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Sample records for bacteriochlorophyll a-producing bacteria

  1. Quantification of two forms of green sulfur bacteria in their natural habitat using bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharcheva, Anastasia V.; Zhiltsova, Anna A.; Lunina, Olga N.; Savvichev, Alexander S.; Patsaeva, Svetlana V.

    2016-04-01

    Detection of phototropic organisms in their natural habitat using optical instruments operating under water is urgently needed for many tasks of ecological monitoring. While fluorescence methods are widely applied nowadays to detect and characterize phytoplankton communities, the techniques for detection and recognition of anoxygenic phototrophs are considered challenging. Differentiation of the forms of anoxygenic green sulfur bacteria in natural water using spectral techniques remains problematic. Green sulfur bacteria could be found in two forms, green-colored (containing BChl d in pigment compound) and brown-colored (containing BChl e), have the special ecological niche in such reservoirs. Separate determination of these microorganisms by spectral methods is complicated because of similarity of spectral characteristics of their pigments. We describe the novel technique of quantification of two forms of green sulfur bacteria directly in water using bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence without pigment extraction. This technique is noninvasive and could be applied in remote mode in the water bodies with restricted water circulation to determine simultaneously concentrations of two forms of green sulfur bacteria in their natural habitat.

  2. Ultrafast time-resolved carotenoid to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 complexes from photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cong, Hong; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; LaFountain, Amy M; Kelsh, Rhiannon M; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Frank, Harry A

    2008-08-28

    Steady-state and ultrafast time-resolved optical spectroscopic investigations have been carried out at 293 and 10 K on LH2 pigment-protein complexes isolated from three different strains of photosynthetic bacteria: Rhodobacter (Rb.) sphaeroides G1C, Rb. sphaeroides 2.4.1 (anaerobically and aerobically grown), and Rps. acidophila 10050. The LH2 complexes obtained from these strains contain the carotenoids, neurosporene, spheroidene, spheroidenone, and rhodopin glucoside, respectively. These molecules have a systematically increasing number of pi-electron conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds. Steady-state absorption and fluorescence excitation experiments have revealed that the total efficiency of energy transfer from the carotenoids to bacteriochlorophyll is independent of temperature and nearly constant at approximately 90% for the LH2 complexes containing neurosporene, spheroidene, spheroidenone, but drops to approximately 53% for the complex containing rhodopin glucoside. Ultrafast transient absorption spectra in the near-infrared (NIR) region of the purified carotenoids in solution have revealed the energies of the S1 (2(1)Ag-)-->S2 (1(1)Bu+) excited-state transitions which, when subtracted from the energies of the S0 (1(1)Ag-)-->S2 (1(1)Bu+) transitions determined by steady-state absorption measurements, give precise values for the positions of the S1 (2(1)Ag-) states of the carotenoids. Global fitting of the ultrafast spectral and temporal data sets have revealed the dynamics of the pathways of de-excitation of the carotenoid excited states. The pathways include energy transfer to bacteriochlorophyll, population of the so-called S* state of the carotenoids, and formation of carotenoid radical cations (Car*+). The investigation has found that excitation energy transfer to bacteriochlorophyll is partitioned through the S1 (1(1)Ag-), S2 (1(1)Bu+), and S* states of the different carotenoids to varying degrees. This is understood through a consideration of the

  3. Terminal steps of bacteriochlorophyll a phytol formation in purple photosynthetic bacteria

    SciT

    Shioi, Y.; Sasa, T.

    1984-04-01

    Four chemically different bacteriochlorophylls (Bchls) a esterified with geranylgeraniol, dihydrogeranyl-geraniol, tetrahydrogeraniol, and phytol have been detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography in cell extracts from Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides and Chromatium vinosum. Bchl a containing phytol is the principal component, and the other three Bchls a comprise about 4% of the total Bchls a in stationary-phase cells of R. sphaeroides and C. vinosum. The high levels of the minor pigments occur in the beginning of Bchl a phytol formation, indicating that they are not degradation products, but intermediates of Bchl a phytol formation.

  4. Discrepancy between experimental and theoretical excitation transfer rates in LH2 bacteriochlorophyll-protein complexes of purple bacteria.

    PubMed

    Borisov, A Y

    2008-02-01

    Discrepancy is revealed between the values of excitation transfer times measured experimentally, and those calculated, for the atomic structures of B800 --> B850 bacteriochlorophylls within the LH2 light-harvesting pigment-protein complex of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. The value 2.9-3.2 ps for the B800 --> B850 excitation transfer, calculated on the basis of atomic structure of LH2, is about 4-times longer than that measured for this bacterium (0.7 ps). This discrepancy appears common in at least two purple bacteria. Possible sources responsible for this discrepancy are discussed. It may either signify some drawback/s/ in our notions about the precise in vivo structure of LH2 complexes, for example, possible changes of LH2 structure during crystallization, or it may reflect our ignorance of some mechanisms involved in excitation migration.

  5. Biosynthesis and Isotopic Composition of Bacteriochlorophyll a and Okenone in Purple Sulfur Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.; Scott, J. H.; Steele, A.; Cody, G. D.; Ohara, S.; Bowden, R.; Fogel, M. L.

    2011-12-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria play an integral part in the anaerobic cycling of sulfur. Bacteriochloroyphll a (Bchl a) is a well-studied photosynthetic compound required for photosynthesis in the organisms that possess it. The only known fossil of purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) in the geologic record is okenane, believed to be of biologic origin originating from the carotenoid pigment okenone, which has only been documented in eleven species of Chromatiaceae. Organic geochemical studies have identified okenane in preserved organic matter in rocks and ancient sediments and further, okenone production has been observed in modern water columns and sediment surfaces. We have undertaken a comprehensive study on the biosynthesis of bacterial pigments including okenone and C, N, and S isotopic fractionation during various growth modes in controlled laboratory experiments of purple sulfur bacteria. Cultures of Marichromatium purpuratum 1591, M. purpuratum 1711, Thiocapsa marina 5653, and FGL21 (isolated from the chemocline of Fayetteville Green Lake, NY) were grown under autotrophic and photoheterotrophic (e.g. acetate or pyruvate) conditions in batch cultures. Concentrations of okenone and Bchl a were quantified as a function of time and growth by Ultra Performance-Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (UP-LC-MS) and spectrophotometry. Overall okenone and Bchl a concentrations reached μM levels in the cultures. At stationary phase, all four strains achieved concentrations of okenone and Bchl a that were approximately 2.5 fM and 0.2 fM per cell, respectively, with okenone to Bchl a ratios of approximately 12 to 1. Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) was performed on bulk cells and compound specific analysis of Bchl a and okenone to better understand the fractionation associated with the production of the compounds.

  6. Construction of hybrid photosynthetic units using peripheral and core antennae from two different species of photosynthetic bacteria: detection of the energy transfer from bacteriochlorophyll a in LH2 to bacteriochlorophyll b in LH1.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Ritsuko; Shimonaka, Shozo; Uchida, Naoko; Gardiner, Alastair T; Cogdell, Richard J; Sugisaki, Mitsuru; Hashimoto, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Typical purple bacterial photosynthetic units consist of supra-molecular arrays of peripheral (LH2) and core (LH1-RC) antenna complexes. Recent atomic force microscopy pictures of photosynthetic units in intact membranes have revealed that the architecture of these units is variable (Scheuring et al. (2005) Biochim Bhiophys Acta 1712:109-127). In this study, we describe methods for the construction of heterologous photosynthetic units in lipid-bilayers from mixtures of purified LH2 (from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila) and LH1-RC (from Rhodopseudomonas viridis) core complexes. The architecture of these reconstituted photosynthetic units can be varied by controlling ratio of added LH2 to core complexes. The arrangement of the complexes was visualized by electron-microscopy in combination with Fourier analysis. The regular trigonal array of the core complexes seen in the native photosynthetic membrane could be regenerated in the reconstituted membranes by temperature cycling. In the presence of added LH2 complexes, this trigonal symmetry was replaced with orthorhombic symmetry. The small lattice lengths for the latter suggest that the constituent unit of the orthorhombic lattice is the LH2. Fluorescence and fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy was applied to the set of the reconstituted membranes prepared with various proportions of LH2 to core complexes. Remarkably, even though the LH2 complexes contain bacteriochlorophyll a, and the core complexes contain bacteriochlorophyll b, it was possible to demonstrate energy transfer from LH2 to the core complexes. These experiments provide a first step along the path toward investigating how changing the architecture of purple bacterial photosynthetic units affects the overall efficiency of light-harvesting.

  7. Origin of Bacteriochlorophyll a and the Early Diversification of Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Tanai

    2016-01-01

    Photosynthesis originated in the domain Bacteria billions of years ago; however, the identity of the last common ancestor to all phototrophic bacteria remains undetermined and speculative. Here I present the evolution of BchF or 3-vinyl-bacteriochlorophyll hydratase, an enzyme exclusively found in bacteria capable of synthetizing bacteriochlorophyll a. I show that BchF exists in two forms originating from an early divergence, one found in the phylum Chlorobi, including its paralogue BchV, and a second form that was ancestral to the enzyme found in the remaining anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The phylogeny of BchF is consistent with bacteriochlorophyll a evolving in an ancestral phototrophic bacterium that lived before the radiation event that gave rise to the phylum Chloroflexi, Chlorobi, Acidobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Gemmatimonadetes, but only after the divergence of Type I and Type II reaction centers. Consequently, it is suggested that the lack of phototrophy in many groups of extant bacteria is a derived trait.

  8. Stability and properties of quasi-stable conformational states in the LH2 light-harvesting complex of Rbl. acidophilus bacteria formed by hexacoordination of bacteriochlorophyll a magnesium atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Aleksandr S.; Khokhlov, Daniil V.; Glebov, Ilya O.; Poddubnyy, Vladimir V.; Eremin, Vadim V.

    2017-06-01

    Single-molecule spectroscopic experiments on several light-harvesting complexes revealed the existence of a set of metastable conformational states with different spectroscopic properties and lifetimes spanning from milliseconds to tens of seconds. In the absence of explicit structural data, a number of probable structural changes underlying the observed spectroscopic shifts were proposed. We examine the donor-acceptor interaction between the magnesium atom and the acetyl group of the adjacent bacteriochlorophylls a as a possible origin of metastable conformational states in the LH2 light-harvesting complex of Rbl. acidophilus bacteria. The results of QM/MM and molecular dynamics simulations show that such ligation can occur at room temperature and leads to one metastable coordination bond per pair of bacteriochlorophylls in the B850 ring. According to the results of Poisson-TrESP modeling, such coordination lowers the energies of the excited states of the complex by up to 163 cm-1 which causes red spectral shift of the B850 band.

  9. Evidence for anoxygenic photosynthesis from the distribution of bacteriochlorophylls in the Black Sea.

    PubMed

    Repeta, D J; Simpson, D J; Jorgensen, B B; Jannasch, H W

    1989-11-02

    The contribution of anoxygenic photosynthesis to carbon cycling in the Black Sea, the world's largest body of anoxic marine water, has been vigorously investigated and debated for over four decades. Penetration of light into the sulphide-containing deep water may result in a zone of anaerobic primary production by photosynthetic bacteria. We report here the results of analyses of photosynthetic pigments in samples of suspended particulate matter collected from two stations in the western basin of the Black Sea. Our data demonstrate high concentrations of a bacterio-chlorophyll at the chemocline, and thus the potential for anoxygenic photosynthesis as a component of primary production in the carbon cycle of the Black Sea. More than 95% of the pigments in the bacteriochlorophyll-maximum are accounted for by a series of aromatic carotenoids and bacteriochlorophylls-e, including a previously unreported geranyl ester of 4-i-butyl bacteriochlorophyll-e. The distribution of pigments is characteristic of the obligate phototrophs Chlorobium phaeobacteroides and C. phaeovibriodes. Total depth-integrated bacteriochlorophyll at one station exceeded total chlorophyll-a in the overlying oxygenated portion of the euphotic zone. We suggest that anoxygenic photosynthesis is a relatively recent phenomenon in the Black Sea initiated by shallowing of the chemocline over the past decade and development of an anoxic layer devoid of O2 and H2S.

  10. Forster energy transfer in chlorosomes of green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Energy transfer properties of whole cells and chlorosome antenna complexes isolated from the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium limicola (containing bacteriochlorophyll c), Chlorobium vibrioforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll d) and Pelodictyon phaeoclathratiforme (containing bacteriochlorophyll e) were measured. The spectral overlap of the major chlorosome pigment (bacteriochlorophyll c, d or, e) with the bacteriochlorophyll a B795 chlorosome baseplate pigment is greatest for bacteriochlorophyll c and smallest for bacteriochlorophyll e. The absorbance and fluorescence spectra of isolated chlorosomes were measured, fitted to gaussian curves and the overlap factors with B795 calculated. Energy transfer times from the bacteriochlorophyll c, d or e to B795 were measured in whole cells and the results interpreted in terms of the Forster theory of energy transfer.

  11. Unexpectedly high bacteriochlorophyll a concentrations in neotropical tank bromeliads.

    PubMed

    Lehours, Anne-Catherine; Jeune, Anne-Hélène Le; Aguer, Jean-Pierre; Céréghino, Régis; Corbara, Bruno; Kéraval, Benoit; Leroy, Céline; Perrière, Fanny; Jeanthon, Christian; Carrias, Jean-François

    2016-06-06

    The contribution of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) to photosynthetically driven electron transport is generally low in aquatic and terrestrial systems. Here, we provide evidence that anoxygenic bacterial phototrophy is widespread and substantial in water retained by tank bromeliads of a primary rainforest in French Guiana. An analysis of the water extracted from 104 randomly selected tank bromeliads using infrared fluorimetry suggested the overall presence of abundant anoxygenic phototrophic bacterial populations. We found that purple bacteria dominated these populations responsible for unusually high BChl a/chlorophyll a ratios (>50%). Our data suggest that BChl a-based phototrophy in tank bromeliads can have significant effects on the ecology of tank-bromeliad ecosystems and on the carbon and energy fluxes in Neotropical forests. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Reconstruction of bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis pathways in the filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacterium Oscillochloris trichoides DG-6 and evolution of anoxygenic phototrophs of the order Chloroflexales.

    PubMed

    Grouzdev, Denis S; Kuznetsov, Boris B; Keppen, Olga I; Krasil'nikova, Elena N; Lebedeva, Natalia V; Ivanovsky, Ruslan N

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly accepted that green filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic (FAP) bacteria are the most ancient representatives of phototrophic micro-organisms. Modern FAPs belonging to the order Chloroflexales are divided into two suborders: Chloroflexineae and Roseiflexineae. Representatives of Roseiflexineae lack chlorosomes and synthesize bacteriochlorophyll a, whereas those of Chloroflexineae synthesize bacteriochlorophylls a and c and utilize chlorosomes for light harvesting. Though they constitute a small number of species, FAPs are quite diverse in their physiology. This bacterial group includes autotrophs and heterotrophs, thermophiles and mesophiles, aerobes and anaerobes, occupying both freshwater and halophilic environments. The anaerobic mesophilic autotroph Oscillochloris trichoides DG-6 is still not well studied in its physiology, and its evolutionary origin remains unclear. The goals of this study included identification of the reaction centre type of O. trichoides DG-6, reconstruction of its bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis pathways, and determination of its evolutionary relationships with other FAPs. By enzymic and genomic analysis, the presence of RCII in O. trichoides DG-6 was demonstrated and the complete gene set involved in biosynthesis of bacteriochlorophylls a and c was established. We found that the bacteriochlorophyll gene sets differed between aerobic and anaerobic FAPs. The aerobic FAP genomes code oxygen-dependent AcsF cyclases, but lack the bchQ/bchR genes, which have been associated with adaptation to low light conditions in the anaerobic FAPs. A scenario of evolution of FAPs belonging to the order Chloroflexales is proposed. © 2015 The Authors.

  13. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolate from Markisa fruit (Passiflora sp.) as a producer of protease enzyme and probiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidayat, Habibi

    2017-03-01

    16S rRNA gene analysis of bacteria lactic acid (LAB) isolate from Markisa Kuning Fruit (Passiflora edulis var. flavicarpa) as a producer of protease enzyme and probiotics has been done. The aim of the study is to determine the protease enzyme activity and 16S rRNA gene amplification using PCR. The calculation procedure was done to M4 isolate bacteria lactic acid (LAB) Isolate which has been resistant to acids with pH 2.0 in the manner of screening protease enzyme activity test result 6.5 to clear zone is 13 mm againts colony diametre is 2 mm. The results of study enzyme activity used spectrophotometer UV-Vis obtainable the regression equation Y=0.02983+0.001312X, with levels of protein M4 isolate is 0.6594 mg/mL and enzyme activity of obtainable is 0.8626 unit/ml while the spesific enzyme activity produced is 1.308 unit/mg. Then, 16S rRNA gene amplificatiom and DNA sequencing has been done. The results of study showed that the bacteria species contained from M4 bacteria lactic acid (LAB) isolate is Weisella cibiria strain II-I-59. Weisella cibiria strain II-I-59 is one of bacteria could be utilized in the digestive tract.

  14. Carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 complexes studied with 10-fs time resolution.

    PubMed

    Polli, Dario; Cerullo, Giulio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; De Silvestri, Sandro; Hashimoto, Hideki; Cogdell, Richard J

    2006-04-01

    In this report, we present a study of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer processes in two peripheral light-harvesting complexes (known as LH2) from purple bacteria. We use transient absorption spectroscopy with approximately 10 fs temporal resolution, which is necessary to observe the very fast energy relaxation processes. By comparing excited-state dynamics of the carotenoids in organic solvents and inside the LH2 complexes, it has been possible to directly evaluate their energy transfer efficiency to the bacteriochlorophylls. In the case of okenone in the LH2 complex from Chromatium purpuratum, we obtained an energy transfer efficiency of etaET2=63+/-2.5% from the optically active excited state (S2) and etaET1=61+/-2% from the optically dark state (S1); for rhodopin glucoside contained in the LH2 complex from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila these values become etaET2=49.5+/-3.5% and etaET1=5.1+/-1%. The measurements also enabled us to observe vibrational energy relaxation in the carotenoids' S1 state and real-time collective vibrational coherence initiated by the ultrashort pump pulses. Our results are important for understanding the dynamics of early events of photosynthesis and relating it to the structural arrangement of the chromophores.

  15. Lipid composition in a strain of Bacillus subtilis, a producer of iturin A lipopeptides that are active against uropathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bernat, Przemysław; Paraszkiewicz, Katarzyna; Siewiera, Paulina; Moryl, Magdalena; Płaza, Grażyna; Chojniak, Joanna

    2016-10-01

    Urinary tract infections are a common disease in humans. Therefore, new methods are needed to destroy biofilms that are formed by uropathogens. Iturin A lipopeptides (LPs) C14 and C15 are potent biosurfactants synthetized by the Bacillus subtilis I'1a strain. The biological activity of extracted LPs was confirmed by examining extracts from I'1a cultures against uropathogenic bacteria that had been isolated from biofilms on urinary catheters. Compared with cultures of DSM 3257, which produce surfactin at a relatively low level, the extract obtained from strain I'1a exhibited a greater inhibitory effect against both planktonic and sessile forms of Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae, Proteus mirabilis, Citrobacter freundii and Enterococcus faecalis. Moreover, cyclic LP biosurfactants may disturb the integrity of cytoplasmic membranes; therefore, we investigated the effects of synthetized LPs on fatty acids and phospholipids of B. subtilis. LPs and lipids were analyzed using GC-MS, LC-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF techniques. Compared with B. subtilis DSM 3257, membranes of the I'1a strain were characterized by an increased amount of anteiso fatty acids and a ten-fold higher ratio of phosphatidylglycerol (PG)-to-phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Interestingly, in cultures of B. subtilis DSM 3257 supplemented with LP extracts of the I'1a strain, the PG-to-PE ratio was fourfold higher, and the amount of anteiso fatty acids was also increased.

  16. Completion of biosynthetic pathways for bacteriochlorophyll g in Heliobacterium modesticaldum: The C8-ethylidene group formation.

    PubMed

    Tsukatani, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Haruki; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Fujita, Yuichi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2013-10-01

    Heliobacteria have the simplest photosynthetic apparatus, i.e., a type-I reaction center lacking a peripheral light-harvesting complex. Bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) g molecules are bound to the reaction center complex and work both as special-pair and antenna pigments. The C8-ethylidene group formation for BChl g is the last missing link in biosynthetic pathways for bacterial special-pair pigments, which include BChls a and b as well. Here, we report that chlorophyllide a oxidoreductase (COR) of Heliobacterium modesticaldum catalyzes the C8-ethylidene formation from 8-vinyl-chlorophyllide a, producing bacteriochlorophyllide g, the direct precursor for BChl g without the farnesyl tail. The finding led to plausible biosynthetic pathways for 8(1)-hydroxy-chlorophyll a, a primary electron acceptor from the special pair in heliobacterial reaction centers. Proposed catalytic mechanisms on hydrogenation reaction of the ethylidene synthase-type CORs are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Spectral heterogeneity and carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 light-harvesting complexes from Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Magdaong, Nikki M; LaFountain, Amy M; Hacking, Kirsty; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Gibson, George N; Cogdell, Richard J; Frank, Harry A

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthetic organisms produce a vast array of spectral forms of antenna pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar energy and also to adapt to growth under the variable environmental conditions of light intensity, temperature, and nutrient availability. This behavior is exemplified by Allochromatium (Alc.) vinosum, a photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium that produces different types of LH2 light-harvesting complexes in response to variations in growth conditions. In the present work, three different spectral forms of LH2 from Alc. vinosum, B800-820, B800-840, and B800-850, were isolated, purified, and examined using steady-state absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, and ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The pigment composition of the LH2 complexes was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography, and all were found to contain five carotenoids: lycopene, anhydrorhodovibrin, spirilloxanthin, rhodopin, and rhodovibrin. Spectral reconstructions of the absorption and fluorescence excitation spectra based on the pigment composition revealed significantly more spectral heterogeneity in these systems compared to LH2 complexes isolated from other species of purple bacteria. The data also revealed the individual carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer efficiencies which were correlated with the kinetic data from the ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic experiments. This series of LH2 complexes allows a systematic exploration of the factors that determine the spectral properties of the bound pigments and control the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer.

  18. Characterization of novel bacteriochlorophyll-a-containing red filaments from alkaline hot springs in Yellowstone National Park.

    PubMed

    Boomer, S M; Pierson, B K; Austinhirst, R; Castenholz, R W

    2000-09-01

    Novel red, filamentous, gliding bacteria formed deep red layers in several alkaline hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. Filaments contained densely layered intracellular membranes and bacteriochlorophyll a. The in vivo absorption spectrum of the red layer filaments was distinct from other phototrophs, with unusual bacteriochlorophyll a signature peaks in the near-infrared (IR) region (807 nm and 911 nm). These absorption peaks were similar to the wavelengths penetrating to the red layer of the mats as measured with in situ spectroradiometry. The filaments also demonstrated maximal photosynthetic uptake of radiolabeled carbon sources at these wavelengths. The red layer filaments displayed anoxygenic photoheterotrophy, as evidenced by the specific incorporation of acetate, not bicarbonate, and by the absence of oxygen production. Photoheterotrophy was unaffected by sulfide and oxygen, but was diminished by high-intensity visible light. Near-IR radiation supported photoheterotrophy. Morphologically and spectrally similar filaments were observed in several springs in Yellowstone National Park, including Octopus Spring. Taken together, these data suggest that the red layer filaments are most similar to the photoheterotroph, Heliothrix oregonensis. Notable differences include mat position and coloration, absorption spectra, and prominent intracellular membranes.

  19. Carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer through vibronic coupling in LH2 from Phaeosprillum molischianum.

    PubMed

    Thyrhaug, Erling; Lincoln, Craig N; Branchi, Federico; Cerullo, Giulio; Perlík, Václav; Šanda, František; Lokstein, Heiko; Hauer, Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    The peripheral light-harvesting antenna complex (LH2) of purple photosynthetic bacteria is an ideal testing ground for models of structure-function relationships due to its well-determined molecular structure and ultrafast energy deactivation. It has been the target for numerous studies in both theory and ultrafast spectroscopy; nevertheless, certain aspects of the convoluted relaxation network of LH2 lack a satisfactory explanation by conventional theories. For example, the initial carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer step necessary on visible light excitation was long considered to follow the Förster mechanism, even though transfer times as short as 40 femtoseconds (fs) have been observed. Such transfer times are hard to accommodate by Förster theory, as the moderate coupling strengths found in LH2 suggest much slower transfer within this framework. In this study, we investigate LH2 from Phaeospirillum (Ph.) molischianum in two types of transient absorption experiments-with narrowband pump and white-light probe resulting in 100 fs time resolution, and with degenerate broadband 10 fs pump and probe pulses. With regard to the split Q x band in this system, we show that vibronically mediated transfer explains both the ultrafast carotenoid-to-B850 transfer, and the almost complete lack of transfer to B800. These results are beyond Förster theory, which predicts an almost equal partition between the two channels.

  20. Intermolecular Modes between LH2 Bacteriochlorophylls and Protein Residues: The Effect on the Excitation Energies.

    PubMed

    Anda, André; De Vico, Luca; Hansen, Thorsten

    2017-06-08

    Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) executes the primary processes of photosynthesis in purple bacteria; photon absorption, and energy transportation to the reaction center. A detailed mechanistic insight into these operations is obscured by the complexity of the light-harvesting systems, particularly by the chromophore-environment interaction. In this work, we focus on the effects of the protein residues that are ligated to the bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and construct potential energy surfaces of the ground and first optically excited state for the various BChl-residue systems where we in each case consider two degrees of freedom in the intermolecular region. We find that the excitation energies are only slightly affected by the considered modes. In addition, we see that axial ligands and hydrogen-bonded residues have opposite effects on both excitation energies and oscillator strengths by comparing to the isolated BChls. Our results indicate that only a small part of the chromophore-environment interaction can be associated with the intermolecular region between a BChl and an adjacent residue, but that it may be possible to selectively raise or lower the excitation energy at the axial and planar residue positions, respectively.

  1. Lifetimes of bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence in Rhodopseudomonas viridis and Heliobacterium chlorum at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinherenbrink, F. A.; Cheng, P.; Amesz, J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetimes of isolated membranes of Rhodopseudomonas viridis were measured in the temperature range of 77 K to 25 K. At room temperature, the main component of the fluorescence decay of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) b had a time constant of 50 ps. In contrast to other purple bacteria, the emission at low temperature was spectrally homogeneous and showed essentially single lifetimes of 140 ps at 77 K and 180 ps at 25 K, with the primary electron donor in the oxidized state. Taking into account the relative fluorescence yields with open and closed reaction centers, we arrive at numbers of 125 ps and 215 ps, respectively, for open reaction centers. These numbers are significantly smaller than expected on the basis of measurements of the efficiency of charge separation, perhaps suggesting that the excitation decay in the absence of reaction centers is considerably faster at low temperature than at room temperature. At least four different spectral components with different lifetimes were observed at 25 K in the emission of Heliobacterium chlorum, a short-wavelength component of about 30 ps and three longer-wavelength components of about 100 ps, 300 ps, and 900 ps. This indicates a strong heterogeneity in the emitting pigment, BChl g-808. The component with the shortest lifetime does not appear to be affected by the redox state of the reaction center and might reflect energy transfer to BChl g species which are connected to the reaction center.

  2. Excitation energy transfer from the bacteriochlorophyll Soret band to carotenoids in the LH2 light-harvesting complex from Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila is negligible.

    PubMed

    Razjivin, A P; Lukashev, E P; Kompanets, V O; Kozlovsky, V S; Ashikhmin, A A; Chekalin, S V; Moskalenko, A A; Paschenko, V Z

    2017-09-01

    Pathways of intramolecular conversion and intermolecular electronic excitation energy transfer (EET) in the photosynthetic apparatus of purple bacteria remain subject to debate. Here we experimentally tested the possibility of EET from the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) Soret band to the singlet S 2 level of carotenoids using femtosecond pump-probe measurements and steady-state fluorescence excitation and absorption measurements in the near-ultraviolet and visible spectral ranges. The efficiency of EET from the Soret band of BChl to S 2 of the carotenoids in light-harvesting complex LH2 from the purple bacterium Ectothiorhodospira haloalkaliphila appeared not to exceed a few percent.

  3. Nonpigmented and Bacteriochlorophyll-Containing Bradyrhizobia Isolated from Aeschynomene indica

    PubMed Central

    van Berkum, P.; Tully, R. E.; Keister, D. L.

    1995-01-01

    The legume genus Aeschynomene is unusual, since many species develop stem nodules and the bradyrhizobia isolated from these nodules produce bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl). Evidence is presented that the bradyrhizobia of Aeschynomene indica have wide distribution throughout the world, since A. indica was nodulated when grown in 58 soils collected in 14 different countries. Only 38 of 79 isolates tested synthesized Bchl and carotenoids during heterotrophic growth. Nine isolates produced Bchl constitutively, and cultures were pigmented after growth in the dark. The other isolates required light for Bchl production. The DNA from seven pigmented and three nonpigmented bradyrhizobia hybridized with a DNA probe containing the genes for the photosynthetic apparatus of Rhodobacter capsulatus, but DNA from two other nonpigmented isolates did not hybridize with this probe. A relationship between pigmentation in culture and symbiotic phenotype was not evident, since bradyrhizobia of both Bchl phenotypes nodulated stems of A. indica and formed nitrogen-fixing symbioses. Several isolates, which were ineffective on A. indica, probably do belong to the proposed cross-inoculation group 3 (D. Alazard, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 50:732-734, 1985), since they did not nodulate Aeschynomene americana or Macroptilium atropurpureum. Since it has been suggested that extant rhizobia arose from photosynthetic ancestors (J. I. Sprent, p. 45-54, in P. M. Gresshoff, L. E. Roth, G. Stacey, and W. E. Newton, ed., Nitrogen Fixation: Achievements and Objectives, 1990), we propose that the nonpigmented isolates may represent an extant lineage of an intermediate evolutionary stage. PMID:16534933

  4. Localisation and origin of the bacteriochlorophyll-derived photosensitizer in the retina of the deep-sea dragon fish Malacosteus niger

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Ronald H.; Genner, Martin J.; Hudson, Alan G.; Partridge, Julian C.; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Most deep-sea fish have a single visual pigment maximally sensitive at short wavelengths, approximately matching the spectrum of both downwelling sunlight and bioluminescence. However, Malcosteus niger produces far-red bioluminescence and its longwave retinal sensitivity is enhanced by red-shifted visual pigments, a longwave reflecting tapetum and, uniquely, a bacteriochlorophyll-derived photosensitizer. The origin of the photosensitizer, however, remains unclear. We investigated whether the bacteriochlorophyll was produced by endosymbiotic bacteria within unusual structures adjacent to the photoreceptors that had previously been described in this species. However, microscopy, elemental analysis and SYTOX green staining provided no evidence for such localised retinal bacteria, instead the photosensitizer was shown to be distributed throughout the retina. Furthermore, comparison of mRNA from the retina of Malacosteus to that of the closely related Pachystomias microdon (which does not contain a bacterichlorophyll-derived photosensitzer) revealed no genes of bacterial origin that were specifically up-regulated in Malacosteus. Instead up-regulated Malacosteus genes were associated with photosensitivity and may relate to its unique visual ecology and the chlorophyll-based visual system. We also suggest that the unusual longwave-reflecting, astaxanthin-based, tapetum of Malacosteus may protect the retina from the potential cytotoxicity of such a system. PMID:27996027

  5. Biotechnology of Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a diverse collection of organisms that are defined by their ability to grow using energy from light without evolving oxygen. The dominant groups are purple sulfur bacteria, purple nonsulfur bacteria, green sulfur bacteria, and green and red filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. They represent several bacterial phyla but they all have bacteriochlorophylls and carotenoids and photochemical reaction centers which generate ATP and cellular reductants used for CO 2 fixation. They typically have an anaerobic lifestyle in the light, although some grow aerobically in the dark. Some of them oxidize inorganic sulfur compounds for light-dependent CO 2 fixation; this ability can be exploited for photobiological removal of hydrogen sulfide from wastewater and biogas. The anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria also perform bioremediation of recalcitrant dyes, pesticides, and heavy metals under anaerobic conditions. Finally, these organisms may be useful for overexpression of membrane proteins and photobiological production of H 2 and other valuable compounds.

  6. Origin and spread of photosynthesis based upon conserved sequence features in key bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis proteins.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Radhey S

    2012-11-01

    The origin of photosynthesis and how this capability has spread to other bacterial phyla remain important unresolved questions. I describe here a number of conserved signature indels (CSIs) in key proteins involved in bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) biosynthesis that provide important insights in these regards. The proteins BchL and BchX, which are essential for Bchl biosynthesis, are derived by gene duplication in a common ancestor of all phototrophs. More ancient gene duplication gave rise to the BchX-BchL proteins and the NifH protein of the nitrogenase complex. The sequence alignment of NifH-BchX-BchL proteins contain two CSIs that are uniquely shared by all NifH and BchX homologs, but not by any BchL homologs. These CSIs and phylogenetic analysis of NifH-BchX-BchL protein sequences strongly suggest that the BchX homologs are ancestral to BchL and that the Bchl-based anoxygenic photosynthesis originated prior to the chlorophyll (Chl)-based photosynthesis in cyanobacteria. Another CSI in the BchX-BchL sequence alignment that is uniquely shared by all BchX homologs and the BchL sequences from Heliobacteriaceae, but absent in all other BchL homologs, suggests that the BchL homologs from Heliobacteriaceae are primitive in comparison to all other photosynthetic lineages. Several other identified CSIs in the BchN homologs are commonly shared by all proteobacterial homologs and a clade consisting of the marine unicellular Cyanobacteria (Clade C). These CSIs in conjunction with the results of phylogenetic analyses and pair-wise sequence similarity on the BchL, BchN, and BchB proteins, where the homologs from Clade C Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria exhibited close relationship, provide strong evidence that these two groups have incurred lateral gene transfers. Additionally, phylogenetic analyses and several CSIs in the BchL-N-B proteins that are uniquely shared by all Chlorobi and Chloroflexi homologs provide evidence that the genes for these proteins have also been

  7. Protein-induced geometric constraints and charge transfer in bacteriochlorophyll-histidine complexes in LH2.

    PubMed

    Wawrzyniak, Piotr K; Alia, A; Schaap, Roland G; Heemskerk, Mattijs M; de Groot, Huub J M; Buda, Francesco

    2008-12-14

    Bacteriochlorophyll-histidine complexes are ubiquitous in nature and are essential structural motifs supporting the conversion of solar energy into chemically useful compounds in a wide range of photosynthesis processes. A systematic density functional theory study of the NMR chemical shifts for histidine and for bacteriochlorophyll-a-histidine complexes in the light-harvesting complex II (LH2) is performed using the BLYP functional in combination with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The computed chemical shift patterns are consistent with available experimental data for positive and neutral(tau) (N(tau) protonated) crystalline histidines. The results for the bacteriochlorophyll-a-histidine complexes in LH2 provide evidence that the protein environment is stabilizing the histidine close to the Mg ion, thereby inducing a large charge transfer of approximately 0.5 electronic equivalent. Due to this protein-induced geometric constraint, the Mg-coordinated histidine in LH2 appears to be in a frustrated state very different from the formal neutral(pi) (N(pi) protonated) form. This finding could be important for the understanding of basic functional mechanisms involved in tuning the electronic properties and exciton coupling in LH2.

