence of multiple CSP protein variant chains particularly found in the pheromone gland. Peptide sequencing demonstrated the occurrence of a pleiad of protein variants for most of all BmorCSPs from the pheromone gland. Our findings show that RNA editing is an important feature in the expression of CSPs and that a high variety of RDDs is found to expand drastically thus altering the repertoire of CSP proteins in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:24551045

  16. AinS and a new family of autoinducer synthesis proteins.

    PubMed

    Gilson, L; Kuo, A; Dunlap, P V

    1995-12-01

    In Vibrio fischeri, the autoinducer N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (AI-1) governs the cell density-dependent induction of the luminescence operon via the LuxR transcriptional activator. The synthesis of AI-1 from bacterial metabolic intermediates is dependent on luxI. Recently, we found a second V. fischeri autoinducer molecule, N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (AI-2), that in E. coli also activates the luminescence operon via LuxR. A locus independent of luxI was identified as being required for AI-2 synthesis. This 2.7-kb ain (autoinducer) locus was characterized by transposon insertion mutagenesis, deletion and complementation analysis, and DNA sequencing. A single 1,185-bp gene, ainS, was found to be the sole exogenous gene necessary for the synthesis of AI-2 in Escherichia coli. In addition, a V. fischeri ainS mutant produced AI-1 but not AI-2, confirming that in its native species ainS is specific for the synthesis of AI-2. ainS is predicted to encode a 45,580-Da protein which exhibits no similarity to LuxI or to any of the LuxI homologs responsible for the synthesis of N-acyl-L-homoserine lactones in a variety of other bacteria. The existence of two different and unrelated autoinducer synthesis genes suggests the occurrence of convergent evolution in the synthesis of homoserine lactone signaling molecules. The C-terminal half of AinS shows homology to a putative protein in Vibrio harveyi, LuxM, which is required for the synthesis of a V. harveyi bioluminescence autoinducer. Together, AinS and LuxM define a new family of autoinducer synthesis proteins. Furthermore, the predicted product of another gene, ainR, encoded immediately downstream of ainS, shows homology to LuxN, which is similarly encoded downstream of luxM in V. harveyi and proposed to have sensor/regulator functions in the bioluminescence response to the V. harveyi auto inducer. This similarity presents the possibility that AI-2, besides interacting with LuxR, also interacts with AinR under

  17. Blood parameters in growing pigs fed increasing levels of bacterial protein meal

    PubMed Central

    Hellwing, Anne Louise F; Tauson, Anne-Helene; Skrede, Anders

    2007-01-01

    The experiment investigated the effects of increasing dietary levels of bacterial protein meal (BPM) on various blood parameters reflecting protein and fat metabolism, liver function, and purine base metabolism in growing pigs. Sixteen barrows were allocated to four different experimental diets. The control diet was based on soybean meal. In the other three diets soybean meal was replaced with increasing levels of BPM, approximately 17%, 35%, and 50% of the nitrogen being derived from BPM. Blood samples from the jugular vein were taken when the body weights of the pigs were approximately 10 kg, 21 kg, 45 kg, and 77 kg. The blood parameters reflecting fat metabolism and liver function were not affected by diet. Both the plasma albumin and uric acid concentrations tended to decrease (P = 0.07 and 0.01, respectively) with increasing dietary BPM content, whereas the plasma glucose concentration tended to increase (P = 0.07) with increasing dietary BPM content. It was concluded that up to 50% of the nitrogen could be derived from BPM without affecting metabolic function, as reflected in the measured blood parameters. PMID:17996082

  18. Third order nonlinear optical properties of stacked bacteriochlorophylls in bacterial photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Laible, P.D.; Spano, F.C.; Manas, E.S.

    1997-09-01

    Enhancement of the nonresonant second order molecular hyperpolarizabilities {gamma} were observed in stacked macrocyclic molecular systems, previously in a {micro}-oxo silicon phthalocyanine (SiPcO) monomer, dimer and trimer series, and now in bacteriochlorophyll a (BChla) arrays of light harvesting (LH) proteins. Compared to monomeric BChla in a tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution, the <{gamma}> for each macrocycle was enhanced in naturally occurring stacked macrocyclic molecular systems in the bacterial photosynthetic LH proteins where BChla`s are arranged in tilted face-to-face arrays. In addition, the {gamma} enhancement is more significant in B875 of LH1 than in B850 in LH2. Theoretical modeling of the nonresonant {gamma} enhancement using simplified molecular orbitals for model SiPcO indicated that the energy level of the two photon state is crucial to the {gamma} enhancement when a two photon process is involved, whereas the charge transfer between the monomers is largely responsible when one photon near resonant process is involved. The calculated results can be extended to {gamma} enhancement in B875 and B850 arrays, suggesting that BChla in B875 are more strongly coupled than in B850. In addition, a 50--160 fold increase in <{gamma}> for the S{sub 1} excited state of relative to S{sub 0} of bacteriochlorophyll in vivo was observed which provides an alternative method for probing excited state dynamics and a potential application for molecular switching.

  19. Voltage-induced "gating" of bacterial porin as reversible protein denaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestorovich, Ekaterina M.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2004-05-01

    General porin OmpF forms water-filled channels in the outer membrane of E. coli bacteria. When reconstituted into planar bilayer lipid membranes, these channels can be closed (or "gated") by high electric fields. We discover that: (i) channel gating is sensitive to the type of cations in the membrane-bathing solution according to their position in the Hofmeister series; (ii) channel gates to a "closed" state that is represented by a set of multiple sub-conformations with at least three distinctly different conformations contributing to the closed-state conductance histogram. Taken together with the nearly symmetric response to the applied voltage of changing polarity and the hysteresis phenomena reported previously by others and reproduced here, these findings suggest that the voltage-induced closure of the OmpF channel is a consequence of reversible denaturation of the protein by the high electric field. If so, the voltage-induced gating of bacterial porins can serve as an instructive model to study the physics of protein folding at the single-molecule level.

  20. Biocompatible and mucoadhesive bacterial cellulose-g-poly(acrylic acid) hydrogels for oral protein delivery.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Naveed; Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd; Mahali, Shalela Mohd; Ismail, Ismanizan; Chuang, Victor Tuan Giam

    2014-11-01

    Stimuli-responsive bacterial cellulose-g-poly(acrylic acid) hydrogels were investigated for their potential use as an oral delivery system for proteins. These hydrogels were synthesized using electron beam irradiation without any cross-linking agents, thereby eliminating any potential toxic effects associated with cross-linkers. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein drug, was loaded into the hydrogels, and the release profile in simulated gastrointestinal fluids was investigated. Cumulative release of less than 10% in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) demonstrated the potential of these hydrogels to protect BSA from the acidic environment of the stomach. Subsequent conformational stability analyses of released BSA by SDS-PAGE, circular dichroism, and an esterase activity assay indicated that the structural integrity and bioactivity of BSA was maintained and preserved by the hydrogels. Furthermore, an increase in BSA penetration across intestinal mucosa tissue was observed in an ex vivo penetration experiment. Our fabricated hydrogels exhibited excellent cytocompatibility and showed no sign of toxicity, indicating the safety of these hydrogels for in vivo applications.