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Sample records for bacterially induced precipitation

  1. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO sub 3 : An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats

    SciTech Connect

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  2. Bacterially induced precipitation of CaCO{sub 3}: An example from studies of cyanobacterial mats. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1990-04-30

    Bacteria induce the precipitation of calcium carbonate in the laboratory and in nature by altering their chemical environment. Geologists are recognizing the possibility that bacterially induced precipitates may form significant mineral deposits, unfortunately, there are currently no sound criteria by which they can be recognized in recent sediments, or in the rock record. Cultures of aerobic and facultative bacteria from cyanobacterial mats on Andros Island, Bahamas, and Baffin Bay, Texas, induced the precipitation of calcium carbonate under controlled conditions. Crusts, the largest features formed, are composed of 5--200{mu}m diameter bundles which are, in turn, composed of numerous individual crystals. The smallest observed features are 0.1--0.4{mu}m spheres and rods which comprise some individual crystals and crystal bundles. Crystal bundles resembling rhombohedra, tetragonal disphenoids, tetragonal dipyramids, and calcite dumbbells appear to be uniquely bacterial in origin, and they have all been observed in recent sediments. Swollen rods, discs, curved dumbbells, and 50--200{mu}m optically continuous crystals resembling brushes may be uniquely bacterial in origin, however, they have not been reported by other laboratories nor observed in natural settings. Presence of any of these forms in recent sediments should be taken as strong evidence for bacterial influence. Spheres and aragonite dumbbells have also been observed in natural environments, however, they are not always bacterial in origin. Precipitation of calcium carbonate occurs preferentially on dead cyanobacteria in the presence of bacteria. Lithification of algal mats to form stromatolites may take place in the zone of decaying organic matter due to bacterial activity.

  3. Bacterially induced calcium carbonate precipitation and strontium coprecipitation in a porous media flow system.

    PubMed

    Lauchnor, Ellen G; Schultz, Logan N; Bugni, Steven; Mitchell, Andrew C; Cunningham, Alfred B; Gerlach, Robin

    2013-02-05

    Strontium-90 is a principal radionuclide contaminant in the subsurface at several Department of Energy sites in the Western U.S., causing a threat to groundwater quality in areas such as Hanford, WA. In this work, we used laboratory-scale porous media flow cells to examine a potential remediation strategy employing coprecipitation of strontium in carbonate minerals. CaCO(3) precipitation and strontium coprecipitation were induced via ureolysis by Sporosarcina pasteurii in two-dimensional porous media reactors. An injection strategy using pulsed injection of calcium mineralization medium was tested against a continuous injection strategy. The pulsed injection strategy involved periods of lowered calcite saturation index combined with short high fluid velocity flow periods of calcium mineralization medium followed by stagnation (no-flow) periods to promote homogeneous CaCO(3) precipitation. By alternating the addition of mineralization and growth media the pulsed strategy promoted CaCO(3) precipitation while sustaining the ureolytic culture over time. Both injection strategies achieved ureolysis with subsequent CaCO(3) precipitation and strontium coprecipitation. The pulsed injection strategy precipitated 71-85% of calcium and 59% of strontium, while the continuous injection was less efficient and precipitated 61% of calcium and 56% of strontium. Over the 60 day operation of the pulsed reactors, ureolysis was continually observed, suggesting that the balance between growth and precipitation phases allowed for continued cell viability. Our results support the pulsed injection strategy as a viable option for ureolysis-induced strontium coprecipitation because it may reduce the likelihood of injection well accumulation caused by localized mineral plugging while Sr coprecipitation efficiency is maintained in field-scale applications.

  4. Bacterially Induced Calcite Precipitation and Strontium Co-Precipitation under Flow Conditions in a Porous Media System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, R.; Mitchell, A. C.; Schultz, L.; Cunningham, A.

    2009-12-01

    The process of in situ carbonate mineral formation has implications in many environmental applications, including, but not limited to aquifer decontamination, enhancement of soil stability, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The high stability of carbonates and the potential for co-precipitation of contaminants within carbonates are attractive attributes for several potential engineering applications. Ureolytic precipitation of calcium and strontium carbonates by Sporosarcina pasteurii was examined in two-dimensional flat plate porous media reactors. Complete reactor plugging due to biofilm formation and calcium carbonate precipitation was achieved in Sr-free systems after 14 hours and in Sr-inclusive systems after 15 hours. Comparison of the reactor influent and effluent after 11 hours indicated that Ca2+ concentrations in the Sr-free reactor effluent were reduced to approximately 0.48% of the influent concentration while the Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations of the Sr-inclusive effluent were reduced to 0.64% and 2.34% of the influent concentration indicating a slight inhibitory effect of strontium on calcium carbonate precipitation . Despite this slight inhibition, more than 98% of the Ca2+ entering the reactors was precipitated. Calcite was identified as the main mineral formed and a larger mean crystal size and density were observed near the reactor influent. Homogenous partition coefficients calculated from extracted precipitates suggest higher Sr2+ partitioning near the inlet region, where higher precipitation kinetics exist. Results confirm the possibility of effective calcite-based co-precipitation of Sr2+ under flow conditions and contributes towards the development of field-scale calcium carbonate mineral-based immobilization strategies.

  5. Bacterially Induced Calcite Precipitation and Strontium Co-Precipitation under Flow Conditions in a Porous Media System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, Robin; Mitchell, Andrew C.; Schultz, Logan N.; Cunningham, Al B.

    2010-05-01

    The process of in situ carbonate mineral formation has implications in many environmental applications, including, but not limited to aquifer decontamination, enhancement of soil stability, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The high stability of carbonates and the potential for co-precipitation of contaminants within carbonates are attractive attributes for several potential engineering applications. Ureolytic precipitation of calcium and strontium carbonates by Sporosarcina pasteurii was examined in two-dimensional flat plate porous media reactors. Complete reactor plugging due to biofilm formation and calcium carbonate precipitation was achieved in Sr-free systems after 14 hours and in Sr-inclusive systems after 15 hours. Comparison of the reactor influent and effluent after 11 hours indicated that Ca2+ concentrations in the Sr-free reactor effluent were reduced to approximately 0.48% of the influent concentration while the Ca2+ and Sr2+ concentrations of the Sr-inclusive effluent were reduced to 0.64% and 2.34% of the influent concentration indicating a slight inhibitory effect of strontium on calcium carbonate precipitation . Despite this slight inhibition, more than 98% of the Ca2+ entering the reactors was precipitated. Calcite was identified as the main mineral formed and a larger mean crystal size and density were observed near the reactor influent. Homogenous partition coefficients calculated from extracted precipitates suggest higher Sr2+ partitioning near the inlet region, where higher precipitation kinetics exist. Results confirm the possibility of effective calcite-based co-precipitation of Sr2+ under flow conditions and contributes towards the development of field-scale calcium carbonate mineral-based immobilization strategies.

  6. Monitoring bacterially induced calcite precipitation in porous media using magnetic resonance imaging and flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Sham, E; Mantle, M D; Mitchell, J; Tobler, D J; Phoenix, V R; Johns, M L

    2013-09-01

    A range of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are employed to provide novel, non-invasive measurements of both the structure and transport properties of porous media following a biologically mediated calcite precipitation reaction. Both a model glass bead pack and a sandstone rock core were considered. Structure was probed using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) via a combination of quantitative one-dimensional profiles and three-dimensional images, applied before and after the formation of calcite in order to characterise the spatial distribution of the precipitate. It was shown through modification and variations of the calcite precipitation treatment that differences in the calcite fill would occur but all methods were successful in partially blocking the different porous media. Precipitation was seen to occur predominantly at the inlet of the bead pack, whereas precipitation occurred almost uniformly along the sandstone core. Transport properties are quantified using pulse field gradient (PFG) NMR measurements which provide probability distributions of molecular displacement over a set observation time (propagators), supplementing conventional permeability measurements. Propagators quantify the local effect of calcite formation on system hydrodynamics and the extent of stagnant region formation. Collectively, the combination of NMR measurements utilised here provides a toolkit for determining the efficacy of a biological-precipitation reaction for partially blocking porous materials. © 2013.

  7. Corneal ciprofloxacin precipitation during bacterial keratitis.

    PubMed

    Wilhelmus, Kirk R; Abshire, Robert L

    2003-12-01

    To examine how age affects the risk of developing a white corneal precipitate during ciprofloxacin therapy for bacterial keratitis and to explore the effect of a white precipitate on rates of clinical improvement and cure. Prospective, multicenter, observational cohort study. Occurrence of a white precipitate of the corneal surface was recorded among 624 patients with presumed bacterial keratitis who were treated with topical ciprofloxacin 0.3% solution or ointment. Relative risks of corneal precipitation were estimated from logistic regression for age categories and other clinical characteristics. The time-dependent effects of precipitate on rates of infection resolution and corneal reepithelialization were estimated by proportional hazards regression. Ninety-five (15.2%) patients developed a white corneal precipitate during ciprofloxacin therapy; 72 (75.8%) began within the first 3 days of treatment. Compared with those younger than 40 years old, patients aged 60 to 69 years had 2.8 (95% confidence limits [CL], 1.9, 3.9) times the risk of ciprofloxacin precipitation; patients 70 years and older had 3.7 (95% CL, 2.6, 5.0) times the risk. Median duration of the visible corneal precipitate was 8.5 days (90% decile, 32 days). Presence of ciprofloxacin precipitation did not significantly affect the time until therapeutic improvement (P =.09) but slowed the time until reepithelialization by 55% (95% CL 32%, 70%). Older patients treated with topical ciprofloxacin for bacterial keratitis have a higher risk of corneal deposition. A white precipitate apparently does not interfere with antibacterial therapeutic response but may delay epithelial healing of ulcerative keratitis.

  8. The Effect of Bacterial Surfaces on Silica Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, N.; Phoenix, V. R.; Konhauser, K. O.; Benning, L. G.

    2001-12-01

    Bacterial silicification is an important geological process in modern geothermal environments (e.g., New Zealand, Iceland, Japan). The precipitation of silica onto bacterial surfaces can affect microbial fossilization, chemical sediment formation, the porosity and permeability of crustal rocks, and silica transport in geothermal hot springs. Previous studies have suggested that active deposition of silica onto bacterial cells begins with the precipitation of heterogeneously nucleated aggregates of amorphous silica. However, the effect of bacteria on silica precipitation is poorly understood, and it is unclear if bacterial surfaces enhance the kinetics of silica precipitation or if the bacteria act as passive precipitation surfaces. In this study, we performed silica precipitation experiments with the filamentous cyanobacteria Calothrix sp. (strain KC97) to elucidate the rates and mechanisms of silicate biomineralization. Batch experiments were conducted as a function of time, Si saturation states, temperature, pH and Fe concentrations. Experiments at both undersaturated and supersaturated conditions indicate that Si-bacteria interactions are weak, and that minimal bacterial silica sorption/precipitation occurs. In supersaturated solutions, abotic polymerization rates are rapid and at the times scales of our experiments (1-300 hours) the presence of bacteria does not enhance silica nucleation or monomeric silica polymerization. However, the presence of Fe-coated bacteria significantly increases silica sorption/precipitation rates, and the extent of Si sorption/precipitation increases with increasing Fe concentrations. Fe precipitation experiments performed without Si indicate that iron precipitation onto bacterial surfaces occurs very rapidly and significantly faster than abotic controls. The experimental data suggest that in the presence of Fe, bacterial silicification occurs as a two step process: 1) Fe precipitates onto bacterial cells via heterogeneous surface

  9. Soil bacterial community structure responses to precipitation reduction and forest management in forest ecosystems across Germany.

    PubMed

    Felsmann, Katja; Baudis, Mathias; Gimbel, Katharina; Kayler, Zachary E; Ellerbrock, Ruth; Bruelheide, Helge; Bruehlheide, Helge; Bruckhoff, Johannes; Welk, Erik; Puhlmann, Heike; Weiler, Markus; Gessler, Arthur; Ulrich, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play an important role in forest ecosystem functioning, but how climate change will affect the community composition and consequently bacterial functions is poorly understood. We assessed the effects of reduced precipitation with the aim of simulating realistic future drought conditions for one growing season on the bacterial community and its relation to soil properties and forest management. We manipulated precipitation in beech and conifer forest plots managed at different levels of intensity in three different regions across Germany. The precipitation reduction decreased soil water content across the growing season by between 2 to 8% depending on plot and region. T-RFLP analysis and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used to study the total soil bacterial community and its active members after six months of precipitation reduction. The effect of reduced precipitation on the total bacterial community structure was negligible while significant effects could be observed for the active bacteria. However, the effect was secondary to the stronger influence of specific soil characteristics across the three regions and management selection of overstorey tree species and their respective understorey vegetation. The impact of reduced precipitation differed between the studied plots; however, we could not determine the particular parameters being able to modify the response of the active bacterial community among plots. We conclude that the moderate drought induced by the precipitation manipulation treatment started to affect the active but not the total bacterial community, which points to an adequate resistance of the soil microbial system over one growing season.

  10. Calcium precipitate induced aerobic granulation.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yayi; Wang, Xingzu; Liu, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic granulation is a novel biotechnology for wastewater treatment. This study refined existing aerobic granulation mechanisms as a sequencing process including formation of calcium precipitate under alkaline pH to form inorganic cores, followed by bacterial attachment and growth on these cores to form the exopolysaccharide matrix. Mature granules comprised an inner core and a matrix layer and a rim layer with enriched microbial strains. The inorganic core was a mix of different crystals of calcium and phosphates. Functional strains including Sphingomonas sp., Paracoccus sp. Sinorhizobium americanum strain and Flavobacterium sp. attached onto the cores. These functional strains promote c-di-GMP production and the expression by Psl and Alg genes for exopolysaccharide production to enhance formation of mature granules.

  11. Soil Bacterial Community Structure Responses to Precipitation Reduction and Forest Management in Forest Ecosystems across Germany

    PubMed Central

    Felsmann, Katja; Baudis, Mathias; Gimbel, Katharina; Kayler, Zachary E.; Ellerbrock, Ruth; Bruehlheide, Helge; Bruckhoff, Johannes; Welk, Erik; Puhlmann, Heike; Weiler, Markus; Gessler, Arthur; Ulrich, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Soil microbial communities play an important role in forest ecosystem functioning, but how climate change will affect the community composition and consequently bacterial functions is poorly understood. We assessed the effects of reduced precipitation with the aim of simulating realistic future drought conditions for one growing season on the bacterial community and its relation to soil properties and forest management. We manipulated precipitation in beech and conifer forest plots managed at different levels of intensity in three different regions across Germany. The precipitation reduction decreased soil water content across the growing season by between 2 to 8% depending on plot and region. T-RFLP analysis and pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used to study the total soil bacterial community and its active members after six months of precipitation reduction. The effect of reduced precipitation on the total bacterial community structure was negligible while significant effects could be observed for the active bacteria. However, the effect was secondary to the stronger influence of specific soil characteristics across the three regions and management selection of overstorey tree species and their respective understorey vegetation. The impact of reduced precipitation differed between the studied plots; however, we could not determine the particular parameters being able to modify the response of the active bacterial community among plots. We conclude that the moderate drought induced by the precipitation manipulation treatment started to affect the active but not the total bacterial community, which points to an adequate resistance of the soil microbial system over one growing season. PMID:25875835

  12. Peloids: a bacterially-induced origin

    SciTech Connect

    Chafetz, H.S.

    1985-01-01

    The origin of peloids within modern reef accumulations has been a controversial subject for almost 20 years. Freshly broken and slabbed splits of samples from Holocene-Pleistocene reef tracts from Jamaica, Belize and Florida, were observed with an SEM; the majority of the specimens had been etched in dilute HC1 prior to coating. Peloids commonly occur within borings in corals and other reef constituents. The peloids are spherical bodies, generally 20-60u in diameter, composed of high-magnesian calcite. They have a fine-grained center of anhedral grains and a dentate exterior of clear euhedral spar. In thin section, the centers commonly are light brown indicating the presence of organic matter. Spherical to elliptical bacterial clumps, approximately 15u in diameter, are evident in SEM views of etched samples from all three locales, whereas no bacteria were observed in non-etched samples. Their apparent absence in non-etched samples is because they occur encased in calcite. The reefal peloids are similar to bacterially-induced precipitates that occur in some travertine deposits. The similarities include: diameter (20-60u), structure, composition, and occurrence in a restricted or harsh environment (borings within corals or in hot H/sub 2/S-rich waters). Laboratory experiments have demonstrated that bacteria can induce carbonate precipitation. Therefore, it is my contention that peloids in modern reefs are bacterially-induced precipitated grains.

  13. Inducing Mineral Precipitation in Groundwater by Addition of Phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Karen E. Wright; Yoshiko Fujita; Thomas Hartmann; Mark Conrad

    2011-10-01

    Induced precipitation of phosphate minerals to scavenge trace metals and radionuclides from groundwater is a potential remediation approach for contaminated aquifers. Phosphate minerals can sequester trace elements by primary mineral formation, solid solution formation and/or adsorption, and they are poorly soluble under many environmental conditions, making them attractive for long-term sustainable remediation. The success of such engineered schemes will depend on the particular mineral phases generated, their rates of formation, and their long term stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals under conditions representative of a natural groundwater. Because microorganisms are present in groundwater, and because some proposed schemes for induced phosphate mineral precipitation rely on the stimulation of native groundwater populations, we also tested the effect of bacterial cells (initial densities of 105 and 107 ml-1) within the precipitation medium. We also tested the effect of a trace mixture of propionic, isovaleric, formic and butyric acids (total concentration 0.035 mM). The experiments showed that the general progression of mineral precipitation was similar under all of the conditions, with initial formation of amorphous calcium carbonate, and transformation to poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) by the end of the week-long experiments. The presence of the bacterial cells appeared to delay precipitation, although by the end of 7 days the overall extent of precipitation was similar for all of the treatments. The stoichiometry of the final precipitates as well as results of Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data indicated that the treatments including organic acids and bacterial cells resulted in increased distortion of the HAP crystal lattice, with the higher concentration of cells resulting in the greatest distortion. Uptake of Sr into the phosphate minerals was decreased in the treatments

  14. Inducing mineral precipitation in groundwater by addition of phosphate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Induced precipitation of phosphate minerals to scavenge trace elements from groundwater is a potential remediation approach for contaminated aquifers. The success of engineered precipitation schemes depends on the particular phases generated, their rates of formation, and their long term stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals under conditions representative of a natural groundwater. Because microorganisms are present in groundwater, and because some proposed schemes for phosphate mineral precipitation rely on stimulation of native microbial populations, we also tested the effect of bacterial cells (initial densities of 105 and 107 mL-1) added to the precipitation medium. In addition, we tested the effect of a trace mixture of propionic, isovaleric, formic and butyric acids (total concentration 0.035 mM). Results The general progression of mineral precipitation was similar under all of the study conditions, with initial formation of amorphous calcium phosphate, and transformation to poorly crystalline hydroxylapatite (HAP) within one week. The presence of the bacterial cells appeared to delay precipitation, although by the end of the experiments the overall extent of precipitation was similar for all treatments. The stoichiometry of the final precipitates as well as Rietveld structure refinement using x-ray diffraction data indicated that the presence of organic acids and bacterial cells resulted in an increasing a and decreasing c lattice parameter, with the higher concentration of cells resulting in the greatest distortion. Uptake of Sr into the solids was decreased in the treatments with cells and organic acids, compared to the control. Conclusions Our results suggest that the minerals formed initially during an engineered precipitation application for trace element sequestration may not be the ones that control long-term immobilization of the contaminants. In addition, the presence of

  15. Magnesium isotope fractionation in bacterial mediated carbonate precipitation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkinson, I. J.; Pearce, C. R.; Polacskek, T.; Cockell, C.; Hammond, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Magnesium is an essential component of life, with pivotal roles in the generation of cellular energy as well as in plant chlorophyll [1]. The bio-geochemical cycling of Mg is associated with mass dependant fractionation (MDF) of the three stable Mg isotopes [1]. The largest MDF of Mg isotopes has been recorded in carbonates, with foraminiferal tests having δ26Mg compositions up to 5 ‰ lighter than modern seawater [2]. Magnesium isotopes may also be fractionated during bacterially mediated carbonate precipitation and such carbonates are known to have formed in both modern and ancient Earth surface environments [3, 4], with cyanobacteria having a dominant role in carbonate formation during the Archean. In this study, we aim to better constrain the extent to which Mg isotope fractionation occurs during cellular processes, and to identify when, and how, this signal is transferred to carbonates. To this end we have undertaken biologically-mediated carbonate precipitation experiments that were performed in artificial seawater, but with the molar Mg/Ca ratio set to 0.6 and with the solution spiked with 0.4% yeast extract. The bacterial strain used was marine isolate Halomonas sp. (gram-negative). Experiments were run in the dark at 21 degree C for two to three months and produced carbonate spheres of various sizes up to 300 μm in diameter, but with the majority have diameters of ~100 μm. Control experiments run in sterile controls (`empty` medium without bacteria) yielded no precipitates, indicating a bacterial control on the precipitation. The carbonate spheres are produced are amenable to SEM, EMP and Mg isotopic analysis by MC-ICP-MS. Our new data will shed light on tracing bacterial signals in carbonates from the geological record. [1] Young & Galy (2004). Rev. Min. Geochem. 55, p197-230. [2] Pogge von Strandmann (2008). Geochem. Geophys. Geosys. 9 DOI:10.1029/2008GC002209. [3] Castanier, et al. (1999). Sed. Geol. 126, 9-23. [4] Cacchio, et al. (2003

  16. Mathematical model of biofilm induced calcite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T; Klapper, I

    2010-01-01

    Microbially modulated carbonate precipitation is a fundamentally important phenomenon of both engineered and natural environments. In this paper, we propose a mixture model for biofilm induced calcite precipitation. The model consists of three phases - calcite, biofilm and solvent - which satisfy conservation of mass and momentum laws with addition of a free energy of mixing. The model also accounts for chemistry, mechanics, thermodynamics, fluid and electrodiffusion transport effects. Numerical simulations qualitatively capturing the dynamics of this process and revealing effects of kinetic parameters and external flow conditions are presented.

  17. Responses of Soil Bacterial Communities to Nitrogen Deposition and Precipitation Increment Are Closely Linked with Aboveground Community Variation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Xu, Zhuwen; Yang, Shan; Li, Xiaobin; Top, Eva M; Wang, Ruzhen; Zhang, Yuge; Cai, Jiangping; Yao, Fei; Han, Xingguo; Jiang, Yong

    2016-05-01

    It has been predicted that precipitation and atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition will increase in northern China; yet, ecosystem responses to the interactive effects of water and N remain largely unknown. In particular, responses of belowground microbial community to projected global change and their potential linkages to aboveground macro-organisms are rarely studied. In this study, we examined the responses of soil bacterial diversity and community composition to increased precipitation and multi-level N deposition in a temperate steppe in Inner Mongolia, China, and explored the diversity linkages between aboveground and belowground communities. It was observed that N addition caused the significant decrease in bacterial alpha-diversity and dramatic changes in community composition. In addition, we documented strong correlations of alpha- and beta-diversity between plant and bacterial communities in response to N addition. It was found that N enriched the so-called copiotrophic bacteria, but reduced the oligotrophic groups, primarily by increasing the soil inorganic N content and carbon availability and decreasing soil pH. We still highlighted that increased precipitation tended to alleviate the effects of N on bacterial diversity and dampen the plant-microbe connections induced by N. The counteractive effects of N addition and increased precipitation imply that even though the ecosystem diversity and function are predicted to be negatively affected by N deposition in the coming decades; the combination with increased precipitation may partially offset this detrimental effect.

  18. Low-frequency electrical response to microbial induced sulfide precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Slater, Lee; Hubbard, Susan

    2005-12-01

    We investigated the sensitivity of low-frequency electrical measurements to microbe-induced metal sulfide precipitation. Three identical sand-packed monitoring columns were used; a geochemical column, an electrical column and a control column. In the first experiment, continuous upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Cells of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (D. vulgaris) were injected into the center of the geochemical and electrical columns. Geochemical sampling and post-experiment destructive analysis showed that microbial induced sulfate reduction led to metal precipitation on bacteria cells, forming motile biominerals. Precipitation initially occurred in the injection zone, followed by chemotactic migration of D. vulgaris and ultimate accumulation around the nutrient source at the column base. Results from this experiment conducted with metals show (1) polarization anomalies, up to 14 mrad, develop at the bacteria injection and final accumulation areas, (2) the onset of polarization increase occurs concurrently with the onset of lactate consumption, (3) polarization profiles are similar to calculated profiles of the rate of lactate consumption, and (4) temporal changes in polarization and conduction correlate with a geometrical rearrangement of metal-coated bacterial cells. In a second experiment, the same biogeochemical conditions were established except that no metals were added to the flow solution. Polarization anomalies were absent when the experiment was replicated without metals in solution. We therefore attribute the polarization increase observed in the first experiment to a metal-fluid interfacial mechanism that develops as metal sulfides precipitate onto microbial cells and form biominerals. Temporal changes in polarization and conductivity reflect changes in (1) the amount of metal-fluid interfacial area, and (2) the amount of electronic conduction resulting from microbial growth, chemotactic movement and final

  19. Induced calcium carbonate precipitation using Bacillus species.

    PubMed

    Seifan, Mostafa; Samani, Ali Khajeh; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-12-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation is an emerging process for the production of self-healing concrete. This study was aimed to investigate the effects and optimum conditions on calcium carbonate biosynthesis. Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus sphaericus, yeast extract, urea, calcium chloride and aeration were found to be the most significant factors affecting the biomineralization of calcium carbonate. It was noticed that the morphology of microbial calcium carbonate was mainly affected by the genera of bacteria (cell surface properties), the viscosity of the media and the type of electron acceptors (Ca(2+)). The maximum calcium carbonate concentration of 33.78 g/L was achieved at the optimum conditions This value is the highest concentration reported in the literature.

  20. Pseudomonas, Pantoea and Cupriavidus isolates induce calcium carbonate precipitation for biorestoration of ornamental stone.

    PubMed

    Daskalakis, M I; Magoulas, A; Kotoulas, G; Catsikis, I; Bakolas, A; Karageorgis, A P; Mavridou, A; Doulia, D; Rigas, F

    2013-08-01

    Bacterially induced calcium carbonate precipitation from various isolates was investigated aiming at developing an environmentally friendly technique for ornamental stone protection and restoration. Micro-organisms isolated from stone samples and identified using 16S rDNA and biochemical tests promoted calcium carbonate precipitation in solid and novel liquid growth media. Biomineral morphology was studied on marble samples with scanning electron microscopy. Most isolates demonstrated specimen weight increase, covering partially or even completely the marble surfaces mainly with vaterite. The conditions under which vaterite precipitated and its stability throughout the experimental runs are presented. A growth medium that facilitated bacterial growth of different species and promoted biomineralization was formulated. Most isolates induced biomineralization of CaCO3 . Micro-organisms may actually be a milestone in the investigation of vaterite formation facilitating our understanding of geomicrobiological interactions. Pseudomonas, Pantoea and Cupriavidus strains could be candidates for bioconsolidation of ornamental stone protection. Characterization of biomineralization capacity of different bacterial species improves understanding of the bacterially induced mineralization processes and enriches the list of candidates for biorestoration applications. Knowledge of biomineral morphology assists in differentiating mineral from biologically induced precipitates. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Ultrasound influence upon calcium carbonate precipitation on bacterial cellulose membranes.

    PubMed

    Stoica-Guzun, Anicuta; Stroescu, Marta; Jinga, Sorin; Jipa, Iuliana; Dobre, Tanase; Dobre, Loredana

    2012-07-01

    The effect of ultrasonic irradiation (40 kHz) on the calcium carbonate deposition on bacterial cellulose membranes was investigated using calcium chloride (CaCl(2)) and sodium carbonate (Na(2)CO(3)) as starting reactants. The composite materials containing bacterial cellulose-calcium carbonate were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and color measurements. The polymorphs of calcium carbonate that were deposited on bacterial cellulose membranes in the presence or in the absence of ultrasonic irradiation were calcite and vaterite. The morphology of the obtained crystals was influenced by the concentration of starting solutions and by the presence of ultrasonic irradiation. In the presence of ultrasonic irradiation the obtained crystals were bigger and in a larger variety of shapes than in the absence of ultrasounds: from cubes of calcite to spherical and flower-like vaterite particles. Bacterial cellulose could be a good matrix for obtaining different types of calcium carbonate crystals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Carbon isotope fractionation during calcium carbonate precipitation induced by ureolytic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millo, Christian; Dupraz, S.; Ader, M.; Guyot, F.; Thaler, C.; Foy, E.; Ménez, B.

    2012-12-01

    Ureolytic bacteria have been proposed as model organisms to investigate the potential of subsurface microorganisms to enhance carbon capture and storage through solubility- and mineral-trapping of CO2 induced by bacterial ureolysis and carbonate formation. Ideally, CO2 incorporation into carbonates can be readily traced using carbon isotope measurements. However, the carbon isotope systematics of bacterial ureolysis and associated carbonate precipitation is still poorly known. We determined the carbon isotope fractionations expressed during ureolysis and carbonate precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii at 30 °C. Our results indicate that bacterial ureolysis proceeds as a Rayleigh distillation characterized by a 13C-enrichment factor equal to -12.5‰. As precipitation proceeds, the δ13C value of CaCO3, initially 1-2.1‰ lower than that of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), evolves progressively until it is 0.5‰ higher than that of the DIC, i.e. close to the value predicted for isotopic equilibrium. The minor isotope disequilibrium at the onset of precipitation and its rapid evolution towards isotopic equilibrium point to bacterial carbonates as reliable recorders of the carbon isotope composition of DIC. This corroborates the potential utility of 13C-tracing for the quantification of microbially-induced CO2 sequestration into solid carbonates and DIC.

  3. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation Employing Environmental Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gunjo; Youn, Heejung

    2016-01-01

    In this study, five microbes were employed to precipitate calcite in cohesionless soils. Four microbes were selected from calcite-precipitating microbes isolated from calcareous sand and limestone cave soils, with Sporosarcina pasteurii ATCC 11859 (standard strain) used as a control. Urease activities of the four microbes were higher than that of S. pasteurii. The microbes and urea–CaCl2 medium were injected at least four times into cohesionless soils of two different relative densities (60% and 80%), and the amount of calcite precipitation was measured. It was found that the relative density of cohesionless soils significantly affects the amount of calcite precipitation and that there is a weak correlation between urease activity and calcite precipitation. PMID:28773600

  4. Rhinovirus Infection Induces Degradation of Antimicrobial Peptides and Secondary Bacterial Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mallia, Patrick; Footitt, Joseph; Sotero, Rosa; Jepson, Annette; Contoli, Marco; Trujillo-Torralbo, Maria-Belen; Kebadze, Tatiana; Aniscenko, Julia; Oleszkiewicz, Gregory; Gray, Katrina; Message, Simon D.; Ito, Kazuhiro; Barnes, Peter J.; Adcock, Ian M.; Papi, Alberto; Stanciu, Luminita A.; Elkin, Sarah L.; Kon, Onn M.; Johnson, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are associated with virus (mostly rhinovirus) and bacterial infections, but it is not known whether rhinovirus infections precipitate secondary bacterial infections. Objectives: To investigate relationships between rhinovirus infection and bacterial infection and the role of antimicrobial peptides in COPD exacerbations. Methods: We infected subjects with moderate COPD and smokers and nonsmokers with normal lung function with rhinovirus. Induced sputum was collected before and repeatedly after rhinovirus infection and virus and bacterial loads measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction and culture. The antimicrobial peptides secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI), elafin, pentraxin, LL-37, α-defensins and β-defensin-2, and the protease neutrophil elastase were measured in sputum supernatants. Measurements and Main Results: After rhinovirus infection, secondary bacterial infection was detected in 60% of subjects with COPD, 9.5% of smokers, and 10% of nonsmokers (P < 0.001). Sputum virus load peaked on Days 5–9 and bacterial load on Day 15. Sputum neutrophil elastase was significantly increased and SLPI and elafin significantly reduced after rhinovirus infection exclusively in subjects with COPD with secondary bacterial infections, and SLPI and elafin levels correlated inversely with bacterial load. Conclusions: Rhinovirus infections are frequently followed by secondary bacterial infections in COPD and cleavage of the antimicrobial peptides SLPI and elafin by virus-induced neutrophil elastase may precipitate these secondary bacterial infections. Therapy targeting neutrophil elastase or enhancing innate immunity may be useful novel therapies for prevention of secondary bacterial infections in virus-induced COPD exacerbations. PMID:23024024

  5. Rhinovirus infection induces degradation of antimicrobial peptides and secondary bacterial infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Mallia, Patrick; Footitt, Joseph; Sotero, Rosa; Jepson, Annette; Contoli, Marco; Trujillo-Torralbo, Maria-Belen; Kebadze, Tatiana; Aniscenko, Julia; Oleszkiewicz, Gregory; Gray, Katrina; Message, Simon D; Ito, Kazuhiro; Barnes, Peter J; Adcock, Ian M; Papi, Alberto; Stanciu, Luminita A; Elkin, Sarah L; Kon, Onn M; Johnson, Malcolm; Johnston, Sebastian L

    2012-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations are associated with virus (mostly rhinovirus) and bacterial infections, but it is not known whether rhinovirus infections precipitate secondary bacterial infections. To investigate relationships between rhinovirus infection and bacterial infection and the role of antimicrobial peptides in COPD exacerbations. We infected subjects with moderate COPD and smokers and nonsmokers with normal lung function with rhinovirus. Induced sputum was collected before and repeatedly after rhinovirus infection and virus and bacterial loads measured with quantitative polymerase chain reaction and culture. The antimicrobial peptides secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI), elafin, pentraxin, LL-37, α-defensins and β-defensin-2, and the protease neutrophil elastase were measured in sputum supernatants. After rhinovirus infection, secondary bacterial infection was detected in 60% of subjects with COPD, 9.5% of smokers, and 10% of nonsmokers (P < 0.001). Sputum virus load peaked on Days 5-9 and bacterial load on Day 15. Sputum neutrophil elastase was significantly increased and SLPI and elafin significantly reduced after rhinovirus infection exclusively in subjects with COPD with secondary bacterial infections, and SLPI and elafin levels correlated inversely with bacterial load. Rhinovirus infections are frequently followed by secondary bacterial infections in COPD and cleavage of the antimicrobial peptides SLPI and elafin by virus-induced neutrophil elastase may precipitate these secondary bacterial infections. Therapy targeting neutrophil elastase or enhancing innate immunity may be useful novel therapies for prevention of secondary bacterial infections in virus-induced COPD exacerbations.

  6. Urease activity in microbiologically-induced calcite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Bachmeier, Keri L; Williams, Amy E; Warmington, John R; Bang, Sookie S

    2002-02-14

    The role of microbial urease in calcite precipitation was studied utilizing a recombinant Escherichia coli HB101 containing a plasmid, pBU11, that encodes Bacillus pasteurii urease. The calcite precipitation by E. coli HB101 (pBU11) was significant although its precipitation level was not as high as that by B. pasteurii. Addition of low concentrations (5-100 microM) of nickel, the cofactor of urease, to the medium further enhanced calcite precipitation by E. coli (pBU11). Calcite precipitation induced by both B. pasteurii and E. coli (pBU11) was inhibited in the presence of a urease inhibitor, acetohydroxamic acid (AHA). These observations on the recombinant urease have confirmed that urease activity is essential for microbiologically-induced calcite precipitation. Partially purified B. pasteurii urease was immobilized in polyurethane (PU) foam to compare the efficacy of calcite precipitation between the free and immobilized enzymes. The immobilized urease showed higher K(m) and lower V(max) values, which were reflected by a slower overall calcite precipitation. However, scanning electron micrographs (SEM) identified that the calcite precipitation occurred throughout the matrices of polyurethane. Furthermore, PU-immobilized urease retained higher enzymatic activities at high temperatures and in the presence of a high concentration of pronase, indicating that immobilization protects the enzyme activity from environmental changes.

  7. Reducing hydraulic conductivity of porous media using CaCO₃ precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii.

    PubMed

    Eryürük, Kağan; Yang, Suyin; Suzuki, Daisuke; Sakaguchi, Iwao; Akatsuka, Tetsuji; Tsuchiya, Takayuki; Katayama, Arata

    2015-03-01

    The effect on hydraulic conductivity in porous media of CaCO3 precipitation induced by Sporosarcina pasteurii (ATCC 11859) was investigated using continuous-flow columns containing glass beads between 0.01 mm and 3 mm in diameter. Resting S. pasteurii cells and a precipitation solution composed of 0.5 M CaCl2 and 0.5 M urea were introduced into the columns, and it was shown that the subsequent formation of CaCO3 precipitation reduced hydraulic conductivity from between 8.38 × 10(-1) and 3.27 × 10(-4) cm/s to between 3.70 × 10(-1) and 3.07 × 10(-5) cm/s. The bacterial cells themselves did not decrease the hydraulic conductivity. The amount of precipitation was proportional with the bacterial number in the column. The specific CaCO3 precipitation rate of the resting cells was estimated as 4.0 ± 0.1 × 10(-3) μg CaCO3/cell. Larger amounts of CaCO3 precipitation were deposited in columns packed with small glass beads than in those packed with large glass beads, resulting in a greater reduction in the hydraulic conductivity of the columns containing small glass beads. Analysis using the Kozeny-Carman equation suggested that the effect of microbially induced CaCO3 precipitation on hydraulic conductivity was not due to the formation of individual CaCO3 crystals but instead that the precipitate aggregated with the glass beads, thus increasing their diameter and consequently decreasing the pore size in the column.

  8. Bacterial Flux by Net Precipitation from the Phyllosphere to the Forest Floor.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, P.; Van Stan, J. T., II; Moore, L. D.; Bittar, T.

    2016-12-01

    Transport pathways of microbes between ecosystem spheres (atmosphere, phyllosphere, and pedosphere) represent major fluxes in nutrient cycles and have the potential to significantly affect microbial ecological processes. We quantified a previously unexamined microbial flux from the phyllosphere to the pedosphere during rainfall and found it to be substantial. Net rainfall bacterial fluxes for throughfall and stemflow were quantified using flow cytometry and a quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) assay for a Quercus virginiana (Mill., southern live oak) forest with heavy epiphyte cover of Tillandsia usneoides (L., Spanish moss) and Pleopeltis polypodiodes (L., resurrection fern) in coastal Georgia (Southeast USA). Total net precipitation flux of bacteria was 15 quadrillion cells year-1 ha-1, which (assuming a bacterial cell mass of 1 pg) is approximately 15 kg of bacterial biomass supply per year. Stemflow generation was low in this stand (rarely exceeded 10 L storm-1) yet still delivered half the annual net precipitation flux due to high bacterial concentration. The role of this previously unquantified bacterial flux in the forest floor has also been under studied, yet it may be significant by contributing functional community members (if living) or labile lysates (if dead).

  9. Storm orientation impacts on atmospheric river induced precipitation efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehran, A.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric Rivers (ARs) along the Pacific North coast are often associated with heavy winter precipitation and flooding. We analyze 35 years (1981 2016) of landfalling ARs over a transect along the U.S. West Coast consisting of four river basins from coastal Washington to Southern California (Chehalis, Russian, Santa Ana, and Santa Margarita Rivers) to assess the impact of storm orientation on precipitation rainout efficiency. We define precipitation rainout efficiency as the correlation coefficient between the net integrated vapor transport and precipitation rate. We use 6-hourly climate data from the Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) for each of the landfalling ARs. We compute storm orientation from CFSR wind vectors (daily averaged over atmospheric levels between 1000 hPa and 300 hPa) associated with each AR event. We also compute integrated vapor transport (IVT) by multiplying precipitable water by the wind vector and compare with daily averaged precipitation averaged over the river basins, where daily precipitation is taken from Parameter-Elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM) to evaluate the impact of storm orientation on rainfall efficiency. We calculate the local topographic orientation of each river basin (slope and aspect) from ArcGIS, which we related to storm orientation. To evaluate the impact of storm orientation on rainout efficiency over the Russian River basin (Northern California), we first calculated approaching IVT (for all of AR induced precipitations from 1981 to 2016) and daily averaged precipitation rate. Next, we calculated the correlation coefficient between IVT and precipitation rate (for all AR induced rainouts over the Russian River basin). Finally, by considering the local topographical changes (slope and aspect from ArcGIS) and integrating them into an effective IVT, we compared the correlation coefficients between actual and effective IVT and basin-average precipitation. We find that over the Russian

  10. Interaction of Uranium with Bacterial Cell Surfaces: Inferences from Phosphatase-Mediated Uranium Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sayali; Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Gupta, Alka; Ballal, Anand

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Deinococcus radiodurans and Escherichia coli expressing either PhoN, a periplasmic acid phosphatase, or PhoK, an extracellular alkaline phosphatase, were evaluated for uranium (U) bioprecipitation under two specific geochemical conditions (GCs): (i) a carbonate-deficient condition at near-neutral pH (GC1), and (ii) a carbonate-abundant condition at alkaline pH (GC2). Transmission electron microscopy revealed that recombinant cells expressing PhoN/PhoK formed cell-associated uranyl phosphate precipitate under GC1, whereas the same cells displayed extracellular precipitation under GC2. These results implied that the cell-bound or extracellular location of the precipitate was governed by the uranyl species prevalent at that particular GC, rather than the location of phosphatase. MINTEQ modeling predicted the formation of predominantly positively charged uranium hydroxide ions under GC1 and negatively charged uranyl carbonate-hydroxide complexes under GC2. Both microbes adsorbed 6- to 10-fold more U under GC1 than under GC2, suggesting that higher biosorption of U to the bacterial cell surface under GC1 may lead to cell-associated U precipitation. In contrast, at alkaline pH and in the presence of excess carbonate under GC2, poor biosorption of negatively charged uranyl carbonate complexes on the cell surface might have resulted in extracellular precipitation. The toxicity of U observed under GC1 being higher than that under GC2 could also be attributed to the preferential adsorption of U on cell surfaces under GC1. This work provides a vivid description of the interaction of U complexes with bacterial cells. The findings have implications for the toxicity of various U species and for developing biological aqueous effluent waste treatment strategies. IMPORTANCE The present study provides illustrative insights into the interaction of uranium (U) complexes with recombinant bacterial cells overexpressing phosphatases. This work demonstrates the effects of aqueous

  11. Microbially induced and microbially catalysed precipitation: two different carbonate factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The landmark paper by Schlager (2003) has revealed three types of benthic carbonate production referred to as "carbonate factories", operative at different locations at different times in Earth history. The tropical or T-factory comprises the classical platforms and fringing reefs and is dominated by carbonate precipitation by autotrophic calcifying metazoans ("biotically controlled" precipitation). The cool or C-factory is also biotically controlled but via heterotrophic, calcifying metazoans in cold and deep waters at the continental margins. A further type is the mud-mound or M-factory, where carbonate precipitation is supported by microorganisms but not controlled by a specific enzymatic pathway ("biotically induced" precipitation). How exactly the microbes influence precipitation is still poorly understood. Based on recent experimental and field studies, the microbial influence on modern mud mound and microbialite growth includes two fundamentally different processes: (1) Metabolic activity of microbes may increase the saturation state with respect to a particular mineral phase, thereby indirectly driving the precipitation of the mineral phase: microbially induced precipitation. (2) In a situation, where a solution is already supersaturated but precipitation of the mineral is inhibited by a kinetic barrier, microbes may act as a catalyser, i.e. they lower the kinetic barrier: microbially catalysed precipitation. Such a catalytic effect can occur e.g. via secreted polymeric substances or specific chemical groups on the cell surface, at which the minerals nucleate or which facilitate mechanistically the bonding of new ions to the mineral surface. Based on these latest developments in microbialite formation, I propose to extend the scheme of benthic carbonate factories of Schlager et al. (2003) by introducing an additional branch distinguishing microbially induced from microbially catalysed precipitation. Although both mechanisms could be operative in a M

  12. Linked Redox Precipitation of Sulfur and Selenium under Anaerobic Conditions by Sulfate-Reducing Bacterial Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Hockin, Simon L.; Gadd, Geoffrey M.

    2003-01-01

    A biofilm-forming strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), isolated from a naturally occurring mixed biofilm and identified by 16S rDNA analysis as a strain of Desulfomicrobium norvegicum, rapidly removed 200 μM selenite from solution during growth on lactate and sulfate. Elemental selenium and elemental sulfur were precipitated outside SRB cells. Precipitation occurred by an abiotic reaction with bacterially generated sulfide. This appears to be a generalized ability among SRB, arising from dissimilatory sulfide biogenesis, and can take place under low redox conditions and in the dark. The reaction represents a new means for the deposition of elemental sulfur by SRB under such conditions. A combination of transmission electron microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy, and cryostage field emission scanning electron microscopy were used to reveal the hydrated nature of SRB biofilms and to investigate the location of deposited sulfur-selenium in relation to biofilm elements. When pregrown SRB biofilms were exposed to a selenite-containing medium, nanometer-sized selenium-sulfur granules were precipitated within the biofilm matrix. Selenite was therefore shown to pass through the biofilm matrix before reacting with bacterially generated sulfide. This constitutes an efficient method for the removal of toxic concentrations of selenite from solution. Implications for environmental cycling and the fate of sulfur and selenium are discussed, and a general model for the potential action of SRB in selenium transformations is presented. PMID:14660350

  13. Linked redox precipitation of sulfur and selenium under anaerobic conditions by sulfate-reducing bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Hockin, Simon L; Gadd, Geoffrey M

    2003-12-01

    A biofilm-forming strain of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), isolated from a naturally occurring mixed biofilm and identified by 16S rDNA analysis as a strain of Desulfomicrobium norvegicum, rapidly removed 200 micro M selenite from solution during growth on lactate and sulfate. Elemental selenium and elemental sulfur were precipitated outside SRB cells. Precipitation occurred by an abiotic reaction with bacterially generated sulfide. This appears to be a generalized ability among SRB, arising from dissimilatory sulfide biogenesis, and can take place under low redox conditions and in the dark. The reaction represents a new means for the deposition of elemental sulfur by SRB under such conditions. A combination of transmission electron microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy, and cryostage field emission scanning electron microscopy were used to reveal the hydrated nature of SRB biofilms and to investigate the location of deposited sulfur-selenium in relation to biofilm elements. When pregrown SRB biofilms were exposed to a selenite-containing medium, nanometer-sized selenium-sulfur granules were precipitated within the biofilm matrix. Selenite was therefore shown to pass through the biofilm matrix before reacting with bacterially generated sulfide. This constitutes an efficient method for the removal of toxic concentrations of selenite from solution. Implications for environmental cycling and the fate of sulfur and selenium are discussed, and a general model for the potential action of SRB in selenium transformations is presented.

  14. Ice nucleators, bacterial cells and Pseudomonas syringae in precipitation at Jungfraujoch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Guilbaud, Caroline; Zopfi, Jakob; Alewell, Christine; Morris, Cindy E.

    2017-03-01

    Ice nucleation is a means by which the deposition of an airborne microorganism can be accelerated under favourable meteorological conditions. Analysis of 56 snow samples collected at the high-altitude observatory Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l.) revealed an order-of-magnitude-larger dynamic range of ice-nucleating particles active at -8 °C (INPs-8) compared to the total number of bacterial cells (of which on average 60 % was alive). This indicates a shorter atmospheric residence time for INPs-8. Furthermore, concentrations of INPs-8 decreased much faster, with an increasing fraction of water precipitated from the air mass prior to sampling, than the number of total bacterial cells. Nevertheless, at high wind speeds (> 50 km h-1) the ratio of INPs-8 to total bacterial cells largely remained in a range between 10-2 and 10-3, independent of prior precipitation, likely because of recent injections of particles in regions upwind. Based on our field observations, we conclude that ice nucleators travel shorter legs of distance with the atmospheric water cycle than the majority of bacterial cells. A prominent ice-nucleating bacterium, Pseudomonas syringae, has been previously supposed to benefit from this behaviour as a means to spread via the atmosphere and to colonise new host plants. Therefore, we targeted this bacterium with a selective cultivation approach. P. syringae was successfully isolated for the first time at such an altitude in 3 of 13 samples analysed. Colony-forming units of this species constituted a minor fraction (10-4) of the numbers of INPs-8 in these samples. Overall, our findings expand the geographic range of habitats where this bacterium has been found and corroborate theories on its robustness in the atmosphere and its propensity to spread to colonise new habitats.

  15. Glycation inhibits trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-induced whey protein precipitation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Four different WPI saccharide conjugates were successfully prepared to test whether glycation could inhibit WPI precipitation induced by trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Conjugates molecular weights after glycation were analyzed with SDS-PAGE. No significant secondary structure change due to glycation wa...

  16. Bacterially induced bone destruction: mechanisms and misconceptions.

    PubMed Central

    Nair, S P; Meghji, S; Wilson, M; Reddi, K; White, P; Henderson, B

    1996-01-01

    Normal bone remodelling requires the coordinated regulation of the genesis and activity of osteoblast and osteoclast lineages. Any interference with these integrated cellular systems can result in dysregulation of remodelling with the consequent loss of bone matrix. Bacteria are important causes of bone pathology in common conditions such as periodontitis, dental cysts, bacterial arthritis, and osteomyelitis. It is now established that many of the bacteria implicated in bone diseases contain or produce molecules with potent effects on bone cells. Some of these molecules, such as components of the gram-positive cell walls (lipoteichoic acids), are weak stimulators of bone resorption in vitro, while others (PMT, cpn60) are as active as the most active mammalian osteolytic factors such as cytokines like IL-1 and TNF. The complexity of the integration of bone cell lineage development means that there are still question marks over the mechanism of action of many well-known bone-modulatory molecules such as parathyroid hormone. The key questions which must be asked of the now-recognized bacterial bone-modulatory molecules are as follows: (i) what cell population do they bind to, (ii) what is the nature of the receptor and postreceptor events, and (iii) is their action direct or dependent on the induction of secondary extracellular bone-modulating factors such as cytokines, eicosanoids, etc. In the case of LPS, this ubiquitous gram-negative polymer probably binds to osteoblasts or other cells in bone through the CD14 receptor and stimulates them to release cytokines and eicosanoids which then induce the recruitment and activation of osteoclasts. This explains the inhibitor effects of nonsteroidal and anticytokine agents on LPS-induced bone resorption. However, other bacterial factors such as the potent toxin PMT may act by blocking the normal maturation pathway of the osteoblast lineage, thus inducing dysregulation in the tightly regulated process of resorption and

  17. Rock fracture grouting with microbially induced carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minto, James M.; MacLachlan, Erica; El Mountassir, Gráinne; Lunn, Rebecca J.

    2016-11-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation has been proposed for soil stabilization, soil strengthening, and permeability reduction as an alternative to traditional cement and chemical grouts. In this paper, we evaluate the grouting of fine aperture rock fractures with calcium carbonate, precipitated through urea hydrolysis, by the bacteria Sporosarcina pasteurii. Calcium carbonate was precipitated within a small-scale and a near field-scale (3.1 m2) artificial fracture consisting of a rough rock lower surfaces and clear polycarbonate upper surfaces. The spatial distribution of the calcium carbonate precipitation was imaged using time-lapse photography and the influence on flow pathways revealed from tracer transport imaging. In the large-scale experiment, hydraulic aperture was reduced from 276 to 22 μm, corresponding to a transmissivity reduction of 1.71 × 10-5 to 8.75 × 10-9 m2/s, over a period of 12 days under constantly flowing conditions. With a modified injection strategy a similar three orders of magnitude reduction in transmissivity was achieved over a period of 3 days. Calcium carbonate precipitated over the entire artificial fracture with strong adhesion to both upper and lower surfaces and precipitation was controlled to prevent clogging of the injection well by manipulating the injection fluid velocity. These experiments demonstrate that microbially induced carbonate precipitation can successfully be used to grout a fracture under constantly flowing conditions and may be a viable alternative to cement based grouts when a high level of hydraulic sealing is required and chemical grouts when a more durable grout is required.

  18. Construction of two ureolytic model organisms for the study of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Connolly, James; Kaufman, Megan; Rothman, Adam; Gupta, Rashmi; Redden, George; Schuster, Martin; Colwell, Frederick; Gerlach, Robin

    2013-09-01

    Two bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa MJK1 and Escherichia coli MJK2, were constructed that both express green fluorescent protein (GFP) and carry out ureolysis. These two novel model organisms are useful for studying bacterial carbonate mineral precipitation processes and specifically ureolysis-driven microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP). The strains were constructed by adding plasmid-borne urease genes (ureABC, ureD and ureFG) to the strains P. aeruginosa AH298 and E. coli AF504gfp, both of which already carried unstable GFP derivatives. The ureolytic activities of the two new strains were compared to the common, non-GFP expressing, model organism Sporosarcina pasteurii in planktonic culture under standard laboratory growth conditions. It was found that the engineered strains exhibited a lower ureolysis rate per cell but were able to grow faster and to a higher population density under the conditions of this study. Both engineered strains were successfully grown as biofilms in capillary flow cell reactors and ureolysis-induced calcium carbonate mineral precipitation was observed microscopically. The undisturbed spatiotemporal distribution of biomass and calcium carbonate minerals were successfully resolved in 3D using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Observations of this nature were not possible previously because no obligate urease producer that expresses GFP had been available. Future observations using these organisms will allow researchers to further improve engineered application of MICP as well as study natural mineralization processes in model systems. © 2013.

  19. Low-frequency Electrical Response to Microbial Induced Sulfide Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Williams, Kenneth H.; Slater, Lee D.; Hubbard, Susan S.

    2005-11-19

    We investigated the sensitivity of low-frequency electrical measurements to microbeinduced metal sulfide precipitation. Three identical sand-packed monitoring columns were used; a geochemical column, an electrical column and a control column. In the first experiment, continuous upward flow of nutrients and metals in solution was established in each column. Cells of Desulfovibrio vulgaris (D. vulgaris) were injected into the center of the geochemical and electrical columns. Geochemical sampling and post-experiment destructive analysis showed that microbial induced sulfate reduction led to metal precipitation on bacteria cells, forming motile biominerals. Precipitation initially occurred in the injection zone, followed by chemotactic migration of D. vulgaris and ultimate accumulation around the nutrient source at the column base.

  20. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for Subsurface Immobilization of Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, R. W.; Fujita, Y.; Ginn, T. R.; Hubbard, S. S.; Dafflon, B.; Delwiche, M.; Gebrehiwet, T.; Henriksen, J. R.; Peterson, J.; Taylor, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of the greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have found that calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr can be accelerated by the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms, that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning, and that nutrient additions can stimulate ureolytic activity. To extend our understanding of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) in an aquifer setting a continuous recirculation field experiment evaluating MICP was conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO. In this experiment, groundwater extracted from an onsite well was amended with urea (total mass of 42.5 kg) and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into a well approximately 4 meters up-gradient for a period of 12 days followed by 10 months of groundwater sampling and monitoring. Crosshole radar and electrical tomographic data were collected prior, during, and after the MICP treatment. The urea and molasses treatment resulted in an enhanced population of sediment associated urea hydrolyzing organisms as evidenced by increases in the number of ureC gene copies, increases in 14C urea hydrolysis rates, and long-term observations of ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) in the injection, extraction and down gradient monitoring wells. Permeability changes and increases in the calcite saturation indexes in the well field suggest that mineral precipitation has occurred; ongoing analysis of field samples seeks to confirm this. Changes in dielectric constant and electrical conductivity were used to interpret the spatiotemporal distribution of the injectate and subsequent calcite precipitation. Modeling activities are underway to

  1. Soil Bacteria Population Dynamics Following Stimulation for Ureolytic Microbial-Induced CaCO3 Precipitation.

    PubMed

    Gat, Daniella; Ronen, Zeev; Tsesarsky, Michael

    2016-01-19

    Microbial-induced CaCO3 precipitation (MICP) via urea-hydrolysis (ureolysis) is an emerging soil improvement technique for various civil engineering and environmental applications. In-situ application of MICP in soils is performed either by augmenting the site with ureolytic bacteria or by stimulating indigenous ureolytic bacteria. Both of these approaches may lead to changes in the indigenous bacterial population composition and to the accumulation of large quantities of ammonium. In this batch study, effective ureolysis was stimulated in coastal sand from a semiarid environment, with low initial ureolytic bacteria abundance. Two different carbon sources were used: yeast-extract and molasses. No ureolysis was observed in their absence. Ureolysis was achieved using both carbon sources, with a higher rate in the yeast-extract enrichment resulting from increased bacterial growth. The changes to the indigenous bacterial population following biostimulation of ureolysis were significant: Bacilli class abundancy increased from 5% in the native sand up to 99% in the yeast-extract treatment. The sand was also enriched with ammonium-chloride, where ammonia-oxidation was observed after 27 days, but was not reflected in the bacterial population composition. These results suggest that biostimulation of ureolytic bacteria can be applied even in a semiarid and nutrient-poor environment using a simple carbon source, that is, molasses. The significant changes to bacterial population composition following ureolysis stimulation could result in a decrease in trophic activity and diversity in the treated site, thus they require further attention.

  2. Fracture-aperture alteration induced by calcite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation significantly alters the transport properties of fractured rock. Chemical solubility gradients that favor precipitation induce mineral growth, which decreases the local aperture and alters preferential flow paths. Understanding the resulting development of spatial heterogeneities is necessary to predict the evolution of transport properties in the subsurface. We present experimental results that quantify the relationship between mineral precipitation and aperture alteration in a transparent analog fracture, 7.62cm x 7.62cm, with a uniform aperture of ~200 μm. Prior to flow experiments, a pump circulated a super-saturated calcite solution over the bottom glass, coating the glass surface with calcite. This method of seeding resulted in clusters of calcite crystals with large reactive surface area and provided micro-scale variability in the aperture field. A continuous flow syringe pump injected a reactive fluid into the fracture at 0.5 ml/min. The fluid was a mixture of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, 0.02M) and calcium chloride (CaCl2 0.0004M) with a saturation index, Ω, of 8.51 with respect to calcite. A strobed LED panel backlit the fracture and a high-resolution CCD camera monitored changes in transmitted light intensity. Light transmission techniques provided a quantitative measurement of fracture aperture over the flow field. Results from these preliminary experiments showed growth near the inlet of the fracture, with decreasing precipitation rates in the flow direction. Over a period of two weeks, the fracture aperture decreased by 17% within the first 4mm of the inlet. Newly precipitated calcite bridged individual crystal clusters and smoothed the reacting surface. This observation is an interesting contradiction to the expectation of surface roughening induced by mineral growth. Additionally, the aperture decreased uniformly across the width of the fracture due to the initial aperture distribution. Future experiments of precipitation

  3. Spectral induced polarization signatures of abiotic FeS precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ntarlagiannis, D.; Doherty, R.; Williams, K. H.

    2010-01-15

    In recent years, geophysical methods have been shown to be sensitive to microbial induced mineralization processes. The spectral induced polarization (SIP) method appears to be very promising for monitoring mineralization and microbial processes. With this work, we study the links of mineralization and SIP signals, in the absence of microbial activity. We recorded the SIP response during abiotic FeS precipitation. We show that the SIP signals are diagnostic of FeS mineralization and can be differentiated from SIP signals from bio-mineralization processes. More specifically the imaginary conductivity shows almost linear dependence on the amount of FeS precipitating out of solution, above the threshold value 0.006 gr under our experimental conditions. This research has direct implications for the use of the SIP method as a monitoring, and decision making, tool for sustainable remediation of metals in contaminated soils and groundwater.

  4. [Induction of metamorphosis in planulae : I. The bacterial inducer].

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner A

    1973-06-01

    1. The metamorphosis of the planulae ofHydractinia echinata (Hydrozoa) is induced by certain marine, gramnegative bacteria which at the end of the exponential growth release a stimulating principle. 2. The stimulus is liberated by stationary cells previously cultivated at low population densities (up to 10(7) cells/ml) in a proper medium (e.g. extract of meat). Transfer into seawater lacking nutritive sources enhances the inductive capacity. 3. The concentration of the inducing agent normally surpasses the threshold level only in the close microenvironment of living cells. But when shocked by a drop in the osmotic pressure the bacteria discharge increased amounts which become traceable in the filtered cell-free medium. 4. Thus the inducer can be accumulated and isolated by a process of osmotic shock which does not affect the viability of the microbes. The principle belongs to a category of microbial substances which are subsumed under the comprehensive term "leakage"-products. 5. The active principle can be precipitated from the leakage solution with acetone and extracted with chloroform. The inducer seems to be an unstable, nondialyzable, polar lipid. 6. In order to evoke complete metamorphosis the isolated agent must be applied in a pulse-like fashion. Using the onset of metamorphosis as criterion for the velocity of reaction the dose-response curves display Michaelis-like saturation kinetics. At short pulses the percentages of induced metamorphoses yield a saturation curve as well. This indicates that an enzyme or carrier-system is involved in the larval response. 7. The inducing effect of the bacterial principle is antagonized by ouabain. Conversely, high doses of the isolated leakage material abolish the ouabain inhibition. The primary effect of the inducer, therefore, can be interpreted as stimulation of the active cation transport, especially of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase.

  5. Epigenetic Alterations Induced by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Coretti, Lorena; Pero, Raffaela; Lembo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the principal bacterial products known to elicit inflammation. Cells of myeloid lineage such as monocytes and macrophages, but also epithelial cells give rise to an inflammatory response upon LPS stimulation. This phenomenon implies reprogramming of cell specific gene expression that can occur through different mechanisms including epigenetic modifications. Given their intrinsic nature, epigenetic modifications may be involved both in the acute response to LPS and in the establishment of a preconditioned genomic state (epigenomic memory) that may potentially influence the host response to further contacts with microorganisms. Information has accumulated during the last years aimed at elucidating the epigenetic mechanisms which underlie the cellular LPS response. These findings, summarized in this chapter, will hopefully be a good basis for a definition of the complete cascade of LPS-induced epigenetic events and their biological significance in different cell types.

  6. Model for Strain-Induced Precipitation Kinetics in Microalloyed Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Sebastian F.; Quispe, Alberto; Gomez, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    Based on Dutta and Sellars's expression for the start of strain-induced precipitation in microalloyed steels, a new model has been constructed which takes into account the influence of variables such as microalloying element percentages, strain, temperature, strain rate, and grain size. Although the equation given by these authors reproduces the typical "C" shape of the precipitation start time (P s) curve well, the expression is not reliable for all cases. Recrystallization-precipitation-time-temperature diagrams have been plotted thanks to a new experimental study carried out by means of hot torsion tests on approximately twenty microalloyed steels with different Nb, V, and Ti contents. Mathematical analysis of the results recommends the modification of some parameters such as the supersaturation ratio (K s) and constant B, which is no longer a constant, but a function of K s when the latter is calculated at the nose temperature (T N) of the P s curve. The value of parameter B is deduced from the minimum point or nose of the P s curve, where ∂t 0.05/∂T is equal to zero, and it can be demonstrated that B cannot be a constant. The new expressions for these parameters are derived from the latest studies undertaken by the authors and this work represents an attempt to improve the model. The expressions are now more consistent and predict the precipitation-time-temperature curves with remarkable accuracy. The model for strain-induced precipitation kinetics is completed by means of Avrami's equation.

  7. Induced and catalysed mineral precipitation in the deep biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    adsorption of silica to freshly precipitated iron oxides along a deep iron oxidation front. In conclusion, two different modes of precipitation can be observed in modern sub-seafloor porewater systems. Dolomite precipitation is thermodynamically controlled through microbially induced supersaturation. Quartz formation is controlled through an auxiliary process that helps it to overcome a kinetic barrier. These observations exemplify the importance to distinguish between kinetic and thermodynamic effects on mineral formation under Earth surface conditions. To evaluate geochemical signatures, these modes of precipitation need to be taken into account. Contreras et al. (2013) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., doi/10.1073/pnas.1305981110 Meister, et al. (2007) Sedimentology 54, 1007-1032. Meister, et al. (2014) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 137, 188-207. Meister, P. (2015) Terra Nova, Focus Article, 00, 1-9.

  8. Microbially Induced Carbonate Precipitation For Engineered Sealing Of Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minto, J. M.; Lunn, R. J.; El Mountassir, G.

    2015-12-01

    ContextEngineering works in the subsurface often requires ground water ingress through fractures in the rock to be minimised. Traditionally cement based grouts have been used for this purpose, however chemical and alternative grouts are increasingly used. A promising alternative grout utilises bacteria to rapidly initiate the precipitation of calcium carbonate in a process termed microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP). Advantages of this process over conventional grouts are very low viscosity and small particle size allowing penetration into small aperture fractures, low toxicity and low associated carbon footprint. The use of MICP for soil stabilisation has been demonstrated and small scale fractures have been sealed in the lab, yet where the CaCO3 precipitates within large fractures is poorly understood. AimThe aim of this project was to assess the feasibility of MICP for large scale fracture sealing and to identify the optimum injection strategy that would allow controllable precipitation of CaCO3 over a large area and hence create a long-lasting reduction in fracture transmissivity. A 3m2 artificial fracture consisting of a rough-cut granite lower surface and transparent polycarbonate upper surface with a central injection well was created (Figure 1) and sealed twice with MICP: the first experiment to determine the transmissivity reduction achievable and the second experiment to optimise where CaCO3 precipitation occurred. The sealing process was then simulated in a model developed with CFD software OpenFOAM. ResultsThe transmissivity of the 300μm hydraulic aperture fracture was reduced from 1.7x10-5 to 8.8x10-9m2/s with 12 injections in the first experiment. A similar transmissivity reduction was achieved with only five injections in the second optimised experiment. Through the transparent upper fracture surface, CaCO3 precipitation was visible over the entire 3m2 fracture and attachment to both the top and bottom surfaces was very strong. This

  9. Empirical thresholds for precipitation-induced landslides in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda, J.; Malet, J. P.; Remaitre, A.; Versace, P.; Ferrari, A.; Laloui, L.; Eichenberger, J.; Narasimhan, H.; Faber, M. H.; Kronholm, K.

    2012-04-01

    The characterisation of precipitation conditions for triggering of landslides is a key component in the design and implementation of early-warning systems and in the estimation of hazard maps for current and future climate scenarios. Physical modelling of those triggering conditions may be usually feasible for individual slopes, but not for local or regional scales, where practical difficulties generally arise due to the lack of estimates of spatially distributed hydraulic and mechanical parameters, and to complexities of ground conditions on susceptible slopes. In those situations, where the implementation of a physical model is not feasible, the preferred approach is to formulate empirical relationships between measurements of precipitation and slope movements or landslide occurrence. This paper presents 6 different empirical models applied to 7 landslide datasets from Italy, France, Norway and Switzerland. The main aim of this contribution is to summarize the experiences of Work Package 1.3 "Statistical studies for precipitation-induced landslides" as part of the SafeLand project funded by the European Commision. The implemented empirical models were: intensity-duration power law forms, classification tree analyses, discriminant analyses, the Forecasting-of-Landslides-Induced-by-Rainfall (FLaIR) model, the AutoRegressive-with-eXogenous-inputs (ARX) model, and the Neural-Network-AutoRegressive-Moving-Average-with-eXogenous-inputs (NNARMAX) model. The landslide datasets included inventories of movements as well as hourly or daily observations of precipitation. The types of events predominating in the inventories were soil slides and debris flows, and a few rock slides and rock falls. The locations of the datasets were: Satriano, Verzino and Sarno (Italy), the Barcelonnette basin (France), the Norangselva catchment (Norway), the Nedre Romerike region (Norway) and the La Frasse landslide (Switzerland). The results indicate that the occurrence of soil slides and

  10. Biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation: application in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, A. J.; Eldring, J.; Lauchnor, E.; Hiebert, R.; Gerlach, R.; Mitchell, A. C.; Esposito, R.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L.

    2012-12-01

    We have investigated mitigation strategies for sealing high permeability regions, like fractures, in the subsurface. This technology has the potential to, for example, improve the long-term security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide (CO2) by sealing fractures in cap rocks or to mitigate leakage pathways to prevent contamination of overlying aquifers from hydraulic fracturing fluids. Sealing technologies using low-viscosity fluids are advantageous since they potentially reduce the necessary injection pressures and increase the radius of influence around injection wells. In this technology, aqueous solutions and suspensions are used to promote microbially-induced mineral precipitation which can be applied in subsurface environments. To this end, a strategy was developed to twice seal a hydraulically fractured, 74 cm (2.4') diameter Boyles Sandstone core, collected in North-Central Alabama, with biofilm-induced calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitates under ambient pressures. Sporosarcina pasteurii biofilms were established and calcium and urea containing reagents were injected to promote saturation conditions favorable for CaCO3 precipitation followed by growth reagents to resuscitate the biofilm's ureolytic activity. Then, in order to evaluate this process at relevant deep subsurface pressures, a novel high pressure test vessel was developed to house the 74 cm diameter core under pressures as high as 96 bar (1,400 psi). After determining that no impact to the fracture permeability occurred due to increasing overburden pressure, the fractured core was sealed under subsurface relevant pressures relating to 457 meters (1,500 feet) below ground surface (44 bar (650 psi) overburden pressure). After fracture sealing under both ambient and subsurface relevant pressure conditions, the sandstone core withstood three times higher well bore pressure than during the initial fracturing event, which occurred prior to biofilm-induced CaCO3 mineralization. These studies suggest

  11. Kinetics of Calcite Precipitation Induced by Ureolytic Bacteria at 10 to 20 oC in Artificial Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phoenix, V. R.; Ferris, F. G.

    2002-12-01

    The ureolytic bacterium Bacillus pasteurii can induce calcite precipitation through the metabolic hydrolysis of urea. Metabolic urea hydrolysis results in the production of ammonium and carbonate ions and an increase in pH, which can induce the precipitation of calcite. Because calcite precipitation may result in solid phase capture of contaminant metals, the bacterially mediated precipitation of calcite is of particular interest for bioremediation purposes. In this study, the kinetics of calcite precipitation induced by bacterially mediated hydrolysis of urea is investigated. Experiments were performed in microcosms inoculated with Bacillus pasteurii ATCC 11859 and containing an artificial groundwater prepared to mimic the aqueous chemistry of the Snake River Plain Aquifer, Idaho Falls, U.S.A. Microcosms also contained 6.0 mM urea (for experiments ran at 20 oC) and 25 mM urea (for experiments ran at 10 and 15 oC). Throughout the experiment the experimental solutions were monitored for ammonium, dissolved magnesium, dissolved calcium content and pH. Experimental data was fit to integrated equations for urea hydrolysis, calcite saturation state and dissolved calcium concentrations using unconstrained nonlinear regression and a quasi-Newton optimization routine for parameter estimation (STATISTICA v 5.0). Rates of urea hydrolysis showed a pronounced inverse temperature dependence with rate constants (kurea) of 0.09, 0.18 and 0.91 at 10, 15 and 20 oC respectively. The production of ammonium and carbonate from urea hydrolysis increased the pH at all temperatures to 9.3 in less than one day. Coupled with this, dissolved calcium concentrations started to decrease after one day at 20 and 15 oC and 2 days at 10 oC. These decreases in dissolved calcium were accompanied by the precipitation of calcite. Although dissolved Ca2+ depletion over time did not appear to correlate directly with the rates of urea hydrolysis, a comparison of Ca2+ depletion with ammonium production

  12. Changes in the Martian atmosphere induced by auroral electron precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shematovich, V. I.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Gérard, J.-C.; Hubert, B.