  8. Descriptions of Roseiarcus fermentans gen. nov., sp. nov., a bacteriochlorophyll a-containing fermentative bacterium related phylogenetically to alphaproteobacterial methanotrophs, and of the family Roseiarcaceae fam. nov.

    PubMed

    Kulichevskaya, Irina S; Danilova, Olga V; Tereshina, Vera M; Kevbrin, Vadim V; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2014-08-01

    A light-pink-pigmented, microaerophilic bacterium was obtained from a methanotrophic consortium enriched from acidic Sphagnum peat and designated strain Pf56(T). Cells of this bacterium were Gram-negative, non-motile, thick curved rods that contained a vesicular intracytoplasmic membrane system characteristic of some purple non-sulfur alphaproteobacteria. The absorption spectrum of acetone/methanol extracts of cells grown in the light showed maxima at 363, 475, 505, 601 and 770 nm; the peaks at 363 and 770 nm are characteristic of bacteriochlorophyll a. However, in contrast to purple non-sulfur bacteria, strain Pf56(T) was unable to grow phototrophically under anoxic conditions in the light. Best growth occurred on some sugars and organic acids under micro-oxic conditions by means of fermentation. The fermentation products were propionate, acetate and hydrogen. Slow chemo-organotrophic growth was also observed under fully oxic conditions. Light stimulated growth. C1 substrates were not utilized. Strain Pf56(T) grew at pH 4.0-7.0 (optimum pH 5.5-6.5) and at 15-30 °C (optimum 22-28 °C). The major cellular fatty acids were 19 : 0 cyclo ω8c and 18 : 1ω7c; quinones were represented by ubiquinone Q-10. The G+C content of the DNA was 70.0 mol%. Strain Pf56 displays 93.6-94.7 and 92.7-93.7% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to members of the families Methylocystaceae and Beijerinckiaceae, respectively, and belongs to a large cluster of environmental sequences retrieved from various wetlands and forest soils in cultivation-independent studies. Phenotypic, genotypic and chemotaxonomic characteristics of strain Pf56(T) suggest that it represents a novel genus and species of bacteriochlorophyll a-containing fermentative bacteria, for which the name Roseiarcus fermentans gen. nov., sp. nov. is proposed. Strain Pf56(T) ( = DSM 24875(T) = VKM B-2876(T)) is the type strain of Roseiarcus fermentans, and is also the first characterized member of a novel family

  9. Isolation of Optically Targeted Single Bacteria by Application of Fluidic Force Microscopy to Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophs from the Phyllosphere

    PubMed Central

    Stiefel, Philipp; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2013-01-01

    In their natural environment, bacteria often behave differently than they do under laboratory conditions. To gain insight into the physiology of bacteria in situ, dedicated approaches are required to monitor their adaptations and specific behaviors under environmental conditions. Optical microscopy is crucial for the observation of fundamental characteristics of bacteria, such as cell shape, size, and marker gene expression. Here, fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM) was exploited to isolate optically selected bacteria for subsequent identification and characterization. In this study, bacteriochlorophyll-producing bacteria, which can be visualized due to their characteristic fluorescence in the infrared range, were isolated from leaf washes. Bacterial communities from the phyllosphere were investigated because they harbor genes indicative of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthesis. Our data show that different species of Methylobacterium express their photosystem in planta, and they show a distinct pattern of bacteriochlorophyll production under laboratory conditions that is dependent on supplied carbon sources. PMID:23770907

  10. Presence of exclusively bacteriochlorophyll-c containing substrain in the culture of green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme strain NCIB 8327 producing bacteriochlorophyll-d.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Oh-oka, Hirozo; Hayashi, Takashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2003-12-01

    The light-dependent composition change of light harvesting bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)s in the present culture of a green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium (Chl.) vibrioforme f. sp. thiosulfatophilum strain NCIB 8327 was investigated by visible absorption spectroscopy and HPLC analyses. When the culture was repeatedly grown in liquid media under a low light condition, both the Soret and Qy absorption bands of the in vivo spectrum were shifted to longer wavelengths. Analysis of the extracted pigments by HPLC revealed that the ratio of the amount of BChl-c to that of BChl-d molecules gradually increased during repeated cultivation. In contrast, when the culture grown under a low light intensity was transferred to a high light condition and continued to be grown, the absorption bands were shifted to shorter wavelengths and the ratio of BChls-c/d decreased finally to the almost original value. Colonies were prepared on solid agar media from the liquid culture containing both BChls-c and d, which was grown under a low light intensity. Each colony obtained was found to contain either BChl-c or d, but not both of them. Two types of cells isolated in this study were derived from the same clone, judged from their genetic analyses. The variation of pigment composition in our liquid culture observed here could be ascribed to the difference of growth rates between two substrains containing BChl-c and BChl-d, respectively, depending on light conditions.

  11. Raman spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll a in the S1 state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizawa, Ei-ichi; Hashimoto, Hideki; Koyama, Yasushi

    1991-07-01

    The S 1 Raman spectrum of bacteriochlorophyll a is reported for the first time. A one-color experiment using the 351 nm picosecond pulses (duration 50 ps and repetition 1 kHz) for tetrahydrofuran solution detected a transient species, which showed distinct Raman lines at 1567, 1409 and 1320 cm -1 and weak profiles around 1169, 1092, 1051 and 794 cm -1. The other one-color experiment using the 355 nm nanosecond pulses (duration 12 ns and repetition 10 Hz) detected the T 1 species reported previously showing Raman lines at 1578 and 1330 cm -1. Thus, the newly identified transient species, which was pumped and probed within 50 ps, is assigned to S 1.

  12. Comparison between chlorosomes containing bacteriochlorophyll-c and chlorosomes containing bacteriochlorophyll-d isolated from two substrains of green sulfur photosynthetic bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIB 8327.

    PubMed

    Saga, Yoshitaka; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2004-07-19

    Chlorosomes containing bacteriochlorophyll(BChl)-c and those containing BChl-d were isolated from two substrains of Chlorobium vibrioforme f. sp. thiosulfatophilum NCIB 8327, respectively. The two types of chlorosomes were investigated from the following aspect, what kinds of effects the molecular structure of chlorosomal BChls had on structural and spectroscopic properties of in vivo self-aggregates in chlorosomes without alteration of the other components such as chlorosomal proteins and lipids; both chlorosomes were expected to have the same components except for light-harvesting BChls. In their visible absorption spectra, the differences of Soret and Q(y) peak positions between BChl-c containing and BChl-d containing chlorosomes were similar to the differences between monomeric BChl-c and d. An inverse S-shaped CD signal in the Q(y) region of BChl-d containing chlorosomes was 1.4 times larger than that of BChl-c containing chlorosomes, when the Q(y) absorbance of the two chlorosomes was almost the same. This implies that the excitonic interaction of BChl-d is larger than that of BChl-c in natural chlorosomes. Resonance Raman spectroscopy showed that BChl self-assemblies in both chlorosomes were essentially formed by the same local structural interaction among 3(1)-hydroxy group, 13-keto group, and central magnesium. BChl-d self-aggregates in chlorosomes were more tolerant of 1-hexanol than in vivo BChl-c aggregates, suggesting that the molecular structure of BChl-d provided more stable self-assemblies than BChl-c in natural chlorosomes.

  13. Complete genome sequence of the bacteriochlorophyll a-containing Roseibacterium elongatum type strain (DSM 19469T), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from Australian coast sand

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    Roseibacterium elongatum Suzuki et al. 2006 is a pink-pigmented and bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine ‘Roseobacter group’ were found to be abundant in the ocean and play an important role in global and biogeochemical processes. In the present study we describe the features of R. elongatum strain OCh 323T together with its genome sequence and annotation. The 3,555,102 bp long genome consists of one circular chromosome with no extrachromosomal elements and is one of the smallest known Roseobacter genomes. It contains 3,540 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a photosynthetic gene cluster, which putatively enables a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Gene sequences associated with quorum sensing, motility, surface attachment, and thiosulfate and carbon monoxide oxidation could be detected. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). PMID:25197467

  14. Complete genome sequence of the bacteriochlorophyll a-containing Roseibacterium elongatum type strain (DSM 19469(T)), a representative of the Roseobacter group isolated from Australian coast sand.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Thomas; Fiebig, Anne; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-15

    Roseibacterium elongatum Suzuki et al. 2006 is a pink-pigmented and bacteriochlorophyll a-producing representative of the Roseobacter group within the alphaproteobacterial family Rhodobacteraceae. Representatives of the marine 'Roseobacter group' were found to be abundant in the ocean and play an important role in global and biogeochemical processes. In the present study we describe the features of R. elongatum strain OCh 323(T) together with its genome sequence and annotation. The 3,555,102 bp long genome consists of one circular chromosome with no extrachromosomal elements and is one of the smallest known Roseobacter genomes. It contains 3,540 protein-coding genes and 59 RNA genes. Genome analysis revealed the presence of a photosynthetic gene cluster, which putatively enables a photoheterotrophic lifestyle. Gene sequences associated with quorum sensing, motility, surface attachment, and thiosulfate and carbon monoxide oxidation could be detected. The genome was sequenced as part of the activities of the Transregional Collaborative Research Centre 51 (TRR51) funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG).

  15. Mutual control of axial and equatorial ligands: model studies with [Ni]-bacteriochlorophyll-a.

    PubMed

    Yerushalmi, Roie; Noy, Dror; Baldridge, Kim K; Scherz, Avigdor

    2002-07-17

    Modification of the metal's electronic environment by ligand association and dissociation in metalloenzymes is considered cardinal to their catalytic activity. We have recently presented a novel system that utilizes the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) macrocycle as a ligand and reporter. This system allows for charge mobilization in the equatorial plane and experimental estimate of changes in the electronic charge density around the metal with no modification of the metal's chemical environment. The unique spectroscopy, electrochemistry and coordination chemistry of [Ni]-bacteriochlorophyll ([Ni]-BChl) enable us to follow directly fine details and steps involved in the function of the metal redox center. This approach is utilized here whereby electro-chemical reduction of [Ni]-BChl to the monoanion [Ni]-BChl(-) results in reversible dissociation of biologically relevant axial ligands. Similar ligand dissociation was previously detected upon photoexcitation of [Ni]-BChl (Musewald, C.; Hartwich, G.; Lossau, H.; Gilch, P.; Pollinger-Dammer, F.; Scheer, H.; Michel-Beyerle, M. E. J. Phys. Chem. B 1999, 103, 7055-7060 and Noy, D.; Yerushalmi, R.; Brumfeld, V.; Ashur, I.; Baldridge, K. K.; Scheer, H.; Scherz, A. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2000, 122, 3937-3944). The electrochemical measurements and quantum mechanical (QM) calculations performed here for the neutral, singly reduced, monoligated, and singly reduced, monoligated [Ni]-BChl suggest the following: (a) Electroreduction, although resulting in a pi anion [Ni]-BChl(-) radical, causes electron density migration to the [Ni]-BChl core. (b) Reduction of nonligated [Ni]-BChl does not change the macrocycle conformation, whereas axial ligation results in a dramatic expansion of the metal core and a flattening of the highly ruffled macrocycle conformation. (c) In both the monoanion and singly excited [Ni]-BChl ([Ni]-BChl*), the frontier singly occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) has a small but nonnegligible metal character. Finally, (d

  16. Solvation effect of bacteriochlorophyll excitons in light-harvesting complex LH2.

    PubMed

    Urboniene, V; Vrublevskaja, O; Trinkunas, G; Gall, A; Robert, B; Valkunas, L

    2007-09-15

    We have characterized the influence of the protein environment on the spectral properties of the bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl) molecules of the peripheral light-harvesting (or LH2) complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The spectral density functions of the pigments responsible for the 800 and 850 nm electronic transitions were determined from the temperature dependence of the Bchl absorption spectra in different environments (detergent micelles and native membranes). The spectral density function is virtually independent of the hydrophobic support that the protein experiences. The reorganization energy for the B850 Bchls is 220 cm(-1), which is almost twice that of the B800 Bchls, and its Huang-Rhys factor reaches 8.4. Around the transition point temperature, and at higher temperatures, both the static spectral inhomogeneity and the resonance interactions become temperature-dependent. The inhomogeneous distribution function of the transitions exhibits less temperature dependence when LH2 is embedded in membranes, suggesting that the lipid phase protects the protein. However, the temperature dependence of the fluorescence spectra of LH2 cannot be fitted using the same parameters determined from the analysis of the absorption spectra. Correct fitting requires the lowest exciton states to be additionally shifted to the red, suggesting the reorganization of the exciton spectrum.

  17. Synthesis of covalently linked dimeric derivatives of chlorophyll a, pyrochlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, and bacteriochlorophyll a

    SciT

    Wasielewski, M.R.; Svec, W.A.

    1980-05-09

    Bis(chlorophyllide) ethylene glycol diesters were prepared for each of the title compounds. Pheophytins a and b isolated from alfalfa and bacteriochlorophyll a isolated from R. sphaeroides were treated with 80% aqueous trifluoroacetic acid to yield the corresponding pheophorbides. Pyropheophorbide was prepared by a literature procedure. Carbonic anhydride and benzotriazole-1-methanesulfonate activation methods were used in the esterification of the pheophorbides with ethylene glycol at ambient temperature. Each method yielded 75%+ of the pheophorbide ethylene glycol monoester. These monoesters were treated with equimolar amounts of the corresponding pheophorbide by using benzotriazol-1-methanesulfonate/4-(dimethylamino)pyridine in CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ or dicyclohexylcarbodiimide/4-(dimethylamino)pyridine in CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/ atmore » ambient temperature. Yields of bis(phenophorbide) ethylene glycol diesters averaged about 50% for the former method and 70% for the latter method. Insertion of the magnesium atoms into the a series macrocycles was accomplished with iodomagnesium 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenolate, IMgBHT, in CH/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/, while the metalation of the b and bacterial series macrocycles was carried out with a mixture of IMgBHT and lithium 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidide in thiophen, all at ambient temperature. Both mono- and dimetalated derivatives were isolated and characterized in each case.« less

  18. The photophysics of monomeric bacteriochlorophylls c and d and their derivatives: properties of the triplet state and singlet oxygen photogeneration and quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krasnovsky, A. A. Jr; Cheng, P.; Blankenship, R. E.; Moore, T. A.; Gust, D.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of pigment triplet-triplet absorption, pigment phosphorescence and photosensitized singlet oxygen luminescence were carried out on solutions containing monomeric bacteriochlorophylls (Bchl) c and d, isolated from green photosynthetic bacteria, and their magnesium-free and farnesyl-free analogs. The energies of the pigment triplet states fell in the range 1.29-1.34 eV. The triplet lifetimes in aerobic solutions were 200-250 ns; they increased to 280 +/- 70 microseconds after nitrogen purging in liquid solutions and to 0.7-2.1 ms in a solid matrix at ambient or liquid nitrogen temperatures. Rate constants for quenching of the pigment triplet state by oxygen were (2.0-2.5) x 10(9) M-1 s-1, which is close to 1/9 of the rate constant for diffusion-controlled reactions. This quenching was accompanied by singlet oxygen formation. The quantum yields for the triplet state formation and singlet oxygen production were 55-75% in air-saturated solutions. Singlet oxygen quenching by ground-state pigment molecules was observed. Quenching was the most efficient for magnesium-containing pigments, kq = (0.31-1.2) x 10(9) M-1 s-1. It is caused mainly by a physical process of singlet oxygen (1O2) deactivation. Thus, Bchl c and d and their derivatives, as well as chlorophyll and Bchl a, combine a high efficiency of singlet oxygen production with the ability to protect photochemical and photobiological systems against damage by singlet oxygen.

  19. [Pigments of green sulfur bacteria isolated from reservoirs of Iavoriv sulfur deposit].

    PubMed

    Baran, I M; Hudz', S P; Hnatush, S O; Fedorovych, A M

    2004-01-01

    The enormous amount of hydrogen sulfide (up to 11 mg/ml) is present in the Yavoriv sulfur deposit reservoirs owing to sulfur reductive bacteria activity. As a consequence the ecological situation is badly affected and requires recovering. The biological H2S decomposition by photosynthetic sulfur bacteria, which use the hydrogen sulfide as electron donor during photosynthesis, can be one of the possible ways of this toxic substance destruction. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of photosynthetic pigments composition that derived from green photosynthesizing sulfur bacteria from reservoirs of Yavoriv sulfur deposit is carried out. It was fixed that Pelodictyon sp., Chlorobium sp. and isolated consortia "Pelochromatium sp." contain the bacteriochlorophyll c and d. All the isolated cultures contained bacteriochlorophyll a in trace amounts. The obtained photosynthetic pigments (bacteriochlorophylls, carotenoids) were recognized by their absorption spectra in the visible and far-red region and by their quantity. The difference was not essential. All investigated cultures of isolated bacteria contain some carotenoid the Chlorobium sp. and obtained consortia possesses isorenieratene. The absorption maxima of extracted pigments from young cultures of isolated green sulfur bacteria are more definitely displayed than those from old cultures. Investigations of phototrophic sulfur bacteria were carried out in Ukraine up to now. Ecological problem that occurred in the Yavoriv sulfur deposit as a result of the deposit exploitation caused a necessity of the investigation of photosynthetic sulfur bacteria and bacterial photosynthesis mechanism. The photosynthetic pigments nature identification will promote the fast and precise identification of the new forms of photosynthetic sulfur bacteria and will extend our knowledge about their role in the anoxygenic photosynthesis.

  20. Two-photon excitation spectroscopy of carotenoid-containing and carotenoid-depleted LH2 complexes from purple bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Ilya; Kompanetz, Viktor; Makhneva, Zoya; Chekalin, Sergey; Moskalenko, Andrei; Razjivin, Andrei

    2009-08-27

    We applied two-photon fluorescence excitation spectroscopy to LH2 complex from purple bacteria Allochromatium minutissimum and Rhodobacter sphaeroides . Bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence was measured under two-photon excitation of the samples within the 1200-1500 nm region. Spectra were obtained for both carotenoid-containing and -depleted complexes of each bacterium to allow their direct comparison. The depletion of carotenoids did not alter the two-photon excitation spectra of either bacteria. The spectra featured a wide excitation band around 1350 nm (2x675 nm, 14,800 cm(-1)) which strongly resembled two-photon fluorescence excitation spectra of similar complexes published by other authors. We consider obtained experimental data to be evidence of direct two-photon excitation of bacteriochlorophyll excitonic states in this spectral region.

  1. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Cranston, Laura J.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Lincoln, Craig N.; Savolainen, Janne; Šanda, František; Mančal, Tomáš; Hauer, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system's Hamiltonian, reproduces all measured quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems.

  2. Vibronic coupling explains the ultrafast carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in natural and artificial light harvesters

    SciT

    Perlík, Václav; Seibt, Joachim; Šanda, František

    The initial energy transfer steps in photosynthesis occur on ultrafast timescales. We analyze the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer in LH2 Marichromatium purpuratum as well as in an artificial light-harvesting dyad system by using transient grating and two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with 10 fs time resolution. We find that Förster-type models reproduce the experimentally observed 60 fs transfer times, but overestimate coupling constants, which lead to a disagreement with both linear absorption and electronic 2D-spectra. We show that a vibronic model, which treats carotenoid vibrations on both electronic ground and excited states as part of the system’s Hamiltonian, reproduces all measuredmore » quantities. Importantly, the vibronic model presented here can explain the fast energy transfer rates with only moderate coupling constants, which are in agreement with structure based calculations. Counterintuitively, the vibrational levels on the carotenoid electronic ground state play the central role in the excited state population transfer to bacteriochlorophyll; resonance between the donor-acceptor energy gap and the vibrational ground state energies is the physical basis of the ultrafast energy transfer rates in these systems.« less

  3. Specific inhibition of antenna bacteriochlorophyll synthesis in Chlorobium vibrioforme by anesthetic gases.

    PubMed Central

    Ormerod, J G; Nesbakken, T; Beale, S I

    1990-01-01

    The green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme contains two types of bacteriochlorophyll (Bchl). The minor pigment, Bchl a, is associated primarily with the cell membrane and its reaction centers; and the major light-harvesting antenna pigment, Bchl d, is found primarily in the chlorosomes, which are attached to the inner surface of the cell membrane. Anesthetic gases, such as N2O, ethylene, and acetylene, were found to inhibit the synthesis of Bchl d, but not of Bchl a, thus allowing the cells to grow at high light intensities with a greatly diminished content of antenna pigment. Chlorosomes were absent or sparse in inhibited cells. Porphyrins accumulated in the inhibited cells. The major one was identified as the Bchl precursor magnesium-protoporphyrin IX monomethyl ester (Mg-PPME) by comparative absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy and thin-layer chromatography of the porphyrin and its derivatives with those of authentic protoporphyrin IX. Small amounts of Mg-PPME were present in control cells, but the addition of inhibitor caused a rapid increase in the Mg-PPME concentration, accompanying the inhibition of Bchl d synthesis. Cells grown in the presence of ethephon (as a source of ethylene) and allowed to stand in dim light for long periods accumulated large amounts of PPME and other porphyrins and excreted or released porphyrins, which accumulated as a brown precipitate in the culture. Inhibition of Bchl d synthesis was relieved upon removal of the inhibitor. These results suggest that the gases act at a step in pigment biosynthesis that affects the utilization of Mg-PPME for isocyclic ring formation. Synthesis of Bchl d and Bchl a may be differentially affected by the gases because of compartmentation of their biosynthetic apparatus or because competition for precursors favors Bchl a synthesis. An ethephon-resistant mutant strain was isolated by selection for growth in dim, long-wavelength light. The mutant cells were also resistant to acetylene, but not

  4. Physical Mapping of bchG, orf427, and orf177 in the Photosynthesis Gene Cluster of Rhodobacter sphaeroides: Functional Assignment of the Bacteriochlorophyll Synthetase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Addlesee, Hugh A.; Fiedor, Leszek; Hunter, C. Neil

    2000-01-01

    The purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides has within its genome a cluster of photosynthesis-related genes approximately 41 kb in length. In an attempt to identify genes involved in the terminal esterification stage of bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis, a previously uncharacterized 5-kb region of this cluster was sequenced. Four open reading frames (ORFs) were identified, and each was analyzed by transposon mutagenesis. The product of one of these ORFs, bchG, shows close homologies with (bacterio)chlorophyll synthetases, and mutants in this gene were found to accumulate bacteriopheophorbide, the metal-free derivative of the bacteriochlorophyll precursor bacteriochlorophyllide, suggesting that bchG is responsible for the esterification of bacteriochlorophyllide with an alcohol moiety. This assignment of function to bchG was verified by the performance of assays demonstrating the ability of BchG protein, heterologously synthesized in Escherichia coli, to esterify bacteriochlorophyllide with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate in vitro, thereby generating bacteriochlorophyll. This step is pivotal to the assembly of a functional photosystem in R. sphaeroides, a model organism for the study of structure-function relationships in photosynthesis. A second gene, orf177, is a member of a large family of isopentenyl diphosphate isomerases, while sequence homologies suggest that a third gene, orf427, may encode an assembly factor for photosynthetic complexes. The function of the remaining ORF, bchP, is the subject of a separate paper (H. Addlesee and C. N. Hunter, J. Bacteriol. 181:7248–7255, 1999). An operonal arrangement of the genes is proposed. PMID:10809697

  5. Towards first-principles calculation of electronic excitations in the ring of the protein-bound bacteriochlorophylls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, Igor V.; Khrenova, Maria G.; Moskovsky, Alexander A.; Shabanov, Boris M.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2018-04-01

    Modeling electronic excitation of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules in light-harvesting (LH) antennae from photosynthetic centers presents a challenge for the quantum theory. We report on a quantum chemical study of the ring of 32 BChl molecules from the bacterial core complex LH1-RC. Diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the excitonic Hamiltonian matrices are estimated in quantum chemical calculations of relevant fragments using the TD-DFT and CIS approaches. The deviation of the computed excitation energy of this BChl system from the experimental data related to the Qy band maximum of this LH1-RC complex is about 0.2 eV. We demonstrate that corrections due to improvement in modeling of an individual BChl molecule and due to contributions from the protein environment are in the range of the obtained discrepancy between theory and experiment. Differences between results of the excitonic model and direct quantum chemical calculations of BChl aggregates fall in the same range.

  6. Mg2+ improves biomass production from soybean wastewater using purple non-sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pan; Zhang, Guangming; Li, Jianzheng

    2015-02-01

    Soybean wastewater was used to generate biomass resource by use of purple non-sulfur bacteria (PNSB). This study investigated the enhancement of PNSB cell accumulation in wastewater by Mg2+ under the light-anaerobic condition. Results showed that with the optimal Mg2+ dosage of 10 mg/L, biomass production was improved by 70% to 3630 mg/L, and biomass yield also was improved by 60%. Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) removal reached above 86% and hydraulic retention time was shortened from 96 to 72 hr. The mechanism analysis indicated that Mg2+ could promote the content of bacteriochlorophyll in photosynthesis because Mg2+ is the bacteriochlorophyll active center, and thus improved adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production. An increase of ATP production enhanced the conversion of organic matter in wastewater into PNSB cell materials (biomass yield) and COD removal, leading to more biomass production. With 10 mg/L Mg2+, bacteriochlorophyll content and ATP production were improved by 60% and 33% respectively. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Singlet-triplet fission of carotenoid excitation in light-harvesting LH2 complexes of purple phototrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Klenina, I B; Makhneva, Z K; Moskalenko, A A; Gudkov, N D; Bolshakov, M A; Pavlova, E A; Proskuryakov, I I

    2014-03-01

    The current generally accepted structure of light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple phototrophic bacteria conflicts with the observation of singlet-triplet carotenoid excitation fission in these complexes. In LH2 complexes from the purple bacterium Allochromatium minutissimum, a drop in the efficiency of carotenoid triplet generation is demonstrated, which correlates with the extent of selective photooxidation of bacteriochlorophylls absorbing at ~850 nm. We conclude that singlet-triplet fission of carotenoid excitation proceeds with participation of these excitonically coupled bacteriochlorophylls. In the framework of the proposed mechanism, the contradiction between LH2 structure and photophysical properties of carotenoids is eliminated. The possibility of singlet-triplet excitation fission involving a third mediator molecule was not considered earlier.

  8. Anaerobic bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    Anaerobic bacteria are bacteria that do not live or grow when oxygen is present. In humans, these bacteria ... Brook I. Diseases caused by non-spore-forming anaerobic bacteria. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  9. Selective protein extraction from Chlorobium tepidum chlorosomes using detergents. Evidence that CsmA forms multimers and binds bacteriochlorophyll a.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Donald A; Vassilieva, Elena V; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Li, Hui

    2002-12-03

    Chlorosomes of the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum consist of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c aggregates that are surrounded by a lipid-protein monolayer envelope that contains ten different proteins. Chlorosomes also contain a small amount of BChl a, but the organization and location of this BChl a are not yet clearly understood. Chlorosomes were treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Lubrol PX, or Triton X-100, separately or in combination with 1-hexanol, and the extracted components were separated from the residual chlorosomes by ultrafiltration on centrifugal filters. When chlorosomes were treated with low concentrations of SDS, all proteins except CsmA were extracted. However, this treatment did not significantly alter the size and shape of the chlorosomes, did not extract the BChl a, and caused only minor changes in the absorption spectrum of the chlorosomes. Cross-linking studies with SDS-treated chlorosomes revealed the presence of multimers of the major chlorosome protein, CsmA, up to homooctamers. Extraction of chlorosomes with SDS and 1-hexanol solubilized all ten chlorosome envelope proteins as well as BChl a. Although the size and shape of these extracted chlorosomes did not initially differ significantly from untreated chlorosomes, the extracted chlorosomes gradually disintegrated, and rod-shaped BChl c aggregates were sometimes observed. These results strongly suggest that CsmA binds the BChl a in Chlorobium-type chlorosomes and further indicate that none of the nine other chlorosome envelope proteins are absolutely required for maintaining the shape and integrity of chlorosomes. Quantitative estimates suggest that chlorosomes contain approximately equimolar amounts of CsmA and BChl a and that roughly one-third of the surface of the chlorosome is covered by CsmA.

  10. [Influence of LDAO on the conformation and release of bacteriochlorophyll of peripheral light-harvesting complex (LH2) from Rhodobacter azotoformans].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gen-gui; Dong, Yan-min; Yang, Su-ping; Jiao, Nian-zhi; Qu, Yin-bo

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the interaction relationships between lauryl dimethylamine N-oxide (LDAO) and peripheral light-harvesting complex (LH2) as well as the influence of LDAO on structure and function of LH2. In the present work, the effects of LDAO on the conformation and release processes of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) of LH2 when incubated under different temperature and pH in the presence and absence of LDAO were investigated by spectroscopy. The results indicated that (1) the presence of LDAO resulted in alterations in the conformation, alpha-helix content, and spectra of Tyr and B850 band of LH2 at room temperature and pH 8.0. Moreover, energy transfer efficiency of LH2 was enhanced markedly in the presence of LDAO. (2) At 60 degrees C, both the B800 and B850 band of LH2 were released and transited into free BChl at pH 8.0. However, the release rates of bacteriochlorophylls of B800 and B850 band from LH2 were slowed down and the release processes were changed when incubated in the presence of LDAO. Hence, the stability of LH2 was improved in the presence of LDAO. (3) The accelerated release processes of bacteriochlorophylls of B800 and B850 band of LH2 were induced to transform into bacteriopheophytin (BPhe) and free BChl by LDAO in strong acid and strong alkalic solution at room temperature. However, the kinetic patterns of the B800 and B850 band were remarkably different. The release and self-assemble processes of B850 in LH2 were observed in strong acid solution without LDAO. Therefore, the different release behaviors of B800 and B850 of LH2 are induced by LDAO under different extreme environmental conditions.

  11. Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the North Pacific Gyre. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottrell, Matthew T.; Mannino, Antonio; Kirchman, David L.

    2005-01-01

    The abundance of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AM) bacteria, cyanobacteria and heterotrophs was examined in the Mid-Atlantic Bight and the central North Pacific gyre using infrared fluorescence microscopy coupled with image analysis and flow cytometry. AAP bacteria comprised 5% to 16% of total prokaryotes in the Atlantic but only 5% or less in the Pacific. In the Atlantic, AAP bacterial abundance was as much as 2-fold higher than Prochlorococcus and 10-folder higher than Synechococcus. In contrast, Prochlorococcus outnumbered AAP bacteria 5- to 50-fold in the Pacific. In both oceans, subsurface abundance maxima occurred within the photic zone, and AAP bacteria were least abundant below the 1% light depth. Concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) were low (approx.1%) compared to chlorophyll a. Although the BChl a content of AAP bacteria per cell was typically 20- to 250-fold lower than the divinyl-chlorophyll a content of Prochlorococcus, in shelf break water the pigment content of AAP bacteria approached that of Prochlorococcus. The abundance of AAP bacteria rivaled some groups of strictly heterotrophic bacteria and was often higher than the abundance of known AAP genera (Erythrobacter and Roseobacter spp.). The distribution of AAP bacteria in the water column, which was similar in the Atlantic and the Pacific, was consistent with phototrophy.

  12. Stability of integral membrane proteins under high hydrostatic pressure: the LH2 and LH3 antenna pigment-protein complexes from photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kangur, Liina; Timpmann, Kõu; Freiberg, Arvi

    2008-07-03

    The bacteriochlorophyll a-containing LH2 and LH3 antenna complexes are the integral membrane proteins that catalyze the photosynthetic process in purple photosynthetic bacteria. The LH2 complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides shows characteristic strong absorbance at 800 and 850 nm due to the pigment molecules confined in two separate areas of the protein. In the LH3 complex from Rhodopesudomonas acidophila the corresponding bands peak at 800 and 820 nm. Using the bacteriochlorophyll a cofactors as intrinsic probes to monitor local changes in the protein structure, we investigate spectral responses of the antenna complexes to very high hydrostatic pressures up to 2.5 GPa when embedded into natural membrane environment or extracted with detergent. We first demonstrate that high pressure does induce significant alterations to the tertiary structure of the proteins not only in proximity of the 800 nm-absorbing bacteriochlorophyll a molecules known previously (Gall, A.; et al. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 13019) but also of the 850 nm- and 820 nm-absorbing molecules, including breakage of the hydrogen bond they are involved in. The membrane-protected complexes appear more resilient to damaging effects of the compression compared with the complexes extracted into mixed detergent-buffer environment. Increased resistance of the isolated complexes is observed at high protein concentration resulting aggregation as well as when cosolvent (glycerol) is added into the solution. These stability variations correlate with ability of penetration of the surrounding polar solvent (water) into the hydrophobic protein interiors, being thus the principal reason of the pressure-induced denaturation of the proteins. Considerable variability of elastic properties of the isolated complexes was also observed, tentatively assigned to heterogeneous protein packing in detergent micelles. While a number of the isolated complexes release most of their bacteriochlorophyll a content under high pressure

  13. Dynamics of energy transfer from lycopene to bacteriochlorophyll in genetically-modified LH2 complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Hörvin Billsten, H; Herek, J L; Garcia-Asua, G; Hashøj, L; Polívka, T; Hunter, C N; Sundström, V

    2002-03-26

    LH2 complexes from Rb. sphaeroides were modified genetically so that lycopene, with 11 saturated double bonds, replaced the native carotenoids which contain 10 saturated double bonds. Tuning the S1 level of the carotenoid in LH2 in this way affected the dynamics of energy transfer within LH2, which were investigated using both steady-state and time-resolved techniques. The S1 energy of lycopene in n-hexane was determined to be approximately 12 500 +/- 150 cm(-1), by direct measurement of the S1-S2 transient absorption spectrum using a femtosecond IR-probing technique, thus placing an upper limit on the S1 energy of lycopene in the LH2 complex. Fluorescence emission and excitation spectra demonstrated that energy can be transferred from lycopene to the bacteriochlorophyll molecules within this LH2 complex. The energy-transfer dynamics within the mutant complex were compared to wild-type LH2 from Rb. sphaeroides containing the carotenoid spheroidene and from Rs. molischianum, in which lycopene is the native carotenoid. The results show that the overall efficiency for Crt --> B850 energy transfer is approximately 80% in lyco-LH2 and approximately 95% in WT-LH2 of Rb. sphaeroides. The difference in overall Crt --> BChl transfer efficiency of lyco-LH2 and WT-LH2 mainly relates to the low efficiency of the Crt S(1) --> BChl pathway for complexes containing lycopene, which was 20% in lyco-LH2. These results show that in an LH2 complex where the Crt S1 energy is sufficiently high to provide efficient spectral overlap with both B800 and B850 Q(y) states, energy transfer via the Crt S1 state occurs to both pigments. However, the introduction of lycopene into the Rb. sphaeroides LH2 complex lowers the S1 level of the carotenoid sufficiently to prevent efficient transfer of energy to the B800 Q(y) state, leaving only the Crt S1 --> B850 channel, strongly suggesting that Crt S1 --> BChl energy transfer is controlled by the relative Crt S1 and BChl Q(y) energies.

  14. High abundances of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lami, Raphaël; Cottrell, Matthew T; Ras, Joséphine; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Claustre, Hervé; Kirchman, David L; Lebaron, Philippe

    2007-07-01

    Little is known about the abundance, distribution, and ecology of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, particularly in oligotrophic environments, which represent 60% of the ocean. We investigated the abundance of AAP bacteria across the South Pacific Ocean, including the center of the gyre, the most oligotrophic water body of the world ocean. AAP bacteria, Prochlorococcus, and total prokaryotic abundances, as well as bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) and divinyl-chlorophyll a concentrations, were measured at several depths in the photic zone along a gradient of oligotrophic conditions. The abundances of AAP bacteria and Prochlorococcus were high, together accounting for up to 58% of the total prokaryotic community. The abundance of AAP bacteria alone was up to 1.94 x 10(5) cells ml(-1) and as high as 24% of the overall community. These measurements were consistent with the high BChl a concentrations (up to 3.32 x 10(-3) microg liter(-1)) found at all stations. However, the BChl a content per AAP bacterial cell was low, suggesting that AAP bacteria are mostly heterotrophic organisms. Interestingly, the biovolume and therefore biomass of AAP bacteria was on average twofold higher than that of other prokaryotic cells. This study demonstrates that AAP bacteria can be abundant in various oligotrophic conditions, including the most oligotrophic regime of the world ocean, and can account for a large part of the bacterioplanktonic carbon stock.

  15. Different sensitivities to oxygen between two strains of the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIB 8327 with bacteriochlorophyll c and d.

    PubMed

    Harada, Jiro; Saga, Yoshitaka; Oh-oka, Hirozo; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2005-11-01

    Two sub-strains of the anoxygenic photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme NCIB 8327 were derived from the same clone and could be discriminated only by their possession of either bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) c or d as the major pigment in the peripheral light-harvesting antenna system, chlorosome (Saga Y et al. (2003) Anal Sci 19: 1575-1579). In the presence of a proper amount of oxygen in the initial culture medium, the BChl d strain showed longer retardation on its growth initiation than the BChl c strain, indicating that the latter was advantageous for survival under aerobic light conditions which produced reactive oxygen species in vivo. The result would be ascribable to the difference of the midpoint potentials between two kinds of chlorosomes formed by self-aggregates of BChl c and d as measured by their fluorescence quenching.

  16. Electron-Transfer Secondary Reaction Matrices for MALDI MS Analysis of Bacteriochlorophyll a in Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Its Zinc and Copper Analogue Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; Ventura, Giovanni; Trotta, Massimo; Bianco, Giuliana; Cataldi, Tommaso R. I.; Palmisano, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriochlorophyll a ( BChl a), a photosynthetic pigment performing the same functions of chlorophylls in plants, features a bacteriochlorin macrocycle ring (18 π electrons) with two reduced pyrrole rings along with a hydrophobic terpenoid side chain (i.e., the phytol residue). Chlorophylls analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) is not so straightforward since pheophytinization (i.e., release of the central metal ion) and cleavage of the phytol-ester linkage are invariably observed by employing protonating matrices such as 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, sinapinic acid, and α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Using BChl a from Rhodobacter sphaeroides R26 strain as a model system, different electron-transfer (ET) secondary reaction matrices, leading to the formation of almost stable radical ions in both positive ([M]+•) and negative ([M]-•) ionization modes at m/z 910.55, were evaluated. Compared with ET matrices such as trans-2-[3-(4-t-butyl-phenyl)-2-methyl-2-propenylidene]malononitrile (DCTB), 2,2':5',2''-terthiophene (TER), anthracene (ANT), and 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DP-ANT), 1,5-diaminonaphthalene (DAN) was found to provide the highest ionization yield with a negligible fragmentation. DAN also displayed excellent ionization properties for two metal ion-substituted bacteriochlorophylls, (i.e., Zn- and Cu-BChl a at m/z 950.49 and 949.49), respectively. MALDI MS/MS of both radical charged molecular species provide complementary information, thus making analyte identification more straightforward.

  17. Spectral diffusion and electron-phonon coupling of the B800 BChl a molecules in LH2 complexes from three different species of purple bacteria.

    PubMed

    Baier, J; Gabrielsen, M; Oellerich, S; Michel, H; van Heel, M; Cogdell, R J; Köhler, J

    2009-11-04

    We have investigated the spectral diffusion and the electron-phonon coupling of B800 bacteriochlorophyll a molecules in the peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 for three different species of purple bacteria, Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodospirillum molischianum, and Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. We come to the conclusion that B800 binding pockets for Rhodobacter sphaeroides and Rhodopseudomonas acidophila are rather similar with respect to the polarity of the protein environment but that the packaging of the alphabeta-polypeptides seems to be less tight in Rb. sphaeroides with respect to the other two species.

  18. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy to Kill Gram-negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Felipe F; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) or photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is a new promising strategy to eradicate pathogenic microorganisms such as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts and fungi. The search for new approaches that can kill bacteria but do not induce the appearance of undesired drug-resistant strains suggests that PDT may have advantages over traditional antibiotic therapy. PDT is a non-thermal photochemical reaction that involves the simultaneous presence of visible light, oxygen and a dye or photosensitizer (PS). Several PS have been studied for their ability to bind to bacteria and efficiently generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photostimulation. ROS are formed through type I or II mechanisms and may inactivate several classes of microbial cells including Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are typically characterized by an impermeable outer cell membrane that contains endotoxins and blocks antibiotics, dyes, and detergents, protecting the sensitive inner membrane and cell wall. This review covers significant peer-reviewed articles together with US and World patents that were filed within the past few years and that relate to the eradication of Gram-negative bacteria via PDI or PDT. It is organized mainly according to the nature of the PS involved and includes natural or synthetic food dyes; cationic dyes such as methylene blue and toluidine blue; tetrapyrrole derivatives such as phthalocyanines, chlorins, porphyrins, chlorophyll and bacteriochlorophyll derivatives; functionalized fullerenes; nanoparticles combined with different PS; other formulations designed to target PS to bacteria; photoactive materials and surfaces; conjugates between PS and polycationic polymers or antibodies; and permeabilizing agents such as EDTA, PMNP and CaCl2. The present review also covers the different laboratory animal models normally used to treat Gram-negative bacterial infections with antimicrobial PDT. PMID

  19. The reaction center is the sensitive target of the mercury(II) ion in intact cells of photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Asztalos, Emese; Sipka, Gábor; Kis, Mariann; Trotta, Massimo; Maróti, Péter

    2012-06-01

    The sensitivity of intact cells of purple photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides wild type to low level (<100 μM) of mercury (Hg²⁺) contamination was evaluated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies of the bacteriochlorophyll-protein complexes. All assays related to the function of the reaction center (RC) protein (induction of the bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence, delayed fluorescence and light-induced oxidation and reduction of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer and energization of the photosynthetic membrane) showed prompt and later effects of the mercury ions. The damage expressed by decrease of the magnitude and changes of rates of the electron transfer kinetics followed complex (spatial and temporal) pattern according to the different Hg²⁺ sensitivities of the electron transport (donor/acceptor) sites including the reduced bound and free cytochrome c₂ and the primary reduced quinone. In contrast to the RC, the light harvesting system and the bc₁ complex demonstrated much higher resistance against the mercury pollution. The 850 and 875 nm components of the peripheral and core complexes were particularly insensitive to the mercury(II) ions. The concentration of the photoactive RCs and the connectivity of the photosynthetic units decreased upon mercury treatment. The degree of inhibition of the photosynthetic apparatus was always higher when the cells were kept in the light than in the dark indicating the importance of metabolism in active transport of the mercury ions from outside to the intracytoplasmic membrane. Any of the tests applied in this study can be used for detection of changes in photosynthetic bacteria at the early stages of the action of toxicants.

  20. Magnetic Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  1. Methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, R S; Hanson, T E

    1996-01-01

    Methane-utilizing bacteria (methanotrophs) are a diverse group of gram-negative bacteria that are related to other members of the Proteobacteria. These bacteria are classified into three groups based on the pathways used for assimilation of formaldehyde, the major source of cell carbon, and other physiological and morphological features. The type I and type X methanotrophs are found within the gamma subdivision of the Proteobacteria and employ the ribulose monophosphate pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, whereas type II methanotrophs, which employ the serine pathway for formaldehyde assimilation, form a coherent cluster within the beta subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Methanotrophic bacteria are ubiquitous. The growth of type II bacteria appears to be favored in environments that contain relatively high levels of methane, low levels of dissolved oxygen, and limiting concentrations of combined nitrogen and/or copper. Type I methanotrophs appear to be dominant in environments in which methane is limiting and combined nitrogen and copper levels are relatively high. These bacteria serve as biofilters for the oxidation of methane produced in anaerobic environments, and when oxygen is present in soils, atmospheric methane is oxidized. Their activities in nature are greatly influenced by agricultural practices and other human activities. Recent evidence indicates that naturally occurring, uncultured methanotrophs represent new genera. Methanotrophs that are capable of oxidizing methane at atmospheric levels exhibit methane oxidation kinetics different from those of methanotrophs available in pure cultures. A limited number of methanotrophs have the genetic capacity to synthesize a soluble methane monooxygenase which catalyzes the rapid oxidation of environmental pollutants including trichloroethylene. PMID:8801441

  2. Ultra-broadband 2D electronic spectroscopy of carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll interactions in the LH1 complex of a purple bacterium

    SciT

    Maiuri, Margherita; Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Washington Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08544; Réhault, Julien

    We investigate the excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways in the photosynthetic light harvesting 1 (LH1) complex of purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum with ultra-broadband two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). We employ a 2DES apparatus in the partially collinear geometry, using a passive birefringent interferometer to generate the phase-locked pump pulse pair. This scheme easily lends itself to two-color operation, by coupling a sub-10 fs visible pulse with a sub-15-fs near-infrared pulse. This unique pulse combination allows us to simultaneously track with extremely high temporal resolution both the dynamics of the photoexcited carotenoid spirilloxanthin (Spx) in the visible range and the EET betweenmore » the Spx and the B890 bacterio-chlorophyll (BChl), whose Q{sub x} and Q{sub y} transitions peak at 585 and 881 nm, respectively, in the near-infrared. Global analysis of the one-color and two-color 2DES maps unravels different relaxation mechanisms in the LH1 complex: (i) the initial events of the internal conversion process within the Spx, (ii) the parallel EET from the first bright state S{sub 2} of the Spx towards the Q{sub x} state of the B890, and (iii) the internal conversion from Q{sub x} to Q{sub y} within the B890.« less

  3. Redox regulation of energy transfer efficiency in antennas of green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.; Cheng, P.; Causgrove, T. P.; Brune, D. C.; Wang, J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of energy transfer from the peripheral chlorosome antenna structure to the membrane-bound antenna in green sulfur bacteria depends strongly on the redox potential of the medium. The fluorescence spectra and lifetimes indicate that efficient quenching pathways are induced in the chlorosome at high redox potential. The midpoint redox potential for the induction of this effect in isolated chlorosomes from Chlorobium vibrioforme is -146 mV at pH 7 (vs the normal hydrogen electrode), and the observed midpoint potential (n = 1) decreases by 60 mV per pH unit over the pH range 7-10. Extraction of isolated chlorosomes with hexane has little effect on the redox-induced quenching, indicating that the component(s) responsible for this effect are bound and not readily extractable. We have purified and partially characterized the trimeric water-soluble bacteriochlorophyll a-containing protein from the thermophilic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum. This protein is located between the chlorosome and the membrane. Fluorescence spectra of the purified protein indicate that it also contains groups that quench excitations at high redox potential. The results indicate that the energy transfer pathway in green sulfur bacteria is regulated by redox potential. This regulation appears to operate in at least two distinct places in the energy transfer pathway, the oligomeric pigments in the interior of the chlorosome and in the bacteriochlorophyll a protein. The regulatory effect may serve to protect the cell against superoxide-induced damage when oxygen is present. By quenching excitations before they reach the reaction center, reduction and subsequent autooxidation of the low potential electron acceptors found in these organisms is avoided.

  4. Bacteria Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Science Applications, Inc.'s ATP Photometer makes a rapid and accurate count of the bacteria in a body fluid sample. Instrument provides information on the presence and quantity of bacteria by measuring the amount of light emitted by the reaction between two substances. Substances are ATP adenosine triphosphate and luciferase. The reactants are applied to a human body sample and the ATP Photometer observes the intensity of the light emitted displaying its findings in a numerical output. Total time lapse is usually less than 10 minutes, which represents a significant time savings in comparison of other techniques. Other applications are measuring organisms in fresh and ocean waters, determining bacterial contamination of foodstuffs, biological process control in the beverage industry, and in assay of activated sewage sludge.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of Streptomyces cattleya NRRL 8057, a Producer of Antibiotics and Fluorometabolites

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Valérie; Bouzon, Madeleine; Mangenot, Sophie; Badet, Bernard; Poulain, Julie; Segurens, Béatrice; Vallenet, David; Marlière, Philippe; Weissenbach, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Streptomyces cattleya, a producer of the antibiotics thienamycin and cephamycin C, is one of the rare bacteria known to synthesize fluorinated metabolites. The genome consists of two linear replicons. The genes involved in fluorine metabolism and in the biosynthesis of the antibiotic thienamycin were mapped on both replicons. PMID:21868806

  6. Role of B800 in carotenoid-bacteriochlorophyll energy and electron transfer in LH2 complexes from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Polívka, Tomas; Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz; Fuciman, Marcel; Sundström, Villy; Frank, Harry A

    2007-06-28

    The role of the B800 in energy and electron transfer in LH2 complexes has been studied using femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy. The B800 site was perturbed by application of lithium dodecyl sulfate (LDS), and comparison of treated and untreated LH2 complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides incorporating carotenoids neurosporene, spheroidene, and spheroidenone was used to explore the role of B800 in carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll-a (BChla) energy transfer and carotenoid radical formation. Efficiencies of the S1-mediated energy transfer in the LDS-treated complexes were 86, 61, and 57% in the LH2 complexes containing neurosporene, spheroidene, and spheroidenone, respectively. Analysis of the carotenoid S1 lifetimes in solution, LDS-treated, and untreated LH2 complexes allowed determination of B800/B850 branching ratio in the S1-mediated energy transfer. It is shown that B800 is a major acceptor, as approximately 60% of the energy from the carotenoid S1 state is accepted by B800. This value is nearly independent of conjugation length of the carotenoid. In addition to its role in energy transfer, the B800 BChla is the only electron acceptor in the event of charge separation between carotenoid and BChla in LH2 complexes, which is demonstrated by prevention of carotenoid radical formation in the LDS-treated LH2 complexes. In the untreated complexes containing neurosporene and spheroidene, the carotenoid radical is formed with a time constant of 300-400 fs. Application of different excitation wavelengths and intensity dependence of the carotenoid radical formation showed that the carotenoid radical can be formed only after excitation of the S2 state of carotenoid, although the S2 state itself is not a precursor of the charge-separated state. Instead, either a hot S1 state or a charge-transfer state lying between S2 and S1 states of the carotenoid are discussed as potential precursors of the charge-separated state.

  7. Purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria monitor environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Kis, Mariann; Sipka, Gábor; Asztalos, Emese; Rázga, Zsolt; Maróti, Péter

    2015-10-01

    Heavy metal ion pollution and oxygen deficiency are major environmental risks for microorganisms in aqueous habitat. The potential of purple non-sulfur photosynthetic bacteria for biomonitoring and bioremediation was assessed by investigating the photosynthetic capacity in heavy metal contaminated environments. Cultures of bacterial strains Rhodobacter sphaeroides, Rhodospirillum rubrum and Rubrivivax gelatinosus were treated with heavy metal ions in micromolar (Hg(2+)), submillimolar (Cr(6+)) and millimolar (Pb(2+)) concentration ranges. Functional assays (flash-induced absorption changes and bacteriochlorophyll fluorescence induction) and electron micrographs were taken to specify the harmful effects of pollution and to correlate to morphological changes of the membrane. The bacterial strains and functional tests showed differentiated responses to environmental stresses, revealing that diverse mechanisms of tolerance and/or resistance are involved. The microorganisms were vulnerable to the prompt effect of Pb(2+), showed weak tolerance to Hg(2+) and proved to be tolerant to Cr(6+). The reaction center controlled electron transfer in Rvx. gelatinosus demonstrated the highest degree of resistance against heavy metal exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluating the Nature of So-Called S*-State Feature in Transient Absorption of Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) from Purple Photosynthetic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Hunter, C Neil; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-11-03

    Carotenoids are a class of natural pigments present in all phototrophic organisms, mainly in their light-harvesting proteins in which they play roles of accessory light absorbers and photoprotectors. Extensive time-resolved spectroscopic studies of these pigments have revealed unexpectedly complex photophysical properties, particularly for carotenoids in light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple bacteria. An ambiguous, optically forbidden electronic excited state designated as S* has been postulated to be involved in carotenoid excitation relaxation and in an alternative carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer pathway, as well as being a precursor of the carotenoid triplet state. However, no definitive and satisfactory origin of the carotenoid S* state in these complexes has been established, despite a wide-ranging series of studies. Here, we resolve the ambiguous origin of the carotenoid S* state in LH2 complex from Rba. sphaeroides by showing that the S* feature can be seen as a combination of ground state absorption bleaching of the carotenoid pool converted to cations and the Stark spectrum of neighbor neutral carotenoids, induced by temporal electric field brought by the carotenoid cation-bacteriochlorophyll anion pair. These findings remove the need to assign an S* state, and thereby significantly simplify the photochemistry of carotenoids in these photosynthetic antenna complexes.

  9. Evaluating the Nature of So-Called S*-State Feature in Transient Absorption of Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) from Purple Photosynthetic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are a class of natural pigments present in all phototrophic organisms, mainly in their light-harvesting proteins in which they play roles of accessory light absorbers and photoprotectors. Extensive time-resolved spectroscopic studies of these pigments have revealed unexpectedly complex photophysical properties, particularly for carotenoids in light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple bacteria. An ambiguous, optically forbidden electronic excited state designated as S* has been postulated to be involved in carotenoid excitation relaxation and in an alternative carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer pathway, as well as being a precursor of the carotenoid triplet state. However, no definitive and satisfactory origin of the carotenoid S* state in these complexes has been established, despite a wide-ranging series of studies. Here, we resolve the ambiguous origin of the carotenoid S* state in LH2 complex from Rba. sphaeroides by showing that the S* feature can be seen as a combination of ground state absorption bleaching of the carotenoid pool converted to cations and the Stark spectrum of neighbor neutral carotenoids, induced by temporal electric field brought by the carotenoid cation–bacteriochlorophyll anion pair. These findings remove the need to assign an S* state, and thereby significantly simplify the photochemistry of carotenoids in these photosynthetic antenna complexes. PMID:27726397

  10. A rapid method for the extraction and analysis of carotenoids and other hydrophobic substances suitable for systems biology studies with photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bóna-Lovász, Judit; Bóna, Aron; Ederer, Michael; Sawodny, Oliver; Ghosh, Robin

    2013-10-11

    A simple, rapid, and inexpensive extraction method for carotenoids and other non-polar compounds present in phototrophic bacteria has been developed. The method, which has been extensively tested on the phototrophic purple non-sulphur bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, is suitable for extracting large numbers of samples, which is common in systems biology studies, and yields material suitable for subsequent analysis using HPLC and mass spectroscopy. The procedure is particularly suitable for carotenoids and other terpenoids, including quinones, bacteriochlorophyll a and bacteriopheophytin a, and is also useful for the analysis of polar phospholipids. The extraction procedure requires only a single step extraction with a hexane/methanol/water mixture, followed by HPLC using a Spherisorb C18 column, with a mobile phase consisting of acetone-water and a non-linear gradient of 50%-100% acetone. The method was employed for examining the carotenoid composition observed during microaerophilic growth of R. rubrum strains, and was able to determine 18 carotenoids, 4 isoprenoid-quinones, bacteriochlorophyll a and bacteriopheophytin a as well as four different phosphatidylglycerol species of different acyl chain compositions. The analytical procedure was used to examine the dynamics of carotenoid biosynthesis in the major and minor pathways operating simultaneously in a carotenoid biosynthesis mutant of R. rubrum.

  11. Evaluating the nature of so-called S*-State feature in transient absorption of carotenoids in light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from purple photosynthetic bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Hunter, C. Neil; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2016-10-11

    Carotenoids are a class of natural pigments present in all phototrophic organisms, mainly in their light-harvesting proteins in which they play roles of accessory light absorbers and photoprotectors. Extensive time-resolved spectroscopic studies of these pigments have revealed unexpectedly complex photophysical properties, particularly for carotenoids in light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple bacteria. An ambiguous, optically forbidden electronic excited state designated as S* has been postulated to be involved in carotenoid excitation relaxation and in an alternative carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer pathway, as well as being a precursor of the carotenoid triplet state. However, no definitive and satisfactory origin of the carotenoid S*more » state in these complexes has been established, despite a wide-ranging series of studies. Here, we resolve the ambiguous origin of the carotenoid S* state in LH2 complex from Rba. sphaeroides by showing that the S* feature can be seen as a combination of ground state absorption bleaching of the carotenoid pool converted to cations and the Stark spectrum of neighbor neutral carotenoids, induced by temporal electric field brought by the carotenoid cation- bacteriochlorophyll anion pair. Lastly, these findings remove the need to assign an S* state, and thereby significantly simplify the photochemistry of carotenoids in these photosynthetic antenna complexes.« less

  12. Evaluating the nature of so-called S*-State feature in transient absorption of carotenoids in light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from purple photosynthetic bacteria

    SciT

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Hunter, C. Neil; Blankenship, Robert E.

    Carotenoids are a class of natural pigments present in all phototrophic organisms, mainly in their light-harvesting proteins in which they play roles of accessory light absorbers and photoprotectors. Extensive time-resolved spectroscopic studies of these pigments have revealed unexpectedly complex photophysical properties, particularly for carotenoids in light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple bacteria. An ambiguous, optically forbidden electronic excited state designated as S* has been postulated to be involved in carotenoid excitation relaxation and in an alternative carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer pathway, as well as being a precursor of the carotenoid triplet state. However, no definitive and satisfactory origin of the carotenoid S*more » state in these complexes has been established, despite a wide-ranging series of studies. Here, we resolve the ambiguous origin of the carotenoid S* state in LH2 complex from Rba. sphaeroides by showing that the S* feature can be seen as a combination of ground state absorption bleaching of the carotenoid pool converted to cations and the Stark spectrum of neighbor neutral carotenoids, induced by temporal electric field brought by the carotenoid cation- bacteriochlorophyll anion pair. Lastly, these findings remove the need to assign an S* state, and thereby significantly simplify the photochemistry of carotenoids in these photosynthetic antenna complexes.« less

  13. On Light-Induced Photoconversion of B800 Bacteriochlorophylls in the LH2 Antenna of the Purple Sulfur Bacterium Allochromatium vinosum.

    PubMed

    Kell, Adam; Jassas, Mahboobe; Hacking, Kirsty; Cogdell, Richard J; Jankowiak, Ryszard

    2017-11-02

    The B800-850 LH2 antenna from the photosynthetic purple sulfur bacterium Allochromatium vinosum exhibits an unusual spectral splitting of the B800 absorption band; i.e., two bands are well-resolved at 5 K with maxima at 805 nm (B800 R ) and 792 nm (B800 B ). To provide more insight into the nature of the B800 bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a molecules, high-resolution hole-burning (HB) spectroscopy is employed. Both white light illumination and selective laser excitations into B800 R or B800 B lead to B800 R → B800 B phototransformation. Selective excitation into B800 B leads to uncorrelated excitation energy transfer (EET) to B800 R and subsequent B800 R → B800 B phototransformation. The B800 B → B800 R EET time is 0.9 ± 0.1 ps. Excitation at 808.4 nm (into the low-energy side of B800 R ) shows that the lower limit of B800 R → B850 EET is about 2 ps, as the B800 R → B800 B phototransformation process could contribute to the corresponding zero-phonon hole width. The phototransformation of B800 R leads to a ∼ 200 cm -1 average blue-shift of transition energies, i.e., B800 R changes into B800 B . We argue that it is unlikely that B800-B850 excitonic interactions give rise to a splitting of the B800 band. We propose that the latter is caused by different protein conformations that can lead to both strong or weak hydrogen bond(s) between B800 pigments and the protein scaffolding. Temperature-dependent absorption spectra of B800, which revealed a well-defined isosbestic point, support a two-site model, likely with strongly and weakly hydrogen-bonded B800 BChls. Thus, BChls contributing to B800 R and B800 B could differ in the position of the proton in the BChl carbonyl-protein hydrogen bond, i.e., proton dynamics along the hydrogen bond may well be the major mechanism of this phototransformation. However, the effective tunneling mass is likely larger than the proton mass.

  14. Back To Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores new research about bacteria. Discusses bacterial genomes, archaea, unusual environments, evolution, pathogens, bacterial movement, biofilms, bacteria in the body, and a bacterial obsession. Contains 29 references. (JRH)

  15. Effects of oxidants and reductants on the efficiency of excitation transfer in green photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, J.; Brune, D. C.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The efficiency of energy transfer in chlorosome antennas in the green sulfur bacteria Chlorobium vibrioforme and Chlorobium limicola was found to be highly sensitive to the redox potential of the suspension. Energy transfer efficiencies were measured by comparing the absorption spectrum of the bacteriochlorophyll c or d pigments in the chlorosome to the excitation spectrum for fluorescence arising from the chlorosome baseplate and membrane-bound antenna complexes. The efficiency of energy transfer approaches 100% at low redox potentials induced by addition of sodium dithionite or other strong reductants, and is lowered to 10-20% under aerobic conditions or after addition of a variety of membrane-permeable oxidizing agents. The redox effect on energy transfer is observed in whole cells, isolated membranes and purified chlorosomes, indicating that the modulation of energy transfer efficiency arises within the antenna complexes and is not directly mediated by the redox state of the reaction center. It is proposed that chlorosomes contain a component that acts as a highly quenching center in its oxidized state, but is an inefficient quencher when reduced by endogenous or exogenous reductants. This effect may be a control mechanism that prevents cellular damage resulting from reaction of oxygen with reduced low-potential electron acceptors found in the green sulfur bacteria. The redox modulation effect is not observed in the green gliding bacterium Chloroflexus aurantiacus, which contains chlorosomes but does not contain low-potential electron acceptors.

  16. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1995-05-30

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  17. Bacteria isolated from amoebae/bacteria consortium

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1995-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  18. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  19. Low potential manganese ions as efficient electron donors in native anoxygenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sasmit S; Protheroe, Charles; Ivanescu, Matei-Alexandru; Lag, Sarah; Kálmán, László

    2018-04-01

    Systematic control over molecular driving forces is essential for understanding the natural electron transfer processes as well as for improving the efficiency of the artificial mimics of energy converting enzymes. Oxygen producing photosynthesis uniquely employs manganese ions as rapid electron donors. Introducing this attribute to anoxygenic photosynthesis may identify evolutionary intermediates and provide insights to the energetics of biological water oxidation. This work presents effective environmental methods that substantially and simultaneously tune the redox potentials of manganese ions and the cofactors of a photosynthetic enzyme from native anoxygenic bacteria without the necessity of genetic modification or synthesis. A spontaneous coordination with bis-tris propane lowered the redox potential of the manganese (II) to manganese (III) transition to an unusually low value (~400 mV) at pH 9.4 and allowed its binding to the bacterial reaction center. Binding to a novel buried binding site elevated the redox potential of the primary electron donor, a dimer of bacteriochlorophylls, by up to 92 mV also at pH 9.4 and facilitated the electron transfer that is able to compete with the wasteful charge recombination. These events impaired the function of the natural electron donor and made BTP-coordinated manganese a viable model for an evolutionary alternative. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Temperature and carbon assimilation regulate the chlorosome biogenesis in green sulfur bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang; Saikin, Semion K; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Enriquez, Miriam M; Huh, Joonsuk; Frank, Harry A; Urban, Volker S; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-09-17

    Green photosynthetic bacteria adjust the structure and functionality of the chlorosome-the light-absorbing antenna complex-in response to environmental stress factors. The chlorosome is a natural self-assembled aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. In this study, we report the regulation of the biogenesis of the Chlorobaculum tepidum chlorosome by carbon assimilation in conjunction with temperature changes. Our studies indicate that the carbon source and thermal stress culture of C. tepidum grows slower and incorporates fewer BChl c in the chlorosome. Compared with the chlorosome from other cultural conditions we investigated, the chlorosome from the carbon source and thermal stress culture displays (a) smaller cross-sectional radius and overall size, (b) simplified BChl c homologs with smaller side chains, (c) blue-shifted Qy absorption maxima, and (d) a sigmoid-shaped circular dichroism spectra. Using a theoretical model, we analyze how the observed spectral modifications can be associated with structural changes of BChl aggregates inside the chlorosome. Our report suggests a mechanism of metabolic regulation for chlorosome biogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Temperature and Carbon Assimilation Regulate the Chlorosome Biogenesis in Green Sulfur Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang; Saikin, Semion K.; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Enriquez, Miriam M.; Huh, Joonsuk; Frank, Harry A.; Urban, Volker S.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2013-01-01

    Green photosynthetic bacteria adjust the structure and functionality of the chlorosome—the light-absorbing antenna complex—in response to environmental stress factors. The chlorosome is a natural self-assembled aggregate of bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) molecules. In this study, we report the regulation of the biogenesis of the Chlorobaculum tepidum chlorosome by carbon assimilation in conjunction with temperature changes. Our studies indicate that the carbon source and thermal stress culture of C. tepidum grows slower and incorporates fewer BChl c in the chlorosome. Compared with the chlorosome from other cultural conditions we investigated, the chlorosome from the carbon source and thermal stress culture displays (a) smaller cross-sectional radius and overall size, (b) simplified BChl c homologs with smaller side chains, (c) blue-shifted Qy absorption maxima, and (d) a sigmoid-shaped circular dichroism spectra. Using a theoretical model, we analyze how the observed spectral modifications can be associated with structural changes of BChl aggregates inside the chlorosome. Our report suggests a mechanism of metabolic regulation for chlorosome biogenesis. PMID:24047985

  2. Carbon isotope fractionation by thermophilic phototrophic sulfur bacteria: evidence for autotrophic growth in natural populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madigan, M. T.; Takigiku, R.; Lee, R. G.; Gest, H.; Hayes, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Purple phototrophic bacteria of the genus Chromatium can grow as either photoautotrophs or photoheterotrophs. To determine the growth mode of the thermophilic Chromatium species, Chromatium tepidum, under in situ conditions, we have examined the carbon isotope fractionation patterns in laboratory cultures of this organism and in mats of C. tepidum which develop in sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park. Isotopic analysis (13C/12C) of total carbon, carotenoid pigments, and bacteriochlorophyll from photoautotrophically grown cultures of C. tepidum yielded 13C fractionation factors near -20%. Cells of C. tepidum grown on excess acetate, wherein synthesis of the Calvin cycle enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase) was greatly repressed, were isotopically heavier, fractionation factors of ca. -7% being observed. Fractionation factors determined by isotopic analyses of cells and pigment fractions of natural populations of C. tepidum growing in three different sulfide thermal springs in Yellowstone National Park were approximately -20%, indicating that this purple sulfur bacterium grows as a photoautotroph in nature.