    2017-09-01

    Typical auroral events in the Martian atmosphere, such as discrete and diffuse auroral emissions detected by UV spectrometers onboard ESA Mars Express and NASA MAVEN, are investigated. Auroral electron kinetic energy distribution functions and energy spectra of the upward and downward electron fluxes are obtained by electron transport calculations using the kinetic Monte Carlo model. These characteristics of auroral electron fluxes make it possible to calculate both the precipitation-induced changes in the atmosphere and the observed manifestations of auroral events on Mars. In particular, intensities of discrete and diffuse auroral emissions in the UV and visible wavelength ranges (Soret et al., 2016; Bisikalo et al., 2017; Gérard et al., 2017). For these conditions of auroral events, the analysis is carried out, and the contribution of the fluxes of precipitating electrons to the heating and ionization of the Martian atmosphere is estimated. Numerical calculations show that in the case of discrete auroral events the effect of the residual crustal magnetic field leads to a significant increase in the upward fluxes of electrons, which causes a decrease in the rates of heating and ionization of the atmospheric gas in comparison with the calculations without taking into account the residual magnetic field. It is shown that all the above-mentioned impact factors of auroral electron precipitation processes should be taken into account both in the photochemical models of the Martian atmosphere and in the interpretation of observations of the chemical composition and its variations using the ACS instrument onboard ExoMars.

  13. The effects of non-metabolizing bacterial cells on the precipitation of U, Pb and Ca phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah; Rui, Xue; Bunker, Bruce; Menguy, Nicolas; Hellmann, Roland; Fein, Jeremy

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we test the potential for passive cell wall biomineralization by determining the effects of non-metabolizing bacteria on the precipitation of uranyl, lead, and calcium phosphates from a range of over-saturated conditions. Experiments were performed using Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. After equilibration, the aqueous phases were sampled and the remaining metal and P concentrations were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES); the solid phases were collected and analyzed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). At the lower degrees of over-saturation studied, bacterial cells exerted no discernable effect on the mode of precipitation of the metal phosphates, with homogeneous precipitation occurring exclusively. However, at higher saturation states in the U system, we observed heterogeneous mineralization and extensive nucleation of hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP) mineralization throughout the fabric of the bacterial cell walls. This mineral nucleation effect was observed in both B. subtilis and S. oneidensis cells. In both cases, the biogenic mineral precipitates formed under the higher saturation state conditions were significantly smaller than those that formed in the abiotic controls. The cell wall nucleation effects that occurred in some of the U systems were not observed under any of the saturation state conditions studied in the Pb or Ca systems. The presence of B. subtilis significantly decreased the extent of precipitation in the U system, but had little effect in the Pb and Ca systems. At least part of this effect is due to higher solubility of the nanoscale HUP precipitate relative to macroscopic HUP. This study documents several effects of non-metabolizing bacterial cells on the nature and extent of metal phosphate precipitation. Each of these effects likely contributes to higher

  14. Urine Bacterial Community Convergence through Fertilizer Production: Storage, Pasteurization, and Struvite Precipitation.

    PubMed

    Lahr, Rebecca H; Goetsch, Heather E; Haig, Sarah J; Noe-Hays, Abraham; Love, Nancy G; Aga, Diana S; Bott, Charles B; Foxman, Betsy; Jimenez, Jose; Luo, Ting; Nace, Kim; Ramadugu, Kirtana; Wigginton, Krista R

    2016-11-01

    Source-separated human urine was collected from six public events to study the impact of urine processing and storage on bacterial community composition and viability. Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed a complex community of bacteria in fresh urine that differed across collection events. Despite the harsh chemical conditions of stored urine (pH > 9 and total ammonia nitrogen > 4000 mg N/L), bacteria consistently grew to 5 ± 2 × 10(8) cells/mL. Storing hydrolyzed urine for any amount of time significantly reduced the number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to 130 ± 70, increased Pielou evenness to 0.60 ± 0.06, and produced communities dominated by Clostridiales and Lactobacillales. After 80 days of storage, all six urine samples from different starting materials converged to these characteristics. Urine pasteurization or struvite precipitation did not change the microbial community, even when pasteurized urine was stored for an additional 70 days. Pasteurization decreased metabolic activity by 50 ± 10% and additional storage after pasteurization did not lead to recovery of metabolic activity. Urine-derived fertilizers consistently contained 16S rRNA genes belonging to Tissierella, Erysipelothrix, Atopostipes, Bacteroides, and many Clostridiales OTUs; additional experiments must determine whether pathogenic species are present, responsible for observed metabolic activity, or regrow when applied.

  15. A field and modeling study of fractured rock permeability reduction using microbially induced calcite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Cuthbert, Mark O; McMillan, Lindsay A; Handley-Sidhu, Stephanie; Riley, Michael S; Tobler, Dominique J; Phoenix, Vernon R

    2013-01-01

    Microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) offers an attractive alternative to traditional grouting technologies for creating barriers to groundwater flow and containing subsurface contamination, but has only thus far been successfully demonstrated at the laboratory scale and predominantly in porous media. We present results of the first field experiments applying MICP to reduce fractured rock permeability in the subsurface. Initially, the ureolytic bacterium, Sporosarcina pasteurii, was fixed in the fractured rock. Subsequent injection of cementing fluid comprising calcium chloride and urea resulted in precipitation of large quantities (approximately 750 g) of calcite; significant reduction in the transmissivity of a single fracture over an area of several m(2) was achieved in around 17 h of treatment. A novel numerical model is also presented which simulates the field data well by coupling flow and bacterial and solute reactive transport processes including feedback due to aperture reduction via calcite precipitation. The results show that MICP can be successfully manipulated under field conditions to reduce the permeability of fractured rock and suggest that an MICP-based technique, informed by numerical models, may form the basis of viable solutions to aid pollution mitigation.

  16. Influence of calcium sources on microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation by Bacillus sp. CR2.

    PubMed

    Achal, Varenyam; Pan, Xiangliang

    2014-05-01

    Stimulation of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is likely to be influenced by calcium sources. In order to study such influences, we performed MICCP using Bacillus sp. CR2 in nutrient broth containing urea, supplemented with different calcium sources (calcium chloride, calcium oxide, calcium acetate and calcium nitrate). The experiment lasted 7 days, during which bacterial growth, urease activity, calcite production and pH were measured. Our results showed that calcium chloride is the better calcium source for MICCP process, since it provides higher urease activity and more calcite production. The influences of calcium sources on MICCP were further studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. These analyses confirmed that the precipitate formed was CaCO3 and composed of predominantly calcite crystals with a little amount of aragonite and vaterite crystals. The maximum yield of calcite precipitation was achievable with calcium chloride followed by calcium nitrate as a calcium source. The results of present study may be applicable to media preparation during efficient MICCP process.

  17. Autophagy Induced by Calcium Phosphate Precipitates Targets Damaged Endosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Khambu, Bilon; Zhang, Hao; Gao, Wentao; Li, Min; Chen, Xiaoyun; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Yin, Xiao-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Calcium phosphate precipitates (CPPs) form complexes with DNA, which enter cells via endocytosis. Under this condition CPPs induce autophagy via the canonic autophagy machinery. Here we showed that CPP-induced autophagy was also dependent on endocytosis as the process was significantly inhibited by methyl-β-cyclodextrin and dynasore, which suppress clathrin-dependent endocytosis. Consistently, CPP treatment triggered the formation of filipin-positive intracellular vesicles whose membranes are rich in cholesterol. Unexpectedly, these vesicles were also positive for galectin 3, suggesting that they were damaged and the membrane glycans became accessible to galectins to bind. Endosome damage was caused by endocytosis of CPPs and was reversed by calcium chelators or by endocytosis inhibitors. Notably, CPP-induced LC3-positive autophagosomes were colocalized with galectin 3, ubiquitin, and p62/SQSTM1. Inhibition of galectin 3 reduced p62 puncta and autophagosome formation. Knockdown of p62 additionally inhibited the colocalization of autophagosomes with galectins. Furthermore, most of the galectin 3-positive vesicles were colocalized with Rab7 or LAMP1. Agents that affect endosome/lysosome maturation and function, such as bafilomycin A1, also significantly affected CPP-induced tubulovesicular autophagosome formation. These findings thus indicate that endocytosed CPPs caused endosome damage and recruitment of galectins, particularly at the later endosome stage, which led to the interaction of the autophagosomal membranes with the damaged endosome in the presence of p62. PMID:24619419

  18. CO2 sequestration by ureolytic microbial consortia through microbially-induced calcite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Okyay, Tugba O; Nguyen, Hang N; Castro, Sarah L; Rodrigues, Debora F

    2016-12-01

    Urea is an abundant nitrogen-containing compound found in urine of mammals and widely used in fertilizers. This compound is part of the nitrogen biogeochemical cycle and is easily biodegraded by ureolytic microorganisms that have the urease enzyme. Previous studies, with ureolytic isolates, have shown that some ureolytic microorganisms are able to sequester CO2 through a process called microbially-induced calcium carbonate precipitation. The present study investigates 15 ureolytic consortia obtained from the "Pamukkale travertines" and the "Cave Without A Name" using different growth media to identify the possible bacterial genera responsible for CO2 sequestration through the microbially-induced calcite precipitation (MICP). The community structure and diversity were determined by deep-sequencing. The results showed that all consortia presented varying CO2 sequestration capabilities and MICP rates. The CO2 sequestration varied between 0 and 86.4%, and it depended largely on the community structure, as well as on pH. Consortia with predominance of Comamonas, Plesiomonas and Oxalobacter presented reduced CO2 sequestration. On the other hand, consortia dominated by Sporosarcina, Sphingobacterium, Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, and Elizabethkingia showed higher rates of CO2 uptake in the serum bottle headspace.

  19. Photo-Induced Effect on Bacterial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Batanouny, M. H.; Amin, Rehab M.; Naga, M. I.; Ibrahim, M. K.

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial resistance against antibiotics is an increasing problem in medicine. This stimulates study of other bactericidal regimens, one of which is photodynamic therapy (PDT), which involves the killing of bacterial species by low power laser light (LLL) in the presence of photosensitizing agent. It has already been shown that, various gram- negative and gram-positive bacteria can be killed by photodynamic therapy in vitro, using exogenous sensitizers. The mechanisms of laser action on bacteria are not adequately understood. Here, PDT on H. pylori, as an example of gram negative bacteria was studied. The ultra structure changes of the organism after PDT were examined under electron microscope. Neither Irradiation with laser without sensitizer nor sensitizing without laser has any lethal effect on bacterial cells. However, the successful lethal photosensitization was achieved by applying certain laser dose with the corresponding concentration of the photosensitizer. On the other hand, PDT has no significant effect on the genomic DNA of the cells.

  20. Torque-induced precession of bacterial flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimogonya, Yuji; Sawano, Yoichiro; Wakebe, Hiromichi; Inoue, Yuichi; Ishijima, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is an ion-driven rotary machine in the cell envelope of bacteria. Using a gold nanoparticle as a probe, we observed the precession of flagella during rotation. Since the mechanism of flagella precession was unknown, we investigated it using a combination of full simulations, theory, and experiments. The results show that the mechanism can be well explained by fluid mechanics. The validity of our theory was confirmed by our full simulation, which was utilized to predict both the filament tilt angle and motor torque from experimental flagellar precession data. The knowledge obtained is important in understanding mechanical properties of the bacterial motor and hook.

  1. Torque-induced precession of bacterial flagella.

    PubMed

    Shimogonya, Yuji; Sawano, Yoichiro; Wakebe, Hiromichi; Inoue, Yuichi; Ishijima, Akihiko; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2015-12-22

    The bacterial flagellar motor is an ion-driven rotary machine in the cell envelope of bacteria. Using a gold nanoparticle as a probe, we observed the precession of flagella during rotation. Since the mechanism of flagella precession was unknown, we investigated it using a combination of full simulations, theory, and experiments. The results show that the mechanism can be well explained by fluid mechanics. The validity of our theory was confirmed by our full simulation, which was utilized to predict both the filament tilt angle and motor torque from experimental flagellar precession data. The knowledge obtained is important in understanding mechanical properties of the bacterial motor and hook.

  2. Minor changes in soil bacterial and fungal community composition occur in response to monsoon precipitation in a semiarid grassland.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Theresa A; Koch, George W; Schwartz, Egbert

    2014-08-01

    Arizona and New Mexico receive half of their annual precipitation during the summer monsoon season, making this large-scale rain event critical for ecosystem productivity. We used the monsoon rains to explore the responses of soil bacterial and fungal communities to natural moisture pulses in a semiarid grassland. Through 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and ITS region, we phylogenetically characterized these communities at 22 time points during a summer season. Relative humidity increased before the rains arrived, creating conditions in soil that allowed for the growth of microorganisms. During the course of the study, the relative abundances of most bacterial phyla showed little variation, though some bacterial populations responded immediately to an increase in soil moisture once the monsoon rains arrived. The Firmicutes phylum experienced over a sixfold increase in relative abundance with increasing water availability. Conversely, Actinobacteria, the dominant taxa at our site, were negatively affected by the increase in water availability. No relationship was found between bacterial diversity and soil water potential. Bacterial community structure was unrelated to all environmental variables that we measured, with the exception of a significant relationship with atmospheric relative humidity. Relative abundances of fungal phyla fluctuated more throughout the season than bacterial abundances did. Variation in fungal community structure was unrelated to soil water potential and to most environmental variables. However, ordination analysis showed a distinct fungal community structure late in the season, probably due to plant senescence.

  3. Characterization of Strain-Induced Precipitation in Inconel 718 Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Jessica; Penalva, Mariluz; Cabrera, José María

    2016-08-01

    Inconel 718 presents excellent mechanical properties at high temperatures, as well as good corrosion resistance and weldability. These properties, oriented to satisfy the design requirements of gas turbine components, depend on microstructural features such as grain size and precipitation. In this work, precipitation-temperature-time diagrams have been derived based on a stress relaxation technique and the characterization of precipitates by scanning electron microscopy. By using this methodology, the effect of strain accumulation during processing on the precipitation kinetics can be determined. The results show that the characteristics of precipitation are significantly modified when plastic deformation is applied, and the kinetics are slightly affected by the amount of total plastic deformation.

  4. North west cape-induced electron precipitation and theoretical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen-xia; Li, Xin-qiao; Wang, Chen-Yu; Chen, Lun-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Enhancement of the electron fluxes in the inner radiation belt, which is induced by the powerful North West Cape (NWC) very-low-frequency (VLF) transmitter, have been observed and analyzed by several research groups. However, all of the previous publications have focused on NWC-induced > 100-keV electrons only, based on observations from the Detection of Electro-Magnetic Emissions Transmitted from Earthquake Regions (DEMETER) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) satellites. Here, we present flux enhancements with 30-100-keV electrons related to NWC transmitter for the first time, which were observed by the GOES satellite at night. Similar to the 100-300-keV precipitated-electron behavior, the low energy 30-100-keV electron precipitation is primarily located east of the transmitter. However, the latter does not drift eastward to the same extent as the former, possibly because of the lower electron velocity. The 30-100-keV electrons are distributed in the L = 1.8-2.1 L-shell range, in contrast to the 100-300-keV electrons which are at L = 1.67-1.9. This is consistent with the perspective that the energy of the VLF-wave-induced electron flux enhancement decreases with higher L-shell values. We expand upon the rationality of the simultaneous enhancement of the 30-100- and 100-300-keV electron fluxes through comparison with the cyclotron resonance theory for the quasi-linear wave-particle interaction. In addition, we interpret the asymmetry characteristics of NWC electric power distribution in north and south hemisphere by ray tracing model. Finally, we present considerable discussion and show that good agreement exists between the observation of satellites and theory. Supported by the China Seismo-Electromagnetic Satellite Mission Ground-Based Verification Project of the Administration of Science, Technology, and Industry for National Defense and Asia-Pacific Space Cooperation Organization Project (APSCO-SP/PM-EARTHQUAKE).

  5. Effect of Mg/Ca ratios on microbially induced carbonate precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu; Seref Sonmez, M.; Kurt, M. Ali

    2016-04-01

    Influence of Mg/Ca ratios on microbially induced carbonate mineralogy were investigated by series of experiments carried out under various environmental conditions (Mg/Ca ratio, temperature and salinity). Halophilic bacterial cultures used for biomineralization experiments were isolated from hypersaline Lake Acıgöl (Denizli, SW Turkey), displaying extreme water chemistry with an average pH around 8.6 (Balci eta l.,2015). Enriched bacterial culture used in the experiments consisted of Halomonas saccharevitans strain AJ275, Halomonas alimentaria strain L7B; Idiomarina sp. TBZ29, 98% Idiomarina seosensis strain CL-SP19. Biomineralization experiments were set up using above enriched culture with Mg/Ca ratios of 0.05, 1, 4 and 15 and salinity of 8% and 15% experiments at 30oC and 10oC. Additionally, long-term biomineralization experiments were set up to last for a year, for Mg/Ca=4 and Mg/Ca=15 experiments at 30oC. For each experimental condition abiotic experiments were also conducted. Solution chemistry throughout incubation was monitored for Na, K, Mg, Ca, bicarbonate, carbonate, ammonium and phosphate for a month. At the end of the experiments, precipitates were collected and morphology and mineralogy of the biominerals were investigated and results were evaluated using the software DIFFRAC.SUITE EVA. Overall the preliminary results showed chemical precipitation of calcite, halite, hydromagnesite and sylvite. Results obtained from biological experiments indicate that, low Mg/Ca ratios (0.05 and 1) favor chlorapatite precipitation, whereas higher Mg/Ca ratios favor struvite precipitation. Biomineralization of dolomite, huntite and magnesite is favorable at high Mg/Ca ratios (4 and 15), in the presence of halophilic bacteria. Moreover, results indicate that supersaturation with respect to Mg (Mg/Ca=15) combined with NaCl (15%) inhibits biomineralization and forms chemical precipitates. 15% salinity is shown to favor chemical precipitation of mineral phases more than

  6. Accelerated microbial-induced CaCO3 precipitation in a defined coculture of ureolytic and non-ureolytic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, D.; Tsesarsky, M.; Shamir, D.; Ronen, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Microbial-induced CaCO3 precipitation (MICP) is an innovative technique that harnesses bacterial activity for the modification of the physical properties of soils. Since stimulation of MICP by urea hydrolysis in natural soils is likely to be affected by interactions between ureolytic and non-ureolytic bacteria, we designed an experiment to examine the interactions between ureolytic and non-ureolytic bacteria and the effect of these interactions on MICP. An artificial groundwater-based rich medium was inoculated with two model species of bacteria, the ureolytic species Sporosarcina pasteurii and the non-ureolytic species Bacillus subtilis. The control treatment was inoculated with a pure culture of S. pasteurii. The following parameters were monitored during the course of the experiment: optical density, pH, the evolution of ammonium, dissolved calcium and dissolved inorganic carbon. The results showed that dissolved calcium was precipitated as CaCO3 faster in the mixed culture than in the control, despite less favorable chemical conditions in the mixed culture, i.e., lower pH and lower CO32- concentration. B. subtilis exhibited a considerably higher growth rate than S. pasteurii, resulting in higher density of bacterial cells in the mixed culture. We suggest that the presence of the non-ureolytic bacterial species, B. subtilis, accelerated the MICP process, via the supply of nucleation sites in the form of non-ureolytic bacterial cells.

  7. Bacterial sulfate reduction is the driving force for dolomite precipitation: New insights from CAS contents and δ34SCAS signatures of sedimentary dolomites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldermann, Andre; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Strauss, Harald; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the underlying reaction pathways and environmental controls inducing the precipitation of dolomite in mostly marine and early diagenetic sedimentary environments suggest that bacterial activity and bacterial sulfate reduction are key processes during the dolomitization of magnesian CaCO3 precursors at ambient temperatures [1]. However, in evaporitic and marine-anoxic, organic-rich sediments the precipitating dolomite is usually non-stoichiometric, highly disordered and metastable and is thus often referred to as (proto)dolomite. Subsequent multiple recrystallization of the (proto)dolomite during burial diagenesis is currently suggested to result in a more stable (stoichiometric and ordered) type of dolomite. On the basis of (micro)textural and (isotope)geochemical signatures of pure dolostone and partly dolomitized platform carbonates exposed in the Upper Jurassic rock succession at Oker (Northern German Basin), we highlight here the important role of bacterial sulfate reduction on the formation of sedimentary dolomite. Our results indicate that the Oker dolomite has been formed by the early diagenetic replacement of pre-existing magnesian calcite and aragonite precursors through reaction with pristine-marine to slightly evaporitic and reducing seawater at temperatures between 26 °C and 37 °C. The elevated δ34SCAS values, from +17.9 to +19.7 ‰ (V-CDT), of the Oker dolomite, relative to the ambient Upper Jurassic seawater, indicate that bacterial sulfate reduction was active during dolomite precipitation. Moreover, the linear anti-correlation (R² = 0.98) between decreasing CAS content (~1000-2000 ppm) in dolomite and increasing degree of cation order (~0.35 to 0.50) of the dolomite lattice structure suggests that, besides temperature and diagenetically driven recrystallization events, incorporation of CAS during co-precipitation of dolomite significantly affects the composition, structure and stability of modern and

  8. Biotic and abiotic effects on CO2 sequestration during microbially-induced calcium carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Okyay, Tugba Onal; Rodrigues, Debora F

    2015-03-01

    In this study, CO2 sequestration was investigated through the microbially-induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) process with isolates obtained from a cave called 'Cave Without A Name' (Boerne, TX, USA) and the Pamukkale travertines (Denizli, Turkey). The majority of the bacterial isolates obtained from these habitats belonged to the genera Sporosarcina, Brevundimonas, Sphingobacterium and Acinetobacter. The isolates were investigated for their capability to precipitate calcium carbonate and sequester CO2. Biotic and abiotic effects of CO2 sequestration during MICP were also investigated. In the biotic effect, we observed that the rate and concentration of CO2 sequestered was dependent on the species or strains. The main abiotic factors affecting CO2 sequestration during MICP were the pH and medium components. The increase in pH led to enhanced CO2 sequestration by the growth medium. The growth medium components, on the other hand, were shown to affect both the urease activity and CO2 sequestration. Through the Plackett-Burman experimental design, the most important growth medium component involved in CO2 sequestration was determined to be urea. The optimized medium composition by the Plackett-Burman design for each isolate led to a statistically significant increase, of up to 148.9%, in CO2 uptake through calcification mechanisms. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Hydrodynamic fingering instability induced by a precipitation reaction.

    PubMed

    Nagatsu, Y; Ishii, Y; Tada, Y; De Wit, A

    2014-07-11

    We experimentally demonstrate that a precipitation reaction at the miscible interface between two reactive solutions can trigger a hydrodynamic instability due to the buildup of a locally adverse mobility gradient related to a decrease in permeability. The precipitate results from an A+B→C type of reaction when a solution containing one of the reactants is injected into a solution of the other reactant in a porous medium or a Hele-Shaw cell. Fingerlike precipitation patterns are observed upon displacement, the properties of which depend on whether A displaces B or vice versa. A mathematical modeling of the underlying mobility profile confirms that the instability originates from a local decrease in mobility driven by the localized precipitation. Nonlinear simulations of the related reaction-diffusion-convection model reproduce the properties of the instability observed experimentally. In particular, the simulations suggest that differences in diffusivity between A and B may contribute to the asymmetric characteristics of the fingering precipitation patterns.

  10. Shear-induced adhesion of bacterial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecuyer, Sigolene; Rusconi, Roberto; Shen, Yi; Forsyth, Alison; Stone, Howard

    2009-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion is the first step in the development of surface-associated communities known as biofilms. The formation of these microbial structures is the cause of many different problems in medical devices and industrial water systems. Despite an extensive literature, the underlying mechanisms of the initial reversible attachment are not fully understood. We have investigated the effects of hydrodynamics on the probability of adsorption and detachment of bacteria on model surfaces by using phase-contrast microscopy in straight microchannels. In this way we have been able to measure the time that each bacterium spends on the surface and to analyze the mobility as a function of the flow rate. The main finding of our experiments and analyses is a counter-intuitive enhanced adhesion as the shear stress is increased over a wide range of shear rates.

  11. Flow Induced by Bacterial Carpets and Transport of Microscale Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, Amy; Fauci, Lisa; Leiderman, Karin; Strawbridge, Eva; Zhao, Longhua

    2015-11-01

    Microfluidic devices carry very small volumes of liquid though channels and may be used to gain insight into many biological applications including drug delivery and development. In many microfluidic experiments, it would be useful to mix the fluid within the chamber. However, the traditional methods of mixing and pumping at large length scales don't work at small length scales. Experimental work has suggested that the flagella of bacteria may be used as motors in microfluidic devices by creating a bacterial carpet. Mathematical modeling can be used to investigate this idea and to quantify flow induced by bacterial carpets. We simulate flow induced by bacterial carpets using the method of regularized Stokeslets, and also examine the transport of vesicles of finite size by arrays of rotating flagella.

  12. Limitations of polyethylene glycol-induced precipitation as predictive tool for protein solubility during formulation development.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Melanie; Winzer, Matthias; Weber, Christian; Gieseler, Henning

    2017-01-20

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced protein precipitation is often used to extrapolate apparent protein solubility at specific formulation compositions. The procedure was used for several fields of application such as protein crystal growth but also protein formulation development. Nevertheless, most studies focused on applicability in protein crystal growth. In contrast, this study focuses on applicability of PEG-induced precipitation during high-concentration protein formulation development. In this study, solubility of three different model proteins was investigated over a broad range of pH. Solubility values predicted by PEG-induced precipitation were compared to real solubility behaviour determined by either turbidity or content measurements. Predicted solubility by PEG-induced precipitation was confirmed for an Fc fusion protein and a monoclonal antibody. In contrast, PEG-induced precipitation failed to predict solubility of a single-domain antibody construct. Applicability of PEG-induced precipitation as indicator of protein solubility during formulation development was found to be not valid for one of three model molecules. Under certain conditions, PEG-induced protein precipitation is not valid for prediction of real protein solubility behaviour. The procedure should be used carefully as tool for formulation development, and the results obtained should be validated by additional investigations. © 2017 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. Colloidal precipitates related to Acid Mine Drainage: bacterial diversity and micro fungi-heavy metal interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, G.; Carbone, C.; Consani, S.; Zotti, M.; Di Piazza, S.; Pozzolini, M.; Giovine, M.

    2015-12-01

    In Acid Mine Drainage (AMD) settings colloidal precipitates control the mobility of Potential Toxic Elements (PTEs). Mineral-contaminant relationships (i.e. adsorption, ion-exchange, desorption) are rarely pure abiotic processes. Microbes, mainly bacteria and microfungi, can catalyze several reactions modifying the element speciation, as well as the bioavailability of inorganic pollutants. Soil, sediments, and waters heavily polluted with PTEs through AMD processes are a potential reservoir of extremophile bacteria and fungi exploitable for biotechnological purposes. Two different AMD related colloids, an ochraceous precipitate (deposited in weakly acidic conditions, composed by nanocrystalline goethite) and a greenish-blue precipitate (deposited at near-neutral pH, composed by allophane + woodwardite) were sampled. The aims of this work were to a) characterize the mycobiota present in these colloidal minerals by evaluating the presence of alive fungal propagules and extracting bacteria DNA; b) verify the fungal strains tolerance, and bioaccumulation capability on greenish-blue and ZnSO4 enriched media; c) evaluate potential impact of bacteria in the system geochemistry. The preliminary results show an interesting and selected mycobiota able to survive under unfavourable environmental conditions. A significant number of fungal strains were isolated in pure culture. Among them, species belonging to Penicillium and Trichoderma genera were tested on both greenish-blue and ZnSO4 enriched media. The results show a significant tolerance and bioaccumulation capability to some PTEs. The same colloidal precipitates were processed to extract bacteria DNA by using a specific procedure developed for sediments. The results give a good yield of nucleic acids and a positive PCR amplification of 16S rDNA accomplished the first step for future metagenomic analyses.

  14. Bacterial Exposure Induces and Activates Matrilysin in Mucosal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    López-Boado, Yolanda S.; Wilson, Carole L.; Hooper, Lora V.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.; Hultgren, Scott J.; Parks, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Matrilysin, a matrix metalloproteinase, is expressed and secreted lumenally by intact mucosal and glandular epithelia throughout the body, suggesting that its regulation and function are shared among tissues. Because matrilysin is produced in Paneth cells of the murine small intestine, where it participates in innate host defense by activation of prodefensins, we speculated that its expression would be influenced by bacterial exposure. Indeed, acute infection (10–90 min) of human colon, bladder, and lung carcinoma cells, primary human tracheal epithelial cells, and human tracheal explants with type 1–piliated Escherichia coli mediated a marked (25–50-fold) and sustained (>24 h) induction of matrilysin production. In addition, bacterial infection resulted in activation of the zymogen form of the enzyme, which was selectively released at the apical surface. Induction of matrilysin was mediated by a soluble, non-LPS bacterial factor and correlated with the release of defensin-like bacteriocidal activity. Bacteria did not induce matrilysin in other cell types, and expression of other metalloproteinases by epithelial cells was not affected by bacteria. Matrilysin was not detected in germ-free mice, but the enzyme was induced after colonization with Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron. These findings indicate that bacterial exposure is a potent and physiologically relevant signal regulating matrilysin expression in epithelial cells. PMID:10725342

  15. Praxis-induced reflex seizures mainly precipitated by writing due to a parietal focal cortical dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Racicot, Frédéric; Obaid, Sami; Bouthillier, Alain; Guillon-Létourneau, Laurent; Clément, Jean-François; Nguyen, Dang Khoa

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 23-year-old left-handed woman with medically intractable praxis-induced reflex seizures mainly precipitated by writing. Selective resection of subtle end-of-sulcus cortical dysplasia in the right inferior parietal lobule resulted in freedom from seizures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of praxis-induced reflex seizures mainly precipitated by writing in which a focal lesion was found and treated successfully by surgery.

  16. Histone modifications induced by a family of bacterial toxins.

    PubMed

    Hamon, Mélanie Anne; Batsché, Eric; Régnault, Béatrice; Tham, To Nam; Seveau, Stéphanie; Muchardt, Christian; Cossart, Pascale

    2007-08-14

    Upon infection, pathogens reprogram host gene expression. In eukaryotic cells, genetic reprogramming is induced by the concerted activation/repression of transcription factors and various histone modifications that control DNA accessibility in chromatin. We report here that the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes induces a dramatic dephosphorylation of histone H3 as well as a deacetylation of histone H4 during early phases of infection. This effect is mediated by the major listerial toxin listeriolysin O in a pore-forming-independent manner. Strikingly, a similar effect also is observed with other toxins of the same family, such as Clostridium perfringens perfringolysin and Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumolysin. The decreased levels of histone modifications correlate with a reduced transcriptional activity of a subset of host genes, including key immunity genes. Thus, control of epigenetic regulation emerges here as an unsuspected function shared by several bacterial toxins, highlighting a common strategy used by intracellular and extracellular pathogens to modulate the host response early during infection.

  17. Microbially-induced Carbonate Precipitation for Immobilization of Toxic Metals.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Deepika; Qian, Xin-Yi; Pan, Xiangliang; Achal, Varenyam; Li, Qianwei; Gadd, Geoffrey Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rapid urbanization and industrialization resulting from growing populations contribute to environmental pollution by toxic metals and radionuclides which pose a threat to the environment and to human health. To combat this threat, it is important to develop remediation technologies based on natural processes that are sustainable. In recent years, a biomineralization process involving ureolytic microorganisms that leads to calcium carbonate precipitation has been found to be effective in immobilizing toxic metal pollutants. The advantage of using ureolytic organisms for bioremediating metal pollution in soil is their ability to immobilize toxic metals efficiently by precipitation or coprecipitation, independent of metal valence state and toxicity and the redox potential. This review summarizes current understanding of the ability of ureolytic microorganisms for carbonate biomineralization and applications of this process for toxic metal bioremediation. Microbial metal carbonate precipitation may also be relevant to detoxification of contaminated process streams and effluents as well as the production of novel carbonate biominerals and biorecovery of metals and radionuclides that form insoluble carbonates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrolyte-induced precipitation of graphene oxide in its aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Hu, Yun Hang

    2013-02-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) can easily dissolve in water to form a stable homogeneous solution due to its hydrophilic property and ionization of functional groups. However, in this paper, it is reported that a strong electrolyte (HCl, LiOH, LiCl, LiBr, KCl, or KBr) can destabilize the GO solution, causing GO precipitation. This indicates that the electrostatic repulsion plays a critical role in stabilizing aqueous GO solution. The electrolyte-induced precipitates were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The oxygen-containing functional groups of GO sheets, which are carboxyl, epoxy, and hydroxyl groups, remained unchanged during acid (HCl)- and salt (LiCl)-induced precipitations. In contrast, during the GO precipitation induced by a base (LiOH), the carboxyl group of GO sheets disappeared with a remarkable increase in hydroxyl group and aromatic C=C bonds. This indicates that the LiOH-induced GO precipitation resulted in the partial reduction of GO sheets. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the HCl-induced GO precipitation is a feasible approach to deposit GO on a substrate as a Pt-free counter electrode for a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), which exhibited 1.65% power conversion efficiency.

  19. Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM: a negative activation enthalpy reaction.

    PubMed

    Meliga, Stefano C; Farrugia, William; Ramsland, Paul A; Falconer, Robert J

    2013-01-17

    Cold-induced precipitation of a monoclonal IgM cryoglobulin isolated from a patient with Waldenström's macroglobulinemia was observed to have a negative activation enthalpy. The rate of the reaction increased, as the temperature decreased. Differential scanning calorimetry of the monoclonal IgM showed precipitation as an inverted peak during a downward temperature scan. The transition temperature was between 14 and 15 °C and was possibly concentration dependent. At temperatures below the transition the precipitation was best described by second-order kinetics. The difference in change in enthalpy between precipitation and disassociation suggests that cold-induced precipitation had a fast precipitation stage followed by a slower consolidation reaction. Negligible curvature of the Eyring plot suggested the precipitation reaction was dominated by van der Waal forces and hydrogen bonding. Conversely, during an upward temperature scan, disassociation was observed as a positive enthalpy peak. This reaction had two stages, a reaction undoing consolidation followed by heat-induced disassociation that had first-order kinetics.

  20. Divergent global precipitation changes induced by natural versus anthropogenic forcing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Bin; Cane, Mark A; Yim, So-Young; Lee, June-Yi

    2013-01-31

    As a result of global warming, precipitation is likely to increase in high latitudes and the tropics and to decrease in already dry subtropical regions. The absolute magnitude and regional details of such changes, however, remain intensely debated. As is well known from El Niño studies, sea-surface-temperature gradients across the tropical Pacific Ocean can strongly influence global rainfall. Palaeoproxy evidence indicates that the difference between the warm west Pacific and the colder east Pacific increased in past periods when the Earth warmed as a result of increased solar radiation. In contrast, in most model projections of future greenhouse warming this gradient weakens. It has not been clear how to reconcile these two findings. Here we show in climate model simulations that the tropical Pacific sea-surface-temperature gradient increases when the warming is due to increased solar radiation and decreases when it is due to increased greenhouse-gas forcing. For the same global surface temperature increase the latter pattern produces less rainfall, notably over tropical land, which explains why in the model the late twentieth century is warmer than in the Medieval Warm Period (around AD 1000-1250) but precipitation is less. This difference is consistent with the global tropospheric energy budget, which requires a balance between the latent heat released in precipitation and radiative cooling. The tropospheric cooling is less for increased greenhouse gases, which add radiative absorbers to the troposphere, than for increased solar heating, which is concentrated at the Earth's surface. Thus warming due to increased greenhouse gases produces a climate signature different from that of warming due to solar radiation changes.

  1. Sea Level Rise Impacts on Precipitation-Induced Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzanga, B. A.

    2016-12-01

    Global sea level rise (SLR) is one of the most immediate impacts of climate change, and poses a significant threat to low-lying coastal communities worldwide. The metropolitan region of Hampton Roads in Southeastern Virginia is one such community, and one where knowledge surrounding SLR is rapidly accumulating. However, most of the research is focused exclusively on surface water processes despite the presence of a shallow groundwater table closely connected to them. SLR will continue to cause the groundwater table to increase in tidally influenced areas of Hampton Road, and thereby decrease storage capacity of the unsaturated zone (UZ). This study investigates how reduced unsaturated storage changes the rainfall-runoff relationship and the resulting areal-flood hazard spectrum. We choose a tidal watershed in Hampton Roads to conduct a conceptual yet realistic simulation of the hydrologic cycle using ten years of historical precipitation data with SLR scenarios from 0 m (current) to 2 m in 0.3048 m intervals. Groundwater infiltration from the land surface, recharge, and evapotranspiration are simulated using the Unsaturated-Zone Flow package with MODFLOW-NWT.Groundwater rise is simulated by increasing the stage of the tidal stream that drains the watershed. Precipitation and overland runoff are simulated using the surface water model SWMM. The two models are coupled to permit the exchange of boundary condition values at each time step. An ensemble approach is taken to test model sensitivity to parameters configurations and determine the contribution of SLR to runoff generation. The primary result of this study quantifies the relationship between SLR and runoff which enables decision makers to more effectively plan for, minimize risk of, and adapt to flooding hazards. This investigation also assesses how water content in the UZ changes in response to precipitation for different SLR scenarios. This result has widespread importance, such as decisions in crop choice or

  2. Mycobacterium massiliense Induces Macrophage Extracellular Traps with Facilitating Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Yina; Na, Yirang; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have been known to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial DNA structures capable of capturing and killing microbes. Recently, a similar phenomenon has been reported in macrophages infected with various pathogens. However, a role for macrophages extracellular traps (METs) in host defense responses against Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass) has yet to be described. In this study, we show that M. mass, a rapid growing mycobacterium (RGM), also induces the release of METs from PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Intriguingly, this process is not dependent on NADPH oxidase activity, which regulates NET formation. Instead, M. mass-induced MET formation partially depends on calcium influx and requires phagocytosis of high bacterial load. The METs consist of a DNA backbone embedded with microbicidal proteins such as histone, MPO and elastase. Released METs entrap M. mass and prevent their dissemination, but do not have bactericidal activity. Instead, they result in enhanced bacterial growth. In this regard, METs were considered to provide interaction of M. mass with cells and an environment for bacterial aggregation, which may facilitate mycobacterial survival and growth. In conclusion, our results demonstrate METs as an innate defense response against M. mass infection, and suggest that extracellular traps play a multifaceted role in the interplay between host and bacteria. PMID:27191593

  3. Mycobacterium massiliense Induces Macrophage Extracellular Traps with Facilitating Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Je, Sungmo; Quan, Hailian; Yoon, Yina; Na, Yirang; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Human neutrophils have been known to release neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), antimicrobial DNA structures capable of capturing and killing microbes. Recently, a similar phenomenon has been reported in macrophages infected with various pathogens. However, a role for macrophages extracellular traps (METs) in host defense responses against Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass) has yet to be described. In this study, we show that M. mass, a rapid growing mycobacterium (RGM), also induces the release of METs from PMA-differentiated THP-1 cells. Intriguingly, this process is not dependent on NADPH oxidase activity, which regulates NET formation. Instead, M. mass-induced MET formation partially depends on calcium influx and requires phagocytosis of high bacterial load. The METs consist of a DNA backbone embedded with microbicidal proteins such as histone, MPO and elastase. Released METs entrap M. mass and prevent their dissemination, but do not have bactericidal activity. Instead, they result in enhanced bacterial growth. In this regard, METs were considered to provide interaction of M. mass with cells and an environment for bacterial aggregation, which may facilitate mycobacterial survival and growth. In conclusion, our results demonstrate METs as an innate defense response against M. mass infection, and suggest that extracellular traps play a multifaceted role in the interplay between host and bacteria.

  4. Irradiation-induced nano-voids in strained tin precipitates in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Gaiduk, P. I.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J. Nylandsted Larsen, A.

    2014-04-14

    We report on self-assembling of spherically shaped voids in nanometer size strained Sn precipitates after irradiation with He{sup +} ions in different conditions. It is found that high-temperature irradiation induces vacancies which are collected by compressively strained Sn precipitates enhancing of out-diffusion of Sn atoms from the precipitates. Nano-voids formation takes place simultaneously with a β- to α-phase transformation in the Sn precipitates. Post-irradiation thermal treatment leads to the removal of voids and a backward transformation of the Sn phase to β-phase. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects along with vacancy assisted Sn out-diffusion and precipitate dissolution are discussed.

  5. Irradiation-induced nano-voids in strained tin precipitates in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaiduk, P. I.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.

    2014-04-01

    We report on self-assembling of spherically shaped voids in nanometer size strained Sn precipitates after irradiation with He+ ions in different conditions. It is found that high-temperature irradiation induces vacancies which are collected by compressively strained Sn precipitates enhancing of out-diffusion of Sn atoms from the precipitates. Nano-voids formation takes place simultaneously with a β- to α-phase transformation in the Sn precipitates. Post-irradiation thermal treatment leads to the removal of voids and a backward transformation of the Sn phase to β-phase. Strain-enhanced separation of point defects along with vacancy assisted Sn out-diffusion and precipitate dissolution are discussed.

  6. Structural changes in precipitated silica induced by external forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gerald Johannes; Göritz, Dietmar

    2010-04-01

    The morphology of pure precipitated silica, silica filled in polydimethylsiloxane rubber, and silica filled in styrene butadiene rubber was studied by means of small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. The silica at a length scale of a few nanometers consists of primary particles, which form aggregates, and clusters with aggregates as basic units. It is evidenced that the aggregate branching, represented by the mass fractal dimension, and the aggregate diameter are different if pure silica and silica in rubber are compared. Contrary, the size of the primary particles and their surface are not influenced. It is demonstrated that the change in the aggregate morphology is due to the external mechanical forces appearing during the mixing process. This is achieved by model experiments using a pistil and a mortar and a composite with different silica fractions. By that means, a systematic change in the morphology with grinding time is observed. Then, the experiments on the composite demonstrate that the major contributions to the mass fractal dimensions are due to the external mechanical forces. In order to test reproducibility and universal validity in the case of precipitated silicas, independent experiments on one silica and further silicas are performed. Several important conclusions are obtained from the study. First, it is shown that a comparison of different pure silica samples without knowing their history may be difficult or questionable. Second, it becomes evident that it is not sufficient to provide only a description of the materials, rather than the details of the sample treatment have to be reported. Therefore, solely the characterization of the morphology of the pure silica is not sufficient to be compared to the mechanical properties of the composites.

  7. Long-term sustainability of microbial-induced CaCO3 precipitation in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Gat, Daniella; Ronen, Zeev; Tsesarsky, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Microbially induced CaCO3 precipitation (MICP) via urea hydrolysis is an emerging technique for soil amelioration, building materials rehabilitation and pollutants sequestration amongst other various environmental applications. The successful application of MICP requires the sustainability of the precipitated CaCO3; to which the fate of ammonia, the main by-product of ureolysis, is potentially significante. Ammonia volatilization and biological ammonia oxidation both induce a pH decrease, which, in turn, might cause CaCO3 dissolution. To examine the potential effect of accumulated ammonia on precipitated CaCO3, we conducted a long-term MICP batch experiment, using environmental enrichment cultures of ureolytic bacteria. Here we show that CaCO3 precipitation was completed within 15-27 days, along with a rise in ammonium concentration. Following completion of ureolysis and precipitation, ammonium concentrations decreased, leading to a pH decrease. About 30 days after precipitation was completed, as much as 30% CaCO3 dissolution, was observed. A two-step model, describing urea hydrolysis followed by the removal of ammonia from the precipitation solution, predicted CaCO3 dissolution due to ammonia volatilization. We suggest that ureolytic MICP might result in ammonia volatilization, leading to significant CaCO3 dissolution. These results provide basic insights into the sustainability of ureolytic MICP and should further encourage removal of the accumulated ammonia from the treated site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Wave-induced burst precipitation events detected with a digital ionosonde

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, M.J.; Smith, A.J. ); Berkey, F.T. ); Carpenter, D.L. )

    1990-01-01

    Initial results are presented from two methods whereby burst precipitation events in the lower ionosphere, almost certainly induced by VLF wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere, have been detected using a ground-based digital ionosonde. In the first method, HF echoes are received above the critical frequency of the surrounding plasma; particle energies and the location and extent of the plasma enhancement may be deduced. In the second method, a rapid decrease in the phase of ionospheric echoes is observed due to refractive index changes along the echo path; particle energies, the duration of the precipitation event and the precipitation energy flux can be estimated.

  9. Mixing-induced calcite precipitation and dissolution kinetics in micromodel experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Valocchi, Albert J.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Dehoff, Karl; Yoon, Hongkyu; Werth, Charles J.

    2010-12-01

    Dissolved CO2 from geological CO2 sequestration may react with dissolved minerals in fractured rocks or confined aquifers and cause mineral precipitation. The overall rate of reaction can be limited by diffusive or dispersive mixing, and mineral precipitation can block pores and further hinder these processes. Mixing-induced calcite precipitation experiments were performed by injecting solutions containing CaCl2 and Na2CO3 through two separate inlets of a micromodel (1-cm x 2-cm x 40-microns); transverse dispersion caused the two solutions to mix along the center of the micromodel, resulting in calcite precipitation. The amount of calcite precipitation initially increased to a maximum and then decreased to a steady state value. Fluorescent microscopy and imaging techniques were used to visualize calcite precipitation, and the corresponding effects on the flow field. Experimental micromodel results were evaluated with pore-scale simulations using a 2-D Lattice-Boltzmann code for water flow and a finite volume code for reactive transport. The reactive transport model included the impact of pH upon carbonate speciation and calcite dissolution. We found that proper estimation of the effective diffusion coefficient and the reaction surface area is necessary to adequately simulate precipitation and dissolution rates. The effective diffusion coefficient was decreased in grid cells where calcite precipitated, and keeping track of reactive surface over time played a significant role in predicting reaction patterns. Our results may improve understanding of the fundamental physicochemical processes during CO2 sequestration in geologic formations.

  10. Role of peach proteins in juice precipitation induced by high pressure CO2.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Zhou, Linyan; Wang, Yongtao; Liao, Xiaojun

    2016-10-15

    To better understand the role of peach proteins in juice precipitation induced by high pressure CO2 (HPCD), proteins extracted from peach juice were subjected to HPCD and heat, and changes in particle size distribution (PSD) and structure were investigated. PSD analysis showed aggregations of proteins were both induced by HPCD and heat, but HPCD induced a stronger aggregation. The endotherm of HPCD- and heat-treated proteins moved to lower temperature, indicating that higher-order structures were altered after treatments. Furthermore, proteins related to HPCD- and heat-induced precipitation were analyzed by proteomics and bioinformatics. It was found that proteins with low content of α-helix and hydrogen bonds were more inclined to precipitate under HPCD, and HPCD precipitated proteins with more compact structures than heat, which might cause the stronger aggregation of proteins by HPCD. In conclusion, HPCD could induce the aggregation of peach proteins by destroying higher-order structures, which contributes to juice precipitation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of some biotic factors on microbially-induced calcite precipitation in cement mortar.

    PubMed

    Al-Salloum, Yousef; Abbas, H; Sheikh, Q I; Hadi, S; Alsayed, Saleh; Almusallam, Tarek

    2017-02-01

    Sporosarcina pasteurii, a common soil bacterium has been tested for microbial treatment of cement mortar. The present study also seeks to investigate the effects of growth medium, bacterial concentration and different buffers concerning the preparation of bacterial suspensions on the compressive strength of cement mortar. Two growth media, six different suspensions and two bacterial concentrations were used in the study. The influence of growth medium on calcification efficiency of S. pasteurii was insignificant. Significant improvement in the compressive as well as the tensile strength of cement mortar was observed. Microbial mineral precipitation visualized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) shows fibrous material that increased the strength of cement mortar. Formation of thin strands of fillers observed through SEM micrographs improves the pore structure, impermeability and thus the compressive as well as the tensile strengths of the cement mortar. The type of substrate and its molarity have a significant influence on the strength of cement mortar.

  12. Characteristics of wind-induced loss of solid precipitation derived from a Norwegian field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen-Øverleir, Asgeir; Wolff, Mareile; Isaksen, Ketil; Ødemark, Karianne; Reitan, Trond; Brækkan, Ragnar

    2016-04-01

    Solid precipitation measurements are known to be plagued by under-catch in windy conditions. Adjustment techniques, either based on a dynamic relationship between under-catch and measured determinants or static corrections, are then typically invoked. Such adjustment procedures, especially if the adjustment algorithm is unfit, introduce notable uncertainties that impact hydrological modelling in snow-dominated regions. In 2010, a test-site was established at a mountain plateau in Haukeli, Telemark, Southern Norway. Precipitation data of automatic gauges were compared with a precipitation gauge located in a Double Fence Inter-comparison Reference (DFIR) wind shield construction that served as the reference. A large number of sensors were additionally monitoring supportive meteorological parameters. The study presented in this poster considers data from three winters that were used to study and determine the wind-induced loss of solid precipitation. A general model framework was proposed, and Bayesian methods were used to objectively choose the most plausible sub-model to describe the loss ratio - wind speed - temperature relationship from the Haukeli data. The derived adjustment function is continuous and accounts for measurements of all types of winter precipitation (from rain to dry snow). The analysis shows a non-linear relationship between the loss ratio and wind speed during significant precipitation events, and there is a clear temperature dependency, believed to be mostly related to the precipitation type. The data also displayed a distinctive scatter that is believed to be an artefact mainly caused by neglecting the varying aerodynamic characteristics of the precipitation particles (for a given temperature) as a determinant. The adjustment formula allowed for the first time to derive an adjustment function with a data-tested validity beyond 8-9 m/s and proved a stabilisation of the wind-induced precipitation loss for higher wind speeds. Preliminary tests of

  13. Bioremediation of strontium (Sr) contaminated aquifer quartz sand based on carbonate precipitation induced by Sr resistant Halomonas sp.

    PubMed

    Achal, Varenyam; Pan, Xiangliang; Zhang, Daoyong

    2012-10-01

    Contamination of aquifers or sediments by radioactive strontium ((90)Sr) is a significant environmental problem. In the present study, microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) was evaluated for its potential to remediate strontium from aquifer quartz sand. A Sr resistant urease producing Halomonas sp. was characterized for its potential role in bioremediation. The bacterial strain removed 80% of Sr from soluble-exchangeable fraction of aquifer quartz sand. X-ray diffraction detected calcite, vaterite and aragonite along with calcite-strontianite (SrCO(3)) solid solution in bioremediated sample with indications that Sr was incorporated into the calcite. Scanning electron micrography coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray further confirmed MICP process in remediation. The study showed that MICP sequesters soluble strontium as biominerals and could play an important role in strontium bioremediation from both ecological and greener point of view.

  14. Estimation of the impact of climate change-induced extreme precipitation events on floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavčová, Kamila; Lapin, Milan; Valent, Peter; Szolgay, Ján; Kohnová, Silvia; Rončák, Peter

    2015-09-01

    In order to estimate possible changes in the flood regime in the mountainous regions of Slovakia, a simple physically-based concept for climate change-induced changes in extreme 5-day precipitation totals is proposed in the paper. It utilizes regionally downscaled scenarios of the long-term monthly means of the air temperature, specific air humidity and precipitation projected for Central Slovakia by two regional (RCM) and two global circulation models (GCM). A simplified physically-based model for the calculation of short-term precipitation totals over the course of changing air temperatures, which is used to drive a conceptual rainfall-runoff model, was proposed. In the paper a case study of this approach in the upper Hron river basin in Central Slovakia is presented. From the 1981-2010 period, 20 events of the basin's most extreme average of 5-day precipitation totals were selected. Only events with continual precipitation during 5 days were considered. These 5-day precipitation totals were modified according to the RCM and GCM-based scenarios for the future time horizons of 2025, 2050 and 2075. For modelling runoff under changed 5-day precipitation totals, a conceptual rainfall-runoff model developed at the Slovak University of Technology was used. Changes in extreme mean daily discharges due to climate change were compared with the original flood events and discussed.

  15. Oligo(L-lysine)-induced titanium dioxide: Effects of consecutive lysine on precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungjun; Park, Sangwoo; Lee, Sang-Yup

    2011-11-01

    Biomineralization of metal oxide utilizes biomolecular substances, such as peptides and proteins, to induce mineralization of metal precursors in a mild aqueous solution. In this study, we investigated biomineralization of an abiological substance, titanium dioxide (TiO 2), by oligo(L-lysine). Specifically, we systemically studied the influence of the number of consecutive lysine on TiO 2 precipitation. Oligo(L-lysine) was chosen as a homopeptide lysine source whose lysine quantity was adjusted. When oligo(L-lysine) contains more than three consecutive lysine, it induces notably fast precipitation, while single and dilysine do not readily form TiO 2 precipitates. Precipitation of TiO 2 was promoted with the length of oligo(L-lysine). The oligo(L-lysine) was associated with TiO 2 precipitate, which was confirmed by spectroscopic and thermogravitational analyses. The outcomes of this research provide a plausible rationale for explaining precipitation of the Ti precursor that is highly dependent on peptide sequences.

  16. Modelling biological and chemically induced precipitation of calcium phosphate in enhanced biological phosphorus removal systems.

    PubMed

    Barat, R; Montoya, T; Seco, A; Ferrer, J

    2011-06-01

    The biologically induced precipitation processes can be important in wastewater treatment, in particular treating raw wastewater with high calcium concentration combined with Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal. Currently, there is little information and experience in modelling jointly biological and chemical processes. This paper presents a calcium phosphate precipitation model and its inclusion in the Activated Sludge Model No 2d (ASM2d). The proposed precipitation model considers that aqueous phase reactions quickly achieve the chemical equilibrium and that aqueous-solid change is kinetically governed. The model was calibrated using data from four experiments in a Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) operated for EBPR and finally validated with two experiments. The precipitation model proposed was able to reproduce the dynamics of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) formation and later crystallization to hydroxyapatite (HAP) under different scenarios. The model successfully characterised the EBPR performance of the SBR, including the biological, physical and chemical processes.

  17. FORWARD AND INVERSE BIO-GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF MICROBIALLY INDUCED PRECIPITATION IN 0.5M COLUMNAR EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Tammer Barkouki; Brian Martinez; Brina Mortensen; Tess Weathers; Jason DeJong; Nic Spycher; Tim Ginn; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert Smith

    2009-09-01

    Microbial ureolysis-induced calcite precipitation may offer an in situ remediation for heavy metal and radionuclide contamination, as well as an alternative to traditional soil strengthening techniques. A microbially mediated calcite precipitation model was built in TOUGHREACT v2 and calibrated to batch and columnar experimental data. Kinetic ureolysis and calcite precipitation-rate expressions were parameterized by coupling TOUCHREACT with UCODE.

  18. Potential CO2 leakage reduction through biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Adrienne J; Lauchnor, Ellen; Eldring, Joachim Joe; Esposito, Richard; Mitchell, Andrew C; Gerlach, Robin; Cunningham, Alfred B; Spangler, Lee H

    2013-01-02

    Mitigation strategies for sealing high permeability regions in cap rocks, such as fractures or improperly abandoned wells, are important considerations in the long term security of geologically stored carbon dioxide (CO(2)). Sealing technologies using low-viscosity fluids are advantageous in this context since they potentially reduce the necessary injection pressures and increase the radius of influence around injection wells. Using aqueous solutions and suspensions that can effectively promote microbially induced mineral precipitation is one such technology. Here we describe a strategy to homogenously distribute biofilm-induced calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) precipitates in a 61 cm long sand-filled column and to seal a hydraulically fractured, 74 cm diameter Boyles Sandstone core. Sporosarcina pasteurii biofilms were established and an injection strategy developed to optimize CaCO(3) precipitation induced via microbial urea hydrolysis. Over the duration of the experiments, permeability decreased between 2 and 4 orders of magnitude in sand column and fractured core experiments, respectively. Additionally, after fracture sealing, the sandstone core withstood three times higher well bore pressure than during the initial fracturing event, which occurred prior to biofilm-induced CaCO(3) mineralization. These studies suggest biofilm-induced CaCO(3) precipitation technologies may potentially seal and strengthen fractures to mitigate CO(2) leakage potential.

  19. Prokaryotic RNA Associated to Bacterial Viability Induces Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Activation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Castillo, Luis A; Landoni, Verónica I; Martire-Greco, Daiana; Milillo, M Ayelén; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fernández, Gabriela C

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are the first cellular line of antibacterial host defense. They sense pathogens through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by innate pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLR). The aim of this study was to investigate whether PMN sense bacterial viability and explore which viability factor could be involved in this phenomenon. For this purpose, different functions were evaluated in isolated human PMN using live Escherichia coli (Ec) and heat-killed Ec (HK-Ec). We found that bacterial viability was indispensable to induce PMN activation, as measured by forward-scatter (FSC) increase, CD11b surface expression, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. As uncapped non-polyadenylated prokaryotic mRNA has been recognized as a PAMP associated to bacterial viability by macrophages and dendritic cells, total prokaryotic RNA (pRNA) from live Ec was purified and used as a stimulus for PMN. pRNA triggered similar responses to those observed with live bacteria. No RNA could be isolated from HK-Ec, explaining the lack of effect of dead bacteria. Moreover, the supernatant of dead bacteria was able to induce PMN activation, and this was associated with the presence of pRNA in this supernatant, which is released in the killing process. The induction of bactericidal functions (ROS and NETosis) by pRNA were abolished when the supernatant of dead bacteria or isolated pRNA were treated with RNAse. Moreover, endocytosis was necessary for pRNA-induced ROS generation and NETosis, and priming was required for the induction of pRNA-induced ROS in whole blood. However, responses related to movement and degranulation (FSC increase, CD11b up-regulation, and chemotaxis) were still triggered when pRNA was digested with RNase, and were not dependent on pRNA endocytosis or PMN priming. In conclusion, our results indicate that PMN sense live bacteria

  20. Prokaryotic RNA Associated to Bacterial Viability Induces Polymorphonuclear Neutrophil Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Castillo, Luis A.; Landoni, Verónica I.; Martire-Greco, Daiana; Milillo, M. Ayelén; Barrionuevo, Paula; Fernández, Gabriela C.

    2017-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) are the first cellular line of antibacterial host defense. They sense pathogens through recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by innate pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLR). The aim of this study was to investigate whether PMN sense bacterial viability and explore which viability factor could be involved in this phenomenon. For this purpose, different functions were evaluated in isolated human PMN using live Escherichia coli (Ec) and heat-killed Ec (HK-Ec). We found that bacterial viability was indispensable to induce PMN activation, as measured by forward-scatter (FSC) increase, CD11b surface expression, chemotaxis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. As uncapped non-polyadenylated prokaryotic mRNA has been recognized as a PAMP associated to bacterial viability by macrophages and dendritic cells, total prokaryotic RNA (pRNA) from live Ec was purified and used as a stimulus for PMN. pRNA triggered similar responses to those observed with live bacteria. No RNA could be isolated from HK-Ec, explaining the lack of effect of dead bacteria. Moreover, the supernatant of dead bacteria was able to induce PMN activation, and this was associated with the presence of pRNA in this supernatant, which is released in the killing process. The induction of bactericidal functions (ROS and NETosis) by pRNA were abolished when the supernatant of dead bacteria or isolated pRNA were treated with RNAse. Moreover, endocytosis was necessary for pRNA-induced ROS generation and NETosis, and priming was required for the induction of pRNA-induced ROS in whole blood. However, responses related to movement and degranulation (FSC increase, CD11b up-regulation, and chemotaxis) were still triggered when pRNA was digested with RNase, and were not dependent on pRNA endocytosis or PMN priming. In conclusion, our results indicate that PMN sense live bacteria

  1. Synthesis, characterizations and anti-bacterial activities of pure and Ag doped CdO nanoparticles by chemical precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, S.; Venkatesan, A.; Soundhirarajan, P.; Khatiwada, Chandra Prasad

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, synthesized pure and Ag (1%, 2%, and 3%) doped Cadmium Oxide (CdO) nanoparticles by chemical precipitation method. Then, the synthesized products were characterized by thermo gravimetric-differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, Ultra violet-Vis diffused reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis-DRS), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-rays (EDX) spectroscopy, and anti-bacterial activities, respectively. The transition temperatures and phase transitions of Cd(OH)2 to CdO at 400 °C was confirmed by TG-DTA analysis. The XRD patterns show the cubic shape and average particle sizes are 21, 40, 34, and 37 nm, respectively for pure and Ag doped samples. FT-IR study confirmed the presence of CdO and Ag at 677 and 459 cm-1, respectively. UV-Vis-DRS study shows the variation on direct and indirect band gaps. The surface morphologies and elemental analysis have been confirmed from SEM and with EDX. In addition, the synthesized products have been characterized by antibacterial activities against Gram-positive and negative bacteria. Further, the present investigation suggests that CdO nanoparticles have the great potential applications on various industrial and medical fields of research.

  2. Sun-stirred Kraken Mare: Circulation in Titan's seas induced by solar heating and methane precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokano, T.; Lorenz, R. D.

    2015-10-01

    Density-driven circulation in Titan's seas forced by solar heating and methane evaporation/precipitation is simulated by an ocean circulation model. If the sea is transparent to sunlight, solar heating can induce anti-clockwise gyres near the sea surface and clockwise gyres near the sea bottom. The gyres are in geostrophic balance between the radially symmetric pressure gradient force and Coriolis force. If instead the sea is turbid and most sunlight is absorbed near the sea surface, the sea gets stratified in warm seasons and the circulation remains weak. Strong summer precipitation at high latitudes causes compositional stratification and increase of the nearsurface methane mole fraction towards the north pole. The resultant latitudinal density contrast drives a meridional overturning with equatorward currents near the sea surface and poleward currents near the sea bottom. Weak precipitation induces gyres rather than meridional overturning.

  3. Calcium Carbonate Precipitation by Bacillus and Sporosarcina Strains Isolated from Concrete and Analysis of the Bacterial Community of Concrete.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Eom, Hyo Jung; Park, Chulwoo; Jung, Jaejoon; Shin, Bora; Kim, Wook; Chung, Namhyun; Choi, In-Geol; Park, Woojun

    2016-03-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (CCP) is a long-standing but re-emerging environmental engineering process for production of self-healing concrete, bioremediation, and long-term storage of CO2. CCP-capable bacteria, two Bacillus strains (JH3 and JH7) and one Sporosarcina strain (HYO08), were isolated from two samples of concrete and characterized phylogenetically. Calcium carbonate crystals precipitated by the three strains were morphologically distinct according to field emission scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry mapping confirmed biomineralization via extracellular calcium carbonate production. The three strains differed in their physiological characteristics: growth at alkali pH and high NaCl concentrations, and urease activity. Sporosarcina sp. HYO08 and Bacillus sp. JH7 were more alkali- and halotolerant, respectively. Analysis of the community from the same concrete samples using barcoded pyrosequencing revealed that the relative abundance of Bacillus and Sporosarcina species was low, which indicated low culturability of other dominant bacteria. This study suggests that calcium carbonate crystals with different properties can be produced by various CCP-capable strains, and other novel isolates await discovery.

  4. Accelerated microbial-induced CaCO3 precipitation in a defined co-culture of ureolytic and non-ureolytic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, D.; Tsesarsky, M.; Shamir, D.; Ronen, Z.

    2013-11-01

    Microbial-induced CaCO3 precipitation (MICP) is an innovative technique that harnesses bacterial activity for the modification of the physical properties of soils. Since stimulation of MICP by urea hydrolysis in natural soils is likely to be affected by interactions between ureolytic and non-ureolytic bacteria, we designed an experiment to examine the interactions between ureolytic and non-ureolytic bacteria and the effect of these interactions on MICP. An artificial groundwater-based rich medium was inoculated with two model species of bacteria, the ureolytic species Sporosarcina pasteurii and the non-ureolytic species Bacillus subtilis. The control treatment was inoculated with a pure culture of S. pasteurii. The following parameters were monitored during the course of the experiment: optical density, pH, and the evolution of ammonium, dissolved calcium, and dissolved inorganic carbon. The results showed that dissolved calcium was precipitated as CaCO3 faster in the mixed culture than in the control, despite less favorable chemical conditions in the mixed culture, i.e., lower pH and lower CO32- concentration. B. subtilis exhibited a considerably higher growth rate than S. pasteurii, resulting in higher density of bacterial cells in the mixed culture. We suggest that the presence of the non-ureolytic bacterial species, B. subtilis, accelerated the MICP process, via the supply of nucleation sites in the form of non-ureolytic bacterial cells.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum-Derived Uric Acid Precipitates Induce Maturation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    van de Hoef, Diana L.; Coppens, Isabelle; Holowka, Thomas; Ben Mamoun, Choukri; Branch, OraLee; Rodriguez, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Malaria is characterized by cyclical fevers and high levels of inflammation, and while an early inflammatory response contributes to parasite clearance, excessive and persistent inflammation can lead to severe forms of the disease. Here, we show that Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes contain uric acid precipitates in the cytoplasm of the parasitophorous vacuole, which are released when erythrocytes rupture. Uric acid precipitates are highly inflammatory molecules that are considered a danger signal for innate immunity and are the causative agent in gout. We determined that P. falciparum-derived uric acid precipitates induce maturation of human dendritic cells, increasing the expression of cell surface co-stimulatory molecules such as CD80 and CD86, while decreasing human leukocyte antigen-DR expression. In accordance with this, uric acid accounts for a significant proportion of the total stimulatory activity induced by parasite-infected erythrocytes. Moreover, the identification of uric acid precipitates in P. falciparum- and P. vivax-infected erythrocytes obtained directly from malaria patients underscores the in vivo and clinical relevance of our findings. Altogether, our data implicate uric acid precipitates as a potentially important contributor to the innate immune response to Plasmodium infection and may provide a novel target for adjunct therapies. PMID:23405174

  6. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions.

  7. Study of Bacterial Samples Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    W, A. Farooq; M, Atif; W, Tawfik; M, S. Alsalhi; Z, A. Alahmed; M, Sarfraz; J, P. Singh

    2014-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) technique has been applied to investigate two different types of bacteria, Escherichia coli (B1) and Micrococcus luteus (B2) deposited on glass slides using Spectrolaser 7000. LIBS spectra were analyzed using spectrolaser software. LIBS spectrum of glass substrate was compared with bacteria spectra. Ca, Mg, Na, K, P, S, Cl, Fe, Al, Mn, Cu, C, H and CN-band appeared in bacterial samples in air. Two carbon lines at 193.02 nm, 247.88 nm and one hydrogen line at 656.28 nm with intensity ratios of 1.9, 1.83 and 1.53 appeared in bacterial samples B1 and B2 respectively. Carbon and hydrogen are the important components of the bio-samples like bacteria and other cancer cells. Investigation on LIBS spectra of the samples in He and Ar atmospheres is also presented. Ni lines appeared only in B2 sample in Ar atmosphere. From the present experimental results we are able to show that LIBS technique has a potential in the identification and discrimination of different types of bacteria.

  8. The quantification and correction of wind-induced precipitation measurement errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochendorfer, John; Rasmussen, Roy; Wolff, Mareile; Baker, Bruce; Hall, Mark E.; Meyers, Tilden; Landolt, Scott; Jachcik, Al; Isaksen, Ketil; Brækkan, Ragnar; Leeper, Ronald

    2017-04-01

    Hydrologic measurements are important for both the short- and long-term management of water resources. Of the terms in the hydrologic budget, precipitation is typically the most important input; however, measurements of precipitation are subject to large errors and biases. For example, an all-weather unshielded weighing precipitation gauge can collect less than 50 % of the actual amount of solid precipitation when wind speeds exceed 5 m s-1. Using results from two different precipitation test beds, such errors have been assessed for unshielded weighing gauges and for weighing gauges employing four of the most common windshields currently in use. Functions to correct wind-induced undercatch were developed and tested. In addition, corrections for the single-Alter weighing gauge were developed using the combined results of two separate sites in Norway and the USA. In general, the results indicate that the functions effectively correct the undercatch bias that affects such precipitation measurements. In addition, a single function developed for the single-Alter gauges effectively decreased the bias at both sites, with the bias at the US site improving from -12 to 0 %, and the bias at the Norwegian site improving from -27 to -4 %. These correction functions require only wind speed and air temperature as inputs, and were developed for use in national and local precipitation networks, hydrological monitoring, roadway and airport safety work, and climate change research. The techniques used to develop and test these transfer functions at more than one site can also be used for other more comprehensive studies, such as the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment (WMO-SPICE).

  9. Gut microbiome perturbations induced by bacterial infection affect arsenic biotransformation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Kun; Cable, Peter Hans; Abo, Ryan Phillip; Ru, Hongyu; Graffam, Michelle E.; Schieper, Katherine Ann; Parry, Nicola M.A.; Levine, Stuart; Bodnar, Wanda M; Wishnok, John S.; Styblo, Miroslav; Swenberg, James A; Fox, James G.; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to arsenic affects large human populations worldwide, and has been associated with a long list of human diseases, including skin, bladder, lung, and liver cancers, diabetes, and cardiovascular disorders. In addition, there are large individual differences in susceptibility to arsenic-induced diseases, which are frequently associated with different patterns of arsenic metabolism. Several underlying mechanisms, such as genetic polymorphisms and epigenetics, have been proposed, as these factors closely impact the individuals' capacity to metabolize arsenic. In this context, the role of the gut microbiome in directly metabolizing arsenic and triggering systemic responses in diverse organs raises the possibility that perturbations of the gut microbial communities affect the spectrum of metabolized arsenic species and subsequent toxicological effects. In this study, we used an animal model with altered gut microbiome induced by bacterial infection, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS)-based arsenic speciation to examine the effect of gut microbiome perturbations on the biotransformation of arsenic. Metagenomics sequencing revealed that bacterial infection significantly perturbed the gut microbiome composition in C57BL/6 mice, which in turn resulted in altered spectra of arsenic metabolites in urine, with inorganic arsenic species, methylated and thiolated arsenic being perturbed. These data clearly illustrated that gut microbiome phenotypes significantly affected arsenic metabolic reactions, including reduction, methylation and thiolation. These findings improve our understanding of how infectious diseases and environmental exposure interact, and may also provide novel insight regarding the gut microbiome composition as a new risk factor of individual susceptibility to environmental chemicals. PMID:24134150

  10. Bioremediation of Pb-contaminated soil based on microbially induced calcite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Achal, Varenyam; Pan, Xiangliang; Zhang, Daoyong; Fu, Qinglong

    2012-02-01

    To remediate lead (Pb)-contaminated soils, it is proposed that microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) would provide the best alternative to other remediation technologies. In this study, Pb bioremediation in soils was investigated using the calcite-precipitating bacterium Kocuria flava. Results indicate that the Pb is primarily associated with the carbonate fraction in bioremediated soil samples. The bioavailability of Pb in contaminated soil was reduced so that the potential stress of Pb was alleviated. This research provides insight into the geochemistry occurring in the MICP-based Pb-remediated soils, which will help in remediation decisions.

  11. Ground Motions Induced by Precipitation and Fluvial Processes: An Example from Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chu-Fang; Chi, Wu-Cheng; Lai, Ying-Ju

    2016-04-01

    Ground motions can be induced by weather-related processes. Analyzing such signals might help quantify those natural processes. Here, we used continuous seismic, meteorological and stream data to analyze broadband ground motions during heavy precipitation events in Taiwan. We detected long period seismic signals in drainage basins during two meteorological cases: Typhoon Morakot in 2009 and East Asian rainy season in 2012. The amplitudes of the seismic waveform correlate well with the amount of the precipitation and the derivative of water level and discharge in a nearby river. We proposed that these seismic signals were induced by ground tilt induced by the loading from the increased water volume in the nearby river. Furthermore, we used the seismic data to estimate and quantify the strength of precipitation during such events. The seismically derived precipitation correlates well with the observed meteorological data. It shows that the long period seismic data may be used to monitor rainfall in real-time. Next, we will try to test our tilt hypothesis using other independent datasets.