  3. Biomass and pigments production in photosynthetic bacteria wastewater treatment: effects of light sources.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Panyue; Zhang, Guangming

    2015-03-01

    This study is aimed at enhancing biomass and pigments production together with pollution removal in photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) wastewater treatment via different light sources. Red, yellow, blue, white LED and incandescent lamp were used. Results showed different light sources had great effects on the PSB. PSB had the highest biomass production, COD removal and biomass yield with red LED. The corresponding biomass, COD removal and biomass yield reached 2580 mg/L, 88.6% and 0.49 mg-biomass/mg-COD-removal, respectively. The hydraulic retention time of wastewater treatment could be shortened to 72 h with red LED. Mechanism analysis showed higher ATP was produced with red LED than others. Light sources could significantly affect the pigments production. The pigments productions were greatly higher with LED than incandescent lamp. Yellow LED had the highest pigments production while red LED produced the highest carotenoid/bacteriochlorophyll ratio. Considering both efficiency and energy cost, red LED was the optimal light source. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... Inside Life Science > Bleach vs. Bacteria Inside Life Science View All Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds ... For Proteins, Form Shapes Function This Inside Life Science article also appears on LiveScience . Learn about related ...

  5. Some bacteria are beneficial!

    McMahon, Peter B.

    1995-01-01

    Most people would agree that bacteria usually spell trouble where the quality of drinking water is con cerned. However, recent studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) under the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) program have shown that some bacteria can improve the quality of water.

  6. Inactivation of biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Cawthon, C D; Lee, R G

    1988-01-01

    The current project was developed to examine inactivation of biofilm bacteria and to characterize the interaction of biocides with pipe surfaces. Unattached bacteria were quite susceptible to the variety of disinfectants tested. Viable bacterial counts were reduced 99% by exposure to 0.08 mg of hypochlorous acid (pH 7.0) per liter (1 to 2 degrees C) for 1 min. For monochloramine, 94 mg/liter was required to kill 99% of the bacteria within 1 min. These results were consistent with those found by other investigators. Biofilm bacteria grown on the surfaces of granular activated carbon particles, metal coupons, or glass microscope slides were 150 to more than 3,000 times more resistant to hypochlorous acid (free chlorine, pH 7.0) than were unattached cells. In contrast, resistance of biofilm bacteria to monochloramine disinfection ranged from 2- to 100-fold more than that of unattached cells. The results suggested that, relative to inactivation of unattached bacteria, monochloramine was better able to penetrate and kill biofilm bacteria than free chlorine. For free chlorine, the data indicated that transport of the disinfectant into the biofilm was a major rate-limiting factor. Because of this phenomenon, increasing the level of free chlorine did not increase disinfection efficiency. Experiments where equal weights of disinfectants were used suggested that the greater penetrating power of monochloramine compensated for its limited disinfection activity. These studies showed that monochloramine was as effective as free chlorine for inactivation of biofilm bacteria. The research provides important insights into strategies for control of biofilm bacteria. Images PMID:2849380

  7. [Darwin and bacteria].

    PubMed

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2009-02-01

    As in 2009 the scientific world celebrates two hundreds years from the birthday of Charles Darwin and one hundred and fifty from the publication of The Origin of Species, an analysis of his complete work is performed, looking for any mention of bacteria. But it seems that the great naturahst never took knowledge about its existence, something rather improbable in a time when the discovery of bacteria shook the medical world, or he deliberately ignored them, not finding a place for such microscopic beings into his theory of evolution. But the bacteria badly affected his familiar life, killing scarlet fever one of his children and worsening to death the evolution of tuberculosis of his favourite Annie. Darwin himself could suffer the sickness of Chagas, whose etiological agent has a similar level to bacteria in the scale of evolution.

  8. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Serrato, Rodrigo V

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure.

  9. Lipopolysaccharides in diazotrophic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Serrato, Rodrigo V.

    2014-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) is a process in which the atmospheric nitrogen (N2) is transformed into ammonia (NH3) by a select group of nitrogen-fixing organisms, or diazotrophic bacteria. In order to furnish the biologically useful nitrogen to plants, these bacteria must be in constant molecular communication with their host plants. Some of these molecular plant-microbe interactions are very specific, resulting in a symbiotic relationship between the diazotroph and the host. Others are found between associative diazotrophs and plants, resulting in plant infection and colonization of internal tissues. Independent of the type of ecological interaction, glycans, and glycoconjugates produced by these bacteria play an important role in the molecular communication prior and during colonization. Even though exopolysaccharides (EPS) and lipochitooligosaccharides (LCO) produced by diazotrophic bacteria and released onto the environment have their importance in the microbe-plant interaction, it is the lipopolysaccharides (LPS), anchored on the external membrane of these bacteria, that mediates the direct contact of the diazotroph with the host cells. These molecules are extremely variable among the several species of nitrogen fixing-bacteria, and there are evidences of the mechanisms of infection being closely related to their structure. PMID:25232535

  10. The fecal bacteria

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  11. Bacteria and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Ruth; Harding, Keith G

    2004-04-01

    Wound healing is a complex process with many potential factors that can delay healing. There is increasing interest in the effects of bacteria on the processes of wound healing. All chronic wounds are colonized by bacteria, with low levels of bacteria being beneficial to the wound healing process. Wound infection is detrimental to wound healing, but the diagnosis and management of wound infection is controversial, and varies between clinicians. There is increasing recognition of the concept of critical colonization or local infection, when wound healing may be delayed in the absence of the typical clinical features of infection. The progression from wound colonization to infection depends not only on the bacterial count or the species present, but also on the host immune response, the number of different species present, the virulence of the organisms and synergistic interactions between the different species. There is increasing evidence that bacteria within chronic wounds live within biofilm communities, in which the bacteria are protected from host defences and develop resistance to antibiotic treatment. An appreciation of the factors affecting the progression from colonization to infection can help clinicians with the interpretation of clinical findings and microbiological investigations in patients with chronic wounds. An understanding of the physiology and interactions within multi-species biofilms may aid the development of more effective methods of treating infected and poorly healing wounds. The emergence of consensus guidelines has helped to optimize clinical management.

  12. Patterns in Abundance, Cell Size and Pigment Content of Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria along Environmental Gradients in Northern Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Fauteux, Lisa; Cottrell, Matthew T.; Kirchman, David L.; Borrego, Carles M.; Garcia-Chaves, Maria Carolina; del Giorgio, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    There is now evidence that aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria are widespread across aquatic systems, yet the factors that determine their abundance and activity are still not well understood, particularly in freshwaters. Here we describe the patterns in AAP abundance, cell size and pigment content across wide environmental gradients in 43 temperate and boreal lakes of Québec. AAP bacterial abundance varied from 1.51 to 5.49 x 105 cells mL-1, representing <1 to 37% of total bacterial abundance. AAP bacteria were present year-round, including the ice-cover period, but their abundance relative to total bacterial abundance was significantly lower in winter than in summer (2.6% and 7.7%, respectively). AAP bacterial cells were on average two-fold larger than the average bacterial cell size, thus AAP cells made a greater relative contribution to biomass than to abundance. Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChla) concentration varied widely across lakes, and was not related to AAP bacterial abundance, suggesting a large intrinsic variability in the cellular pigment content. Absolute and relative AAP bacterial abundance increased with dissolved organic carbon (DOC), whereas cell-specific BChla content was negatively related to chlorophyll a (Chla). As a result, both the contribution of AAP bacteria to total prokaryotic abundance, and the cell-specific BChla pigment content were positively correlated with the DOC:Chla ratio, both peaking in highly colored, low-chlorophyll lakes. Our results suggest that photoheterotrophy might represent a significant ecological advantage in highly colored, low-chlorophyll lakes, where DOC pool is chemically and structurally more complex. PMID:25927833

  13. Patterns in Abundance, Cell Size and Pigment Content of Aerobic Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria along Environmental Gradients in Northern Lakes.

    PubMed

    Fauteux, Lisa; Cottrell, Matthew T; Kirchman, David L; Borrego, Carles M; Garcia-Chaves, Maria Carolina; Del Giorgio, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    There is now evidence that aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria are widespread across aquatic systems, yet the factors that determine their abundance and activity are still not well understood, particularly in freshwaters. Here we describe the patterns in AAP abundance, cell size and pigment content across wide environmental gradients in 43 temperate and boreal lakes of Québec. AAP bacterial abundance varied from 1.51 to 5.49 x 105 cells mL-1, representing <1 to 37% of total bacterial abundance. AAP bacteria were present year-round, including the ice-cover period, but their abundance relative to total bacterial abundance was significantly lower in winter than in summer (2.6% and 7.7%, respectively). AAP bacterial cells were on average two-fold larger than the average bacterial cell size, thus AAP cells made a greater relative contribution to biomass than to abundance. Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChla) concentration varied widely across lakes, and was not related to AAP bacterial abundance, suggesting a large intrinsic variability in the cellular pigment content. Absolute and relative AAP bacterial abundance increased with dissolved organic carbon (DOC), whereas cell-specific BChla content was negatively related to chlorophyll a (Chla). As a result, both the contribution of AAP bacteria to total prokaryotic abundance, and the cell-specific BChla pigment content were positively correlated with the DOC:Chla ratio, both peaking in highly colored, low-chlorophyll lakes. Our results suggest that photoheterotrophy might represent a significant ecological advantage in highly colored, low-chlorophyll lakes, where DOC pool is chemically and structurally more complex.

  14. Mycorrhiza helper bacteria

    SciT

    Deveau, Aurelie; Labbe, Jessy

    This chapter focuses on the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacteria (MHB), a generic name given to bacteria which stimulate the formation of mycorrhizal symbiosis. By extension, some bacterial strains that positively impact the functioning of mycorrhizal symbiosis are also called MHB. These bacteria have applicative interests, as they indirectly improve the health and growth of tree seedlings. MHB are not restricted to a specific type of ecosystem, but are rather generalist in the way that they associate with both herbaceous and woody mycorrhizal plants from boreal, temperate, arid and tropical ecosystems. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms and their specificities will help usmore » to know more about the ecology of the MHB. The process of acquisition varies between fungal species; while ectomycorrhizal fungi most probably recurrently acquire them from the environment, the association between bacterial endosymbionts and Glomeromycota probably dates back to very ancient times, and has since been vertically transmitted.« less

  15. Ice-Nucleating Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Hitoshi

    Since the discovery of ice-nucleating bacteria in 1974 by Maki et al., a large number of studies on the biological characteristics, ice-nucleating substance, ice nucleation gene and frost damage etc. of the bacteria have been carried out. Ice-nucleating bacteria can cause the freezing of water at relatively warm temperature (-2.3°C). Tween 20 was good substrates for ice-nucleating activity of Pseudomonas fluorescens KUIN-1. Major fatty acids of Isolate (Pseudomonas fluorescens) W-11 grown at 30°C were palmitic, cis-9-hexadecenoic and cis-11-octadecenoic which amounted to 90% of the total fatty acids. Sequence analysis shows that an ice nucleation gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens is related to the gene of Pseudomonas syringae.

  16. Effects of dissolved oxygen concentration on photosynthetic bacteria wastewater treatment: Pollutants removal, cell growth and pigments production.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fan; Yang, Anqi; Zhang, Guangming; Wang, Hangyao

    2017-10-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is an important parameter in photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) wastewater treatment. This study set different DO levels and detected the pollutants removal, PSB growth and pigments production. Results showed that DO significantly influenced the performances of PSB wastewater treatment process. The highest COD (93%) and NH 3 -N removal (83%) was achieved under DO of 4-8mg/L, but DO of 2-4mg/L was recommended considering the aeration cost. PSB biomass reached 1645mg/L under DO of 4-8mg/L with satisfying co-enzyme Q10 content. The biomass yield was relatively stable at all DO levels. For bacteriochlorophyll and carotenoids, DO>1mg/L could satisfy their production. On the other hand, DO<0.5mg/L led to the highest dehydrogenase activity. According to the different purposes, the optimal treatment time was different. The most pigments production occurred at 24h; biomass reached peak at 48h; and the optimal time for pollutants removal was 72h. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Bacteria-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Tuson, Hannah H; Weibel, Douglas B

    2013-05-14

    The interaction of bacteria with surfaces has important implications in a range of areas, including bioenergy, biofouling, biofilm formation, and the infection of plants and animals. Many of the interactions of bacteria with surfaces produce changes in the expression of genes that influence cell morphology and behavior, including genes essential for motility and surface attachment. Despite the attention that these phenotypes have garnered, the bacterial systems used for sensing and responding to surfaces are still not well understood. An understanding of these mechanisms will guide the development of new classes of materials that inhibit and promote cell growth, and complement studies of the physiology of bacteria in contact with surfaces. Recent studies from a range of fields in science and engineering are poised to guide future investigations in this area. This review summarizes recent studies on bacteria-surface interactions, discusses mechanisms of surface sensing and consequences of cell attachment, provides an overview of surfaces that have been used in bacterial studies, and highlights unanswered questions in this field.

  18. PATHOGENICITY OF BIOFILM BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is a paucity of information concerning any link between the microorganisms commonly found in biofilms of drinking water systems and their impacts on human health. For bacteria, culture-based techniques detect only a limited number of the total microorganisms associated wit...

  19. Communication among Oral Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kolenbrander, Paul E.; Andersen, Roxanna N.; Blehert, David S.; Egland, Paul G.; Foster, Jamie S.; Palmer, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Human oral bacteria interact with their environment by attaching to surfaces and establishing mixed-species communities. As each bacterial cell attaches, it forms a new surface to which other cells can adhere. Adherence and community development are spatiotemporal; such order requires communication. The discovery of soluble signals, such as autoinducer-2, that may be exchanged within multispecies communities to convey information between organisms has emerged as a new research direction. Direct-contact signals, such as adhesins and receptors, that elicit changes in gene expression after cell-cell contact and biofilm growth are also an active research area. Considering that the majority of oral bacteria are organized in dense three-dimensional biofilms on teeth, confocal microscopy and fluorescently labeled probes provide valuable approaches for investigating the architecture of these organized communities in situ. Oral biofilms are readily accessible to microbiologists and are excellent model systems for studies of microbial communication. One attractive model system is a saliva-coated flowcell with oral bacterial biofilms growing on saliva as the sole nutrient source; an intergeneric mutualism is discussed. Several oral bacterial species are amenable to genetic manipulation for molecular characterization of communication both among bacteria and between bacteria and the host. A successful search for genes critical for mixed-species community organization will be accomplished only when it is conducted with mixed-species communities. PMID:12209001

  20. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longenecker, Nevin E.; Oppenheimer, Dan

    1982-01-01

    A study conducted by high school advanced bacteriology students appears to confirm the hypothesis that the incremental administration of antibiotics on several species of bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermis, Bacillus sublitus, Bacillus megaterium) will allow for the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. (PEB)

  1. Mechanism of energy transfer from carotenoids to bacteriochlorophyll : light-harvesting by carotenoids having different extents of {pi}-electron conjugation incorporated into the B850 antenna complex from the carotenoidless bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1.

    SciT

    Desamero, R. Z. B.; Chynwat, V.; van der Hoef, I.

    1998-10-15

    Spheroidene and a series of spheroidene analogues with extents of p-electron conjugation ranging from 7 to 13 carbon-carbon double bonds were incorporated into the B850 light-harvesting complex of Rhodobacter sphaeroides R-26.1. The structures and spectroscopic properties of the carotenoids and the dynamics of energy transfer from the carotenoid to bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) in the B850 complex were studied by using steady-state absorption, fluorescence, fluorescence excitation, resonance Raman, and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The spheroidene analogues used in this study were 5',6'-dihydro-7',8'-didehydrospheroidene, 7',8'-didehydrospheroidene, and 1',2'-dihydro-3',4',7',8'-tetradehydrospheroidene. These data, taken together with results from 3,4,7,8-tetrahydrospheroidene, 3,4,5,6-tetrahydrospheroidene, 3,4-dihydrospheroidene, and spheroidene already published (Frank, H. A.; Farhoosh,more » R.; Aldema, M. L.; DeCoster, B.; Christensen, R. L.; Gebhard, R.; Lugtenburg, J. Photochem. Photobiol. 1993, 57, 49. Farhoosh, R.; Chynwat, V.; Gebhard, R.; Lugtenburg, J.; Frank, H. A. Photosynth. Res. 1994, 42, 157), provide a systematic series of molecules for understanding the molecular features that determine the mechanism of energy transfer from carotenoids to BChl in photosynthetic bacterial light-harvesting complexes. The data support the hypothesis that only carotenoids having 10 or less carbon-carbon double bonds transfer energy via their 21Ag (S1) states to BChl to any significant degree. Energy transfer via the 11Bu (S2) state of the carotenoid becomes more important than the S1 route as the number of conjugated carbon-carbon double bonds increases. The results also suggest that the S2 state associated with the Qx transition of the B850 BChl is the most likely acceptor state for energy transfer originating from both the 2{sup 1}A{sub g} (S{sub 1}) and 1{sup 1}B{sub u} (S{sub 2}) states of all carotenoids.« less

  2. [Construction and Characterization of B850-Only LH2 Energy Transfer System in Purple Bacteria].

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Zhao, Chun-gui; Yue, Hui-ying; Yang, Su-ping; Qu, Yin-bo; Jiao, Nian-zhi

    2015-04-01

    To seek microscopic molecular mechanism of energy transfer and complex reconstitution in the photosynthesis, the conditions for construction of B850-only peripheral light-harvesting complex (LH2) and their properties were investigated using absorption, fluorescence spectroscopy, molecular sieve chromatography, ultrafiltration and sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) from the purple bacteria. The results indicated that bacteriochlorophylls (BChl) of B800 incubated in 10 mmo · L(-1) Tris-HCl (pH 8.0) buffer are selectively released from their binding sites of LH2 of Rhodobacter azotoformans (A-LH2) by 0.08% (W/V) SDS. B850-only A-LH2 was constructed after removing free BChl mixing with 10% methyl alcohol by ultrafiltration. B850 BChl was released after A-LH2 was incubated for 240 min in dark at room temperature (RT). While BChl of B800 incubated in pH 1.9 buffer were selectively released from their binding sites of LH2 of Rhodopseudomonas palustris (P-LH2). The authors acquired two components using molecular sieve chromatography. Free BChl of one component was not removed and self-assembled to P-LH2. The other removed free BChl and B850-only P-LH2 was constructed. B850 unchanged after P-LH2 was incubated. P-LH2 α and β subunits have different molecular weights, but those of A-LH2 are in the contrary. It is concluded that B850-only P-LH2 is more stable than A-LH2. The enigmatic split of the B800 absorption band was not observed in these LH2, but we acquired two kinds of B800-released LH2 from Rhodopseudomonas palustris. The authors' results may provide a new light to separate homogeneous Apoprotein LH2.

  3. Regulated Proteolysis in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Samar A; Chien, Peter

    2018-06-20

    Regulated proteolysis is a vital process that affects all living things. Bacteria use energy-dependent AAA+ proteases to power degradation of misfolded and native regulatory proteins. Given that proteolysis is an irreversible event, specificity and selectivity in degrading substrates are key. Specificity is often augmented through the use of adaptors that modify the inherent specificity of the proteolytic machinery. Regulated protein degradation is intricately linked to quality control, cell-cycle progression, and physiological transitions. In this review, we highlight recent work that has shed light on our understanding of regulated proteolysis in bacteria. We discuss the role AAA+ proteases play during balanced growth as well as how these proteases are deployed during changes in growth. We present examples of how protease selectivity can be controlled in increasingly complex ways. Finally, we describe how coupling a core recognition determinant to one or more modifying agents is a general theme for regulated protein degradation.

  4. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  5. Sociomicrobiology and Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Joao B

    2016-06-01

    The study of microbial pathogenesis has been primarily a reductionist science since Koch's principles. Reductionist approaches are essential to identify the causal agents of infectious disease, their molecular mechanisms of action, and potential drug targets, and much of medicine's success in the treatment of infectious disease stems from that approach. But many bacteria-caused diseases cannot be explained by a single bacterium. Several aspects of bacterial pathogenesis will benefit from a more holistic approach that takes into account social interaction among bacteria of the same species and between species in consortia such as the human microbiome. The emerging discipline of sociomicrobiology provides a framework to dissect microbial interactions in single and multi-species communities without compromising mechanistic detail. The study of bacterial pathogenesis can benefit greatly from incorporating concepts from other disciplines such as social evolution theory and microbial ecology, where communities, their interactions with hosts, and with the environment play key roles.

  6. Denitrification by extremely halophilic bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1985-01-01

    Extremely halophilic bacteria were isolated from widely separated sites by anaerobic enrichment in the presence of nitrate. The anaerobic growth of several of these isolates was accompanied by the production of nitrite, nitrous oxide, and dinitrogen. These results are a direct confirmation of the existence of extremely halophilic denitrifying bacteria, and suggest that such bacteria may be common inhabitants of hypersaline environments.

  7. Living bacteria in silica gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, Nadine; Bouvet, Odile; Noelle Rager, Marie; Roux, Cécile; Coradin, Thibaud; Livage, Jacques

    2002-09-01

    The encapsulation of enzymes within silica gels has been extensively studied during the past decade for the design of biosensors and bioreactors. Yeast spores and bacteria have also been recently immobilized within silica gels where they retain their enzymatic activity, but the problem of the long-term viability of whole cells in an inorganic matrix has never been fully addressed. It is a real challenge for the development of sol-gel processes. Generic tests have been performed to check the viability of Escherichia coli bacteria in silica gels. Surprisingly, more bacteria remain culturable in the gel than in an aqueous suspension. The metabolic activity of the bacteria towards glycolysis decreases slowly, but half of the bacteria are still viable after one month. When confined within a mineral environment, bacteria do not form colonies. The exchange of chemical signals between isolated bacteria rather than aggregates can then be studied, a point that could be very important for 'quorum sensing'.

  8. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  9. Phenotypic switching in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrin, Jack

    Living matter is a non-equilibrium system in which many components work in parallel to perpetuate themselves through a fluctuating environment. Physiological states or functionalities revealed by a particular environment are called phenotypes. Transitions between phenotypes may occur either spontaneously or via interaction with the environment. Even in the same environment, genetically identical bacteria can exhibit different phenotypes of a continuous or discrete nature. In this thesis, we pursued three lines of investigation into discrete phenotypic heterogeneity in bacterial populations: the quantitative characterization of the so-called bacterial persistence, a theoretical model of phenotypic switching based on those measurements, and the design of artificial genetic networks which implement this model. Persistence is the phenotype of a subpopulation of bacteria with a reduced sensitivity to antibiotics. We developed a microfluidic apparatus, which allowed us to monitor the growth rates of individual cells while applying repeated cycles of antibiotic treatments. We were able to identify distinct phenotypes (normal and persistent) and characterize the stochastic transitions between them. We also found that phenotypic heterogeneity was present prior to any environmental cue such as antibiotic exposure. Motivated by the experiments with persisters, we formulated a theoretical model describing the dynamic behavior of several discrete phenotypes in a periodically varying environment. This theoretical framework allowed us to quantitatively predict the fitness of dynamic populations and to compare survival strategies according to environmental time-symmetries. These calculations suggested that persistence is a strategy used by bacterial populations to adapt to fluctuating environments. Knowledge of the phenotypic transition rates for persistence may provide statistical information about the typical environments of bacteria. We also describe a design of artificial

  10. A quantum mechanical analysis of the light-harvesting complex 2 (LH2) from purple photosynthetic bacteria: insights into the electrostatic effects of transmembrane helices.

    PubMed

    Pichierri, Fabio

    2011-02-01

    We perform a quantum mechanical study of the peptides that are part of the LH2 complex from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila, a non-sulfur purple bacteria that has the ability of producing chemical energy from photosynthesis. The electronic structure calculations indicate that the transmembrane helices of these peptides are characterized by dipole moments with a magnitude of about 150D. When the full nonamer assembly made of 18 peptides is considered, then a macrodipole of magnitude 806D is built up from the vector sum of each monomer dipole. The macrodipole is oriented normal to the membrane plane and with the positive tip toward the cytoplasm thereby indicating that the electronic charge of the protein scaffold is polarized toward the periplasm. The results obtained here suggest that the asymmetric charge distribution of the protein scaffold contributes an anisotropic electrostatic environment which differentiates the absorption properties of the bacteriochlorophyll pigments, B800 and B850, embedded in the LH2 complex. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. STUDIES ON LUMINOUS BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Thomas F.

    1925-01-01

    1. A method has been described whereby the intensity of the light of luminous bacteria may be measured in a quantitative manner. 2. It is pointed out that the temperature coefficients for light intensity do not follow the van't Hoff rule, but are higher and vary with each 10° temperature interval. 3. From a comparison with other data it is found that the process is not a simple one, but that the observed curve is the resultant of several reactions which proceed simultaneously. 4. The discrepancies in the temperature coefficients in the neighborhood of the "optimum temperature" may be due to a process of coagulation of the colloidal particles of the enzyme. This coagulation will tend to cause a deviation of the curve away from that normal for chemical reactions. PMID:19872179

  12. Acoustofluidic bacteria separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sixing; Ma, Fen; Bachman, Hunter; Cameron, Craig E.; Zeng, Xiangqun; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial separation from human blood samples can help with the identification of pathogenic bacteria for sepsis diagnosis. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic device for label-free bacterial separation from human blood samples. In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) field to separate Escherichia coli from human blood cells based on their size difference. Flow cytometry analysis of the E. coli separated from red blood cells shows a purity of more than 96%. Moreover, the label-free electrochemical detection of the separated E. coli displays reduced non-specific signals due to the removal of blood cells. Our acoustofluidic bacterial separation platform has advantages such as label-free separation, high biocompatibility, flexibility, low cost, miniaturization, automation, and ease of in-line integration. The platform can be incorporated with an on-chip sensor to realize a point-of-care sepsis diagnostic device.

  13. Interactions between Diatoms and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shady A.; Parker, Micaela S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans. PMID:22933565

  14. Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Tyutikov, F M; Bespalova, I A; Rebentish, B A; Aleksandrushkina, N N; Krivisky, A S

    1980-01-01

    Bacteriophages of methanotrophic bacteria have been found in 16 out of 88 studied samples (underground waters, pond water, soil, gas and oil installation waters, fermentor cultural fluids, bacterial paste, and rumen of cattle) taken in different geographic zones of the Soviet Union. Altogether, 23 phage strains were isolated: 10 strains that specifically lysed only Methylosinus sporium strains, 2 strains that each lysed 1 of 5 Methylosinus trichosporium strains studied, and 11 strains that lysed Flavobacterium gasotypicum and, at the same time, 1 M. sporium strain. By fine structure, the phages were divided into two types (with very short or long noncontractile tails); by host range and serological properties, they fell into three types. One-step growth characteristics of the phages differed only slightly; the latent period varied from 6 to 8 h, the rise period varied from 4 to 6 h, and the average burst size was 100. All phages had guanine- and cytosine-rich double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid consisting of common nitrogen bases. The molecular mass of the deoxyribonucleic acid as determined by restriction endonuclease analysis was 29.4 X 10(6) for M. sporium phages and 44 X 10(6) for F. gasotypicum phages. By all of the above-mentioned properties, all phages within each of the groups were completely identical to one another, but differed from phages of other groups. Bacteriophages lysing M. sporium and M. trichosporium GB2 were identical to phages M1 and M4, respectively, which were isolated earlier in the German Democratic Republic on the same methanotrophic species. Images PMID:6774962

  15. Evaluation of Cariogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawara, Fusao; Nomura, Yoshiaki; Imai, Susumu; Senda, Akira; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The evaluation of Mutans streptococci (MS) is one of the index for caries risk. DentocultTM and CRTTM are commercial kits to detect and evaluate MS, conveniently. However, the evaluation of MS has also been carried out simply using an instruction manual. But the instruction manual is not easy to use for evaluation of MS. The aim of this study was to examine the utility of modified Mitis-Salivalius Bacitracin (MSB) agar medium compared with MSB agar medium and commercial kits, and to establish a convenient kit (mMSB-kit) using modified MSB agar. Methods The MS in stimulated saliva from 27 subjects were detected by MSB, modified MSB agar medium and commercial kits. Laboratory and clinically isolated strains of MS were similarly evaluated. The ratios of MS in detected bacteria were compared by ELISA. Results The scores using an mMSB-kit on the basis of modified MSB agar medium were tabulated. Saliva samples showed different levels of MS between culture methods and the commercial kit. Some samples which were full of MS were not detected by the commercial kit. The detection of MS by modified MSB agar medium and mMSB-kit were significantly higher when compared with MSB agar medium,CRTTM, (P< .01) and Dentocult SMTM (P<.05). Conclusion The sensitivity for detection of MS is higher for modified MSB agar medium when compared with MSB agar medium. The mMSB-kit can be used simply, and can be an important contributor for the evaluation of MS as a caries risk factor. PMID:19212495

  16. Review on SERS of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mosier-Boss, Pamela A.

    2017-01-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has been widely used for chemical detection. Moreover, the inherent richness of the spectral data has made SERS attractive for use in detecting biological materials, including bacteria. This review discusses methods that have been used to obtain SERS spectra of bacteria. The kinds of SERS substrates employed to obtain SERS spectra are discussed as well as how bacteria interact with silver and gold nanoparticles. The roll of capping agents on Ag/Au NPs in obtaining SERS spectra is examined as well as the interpretation of the spectral data. PMID:29137201

  17. Clinical microbiology of coryneform bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; von Graevenitz, A; Clarridge, J E; Bernard, K A

    1997-01-01

    Coryneform bacteria are aerobically growing, asporogenous, non-partially-acid-fast, gram-positive rods of irregular morphology. Within the last few years, there has been a massive increase in the number of publications related to all aspects of their clinical microbiology. Clinical microbiologists are often confronted with making identifications within this heterogeneous group as well as with considerations of the clinical significance of such isolates. This review provides comprehensive information on the identification of coryneform bacteria and outlines recent changes in taxonomy. The following genera are covered: Corynebacterium, Turicella, Arthrobacter, Brevibacterium, Dermabacter. Propionibacterium, Rothia, Exiguobacterium, Oerskovia, Cellulomonas, Sanguibacter, Microbacterium, Aureobacterium, "Corynebacterium aquaticum," Arcanobacterium, and Actinomyces. Case reports claiming disease associations of coryneform bacteria are critically reviewed. Minimal microbiological requirements for publications on disease associations of coryneform bacteria are proposed. PMID:8993861

  18. Gut Bacteria Affect Immunotherapy Response

    Cancer.gov

    Three new studies have identified intestinal bacteria that appear to influence the response to checkpoint inhibitors. This Cancer Currents blog post explains how the researchers think their findings could be used to improve patients’ responses to these immunotherapy drugs.

  19. Anaerobic bacteria that dechlorinate perchloroethene.

    PubMed Central

    Fathepure, B Z; Nengu, J P; Boyd, S A

    1987-01-01

    In this study, we identified specific cultures of anaerobic bacteria that dechlorinate perchlorethene (PCE). The bacteria that significantly dechlorinated PCE were strain DCB-1, an obligate anaerobe previously shown to dechlorinate chlorobenzoate, and two strains of Methanosarcina. The rate of PCE dechlorination by DCB-1 compared favorably with reported rates of trichloroethene bio-oxidation by methanotrophs. Even higher PCE dechlorination rates were achieved when DCB-1 was grown in a methanogenic consortium. PMID:3426224

  20. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus B.; Dittmer, Anders Lindequist; Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Trojan, Daniela; Schreiber, Lars; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures and electric fields indicated electron transfer between vertically separated anodic and cathodic half-reactions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed the presence of Desulfobulbaceae filaments. In addition, in situ measurements of oxygen, pH, and electric potential distributions in the waterlogged banks of Giber Å demonstrated the presence of distant electric redox coupling in naturally occurring freshwater sediment. At the same site, filamentous Desulfobulbaceae with cable bacterium morphology were found to be present. Their 16S rRNA gene sequence placed them as a distinct sister group to the known marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary origin of the cable phenotype within Desulfobulbaceae with subsequent diversification into a freshwater and a marine lineage. PMID:26116678

  1. 7 CFR 170.2 - Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market? 170...) MISCELLANEOUS MARKETING PRACTICES UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 USDA FARMERS MARKET § 170.2 Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market? Yes. A producer-only market is one that does not offer...

  2. 7 CFR 170.2 - Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market? 170...) MISCELLANEOUS MARKETING PRACTICES UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 USDA FARMERS MARKET § 170.2 Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market? Yes. A producer-only market is one that does not offer...

  3. 7 CFR 170.2 - Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market? 170...) MISCELLANEOUS MARKETING PRACTICES UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 USDA FARMERS MARKET § 170.2 Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market? Yes. A producer-only market is one that does not offer...

  4. 7 CFR 170.2 - Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market? 170...) MISCELLANEOUS MARKETING PRACTICES UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 USDA FARMERS MARKET § 170.2 Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market? Yes. A producer-only market is one that does not offer...

  5. 7 CFR 170.2 - Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market? 170...) MISCELLANEOUS MARKETING PRACTICES UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 USDA FARMERS MARKET § 170.2 Is the USDA Farmers Market a producer-only market? Yes. A producer-only market is one that does not offer...

  6. Bacteria foraging in turbulent waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, John; Tang, Wenbo; Stocker, Roman

    2009-11-01

    Marine bacteria are the Ocean's recyclers, contributing to as much as 50% of the productivity of the marine food web. Bacteria forage on patches of dissolved nutrients using chemotaxis, the ability to swim up chemical gradients. As turbulence is ubiquitous in the Ocean, it is important to understand how turbulent flow conditions affect bacterial foraging. We used three-dimensional, isotropic direct numerical simulations coupled with a bacterial transport equation to address this problem. After the flow is continuously forced until it reaches a steady state, microscale nutrient patches are injected into the turbulent flow, and stirring produces thin nutrient filaments. Two populations of bacteria compete against each other: one population is motile and chemotactic (`active'), the other is non-motile (`passive'). The distribution of both populations is initially uniform. Chemotaxis allows active bacteria to cluster near the center of the nutrient filaments, increasing their nutrient uptake relative to passive bacteria. Increasing the turbulence intensity increases the short-term chemotactic advantage by quickly producing large gradients in the nutrient concentration, but also leads to rapid mixing of the nutrient field, which makes the chemotactic advantage short-lived. The results suggest that the evolutionary advantage of chemotaxis, based on the increase in nutrient uptake relative to the energetic cost of swimming, strongly depends on the turbulence level.

  7. Horizontal gene transfer between bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heuer, Holger; Smalla, Kornelia

    2007-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) refers to the acquisition of foreign genes by organisms. The occurrence of HGT among bacteria in the environment is assumed to have implications in the risk assessment of genetically modified bacteria which are released into the environment. First, introduced genetic sequences from a genetically modified bacterium could be transferred to indigenous micro-organisms and alter their genome and subsequently their ecological niche. Second, the genetically modified bacterium released into the environment might capture mobile genetic elements (MGE) from indigenous micro-organisms which could extend its ecological potential. Thus, for a risk assessment it is important to understand the extent of HGT and genome plasticity of bacteria in the environment. This review summarizes the present state of knowledge on HGT between bacteria as a crucial mechanism contributing to bacterial adaptability and diversity. In view of the use of GM crops and microbes in agricultural settings, in this mini-review we focus particularly on the presence and role of MGE in soil and plant-associated bacteria and the factors affecting gene transfer.

  8. Human body may produce bacteria.

    PubMed

    Salerian, Alen J

    2017-06-01

    "Human body may produce bacteria" proposes that human body may produce bacteria and represent an independent source of infections contrary to the current paradigm of infectious disorders proposed by Louis Pasteur in 1880. The following observations are consistent with this hypothesis: A. Bidirectional transformations of both living and nonliving things have been commonly observed in nature. B. Complex multicellular organisms harbor the necessary properties to produce bacteria (water, nitrogen and oxygen). C. Physical laws suggest any previously observed phenomenon or action will occur again (life began on earth; a non living thing). D. Animal muscle cells may generate energy (fermentation). E. Sterilized food products (i.e. boiled eggs), may produce bacteria and fungus under special conditions and without any exposure to foreign living cells. "Human body may produce bacteria" may challenge the current medical paradigm that views human infectious disorders as the exclusive causative byproducts of invading foreign cells. It may also introduce new avenues to treat infectious disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Methylotrophic bacteria in sustainable agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish; Tomar, Rajesh Singh; Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby

    2016-07-01

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers to increase production from available land has resulted in deterioration of soil quality. To prevent further soil deterioration, the use of methylotrophic bacteria that have the ability to colonize different habitats, including soil, sediment, water, and both epiphytes and endophytes as host plants, has been suggested for sustainable agriculture. Methylotrophic bacteria are known to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle in soil ecosystems, ultimately fortifying plants and sustaining agriculture. Methylotrophs also improve air quality by using volatile organic compounds such as dichloromethane, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid. Additionally, methylotrophs are involved in phosphorous, nitrogen, and carbon cycling and can help reduce global warming. In this review, different aspects of the interaction between methylotrophs and host plants are discussed, including the role of methylotrophs in phosphorus acquisition, nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, iron chelation, and plant growth promotion, and co-inoculation of these bacteria as biofertilizers for viable agriculture practices.

  10. Raman spectroscopy of oral bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Andrew J.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Quivey, Robert G.

    2003-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to measure the varying concentrations of two oral bacteria in simple mixtures. Evaporated droplets of centrifuged mixtures of Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans were analyzed via Raman microspectroscopy. The concentration of s. sanguis was determined based upon the measured Raman spectrum, using partial least squares cross-validation, with an r2 value of 0.98.

  11. Manipulating Genetic Material in Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Lisa Crawford, a graduate research assistant from the University of Toledo, works with Laurel Karr of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the molecular biology laboratory. They are donducting genetic manipulation of bacteria and yeast for the production of large amount of desired protein. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  12. Antagonism of Lactic Acid Bacteria against Phytopathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Ronèl; Holzapfel, Wilhelm H.; Bezuidenhout, Johannes J.; Kotzé, Johannes M.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of lactic acid bacteria, isolated from plant surfaces and plant-associated products, were found to be antagonistic to test strains of the phytopathogens Xanthomonas campestris, Erwinia carotovora, and Pseudomonas syringae. Effective “in vitro” inhibition was found both on agar plates and in broth cultures. In pot trials, treatment of bean plants with a Lactobacillus plantarum strain before inoculation with P. syringae caused a significant reduction of the disease incidence. Images PMID:16347150

  13. Killer Pigments in Bacteria: An Ecological Nightmare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Saccardi, Marion

    2000-01-01

    Describes an alternative to teaching ecology by using bacteria to test competitor survival. Students observe a time-dependent selective killing of other unrelated bacteria by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. (SAH)

  14. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  15. Envisaging bacteria as phage targets

    PubMed Central

    Abedon, Stephen T.

    2011-01-01

    It can be difficult to appreciate just how small bacteria and phages are or how large, in comparison, the volumes that they occupy. A single milliliter, for example, can represent to a phage what would be, with proper scaling, an “ocean” to you and me. Here I illustrate, using more easily visualized macroscopic examples, the difficulties that a phage, as a randomly diffusing particle, can have in locating bacteria to infect. I conclude by restating the truism that the rate of phage adsorption to a given target bacterium is a function of phage density, that is, titer, in combination with the degree of bacterial susceptibility to adsorption by an encountering phage. PMID:23616932

  16. Virulence properties of cariogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kuramitsu, Howard K; Wang, Bing-Yan

    2006-01-01

    The importance of Streptococcus mutans in the etiology of dental caries has been well documented. However, there is growing recognition that the cariogenic potential of dental plaque may be determined by the composite interactions of the total plaque bacteria rather than solely the virulence properties of a single organism. This study will examine how the interactions of S. mutans with other biofilm constituents may influence the cariogenicity of plaque samples. In order to begin to investigate the effects of nonmutans streptococci on the cariogenic potential of S. mutans, we have examined the effects of Streptococcus gordonii on the virulence properties of the former organisms. These studies have indicated that S.gordonii can attenuate several potential virulence properties of S. mutans including bacteriocin production, genetic transformation, and biofilm formation. Therefore, modulation of the interactions between plaque bacteria might be a novel approach for attenuating dental caries initiation. PMID:16934112

  17. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    DOEpatents

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  18. Enteric bacteria in aerobically digested sludge.

    PubMed Central

    Farrah, S R; Bitton, G

    1984-01-01

    Indicator bacteria, Salmonella spp., and total aerobic bacteria were determined in samples of undigested sludge and sludge that had been treated by one or two stages of aerobic digestion. Aerobic sludge digestion reduced the level of indicator bacteria by 1 to 2 log10 per g. The level of Salmonella spp. was also reduced during aerobic treatment of sludge. In general, aerobic treatment of sludge reduced, but did not eliminate, indicator bacteria and Salmonella spp. PMID:6721492

  19. Antibiotic Production by Anaerobic Bacteria1

    PubMed Central

    Sturgen, Nancy O.; Casida, L. E.

    1962-01-01

    Soils from aerobic and anaerobic sources were investigated for the possible presence of bacteria which produce antibiotics under anaerobic conditions of growth. The screening techniques devised for this study yielded 157 soil bacteria which, during anaerobic growth, produced antibiotic activity against aerobic test bacteria. Studies on choice of media, presence of oxygen, and changes in antibiotic activity during growth indicated that representative strains of these bacteria produced mixtures of antibiotics. The activity was heat labile. PMID:13918037

  20. Bacteria turn a tiny gear

    SciT

    Aronson, Igor

    2009-01-01

    Thousands of tiny Bacillus subtillis bacteria turn a single gear, just 380 microns across. (A human hair is about 100 microns across.) The method could be used to create micro-machines. Argonne National Laboratory scientist Igor Aronson pioneered this technique. Read more at the New York Times: http://ow.ly/ODfI or at Argonne: http://ow.ly/ODfa Video courtesy Igor Aronson.

  1. Bacteria, fungi and protozoa paper

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bacteria and fungi in source and treated drinking waterThis dataset is associated with the following publication:King , D., S. Pfaller , M. Donohue , S. Vesper , E. Villegas , M. Ware , S. Glassmeyer , M. Vogal, E. Furlong, and D. Kolpin. Microbial pathogens in source and treated waters from drinking water treatment plants in the United States and implications for human health. SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT. Elsevier BV, AMSTERDAM, NETHERLANDS, 562: 987–995, (2016).

  2. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  3. Probiotic bacteria cell walls stimulate the activity of the intestinal epithelial cells and macrophage functionality.

    PubMed

    Lemme-Dumit, J M; Polti, M A; Perdigón, G; Galdeano, C Maldonado

    2018-01-29

    The effect of oral administration of probiotic bacteria cell walls (PBCWs) in the stimulation of the immune system in healthy BALB/c mice was evaluated. We focused our investigation mainly on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) which are essential for coordinating an adequate mucosal immune response and on the functionality of macrophages. The probiotic bacteria and their cell walls were able to stimulate the IECs exhibiting an important activation and cytokine releases. Supplementation with PBCWs promoted macrophage activation from peritoneum and spleen, indicating that the PBCWs oral administration was able to improve the functionality of the macrophages. In addition, the PBCWs increased immunoglobulin A (IgA)-producing cells in the gut lamina propria in a similar way to probiotic bacteria, but this supplementation did not have an effect on the population of goblet cells in the small intestine epithelium. These results indicate that the probiotic bacteria and their cell walls have an important immunoregulatory effect on the IECs without altering the homeostatic environment but with an increase in IgA+ producing cells and in the innate immune cells, mainly those distant from the gut such as spleen and peritoneum. These findings about the capacity of the cell walls from probiotic bacteria to stimulate key cells, such as IECs and macrophages, and to improve the functioning of the immune system, suggest that those structures could be applied as a new oral adjuvant.

  4. Endocarditis caused by anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kestler, M; Muñoz, P; Marín, M; Goenaga, M A; Idígoras Viedma, P; de Alarcón, A; Lepe, J A; Sousa Regueiro, D; Bravo-Ferrer, J M; Pajarón, M; Costas, C; García-López, M V; Hidalgo-Tenorio, C; Moreno, M; Bouza, E

    2017-10-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) caused by anaerobic bacteria is a rare and poorly characterized disease. Most data reported in the literature are from case reports [1-3]. Therefore, we assessed the situation of anaerobic IE (AIE) in Spain using the database of the Spanish Collaboration on Endocarditis (GAMES). We performed a prospective study from 2008 to 2016 in 26 Spanish centers. We included 2491 consecutive cases of definite IE (Duke criteria). Anaerobic bacteria caused 22 cases (0.9%) of definite IE. Median age was 66 years (IQR, 56-73), and 19 (86.4%) patients were men. Most patients (14 [63.6%]) had prosthetic valve IE and all episodes were left-sided: aortic valves, 12 (54.5%); and mitral valves, 8 (36.4%). The most common pathogens were Propionibacterium acnes (14 [63.6%]), Lactobacillus spp (3 [13.63%]), and Clostridium spp. (2 [9.0%]), and the infection was mainly odontogenic. Fifteen of the 22 patients (68.2%) underwent cardiac surgery. Mortality was 18.2% during admission and 5.5% after 1 year of follow-up. When patients with AIE were compared with the rest of the cohort, we found that although those with AIE had a similar age and Charlson comorbidity index, they were more likely to have community-acquired IE (86.4% vs. 60.9%, p = 0.01), have undergone cardiac surgery (68.2% vs 48.7% p = 0.06), and have had lower mortality rates during admission (18.2% vs. 27.3%). IE due to anaerobic bacteria is an uncommon disease that affects mainly prosthetic valves and frequently requires surgery. Otherwise, there are no major differences between AIE and IE caused by other microorganisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Bacteria and vampirism in cinema.

    PubMed

    Castel, O; Bourry, A; Thévenot, S; Burucoa, C

    2013-09-01

    A vampire is a non-dead and non-alive chimerical creature, which, according to various folklores and popular superstitions, feeds on blood of the living to draw vital force. Vampires do not reproduce by copulation, but by bite. Vampirism is thus similar to a contagious disease contracted by intravascular inoculation with a suspected microbial origin. In several vampire films, two real bacteria were staged, better integrated than others in popular imagination: Yersinia pestis and Treponema pallidum. Bacillus vampiris was created for science-fiction. These films are attempts to better define humans through one of their greatest fears: infectious disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Bacteria detection instrument and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renner, W.; Fealey, R. D. (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A method and apparatus for screening a sample fluid for bacterial presence are disclosed wherein the fluid sample is mixed with culture media of sufficient quantity to permit bacterial growth in order to obtain a test solution. The concentration of oxygen dissolved in the test solution is then monitored using the potential difference between a reference electrode and a noble metal electrode which are in contact with the test solution. The change in oxygen concentration which occurs during a period of time as indicated by the electrode potential difference is compared with a detection criterion which exceeds the change which would occur absent bacteria.

  7. Resistance of Bacteria to Biocides.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Jean-Yves

    2018-04-01

    Biocides and formulated biocides are used worldwide for an increasing number of applications despite tightening regulations in Europe and in the United States. One concern is that such intense usage of biocides could lead to increased bacterial resistance to a product and cross-resistance to unrelated antimicrobials including chemotherapeutic antibiotics. Evidence to justify such a concern comes mostly from the use of health care-relevant bacterial isolates, although the number of studies of the resistance characteristics of veterinary isolates to biocides have increased the past few years. One problem remains the definition of "resistance" and how to measure resistance to a biocide. This has yet to be addressed globally, although the measurement of resistance is becoming more pressing, with regulators both in Europe and in the United States demanding that manufacturers provide evidence that their biocidal products will not impact on bacterial resistance. Alongside in vitro evidence of potential antimicrobial cross-resistance following biocide exposure, our understanding of the mechanisms of bacterial resistance and, more recently, our understanding of the effect of biocides to induce a mechanism(s) of resistance in bacteria has improved. This article aims to provide an understanding of the development of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria following a biocide exposure. The sections provide evidence of the occurrence of bacterial resistance and its mechanisms of action and debate how to measure bacterial resistance to biocides. Examples pertinent to the veterinary field are used where appropriate.

  8. DMTB: the magnetotactic bacteria database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; Lin, W.

    2012-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are of interest in biogeomagnetism, rock magnetism, microbiology, biomineralization, and advanced magnetic materials because of their ability to synthesize highly ordered intracellular nano-sized magnetic minerals, magnetite or greigite. Great strides for MTB studies have been made in the past few decades. More than 600 articles concerning MTB have been published. These rapidly growing data are stimulating cross disciplinary studies in such field as biogeomagnetism. We have compiled the first online database for MTB, i.e., Database of Magnestotactic Bacteria (DMTB, http://database.biomnsl.com). It contains useful information of 16S rRNA gene sequences, oligonucleotides, and magnetic properties of MTB, and corresponding ecological metadata of sampling sites. The 16S rRNA gene sequences are collected from the GenBank database, while all other data are collected from the scientific literature. Rock magnetic properties for both uncultivated and cultivated MTB species are also included. In the DMTB database, data are accessible through four main interfaces: Site Sort, Phylo Sort, Oligonucleotides, and Magnetic Properties. References in each entry serve as links to specific pages within public databases. The online comprehensive DMTB will provide a very useful data resource for researchers from various disciplines, e.g., microbiology, rock magnetism and paleomagnetism, biogeomagnetism, magnetic material sciences and others.

  9. Pathogenic mechanisms of intracellular bacteria.

    PubMed

    Niller, Hans Helmut; Masa, Roland; Venkei, Annamária; Mészáros, Sándor; Minarovits, Janos

    2017-06-01

    We wished to overview recent data on a subset of epigenetic changes elicited by intracellular bacteria in human cells. Reprogramming the gene expression pattern of various host cells may facilitate bacterial growth, survival, and spread. DNA-(cytosine C5)-methyltransferases of Mycoplasma hyorhinis targeting cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) dinucleotides and a Mycobacterium tuberculosis methyltransferase targeting non-CpG sites methylated the host cell DNA and altered the pattern of gene expression. Gene silencing by CpG methylation and histone deacetylation, mediated by cellular enzymes, also occurred in M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages. M. tuberculosis elicited cell type-specific epigenetic changes: it caused increased DNA methylation in macrophages, but induced demethylation, deposition of euchromatic histone marks and activation of immune-related genes in dendritic cells. A secreted transposase of Acinetobacter baumannii silenced a cellular gene, whereas Mycobacterium leprae altered the epigenotype, phenotype, and fate of infected Schwann cells. The 'keystone pathogen' oral bacterium Porphyromonas gingivalis induced local DNA methylation and increased the level of histone acetylation in host cells. These epigenetic changes at the biofilm-gingiva interface may contribute to the development of periodontitis. Epigenetic regulators produced by intracellular bacteria alter the epigenotype and gene expression pattern of host cells and play an important role in pathogenesis.

  10. Money and transmission of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Money is one of the most frequently passed items in the world. The aim of this study was to ascertain the survival status of bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Vancomycin- Resistant Enterococci (VRE) on banknotes from different countries and the transmission of bacteria to people who come in contact with the banknotes. The survival rate was highest for the Romanian Leu yielding all three microorganisms used after both three and six hours of drying. Furthermore, the Leu was the only banknote to yield VRE after one day of drying. Other currencies either enabled the survival of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL) and VRE (e.g. Euro), but not of MRSA, or the other way round (e.g. US Dollar). While a variety of factors such as community hygiene levels, people’s behaviour, and antimicrobial resistance rates at community level obviously have influence on the transmission of resistant microorganisms, the type of banknote-paper may be an additional variable to consider. PMID:23985137

  11. Draft Genome Sequence of Pedobacter sp. Strain NL19, a Producer of Potent Antibacterial Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the draft genome sequence of Pedobacter sp. strain NL19. The genome has 5.99 Mbp and a G+C content of 39.0%. NL19 was isolated from sludge from an abandoned uranium mine in the north of Portugal, and it produces potent antibacterials against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25814603

  12. Strategies and ecological roles of algicidal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Nils; Bigalke, Arite; Kaulfuß, Anett; Pohnert, Georg

    2017-11-01

    In both freshwater and marine ecosystems, phytoplankton are the most dominant primary producers, contributing substantially to aquatic food webs. Algicidal bacteria that can associate to microalgae from the phytoplankton have the capability to control the proliferation and even to lyse them. These bacteria thus play an important role in shaping species composition in pelagic environments. In this review, we discuss and categorise strategies used by algicidal bacteria for the attack on microalgae. We highlight the complex regulation of algicidal activity and defence responses that govern alga-bacteria interactions. We also discuss how algicidal bacteria impact algal physiology and metabolism and survey the existing algicidal metabolites and enzymes. The review illustrates that the ecological role of algicidal bacteria is not yet fully understood and critically discusses the challenges in obtaining ecologically relevant data. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Differential staining of bacteria: acid fast stain.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jackie; Moyes, Rita B; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    Acid-fastness is an uncommon characteristic shared by the genera Mycobacterium (Section 10A) and Nocardia. Because of this feature, this stain is extremely helpful in identification of these bacteria. Although Gram positive, acid-fast bacteria do not take the crystal violet into the wall well, appearing very light purple rather than the deep purple of normal Gram-positive bacteria. (c) 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    SciT

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  15. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-03-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the last 10 years, however, several events have occurred that demand the attention of the general populace — including the ranks of physicists among them.

  16. Small Universal Bacteria and Plasmid Computing Systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Zheng, Pan; Ma, Tongmao; Song, Tao

    2018-05-29

    Bacterial computing is a known candidate in natural computing, the aim being to construct "bacterial computers" for solving complex problems. In this paper, a new kind of bacterial computing system, named the bacteria and plasmid computing system (BP system), is proposed. We investigate the computational power of BP systems with finite numbers of bacteria and plasmids. Specifically, it is obtained in a constructive way that a BP system with 2 bacteria and 34 plasmids is Turing universal. The results provide a theoretical cornerstone to construct powerful bacterial computers and demonstrate a concept of paradigms using a "reasonable" number of bacteria and plasmids for such devices.

  17. Spectroscopic diagnostics for bacteria in biologic sample

    DOEpatents

    El-Sayed, Mostafa A.; El-Sayed, Ivan H.

    2002-01-01

    A method to analyze and diagnose specific bacteria in a biologic sample using spectroscopy is disclosed. The method includes obtaining the spectra of a biologic sample of a non-infected patient for use as a reference, subtracting the reference from the spectra of an infected sample, and comparing the fingerprint regions of the resulting differential spectrum with reference spectra of bacteria in saline. Using this diagnostic technique, specific bacteria can be identified sooner and without culturing, bacteria-specific antibiotics can be prescribed sooner, resulting in decreased likelihood of antibiotic resistance and an overall reduction of medical costs.

  18. Survival of soil bacteria during prolonged desiccation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, M.; Alexander, M.

    1973-01-01

    A determination was made of the kinds and numbers of bacteria surviving when two soils were maintained in the laboratory under dry conditions for more than half a year. Certain non-spore-forming bacteria were found to survive in the dry condition for long periods. A higher percentage of drought-tolerant than drought-sensitive bacteria was able to grow at low water activities. When they were grown in media with high salt concentrations, bacteria generally became more tolerant of prolonged drought and they persisted longer. The percent of cells in a bacterial population that remained viable when exposed to drought stress varied with the stage of growth.

  19. Bioenergetics of photoheterotrophic bacteria in the oceans.

    PubMed

    Kirchman, David L; Hanson, Thomas E

    2013-04-01

    Photoheterotrophic microbes, such as proteorhodopsin (PR)-based phototrophic (PRP) and aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, are well known to be abundant in the oceans, potentially playing unique roles in biogeochemical cycles. However, the contribution of phototrophy to the energy requirements of these bacteria has not been quantitatively examined to date. To better understand the implications of photoheterophy in the oceans, we calculated energy benefits and costs of phototrophy and compared net benefits with maintenance costs. Benefits depend on the number of photosynthetic units (PSUs), absorption cross-section area of each PSU as function of wavelength, the in situ light quality, and the energy yield per absorbed photon. For costs we considered the energy required for the synthesis of pigments, amino acids and proteins in each PSU. Our calculations indicate that AAP bacteria harvest more light energy than do PRP bacteria, but the costs of phototrophy are much higher for AAP bacteria. Still, the net energy gained by AAP bacteria is often sufficient to meet maintenance costs, while that is not the case for PRP bacteria except with high light intensities and large numbers of proteorhodopsin molecules per cell. The low costs and simplicity of PR-based phototrophy explain the high abundance of proteorhodopsin genes in the oceans. However, even for AAP bacteria, the net energy yield of phototrophy is apparently too low to influence the distribution of photoheterotrophic bacteria among various marine systems. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Modeling Political Populations with Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, Chris; Liao, David

    2011-03-01

    Results from lattice-based simulations of micro-environments with heterogeneous nutrient resources reveal that competition between wild-type and GASP rpoS819 strains of E. Coli offers mutual benefit, particularly in nutrient deprived regions. Our computational model spatially maps bacteria populations and energy sources onto a set of 3D lattices that collectively resemble the topology of North America. By implementing Wright-Fishcer re- production into a probabilistic leap-frog scheme, we observe populations of wild-type and GASP rpoS819 cells compete for resources and, yet, aid each other's long term survival. The connection to how spatial political ideologies map in a similar way is discussed.

  1. Antioxidant Properties of Probiotic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Yanping; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Han; Mei, Xiaoqiang; Yu, Dongyou; Wang, Yibing; Li, Weifen

    2017-05-19

    Oxidative stress defines a condition in which the prooxidant-antioxidant balance in the cell is disturbed, resulting in DNA hydroxylation, protein denaturation, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis, ultimately compromising cells' viability. Probiotics have been known for many beneficial health effects, and the consumption of probiotics alone or in food shows that strain-specific probiotics can present antioxidant activity and reduce damages caused by oxidation. However, the oxidation-resistant ability of probiotics, especially the underling mechanisms, is not properly understood. In this view, there is interest to figure out the antioxidant property of probiotics and summarize the mode of action of probiotic bacteria in antioxidation. Therefore, in the present paper, the antioxidant mechanisms of probiotics have been reviewed in terms of their ability to improve the antioxidant system and their ability to decrease radical generation. Since in recent years, oxidative stress has been associated with an altered gut microbiota, the effects of probiotics on intestinal flora composition are also elaborated.

  2. Antioxidant Properties of Probiotic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wu, Yanping; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Han; Mei, Xiaoqiang; Yu, Dongyou; Wang, Yibing; Li, Weifen

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress defines a condition in which the prooxidant–antioxidant balance in the cell is disturbed, resulting in DNA hydroxylation, protein denaturation, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis, ultimately compromising cells’ viability. Probiotics have been known for many beneficial health effects, and the consumption of probiotics alone or in food shows that strain-specific probiotics can present antioxidant activity and reduce damages caused by oxidation. However, the oxidation-resistant ability of probiotics, especially the underling mechanisms, is not properly understood. In this view, there is interest to figure out the antioxidant property of probiotics and summarize the mode of action of probiotic bacteria in antioxidation. Therefore, in the present paper, the antioxidant mechanisms of probiotics have been reviewed in terms of their ability to improve the antioxidant system and their ability to decrease radical generation. Since in recent years, oxidative stress has been associated with an altered gut microbiota, the effects of probiotics on intestinal flora composition are also elaborated. PMID:28534820

  3. Cell Size Regulation in Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-05-01

    Various bacteria such as the canonical gram negative Escherichia coli or the well-studied gram positive Bacillus subtilis divide symmetrically after they approximately double their volume. Their size at division is not constant, but is typically distributed over a narrow range. Here, we propose an analytically tractable model for cell size control, and calculate the cell size and interdivision time distributions, as well as the correlations between these variables. We suggest ways of extracting the model parameters from experimental data, and show that existing data for E. coli supports partial size control, and a particular explanation: a cell attempts to add a constant volume from the time of initiation of DNA replication to the next initiation event. This hypothesis accounts for the experimentally observed correlations between mother and daughter cells as well as the exponential dependence of size on growth rate.

  4. Sterol Synthesis in Diverse Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jeremy H; Yin, Xinchi; Welander, Paula V

    2016-01-01

    Sterols are essential components of eukaryotic cells whose biosynthesis and function has been studied extensively. Sterols are also recognized as the diagenetic precursors of steranes preserved in sedimentary rocks where they can function as geological proxies for eukaryotic organisms and/or aerobic metabolisms and environments. However, production of these lipids is not restricted to the eukaryotic domain as a few bacterial species also synthesize sterols. Phylogenomic studies have identified genes encoding homologs of sterol biosynthesis proteins in the genomes of several additional species, indicating that sterol production may be more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. Although the occurrence of sterol synthesis genes in a genome indicates the potential for sterol production, it provides neither conclusive evidence of sterol synthesis nor information about the composition and abundance of basic and modified sterols that are actually being produced. Here, we coupled bioinformatics with lipid analyses to investigate the scope of bacterial sterol production. We identified oxidosqualene cyclase (Osc), which catalyzes the initial cyclization of oxidosqualene to the basic sterol structure, in 34 bacterial genomes from five phyla (Bacteroidetes, Cyanobacteria, Planctomycetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia) and in 176 metagenomes. Our data indicate that bacterial sterol synthesis likely occurs in diverse organisms and environments and also provides evidence that there are as yet uncultured groups of bacterial sterol producers. Phylogenetic analysis of bacterial and eukaryotic Osc sequences confirmed a complex evolutionary history of sterol synthesis in this domain. Finally, we characterized the lipids produced by Osc-containing bacteria and found that we could generally predict the ability to synthesize sterols. However, predicting the final modified sterol based on our current knowledge of sterol synthesis was difficult. Some bacteria

  5. Phosphatidic Acid Synthesis in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O.

    2012-01-01

    Membrane phospholipid synthesis is a vital facet of bacterial physiology. Although the spectrum of phospholipid headgroup structures produced by bacteria is large, the key precursor to all of these molecules is phosphatidic acid (PtdOH). Glycerol-3-phosphate derived from the glycolysis via glycerol-phosphate synthase is the universal source for the glycerol backbone of PtdOH. There are two distinct families of enzymes responsible for the acylation of the 1-position of glycerol-3-phosphate. The PlsB acyltransferase was discovered in Escherichia coli, and homologs are present in many eukaryotes. This protein family primarily uses acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) endproducts of fatty acid synthesis as acyl donors, but may also use acyl-CoA derived from exogenous fatty acids. The second protein family, PlsY, is more widely distributed in bacteria and utilizes the unique acyl donor, acyl-phosphate, which is produced from acyl-ACP by the enzyme PlsX. The acylation of the 2-position is carried out by members of the PlsC protein family. All PlsCs use acyl-ACP as the acyl donor, although the PlsCs of the γ-proteobacteria also may use acyl-CoA. Phospholipid headgroups are precursors in the biosynthesis of other membrane-associated molecules and the diacylglycerol product of these reactions is converted to PtdOH by one of two distinct families of lipid kinases. The central importance of the de novo and recycling pathways to PtdOH in cell physiology suggest these enzymes are suitable targets for the development of antibacterial therapeutics in Gram-positive pathogens. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:22981714

  6. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-09-24

    A new protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. The isolated consortia and bacteria are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. The isolated consortia, bacteria, and dispersants are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  7. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  8. Rock-degrading endophytic bacteria in cacti

    M. Esther Puente; Ching Y. Li; Yoav Bashan

    2009-01-01

    A plant-bacterium association of the cardon cactus (Pachycereus pringlei) and endophytic bacteria promotes establishment of seedlings and growth on igneous rocks without soil. These bacteria weather several rock types and minerals, unbind significant amounts of useful minerals for plants from the rocks, fix in vitro N2. produce...

  9. Interleukin-17A-producing T lymphocytes in chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Rieko; Imai, Masaki; Kawada, Jun-ichi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshinori

    2013-02-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells are reportedly effector T cells that produce interleukin (IL)-17A and play a significant role in the development of autoimmune diseases and immune responses for antimicrobial host defense. Production of IL-17A in chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) was studied to investigate its contribution to pathogenesis of this disease. Significantly more IL-17A-producing cells were detected in the peripheral blood of CAEBV patients than in that of healthy controls, although a significant difference in serum IL-17A production was not confirmed. Of the IL-17A-producing cells, 91.8% were cluster of differentiation (CD)4-positive Th17 cells. Moreover, there were significantly more IL-17A-producing cells among CD4(+) cells in peripheral blood of CAEBV patients than in that of controls (1.97 ± 0.69% vs. 1.09 ± 0.53%, P = 0.0073). These data suggest that IL-17A-producing cells may influence the pathophysiology of CAEBV. © 2012 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Filamentous bacteria existence in aerobic granular reactors.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, M; Val del Río, A; Campos, J L; Méndez, R; Mosquera-Corral, A

    2015-05-01

    Filamentous bacteria are associated to biomass settling problems in wastewater treatment plants. In systems based on aerobic granular biomass they have been proposed to contribute to the initial biomass aggregation process. However, their development on mature aerobic granular systems has not been sufficiently studied. In the present research work, filamentous bacteria were studied for the first time after long-term operation (up to 300 days) of aerobic granular systems. Chloroflexi and Sphaerotilus natans have been observed in a reactor fed with synthetic wastewater. These filamentous bacteria could only come from the inoculated sludge. Thiothrix and Chloroflexi bacteria were observed in aerobic granular biomass treating wastewater from a fish canning industry. Meganema perideroedes was detected in a reactor treating wastewater from a plant processing marine products. As a conclusion, the source of filamentous bacteria in these mature aerobic granular systems fed with industrial effluents was the incoming wastewater.

  11. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  12. PCR detection of uncultured rumen bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Jaime A; Strosová, Lenka; Mrázek, Jakub; Fliegerová, Kateřina; Kopečný, Jan

    2012-07-01

    16S rRNA sequences of ruminal uncultured bacterial clones from public databases were phylogenetically examined. The sequences were found to form two unique clusters not affiliated with any known bacterial species: cluster of unidentified sequences of free floating rumen fluid uncultured bacteria (FUB) and cluster of unidentified sequences of bacteria associated with rumen epithelium (AUB). A set of PCR primers targeting 16S rRNA of ruminal free uncultured bacteria and rumen epithelium adhering uncultured bacteria was designed based on these sequences. FUB primers were used for relative quantification of uncultured bacteria in ovine rumen samples. The effort to increase the population size of FUB group has been successful in sulfate reducing broth and culture media supplied with cellulose.

  13. Are Uncultivated Bacteria Really Uncultivable?

    PubMed Central

    Puspita, Indun Dewi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Tanaka, Michiko; Asano, Kozo; Nakatsu, Cindy H.

    2012-01-01

    Many strategies have been used to increase the number of bacterial cells that can be grown from environmental samples but cultivation efficiency remains a challenge for microbial ecologists. The difficulty of cultivating a fraction of bacteria in environmental samples can be classified into two non-exclusive categories. Bacterial taxa with no cultivated representatives for which appropriate laboratory conditions necessary for growth are yet to be identified. The other class is cells in a non-dividing state (also known as dormant or viable but not culturable cells) that require the removal or addition of certain factors to re-initiate growth. A number of strategies, from simple to high throughput techniques, are reviewed that have been used to increase the cultivation efficiency of environmental samples. Some of the underlying mechanisms that contribute to the success of these cultivation strategies are described. Overall this review emphasizes the need of researchers to first understand the factors that are hindering cultivation to identify the best strategies to improve cultivation efficiency. PMID:23059723

  14. Multiscale Model of Swarming Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alber, Mark

    2011-03-01

    Many bacteria can rapidly traverse surfaces from which they are extracting nutrient for growth. They generate flat, spreading colonies, called swarms because they resemble swarms of insects. In the beginning of the talk, swarms of the M. xanthus will be described in detail. Individual M. xanthus cells are elongated; they always move in the direction of their long axis; and they are in constant motion, repeatedly touching each other. As a cell glides, the slime capsule of a cell interacts with the bare agar surface, non-oriented slime which arises from the surface contact with the slime capsule, or oriented slime trails. Remarkably, cells regularly reverse their gliding directions. In this talk a detailed cell- and behavior-based computational model of M. xanthus swarming will be used to demonstrate that reversals of gliding direction and cell bending are essential for swarming and that specific reversal frequencies result in optimal swarming rate of the whole population. This suggests that the circuit regulating reversals evolved to its current sensitivity under selection for growth achieved by swarming.