  12. Direct measurement of precipitate induced strain in an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy with aberration corrected transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ying, X R; Du, Y X; Song, M; Lu, N; Ye, H Q

    2016-11-01

    Precipitates and their associated strain fields significantly influence mechanical properties and, consequently, the industrial performance of aluminum alloys. In this work, we present a direct measurement of strains induced by η' and η precipitates in an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy using aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and quantitative strain analysis. The results demonstrate that the strain induced by precipitates in the Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy shows significant tensile strains perpendicular to the longitudinal direction of the precipitate discs on the side of the discs and along the longitudinal direction at both ends of the η' and η precipitates. This strain field can be described by an equivalent dislocation model, in which the lattice mismatch between the precipitate and the matrix is equivalent to a series of dislocation pairs along the precipitate/matrix interfaces.

  13. Experimental and visual research on the microbial induced carbonate precipitation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Guo, Xu-Jing; Li, Yun-Zhen; Huang, Tao

    2017-12-01

    Microbial induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) is a common occurrence of geochemistry influences in many fields, such as biological, geographical, and engineering systems. However, the processes that control interactions between carbonate biomineralization and biofilm properties are poorly understood. We develop a method for real time, in situ and nondestructive imaging with confocal scanning microscopy. This method provides a possible way to observe biomineralization process and the morphology of biomineralized deposits within biofilms. We use this method to show calcite biominerals produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms which extremely change biofilm structures. The distribution of calcite precipitation produced in situ biomineralization is highly heterogeneous in biofilms and also to occur primarily on the bottom of biofilms. It is distinct from those usual expectations that mineral started to precipitate from surface of biofilm. Our results reveal that biomineralization plays a comprehensive regulation function on biofilm architecture and properties.

  14. How Well do we Measure Precipitation? 'Wind-Induced Undercatch' Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, M.; Colli, M.; Dutton, M.; O'Donnell, G. M.; Wilkinson, M.; Black, A.; Kilsby, C. G.; Quinn, P. F.; Lanza, L. G.; Stagnaro, M.; O'Connell, P. E.

    2016-12-01

    Data from precipitation gauges are critical for flood forecasting and flood risk management; radar calibration and numerical weather prediction models; and water resource management and hydrological modelling. They are often considered to provide the most accurate practicable measure of precipitation at a point in space and time, but remain subject to considerable errors. Inaccuracies in measurements are compounded in modelling applications by producing potentially misleading or incorrect results; it is therefore of utmost importance to understand uncertainty in observations. All precipitation gauges mounted above the ground surface present an obstruction to the prevailing wind. This causes an acceleration of wind above the orifice of a gauge resulting in what is commonly referred to as `wind-induced undercatch'. This is where precipitation is deflected away from the orifice and lands 'downstream' of the area represented by the gauge measurement, which reduces its collection efficiency (CE). The physical shape of a gauge bears a significant impact on its CE. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) simulations are used to investigate how different shapes of precipitation gauge are affected by the wind. The CFD modelling is supported by high-resolution field measurements at several exposed `Hydro-Met' research stations in the UK. These sites are occupied by a range of precipitation gauges, scrutinised in the CFD analysis, which have different shapes and are mounted at varying heights. The wind-induced undercatch present within a number of large UK storms, which is not captured by operational gauge networks in the UK, is quantified and presented in this study. The combination of results from CFD modelling and the field studies show that gauge shape and mounting height significantly affect the extent of the `undercatching'. `Aerodynamic' gauges following a `champagne flute' or a `funnel' profile were demonstrated by both to have significant advantages over conventional gauge

  15. Atmospheric ionization induced by precipitating electrons: Comparison of CRAC:EPII model with a parametrization model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artamonov, A. A.; Mishev, A. L.; Usoskin, I. G.

    2016-11-01

    Results of a comparison of a new model CRAC:EPII (Cosmic Ray Atmospheric Cascade: Electron Precipitation Induced Ionization) with a commonly used parametric model of atmospheric ionization is presented. The CRAC:EPII is based on a Monte Carlo simulation of precipitating electrons propagation and interaction with matter in the Earth's atmosphere. It explicitly considers energy deposit: ionization, pair production, Compton scattering, generation of Bremsstrahlung high energy photons, photo-ionization and annihilation of positrons, multiple scattering as physical processes accordingly. Propagation of precipitating electrons and their interactions with air is simulated with the GEANT4 simulation tool PLANETOCOSMICS code using NRLMSISE-00 atmospheric model. Ionization yields are computed and compared with a parametrization model for different energies of incident precipitating energetic electrons, using simulated fluxes of mono-energetic particles. A good agreement between the two models is achieved in the mesosphere but the contribution of Bremsstrahlung in the stratosphere, which is not accounted for in the parametric models, is found significant. As an example, we calculated profiles of the ion production rates in the middle and upper atmosphere (below 100 km) on the basis of balloon-born measured spectra of precipitating electrons for 30-October-2002 and 07-January-2004.

  16. The variability of temperature and precipitation over Korean Peninsula induced by off-equatorial western Pacific precipitation during boreal summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yerim; Ham, Yoo-Geun

    2016-04-01

    The convection activity and variability are active in Tropic-subtropic area because of equatorial warm pool. The variability's impacts on not only subtropic also mid-latitude. The impact effects on through teleconnection between equatorial and mid-latitude like Pacific-Japan(PJ) pattern. In this paper, two groups are divided based on PJ pattern and JJA Korean precipitation for the analysis that Korean precipitation is affected by PJ pattern. 'PJ+NegKorpr' is indicated when PJ pattern occur that JJA(Jun-July_August) Korean precipitation has negative value. In this case, positive precipitation in subtropic is expanded to central Pacific. And the positive precipitation's pattern is increasing toward north. Because, the subtropical south-eastly wind is forming subtropical precipitation's pattern through cold Kelvin wave is expanding eastward. Cold Kelvin wave is because of Indian negative SST. Also, Korea has negative moisture advection and north-eastly is the role that is moving high-latitude's cold and dry air to Korea. So strong high pressure is formed in Korea. The strong high pressure involves that short wave energy is increasing on surface. As a result, The surface temperature is increased on Korea. But the other case, that 'PJ_Only' case, is indicated when PJ pattern occur and JJA Korean precipitation doesn't have negative value over significant level. The subtropic precipitation's pattern in 'PJ_Only' shows precipitation is confined in western Pacific and expended northward to 25°N near 130°E. And tail of precipitation is toward equatorial(south-eastward). Also, Korean a little positive moisture advection and south-westly is the role that is moving low-latitude's warm and wet air to Korea. So weak high pressure is formed in Korea. The weak high pressure influence amount of short wave energy, so Korean surface temperature is lower. In addition, the case of 'PJ_Only' and Pacific Decal Oscillation(PDO) are occur at the same time has negative impact in Korea

  17. Precipitation of energetic neutral atoms and induced non-thermal escape fluxes from the Martian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Lewkow, N. R.; Kharchenko, V.

    2014-08-01

    The precipitation of energetic neutral atoms, produced through charge exchange collisions between solar wind ions and thermal atmospheric gases, is investigated for the Martian atmosphere. Connections between parameters of precipitating fast ions and resulting escape fluxes, altitude-dependent energy distributions of fast atoms and their coefficients of reflection from the Mars atmosphere, are established using accurate cross sections in Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Distributions of secondary hot (SH) atoms and molecules, induced by precipitating particles, have been obtained and applied for computations of the non-thermal escape fluxes. A new collisional database on accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections, required for description of the energy-momentum transfer in collisions of precipitating particles and production of non-thermal atmospheric atoms and molecules, is reported with analytic fitting equations. Three-dimensional MC simulations with accurate energy-angular-dependent cross sections have been carried out to track large ensembles of energetic atoms in a time-dependent manner as they propagate into the Martian atmosphere and transfer their energy to the ambient atoms and molecules. Results of the MC simulations on the energy-deposition altitude profiles, reflection coefficients, and time-dependent atmospheric heating, obtained for the isotropic hard sphere and anisotropic quantum cross sections, are compared. Atmospheric heating rates, thermalization depths, altitude profiles of production rates, energy distributions of SH atoms and molecules, and induced escape fluxes have been determined.

  18. Ethanol or/and captopril-induced precipitation and secondary conformational changes of human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Li, Mei-Jane; Wei, Yen-Shan

    2004-11-01

    We determined the secondary structure of solid-state native human serum albumin (HSA) and its precipitates induced by ethanol, captopril, or a captopril/ethanol mixture. A transmission Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy equipped with a thermal analyzer was used. The secondary structural composition of solid-state native HSA was 54% α-helices (1655 cm -1), 22% β-turns (1679 cm -1), and 23% β-sheets (1633 cm -1). After ethanol treatment, a new peak was observed at 1690 cm -1, and the peak at 1633 cm -1 was more apparent in the HSA precipitates. The corresponding compositions consisted of 59% α-helices, 17% β-turns, and 24% β-sheets. After treatment with captopril with or without ethanol, the percentage of α-helices and β-turns decreased in both HSA precipitates, but the percentage of β-sheets increased. The temperature-dependent structural transformation from α-helices/random coils to β-sheets for the solid-state HSA samples occurred at markedly different onset temperatures. The onset temperature for native HSA was 85 °C, and that for HSA precipitates obtained from ethanol, captopril, or captopril/ethanol was 100, 48 or 57 °C, respectively. The thermal-induced structural transformation from α-helices/random coils to β-sheets implies a partial unfolding structure in these HSA samples.

  19. Effects of turbulence-induced collision enhancement on heavy precipitation: The 21 September 2010 case over the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyunho; Baik, Jong-Jin

    2016-10-01

    The effects of turbulence-induced collision enhancement (TICE) on a heavy precipitation event that occurred on 21 September 2010 over the middle Korean Peninsula are examined. For this purpose, an updated bin microphysics scheme incorporating TICE for drop-drop and drop-graupel collisions is implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The numerical simulation shows some differences in the strong precipitation system compared to the observations but generally captures well the important features of observed synoptic conditions, surface precipitation, and radar reflectivity. While the change in domain-averaged surface precipitation amount due to TICE is small and similar to that due to small initial perturbations, the spatial distribution of surface precipitation amount is somewhat altered due to TICE. The surface precipitation amount is increased due to TICE in the area where the largest surface precipitation occurred, but the effects of different flow realizations also contribute to the changes. TICE accelerates the coalescence between small cloud droplets, which induces a decrease in condensation and an increase in excess water vapor transported upward. This causes an increase in relative humidity with respect to ice at high altitudes, hence increasing the depositional growth of ice particles. Therefore, the ice mass increases due to TICE, and this increase induces the increases in riming and melting of ice particles. A series of these microphysical changes due to TICE are regarded as partially contributing to the increase in surface precipitation amount in some areas, hence inducing alterations in the spatial distribution of surface precipitation amount.

  20. Femtosecond laser filament induced condensation and precipitation in a cloud chamber

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jingjing; Liu, Jiansheng; Liang, Hong; Chen, Yu; Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Jingwei; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Chin, See Leang

    2016-01-01

    A unified picture of femtosecond laser induced precipitation in a cloud chamber is proposed. Among the three principal consequences of filamentation from the point of view of thermodynamics, namely, generation of chemicals, shock waves and thermal air flow motion (due to convection), the last one turns out to be the principal cause. Much of the filament induced chemicals would stick onto the existing background CCN’s (Cloud Condensation Nuclei) through collision making the latter more active. Strong mixing of air having a large temperature gradient would result in supersaturation in which the background CCN’s would grow efficiently into water/ice/snow. This conclusion was supported by two independent experiments using pure heating or a fan to imitate the laser-induced thermal effect or the strong air flow motion, respectively. Without the assistance of any shock wave and chemical CCN’s arising from laser filament, condensation and precipitation occurred. Meanwhile we believe that latent heat release during condensation /precipitation would enhance the air flow for mixing. PMID:27143227

  1. Femtosecond laser filament induced condensation and precipitation in a cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Ju, Jingjing; Liu, Jiansheng; Liang, Hong; Chen, Yu; Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Jingwei; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Chin, See Leang

    2016-05-05

    A unified picture of femtosecond laser induced precipitation in a cloud chamber is proposed. Among the three principal consequences of filamentation from the point of view of thermodynamics, namely, generation of chemicals, shock waves and thermal air flow motion (due to convection), the last one turns out to be the principal cause. Much of the filament induced chemicals would stick onto the existing background CCN's (Cloud Condensation Nuclei) through collision making the latter more active. Strong mixing of air having a large temperature gradient would result in supersaturation in which the background CCN's would grow efficiently into water/ice/snow. This conclusion was supported by two independent experiments using pure heating or a fan to imitate the laser-induced thermal effect or the strong air flow motion, respectively. Without the assistance of any shock wave and chemical CCN's arising from laser filament, condensation and precipitation occurred. Meanwhile we believe that latent heat release during condensation /precipitation would enhance the air flow for mixing.

  2. Femtosecond laser filament induced condensation and precipitation in a cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Jingjing; Liu, Jiansheng; Liang, Hong; Chen, Yu; Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Wang, Jingwei; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Chin, See Leang

    2016-05-01

    A unified picture of femtosecond laser induced precipitation in a cloud chamber is proposed. Among the three principal consequences of filamentation from the point of view of thermodynamics, namely, generation of chemicals, shock waves and thermal air flow motion (due to convection), the last one turns out to be the principal cause. Much of the filament induced chemicals would stick onto the existing background CCN’s (Cloud Condensation Nuclei) through collision making the latter more active. Strong mixing of air having a large temperature gradient would result in supersaturation in which the background CCN’s would grow efficiently into water/ice/snow. This conclusion was supported by two independent experiments using pure heating or a fan to imitate the laser-induced thermal effect or the strong air flow motion, respectively. Without the assistance of any shock wave and chemical CCN’s arising from laser filament, condensation and precipitation occurred. Meanwhile we believe that latent heat release during condensation /precipitation would enhance the air flow for mixing.

  3. Starvation-induced effects on bacterial surface characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kjelleberg, S; Hermansson, M

    1984-09-01

    Changes in bacterial surface hydrophobicity, charge, and degree of irreversible binding to glass surfaces of seven marine isolates were followed during starvation. The degree of hydrophobicity was measured by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and by two-phase separation in a hexadecane-water system, whereas changes in charge were measured by electrostatic interaction chromatography. All isolates underwent the starvation-induced responses of fragmentation, which is defined as division without growth, and continuous size reduction, which results in populations with increased numbers of smaller cells. The latter process was also responsible for a significant proportion of the total drop in cell volume; this was observed by noting the biovolume (the average cell multiplied by the number of bacteria) of a population after various times of starvation. Four strains exhibited increases in both hydrophobicity and irreversible binding, initiated after different starvation times. The most hydrophilic and most hydrophobic isolates both showed a small increase in the degree of irreversible binding after only 5 h, followed by a small decrease after 22 h. Their hydrophobicity remained constant, however, throughout the entire starvation period. On the other hand, one strain, EF190, increased its hydrophobicity after 5 h of starvation, although the degree of irreversible binding remained constant. Charge effects could not be generally related to the increase in irreversible binding. Scanning electron micrographs showed a large increase in surface roughness throughout the starvation period for all strains that showed marked changes in physicochemical characteristics.

  4. Sensitivity of the Tropical Pacific Ocean to Precipitation Induced Freshwater Flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song; Lau, K.-M.; Schopf, Paul S.

    1999-01-01

    We have performed a series of experiments using an ocean model to study the sensitivity of tropical Pacific Ocean to variations in precipitation induced freshwater fluxes. Variations in these fluxes arise from natural causes on all time scales. In addition, estimates of these fluxes are uncertain because of differences among measurement techniques. The model used is a quasi-isopycnal model, covering the Pacific from 40 S to 40 N. The surface forcing is constructed from observed wind stress, evaporation, precipitation, and surface temperature (SST) fields. The heat flux is produced with an iterative technique so as to maintain the model close to the observed climatology, but with only a weak damping to that climatology. Climatological estimates of evaporation are combined with various estimates of precipitation to determine the net surface freshwater flux. Results indicate that increased freshwater input decreases salinity as expected, but increases temperatures in the upper ocean. Using the freshwater flux estimated from the Microwave Sounding Unit leads to a warming of up to 0.6 C in the western Pacific over a case with zero net freshwater flux. SST is sensitive to the discrepancies among different precipitation observations, with root-mean-square differences in SST on the order of 0.2-0.3 C. The change in SST is more pronounced in the eastern Pacific, with differences of over 1 C found among the various precipitation products. Interannual variation in precipitation during El Nino events leads to increased warming. During the winter of 1982-83, freshwater flux accounts for about 0.4 C (approximately 10-15% of the maximum warming) of the surface warming in the central-eastern Pacific. Thus, the error of SST caused by the discrepancies in precipitation products is more than half of the SST anomaly produced by the interannual variability of observed precipitation. Further experiments, in which freshwater flux anomalies are imposed in the western, central, and eastern

  5. Irradiation-induced precipitation and mechanical properties of vanadium alloys at <430 C

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Gazda, J.; Smith, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    Recent attention to V-base alloys has focused on the effect of low-temperature (<430 C) irradiation on tensile and impact properties of V-4Cr-4Ti. In previous studies, dislocation channeling, which causes flow localization and severe loss of work-hardening capability, has been attributed to dense, irradiation-induced precipitation of very fine particles. However, efforts to identify the precipitates were unsuccessful until now. In this study, analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was conducted on unalloyed V, V-5Ti, V-3Ti-1Si, and V-4Cr-4Ti specimens that were irradiated at <430 C in conventional and dynamic helium charging experiments. By means of dark-field imaging and selected-area-diffraction analysis, the characteristic precipitates were identified to be (V,Ti{sub 1{minus}x})(C,O,N). In V-3Ti-1Si, precipitation of (V,Ti{sub 1{minus}x})(C,O,N) was negligible at <430 C, and as a result, dislocation channeling did not occur and work-hardening capability was high.

  6. Ifosfamide-induced Encephalopathy Precipitated by Aprepitant: A Rarely Manifested Side Effect of Drug Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kataria, Pritam Sureshchandra; Kendre, Pradip Piraji; Patel, Apurva A.

    2017-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) toxicity has been reported in approximately 10%–30% of patients receiving intravenous infusions of ifosfamide. Encephalopathy is a rare but serious CNS adverse reaction in these patients, and although usually transient and reversible, may cause persistent neurological dysfunction or death. Clinical features range from fatigue and confusion to coma and death. Ifosfamide forms backbone of various treatment regimens including curative treatment and palliative chemotherapy regimen. Precipitation of ifosfamide-induced encephalopathy (IIE) by aprepitant has been reported in the literature rarely. Ifosfamide is moderately emetogenic; hence, aprepitant is used to prevent emesis induced by ifosfamide. We here report a case where a patient of recurrent B-cell Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic lymphoma was given aprepitant to prevent ifosfamide-induced emesis. After 24 h of ifosfamide infusion, the patient developed symptoms of encephalopathy, i.e., headache, vomiting, and one episode of seizure which was followed by disoriented behavior. After doing all routine investigations and neuroimaging, the diagnosis of IIE was kept on clinical grounds, and after looking for the various factors, we came across injection fosaprepitant as the precipitating factor. On the clinical grounds, the patient was treated with hydration and injection methylene blue for above complaints, and the patient recovered without any residual deficit within 48–72 h. Hence, in the presence of causative agent, i.e., ifosfamide and precipitating agent injection fosaprepitant with negative imaging and normal laboratory parameters as well as the early and good response to methylene blue, the diagnosis of IIE precipitated by aprepitant was confirmed. PMID:28405136

  7. A quantitative analysis of microbially-induced calcite precipitation employing artificial and naturally-occurring sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokier, Stephen; Krieg Dosier, Ginger

    2013-04-01

    Microbially-induced calcite precipitation is a strong candidate for the production of sustainable construction materials. The process employs the microbe Sporosarcina pasteurii as an agent to microbially mediate the precipitation of calcium carbonate to bind unconsolidated sediment. As this process can be achieved under ambient temperature conditions and can utilise a wide variety of easily-available sediments, potentially including waste materials, it is envisioned that this procedure could significantly reduce carbon-dioxide emissions in the construction industry. This study describes and quantifies the precipitation of calcite cement in a range of naturally-occurring sediments compared with a control matrix. The study establishes the optimum treatment time for effective cement precipitation in order to produce a material that meets the standards required for construction whilst keeping economic and environmental outlays at a minimum. The 'control sediment' employed industrial-grade glass beads with a grain size range of 595-1180 microns (16-30 US mesh). Sporosarcina pasteurii were mixed in a solution of urea and calcium chloride and then inoculated into the control sediment. The microbes attach to the surface of the sediment grains and employ urea as a source of energy to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide. By so doing, they increase the pH of the solution allowing calcium carbonate to precipitate at the cell walls to act as nucleation points facilitating the precipitation of cements as a grain-coating and biocementing the unconsolidated sediment. The solution treatment was repeated at eight hour intervals with samples removed for detailed analysis after each every five consecutive treatments (i.e. 40 hours). The process was repeated to produce 20 samples with treatment times between 40 and 800 hours. Cemented samples were impregnated with blue epoxy and examined petrographically to monitor cement development. Modal analysis was undertaken on each cemented

  8. Search for lightning-induced electron precipitation with rocket-borne photometers

    SciTech Connect

    Massey, R.D.; McCarthy, M.P.; Parks, G.K.

    1990-11-01

    Photometers at 3,914{angstrom} and 5,577{angstrom} and an optical imager were part of an experimental package launched on a sounding rocket in the 1987 Wave Induced Particle Precipitation (WIPP) campaign at Wallops Island, Virginia. The objective was to measure lightning-induced electron precipitation (LEP) by means of its optical signature. This was the first attempt to measure LEP using rocket-borne optical instrumentation. Launch criteria included nearby thunderstorm activity and ground-based observations of Trimpi events. Lightning flashes are clearly discernible in the data. The photometer data was also characterized by large spin and precession modulations in the photon count rate, consistent with elevated steady particle fluxes in the northern portion of the instrument field of view. No evidence of LEP was observed by the photometers or onboard particle detectors (Arnoldy and Kinter, 1989). Analysis of the data has enabled the authors to place an upper limit of 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} ergs-cm{sup {minus}2}-sec{sup {minus}1} on any burst precipitation energy flux that many have occurred during the rocket flight in the regions explored by the photometers.

  9. Orientation relationship formed during irradiation induced precipitation of W in Cu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Kaiping; Averback, Robert S.; Bellon, Pascal; Vo, Nhon; Ashkenazy, Yinon; Dillon, Shen J.

    2014-11-01

    Irradiation of dilute Cu-W alloys with 1.8 MeV Kr+ between 300 K and 573 K is found to induce nucleation of a high density of W nano-precipitates. HRTEM and aberration-corrected STEM reveal that the ∼3 nm precipitates have a preferred orientation relationship with the matrix. A variant of the Bain relationship exists with preferred alignment occurring along Cu<2 2 0> || W<010>, with small angular differences amongst the particles, which is compensated by interfacial dislocations or strain. The formation mechanism for such an orientation relationship is rationalized on the basis that small W clusters form within the local melt of an energetic displacements cascade, resulting in the partial alignment of the nanoprecipitates with the Cu lattice as the Cu solidifies.

  10. Fungal innate immunity induced by bacterial microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plants and animals detect bacterial presence through Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns (MAMPs) which induce an innate immune response. The field of fungal-bacterial interaction at the molecular level is still in its infancy and very little is known about fungal molecular responses to bacteria, a...

  11. Image-based Modeling of Biofilm-induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J. M.; Rothman, A.; Jackson, B.; Klapper, I.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.

    2013-12-01

    Pore scale biological processes in the subsurface environment are important to understand in relation to many engineering applications including environmental contaminant remediation, geologic carbon sequestration, and petroleum production. Specifically, biofilm induced calcium carbonate precipitation has been identified as an attractive option to reduce permeability in a lasting way in the subsurface. This technology may be able to replace typical cement-based grouting in some circumstances; however, pore-scale processes must be better understood for it to be applied in a controlled manor. The work presented will focus on efforts to observe biofilm growth and ureolysis-induced mineral precipitation in micro-fabricated flow cells combined with finite element modelling as a tool to predict local chemical gradients of interest (see figure). We have been able to observe this phenomenon over time using a novel model organism that is able to hydrolyse urea and express a fluorescent protein allowing for non-invasive observation over time with confocal microscopy. The results of this study show the likely existence of a wide range of local saturation indices even in a small (1 cm length scale) experimental system. Interestingly, the locations of high predicted index do not correspond to the locations of higher precipitation density, highlighting the need for further understanding. Figure 1 - A micro-fabricated flow cell containing biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation. (A) Experimental results: Active biofilm is in green and dark circles are calcium carbonate crystals. Note the channeling behavior in the top of the image, leaving a large hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm mass. (B) Finite element model: The prediction of relative saturation of calcium carbonate (as calcite). Fluid enters the system at a low saturation state (blue) but areas of high supersaturation (red) are predicted within the hydraulically inactive area in the biofilm. If only effluent

  12. Decolorization of acid and basic dyes: understanding the metabolic degradation and cell-induced adsorption/precipitation by Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Cerboneschi, Matteo; Corsi, Massimo; Bianchini, Roberto; Bonanni, Marco; Tegli, Stefania

    2015-10-01

    Escherichia coli strain DH5α was successfully employed in the decolorization of commercial anthraquinone and azo dyes, belonging to the general classes of acid or basic dyes. The bacteria showed an aptitude to survive at different pH values on any dye solution tested, and a rapid decolorization was obtained under aerobic conditions for the whole collection of dyes. A deep investigation about the mode of action of E. coli was carried out to demonstrate that dye decolorization mainly occurred via three different pathways, specifically bacterial induced precipitation, cell wall adsorption, and metabolism, whose weight was correlated with the chemical nature of the dye. In the case of basic azo dyes, an unexpected fast decolorization was observed after just 2-h postinoculation under aerobic conditions, suggesting that metabolism was the main mechanism involved in basic azo dye degradation, as unequivocally demonstrated by mass spectrometric analysis. The reductive cleavage of the azo group by E. coli on basic azo dyes was also further demonstrated by the inhibition of decolorization occurring when glucose was added to the dye solution. Moreover, no residual toxicity was found in the E. coli-treated basic azo dye solutions by performing Daphnia magna acute toxicity assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that E. coli can be simply exploited for its natural metabolic pathways, without applying any recombinant technology. The high versatility and adaptability of this bacterium could encourage its involvement in industrial bioremediation of textile and leather dyeing wastewaters.

  13. Membrane vesicles nucleate mineralo-organic nanoparticles and induce carbonate apatite precipitation in human body fluids.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Martel, Jan; Cheng, Wei-Yun; He, Chao-Chih; Ojcius, David M; Young, John D

    2013-10-18

    Recent studies indicate that membrane vesicles (MVs) secreted by various cells are associated with human diseases, including arthritis, atherosclerosis, cancer, and chronic kidney disease. The possibility that MVs may induce the formation of mineralo-organic nanoparticles (NPs) and ectopic calcification has not been investigated so far. Here, we isolated MVs ranging in size between 20 and 400 nm from human serum and FBS using ultracentrifugation and sucrose gradient centrifugation. The MV preparations consisted of phospholipid-bound vesicles containing the serum proteins albumin, fetuin-A, and apolipoprotein A1; the mineralization-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase; and the exosome proteins TNFR1 and CD63. Notably, we observed that MVs induced mineral precipitation following inoculation and incubation in cell culture medium. The mineral precipitates consisted of round, mineralo-organic NPs containing carbonate hydroxyapatite, similar to previous descriptions of the so-called nanobacteria. Annexin V-immunogold staining revealed that the calcium-binding lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the external surface of serum MVs. Treatment of MVs with an anti-PS antibody significantly decreased their mineral seeding activity, suggesting that PS may provide nucleating sites for calcium phosphate deposition on the vesicles. These results indicate that MVs may represent nucleating agents that induce the formation of mineral NPs in body fluids. Given that mineralo-organic NPs represent precursors of calcification in vivo, our results suggest that MVs may initiate ectopic calcification in the human body.

  14. Correlation between hypocenter depth, antecedent precipitation and earthquake-induced landslide spatial distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuoka, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Eisuke

    2017-04-01

    Since Keefer published the paper on earthquake magnitude and affected area, maximum epicentral/fault distance of induced landslide distribution in 1984, showing the envelope of plots, a lot of studies on this topic have been conducted. It has been generally supposed that landslides have been triggered by shallow quakes and more landslides are likely to occur with heavy rainfalls immediately before the quake. In order to confirm this, we have collected 22 case records of earthquake-induced landslide distribution in Japan and examined the effect of hypocenter depth and antecedent precipitation. Earthquake magnitude by JMA (Japan Meteorological Agency) of the cases are from 4.5 to 9.0. Analysis on hycpocenter depth showed the deeper quake cause wider distribution. Antecedent precipitation was evaluated using the Soil Water Index (SWI), which was developed by JMA for issuing landslide alert. We could not find meaningful correlation between SWI and the earthquake-induced landslide distribution. Additionally, we found that smaller minimum size of collected landslides results in wider distribution especially between 1,000 to 100,000 m2.

  15. Membrane Vesicles Nucleate Mineralo-organic Nanoparticles and Induce Carbonate Apatite Precipitation in Human Body Fluids*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Yeu; Martel, Jan; Cheng, Wei-Yun; He, Chao-Chih; Ojcius, David M.; Young, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that membrane vesicles (MVs) secreted by various cells are associated with human diseases, including arthritis, atherosclerosis, cancer, and chronic kidney disease. The possibility that MVs may induce the formation of mineralo-organic nanoparticles (NPs) and ectopic calcification has not been investigated so far. Here, we isolated MVs ranging in size between 20 and 400 nm from human serum and FBS using ultracentrifugation and sucrose gradient centrifugation. The MV preparations consisted of phospholipid-bound vesicles containing the serum proteins albumin, fetuin-A, and apolipoprotein A1; the mineralization-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase; and the exosome proteins TNFR1 and CD63. Notably, we observed that MVs induced mineral precipitation following inoculation and incubation in cell culture medium. The mineral precipitates consisted of round, mineralo-organic NPs containing carbonate hydroxyapatite, similar to previous descriptions of the so-called nanobacteria. Annexin V-immunogold staining revealed that the calcium-binding lipid phosphatidylserine (PS) was exposed on the external surface of serum MVs. Treatment of MVs with an anti-PS antibody significantly decreased their mineral seeding activity, suggesting that PS may provide nucleating sites for calcium phosphate deposition on the vesicles. These results indicate that MVs may represent nucleating agents that induce the formation of mineral NPs in body fluids. Given that mineralo-organic NPs represent precursors of calcification in vivo, our results suggest that MVs may initiate ectopic calcification in the human body. PMID:23990473

  16. Harnessing a radiation inducible promoter of Deinococcus radiodurans for enhanced precipitation of uranium.

    PubMed

    Misra, Chitra Seetharam; Mukhopadhyaya, Rita; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2014-11-10

    Bioremediation is an attractive option for the treatment of radioactive waste. We provide a proof of principle for augmentation of uranium bioprecipitation using the radiation inducible promoter, Pssb from Deinococcus radiodurans. Recombinant cells of D. radiodurans carrying acid phosphatase gene, phoN under the regulation of Pssb when exposed to 7 kGy gamma radiation at two different dose rates of 56.8 Gy/min and 4 Gy/min, showed 8-9 fold increase in acid phosphatase activity. Highest whole cell PhoN activity was obtained after 2h in post irradiation recovery following 8 kGy of high dose rate radiation. Such cells showed faster removal of high concentrations of uranium than recombinant cells expressing PhoN under a radiation non-inducible deinococcal promoter, PgroESL and could precipitate uranium even after continuous exposure to 0.6 Gy/min gamma radiation for 10 days. Radiation induced recombinant D. radiodurans cells when lyophilized retained high levels of PhoN activity and precipitated uranium efficiently. These results highlight the importance of using a suitable promoter for removal of radionuclides from solution.

  17. Numerical investigation of microbially induced calcite precipitation as a leakage mitigation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, Johannes; Cunningham, Alfred; Helmig, Rainer; Ebigbo, Anozie; Class, Holger

    2013-04-01

    One of the key issues of carbon capture and storage (CCS) is the long term security of the storage site, i.e. the permanent enclosure of the stored carbon dioxide (CO2) in the target reservoir. Amongst the different storage mechanisms, cap rock integrity is crucial for preventing leakage of CO2. Leakage to shallower regions or back to the atmosphere would reduce the efficiency and pose a threat to the environment, for example to groundwater resources or human residence areas. Ureolysis-driven microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) is one of the technologies in the current focus of research aiming at mitigation of potential leakage by sealing high permeability zones in cap rocks. In our current work, a numerical model has been developed and validated using MICP experiments in sand filled columns under atmospheric pressure conditions [1]. Based on new experimental data under reservoir pressure conditions in sandstone rock cores [2] the model will be improved and optimized. The focus is on extending the model to 3-D radial flow and the validation of the model under conditions relevant for field scale CCS. The improved numerical model will be used to design field scale MICP experiments and evaluate the results of those experiments to get a better understanding of the potential of MICP as a sealing technology. [1] Ebigbo A., Phillips A., Gerlach R., Helmig R., Cunningham A.B., Class H., and Spangler L. H. (2012), Darcy-scale modeling of microbially induced carbonate mineral precipitation in sand columns, Water Resour. Res., 48 [2] Phillips A., Lauchnor E., Eldring J., Esposito R., Mitchell A.C., Gerlach R., Cunningham A.B., and Spangler L. H. (2013), Potential CO2 leakage reduction through biofilm-induced calcium carbonate precipitation, Environ. Sci. Technol., 47(1)

  18. Hyperosmolar nonketotic coma precipitated by lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Azam, H.; Newton, R. W.; Morris, A. D.; Thompson, C. J.

    1998-01-01

    A 45-year-old man, with a 10-year history of manic depression treated with lithium, was admitted with hyperosmolar, nonketotic coma. He gave a five-year history of polyuria and polydipsia, during which time urinalysis had been negative for glucose. After recovery from hyperglycaemia, he remained polyuric despite normal blood glucose concentrations; water deprivation testing indicated nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, likely to be lithium-induced. We hypothesize that when this man developed type 2 diabetes, chronic polyuria due to nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was sufficient to precipitate hyperosmolar dehydration. PMID:9538487

  19. Spectral induced polarization signatures of hydroxide adsorption and mineral precipitation in porous media.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chi; Slater, Lee; Redden, George; Fujita, Yoshiko; Johnson, Timothy; Fox, Don

    2012-04-17

    The spectral induced polarization (SIP) technique is a promising approach for delineating subsurface physical and chemical property changes in a minimally invasive manner. To facilitate the understanding of position and chemical properties of reaction fronts that involve mineral precipitation in porous media, we investigated spatiotemporal variations in complex conductivity during evolution of urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation reaction fronts within a silica gel column. The real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity were shown to be sensitive to changes in both solution chemistry and calcium carbonate precipitation. Distinct changes in imaginary conductivity coincided with increased hydroxide ion concentration during urea hydrolysis. In a separate experiment focused on the effect of hydroxide concentration on interfacial polarization of silica gel and well-sorted sand, we found a significant dependence of the polarization response on pH changes of the solution. We propose a conceptual model describing hydroxide ion adsorption behavior in silica gel and its control on interfacial polarizability. Our results demonstrate the utility of SIP for noninvasive monitoring of reaction fronts, and indicate its potential for quantifying geochemical processes that control the polarization responses of porous media at larger spatial scales in the natural environment.

  20. Assessing Flood Risk from Hurricane-induced Precipitation and Storm Surge: A Bayesian Network Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastian, A.; Dupuits, E. J. C.; Morales-Napoles, O.

    2015-12-01

    Hurricanes pose a major flood hazard to communities on the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf Coasts. Over the past decade, the economic costs associated with hurricane flood damages have escalated and recent studies indicate that a large percentage of flood damages are occurring outside of FEMA-designated flood hazard areas. While FEMA recently upgraded coastal flood hazard maps using the Advanced CIRCulation (ADCIRC) Model, these maps do not consider the flood hazard resulting from the joint occurrence of precipitation over the watershed and storm surge at the coast. Instead, the two individual hazards are mapped separately, ignoring the floodplain resulting from their interaction.In this study, a risk assessment methodology was developed to predict the damages associated with hurricane-induced flooding in the Houston Galveston Bay Area. Historical hurricanes were analyzed to derive probability distributions for storm surge height, cumulative precipitation, hurricane landfall, wind speed, angle of approach, radius to maximum winds, and forward speed. A Bayesian Network was built and used to simulate a large number of synthetic storms. The resulting 1% combinations of storm surge and precipitation were applied as boundary conditions to a hydraulic modeled and the maximum extent of flooding was compared to the FEMA-designated flood hazard areas. A high resolution GIS-based model was used to predict damages.

  1. Spectral Induced Polarization Signatures of Hydroxide Adsorption and Mineral Precipitation in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chi; Slater, Lee; Redden, George D.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Johnson, Timothy C.; Fox, Don

    2012-04-17

    The spectral induced polarization (SIP) technique is a promising approach for delineating subsurface physical and chemical property changes in a minimally invasive manner. To facilitate the understanding of position and chemical properties of reaction fronts that involve mineral precipitation in porous media, we investigated spatiotemporal variations in complex conductivity during evolution of urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation reaction fronts within a silica gel column. The real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity were shown to be sensitive to changes in both solution chemistry and calcium carbonate precipitation. Distinct changes in imaginary conductivity coincided with increased hydroxide ion concentration during urea hydrolysis. In a separate experiment focused on the effect of hydroxide concentration on interfacial polarization of silica gel and well-sorted sand, we found a significant dependence of the polarization response on pH changes of the solution. We propose a conceptual model describing hydroxide ion adsorption behavior in silica gel and its control on interfacial polarizability. Our results demonstrate the utility of SIP for noninvasive monitoring of reaction fronts, and indicate its potential for quantifying geochemical processes that control the polarization responses of porous media at larger spatial scales in the natural environment.

  2. Sun-stirred Kraken Mare: Circulation in Titan's seas induced by solar heating and methane precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokano, Tetsuya; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2016-05-01

    Density-driven circulation in Titan's seas forced by solar heating and methane evaporation/precipitation is simulated by an ocean circulation model. If the sea is transparent to sunlight, solar heating can induce anti-clockwise gyres near the sea surface and clockwise gyres near the sea bottom. The gyres are in geostrophic balance between the radially symmetric pressure gradient force and Coriolis force. If instead the sea is turbid and most sunlight is absorbed near the sea surface, the sea gets stratified in warm seasons and the circulation remains weak. Precipitation causes compositional stratification of the sea to an extent that the sea surface temperature can be lower than the sea interior temperature without causing a convective overturning. Non-uniform precipitation can also generate a latitudinal gradient in the methane mole fraction and density, which drives a meridional overturning with equatorward currents near the sea surface and poleward currents near the sea bottom. However, gyres are more ubiquitous than meridional overturning.

  3. Global and Seasonal Assessments of Magnetosphere / Ionosphere Coupling via Lightning-Induced Electron Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Austin; Marshall, Robert; Close, Sigrid

    2016-07-01

    Pitch-angle scattering by radio waves in the VLF (~3-30kHz) band is thought to be a major loss mechanism for energetic radiation-belt electrons. Resonant interactions with Whistler-mode VLF waves can alter the reflection altitude of trapped electrons ~100keV - 1MeV; when a particle reflects at a low enough altitude, it can be removed from the magnetosphere through collisions with ionospheric constituents. Terrestrial lightning provides a natural and constantly-occurring source of VLF waves. Here we present a global assessment of lightning-induced electron precipitation (LEP) due to resonant pitch-angle scattering from whistler-mode waves, which represent a coupling process between the magnetosphere and ionosphere. We combine an end-to-end model of the LEP process with terrestrial lightning activity data from the GLD360 sensor network to construct a realtime geospatial model of LEP-driven energy deposition into the ionosphere. We explore global and seasonal statistics, provide precipitation estimates across a variety of magnetospheric conditions, and compare the total impact to other magnetospheric loss processes. Additionally, we use our model to optimize event selection from the energetic-particle detectors on board the FIREBIRD CubeSats, in order to download data over the satellite's low-bandwidth downlink. Ultimately, FIREBIRD data will be used to validate our model, and to provide one-to-one correlative measurements of lightning strokes and subsequent precipitation.

  4. Pulsed laser-induced epitaxy and precipitation of group IV alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, Kenneth Michael

    Substitutional Sisb{1-x}Csb{x} solutions produced by pulsed laser induced epitaxy of ion implanted Si were studied in the concentration range from 0.35 to 3.8 at.% C. Films were formed by multiple energy ion implantation of carbon into \\{001\\} Si to produce nearly uniform composition profiles, followed by irradiation with a 308 nm, 30 ns excimer laser pulse. Heteroepitaxy proceeded from the underlying \\{001\\} Si through the carbon containing layer at approximately 4 m/s. The diffusion coefficient was determined as ˜2 × 10sp{-4} cmsp2 ssp{-1} by comparison of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) profiles with numerical calculations. Non-equilibrium carbon segregation was observed with a segregation coefficient >0.4 estimated from the SIMS profiles. At 1.4 at.% C, SIMS profiles display an immobile carbon component at the peak carbon concentrations. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveals an areal precipitate density of about 4 × 10sp9 cmsp{-2} at 1.4 at.% C, far less than necessary to account for the anomalous diffusion behavior. At 2.1 at.% C, randomly oriented SiC precipitates are identified with diameters ranging from 5 to 7 nm and areal densities of 6 × 10sp{11} cmsp{-2}. Layers with up to 2.1 at.% C are free of dislocations and stacking faults; at 3.8 at.% C both precipitates and dislocations were observed. Numerical calculations of heat and mass diffusion were combined with classical nucleation theory to model the SiC precipitation kinetics in Si-C solutions during laser annealing. Comparison of experimental observations with model calculations resulted in an estimate for the SiC-liquid surface energy between 0.53 to 0.56 J msp{-2}. The model predicts higher precipitate densities with decreasing pulse width and increasing laser energy density. A factor of 10 difference between calculated and TEM measured precipitate densities was found and sources of this discrepancy are discussed. Pulsed laser recrystallization and solid-phase epitaxy (SPE) of

  5. Monitoring Microbe-Induced Sulfide Precipitation Under Dynamic Flow Conditions Using Multiple Geophysical Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. H.; Hubbard, S.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Banfield, J.

    2004-05-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of using minimally invasive geophysical techniques to monitor microbe-induced sulfide precipitation in saturated sand-packed columns under dynamic flow conditions. Specifically, the effect of zinc and iron sulfide precipitation on geophysical signatures was evaluated during stimulated sulfate-reduction by Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Four inoculated columns and one non-inoculated control were operated under a continuous upward flow velocity of 50cm/day with the following measurements made: multi-port fluid sampling, cross-column acoustic wave propagation, induced polarization, time domain reflectometry and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Over a period of seven weeks, the onset and progression of sulfate reduction within the columns was confirmed through decreasing substrate and aqueous metals concentrations, increased biomass, and visible regions of sulfide accumulation. Decreases in initial lactate and sulfate concentrations (2.8mM and 4.0mM, respectively) followed predicted stoichiometric relationships and soluble Zn(II) and Fe(II) concentrations (0.31mM and 0.36mM, respectively) were reduced to levels below detection through sequestration as insoluble sulfide phases. The areas where sulfide precipitation and accumulation occurred resulted in significant changes in two of the three geophysical measurements. High frequency (400-600kHz) acoustic wave amplitudes were reduced by nearly an order of magnitude over the course of the experiment with no significant accompanying change in wave velocity. Neither the wave amplitudes nor the velocities changed significantly in the downgradient portions of the column where microbial activity and sulfide precipitation were depressed due to depleted substrate and metals concentrations. The frequency content of the transmitted waves remained unchanged throughout the course of the experiment. Over the frequency range of the induced polarization measurements (0.1-1000Hz

  6. Improving Control of Microbially-Induced Mineral Precipitation in Flow Systems - Experiments and Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlach, R.; Phillips, A. J.; Lauchnor, E.; Ebigbo, A.; Connolly, J.; Mitchell, A. C.; Helmig, R.; Cunningham, A. B.; Spangler, L.

    2012-12-01

    Batch and flow experiments at atmospheric and geologic CO2 storage-relevant pressures in our laboratories have demonstrated the ability of microbial biofilms and biofilm produced calcium carbonate precipitates to decrease the permeability of natural and artificial porous media as well as improve the stability of unconsolidated porous media. Two overarching challenges in effectively implementing microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) are controlling (1) the spatial and temporal distribution of the formed precipitates and (2) the inactivation of microbes during the calcium carbonate precipitation process. Failure to control either one of those could result in injection well plugging or the necessity to implement costly cell-reinjection or -resuscitation strategies. Our recent work has focused on optimizing strategies for MICP in small (capillaries and micromodels), small columns (1 to 2.5 cm diameter, up to 5 cm in length), meso- (2 ft columns and 4 cm x 8 cm 2-d reactors) and large-scale (75 cm diameter, 38 cm high sandstone radial flow) systems. Results of these experiments have been modelled using two different approaches. (1) a microscale phase-field approach and (2) a large scale volume averaging approach. Close interaction between experimenters and modellers have resulted in improved injection strategies and the models are currently being used as experimental design tools. This presentation will focus on our recent efforts that combined 2 ft column experimentation with Darcy-scale modelling to calibrate and validate a model before utilizing the model for the optimization of biomineralization strategies in radial flow demonstrations in meso-scale sand stone cores at ambient and high pressures. Schematic pore-scale representation of MICP model

  7. Endomorphin-1 and -2 induce naloxone-precipitated withdrawal syndromes in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, J-C; Tao, P-L; Li, J-Y; Wong, C-H; Huang, E Y-K

    2003-03-01

    In 1997, endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and -2 (EM-2) were identified as the most specific endogenous mu-opioid ligands. These two peptides have shown analgesic effects and many other opioid functions. In the present study, we attempt to investigate the possible ability of endomorphins to induce naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in comparison with that induced by morphine. Using the previously established scoring system in rats, 12 withdrawal signs (chewing, sniffing, grooming, wet-dog shakes, stretching, yawning, rearing, jumping, teeth grinding, ptosis, diarrhea, and penile erection) were observed and scored following naloxone (4 mg/kg, i.p.) challenge. Compared with the sham control, EM-1 and EM-2 (20 microg, i.c.v., b.i.d. for 5 days) both produced significant naloxone-induced withdrawal syndromes with similar severity to that induced by the same dose of morphine. There was no significant difference between EM-1, EM-2, and morphine-treated group for naloxone-induced withdrawal signs, except for grooming. EM-1 and EM-2 induced more grooming than that caused by morphine. Although EM-1 and EM-2 both led to the withdrawal, they displayed different potency for certain signs and suggest their distinct regulations. The present results indicate EM-1 and EM-2 could initiate certain mechanism involved opiate dependence.

  8. Fracture Sealing with Microbially-Induced Calcium Carbonate Precipitation: A Field Study.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Adrienne J; Cunningham, Alfred B; Gerlach, Robin; Hiebert, Randy; Hwang, Chiachi; Lomans, Bartholomeus P; Westrich, Joseph; Mantilla, Cesar; Kirksey, Jim; Esposito, Richard; Spangler, Lee

    2016-04-05

    A primary environmental risk from unconventional oil and gas development or carbon sequestration is subsurface fluid leakage in the near wellbore environment. A potential solution to remediate leakage pathways is to promote microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) to plug fractures and reduce permeability in porous materials. The advantage of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) over cement-based sealants is that the solutions used to promote MICP are aqueous. MICP solutions have low viscosities compared to cement, facilitating fluid transport into the formation. In this study, MICP was promoted in a fractured sandstone layer within the Fayette Sandstone Formation 340.8 m below ground surface using conventional oil field subsurface fluid delivery technologies (packer and bailer). After 24 urea/calcium solution and 6 microbial (Sporosarcina pasteurii) suspension injections, the injectivity was decreased (flow rate decreased from 1.9 to 0.47 L/min) and a reduction in the in-well pressure falloff (>30% before and 7% after treatment) was observed. In addition, during refracturing an increase in the fracture extension pressure was measured as compared to before MICP treatment. This study suggests MICP is a promising tool for sealing subsurface fractures in the near wellbore environment.

  9. Microbially Induced Carbonate Precipitation: a Novel Grout for Permeability Control in Subsurface Engineering Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minto, J. M.; Hingerl, F.; Lunn, R. J.; Benson, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    ContextWe utilise the urea hydrolysing capability of soil bacteria Sporosarcina pasteurii to precipitate CaCO3 in a process termed Microbially Induced Carbonate Precipitation (MICP). MICP injection fluid properties are low particle size and low viscosity giving excellent grout penetrability. The CaCO3 grout has been shown to be effective at reducing permeability in porous and fractured media. MICP has consequently been proposed as an alternative to more traditional cement and chemical grouts, particularly in the fields of radioactive waste disposal and geological sequestration of CO2. This study investigates the role of fluid flow/CaCO3 feedback during precipitation and accelerated dissolution to better understand the longevity of an MICP grout under low pH environmental conditions such as found in a carbon sequestration reservoir. MethodsExperiments were conducted on a single Berea sandstone core in a high pressure core holder to characterise permeability, porosity and multiphase flow behaviour at sequestration reservoir temperature and pressure. Characterisation was carried out before MICP, after MICP, and after accelerated dissolution with hydrochloric acid. At each step the entire core was scanned in a medical x-ray CT scanner to spatially resolve (with a resolution of 0.5x0.5x1mm) the changes in porosity and saturation with CaCO3 precipitation and dissolution. Finally, the dried core was scanned with μ-CT at 30μm (full core) and 10μm (sub-volume) resolutions to investigate structural changes to the Berea at near pore scale. ResultsSix MICP treatment cycles over two days reduced core permeability from 886 mDarcy to 40 mDarcy with a greater reduction in porosity at the inlet. Dissolution with acid restored much of the porosity, but did not restore permeability to the same extent. Preferential flow paths formed during the dissolution step were visible in the first 4mm of the 100mm core, but did not extend further into the core. DiscussionThis study provides

  10. Bacterial Flora Changes in Conjunctiva of Rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Type I Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Fei, Yuda; Qin, Yali; Luo, Dan; Yang, Shufei; Kou, Xinyun; Zi, Yingxin; Deng, Tingting; Jin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    The microbiota of both humans and animals plays an important role in their health and the development of disease. Therefore, the bacterial flora of the conjunctiva may also be associated with some diseases. However, there are no reports on the alteration of bacterial flora in conjunctiva of diabetic rats in the literature. Therefore, we investigated the changes in bacterial flora in bulbar conjunctiva of rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type I diabetes. A high dose of STZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats to induce type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The diabetic rats were raised in the animal laboratory and at 8 months post-injection of STZ swab samples were taken from the bulbar conjunctiva for cultivation of aerobic bacteria. The bacterial isolates were identified by Gram staining and biochemical features. The identified bacteria from both diabetic and healthy rats were then compared. The diabetic and healthy rats had different bacterial flora present in their bulbar conjunctiva. In total, 10 and 8 bacterial species were found in the STZ and control groups, respectively, with only three species (Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus gallinarum and Escherichia coli) shared between the two groups. Gram-positive bacteria were common in both groups and the most abundant was Enterococcus faecium. However, after the development of T1DM, the bacterial flora in the rat bulbar conjunctiva changed considerably, with a reduced complexity evident. STZ-induced diabetes caused alterations of bacterial flora in the bulbar conjunctiva in rats, with some bacterial species disappearing and others emerging. Our results indicate that the conjunctival bacterial flora in diabetic humans should be surveyed for potential diagnostic markers or countermeasures to prevent eye infections in T1DM patients.

  11. Bacterial Flora Changes in Conjunctiva of Rats with Streptozotocin-Induced Type I Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yali; Luo, Dan; Yang, Shufei; Kou, Xinyun; Zi, Yingxin; Deng, Tingting; Jin, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background The microbiota of both humans and animals plays an important role in their health and the development of disease. Therefore, the bacterial flora of the conjunctiva may also be associated with some diseases. However, there are no reports on the alteration of bacterial flora in conjunctiva of diabetic rats in the literature. Therefore, we investigated the changes in bacterial flora in bulbar conjunctiva of rats with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type I diabetes. Methods A high dose of STZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected into Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats to induce type I diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The diabetic rats were raised in the animal laboratory and at 8 months post-injection of STZ swab samples were taken from the bulbar conjunctiva for cultivation of aerobic bacteria. The bacterial isolates were identified by Gram staining and biochemical features. The identified bacteria from both diabetic and healthy rats were then compared. Results The diabetic and healthy rats had different bacterial flora present in their bulbar conjunctiva. In total, 10 and 8 bacterial species were found in the STZ and control groups, respectively, with only three species (Enterococcus faecium, Enterococcus gallinarum and Escherichia coli) shared between the two groups. Gram-positive bacteria were common in both groups and the most abundant was Enterococcus faecium. However, after the development of T1DM, the bacterial flora in the rat bulbar conjunctiva changed considerably, with a reduced complexity evident. Conclusions STZ-induced diabetes caused alterations of bacterial flora in the bulbar conjunctiva in rats, with some bacterial species disappearing and others emerging. Our results indicate that the conjunctival bacterial flora in diabetic humans should be surveyed for potential diagnostic markers or countermeasures to prevent eye infections in T1DM patients. PMID:26176548

  12. Deformation twinning induced decomposition of lamellar LPSO structure and its re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy

    PubMed Central

    Shao, X. H.; Zheng, S. J.; Chen, D.; Jin, Q. Q.; Peng, Z. Z.; Ma, X. L.

    2016-01-01

    The high hardness or yield strength of an alloy is known to benefit from the presence of small-scale precipitation, whose hardening effect is extensively applied in various engineering materials. Stability of the precipitates is of critical importance in maintaining the high performance of a material under mechanical loading. The long period stacking ordered (LPSO) structures play an important role in tuning the mechanical properties of an Mg-alloy. Here, we report deformation twinning induces decomposition of lamellar LPSO structures and their re-precipitation in an Mg-Zn-Y alloy. Using atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), we directly illustrate that the misfit dislocations at the interface between the lamellar LPSO structure and the deformation twin is corresponding to the decomposition and re-precipitation of LPSO structure, owing to dislocation effects on redistribution of Zn/Y atoms. This finding demonstrates that deformation twinning could destabilize complex precipitates. An occurrence of decomposition and re-precipitation, leading to a variant spatial distribution of the precipitates under plastic loading, may significantly affect the precipitation strengthening. PMID:27435638

  13. Induced precipitation recycling (IPR) strategy to increase forest growth and regional rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Layton, K. M.; Ellison, D.

    2013-12-01

    This presentation describes a project designed to capitalize on observed natural interactions between forest cover and the hydrologic cycle in order to increase available water supplies in arid regions, and to purify degraded water resources. An approach is presented to transition observed precipitation recycling effects into practical applications. Higher regional precipitation can be induced by promoting favorable conditions through afforestation and the irrigation of afforested land (IPR). Waste-water streams processed by the forest can increase local precipitation through the by-product evapotranspiration (ET). The proposed project illustrates how increased runoff from induced precipitation can help mitigate chronic regional water shortages in Southern California, using available degraded water resources. Each day, several hundred million gallons of treated sewage and excess storm water from the Los Angeles basin are channeled to the ocean for disposal. A portion of this can irrigate afforested land, initiating the IPR process. The afforested site likewise produces additional beneficial ecosystem services including nutrient management (of the sewage stream), carbon sequestration (from new growth), cooling of urban 'heat islands', and flood control. Research will explore interactions between ET plumes and local geography to aid the selection of afforestation sites and ensure increased precipitation over land, supporting the regional water supply. The IPR project is designed to manage risk and complexity through phased implementation. While no unproven technologies are used, there are uncertainties in applying theories from scientific research. During the 'pilot phase', initial afforestation site(s) will support research to examine the interactions of irrigated forest cover and IPR. As a proof of concept, this will develop the analytical basis for large-scale expansion. Once the theoretical foundation has been established, the project can expand to more irrigated

  14. Wind induced errors on solid precipitation measurements: an evaluation using time-dependent turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colli, Matteo; Lanza, Luca Giovanni; Rasmussen, Roy; Mireille Thériault, Julie

    2014-05-01

    Among the different environmental sources of error for ground based solid precipitation measurements, wind is the main responsible for a large reduction of the catching performance. This is due to the aero-dynamic response of the gauge that affects the originally undisturbed airflow causing the deformation of the snowflakes trajectories. The application of composite gauge/wind shield measuring configurations allows the improvements of the collection efficiency (CE) at low wind speeds (Uw) but the performance achievable under severe airflow velocities and the role of turbulence still have to be explained. This work is aimed to assess the wind induced errors of a Geonor T200B vibrating wires gauge equipped with a single Alter shield. This is a common measuring system for solid precipitation, which constitutes of the R3 reference system in the ongoing WMO Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment (SPICE). The analysis is carried out by adopting advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools for the numerical simulation of the turbulent airflow realized in the proximity of the catching section of the gauge. The airflow patterns were computed by running both time-dependent (Large Eddies Simulation) and time-independent (Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes) simulations. on the Yellowstone high performance computing system of the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The evaluation of CE under different Uw conditions was obtained by running a Lagrangian model for the calculation of the snowflakes trajectories building on the simulated airflow patterns. Particular attention has been paid to the sensitivity of the trajectories to different snow particles sizes and water content (corresponding to dry and wet snow). The results will be illustrated in comparative form between the different methodologies adopted and the existing infield CE evaluations based on double shield reference gauges.

  15. Observation of Long Ionospheric Recoveries from Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour Salut, M.; Cohen, M.

    2015-12-01

    Lightning strokes induces lower ionospheric nighttime disturbances which can be detected through Very Low Frequency (VLF) remote sensing via at least two means: (1) direct heating and ionization, known as an Early event, and (2) triggered precipitation of energetic electrons from the radiation belts, known as Lightning-induced Electron Precipitation (LEP). For each, the ionospheric recover time is typically a few minutes or less. A small class of Early events have been identified as having unusually long ionospheric recoveries (10s of minutes), with the underlying mechanism still in question. Our study shows for the first time that some LEP events also demonstrate unusually long recovery. The VLF events were detected by visual inspection of the recorded data in both the North-South and East-West magnetic fields. Data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) are used to determine the location and peak current of the lightning responsible for each lightning-associated VLF perturbation. LEP or Early VLF events are determined by measuring the time delay between the causative lightning discharges and the onset of all lightning-associated perturbations. LEP events typically possess an onset delay greater than ~ 200 msec following the causative lightning discharges, while the onset of Early VLF events is time-aligned (<20 msec) with the lightning return stroke. Nonducted LEP events are distinguished from ducted events based on the location of the causative lightning relative to the precipitation region. From 15 March to 20 April and 15 October to 15 November 2011, a total of 385 LEP events observed at Indiana, Montana, Colorado and Oklahoma VLF sites, on the NAA, NLK and NML transmitter signals. 46 of these events exhibited a long recovery. It has been found that the occurrence rate of ducted long recovery LEP events is higher than nonducted. Of the 46 long recovery LEP events, 33 events were induced by ducted whistlers, and 13 events were associated with

  16. A revised model for microbially induced calcite precipitation: Improvements and new insights based on recent experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommel, Johannes; Lauchnor, Ellen; Phillips, Adrienne; Gerlach, Robin; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Helmig, Rainer; Ebigbo, Anozie; Class, Holger

    2015-05-01

    The model for microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) published by Ebigbo et al. (2012) has been improved based on new insights obtained from experiments and model calibration. The challenge in constructing a predictive model for permeability reduction in the underground with MICP is the quantification of the complex interaction between flow, transport, biofilm growth, and reaction kinetics. New data from Lauchnor et al. (2015) on whole-cell ureolysis kinetics from batch experiments were incorporated into the model, which has allowed for a more precise quantification of the relevant parameters as well as a simplification of the reaction kinetics in the equations of the model. Further, the model has been calibrated objectively by inverse modeling using quasi-1D column experiments and a radial flow experiment. From the postprocessing of the inverse modeling, a comprehensive sensitivity analysis has been performed with focus on the model input parameters that were fitted in the course of the model calibration. It reveals that calcite precipitation and concentrations of NH4+ and Ca2+ are particularly sensitive to parameters associated with the ureolysis rate and the attachment behavior of biomass. Based on the determined sensitivities and the ranges of values for the estimated parameters in the inversion, it is possible to identify focal areas where further research can have a high impact toward improving the understanding and engineering of MICP.

  17. Uncertainty in watershed response predictions induced by spatial variability of precipitation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Ling; Lo, Shang-Lien; Chen, Ming-Ying

    2007-04-01

    Negligence to consider the spatial variability of rainfall could result in serious errors in model outputs. The objective of this study was to examine the uncertainty of both runoff and pollutant transport predictions due to the input errors of rainfall. This study used synthetic data to represent the "true" rainfall pattern, instead of interpolated precipitation. It was conducted on a synthetic case area having a total area of 20 km(2) with ten subbasins. Each subbasin has one rainfall gauge with synthetic precipitation records. Six rainfall storms with varied spatial distribution were generated. The average rainfall was obtained from all of the ten gauges by the arithmetic average method. The input errors of rainfall were induced by the difference between the actual rainfall pattern and estimated average rainfall. The results show that spatial variability of rainfall can cause uncertainty in modeling outputs of hydrologic, which would be transport to pollutant export predictions, when uniformity of rainfall is assumed. Since rainfall is essential information for predicting watershed responses, it is important to consider the properties of rainfall, particularly spatial rainfall variability, in the application of hydrologic and water quality models.

  18. Spectral induced polarization signatures of hydroxide adsorption and mineral precipitation in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Chi Zhang; Lee Slater; George Redden; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy Johnson; Don Fox

    2012-04-01

    The spectral induced polarization (SIP) technique is a promising approach for delineating subsurface physical and chemical property changes in a minimally invasive manner. We investigated spatiotemporal variations in complex conductivity during evolution of urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation reaction fronts within a silica gel column. The real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity were shown to be sensitive to changes in both solution chemistry and calcium carbonate precipitation. Distinct changes in imaginary conductivity coincided with increased hydroxide ion concentration during urea hydrolysis. In a separate experiment focused on the effect of hydroxide concentration on interfacial polarization of silica gel and well-sorted sand, we found a strong dependence of the polarization response on pH changes of the solution. We propose a conceptual model describing hydroxide ion adsorption behavior in silica gel and its control on interfacial polarizability. Our results demonstrate the utility of SIP for non-invasive monitoring of reaction fronts, and indicate its potential for quantifying geochemical processes that control the polarization responses of porous media at larger spatial scales in the natural environment.

  19. Search for wave-induced particle precipitation from lightning and transmitter sources. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    Wave-induced particle precipitation is introduced and examined for whistlers whose sources are within the plasmapause. The possible correlation between lightning strokes that carry positive charge to the ground and the observed Trimpi events is discussed, sudden phase and/or amplitude shifts of a received VLF signal with gradual return to predisturbed values. The thunderstorm charging mechanisms that lead to the observed charge distribution and the advection of the positively charged cirrus anvil away from the body of the thunderstorm are briefly examined. The comparative current strengths and the relative frequency of positive and negative strokes is studied for different types of thunderstorms. The magnetospheric ducting of the lightning-generated whistler wave and the interaction with trapped electrons is examined. The detectable effects the precipitating electrons have on the ionosphere is introduced. Included are testing and design of the x-ray detector and balloon-launch considerations. The problems encountered during the x-ray-detector's balloon flights are examined. The riometer and x-ray-detector data-analysis methods are mentioned. The results were negative for the data analyzed, but the limiting factors severely restricted the usable data. Possible experimental methods are mentioned.

  20. Radiation-induced segregation and precipitation in molybdenum-rhenium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Erck, R.A.; Wayman, C.M.; Rehn, L.E.

    1986-02-01

    Specimens of Mo-7 at. % Re and Mo-30 at. % Re were irradiated with 1.8 MeV /sup 4/He/sup +/ ions at elevated temperatures. Radiation-induced segregation of Re was measured during irradiation by in situ Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Segregation of the undersized Re atoms in the same direction as the defect fluxes, i.e., toward the external surface, was observed. The amount of Re enrichment in the near-surface region was measured as a function of temperature and of dose at a calculated near-surface displacement rate near 1 x 10/sup -4/dpa/s. Segregation was observed at temperatures from 800 to 1500/sup 0/C in Mo-7Re, and from 850 to 1225/sup 0/C in Mo-30Re. Irradiated disks were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Precipitates of Chi phase were observed on grain boundaries, or in a thin layer at the irradiated surface in Mo-30Re after irradiation at temperatures from 750 to 1075/sup 0/C. Frequently, Chi precipitates formed with a crystallographic twin orientation with respect to the host matrix. No voids were observed for doses up to 1.6 dpa.

  1. Klebsiella pneumoniae Siderophores Induce Inflammation, Bacterial Dissemination, and HIF-1α Stabilization during Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Victoria I.; Breen, Paul; Houle, Sébastien; Dozois, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, and is rapidly acquiring antibiotic resistance. K. pneumoniae requires secretion of siderophores, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators, for bacterial replication and full virulence. The specific combination of siderophores secreted by K. pneumoniae during infection can impact tissue localization, systemic dissemination, and host survival. However, the effect of these potent iron chelators on the host during infection is unknown. In vitro, siderophores deplete epithelial cell iron, induce cytokine secretion, and activate the master transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein that controls vascular permeability and inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae directly contributes to inflammation and bacterial dissemination during pneumonia. To examine the effects of siderophore secretion independently of bacterial growth, we performed infections with tonB mutants that persist in vivo but are deficient in siderophore import. Using a murine model of pneumonia, we found that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae induces the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), CXCL1, and CXCL2, as well as bacterial dissemination to the spleen, compared to siderophore-negative mutants at an equivalent bacterial number. Furthermore, we determined that siderophore-secreting K. pneumoniae stabilized HIF-1α in vivo and that bacterial dissemination to the spleen required alveolar epithelial HIF-1α. Our results indicate that siderophores act directly on the host to induce inflammatory cytokines and bacterial dissemination and that HIF-1α is a susceptibility factor for bacterial invasion during pneumonia. PMID:27624128

  2. Spatiotemporal Structure of Tropical Moisture Exports and their Precursors associated with High Precipitation induced Floods over the Continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, M.; Lall, U.

    2014-12-01

    Nonstationarity of flood risk has emerged as an important issue and progress in addressing this concern can only come from an improved understanding of the associated climate dynamics. An understanding of the dynamical mechanisms and statistics associated with the frequency and structure of heavy precipitation induced floods events can aid exploration of the key sources of uncertainties that challenge extreme hydrometerological forecasts, and improve reliability of streamflow forecasts for real-time applications. Although the climate mechanisms governing precipitation vary by location, extreme precipitation events in the mid-latitudes are typically associated with anomalous atmospheric moisture from warmer tropical or subtropical oceanic areas. Tropical moisture exports (TMEs) to the Northern Hemispheric extratropics are an important feature of the general circulation of the atmosphere and link tropical moisture sources with extratropical precipitation and occasionally with explosive cyclogenesis. TMEs, contributing to the global climatology precipitation and its extremes, are closely related to flood events, especially in the midlatitudes. Here, a statistically and physically based framework is put forward that investigates the relationship between TMEs, and Extreme Precipitation and Floods over the continental United States, and relates the spatial flood incidence across the regions to the persistence and spatiotemporal structure of these tracks. The origins and pathways of moist and warm tropical air masses, which are the fuel for the heavy precipitation events and rapid cyclogenesis in the extratropics, are examined. The clustered TME tracks provide a critical source of identify different moisture sources and climate dynamics, which governs and drives the movements of water vapor to the flooded areas, together with an atmospheric circulation pattern that leads to persistent multi-day convergence and precipitation in those regions. The genesis location of TME

  3. Evidence of Urban-Induced Precipitation Variability in Arid Climate Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall

    2005-01-01

    Water is essential to life in the Earth system. The water cycle components that sustain life are becoming more scarce and polluted. The most recent (1999-2004) drought experienced in the southwestern United States is the seventh worst in the approximately 500-year proxy tree-ring record. As a result, many regions contemplated drought emergencies in which severe water restrictions are implemented. Though larger weather and climate processes likely control drought processes, there is increasing evidence that anthropogenic or human-related activities can significantly alter precipitation processes. Urbanization is an example of anthropogenic forcing. Recent studies continue to provide evidence that urban environments can modify or induce precipitation under a specific set of conditions. Arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern United States and other parts of the world are rapidly developing and placing greater demands on the environmental system. In the past fifty years, Phoenix has expanded from a predominantly agricultural center to an urbanized region with extent 700 percent larger than its size in the middle of the twentieth century. Riyadh's population grew from about a half million people in 1972 to almost two million by 2000. Saudi Arabia experienced urbanization later than many other countries; in the early 1970s its urban-rural ratio was still about 1:3. By 1990 the ratio had reversed to about 3:l. In the mid-1970s Riyadh's population was increasing by about 10 percent a year. Irrigation also significantly increased between 1972 and 1990 southeast of Riyadh. The study employs a 108-year precipitation historical data record, global climate observing network observations and satellite data to identify possible anomalies in rainfall in and around two major arid urban areas, Phoenix, Arizona and Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It provides statistically sound evidence that rainfall distribution and magnitude is statistically different in post-urban than in pre

  4. Revisiting borehole strain, typhoons, and slow earthquakes using quantitative estimates of precipitation-induced strain changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ya-Ju; Chang, Yuan-Shu; Liu, Chi-Ching; Lee, Hsin-Ming; Linde, Alan T.; Sacks, Selwyn I.; Kitagawa, Genshio; Chen, Yue-Gau

    2015-06-01

    not anticipated from our estimates of the precipitation transfer function) that are more readily explained in terms of tectonic-origin motions, but clearly the triggering argument is now weaker than that presented in Liu et al. (2009). Additional on-site water level sensors and rain gauges will provide data critical for a more complete understanding, including the currently unresolved issue of why, for some typhoons, there appears to be a much smaller transfer function for precipitation-induced strain changes.

  5. Measurement of precipitation induced FUV emission and Geocoronal Lyman Alpha from the IMI mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, Stephen B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Rairden, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    This final report describes the activities of the Lockheed Martin Palo Alto Research Laboratory in studying the measurement of ion and electron precipitation induced Far Ultra-Violet (FUV) emissions and Geocoronal Lyman Alpha for the NASA Inner Magnetospheric Imager (IMI) mission. this study examined promising techniques that may allow combining several FUV instruments that would separately measure proton aurora, electron aurora, and geocoronal Lyman alpha into a single instrument operated on a spinning spacecraft. The study consisted of two parts. First, the geocoronal Lyman alpha, proton aurora, and electron aurora emissions were modeled to determine instrument requirements. Second, several promising techniques were investigated to determine if they were suitable for use in an IMI-type mission. Among the techniques investigated were the Hydrogen gas cell for eliminating cold geocoronal Lyman alpha emissions, and a coded aperture spectrometer with sufficient resolution to separate Doppler shifted Lyman alpha components.