  15. Tape Cassette Bacteria Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of an automatic bacteria detection system with a zero-g capability and based on the filter-capsule approach is described. This system is intended for monitoring the sterility of regenerated water in a spacecraft. The principle of detection is based on measuring the increase in chemiluminescence produced by the action of bacterial porphyrins (i.e., catalase, cytochromes, etc.) on a luminol-hydrogen peroxide mixture. Since viable as well as nonviable organisms initiate this luminescence, viable organisms are detected by comparing the signal of an incubated water sample with an unincubated control. Higher signals for the former indicate the presence of viable organisms. System features include disposable sealed sterile capsules, each containing a filter membrane, for processing discrete water samples and a tape transport for moving these capsules through a processing sequence which involves sample concentration, nutrient addition, incubation, a 4 Molar Urea wash and reaction with luminol-hydrogen peroxide in front of a photomultiplier tube. Liquids are introduced by means of a syringe needle which pierces a rubber septum contained in the wall of the capsule. Detection thresholds obtained with this unit towards E. coli and S. marcescens assuming a 400 ml water sample are indicated.

  16. Spoilage bacteria of fresh broiler chicken carcasses.

    PubMed

    Russell, S M; Fletcher, D L; Cox, N A

    1995-12-01

    Studies were conducted to identify the bacteria responsible for spoilage of fresh broiler chicken carcasses and to characterize the off-odors these bacteria produce. Broiler carcasses were collected from processing plants in the northeast Georgia area, the southeastern U.S., Arkansas, California, and North Carolina. The carcasses were allowed to spoil under controlled conditions at 3 C and spoilage bacteria were isolated. Each spoilage bacterium was separately inoculated into a sterile chicken skin medium, incubated at 25 C for 48 h, and subjectively evaluated for odor. The bacteria isolated from spoiled carcasses that consistently produced off-odors in the chicken skin medium, regardless of the geographical location from which the chickens were obtained, were Shewanella putrefaciens A, B, and D, Pseudomonas fluorescens A, B, and D, and Pseudomonas fragi. These bacteria produced off-odors that resembled "sulfur", "dishrag", "ammonia", "wet dog", "skunk", "dirty socks", "rancid fish", "unspecified bad odor", or a sweet smell resembling "canned corn". Odors produced by the spoilage bacteria were varied; however, odors most associated with spoiled poultry, such as "dishraggy" odors, were produced by the bacteria that were most consistently isolated, such as S. putrefaciens and the pseudomonads.

  17. R-body-producing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Pond, F R; Gibson, I; Lalucat, J; Quackenbush, R L

    1989-01-01

    Until 10 years ago, R bodies were known only as diagnostic features by which endosymbionts of paramecia were identified as kappa particles. They were thought to be limited to the cytoplasm of two species in the Paramecium aurelia species complex. Now, R bodies have been found in free-living bacteria and other Paramecium species. The organisms now known to form R bodies include the cytoplasmic kappa endosymbionts of P. biaurelia and P. tetraurelia, the macronuclear kappa endosymbionts of P. caudatum, Pseudomonas avenae (a free-living plant pathogen), Pseudomonas taeniospiralis (a hydrogen-oxidizing soil microorganism), Rhodospirillum centenum (a photosynthetic bacterium), and a soil bacterium, EPS-5028, which is probably a pseudomonad. R bodies themselves fall into five distinct groups, distinguished by size, the morphology of the R-body ribbons, and the unrolling behavior of wound R bodies. In recent years, the inherent difficulties in studying the organization and assembly of R bodies by the obligate endosymbiont kappa, have been alleviated by cloning and expressing genetic determinants for these R bodies (type 51) in Escherichia coli. Type 51 R-body synthesis requires three low-molecular-mass polypeptides. One of these is modified posttranslationally, giving rise to 12 polypeptide species, which are the major structural subunits of the R body. R bodies are encoded in kappa species by extrachromosomal elements. Type 51 R bodies, produced in Caedibacter taeniospiralis, are encoded by a plasmid, whereas bacteriophage genomes probably control R-body synthesis in other kappa species. However, there is no evidence that either bacteriophages or plasmids are present in P. avenae or P. taeniospiralis. No sequence homology was detected between type 51 R-body-encoding DNA and DNA from any R-body-producing species, except C. varicaedens 1038. The evolutionary relatedness of different types of R bodies remains unknown. Images PMID:2651865

  18. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    SciT

    Stevens, R.H.; Hammond, B.F.

    1988-11-01

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs bymore » all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species.« less

  19. Bacteria Interactions with Dying Diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smriga, S.; Juarez, G.; Fernandez, V.; Stocker, R.

    2016-02-01

    Dying phytoplankton are surrounded by microscale gradients of dissolved organic matter (DOM) that can attract bacteria. These 'phycospheres' may impact the trophic transfer of DOM in the marine microbial food web and enable the growth of bacterial populations, yet these effects remain poorly quantified particularly in relation to the physiological state of the phytoplankton. We dissected phycosphere interactions at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution using the model diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii and the bacterium Marinobacter adhaerans. Diatom stress was stimulated by addition of polyunsaturated aldehyde (PUA) and both diatom and bacterial responses were captured via time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. We found that stressed diatoms underwent lysis 10-15 h after PUA treatment. Coordinated with the timing of this transition into phytodetritus, wild-type Marinobacter accumulated via chemotaxis near the diatoms immediately following lysis. In contrast, at lysis there was no accumulation of either a non-chemotactic or a non-motile mutant of Marinobacter, pointing to behavioral rather than demographic responses as drivers for the accumulation. Despite the lack of response, non-chemotactic as well as non-swimming bacterial cells that by chance attached to or were located near (<30 µm) stressed diatoms experienced more growth than cells further afield. Growth within the phycosphere was even greater after diatom lysis. Through quantification at the microscale, these results reveal that chemotaxis may precede rapid bacterial attachment to stressed and dying diatoms and may be integral to the microbial colonization of new phytodetritus during phytoplankton blooms and bloom collapses in coastal ecosystems. Even while chemotactic cells retain a growth advantage given their ability to sense and respond to lysis events, phycosphere DOM provides growth benefits to both motile and non-motile taxa that become attached to or happen to be co-located with new

  20. Isolation and characterization of endophytic huperzine A-producing fungi from Huperzia serrata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Zeng, Qing Gui; Zhang, Zhi Bin; Yan, Ri Ming; Wang, Ling Yun; Zhu, Du

    2011-09-01

    Huperzia serrata is a producer of huperzine A (HupA), a cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI). Over 120 endophytic fungi were recovered from this plant and screened for Hup-A and nine were found. These nine represented seven different fungal genera with the most significant producer being Shiraia sp. A total of 127 endophytic fungi isolates obtained from the root, stem, and leaf segments of H. serrata were grouped into 19 genera based on their morphological traits and sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacers (ITS1-5.8S-ITS2), indicating endophytic fungi in H. serrata are diverse and abundant. Aspergillus, Podospora, Penicillium, Colletotrichum, and Acremonium were the frequent genera, whereas the remaining genera were infrequent groups. Overall, 39 endophytic fungi isolates showed acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition in vitro. Nine endophytic fungi isolates from seven distinct genera were capable of producing HupA verified by thin-layer chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Among the HupA-producing fungi, the yield of HupA produced by the Shiraia sp. Slf14 was 327.8 μg/l in potato dextrose broth, and the fungal HupA was further validated by mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The present study demonstrated that H. serrata was a fascinating fungal reservoir for producing HupA and other ChEIs.

  1. Path induced coherent energy transfer in light-harvesting complexes in purple bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Kewei; Ye, Jun; Zhao, Yang

    2014-09-01

    Features of path dependent energy transfer in a dual-ring light-harvesting (LH2) complexes (B850) system have been examined in detail systematically. The Frenkel-Dirac time dependent variational method with the Davydov D1 Ansatz is employed with detailed evolution of polaron dynamics in real space readily obtained. It is found that the phase of the transmission amplitude through the LH2 complexes plays an important role in constructing the coherent excitonic energy transfer. It is also found that the symmetry breaking caused by the dimerization of bacteriochlorophylls and coherence or correlation between two rings will be conducive in enhancing the exciton transfer efficiency.

  2. Physiological assessment of bacteria using fluorochromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFeters, G. A.; Yu, F. P.; Pyle, B. H.; Stewart, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    This minireview focuses on the application of fluorogenic compounds in the detection of bacteria with particular emphasis on the assessment of physiological activity using epifluorescence microscopy. Microbiological applications of several related methods will also be reviewed.

  3. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom.

  4. Protection of probiotic bacteria in synbiotic matrices

    Probiotics, like Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, when encapsulated with prebiotic fibers such as fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS), inulin (I) and pectic-oligosaccharides (POS), formed a synbiotic matrix system that protected the bacteria ...

  5. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-11-26

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution.

  6. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    SciT

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive genemore » loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.« less

  7. Bacteria-mediated bisphenol A degradation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiwei; Yin, Kun; Chen, Lingxin

    2013-07-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is an important monomer in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastics, food cans, and other daily used chemicals. Daily and worldwide usage of BPA and BPA-contained products led to its ubiquitous distribution in water, sediment/soil, and atmosphere. Moreover, BPA has been identified as an environmental endocrine disruptor for its estrogenic and genotoxic activity. Thus, BPA contamination in the environment is an increasingly worldwide concern, and methods to efficiently remove BPA from the environment are urgently recommended. Although many factors affect the fate of BPA in the environment, BPA degradation is mainly depended on the metabolism of bacteria. Many BPA-degrading bacteria have been identified from water, sediment/soil, and wastewater treatment plants. Metabolic pathways of BPA degradation in specific bacterial strains were proposed, based on the metabolic intermediates detected during the degradation process. In this review, the BPA-degrading bacteria were summarized, and the (proposed) BPA degradation pathway mediated by bacteria were referred.

  8. Distribution of phytopathogenic bacteria in infested seeds

    Populations of phytopathogenic bacteria representing five host-pathogen combinations were assessed to determine if there was a mathematical relationship common across seedborne bacterial diseases. Bacterial populations were estimated from naturally-infested seeds of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peppe...

  9. Extracellular deoxyribonuclease production by periodontal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Palmer, L J; Chapple, I L C; Wright, H J; Roberts, A; Cooper, P R

    2012-08-01

    Whilst certain bacteria have long been known to secrete extracellular deoxyribonuclease (DNase), the purpose in microbial physiology was unclear. Recently, however, this enzyme has been demonstrated to confer enhanced virulence, enabling bacteria to evade the host's immune defence of extruded DNA/chromatin filaments, termed neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). As NETs have recently been identified in infected periodontal tissue, the aim of this study was to screen periodontal bacteria for extracellular DNase activity. To determine whether DNase activity was membrane bound or secreted, 34 periodontal bacteria were cultured in broth and on agar plates. Pelleted bacteria and supernatants from broth cultures were analysed for their ability to degrade DNA, with relative activity levels determined using an agarose gel electrophoresis assay. Following culture on DNA-supplemented agar, expression was determined by the presence of a zone of hydrolysis and DNase activity related to colony size. Twenty-seven bacteria, including red and orange complex members Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, Parvimonas micra, Prevotella intermedia, Streptococcus constellatus, Campylobacter rectus and Prevotella nigrescens, were observed to express extracellular DNase activity. Differences in DNase activity were noted, however, when bacteria were assayed in different culture states. Analysis of the activity of secreted DNase from bacterial broth cultures confirmed their ability to degrade NETs. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, that DNase activity is a relatively common property of bacteria associated with advanced periodontal disease. Further work is required to determine the importance of this bacterial DNase activity in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Plants as sources of airborne bacteria, including ice nucleation-active bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, J; Constantinidou, H A; Barchet, W R; Upper, C D

    1982-11-01

    Vertical wind shear and concentration gradients of viable, airborne bacteria were used to calculate the upward flux of viable cells above bare soil and canopies of several crops. Concentrations at soil or canopy height varied from 46 colony-forming units per m over young corn and wet soil to 663 colony-forming units per m over dry soil and 6,500 colony-forming units per m over a closed wheat canopy. In simultaneous samples, concentrations of viable bacteria in the air 10 m inside an alfalfa field were fourfold higher than those over a field with dry, bare soil immediately upwind. The upward flux of viable bacteria over alfalfa was three- to fourfold greater than over dry soil. Concentrations of ice nucleation-active bacteria were higher over plants than over soil. Thus, plant canopies may constitute a major source of bacteria, including ice nucleation-active bacteria, in the air.

  11. Tyramine and phenylethylamine biosynthesis by food bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marcobal, Angela; De las Rivas, Blanca; Landete, José María; Tabera, Laura; Muñoz, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    Tyramine poisoning is caused by the ingestion of food containing high levels of tyramine, a biogenic amine. Any foods containing free tyrosine are subject to tyramine formation if poor sanitation and low quality foods are used or if the food is subject to temperature abuse or extended storage time. Tyramine is generated by decarboxylation of the tyrosine through tyrosine decarboxylase (TDC) enzymes derived from the bacteria present in the food. Bacterial TDC have been only unequivocally identified and characterized in Gram-positive bacteria, especially in lactic acid bacteria. Pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent TDC encoding genes (tyrDC) appeared flanked by a similar genetic organization in several species of lactic acid bacteria, suggesting a common origin by a single mobile genetic element. Bacterial TDC are also able to decarboxylate phenylalanine to produce phenylethylamine (PEA), another biogenic amine. The molecular knowledge of the genes involved in tyramine production has led to the development of molecular methods for the detection of bacteria able to produce tyramine and PEA. These rapid and simple methods could be used for the analysis of the ability to form tyramine by bacteria in order to evaluate the potential risk of tyramine biosynthesis in food products.

  12. A novel endophytic Huperzine A-producing fungus, Shiraia sp. Slf14, isolated from Huperzia serrata.

    PubMed

    Zhu, D; Wang, J; Zeng, Q; Zhang, Z; Yan, R

    2010-10-01

    To characterize and identify a novel Huperzine A (HupA)-producing fungal strain Slf14 isolated from Huperzia serrata (Thunb. ex Murray) Trev. in China. The isolation, identification and characterization of a novel endophytic fungus producing HupA specifically and consistently from the leaves of H. serrata were investigated. The fungus was identified as Shiraia sp. Slf14 by molecular and morphological methods. The HupA produced by this endophytic fungus was shown to be identical to authentic HupA analysed by thin layer chromatographic, High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), LC-MS, (1) H NMR and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition activity in vitro. The amount of HupA produced by Shiraia sp. Slf14 was quantified to be 327.8 μg l(-1) by HPLC, which was far higher than that of the reported endophytic fungi, Acremonium sp., Blastomyces sp. and Botrytis sp. The production of HupA by endophyte Shiraia sp. Slf14 is an enigmatic observation. It would be interesting to further study the HupA production and regulation by the cultured endophyte in H. serrata and in axenic cultures. Although the current accumulation of HupA by the endophyte is not very high, it could provide a promising alterative approach for large-scale production of HupA. However, further strain improvement and the fermentation process optimization are required to result in the consistent and dependable production. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. [Immobilization of introduced bacteria and degradation of pyrene and benzo(alpha) pyrene in soil by immobilized bacteria].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Li, Peijun; Song, Shouzhi; Zhong, Yong; Zhang, Hui; Verkhozina, E V

    2006-11-01

    In this study, introduced bacteria were applied in the bioremediation of pyrene and benzo (alpha) pyrene in organic pollutants-contaminated soils, aimed to test whether it was feasible to introduce bacteria to environmental engineering. Three introduced bacteria were immobilized separately or together to degrade the pyrene and benzo (alpha) pyrene in soil, taking dissociated bacteria as the control, and comparing with three indigenous bacteria. The results showed that immobilized introduced bacteria, either single or mixed, had higher degradation efficiency than dissociated bacteria. Compared with indigenous bacteria, some introduced bacteria had predominance to some degree. The introduced bacteria-mixture had better degradation efficiency after being immobilized. The degradation rate of pyrene and benzo(alpha) pyrene after treated with immobilized bacteria-( B61-B67)-mixture for 96 hours was 43.49% and 38.55%, respectively.

  14. [Spectrum and susceptibility of preoperative conjunctival bacteria].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rubio, M E; Cuesta-Rodríguez, T; Urcelay-Segura, J L; Cortés-Valdés, C

    2013-12-01

    To describe the conjunctival bacterial spectrum of our patients undergoing intraocular surgery and their antibiotic sensitivity during the study period. A retrospective study of preoperative conjunctival culture of patients consecutively scheduled for intraocular surgery from 21 February 2011 to 1 April 2013. Specimens were directly seeded onto blood-agar and MacConkey-agar (aerobiosis incubation, 2 days), and on chocolate-agar (6% CO2 incubation, 7 days). The identified bacteria were divided into 3 groups according to their origin; the bacteria susceptibility tests were performed on those more pathogenic and on some of the less pathogenic when more than 5 colonies were isolated. The sensitivity of the exigent growing bacteria was obtained with disk diffusion technique, and for of the non-exigent bacteria by determining their minimum inhibitory concentration. The Epidat 3.1 program was used for statistical calculations. A total of 13,203 bacteria were identified in 6,051 cultures, with 88.7% being typical colonizers of conjunctiva (group 1), 8.8% typical of airways (group 2), and the remaining 2.5% of undetermined origin (group 3). 530 cultures (8.8%) were sterile. The sensitivity of group 1 was: 99% vancomycin, 95% rifampicin, 87% chloramphenicol, 76% tetracycline. Levels of co-trimoxazole, aminoglycosides, quinolones, β-lactams and macrolides decreased since 2007. The group 2 was very sensitive to chloramphenicol, cefuroxime, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanate. In group 3, to levofloxacin 93%, ciprofloxacin 89%, tobramycin 76%, but ceftazidime 53% and cefuroxime 29% decreased. None of the tested antibiotics could eradicate all possible conjunctival bacteria. Bacteria living permanently on the conjunctiva (group 1) have achieved higher resistance than the eventual colonizers. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Airborne Bacteria in an Urban Environment

    PubMed Central

    Mancinelli, Rocco L.; Shulls, Wells A.

    1978-01-01

    Samples were taken at random intervals over a 2-year period from urban air and tested for viable bacteria. The number of bacteria in each sample was determined, and each organism isolated was identified by its morphological and biochemical characteristics. The number of bacteria found ranged from 0.013 to 1.88 organisms per liter of air sampled. Representatives of 19 different genera were found in 21 samples. The most frequently isolated organisms and their percent of occurence were Micrococcus (41%), Staphylococcus (11%), and Aerococcus (8%). The bacteria isolated were correlated with various weather and air pollution parameters using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient method. Statistically significant correlations were found between the number of viable bacteria isolated and the concentrations of nitric oxide (−0.45), nitrogen dioxide (+0.43), and suspended particulate pollutants (+0.56). Calculated individually, the total number of Micrococcus, Aerococcus, and Staphylococcus, number of rods, and number of cocci isolated showed negative correlations with nitric oxide and positive correlations with nitrogen dioxide and particulates. Statistically significant positive correlations were found between the total number of rods isolated and the concentration of nitrogen dioxide (+0.54) and the percent relative humidity (+0.43). The other parameters tested, sulfur dioxide, hydrocarbons, and temperature, showed no significant correlations. Images PMID:677875

  16. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Hazen, Terry C.

    1994-01-01

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  17. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia Coli Bacteria from Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light and a method of detecting Eschericha Coli bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  18. Using Fluorescent Viruses for Detecting Bacteria in Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Qian, Xiaohua; Russo, Jaimie A.

    2009-01-01

    A method of detecting water-borne pathogenic bacteria is based partly on established molecular-recognition and fluorescent-labeling concepts, according to which bacteria of a species of interest are labeled with fluorescent reporter molecules and the bacteria can then be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. The novelty of the present method lies in the use of bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to deliver the fluorescent reporter molecules to the bacteria of the species of interest.

  19. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host. PMID:25652326

  20. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF GREEN BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Bazire, Germaine; Pfennig, Norbert; Kunisawa, Riyo

    1964-01-01

    The fine structure of several strains of green bacteria belonging to the genus Chlorobium has been studied in thin sections with the electron microscope. In addition to having general cytological features typical of Gram-negative bacteria, the cells of these organisms always contain membranous mesosomal elements, connected with the cytoplasmic membrane, and an elaborate system of isolated cortical vesicles, some 300 to 400 A wide and 1000 to 1500 A long. The latter structures, chlorobium vesicles, have been isolated in a partly purified state by differential centrifugation of cell-free extracts. They are associated with a centrifugal fraction that has a very high specific chlorophyll content. In all probability, therefore, the chlorobium vesicles are the site of the photosynthetic apparatus of green bacteria. PMID:14195611

  1. Transition Metals and Virulence in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Lauren D; Skaar, Eric P

    2016-11-23

    Transition metals are required trace elements for all forms of life. Due to their unique inorganic and redox properties, transition metals serve as cofactors for enzymes and other proteins. In bacterial pathogenesis, the vertebrate host represents a rich source of nutrient metals, and bacteria have evolved diverse metal acquisition strategies. Host metal homeostasis changes dramatically in response to bacterial infections, including production of metal sequestering proteins and the bombardment of bacteria with toxic levels of metals. In response, bacteria have evolved systems to subvert metal sequestration and toxicity. The coevolution of hosts and their bacterial pathogens in the battle for metals has uncovered emerging paradigms in social microbiology, rapid evolution, host specificity, and metal homeostasis across domains. This review focuses on recent advances and open questions in our understanding of the complex role of transition metals at the host-pathogen interface.

  2. Interactions among sulfide-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poplawski, R.

    1985-01-01

    The responses of different phototrophic bacteria in a competitive experimental system are studied, one in which primary factors such as H2S or light limited photometabolism. Two different types of bacteria shared one limited source of sulfide under specific conditions of light. The selection of a purple and a green sulfur bacteria and the cyanobacterium was based on their physiological similarity and also on the fact that they occur together in microbial mats. They all share anoxygenic photosynthesis, and are thus probably part of an evolutionary continuum of phototrophic organisms that runs from, strictly anaerobic physiology to the ability of some cyanobacteria to shift between anoxygenic bacterial style photosynthesis and the oxygenic kind typical of eukaryotes.

  3. Threats and opportunities of plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tarkowski, Petr; Vereecke, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Plant pathogenic bacteria can have devastating effects on plant productivity and yield. Nevertheless, because these often soil-dwelling bacteria have evolved to interact with eukaryotes, they generally exhibit a strong adaptivity, a versatile metabolism, and ingenious mechanisms tailored to modify the development of their hosts. Consequently, besides being a threat for agricultural practices, phytopathogens may also represent opportunities for plant production or be useful for specific biotechnological applications. Here, we illustrate this idea by reviewing the pathogenic strategies and the (potential) uses of five very different (hemi)biotrophic plant pathogenic bacteria: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, A. rhizogenes, Rhodococcus fascians, scab-inducing Streptomyces spp., and Pseudomonas syringae. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Transition Metals and Virulence in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Lauren D.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals are required trace elements for all forms of life. Due to their unique inorganic and redox properties, transition metals serve as cofactors for enzymes and other proteins. In bacterial pathogenesis, the vertebrate host represents a rich source of nutrient metals, and bacteria have evolved diverse metal acquisition strategies. Host metal homeostasis changes dramatically in response to bacterial infections, including production of metal sequestering proteins and the bombardment of bacteria with toxic levels of metals. Presumably, in response, bacteria have evolved systems to subvert metal sequestration and toxicity. The coevolution of hosts and their bacterial pathogens in the battle for metals has uncovered emerging paradigms in social microbiology, rapid evolution, host specificity, and metal homeostasis across domains. This review focuses on recent advances and open questions in our understanding of the complex role of transition metals at the host-pathogen interface. PMID:27617971

  5. Lethal photosensitization of biofilm-grown bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Michael

    1997-12-01

    Antibacterial agents are increasingly being used for the prophylaxis and treatment of oral diseases. As these agents can be rendered ineffective by resistance development in the target organisms there is a need to develop alternative antimicrobial approaches. Light-activated antimicrobial agents release singlet oxygen and free radicals which can kill adjacent bacteria and a wide range of cariogenic and periodontopathogenic bacteria has been shown to be susceptible to such agents. In the oral cavity these organisms are present as biofilms (dental plaques) which are less susceptible to traditional antimicrobial agents than bacterial suspensions. The results of these studies have shown that biofilm-grown oral bacteria are also susceptible to lethal photosensitization although the light energy doses required are grater than those needed to kill the organisms when they are grown as aqueous suspensions.

  6. Carotenoid radical cation formation in LH2 of purple bacteria: a quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2006-11-30

    In LH2 complexes of Rhodobacter sphaeroides the formation of a carotenoid radical cation has recently been observed upon photoexcitation of the carotenoid S2 state. To shed more light onto the yet unknown molecular mechanism leading to carotenoid radical formation in LH2, the interactions between carotenoid and bacteriochlorophyll in LH2 are investigated by means of quantum chemical calculations for three different carotenoids--neurosporene, spheroidene, and spheroidenone--using time-dependent density functional theory. Crossings of the calculated potential energy curve of the electron transfer state with the bacteriochlorophyll Qx state and the carotenoid S1 and S2 states occur along an intermolecular distance coordinate for neurosporene and spheroidene, but for spheroidenone no crossing of the electron transfer state with the carotenoid S1 state could be found. By comparison with recent experiments where no formation of a spheroidenone radical cation has been observed, a molecular mechanism for carotenoid radical cation formation is proposed in which it is formed via a vibrationally excited carotenoid S1 or S*state. Arguments are given why the formation of the carotenoid radical cation does not proceed via the Qx, S2, or higher excited electron transfer states.

  7. Gastric spiral bacteria in small felids.

    PubMed

    Kinsel, M J; Kovarik, P; Murnane, R D

    1998-06-01

    Nine small cats, including one bobcat (Felis rufus), one Pallas cat (F. manul), one Canada lynx (F. lynx canadensis), two fishing cats (F. viverrina), two margays (F. wiedii), and two sand cats (F. margarita), necropsied between June 1995 and March 1997 had large numbers of gastric spiral bacteria, whereas five large cats, including one African lion (Panthera leo), two snow leopards (P. uncia), one Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica), and one jaguar (P. onca), necropsied during the same period had none. All of the spiral organisms from the nine small cats were histologically and ultrastructurally similar. Histologically, the spiral bacteria were 5-14 microm long with five to nine coils per organism and were located both extracellularly within gastric glands and surface mucus, and intracellularly in parietal cells. Spiral bacteria in gastric mucosal scrapings from the Canada lynx, one fishing cat, and the two sand cats were gram negative and had corkscrewlike to tumbling motility when viewed with phase contrast microscopy. The bacteria were 0.5-0.7 microm wide, with a periodicity of 0.65-1.1 microm in all cats. Bipolar sheathed flagella were occasionally observed, and no periplasmic fibrils were seen. The bacteria were extracellular in parietal cell canaliculi and intracellular within parietal cells. Culture of mucosal scrapings from the Canada lynx and sand cats was unsuccessful. Based on morphology, motility, and cellular tropism, the bacteria were probably Helicobacter-like organisms. Although the two margays had moderate lymphoplasmacytic gastritis, the other cats lacked or had only mild gastric lymphoid infiltrates, suggesting that these organisms are either commensals or opportunistic pathogens.

  8. Exogenous fatty acid metabolism in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiangwei; Rock, Charles O

    2017-10-01

    Bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis (FASII) is a target for novel antibiotic development. All bacteria encode for mechanisms to incorporate exogenous fatty acids, and some bacteria can use exogenous fatty acids to bypass FASII inhibition. Bacteria encode three different mechanisms for activating exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipid synthesis. Exogenous fatty acids are converted into acyl-CoA in Gammaproteobacteria such as E. coli. Acyl-CoA molecules constitute a separate pool from endogenously synthesized acyl-ACP. Acyl-CoA can be used for phospholipid synthesis or broken down by β-oxidation, but cannot be used for lipopolysaccharide synthesis. Exogenous fatty acids are converted into acyl-ACP in some Gram-negative bacteria. The resulting acyl-ACP undergoes the same fates as endogenously synthesized acyl-ACP. Exogenous fatty acids are converted into acyl-phosphates in Gram-positive bacteria, and can be used for phospholipid synthesis or become acyl-ACP. Only the order Lactobacillales can use exogenous fatty acids to bypass FASII inhibition. FASII shuts down completely in presence of exogenous fatty acids in Lactobacillales, allowing Lactobacillales to synthesize phospholipids entirely from exogenous fatty acids. Inhibition of FASII cannot be bypassed in other bacteria because FASII is only partially down-regulated in presence of exogenous fatty acid or FASII is required to synthesize essential metabolites such as β-hydroxyacyl-ACP. Certain selective pressures such as FASII inhibition or growth in biofilms can select for naturally occurring one step mutations that attenuate endogenous fatty acid synthesis. Although attempts have been made to estimate the natural prevalence of these mutants, culture-independent metagenomic methods would provide a better estimate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kanta; Konings, Wil N

    2003-12-31

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and Megasphaera cerevisiae. They can spoil beer by turbidity, acidity and the production of unfavorable smell such as diacetyl or hydrogen sulfide. For the microbiological control, many advanced biotechnological techniques such as immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been applied in place of the conventional and time-consuming method of incubation on culture media. Subsequently, a method is needed to determine whether the detected bacterium is capable of growing in beer or not. In lactic acid bacteria, hop resistance is crucial for their ability to grow in beer. Hop compounds, mainly iso-alpha-acids in beer, have antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. They act as ionophores which dissipate the pH gradient across the cytoplasmic membrane and reduce the proton motive force (pmf). Consequently, the pmf-dependent nutrient uptake is hampered, resulting in cell death. The hop-resistance mechanisms in lactic acid bacteria have been investigated. HorA was found to excrete hop compounds in an ATP-dependent manner from the cell membrane to outer medium. Additionally, increased proton pumping by the membrane bound H(+)-ATPase contributes to hop resistance. To energize such ATP-dependent transporters hop-resistant cells contain larger ATP pools than hop-sensitive cells. Furthermore, a pmf-dependent hop transporter was recently presented. Understanding the hop-resistance mechanisms has enabled the development of rapid methods to discriminate beer spoilage strains from nonspoilers. The horA-PCR method has been applied for bacterial control in breweries. Also, a discrimination method was developed based on ATP pool measurement in lactobacillus cells. However

  10. Motile bacteria in a critical fluid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumakis, Nick; Devailly, Clémence; Poon, Wilson C. K.

    2018-06-01

    We studied the swimming of Escherichia coli bacteria in the vicinity of the critical point in a solution of the nonionic surfactant C12E5 in buffer solution. In phase-contrast microscopy, each swimming cell produces a transient trail behind itself lasting several seconds. Comparing quantitative image analysis with simulations show that these trails are due to local phase reorganization triggered by differential adsorption. This contrasts with similar trails seen in bacteria swimming in liquid crystals, which are due to shear effects. We show how our trails are controlled, and use them to probe the structure and dynamics of critical fluctuations in the fluid medium.

  11. Differential staining of bacteria: gram stain.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Rita B; Reynolds, Jackie; Breakwell, Donald P

    2009-11-01

    In 1884, Hans Christian Gram, a Danish doctor, developed a differential staining technique that is still the cornerstone of bacterial identification and taxonomic division. This multistep, sequential staining protocol separates bacteria into four groups based on cell morphology and cell wall structure: Gram-positive cocci, Gram-negative cocci, Gram-positive rods, and Gram-negative rods. The Gram stain is useful for assessing bacterial contamination of tissue culture samples or for examining the Gram stain status and morphological features of bacteria isolated from mixed or isolated bacterial cultures. (c) 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. [Quorum sensing in bacteria and yeast].

    PubMed

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Eiros Bouza, José María

    2013-10-19

    Bacterial sets are complex dynamic systems, which interact with each other and through the interaction, bacteria coexist, collaborate, compete and share information in a coordinated manner. A way of bacterial communication is quorum sensing. Through this mechanism the bacteria can recognize its concentration in a given environment and they can decide the time at which the expression of a particular set of genes should be started for developing a specific and simultaneous response. The result of these interconnections raises properties that cannot be explained from a single isolated bacterial cell. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Bacteria Provide Cleanup of Oil Spills, Wastewater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Marshall Space Flight Center, Micro-Bac International Inc., of Round Rock, Texas, developed a phototrophic cell for water purification in space. Inside the cell: millions of photosynthetic bacteria. Micro-Bac proceeded to commercialize the bacterial formulation it developed for the SBIR project. The formulation is now used for the remediation of wastewater systems and waste from livestock farms and food manufacturers. Strains of the SBIR-derived bacteria also feature in microbial solutions that treat environmentally damaging oil spills, such as that resulting from the catastrophic 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico.

  14. Pervasive transcription: detecting functional RNAs in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lybecker, Meghan; Bilusic, Ivana; Raghavan, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive, or genome-wide, transcription has been reported in all domains of life. In bacteria, most pervasive transcription occurs antisense to protein-coding transcripts, although recently a new class of pervasive RNAs was identified that originates from within annotated genes. Initially considered to be non-functional transcriptional noise, pervasive transcription is increasingly being recognized as important in regulating gene expression. The function of pervasive transcription is an extensively debated question in the field of transcriptomics and regulatory RNA biology. Here, we highlight the most recent contributions addressing the purpose of pervasive transcription in bacteria and discuss their implications.

  15. Tooth brushing inhibits oral bacteria in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Kotaro; Kijima, Saku; Nonaka, Chie; Yamazoe, Kazuaki

    2015-10-01

    In this study, scaling, polishing and daily tooth brushing were performed in 20 beagle dogs, and the number of oral bacteria was determined using a bacterial counter. The dogs were randomized into the scaling (S), scaling + polishing (SP), scaling + tooth daily brushing (SB) and scaling + polishing + tooth daily brushing (SPB) groups. Samples were collected from the buccal surface of the maxillary fourth premolars of the dogs immediately after scaling and every week thereafter from weeks 1 to 8. Throughout the study, the number of bacteria was significantly lower in the SB and SPB groups compared with the S group. The findings suggest that daily tooth brushing inhibited oral bacterial growth in the dogs.