  6. Klebsiella pneumoniae Siderophores Induce Inflammation, Bacterial Dissemination, and HIF-1α Stabilization during Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Holden, Victoria I; Breen, Paul; Houle, Sébastien; Dozois, Charles M; Bachman, Michael A

    2016-09-13

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections, including pneumonia and bacteremia, and is rapidly acquiring antibiotic resistance. K. pneumoniae requires secretion of siderophores, low-molecular-weight, high-affinity iron chelators, for bacterial replication and full virulence. The specific combination of siderophores secreted by K. pneumoniae during infection can impact tissue localization, systemic dissemination, and host survival. However, the effect of these potent iron chelators on the host during infection is unknown. In vitro, siderophores deplete epithelial cell iron, induce cytokine secretion, and activate the master transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein that controls vascular permeability and inflammatory gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae directly contributes to inflammation and bacterial dissemination during pneumonia. To examine the effects of siderophore secretion independently of bacterial growth, we performed infections with tonB mutants that persist in vivo but are deficient in siderophore import. Using a murine model of pneumonia, we found that siderophore secretion by K. pneumoniae induces the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6), CXCL1, and CXCL2, as well as bacterial dissemination to the spleen, compared to siderophore-negative mutants at an equivalent bacterial number. Furthermore, we determined that siderophore-secreting K. pneumoniae stabilized HIF-1α in vivo and that bacterial dissemination to the spleen required alveolar epithelial HIF-1α. Our results indicate that siderophores act directly on the host to induce inflammatory cytokines and bacterial dissemination and that HIF-1α is a susceptibility factor for bacterial invasion during pneumonia. Klebsiella pneumoniae causes a wide range of bacterial diseases, including pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and sepsis. To cause infection, K. pneumoniae steals

  7. Isoniazid-induced cell death is precipitated by underlying mitochondrial complex I dysfunction in mouse hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Kwang; Fujimoto, Kazunori; Zhang, Carmen; Schwall, Christine T; Alder, Nathan N; Pinkert, Carl A; Krueger, Winfried; Rasmussen, Theodore; Boelsterli, Urs A

    2013-12-01

    Isoniazid (INH) is an antituberculosis drug that has been associated with idiosyncratic liver injury in susceptible patients. The underlying mechanisms are still unclear, but there is growing evidence that INH and/or its major metabolite, hydrazine, may interfere with mitochondrial function. However, hepatic mitochondria have a large reserve capacity, and minor disruption of energy homeostasis does not necessarily induce cell death. We explored whether pharmacologic or genetic impairment of mitochondrial complex I may amplify mitochondrial dysfunction and precipitate INH-induced hepatocellular injury. We found that INH (≤ 3000 μM) did not induce cell injury in cultured mouse hepatocytes, although it decreased hepatocellular respiration and ATP levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. However, coexposure of hepatocytes to INH and nontoxic concentrations of the complex I inhibitors rotenone (3 μM) or piericidin A (30 nM) resulted in massive ATP depletion and cell death. Although both rotenone and piericidin A increased MitoSox-reactive fluorescence, Mito-TEMPO or N-acetylcysteine did not attenuate the extent of cytotoxicity. However, preincubation of cells with the acylamidase inhibitor bis-p-nitrophenol phosphate provided protection from hepatocyte injury induced by rotenone/INH (but not rotenone/hydrazine), suggesting that hydrazine was the cell-damaging species. Indeed, we found that hydrazine directly inhibited the activity of solubilized complex II. Hepatocytes isolated from mutant Ndufs4(+/-) mice, although featuring moderately lower protein expression levels of this complex I subunit in liver mitochondria, exhibited unchanged hepatic complex I activity and were therefore not sensitized to INH. These data indicate that underlying inhibition of complex I, which alone is not acutely toxic, can trigger INH-induced hepatocellular injury.

  8. Photodynamic therapy induces an immune response against a bacterial pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Tanaka, Masamitsu; Vecchio, Daniela; Garcia-Diaz, Maria; Chang, Julie; Morimoto, Yuji; Hamblin, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) employs the triple combination of photosensitizers, visible light and ambient oxygen. When PDT is used for cancer, it has been observed that both arms of the host immune system (innate and adaptive) are activated. When PDT is used for infectious disease, however, it has been assumed that the direct antimicrobial PDT effect dominates. Murine arthritis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the knee failed to respond to PDT with intravenously injected Photofrin®. PDT with intra-articular Photofrin produced a biphasic dose response that killed bacteria without destroying host neutrophils. Methylene blue was the optimum photosensitizer to kill bacteria while preserving neutrophils. We used bioluminescence imaging to noninvasively monitor murine bacterial arthritis and found that PDT with intra-articular methylene blue was not only effective, but when used before infection, could protect the mice against a subsequent bacterial challenge. The data emphasize the importance of considering the host immune response in PDT for infectious disease. PMID:22882222

  9. Functionalization of fabrics with PANI/CuO nanoparticles by precipitation route for anti-bacterial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, V. V. Anusha; Thanka Rajan, S.; Anupriya, K.; Subramanian, B.

    2015-01-01

    The present work aims at developing copper oxide nanocrystals immobilized onto the fabrics for the improvement of antimicrobial activity. The CuO nanocrytstals were deposited onto woven fabrics and non-woven fabrics through chemical precipitation route. The samples were characterized by XRD, Raman spectroscopy, FE-SEM, and TEM. The presence of CuO on the surface of the fabrics was confirmed by EDAX. The CuO nanoparticles were found to have grown to a size of 50 nm with a monoclinic structure. The antibacterial activities were assessed for the coated CuO samples by the agar diffusion plate method followed by FE-SEM. To promote the slow release of Cu ions into the medium from the fabric matrix, the synthesized nanoparticles were immobilized in polyaniline polymer matrix before being coated onto the fabric samples, and the results are discussed.

  10. Bacterial persistence induced by salicylate via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiebin; El Meouche, Imane; Dunlop, Mary J.

    2017-01-01

    Persisters are phenotypic variants of regular cells that exist in a dormant state with low metabolic activity, allowing them to exhibit high tolerance to antibiotics. Despite increasing recognition of their role in chronic and recalcitrant infections, the mechanisms that induce persister formation are not fully understood. In this study, we find that salicylate can induce persister formation in Escherichia coli via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Salicylate-induced ROS cause a decrease in the membrane potential, reduce metabolism and lead to an increase in persistence. These effects can be recovered by culturing cells in the presence of a ROS quencher or in an anaerobic environment. Our findings reveal that salicylate-induced oxidative stress can lead to persistence, suggesting that ROS, and their subsequent impact on membrane potential and metabolism, may play a broad role in persister formation. PMID:28281556

  11. Rotation-Induced Polymorphic Transitions in Bacterial Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, Reinhard; Stark, Holger

    2013-04-01

    Bacteria propel themselves with the help of rotating helical flagella. They change their swimming direction during tumbling events in order to increase, for example, their supply of nutrients (chemotaxis). During tumbling a bacterial flagellum assumes different polymorphic states. Based on a continuum model for the motor-flagellum system, we demonstrate that a changing motor torque can initiate these polymorphic transformations. In particular, we investigate the run-and-stop tumble strategy of Rhodobacter sphaeroides which uses a coiled-to-normal transition in its single flagellum. We also show that torque reversal in single-flagellated Escherichia coli generates a normal-to-curly I transition as observed for tumbling E. coli that swim with a bundle of several flagella.

  12. Seasonal, latitudinal and diurnal distributions of whistler-induced electron precipitation events

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, D.L.; Inan, U.S. )

    1987-04-01

    The seasonal, latitudinal, and diurnal distributions of whistler-induced electron precipitation events, detected as subionospheric signal perturbations (Trimpi events), have been studied by means of data sets acquired in 1982-1983 at Palmer and Siple stations, Antarctica. The data sets, substantially larger than any previously examined, confirm previous indications of a broad ({approximately} 4 hour) maximum in hourly event occurrence rates. The peak was centered {approximately} 1-2 hours after local midnight at Palmer for the roughly north-south Argentina Omega 12.9-kHz path, but was shifted several hours later for the 23.4-kHz NPM path, which has a westerly arrival bearing at Palmer. The previously reported seasonal variation, with peaks at the equinoxes, was confirmed; activity persisted in the austral winter, particularly following a magnetic storm, but in general occurred on fewer days and during shorter daily periods. Comparisons of occurrence data at Siple (L {approx equal} 4.3) and Palmer (L {approx equal}2.4) for particular signal sources showed the number of days of activity to be larger at Palmer by a factor of {approximately} 2 or more. Comparisons of five months of simultaneous Palmer and Siple receptions of 21.4-kHz NSS signals on north-south paths suggest that most of the events observed at Siple occurred as the result of ionospheric perturbations relatively close to the L shell of Palmer, that is, in the range L = 2-3. This result is consistent with the expected variation with latitude of the energy of electrons precipitated due to equatorial gyroresonance at typical whistler frequencies.

  13. Complete genome sequence of Lysinibacillus sphaericus LMG 22257, a strain with ureolytic activity inducing calcium carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenkai; Xiao, Xiang; Zhang, Yu

    2017-03-20

    Microbiologically induced calcium carbonate precipitation shows the potential for use in bioremediation and construction consolidation, but the efficiency of this process must be improved. Lysinibacillus sphaericus LMG 22257 is a gram-positive ureolytic strain that has recently been applied for consolidating construction by mediating calcium carbonate precipitation. The complete genome sequence of L. sphaericus LMG 22257 is 3,436,578 base pairs with a GC content of 38.99%. The urea degradation pathway and genes related to extracellular polymeric substance biosynthesis were also identified. The strain can tolerate high alkalinity (pH up to 10) and high urea concentration (up to 3M). These findings provide insights into the microbiologically induced carbonate precipitation and extend the application of the metabolic potential of L. sphaericus LMG 22257 for bioremediation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of Chemically-Induced Bacterial Ghosts (BGs) Using Sodium Hydroxide-Induced Vibrio parahaemolyticus Ghosts (VPGs)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jung; Oh, Sung; Vinod, Nagarajan; Ji, Seongmi; Noh, Han Byul; Koo, Jung Mo; Lee, Su Hyeong; Kim, Sei Chang; Lee, Ki-Sung; Choi, Chang Won

    2016-01-01

    Acellular bacterial ghosts (BGs) are empty non-living bacterial cell envelopes, commonly generated by controlled expression of the cloned lysis gene E of bacteriophage PhiX174. In this study, Vibrio parahaemolyticus ghosts (VPGs) were generated by chemically-induced lysis and the method is based on minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), acetic acid, boric acid, citric acid, maleic acid, hydrochloric acid, and sulfuric acid. The MIC values of the respective chemicals were 3.125, 6.25, <50.0, 25.0, 6.25, 1.56, and 0.781 mg/mL. Except for boric acid, the lysis efficiency reached more than 99.99% at 5 min after treatment of all chemicals. Among those chemicals, NaOH-induced VPGs appeared completely DNA-free, which was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Besides, lipopolysaccharides (LPS) extracted from the NaOH-induced VPGs showed no distinctive band on SDS-PAGE gel after silver staining. On the other hand, LPS extracted from wild-type bacterial cells, as well as the organic acids-induced VPGs showed triple major bands and LPS extracted from the inorganic acids-induced VPGs showed double bands. It suggests that some surface structures in LPS of the NaOH-induced VPGs may be lost, weakened, or modified by the MIC of NaOH. Nevertheless, Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay revealed that there is no significant difference in endotoxic activity between the NaOH-induced VPGs and wild-type bacterial cells. Macrophages exposed to the NaOH-induced VPGs at 0.5 × 106 CFU/mL showed cell viability of 97.9%, however, the MIC of NaOH did not reduce the cytotoxic effect of wild-type bacterial cells. Like Escherichia coli LPS, the NaOH-induced VPGs are an excellent activator of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and iNOS), anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10), and dual activities (IL-6) in the stimulated macrophage cells. On the other hand, the induction of TNF-α mRNA was remarkable in the macrophages exposed with wild-type cells. Scanning electron

  15. Alteration of epithelial cell lysosomal integrity induced by bacterial cholesterol‐dependent cytolysins

    PubMed Central

    Malet, Julien Karim

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial pathogens can interfere during infection with host cell organelles, such as mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum‐Golgi system or nuclei. As important cellular functions are often compartmentalized in these organelles, their targeting allows pathogens to manipulate key host functions during infection. Here, we identify lysosomes as a new class of organelles targeted by the pathogenic bacterium Listeria monocytogenes. We demonstrate that extracellular Listeria, via secretion of the pore‐forming toxin listeriolysin O, alters lysosomal integrity in epithelial cells but not in macrophages. Listeriolysin O induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization and release of lysosomal content, such as cathepsins proteases, which remain transiently active in the host cytosol. We furthermore show that other bacterial pore‐forming toxins, such as perfringolysin O and pneumolysin, also induce lysosomes alteration. Together, our data unveil a novel activity of bacterial cholesterol‐dependent cytolysins. PMID:27739224

  16. Dislocation pinning effects induced by nano-precipitates during warm laser shock peening: Dislocation dynamic simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yiliang; Ye, Chang; Gao, Huang; Kim, Bong-Joong; Suslov, Sergey; Stach, Eric A.; Cheng, Gary J.

    2011-07-01

    Warm laser shock peening (WLSP) is a new high strain rate surface strengthening process that has been demonstrated to significantly improve the fatigue performance of metallic components. This improvement is mainly due to the interaction of dislocations with highly dense nanoscale precipitates, which are generated by dynamic precipitation during the WLSP process. In this paper, the dislocation pinning effects induced by the nanoscale precipitates during WLSP are systematically studied. Aluminum alloy 6061 and AISI 4140 steel are selected as the materials with which to conduct WLSP experiments. Multiscale discrete dislocation dynamics (MDDD) simulation is conducted in order to investigate the interaction of dislocations and precipitates during the shock wave propagation. The evolution of dislocation structures during the shock wave propagation is studied. The dislocation structures after WLSP are characterized via transmission electron microscopy and are compared with the results of the MDDD simulation. The results show that nano-precipitates facilitate the generation of highly dense and uniformly distributed dislocation structures. The dislocation pinning effect is strongly affected by the density, size, and space distribution of nano-precipitates.

  17. Sensing cytosolic RpsL by macrophages induces lysosomal cell death and termination of bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenhan; Tao, Lili; Quick, Marsha L; Joyce, Johanna A; Qu, Jie-Ming; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2015-03-01

    The intracellular bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila provokes strong host responses and has proven to be a valuable model for the discovery of novel immunosurveillance pathways. Our previous work revealed that an environmental isolate of L. pneumophila induces a noncanonical form of cell death, leading to restriction of bacterial replication in primary mouse macrophages. Here we show that such restriction also occurs in infections with wild type clinical isolates. Importantly, we found that a lysine to arginine mutation at residue 88 (K88R) in the ribosome protein RpsL that not only confers bacterial resistance to streptomycin, but more importantly, severely attenuated the induction of host cell death and enabled L. pneumophila to replicate in primary mouse macrophages. Although conferring similar resistance to streptomycin, a K43N mutation in RpsL does not allow productive intracellular bacterial replication. Further analysis indicated that RpsL is capable of effectively inducing macrophage death via a pathway involved in lysosomal membrane permeabilization; the K88R mutant elicits similar responses but is less potent. Moreover, cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease that causes cell death after being released into the cytosol upon the loss of membrane integrity, is required for efficient RpsL-induced macrophage death. Furthermore, despite the critical role of cathepsin B in delaying RpsL-induced cell death, macrophages lacking cathepsin B do not support productive intracellular replication of L. pneumophila harboring wild type RpsL. This suggests the involvement of other yet unidentified components in the restriction of bacterial replication. Our results identified RpsL as a regulator in the interactions between bacteria such as L. pneumophila and primary mouse macrophages by triggering unique cellular pathways that restrict intracellular bacterial replication.

  18. Modulation of Inflammatory Response in a Cirrhotic Rat Model with Induced Bacterial Peritonitis

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Elisabet; Francés, Rubén; Soriano, Germán; Mirelis, Beatriz; Sancho, Francesc J.; González-Navajas, José Manuel; Muñoz, Carlos; Song, Xiao-yu

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial peritonitis is a severe complication in patients with cirrhosis and ascites and despite antibiotic treatment, the inflammatory response to infection may induce renal dysfunction leading to death. This investigation evaluated the effect of TNF-α blockade on the inflammatory response and mortality in cirrhotic rats with induced bacterial peritonitis treated or not with antibiotics. Sprague-Dawley rats with carbon-tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis were treated with an intraperitoneal injection of 109 CFU of Escherichia coli diluted in 20 mL of sterile water to induce bacterial peritonitis and randomized to receive subcutaneously-administered placebo, ceftriaxone, anti-TNF-α mAb and ceftriaxone, or anti-TNF-α mAb alone. No differences were observed between groups at baseline in respect to renal function, liver hepatic tests, serum levels of nitrite/nitrate and TNF-α. Treatment with ceftriaxone reduced mortality (73.3%) but differences did not reach statistical significance as compared to placebo. Mortality in rats treated with ceftriaxone and anti-TNF-α mAb was significantly lower than in animals receiving placebo (53% vs. 100%, p<0.01). Serum TNF-α decreased significantly in surviving rats treated with ceftriaxone plus anti-TNF-α mAb but not in treated with antibiotics alone. Additional studies including more animals are required to assess if the association of antibiotic therapy and TNF-α blockade might be a possible approach to reduce mortality in cirrhotic patients with bacterial peritonitis. PMID:23527251

  19. A quantitative model of bacterial mismatch repair as applied to studying induced mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, O. V.; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Kapralov, M. I.; Sweilam, N. H.

    2013-11-01

    The paper presents a mathematical model of the DNA mismatch repair system in Escherichia coli bacterial cells. The key pathways of this repair mechanism were simulated on the basis of modern experimental data. We have modelled in detail five main pathways of DNA misincorporation removal with different DNA exonucleases. Here we demonstrate an application of the model to problems of radiation-induced mutagenesis.

  20. Mechanisms of ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L. D.; Sangwijit, K.; Prakrajang, K.; Phanchaisri, B.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Thopan, P.; Singkarat, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-05-01

    As a useful ion beam biotechnology, ion-bombardment-induced DNA transfer into bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells has been successfully operated using argon ions. In the process ion bombardment of the bacterial cells modifies the cell envelope materials to favor the exogenous DNA molecules to pass through the envelope to enter the cell. The occurrence of the DNA transfer induction was found ion energy and fluence dependent in a complex manner. At ion energy of a few keV and a few tens of keV to moderate fluences the DNA transfer could be induced by ion bombardment of the bacterial cells, while at the same ion energy but to high fluences DNA transfer could not be induced. On the other hand, when the ion energy was medium, about 10-20 keV, the DNA transfer could not be induced by ion bombardment of the cells. The complexity of the experimental results indicated a complex mechanism which should be related to the complex structure of the bacterial E. coli cell envelope. A phase diagram was proposed to interpret different mechanisms involved as functions of the ion energy and fluence.

  1. Selective nucleation induced by defect nanostructures: A way to control cobalt disilicide precipitation during ion implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Fortuna, F.; Nguyen, M.-A.; Ruault, M.-O.; Kirk, M. A.; Borodin, V. A.; Ganchenkova, M. G.

    2012-12-15

    In this paper, we show a way to control cobalt disilicide precipitation during Co ion implantation at high temperatures (650 Degree-Sign C) by affecting radiation defects involved in precipitate nucleation and growth. We demonstrate that the relative shares of different precipitate types nucleated by implantation are strongly affected by defect microstructures deliberately created in investigated samples prior to cobalt implantation. Especially interesting is the effect of a dense ensemble of extremely small (1-3 nm) cavities, which promotes the formation of a relatively uniform layer of coherent cobalt disilicide precipitates with a narrow size distribution. In order to better understand the mechanism of the microstructural influence on the precipitate nucleation modes during Co implantation, we investigate the disilicide precipitation using different implantation setups and compare the results with those for cavity-free Si specimens implanted in similar conditions.

  2. STRESS ANNEALING INDUCED DIFFUSE SCATTERING FROM Ni3(Al,Si) PRECIPITATES

    SciTech Connect

    Barabash, Rozaliya; Ice, Gene E; Karapetrova, Evgenia; Zschack, P.

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse scattering caused by L12 type Ni3 (Al,Si) precipitates after stress annealing of Ni-Al-Si alloys is studied. Experimental reciprocal space maps are compared to the theoretical ones. Oscillations of diffuse scattering due to Ni3 (Al,Sc) precipitates are observed. Peculiarities of diffuse scattering in asymptotic region as compared to Huang scattering region are discussed. Coupling between the stress annealing direction and the precipitate shape is demonstrated.

  3. Rapid identification and discrimination of bacterial strains by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, S; Moncayo, S; Navarro-Villoslada, F; Ayala, J A; Izquierdo-Hornillos, R; de Villena, F J Manuel; Caceres, J O

    2014-04-01

    Identification and discrimination of bacterial strains of same species exhibiting resistance to antibiotics using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and neural networks (NN) algorithm is reported. The method has been applied to identify 40 bacterial strains causing hospital acquired infections (HAI), i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella pullurum and Salmonella salamae. The strains analyzed included both isolated from clinical samples and constructed in laboratory that differ in mutations as a result of their resistance to one or more antibiotics. Small changes in the atomic composition of the bacterial strains, as a result of their mutations and genetic variations, were detected by the LIBS-NN methodology and led to their identification and classification. This is of utmost importance because solely identification of bacterial species is not sufficient for disease diagnosis and identification of the actual strain is also required. The proposed method was successfully able to discriminate strains of the same bacterial species. The optimized NN models provided reliable bacterial strain identification with an index of spectral correlation higher than 95% for the samples analyzed, showing the potential and effectiveness of the method to address the safety and social-cost HAI-related issue. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [The long-term therapy of familial hypercholesterolemia with heparin-induced extracorporeal LDL precipitation].

    PubMed

    Roth, R; Köster, W; Wanner, C; Andre, M; Orth, M; Wieland, H; Schollmeyer, P

    1992-07-24

    The long-term tolerance to and effectiveness of heparin-induced extracorporeal LDL precipitation (HELP) in combination with lipid reducing drugs and diet was tested in six patient (5 males, 1 female; mean age 48 +/- 4 years). Follow-up period was over 50 months, in one patient over 24 months, while one man had a sudden cardiac death 57 weeks after starting treatment. The study was divided into three phases. In phase I (24 months) treatment consisted of HELP and conventional lipid-reducing drugs; in phase II (12 months) of lovastatin (80 mg daily) and cholestyramine (12-24 g daily); and phase III (14 months) of HELP, lovastatin and cholestyramine. In phase I it was possible to lower the pre-treatment level of LDL-cholesterol from 306 +/- 18 mg/dl to 173 +/- 13 mg/dl (43.5%). A similar effect (from 307 +/- 21 mg/dl to 155 +/- 17 mg/dl [-49.5%]) was obtained in phase II. The resumption of HELP reduced the pre-treatment LDL concentration to 136 +/- 9 mg/dl (-55.7%). The various treatment regimens were well tolerated. Biochemical data remained unchanged except for iron loss requiring substitution. Thus combined HELP, lovastatin and ion exchange offer for the first time an effective and reliable means in familial hypercholesterolaemia of clearly reducing long-term the mean LDL cholesterol level below the atherosclerosis threshold of 120 mg/dl.

  5. Observations of blocking-induced convergence zones and effects on precipitation in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, Douglas A.; Pielke, Roger A.

    Through an extensive set of observations, including standard surface measurements, Doppler radar, routine National Weather Service radiosondes and special Cross-chain Loran Atmospheric Sounding System (CLASS) data, two case studies of wintertime storms on the east slopes of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are presented (9-10 February 1988 and 30-31 March 1988). The emphases are the effects of blocking-induced convergence zones on snowfall distributions, snow crystal production mechanisms and banded reflectivity structure. As shown by the analysis of a typical Front Range storm, cold air damming can frequently lead to convergence zones and enhanced precipitation east of the mountains. The meso-fronts often form in place just east of the foothills, and are sensitive to the nature of the low-level synoptic easterly flow. For other upslope situations, the convergence zone does not appear as a meso-front, but as a less distinct area of convergence. Measured vertical profiles associated with the blocked surface patterns reveal a distincly layered temperature and wind structure. These soundings, along with surface measurements of wind, moisture and snow crystal types, enable some microphysical interpretation to be made concerning snowfall production in zones of ascent aloft, which are related to frontal surface as well as lifting at the top of the blocking-induced cold pool. Predominance of heavily rimed, dendritic aggregates implies lifting associated with the layered vertical structure in both storms. Bands of enhanced Doppler reflectivity exhibit significant correlation with snowfall intensity. The two case studies demonstrate that distinctly different patterns of blocking and convergence can appear in Colorado Front Range storms, each resulting in a unique snowfall distribution.

  6. Bacterially mediated mineralization of vaterite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Jimenez-Lopez, Concepcion; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro; Gonzalez-Muñoz, Maria Teresa; Rodriguez-Gallego, Manuel

    2007-03-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a common soil bacterium, plays an active role in the formation of spheroidal vaterite. Bacterial production of CO 2 and NH 3 and the transformation of the NH 3 to NH4+ and OH -, thus increasing solution pH and carbonate alkalinity, set the physicochemical conditions (high supersaturation) leading to vaterite precipitation in the microenvironment around cells, and directly onto the surface of bacterial cells. In the latter case, fossilization of bacteria occurs. Vaterite crystals formed by aggregation of oriented nanocrystals with c-axis normal to the bacterial cell-wall, or to the core of the spherulite when bacteria were not encapsulated. While preferred orientation of vaterite c-axis appears to be determined by electrostatic affinity (ionotropic effect) between vaterite crystal (0001) planes and the negatively charged functional groups of organic molecules on the bacterium cell-wall or on extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), analysis of the changes in the culture medium chemistry as well as high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations point to polymorph selection by physicochemical (kinetic) factors (high supersaturation) and stabilization by organics, both connected with bacterial activity. The latter is in agreement with inorganic precipitation of vaterite induced by NH 3 and CO 2 addition in the protein-rich sterile culture medium. Our results as well as recent studies on vaterite precipitation in the presence of different types of bacteria suggest that bacterially mediated vaterite precipitation is not strain-specific, and could be more common than previously thought.

  7. Calcium-induced precipitate formation in brain mitochondria: composition, calcium capacity, and retention

    PubMed Central

    Kristian, Tibor; Pivovarova, Natalia B.; Fiskum, Gary; Andrews, S. Brian

    2008-01-01

    Both isolated brain mitochondria and mitochondria in intact neurons are capable of accumulating large amounts of calcium, which leads to formation in the matrix of calcium- and phosphorus-rich precipitates, the chemical composition of which is largely unknown. Here, we have used inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) to determine how the amount and rate of mitochondrial calcium uptake relate to mitochondrial morphology, precipitate composition, and precipitate retention. Using isolated rat brain (RBM) or liver mitochondria (RLM) Ca2+-loaded by continuous cation infusion, precipitate composition was measured in situ in parallel with Ca2+ uptake and mitochondrial swelling. In RBM, the endogenous MPT inhibitors adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) increased mitochondrial Ca2+ loading capacity and facilitated formation of precipitates. In the presence of ADP, the Ca/P ratio approached 1.5, while ATP or reduced infusion rates decreased this ratio towards 1.0, indicating that precipitate chemical form varies with the conditions of loading. In both RBM and RLM, the presence of cyclosporine A in addition to ADP increased the Ca2+ capacity and precipitate Ca/P ratio. Following MPT and/or depolarization, the release of accumulated Ca2+ is rapid but incomplete; significant residual calcium in the form of precipitates is retained in damaged mitochondria for prolonged periods. PMID:17663756

  8. Calcium-induced precipitate formation in brain mitochondria: composition, calcium capacity, and retention.

    PubMed

    Kristian, Tibor; Pivovarova, Natalia B; Fiskum, Gary; Andrews, S Brian

    2007-08-01

    Both isolated brain mitochondria and mitochondria in intact neurons are capable of accumulating large amounts of calcium, which leads to formation in the matrix of calcium- and phosphorus-rich precipitates, the chemical composition of which is largely unknown. Here, we have used inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) to determine how the amount and rate of mitochondrial calcium uptake relate to mitochondrial morphology, precipitate composition, and precipitate retention. Using isolated rat brain (RBM) or liver mitochondria (RLM) Ca(2+)-loaded by continuous cation infusion, precipitate composition was measured in situ in parallel with Ca(2+) uptake and mitochondrial swelling. In RBM, the endogenous MPT inhibitors adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) loading capacity and facilitated formation of precipitates. In the presence of ADP, the Ca/P ratio approached 1.5, while ATP or reduced infusion rates decreased this ratio towards 1.0, indicating that precipitate chemical form varies with the conditions of loading. In both RBM and RLM, the presence of cyclosporine A in addition to ADP increased the Ca(2+) capacity and precipitate Ca/P ratio. Following MPT and/or depolarization, the release of accumulated Ca(2+) is rapid but incomplete; significant residual calcium in the form of precipitates is retained in damaged mitochondria for prolonged periods.

  9. Characterization of maize cytochrome P450 monooxygenases induced in response to safeners and bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Persans, M W; Wang, J; Schuler, M A

    2001-02-01

    Plants use a diverse array of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in their biosynthetic and detoxification pathways. To determine the extent to which various maize P450s are induced in response to chemical inducers, such as naphthalic anhydride (NA), triasulfuron (T), phenobarbital, and bacterial pathogens (Erwinia stuartii, Acidovorax avenae), we have analyzed the response patterns of seven P450 transcripts after treatment of seedlings with these inducers. Each of these P450 transcripts has distinct developmental, tissue-specific, and chemical cues regulating their expression even when they encode P450s within the same biosynthetic pathway. Most notably, the CYP71C1 and CYP71C3 transcripts, encoding P450s in the DIMBOA biosynthetic pathway, are induced to the same level in response to wounding and NA treatment of younger seedlings and differentially in response to NA/T treatment of younger seedlings and NA and NA/T treatment of older seedlings. NA and T induce expression of both CYP92A1 and CYP72A5 transcripts in older seedling shoots, whereas phenobarbital induces CYP92A1 expression in older seedling shoots and highly induces CYP72A5 expression in young and older seedling roots. Expressed sequence tag (EST) 6c06b11 transcripts, encoding an undefined P450 activity, are highly induced in seedling shoots infected with bacterial pathogens.

  10. Characterization of Maize Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases Induced in Response to Safeners and Bacterial Pathogens1

    PubMed Central

    Persans, Michael W.; Wang, Jian; Schuler, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    Plants use a diverse array of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in their biosynthetic and detoxification pathways. To determine the extent to which various maize P450s are induced in response to chemical inducers, such as naphthalic anhydride (NA), triasulfuron (T), phenobarbital, and bacterial pathogens (Erwinia stuartii, Acidovorax avenae), we have analyzed the response patterns of seven P450 transcripts after treatment of seedlings with these inducers. Each of these P450 transcripts has distinct developmental, tissue-specific, and chemical cues regulating their expression even when they encode P450s within the same biosynthetic pathway. Most notably, the CYP71C1 and CYP71C3 transcripts, encoding P450s in the DIMBOA biosynthetic pathway, are induced to the same level in response to wounding and NA treatment of younger seedlings and differentially in response to NA/T treatment of younger seedlings and NA and NA/T treatment of older seedlings. NA and T induce expression of both CYP92A1 and CYP72A5 transcripts in older seedling shoots, whereas phenobarbital induces CYP92A1 expression in older seedling shoots and highly induces CYP72A5 expression in young and older seedling roots. Expressed sequence tag (EST) 6c06b11 transcripts, encoding an undefined P450 activity, are highly induced in seedling shoots infected with bacterial pathogens. PMID:11161067

  11. Thermomechanical properties of Ni-Ti shape memory wires containing nanoscale precipitates induced by stress-assisted ageing.

    PubMed

    Cong, D Y; Saha, G; Barnett, M R

    2014-12-01

    This paper systematically examines the thermomechanical properties and phase transformation behaviour of slightly Ni-rich Ni-Ti biomedical shape memory wires containing homogeneously distributed nanoscale precipitates induced by stress-assisted ageing. In contrast to previous studies, particular attention is paid to the role of precipitates in impeding twin boundary movement (TBM) and its underlying mechanisms. The size and volume fraction of precipitates are altered by changing the ageing time. The martensitic transformation temperatures increase with prolonged ageing time, whereas the R-phase transformation temperature remains relatively unchanged. The stress-strain behaviour in different phase regions during both cooling and heating is comprehensively examined, and the underlying mechanisms for the temperature- and thermal-history-dependent behaviour are elucidated with the help of the established stress-temperature phase diagram. The effect of precipitates on TBM is explored by mechanical testing at 133K. It is revealed that the critical stress for TBM (σcr) increases with increasing ageing time. There is a considerable increase of 104MPa in σcr in the sample aged at 773K for 120min under 70MPa compared with the solution-treated sample, owing to the presence of precipitates. The Orowan strengthening model of twinning dislocations is insufficient to account for this increase in σcr. The back stress generation is the predominant mechanism for the interactions between precipitates and twin boundaries during TBM that give rise to the increase in σcr. Such results provide new insights into the thermomechanical properties of precipitate containing Ni-Ti biomedical shape memory wires, which are instructive for developing high-performance biomedical shape memory alloys. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Sanecki, J.E.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-12-01

    Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a significant materials issue for the light water reactor (LWR) industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power reactors that will use water as coolant. A new metallurgical process is proposed that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of minor impurity elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. MnS-type precipitates, which contain most of the sulfur in stainless steels, are thought to be unstable under irradiation. First, Mn transmutes strongly to Fe in thermalized neutron spectra. Second, cascade-induced disordering and the inverse Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates are thought to act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow sulfur, which is known to exert a deleterious influence on intergranular cracking, to re-enter the matrix. To test this hypothesis, compositions of MnS-type precipitates contained in several unirradiated and irradiated heats of Type 304, 316, and 348 stainless steels (SSs) were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Evidence is presented that shows a progressive compositional modification of MnS precipitates as exposure to neutrons increases in boiling water reactors. As the fluence increases, the Mn level in MnS decreases, whereas the Fe level increases. The S level also decreases relative to the combined level of Mn and Fe. MnS precipitates were also found to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as F and O which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates.

  13. FORWARD AND INVERSE BIO-GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF MICROBIALLY INDUCED PRECIPITATION IN 0.5M COLUMNAR EXPERIMENTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkouki, T. H.; Martinez, B.; Mortensen, B.; Dejong, J.; Weathers, T. S.; Spycher, N.; Ginn, T. R.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R. W.

    2009-12-01

    Subsurface contamination by metals and radionuclides threatens water supplies and ecosystem health at sites worldwide. One potential solution is immobilization in calcite where mineral precipitation is induced in situ by microbially-mediated ureolysis. Specifically, immobile aerobic biophases (cells or enzymes) mediate the conversion of urea to ammonium and carbonate, raising pH and promoting calcite precipitation. Divalent species such as strontium (including 90Sr, a common radionuclide contaminant) can co-precipitate, resulting in in situ immobilization. In waters that are saturated with respect to calcite, this represents a long-term sequestration mechanism. Calcite precipitation also enables control of mechanical properties of the medium through the cementation of particles thus increasing the shear strength and stiffness, while decreasing the permeability and compressibility. Challenges in application include design of the injectate aqueous chemistry (e.g., calcium, carbonate, urea, pH buffer, microbial nutrients) and selection of injection rates in order to control the timing and rate of calcite precipitation to generate the desired spatial distribution. Modeling ultimately requires incorporation of comprehensive reaction networks into transport simulators for non-uniform flow. To develop and validate the reaction network for use in both contaminant co-precipitation and subsurface structural modification applications, multicomponent biogeochemical modeling (TOUGHREACT v2) was applied in analyses of laboratory batch and column investigations of microbially-mediated calcite precipitation using Sporosarcina pasteurii. Column experiments included continuous and repeat pulse-flows, with cumulative flux equal in both cases. Aqueous chemistry and calcite distribution were monitored, as well as seismic shear waves that correlate to the stiffness of the column and thus to precipitation extent. TOUGHREACT was coupled with the inversion code UCODE to invert on observed

  14. Effects of Exogenous Cholecystokinin Octapeptide on Acquisition of Naloxone Precipitated Withdrawal Induced Conditioned Place Aversion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chunling; Meng, Yanxin; Li, Shujin; Ni, Zhiyu; Cong, Bin

    2012-01-01

    Cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8), a gut-brain peptide, regulates a variety of physiological behavioral processes. Previously, we reported that exogenous CCK-8 attenuated morphine-induced conditioned place preference, but the possible effects of CCK-8 on aversively motivated drug seeking remained unclear. To investigate the effects of endogenous and exogenous CCK on negative components of morphine withdrawal, we evaluated the effects of CCK receptor antagonists and CCK-8 on the naloxone-precipitated withdrawal-induced conditioned place aversion (CPA). The results showed that CCK2 receptor antagonist (LY-288,513, 10 µg, i.c.v.), but not CCK1 receptor antagonist (L-364,718, 10 µg, i.c.v.), inhibited the acquisition of CPA when given prior to naloxone (0.3 mg/kg) administration in morphine-dependent rats. Similarly, CCK-8 (0.1–1 µg, i.c.v.) significantly attenuated naloxone-precipitated withdrawal-induced CPA, and this inhibitory function was blocked by co-injection with L-364,718. Microinjection of L-364,718, LY-288,513 or CCK-8 to saline pretreated rats produced neither a conditioned preference nor aversion, and the induction of CPA by CCK-8 itself after morphine pretreatments was not significant. Our study identifies a different role of CCK1 and CCK2 receptors in negative affective components of morphine abstinence and an inhibitory effect of exogenous CCK-8 on naloxone-precipitated withdrawal-induced CPA via CCK1 receptor. PMID:22848639

  15. Radiation-induced instability of MnS precipitates and its possible consequences on IASCC of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, H.M.; Garner, F.A.

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) continues to be a significant materials issue for the light water reactor industry and may also pose a problem for fusion power devices that employ water cooling. Although a number of potential mechanisms have been proposed to participate in this phenomenon, at this time it is not clear that any of these candidate mechanisms are sufficient to rationalize the observed failures. A new mechanism is proposed in this paper that involves the radiation-induced release into solution of elements not usually thought to participate in IASCC. It is shown in this paper that MnS precipitates, which contain most of the sulphur in stainless steels, are probably unstable under irradiation. First, the Mn transmutes very strongly to Fe in highly thermalized neutron spectra. Second, the combination of cascade-induced disordering and the inverse-Kirkendall effect operating at the incoherent interfaces of MnS precipitates will probably act as a pump to export Mn from the precipitate surface into the alloy matrix. Both of these processes will most likely allow some of the sulphur to re-enter the alloy matrix. Sulphur is known to exert a deleterious influence on grain boundary cracking. MnS precipitates are also thought to be a reservoir of other deleterious impurities such as fluorine which could be also released due to radiation-induced instability of the precipitates. This possibility has been confirmed by Auger electron spectroscopy of Types 304, 316, and 348 stainless steel specimens sectioned from several BWR components irradiated up to 3.5x10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV).

  16. The potential role of amlodipine on experimentally induced bacterial rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Tatar, Arzu; Korkmaz, Mukadder; Yayla, Muhammed; Polat, Elif; Uslu, Hakan; Halici, Zekai; Parlak, Secil N

    2016-09-28

    For the treatment of rhinosinusitis antibiotics are used frequently. Concerns have been raised regarding the adverse effects of antibiotics and growing resistance. The lack of discovery of new antibiotic compounds has increased the necessity for exploration of non-antibiotic compounds that have antibacterial activity. Amlodipine is a non-antibiotic compound with anti-inflammatory activity. In this study we aimed to investigate the potential role of amlodipine in treatment of rhinosinusitis by evaluating its effects on tissue oxidative status, mucosal histology and inflammation. Fifteen adult albino guinea pigs were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus and treated with saline, cefazolin sodium, or amlodipine for 7 days. The control group was five healthy guinea pigs. Animals were sacrificed after the treatment. Histopathological changes were identified using Hematoxylin-Eosin staining. Inflammation was assessed by Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte (PMNL) infiltration density. Tissue levels of antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, glutathione) and an oxidative product (malondialdehyde) were determined. In rhinosinusitis induced animals, amlodipine reduced loss of cilia, lamina propria edema and collagen deposition compared to placebo (saline) and although not superior to cefazolin, amlodipine decreased PMNL infiltration. The superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione levels were reduced, whereas the malondialdehyde levels were increased significantly in all three-treatment groups compared to the control group. Amlodipine treated group showed significantly increased superoxide dismutase and glutathione levels and decreased malondialdehyde levels compared to all treatment groups. The non-antibiotic compound amlodipine may have a role in acute rhinosinusitis treatment through tissue protective, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All

  17. Quantification of precipitation measurement discontinuity induced by wind shields on national gauges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, D.; Goodison, B.E.; Metcalfe, J.R.; Louie, P.; Leavesley, G.; Emerson, D.; Hanson, C.L.; Golubev, V.S.; Elomaa, E.; Gunther, T.; Pangburn, T.; Kang, E.; Milkovic, J.

    1999-01-01

    Various combinations of wind shields and national precipitation gauges commonly used in countries of the northern hemisphere have been studied in this paper, using the combined intercomparison data collected at 14 sites during the World Meteorological Organization's (WMO) Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project. The results show that wind shields improve gauge catch of precipitation, particularly for snow. Shielded gauges, on average, measure 20-70% more snow than unshielded gauges. Without a doubt, the use of wind shields on precipitation gauges has introduced a significant discontinuity into precipitation records, particularly in cold and windy regions. This discontinuity is not constant and it varies with wind speed; temperature, and precipitation type. Adjustment for this discontinuity is necessary to obtain homogenous precipitation data for climate change and hydrological studies. The relation of the relative catch ratio (RCR, ratio of measurements of shielded gauge to unshielded gauge) versus wind speed and temperature has been developed for Alter and Tretyakov wind shields. Strong linear relations between measurements of shielded gauge and unshielded gauge have also been found for different precipitation types. The linear relation does not fully take into account the varying effect of wind and temperature on gauge catch. Overadjustment by the linear relation may occur at those sites with lower wind speeds, and underadjustment may occur at those stations with higher wind speeds. The RCR technique is anticipated to be more applicable in a wide range of climate conditions. The RCR technique and the linear relation have been tested at selected WMO intercomparison stations, and reasonable agreement between the adjusted amounts and the shielded gauge measurement was obtained at most of the sites. Test application of the developed methodologies to a regional or national network is therefore recommended to further evaluate their applicability in

  18. Pseudospherulitic fibrous calcite from the Quaternary shallow lacustrine carbonates of the Farafra Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt: A primary precipitate with possible bacterial influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanas, H. A.

    2012-04-01

    Pseudospherulitic fibrous calcite (PFC) has been found as a major constituent (85-90%) within thin massive limestone beds of the Quaternary mudflat-shallow lacustrine facies association (1.5-2 m thick) that forms part of combined facies associations of the Quaternary clastic-carbonate unit (25-30 m thick) at Bir-Karawein area in the Farafra Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt. The thin massive limestone beds (2-5 cm thick) are devoid of pedogenic features and marine fossils. They form a rhythmic cyclic succession with thin massive mudrocks (5-10 cm thick). The mudflat-shallow lacustrine facies association herein occurs within a depositional sequence of distal alluvial-floodplain (6-12 m thick) and palustrine (1.5-4.5 m thick) facies associations. The PFC is a composed of loosely packed rounded to sub-rounded single low-Mg-calcite crystals (150-250 μm-sized) with intracrystalline fibrous microfabric marked by fibers (150-250 μm long and 10-20 μm wide) radiating from the center of the individual crystals and displaying irregular internal growth with lobate pattern. The PFC crystals show non-planar to highly irregular intercrystalline boundaries. Under SEM, the individual crystal fibers group of PFC form ellipsoid to sub-globular bodies. Each PFC crystal exhibits successive zones of thick non-luminescence and thin brightly orange to dull luminescence. The matrix (10-15%) between the PFC crystals is mainly a honeycomb-like smectite. The PFC is postulated to be a primary precipitate. This concept is reached because the PFC: (i) does not display the criteria of typical Microcodium structures, root-calcification, speleothem structures, calcite spherulites of laminar calcretes, and calcitization of precursor dolomite or aragonite, (ii) possesses homogenous compositional and textural characteristics, and (iii) occurs within limestone beds that lie in between impermeable massive mudrock beds that dampen diagenesis. A role for possible bacterial contribution in crystallization of

  19. The Use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Distinguishing Between Bacterial Pathogen Species and Strains

    PubMed Central

    Multari, Rosalie A.; Cremers, David A.; Dupre, Joanne M.; Gustafson, John E.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was used in a blind study to successfully differentiate bacterial pathogens, both species and strain. The pathogens used for the study were chosen and prepared by one set of researchers. The LIBS data were collected and analyzed by another set of researchers. The latter researchers had no knowledge of the sample identities other than that (1) the first five of fifteen samples were unique (not replicates) and (2) the remaining ten samples consisted of two replicates of each of the first five samples. Using only chemometric analysis of the LIBS data, the ten replicate bacterial samples were successfully matched to each of the first five samples. The results of this blind study show it is possible to differentiate the bacterial pathogens Escherichia coli, three clonal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, and one unrelated MRSA strain using LIBS. This is an important finding because it demonstrates that LIBS can be used to determine bacterial pathogen species within a defined sample set and can be used to differentiate between clonal relationships among strains of a single multiple-antibiotic-resistant bacterial species. Such a capability is important for the development of LIBS instruments for use in medical, water, and food safety applications. PMID:20615288

  20. Linezolid-induced lactic acidosis: the thin line between bacterial and mitochondrial ribosomes.

    PubMed

    Santini, Alessandro; Ronchi, Dario; Garbellini, Manuela; Piga, Daniela; Protti, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Linezolid inhibits bacterial growth by targeting bacterial ribosomes and by interfering with bacterial protein synthesis. Lactic acidosis is a rare, but potentially lethal, side effect of linezolid. Areas covered: The pathogenesis of linezolid-induced lactic acidosis is reviewed with special emphasis on aspects relevant to the recognition, prevention and treatment of the syndrome. Expert opinion: Linezolid-induced lactic acidosis reflects the untoward interaction between the drug and mitochondrial ribosomes. The inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis diminishes the respiratory chain enzyme content and thus limits aerobic energy production. As a result, anaerobic glycolysis and lactate generation accelerate independently from tissue hypoxia. In the absence of any confirmatory test, linezolid-induced lactic acidosis should be suspected only after exclusion of other, more common, causes of lactic acidosis such as hypoxemia, anemia or low cardiac output. Normal-to-high whole-body oxygen delivery, high venous oxygen saturation and lack of response to interventions that effectively increase tissue oxygen provision all suggest a primary defect in oxygen use at the mitochondrial level. During prolonged therapy with linezolid, blood drug and lactate levels should be regularly monitored. The current standard-of-care treatment of linezolid-induced lactic acidosis consists of drug withdrawal to reverse mitochondrial intoxication and intercurrent life support.

  1. Precipitant induced porosity augmentation of polystyrene preserves the chondrogenicity of human chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Joergensen, Natasja L; Foldager, Casper B; Le, Dang Q S; Lind, Martin; Lysdahl, Helle

    2016-12-01

    Cells constantly sense and receive chemical and physical signals from neighboring cells, interstitial fluid, and extracellular matrix, which they integrate and translate into intracellular responses. Thus, the nature of the surface on which cells are cultured in vitro plays an important role for cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. Autologs chondrocyte implantation is considered the treatment of choice for larger cartilage defects in the knee. To obtain a sufficient number of chondrocytes for implantation multiple passaging is often needed, which raises concerns about the changes in the chondrogenic phenotype. In the present study, we analyzed the effect at cellular and molecular level of precipitant induced porosity augmentation (PIPA) of polystyrene surfaces on proliferation and differentiation of human chondrocytes. Human chondrocytes were isolated from healthy patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction and cultured on PIPA modified polystyrene surfaces. Microscopical analysis revealed topographically arranged porosity with micron pores and nanometer pits. Chondrocytes cultured on PIPA surfaces revealed no difference in cell viability and proliferation, but gene- and protein expressions of collagen type II were pronounced in the first passage of chondrocytes when compared to chondrocytes cultured on control surfaces. Additionally, an analysis of 40 kinases revealed that chondrocytes expanded on PIPA caused upregulated PI3K/mTOR pathway activation and inhibition of mTORC1 resulted in reduced sGAG synthesis. These findings indicate that PIPA modified polystyrene preserved the chondrogenicity of expanded human chondrocytes at gene and protein levels, which clinically may be attractive for the next generation of cell-culture surfaces for ex vivo cell growth. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3073-3081, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Rapid, Room-Temperature Formation of Crystalline Calcium Molybdate Phosphor Microparticles via Peptide-Induced Precipitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    observed that most of the precipi- tate was lost through dissolution . In a subsequent experiment under similar precipitation conditions, the precipitate was...aspartate, glutamate) in addition to the C-terminal carboxylate group. Li et al. have previously reported that calcite -binding pep- tides, identified...Philips PW 1800, PANalytical Almelo, The Netherlands) were conducted with Cu Ka radiation at a scan rate of 0.6° min–1. TG analyses were conducted with

  3. Kinetics and Equilibrium of Age-Induced Precipitation in Cu-4 At. Pct Ti Binary Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semboshi, Satoshi; Amano, Shintaro; Fu, Jie; Iwase, Akihiro; Takasugi, Takayuki

    2017-03-01

    Transformation kinetics and phase equilibrium of metastable and stable precipitates in age-hardenable Cu-4 at. pct Ti binary alloy have been investigated by monitoring the microstructural evolution during isothermal aging at temperatures between 693 K (420 °C) and 973 K (700 °C). The microstructure of the supersaturated solid solution evolves in four stages: compositional modulation due to spinodal decomposition, continuous precipitation of the needle-shaped metastable β'-Cu4Ti with a tetragonal structure, discontinuous precipitation of cellular components containing stable β-Cu4Ti lamellae with an orthorhombic structure, and eventually precipitation saturation at equilibrium. In specimens aged below 923 K (650 °C), the stable β-Cu4Ti phase is produced only due to the cellular reaction, whereas it can be also directly obtained from the intergranular needle-shaped β'-Cu4Ti precipitates in specimens aged at 973 K (700 °C). The precipitation kinetics and phase equilibrium observed for the specimens aged between 693 K (420 °C) and 973 K (700 °C) were characterized in accordance with a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram and a Cu-Ti partial phase diagram, which were utilized to determine the alloy microstructure, strength, and electrical conductivity.

  4. Kinetics and Equilibrium of Age-Induced Precipitation in Cu-4 At. Pct Ti Binary Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semboshi, Satoshi; Amano, Shintaro; Fu, Jie; Iwase, Akihiro; Takasugi, Takayuki

    2017-01-01

    Transformation kinetics and phase equilibrium of metastable and stable precipitates in age-hardenable Cu-4 at. pct Ti binary alloy have been investigated by monitoring the microstructural evolution during isothermal aging at temperatures between 693 K (420 °C) and 973 K (700 °C). The microstructure of the supersaturated solid solution evolves in four stages: compositional modulation due to spinodal decomposition, continuous precipitation of the needle-shaped metastable β'-Cu4Ti with a tetragonal structure, discontinuous precipitation of cellular components containing stable β-Cu4Ti lamellae with an orthorhombic structure, and eventually precipitation saturation at equilibrium. In specimens aged below 923 K (650 °C), the stable β-Cu4Ti phase is produced only due to the cellular reaction, whereas it can be also directly obtained from the intergranular needle-shaped β'-Cu4Ti precipitates in specimens aged at 973 K (700 °C). The precipitation kinetics and phase equilibrium observed for the specimens aged between 693 K (420 °C) and 973 K (700 °C) were characterized in accordance with a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram and a Cu-Ti partial phase diagram, which were utilized to determine the alloy microstructure, strength, and electrical conductivity.

  5. Weekly variability of precipitation induced by anthropogenic aerosols: A case study in Korea in summer 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Soo Ya; Jeong, Jaein I.; Park, R.; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Hong, Song-You

    2016-01-06

    We examine the effect of anthropogenic aerosols on the weekly variability of precipitation in Korea in summer 2004 by using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) models. We con-duct two WRF simulations including a baseline simulation with empirically based cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations and a sensitivity simulation with our implementation to account for the effect of aerosols on CCN number concentrations. The first simulation underestimates observed precipitation amounts, particularly in northeastern coastal areas of Korea, whereas the latter shows higher precipitation amounts that are in better agree-ment with the observations. In addition, the sensitivity model with the aerosol effects reproduces the observed weekly variability, particularly for precipitation frequency with a high R at 0.85, showing 20% increase of precipita-tion events during the weekend than those during weekdays. We find that the aerosol effect results in higher CCN number concentrations during the weekdays and a three-fold increase of the cloud water mixing ratio through en-hanced condensation. As a result, the amount of warm rain is generally suppressed because of the low auto-conversion process from cloud water to rain water under high aerosol conditions. The inefficient conversion, how-ever, leads to higher vertical development of clouds in the mid-atmosphere with stronger updrafts in the sensitivity model, which increases by 21% cold-phase hydrometeors including ice, snow, and graupel relative to the baseline model and ultimately results in higher precipitation amounts in summer.

  6. Weekly variability of precipitation induced by anthropogenic aerosols: A case study in Korea in summer 2004.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Ya; Jeong, Jaein I; Park, Rokjin J; Lim, Kyo-Sun Sunny; Hong, Song-You

    2016-01-15

    We examine the effect of anthropogenic aerosols on the weekly variability of precipitation in Korea in summer 2004 by using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) models. We conduct two WRF simulations including a baseline simulation with empirically based cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentrations and a sensitivity simulation with our implementation to account for the effect of aerosols on CCN number concentrations. The first simulation underestimates observed precipitation amounts, particularly in northeastern coastal areas of Korea, whereas the latter shows higher precipitation amounts that are in better agreement with the observations. In addition, the sensitivity model with the aerosol effects reproduces the observed weekly variability, particularly for precipitation frequency with a high R at 0.85, showing 20% increase of precipitation events during the weekend than those during weekdays. We find that the aerosol effect results in higher CCN number concentrations during the weekdays and a three-fold increase of the cloud water mixing ratio through enhanced condensation. As a result, the amount of warm rain is generally suppressed because of the low auto-conversion process from cloud water to rain water under high aerosol conditions. The inefficient conversion, however, leads to higher vertical development of clouds in the mid-atmosphere with stronger updrafts in the sensitivity model, which increases by 21% cold-phase hydrometeors including ice, snow, and graupel relative to the baseline model and ultimately results in higher precipitation amounts in summer.

  7. The role of the bacterial mismatch repair system in SOS-induced mutagenesis: a theoretical background.

    PubMed

    Belov, Oleg V; Chuluunbaatar, Ochbadrakh; Kapralov, Mikhail I; Sweilam, Nasser H

    2013-09-07

    A theoretical study is performed of the possible role of the methyl-directed mismatch repair system in the ultraviolet-induced mutagenesis of Escherichia coli bacterial cells. For this purpose, mathematical models of the SOS network, translesion synthesis and mismatch repair are developed. Within the proposed models, the key pathways of these repair systems were simulated on the basis of modern experimental data related to their mechanisms. Our model approach shows a possible mechanistic explanation of the hypothesis that the bacterial mismatch repair system is responsible for attenuation of mutation frequency during ultraviolet-induced SOS response via removal of the nucleotides misincorporated by DNA polymerase V (the UmuD'2C complex). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The methyltransferase Setdb2 mediates virus-induced susceptibility to bacterial superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Schliehe, Christopher; Swaminanthan, Savitha; Bosnjak, Berislav; Bauer, Lisa; Kandasamy, Richard K.; Griesshammer, Isabel M.; Kosack, Lindsay; Schmitz, Frank; Litvak, Vladimir; Sissons, James; Lercher, Alexander; Bhattacharya, Anannya; Khamina, Kseniya; Trivett, Anna L.; Tessarollo, Lino; Mesteri, Ildiko; Hladik, Anastasiya; Merkler, Doron; Kubicek, Stefan; Knapp, Sylvia; Epstein, Michelle M.; Bergthaler, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Immune responses are tightly regulated to ensure efficient pathogen clearance while avoiding tissue damage. Here we report that SET domain bifurcated 2 (Setdb2) was the only protein lysine methyltransferase induced during influenza virus infection. Setdb2 expression depended on type-I interferon signaling and it repressed the expression of the neutrophil attractant Cxcl1 and other NF-κB target genes. This coincided with Setdb2 occupancy at the Cxcl1 promoter, which in the absence of Setdb2 displayed reduced H3K9 tri-methylation. Setdb2 hypomorphic gene-trap mice exhibited increased neutrophil infiltration in sterile lung inflammation and were less sensitive to bacterial superinfection upon influenza virus infection. This suggests that a Setdb2-mediated regulatory crosstalk between the type-I interferon and NF-κB pathways represents an important mechanism for virus-induced susceptibility to bacterial superinfection. PMID:25419628

  9. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwijit, K.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Pitakrattananukool, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 1012 to 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  10. GCM simulations of anthropogenic aerosol-induced changes in aerosol extinction, atmospheric heating and precipitation over India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherian, Ribu; Venkataraman, C.; Quaas, J.; Ramachandran, S.

    2013-04-01

    The influence of anthropogenic emissions on aerosol distributions and the hydrological cycle are examined with a focus on monsoon precipitation over the Indian subcontinent, during January 2001 to December 2005, using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts-Hamburg (ECHAM5.5) general circulation model extended by the Hamburg Aerosol Module (HAM). The seasonal variability of aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieved from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the Terra and Aqua satellite is broadly well simulated (R ≈ 0.6-0.85) by the model. The spatial distribution and seasonal cycle of the precipitation observed over the Indian region are reasonably well simulated (R ≈ 0.5 to 0.8) by the model, while in terms of absolute magnitude, the model underestimates precipitation, in particular in the south-west (SW) monsoon season. The model simulates significant anthropogenic aerosol-induced changes in clear-sky net surface solar radiation (dimming greater than -7 W m-2), which agrees well with the observed trends over the Indian region. A statistically significant decreasing precipitation trend is simulated only for the SW monsoon season over the central-north Indian region, which is consistent with the observed seasonal trend over the Indian region. In the model, this decrease results from a reduction in convective precipitation, where there is an increase in stratiform cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and solar dimming that resulted from increased stability and reduced evaporation. Similarities in spatial patterns suggest that surface cooling, mainly by the aerosol indirect effect, is responsible for this reduction in convective activity. When changes in large-scale dynamics are allowed by slightly disturbing the initial state of the atmosphere, aerosol absorption in addition leads to a further stabilization of the lower troposphere, further reducing convective precipitation.

  11. Wood Ash Induced pH Changes Strongly Affect Soil Bacterial Numbers and Community Composition.

    PubMed

    Bang-Andreasen, Toke; Nielsen, Jeppe T; Voriskova, Jana; Heise, Janine; Rønn, Regin; Kjøller, Rasmus; Hansen, Hans C B; Jacobsen, Carsten S

    2017-01-01

    Recirculation of wood ash from energy production to forest soil improves the sustainability of this energy production form as recycled wood ash contains nutrients that otherwise would be lost at harvest. In addition, wood-ash is beneficial to many soils due to its inherent acid-neutralizing capabilities. However, wood ash has several ecosystem-perturbing effects like increased soil pH and pore water electrical conductivity both known to strongly impact soil bacterial numbers and community composition. Studies investigating soil bacterial community responses to wood ash application remain sparse and the available results are ambiguous and remain at a general taxonomic level. Here we investigate the response of bacterial communities in a spruce forest soil to wood ash addition corresponding to 0, 5, 22, and 167 t wood ash ha(-1). We used culture-based enumerations of general bacteria, Pseudomonas and sporeforming bacteria combined with 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to valuate soil bacterial responses to wood ash application. Results showed that wood ash addition strongly increased soil pH and electrical conductivity. Soil pH increased from acidic through neutral at 22 t ha(-1) to alkaline at 167 t ha(-1). Bacterial numbers significantly increased up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha(-1) followed by significant decrease at 167 t ha(-1) wood ash. The soil bacterial community composition changed after wood ash application with copiotrophic bacteria responding positively up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha(-1) while the adverse effect was seen for oligotrophic bacteria. Marked changes in bacterial community composition occurred at a wood ash dose of 167 t ha(-1) with a single alkaliphilic genus dominating. Additionally, spore-formers became abundant at an ash dose of 167 t ha(-1) whereas this was not the case at lower ash doses. Lastly, bacterial richness and diversity strongly decreased with increasing amount of wood ash applied. All of the observed bacterial responses can

  12. Wood Ash Induced pH Changes Strongly Affect Soil Bacterial Numbers and Community Composition

    PubMed Central

    Bang-Andreasen, Toke; Nielsen, Jeppe T.; Voriskova, Jana; Heise, Janine; Rønn, Regin; Kjøller, Rasmus; Hansen, Hans C. B.; Jacobsen, Carsten S.

    2017-01-01

    Recirculation of wood ash from energy production to forest soil improves the sustainability of this energy production form as recycled wood ash contains nutrients that otherwise would be lost at harvest. In addition, wood-ash is beneficial to many soils due to its inherent acid-neutralizing capabilities. However, wood ash has several ecosystem-perturbing effects like increased soil pH and pore water electrical conductivity both known to strongly impact soil bacterial numbers and community composition. Studies investigating soil bacterial community responses to wood ash application remain sparse and the available results are ambiguous and remain at a general taxonomic level. Here we investigate the response of bacterial communities in a spruce forest soil to wood ash addition corresponding to 0, 5, 22, and 167 t wood ash ha-1. We used culture-based enumerations of general bacteria, Pseudomonas and sporeforming bacteria combined with 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing to valuate soil bacterial responses to wood ash application. Results showed that wood ash addition strongly increased soil pH and electrical conductivity. Soil pH increased from acidic through neutral at 22 t ha-1 to alkaline at 167 t ha-1. Bacterial numbers significantly increased up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha-1 followed by significant decrease at 167 t ha-1 wood ash. The soil bacterial community composition changed after wood ash application with copiotrophic bacteria responding positively up to a wood ash dose of 22 t ha-1 while the adverse effect was seen for oligotrophic bacteria. Marked changes in bacterial community composition occurred at a wood ash dose of 167 t ha-1 with a single alkaliphilic genus dominating. Additionally, spore-formers became abundant at an ash dose of 167 t ha-1 whereas this was not the case at lower ash doses. Lastly, bacterial richness and diversity strongly decreased with increasing amount of wood ash applied. All of the observed bacterial responses can be directly

  13. Ultraviolet radiation induces filamentation in bacterial assemblages from North Andean Patagonian lakes.

    PubMed

    Modenutti, Beatriz; Balseiro, Esteban; Corno, Gianluca; Callieri, Cristiana; Bertoni, Roberto; Caravati, Emanuele

    2010-01-01

    Through laboratory experiments, we tested whether UV radiation (UVR) induces filamentation in natural bacteria assemblages from North Andean Patagonian lakes. We incubated water from three different lakes for 72 h in four separate treatments: (1) UVR + PAR (photosynthetically active radiation), (2) 50% UVR + PAR, (3) PAR and (4) 50% PAR. The irradiance levels used in the experiments were equivalent to those registered at the epilimnion of the lakes. In the UVR treatments filamentation was induced after the first 24 h and the proportion continued to increase for the next 48-72 h. A comparison of the gross composition and diversity of the entire community (cells >0.2 microm) with bacterial filaments alone (>5.0 microm) showed that UVR-induced filamentation is not a feature of any particular cluster. By sequencing part of the 16S rRNA gene of the taxonomic units obtained using denaturing gels, we observed that strains in the beta-Proteobacteria group were of relatively high importance in filament formation, followed by Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides, gamma-Proteobacteria and alpha-Proteobacteria, whereas Actinobacteria were almost nonexistent in the filaments. We propose that UVR doses equivalent to those of Andean lakes produce bacterial morphological changes, and that all bacterial groups except Actinobacteria can potentially form filaments.

  14. Resolution of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation reverses established fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Letitia; Hutson, Paul R.; Bushman, Wade

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostatic inflammation has been suggested to contribute to the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms by inducing fibrosis. We previously used a well-characterized mouse model of bacterial-induced prostate inflammation to demonstrate that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition. Here, we examined stability of the newly synthesized collagen in bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation and the reversibility of fibrosis after resolution of infection and inflammation. Methods Uropathogenic E. coli 1677 was instilled transurethrally into adult C3H/HeOuJ male mice to induce chronic prostatic inflammation. Collagen was labeled by 3H-proline administration for 28 days post-inoculation and 3H-hydroxyproline incorporation measured to determine stability of the newly synthesized collagen. Inflammation score was graded using a previously established system and total collagen content was measured by picrosirius red staining quantitation and hydroxyproline content. Resolution of inflammation and reversal of collagen deposition was assessed after treatment with antibiotic enrofloxacin for two weeks on day 28 post-inoculation followed by an eight-week recovery period. Results Decay analysis of incorporated 3H-hydroxyproline revealed the half-life of newly synthesized collagen to be significantly shorter in infected/inflamed prostates than in controls. Treatment with antibiotic enrofloxacin completely eradicated bacterial infection and allowed resolution of inflammation. This was followed by marked attenuation of collagen content and correlation analysis verified a positive association between the resolution of inflammation and the reversal of collagen deposition. Conclusions These data demonstrate, for the first time, that inflammation-induced prostatic fibrosis is a reversible process. PMID:25284058

  15. Herbicides induce change in metabolic and genetic diversity of bacterial community from a cold oligotrophic lake.

    PubMed

    Aguayo, P; González, C; Barra, R; Becerra, J; Martínez, M

    2014-03-01

    Pristine cold oligotrophic lakes show unique physical and chemical characteristics with permanent fluctuation in temperature and carbon source availability. Incorporation of organic toxic matters to these ecosystems could alter the bacterial community composition. Our goal was to assess the effects of simazine (Sz) and 2,4 dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) upon the metabolic and genetic diversity of the bacterial community in sediment samples from a pristine cold oligotrophic lake. Sediment samples were collected in winter and summer season, and microcosms were prepared using a ration 1:10 (sediments:water). The microcosms were supplemented with 0.1 mM 2,4-D or 0.5 mM Sz and incubated for 20 days at 10 °C. Metabolic diversity was evaluated by using the Biolog Ecoplate™ system and genetic diversity by 16S rDNA amplification followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. Total bacterial counts and live/dead ratio were determined by epifluorescence microscopy. The control microcosms showed no significant differences (P > 0.05) in both metabolic and genetic diversity between summer and winter samples. On the other hand, the addition of 2,4-D or Sz to microcosms induces statistical significant differences (P < 0.05) in metabolic and genetic diversity showing the prevalence of Actinobacteria group which are usually not detected in the sediments of these non-contaminated lacustrine systems. The obtained results suggest that contaminations of cold pristine lakes with organic toxic compounds of anthropic origin alter their homeostasis by inhibiting specific susceptible bacterial groups. The concomitant increase of usually low representative bacterial groups modifies the bacterial composition commonly found in this pristine lake.

  16. Pore-scale network modeling of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation: Insight into scale dependence of biogeochemical reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Chao-Zhong; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid; Ebigbo, Anozie

    2016-11-01

    The engineering of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP) has attracted much attention in a number of applications, such as sealing of CO2 leakage pathways, soil stabilization, and subsurface remediation of radionuclides and toxic metals. The goal of this work is to gain insight into pore-scale processes of MICP and scale dependence of biogeochemical reaction rates. This will help us develop efficient field-scale MICP models. In this work, we have developed a comprehensive pore-network model for MICP, with geochemical speciation calculated by the open-source PHREEQC module. A numerical pseudo-3-D micromodel as the computational domain was generated by a novel pore-network generation method. We modeled a three-stage process in the engineering of MICP including the growth of biofilm, the injection of calcium-rich medium, and the precipitation of calcium carbonate. A number of test cases were conducted to illustrate how calcite precipitation was influenced by different operating conditions. In addition, we studied the possibility of reducing the computational effort by simplifying geochemical calculations. Finally, the effect of mass transfer limitation of possible carbonate ions in a pore element on calcite precipitation was explored.

  17. The inhibiting effect of dislocation helices on the stress-induced orientation of S' precipitates in Al–Cu–Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xiaobin; Deng, Yunlai; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Xinming

    2015-09-15

    The phenomenon of restrained stress-induced preferential orientation of S′ precipitates is investigated using a single-crystal of Al–1.23Cu–0.43 Mg alloy. Al–1.23Cu–0.43 Mg single-crystal specimens are subjected to stress aging, and the microstructure is analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that the stress-induced preferential orientation of S′ precipitates is restrained owing to the dislocations produced by a higher stress. The effect of dislocations on the oriented precipitates depends on the total length of the intersection lines for precipitate habit planes and dislocation glide planes. This investigation not only provides important insight into solving the anisotropy problem attributed to precipitation strengthening, but also offers a benchmark for choosing the appropriate stress range in manufacturing of Al–Cu–Mg alloys. - Highlights: • Single crystals of an Al–Cu–Mg alloy were prepared for the investigations. • A phenomenon of restrained stress-induced preferential orientation of S′ precipitates was found. • The influence of dislocation helices on precipitation during stress-aging was studied. • Difference of orientation degree of S′ precipitates and θ′ precipitates was explained. • A basis for choosing the appropriate stress range in manufacturing of Al–Cu–Mg alloys is provided.

  18. Investigation of the development of irradiation-induced precipitates in VVER-440 type reactor pressure vessel steels and weld metals after irradiation and annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, M.; Nitzsche, P.; Boehmert, J.; Brauer, G.

    1999-10-01

    The development of irradiation-induced precipitates in VVER-440 type reactor pressure vessel steels 15Kh2MFA and weld metals SV-10KhMFT during irradiation and post-irradiation annealing is studied by small angle neutron and X-ray scattering. The kinetic conditions for the precipitation of particles, which already exist in the unirradiated state, seem to be improved at temperatures of about 270 C due to the irradiation. The size distribution of the irradiation-induced precipitates depends on the copper content and differs between weld and base metal. A strong correlation between the formation of irradiation-induced precipitates and the irradiation hardening is found. The hardness nearly linearly depends on the number of these precipitates.

  19. Microbially induced iron precipitation associated with a neutrophilic spring at Borra Caves, Vishakhapatnam, India.

    PubMed

    Baskar, Sushmitha; Baskar, Ramanathan; Thorseth, Ingunn H; Ovreås, Lise; Pedersen, Rolf B

    2012-04-01

    The present investigation uncovers various pieces of evidence for the possible biologically induced mineralization in iron mats associated with a pH-neutral spring in the Borra caves, Vishakhapatnam, India. Electron microscopy [scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)] demonstrated large numbers of (i) hollow tubes (diameter ∼1 μm) resembling sheaths of the iron-oxidizing bacteria Leptothrix, (ii) thin (diameter <1 μm) solid fibers of uncertain origin, (iii) nanoscale subspherical to irregularly shaped particles encrusting tubes and fibers, and (iv) aggregates of broken and partially disintegrated sheaths, fibers, and particles embedded in extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) occasionally including microbial cells. X-ray microanalyses by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that the mat accumulated largely Fe but also smaller amounts of Si and traces of P and Ca. Particles rich in Si and Al (possibly kaolinite) and Ca (carbonate) were also observed. High-resolution TEM/EDS of unstained ultrathin sections suggests that microbial sheaths were highly mineralized by amorphous to cryptocrystalline Fe-rich phases and less frequently by other fine-grained and fibrous authigenic claylike minerals. Total number of microorganisms in the iron mats was 5.8×10(5) cells, g sed(-1) (wet weight). Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene diversity revealed microorganisms assigned to eight different phyla [Proteobacteria (62%), Chloroflexi (8%), Bacteroidetes (7%), Planctomycetes (1%), Actinobacteria (5%), Acidobacteria (6%), Nitrospira (1%), Firmicutes (5%)]. Within the Proteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria was the predominant class, which accounted for 28% of the sequences. Within this class some obvious similarities between the obtained sequences and sequences from other cave systems could be seen, especially sequences affiliated with Leptothrix, Siderooxidans, Crenothrix, Comamonadaceae, Dechloromonas, and many uncultured

  20. Location and chemical composition of microbially induced phosphorus precipitates in anaerobic and aerobic granular sludge.

    PubMed

    Mañas, A; Spérandio, M; Decker, F; Biscans, B

    2012-01-01

    This work focuses on combined scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) applied to granular sludge used for biological treatment of high-strength wastewater effluents. Mineral precipitation is shown to occur in the core of microbial granules under different operating conditions. Three dairy wastewater effluents, from three different upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors and two aerobic granular sequenced batch reactors (GSBR) were evaluated. The relationship between the solid phase precipitation and the chemical composition of the wastewater was investigated with PHREEQC software (calculation of saturation indexes). Results showed that pH, Ca:P ratios and biological reactions played a major role in controlling the biomineralization phenomena. Thermodynamics calculations can be used to foresee the nature of bio-precipitates, but the location of the mineral concretions will need further investigation as it is certainly due to local microbial activity.

  1. Soil pH effect on phosphate induced cadmium precipitation in Arable soil.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chang Oh; Owens, Vance N; Kim, Yong Gyun; Lee, Sang Mong; Park, Hyean Cheal; Kim, Keun Ki; Son, Hong Joo; Suh, Jeong Min; Kim, Pil Joo

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine soil pH conditions that allow cadmium (Cd) to precipitate as Cd minerals in phosphate (P) amended soil. Cadmium immobilization could be attributed primarily to Cd adsorption due to increase in pH and negative charge. Soil pH might not affect Cd precipitation as Cd3(PO4)2 by direct reaction of Cd and P in the studied soil, even when soil pH increased up to 9.0. However, Cd might precipitate as CdCO3 with increasing pH up to 9.0 in P untreated soil and up to 8.0 in P treated soil depending on CO2 level.

  2. Middle atmosphere NO/x/ production due to ion propulsion induced radiation belt proton precipitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikin, A. C.; Jackman, C. H.

    1980-01-01

    The suggestion that keV Ar(+) resulting from ion propulsion operations during solar power satellite construction could cause energetic proton precipitation from the inner radiation belt is examined to determine if such precipitation could cause significant increases in middle atmosphere nitric oxide concentrations thereby adversely affecting stratospheric ozone. It is found that the initial production rate of NO (mole/cu cm-sec) at 50 km is 130 times that due to nitrous oxide reacting with excited oxygen. However, since the time required to empty the inner belt of protons is about 1 sec and short compared to the replenishment time due to neutron decay, precipitation of inner radiation belt protons will have no adverse atmospheric environmental effect.

  3. Bacterial feeding, Leishmania infection and distinct infection routes induce differential defensin expression in Lutzomyia longipalpis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phlebotomine insects harbor bacterial, viral and parasitic pathogens that can cause diseases of public health importance. Lutzomyia longipalpis is the main vector of visceral leishmaniasis in the New World. Insects can mount a powerful innate immune response to pathogens. Defensin peptides take part in this response and are known to be active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and some parasites. We studied the expression of a defensin gene from Lutzomyia longipalpis to understand its role in sand fly immune response. Methods We identified, sequenced and evaluated the expression of a L. longipalpis defensin gene by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The gene sequence was compared to other vectors defensins and expression was determined along developmental stages and after exposure of adult female L. longipalpis to bacteria and Leishmania. Results Phylogenetic analysis showed that the L. longipalpis defensin is closely related to a defensin from the Old World sand fly Phlebotomus duboscqi. Expression was high in late L4 larvae and pupae in comparison to early larval stages and newly emerged flies. Defensin expression was modulated by oral infection with bacteria. The Gram-positive Micrococcus luteus induced early high defensin expression, whilst the Gram-negative entomopathogenic Serratia marcescens induced a later response. Bacterial injection also induced defensin expression in adult insects. Female sand flies infected orally with Leishmania mexicana showed no significant difference in defensin expression compared to blood fed insects apart from a lower defensin expression 5 days post Leishmania infection. When Leishmania was introduced into the hemolymph by injection there was no induction of defensin expression until 72 h later. Conclusions Our results suggest that L. longipalpis modulates defensin expression upon bacterial and Leishmania infection, with patterns of expression that are distinct among bacterial species and routes of infection

  4. The rapid degradation of bisphenol A induced by the response of indigenous bacterial communities in sediment.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Xu, Piao; Zeng, Guangming; Huang, Danlian; Lai, Cui; Cheng, Min; Deng, Linjing; Zhang, Chen; Wan, Jia; Liu, Linshan

    2017-02-16

    In the present study, sediment was spiked with bisphenol A (BPA) solution to explore the interaction between indigenous bacterial communities and BPA biodegradation in sediment. Results showed that BPA could be adsorbed to the sediment and then biodegraded rapidly. Biodegradation efficiency of BPA in treatments with 10 and 50 mg/L BPA reached 64.3 and 61.8% on the first day, respectively. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that BPA affected the densities, species, and diversities of bacteria significantly. The response of bacterial community to BPA favored BPA biodegradation by promoting the growth of BPA-reducing bacteria and inhibiting other competitors. According to the results of sequencing, Pseudomonas and Sphingomonas played vital roles in the degradation of BPA. They presented over 73% of the original bacterial community, and both of them were promoted by BPA comparing with controls. Laccase and polyphenol oxidase contributed to the degradation of BPA and metabolic intermediates, respectively. This paper illustrates the rapid biodegradation of BPA induced by the response of indigenous bacterial communities to the BPA stress, which will improve the understandings of BPA degradation in sediment.

  5. Bacterial infection of osteoblasts induces interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18 transcription but not protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Ian; Hughes, Francis M; Bost, Kenneth L

    2002-10-01

    A growing body of evidence has shown that bacterially challenged bone-forming osteoblasts are a significant source of an array of cytokines and chemokines that can support immune responses during bone disease. In the present study, Staphylococcus aureus and Salmonella, two common pathogens of bone, were investigated for their ability to induce production of two related inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and IL18, in osteoblasts. Cultured mouse osteoblasts were found to respond rapidly to either bacterial challenge by upregulation in the levels of mRNA encoding both IL-1beta and IL-18. Surprisingly, this mRNA expression did not translate into intracellular accumulation of IL-1beta or IL-18 precursor proteins or secretion of mature cytokines, despite the presence of detectable caspase-1 activity in these cells. These studies demonstrate that although osteoblasts can secrete a number of key proinflammatory mediators in response to bacterial pathogens, IL-1beta and IL-18 are not among this number. We suggest that osteoblasts are an unlikely source of these cytokines during the progression of bacterial infection of bone.

  6. Simvastatin attenuates stroke-induced splenic atrophy and lung susceptibility to spontaneous bacterial infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Rong; Zhu, Xiaolei; Liu, Lin; Nanda, Anil; Granger, D Neil; Li, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Statins are widely used in the primary and secondary prevention of ischemic stroke, but their effects on stroke-induced immunodeppression and post-stroke infections are elusive. We investigated effects of simvastatin treatment on stroke-induced splenic atrophy and lung susceptibility to bacterial infection in acute experimental stroke in mice. Methods Ischemic stroke was induced by transient occlusion of middle cerebral artery (MCAO) followed by reperfusion. In some experiments, splenectomies were performed 2 weeks prior to MCAO. Animals were randomly assigned to sham and MCAO groups treated subcutaneously with vehicle or simvastatin (20 mg/kg/day). Brain infarction, neurological function, brain interferon-γ expression, splenic atrophy and apoptosis, and lung infection were examined. Results Simvastatin reduced stroke-induced spleen atrophy and splenic apoptosis via increased mitochrondrial anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression and decreased pro-apoptotic Bax translocation from cytosol into mitochondria. Splenectomy reduced brain interferon-γ (3d) and infarct size (5d) after stroke and these effects were reversed by adoptive transfer of splenocytes. Simvastatin inhibited brain interferon-γ (3d) and reduced infarct volume and neurological deficits (5d) after stroke, and these protective effects were observed not only in naïve stroke mice but also in splenectomied stroke mice adoptively transferred with splenocytes. Simvastatin also decreased the stroke-associated lung susceptibility to spontaneous bacterial infection. Conclusions Results provide the first direct experimental evidence that simvastatin ameliorates stroke-induced peripheral immunodepression by attenuating spleen atrophy and lung bacterial infection. These findings contribute to a better understanding of beneficial effects of statins in the treatment of stroke. PMID:23391769

  7. Sympathetic activity induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal is blocked in genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    García-Carmona, Juan-Antonio; Martínez-Laorden, Elena; Milanés, María-Victoria; Laorden, María-Luisa

    2015-02-15

    There is large body evidence indicating that stress can lead to cardiovascular disease. However, the exact brain areas and the mechanisms involved remain to be revealed. Here, we performed a series of experiments to characterize the role of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) in the stress response induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal. The experiments were performed in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) ventrolateral medulla (VLM), brain regions involved in the regulation of cardiovascular activity, and in the right ventricle by using genetically engineered mice lacking functional CRF1R levels (KO). Mice were treated with increasing doses of morphine and withdrawal was precipitated by naloxone administration. Noradrenaline (NA) turnover, c-Fos, expression, PKA and TH phosphorylated at serine 40, was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Morphine withdrawal induced an enhancement of NA turnover in PVN in parallel with an increase in TH neurons expressing c-Fos in VLM in wild-type mice. In addition we have demonstrated an increase in NA turnover, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA levels in heart. The main finding of the present study was that NA turnover, TH positive neurons that express c-Fos, TH phosphorylated at serine 40 and PKA expression observed during morphine withdrawal were significantly inhibited in CRF1R KO mice. Our results demonstrate that CRF/CRF1R activation may contribute to the adaptive changes induced by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in the heart and in the brain areas which modulate the cardiac sympathetic function and suggest that CRF/CRF1R pathways could be contributing to cardiovascular disease associated to opioid addiction. - Highlights: • Naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal increases sympathetic activity in the PVN and heart. • Co-localization of TH phosphorylated at serine 40/c-Fos in the VLM after morphine withdrawal • Naloxone-precipitated

  8. Macroalgal Extracts Induce Bacterial Assemblage Shifts and Sublethal Tissue Stress in Caribbean Corals

    PubMed Central

    Morrow, Kathleen M.; Ritson-Williams, Raphael; Ross, Cliff; Liles, Mark R.; Paul, Valerie J.

    2012-01-01

    Benthic macroalgae can be abundant on present-day coral reefs, especially where rates of herbivory are low and/or dissolved nutrients are high. This study investigated the impact of macroalgal extracts on both coral-associated bacterial assemblages and sublethal stress response of corals. Crude extracts and live algal thalli from common Caribbean macroalgae were applied onto the surface of Montastraea faveolata and Porites astreoides corals on reefs in both Florida and Belize. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rRNA gene amplicons was used to examine changes in the surface mucus layer (SML) bacteria in both coral species. Some of the extracts and live algae induced detectable shifts in coral-associated bacterial assemblages. However, one aqueous extract caused the bacterial assemblages to shift to an entirely new state (Lobophora variegata), whereas other organic extracts had little to no impact (e.g. Dictyota sp.). Macroalgal extracts more frequently induced sublethal stress responses in M. faveolata than in P. astreoides corals, suggesting that cellular integrity can be negatively impacted in selected corals when comparing co-occurring species. As modern reefs experience phase-shifts to a higher abundance of macroalgae with potent chemical defenses, these macroalgae are likely impacting the composition of microbial assemblages associated with corals and affecting overall reef health in unpredicted and unprecedented ways. PMID:23028648

  9. Bacterial sensing underlies artificial sweetener-induced growth of gut Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Daly, Kristian; Darby, Alistair C; Hall, Neil; Wilkinson, Mark C; Pongchaikul, Pisut; Bravo, David; Shirazi-Beechey, Soraya P

    2016-07-01

    Disruption in stable establishment of commensal gut microbiota by early weaning is an important factor in susceptibility of young animals to enteric disorders. The artificial sweetener SUCRAM [consisting of neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC) and saccharin] included in piglets' feed reduces incidence of enteric disease. Pyrosequencing of pig caecal 16S rRNA gene amplicons identified 25 major families encompassing seven bacterial classes with Bacteroidia, Clostridia and Bacilli dominating the microbiota. There were significant shifts in microbial composition in pigs maintained on a diet containing SUCRAM, establishing SUCRAM as a major influence driving bacterial community dynamics. The most notable change was a significant increase of Lactobacillaceae population abundance, almost entirely due to a single phylotype, designated Lactobacillus 4228. The sweetener-induced increase in Lactobacillaceae was observed in two different breeds of pigs signifying a general effect. We isolated Lactobacillus 4228, sequenced its genome and found it to be related to Lactobacillus amylovorus. In vitro analyses of Lactobacillus 4228 growth characteristics showed that presence of NHDC significantly reduces the lag phase of growth and enhances expression of specific sugar transporters, independently of NHDC metabolism. This study suggests that sensing of NHDC by a bacterial plasma membrane receptor underlies sweetener-induced growth of a health promoting gut bacterium. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. miR-155 suppresses bacterial clearance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced keratitis by targeting Rheb.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Minhao; Li, Meiyu; Li, Dandan; Peng, Anping; Nie, Xinxin; Sun, Mingxia; Wang, Jinli; Wu, Yongjian; Deng, Qiuchan; Zhu, Min; Chen, Kang; Yuan, Jin; Huang, Xi

    2014-07-01

    miR-155 (microRNA-155) is an important noncoding RNA in regulating host inflammatory responses. However, its regulatory role in ocular infection remains unclear. Our study first explored the function of miR-155 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced keratitis, one of the most common sight-threatening ocular diseases. We found that miR-155 expression was enhanced in human and mouse corneas after P. aeruginosa infection and was mainly expressed in macrophages but not neutrophils. In vivo studies demonstrated that miR-155 knockout mice displayed more resistance to P. aeruginosa keratitis, with a higher inducible nitric oxide synthase level and a lower bacterial burden. More importantly, in vitro data indicated that miR-155 suppressed the macrophage-mediated bacterial phagocytosis and intracellular killing of P. aeruginosa by targeting Rheb (Ras homolog enriched in brain). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to explore the role of miR-155 in bacterial keratitis, which may provide a promising target for clinical treatment of P. aeruginosa keratitis and other infectious diseases.

  11. Lesion bacterial communities in American lobsters with diet-induced shell disease.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Robert A; Metzler, Anita; Tlusty, Michael; Smolowitz, Roxanna M; Leberg, Paul; Chistoserdov, Andrei Y

    2012-04-26

    In southern New England, USA, shell disease affects the profitability of the American lobster Homarus americanus fishery. In laboratory trials using juvenile lobsters, exclusive feeding of herring Clupea harengus induces shell disease typified initially by small melanized spots that progress into distinct lesions. Amongst a cohabitated, but segregated, cohort of 11 juvenile lobsters fed exclusively herring, bacterial communities colonizing spots and lesions were investigated by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA amplified using 1 group-specific and 2 universal primer sets. The Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria predominated in both spots and lesions and included members of the orders Flavobacteriales (Bacteriodetes), Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales and Rhizobiales (Alphaproteobacteria), Xanthomonadales (Gammaproteobacteria) and unclassified Gammaproteobacteria. Bacterial communities in spot lesions displayed more diversity than communities with larger (older) lesions, indicating that the lesion communities stabilize over time. At least 8 bacterial types persisted as lesions developed from spots. Aquimarina 'homaria', a species commonly cultured from lesions present on wild lobsters with epizootic shell disease, was found ubiquitously in spots and lesions, as was the 'Candidatus Kopriimonas aquarianus', implicating putative roles of these species in diet-induced shell disease of captive lobsters.

  12. Femtosecond laser-induced oriented precipitation of Ba2TiGe2O8 crystals in glass.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ye; Ma, Hongliang; Lu, Bo; Yu, Bingkun; Zhu, Bin; Qiu, Jianrong

    2008-03-17

    Ba(2)TiGe(2)O(8) crystals were selectively precipitated on femtosecond laser irradiated BaO-TiO(2)-GeO(2) glass surface. Furthermore, the crystal could grow from the surface of glass to the interior towards the laser movement direction when the laser focus was continuously moved. The laser-induced crystal was confirmed to be Ba(2)TiGe(2)O(8) phase by x-ray diffraction analysis and micro-Raman spectra. We also observed blue light due to double-frequency conversion of the 800nm incident laser in the crystallized regions. We propose the observed phenomena resulted from the femtosecond laser-assisted orientation of precipitation of crystal.

  13. Modelling microbially induced carbonate precipitation and its influence on CO2 and water flow in the subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebigbo, A.; Helmig, R.; Gerlach, R.; Cunningham, A. B.; Phillips, A.

    2011-12-01

    A numerical model is presented which is capable of simulating and investigating the development of a microbially mediated hydraulic barrier near the injection well of a CO2 storage site. The model accounts for the transport of bacteria in the porous medium, their accumulation as biofilms, and the role they play in the increased hydrolysis of urea -- leading to the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Additionally, the influence of the precipitates and biofilm on the flow of the two fluid phases (CO2 and water) through the porous medium is accounted for. Part of the model is validated with experiments involving saturated flow through sand-packed columns. This numerical model is a useful tool for the optimisation of strategies for the proposed technology involving the use of such microbially induced barriers to increase storage security near wellbores. It also aids in improving our understanding of the relevant processes.

  14. Misfit-induced changes of lattice parameters in two-phase systems: coherent/incoherent precipitates in a matrix

    PubMed Central

    Akhlaghi, Maryam; Steiner, Tobias; Meka, Sai Ramudu; Mittemeijer, Eric Jan

    2016-01-01

    Elastic accommodation of precipitation-induced or thermally induced misfit leads to lattice-parameter changes in crystalline multi-phase systems. Formulae for calculation of such misfit-induced lattice-parameter changes are presented for the aggregate (matrix + second-phase particles) and for the individual matrix and second phase, recognizing the occurrence of either coherent or incoherent diffraction by the matrix and second-phase particles. An overview and an (re)interpretation on the above basis is presented of published lattice-parameter data, obtained by X-ray diffraction analyses of aggregates of matrix plus second-phase particles. Examples for three types of systems consisting of a matrix with misfitting second-phase particles are dealt with, which differ in the origin of the misfit (precipitation or thermally induced) and in the type of diffraction (coherent or incoherent diffraction of matrix plus second-phase particles). The experimental data are shown to be in good to very good agreement with predictions according to the current treatment. PMID:26937236

  15. Global-warming-induced Increases in Extreme Precipitation are Smallest over Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, X.; Durran, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    Climate-model simulations predict an intensification of extreme precipitation in almost all areas of the world under global warming. Geographical variations in the magnitude of this intensification are clearly evident in the simulations, but most previous efforts to understand the factors responsible for the changes in extreme precipitation have focused on zonal averages, neglecting the variations that occur in different regions at the same latitude. Here we present climate-model simulations for an ocean-covered earth having simple idealized continents with north-south mountain barriers in its northern midlatitudes. We show that the sensitivity of extreme precipitation to increases in the global mean surface temperature is 3 %/K lower over the mountains than over the oceans and the plains. Fundamental factors responsible for changes in precipitation intensity may be divided between thermodynamic effects, arising through changes in temperature and moisture, and dynamical effects, produced by changes in the ascent rates of saturated air parcels. The difference in sensitivity among these regions is not due to thermodynamic effects, but rather to differences between the gravity-wave dynamics governing vertical velocities over the mountains and the cyclone dynamics governing vertical motions over the oceans and plains.

  16. Snow precipitation on Mars driven by cloud-induced night-time convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Hinson, David P.; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Navarro, Thomas; Millour, Ehouarn; Forget, François; Montmessin, Franck

    2017-09-01

    Although it contains less water vapour than Earth's atmosphere, the Martian atmosphere hosts clouds. These clouds, composed of water-ice particles, influence the global transport of water vapour and the seasonal variations of ice deposits. However, the influence of water-ice clouds on local weather is unclear: it is thought that Martian clouds are devoid of moist convective motions, and snow precipitation occurs only by the slow sedimentation of individual particles. Here we present numerical simulations of the meteorology in Martian cloudy regions that demonstrate that localized convective snowstorms can occur on Mars. We show that such snowstorms--or ice microbursts--can explain deep night-time mixing layers detected from orbit and precipitation signatures detected below water-ice clouds by the Phoenix lander. In our simulations, convective snowstorms occur only during the Martian night, and result from atmospheric instability due to radiative cooling of water-ice cloud particles. This triggers strong convective plumes within and below clouds, with fast snow precipitation resulting from the vigorous descending currents. Night-time convection in Martian water-ice clouds and the associated snow precipitation lead to transport of water both above and below the mixing layers, and thus would affect Mars' water cycle past and present, especially under the high-obliquity conditions associated with a more intense water cycle.

  17. A Bacterial Cocaine Esterase Protects Against Cocaine-Induced Epileptogenic Activity and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Jutkiewicz, Emily M.; Baladi, Michelle G.; Cooper, Ziva D.; Narasimhan, Diwahar; Sunahara, Roger K.; Woods, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Study objective Cocaine toxicity results in cardiovascular complications, seizures, and death and accounts for approximately 20% of drug-related emergency department visits every year. Presently, there are no treatments to eliminate the toxic effects of cocaine. The present study hypothesizes that a bacterial cocaine esterase with high catalytic efficiency would provide rapid and robust protection from cocaine-induced convulsions, epileptogenic activity, and lethality. Methods Cocaine-induced paroxysmal activity and convulsions were evaluated in rats surgically implanted with radiotelemetry devices (N=6 per treatment group). Cocaine esterase was administered 1 minute after a lethal dose of cocaine or after cocaine-induced convulsions to determine the ability of the enzyme to prevent or reverse, respectively, the effects of cocaine. Results The cocaine esterase prevented all cocaine-induced electroencephalographic changes and lethality. This effect was specific for cocaine because the esterase did not prevent convulsions and death induced by a cocaine analog, (−)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-phenyltropane. The esterase prevented lethality even after cocaine-induced convulsions occurred. In contrast, the short-acting benzodiazepine, midazolam, prevented cocaine-induced convulsions but not the lethal effects of cocaine. Conclusion The data showed that cocaine esterase successfully degraded circulating cocaine to prevent lethality and that cocaine-induced convulsions alone are not responsible for the lethal effects of cocaine in this model. Therefore, further investigation into the use of cocaine esterase for treating cocaine overdose and its toxic effects is warranted. PMID:19013687

  18. On the effect of the injection of potassium phosphate in vivo inducing the precipitation of serum calcium with inorganic phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Alcimar B; Ticianeli, José G; Soares, Letícia B M; Amaro, George

    2013-01-01

    High concentrations of inorganic phosphate (Pi) resulted from the hydrolysis of ATP is strongly associated to the weakness of the contractile mechanism of muscles due to its attractiveness to calcium. The majority of the experiments to study such effect are conducted in vitro. This work investigates the effects of different concentrations of Pi, induced by the injection of potassium phosphate in live animals, in the precipitation with serum calcium and the generation of calcium phosphate composites. The experiments were also designed to find out the ideal amount of potassium phosphate to induce an effective reaction. Potassium phosphate was injected in Wistar rats, randomly separated and distributed into seven groups. Group I was injected with 0.5 ml of saline solution (control) and groups II through VII were injected with 0.5, 1.5, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10.0 mg/kg of potassium phosphate, respectively. Blood collected from the inferior vena cava was submitted to biochemical analyses to measure the concentrations of calcium, Pi, urea and creatinine. The results showed that Pi, induced by the injection of potassium phosphate in live animals, causes precipitation with serum calcium, with statistically significant differences between the control and the treatment groups for doses up to 5.0 mg/kg. No statistically significant differences were found between the different doses and the concentration of urea and creatinine in the plasma. We conclude that potassium phosphate can be used to induce serum calcium precipitation in-vivo, with minor effects on other physiological variables, and the ideal dose to do so is 5.0 mg/kg. PMID:24379908

  19. Reactive Transport Modeling of Induced Calcite Precipitation Reaction Fronts in Porous Media Using A Parallel, Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Gaston, D.; Redden, G. D.; Fox, D. T.; Fujita, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Inducing mineral precipitation in the subsurface is one potential strategy for immobilizing trace metal and radionuclide contaminants. Generating mineral precipitates in situ can be achieved by manipulating chemical conditions, typically through injection or in situ generation of reactants. How these reactants transport, mix and react within the medium controls the spatial distribution and composition of the resulting mineral phases. Multiple processes, including fluid flow, dispersive/diffusive transport of reactants, biogeochemical reactions and changes in porosity-permeability, are tightly coupled over a number of scales. Numerical modeling can be used to investigate the nonlinear coupling effects of these processes which are quite challenging to explore experimentally. Many subsurface reactive transport simulators employ a de-coupled or operator-splitting approach where transport equations and batch chemistry reactions are solved sequentially. However, such an approach has limited applicability for biogeochemical systems with fast kinetics and strong coupling between chemical reactions and medium properties. A massively parallel, fully coupled, fully implicit Reactive Transport simulator (referred to as “RAT”) based on a parallel multi-physics object-oriented simulation framework (MOOSE) has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Within this simulator, systems of transport and reaction equations can be solved simultaneously in a fully coupled, fully implicit manner using the Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method with additional advanced computing capabilities such as (1) physics-based preconditioning for solution convergence acceleration, (2) massively parallel computing and scalability, and (3) adaptive mesh refinements for 2D and 3D structured and unstructured mesh. The simulator was first tested against analytical solutions, then applied to simulating induced calcium carbonate mineral precipitation in 1D columns and 2D flow cells as analogs

  20. Key role of selective viral-induced mortality in determining marine bacterial community composition.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, T; del Giorgio, P A

    2007-02-01

    Viral infection is thought to play an important role in shaping bacterial community composition and diversity in aquatic ecosystems, but the strength of this interaction and the mechanisms underlying this regulation are still not well understood. The consensus is that viruses may impact the dominant bacterial strains, but there is little information as to how viruses may affect the less abundant taxa, which often comprise the bulk of the total bacterial diversity. The potential effect of viruses on the phylogenetic composition of marine bacterioplankton was assessed by incubating marine bacteria collected along a North Pacific coastal-open ocean transect in seawater that was greatly depleted of ambient viruses. The ambient communities were dominated by typical marine groups, including alphaproteobacteria and the Bacteroidetes. Incubation of these communities in virus-depleted ambient water yielded an unexpected and dramatic increase in the relative abundance of bacterial groups that are generally undetectable in the in situ assemblages, such as betaproteobacteria and Actinobacteria. Our results suggest that host susceptibility is not necessarily only proportional to its density but to other characteristics of the host, that rare marine bacterial groups may be more susceptible to viral-induced mortality, and that these rare groups may actually be the winners of competition for resources. These observations are not inconsistent with the 'phage kills the winner' hypothesis but represent an extreme and yet undocumented case of this paradigm, where the potential winners apparently never actually develop beyond a very low abundance threshold in situ. We further suggest that this mode of regulation may influence not just the distribution of single strains but of entire phylogenetic groups.

  1. Basagran(®) induces developmental malformations and changes the bacterial community of zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jacinta M M; Galhano, Victor; Henriques, Isabel; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to assess the effects of Basagran(®) on zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos. The embryos were exposed to Basagran(®) at concentrations ranging from 120.0 to 480.6 mg/L, and the effects on embryo development (up to 96 h) and bacterial communities of 96 h-larvae were assessed. The embryo development response was time-dependent and concentration-dependent (106.35 < EC50 < 421.58 mg/L). The sensitivity of embryo-related endpoints decreased as follows: blood clotting in the head and/or around the yolk sac > delay or anomaly in yolk sac absorption > change in swimming equilibrium > development of pericardial and/or yolk sac oedema > scoliosis. A PCR-DGGE analysis was used to evaluate changes in the structure, richness, evenness and diversity of bacterial communities after herbicide exposure. A herbicide-induced structural adjustment of bacterial community was observed. In this study, it was successfully demonstrated that Basagran(®) affected zebrafish embryos and associated bacterial communities, showing time-dependent and concentration-dependent embryos' developmental response and structural changes in bacterial community. Thus, this work provides for the first time a complementary approach, which is useful to derive robust toxicity thresholds considering the embryo-microbiota system as a whole. The aquatic hazard assessment will be strengthened by combining current ecotoxicological tests with molecular microbiology tools. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. VSL#3 probiotic treatment decreases bacterial translocation in rats with carbon tetrachloride-induced cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Elisabet; Nieto, Juan C; Boullosa, Ana; Vidal, Silvia; Sancho, Francesc J; Rossi, Giacomo; Sancho-Bru, Pau; Oms, Rosa; Mirelis, Beatriz; Juárez, Cándido; Guarner, Carlos; Soriano, Germán

    2015-03-01

    Probiotics can prevent pathological bacterial translocation in cirrhosis by modulating intestinal microbiota and improving gut barrier and immune disturbances. To evaluate the effect of probiotic VSL#3 on bacterial translocation, intestinal microbiota, gut barrier and inflammatory response in rats with experimental cirrhosis. Forty-six Sprague-Dawley rats with CCl4 -induced cirrhosis were randomized into two groups: VSL#3 group (n = 22) that received VSL#3 in drinking water, and water group (n = 24) that received water only. Treatment began at week 6 of cirrhosis induction and continued until laparotomy, performed 1 week after development of ascites or at week 20. A control group included 11 healthy rats. At this study end, we evaluated bacterial translocation, intestinal flora, intestinal barrier (ileal claudin-2 and 4, β-defensin-1, occludin and malondialdehyde as index of oxidative damage) and serum cytokines. Mortality during this study was similar in the VSL#3 group (10/22, 45%) and the water group (10/24, 42%) (P = 1). The incidence of bacterial translocation was 1/12 (8%) in the VSL#3 group, 7/14 (50%) in the water group (P = 0.03 vs. VSL#3 group) and 0/11 in the control group (P = 0.008 vs. water group). The concentration of ileal and caecal enterobacteria and enterococci was similar in the two groups of cirrhotic rats. The ileal occludin concentration was higher and ileal malondialdehyde and serum levels of TNF-α were lower in the VSL#3 group than in the water group (P < 0.05). VSL#3 decreases bacterial translocation, the pro-inflammatory state and ileal oxidative damage and increases ileal occludin expression in rats with experimental cirrhosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Influences on the Emissions of Bacterial Plasmas Generated through Nanosecond Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malenfant, Dylan J.

    In the past decade, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been shown to provide compositional data that can be used for discrimination between bacterial specimens at the strain level. This work demonstrates the viability of this technique in a clinical setting. Studies were conducted to investigate the impact of emissions generated by a nitrocellulose filter paper background on the classification of four species: E. coli, S. epidermidis, M. smegmatis, and P. aeruginosa. Limits of detection were determined as 48+/-12 kCFU per ablation event for new mounting procedures using standard diagnostic laboratory techniques, and a device for centrifuge filtration was designed for sampling from low-titer bacterial suspensions. Plasma emissions from samples grown at biological levels of magnesium, zinc, and glucose were shown not to deviate from controls. A limit of detection for environmental zinc was found to be 11 ppm. Discrimination with heat-killed samples was demonstrated, providing a sterile diagnostic environment.

  4. Pore-forming bacterial toxins potently induce release of nitric oxide in porcine endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is believed to play an important role in sepsis- related hypotension. We examined the effects of two pore-forming bacterial exotoxins, Escherichia coli hemolysin and Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin, on NO formation in cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells. NO was quantified using a difference- spectrophotometric method based on the rapid and stoichiometric reaction of NO with oxyhemoglobin. Endothelial cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels were also monitored. Both exotoxins increased NO synthesis in endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner to an extent exceeding that observed with the ionophore A23187 or thrombin. The capacity of exotoxins to induce NO formation may be relevant in patients with severe local or systemic bacterial infections. PMID:8391061

  5. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides induce in vitro degradation of cartilage matrix through chondrocyte activation.

    PubMed Central

    Jasin, H E

    1983-01-01

    The present studies demonstrate that bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induce cartilage matrix degradation in live explants in organ culture. Quintuplicate bovine nasal fibrocartilage explants cultured for 8 d with three different purified LPS preparations derived from Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhosa at concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 25.0 micrograms/ml resulted in matrix proteoglycan depletion of 33.3 +/- 5.8 to 92.5 +/- 2.0% (medium control depletion 17.7 +/- 0.7 to 32.4 +/- 1.4%). Matrix degradation depended on the presence of live chondrocytes because frozen-thawed explants incubated with LPS failed to show any proteoglycan release. Moreover, the addition of Polymyxin B (25 micrograms/ml) to live explants incubated with LPS abolished matrix release, whereas Polymyxin B had no effect on the matrix-degrading activity provided by blood mononuclear cell factors. A highly purified Lipid A preparation induced matrix degradation at a concentration of 0.01 micrograms/ml. Cartilage matrix collagen and proteoglycan depletion also occurred with porcine articular cartilage explants (collagen release: 18.3 +/- 3.5%, medium control: 2.1 +/- 0.5%; proteoglycan release: 79.0 +/- 5.9%, medium control: 28.8 +/- 4.8%). Histochemical analysis of the cultured explants confirmed the results described above. Gel chromatography of the proteoglycans released in culture indicated that LPS induced significant degradation of the high molecular weight chondroitin sulfate-containing aggregates. These findings suggest that bacterial products may induce cartilage damage by direct stimulation of chondrocytes. This pathogenic mechanism may play a role in joint damage in septic arthritis and in arthropathies resulting from the presence of bacterial products derived from the gastrointestinal tract. Images PMID:6358260

  6. Icodextrin-induced peritonitis: study of five cases and comparison with bacterial peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Touré, Fatouma; Lavaud, Sylvie; Mohajer, Mehdi; Lavaud, François; Canivet, Eric; Nguyen, Philippe; Chanard, Jacques; Rieu, Philippe

    2004-02-01

    An epidemic of aseptic peritonitis related to the presence of peptidoglycan contaminant in some batches of icodextrin solution (Extraneal, Baxter Healthcare Corporation) occurred in Europe in the first six months of 2002. By case-control study we examined the clinical and biologic features of 5 patients with icodextrin-induced peritonitis (group AP) and compared them with 7 patients with bacterial peritonitis (group BP) recruited in our clinical center between January and June 2002. Diagnosis of icodextrin-induced peritonitis was confirmed in all cases by a positive reintroduction test with contaminated batches of icodextrin. No recurrence was observed on re-exposure to icodextrin free of peptidoglycan. Skin tests were positive with contaminated icodextrin in 2 of 5 patients, while they were negative with icodextrin solution free of peptidoglycan (<0.6 ng/mL). During peritonitis, serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP) was lower in group AP (42.4 +/- 34 mg/L) than in group BP (135 +/- 59 mg/L) (P= 0.01). Leukocyte number in peritoneal dialysis effluent was lower in group AP (284 +/- 101/mm3), with a lower neutrophil/monocyte ratio (N/M = 0.67) than in group BP (1410 +/- 973/mm3; N/M = 4) (P < 0.05). A low number of peritoneal fluid eosinophilia (11 +/- 8%) was detected in group AP. Icodextrin-induced peritonitis was associated with a burst of intraperitoneal cytokines. The phenotype of peritoneal neutrophils was different between aseptic and bacterial peritonitis, indicating that inflammatory stimuli that activate neutrophils in both types of peritonitis are clearly distinct. Finally, peritoneal injury measured by weight gain, peritoneal permeability, and CA125 concentration seemed to be less severe during icodextrin-induced peritonitis than during bacterial peritonitis.

  7. Cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats--does bacterial translocation occur via a transperitoneal pathway?

    PubMed

    Arendt, T; Wendt, M; Olszewski, M; Falkenhagen, U; Stoffregen, C; Fölsch, U R

    1997-10-01

    Bacterial infectious complications are the most common cause of morbidity and mortality associated with acute pancreatitis. Most pathogens are common gastrointestinal flora, indicating that the gut is the source of pancreatitis-related infections. However, the route whereby the microorganisms reach distant organs remains speculative. We tested the hypothesis that spread of bacteria occurs via a transperitoneal pathway. Acute interstitial pancreatitis (AIP) was induced in antibiotic (gentamicin, bacithracin, neomycin)-decontaminated rats by intravenous infusion of cerulein. Effects of pancreatic necrosis (PN) were studied in rats that received additional injections into the peritoneal cavity of pancreatic tissue obtained from donor rats. The rats were inoculated with Escherichia coli (O2:KN:H18) resistant to the antibiotics used for decontamination either orally (10(12) microorganisms; experiment I) or intraperitoneally (10(8) microorganisms; experiment II). Moreover, the rat peritoneal cavity wash was inoculated with 10(8) E. coli in vitro (experiment III). In rats with AIP and PN, recovery of the bacteria from liver, spleen, pancreas, lung, and blood following oral inoculation demonstrated that acute pancreatitis promotes bacterial translocation from the gut. The absence of E. coli in these organs following intraperitoneal inoculation showed that the bacteria do not spread from the peritoneal cavity. Rats with PN cleared E. coli from the peritoneal cavity in a shorter period than rats with AIP and controls (5 vs. 7 and 8 days; p < 0.05). The multiplication rate of E. coli in peritoneal cavity wash was lower in rats with PN than in rats with AIP and controls (p < 0.01). We conclude that (1) translocation of E. coli from the gut during cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis occurs via nonperitoneal pathways, (2) the peritoneal cavity acts as a trap for the bacteria rather than a source of bacterial seeding, and (3) PN impairs survival of E. coli in the peritoneal

  8. Protective effect of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 against induced bacterial antigen translocation in experimental cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Moratalla, Alba; Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Santacruz, Arlette; Moya, Ángela; Peiró, Gloria; Zapater, Pedro; González-Navajas, José M; Giménez, Paula; Such, José; Sanz, Yolanda; Francés, Rubén

    2014-07-01

    Intervention in the gut ecosystem is considered as a potential strategy to treat liver diseases and their complications. We have evaluated the effects of Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 on bacterial translocation and the liver status in experimental cirrhosis. Liver damage was induced in Balb/c mice by weight-controlled oral administration of carbon tetrachloride. Laparotomies were performed at week 12. One week prior to laparotomy, animals received B. pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 (10(9) cfu/daily) or placebo intragastrically. All animals received Escherichia coli (10(7) cfu/single dose) intragastrically 24 hours before laparotomy. A group of naïve non-treated animals was included as control. Liver tissue specimens, mesenteric lymph nodes, intestinal content and blood were collected. Liver histology, profibrogenic genes expression, bacterial DNA translocation, serum endotoxaemia and liver cytokine levels were measured. Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 showed no significant effect on structural liver damage, as determined by histological evaluation, alpha-smooth muscle actin distribution, profibrogenic gene expression levels, total hydroxyproline levels and malon dialdehyde production compared with mice receiving placebo. Interestingly, bacterial DNA translocation and serum endotoxin levels were significantly decreased in mice receiving the Bifidobacterium strain compared with placebo. Gut barrier integrity markers were up-regulated in mice receiving B. pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 and quantitatively correlated with intestinal gene copy numbers of the bifidobacterial strain. Gene expression levels of several anti-inflammatory mediators were also increased in mice receiving B. pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 compared with placebo. Oral administration of B. pseudocatenulatum CECT7765 is associated with improved gut barrier integrity and shows a beneficial effect against induced bacterial antigen translocation in the CCl4 -model of cirrhosis. © 2013 John

  9. Impact of floods induced by extreme precipitation events on public health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavroulis, Spyridon; Mavrouli, Maria; Lekkas, Efthymios; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2017-04-01

    Hydrometeorological disasters comprise the most reported type of natural disaster, and floods account for the majority of disasters in this category in both developed and developing countries. Flooding can lead to extensive morbidity and mortality and pose multiple risks to public health throughout the world. This study involved an extensive and systematic literature review of 124 research publications related to public health impact of 98 floods that occurred globally (Oceania 4, Africa 9, America 22, Europe 24, Asia 39) from 1942 to 2014. The inclusion criteria were literature type comprising journal articles and official reports, natural disaster type including floods induced after extreme precipitation events (accumulation of rainwater in poorly-drained environments, riverine and flash floods), population type including humans, and outcome measure characterized by infectious diseases (ID) incidence increase. The potential post-flood ID are classified into 13 groups including rodent-borne (reported in 38 of the total 98 events, 38.78%), water-borne (33, 33.67%), vector-borne (25, 25.51%), respiratory (19, 19.39%), fecal-oral (14, 14.29%), skin (9, 9.18%), blood-borne (4, 4.08%), eye (3, 3.06%), soil-related (3, 3.06%), ear (2, 2.04%), fungal (1, 1.02%) and wound-borne (1, 1.02%) ID. Based on available age and genre data, it is concluded that the most vulnerable population groups are predominantly young children (age ≤ 5 years) and male. The most fatal post-flood ID are leptospirosis and diarrhea followed by respiratory tract infections. The detected risk factors include (1) poor economic status and living in flood prone areas, (2) destruction of infrastructures, disruption of public utilities and interruption of basic public health services such as vector control programs, (3) direct physical exposure to sewage-polluted flood water, (4) lack of adequate potable water and water-supply from contaminated ponds and tube wells along with lack of distribution of

  10. Critical role of bacterial isochorismatase in the autophagic process induced by Acinetobacter baumannii in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Zhang, Kaiyu; Shi, Xiaochen; Wang, Chao; Wang, Feng; Fan, Junwen; Shen, Fengge; Xu, Jiancheng; Bao, Wanguo; Liu, Mingyuan; Yu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    A recent study reported that Acinetobacter baumannii could induce autophagy, but the recognition and clearance mechanism of intracytosolic A. baumannii in the autophagic process and the molecular mechanism of autophagy induced by the pathogen remains unknown. In this study, we first demonstrated that invading A. baumannii induced a complete, ubiquitin-mediated autophagic response that is dependent upon septins SEPT2 and SEPT9 in mammalian cells. We also demonstrated that autophagy induced by A. baumannii was Beclin-1 dependent via the AMPK/ERK/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. Of interest, we found that the isochorismatase mutant strain had significantly decreased siderophore-mediated ferric iron acquisition ability and had a reduced the ability to induce autophagy. We verified that isochorismatase was required for the recognition of intracytosolic A. baumannii mediated by septin cages, ubiquitinated proteins, and ubiquitin-binding adaptor proteins p62 and NDP52 in autophagic response. We also confirmed that isochorismatase was required for the clearance of invading A. baumannii by autophagy in vitro and in the mouse model of infection. Together, these findings provide insight into the distinctive recognition and clearance of intracytosolic A. baumannii by autophagy in host cells, and that isochorismatase plays a critical role in the A. baumannii–induced autophagic process.—Wang, Y., Zhang, K., Shi, X., Wang, C., Wang, F., Fan, J., Shen, F., Xu, J., Bao, W., Liu, M., Yu, L. Critical role of bacterial isochorismatase in the autophagic process induced by Acinetobacter baumannii in mammalian cells. PMID:27432399

  11. Activation of liver X receptors and retinoid X receptors prevents bacterial-induced macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Valledor, Annabel F; Hsu, Li-Chung; Ogawa, Sumito; Sawka-Verhelle, Dominique; Karin, Michael; Glass, Christopher K

    2004-12-21

    Microbe-macrophage interactions play a central role in the pathogenesis of many infections. The ability of some bacterial pathogens to induce macrophage apoptosis has been suggested to contribute to their ability to elude innate immune responses and successfully colonize the host. Here, we provide evidence that activation of liver X receptors (LXRs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs) inhibits apoptotic responses of macrophages to macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) withdrawal and several inducers of apoptosis. In addition, combined activation of LXR and RXR protected macrophages from apoptosis caused by infection with Bacillus anthracis, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella typhimurium. Expression-profiling studies demonstrated that LXR and RXR agonists induced the expression of antiapoptotic regulators, including AIM/CT2, Bcl-X(L), and Birc1a. Conversely, LXR and RXR agonists inhibited expression of proapoptotic regulators and effectors, including caspases 1, 4/11, 7, and 12; Fas ligand; and Dnase1l3. The combination of LXR and RXR agonists was more effective than either agonist alone at inhibiting apoptosis in response to various inducers of apoptosis, and it acted synergistically to induce expression of AIM/CT2. Inhibition of AIM/CT2 expression in response to LXR/RXR agonists partially reversed their antiapoptotic effects. These findings reveal unexpected roles of LXRs and RXRs in the control of macrophage survival and raise the possibility that LXR/RXR agonists may be exploited to enhance innate immunity to bacterial pathogens that induce apoptotic programs as a strategy for evading host responses.

  12. Aragonite precipitation induced by anaerobic oxidation of methane in shallow-water seeps, Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedling, Johanna; Kuhfuß, Hanna; Lott, Christian; Böttcher, Michael E.; Lichtschlag, Anna; Wegener, Gunter; Deusner, Christian; Bach, Wolfgang; Weber, Miriam

    2014-05-01

    In the shallow-water organic-poor silicate sands off the West coast of Elba, Italy, we found aragonite precipitates within a radius of 10 cm to methane seeps in 20 - 40 cm sediment depth. The shallow seep site was mapped by SCUBA diving and in an area of 100 m2 nine gas emission spots were observed. The gas emission, containing 73 Vol. % methane, was measured to be 0.72 L m-2 d-1. Findings of anaerobic methane oxidizing archea (ANME 1, 2, 2a, 2b) and sulphate reducing bacteria (SRB) as well as in vitro rate measurements of anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) with a maximum of 67 ± 7 nmol CH4 cm-3 d-1 led to the hypothesis that carbonate precipitation is coupled to these microbial processes. Porewater analysis showed elevated concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) (up to 15.5 mmol L-1) and hydrogen sulfide (up to 6.6 mmol L-1). The presence of bicarbonate and the ambient temperature (14 - 25 ° C) facilitate the precipitation of needle-shaped aragonite. Oxygen isotope compositions of the mineral are consistent with the ambient temperatures and may indicate a recent diagenetic formation of this mineral. Although precipitation should not be preserved in these sandy permeable sediments, influenced by seasonality, wave action, and fluid flow, we found up to 10-50 cm3 irregular pieces of cemented sand grains, very often encrusting dead seagrass rhizomes. Commonly known carbonate structures, especially from the deep sea, are chimneys, mounds, hardgrounds and nodules. These structures are well known from seep and vent sites, usually showing the same range of stable carbon isotope fractionation as the escaping methane. The permeable sediment at the Elba site possibly allows the gas to frequently change its pathway to the sediment surface and thus precipitation can occure at several spots and more irregular than in the reported sites. Preservation of precipitates, however, requires sufficient authigenic aragonite to be formed before fluid dynamics changed the

  13. Microbial phytase-induced calcium-phosphate precipitation--a potential soil stabilization method.

    PubMed

    Roeselers, G; Van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2010-11-01

    Two hypotheses were tested: (1) microbial dephosphorylation of phytate in the presence of Ca²+ ions will result in the precipitation of hydroxyapatite-like crystals and (2) precipitation of calcium-phosphate crystals on and between sand-like particles can cause cementation. A growing culture of the dimorphic phytase-active yeast Arxula adeninivorans was introduced into a column filled with quartz particles and subsequently a liquid growth medium amended with calcium phytate was pumped through the column resulting in increased strength and stiffness of the quartz particle matrix. Environmental scanning electron microscope analysis combined with energy-dispersive X-ray measurement revealed cementation of the quartz particles by calcium-phosphate crystals. This microbial mineralization process could provide a novel approach to improving the mechanical properties like strength and stiffness of sandy soils.

  14. Refining hot-water extracted silk sericin by ethanol-induced precipitation.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hanjin; Lee, Ji Young; Kim, Moo Kon; Um, In Chul; Lee, Ki Hoon

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve some inherent disadvantages in the mechanical properties of silk sericin (SS), we prepared ethanol-precipitated sericin (EpSS) by adding ethanol into hot-water extracted sericin (HS) solution. EpSS had higher viscosity compared to HS and it was due to the differences in their molecular weight distribution (MWD). The different MWD of EpSS was due to the different solubility of sericin molecules at various concentrations of ethanol, and the amino acid composition of EpSS showed that the more hydrophobic sericin is precipitated more readily in the presence of ethanol. The secondary structure of sericin is also changed from a random coil to β-sheet structure when the amount of ethanol added is high enough. The DSC analysis also revealed that EpSSs has a more compact structure. Finally, when beads were prepared from EpSS, they had enhanced compressive strength compared to those from HS.

  15. Precipitation-Induced Voltage-Dependent Ion Current Fluctuations in Conical Nanopores

    SciTech Connect

    Vlassiouk, Ivan V

    2010-01-01

    Single conically shaped nanopores produce stable ion current fluctuations when in contact with weakly soluble salts, such as calcium hydrogen phosphate (CaHPO{sub 4}) and cobalt hydrogen phosphate (CoHPO{sub 4}). The pore spontaneously switches between high and low conductance states, called open and closed states, respectively. Pore opening and closing are linked to the dynamic formation of the calcium and cobalt precipitates at the small opening of the pore. The probabilities of pore opening and closing are voltage-dependent, and this characteristic of ion current signal is known for biological voltage-gated channels. We show that new types of ion current fluctuations are obtained in conditions at which precipitates of CaHPO{sub 4} and CoHPO{sub 4} can form in the pore at the same time.

  16. micro-Opioid receptor endocytosis prevents adaptations in ventral tegmental area GABA transmission induced during naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Anuradha; He, Li; Stuber, Garret D; Bonci, Antonello; Whistler, Jennifer L

    2010-03-03

    Chronic morphine drives adaptations in synaptic transmission thought to underlie opiate dependence. Here we examine the role of micro-opioid receptor (MOR) trafficking in one of these adaptations, specifically, changes in GABA transmission in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). To address this question, we used a knock-in mouse, RMOR (for recycling MOR), in which genetic change in the MOR promotes morphine-induced receptor desensitization and endocytosis in GABA interneurons of the VTA. In wild-type mice (postnatal days 23-28) chronic morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c., twice daily for 5 d), induced a cAMP-dependent increase in the probability of GABA release onto VTA dopamine neurons. The increased GABA release frequency correlated with physical dependence on morphine measured by counting somatic signs of morphine withdrawal, such as, tremors, jumps, rears, wet-dog shakes, and grooming behavior precipitated by subcutaneous administration of naloxone (NLX) (2 mg/kg). This adaptation in GABA release was prevented in RMOR mice given the same morphine treatment, implicating MOR trafficking in this morphine-induced change in plasticity. Importantly, treatment with the cAMP activity inhibitor rp-cAMPS [(R)-adenosine, cyclic 3',5'-(hydrogenphosphorothioate) triethylammonium] (50 ng/0.5 microl), directly to the VTA, attenuated somatic withdrawal signs to systemic morphine produced by intra-VTA NLX (500 ng/0.5 microl), directly tying enhanced cAMP-driven GABA release to naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in the VTA.

  17. On the basin-scale detection and attribution of human-induced climate change in monsoon precipitation and streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Arpita; Mujumdar, P. P.

    2012-10-01

    Detecting and quantifying the presence of human-induced climate change in regional hydrology is important for studying the impacts of such changes on the water resources systems as well as for reliable future projections and policy making for adaptation. In this article a formal fingerprint-based detection and attribution analysis has been attempted to study the changes in the observed monsoon precipitation and streamflow in the rain-fed Mahanadi River Basin in India, considering the variability across different climate models. This is achieved through the use of observations, several climate model runs, a principal component analysis and regression based statistical downscaling technique, and a Genetic Programming based rainfall-runoff model. It is found that the decreases in observed hydrological variables across the second half of the 20th century lie outside the range that is expected from natural internal variability of climate alone at 95% statistical confidence level, for most of the climate models considered. For several climate models, such changes are consistent with those expected from anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. However, unequivocal attribution to human-induced climate change cannot be claimed across all the climate models and uncertainties in our detection procedure, arising out of various sources including the use of models, cannot be ruled out. Changes in solar irradiance and volcanic activities are considered as other plausible natural external causes of climate change. Time evolution of the anthropogenic climate change "signal" in the hydrological observations, above the natural internal climate variability "noise" shows that the detection of the signal is achieved earlier in streamflow as compared to precipitation for most of the climate models, suggesting larger impacts of human-induced climate change on streamflow than precipitation at the river basin scale.

  18. Inducible expression of transmembrane proteins on bacterial magnetic particles in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Tomoko; Shimojo, Akiko; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-02-01

    Bacterial magnetic particles (BacMPs) produced by the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 are used for a variety of biomedical applications. In particular, the lipid bilayer surrounding BacMPs has been reported to be amenable to the insertion of recombinant transmembrane proteins; however, the display of transmembrane proteins in BacMP membranes remains a technical challenge due to the cytotoxic effects of the proteins when they are overexpressed in bacterial cells. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible expression system was developed to display transmembrane proteins on BacMPs. The expression and localization of the target proteins were confirmed using luciferase and green fluorescent protein as reporter proteins. Gene expression was suppressed in the absence of anhydrotetracycline, and the level of protein expression could be controlled by modulating the concentration of the inducer molecule. This system was implemented to obtain the expression of the tetraspanin CD81. The truncated form of CD81 including the ligand binding site was successfully displayed at the surface of BacMPs by using Mms13 as an anchor protein and was shown to bind the hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2. These results suggest that the tetracycline-inducible expression system described here will be a useful tool for the expression and display of transmembrane proteins in the membranes of BacMPs.

  19. Independent Effects of a Herbivore’s Bacterial Symbionts on Its Performance and Induced Plant Defences

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Heike; Schimmel, Bernardus C. J.; Lamers, Mart M.; Wybouw, Nicky; Groot, Astrid T.; Kant, Merijn R.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that microbial pathogens and herbivores elicit defence responses in plants. Moreover, microorganisms associated with herbivores, such as bacteria or viruses, can modulate the plant’s response to herbivores. Herbivorous spider mites can harbour different species of bacterial symbionts and exert a broad range of effects on host-plant defences. Hence, we tested the extent to which such symbionts affect the plant’s defences induced by their mite host and assessed if this translates into changes in plant resistance. We assessed the bacterial communities of two strains of the common mite pest Tetranychus urticae. We found that these strains harboured distinct symbiotic bacteria and removed these using antibiotics. Subsequently, we tested to which extent mites with and without symbiotic bacteria induce plant defences in terms of phytohormone accumulation and defence gene expression, and assessed mite oviposition and survival as a measure for plant resistance. We observed that the absence/presence of these bacteria altered distinct plant defence parameters and affected mite performance but we did not find indications for a causal link between the two. We argue that although bacteria-related effects on host-induced plant defences may occur, these do not necessarily affect plant resistance concomitantly. PMID:28106771

  20. Independent Effects of a Herbivore's Bacterial Symbionts on Its Performance and Induced Plant Defences.

    PubMed

    Staudacher, Heike; Schimmel, Bernardus C J; Lamers, Mart M; Wybouw, Nicky; Groot, Astrid T; Kant, Merijn R

    2017-01-18

    It is well known that microbial pathogens and herbivores elicit defence responses in plants. Moreover, microorganisms associated with herbivores, such as bacteria or viruses, can modulate the plant's response to herbivores. Herbivorous spider mites can harbour different species of bacterial symbionts and exert a broad range of effects on host-plant defences. Hence, we tested the extent to which such symbionts affect the plant's defences induced by their mite host and assessed if this translates into changes in plant resistance. We assessed the bacterial communities of two strains of the common mite pest Tetranychus urticae. We found that these strains harboured distinct symbiotic bacteria and removed these using antibiotics. Subsequently, we tested to which extent mites with and without symbiotic bacteria induce plant defences in terms of phytohormone accumulation and defence gene expression, and assessed mite oviposition and survival as a measure for plant resistance. We observed that the absence/presence of these bacteria altered distinct plant defence parameters and affected mite performance but we did not find indications for a causal link between the two. We argue that although bacteria-related effects on host-induced plant defences may occur, these do not necessarily affect plant resistance concomitantly.

  1. Helminth-induced alterations of the gut microbiota exacerbate bacterial colitis.

    PubMed

    Su, C; Su, L; Li, Y; Long, S R; Chang, J; Zhang, W; Walker, W A; Xavier, R J; Cherayil, B J; Shi, H N

    2017-03-29

    Infection with the intestinal helminth parasite Heligmosomoides polygyrus exacerbates the colitis caused by the bacterial enteropathogen Citrobacter rodentium. To clarify the underlying mechanism, we analyzed fecal microbiota composition of control and helminth-infected mice and evaluated the functional role of compositional differences by microbiota transplantation experiments. Our results showed that infection of Balb/c mice with H. polygyrus resulted in significant changes in the composition of the gut microbiota, characterized by a marked increase in the abundance of Bacteroidetes and decreases in Firmicutes and Lactobacillales. Recipients of the gut microbiota from helminth-infected wide-type, but not STAT6-deficient, Balb/c donors had increased fecal pathogen shedding and significant worsening of Citrobacter-induced colitis compared to recipients of microbiota from control donors. Recipients of helminth-altered microbiota also displayed increased regulatory T cells and IL-10 expression. Depletion of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells and neutralization of IL-10 in recipients of helminth-altered microbiota led to reduced stool C. rodentium numbers and attenuated colitis. These results indicate that alteration of the gut microbiota is a significant contributor to the H. polygyrus-induced exacerbation of C. rodentium colitis. The helminth-induced alteration of the microbiota is Th2-dependent and acts by promoting regulatory T cells that suppress protective responses to bacterial enteropathogens.Mucosal Immunology advance online publication 29 March 2017 doi:10.1038/mi.2017.20.

  2. Immune responses and protection induced by Brucella suis S2 bacterial ghosts in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Li, Yi; Sun, Yang; Ji, Xue; Zhu, Lingwei; Guo, Xuejun; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Bo; Liu, Shuang; Zhang, Ruian; Feng, Shuzhang

    2015-08-15

    With the purpose of generating Brucella suis bacterial ghosts and investigating the immunogenicity of bacterial ghosts as a vaccine candidate, the lysis gene E and temperature-sensitive regulator cassette were cloned into a shuttle plasmid, pBBR1MCS-2, for construction of a recombinant temperature-sensitive shuttle lysis plasmid, pBBR1MCS-E. pBBR1MCS-E was then introduced into attenuated B. suis live vaccine S2 bacteria, and the resultant transformants were used for production of B. suis ghosts (BSGs) by inducing lysis gene E expression. The BSGs were characterized by observing their morphology by transmission electron microscopy. The safety and immunogenicity of BSGs were further evaluated using a murine model, the result suggested that BSG was as safe as formalin-killed B. suis. In mice, BSG demonstrated a similar capacity of inducing pathogen-specific serum IgG antibody response, spleen CD3(+) and CD4(+) T cell responses, induce secretion of gamma interferon and interleukin-4, and protection levels against Brucella melitensis 16M challenge, as the attenuated B. suis live vaccine. These data suggesting that BSG could confer protection against Brucella infection in a mouse model of disease and may be developed as a new vaccine candidate against Brucella infection.

  3. Inducible Expression of Transmembrane Proteins on Bacterial Magnetic Particles in Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1▿

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, Tomoko; Shimojo, Akiko; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-01-01

    Bacterial magnetic particles (BacMPs) produced by the magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 are used for a variety of biomedical applications. In particular, the lipid bilayer surrounding BacMPs has been reported to be amenable to the insertion of recombinant transmembrane proteins; however, the display of transmembrane proteins in BacMP membranes remains a technical challenge due to the cytotoxic effects of the proteins when they are overexpressed in bacterial cells. In this study, a tetracycline-inducible expression system was developed to display transmembrane proteins on BacMPs. The expression and localization of the target proteins were confirmed using luciferase and green fluorescent protein as reporter proteins. Gene expression was suppressed in the absence of anhydrotetracycline, and the level of protein expression could be controlled by modulating the concentration of the inducer molecule. This system was implemented to obtain the expression of the tetraspanin CD81. The truncated form of CD81 including the ligand binding site was successfully displayed at the surface of BacMPs by using Mms13 as an anchor protein and was shown to bind the hepatitis C virus envelope protein E2. These results suggest that the tetracycline-inducible expression system described here will be a useful tool for the expression and display of transmembrane proteins in the membranes of BacMPs. PMID:20038711

  4. Al precipitate evolution in epitaxial silicon layers induced by thermal oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Rimini, E.; Galvagno, G.; La Ferla, A.

    1996-12-31

    Al, the fastest p-type diffuser in silicon, interacts strongly with oxygen, defects, and precipitates, with a detrimental effect on the electrical activity. Although, substrates with low oxygen content, such as epitaxial layers on FZ grown crystals, can be used, it is practically impossible to avoid oxidation steps and then the amount of oxygen that is introduced into the wafer depends on the oxidation temperature. The present work deals with the behaviour of Al implanted at high energies either in bare epitaxial Si or in pre-oxidized epitaxial Si with a 300 nm thick thermal oxide layer. The subsequent annealings were performed under oxygen or nitrogen atmosphere. The SIMS and the spreading resistance analyses indicate that even the oxygen present in the silicon substrates after the thermal oxidation at temperatures above 1000 {degrees}C causes the precipitation of Al at the depth of the damage peak. The effect has been quantitatively analysed by comparison with thermal processes in nitrogen atmosphere. For the Al implant through the oxide layer, the growth and dissolution of Al-O precipitates has been studied.

  5. The Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS): The Scientific Strategy, the Field Phase, and Research Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Wulfmeyer, Volker; Behrendt, Andreas; Kottmeir, Christoph; Corsmeier, Ulrich; Barthlott, Christian; Craig, George C.; Hagen, Martin; Althausen, Dietrich; Aoshima, Fumiko; Arpagaus, Marco; Bauer, Hans-Stefan; Bennett, Lindsay; Blyth, Alan; Brandau, Christine; Champollion, Cedric; Crewell, Susanne; Dick, Galina; di Girolamo, Paolo; Dorninger, Manfred; Dufournet, Yann; Eigenmann, Rafael; Engelmann, Ronny; Flamant, C.; Foken, Thomas; Gorgas, Theresa; Grzeschik, Matthias; Handwerker, Jan; Hauck, Christian; Holler, Hartmut; Junkermann, W.; Kalthoff, Norbert; Kiemle, Christoph; Klink, Stefan; Konig, Marianne; Krauss, Liane; Long, Charles N.; Madonna, Fabio; Mobbs, S.; Neininger, Bruno; Pal, Sandip; Peters, Gerhard; Pigeon, Gregoire; Richard, Evelyne; Rotach, Mathias W.; Russchenberg, Herman; Schwitalla, Thomas; Smith, Victoria; Steinacker, Reinhold; Trentman, Jorg; Turner, David D.; van Baelen, Joel; Vogt, Siegfried; Volkert, Hans; Weckwerth, Tammy; Wernli, Heini; Wieser, Andreas; Wirth, Martin

    2011-02-24

    Within the frame of the international field campaign COPS (Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study), a large suite of state-of-the-art meteorological instrumentation was operated, partially combined for the first time. The COPS field phase was performed from 01 June - 31 August 2007 in a low-mountain area in southwestern Germany/eastern France covering the Vosges Mountains, the Rhine valley and the Black Forest Mountains. The collected data set covers the entire evolution of convective precipitation events in complex terrain from their initiation, to their development and mature phase up to their decay. 18 Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs) with 34 operation days and 8 additional Special Observation Periods (SOPs) were performed providing a comprehensive data set covering different forcing conditions. In this paper an overview of the COPS scientific strategy, the field phase, and its first accomplishments is given. Some highlights of the campaign are illustrated with several measurement examples. It is demonstrated that COPS provided new insight in key processes leading to convection initiation and to the modification of precipitation by orography, in the improvement of QPF by the assimilation of new observations, and in the performance of ensembles of convection permitting models in complex terrain.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Black Forest Germany for the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS)

    DOE Data Explorer

    The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to other sites as determined. In 2007 the AMF operated in the Black Forest region of Germany as part of the Convective and Orographically Induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Scientists studied rainfall resulting from atmospheric uplift (convection) in mountainous terrain, otherwise known as orographic precipitation. This was part of a six -year duration of the German Quantitative Precipitation Forecasting (QPF) Program. COPS was endorsed as a Research and Development Project by the World Weather Research Program. This program was established by the World Meteorological Organization to develop improved and cost-effective forecasting techniques, with an emphasis on high-impact weather. A large collection of data plots based on data streams from specific instruments used at Black Forest are available via a link from ARM's Black Forest site information page. Users will be requested to create a password, but the plots and the data files in the ARM Archive are free for viewing and downloading.

  7. Impact of bacterial colonization on the severity, and accompanying airway inflammation, of virus-induced wheezing in children.

    PubMed

    Yu, D; Wei, L; Zhengxiu, L; Jian, L; Lijia, W; Wei, L; Xiqiang, Y; Xiaodong, Z; Zhou, F; Enmei, L

    2010-09-01

    It is reported that bacterial colonization of the airway in neonates affects the likelihood and severity of subsequent wheezing in childhood. This study aimed to explore the impact of bacterial colonization on the severity of virus-induced wheezing, and accompanying airway inflammation. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) from 68 hospitalized children with bronchiolitis and 85 children with recurrent wheezing were obtained. Eleven common respiratory viruses were sought by PCR and/or direct fluorescence assay. Bacteria were isolated from NPAs by routine culture methods. Cell numbers and concentrations of cytokines/chemokines in the NPAs were measured, and nucleated cells were characterized. The frequency of bacterial colonization in children with recurrent wheezing was significantly higher than in children with an initial attack of bronchiolitis. Bacterial colonization accompanying virus infection had no effect on clinical manifestations, duration of hospitalization, concentrations of cytokines/chemokines (except interleukin-10 (IL-10)) or cellularity in the children with bronchiolitis; however, among the children with recurrent wheezing, those who had coexistent non-invasive bacterial colonization and virus infection presented more frequent cyanosis, longer duration of hospitalization, a higher concentration of IL-10 and a higher percentage of neutrophils in NPAs than those with virus infection but without bacterial colonization. Bacterial colonization was common in children with virus-induced wheezing, particularly in the situation of recurrent wheezing. To some extent, bacterial colonization accompanying virus infection may contribute to the severity of the wheezing because of its impact on airway inflammation.

  8. Modeling investigation of the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of nanoscale precipitates in advanced structural materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, Brian

    2015-04-08

    Materials used in extremely hostile environment such as nuclear reactors are subject to a high flux of neutron irradiation, and thus vast concentrations of vacancy and interstitial point defects are produced because of collisions of energetic neutrons with host lattice atoms. The fate of these defects depends on various reaction mechanisms which occur immediately following the displacement cascade evolution and during the longer-time kinetically dominated evolution such as annihilation, recombination, clustering or trapping at sinks of vacancies, interstitials and their clusters. The long-range diffusional transport and evolution of point defects and self-defect clusters drive a microstructural and microchemical evolution that are known to produce degradation of mechanical properties including the creep rate, yield strength, ductility, or fracture toughness, and correspondingly affect material serviceability and lifetimes in nuclear applications. Therefore, a detailed understanding of microstructural evolution in materials at different time and length scales is of significant importance. The primary objective of this work is to utilize a hierarchical computational modeling approach i) to evaluate the potential for nanoscale precipitates to enhance point defect recombination rates and thereby the self-healing ability of advanced structural materials, and ii) to evaluate the stability and irradiation-induced evolution of such nanoscale precipitates resulting from enhanced point defect transport to and annihilation at precipitate interfaces. This project will utilize, and as necessary develop, computational materials modeling techniques within a hierarchical computational modeling approach, principally including molecular dynamics, kinetic Monte Carlo and spatially-dependent cluster dynamics modeling, to identify and understand the most important physical processes relevant to promoting the “selfhealing” or radiation resistance in advanced materials containing

  9. Inter-relationships of MnO 2 precipitation, siderophore-Mn (III) complex formation, siderophore degradation, and iron limitation in Mn (II)-oxidizing bacterial cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Dorothy L.; Morita, Takami; Mozafarzadeh, Mylene L.; Verity, Rebecca; McCarthy, James K.; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2007-12-01

    To examine the pathways that form Mn (III) and Mn (IV) in the Mn (II)-oxidizing bacterial strains Pseudomonas putida GB-1 and MnB1, and to test whether the siderophore pyoverdine (PVD) inhibits Mn (IV)O 2 formation, cultures were subjected to various protocols at known concentrations of iron and PVD. Depending on growth conditions, P. putida produced one of two oxidized Mn species - either soluble PVD-Mn (III) complex or insoluble Mn (IV)O 2 minerals - but not both simultaneously. PVD-Mn (III) was present, and MnO 2 precipitation was inhibited, both in iron-limited cultures that had synthesized 26-50 μM PVD and in iron-replete (non-PVD-producing) cultures that were supplemented with 10-550 μM purified PVD. PVD-Mn (III) arose by predominantly ligand-mediated air oxidation of Mn (II) in the presence of PVD, based on the following evidence: (a) yields and rates of this reaction were similar in sterile media and in cultures, and (b) GB-1 mutants deficient in enzymatic Mn oxidation produced PVD-Mn (III) as efficiently as wild type. Only wild type, however, could degrade PVD-Mn (III), a process linked to the production of both MnO 2 and an altered PVD with absorbance and fluorescence spectra markedly different from those of either PVD or PVD-Mn (III). Two conditions, the presence of bioavailable iron and the absence of PVD at concentrations exceeding those of Mn, both had to be satisfied for MnO 2 to appear. These results suggest that P. putida cultures produce soluble Mn (III) or MnO 2 by different and mutually inhibitory pathways: enzymatic catalysis yielding MnO 2 under iron sufficiency or PVD-promoted oxidation yielding PVD-Mn (III) under iron limitation. Since PVD-producing Pseudomonas species are environmentally prevalent Mn oxidizers, these data predict influences of iron (via PVD-Mn (III) versus MnO 2) on the global oxidation/reduction cycling of various pollutants, recalcitrant organic matter, and elements such as C, S, N, Cr, U, and Mn.

  10. Bacterially induced stolon settlement in the scyphopolyp of Aurelia aurita (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmahl, G.

    1985-03-01

    Unsettled stoloniferous scyphopolyps of Aurelia aurita Lamarck were offered different substrates for settlement under defined conditions. On addition of different biogenic and abiotic substrates, a pure strain of bacteria, a species of Micrococcaceae, was observed to trigger the settlement of the stolon. The settlement reaction only takes place following direct contact with the bacteria; sterile filtrated culture medium of the same bacterial strain was not able to induce settlement. The bacteria were found to be effective on stolon settlement during the logarithmic growth phase, but not during the stationary phase.