  16. Phylogenetic tree of 16s rRNA sequences from sulfate-reducing bacteria in a sandy marine sediment

    SciT

    Devereux, R.; Mundfrom, G.W.

    1994-01-01

    Phylogenetic divergence among sulfate-reducing bateria in an estuarine sediment sample was investigated by PCR amplification and comparison of partial 16S rDNA sequences. Twenty unique 16S rDNA sequences were found, 12 from delta subclass bacteria based on overall sequence similarity (82-91%). Two successive PCR amplifications were used to obtain and clone the 16S rDNA. The first reaction used templates derived from phosphate-buffered saline washed sediment with primers designed to amplify nearly full-length bacterial domain 16S rDNA. A produce from a first reaction was used as template in a second reaction with primers designed to selectivity amplify a region of 16S rDNAmore » genes of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A phylogenetic tree incorporating the cloned sequences suggests the presence of yet to be cultivated lines of sulfate-reducing bacteria within the sediment sample.« less

  17. 40 CFR 80.1155 - What are the additional requirements for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol? 80.1155 Section 80.1155... producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol? (a) A producer of cellulosic biomass... ethanol producer's facility is a facility that has the capability of producing cellulosic biomass ethanol...

  18. 40 CFR 80.1155 - What are the additional requirements for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol? 80.1155 Section 80.1155... producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol? (a) A producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol (hereinafter referred to as “ethanol producer” under this section) is...

  19. 40 CFR 80.1155 - What are the additional requirements for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol? 80.1155 Section 80.1155... producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol? (a) A producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol (hereinafter referred to as “ethanol producer” under this section) is...

  20. 40 CFR 80.1155 - What are the additional requirements for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol? 80.1155 Section 80.1155... producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol? (a) A producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol (hereinafter referred to as “ethanol producer” under this section) is...

  1. 40 CFR 80.1155 - What are the additional requirements for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... for a producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol? 80.1155 Section 80.1155... producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol? (a) A producer of cellulosic biomass ethanol or waste derived ethanol (hereinafter referred to as “ethanol producer” under this section) is...

  2. Bacteria entombed in the center of cholesterol gallstones induce fewer infectious manifestations than bacteria in the matrix of pigment stones.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lygia; Griffiss, J McLeod; Jarvis, Gary A; Way, Lawrence W

    2007-10-01

    The clinical significance of bacteria in the pigment centers of cholesterol stones is unknown. We compared the infectious manifestations and characteristics of bacteria from pigment stones and predominantly cholesterol stones. Three hundred forty patients were studied. Bile was cultured. Gallstones were cultured and examined with scanning electron microscopy. Level of bacterial immunoglobulin G (bile, serum), complement killing, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production were determined. Twenty-three percent of cholesterol stones and 68% of pigment stones contained bacteria (P < 0.0001). Stone culture correlated with scanning electron microscopy results. Pigment stone bacteria were more often present in bile and blood. Cholesterol stone bacteria caused more severe infections (19%) than sterile stones (0%), but less than pigment stone bacteria (57%) (P < 0.0001). Serum and bile from patients with cholesterol stone bacteria had less bacterial-specific immunoglobulin G. Cholesterol stone bacteria produced more slime. Pigment stone bacteria were more often killed by a patient's serum. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha production of the groups was similar. Bacteria are readily cultured from cholesterol stones with pigment centers, allowing for analysis of their virulence factors. Bacteria sequestered in cholesterol stones cause infectious manifestations, but less than bacteria in pigment stones. Possibly because of their isolation, cholesterol stone bacteria were less often present in bile and blood, induced less immunoglobulin G, were less often killed by a patient's serum, and demonstrated fewer infectious manifestations than pigment stone bacteria. This is the first study to analyze the clinical relevance of bacteria within cholesterol gallstones.

  3. Effects of symbiotic bacteria on chemical sensitivity of Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Manakul, Patcharaporn; Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    The crustacean zooplankton Daphnia magna has been widely used for chemical toxicity tests. Although abiotic factors have been well documented in ecotoxicological test protocols, biotic factors that may affect the sensitivity to chemical compounds remain limited. Recently, we identified symbiotic bacteria that are critical for the growth and reproduction of D. magna. The presence of symbiotic bacteria on Daphnia raised the question as to whether these bacteria have a positive or negative effect on toxicity tests. In order to evaluate the effects of symbiotic bacteria on toxicity tests, bacteria-free Daphnia were prepared, and their chemical sensitivities were compared with that of Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria based on an acute immobilization test. The Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria showed higher chemical resistance to nonylphenol, fenoxycarb, and pentachlorophenol than bacteria-free Daphnia. These results suggested potential roles of symbiotic bacteria in the chemical resistance of its host Daphnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water distribution system: a review.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shakhawat

    2012-10-01

    The microbiological quality of drinking water in municipal water distribution systems (WDS) depends on several factors. Free residual chlorine and/or chloramines are typically used to minimize bacterial recontamination and/or regrowth in WDS. Despite such preventive measures, regrowth of heterotrophic (HPC) and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms has yet to be controlled completely. No approach has shown complete success in eliminating biofilms or HPC bacteria from bulk water and pipe surfaces. Biofilms can provide shelter for pathogenic bacteria and protect these bacteria from disinfectants. Some HPC bacteria may be associated with aesthetic and non-life threatening diseases. Research to date has achieved important success in understanding occurrence and regrowth of bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS. To achieve comprehensive understanding and to provide efficient control against bacteria regrowth, future research on bacteria regrowth dynamics and their implications is warranted. In this study, a review was performed on the literature published in this area. The findings and limitations of these papers are summarized. Occurrences of bacteria in WDS, factors affecting bacteria regrowth in bulk water and biofilms, bacteria control strategies, sources of nutrients, human health risks from bacterial exposure, modelling of bacteria regrowth and methods of bacteria sampling and detection and quantification are investigated. Advances to date are noted, and future research needs are identified. Finally, research directions are proposed to effectively control HPC and opportunistic bacteria in bulk water and biofilms in WDS.

  5. Automated detection of bacteria in urine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleig, A. J.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Kelbaugh, B. N.

    1972-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of bacteria in urine was developed which utilizes the bioluminescent reaction of adenosine triphosphate with luciferin and luciferase derived from the tails of fireflies. The method was derived from work on extraterrestrial life detection. A device was developed which completely automates the assay process.

  6. THE EFFECTS OF LIGHT ON LUMINOUS BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, E. Newton

    1925-01-01

    A conservative statement would therefore be that luminous bacteria show no changes in luminescence as a result of illumination by 625 foot candles for 1.5 minutes when examined 1/200 of a second after exposure, and none as the result of illumination by 15,000 foot candles for 6 minutes when examined ⅙ of a second after exposure. PMID:19872170

  7. Metabolic plasticity for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Gil, Jordi; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2013-05-15

    Isoprenoids are a large family of compounds synthesized by all free-living organisms. In most bacteria, the common precursors of all isoprenoids are produced by the MEP (methylerythritol 4-phosphate) pathway. The MEP pathway is absent from archaea, fungi and animals (including humans), which synthesize their isoprenoid precursors using the completely unrelated MVA (mevalonate) pathway. Because the MEP pathway is essential in most bacterial pathogens (as well as in the malaria parasites), it has been proposed as a promising new target for the development of novel anti-infective agents. However, bacteria show a remarkable plasticity for isoprenoid biosynthesis that should be taken into account when targeting this metabolic pathway for the development of new antibiotics. For example, a few bacteria use the MVA pathway instead of the MEP pathway, whereas others possess the two full pathways, and some parasitic strains lack both the MVA and the MEP pathways (probably because they obtain their isoprenoids from host cells). Moreover, alternative enzymes and metabolic intermediates to those of the canonical MVA or MEP pathways exist in some organisms. Recent work has also shown that resistance to a block of the first steps of the MEP pathway can easily be developed because several enzymes unrelated to isoprenoid biosynthesis can produce pathway intermediates upon spontaneous mutations. In the present review, we discuss the major advances in our knowledge of the biochemical toolbox exploited by bacteria to synthesize the universal precursors for their essential isoprenoids.

  8. Spatial Control of Bacteria Using Screen Printing

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Soonhee; Fritz, Ian L.; Singer, Zakary S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Synthetic biology has led to advances in both our understanding and engineering of genetic circuits that affect spatial and temporal behaviors in living cells. A growing array of native and synthetic circuits such as oscillators, pattern generators, and cell–cell communication systems has been studied, which exhibit spatiotemporal properties. To better understand the design principles of these genetic circuits, there is a need for versatile and precise methods for patterning cell populations in various configurations. In this study, we develop a screen printing methodology to pattern bacteria on agar, glass, and paper surfaces. Initially, we tested three biocompatible resuspension media with appropriate rheological properties for screen printing. Using microscopy, we characterized the resolution and bleed of bacteria screen prints on agar and glass surfaces, obtaining resolutions as low as 188 μm. Next, we engineered bacterial strains producing visible chromoproteins analogous to the cyan, magenta, and yellow subtractive color system for the creation of multicolored bacteria images. Using this system, we printed distinct populations in overlapping or interlocking designs on both paper and agar substrates. These proof-of-principle experiments demonstrated how the screen printing method could be used to study microbial community interactions and pattern formation of biofilms at submillimeter length scales. Overall, our approach allows for rapid and precise prototyping of patterned bacteria species that will be useful in the understanding and engineering of spatiotemporal behaviors in microbial communities. PMID:29577061

  9. Freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fernanda; Cenard, Stéphanie; Passot, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are of great importance for the food and biotechnology industry. They are widely used as starters for manufacturing food (e.g., yogurt, cheese, fermented meats, and vegetables) and probiotic products, as well as for green chemistry applications. Freeze-drying or lyophilization is a convenient method for preservation of bacteria. By reducing water activity to values below 0.2, it allows long-term storage and low-cost distribution at suprazero temperatures, while minimizing losses in viability and functionality. Stabilization of bacteria via freeze-drying starts with the addition of a protectant solution to the bacterial suspension. Freeze-drying includes three steps, namely, (1) freezing of the concentrated and protected cell suspension, (2) primary drying to remove ice by sublimation, and (3) secondary drying to remove unfrozen water by desorption. In this chapter we describe a method for freeze-drying of lactic acid bacteria at a pilot scale, thus allowing control of the process parameters for maximal survival and functionality recovery.

  10. Tolerance of Anaerobic Bacteria to Chlorinated Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Joanna C.; Groissmeier, Kathrin D.; Manefield, Mike J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of four chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), perchloroethene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), chloroform (CF) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), on the growth of eight anaerobic bacteria: four fermentative species (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Clostridium sp. and Paenibacillus sp.) and four respiring species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Desulfovibrio vulgaris). Effective concentrations of solvents which inhibited growth rates by 50% (EC50) were determined. The octanol-water partition coefficient or log Po/w of a CAH proved a generally satisfactory measure of its toxicity. Most species tolerated approximately 3-fold and 10-fold higher concentrations of the two relatively more polar CAHs CF and 1,2-DCA, respectively, than the two relatively less polar compounds PCE and CT. EC50 values correlated well with growth rates observed in solvent-free cultures, with fast-growing organisms displaying higher tolerance levels. Overall, fermentative bacteria were more tolerant to CAHs than respiring species, with iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in particular appearing highly sensitive to CAHs. These data extend the current understanding of the impact of CAHs on a range of anaerobic bacteria, which will benefit the field of bioremediation. PMID:24441515

  11. Detection of Mannitol Formation by Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chalfan, Y.; Levy, R.; Mateles, R. I.

    1975-01-01

    A test is described by means of which formation of mannitol from fructose by lactic acid bacteria can be readily detected. The test is based on removal of interference of residual fructose by dehydration with hydrochloric acid followed by thin-layer chromatography. PMID:1101827

  12. Competitive interactions between sponge-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Ana I S; Cullen, Alescia; Thomas, Torsten

    2017-03-01

    The diversity of the microbial communities associated with marine sponges has been extensively studied, but their functioning and interactions within the sponge holobiont are only recently being appreciated. Sponge-associated microorganisms are known for the production of a range of inhibitory metabolites with biotechnological application, but the ecological role that these compounds remains elusive. In this work, we explore the competitive interactions between cultivated sponge-associated bacteria to inspect whether bacteria that produce antimicrobial activities are able to inhibit potentially pathogenic bacteria. We isolated a Bacillus sp. bacterium with sponge-degrading activity, which likely has a negative impact on the host. This bacterium, along with other sponge isolates from the same genus, was found to be inhibited by a subpopulation of closely related sponge-derived Pseudovibrio spp. In some Pseudovibrio strains, these inhibitory activities were correlated with the genetic capacity to produce polyketides, such as erythronolide. Our observations suggest that antagonistic activities likely influence the composition of the sponge microbiome, including the abundance of bacteria that can be harmful to the host. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. INTERACTIONS OF INTRODUCED BACTERIA AND AQUATIC INVERTEBRATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacteria enter into stream environments from a variety of sources and interact in varying ways with other biota. There were three basic objectives for this project: 1) to examine the effect of different types of macroinvertebrates on bacterial survival and distribution, 2) to com...

  14. Biodegradation of chlorobenzene by indigenous bacteria

    SciT

    Nishino, S.F.; Spain, J.C.; Pettigrew, C.A.

    Soil and ground water from four sites chronically contaminated with chlorobenzenes were examined to determine whether indigenous bacteria could degrade the contaminants and whether the addition of specific chlorobenzene-degrading bacteria enhanced the degradation rate. At each site, chlorobenzene-degrading bacteria were readily isolated from chlorobenzene-contaminated wells, whereas similar samples from noncontaminated wells yielded no chlorobenzene-degrading bacteria. Isolates were tested for growth on a variety of substrates. At a site contaminated with several solvents, a bioreactor was inoculated with the chlorobenzene-degrading Pseudomonas sp. strain JS150. Contaminated water was pumped through this bioreactor and a control bioreactor that had been colonized by inmore » indigenous microorganisms. The contaminants were removed from both bioreactors; however, JS150 could not be recovered from the inoculated bioreactor after three weeks of operation. A follow-up lab study using ground water from the contaminated site confirmed the field results. The authors conclude that chlorobenzene contamination of soil causes the development of indigenous degradative populations that have a competitive advantage over inoculated strains. The mechanism and time course of this acclimation are poorly understood and require additional study.« less

  15. Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria: There is Hope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offner, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Argues that reduction in the use of antibiotics would enable antibiotic-sensitive bacteria to flourish. Presents an activity designed to show students how a small, seemingly unimportant difference in doubling time can, over a period of time, make an enormous difference in population size. (DDR)

  16. Brilliant glyconanocapsules for trapping of bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xibo; Sivignon, Adeline; Alcouffe, Pierre; Burdin, Béatrice; Favre-Bonté, Sabine; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Barnich, Nicolas; Fleury, Etienne; Ganachaud, François; Bernard, Julien

    2015-08-28

    Nanoprecipitation of miglyol into droplets surrounded by a functional glycopolymer generates nanocapsules of biointerest. Fluorophores are trapped in situ or post-grafted onto the crosslinked polymer shell for efficient imaging. The resulting colloids induce aggregation of bacteria through strong specific interactions and promote their facile removal.

  17. Tolerance of anaerobic bacteria to chlorinated solvents.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Joanna C; Groissmeier, Kathrin D; Manefield, Mike J

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of four chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs), perchloroethene (PCE), carbon tetrachloride (CT), chloroform (CF) and 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), on the growth of eight anaerobic bacteria: four fermentative species (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella sp., Clostridium sp. and Paenibacillus sp.) and four respiring species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Desulfovibrio vulgaris). Effective concentrations of solvents which inhibited growth rates by 50% (EC50) were determined. The octanol-water partition coefficient or log Po/w of a CAH proved a generally satisfactory measure of its toxicity. Most species tolerated approximately 3-fold and 10-fold higher concentrations of the two relatively more polar CAHs CF and 1,2-DCA, respectively, than the two relatively less polar compounds PCE and CT. EC50 values correlated well with growth rates observed in solvent-free cultures, with fast-growing organisms displaying higher tolerance levels. Overall, fermentative bacteria were more tolerant to CAHs than respiring species, with iron- and sulfate-reducing bacteria in particular appearing highly sensitive to CAHs. These data extend the current understanding of the impact of CAHs on a range of anaerobic bacteria, which will benefit the field of bioremediation.

  18. Jumping Genes: The Transposable DNAs of Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Claire M.; Berg, Douglas E.

    1984-01-01

    Transposons are transposable elements that carry genes for antibiotic resistance. Provides background information on the structure and organization of these "jumping genes" in bacteria. Also describes the use of transposons in tagging genes and lists pertinent references and resource materials. (DH)

  19. Endocarditis Due to Rare and Fastidious Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Brouqui, P.; Raoult, D.

    2001-01-01

    The etiologic diagnosis of infective endocarditis is easily made in the presence of continuous bacteremia with gram-positive cocci. However, the blood culture may contain a bacterium rarely associated with endocarditis, such as Lactobacillus spp., Klebsiella spp., or nontoxigenic Corynebacterium, Salmonella, Gemella, Campylobacter, Aeromonas, Yersinia, Nocardia, Pasteurella, Listeria, or Erysipelothrix spp., that requires further investigation to establish the relationship with endocarditis, or the blood culture may be uninformative despite a supportive clinical evaluation. In the latter case, the etiologic agents are either fastidious extracellular or intracellular bacteria. Fastidious extracellular bacteria such as Abiotrophia, HACEK group bacteria, Clostridium, Brucella, Legionella, Mycobacterium, and Bartonella spp. need supplemented media, prolonged incubation time, and special culture conditions. Intracellular bacteria such as Coxiella burnetii cannot be isolated routinely. The two most prevalent etiologic agents of culture-negative endocarditis are C. burnetti and Bartonella spp. Their diagnosis is usually carried out serologically. A systemic pathologic examination of excised heart valves including periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining and molecular methods has allowed the identification of Whipple's bacillus endocarditis. Pathologic examination of the valve using special staining, such as Warthin-Starry, Gimenez, and PAS, and broad-spectrum PCR should be performed systematically when no etiologic diagnosis is evident through routine laboratory evaluation. PMID:11148009

  20. ACETOGENIC BACTERIA ASSOCIATED WITH SEAGRASS ROOTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seagrasses are adapted to being rooted in reduced, anoxic sediments with high rates of sulfate reduction. During the day, an oxygen gradient is generated around the roots, becoming anoxic at night. Thus, obligate anaerobic bacteria in the rhizosphere have to tolerate elevated oxy...

  1. Automatic bio-sample bacteria detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Colburn, M.; Kelbaugh, B. N.; Picciolo, G. L.

    1971-01-01

    Electromechanical device analyzes urine specimens in 15 minutes and processes one sample per minute. Instrument utilizes bioluminescent reaction between luciferase-luciferin mixture and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to determine number of bacteria present in the sample. Device has potential application to analysis of other body fluids.

  2. Anaerobic bacteria in wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Cyprowski, Marcin; Stobnicka-Kupiec, Agata; Ławniczek-Wałczyk, Anna; Bakal-Kijek, Aleksandra; Gołofit-Szymczak, Małgorzata; Górny, Rafał L

    2018-03-28

    The objective of this study was to assess exposure to anaerobic bacteria released into air from sewage and sludge at workplaces from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Samples of both sewage and sludge were collected at six sampling points and bioaerosol samples were additionally collected (with the use of a 6-stage Andersen impactor) at ten workplaces covering different stages of the technological process. Qualitative identification of all isolated strains was performed using the biochemical API 20A test. Additionally, the determination of Clostridium pathogens was carried out using 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The average concentration of anaerobic bacteria in the sewage samples was 5.49 × 10 4 CFU/mL (GSD = 85.4) and in sludge-1.42 × 10 6 CFU/g (GSD = 5.1). In turn, the average airborne bacterial concentration was at the level of 50 CFU/m 3 (GSD = 5.83) and the highest bacterial contamination (4.06 × 10 3  CFU/m 3 ) was found in winter at the bar screens. In total, 16 bacterial species were determined, from which the predominant strains belonged to Actinomyces, Bifidobacterium, Clostridium, Propionibacterium and Peptostreptococcus genera. The analysis revealed that mechanical treatment processes were responsible for a substantial emission of anaerobic bacteria into the air. In both the sewage and air samples, Clostridium perfringens pathogen was identified. Anaerobic bacteria were widely present both in the sewage and in the air at workplaces from the WWTP, especially when the technological process was performed in closed spaces. Anaerobic bacteria formed small aggregates with both wastewater droplets and dust particles of sewage sludge origin and as such may be responsible for adverse health outcomes in exposed workers.

  3. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  4. Proteome analysis of the fungus Aspergillus carbonarius under ochratoxin A producing conditions.

    PubMed

    Crespo-Sempere, A; Gil, J V; Martínez-Culebras, P V

    2011-06-30

    Aspergillus carbonarius is an important ochratoxin A producing fungus that is responsible for mycotoxin contamination of grapes and wine. In this study, the proteomes of highly (W04-40) and weakly (W04-46) OTA-producing A. carbonarius strains were compared to identify proteins that may be involved in OTA biosynthesis. Protein samples were extracted from two biological replicates and subjected to two dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis and mass spectrometry. Expression profile comparison (PDQuest software), revealed 21 differential spots that were statistically significant and showed a two-fold change in expression, or greater. Among these, nine protein spots were identified by MALDI-MS/MS and MASCOT database and twelve remain unidentified. Of the identified proteins, seven showed a higher expression in strain W04-40 (high OTA producer) and two in strain W04-46 (low OTA producer). Some of the identified amino acid sequences shared homology with proteins involved in regulation, amino acid metabolism, oxidative stress and sporulation. It is worth noting the presence of a protein with 126.5 fold higher abundance in strain W04-40 showing homology with protein CipC, a protein with unknown function related with pathogenesis and mycotoxin production by some authors. Variations in protein expression were also further investigated at the mRNA level by real-time PCR analysis. The mRNA expression levels from three identified proteins including CipC showed correlation with protein expression levels. This study represents the first proteomic analysis for a comparison of two A. carbonarius strains with different OTA production and will contribute to a better understanding of the molecular events involved in OTA biosynthesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. OCCURRENCE OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA WITH VIRULENCE CHARACTERISTICS IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Treated potable water contains a variety of heterotrophic bacteria that survive current treatment processes. There is evidence that these bacteria are not hazardous to the healthy population, however, the possibility exists that some of them may be opportunistic pathogens capabl...

  6. MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF BACTERIA INHABITING A WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM SIMULATOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impact of chlorination and chloramination treatments on heterotrophic bacteria (HB) and ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) inhabiting a water distribution system simulator was investigated. Notable changes in bacterial densities were observed during this monitoring study. For e...

  7. Bacteria Culture Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information → Bacteria Culture Test URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/bacteriaculturetest.html Bacteria Culture Test ... 2017 Mar 4]; [about 3 screens]. Available from: https://labtestsonline.org/understanding/analytes/sputum-culture/tab/test/ ...

  8. Rapid detection of bacteria in foods and biological fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fealey, R. D.; Renner, W.

    1973-01-01

    Simple and inexpensive apparatus, called "redox monitoring cell," rapidly detects presence of bacteria. Bacteria is detected by measuring drop in oxygen content in test solution. Apparatus consists of vial with two specially designed electrodes connected to sensitive voltmeter.

  9. THE ECOLOGY OF BACTERIA IN THE ALFRESCO ATMOSPHERE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This MiniReview is concerned with the sources,flux and the spacial and temporal distributions of culturable airborne bacteria; how meteorological conditions modulate these distributions; and how death, culture media, and experimental devices relate to measuring airborne bacteria....

  10. Micromonospora schwarzwaldensis sp. nov., a producer of telomycin, isolated from soil.

    PubMed

    Vela Gurovic, Maria Soledad; Müller, Sebastian; Domin, Nicole; Seccareccia, Ivana; Nietzsche, Sandor; Martin, Karin; Nett, Markus

    2013-10-01

    A Gram-stain-positive, spore-forming actinomycete strain (HKI0641(T)) was isolated from a soil sample collected in the Black Forest, Germany. During screening for antimicrobial natural products this bacterium was identified as a producer of the antibiotic telomycin. Morphological characteristics and chemotaxonomic data indicated that the strain belonged to the genus Micromonospora. The peptidoglycan of strain HKI0641(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid, and the fatty acid profile consisted predominantly of anteiso-C15 : 0, iso-C15 : 0, iso-C16 : 0 and C16 : 0. MK-10(H4), MK-10(H2) and MK-10 were identified as the major menaquinones. To determine the taxonomic positioning of strain HKI0641(T), we computed a binary tanglegram of two rooted phylogenetic trees that were based upon 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences. The comparative analysis of the two common classification methods strongly supported the phylogenetic affiliation with the genus Micromonospora, but it also revealed discrepancies in the assignment at the level of the genomic species. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis identified Micromonospora coxensis DSM 45161(T) (99.1 % sequence similarity) and Micromonospora marina DSM 45555(T) (99.0 %) as the nearest taxonomic neighbours, whereas the gyrB sequence of strain HKI0641(T) indicated a closer relationship to Micromonospora aurantiaca DSM 43813(T) (95.1 %). By means of DNA-DNA hybridization experiments, it was possible to resolve this issue and to clearly differentiate strain HKI0641(T) from other species of the genus Micromonospora. The type strains of the aforementioned species of the genus Micromonospora could be further distinguished from strain HKI0641(T) by several phenotypic properties, such as colony colour, NaCl tolerance and the utilization of carbon sources. The isolate was therefore assigned to a novel species of the genus Micromonospora, for which the name Micromonospora schwarzwaldensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain

  11. Physics of Intracellular Organization in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wingreen, Ned S; Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2015-01-01

    With the realization that bacteria achieve exquisite levels of spatiotemporal organization has come the challenge of discovering the underlying mechanisms. In this review, we describe three classes of such mechanisms, each of which has physical origins: the use of landmarks, the creation of higher-order structures that enable geometric sensing, and the emergence of length scales from systems of chemical reactions coupled to diffusion. We then examine the diversity of geometric cues that exist even in cells with relatively simple geometries, and end by discussing both new technologies that could drive further discovery and the implications of our current knowledge for the behavior, fitness, and evolution of bacteria. The organizational strategies described here are employed in a wide variety of systems and in species across all kingdoms of life; in many ways they provide a general blueprint for organizing the building blocks of life.

  12. Have sex or not? Lessons from bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lodé, T

    2012-01-01

    Sex is one of the greatest puzzles in evolutionary biology. A true meiotic process occurs only in eukaryotes, while in bacteria, gene transcription is fragmentary, so asexual reproduction in this case really means clonal reproduction. Sex could stem from a signal that leads to increased reproductive output of all interacting individuals and could be understood as a secondary consequence of primitive metabolic reactions. Meiotic sex evolved in proto-eukaryotes to solve a problem that bacteria did not have, namely a large amount of DNA material, occurring in an archaic step of proto-cell formation and genetic exchanges. Rather than providing selective advantages through reproduction, sex could be thought of as a series of separate events which combines step-by-step some very weak benefits of recombination, meiosis, gametogenesis and syngamy. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Specialized cell surface structures in cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lamed, R; Naimark, J; Morgenstern, E; Bayer, E A

    1987-01-01

    The cell surface topology of various gram-negative and -positive, anaerobic and aerobic, mesophilic and thermophilic, cellulolytic and noncellulolytic bacteria was investigated by scanning electron microscopic visualization using cationized ferritin. Characteristic protuberant structures were observed on cells of all cellulolytic strains. These structures appeared to be directly related to the previously described exocellular cellulase-containing polycellulosomes of Clostridium thermocellum YS (E. A. Bayer and R. Lamed, J. Bacteriol. 167:828-836, 1986). Immunochemical evidence and lectin-binding studies suggested a further correlation on the molecular level among cellulolytic bacteria. The results indicate that such cell surface cellulase-containing structures may be of general consequence to the bacterial interaction with and degradation of cellulose. Images PMID:3301817

  14. Necrotizing enterocolitis and preterm infant gut bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Barbara B.; Tarr, Phillip I.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Necrotizing enterocolitis remains an intractable consequence of preterm birth. Gut microbial communities, especially bacterial communities, have long been suspected to play a role in the development of necrotizing enterocolitis. Direct-from-stool nucleic acid sequencing technology now offers insights into the make-up of these communities. Data are now converging on the roles of Gram-negative bacteria as causative agents, despite the dynamic nature of bacterial populations, the varying technologies and sampling strategies, and the overall small sample sizes in these case–control studies. Bacteria that confer protection from necrotizing enterocolitis have not been identified across studies. The beneficial effect of probiotics is not apparent in infants with birth weights <1000 g (these infants are at highest risk of, and have the highest case fatality rate from, necrotizing enterocolitis). Further work should be directed to the modulating gut microbes, or the products they produce, to prevent this devastating complication of preterm birth. PMID:27343151

  15. Sulfate-reducing bacteria: Microbiology and physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peck, H. D.

    1985-01-01

    The sulfate reducing bacteria, the first nonphotosynthetic anaerobic bacteria demonstrated to contain c type cytochromes, perform electron transfer coupled to phosphorylation. A new bioenergetic scheme for the formation of a proton gradient for growth of Desulfovibrio on organic substrates and sulfate involving vectors electron transfer and consistent with the cellular localization of enzymes and electron transfer components was proposed. Hydrogen is produced in the cytoplasm from organic substrates and, as a permease molecule diffuses rapidly across the cytoplasmic membrane, it is oxidized to protons and electrons by the periplasmic hydrogenase. The electrons only are transferred across the cytoplasmic membrane to the cytoplasm where they are used to reduce sulfate to sulfide. The protons are used for transport or to drive a reversible ATPOSE. The net effect is the transfer of protons across the cytoplasmic membrane with the intervention of a proton pump. This type of H2 cycling is relevant to the bioenergetics of other types of anaerobic microorganisms.

  16. Mucosal immunity to pathogenic intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Behnsen, Judith; Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Raffatellu, Manuela

    2016-03-01

    The intestinal mucosa is a particularly dynamic environment in which the host constantly interacts with trillions of commensal microorganisms, known as the microbiota, and periodically interacts with pathogens of diverse nature. In this Review, we discuss how mucosal immunity is controlled in response to enteric bacterial pathogens, with a focus on the species that cause morbidity and mortality in humans. We explain how the microbiota can shape the immune response to pathogenic bacteria, and we detail innate and adaptive immune mechanisms that drive protective immunity against these pathogens. The vast diversity of the microbiota, pathogens and immune responses encountered in the intestines precludes discussion of all of the relevant players in this Review. Instead, we aim to provide a representative overview of how the intestinal immune system responds to pathogenic bacteria.

  17. Molecular Determinants in Phagocyte-Bacteria Interactions.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Dorhoi, Anca

    2016-03-15

    Phagocytes are crucial for host defense against bacterial pathogens. As first demonstrated by Metchnikoff, neutrophils and mononuclear phagocytes share the capacity to engulf, kill, and digest microbial invaders. Generally, neutrophils focus on extracellular, and mononuclear phagocytes on intracellular, pathogens. Reciprocally, extracellular pathogens often capitalize on hindering phagocytosis and killing of phagocytes, whereas intracellular bacteria frequently allow their engulfment and then block intracellular killing. As foreseen by Metchnikoff, phagocytes become highly versatile by acquiring diverse phenotypes, but still retaining some plasticity. Further, phagocytes engage in active crosstalk with parenchymal and immune cells to promote adjunctive reactions, including inflammation, tissue healing, and remodeling. This dynamic network allows the host to cope with different types of microbial invaders. Here we present an update of molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying phagocyte functions in antibacterial defense. We focus on four exemplary bacteria ranging from an opportunistic extracellular to a persistent intracellular pathogen. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Application of anaerobic bacteria detection in oral and maxillofacial infection].

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhen-ying; Lin, Qin; Meng, Yan-hong; He, Chun; Su, Jia-zeng; Peng, Xin

    2016-02-18

    To investigate the distribution and drug resistance of anaerobic bacteria in the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection. Aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures from 61 specimens of pus from the patients with oral and maxillofacial infection in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School of Stomatology were identified. The culture type was evaluated by API 20A kit and drug resistance test was performed by Etest method. The clinical data and antibacterial agents for the treatment of the 61 cases were collected, and the final outcomes were recorded. The bacteria cultures were isolated from all the specimens, with aerobic bacteria only in 6 cases (9.8%), anaerobic bacteria only in 7 cases (11.5%), and both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in 48 cases (78.7%). There were 55 infected cases (90.2%) with anaerobic bacteria, and 81 anaerobic bacteria stains were isolated. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram positive anaerobic bacteria could be found in Peptostreptococcus, Bifidobacterium and Pemphigus propionibacterium. No cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was detected in the above three Gram positive anaerobic bacteria. The highest bacteria isolation rate of Gram negative anaerobic bacteria could be detected in Porphyromonas and Prevotella. No metronidazole, cefoxitin, amoxicillin/carat acid resistant strain was found in the two Gram negative anaerobic bacteria. In the study, 48 patients with oral and maxillofacial infection were treated according to the results of drug resistance testing, and the clinical cure rate was 81.3%. Mixed aerobic and anaerobic bacteria cultures are very common in most oral and maxillofacial infection patients. Anaerobic bacteria culture and drug resistance testing play an important role in clinical treatment.