  11. Antibiotic-Induced Change of Bacterial Communities Associated with the Copepod Nitocra spinipes

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Anna; Ek, Karin; Breitholtz, Magnus; Gorokhova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Environmental pressures, such as physical factors, diet and contaminants may affect interactions between microbial symbionts and their multicellular hosts. Despite obvious relevance, effects of antimicrobial contaminants on host-symbiont relations in non-target aquatic organisms are largely unknown. We show that exposure to antibiotics had negative effects on survival and juvenile development of the copepod Nitocra spinipes and caused significant alterations in copepod-associated bacterial communities. The significant positive correlations between indices of copepod development and bacterial diversity indicate that disruption of the microflora was likely to be an important factor behind retarded juvenile development in the experimental animals. Moreover, as evidenced by ribotype distribution in the bacterial clone libraries, the exposure to antibiotics caused a shift in dominance from Betaproteobacteria to Cardinium bacteria; the latter have been shown to cause reproductive manipulations in various terrestrial arthropods. Thus, in addition to providing evidence that the antibiotic-induced perturbation of the microbial community associates with reductions in fitness-related traits of the host, this study is the first record of a copepod serving as a host for endosymbiotic Cardinium. Taken together, our results suggest that (1) antimicrobial substances and possibly other stressors can affect micobiome and symbiont-mediated interactions in copepods and other hosts, and (2) Cardinium endosymbionts may occur in other copepods and affect reproduction of their hosts. PMID:22427962

  12. [Joint effects of apoptosis induced by microcystins and bacterial lipopolysaccharides on grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Fang, Wen-Di; Zhang, Hang-Jun; Wu, Yu-Huan

    2014-02-01

    In this study, grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idellus) lymphocytes were used as the vitro test object to demonstrate the joint effects of microcystins (MC-LR) and bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) on fish immune system. The results showed that MC-LR and LPS in the single and combined exposure groups could both induce grass carp lymphocytes apoptosis with typical ladder-like DNA electrophoresis characteristics. However, comparing the apoptosis rate of the combined and single exposure groups, it was suggested that bacterial LPS could cooperate with MC-LR causing a higher rate of fish lymphocytes apoptosis (2.1 and 3.3-fold of that for the single exposure group I (MC-LR) and II (LPS), respectively), and there existed a significant dose-response relationship. The MC-LR cooperating with bacterial LPS decreased the activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST), increased the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), resulted in DNA damage and cell arrest in G0 phase, which inhibited cell proliferation and accelerated apoptosis. It was proved that MC-LR exacerbated fish immunotoxicity by collaborating with LPS, which had a serious adverse effect on aquaculture industry.

  13. Parallel changes of taxonomic interaction networks in lacustrine bacterial communities induced by a polymetallic perturbation

    PubMed Central

    Laplante, Karine; Sébastien, Boutin; Derome, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Heavy metals released by anthropogenic activities such as mining trigger profound changes to bacterial communities. In this study we used 16S SSU rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing to characterize the impact of a polymetallic perturbation and other environmental parameters on taxonomic networks within five lacustrine bacterial communities from sites located near Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec, Canada. The results showed that community equilibrium was disturbed in terms of both diversity and structure. Moreover, heavy metals, especially cadmium combined with water acidity, induced parallel changes among sites via the selection of resistant OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Unit) and taxonomic dominance perturbations favoring the Alphaproteobacteria. Furthermore, under a similar selective pressure, covariation trends between phyla revealed conservation and parallelism within interphylum interactions. Our study sheds light on the importance of analyzing communities not only from a phylogenetic perspective but also including a quantitative approach to provide significant insights into the evolutionary forces that shape the dynamic of the taxonomic interaction networks in bacterial communities. PMID:23789031

  14. Antibiotic-induced change of bacterial communities associated with the copepod Nitocra spinipes.

    PubMed

    Edlund, Anna; Ek, Karin; Breitholtz, Magnus; Gorokhova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Environmental pressures, such as physical factors, diet and contaminants may affect interactions between microbial symbionts and their multicellular hosts. Despite obvious relevance, effects of antimicrobial contaminants on host-symbiont relations in non-target aquatic organisms are largely unknown. We show that exposure to antibiotics had negative effects on survival and juvenile development of the copepod Nitocra spinipes and caused significant alterations in copepod-associated bacterial communities. The significant positive correlations between indices of copepod development and bacterial diversity indicate that disruption of the microflora was likely to be an important factor behind retarded juvenile development in the experimental animals. Moreover, as evidenced by ribotype distribution in the bacterial clone libraries, the exposure to antibiotics caused a shift in dominance from Betaproteobacteria to Cardinium bacteria; the latter have been shown to cause reproductive manipulations in various terrestrial arthropods. Thus, in addition to providing evidence that the antibiotic-induced perturbation of the microbial community associates with reductions in fitness-related traits of the host, this study is the first record of a copepod serving as a host for endosymbiotic Cardinium. Taken together, our results suggest that (1) antimicrobial substances and possibly other stressors can affect micobiome and symbiont-mediated interactions in copepods and other hosts, and (2) Cardinium endosymbionts may occur in other copepods and affect reproduction of their hosts.

  15. Bacterial Peptidoglycan Transverses the Placenta to Induce Fetal Neuroproliferation and Aberrant Postnatal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Humann, Jessica; Mann, Beth; Gao, Geli; Moresco, Philip; Ramahi, Joseph; Loh, Lip Nam; Farr, Arden; Hu, Yunming; Durick-Eder, Kelly; Fillon, Sophie A.; Smeyne, Richard J.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Maternal infection during pregnancy is associated with adverse outcomes for the fetus, including postnatal cognitive disorders. However, the underlying mechanisms are obscure. We find that bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan (CW), a universal PAMP for TLR2, traverses across the murine placenta into the developing fetal brain. In contrast to adults, CW-exposed fetal brains did not show any signs of inflammation or neuronal death. Instead, the neuronal transcription factor FoxG1 was induced and neuroproliferation leading to a 50% greater density of neurons in the cortical plate was observed. Bacterial infection of pregnant dams followed by antibiotic treatment, which releases CW, yielded the same result. Neuroproliferation required TLR2 and was recapitulated in vitro with fetal neuronal precursor cells and TLR2/6, but not TLR2/1 ligands. The fetal neuroproliferative response correlated with abnormal cognitive behavior in CW-exposed pups following birth. Thus, the bacterial CW-TLR2 signaling axis affects fetal neurodevelopment and may underlie postnatal cognitive disorders. PMID:26962947

  16. Nutrient reduction induced stringent responses promote bacterial quorum-sensing divergence for population fitness

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kelei; Zhou, Xikun; Li, Wujiao; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria use a cell-cell communication system termed quorum-sensing (QS) to adjust population size by coordinating the costly but beneficial cooperative behaviors. It has long been suggested that bacterial social conflict for expensive extracellular products may drive QS divergence and cause the “tragedy of the commons”. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of social divergence and its evolutionary consequences for the bacterial ecology still remain largely unknown. By using the model bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, here we show that nutrient reduction can promote QS divergence for population fitness during evolution but requiring adequate cell density. Mechanically, decreased nutrient supplies can induce RpoS-directed stringent response and enhance the selection pressure on lasR gene, and lasR mutants are evolved in association with the DNA mismatch repair “switch-off”. The lasR mutants have higher relative fitness than QS-intact individuals due to their energy-saving characteristic under nutrient decreased condition. Furthermore an optimal incorporation of lasR mutants is capable of maximizing the fitness of entire population during in vitro culture and the colonization in mouse lung. Consequently, rather than worsen the population health, QS-coordinated social divergence is an elaborate evolutionary strategy that renders the entire bacterial population more fit in tough times. PMID:27713502

  17. Radiation induced segregation and precipitation behavior in self-ion irradiated Ferritic/Martensitic HT9 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ce; Auger, Maria A.; Moody, Michael P.; Kaoumi, Djamel

    2017-08-01

    In this study, Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) HT9 steel was irradiated to 20 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 nm depth at 420 and 440 °C, and to 1, 10 and 20 dpa at 600 nm depth at 470 °C using 5 MeV Fe++ ions. The characterization was conducted using ChemiSTEM and Atom Probe Tomography (APT), with a focus on radiation induced segregation and precipitation. Ni and/or Si segregation at defect sinks (grain boundaries, dislocation lines, carbide/matrix interfaces) together with Ni, Si, Mn rich G-phase precipitation were observed in self-ion irradiated HT9 except in very low dose case (1 dpa at 470 °C). Some G-phase precipitates were found to nucleate heterogeneously at defect sinks where Ni and/or Si segregated. In contrast to what was previously reported in the literature for neutron irradiated HT9, no Cr-rich α‧ phase, χ-phases, η phase and voids were found in self-ion irradiated HT9. The difference of observed microstructures is probably due to the difference of irradiation dose rate between ion irradiation and neutron irradiation. In addition, the average size and number density of G-phase precipitates were found to be sensitive to both irradiation temperature and dose. With the same irradiation dose, the average size of G-phase increased whereas the number density decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Within the same irradiation temperature, the average size increased with increasing irradiation dose.

  18. Statistical analysis of the relationship between climate-induced maize yield and rainy-season precipitation across Inner Mongolia, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jin; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Limin; Xue, Yan; Lin, Jie

    2017-08-01

    Exploring possible relationships between climate-induced maize yield and rainy-season precipitation under climate change is fundamental to science-based decision for food security in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region (IMAR). To determine the relationship of maize yield with precipitation variables across IMAR during 1960-2012, we selected 11 precipitation indices of rainy season and divided IMAR into four sub-regions—west, middle, east, and northeast using principal component analysis and K-means clustering methods. Results show that climate-induced maize yield is more sensitive to precipitation variability in the west and middle IMAR. The most important precipitation factor that limits maize yield is moderate precipitation days in these two sub-regions. Moreover, west and middle Inner Mongolia was dominated by decreasing precipitation during the rainy season. Furthermore, the El Niño/La Niña-Southern Oscillation cycle has the significant influence on the rainy-season precipitation in the west and middle IMAR.

  19. Statistical analysis of the relationship between climate-induced maize yield and rainy-season precipitation across Inner Mongolia, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jin; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Limin; Xue, Yan; Lin, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Exploring possible relationships between climate-induced maize yield and rainy-season precipitation under climate change is fundamental to science-based decision for food security in Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region (IMAR). To determine the relationship of maize yield with precipitation variables across IMAR during 1960-2012, we selected 11 precipitation indices of rainy season and divided IMAR into four sub-regions—west, middle, east, and northeast using principal component analysis and K-means clustering methods. Results show that climate-induced maize yield is more sensitive to precipitation variability in the west and middle IMAR. The most important precipitation factor that limits maize yield is moderate precipitation days in these two sub-regions. Moreover, west and middle Inner Mongolia was dominated by decreasing precipitation during the rainy season. Furthermore, the El Niño/La Niña-Southern Oscillation cycle has the significant influence on the rainy-season precipitation in the west and middle IMAR.

  20. Biomineralization of calcium carbonate polymorphs by the bacterial strains isolated from calcareous sites.

    PubMed

    Dhami, Navdeep Kaur; Reddy, M Sudhakara; Mukherjee, Abhijit

    2013-05-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is a naturally occurring biological process that has various applications in remediation and restoration of a range of building materials. In the present investigation, five ureolytic bacterial isolates capable of inducing calcium carbonate precipitation were isolated from calcareous soils on the basis of production of urease, carbonic anhydrase, extrapolymeric substances, and biofilm. Bacterial isolates were identified as Bacillus megaterium, B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. subtilis, and Lysinibacillus fusiformis based on 16S rRNA analysis. The calcium carbonate polymorphs produced by various bacterial isolates were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, X ray diffraction, and Fourier transmission infra red spectroscopy. A strainspecific precipitation of calcium carbonate forms was observed from different bacterial isolates. Based on the type of polymorph precipitated, the technology of MICCP can be applied for remediation of various building materials.

  1. TPN-induced sympathetic activation is related to diet, bacterial translocation, and an intravenous line.

    PubMed

    Helton, W S; Rockwell, M; Garcia, R M; Maier, R V; Heitkemper, M

    1995-02-01

    To investigate the effects of an intravenous line and the administration of a total parenteral nutrition (TPN) formula by the parenteral and oral routes on bacterial translocation and urinary catecholamine excretion in rodents. Rats were fed chow with or without an intravenous line and a fat-free TPN solution either orally or intravenously for 5 consecutive days. Urine was collected on the first, third, and fifth days of feeding and quantitatively analyzed for norepinephrine and epinephrine excretion. Mesenteric lymph nodes were cultured for bacteria at the end of the study (day 5). Oral and intravenous TPN diets significantly increased norepinephrine excretion over time (P < .0001) compared with excretion in rats fed chow. Oral TPN diets increased epinephrine secretion after 5 days of feeding. The route of feeding TPN solution had no effect on norepinephrine or epinephrine excretion. Chow-fed rats with intravenous lines tended to have increased norepinephrine excretion over 5 days of feeding compared with chow-fed rats without intravenous lines (55% vs 13%, P = .08). Rats with bacterial translocation had greater norepinephrine excretion (mean +/- SEM, 136 +/- 23 pmol/mumol of creatinine) than rats without bacterial translocation (64 +/- 14 pmol/mumol of creatinine) (P < .05). Intravenous and oral fat-free, hypertonic glucose diets increase sympathetic nervous activity. This diet-induced sympathetic activity may be related to the presence of an intravenous line, bacterial translocation, the thermic effects of hypertonic glucose, and/or the absence of orally ingested food substances in rodent chow. In this model of rodent feeding, increased sympathetic activity may account for alterations in intestinal and immunologic defenses.

  2. Prompt precipitation and energization of relativistic radiation belt electrons induced by ULF oscillations in the magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, T.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2011-12-01

    The energization and loss processes for energetic radiation belt electrons are not yet well understood. Global simulations using magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model fields as drivers provide a valuable tool to study the dynamics of these ~MeV energetic particles. We use satellite measurements of the solar wind as the boundary condition for the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) 3D MHD code calculation of fields which then drive electrons in a 3D test particle simulation that keeps track of attributes like energy, pitch-angle and L-shell. Wave-particle interaction can cause both energization and pitch-angle scattering loss. Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves resolved by the MHD code have been correlated with both enhancement in outer zone radiation belt electron flux1 and modulation of precipitation loss to the atmosphere2. The time scales seen in several studies linking ULF waves with radiation belt flux increases are usually several hours to a few days1,3, but few studies consider the effects of ULF waves in the Pc-4 to Pc-5 range on electron loss to the atmosphere on a time scale of tens of minutes. We investigate such rapid loss, using measured solar wind input to MHD-test particle simulations for a CME-shock event that occurred on January 21, 2005. We focus on mechanisms by which ULF waves, seen both in the simulations and observations, especially ones driven by pressure variations in the solar wind, influence the radiation belts. ULF modulation was seen in precipitation detected by the MINIS balloon campaign measurements of atmospheric Bremsstrahlung from MeV electron precipitation4. We propose a coherent energization and precipitation mechanism due to trapped electron drift resonance with azimuthally propagating poloidal mode ULF waves during the CME-shock compression of the magnetosphere4; depending on the drift phase, some electrons are energized by the azimuthal electric field pulse and some are de-energized in the perpendicular direction causing them to pitch

  3. Heavy ion-induced amorphlsation of Zr(Fe, Cr) 2 precipitates in Zircaloy-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Florence; Lemaignan, Clément

    1989-05-01

    It is generally accepted that the impact of neutron irradiation on Zircaloy microstructure may be involved on the behaviour of PWR fuel cladding at high burnup during transients. In order to describe and understand the microstructure evolution in reactor, neutron damage has been simulated with heavy ions on a Zircaloy-4 recrystallized sheet up to 100 dpa at 873 K. A complete amorphisation is observed for all precipitates, and a chromium and iron segregation ring is measured around them. The contributions of nuclear collisions and thermal diffusion as driving forces of both phenomena are discussed, as well as the impact of it on Pellet Cladding Interaction (PCI) behaviour.

  4. Electric field induced salt precipitation into activated carbon air-cathode causes power decay in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    An, Jingkun; Li, Nan; Wan, Lili; Zhou, Lean; Du, Qing; Li, Tian; Wang, Xin

    2017-10-15

    As a promising design for the real application of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) in wastewater treatment, activated carbon (AC) air-cathode is suffering from a serious power decay after long-term operation. However, the decay mechanism is still not clear because of the complex nature of contaminations. Different from previous reports, we found that local alkalinization and natural evaporation had an ignorable effect on cathode performance (∼2% decay on current densities), while electric field induced salt precipitation (∼53%) and biofouling (∼37%) were dominant according to the charge transfer resistance, which decreased power desities by 36% from 1286 ± 30 to 822 ± 23 mW m(-2) in 6 months. Biofouling can be removed by scrapping, however, electric field induced salt precipitation under biofilm still clogged 37% of specific area in catalyst layer, which was even seen to penetrate through the gas diffusion layer. Our findings provided a new insight of AC air-cathode performance decay, providing important information for the improvement of cathodic longevity in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Precipitation, adsorption and rhizosphere effect: The mechanisms for Phosphate-induced Pb immobilization in soils-A review.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guangming; Wan, Jia; Huang, Danlian; Hu, Liang; Huang, Chao; Cheng, Min; Xue, Wenjing; Gong, Xiaomin; Wang, Rongzhong; Jiang, Danni

    2017-10-05

    Lead (Pb) is one of the most toxic heavy metals that pose a direct threat to organisms and it can not been degraded through microbial activities or chemical reaction. Bioavaibility and eco-toxicity of Pb which mostly depend on Pb chemical speciation play an important role in the remediation of Pb-contaminated soils. Phosphate (P) amendments which could transfer Pb from unstable fraction to stable fraction are commonly used to immobilize Pb in soils and have been extensively studied by researchers during decades. Based on the previous study, it can be concluded that three principal mechanisms may be responsible for P-induced Pb immobilization: 1) the precipitation of Pb-phosphates, including direct precipitation, ion-exchange (or substitution) effect and liming effect; 2) the adsorption of Pb, including the direct adsorption and the adsorption of Pb to iron (hydr)oxides; 3) the rhizosphere effect, including acidification effect and mycorrhizae effect. In this review, these mechanisms have been completely discussed and the internal relationships among them were summarized to give a better understanding of P-induced Pb immobilization in soils and promote the development of P-based remediation technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cardiovascular and behavioural effects induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in rat: characterization with tachykinin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Nadine; Couture, Réjean

    2003-12-01

    This study examined the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) effects of three selective tachykinin receptor antagonists on the cardiovascular and behavioural responses induced by naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal in rats. I.c.v. injection of naloxone (10 microg) to morphine pre-treated rats (i.c.v. for 5 days) induced an immediate increase in blood pressure ( approximately 10 mmHg) and behavioural activity (sniffing > rearing > face washing approximately grooming approximately wet dog shake) without causing significant heart rate changes. The prior i.c.v. injection of the NK(1) receptor antagonist (6.5 nmol LY306740) reduced face washing and grooming during morphine withdrawal. NK(2) and NK(3) receptor antagonists (6.5 nmol SR48968 and R820) did not affect behavioural effects, yet the co-injection of the three tachykinin antagonists reduced all behavioural activity. The pressor response was not affected by the selective inhibition of NK(1) and NK(3) receptors while both blood pressure and heart rate were markedly enhanced by SR48968 during morphine withdrawal. The potentiating effect of SR48968 was prevented following simultaneous blockade of the three tachykinin receptors. In addition to confirming the involvement of central tachykinins in behavioural manifestations to morphine withdrawal, data suggest a modulatory function for tachykinins, especially the NK(2) receptor, in brain autonomic control of blood pressure and heart rate in supraspinal noloxone-precipitated withdrawal.

  7. The bacterial toxin CNF1 as a tool to induce retinal degeneration reminiscent of retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Guadagni, Viviana; Cerri, Chiara; Piano, Ilaria; Novelli, Elena; Gargini, Claudia; Fiorentini, Carla; Caleo, Matteo; Strettoi, Enrica

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) comprises a group of inherited pathologies characterized by progressive photoreceptor degeneration. In rodent models of RP, expression of defective genes and retinal degeneration usually manifest during the first weeks of postnatal life, making it difficult to distinguish consequences of primary genetic defects from abnormalities in retinal development. Moreover, mouse eyes are small and not always adequate to test pharmacological and surgical treatments. An inducible paradigm of retinal degeneration potentially extensible to large animals is therefore desirable. Starting from the serendipitous observation that intraocular injections of a Rho GTPase activator, the bacterial toxin Cytotoxic Necrotizing Factor 1 (CNF1), lead to retinal degeneration, we implemented an inducible model recapitulating most of the key features of Retinitis Pigmentosa. The model also unmasks an intrinsic vulnerability of photoreceptors to the mechanism of CNF1 action, indicating still unexplored molecular pathways potentially leading to the death of these cells in inherited forms of retinal degeneration. PMID:27775019

  8. Macrophage activation induced by Brucella DNA suppresses bacterial intracellular replication via enhancing NO production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Lin; Sun, Changjiang; Yang, Li; Tang, Bin; Sun, Wanchun; Peng, Qisheng

    2015-12-01

    Brucella DNA can be sensed by TLR9 on endosomal membrane and by cytosolic AIM2-inflammasome to induce proinflammatory cytokine production that contributes to partially activate innate immunity. Additionally, Brucella DNA has been identified to be able to act as a major bacterial component to induce type I IFN. However, the role of Brucella DNA in Brucella intracellular growth remains unknown. Here, we showed that stimulation with Brucella DNA promote macrophage activation in TLR9-dependent manner. Activated macrophages can suppresses wild type Brucella intracellular replication at early stage of infection via enhancing NO production. We also reported that activated macrophage promotes bactericidal function of macrophages infected with VirB-deficient Brucella at the early or late stage of infection. This study uncovers a novel function of Brucella DNA, which can help us further elucidate the mechanism of Brucella intracellular survival.

  9. Expression of bacterial superantigen genes in mice induces localized mononuclear cell inflammatory responses.

    PubMed Central

    Dow, S W; Potter, T A

    1997-01-01

    Bacterial superantigens are potent T cell activators, and superantigen proteins have been injected into mice and other animals to study T cell responses in vivo. When superantigen proteins are injected, however, the T cell stimulatory effects cannot be confined to specific tissues. Therefore, to target superantigen expression to specific tissues, we used gene transfer techniques to express bacterial superantigen genes in mammalian cells in vitro and in tissues in vivo. Murine, human, and canine cells transfected with superantigen genes in vitro all produced superantigen proteins both intracellularly and extracellularly, as assessed by bioassay, immunocytochemistry, and antigen ELISA. Superantigens produced by transfected eukaryotic cells retained their biologic specificity for T cell receptor binding. Intramuscular injection of superantigen plasmid DNA in vivo induced an intense intramuscular mononuclear cell infiltrate, an effect that could not be reproduced by intramuscular injection of superantigen protein. Intradermal and intravenous injection of superantigen DNA induced cutaneous and intrapulmonary mononuclear cell inflammatory responses, respectively. Thus, superantigen genes can be expressed by mammalian cells in vivo. Superantigen gene therapy represents a novel method of targeting localized T cell inflammatory reactions, with potential application to treatment of cancer and certain infectious diseases. PMID:9169491

  10. Mating in the Closest Living Relatives of Animals Is Induced by a Bacterial Chondroitinase.

    PubMed

    Woznica, Arielle; Gerdt, Joseph P; Hulett, Ryan E; Clardy, Jon; King, Nicole

    2017-09-07

    We serendipitously discovered that the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri induces sexual reproduction in one of the closest living relatives of animals, the choanoflagellate Salpingoeca rosetta. Although bacteria influence everything from nutrition and metabolism to cell biology and development in eukaryotes, bacterial regulation of eukaryotic mating was unexpected. Here, we show that a single V. fischeri protein, the previously uncharacterized EroS, fully recapitulates the aphrodisiac-like activity of live V. fischeri. EroS is a chondroitin lyase; although its substrate, chondroitin sulfate, was previously thought to be an animal synapomorphy, we demonstrate that S. rosetta produces chondroitin sulfate and thus extend the ancestry of this important glycosaminoglycan to the premetazoan era. Finally, we show that V. fischeri, purified EroS, and other bacterial chondroitin lyases induce S. rosetta mating at environmentally relevant concentrations, suggesting that bacteria likely regulate choanoflagellate mating in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The methyltransferase Setdb2 mediates virus-induced susceptibility to bacterial superinfection.

    PubMed

    Schliehe, Christopher; Flynn, Elizabeth K; Vilagos, Bojan; Richson, Udochuku; Swaminanthan, Savitha; Bosnjak, Berislav; Bauer, Lisa; Kandasamy, Richard K; Griesshammer, Isabel M; Kosack, Lindsay; Schmitz, Frank; Litvak, Vladimir; Sissons, James; Lercher, Alexander; Bhattacharya, Anannya; Khamina, Kseniya; Trivett, Anna L; Tessarollo, Lino; Mesteri, Ildiko; Hladik, Anastasiya; Merkler, Doron; Kubicek, Stefan; Knapp, Sylvia; Epstein, Michelle M; Symer, David E; Aderem, Alan; Bergthaler, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Immune responses are tightly regulated to ensure efficient pathogen clearance while avoiding tissue damage. Here we report that Setdb2 was the only protein lysine methyltransferase induced during infection with influenza virus. Setdb2 expression depended on signaling via type I interferons, and Setdb2 repressed expression of the gene encoding the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 and other genes that are targets of the transcription factor NF-κB. This coincided with occupancy by Setdb2 at the Cxcl1 promoter, which in the absence of Setdb2 displayed diminished trimethylation of histone H3 Lys9 (H3K9me3). Mice with a hypomorphic gene-trap construct of Setdb2 exhibited increased infiltration of neutrophils during sterile lung inflammation and were less sensitive to bacterial superinfection after infection with influenza virus. This suggested that a Setdb2-mediated regulatory crosstalk between the type I interferons and NF-κB pathways represents an important mechanism for virus-induced susceptibility to bacterial superinfection.

  12. Changes in equine hindgut bacterial populations during oligofructose-induced laminitis.

    PubMed

    Milinovich, G J; Trott, D J; Burrell, P C; van Eps, A W; Thoefner, M B; Blackall, L L; Al Jassim, R A M; Morton, J M; Pollitt, C C

    2006-05-01

    In the horse, carbohydrate overload is thought to play an integral role in the onset of laminitis by drastically altering the profile of bacterial populations in the hindgut. The objectives of this study were to develop and validate microbial ecology methods to monitor changes in bacterial populations throughout the course of experimentally induced laminitis and to identify the predominant oligofructose-utilizing organisms. Laminitis was induced in five horses by administration of oligofructose. Faecal specimens were collected at 8 h intervals from 72 h before to 72 h after the administration of oligofructose. Hindgut microbiota able to utilize oligofructose were enumerated throughout the course of the experiment using habitat-simulating medium. Isolates were collected and representatives identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The majority of these isolates collected belonged to the genus Streptococcus, 91% of which were identified as being most closely related to Streptococcus infantarius ssp. coli. Furthermore, S. infantarius ssp. coli was the predominant oligofructose-utilizing organism isolated before the onset of lameness. Fluorescence in situ hybridization probes developed to specifically target the isolated Streptococcus spp. demonstrated marked population increases between 8 and 16 h post oligofructose administration. This was followed by a rapid population decline which corresponded with a sharp decline in faecal pH and subsequently lameness at 24-32 h post oligofructose administration. This research suggests that streptococci within the Streptococcus bovis/equinus complex may be involved in the series of events which precede the onset of laminitis in the horse.

  13. Comparative study on earthquake and ground based transmitter induced radiation belt electron precipitation at middle latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidiropoulos, N. F.; Anagnostopoulos, G.; Rigas, V.

    2011-07-01

    We examined (peak-to-background flux ratio p/b > 20) energetic electron bursts in the presence of VLF activity, as observed from the DEMETER satellite at low altitudes (~700 km). Our statistical analysis of measurements during two 6-month periods suggests that: (a) the powerful transmitter NWC causes the strongest effects on the inner radiation belts in comparison with other ground-based VLF transmitters, (b) the NWC transmitter was responsible for only ~1.5 % of total electron bursts examined during the 6-month period (1 July 2008 to 31 December 2008), (c) VLF transmitter-related electron bursts are accompanied by the presence of a narrow band emission centered at the radiating frequency emission, whereas the earthquake-related electron bursts are accompanied by the presence of broadband emissions from a few kHz to >20 KHz, (d) daytime events are less preferable than nighttime events, but this asymmetry was found to be less evident when the powerful transmitter NWC was turned off and (d) seismic activity most probably dominated the electromagnetic interactions producing the electron precipitation at middle latitudes. The results of this study support the proposal that the detection of radiation belt electron precipitation, besides other kinds of studies, is a useful tool for earthquake prediction research.

  14. Prediction of precipitation-induced phlebitis: a statistical validation of an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer L H; He, Yan; Yalkowsky, Samuel H

    2003-08-01

    To avoid phlebitis, new intravenous (IV) parenterals are often screened by injection into animals. This method is not only expensive and time consuming, it is also detrimental to the animals. An alternate method, focusing on precipitation as the cause, uses an in vitro dynamic injection model that requires less money and time and reduces the need for live models. Validation of the dynamic injection apparatus, for predicting mechanical phlebitis, is established. Twenty-one currently marketed IV products were injected into isotonic Sorenson's phosphate buffer flowing at 5 mL/min. The resulting opacities, produced by precipitation, are measured in an ultraviolet flow cell. These opacity data, coupled with literature reports on phlebitis occurrence, were used to generate a logistic regression that indicates the probability of phlebitis given an opacity value measured by the apparatus. Regression results are supported by a receiver operator characteristic curve that establishes the most ideal cut-off opacity value. This opacity value provides the highest combined sensitivity (statistical power) and specificity while minimizing false-positive and false-negative results. Both analyses show that an opacity value of 0.003 best delineates phlebitic and nonphlebitic products. Measures of sensitivity (0.83), specificity (0.93), positive predictive value (0.93), and negative predictive value (0.78) indicate the model's predictive accuracy and reliability. These results support the use of the dynamic model in place of animals for preliminary phlebitis testing of new IV injectables.

  15. Calcium phosphate formation due to pH-induced adsorption/precipitation switching along salinity gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxmann, J. F.; Schwendenmann, L.

    2014-07-01

    Mechanisms governing phosphorus (P) speciation in coastal sediments remain unknown due to the diversity of coastal environments and poor analytical specificity for P phases. We investigated P speciation along salinity gradients comprising diverse ecosystems in a P-enriched estuary. To determine P load effects on P speciation we compared the high P site with a P-unenriched site. To improve analytical specificity, octacalcium phosphate (OCP), authigenic apatite (carbonate fluorapatite; CFAP) and detrital apatite (fluorapatite) were quantitated in addition to Al/Fe-bound P (Al/Fe-P) and Ca-bound P (Ca-P). Sediment pH primarily affected P fractions across ecosystems and independent of the P status. Increasing pH caused a pronounced downstream transition from adsorbed Al/Fe-P to mineral Ca-P. Downstream decline in Al/Fe-P was counterbalanced by the precipitation of Ca-P. This marked upstream-to-downstream switch occurred at near-neutral sediment pH and was enhanced by increased P loads. Accordingly, the site comparison indicated two location-dependent accumulation mechanisms at the P-enriched site, which mainly resulted in elevated Al/Fe-P at pH < 6.6 (upstream; adsorption) and elevated Ca-P at pH > 6.6 (downstream; precipitation). Enhanced Ca-P precipitation by increased loads was also evident from disproportional accumulation of metastable Ca-P (Ca-PMmeta). The average Ca-Pmeta concentration was six-fold, whereas total Ca-P was only twofold higher at the P-enriched site compared to the P-unenriched site. Species concentrations showed that these largely elevated Ca-Pmeta levels resulted from transformation of fertilizer-derived Al/Fe-P to OCP and CFAP due to decreasing acidity from land to the sea. Formation of OCP and CFAP results in P retention in coastal zones, which may lead to substantial inorganic P accumulation by anthropogenic P input in near-shore sediments.

  16. In vitro evaluation of the risk of inducing bacterial resistance to disinfection treatment with photolysis of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ikai, Hiroyo; Odashima, Yu; Kanno, Taro; Nakamura, Keisuke; Shirato, Midori; Sasaki, Keiichi; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the risk of inducing bacterial resistance to disinfection treatment with photolysis of H2O2 and comparing this with existing antibacterial agents. We tested seven antibacterial agents, including amoxicillin, cefepime hydrochloride, erythromycin, ofloxacin, clindamycin hydrochloride, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, and minocycline hydrochloride, as positive controls for validation of the assay protocol. For all of the agents tested, at least one of the four bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus salivarius) was resistant to these agents by repeated exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of the agents up to 10 times. In contrast, antibacterial activity against any of the bacterial species tested (S. aureus, E. faecalis, E. coli, S. salivarius, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus mutans, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) was not affected by repeated exposure to the disinfection treatment up to 40 times. This finding suggested that the risk of inducing bacterial resistance by disinfection treatment was low. The active ingredient of this disinfection treatment is hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H2O2. Therefore, hydroxyl radicals interact with several cell structures and different metabolic pathways in microbial cells, probably resulting in a lack of development of bacterial resistance. In conclusion, disinfection treatment with photolysis of H2O2 appears to be a potential alternative for existing antimicrobial agents in terms of a low risk of inducing bacterial resistance.

  17. In Vitro Evaluation of the Risk of Inducing Bacterial Resistance to Disinfection Treatment with Photolysis of Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Ikai, Hiroyo; Odashima, Yu; Kanno, Taro; Nakamura, Keisuke; Shirato, Midori; Sasaki, Keiichi; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the risk of inducing bacterial resistance to disinfection treatment with photolysis of H2O2 and comparing this with existing antibacterial agents. We tested seven antibacterial agents, including amoxicillin, cefepime hydrochloride, erythromycin, ofloxacin, clindamycin hydrochloride, ciprofloxacin hydrochloride, and minocycline hydrochloride, as positive controls for validation of the assay protocol. For all of the agents tested, at least one of the four bacterial species (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, and Streptococcus salivarius) was resistant to these agents by repeated exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of the agents up to 10 times. In contrast, antibacterial activity against any of the bacterial species tested (S. aureus, E. faecalis, E. coli, S. salivarius, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus mutans, and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans) was not affected by repeated exposure to the disinfection treatment up to 40 times. This finding suggested that the risk of inducing bacterial resistance by disinfection treatment was low. The active ingredient of this disinfection treatment is hydroxyl radicals generated by photolysis of H2O2. Therefore, hydroxyl radicals interact with several cell structures and different metabolic pathways in microbial cells, probably resulting in a lack of development of bacterial resistance. In conclusion, disinfection treatment with photolysis of H2O2 appears to be a potential alternative for existing antimicrobial agents in terms of a low risk of inducing bacterial resistance. PMID:24282582

  18. Subionospheric VLF/LF phase perturbations produced by lightning-whistler induced particle precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inan, U. S.; Carpenter, D. L.; Helliwell, R. A.; Katsufrakis, J. P.

    1985-08-01

    Rapid phase perturbations of subionospherically propagating VLF/LF signals are associated with lightning-generated whistlers which propagate in the magnetosphere. The perturbations, called 'Trimpi events' or 'Trimpi effects' after their discoverer, are attributed to alterations in the earth-ionosphere waveguide caused by localized enhancements in the ionospheric D region. These enhancements are produced by bursts of high-energy electrons which are precipitated out of the earth's radiation belts by the whistler waves. The present paper has the objective to present and discuss new evidence of whistler-associated phase perturbations of subionospheric signals. Events of this type, called phase Trimpi's were first reported by Lohrey and Kaiser (1979). Attention is given to occurrence statistics in terms of the seasonal distribution and hourly rate of events, possible effects on global VLF/LF navigation, and an interpretive model.

  19. Surgically induced necrotising sclerokeratitis (SINS)--precipitating factors and response to treatment.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donoghue, E; Lightman, S; Tuft, S; Watson, P

    1992-01-01

    The clinical features, treatment, and visual outcome of 52 eyes from 43 patients who developed scleritis following surgery were reviewed. In all patients the scleral inflammation developed adjacent to a surgical wound. Ninety six per cent had necrotising disease and 23% also had evidence of secondary posterior scleritis. Many different types of ocular surgery were implicated and the majority (75%) of the patients had two or more surgical procedures before the onset of the scleritis. Although cataract extraction through a limbal incision resulted in the largest subgroup, scleritis also followed glaucoma, strabismus, and retinal detachment surgery. The latent period between surgery and the appearance of inflammation was short (mean 9 months) except for a small group in whom scleritis occurred many years after squint surgery. Sixty three per cent of patients had evidence of a systemic disease. Early diagnosis and aggressive medical treatment significantly improved the visual outcome. The precipitating factors, pathogenesis, and course of this condition are discussed. Images PMID:1739684

  20. Biosequestration of copper by bacteria isolated from an abandoned mine by using microbially induced calcite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Ho; Shin, YuJin; Anbu, Periasamy; Nam, In-Hyun; So, Jae-Seong

    2016-09-12

    Abandoned mine sites are frequently polluted with high concentrations of heavy metals. In this study, 25 calcite-forming bacteria were newly isolated from the soil of an abandoned metal mine in Korea. Based on their urease activity, calcite production, and resistance to copper toxicity, four isolates were selected and further identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Among the isolates, Sporosarcina soli B-22 was selected for subsequent copper biosequestration studies, using the sand impermeability test by production of calcite and extracellular polymeric substance. High removal rates (61.8%) of copper were obtained when the sand samples were analyzed using an inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometer following 72 h of incubation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the copper carbonate precipitates had a diameter of approximately 5-10 μm. X-ray diffraction further confirmed the presence of copper carbonate and calcium carbonate crystals.

  1. Effect of convective disturbances induced by g-jitter on the periodic precipitation of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Lappa, M; Carotenuto, L

    2003-01-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the crystallization process of a protein macromolecular substance under two different conditions: pure diffusive regime and microgravity conditions present on space laboratories. The configuration under investigation consists of a protein reactor and a salt chamber separated by an "interface". The interface is strictly related to the presence of agarose gel in one of the two chambers. Sedimentation and convection under normal gravity conditions are prevented by the use of gel in the protein chamber (pure diffusive regime). Under microgravity conditions periodic time-dependent accelerations (g-jitter) are taken into account. Novel mathematical models are introduced to simulate the complex phenomena related to protein nucleation and further precipitation (or resolution) according to the concentration distribution and in particular to simulate the motion of the crystals due to g-litter in the microgravity environment. The numerical results show that gellified lysozyme (crystals "locked"on the matrix of agarose gel) precipitates to produce "spaced deposits". The crystal formation results modulated in time and in space (Liesegang patterns), due to the non-linear interplay among transport, crystal nucleation and growth. The propagation of the nucleation front is characterized by a wave-like behavior. In microgravity conditions (without gel), g-jitter effects act modifying the phenomena with respect to the on ground gellified configuration. The role played by the direction of the applied sinusoidal acceleration with respect to the imposed concentration gradient (parallel or perpendicular) is investigated. It has a strong influence on the dynamic behaviour of the depletion zones and on the spatial distribution of the crystals. Accordingly the possibility to obtain better crystals for diffraction analyses is discussed.

  2. pH-Induced precipitation behavior of weakly basic compounds: determination of extent and duration of supersaturation using potentiometric titration and correlation to solid state properties.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Ling; Ilevbare, Grace A; Van Eerdenbrugh, Bernard; Box, Karl J; Sanchez-Felix, Manuel Vincente; Taylor, Lynne S

    2012-10-01

    To examine the precipitation and supersaturation behavior of ten weak bases in terms of the relationship between pH-concentration-time profiles and the solid state properties of the precipitated material. Initially the compound was dissolved at low pH, followed by titration with base to induce precipitation. Upon precipitation, small aliquots of acid or base were added to induce slight subsaturation and supersaturation respectively and the resultant pH gradient was determined. The concentration of the unionized species was calculated as a function of time and pH using mass and charge balance equations. Two patterns of behavior were observed in terms of the extent and duration of supersaturation arising following an increase in pH and this behavior could be rationalized based on the crystallization tendency of the compound. For compounds that did not readily crystallize, an amorphous precipitate was formed and a prolonged duration of supersaturation was observed. For compounds that precipitated to crystalline forms, the observed supersaturation was short-lived. This study showed that supersaturation behavior has significant correlation with the solid-state properties of the precipitate and that pH-metric titration methods can be utilized to evaluate the supersaturation behavior.

  3. THE PROTEASOME REGULATES BACTERIAL CpG DNA-INDUCED SIGNALING PATHWAYS IN MURINE MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian Jun; Shen, Jing; Kolbert, Christopher; Raghavakaimal, Sreekumar; Papasian, Christopher J.; Qureshi, Asaf A.; Vogel, Stefanie N.; Morrison, David C.; Qureshi, Nilofer

    2010-01-01

    Our previous work has provided strong evidence that the proteasome is central to the vast majority of genes induced in mouse macrophages in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. In the studies presented here, we evaluated the role of the macrophage proteasome in response to a second microbial product CpG DNA (unmethylated bacterial DNA). For these studies, we applied Affymetrix microarray analysis of RNA derived from murine macrophages stimulated with CpG DNA in the presence or absence of proteasome inhibitor, lactacystin. The results of these studies revealed that similar to LPS, a vast majority of those macrophage genes regulated by CpG DNA are also under the control of the proteasome at 4 h. In contrast to LPS stimulation, however, many of these genes were induced much later than 4 h, at 18 h, in response to CpG DNA. Lactacystin treatment of macrophages completely blocked the CpG DNA-induced gene expression of TNF-α and other genes involved in production of inflammatory mediators. These data strongly support the conclusion that, similar to LPS, the macrophage proteasome is a key regulator of CpG DNA-induced signaling pathways. PMID:20160661

  4. Prostatic Inflammation Induces Fibrosis in a Mouse Model of Chronic Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Letitia; Hutson, Paul R.; Bushman, Wade

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation of the prostate is strongly correlated with development of lower urinary tract symptoms and several studies have implicated prostatic fibrosis in the pathogenesis of bladder outlet obstruction. It has been postulated that inflammation induces prostatic fibrosis but this relationship has never been tested. Here, we characterized the fibrotic response to inflammation in a mouse model of chronic bacterial-induced prostatic inflammation. Transurethral instillation of the uropathogenic E. coli into C3H/HeOuJ male mice induced persistent prostatic inflammation followed by a significant increase in collagen deposition and hydroxyproline content. This fibrotic response to inflammation was accompanied with an increase in collagen synthesis determined by the incorporation of 3H-hydroxyproline and mRNA expression of several collagen remodeling-associated genes, including Col1a1, Col1a2, Col3a1, Mmp2, Mmp9, and Lox. Correlation analysis revealed a positive correlation of inflammation severity with collagen deposition and immunohistochemical staining revealed that CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes were abundant in inflamed prostates at the time point coinciding with increased collagen synthesis. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an increased percentage of these CD45+VIM+ fibrocytes among collagen type I expressing cells. These data show–for the first time–that chronic prostatic inflammation induces collagen deposition and implicates fibrocytes in the fibrotic process. PMID:24950301

  5. Pore-Forming Toxins Induce Macrophage Necroptosis during Acute Bacterial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    González-Juarbe, Norberto; Gilley, Ryan Paul; Hinojosa, Cecilia Anahí; Bradley, Kelley Margaret; Kamei, Akinobu; Gao, Geli; Dube, Peter Herman; Bergman, Molly Ann; Orihuela, Carlos Javier

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is a highly pro-inflammatory mode of cell death regulated by RIP (or RIPK)1 and RIP3 kinases and mediated by the effector MLKL. We report that diverse bacterial pathogens that produce a pore-forming toxin (PFT) induce necroptosis of macrophages and this can be blocked for protection against Serratia marcescens hemorrhagic pneumonia. Following challenge with S. marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Listeria monocytogenes, uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), and purified recombinant pneumolysin, macrophages pretreated with inhibitors of RIP1, RIP3, and MLKL were protected against death. Alveolar macrophages in MLKL KO mice were also protected during S. marcescens pneumonia. Inhibition of caspases had no impact on macrophage death and caspase-1 and -3/7 were determined to be inactive following challenge despite the detection of IL-1β in supernatants. Bone marrow-derived macrophages from RIP3 KO, but not caspase-1/11 KO or caspase-3 KO mice, were resistant to PFT-induced death. We explored the mechanisms for PFT-induced necroptosis and determined that loss of ion homeostasis at the plasma membrane, mitochondrial damage, ATP depletion, and the generation of reactive oxygen species were together responsible. Treatment of mice with necrostatin-5, an inhibitor of RIP1; GW806742X, an inhibitor of MLKL; and necrostatin-5 along with co-enzyme Q10 (N5/C10), which enhances ATP production; reduced the severity of S. marcescens pneumonia in a mouse intratracheal challenge model. N5/C10 protected alveolar macrophages, reduced bacterial burden, and lessened hemorrhage in the lungs. We conclude that necroptosis is the major cell death pathway evoked by PFTs in macrophages and the necroptosis pathway can be targeted for disease intervention. PMID:26659062

  6. Precipitants of hepatic encephalopathy induce rapid astrocyte swelling in an oxidative stress dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, Vera; Görg, Boris; Bidmon, Hans Jürgen; Keitel, Verena; Häussinger, Dieter

    2013-08-15

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is seen as the clinical manifestation of a low grade cerebral edema with formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RNOS). Astrocyte swelling is a crucial event and in cultured astrocytes HE-relevant factors almost instantaneously induce the formation of RNOS. However, short term effects of ammonia, inflammatory cytokines and RNOS on the volume of astrocytes and other brain cells as well as the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown, although a pathogenic link between RNOS formation and swelling in HE has been proposed. This issue was addressed in the present study by means of live-cell volume microscopy of brain cells in vitro. Ammonia, diazepam and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor-necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interferon-γ, interleukin-1β induced within 20min astrocyte swelling by about 25% accompanied by nuclear swelling of similar magnitude. Astrocyte swelling in response to NH4Cl, TNF-α or diazepam was abolished by the antioxidant epigallocatechin-gallate pointing to an involvement of RNOS. NH4Cl-induced astrocyte swelling was sensitive to inhibition of glutamine synthetase, NADPH oxidase or nitric oxide synthases. In line with a NMDA receptor-, prostanoid- and Ca(2+)-dependence of NH4Cl-induced RNOS formation, Ca(2+) chelation and inhibition of NMDA receptors or cyclooxygenase suppressed NH4Cl-induced astrocyte swelling, whereas the Ca(2+)-ionophore ionomycin, NMDA, glutamate and prostanoids induced rapid astrocyte swelling. NH4Cl also induced swelling of cultured microglia in a glutamine-synthesis dependent way, but had no effect on cell volume of cultured neurons. It is concluded that the pathways which trigger RNOS formation in astrocytes also trigger astrocyte swelling, whereas conversely and as shown previously hypoosmotic astrocyte swelling can induce RNOS formation. This establishes a complex interplay with an auto-amplificatory loop between RNOS formation and astrocyte swelling as an important event in

  7. The Influence of the Induced Ferrite and Precipitates of Ti-bearing Steel on the Ductility of Continuous Casting Slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Guoyu; Cheng, Guoguang; Hou, Zibing

    2015-11-01

    In order to investigate the loss of the ductility of Ti-bearing ship plate steel under 1000 °C, where the ductility begins to reduce rapidly, so the hot ductility of Ti-bearing ship plate steel has been obtained using the Gleeble 1500 thermal-mechanical simulator and also the studies about the effect of grain boundary ferrite films and precipitates containing Ti on the ductility has been carried out. The result showed that the TiN particles precipitating at 950 °C with a larger size and smaller volume fraction cannot effectively suppress the occurrence of recrystallization and the ductility still retains at a high level, although R.A. value presents a certain degree of decline compared with 1000 °C. A large number of smaller Ti(C,N) particles precipitate at 900 °C and can induce the formation of a very small amount of fine grain boundary ferrite, which deteriorates the adhesion strength of the grain boundary, so the R.A. value rapidly reduces to less than 50%. When the temperature falls to close Ae3 (827 °C), the amount of the grain boundary ferrite films increase due to the ferrite phase transformation, but the ferrite film thickness becomes more uneven at the same time, which results in the increase of strain concentration and plays a leading role in causing the decrease of ductility, so the R.A. value has been kept less than 40% as the temperature cooling to 800 °C from 850 °C. When the temperature further decreases, the ductility starts to recover due to the increase of average ferrite film thickness to a greater degree which greatly reduces the strain concentration of the grain boundary.

  8. The impact of temporal aggregation of solid precipitation measurements on the correction for wind-induced undercatch.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stagnaro, Mattia; Colli, Matteo; Lanza, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Solid precipitation measurements are affected by systematic wind-induced errors, due to the aerodynamic response of catching type gauges. The snowflakes deviate from their undisturbed trajectories due to the alteration of the airflow field around the body of the gauge and the corresponding developed turbulence. The resulting effect consists in a certain degree of undercatch, which is a function of the undisturbed wind velocity. The correction of wind-induced errors has been addressed in the literature from the conceptual, numerical and experimental point of view. The Collection Efficiency (CE) curve of a single gauge, i.e. the relationship between the expected undercatch and the undisturbed wind speed, is derived from CFD simulations or field test studies (Colli et al., 2015; Wolff et al., 2015). This is used to apply a suitable transfer function (TF) to correct the wind-induced errors in real world measurements. Snowfall depth and wind speed measurements are commonly recorded at a temporal resolution in the order of 30-60 minutes, although the effect of wind bursts can affect the measurements at a much higher resolution. In this work, we investigate the impact of the aggregation scale on the accuracy of snowfall data when corrected by using the transfer function. From the WMO SPICE (Solid Precipitation Intercomparison Experiment) field campaign, we selected a number of snowfall events recorded at the Marshall Field test site (Colorado, USA) during the winter seasons from 2013 to 2015. We used three Geonor weighing type gauges with different configurations: unshielded, Single Alter shielded (SA) and the Double Fence Intercomparison Reference (DFIR). Both precipitation and wind speed data are quality controlled and provided with the time resolution of one minute. The Transfer Function has been derived from the selected number of snowfall events by comparison with the field reference (DFIR). Starting from the reference snowfall measurements and the wind speed values

  9. Infection on polypropylene mesh implantation site in the abdominal wall of rats with induced bacterial peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Sebben, Geraldo Alberto; Rocha, Sérgio Luiz; Von Bahten, Luiz Carlos; Biondo-Simões, Maria de Lourdes Pessole; Ramos, Fernando Henrique Azevedo; Pilonetto, Marcelo; Zonatto, Luciana Munhoz

    2006-01-01

    Evaluate incidence of bacterial growth on implanted meshes in the abdominal wall of rats after to induce bacterial peritonitis. 36 rats were used. They were allocated in two groups: group B, experiment group (n =18) and group S, control group (n =18). They were submitted to the implant of polypropylene meshes on the abdominal wall, at the preperitoneal space. Then, in the animals of the experiment group, the induction of peritonitis was made through the inoculation in the peritoneal cavity of standardized solution of Escherichia coli. In the animals of the control group it was made through the inoculation of physiologic solution. The animals of both groups were reallocated in three subgroups of six animals and observed until the reoperations time, for evaluation of the implantation sites, collection of the meshes for cultures, evaluation of the abdominal cavity and peritoneal lavage for cultures. The reoperations occurred in 24, 48 and 72 hours. All the animals of the experiment group presented clinical symptoms of peritonitis. The cultures of the meshes taken off from the implantation sites were positive in 83% of the animals when the moment of the evaluations was of 24 hours, decreasing to 33% in 48 hours and 17% in 72 hours. Globally, it was of 44%. In the animals of the control group there was no case of positive culture neither in the meshes, nor in the peritoneal lavages. The experimental model used was effective, producing 100% of peritonitis. The incidence of bacterial growth on the implanted polypropylene meshes was 83% in 24 hours, decreasing with the time.

  10. Plant secondary metabolite-induced shifts in bacterial community structure and degradative ability in contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Hroudova, Miluse; Vlcek, Cestmir; Koubek, Jiri; Holeckova, Marcela; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how selected natural compounds (naringin, caffeic acid, and limonene) induce shifts in both bacterial community structure and degradative activity in long-term polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil and how these changes correlate with changes in chlorobiphenyl degradation capacity. In order to address this issue, we have integrated analytical methods of determining PCB degradation with pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene tag-encoded amplicons and DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Our model system was set in laboratory microcosms with PCB-contaminated soil, which was enriched for 8 weeks with the suspensions of flavonoid naringin, terpene limonene, and phenolic caffeic acid. Our results show that application of selected plant secondary metabolites resulted in bacterial community structure far different from the control one (no natural compound amendment). The community in soil treated with caffeic acid is almost solely represented by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia (together over 99 %). Treatment with naringin resulted in an enrichment of Firmicutes to the exclusion of Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. SIP was applied in order to identify populations actively participating in 4-chlorobiphenyl catabolism. We observed that naringin and limonene in soil foster mainly populations of Hydrogenophaga spp., caffeic acid Burkholderia spp. and Pseudoxanthomonas spp. None of these populations were detected among 4-chlorobiphenyl utilizers in non-amended soil. Similarly, the degradation of individual PCB congeners was influenced by the addition of different plant compounds. Residual content of PCBs was lowest after treating the soil with naringin. Addition of caffeic acid resulted in comparable decrease of total PCBs with non-amended soil; however, higher substituted congeners were more degraded after caffeic acid treatment compared to all other treatments. Finally, it appears that plant secondary metabolites

  11. Raman Lidar Observations of a MCS in the frame of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Bhawar, Rohini; Summa, Donato; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Demoz, Belay B.

    2009-03-01

    The Raman lidar system BASIL was deployed in Achern (Supersite R, Lat: 48.64° N, Long: 8.06° E, Elev.: 140 m) in the frame of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study. On 20 July 2007 a frontal zone passed over the COPS region, with a Mesoscale Convective System (MCS) imbedded in it. BASIL was operated continuously during this day, providing measurements of temperature, water vapour, particle backscattering coefficient at 355, 532 and 1064 nm, particle extinction coefficient at 355 and 532 nm and particle depolarization at 355 and 532 nm. The thunderstorm approaching determined the lowering of the anvil clouds, which is clearly visible in the lidar data. A cloud deck is present at 2 km, which represents a mid-level outflow from the thunderstorm/MCS. The mid-level outflow spits out hydrometeor-debris (mostly virga) and it is recycled back into it. The MCS modified the environment at 1.6-2.5 km levels directly (outflow) and the lower levels through the virga/precipitation. Wave structures were observed in the particle backscatter data. The wave activity seems to be a reflection of the shear that is produced by the MCS and the inflow environmental wind. Measurements in terms of particle backscatter and water vapour mixing ratio are discussed to illustrate the above phenomena.

  12. A conserved bacterial protein induces pancreatic beta cell expansion during zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jennifer Hampton; Franzosa, Eric A; Huttenhower, Curtis; Guillemin, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Resident microbes play important roles in the development of the gastrointestinal tract, but their influence on other digestive organs is less well explored. Using the gnotobiotic zebrafish, we discovered that the normal expansion of the pancreatic β cell population during early larval development requires the intestinal microbiota and that specific bacterial members can restore normal β cell numbers. These bacteria share a gene that encodes a previously undescribed protein, named herein BefA (β Cell Expansion Factor A), which is sufficient to induce β cell proliferation in developing zebrafish larvae. Homologs of BefA are present in several human-associated bacterial species, and we show that they have conserved capacity to stimulate β cell proliferation in larval zebrafish. Our findings highlight a role for the microbiota in early pancreatic β cell development and suggest a possible basis for the association between low diversity childhood fecal microbiota and increased diabetes risk. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20145.001 PMID:27960075

  13. Effect of dietary antioxidant supplementation (Cuminum cyminum) on bacterial susceptibility of diabetes-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Moubarz, Gehan; Embaby, Mohamed A; Doleib, Nada M; Taha, Mona M

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients are at risk of acquiring infections. Chronic low-grade inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic complication. Diabetes causes generation of reactive oxygen species that increases oxidative stress, which may play a role in the development of complications as immune-deficiency and bacterial infection. The study aimed to investigate the role of a natural antioxidant, cumin, in the improvement of immune functions in diabetes. Diabetes was achieved by interperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Bacterial infection was induced by application of Staphylococcus aureus suspension to a wound in the back of rats. The antioxidant was administered for 6 weeks. Results revealed a decrease in blood glucose levels in diabetic rats (p < 0.001), in addition to improving immune functions by decreasing total IgE approaching to the normal control level. Also, inflammatory cytokine (IL-6, IL-1β and TNF) levels, as well as total blood count decreased in diabetic rats as compared to the control group. Thus, cumin may serve as anti-diabetic treatment and may help in attenuating diabetic complications by improving immune functions. Therefore, a medical dietary antioxidant supplementation is important to improve the immune functions in diabetes.

  14. Effect of dietary antioxidant supplementation (Cuminum cyminum) on bacterial susceptibility of diabetes-induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Embaby, Mohamed A.; Doleib, Nada M.; Taha, Mona M.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients are at risk of acquiring infections. Chronic low-grade inflammation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic complication. Diabetes causes generation of reactive oxygen species that increases oxidative stress, which may play a role in the development of complications as immune-deficiency and bacterial infection. The study aimed to investigate the role of a natural antioxidant, cumin, in the improvement of immune functions in diabetes. Diabetes was achieved by interperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Bacterial infection was induced by application of Staphylococcus aureus suspension to a wound in the back of rats. The antioxidant was administered for 6 weeks. Results revealed a decrease in blood glucose levels in diabetic rats (p < 0.001), in addition to improving immune functions by decreasing total IgE approaching to the normal control level. Also, inflammatory cytokine (IL-6, IL-1β and TNF) levels, as well as total blood count decreased in diabetic rats as compared to the control group. Thus, cumin may serve as anti-diabetic treatment and may help in attenuating diabetic complications by improving immune functions. Therefore, a medical dietary antioxidant supplementation is important to improve the immune functions in diabetes. PMID:27536197

  15. Peripheral ischaemic retinopathy and neovascularisation in a patient with subacute streptococcus mitis-induced bacterial endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Leysen, Laura S.; Kreps, Elke O.; De Schryver, Ilse; Hoornaert, Kristien P.; Smith, Vanessa; De Zaeytijd, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe a patient with peripheral retinal ischaemia and neovascularisation who was diagnosed with streptococcus mitis-induced bacterial endocarditis. Methods: Retrospective analysis of case report. A 57-year-old man presented with a history of a rapidly progressive, bilateral, painless visual loss. He also suffered from pain in the neck and lower back and a weight loss of 10 kg. He underwent a full ophthalmologic work-up, laboratory investigations, and imaging of the spine. Results: BCVA was reduced to 20/40 in the right eye and 20/32 in the left eye. Fundoscopy showed rare intra-retinal haemorrhages including few Roth spots and cotton wool lesions. Fluorescein angiography demonstrated large areas of peripheral retinal ischaemia and neovascularisation. Imaging of the spine showed spondylodiscitis on several levels. Further imaging and blood cultures confirmed bacterial endocarditis of the mitral valve. Streptococcus mitis was subsequently identified as the causative organism. Conclusion: Peripheral retinal ischaemia and neovascularisation were previously unrecognised as a feature of infectious endocarditis. Therefore, their presence, apart from the classic Roth spots, should prompt the consideration of infectious endocarditis in the etiologic work-up. PMID:28944156

  16. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J. M.; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4+ central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:26351279

  17. TIR Domain-Containing Adapter-Inducing Beta Interferon (TRIF) Mediates Immunological Memory against Bacterial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Termini, J M; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Ruiz, Jose; Arditi, Moshe; Schesser, Kurt; Fukata, Masayuki

    2015-11-01

    Induction of adaptive immunity leads to the establishment of immunological memory; however, how innate immunity regulates memory T cell function remains obscure. Here we show a previously undefined mechanism in which innate and adaptive immunity are linked by TIR domain-containing adapter-inducing beta interferon (TRIF) during establishment and reactivation of memory T cells against Gram-negative enteropathogens. Absence of TRIF in macrophages (Mϕs) but not dendritic cells led to a predominant generation of CD4(+) central memory T cells that express IL-17 during enteric bacterial infection in mice. TRIF-dependent type I interferon (IFN) signaling in T cells was essential to Th1 lineage differentiation and reactivation of memory T cells. TRIF activated memory T cells to facilitate local neutrophil influx and enhance bacterial elimination. These results highlight the importance of TRIF as a mediator of the innate and adaptive immune interactions in achieving the protective properties of memory immunity against Gram-negative bacteria and suggest TRIF as a potential therapeutic target.

  18. Bacterial Suspensions Deposited on Microbiological Filter Material for Rapid Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Identification.

    PubMed

    Malenfant, Dylan J; Gillies, Derek J; Rehse, Steven J

    2016-03-01

    Four species of bacteria, E. coli, S. epidermidis, M. smegmatis, and P. aeruginosa, were harvested from agar nutrient medium growth plates and suspended in water to create liquid specimens for the testing of a new mounting protocol. Aliquots of 30 µL were deposited on standard nitrocellulose filter paper with a mean 0.45 µm pore size to create highly flat and uniform bacterial pads. The introduction of a laser-based lens-to-sample distance measuring device and a pair of matched off-axis parabolic reflectors for light collection improved both spectral reproducibility and the signal-to-noise ratio of optical emission spectra acquired from the bacterial pads by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. A discriminant function analysis and a partial least squares-discriminant analysis both showed improved sensitivity and specificity compared to previous mounting techniques. The behavior of the spectra as a function of suspension concentration and filter coverage was investigated, as was the effect on chemometric cell classification of sterilization via autoclaving. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Nods, Nalps and Naip: intracellular regulators of bacterial-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chamaillard, Mathias; Girardin, Stephen E; Viala, Jérôme; Philpott, Dana J

    2003-09-01

    The innate immune system is the most ancestral and ubiquitous system of defence against microbial infection. The microbial sensing proteins involved in innate immunity recognize conserved and often structural components of microorganisms. One class of these pattern-recognition molecules, the Toll-like receptors (TLRs), are involved in detection of microbes in the extracellular compartment whereas a newly discovered family of proteins, the NBS-LRR proteins (for nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeat), are involved in intracellular recognition of microbes and their products. NBS-LRR proteins are characterized by three structural domains: a C-terminal leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain able to sense a microbial motif, an intermediary nucleotide binding site (NBS) essential for the oligomerization of the molecule that is necessary for the signal transduction induced by different N-terminal effector motifs, such as a pyrin domain (PYD), a caspase-activating and recruitment domain (CARD) or a baculovirus inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat (BIR) domain. Two of these family members, Nod1 and Nod2, play a role in the regulation of pro-inflammatory pathways through NF-kappaB induced by bacterial ligands. Recently, it was shown that Nod2 recognizes a specific peptidoglycan motif from bacteria, muramyl dipeptide (MDP). A surprising number of human genetic disorders have been linked to NBS-LRR proteins. For example, mutations in Nod2, which render the molecule insensitive to MDP and unable to induce NF-kappaB activation when stimulated, are associated with susceptibility to a chronic intestinal inflammatory disorder, Crohn's disease. Conversely, mutations in the NBS region of Nod2 induce a constitutive activation of NF-kappaB and are responsible for Blau syndrome, another auto-inflammatory disease. Nalp3, which is an NBS-LRR protein with an N-terminal Pyrin domain, is also implicated in rare auto-inflammatory disorders. In conclusion, NBS-LRR molecules appear as a new

  20. Nerve-targeted desensitizing toothpastes occlude dentin tubules and induce mineral precipitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhejun; Jiang, Tao; Sauro, Salvatore; Wang, Yining; Xing, Wenzhong; Liang, Shanshan; Sa, Yue; Zhang, Chengfei; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus

    2012-02-01

    To examine the laboratory dentin tubules occlusion and mineral precipitation capability of two potassium salts-containing desensitizing toothpastes. 40 dentin disks were obtained and divided into four groups, including artificial saliva (AS), distilled water (DW), Sensodyne Freshmint (SF) and Colgate Sensitive (CS). Dentin permeability measurement was performed after EDTA etching, initial brush, 3-day brush, 7-day brush and citric acid challenge, respectively. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to monitor the variation of mineral content before and after treatments. The ultra-morphology of dentin surface was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate tubule occlusion. The two potassium salts-containing desensitizing toothpastes significantly reduced dentin permeability to less than 40% after 7-day treatment (P<0.05). The ATR-FTIR analysis showed increase of the intensity of the phosphate peak after a 7-day brushing period using both of the tested toothpastes. However, the dentin permeability significantly increased and the intensity of phosphate peak decreased after acid etching for all groups. The SEM examination revealed partially occluded dentin tubules after toothpaste treatments, but after the acid challenge the tubules were opened again.

  1. Lidar and Radar Measurements of the melting layer in the frame of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Summa, Donato; Bhawar, Rohini; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Vaughan, Geraint; Norton, Emily; Peters, Gerhard

    2009-03-01

    During the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS), lidar dark bands were observed by the Univ. of BASILicata Raman lidar system (BASIL) on several IOPs and SOPs (among others, 23 July, 15 August, 17 August). Dark band signatures appear in the lidar measurements of particle backscattering at 355, 532 and 1064 nm and particle extinction at 355 and 532 nm, as well as in particle depolarization measurements. Lidar data are supported by measurements from the University of Hamburg cloud radar MIRA 36 (36 GHz), the University of Hamburg dual-polarization micro rain radars (24.1 GHz) and the University of Manchester Radio UHF clear air wind profiler (1.29 GHz). Results from BASIL and the radars are illustrated and discussed to support in the comprehension of the microphysical and scattering processes responsible for the appearance of the lidar dark band and radar bright band.

  2. Glutamine deamidation and dysfunction of ubiquitin/NEDD8 induced by a bacterial effector family.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jixin; Yao, Qing; Li, Shan; Ding, Xiaojun; Lu, Qiuhe; Mao, Haibin; Liu, Liping; Zheng, Ning; Chen, She; Shao, Feng

    2010-09-03

    A family of bacterial effectors including Cif homolog from Burkholderia pseudomallei (CHBP) and Cif from Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) adopt a functionally important papain-like hydrolytic fold. We show here that CHBP was a potent inhibitor of the eukaryotic ubiquitination pathway. CHBP acted as a deamidase that specifically and efficiently deamidated Gln40 in ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 both in vitro and during Burkholderia infection. Deamidated ubiquitin was impaired in supporting ubiquitin-chain synthesis. Cif selectively deamidated NEDD8, which abolished the activity of neddylated Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRLs). Ubiquitination and ubiquitin-dependent degradation of multiple CRL substrates were impaired by Cif in EPEC-infected cells. Mutations of substrate-contacting residues in Cif abolished or attenuated EPEC-induced cytopathic phenotypes of cell cycle arrest and actin stress fiber formation.

  3. Beta-lactam antibiotics induce a lethal malfunctioning of the bacterial cell wall synthesis machinery

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hongbaek; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Bernhardt, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Penicillin and related beta-lactams comprise one of our oldest and most widely used antibiotic therapies. These drugs have long been known to target enzymes called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that build the bacterial cell wall. Investigating the downstream consequences of target inhibition and how they contribute to the lethal action of these important drugs, we demonstrate that beta-lactams do more than just inhibit the PBPs as is commonly believed. Rather, they induce a toxic malfunctioning of their target biosynthetic machinery involving a futile cycle of cell wall synthesis and degradation, thereby depleting cellular resources and bolstering their killing activity. Characterization of this mode of action additionally revealed a quality-control function for enzymes that cleave bonds in the cell wall matrix. The results thus provide insight into the mechanism of cell wall assembly and suggest how best to interfere with the process for future antibiotic development. PMID:25480295

  4. Beta-lactam antibiotics induce a lethal malfunctioning of the bacterial cell wall synthesis machinery.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongbaek; Uehara, Tsuyoshi; Bernhardt, Thomas G

    2014-12-04

    Penicillin and related beta-lactams comprise one of our oldest and most widely used antibiotic therapies. These drugs have long been known to target enzymes called penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that build the bacterial cell wall. Investigating the downstream consequences of target inhibition and how they contribute to the lethal action of these important drugs, we demonstrate that beta-lactams do more than just inhibit the PBPs as is commonly believed. Rather, they induce a toxic malfunctioning of their target biosynthetic machinery involving a futile cycle of cell wall synthesis and degradation, thereby depleting cellular resources and bolstering their killing activity. Characterization of this mode of action additionally revealed a quality control function for enzymes that cleave bonds in the cell wall matrix. The results thus provide insight into the mechanism of cell wall assembly and suggest how best to interfere with the process for future antibiotic development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification and discrimination of bacterial strains by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and neural networks.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Martinez, D; Ayala, J A; Izquierdo-Hornillos, R C; de Villena, F J Manuel; Caceres, J O

    2011-05-15

    A method based on laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and neural networks (NNs) has been developed and applied to the identification and discrimination of specific bacteria strains (Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium). Instant identification of the samples is achieved using a spectral library, which was obtained by analysis using a single laser pulse of representative samples and treatment by neural networks. The samples used in this study were divided into three groups, which were prepared on three different days. The results obtained allow the identification of the bacteria tested with a certainty of over 95%, and show that only a difference between the bacteria can cause identification. Single-shot measurements were sufficient for clear identification of the bacterial strains studied. The method can be developed for automatic real time, fast, reliable and robust measurements and can be packaged in portable systems for non-specialist users. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pathogen identification with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy: the effect of bacterial and biofluid specimen contamination.

    PubMed

    Mohaidat, Qassem I; Sheikh, Khadija; Palchaudhuri, Sunil; Rehse, Steven J

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, the potential use of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for the rapid discrimination and identification of bacterial pathogens in realistic clinical specimens is investigated. Specifically, the common problem of sample contamination was studied by creating mixed samples to investigate the effect that the presence of a second contaminant bacterium in the specimen had on the LIBS-based identification of the primary pathogen. Two closely related bacterial specimens, Escherichia coli strain ATCC 25922 and Enterobacter cloacae strain ATCC 13047, were mixed together in mixing fractions of 10:1, 100:1, and 1000:1. LIBS spectra from the three mixtures were reliably classified as the correct E. coli strain with 98.5% accuracy when all the mixtures were withheld from the training model and classified against spectra from pure specimens. To simulate a rapid test for the presence of urinary tract infection pathogens, LIBS spectra were obtained from specimens of Staphylococcus epidermidis obtained from distilled water and sterile urine. LIBS spectra from the urine-harvested bacteria were classified as S. epidermidis with 100% accuracy when classified using a model containing only spectra from other Staphylococci species and with 88.5% accuracy when a model containing five genera of bacteria was utilized. Bacterial specimens comprising five different genera and 13 classifiable taxonomic groups of species and strains were compiled in a library that was tested using external validation techniques. The importance of utilizing external validation techniques where the library is tested with data withheld from all previous testing and training of the model was revealed by comparing the results against "leave-one-out" cross-validation results. Last, the effect of using sequential models for the classification of a single unknown spectrum was investigated by comparing the misclassification of two closely related bacteria, E. coli and E. cloacae, when the

  7. Petrographic and geochemical evidence for the formation of primary, bacterially induced lacustrine dolomite: La Roda 'white earth' (Pliocene, Central Spain)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garcia, Del; Cura, M.A.; Calvo, J.P.; Ordonez, S.; Jones, B.F.; Canaveras, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    Upper Pliocene dolomites ('white earth') from La Roda, Spain, offer a good opportunity to evaluate the process of dolomite formation in lakes. The relatively young nature of the deposits could allow a link between dolomites precipitated in modern lake systems and those present in older lacustrine formations. The La Roda Mg-carbonates (dolomite unit) occur as a 3??5- to 4-m- thick package of poorly indurated, white, massive dolomite beds with interbedded thin deposits of porous carbonate displaying root and desiccation traces as well as local lenticular gypsum moulds. The massive dolomite beds consist mainly of loosely packed 1- to 2-??m-sized aggregates of dolomite crystals exhibiting poorly developed faces, which usually results in a subrounded morphology of the crystals. Minute rhombs of dolomite are sparse within the aggregates. Both knobbly textures and clumps of spherical bodies covering the crystal surfaces indicate that bacteria were involved in the formation of the dolomites. In addition, aggregates of euhedral dolomite crystals are usually present in some more clayey (sepiolite) interbeds. The thin porous carbonate (mostly dolomite) beds exhibit both euhedral and subrounded, bacterially induced dolomite crystals. The carbonate is mainly Ca-dolomite (51-54 mol% CaCO3), showing a low degree of ordering (degree of ordering ranges from 0??27 to 0??48). Calcite is present as a subordinate mineral in some samples. Sr, Mn and Fe contents show very low correlation coefficients with Mg/Ca ratios, whereas SiO2 and K contents are highly correlated. ??18O- and ??13C-values in dolomites range from -3??07??? to 5??40??? PDB (mean = 0??06, ?? = 1??75) and from -6??34??? to -0??39??? PDB (mean = -3??55, ?? = 1??33) respectively. Samples containing significant amounts of both dolomite and calcite do not in general show significant enrichment or depletion in 18O and 13C between the two minerals. The correlation coefficient between ??18O and ??13C for dolomite is extremely

  8. Bacterial translocation aggravates CCl4-induced liver cirrhosis by regulating CD4+ T cells in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Haiyan; Lv, Longxian; Cao, Hongcui; Lu, Haifeng; Zhou, Ning; Yang, Jiezuan; Jiang, Haiyin; Dong, Huihui; Hu, Xinjun; Yu, Wei; Jiang, Xiawei; Zheng, Beiwen; Li, Lanjuan

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial translocation (BT) is thought to play an important role in the development of liver cirrhosis, but the mechanisms have not been fully explored. This study aims to investigate the distribution of Treg (CD3+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+), Th17 (CD3+CD4+IL-17+), and Th1 (CD3+CD4+IFN-γ+) cells in the intestinal lamina propria, liver and blood and to explore their relationships with BT. Cirrhotic rats with ascites were induced by CCl4. We found that there were lower levels of total protein and albumin, lower albumin/globulin ratio, lower body weight and higher spleen weight and ascites volume in cirrhotic rats with than without BT. We found that BT may cause increase of Treg cells in the proximal small intestine and decrease of Th17 cells in the whole intestine and blood in cirrhotic rats. It may also aggravate the CCl4-induced decrease in Th1 cells in the whole intestine, liver, caecum, and blood and the CCl4-induced increase in Th17 cells in the liver and Tregs in the distal small intestine, colon, and liver. Our data suggest that BT may aggravate liver injury and decrease liver function via an interaction with CD4+ T Cells. The results of this study may be helpful for the development of new treatments for liver cirrhosis. PMID:28134306

  9. Identification of in vivo-induced bacterial protein antigens during calf infection with Chlamydia psittaci.

    PubMed

    Kästner, Julia; Saluz, Hans Peter; Hänel, Frank

    2015-05-01

    Chlamydia (C.) psittaci, the causative agent of ornithosis, is an obligate intracellular pathogen with a unique developmental cycle and a high potential for zoonotic transmission. Various mammalian hosts, such as cattle, horse, sheep and man that are in close contact with contaminated birds can get infected (referred to as psittacosis). Since little is known about long-term sequelae of chronic disease and the molecular mechanisms of chlamydial pathogenesis, a key step in understanding the in vivo situation is the identification of C. psittaci infection-associated proteins. For this, we investigated sera of infected calves. Using the immunoscreening approach In Vivo Induced Antigen Technology (IVIAT) including all relevant controls, we focused on C. psittaci proteins, which are induced in vivo during infection. Sera were pooled, extensively adsorbed against in vitro antigens to eliminate false positive results, and used to screen an inducible C. psittaci 02DC15 genomic expression library. Screening and control experiments revealed 19 immunogenic proteins, which are expressed during infection. They are involved in transport and oxidative stress response, heme and folate biosynthesis, DNA replication, recombination and repair, cell envelope, bacterial secretion systems and hypothetical proteins of so far unknown functions. Some of the proteins found may be considered as diagnostic markers or as candidates for the development of vaccines.

  10. Characterization of uveitis induced by use of a single intravitreal injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in cats.

    PubMed

    Del Sole, María J; Sande, Pablo H; Felipe, Antonio E; Fernandez, Diego C; Keller Sarmiento, María I; Aba, Marcelo A; Rosenstein, Ruth E

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the use of a single intravitreal injection of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to experimentally induce uveitis in cats. 7 young male European shorthair cats that were considered physically and ophthalmologically healthy. In each cat, LPS was injected intravitreally into 1 eye; the contralateral eye was injected with the preparation vehicle. During a period of 45 days, both eyes were evaluated by means of clinical evaluation; assessment of the integrity of the blood-aqueous humor barrier (determined via measurement of protein concentration and cell content in samples of aqueous humor); functional analysis (via electroretinography); and following euthanasia, histologic examination of the retinas. In LPS-treated eyes, several clinical signs were observed until day 45 after injection. Compared with vehicle-treated eyes, intraocular pressure was significantly lower and protein concentration and the number of infiltrating cells were significantly higher in LPS-treated eyes. Mean amplitudes of scotopic electroretinographic a- and b-waves were significantly reduced in eyes injected with LPS, compared with findings in eyes injected with vehicle. At 45 days after injection, LPS-induced alterations in photoreceptors and the middle portion of the retina were detected histologically. Results indicated that a single intravitreal injection of LPS in eyes of cats induced clinical, biochemical, functional, and histologic changes that were consistent with the main features of naturally occurring uveitis. This technique may be a useful tool in the investigation of new treatment strategies for uveitis in cats.

  11. Early Enhanced Local Neutrophil Recruitment in Peritonitis-Induced Sepsis Improves Bacterial Clearance and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Craciun, Florin L.; Schuller, Elizabeth R.; Remick, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrophils are critical for the rapid eradication of bacterial pathogens, but they also contribute to the development of multiple organ failure in sepsis. We hypothesized that increasing early recruitment of neutrophils to the focus of infection will increase bacterial clearance and improve survival. Sepsis was induced in mice, using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP); blood samples were collected at 6 and 24 h; and survival was followed for 28 d. In separate experiments, peritoneal bacteria and inflammatory cells were measured. Septic mice predicted to die based on IL-6 levels (Die-P) had higher concentrations of CXCL1 and CXCL2 in the peritoneum and plasma compared with those predicted to live (Live-P). At 6 h, Live-P and Die-P had equivalent numbers of peritoneal neutrophils and bacteria. In Die-P mice the number of peritoneal bacteria increased between 6 and 24 h post-CLP, whereas in Live-P it decreased. The i.p. injection of CXCL1 and CXCL2 in naive mice resulted in local neutrophil recruitment. When given immediately after CLP, CXC chemokines increased peritoneal neutrophil recruitment at 6 h after CLP. This early increase in neutrophils induced by exogenous chemokines resulted in significantly fewer peritoneal bacteria by 24 h [CFU (log) = 6.04 versus 4.99 for vehicle versus chemokine treatment; p < 0.05]. Chemokine treatment significantly improved survival at both 5 d (40 versus 72%) and 28 d (27 versus 52%; p < 0.02 vehicle versus chemokines). These data demonstrate that early, local treatment with CXC chemokines enhances neutrophil recruitment and clearance of bacteria as well as improves survival in the CLP model of sepsis. PMID:21041722

  12. Early enhanced local neutrophil recruitment in peritonitis-induced sepsis improves bacterial clearance and survival.

    PubMed

    Craciun, Florin L; Schuller, Elizabeth R; Remick, Daniel G

    2010-12-01

    Neutrophils are critical for the rapid eradication of bacterial pathogens, but they also contribute to the development of multiple organ failure in sepsis. We hypothesized that increasing early recruitment of neutrophils to the focus of infection will increase bacterial clearance and improve survival. Sepsis was induced in mice, using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP); blood samples were collected at 6 and 24 h; and survival was followed for 28 d. In separate experiments, peritoneal bacteria and inflammatory cells were measured. Septic mice predicted to die based on IL-6 levels (Die-P) had higher concentrations of CXCL1 and CXCL2 in the peritoneum and plasma compared with those predicted to live (Live-P). At 6 h, Live-P and Die-P had equivalent numbers of peritoneal neutrophils and bacteria. In Die-P mice the number of peritoneal bacteria increased between 6 and 24 h post-CLP, whereas in Live-P it decreased. The i.p. injection of CXCL1 and CXCL2 in naive mice resulted in local neutrophil recruitment. When given immediately after CLP, CXC chemokines increased peritoneal neutrophil recruitment at 6 h after CLP. This early increase in neutrophils induced by exogenous chemokines resulted in significantly fewer peritoneal bacteria by 24 h [CFU (log) = 6.04 versus 4.99 for vehicle versus chemokine treatment; p < 0.05]. Chemokine treatment significantly improved survival at both 5 d (40 versus 72%) and 28 d (27 versus 52%; p < 0.02 vehicle versus chemokines). These data demonstrate that early, local treatment with CXC chemokines enhances neutrophil recruitment and clearance of bacteria as well as improves survival in the CLP model of sepsis.

  13. Do quaternary ammonium monomers induce drug resistance in cariogenic, endodontic and periodontal bacterial species?

    PubMed

    Wang, Suping; Wang, Haohao; Ren, Biao; Li, Hao; Weir, Michael D; Zhou, Xuedong; Oates, Thomas W; Cheng, Lei; Xu, Hockin H K

    2017-10-01

    Antibacterial monomers were developed to combat oral biofilm acids and caries; however, little is known on whether quaternary ammonium monomers (QAMs) would induce drug resistance in oral bacteria. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of new antimicrobial monomers dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM) and dimethylaminododecyl methacrylate (DMADDM) on the induction of drug resistance in eight species of cariogenic, endodontic and periodontal bacteria for the first time. Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans), Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus gordonii, Enterococcus faecalis (E. faecalis), Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum), Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), and Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia) were tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was assessed using chlorhexidine (CHX) as control. Minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC), bacterial growth and membrane permeability properties were also investigated. CHX induced drug resistance in four species. DMAHDM did not induce any resistance. DMADDM induced drug resistance in only one benign species S. gordonii. The DMADDM-resistant and CHX-resistant S. gordonii had the same MIC and MBC values as S. gordonii parental strain against DMAHDM (p>0.1), hence DMAHDM effectively inhibited the resistant strains. The resistant strains had slower growth metabolism than parental strain. DMAHDM induced no drug resistance, and DMADDM had much less drug resistance than the commonly-used CHX in the eight common oral species. With its potent antimicrobial functions shown previously, the new DMAHDM is promising for applications in restorative, preventive, periodontal and endodontic treatments to combat cariogenic and pathological bacteria with no drug resistance in all tested species. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hippocampal microglial activation and glucocorticoid receptor down-regulation precipitate visceral hypersensitivity induced by colorectal distension in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gongliang; Zhao, Bing-Xue; Hua, Rong; Kang, Jie; Shao, Bo-Ming; Carbonaro, Theresa M; Zhang, Yong-Mei

    2016-03-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity is a common characteristic in patients suffering from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and other disorders with visceral pain. Although the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity remains speculative due to the absence of pathological changes, the long-lasting sensitization in neuronal circuitry induced by early life stress may play a critical role beyond the digestive system even after complete resolution of the initiating event. The hippocampus integrates multiple sources of afferent inputs and sculpts integrated autonomic outputs for pain and analgesia regulation. Here, we examined the hippocampal mechanism in the pathogenesis of visceral hypersensitivity with a rat model induced by neonatal and adult colorectal distensions (CRDs). Neither neonatal nor adult CRD evoked behavioral abnormalities in adulthood; however, adult re-exposure to CRD induced persistent visceral hypersensitivity, depression-like behaviors, and spatial learning impairment in rats that experienced neonatal CRD. Rats that experienced neonatal and adult CRDs presented a decrease in hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) immunofluorescence staining and protein expression, and increases in hippocampal microglial activation and cytokine (IL-1β and TNF-α) accumulation. The decrease in hippocampal GR expression and increase in hippocampal IL-1β and TNF-α accumulation could be prevented by hippocampal local infusion of minocycline, a microglial inhibitor. These results suggest that neonatal CRD can increase the vulnerability of hippocampal microglia, and adult CRD challenge facilitates the hippocampal cytokine release from the sensitized microglia, which down-regulates hippocampal GR protein expression and, subsequently, precipitates visceral hypersensitivity.

  15. Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) by denitrification as ground improvement method - Process control in sand column experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Vinh; van Paassen, Leon; Nakano, Akiko; Kanayama, Motohei; Heimovaara, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Calcite precipitation induced by microbes has been proven to be efficient in stabilizing granular soils, especially with urea hydrolysis, as it has been successfully demonstrated in a pilot application 2010. However, as a byproduct highly concentrated ammonium chloride (NH4Cl) solution is produced, which has to be removed and disposed and forms a significant disadvantage of the technique that makes an alternative process like denitrification preferred. The proof of principle of microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) by denitrification has been demonstrated by Van Paassen et al (2010) who suggested that instead of producing waste as a byproduct, different pre-treated waste streams could be used as substrates for in situ growth of denitrifying bacteria and simultaneous cementation without producing waste to be removed. In this study sand column experiments are performed in which calcium carbonate was successfully precipitated by indigenous denitrifying micro-organisms, which were supplied weekly with a pulse of a substrate solution containing calcium acetate and calcium nitrate. Besides the production of calcite and the growth of bacteria in biofilms, the reduction of nitrate resulted in the production of (nitrogen) gas. It was observed that this gas partly fills up the pore space and consequently contributed to a reduction of the permeability of the treated sand. The presence of gas in the pore space affected the flow of the injected substrates and influenced to the distribution of calcium carbonate. The effect of the mean particle size (D50) on the flow and transport of solutes and gas in the porous media has been evaluated by treating several columns with varying grain size distribution and comparing the change in permeability after each incubation period and analyzing the distribution of the gas throughout the columns using X-ray computed tomography (CT) scanning. The present results show that there is a considerable decrease of permeability - a

  16. Maternal and fetal roles in bacterially-induced preterm labor in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    FILIPOVICH, Yana; KLEIN, Jeremy; ZHOU, Ying; HIRSCH, Emmet

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The relative roles of the mother and fetus in signaling for labor remain poorly understood. OBJECTIVE We previously demonstrated using gene-knockout (KO) mice that E. coli-induced preterm delivery is completely dependent upon MyD88, a toll-like receptor adaptor protein. Here, we leveraged this finding to conduct a genetic experiment testing whether the mother, the fetus, or both signal for parturition in bacterially induced labor. STUDY DESIGN Six different maternal/fetal genotype combinations for MyD88 were studied: Wild-type (WT) dams carrying either (1) WT or (2) MyD88 heterozygous (het) fetuses (generated by mating WT females with WT or MyD88-KO males, respectively); (3) WT dams carrying MyD88-KO fetuses (generated by replacing the ovaries of WT females with MyD88-KO ovaries, followed by mating with MyD88-KO males). A similar strategy was used to generate MyD88-KO dams carrying (4) MyD88-KO, (5) MyD88 het or (6) WT fetuses. On day 14.5 of gestation, mice received intrauterine injections of either 1 × 109 killed E. coli or sterile medium. Delivery of ≥1 fetus within 48h was considered preterm. A separate group of similarly treated pregnant mice was euthanized 5 hours after surgery for gene expression and tissue analysis. RESULTS E. coli-induced preterm delivery is dependent upon maternal and not fetal genotype: >95% of WT and < 5% of MyD88-KO dams deliver prematurely regardless of fetal genotype (p=0.0001). In contrast, fetal survival in utero is influenced by fetal genotype: in MyD88-KO dams, in which premature birth rarely occurs, only 81% of WT and 86% of MyD88-heterozygous fetuses were alive 48 hours after surgery compared to 100% of MyD88-KO fetuses (p < 0.01). mRNAs for the inflammatory mediators IL-1β, TNF, IL-6 and COX-2 were elevated in uterine tissues only in WT mothers treated with E. coli, and were low or undetectable in the uteri of KO mothers or in animals treated with saline. Serum progesterone levels were lower in KO mothers with

  17. Maternal and fetal roles in bacterially induced preterm labor in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Filipovich, Yana; Klein, Jeremy; Zhou, Ying; Hirsch, Emmet

    2016-03-01

    The relative roles of the mother and fetus in signaling for labor remain poorly understood. We previously demonstrated using gene knockout (KO) mice that Escherichia coli-induced preterm delivery is completely dependent on MyD88, a toll-like receptor adaptor protein. Here we leveraged this finding to conduct a genetic experiment testing whether the mother, the fetus, or both signal for parturition in bacterially induced labor. Six different maternal/fetal genotype combinations for MyD88 were studied: wild-type (WT) dams carrying one of the following: (1) WT or (2) MyD88 heterozygous (het) fetuses (generated by mating WT females with WT or MyD88-knockout [KO] males, respectively); (3) WT dams carrying MyD88-KO fetuses (generated by replacing the ovaries of WT females with MyD88-KO ovaries, followed by mating with MyD88-KO males); a similar strategy was used to generate MyD88-KO dams carrying (4) MyD88-KO, (5) MyD88 het, or (6) WT fetuses. On day 14.5 of gestation, mice received intrauterine injections of either 1 × 10(9) killed E coli or sterile medium. Delivery of ≥ 1 fetus within 48 hours was considered preterm. A separate group of similarly treated pregnant mice was euthanized 5 hours after surgery for gene expression and tissue analysis. E coli-induced preterm delivery is dependent on maternal and not fetal genotype: > 95% of WT and < 5% of MyD88-KO dams deliver prematurely, regardless of fetal genotype (P = .0001). In contrast, fetal survival in utero is influenced by fetal genotype: in MyD88-KO dams, in which premature birth rarely occurs, only 81% of WT and 86% of MyD88-heterozygous fetuses were alive 48 hours after surgery compared with 100% of MyD88-KO fetuses (P < .01). Messenger ribonucleic acids for the inflammatory mediators interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-6, and cyclooxygenase-2 were elevated in uterine tissues only in WT mothers treated with E coli and were low or undetectable in the uteri of KO mothers or in animals treated

  18. Piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance study of the Pb2+-induced precipitation of bovine serum albumin and its dissolution with EDTA in an aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu; Cai, Yan; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2002-07-01

    The piezoelectric quartz crystal impedance technique (QCI) was employed to monitor in situ the Pb2+-induced precipitation of BSA onto a gold electrode and the precipitate dissolution with EDTA in an aqueous solution. The critical precipitation concentration of Pb2+, at which the resonant frequency decreased significantly, was estimated to be 4.78 x 10(-4) mol/L. The saturated adherence of the precipitate on the electrode was observed when the concentration of Pb2+ was greater than 7.53 x 10(-2) mol/L. The frequency response was mainly caused by the mass effect of the precipitate adherence to the electrode, rather than the changes in the physico-chemical properties of the contacting liquid. An excess addition of Na2EDTA after the Pb2+-BSA dissolution led to new precipitation, probably due to the formation of an EDTA precipitate in this medium (pH approximately 3). The pH effect on the response of the resonant frequency was analyzed by using the sum of two exponential functions. A larger frequency response occurred at a pH greater than pI. These findings have been reasonably explained. Also, a decrease in the concentration of the background electrolyte increased the frequency response.

  19. Local decomposition induced by dislocation motions inside precipitates in an Al-alloy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, B.; Zhou, Y. T.; Chen, D.; Ma, X. L.

    2013-01-01

    Dislocations in crystals are linear crystallographic defects, which move in lattice when crystals are plastically deformed. Motion of a partial dislocation may remove or create stacking fault characterized with a partial of a lattice translation vector. Here we report that motion of partial dislocations inside an intermetallic compound result in a local composition deviation from its stoichiometric ratio, which cannot be depicted with any vectors of the primary crystal. Along dislocation slip bands inside the deformed Al2Cu particles, redistribution of Cu and Al atoms leads to a local decomposition and collapse of the original crystal structure. This finding demonstrates that dislocation slip may induce destabilization in complex compounds, which is fundamentally different from that in monometallic crystals. This phenomenon of chemical unmixing of initially homogeneous multicomponent solids induced by dislocation motion might also have important implications for understanding the geologic evolvement of deep-focus peridotites in the Earth. PMID:23301160

  20. Electrochemical Induced Calcium Phosphate Precipitation: Importance of Local pH

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for living organisms and cannot be replaced or substituted. In this paper, we present a simple yet efficient membrane free electrochemical system for P removal and recovery as calcium phosphate (CaP). This method relies on in situ formation of hydroxide ions by electro mediated water reduction at a titanium cathode surface. The in situ raised pH at the cathode provides a local environment where CaP will become highly supersaturated. Therefore, homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation of CaP occurs near and at the cathode surface. Because of the local high pH, the P removal behavior is not sensitive to bulk solution pH and therefore, efficient P removal was observed in three studied bulk solutions with pH of 4.0 (56.1%), 8.2 (57.4%), and 10.0 (48.4%) after 24 h of reaction time. While P removal efficiencies are not generally affected by bulk solution pH, the chemical-physical properties of CaP solids collected on the cathode are still related to bulk solution pH, as confirmed by structure characterizations. High initial solution pH promotes the formation of more crystalline products with relatively high Ca/P molar ratio. The Ca/P molar ratio increases from 1.30 (pH 4.0) to 1.38 (pH 8.2) and further increases to 1.55 (pH 10.0). The formation of CaP precipitates was a typical crystallization process, with an amorphous phase formed at the initial stage which then transforms to the most stable crystal phase, hydroxyapatite, which is inferred from the increased Ca/P molar ratio from 1.38 (day 1) to the theoretical 1.76 (day 11) and by the formation of needle-like crystals. Finally, we demonstrated the efficiency of this system for real wastewater. This, together with the fact that the electrochemical method can work at low bulk pH, without dosing chemicals and a need for a separation process, highlights the potential application of the electrochemical method for P removal and recovery. PMID:28872838

  1. Transcriptome analysis of a bacterially induced basal and hypersensitive response of Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Bozsó, Zoltán; Maunoury, Nicolas; Szatmari, Agnes; Mergaert, Peter; Ott, Péter G; Zsíros, László R; Szabó, Erika; Kondorosi, Eva; Klement, Zoltán

    2009-08-01

    Research using the well-studied model legume Medicago truncatula has largely focused on rhizobium symbiosis, while little information is currently available for this species on pathogen-induced transcriptome changes. We have performed a transcriptome analysis of this species with the objective of studying the basal (BR, no visible symptoms) and hypersensitive response (HR, plant cell death) in its leaves at 6 and at 24 h after infection by HR-negative (hrcC mutant) and HR-inducing Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains, respectively. Although there were no visible symptoms at the BR, the alterations in gene expression were comparable to those found with the HR. Both responses resulted in the transcriptional alteration of hundreds of plant genes; however, the responses in the HR were usually more intense. The reactions to HR-inducing and HR-negative bacterial strains were significantly overlapping. Parallel up- or down-regulation of genes with the same function occurred frequently. However, some plant processes were regulated in one direction; for example, most of the protein synthesis-related genes were activated and all of the photosynthetic/chloroplast genes were suppressed during BR. The possible roles of several functional classes (e.g., cell rescue, signaling, defense, cell death, etc.) of transcriptionally altered genes are discussed. The results of the comparison with available mycorrhizal and nodule expression data show that there is a significant overlap between nodulation and the leaf defense response and that during the early stage of the nodulation in roots, Sinorhizobium meliloti induces a fluctuation in the transcription of BR- and HR-responsive genes.

  2. Contribution of endogenous and exogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in the bacterial spore

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, G.P.; Samuni, A.; Czapski, G.

    1980-01-01

    Radical scavengers such as polyethylene glycol 4000 and bovine albumin have been used to define the contribution of exogenous and endogenous damage to the total radiation-induced damage in aqueous buffered suspensions of Bacillus pumilus spores. The results indicate that this damage in the bacterial spore is predominantly endogenous.

  3. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance caused by stress-induced transfer of resistance genes--a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongchang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Lihong

    2013-07-04

    The transfer of resistance gene is one of the most important causes of bacterial resistance. Recent studies reveal that stresses induce the transfer of antibiotic resistance gene through multiple mechanisms. DNA damage stresses trigger bacterial SOS response and induce the transfer of resistance gene mediated by conjugative DNA. Antibiotic stresses induce natural bacterial competence for transformation in some bacteria which lack the SOS system. In addition, our latest studies show that the general stress response regulator RpoS regulates a novel type of resistance gene transfer which is mediated by double-stranded plasmid DNA and occurs exclusively on the solid surface. In this review, we summarized recent advances in SOS dependent and independent stress-induced DNA transfer which is mediated by conjugation and transformation respectively, and the transfer of double-stranded plasmid DNA on the solid surface which is regulated by RpoS. We propose that future work should address how stresses activate the key regulators and how these regulators control the expression of gene transfer related genes. Answers to the above questions would pave the way for searching for candidate targets for controlling bacterial resistance resulted from the transfer of antibiotic genes.

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy of bacterial spores, molds, pollens, and protein: initial studies of discrimination potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samuels, Alan C.; Delucia, Frank C.; McNesby, Kevin L.; Miziolek, Andrzej W.

    2003-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to study bacterial spores, molds, pollens, and proteins. Biosamples were prepared and deposited onto porous silver substrates. LIBS data from the individual laser shots were analyzed by principal-components analysis and were found to contain adequate information to afford discrimination among the different biomaterials. Additional discrimination within the three bacilli studied appears feasible.

  5. Modeling nucleotide excision repair and its impact on UV-induced mutagenesis during SOS-response in bacterial cells.

    PubMed

    Bugay, Aleksandr N; Krasavin, Evgeny A; Parkhomenko, Aleksandr Yu; Vasilyeva, Maria A

    2015-01-07

    A model of the UV-induced mutation process in Escherichia coli bacteria has been developed taking into account the whole sequence of molecular events starting from initial photo-damage and finishing with the fixation of point mutations. The wild-type phenotype bacterial cells are compared with UV-sensitive repair-deficient mutant cells. Attention is mainly paid to excision repair system functioning as regards induced mutagenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Bacterial Quorum-Sensing Precursor Induces Mortality in the Marine Coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Elizabeth L.; Deering, Robert W.; Rowley, David C.; El Gamal, Abrahim; Schorn, Michelle; Moore, Bradley S.; Johnson, Matthew D.; Mincer, Tracy J.; Whalen, Kristen E.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between phytoplankton and bacteria play a central role in mediating biogeochemical cycling and food web structure in the ocean. However, deciphering the chemical drivers of these interspecies interactions remains challenging. Here, we report the isolation of 2-heptyl-4-quinolone (HHQ), released by Pseudoalteromonas piscicida, a marine gamma-proteobacteria previously reported to induce phytoplankton mortality through a hitherto unknown algicidal mechanism. HHQ functions as both an antibiotic and a bacterial signaling molecule in cell–cell communication in clinical infection models. Co-culture of the bloom-forming coccolithophore, Emiliania huxleyi with both live P. piscicida and cell-free filtrates caused a significant decrease in algal growth. Investigations of the P. piscicida exometabolome revealed HHQ, at nanomolar concentrations, induced mortality in three strains of E. huxleyi. Mortality of E. huxleyi in response to HHQ occurred slowly, implying static growth rather than a singular loss event (e.g., rapid cell lysis). In contrast, the marine chlorophyte, Dunaliella tertiolecta and diatom, Phaeodactylum tricornutum were unaffected by HHQ exposures. These results suggest that HHQ mediates the type of inter-domain interactions that cause shifts in phytoplankton population dynamics. These chemically mediated interactions, and other like it, ultimately influence large-scale oceanographic processes. PMID:26870019

  7. Ralstonia solanacearum lipopeptide induces chlamydospore development in fungi and facilitates bacterial entry into fungal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Spraker, Joseph E; Sanchez, Laura M; Lowe, Tiffany M; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Keller, Nancy P

    2016-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a globally distributed soil-borne plant pathogenic bacterium, which shares a broad ecological range with many plant- and soil-associated fungi. We sought to determine if R. solanacearum chemical communication directs symbiotic development of polymicrobial consortia. R. solanacearum produced a diffusible metabolite that induced conserved morphological differentiation in 34 species of fungi across three diverse taxa (Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes and Zygomycetes). Fungi exposed to this metabolite formed chlamydospores, survival structures with thickened cell walls. Some chlamydospores internally harbored R. solanacearum, indicating a newly described endofungal lifestyle for this important plant pathogen. Using imaging mass spectrometry and peptidogenomics, we identified an undescribed lipopeptide, ralsolamycin, produced by an R. solanacearum non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase hybrid. Inactivation of the hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase gene, rmyA, abolished ralsolamycin synthesis. R. solanacearum mutants lacking ralsolamycin no longer induced chlamydospore development in fungal coculture and invaded fungal hyphae less well than wild-type. We propose that ralsolamycin contributes to the invasion of fungal hyphae and that the formation of chlamydospores may provide not only a specific niche for bacterial colonization but also enhanced survival for the partnering fungus. PMID:26943626

  8. A new cytogenetic mechanism for bacterial endosymbiont-induced parthenogenesis in Hymenoptera.

    PubMed

    Adachi-Hagimori, Tetsuya; Miura, Kazuki; Stouthamer, Richard

    2008-12-07

    Vertically transmitted endosymbiotic bacteria, such as Wolbachia, Cardinium and Rickettsia, modify host reproduction in several ways to facilitate their own spread. One such modification results in parthenogenesis induction, where males, which are unable to transmit the bacteria, are not produced. In Hymenoptera, the mechanism of diploidization due to Wolbachia infection, known as gamete duplication, is a post-meiotic modification. During gamete duplication, the meiotic mechanism is normal, but in the first mitosis the anaphase is aborted. The two haploid sets of chromosomes do not separate and thus result in a single nucleus containing two identical sets of haploid chromosomes. Here, we outline an alternative cytogenetic mechanism for bacterial endosymbiont-induced parthenogenesis in Hymenoptera. During female gamete formation in Rickettsia-infected Neochrysocharis formosa (Westwood) parasitoids, meiotic cells undergo only a single equational division followed by the expulsion of a single polar body. This absence of meiotic recombination and reduction corresponds well with a non-segregation pattern in the offspring of heterozygous females. We conclude that diploidy in N. formosa is maintained through a functionally apomictic cloning mechanism that differs entirely from the mechanism induced by Wolbachia.

  9. Midgut immune responses induced by bacterial infection in the silkworm, Bombyx mori *

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Lei; WANG, Yan-wen; LU, Zhi-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Insect gut epithelial cells produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) to protect hosts from pathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we evaluate the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Bacillus bombysepticus in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Survival curves show that B. bombysepticus is deadly when larval silkworms are infected orally. Bacterial infection caused intestinal hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) levels to increase significantly by 8 and 16 h post-infection (hpi), respectively. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis shows that the transcription levels of dual oxidase (Duox) and catalase (CAT) are highly up-regulated by P. aeruginosa infection at 8 hpi. P. aeruginosa infection induced nitric oxide synthase 2 (NOS2) expression at 16 hpi, which contributes to the generation of NO. mRNA levels of AMP genes, specifically Glovorin 2 and Glovorin 3, which obviously increase during the early infection stage. These results indicate that invading bacteria elevate intestinal ROS and NO levels and induce AMP gene transcription, which contributes to intestinal immune defense. PMID:26465135

  10. Ralstonia solanacearum lipopeptide induces chlamydospore development in fungi and facilitates bacterial entry into fungal tissues.

    PubMed

    Spraker, Joseph E; Sanchez, Laura M; Lowe, Tiffany M; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Keller, Nancy P

    2016-09-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a globally distributed soil-borne plant pathogenic bacterium, which shares a broad ecological range with many plant- and soil-associated fungi. We sought to determine if R. solanacearum chemical communication directs symbiotic development of polymicrobial consortia. R. solanacearum produced a diffusible metabolite that induced conserved morphological differentiation in 34 species of fungi across three diverse taxa (Ascomycetes, Basidiomycetes and Zygomycetes). Fungi exposed to this metabolite formed chlamydospores, survival structures with thickened cell walls. Some chlamydospores internally harbored R. solanacearum, indicating a newly described endofungal lifestyle for this important plant pathogen. Using imaging mass spectrometry and peptidogenomics, we identified an undescribed lipopeptide, ralsolamycin, produced by an R. solanacearum non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase hybrid. Inactivation of the hybrid non-ribosomal peptide synthetase-polyketide synthase gene, rmyA, abolished ralsolamycin synthesis. R. solanacearum mutants lacking ralsolamycin no longer induced chlamydospore development in fungal coculture and invaded fungal hyphae less well than wild-type. We propose that ralsolamycin contributes to the invasion of fungal hyphae and that the formation of chlamydospores may provide not only a specific niche for bacterial colonization but also enhanced survival for the partnering fungus.

  11. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation (MICP) - A Technology for Managing Flow and Transport in Porous and Fractured Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, A. J.; Hiebert, R.; Kirksey, J.; Lauchnor, E. G.; Rothman, A.; Spangler, L.; Esposito, R.; Gerlach, R.; Cunningham, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Certain microorganisms e.g., Sporosarcina pasteurii contribute enzymes that catalyze reactions which in the presence of calcium, can create saturation conditions favorable for calcium carbonate precipitation (microbially-induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP)). MICP can be used for a number of engineering applications including securing geologic storage of CO2 or other fluids by sealing fractures, improving wellbore integrity, and stabilizing fractured and unstable porous media. MICP treatment has the advantage of the use of small microorganisms, ~2μm, suggesting applicability to treatment of small aperture fractures not accessible to traditional treatments, for example the use of fine cement. The promotion of MICP in the subsurface is a complex reactive transport problem coupling microbial, abiotic (geochemical), geomechanical and hydrodynamic processes. In the laboratory, MICP has been demonstrated to cement together heavily fractured shale and reduce the permeability of fractures in shale and sandstone cores up to five orders of magnitude under both ambient and subsurface relevant pressure conditions (Figure 1). Most recently, a MICP fracture treatment field study was performed at a well at the Southern Company Gorgas Steam Generation Plant (Alabama) (Figure 1). The Fayetteville Sandstone at approximately 1120' below ground surface was hydraulically fractured prior to MICP treatment. After 4 days of injection of 24 calcium pulses and 6 microbial inoculations, injectivity of brine into the formation was significantly reduced. The experiment also resulted in a reduction in pressure decay which is a measure of improved wellbore integrity. These promising results suggest the potential for MICP treatment to seal fractured pathways at the field scale to improve the long-term security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide or prevent leakage of shale gas or hydraulic fracturing fluids into functional overlying aquifers, reducing environmental impacts.

  12. Pathogen-induced conditioning of the primary xylem vessels - a prerequisite for the formation of bacterial emboli by Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Gorshkov, V Y; Daminova, A G; Mikshina, P V; Petrova, O E; Ageeva, M V; Salnikov, V V; Gorshkova, T A; Gogolev, Y V

    2016-07-01

    Representatives of Pectobacterium genus are some of the most harmful phytopathogens in the world. In the present study, we have elucidated novel aspects of plant-Pectobacterium atrosepticum interactions. This bacterium was recently demonstrated to form specific 'multicellular' structures - bacterial emboli in the xylem vessels of infected plants. In our work, we showed that the process of formation of these structures includes the pathogen-induced reactions of the plant. The colonisation of the plant by P. atrosepticum is coupled with the release of a pectic polysaccharide, rhamnogalacturonan I, into the vessel lumen from the plant cell wall. This polysaccharide gives rise to a gel that serves as a matrix for bacterial emboli. P. atrosepticum-caused infection involves an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in the vessels, creating the conditions for the scission of polysaccharides and modification of plant cell wall composition. Both the release of rhamnogalacturonan I and the increase in ROS precede colonisation of the vessels by bacteria and occur only in the primary xylem vessels, the same as the subsequent formation of bacterial emboli. Since the appearance of rhamnogalacturonan I and increase in ROS levels do not hamper the bacterial cells and form a basis for the assembly of bacterial emboli, these reactions may be regarded as part of the susceptible response of the plant. Bacterial emboli thus represent the products of host-pathogen integration, since the formation of these structures requires the action of both partners.

  13. Recent Advances in Ligand and Structure Based Screening of Potent Quorum Sensing Inhibitors Against Antibiotic Resistance Induced Bacterial Virulence.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Sisir

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing threat in the treatment of bacterial diseases. Bacterial invasion and its virulence can cause damage to the host cells via quorum sensing mechanism which is responsible for the intercellular communication among bacteria that regulates expression of many genes. Quorum sensing (QS) differentially expresses specific sets of genes which may produce resistance. Researchers have been devoted to develop more potent compounds against bacterial resistant quorum sensing inhibitors. A number of anti-quorum sensing approaches have been documented to screen potent inhibitors against quorum sensing induced bacterial virulence. Experimental screening of a large chemical compound library against a quorum sensing biological target is an established technology for lead identification but it is expensive, laborious and time consuming. Therefore, computer-aided high throughput ligand and structure based virtual screening are most effective pharmacoinformatic tools prior to experiment in this context. Ligand based screening includes quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) and pharmacophore generation whereas techniques of structure based virtual screening include molecular docking. The study in this direction can increase the findings of hit rates and decrease cost of drug design and development by producing potent natural as well as synthetic anti-quorum sensing compounds. Most recent patent coverage on ligand and structure based design of novel bioactive quorum sensing inhibitors has been presented here. The paper has also critically reviewed the screening and design of potent quorum sensing inhibitor leads that would help in patenting novel leads active against bacterial virulence and minimizing antibiotic resistance among bacterial pathogens.

  14. No long-term persistence of bacterial pollution-induced community tolerance in tylosin-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Demoling, Louise Aldén; Bååth, Erland

    2008-09-15

    Pollution-induced community tolerance (PICT) of soil bacteria to the antibiotic tylosin was studied over 95 days. Tylosin was added at increasing concentrations, together with different amounts of alfalfa to study the effects of substrate addition on PICT and bacterial growth in soil. The leucine incorporation technique was used to estimate bacterial growth and as a detection method in the PICT concept. Direct inhibition of the bacterial growth rates, resulting in a dose-response curve, was found above 50 mg of tylosin kg(-1) of soil two days after tylosin addition (IC50 value of 960 mg tylosin kg(-1)). After 10 days of exposure to at least 50 mg of tylosin kg(-1), the PICT was observed and correlated to inhibition of bacterial growth by tylosin. A return of the PICT to control levels was found over time, and after 95 days at 1500 mg of tylosin kg(-1), essentially no PICT was found, as compared to the unpolluted control soil. The return of PICT to pre-exposure levels was not totally reflected in the recovery of bacterial growth. Alfalfa addition did not affect the inhibitory effect of tylosin on bacterial growth rates; neither did it alter the PICT. Since tylosin is relatively rapidly degraded in soil, our results indicate that the PICT will return to prepollution levels when the selective pressure of the toxicant is removed and will thus be a useful technique for monitoring remediation measures.

  15. A dietary nucleoside-nucleotide mixture inhibits endotoxin-induced bacterial translocation in mice fed protein-free diet.

    PubMed

    Adjei, A A; Yamamoto, S

    1995-01-01

    Nucleosides and nucleotides are important substrates utilized by the intestinal mucosa. To determine the relative effect of dietary nucleosides and nucleotides on the gut, we investigated the effects of these compounds on endotoxin-induced bacterial translocation, cecal bacterial populations and ileal histology in protein-malnourished mice. There was an inhibition of gram-negative enteric bacteria in the mesenteric lymph node and spleen of the surviving mice fed the protein-free diet supplemented with a nucleoside-nucleotide mixture compared with the nonsupplemented group. Histologically, the damage to the gut mucosal barrier was more pronounced in the nonsupplemented group than in the nucleoside-nucleotide supplemented group. However, the cecal bacterial populations in the groups were not different. The villous height, crypt depth and total wall thickness were more developed in the supplemented group compared with the nonsupplemented group, indicating that the nucleoside-nucleotide mixture blocked bacterial translocation by preventing endotoxin-induced mucosal or epithelial damage. These results suggest that the nucleoside-nucleotide mixture could be used to inhibit or reduce the incidence of bacterial translocation, decrease intestinal injury and improve survival in a lethal model of protein deficiency and endotoxemia.

  16. Host-induced bacterial cell wall decomposition mediates pattern-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaokun; Grabherr, Heini M; Willmann, Roland; Kolb, Dagmar; Brunner, Frédéric; Bertsche, Ute; Kühner, Daniel; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Amin, Bushra; Felix, Georg; Ongena, Marc; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gust, Andrea A

    2014-06-23

    Peptidoglycans (PGNs) are immunogenic bacterial surface patterns that trigger immune activation in metazoans and plants. It is generally unknown how complex bacterial structures such as PGNs are perceived by plant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and whether host hydrolytic activities facilitate decomposition of bacterial matrices and generation of soluble PRR ligands. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana, upon bacterial infection or exposure to microbial patterns, produces a metazoan lysozyme-like hydrolase (lysozyme 1, LYS1). LYS1 activity releases soluble PGN fragments from insoluble bacterial cell walls and cleavage products are able to trigger responses typically associated with plant immunity. Importantly, LYS1 mutant genotypes exhibit super-susceptibility to bacterial infections similar to that observed on PGN receptor mutants. We propose that plants employ hydrolytic activities for the decomposition of complex bacterial structures, and that soluble pattern generation might aid PRR-mediated immune activation in cell layers adjacent to infection sites.

  17. Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis Is Associated with Inflammation and Bacterial Translocation in Mice with CCl4-Induced Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Hurtado, Isabel; Santacruz, Arlette; Peiró, Gloria; Zapater, Pedro; Gutiérrez, Ana; Pérez-Mateo, Miguel; Sanz, Yolanda; Francés, Rubén

    2011-01-01

    Background Gut is the major source of endogenous bacteria causing infections in advanced cirrhosis. Intestinal barrier dysfunction has been described in cirrhosis and account for an increased bacterial translocation rate. Hypothesis and Aims We hypothesize that microbiota composition may be affected and change along with the induction of experimental cirrhosis, affecting the inflammatory response. Animals and Methods Progressive liver damage was induced in Balb/c mice by weight-controlled oral administration of carbon tetrachloride. Laparotomies were performed at weeks 6, 10, 13 and 16 in a subgroup of treated mice (n = 6/week) and control animals (n = 4/week). Liver tissue specimens, mesenteric lymph nodes, intestinal content and blood were collected at laparotomies. Fibrosis grade, pro-fibrogenic genes expression, gut bacterial composition, bacterial translocation, host's specific butyrate-receptor GPR-43 and serum cytokine levels were measured. Results Expression of pro-fibrogenic markers was significantly increased compared with control animals and correlated with the accumulated dose of carbon tetrachloride. Bacterial translocation episodes were less frequent in control mice than in treated animals. Gram-positive anaerobic Clostridia spp count was decreased in treated mice compared with control animals and with other gut common bacterial species, altering the aerobic/anaerobic ratio. This fact was associated with a decreased gene expression of GPR43 in neutrophils of treated mice and inversely correlated with TNF-alpha and IL-6 up-regulation in serum of treated mice along the study protocol. This pro-inflammatory scenario favoured blood bacterial translocation in treated animals, showing the highest bacterial translocation rate and aerobic/anaerobic ratio at the same weeks. Conclusions Gut microbiota alterations are associated with the development of an inflammatory environment, fibrosis progression and bacterial translocation in carbon tetrachloride

  18. Streptococcus oralis Induces Lysosomal Impairment of Macrophages via Bacterial Hydrogen Peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Okahashi, Nobuo; Kuwata, Hirotaka; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus oralis, an oral commensal, belongs to the mitis group of streptococci and occasionally causes opportunistic infections, such as bacterial endocarditis and bacteremia. Recently, we found that the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by S. oralis is sufficient to kill human monocytes and epithelial cells, implying that streptococcal H2O2 is a cytotoxin. In the present study, we investigated whether streptococcal H2O2 impacts lysosomes, organelles of the intracellular digestive system, in relation to cell death. S. oralis infection induced the death of RAW 264 macrophages in an H2O2-dependent manner, which was exemplified by the fact that exogenous H2O2 also induced cell death. Infection with either a mutant lacking spxB, which encodes pyruvate oxidase responsible for H2O2 production, or Streptococcus mutans, which does not produce H2O2, showed less cytotoxicity. Visualization of lysosomes with LysoTracker revealed lysosome deacidification after infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2, which was corroborated by acridine orange staining. Similarly, fluorescent labeling of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 gradually disappeared during infection with S. oralis or exposure to H2O2. The deacidification and the following induction of cell death were inhibited by chelating iron in lysosomes. Moreover, fluorescent staining of cathepsin B indicated lysosomal destruction. However, treatment of infected cells with a specific inhibitor of cathepsin B had negligible effects on cell death; instead, it suppressed the detachment of dead cells from the culture plates. These results suggest that streptococcal H2O2 induces cell death with lysosomal destruction and then the released lysosomal cathepsins contribute to the detachment of the dead cells. PMID:27113357

  19. Periodontal bacterial colonization in synovial tissues exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis in B10.RIII mice.

    PubMed

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes; Gehlot, Prashasnika; Velsko, Irina; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Calise, S John; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward K L; Holoshitz, Joseph; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2016-07-12

    It has been previously hypothesized that oral microbes may be an etiological link between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease. However, the mechanistic basis of this association is incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of periodontal bacteria in induction of joint inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in B10.RIII mice. CIA-prone B10.RIII mice were infected orally with a polybacterial mixture of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia for 24 weeks before induction of CIA. The ability of polybacterial mixture to colonize the periodontium and induce systemic response, horizontal alveolar bone resorption in infected B10.RIII mice was investigated. Arthritis incidence, severity of joint inflammation, pannus formation, skeletal damage, hematogenous dissemination of the infection, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) levels, and interleukin-17 expression levels were evaluated. B10.RIII mice had gingival colonization with all three bacteria, higher levels of anti-bacterial immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies, significant alveolar bone resorption, and hematogenous dissemination of P. gingivalis to synovial joints. Infected B10.RIII mice had more severe arthritis, and higher serum matrix metalloproteinase 3 levels and activity. Histopathological analysis showed increased inflammatory cell infiltration, destruction of articular cartilage, erosions, and pannus formation. Additionally, involved joints showed had expression levels of interleukin-17. These findings demonstrate that physical presence of periodontal bacteria in synovial joints of B10.RIII mice with collagen-induced arthritis is associated with arthritis exacerbation, and support the hypothesis that oral bacteria, specifically P. gingivalis, play a significant role in augmenting autoimmune arthritis due to their intravascular dissemination to the joints.

  20. Soil bacterial community structure remains stable over a 5-year chronosequence of insect-induced tree mortality.

    PubMed

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Knelman, Joseph E; Jones, Jennifer M; Beals, Stower C; Bowman, William D; Nemergut, Diana R

    2014-01-01

    Extensive tree mortality from insect epidemics has raised concern over possible effects on soil biogeochemical processes. Yet despite the importance of microbes in nutrient cycling, how soil bacterial communities respond to insect-induced tree mortality is largely unknown. We examined soil bacterial community structure (via 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing) and community assembly processes (via null deviation analysis) along a 5-year chronosequence (substituting space for time) of bark beetle-induced tree mortality in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA. We also measured microbial biomass and soil chemistry, and used in situ experiments to assess inorganic nitrogen mineralization rates. We found that bacterial community structure and assembly-which was strongly influenced by stochastic processes-were largely unaffected by tree mortality despite increased soil ammonium ([Formula: see text]) pools and reductions in soil nitrate ([Formula: see text]) pools and net nitrogen mineralization rates after tree mortality. Linear models suggested that microbial biomass and bacterial phylogenetic diversity are significantly correlated with nitrogen mineralization rates of this forested ecosystem. However, given the overall resistance of the bacterial community to disturbance from tree mortality, soil nitrogen processes likely remained relatively stable following tree mortality when considered at larger spatial and longer temporal scales-a supposition supported by the majority of available studies regarding biogeochemical effects of bark beetle infestations in this region. Our results suggest that soil bacterial community resistance to disturbance helps to explain the relatively weak effects of insect-induced tree mortality on soil N and C pools reported across the Rocky Mountains, USA.

  1. Soil bacterial community structure remains stable over a 5-year chronosequence of insect-induced tree mortality

    PubMed Central

    Ferrenberg, Scott; Knelman, Joseph E.; Jones, Jennifer M.; Beals, Stower C.; Bowman, William D.; Nemergut, Diana R.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive tree mortality from insect epidemics has raised concern over possible effects on soil biogeochemical processes. Yet despite the importance of microbes in nutrient cycling, how soil bacterial communities respond to insect-induced tree mortality is largely unknown. We examined soil bacterial community structure (via 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing) and community assembly processes (via null deviation analysis) along a 5-year chronosequence (substituting space for time) of bark beetle-induced tree mortality in the southern Rocky Mountains, USA. We also measured microbial biomass and soil chemistry, and used in situ experiments to assess inorganic nitrogen mineralization rates. We found that bacterial community structure and assembly—which was strongly influenced by stochastic processes—were largely unaffected by tree mortality despite increased soil ammonium (NH4+) pools and reductions in soil nitrate (NO3−) pools and net nitrogen mineralization rates after tree mortality. Linear models suggested that microbial biomass and bacterial phylogenetic diversity are significantly correlated with nitrogen mineralization rates of this forested ecosystem. However, given the overall resistance of the bacterial community to disturbance from tree mortality, soil nitrogen processes likely remained relatively stable following tree mortality when considered at larger spatial and longer temporal scales—a supposition supported by the majority of available studies regarding biogeochemical effects of bark beetle infestations in this region. Our results suggest that soil bacterial community resistance to disturbance helps to explain the relatively weak effects of insect-induced tree mortality on soil N and C pools reported across the Rocky Mountains, USA. PMID:25566204

  2. Electrostatic Precipitator

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-09

    New Electrostatic Precipitator in a flow-through system. The precipitator system is being developed to remove dust from the atmospheric intakes of the MARS ISRU chambers. It uses electrostatic forces for the dust removal.

  3. Precipitation thresholds and drought-induced tree die-off: Insights from patterns of Pinus edulis mortality along an environmental stress gradient

    Treesearch

    Michael J. Clifford; Patrick D. Royer; Neil S. Cobb; David D. Breshears; Paulette L. Ford

    2013-01-01

    Recent regional tree die-off events appear to have been triggered by a combination of drought and heat - referred to as 'global-change-type drought'. To complement experiments focused on resolving mechanisms of drought-induced tree mortality, an evaluation of how patterns of tree die-off relate to highly spatially variable precipitation is needed....

  4. Bioremediation of Cd by strain GZ-22 isolated from mine soil based on biosorption and microbially induced carbonate precipitation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Yao, Jun; Yuan, Zhimin; Wang, Tianqi; Zhang, Yiyue; Wang, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Microbially induced carbonate precipitation (MICP) is an emerging and promising bioremediation technology to restore the environment polluted by heavy metals. Carbonate-biomineralization microbe can immobilize heavy metals from mobile species into stable crystals. In the present manuscript, laboratory batch studies were conducted to evaluate the Cd removal ability based on biosorption and MICP, using carbonate-biomineralization microbe GZ-22 isolated from a mine soil. This strain was identified as a Bacillus sp. according to 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. Results of batch experiments revealed that MICP of the strain GZ-22 showed a greater potential to remove Cd than biomass biosorption under different impact factors such as pH, initial Cd concentration, and contact time. The optimum pH for MICP was 6 (50.34 %), while for biomass biosorption, it was 5 (38.81 %). When the initial concentration of Cd was 10 mg/L, removal efficiency induced by MICP was 53.06 % after 3 h, which was about 11 % greater than the removal efficiency induced by adsorption. The Cd removal efficiency increased as reaction time. The maximum removal efficiency based on MICP can reach 60.72 % at 10 mg/L for 48 h compared with 56.27 % by biosorption. X-ray diffractomer (XRD) revealed that Cd was transformed into CdCO3 by MICP of GZ-22. The present illustrated that the carbonate-biomineralization microbe GZ-22 can offer an effective and eco-friendly approach to immobilize soluble Cd and that MICP may play an important role in heavy metal bioremediation.

  5. Newly identified precipitating factors in mechanical ventilation-induced brain damage: implications for treating ICU delirium.

    PubMed

    González-López, Adrián; Albaiceta, Guillermo M; Talbot, Konrad

    2014-06-01

    Delirium is 1.5 to 4.1 times as likely in intensive care unit patients when they are mechanically ventilated. While progress in treatment has occurred, delirium is still a major problem in mechanically ventilated patients. Based on studies of a murine mechanical ventilation model, we summarize evidence here for a novel mechanism by which such ventilation can quickly initiate brain damage likely to cause cognitive deficits expressed as delirium. That mechanism consists of aberrant vagal sensory input driving sustained dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) signaling in the hippocampal formation, which induces apoptosis in that brain area within 90 min without causing hypoxia, oxidative stress, or inflammatory responses. This argues for minimizing the duration and tidal volumes of mechanical ventilation and for more effectively reducing sustained D2R signaling than achieved with haloperidol alone. The latter might be accomplished by reducing D2R cell surface expression and D2R-mediated Akt inhibition by elevating protein expression of dysbindin-1C.

  6. The impact of polymeric excipients on the particle size of poorly soluble drugs after pH-induced precipitation.

    PubMed

    Punčochová, Kateřina; Prajzlerová, Marie; Beránek, Josef; Štěpánek, František

    2016-12-01

    Active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) with strongly pH-dependent aqueous solubility can face the problem of precipitating from solution when the pH changes from acidic in the stomach to neutral in the intestine. The present work investigates the effect of two polymeric excipients - polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and Soluplus - on the ability to either prevent precipitation, or to control the size distribution of precipitated particles when precipitation cannot be prevented. Two different APIs were compared, Dabigatran etexilate mesylate and Rilpivirine hydrochloride. The effect of excipient concentration on the precipitation behaviour during pH titration was systematically investigated and qualitatively different trends were observed: in case of Soluplus, which forms a micellar solution when critical micelle concentration is exceeded, precipitation was inhibited in the case of Dabigatran etexilate, which partitioned into the micelles. On the other hand, Rilpivirine precipitated independently of Soluplus concentration. In the case of PVP, which does not form micelles, precipitation could not be avoided. Increased polymer concentration, however prevented the aggregation of precipitated particles into larger cluster. The observed effect of PVP was especially pronounced for Rilpivirine. The main conclusion of this study is that a suitably chosen polymeric excipient can either prevent precipitation altogether or reduce the size of the resulting particles. The mechanism of action, however, seems-specific to a given molecule. It was also shown that the polymer-stabilised particles have a potential to redissolve.

  7. Effect of the thermionic emission on the recombination and electron beam induced current contrast at the interface of a metallic precipitate embedded in a semiconductor matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Tarento, R.-J.; Debez, M.; Mekki, D. E.; Djemel, A.

    2013-12-15

    The barrier height and the recombination velocity at the interface between a metallic precipitate and a semiconductor matrix are investigated with a new self consistent procedure based both on the analysis of the recombination and emission balance rates for electrons and holes and on the determination of the size-dependent electronic structure of the embedded precipitate. In the present work, the precipitate is modeled within the spherical well potential framework. The main result is the dependence of the recombination features on the electronic structure of the metal precipitate unlike the models based only on the Shockley-Read-Hall theory. The behaviors of the surface charge density on the metallic precipitate and the barrier height versus the precipitate size are similar to our previous studies. Unlike previous works, the recombination velocity reaches a constant non-zero value for sizes smaller than a critical size which is dependent on the defect concentration at the interface. The new dependencies of the recombination parameters are illustrated by the calculation of the electron beam induced current (EBIC) contrast at the interface.

  8. Modeling of light-induced degradation due to Cu precipitation in p-type silicon. II. Comparison of simulations and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahlman, H.; Haarahiltunen, A.; Kwapil, W.; Schön, J.; Inglese, A.; Savin, H.

    2017-05-01

    The presence of copper impurities is known to deteriorate the bulk minority carrier lifetime of silicon. In p-type silicon, the degradation occurs only under carrier injection (e.g., illumination), but the reason for this phenomenon called copper-related light-induced degradation (Cu-LID) has long remained uncertain. To clarify the physics of this problem, a mathematical model of Cu-LID was introduced in Paper I of this article. Within the model, kinetic precipitation simulations are interlinked with a Schottky junction model for electric behavior of metallic precipitates. As this approach enables simulating precipitation directly at the minority carrier lifetime level, the model is verified in this second part with a direct comparison to the corresponding degradation experiments and literature data. Convincing agreement is found with different doping and Cu concentrations as well as at increased temperature, and in the dark, both simulated degradation and measured degradation are very slow. In addition, modeled final lifetimes after illumination are very close to experimental final lifetimes, and a correlation with the final precipitate size is found. However, the model underestimates experimentally observed differences in the degradation rate at different illumination intensities. Nevertheless, the results of this work support the theory of Cu-LID as a precipitate formation process. Part of the results also imply that heterogeneous nucleation sites play a role during precipitate nucleation. The model reveals fundamental aspects of the physics of Cu-LID including how doping and heterogeneous nucleation site concentrations can considerably influence the final recombination activity.

  9. Assessing the impact of polymers on the pH-induced precipitation behavior of poorly water soluble compounds using synchrotron wide angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yi-Ling; Box, Karl; Taylor, Lynne S

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pH-induced precipitation behavior of four ionizable compounds (papaverine, dipyridamole, glyburide, and warfarin) in the absence and presence of polymers. Polymers selected included nonionic, anionic, and cationic polymers. Precipitates were analyzed immediately after formation using high-energy radiation wide-angle X-ray scattering analysis and polarized light microscopy. Papaverine immediately crystallized to the original solid-state form upon creation of a highly supersaturated solution and polymers were unable to prevent crystallization. Dipyridamole also crystallized rapidly, forming a metastable polymorph that was stabilized by several of the cellulosic polymers. For glyburide and warfarin, although the compounds readily crystallized in the absence of the polymers, several of the polymers were able to prevent crystallization for more than 6 h. In general, measurements of solution concentration immediately following precipitation corroborated the solid-state analysis results, with the solution phase for the noncrystalline precipitates having a concentration considerably higher than that of the equilibrium solubility value, whereas for the crystalline precipitates, values were closer to the equilibrium solubility. Thus, precipitation to a noncrystalline solid was found to be promoted by the presence of some polymers, resulting in the formation of a supersaturated solution.

  10. Effect of the thermionic emission on the recombination and electron beam induced current contrast at the interface of a metallic precipitate embedded in a semiconductor matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Tarento, R.-J.; Debez, M.; Mekki, D. E.; Djemel, A.

    2013-12-15

    The barrier height and the recombination velocity at the interface between a metallic precipitate and a semiconductor matrix are investigated with a new self consistent procedure based both on the analysis of the recombination and emission balance rates for electrons and holes and on the determination of the size-dependent electronic structure of the embedded precipitate. In the present work, the precipitate is modeled within the spherical well potential framework. The main result is the dependence of the recombination features on the electronic structure of the metal precipitate unlike the models based only on the Shockley-Read-Hall theory. The behaviors of the surface charge density on the metallic precipitate and the barrier height versus the precipitate size are similar to our previous studies. Unlike previous works, the recombination velocity reaches a constant non-zero value for sizes smaller than a critical size which is dependent on the defect concentration at the interface. The new dependencies of the recombination parameters are illustrated by the calculation of the electron beam induced current (EBIC) contrast at the interface.

  11. Energy Deposition and Escape Fluxes Induced by Energetic Solar Wind Ions and ENAs Precipitating into Mars Atmosphere: Accurate Consideration of Energy Transfer Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharchenko, V. A.; Lewkow, N.; Gacesa, M.

    2014-12-01

    Formation and evolution of neutral fluxes of atoms and molecules escaping from the Mars atmosphere have been investigated for the sputtering and photo-chemical mechanisms. Energy and momentum transfer in collisions between the atmospheric gas and fast atoms and molecules have been considered using our recently obtained angular and energy dependent cross sections[1]. We have showed that accurate angular dependent collision cross sections are critical for the description of the energy relaxation of precipitating keV energetic ions/ENAs and for computations of altitude profiles of the fast atom and molecule production rates in recoil collisions. Upward and escape fluxes of the secondary energetic He and O atoms and H2, N2, CO and CO2 molecules, induced by precipitating ENAs, have been determined and their non-thermal energy distribution functions have been computed at different altitudes for different solar conditions. Precipitation and energy deposition of the energetic H2O molecules and products of their dissociations into the Mars atmosphere in the Comet C/2013 A1 (Siding Spring) - Mars interaction have been modeled using accurate cross sections. Reflection of precipitating ENAs by the Mars atmosphere has been analyzed in detail. [1] N. Lewkow and V. Kharchenko, "Precipitation of Energetic Neutral Atoms and Escape Fluxes induced from the Mars Atmosphere, ApJ, v.790, p.98 (2014).

  12. Atmospheric Rivers Induced Heavy Precipitation and Flooding in the Western U.S. Simulated by the WRF Regional Climate Model

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Lai R.; Qian, Yun

    2009-02-12

    Twenty years of regional climate simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting model for North America has been analyzed to study the influence of the atmospheric rivers and the role of the land surface on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S. Compared to observations, the simulation realistically captured the 95th percentile extreme precipitation, mean precipitation intensity, as well as the mean precipitation and temperature anomalies of all the atmospheric river events between 1980-1999. Contrasting the 1986 President Day and 1997 New Year Day atmospheric river events, differences in atmospheric stability are found to have an influence on the spatial distribution of precipitation in the Coastal Range of northern California. Although both cases yield similar amounts of heavy precipitation, the 1997 case was found to produce more runoff compared to the 1986 case. Antecedent soil moisture, the ratio of snowfall to total precipitation (which depends on temperature), and existing snowpack all seem to play a role, leading to a higher runoff to precipitation ratio simulated for the 1997 case. This study underscores the importance of characterizing or simulating atmospheric rivers and the land surface conditions for predicting floods, and for assessing the potential impacts of climate change on heavy precipitation and flooding in the western U.S.

  13. Differential effects of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial products on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ninkovic, Jana; Jana, Ninkovic; Anand, Vidhu; Vidhu, Anand; Dutta, Raini; Raini, Dutta; Zhang, Li; Saluja, Anuj; Meng, Jingjing; Koodie, Lisa; Lisa, Koodie; Banerjee, Santanu; Santanu, Banerjee; Roy, Sabita; Sabita, Roy

    2016-02-19

    Opioid drug abusers have a greater susceptibility to gram positive (Gram (+)) bacterial infections. However, the mechanism underlying opioid modulation of Gram (+) versus Gram (-) bacterial clearance has not been investigated. In this study, we show that opioid treatment resulted in reduced phagocytosis of Gram (+), when compared to Gram (-) bacteria. We further established that LPS priming of chronic morphine treated macrophages leads to potentiated phagocytosis and killing of both Gram (+) and Gram (-) bacteria in a P-38 MAP kinase dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, LTA priming lead to inhibition of both phagocytosis and bacterial killing. This study demonstrates for the first time the differential effects of TLR4 and TLR2 agonists on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis. Our results suggest that the incidence and severity of secondary infections with Gram (+) bacteria would be higher in opioid abusers.

  14. Differential effects of gram-positive and gram-negative bacterial products on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Ninkovic; Vidhu, Anand; Raini, Dutta; Zhang, Li; Saluja, Anuj; Meng, Jingjing; Lisa, Koodie; Santanu, Banerjee; Sabita, Roy

    2016-01-01

    Opioid drug abusers have a greater susceptibility to gram positive (Gram (+)) bacterial infections. However, the mechanism underlying opioid modulation of Gram (+) versus Gram (−) bacterial clearance has not been investigated. In this study, we show that opioid treatment resulted in reduced phagocytosis of Gram (+), when compared to Gram (−) bacteria. We further established that LPS priming of chronic morphine treated macrophages leads to potentiated phagocytosis and killing of both Gram (+) and Gram (−) bacteria in a P-38 MAP kinase dependent signaling pathway. In contrast, LTA priming lead to inhibition of both phagocytosis and bacterial killing. This study demonstrates for the first time the differential effects of TLR4 and TLR2 agonists on morphine induced inhibition of phagocytosis. Our results suggest that the incidence and severity of secondary infections with Gram (+) bacteria would be higher in opioid abusers. PMID:26891899

  15. Label-Free Bacterial Imaging with Deep-UV-Laser-Induced Native Fluorescence ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bhartia, Rohit; Salas, Everett C.; Hug, William F.; Reid, Ray D.; Lane, Arthur L.; Edwards, Katrina J.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a near-real-time optical imaging method that works via the detection of the intrinsic fluorescence of life forms upon excitation by deep-UV (DUV) illumination. A DUV (<250-nm) source enables the detection of microbes in their native state on natural materials, avoiding background autofluorescence and without the need for fluorescent dyes or tags. We demonstrate that DUV-laser-induced native fluorescence can detect bacteria on opaque surfaces at spatial scales ranging from tens of centimeters to micrometers and from communities to single cells. Given exposure times of 100 μs and low excitation intensities, this technique enables rapid imaging of bacterial communities and cells without irreversible sample alteration or destruction. We also demonstrate the first noninvasive detection of bacteria on in situ-incubated environmental experimental samples from the deep ocean (Lo'ihi Seamount), showing the use of DUV native fluorescence for in situ detection in the deep biosphere and other nutrient-limited environments. PMID:20817797

  16. Discrimination of bacteria on food using laser-induced bacterial autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.; Plagmann, Manfred

    2000-12-01

    This paper updates progress on work1 in detecting bacterial auto-fluorescence against various food backgrounds using Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIE). The fluorescence of bacteria and various meat products has been measured in order to find suitable excitation and detection wavelengths for discriminative imaging. The optical absorption of bacteria, meat and fish tissue was measured to provide a starting point for the fluorescence measurements. The bacteria measured was Escherichia Coli, and the food tissue products were, lamb, pork, chicken and fish. All absorption spectra have a peak around 400nm and most muscle tissue types have lower absorption around 325nm giving a good low contrast fluorescent background for the F. Coli. However, other tissue types such as fat, skin and bone skin have higher absorption levels and hence fluorescence. Three interference filters can be used to selectively sample the fluorescence spectra to generate a three point intensity ratio that can be used to discriminate between fluorescence of the various tissue types and E. Coli. The best fluorescence discrimination was achieved using the HeCd laser wavelength of 325nm. However in our current experimental setup there is not enough optical power at 325nm for direct laser imaging. We are currently working to increase UV laser excitation levels by using a dye laser to pump a frequency doubling crystal.

  17. Septic Shock Induced by Bacterial Prostatitis with Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a Posttransplantation Patient

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaofan; Chen, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a common complication after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). Morganella morganii is ubiquitous Gram-negative facultative anaerobe, which may cause many kinds of opportunistic infection. Herein we report a case of a 55-year-old man who presented with frequent urination, urgency, and mild pain that comes and goes low in the abdomen and around the anus. The patient had a medical history of chronic prostatitis for 4 years. He received HLA-matched sibling allo-HSCT because of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma 29 months ago. The routine examination of prostatic fluid showed increased leukocytes and the culture of prostatic fluid showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient developed chills and fever 18 hours after examination. Both urine culture and blood culture showed Morganella morganii subsp. morganii. The patient was successfully treated with antibiotic therapy and septic shock management. Taken together, Morganella morganii should be considered a possible pathogen when immunocompromised patients develop prostatitis. Also, prostatic massage could be a possible trigger of septic shock induced by Morganella morganii subsp. morganii in a posttransplantation patient. PMID:26798544

  18. Bacterial lipopolysaccharides, phorbol myristate acetate, and zymosan induce the myristoylation of specific macrophage proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Aderem, A A; Keum, M M; Pure, E; Cohn, Z A

    1986-01-01

    We demonstrate stimulus-dependent incorporation of exogenously added [3H]myristic acid into specific macrophage proteins. In control unstimulated cells an 18-kDa protein is the major acylated species. In cells incubated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or its monoacyl glucosamine phosphate derivative, fatty acid is incorporated into proteins with molecular mass of 68 kDa and a doublet of approximately 42-45 kDa. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or a phagocytic stimulus (zymosan) promotes the acylation of a similar array of proteins. However, PMA and zymosan also promote the myristoylation of unique proteins of 92 and 50 kDa. The fatty acid associated with each of the acylated proteins is myristic acid. The myristate is probably linked to the proteins through amide bonds, since it is not released by treatment with hydroxylamine. Palmitate and arachidonate are not incorporated into proteins in the same manner. Temporal analysis revealed that LPS-induced proteins are myristoylated by 30 min, while the 50-kDa protein myristoylated in response to PMA is labeled later. Most myristoylated proteins appear to be associated with the membrane fraction. Macrophages from C3H/HeJ mice, which do not respond to LPS, do not show any LPS-dependent protein acylation. Interestingly, zymosan and PMA induce the myristoylation of the 50-kDa protein in C3H/HeJ macrophages, but not the acylation of the 68-kDa and 42-kDa doublet species. We suggest that myristoylation of specific proteins is an intermediary in the capacity of LPS, PMA, and zymosan to alter macrophage functions such as arachidonic acid metabolism. Images PMID:3461461

  19. Tumor Necrosis Factor α-Dependent Neutrophil Priming Prevents Intestinal Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Bacterial Translocation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yen-Zhen; Huang, Ching-Ying; Huang, Yi-Cheng; Lee, Tsung-Chun; Kuo, Wei-Ting; Pai, Yu-Chen; Yu, Linda Chia-Hui

    2017-06-01

    Intestinal ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) causes barrier impairment and bacterial influx. Protection against I/R injury in sterile organs by hypoxic preconditioning (HPC) had been attributed to erythropoietic and angiogenic responses. Our previous study showed attenuation of intestinal I/R injury by HPC for 21 days in a neutrophil-dependent manner. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of neutrophil priming by HPC, and explore whether adoptive transfer of primed neutrophils is sufficient to ameliorate intestinal I/R injury. Rats raised in normoxia (NM) and HPC for 3 or 7 days were subjected to sham operation or superior mesenteric artery occlusion for I/R challenge. Neutrophils isolated from rats raised in NM or HPC for 21 days were intravenously injected into naïve controls prior to I/R. Similar to the protective effect of HPC-21d, I/R-induced mucosal damage was attenuated by HPC-7d but not by HPC-3d. Naïve rats reconstituted with neutrophils of HPC-21d rats showed increase in intestinal phagocytic infiltration and myeloperoxidase activity, and barrier protection against I/R insult. Elevated free radical production, and higher bactericidal and phagocytic activity were observed in HPC neutrophils compared to NM controls. Moreover, increased serum levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1) were seen in HPC rats. Naïve neutrophils incubated with HPC serum or recombinant TNFα, but not CINC-1, exhibited heightened respiratory burst and bactericidal activity. Lastly, neutrophil priming effect was abolished by neutralization of TNFα in HPC serum. TNFα-primed neutrophils by HPC act as effectors cells for enhancing barrier integrity under gut ischemia.

  20. Inhibition of GSK3 Abolishes Bacterial-Induced Periodontal Bone Loss in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Adamowicz, Karina; Wang, Huizhi; Jotwani, Ravi; Zeller, Iris; Potempa, Jan; Scott, David A

    2012-01-01

    The tissue destruction that characterizes periodontitis is driven by the host response to bacterial pathogens. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) in innate cells leads to suppression of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-initiated proinflammatory cytokines under nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) p65 transcriptional control and promotion of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding (CREB)-dependent gene activation. Therefore, we hypothesized that the cell permeable GSK3-specific inhibitor, SB216763, would protect against alveolar bone loss induced by the key periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), in a murine model. B6129SF2/J mice either were infected orally with P. gingivalis ATCC 33277; or treated with SB216763 and infected with P. gingivalis; sham infected; or exposed to vehicle only (dimethyl sulfoxide [DMSO]); or to GSK3 inhibitor only (SB216763). Alveolar bone loss and local (neutrophil infiltration and interleukin [IL]-17) and systemic (tumor necrosis factor [TNF], IL-6, Il-1β and IL-12/IL-23 p40) inflammatory indices also were monitored. SB216763 unequivocally abrogated mean P. gingivalis–induced bone resorption, measured at 14 predetermined points on the molars of defleshed maxillae as the distance from the cementoenamel junction to the alveolar bone crest (p < 0.05). The systemic cytokine response, the local neutrophil infiltration and the IL-17 expression were suppressed (p < 0.001). These data confirm the relevance of prior in vitro phenomena and establish GSK3 as a novel, efficacious therapeutic preventing periodontal disease progression in a susceptible host. These findings also may have relevance to other chronic inflammatory diseases and the systemic sequelae associated with periodontal infections. PMID:22847803

  1. Contribution of virus-induced lysis and protozoan grazing to benthic bacterial mortality estimated simultaneously in microcosms.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ulrike R; Wieltschnig, Claudia; Kirschner, Alexander K T; Velimirov, Branko

    2006-08-01

    In contrast to the water column, the fate of bacterial production in freshwater sediments is still a matter of debate. Thus, the importance of virus-induced lysis and protozoan grazing of bacteria was investigated for the first time simultaneously in a silty sediment layer of a mesotrophic oxbow lake. Microcosms were installed in the laboratory in order to study the dynamics of these processes over 15 days. All microbial and physicochemical parameters showed acceptable resemblance to field data observed during a concomitant in situ study, and similar conclusions can be drawn with respect to the quantitative impact of viruses and protozoa on the bacterial compartment. Viral decay rates ranged from undetectable to 0.078 h(-1) (average, 0.033 h(-1)), and the control of bacterial production from below the detection limit to 36% (average, 12%). The contribution of virus-induced lysis of bacteria to the dissolved organic matter pool as well as to benthic bacterial nutrition was low. Ingestion rates of protozoan grazers ranged from undetectable to 24.7 bacteria per heterotrophic nanoflagellate (HNF) per hour (average, 4.8 bacteria HNF(-1) h(-1)) and from undetectable to 73.3 bacteria per ciliate per hour (average, 11.2 bacteria ciliate(-1) h(-1)). Heterotrophic nanoflagellate and ciliates together cropped up to 5% (average, 1%) of bacterial production. The viral impact on bacteria prevailed over protozoan grazing by a factor of 2.5-19.9 (average, 9.5). In sum, these factors together removed up to 36% (average, 12%) of bacterial production. The high number of correlations between viral and protozoan parameters is discussed in view of a possible relationship between virus removal and the presence of protozoan grazers.

  2. Comparative proteomic analysis of casein and whey as prepared by chymosin-induced separation, isoelectric precipitation or ultracentrifugation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Hanne B; Poulsen, Nina A; Møller, Hanne S; Stensballe, Allan; Larsen, Lotte B

    2012-11-01

    Fractionation of bovine milk was performed using chymosin-induced separation, isoelectric precipitation or ultracentrifugation as separation techniques prior to gel-based proteomic analysis. This approach allowed for comparative display and identification of proteins partitioned into casein and whey, respectively. Initially, three different staining methods (silver staining, colloidal Coomassie Blue G-250 or fluorescent Flamingo Pink staining) for two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) analysis were compared for their suitability as staining agent, especially in relation to their suitability to reveal differences in the casein fractions. Fluorescent staining proved to be the most appropriate for this purpose, giving a high sensitivity, and using this staining method, characteristic 2-DGE fingerprints were obtained for each casein and whey fraction from each separation method. A number of protein spots in both casein and whey fractions varied with separation method and these spots were subsequently identified using tandem mass spectrometry (MS). In rennet casein, proteolytic fragmentation of caseins (α(s1)-, α(s2),-, β- and κ-) was identified as a result of chymosin hydrolysis, whereas the 2-DGE profile of acid and ultracentrifuged casein was dominated by the presence of multiple isoforms of κ-caseins. Furthermore, casein remnants were identified in milk serum after ultracentrifugation. This study shows that gel-based proteomic analysis is suitable for characterisation of subtle variations in protein composition of milk fractions that occur as a consequence of different milk fractionation strategies.

  3. Observation of a Saharan dust outbreaks in the frame of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Summa, Donato; Bhawar, Rohini; Di Iorio, Tatiana; Caccaini, Marco; Veselovskii, Igor; Kolgotin, Alexey

    2009-03-01

    The Raman lidar system BASIL was operational in Achern (Supersite R, Lat: 48.64° N, Long: 8.06° E, Elev.: 140 m) in the frame of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study. BASIL operated continuously over a period of approx. 36 hours from 06:22 UTC on 1 August to 18:28 UTC on 2 August 2007, to cover IOPs 13 a-b. In this timeframe the signature of a severe Saharan dust outbreak episode was captured. An inversion algorithm was used to retrieve particle size distribution parameters, i.e., mean and effective radius, number, surface area, and volume concentration, and complex refractive index, as well as the parameters of a bimodal particle size distribution, from the multi-wavelength lidar data of particle backscattering and extinction. The inversion method employs Tikhonov's inversion with regularization. Size distribution parameters are estimated as a function of altitude at different times during the dust outbreak event. Retrieval results reveal the dominance in the upper dust layer of a coarse mode with radii 3-4 μm. Number density and volume concentration are in the range 100-800 cm-3 and 5-40 μm3/cm3, respectively, while real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index are in the range 1.41-1.53 and 0.003-0.014, respectively.

  4. Characterization of particle hygroscopicity by Raman lidar: Selected case studies from the convective and orographically-induced precipitation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelitano, Dario; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Summa, Donato

    2013-05-01

    The characterization of particle hygroscopicity has primary importance for climate monitoring and prediction. Model studies have demonstrated that relative humidity (RH) has a critical influence on aerosol climate forcing. Hygroscopic properties of aerosols influence particle size distribution and refractive index and hence their radiative effects. Aerosol particles tend to grow at large relative humidity values as a result of their hygroscopicity. Raman lidars with aerosol, water vapor and temperature measurement capability are potentially attractive tools for studying aerosol hygroscopicity as in fact they can provide continuous altitude-resolved measurements of particle optical, size and microphysical properties, as well as relative humidity, without perturbing the aerosols or their environment. Specifically, the University of Basilicata Raman lidar system (BASIL) considered for the present study, has the capability to perform all-lidar measurements of relative humidity based on the application of both the rotational and the vibrational Raman lidar techniques in the UV. BASIL was operational in Achern (Black Forest, Lat: 48.64° N, Long: 8.06° E, Elev.: 140 m) between 25 May and 30 August 2007 in the framework of the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS). The present analysis is focused on selected case studies characterized by the presence of different aerosol types with different hygroscopic behavior. The observed behavior, dependent upon aerosol composition, may range from hygrophobic to strongly hygroscopic.

  5. Detecting Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation in a Model Well-Bore Using Downhole Low-Field NMR

    DOE PAGES

    Kirkland, Catherine M.; Zanetti, Sam; Grunewald, Elliot; ...

    2016-12-20

    Microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) has been widely researched recently due to its relevance for subsurface engineering applications including sealing leakage pathways and permeability modification. These applications of MICP are inherently difficult to monitor nondestructively in time and space. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can characterize the pore size distributions, porosity, and permeability of subsurface formations. This investigation used a low-field NMR well-logging probe to monitor MICP in a sand-filled bioreactor, measuring NMR signal amplitude and T2 relaxation over an 8 day experimental period. Following inoculation with the ureolytic bacteria, Sporosarcina pasteurii, and pulsed injections of urea and calcium substrate, themore » NMR measured water content in the reactor decreased to 76% of its initial value. T2 relaxation distributions bifurcated from a single mode centered about approximately 650 ms into a fast decaying population (T2 less than 10 ms) and a larger population with T2 greater than 1000 ms. The combination of changes in pore volume and surface minerology accounts for the changes in the T2 distributions. Destructive sampling confirmed final porosity was approximately 88% of the original value. Here, these results indicate the low-field NMR well-logging probe is sensitive to the physical and chemical changes caused by MICP in a laboratory bioreactor.« less

  6. Detecting Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation in a Model Well-Bore Using Downhole Low-Field NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, Catherine M.; Zanetti, Sam; Grunewald, Elliot; Walsh, David O.; Codd, Sarah L.; Phillips, Adrienne J.

    2016-12-20

    Microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) has been widely researched recently due to its relevance for subsurface engineering applications including sealing leakage pathways and permeability modification. These applications of MICP are inherently difficult to monitor nondestructively in time and space. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can characterize the pore size distributions, porosity, and permeability of subsurface formations. This investigation used a low-field NMR well-logging probe to monitor MICP in a sand-filled bioreactor, measuring NMR signal amplitude and T2 relaxation over an 8 day experimental period. Following inoculation with the ureolytic bacteria, Sporosarcina pasteurii, and pulsed injections of urea and calcium substrate, the NMR measured water content in the reactor decreased to 76% of its initial value. T2 relaxation distributions bifurcated from a single mode centered about approximately 650 ms into a fast decaying population (T2 less than 10 ms) and a larger population with T2 greater than 1000 ms. The combination of changes in pore volume and surface minerology accounts for the changes in the T2 distributions. Destructive sampling confirmed final porosity was approximately 88% of the original value. Here, these results indicate the low-field NMR well-logging probe is sensitive to the physical and chemical changes caused by MICP in a laboratory bioreactor.

  7. Strontium Incorporation Into Calcite Generated by Bacterial Ureolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Y.; Ingram, J. A.; Cortez, M. M.; Redden, G. D.; Smith, R. W.

    2002-12-01

    Strontium incorporation into calcite generated by bacterial ureolytic activity was investigated as part of a larger effort to evaluate the use of in situ urea hydrolysis for accelerating co-precipitation of trace metals and radionuclides in contaminated aquifers. 90Sr, a uranium fission product with a half-life of 29 years, is a significant subsurface contaminant at several Department of Energy facilities and could be immobilized using this remediation strategy. Experiments were conducted in a medium designed to simulate the groundwater of the Snake River Plain Aquifer in eastern Idaho, amended with strontium. Initially the solution was undersaturated with respect to calcite. As a model ureolytic organism, we used Bacillus pasteurii, a well-characterized bacterium known for high urease activity and previously shown to induce calcite precipitation in urea-amended medium. To gain information on the effect of the bacterial surfaces, we also looked at precipitation in the presence of a bacterial species that did not hydrolyze urea, as well as in the absence of bacteria. In the absence of bacterial ureolysis, carbonate precipitation was induced by addition of ammonium carbonate. All products were identified as calcite by X-ray diffraction. Strontium uptake was observed in all cases, but was greatest in the system including bacterial ureolysis. Sputter depth element profiling by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) confirmed this finding, showing highest Sr:Ca ratios in the bacterially generated calcite throughout the depth (~350 nm) investigated. Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) of the solids revealed regular crystals containing the outlines of embedded or entombed bacterial cells, suggesting that calcite precipitated directly on the cell surfaces when present. Analysis by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) indicated that in both the biotically and abiotically generated calcites the Sr was incorporated into the calcite

  8. Cheese 'refinement' with whey B-vitamin removal during precipitation potentially induces temporal 'functional' dietary shortage: homocysteine as a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Shapira, N

    2014-07-25

    Cottage cheese 'refinement' with massive B-vitamin losses (≈70-84%) through whey removal during precipitation may potentially induce an acute imbalance between protein/methionine load and temporal inadequacy/shortage of nutrients critical for their metabolism, i.e. B6 and B12. The temporal effect of cottage cheese consumption was evaluated using increased plasma homocysteine as a B-vitamin shortage marker. In a double-blind study, healthy, normal-weight (BMI = 22-27), premenopausal women aged 25-45 years were first given a methionine load (100 mg kg(-1), n = 15), then cottage cheese alone (500 g, ≈50 g protein, ≈1200 mg methionine, n = 49) at breakfast, and then with added B6 (2 mg, n = 8) and/or B6 + folate (1 mg + 200 mcg, n = 7). Plasma homocysteine was measured preprandially (t0) and then postprandially 5 h (t5) and ≥6-24 h. Cheese-induced homocysteine increased 28.7% (p ≤ 0.001), ≈60% of the free methionine response, remaining higher through ≥6-8 h. Co-supplementation with B6 reduced the Hcy increase by 45.0% (to 14.9%, p = 0.025), and that with B6 + folate reduced the Hcy increase by 72.3% (to 7.5%, p = 0.556, NS). Homocysteine increased more in participants with lower baselines (<5 μM vs. ≥5 μM, p ≤ 0.001) following cheese, ≈3-fold (54.8% vs. 18.5%) or methionine, 47.3% (266.7% vs. 181.1%). Cheese B-vitamin depletion - i.e. to B6 ≈ 2.0-4.0 μg g(-1) protein, far below women's metabolic requirement (15-20 μg g(-1)) - appeared to induce acute relative shortage compared to methionine/protein loads, exemplified by greater homocysteine increases than with other animal proteins (previous data), more so with lower baseline homocysteine. Smaller increases following re-supplementation demonstrated potential for 'functional fortification'/co-supplementation. Unnoted cheese 'refinement', like white bread, potentially induces episodic vitamin shortage effects, warranting consideration for acute/cumulative implications, alternative processing

  9. Multi-satellite sensor study on precipitation-induced emission pulses of NOx from soils in semi-arid ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zörner, Jan; Penning de Vries, Marloes; Beirle, Steffen; Sihler, Holger; Veres, Patrick R.; Williams, Jonathan; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    We present a top-down approach to infer and quantify rain-induced emission pulses of NOx ( ≡ NO + NO2), stemming from biotic emissions of NO from soils, from satellite-borne measurements of NO2. This is achieved by synchronizing time series at single grid pixels according to the first day of rain after a dry spell of prescribed duration. The full track of the temporal evolution several weeks before and after a rain pulse is retained with daily resolution. These are needed for a sophisticated background correction, which accounts for seasonal variations in the time series and allows for improved quantification of rain-induced soil emissions. The method is applied globally and provides constraints on pulsed soil emissions of NOx in regions where the NOx budget is seasonally dominated by soil emissions. We find strong peaks of enhanced NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) induced by the first intense precipitation after prolonged droughts in many semi-arid regions of the world, in particular in the Sahel. Detailed investigations show that the rain-induced NO2 pulse detected by the OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument), GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY satellite instruments could not be explained by other sources, such as biomass burning or lightning, or by retrieval artefacts (e.g. due to clouds). For the Sahel region, absolute enhancements of the NO2 VCDs on the first day of rain based on OMI measurements 2007-2010 are on average 4 × 1014  molec cm-2 and exceed 1 × 1015  molec cm-2 for individual grid cells. Assuming a NOx lifetime of 4 h, this corresponds to soil NOx emissions in the range of 6 up to 65 ng N m-2 s-1, which is in good agreement with literature values. Apart from the clear first-day peak, NO2 VCDs are moderately enhanced (2 × 1014  molec cm-2) compared to the background over the following 2 weeks, suggesting potential further emissions during that period of about 3.3 ng N m-2 s-1

  10. Bacterial modulins: a novel class of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology by inducing cytokine synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, B; Poole, S; Wilson, M

    1996-01-01

    Cytokines are a diverse group of proteins and glycoproteins which have potent and wide-ranging effects on eukaryotic cell function and are now recognized as important mediators of tissue pathology in infectious diseases. It is increasingly recognized that for many bacterial species, cytokine induction is a major virulence mechanism. Until recent years, the only bacterial component known to stimulate cytokine synthesis was lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It is only within the past decade that it has been clearly shown that many components associated with the bacterial cell wall, including proteins, glycoproteins, lipoproteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, have the capacity to stimulate mammalian cells to produce a diverse array of cytokines. It has been established that many of these cytokine-inducing molecules act by mechanisms distinct from that of LPS, and thus their activities are not due to LPS contamination. Bacteria produce a wide range of virulence factors which cause host tissue pathology, and these diverse factors have been grouped into four families: adhesins, aggressins, impedins, and invasins. We suggest that the array of bacterial cytokine-inducing molecules represents a new class of bacterial virulence factor, and, by analogy with the known virulence families, we suggest the term "modulin" to describe these molecules, because the action of cytokines is to modulate eukaryotic cell behavior. This review summarizes our current understanding of cytokine biology in relation to tissue homeostasis and disease and concisely reviews the current literature on the cytokine-inducing molecules produced by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, with an emphasis on the cellular mechanisms responsible for cytokine induction. We propose that modulins, by controlling the host immune and inflammatory responses, maintain the large commensal flora that all multicellular organisms support. PMID:8801436

  11. A small molecule deubiquitinase inhibitor increases localization of inducible nitric oxide synthase to the macrophage phagosome and enhances bacterial killing.

    PubMed

    Burkholder, Kristin M; Perry, Jeffrey W; Wobus, Christiane E; Donato, Nicholas J; Showalter, Hollis D; Kapuria, Vaibhav; O'Riordan, Mary X D

    2011-12-01

    Macrophages are key mediators of antimicrobial defense and innate immunity. Innate intracellular defense mechanisms can be rapidly regulated at the posttranslational level by the coordinated addition and removal of ubiquitin by ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs). While ubiquitin ligases have been extensively studied, the contribution of DUBs to macrophage innate immune function is incompletely defined. We therefore employed a small molecule DUB inhibitor, WP1130, to probe the role of DUBs in the macrophage response to bacterial infection. Treatment of activated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMM) with WP1130 significantly augmented killing of the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. WP1130 also induced killing of phagosome-restricted bacteria, implicating a bactericidal mechanism associated with the phagosome, such as the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). WP1130 had a minimal antimicrobial effect in macrophages lacking iNOS, indicating that iNOS is an effector mechanism for WP1130-mediated bacterial killing. Although overall iNOS levels were not notably different, we found that WP1130 significantly increased colocalization of iNOS with the Listeria-containing phagosome during infection. Taken together, our data indicate that the deubiquitinase inhibitor WP1130 increases bacterial killing in macrophages by enhancing iNOS localization to the phagosome and suggest a potential role for ubiquitin regulation in iNOS trafficking.

  12. Synthesis and magnetic properties of bacterial cellulose—ferrite (MFe2O4, M  =  Mn, Co, Ni, Cu) nanocomposites prepared by co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriplai, Nipaporn; Mongkolthanaruk, Wiyada; Pinitsoontorn, Supree

    2017-09-01

    The magnetic nanocomposites based on bacterial cellulose (BC) matrix and ferrite (MFe2O4, M  =  Mn, Co, Ni and Cu) nanoparticles (NPs) were fabricated. The never-dried and freeze-dried BC nanofibrils were used as templates and a co-precipitation method was applied for NPs synthesis. The nanocomposites were either freeze-dried or annealed before subjected to characterization. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed that only MnFe2O4 and CoFe2O4 NPs could be successfully incorporated in the BC nanostructures. The results also indicated that the BC template should be freeze-dried prior to the co-precipitation process. The magnetic measurement by a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) showed that the strongest ferromagnetic signal was found for BC-CoFe2O4 nanocomposites. The morphological investigation by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) showed the largest volume fraction of NPs in the BC-CoFe2O4 sample which was complimentary to the magnetic property measurement. Annealing resulted in the collapse of the opened nanostructure of the BC composites. Invited talk at 5th Thailand International Nanotechnology Conference (Nano Thailand-2016), 27-29 November 2016, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand.

  13. A membrane basis for bacterial identification and discrimination using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehse, Steven J.; Jeyasingham, Narmatha; Diedrich, Jonathan; Palchaudhuri, Sunil

    2009-05-01

    Nanosecond single-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to discriminate between two different genera of Gram-negative bacteria and between several strains of the Escherichia coli bacterium based on the relative concentration of trace inorganic elements in the bacteria. Of particular importance in all such studies to date has been the role of divalent cations, specifically Ca2+ and Mg2+, which are present in the membranes of Gram-negative bacteria and act to aggregate the highly polar lipopolysaccharide molecules. We have demonstrated that the source of emission from Ca and Mg atoms observed in LIBS plasmas from bacteria is at least partially located at the outer membrane by intentionally altering membrane biochemistry and correlating these changes with the observed changes in the LIBS spectra. The definitive assignment of some fraction of the LIBS emission to the outer membrane composition establishes a potential serological, or surface-antigen, basis for the laser-based identification. E. coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were cultured in three nutrient media: trypticase soy agar as a control, a MacConkey agar with a 0.01% concentration of bile salts including sodium deoxycholate, and a trypticase soy agar with a 0.4% deoxycholate concentration. The higher concentration of deoxycholate is known to disrupt bacterial outer membrane integrity and was expected to induce changes in the observed LIBS spectra. Altered LIBS emission was observed for bacteria cultured in this 0.4% medium and laser ablated in an all-argon environment. These spectra evidenced a reduced calcium emission and in the case of one species, a reduced magnesium emission. Culturing on the lower (0.01%) concentration of bile salts altered the LIBS spectra for both the P. aeruginosa and two strains of E. coli in a highly reproducible way, although not nearly as significantly as culturing in the higher concentration of deoxycholate did. This was possibly due to the accumulation

  14. Precipitation thresholds and drought-induced tree die-off: insights from patterns of Pinus edulis mortality along an environmental stress gradient.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Michael J; Royer, Patrick D; Cobb, Neil S; Breshears, David D; Ford, Paulette L

    2013-10-01

    Recent regional tree die-off events appear to have been triggered by a combination of drought and heat - referred to as 'global-change-type drought'. To complement experiments focused on resolving mechanisms of drought-induced tree mortality, an evaluation of how patterns of tree die-off relate to highly spatially variable precipitation is needed. Here, we explore precipitation relationships with a die-off event of pinyon pine (Pinus edulis Engelm.) in southwestern North America during the 2002-2003 global-change-type drought. Pinyon die-off and its relationship with precipitation was quantified spatially along a precipitation gradient in north-central New Mexico with standard field plot measurements of die-off combined with canopy cover derived from normalized burn ratio (NBR) from Landsat imagery. Pinyon die-off patterns revealed threshold responses to precipitation (cumulative 2002-2003) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD), with little to no mortality (< 10%) above 600 mm and below warm season VPD of c. 1.7 kPa. [Correction added after online publication 17 June 2013; in the preceding sentence, the word 'below' has been inserted.] Our results refine how precipitation patterns within a region influence pinyon die-off, revealing a precipitation and VPD threshold for tree mortality and its uncertainty band where other factors probably come into play - a response type that influences stand demography and landscape heterogeneity and is of general interest, yet has not been documented. © 2013 No claim to US Government works. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. A Precipitate-Strengthening Model Based on Crystallographic Anisotropy, Stress-Induced Orientation, and Dislocation of Stress-Aged Al-Cu-Mg Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaobin; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Jin; Deng, Yunlai; Zhang, Xinming

    2017-10-01

    We investigate the relationship between inhomogeneously distributed S precipitates and hardness of stress-aged single-crystal Al-Cu-Mg. First, the effect of crystallographic anisotropy is considered and modeled from the results of free-stress aged single-crystal Al-1.2Cu-0.5Mg with ( 1\\bar{1}8 ), ( \\bar{1}\\bar{2}5 ), (356), and (319) plane orientations. Effect of crystallographic anisotropy depends on the angle between the plane orientation of the single crystal and {012} habit planes of the S precipitates. Second, the effects of the magnitude of the applied stress and direction on the S-laths' size and distribution are considered. As the applied stress-induced S-laths inhomogeneously distribute during aging, the effect of the single-crystal's orientation on the distribution of S-laths is modeled. The results show that a single crystal near (111) plane orientation has the lowest stress-orienting effect. Finally, at higher applied stresses, such as 50 MPa, the S precipitates disperse more homogeneously due to the influence of the dislocations. Inhibiting the effect of dislocation depends on the angle between the plane orientation of the single crystal and the {111} dislocation slide planes. A precipitate-strengthening model of the stress-aged Al-Cu-Mg alloys is established based on crystallographic anisotropy, stress-orienting precipitates, and inhibiting the effect of dislocations.

  16. Mineral precipitation-induced porosity reduction and its effect on transport parameters in diffusion-controlled porous media.

    PubMed

    Chagneau, Aurélie; Claret, Francis; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael; Heck, Stephanie; Madé, Benoît; Schäfer, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    In geochemically perturbed systems where porewater and mineral assemblages are unequilibrated the processes of mineral precipitation and dissolution may change important transport properties such as porosity and pore diffusion coefficients. These reactions might alter the sealing capabilities of the rock by complete pore-scale precipitation (cementation) of the system or by opening new migration pathways through mineral dissolution. In actual 1D continuum reactive transport codes the coupling of transport and porosity is generally accomplished through the empirical Archie's law. There is very little reported data on systems with changing porosity under well controlled conditions to constrain model input parameters. In this study celestite (SrSO4) was precipitated in the pore space of a compacted sand column under diffusion controlled conditions and the effect on the fluid migration properties was investigated by means of three complementary experimental approaches: (1) tritiated water (HTO) tracer through diffusion, (2) computed micro-tomography (µ-CT) imaging and (3) post-mortem analysis of the precipitate (selective dissolution, SEM/EDX). The through-diffusion experiments reached steady state after 15 days, at which point celestite precipitation ceased and the non-reactive HTO flux became constant. The pore space in the precipitation zone remained fully connected using a 6 µm µ-CT spatial resolution with 25 % porosity reduction in the approx. 0.35 mm thick dense precipitation zone. The porosity and transport parameters prior to pore-scale precipitation were in good agreement with a porosity of 0.42 ± 0.09 (HTO) and 0.40 ± 0.03 (µ-CT), as was the mass of SrSO4 precipitate estimated by µ-CT at 25 ± 5 mg and selective dissolution 21.7 ± 0.4 mg, respectively. However, using this data as input parameters the 1D single continuum reactive transport model was not able to accurately reproduce both the celestite precipitation front and the remaining

  17. Electrostatic precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Albanese, V.

    1980-07-22

    A method is described of improving the conductivity of particles entrained in a stream of particle-laden gas formed by the burning of coal. The particles are collected by an electrostatic precipitator which comprises treating said gas containing particles prior to contact with the electrostatic precipitator at a temperature not greater than about 800/sup 0/F with a resistivitydecreasing amount of hexamethylene tetramine or its water-soluble salts and thereafter passing the gas to the electrostatic precipitator.

  18. Bacterial signals N-acyl homoserine lactones induce the changes of morphology and ethanol tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ge; Ma, Anzhou; Liu, Weifeng; Zhuang, Xuliang; Zhuang, Guoqiang

    2016-12-01

    The bacterial quorum sensing signals N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signals are able to regulate a diverse array of physiological activities, such as symbiosis, virulence and biofilm formation, depending on population density. Recently, it has been discovered that the bacterial quorum sensing (QS) signal molecules can induce extensive response of higher eukaryotes including plants and mammalian cells. However, little is known about the response of fungi reacting to these bacterial signals. Here we showed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as an ancient eukaryote and widely used for alcoholic beverage and bioethanol production, exposed to short-chain 3-OC6-HSL and long-chain C12-HSL appeared obvious changes in morphology and ethanol tolerance. AHLs could increase the frequency of cells with bipolar and multipolar buds, and these changes did not present distinct differences when induced by different types (3-OC6-HSL and C12-HSL) and varied concentrations (200 nM and 2 μM) of AHLs. Further investigation by flow cytometer displayed that the cells untreated by AHLs reduced cell size (decreased FSC) and enhanced intracellular density (increased in SSC), compared with the AHLs-induced cells after incubation 6 h. In addition, the long-chain C12-HSL could slightly increase the ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae while the short-chain HSL obviously decreased it. Our study would be valuable to further research on the interaction between prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbes, and be reference for industrial production of bioethanol.

  19. Host-induced bacterial cell wall decomposition mediates pattern-triggered immunity in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokun; Grabherr, Heini M; Willmann, Roland; Kolb, Dagmar; Brunner, Frédéric; Bertsche, Ute; Kühner, Daniel; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Amin, Bushra; Felix, Georg; Ongena, Marc; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Gust, Andrea A

    2014-01-01

    Peptidoglycans (PGNs) are immunogenic bacterial surface patterns that trigger immune activation in metazoans and plants. It is generally unknown how complex bacterial structures such as PGNs are perceived by plant pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and whether host hydrolytic activities facilitate decomposition of bacterial matrices and generation of soluble PRR ligands. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana, upon bacterial infection or exposure to microbial patterns, produces a metazoan lysozyme-like hydrolase (lysozyme 1, LYS1). LYS1 activity releases soluble PGN fragments from insoluble bacterial cell walls and cleavage products are able to trigger responses typically associated with plant immunity. Importantly, LYS1 mutant genotypes exhibit super-susceptibility to bacterial infections similar to that observed on PGN receptor mutants. We propose that plants employ hydrolytic activities for the decomposition of complex bacterial structures, and that soluble pattern generation might aid PRR-mediated immune activation in cell layers adjacent to infection sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01990.001 PMID:24957336

  20. Giardia duodenalis induces paracellular bacterial translocation and causes postinfectious visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Halliez, Marie C. M.; Motta, Jean-Paul; Feener, Troy D.; Guérin, Gaetan; LeGoff, Laetitia; François, Arnaud; Colasse, Elodie; Favennec, Loic; Gargala, Gilles; Lapointe, Tamia K.; Altier, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequent functional gastrointestinal disorder. It is characterized by abdominal hypersensitivity, leading to discomfort and pain, as well as altered bowel habits. While it is common for IBS to develop following the resolution of infectious gastroenteritis [then termed postinfectious IBS (PI-IBS)], the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Giardia duodenalis is a cosmopolitan water-borne enteropathogen that causes intestinal malabsorption, diarrhea, and postinfectious complications. Cause-and-effect studies using a human enteropathogen to help investigate the mechanisms of PI-IBS are sorely lacking. In an attempt to establish causality between giardiasis and postinfectious visceral hypersensitivity, this study describes a new model of PI-IBS in neonatal rats infected with G. duodenalis. At 50 days postinfection with G. duodenalis (assemblage A or B), long after the parasite was cleared, rats developed visceral hypersensitivity to luminal balloon distension in the jejunum and rectum, activation of the nociceptive signaling pathway (increased c-fos expression), histological modifications (villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia), and proliferation of mucosal intraepithelial lymphocytes and mast cells in the jejunum, but not in the rectum. G. duodenalis infection also disrupted the intestinal barrier, in vivo and in vitro, which in turn promoted the translocation of commensal bacteria. Giardia-induced bacterial paracellular translocation in vitro correlated with degradation of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-4. The extensive observations associated with gut hypersensitivity described here demonstrate that, indeed, in this new model of postgiardiasis IBS, alterations to the gut mucosa and c-fos are consistent with those associated with PI-IBS and, hence, offer avenues for new mechanistic research in the field. PMID:26744469

  1. Giardia duodenalis induces paracellular bacterial translocation and causes postinfectious visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Halliez, Marie C M; Motta, Jean-Paul; Feener, Troy D; Guérin, Gaetan; LeGoff, Laetitia; François, Arnaud; Colasse, Elodie; Favennec, Loic; Gargala, Gilles; Lapointe, Tamia K; Altier, Christophe; Buret, André G

    2016-04-15

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most frequent functional gastrointestinal disorder. It is characterized by abdominal hypersensitivity, leading to discomfort and pain, as well as altered bowel habits. While it is common for IBS to develop following the resolution of infectious gastroenteritis [then termed postinfectious IBS (PI-IBS)], the mechanisms remain incompletely understood. Giardia duodenalis is a cosmopolitan water-borne enteropathogen that causes intestinal malabsorption, diarrhea, and postinfectious complications. Cause-and-effect studies using a human enteropathogen to help investigate the mechanisms of PI-IBS are sorely lacking. In an attempt to establish causality between giardiasis and postinfectious visceral hypersensitivity, this study describes a new model of PI-IBS in neonatal rats infected with G. duodenalis At 50 days postinfection with G. duodenalis (assemblage A or B), long after the parasite was cleared, rats developed visceral hypersensitivity to luminal balloon distension in the jejunum and rectum, activation of the nociceptive signaling pathway (increased c-fos expression), histological modifications (villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia), and proliferation of mucosal intraepithelial lymphocytes and mast cells in the jejunum, but not in the rectum. G. duodenalis infection also disrupted the intestinal barrier, in vivo and in vitro, which in turn promoted the translocation of commensal bacteria. Giardia-induced bacterial paracellular translocation in vitro correlated with degradation of the tight junction proteins occludin and claudin-4. The extensive observations associated with gut hypersensitivity described here demonstrate that, indeed, in this new model of postgiardiasis IBS, alterations to the gut mucosa and c-fos are consistent with those associated with PI-IBS and, hence, offer avenues for new mechanistic research in the field. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Evaporation-induced stimulation of bacterial osmoregulation for electrical assessment of cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Aida; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria cells use osmoregulatory proteins as emergency valves to respond to changes in the osmotic pressure of their external environment. The existence of these emergency valves has been known since the 1960s, but they have never been used as the basis of a viability assay to tell dead bacteria cells apart from live ones. In this paper, we show that osmoregulation provides a much faster, label-free assessment of cell viability compared with traditional approaches that rely on cell multiplication (growth) to reach a detectable threshold. The cells are confined in an evaporating droplet that serves as a dynamic microenvironment. Evaporation-induced increase in ionic concentration is reflected in a proportional increase of the droplet’s osmotic pressure, which in turn, stimulates the osmoregulatory response from the cells. By monitoring the time-varying electrical conductance of evaporating droplets, bacterial cells are identified within a few minutes compared with several hours in growth-based methods. To show the versatility of the proposed method, we show detection of WT and genetically modified nonhalotolerant cells (Salmonella typhimurium) and dead vs. live differentiation of nonhalotolerant (such as Escherichia coli DH5α) and halotolerant cells (such as Staphylococcus epidermidis). Unlike the growth-based techniques, the assay time of the proposed method is independent of cell concentration or the bacteria type. The proposed label-free approach paves the road toward realization of a new class of real time, array-formatted electrical sensors compatible with droplet microfluidics for laboratory on a chip applications. PMID:27303045

  3. Atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet induced bacterial inactivation in aqueous environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Gonzales, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    An atmospheric pressure resistive barrier air plasma jet is designed to inactivate bacteria in aqueous media in direct and indirect exposure modes of treatment. The resistive barrier plasma jet is designed to operate at both dc and standard 50-60 Hz low frequency ac power input and the ambient air at 50% humidity level was used as the operating gas. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma jet were analyzed and the operating frequency of the discharge was measured to be 20 kHz and the plasma power was measured to be 26 W. The plasma jet rotational temperatures (Trot) are obtained from the optical emission spectra, from the N2C-B(2+) transitions by matching the experimental spectrum results with the Spectra Air (SPECAIR) simulation spectra. The reactive oxygen and nitrogen species were measured using optical emission spectroscopy and gas analyzers, for direct and indirect treatment modes. The nitric oxides (NO) were observed to be the predominant long lived reactive nitrogen species produced by the plasma. Three different bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive), Escherichia coli (Gram-negative), and Neisseria meningitidis (Gram-negative) were suspended in an aqueous media and treated by the resistive barrier air plasma jet in direct and indirect exposure modes. The results show that a near complete bacterial inactivation was achieved within 120 s for both direct and indirect plasma treatment of S. aureus and E. coli bacteria. Conversely, a partial inactivation of N. meningitidis was observed by 120 s direct plasma exposure and insignificant inactivation was observed for the indirect plasma exposure treatment. Plasma induced shifts in N. meningitidis gene expression was analyzed using pilC gene expression as a representative gene and the results showed a reduction in the expression of the pilC gene compared to untreated samples suggesting that the observed protection against NO may be regulated by other genes.

  4. Ruthenium red-induced bundling of bacterial cell division protein, FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Santra, Manas Kumar; Beuria, Tushar K; Banerjee, Abhijit; Panda, Dulal

    2004-06-18

    The assembly of FtsZ plays a major role in bacterial cell division, and it is thought that the assembly dynamics of FtsZ is a finely regulated process. Here, we show that ruthenium red is able to modulate FtsZ assembly in vitro. In contrast to the inhibitory effects of ruthenium red on microtubule polymerization, we found that a substoichiometric concentration of ruthenium red strongly increased the light-scattering signal of FtsZ assembly. Further, sedimentable polymer mass was increased by 1.5- and 2-fold in the presence of 2 and 10 microm ruthenium red, respectively. In addition, ruthenium red strongly reduced the GTPase activity and prevented dilution-induced disassembly of FtsZ polymers. Electron microscopic analysis showed that 4-10 microm of ruthenium red produced thick bundles of FtsZ polymers. The significant increase in the light-scattering signal and pelletable polymer mass in the presence of ruthenium red seemed to be due to the bundling of FtsZ protofilaments into larger polymers rather than the actual increase in the level of polymeric FtsZ. Furthermore, ruthenium red was found to copolymerize with FtsZ, and the copolymerization of substoichiometric amounts of ruthenium red with FtsZ polymers promoted cooperative assembly of FtsZ that produced large bundles. Calcium inhibited the binding of ruthenium red to FtsZ. However, a concentration of calcium 1000-fold higher than that of ruthenium red was required to produce similar effects on FtsZ assembly. Ruthenium red strongly modulated FtsZ polymerization, suggesting the presence of an important regulatory site on FtsZ and suggesting that a natural ligand, which mimics the action of ruthenium red, may regulate the assembly of FtsZ in bacteria.

  5. Photodynamic therapy can induce non-specific protective immunity against a bacterial infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Mroz, Pawel; Dai, Tianhong; Kinoshita, Manabu; Morimoto, Yuji; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2012-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for cancer is known to induce an immune response against the tumor, in addition to its well-known direct cell-killing and vascular destructive effects. PDT is becoming increasingly used as a therapy for localized infections. However there has not to date been a convincing report of an immune response being generated against a microbial pathogen after PDT in an animal model. We have studied PDT as a therapy for bacterial arthritis caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection in the mouse knee. We had previously found that PDT of an infection caused by injection of MRSA (5X107 CFU) into the mouse knee followed 3 days later by 1 μg of Photofrin and 635- nm diode laser illumination with a range of fluences within 5 minutes, gave a biphasic dose response. The greatest reduction of MRSA CFU was seen with a fluence of 20 J/cm2, whereas lower antibacterial efficacy was observed with fluences that were either lower or higher. We then tested the hypothesis that the host immune response mediated by neutrophils was responsible for most of the beneficial antibacterial effect. We used bioluminescence imaging of luciferase expressing bacteria to follow the progress of the infection in real time. We found similar results using intra-articular methylene blue and red light, and more importantly, that carrying out PDT of the noninfected joint and subsequently injecting bacteria after PDT led to a significant protection from infection. Taken together with substantial data from studies using blocking antibodies we believe that the pre-conditioning PDT regimen recruits and stimulates neutrophils into the infected joint which can then destroy bacteria that are subsequently injected and prevent infection.

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Gut Bacterial Proteases Involved in Inducing Pathogenicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Toxin in Cotton Bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Regode, Visweshwar; Kuruba, Sreeramulu; Mohammad, Akbar S.; Sharma, Hari C.

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis toxin proteins are deployed in transgenic plants for pest management. The present studies were aimed at characterization of gut bacterial proteases involved in activation of inactive Cry1Ac protoxin (pro-Cry1Ac) to active toxin in Helicoverpa armigera. Bacterial strains were isolated from H. armigera midgut and screened for their proteolytic activation toward pro-Cry1Ac. Among 12 gut bacterial isolates seven isolates showed proteolytic activity, and proteases from three isolates (IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3) were found to be involved in the proteolytic conversion of pro-Cry1Ac into active toxin. The proteases from IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 isolates were purified to 11.90-, 15.50-, and 17.20-fold, respectively. The optimum pH and temperature for gut bacterial protease activity was 8.0 and 40°C. Maximum inhibition of total proteolytic activity was exerted by phenylmethane sulfonyl fluoride followed by EDTA. Fluorescence zymography revealed that proteases from IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 were chymotrypsin-like and showing protease band at ~15, 65, and 15 kDa, respectively. Active Cry1Ac formed from processing pro-Cry1Ac by gut bacterial proteases exhibited toxicity toward H. armigera. The gut bacterial isolates IVS1, IVS2, and IVS3 showed homology with B. thuringiensis (CP003763.1), Vibrio fischeri (CP000020.2), and Escherichia coli (CP011342.1), respectively. Proteases produced by midgut bacteria are involved in proteolytic processing of B. thuringiensis protoxin and play a major role in inducing pathogenicity of B. thuringiensis toxins in H. armigera. PMID:27766093

  7. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Increase Survival and Decrease Bacterial Load in Mice Subjected to Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Ulleryd, Marcus A.; Grahnemo, Louise; Ståhlman, Marcus; Borén, Jan; Nilsson, Staffan; Jansson, John-Olov

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is increasing in incidence. With the alarming use of antibiotics, S. aureus is prone to become methicillin resistant. Antibiotics are the only widely used pharmacological treatment for sepsis. Interestingly, mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids have better survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis than mice fed HFD rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S). To investigate what component of polyunsaturated fatty acids, i.e., omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids, exerts beneficial effects on the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis, mice were fed HFD rich in omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids for 8 weeks prior to inoculation with S. aureus. Further, mice fed HFD-S were treated with omega-3 fatty acid metabolites known as resolvins. Mice fed HFD rich in omega-3 fatty acids had increased survival and decreased bacterial loads compared to those for mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis. Furthermore, the bacterial load was decreased in resolvin-treated mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis compared with that in mice treated with vehicle. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids increase the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis by reversing the deleterious effect of HFD-S on mouse survival. PMID:26857576

  8. Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acids Increase Survival and Decrease Bacterial Load in Mice Subjected to Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Svahn, Sara L; Ulleryd, Marcus A; Grahnemo, Louise; Ståhlman, Marcus; Borén, Jan; Nilsson, Staffan; Jansson, John-Olov; Johansson, Maria E

    2016-04-01

    Sepsis caused by Staphylococcus aureus is increasing in incidence. With the alarming use of antibiotics,S. aureus is prone to become methicillin resistant. Antibiotics are the only widely used pharmacological treatment for sepsis. Interestingly, mice fed high-fat diet (HFD) rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids have better survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis than mice fed HFD rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S). To investigate what component of polyunsaturated fatty acids, i.e., omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids, exerts beneficial effects on the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis, mice were fed HFD rich in omega-3 or omega-6 fatty acids for 8 weeks prior to inoculation with S. aureus Further, mice fed HFD-S were treated with omega-3 fatty acid metabolites known as resolvins. Mice fed HFD rich in omega-3 fatty acids had increased survival and decreased bacterial loads compared to those for mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis. Furthermore, the bacterial load was decreased in resolvin-treated mice fed HFD-S after S. aureus-induced sepsis compared with that in mice treated with vehicle. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids increase the survival of S. aureus-induced sepsis by reversing the deleterious effect of HFD-S on mouse survival.

  9. Delayed development induced by toxicity to the host can be inherited by a bacterial-dependent, transgenerational effect

    PubMed Central

    Fridmann-Sirkis, Yael; Stern, Shay; Elgart, Michael; Galili, Matana; Zeisel, Amit; Shental, Noam; Soen, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Commensal gut bacteria in many species including flies are integral part of their host, and are known to influence its development and homeostasis within generation. Here we report an unexpected impact of host–microbe interactions, which mediates multi-generational, non-Mendelian inheritance of a stress-induced phenotype. We have previously shown that exposure of fly larvae to G418 antibiotic induces transgenerationally heritable phenotypes, including a delay in larval development, gene induction in the gut and morphological changes. We now show that G418 selectively depletes commensal Acetobacter species and that this depletion explains the heritable delay, but not the inheritance of the other phenotypes. Notably, the inheritance of the delay was mediated by a surprising trans-generational effect. Specifically, bacterial removal from F1 embryos did not induce significant delay in F1 larvae, but nonetheless led to a considerable delay in F2. This effect maintains a delay induced by bacterial-independent G418 toxicity to the host. In line with these findings, reintroduction of isolated Acetobacter species prevented the inheritance of the delay. We further show that this prevention is partly mediated by vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) produced by these bacteria; exogenous Riboflavin led to partial prevention and inhibition of Riboflavin synthesis compromised the ability of the bacteria to prevent the inheritance. These results identify host–microbe interactions as a hitherto unrecognized factor capable of mediating non-Mendelian inheritance of a stress-induced phenotype. PMID:24611070

  10. EXAFS study on solute precipitation in FeCu alloy induced by energetic electron bombardments and thermal aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimura, Y.; Yoshizaki, H.; Nakagawa, Shou; Okamoto, Y.; Ishikawa, N.; Saitoh, Y.; Hori, F.; Iwase, A.

    2015-07-01

    The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurement is a useful tool for the observation of local atomic arrangements around selected atoms. We performed EXAFS measurements for the electron-irradiated and the thermally-aged Fe-0.6 wt.% Cu alloy and compared the experimental result with that of the simulation by the FEFF simulation code in order to investigate the local atomic structure around Cu atoms. Cu precipitates which were produced by the thermal aging at 773 K transformed from the bcc structure to the fcc structure as the precipitates grow large enough. However, for electron-irradiated specimens, although the hardness greatly increased, the transformation of Cu precipitates from the bcc to the fcc structure was not clearly confirmed. This result indicates that small sized Cu precipitates which had the bcc structure were produced by the electron irradiation and they could hardly coarsen during the irradiation.

  11. Bacterial Infection of Fly Ovaries Reduces Egg Production and Induces Local Hemocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Stephanie M.; Schneider, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Morbidity, the state of being diseased, is an important aspect of pathogenesis that has gone relatively unstudied in fruit flies. Our interest is in characterizing how bacterial pathogenesis affects various physiologies of the fly. We chose to examine the fly ovary because we found bacterial infection had a striking effect on fly reproduction. We observed decreased egg laying after bacterial infection that correlated with increased bacterial virulence. We also found that bacteria colonized the ovary in a previously undescribed manner; bacteria were found in the posterior of the ovary, adjacent to the lateral oviduct. This local infection in the ovary resulted in melanization and activation of the cellular immune response at the site of infection. PMID:17400292

  12. Nod1 activation by bacterial iE-DAP induces maternal-fetal inflammation and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Ingrid; Mulla, Melissa J; Myrtolli, Kledia; Sfakianaki, Anna K; Norwitz, Errol R; Tadesse, Serkalem; Guller, Seth; Abrahams, Vikki M

    2011-07-15

    There is a strong association between infection and prematurity; however, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Nod1 and Nod2 are intracellular pattern recognition receptors that are activated by bacterial peptides and mediate innate immunity. We previously demonstrated that human first-trimester trophoblasts express Nod1 and Nod2, which trigger inflammation upon stimulation. This study sought to determine the expression and function of Nod1 and Nod2 in third-trimester trophoblasts, and to characterize the in vivo effects of Nod1 activation on pregnancy outcome. Human term placental tissues and isolated term trophoblast expressed Nod1, but not Nod2. Activation of Nod1 by its agonist, bacterial γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelic acid (iE-DAP), in term trophoblast cultures induced a proinflammatory cytokine profile, characterized by elevated levels of secreted IL-6, GRO-α, and MCP-1, when compared with the control. However, these cytokines were not upregulated in response to Nod2 stimulation with bacterial MDP. Administration of high-dose bacterial iE-DAP to pregnant C57BL/6J mice on embryonic day 14.5 triggered preterm delivery within 24 h. iE-DAP at a lower dose that did not induce prematurity, reduced fetal weight, altered the cytokine profile at the maternal-fetal interface, and induced fetal inflammation. Thus, functional Nod1 is expressed by trophoblast cells across gestation and may have a role in mediating infection-associated inflammation and prematurity. This study demonstrates that pattern recognition receptors, other than the TLRs, may be implicated or involved in infection-associated preterm labor.

  13. Changes in soil bacterial community triggered by drought-induced gap succession preceded changes in soil C stocks and quality

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Jorge Curiel; Barba, Josep; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Antonio José; Fernandez-Lopez, Manuel; Mattana, Stefania; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; Nolis, Pau; Lloret, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how drought-induced tree mortality and subsequent secondary succession would affect soil bacterial taxonomic composition as well as soil organic matter (SOM) quantity and quality in a mixed Mediterranean forest where the Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) population, affected by climatic drought-induced die-off, is being replaced by Holm-oaks (HO; Quercus ilex). We apply a high throughput DNA pyrosequencing technique and 13C solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP-MAS 13C NMR) to soils within areas of influence (defined as an surface with 2-m radius around the trunk) of different trees: healthy and affected (defoliated) pines, pines that died a decade ago and healthy HOs. Soil respiration was also measured in the same spots during a spring campaign using a static close-chamber method (soda lime). A decade after death, and before aerial colonization by the more competitive HOs have even taken place, we could not find changes in soil C pools (quantity and/or quality) associated with tree mortality and secondary succession. Unlike C pools, bacterial diversity and community structure were strongly determined by tree mortality. Convergence between the most abundant taxa of soil bacterial communities under dead pines and colonizer trees (HOs) further suggests that physical gap colonization was occurring below-ground before above-ground colonization was taken place. Significantly higher soil respiration rates under dead trees, together with higher bacterial diversity and anomalously high representation of bacteria commonly associated with copiotrophic environments (r-strategic bacteria) further gives indications of how drought-induced tree mortality and secondary succession were influencing the structure of microbial communities and the metabolic activity of soils. PMID:23301169

  14. Changes in soil bacterial community triggered by drought-induced gap succession preceded changes in soil C stocks and quality.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Jorge Curiel; Barba, Josep; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Antonio José; Fernandez-Lopez, Manuel; Mattana, Stefania; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; Nolis, Pau; Lloret, Francisco

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to understand how drought-induced tree mortality and subsequent secondary succession would affect soil bacterial taxonomic composition as well as soil organic matter (SOM) quantity and quality in a mixed Mediterranean forest where the Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) population, affected by climatic drought-induced die-off, is being replaced by Holm-oaks (HO; Quercus ilex). We apply a high throughput DNA pyrosequencing technique and (13)C solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CP-MAS (13)C NMR) to soils within areas of influence (defined as an surface with 2-m radius around the trunk) of different trees: healthy and affected (defoliated) pines, pines that died a decade ago and healthy HOs. Soil respiration was also measured in the same spots during a spring campaign using a static close-chamber method (soda lime). A decade after death, and before aerial colonization by the more competitive HOs have even taken place, we could not find changes in soil C pools (quantity and/or quality) associated with tree mortality and secondary succession. Unlike C pools, bacterial diversity and community structure were strongly determined by tree mortality. Convergence between the most abundant taxa of soil bacterial communities under dead pines and colonizer trees (HOs) further suggests that physical gap colonization was occurring below-ground before above-ground colonization was taken place. Significantly higher soil respiration rates under dead trees, together with higher bacterial diversity and anomalously high representation of bacteria commonly associated with copiotrophic environments (r-strategic bacteria) further gives indications of how drought-induced tree mortality and secondary succession were influencing the structure of microbial communities and the metabolic activity of soils.

  15. Rapid and Portable Methods for Identification of Bacterially Influenced Calcite: Application of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and AOTF Reflectance Spectroscopy, Fort Stanton Cave, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, N. J.; Chavez, A.; Chanover, N.; Voelz, D.; Uckert, K.; Tawalbeh, R.; Gariano, J.; Dragulin, I.; Xiao, X.; Hull, R.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid, in-situ methods for identification of biologic and non-biologic mineral precipitation sites permit mapping of biological hot spots. Two portable spectrometers, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Acoustic-Optic Tunable Filter Reflectance Spectroscopy (AOTFRS) were used to differentiate between bacterially influenced and inorganically precipitated calcite specimens from Fort Stanton Cave, NM, USA. LIBS collects light emitted from the decay of excited electrons in a laser ablation plasma; the spectrum is a chemical fingerprint of the analyte. AOTFRS collects light reflected from the surface of a specimen and provides structural information about the material (i.e., the presence of O-H bonds). These orthogonal data sets provide a rigorous method to determine the origin of calcite in cave deposits. This study used a set of 48 calcite samples collected from Fort Stanton cave. Samples were examined in SEM for the presence of biologic markers; these data were used to separate the samples into biologic and non-biologic groups. Spectra were modeled using the multivariate technique Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). Half of the spectra were used to train a PLSR model, in which biologic samples were assigned to the independent variable "0" and non-biologic samples were assigned the variable "1". Values of the independent variable were calculated for each of the training samples, which were close to 0 for the biologic samples (-0.09 - 0.23) and close to 1 for the non-biologic samples (0.57 - 1.14). A Value of Apparent Distinction (VAD) of 0.55 was used to numerically distinguish between the two groups; any sample with an independent variable value < 0.55 was classified as having a biologic origin; a sample with a value > 0.55 was determined to be non-biologic in origin. After the model was trained, independent variable values for the remaining half of the samples were calculated. Biologic or non-biologic origin was assigned by comparison to the VAD

  16. Gut Commensal E. coli Proteins Activate Host Satiety Pathways following Nutrient-Induced Bacterial Growth.

    PubMed

    Breton, Jonathan; Tennoune, Naouel; Lucas, Nicolas; Francois, Marie; Legrand, Romain; Jacquemot, Justine; Goichon, Alexis; Guérin, Charlène; Peltier, Johann; Pestel-Caron, Martine; Chan, Philippe; Vaudry, David; do Rego, Jean-Claude; Liénard, Fabienne; Pénicaud, Luc; Fioramonti, Xavier; Ebenezer, Ivor S; Hökfelt, Tomas; Déchelotte, Pierre; Fetissov, Sergueï O

    2016-02-09

    The composition of gut microbiota has been associated with host metabolic phenotypes, but it is not known if gut bacteria may influence host appetite. Here we show that regular nutrient provision stabilizes exponential growth of E. coli, with the stationary phase occurring 20 min after nutrient supply accompanied by bacterial proteome changes, suggesting involvement of bacterial proteins in host satiety. Indeed, intestinal infusions of E. coli stationary phase proteins increased plasma PYY and their intraperitoneal injections suppressed acutely food intake and activated c-Fos in hypothalamic POMC neurons, while their repeated administrations reduced meal size. ClpB, a bacterial protein mimetic of α-MSH, was upregulated in the E. coli stationary phase, was detected in plasma proportional to ClpB DNA in feces, and stimulated firing rate of hypothalamic POMC neurons. Thus, these data show that bacterial proteins produced after nutrient-induced E. coli growth may signal meal termination. Furthermore, continuous exposure to E. coli proteins may influence long-term meal pattern.

  17. Summer precipitation anomalies in Asia and North America induced by Eurasian non-monsoon land heating versus ENSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ping; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jiping; Zhou, Xiuji; Chen, Junming; Nan, Sulan; Liu, Ge; Xiao, Dong

    2016-02-01

    When floods ravage Asian monsoon regions in summer, megadroughts often attack extratropical North America, which feature an intercontinental contrasting precipitation anomaly between Asia and North America. However, the characteristics of the contrasting Asian-North American (CANA) precipitation anomalies and associated mechanisms have not been investigated specifically. In this article, we firmly establish this summer CANA pattern, providing evidence for a significant effect of the land surface thermal forcing over Eurasian non-monsoon regions on the CANA precipitation anomalies by observations and numerical experiments. We show that the origin of the CANA precipitation anomalies and associated anomalous anticyclones over the subtropical North Pacific and Atlantic has a deeper root in Eurasian non-monsoon land surface heating than in North American land surface heating. The ocean forcing from the ENSO is secondary and tends to be confined in the tropics. Our results have strong implications to interpretation of the feedback of global warming on hydrological cycle over Asia and North America. Under the projected global warming due to the anthropogenic forcing, the prominent surface warming over Eurasian non-monsoon regions is a robust feature which, through the mechanism discussed here, would favor a precipitation increase over Asian monsoon regions and a precipitation decrease over extratropical North America.

  18. Summer precipitation anomalies in Asia and North America induced by Eurasian non-monsoon land heating versus ENSO.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jiping; Zhou, Xiuji; Chen, Junming; Nan, Sulan; Liu, Ge; Xiao, Dong

    2016-02-26

    When floods ravage Asian monsoon regions in summer, megadroughts often attack extratropical North America, which feature an intercontinental contrasting precipitation anomaly between Asia and North America. However, the characteristics of the contrasting Asian-North American (CANA) precipitation anomalies and associated mechanisms have not been investigated specifically. In this article, we firmly establish this summer CANA pattern, providing evidence for a significant effect of the land surface thermal forcing over Eurasian non-monsoon regions on the CANA precipitation anomalies by observations and numerical experiments. We show that the origin of the CANA precipitation anomalies and associated anomalous anticyclones over the subtropical North Pacific and Atlantic has a deeper root in Eurasian non-monsoon land surface heating than in North American land surface heating. The ocean forcing from the ENSO is secondary and tends to be confined in the tropics. Our results have strong implications to interpretation of the feedback of global warming on hydrological cycle over Asia and North America. Under the projected global warming due to the anthropogenic forcing, the prominent surface warming over Eurasian non-monsoon regions is a robust feature which, through the mechanism discussed here, would favor a precipitation increase over Asian monsoon regions and a precipitation decrease over extratropical North America.

  19. Summer precipitation anomalies in Asia and North America induced by Eurasian non-monsoon land heating versus ENSO

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ping; Wang, Bin; Liu, Jiping; Zhou, Xiuji; Chen, Junming; Nan, Sulan; Liu, Ge; Xiao, Dong

    2016-01-01

    When floods ravage Asian monsoon regions in summer, megadroughts often attack extratropical North America, which feature an intercontinental contrasting precipitation anomaly between Asia and North America. However, the characteristics of the contrasting Asian-North American (CANA) precipitation anomalies and associated mechanisms have not been investigated specifically. In this article, we firmly establish this summer CANA pattern, providing evidence for a significant effect of the land surface thermal forcing over Eurasian non-monsoon regions on the CANA precipitation anomalies by observations and numerical experiments. We show that the origin of the CANA precipitation anomalies and associated anomalous anticyclones over the subtropical North Pacific and Atlantic has a deeper root in Eurasian non-monsoon land surface heating than in North American land surface heating. The ocean forcing from the ENSO is secondary and tends to be confined in the tropics. Our results have strong implications to interpretation of the feedback of global warming on hydrological cycle over Asia and North America. Under the projected global warming due to the anthropogenic forcing, the prominent surface warming over Eurasian non-monsoon regions is a robust feature which, through the mechanism discussed here, would favor a precipitation increase over Asian monsoon regions and a precipitation decrease over extratropical North America. PMID:26916258

  20. Towards the clinical application of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for rapid pathogen diagnosis: the effect of mixed cultures and sample dilution on bacterial identification

    SciTech Connect

    Rehse, Steven J.; Mohaidat, Qassem I.; Palchaudhuri, Sunil

    2010-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy has been utilized to classify and identify bacterial specimens on the basis of their atomic composition. We have characterized the effect that the presence of a second bacterial species in the ablated specimen had on the identification of the majority species. Specimens with a reduced number of bacterial cells (approximately 2500) were identified with 100% accuracy when compared to undiluted specimens. In addition, a linear dependence of the total spectral power as a function of cell number was determined. Lastly, a high selectivity was obtained for a LIBS-based analysis of nine separate bacterial strains from four genera.

  1. Caprylic acid-induced impurity precipitation from protein A capture column elution pool to enable a two-chromatography-step process for monoclonal antibody purification.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji; Wang, Lu; Twarowska, Barbara; Laino, Sarah; Sparks, Colleen; Smith, Timothy; Russell, Reb; Wang, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the use of caprylic acid (CA) to precipitate impurities from the protein A capture column elution pool for the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with the objective of developing a two chromatography step antibody purification process. A CA-induced impurity precipitation in the protein A column elution pool was evaluated as an alternative method to polishing chromatography techniques for use in the purification of mAbs. Parameters including pH, CA concentrations, mixing time, mAb concentrations, buffer systems, and incubation temperatures were evaluated on their impacts on the impurity removal, high-molecular weight (HMW) formation and precipitation step yield. Both pH and CA concentration, but not mAb concentrations and buffer systems, are key parameters that can affect host-cell proteins (HCPs) clearance, HMW species, and yield. CA precipitation removes HCPs and some HMW species to the acceptable levels under the optimal conditions. The CA precipitation process is robust at 15-25°C. For all five mAbs tested in this study, the optimal CA concentration range is 0.5-1.0%, while the pH range is from 5.0 to 6.0. A purification process using two chromatography steps (protein A capture column and ion exchange polishing column) in combination with CA-based impurity precipitation step can be used as a robust downstream process for mAb molecules with a broad range of isoelectric points. Residual CA can be effectively removed by the subsequent polishing cation exchange chromatography.

  2. Enhanced green fluorescent protein in optofluidic Fabry-Perot microcavity to detect laser induced temperature changes in a bacterial culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoz, F.; Martín, I. R.; Walo, D.; Freire, R.; Gil-Rostra, J.; Yubero, F.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A. R.

    2017-09-01

    Thermal therapy using laser sources can be used in combination with other cancer therapies to eliminate tumors. However, high precision temperature control is required to avoid damage in healthy surrounding tissues. Therefore, in order to detect laser induced temperature changes, we have used the fluorescence signal of the enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) over-expressed in an E. coli bacterial culture. For that purpose, the bacteria expressing eGFP are injected in a Fabry-Perot (FP) optofluidic planar microcavity. In order to locally heat the bacterial culture, external infrared or ultraviolet lasers were used. Shifts in the wavelengths of the resonant FP modes are used to determine the temperature increase as a function of the heating laser pump power. Laser induced local temperature increments up to 6-7 °C were measured. These results show a relatively easy way to measure laser induced local temperature changes using a FP microcavity and using eGFP as a molecular probe instead of external nanoparticles, which could damage/alter the cell. Therefore, we believe that this approach can be of interest for the study of thermal effects in laser induced thermal therapies.

  3. l-Histidine Induces Resistance in Plants to the Bacterial Pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum Partially Through the Activation of Ethylene Signaling.

    PubMed

    Seo, Shigemi; Nakaho, Kazuhiro; Hong, Si Won; Takahashi, Hideki; Shigemori, Hideyuki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Wilt disease in plants, which is caused by the soil-borne bacterial pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum, is one of the most devastating plant diseases. We previously detected bacterial wilt disease-inhibiting activity in an extract from yeast cells. In the present study, we purified this activity and identified one of the substances responsible for the activity as the amino acid histidine. The exogenous application of l-histidine, but not d-histidine, inhibited wilt disease in tomato and Arabidopsis plants without exhibiting any antibacterial activity. l-Histidine induced the expression of genes related to ethylene (ET) biosynthesis and signaling as well as the production of ET in tomato and Arabidopsis plants. l-Histidine-induced resistance to R. solanacearum was partially abolished in ein3-1, an ET-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant line. Resistance to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, which is known to require ET biosynthesis or signaling, was also induced by exogenously applied l-histidine. These results suggest that l-histidine induces resistance to R. solanacearum and B. cinerea partially through the activation of ET signaling in plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Bacterial-excreted small volatile molecule 2-aminoacetophenone induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in murine skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    BANDYOPADHAYA, ARUNAVA; CONSTANTINOU, CATERINA; PSYCHOGIOS, NIKOLAOS; UEKI, RYUSUKE; YASUHARA, SHINGO; MARTYN, J.A. JEEVENDRA; WILHELMY, JULIE; MINDRINOS, MICHAEL; RAHME, LAURENCE G.; TZIKA, A. ARIA

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress induces mitochondrial dysfunction and facilitates apoptosis, tissue damage or metabolic alterations following infection. We have previously discovered that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) quorum sensing (QS)-excreted small volatile molecule, 2-aminoacetophenone (2-AA), which is produced in infected human tissue, promotes bacterial phenotypes that favor chronic infection, while also compromising muscle function and dampens the pathogen-induced innate immune response, promoting host tolerance to infection. In this study, murine whole-genome expression data have demonstrated that 2-AA affects the expression of genes involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis, thus producing an oxidative stress signature in skeletal muscle. The results of the present study demonstrated that the expression levels of genes involved in apoptosis signaling pathways were upregulated in the skeletal muscle of 2-AA-treated mice. To confirm the results of our transcriptome analysis, we used a novel high-resolution magic-angle-spinning (HRMAS), proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method and observed increased levels of bisallylic methylene fatty acyl protons and vinyl protons, suggesting that 2-AA induces skeletal muscle cell apoptosis. This effect was corroborated by our results demonstrating the downregulation of mitochondrial membrane potential in vivo in response to 2-AA. The findings of the present study indicate that the bacterial infochemical, 2-AA, disrupts mitochondrial functions by inducing oxidative stress and apoptosis signaling and likely promotes skeletal muscle dysfunction, which may favor chronic/persistent infection. PMID:26935176

  5. Suppression effects of dental glass-ceramics with polarization-induced highly dense surface charges against bacterial adhesion.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Kosuke; Koizumi, Hiroki; Horiuchi, Naohiro; Nakamura, Miho; Okura, Toshinori; Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nagai, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the surface characteristics and antibacterial ability capacity of surface-improved dental glass-ceramics by an electrical polarization process. Commercially available dental glass-ceramic materials were electrically polarized to induce surface charges in a direct current field by heating. The surface morphology, chemical composition, crystal structure, and surface free energy (SFE) were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and water droplet methods, respectively. The antibacterial capacity was assessed by a bacterial adhesion test using Streptococcus mutans. Although the surface morphology, chemical composition, and crystal structure were not affected by electrical polarization, the polar component and total SFE were enhanced. After 24 h incubation at 37ºC, bacterial adhesion to the polarized samples was inhibited. The electrical polarization method may confer antibacterial properties on prosthetic devices, such as porcelain fused to metal crowns or all ceramic restorations, without any additional bactericidal agents.

  6. The effect of bacterial products on synovial fibroblast function: hypermetabolic changes induced by endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Robert B.; Castor, C. William

    1972-01-01

    The effects of bacterial products on selected synovial fibroblast functions were studied. Extracts of commonly encountered microorganisms were prepared by sonic or mechanical disruption. “Purified” endotoxins were prepared from selected organisms, and in some cases were purchased commercially. Normal fibroblasts were derived from synovial connective tissue obtained from amputations or arthrotomy. The cells were grown as a monolayer on glass and were nourished by a semisynthetic nutrient medium. Extracts of Gram-negative bacteria, applied to fibroblast cultures, markedly increased hyaluronic acid production, glucose utilization, and lactate output. Treatment of the extracts with heat at 100°C for ½ hr decreased their effectiveness by approximately 40%. Purified Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin stimulated synovial fibroblasts to an extent comparable to that caused by heat-treated whole extracts. The lipid moiety of the endotoxin molecule appeared to account for much of the stimulatory activity of the endotoxin. Extracts of commonly encountered Gram-positive cocci, yeast, and Mycoplasma had no stimulating capabilities. Corynebacterial extracts, however, had definite stimulating potential. Endotoxin-synovial cell interaction experiments demonstrated that endotoxin was bound to fibroblasts. Reassay of the endotoxin after extraction from the cells showed that it retained its stimulatory potential. The metabolic phenomena stimulated by bacterial products duplicate the major known actions of connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP). The observations made in this study suggest that bacterial products may participate in a fundamental way in the activation process, and indicate a possible role for bacterial products in synovial inflammation in humans. PMID:4259829

  7. Changes in soil bacterial communities induced by the invasive plant Pennisetum setaceum in a semiarid environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez-Caballero, Gema; Caravaca, Fuensanta; del Mar Alguacil, María; Fernández-López, Manuel; José Fernández-González, Antonio; García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Roldán, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Invasive alien species are considered as a global threat being among the main causes of biodiversity loss. Plant invasions have been extensively studied from different disciplines with the purpose of identifying predictor traits of invasiveness and finding solutions. However, less is known about the implication of the rhizosphere microbiota in these processes, even when it is well known the importance of the interaction between plant rhizosphere and microbial communities. The objective of this study was to determine whether native and invasive plants support different bacterial communities in their rhizospheres and whether there are bacterial indicator species that might be contributing to the invasion process of these ecosystems. We carried out a study in five independent locations under Mediterranean semiarid conditions, where the native Hyparrhenia hirta is being displaced by Pennisetum setaceum, an aggressive invasive Poaceae and soil bacterial communities were amplified and 454-pyrosequenced. Changes in the composition and structure of the bacterial communities, owing to the invasive status of the plant, were detected when the richness and alpha-diversity estimators were calculated as well as when we analyzed the PCoA axes scores. The Indicator Species Analysis results showed a higher number of indicators for invaded communities at all studied taxonomic levels. In conclusion, the effect of the invasiveness and its interaction with the soil location has promoted shifts in the rhizosphere bacterial communities which might be facilitating the invader success in these ecosystems.

  8. Numerical study of evaporation-induced salt accumulation and precipitation in bare saline soils: Mechanism and feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chenming; Li, Ling; Lockington, David

    2014-10-01

    Evaporation from bare saline soils in coastal wetlands causes salt precipitation in the form of efflorescence and subflorescence. However, it is not clear how much the precipitated salt in turn affects the water transport in the soil and hence the evaporation rate. We hypothesized that efflorescence exerts a mulching resistance to evaporation, while subflorescence reduces the pore space for water vapor to move through the soil. A numerical model is developed to simulate the transport of water, solute, and heat in the soil, and resulting evaporation and salt precipitation with the hypothesized feedback mechanism incorporated. The model was applied to simulate four evaporation experiments in soil columns with and without a fixed shallow water table, and was found to replicate well the experimental observations. The simulated results indicated that as long as the hydraulic connection between the near surface soil layer and the water source in the interior soil layer exists, vaporization occurs near the surface, and salt precipitates exclusively as efflorescence. When such hydraulic connection is absent, the vaporization plane develops downward and salt precipitates as subflorescence. Being more substantial in quantity, efflorescent affects more significantly evaporation than subflorescence during the soil-drying process. Different evaporation stages based on the location of the vaporization plane and the state of salt accumulation can be identified for characterizing the process of evaporation from bare saline soils with or without a fixed shallow water table.

  9. Putative bacterial volatile-mediated growth in soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) and expression of induced proteins under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Vaishnav, A; Kumari, S; Jain, S; Varma, A; Choudhary, D K

    2015-08-01

    Plant root-associated rhizobacteria elicit plant immunity referred to as induced systemic tolerance (IST) against multiple abiotic stresses. Among multibacterial determinants involved in IST, the induction of IST and promotion of growth by putative bacterial volatile compounds (VOCs) is reported in the present study. To characterize plant proteins induced by putative bacterial VOCs, proteomic analysis was performed by MALDI-MS/MS after exposure of soybean seedlings to a new strain of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae strain AU. Furthermore, expression analysis by Western blotting confirmed that the vegetative storage protein (VSP), gamma-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH) and RuBisCo large chain proteins were significantly up-regulated by the exposure to AU strain and played a major role in IST. VSP has preponderant roles in N accumulation and mobilization, acid phosphatase activity and Na(+) homeostasis to sustain plant growth under stress condition. More interestingly, plant exposure to the bacterial strain significantly reduced Na(+) and enhanced K(+) and P content in root of soybean seedlings under salt stress. In addition, high accumulation of proline and chlorophyll content also provided evidence of protection against osmotic stress during the elicitation of IST by bacterial exposure. T