  19. Macrophage defense mechanisms against intracellular bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Günter; Schaible, Ulrich E

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages and neutrophils play a decisive role in host responses to intracellular bacteria including the agent of tuberculosis (TB), Mycobacterium tuberculosis as they represent the forefront of innate immune defense against bacterial invaders. At the same time, these phagocytes are also primary targets of intracellular bacteria to be abused as host cells. Their efficacy to contain and eliminate intracellular M. tuberculosis decides whether a patient initially becomes infected or not. However, when the infection becomes chronic or even latent (as in the case of TB) despite development of specific immune activation, phagocytes have also important effector functions. Macrophages have evolved a myriad of defense strategies to combat infection with intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. These include induction of toxic anti-microbial effectors such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen intermediates, the stimulation of microbe intoxication mechanisms via acidification or metal accumulation in the phagolysosome, the restriction of the microbe's access to essential nutrients such as iron, fatty acids, or amino acids, the production of anti-microbial peptides and cytokines, along with induction of autophagy and efferocytosis to eliminate the pathogen. On the other hand, M. tuberculosis, as a prime example of a well-adapted facultative intracellular bacterium, has learned during evolution to counter-balance the host's immune defense strategies to secure survival or multiplication within this otherwise hostile environment. This review provides an overview of innate immune defense of macrophages directed against intracellular bacteria with a focus on M. tuberculosis. Gaining more insights and knowledge into this complex network of host-pathogen interaction will identify novel target sites of intervention to successfully clear infection at a time of rapidly emerging multi-resistance of M. tuberculosis against conventional antibiotics. PMID:25703560

  20. Method of detecting and counting bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An improved method is provided for determining bacterial levels, especially in samples of aqueous physiological fluids. The method depends on the quantitative determination of bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the presence of nonbacterial ATP. The bacterial ATP is released by cell rupture and is measured by an enzymatic bioluminescent assay. A concentration technique is included to make the method more sensitive. It is particularly useful where the fluid to be measured contains an unknown or low bacteria count.

  1. Evidence for metabolic activity of airborne bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatigny, M. A.; Wolochow, H.

    1974-01-01

    Aerosols of the bacterium Serratia marcescens, and of uniformly labeled C-14 glucose were produced simultaneously and mixed in tubing leading to an aerosol chamber. During a subsequent period of about 5 hrs, carbon dioxide was produced metabolically within the chamber, and labeled material incorporated within the suspended particles first increased then decreased. This constitutes the first direct evidence of microbial metabolism of bacteria suspended in the air.

  2. Excitons in intact cells of photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Arvi; Pajusalu, Mihkel; Rätsep, Margus

    2013-09-26

    Live cells and regular crystals seem fundamentally incompatible. Still, effects characteristic to ideal crystals, such as coherent sharing of excitation, have been recently used in many studies to explain the behavior of several photosynthetic complexes, especially the inner workings of the light-harvesting apparatus of the oldest known photosynthetic organisms, the purple bacteria. To this date, there has been no concrete evidence that the same effects are instrumental in real living cells, leaving a possibility that this is an artifact of unnatural study conditions, not a real effect relevant to the biological operation of bacteria. Hereby, we demonstrate survival of collective coherent excitations (excitons) in intact cells of photosynthetic purple bacteria. This is done by using excitation anisotropy spectroscopy for tracking the temperature-dependent evolution of exciton bands in light-harvesting systems of increasing structural complexity. The temperature was gradually raised from 4.5 K to ambient temperature, and the complexity of the systems ranged from detergent-isolated complexes to complete bacterial cells. The results provide conclusive evidence that excitons are indeed one of the key elements contributing to the energetic and dynamic properties of photosynthetic organisms.

  3. Force generation by groups of migrating bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Matthias D.; Liu, Guannan; Stone, Howard A.; Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2017-01-01

    From colony formation in bacteria to wound healing and embryonic development in multicellular organisms, groups of living cells must often move collectively. Although considerable study has probed the biophysical mechanisms of how eukaryotic cells generate forces during migration, little such study has been devoted to bacteria, in particular with regard to the question of how bacteria generate and coordinate forces during collective motion. This question is addressed here using traction force microscopy. We study two distinct motility mechanisms of Myxococcus xanthus, namely, twitching and gliding. For twitching, powered by type-IV pilus retraction, we find that individual cells exert local traction in small hotspots with forces on the order of 50 pN. Twitching bacterial groups also produce traction hotspots, but with forces around 100 pN that fluctuate rapidly on timescales of <1.5 min. Gliding, the second motility mechanism, is driven by lateral transport of substrate adhesions. When cells are isolated, gliding produces low average traction on the order of 1 Pa. However, traction is amplified approximately fivefold in groups. Advancing protrusions of gliding cells push, on average, in the direction of motion. Together, these results show that the forces generated during twitching and gliding have complementary characters, and both forces have higher values when cells are in groups. PMID:28655845

  4. Force generation by groups of migrating bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sabass, Benedikt; Koch, Matthias D; Liu, Guannan; Stone, Howard A; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2017-07-11

    From colony formation in bacteria to wound healing and embryonic development in multicellular organisms, groups of living cells must often move collectively. Although considerable study has probed the biophysical mechanisms of how eukaryotic cells generate forces during migration, little such study has been devoted to bacteria, in particular with regard to the question of how bacteria generate and coordinate forces during collective motion. This question is addressed here using traction force microscopy. We study two distinct motility mechanisms of Myxococcus xanthus , namely, twitching and gliding. For twitching, powered by type-IV pilus retraction, we find that individual cells exert local traction in small hotspots with forces on the order of 50 pN. Twitching bacterial groups also produce traction hotspots, but with forces around 100 pN that fluctuate rapidly on timescales of <1.5 min. Gliding, the second motility mechanism, is driven by lateral transport of substrate adhesions. When cells are isolated, gliding produces low average traction on the order of 1 Pa. However, traction is amplified approximately fivefold in groups. Advancing protrusions of gliding cells push, on average, in the direction of motion. Together, these results show that the forces generated during twitching and gliding have complementary characters, and both forces have higher values when cells are in groups.

  5. Alkaline phosphatase activity of rumen bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K J; Costerton, J W

    1977-11-01

    Of the 54 strains of rumen bacteria examined for alkaline phosphatase (APase) production, 9 of 33 gram-negative strains and none of 21 gram-positive strains produced the enzyme. The APase of the cells of the three strains of Bacteroides ruminicola that produced significant amounts of the enzyme was located in the periplasmic area of the cell envelope, whereas the enzyme was located in the strains of Selenomonas ruminantium and Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens was associated with the outer membrane. The localization of APase production in the cells of natural populations of rumen bacteria from hay-fed sheep was accomplished by reaction product deposition, and both the proportion of APase-producing bacteria and the location of the enzyme in the cell envelope of the producing cells could be determined. We suggest that this procedure is useful in detecting shifts in the bacterial population and the release of cell-bound APase that accompany feedlot bloat and other sequelae of dietary manipulation in ruminants.

  6. Alkaline phosphatase activity of rumen bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, K J; Costerton, J W

    1977-01-01

    Of the 54 strains of rumen bacteria examined for alkaline phosphatase (APase) production, 9 of 33 gram-negative strains and none of 21 gram-positive strains produced the enzyme. The APase of the cells of the three strains of Bacteroides ruminicola that produced significant amounts of the enzyme was located in the periplasmic area of the cell envelope, whereas the enzyme was located in the strains of Selenomonas ruminantium and Succinivibrio dextrinosolvens was associated with the outer membrane. The localization of APase production in the cells of natural populations of rumen bacteria from hay-fed sheep was accomplished by reaction product deposition, and both the proportion of APase-producing bacteria and the location of the enzyme in the cell envelope of the producing cells could be determined. We suggest that this procedure is useful in detecting shifts in the bacterial population and the release of cell-bound APase that accompany feedlot bloat and other sequelae of dietary manipulation in ruminants. Images PMID:563216

  7. Bacteria associated with Amblyomma cajennense tick eggs

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Ferreira, Erik; Vizzoni, Vinicius Figueiredo; Piesman, Joseph; Gazeta, Gilberto Salles; Soares, Carlos Augusto Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Ticks represent a large group of pathogen vectors that blood feed on a diversity of hosts. In the Americas, the Ixodidae ticks Amblyomma cajennense are responsible for severe impact on livestock and public health. In the present work, we present the isolation and molecular identification of a group of culturable bacteria associated with A. cajennense eggs from females sampled in distinct geographical sites in southeastern Brazil. Additional comparative analysis of the culturable bacteria from Anocentor nitens, Rhipicephalus sanguineus and Ixodes scapularis tick eggs were also performed. 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses identified 17 different bacterial types identified as Serratia marcescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Enterobacter spp., Micrococcus luteus, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus spp., distributed in 12 phylogroups. Staphylococcus spp., especially S. sciuri, was the most prevalent bacteria associated with A. cajennense eggs, occurring in 65% of the samples and also frequently observed infecting A. nitens eggs. S. maltophilia, S. marcescens and B. cereus occurred infecting eggs derived from specific sampling sites, but in all cases rising almost as pure cultures from infected A. cajennense eggs. The potential role of these bacterial associations is discussed and they possibly represent new targets for biological control strategies of ticks and tick borne diseases. PMID:26537602

  8. Bacteria-powered battery on paper.

    PubMed

    Fraiwan, Arwa; Choi, Seokheun

    2014-12-21

    Paper-based devices have recently emerged as simple and low-cost paradigms for fluid manipulation and analytical/clinical testing. However, there are significant challenges in developing paper-based devices at the system level, which contain integrated paper-based power sources. Here, we report a microfabricated paper-based bacteria-powered battery that is capable of generating power from microbial metabolism. The battery on paper showed a very short start-up time relative to conventional microbial fuel cells (MFCs); paper substrates eliminated the time traditional MFCs required to accumulate and acclimate bacteria on the anode. Only four batteries connected in series provided desired values of current and potential to power an LED for more than 30 minutes. The battery featured (i) a low-cost paper-based proton exchange membrane directly patterned on commercially available parchment paper and (ii) paper reservoirs for holding the anolyte and the catholyte for an extended period of time. Based on this concept, we also demonstrate the use of paper-based test platforms for the rapid characterization of electricity-generating bacteria. This paper-based microbial screening tool does not require external pumps/tubings and represents the most rapid test platform (<50 min) compared with the time needed by using traditional screening tools (up to 103 days) and even recently proposed MEMS arrays (< 2 days).

  9. Fish skin bacteria: Colonial and cellular hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Sar, N; Rosenberg, E

    1987-05-01

    Bacteria were desorbed from the skin of healthy, fast-swimming fish by several procedures, including brief exposure to sonic oscillation and treatment with nontoxic surface active agents. The surface properties of these bacteria were studied by measuring their adhesion to hexadecane, as well as by a newly developed, simple method for studying the hydrophobicity of bacterial lawns. This method, referred to as the "Direction of Spreading" (DOS) method, consists of recording the direction to which a water drop spreads when introduced at the border between bacterial lawns and other surfaces. Of the 13 fish skin isolates examined, two strains were as hydrophobic as polystyrene by the DOS method. Suspended cells of one of these strains adhered strongly to hexadecane (84%), whereas cells of the other strain adhered poorly (13%). Another strain which was almost as hydrophobic as polystyrene by the DOS method did not adhere to hexadecane at all. Similarly, lawns of three other strains were more hydrophobic than glass by the DOS method, but cell suspensions prepared from these colonies showed little or no adhesion to hexadecane. The high colonial but relatively low cellular hydrophobicity could be due to a hydrophobic slime that is removed during the suspension and washing procedures. The possibility that specific bacteria assist in fish locomotion by changing the surface properties of the fish skin and by producing drag-reducing polymers is discussed.

  10. Acoustic manipulation of bacteria cells suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GutiéRrez-Ramos, Salomé; Hoyos, Mauricio; Aider, Jean Luc; Ruiz, Carlos; Acoustofluidics Team Team; Soft; Bio Group Collaboration

    An acoustic contacless manipulation gives advantages in the exploration of the complex dynamics enviroment that active matter exhibits. Our works reports the control confinement and dispersion of Escherichia coliRP437-pZA3R-YFP suspensions (M9Glu-Ca) via acoustic levitation.The manipulation of the bacteria bath in a parallel plate resonator is achieved using the acoustic radiation force and the secondary radiation force. The primary radiation force generates levitation of the bacteria cells at the nodal plane of the ultrasonic standing wave generated inside the resonator. On the other side, secondary forces leads to the consolidation of stable aggregates. All the experiments were performed in the acoustic trap described, where we excite the emission plate with a continuous sinusoidal signal at a frequency in the order of MHz and a quartz slide as the reflector plate. In a typical experiment we observed that, before the input of the signal, the bacteria cells exhibit their typical run and tumble behavior and after the sound is turned on all of them displace towards the nodal plane, and instantaneously the aggregation begins in this region. CNRS French National Space Studies, CONACYT Mexico.

  11. Influence of surfaces on sulphidogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bass, C J; Webb, J S; Sanders, P F; Lappin-Scott, H M

    1996-01-01

    Sulphidogenic bacteria in oil reservoirs are of great economic importance in terms of souring, fouling and corrosion. Mixed cultures containing these bacteria were isolated from chalk formations in North Sea oil reservoirs. These were thermophilic cultures, growing optimally at 60°C. Oil formations are porous matrices, providing a very large surface area and ideal conditions for bacterial attachment, survival and growth. This study included assessments of sulphide production rates of thermophilic (t-)sulphidogen consortia with and without additional surfaces. The availability of a surface contributed significantly to the rate and extent of sulphide generation. Surfaces were offered in varying amounts to growing planktonic cultures: significantly more sulphide was produced from cultures in contact with a surface than from identical cultures in the absence of a surface. In another series of experiments, t-sulphidogens were added to chalk rock chips in the presence of nutrients and incubated for several months. This resulted in rapid sulphide generation, the final concentration being related to the initial nutrient concentration. Subsequent nutrient addition resulted in renewed sulphide generation. It is suggested that bacteria in reservoirs can withstand long periods of nutrient deprivation while attached within the porous rock matrix and opportunistically utilise nutrients when they become available.

  12. Transfer of DNA from Bacteria to Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Historically, the members of the Agrobacterium genus have been considered the only bacterial species naturally able to transfer and integrate DNA into the genomes of their eukaryotic hosts. Yet, increasing evidence suggests that this ability to genetically transform eukaryotic host cells might be more widespread in the bacterial world. Indeed, analyses of accumulating genomic data reveal cases of horizontal gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotes and suggest that it represents a significant force in adaptive evolution of eukaryotic species. Specifically, recent reports indicate that bacteria other than Agrobacterium, such as Bartonella henselae (a zoonotic pathogen), Rhizobium etli (a plant-symbiotic bacterium related to Agrobacterium), or even Escherichia coli, have the ability to genetically transform their host cells under laboratory conditions. This DNA transfer relies on type IV secretion systems (T4SSs), the molecular machines that transport macromolecules during conjugative plasmid transfer and also during transport of proteins and/or DNA to the eukaryotic recipient cells. In this review article, we explore the extent of possible transfer of genetic information from bacteria to eukaryotic cells as well as the evolutionary implications and potential applications of this transfer. PMID:27406565

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides Targeting Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have remarkably different structures as well as biological activity profiles, whereupon most of these peptides are supposed to kill bacteria via membrane damage. In order to understand their molecular mechanism and target cell specificity for Gram-positive bacteria, it is essential to consider the architecture of their cell envelopes. Before AMPs can interact with the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-positive bacteria, they have to traverse the cell wall composed of wall- and lipoteichoic acids and peptidoglycan. While interaction of AMPs with peptidoglycan might rather facilitate penetration, interaction with anionic teichoic acids may act as either a trap for AMPs or a ladder for a route to the cytoplasmic membrane. Interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane frequently leads to lipid segregation affecting membrane domain organization, which affects membrane permeability, inhibits cell division processes or leads to delocalization of essential peripheral membrane proteins. Further, precursors of cell wall components, especially the highly conserved lipid II, are directly targeted by AMPs. Thereby, the peptides do not inhibit peptidoglycan synthesis via binding to proteins like common antibiotics, but form a complex with the precursor molecule, which in addition can promote pore formation and membrane disruption. Thus, the multifaceted mode of actions will make AMPs superior to antibiotics that act only on one specific target. PMID:27657092

  14. Precision genome engineering in lactic acid bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Innovative new genome engineering technologies for manipulating chromosomes have appeared in the last decade. One of these technologies, recombination mediated genetic engineering (recombineering) allows for precision DNA engineering of chromosomes and plasmids in Escherichia coli. Single-stranded DNA recombineering (SSDR) allows for the generation of subtle mutations without the need for selection and without leaving behind any foreign DNA. In this review we discuss the application of SSDR technology in lactic acid bacteria, with an emphasis on key factors that were critical to move this technology from E. coli into Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactococcus lactis. We also provide a blueprint for how to proceed if one is attempting to establish SSDR technology in a lactic acid bacterium. The emergence of CRISPR-Cas technology in genome engineering and its potential application to enhancing SSDR in lactic acid bacteria is discussed. The ability to perform precision genome engineering in medically and industrially important lactic acid bacteria will allow for the genetic improvement of strains without compromising safety. PMID:25185700

  15. Isolation of Lightning-Competent Soil Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cérémonie, Hélène; Buret, François; Simonet, Pascal; Vogel, Timothy M.

    2004-01-01

    Artificial transformation is typically performed in the laboratory by using either a chemical (CaCl2) or an electrical (electroporation) method. However, laboratory-scale lightning has been shown recently to electrotransform Escherichia coli strain DH10B in soil. In this paper, we report on the isolation of two “lightning-competent” soil bacteria after direct electroporation of the Nycodenz bacterial ring extracted from prairie soil in the presence of the pBHCRec plasmid (Tcr, Spr, Smr). The electrotransformability of the isolated bacteria was measured both in vitro (by electroporation cuvette) and in situ (by lightning in soil microcosm) and then compared to those of E. coli DH10B and Pseudomonas fluorescens C7R12. The electrotransformation frequencies measured reached 10−3 to 10−4 by electroporation and 10−4 to 10−5 by simulated lightning, while no transformation was observed in the absence of electrical current. Two of the isolated lightning-competent soil bacteria were identified as Pseudomonas sp. strains. PMID:15466589

  16. Mutations and Misconceptions: The Isolation and Study of Mutant Bacteria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corner, Thomas R.

    1992-01-01

    Describes simple, inexpensive activities for teaching students about mutants and mutations in bacteria. Explains how to isolate bacteria from soil and leaves and how to grow bacteria on agar or in broth. Describes how to construct a gradient plate for finding the minimum inhibitory concentration of a substance and how to use this set up to find…

  17. NREL Scientists Model Methane-Eating Bacteria | News | NREL

    Scientists Model Methane-Eating Bacteria News Release: NREL Scientists Model Methane-Eating Bacteria February 13, 2018 Nature is full of surprises - not to mention solutions. A research team ) recently explored the possibilities provided by the natural world by researching how the bacteria

  18. Bacteria-Targeting Nanoparticles for Managing Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar Filip

    Bacterial infections continue to be a significant concern particularly in healthcare settings and in the developing world. Current challenges include the increasing spread of drug resistant (DR) organisms, the side effects of antibiotic therapy, the negative consequences of clearing the commensal bacterial flora, and difficulties in developing prophylactic vaccines. This thesis was an investigation of the potential of a class of polymeric nanoparticles (NP) to contribute to the management of bacterial infections. More specifically, steps were taken towards using these NPs (1) to achieve greater spatiotemporal control over drug therapy by more targeted antibiotic delivery to bacteria, and (2) to develop a prophylactic vaccine formulation against the common bacterial sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by Chlamydia trachomatis. In the first part, we synthesized polymeric NPs containing poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-poly(L-histidine)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PLH-PEG). We show that these NPs are able to bind to bacteria under model acidic infection conditions and are able to encapsulate and deliver vancomycin to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in vitro. Further work showed that the PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs demonstrated the potential for competition for binding bacteria at a site of infection from soluble protein and model phagocytic and tissue-resident cells in a NP composition dependent manner. The NPs demonstrated low toxicity in vitro, were well tolerated by mice in vivo, and circulated in the blood on timescales comparable to control PLGA-PEG NPs. In the second part, we used PLGA-PLH-PEG-based NPs to design a prophylactic vaccine against the obligate intracellular bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis, the most common cause of bacterial STD in the world. Currently, no vaccines against this pathogen are approved for use in humans. We first formulated NPs encapsulating the TLR7 agonist R848 conjugated to poly(lactic acid) (R848-PLA

  19. Screening and characterization of phosphate solubilizing bacteria from isolate of thermophilic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yulianti, Evy; Rakhmawati, Anna

    2017-08-01

    The aims of this study were to select bacteria that has the ability to dissolve phosphate from thermophilic bacteria isolates after the Merapi eruption. Five isolates of selected bacteria was characterized and continued with identification. Selection was done by using a pikovskaya selective medium. Bacterial isolates were grown in selective medium and incubated for 48 hours at temperature of 55 ° C. Characterization was done by looking at the cell and colony morphology, physiological and biochemical properties. Identification was done with the Profile Matching method based on the reference genus Oscillospira traced through Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology. Dendogram was created based on similarity index SSM. The results showed there were 14 isolates of bacteria that were able to dissolve phosphate indicated by a clear zone surrounding the bacterial colony on selective media. Five isolates were selected with the largest clear zone. Isolates D79, D92, D110a, D135 and D75 have different characters. The result of phenotypic characters identification with Genus Oscillospira profile has a percentage of 100% similarity to isolate D92 and D110a; 92.31% for isolates D79, and 84.6% for isolates D75 and D135. Dendogram generated from average linkage algorithm / UPGMA using the Simple Matching Coefficient (SSM) algorithms showed, isolate thermophilic bacteria D75 and D135 are combined together to form cluster 1. D110a and D92 form a sub cluster A. Sub cluster A and D79 form cluster 2

  20. Population of Nitrifying Bacteria and Nitrification in Ammonium Saturated Clinoptilolite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, Douglas W.; Gruener, J.

    1999-01-01

    As humans begin to spend longer periods of time in space, plants will be incorporated into life support systems. Ammonium saturated clinoptilolite is one plant growth substrate but a balance between ammonium and nitrate is needed. A laboratory study was conducted to determine effects of nitrifying bacteria on ammonium concentrations and kinetics of nitrification. Columns containing clinoptilolite substrate amended with nitrifying bacteria obtained from soil enrichment were analyzed weekly for a 90 day period. The enrichment culture initially contained 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria and 1 x 10(exp 2) nitrite oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate. Populations of ammonium oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 6) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria increased to 1 x 10(exp 3) per gram of substrate. The nitrification rate was approximately 0.25mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Experiments were also conducted to enumerate nitrifying bacteria in a clinoptilolite substrate used to grow wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Seventy days following the initial inoculation with an unknown number of commercial nitrifying bacteria, 1 x 10(exp 5) ammonium oxidizing bacteria per gram of substrate were present. The number of nitrite oxidizing bacteria was between 1 x 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) per gram of substrate as measured by the most probable number method. Nitrification rates were approximately 0.20mg NO3(-)-N/kg.hr. Clinoptilolite readily exchanged sufficient concentrations of ammonium to support nitrifying bacteria and they survived well in this medium.

  1. Screening and biological characteristics of fufenozide degrading bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chenhao; Gong, Mingfu; Guan, Qinlan; Deng, Xia; Deng, Hongyan; Huang, Jiao

    2018-04-01

    Fufenozide was a novel pesticide for the control of Lepidoptera pests, which was highly toxic to silkworm. Fufenozide-contaminated soil samples were collected and the bacteria that degrade fufenozide were isolated and screened by selective medium. The colony characteristics, cell characteristics and degradation characteristics in different concentrations fufenozide of the fufenozide degrading bacteria were studied. The results indicated that seven strains of fufenozide degradeing bacteria, named as DDH01, DDH03, DDH04, DDH04, DDH05, DDH07 and DDH07 respectively, were isolated from soil contaminated with fufenozide. DDH01, DDH02, DDH04 and DDH05 of seven fufenozide degrading bacteria, was gram-positive bacteria, and DDH03, DDH06 and DDH07 was gram-negative bacteria. All of seven strains of fufenozide degrading bacteria were not spores, weeks flagella, rod-shaped bacteria. DDH06 and DDH07 had capsules, and the remaining five strains had not capsule. The colonies formed by seven strains of fufenozide degradation bacteria on beef extract peptone medium plate were milky white colonies with irregular edges, thinner lawn, smaller colony with smooth surface. The growth of 7 strains of fufenozide degradation bacteria was significantly affected by the concentration of fufenozide, All of 7 strains grown in the range from 0.00025 g/mL to 1 g/mL of 10% fufenozide suspension. DDH2 was the best among the 7 strains of fufenozide degrading bacteria grown in 10% fufenozide suspension medium.

  2. Bacteria-bacteria interactions within the microbiota of the ancestral metazoan Hydra contribute to fungal resistance.

    PubMed

    Fraune, Sebastian; Anton-Erxleben, Friederike; Augustin, René; Franzenburg, Sören; Knop, Mirjam; Schröder, Katja; Willoweit-Ohl, Doris; Bosch, Thomas C G

    2015-07-01

    Epithelial surfaces of most animals are colonized by diverse microbial communities. Although it is generally agreed that commensal bacteria can serve beneficial functions, the processes involved are poorly understood. Here we report that in the basal metazoan Hydra, ectodermal epithelial cells are covered with a multilayered glycocalyx that provides a habitat for a distinctive microbial community. Removing this epithelial microbiota results in lethal infection by the filamentous fungus Fusarium sp. Restoring the complex microbiota in gnotobiotic polyps prevents pathogen infection. Although mono-associations with distinct members of the microbiota fail to provide full protection, additive and synergistic interactions of commensal bacteria are contributing to full fungal resistance. Our results highlight the importance of resident microbiota diversity as a protective factor against pathogen infections. Besides revealing insights into the in vivo function of commensal microbes in Hydra, our findings indicate that interactions among commensal bacteria are essential to inhibit pathogen infection.

  3. Fluorescence Characterization of Clinically-Important Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Roberts, Tom A.; Moore, Ginny; Ward, John M.; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAI/HAI) represent a substantial threat to patient health during hospitalization and incur billions of dollars additional cost for subsequent treatment. One promising method for the detection of bacterial contamination in a clinical setting before an HAI outbreak occurs is to exploit native fluorescence of cellular molecules for a hand-held, rapid-sweep surveillance instrument. Previous studies have shown fluorescence-based detection to be sensitive and effective for food-borne and environmental microorganisms, and even to be able to distinguish between cell types, but this powerful technique has not yet been deployed on the macroscale for the primary surveillance of contamination in healthcare facilities to prevent HAI. Here we report experimental data for the specification and design of such a fluorescence-based detection instrument. We have characterized the complete fluorescence response of eleven clinically-relevant bacteria by generating excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) over broad wavelength ranges. Furthermore, a number of surfaces and items of equipment commonly present on a ward, and potentially responsible for pathogen transfer, have been analyzed for potential issues of background fluorescence masking the signal from contaminant bacteria. These include bedside handrails, nurse call button, blood pressure cuff and ward computer keyboard, as well as disinfectant cleaning products and microfiber cloth. All examined bacterial strains exhibited a distinctive double-peak fluorescence feature associated with tryptophan with no other cellular fluorophore detected. Thus, this fluorescence survey found that an emission peak of 340nm, from an excitation source at 280nm, was the cellular fluorescence signal to target for detection of bacterial contamination. The majority of materials analysed offer a spectral window through which bacterial contamination could indeed be detected. A few instances were found of potential problems

  4. Fluorescence characterization of clinically-important bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Roberts, Tom A; Moore, Ginny; Ward, John M; Muller, Jan-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAI/HAI) represent a substantial threat to patient health during hospitalization and incur billions of dollars additional cost for subsequent treatment. One promising method for the detection of bacterial contamination in a clinical setting before an HAI outbreak occurs is to exploit native fluorescence of cellular molecules for a hand-held, rapid-sweep surveillance instrument. Previous studies have shown fluorescence-based detection to be sensitive and effective for food-borne and environmental microorganisms, and even to be able to distinguish between cell types, but this powerful technique has not yet been deployed on the macroscale for the primary surveillance of contamination in healthcare facilities to prevent HAI. Here we report experimental data for the specification and design of such a fluorescence-based detection instrument. We have characterized the complete fluorescence response of eleven clinically-relevant bacteria by generating excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) over broad wavelength ranges. Furthermore, a number of surfaces and items of equipment commonly present on a ward, and potentially responsible for pathogen transfer, have been analyzed for potential issues of background fluorescence masking the signal from contaminant bacteria. These include bedside handrails, nurse call button, blood pressure cuff and ward computer keyboard, as well as disinfectant cleaning products and microfiber cloth. All examined bacterial strains exhibited a distinctive double-peak fluorescence feature associated with tryptophan with no other cellular fluorophore detected. Thus, this fluorescence survey found that an emission peak of 340nm, from an excitation source at 280nm, was the cellular fluorescence signal to target for detection of bacterial contamination. The majority of materials analysed offer a spectral window through which bacterial contamination could indeed be detected. A few instances were found of potential problems

  5. Do foliar endophytic bacteria fix nitrogen?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, L. M.; Moyes, A. B.; Frank, C.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Carper, D.; Vandehey, N.; O'Neil, J.; Dekas, A.

    2015-12-01

    Endophytic microorganisms - bacteria and fungi that live inside healthy plant tissue - are a relatively unexplored source of functional diversity in natural ecosystems. Prior to modern sequencing technology, detecting uncultured endophytic bacteria and assessing their putative functions was challenging. However, recent work has revealed a remarkable diversity of as yet non-culturable endophytic taxa and is beginning to identify functional roles within plant microbiomes. We recently examined bacterial communities in the foliage of a long-lived, high-elevation conifer species, limber pine (Pinus flexilis), and discovered a community strongly dominated by acetic acid bacteria (Acetobacteraceae), with several taxa closely related to known nitrogen fixers. Given limber pine's status as a pioneer species that is able to grow in low fertility soils, we hypothesized that this bacterial community has a potential functional role in fixing atmospheric nitrogen, providing a source of this limiting nutrient to the host tree. We used the radioisotope 13N2 to confirm that N2 rapidly diffuses into pine needles, where it could potentially be fixed. With an acetylene reduction assay we confirmed nitrogenase enzyme activity inside excised twigs 4 times over a growing season, and estimate potential rates of N2 fixation at 0.1 nmol N2 g needle-1 hr-1. Scaled to the stand level, this N input could be on the order of ~20 mg N m-2 d-1 over a growing season. While these rates are low, the long lifespan of individual trees (~1000 years) makes them biologically meaningful. Still, measured rates of acetylene reduction and bulk 15N2 incorporation are quite variable in space and time. Much work remains to better characterize the plant-microbial interactions in this system, including the rates of nitrogen fixation and their variability over the growing season, across edaphic conditions, among host species, and through plant development; and to determine which community members are responsible

  6. Clay-Bacteria Systems and Biofilm Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, J.; Alimova, A.; Katz, A.; Steiner, N.; Rudolph, E.; Gottlieb, P.

    2007-12-01

    Soil clots and the aerosol transport of bacteria and spores are promoted by the formation of biofilms (bacteria cells in an extracellular polymeric matrix). Biofilms protect microorganisms by promoting adhesion to both organic and inorganic surfaces. Time series experiments on bacteria-clay suspensions demonstrate that biofilm growth is catalyzed by the presence of hectorite in minimal growth media for the studied species: Gram negatives (Pseudomonas syringae and Escherichia coli,) and Gram positives (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilis). Soil organisms (P. syringae, B. subtilis) and organisms found in the human population (E. coli, S. aureus) are both used to demonstrate the general applicability of clay involvement. Fluorescent images of the biofilms are acquired by staining with propidium iodide, a component of the BacLightTM Live/Dead bacterial viability staining kit (Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR). The evolving polysaccharide-rich biofilm reacts with the clay interlayer site causing a complex substitution of the two-water hectorite interlayer with polysaccharide. The result is often a three-peak composite of the (001) x-ray diffraction maxima resulting from polysaccharide-expanded clays and an organic-driven contraction of a subset of the clays in the reaction medium. X-ray diffractograms reveal that the expanded set creates a broad maximum with clay subsets at 1.84 nm and 1.41 nm interlayer spacings as approximated by a least squares double Lorentzian fit, and a smaller shoulder at larger 2q, deriving from a contraction of the interlayer spacing. Washing with chlorox removes organic material from the contracted clay and creates a 1-water hectorite single peak in place of the double peak. The clay response can be used as an indirect indicator of biofilm in an environmental system.

  7. Diversity of Bacteria at Healthy Human Conjunctiva

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qunfeng; Brulc, Jennifer M.; Iovieno, Alfonso; Bates, Brandon; Garoutte, Aaron; Miller, Darlene; Revanna, Kashi V.; Gao, Xiang; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Slepak, Vladlen Z.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Ocular surface (OS) microbiota contributes to infectious and autoimmune diseases of the eye. Comprehensive analysis of microbial diversity at the OS has been impossible because of the limitations of conventional cultivation techniques. This pilot study aimed to explore true diversity of human OS microbiota using DNA sequencing-based detection and identification of bacteria. Methods. Composition of the bacterial community was characterized using deep sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene amplicon libraries generated from total conjunctival swab DNA. The DNA sequences were classified and the diversity parameters measured using bioinformatics software ESPRIT and MOTHUR and tools available through the Ribosomal Database Project-II (RDP-II). Results. Deep sequencing of conjunctival rDNA from four subjects yielded a total of 115,003 quality DNA reads, corresponding to 221 species-level phylotypes per subject. The combined bacterial community classified into 5 phyla and 59 distinct genera. However, 31% of all DNA reads belonged to unclassified or novel bacteria. The intersubject variability of individual OS microbiomes was very significant. Regardless, 12 genera—Pseudomonas, Propionibacterium, Bradyrhizobium, Corynebacterium, Acinetobacter, Brevundimonas, Staphylococci, Aquabacterium, Sphingomonas, Streptococcus, Streptophyta, and Methylobacterium—were ubiquitous among the analyzed cohort and represented the putative “core” of conjunctival microbiota. The other 47 genera accounted for <4% of the classified portion of this microbiome. Unexpectedly, healthy conjunctiva contained many genera that are commonly identified as ocular surface pathogens. Conclusions. The first DNA sequencing-based survey of bacterial population at the conjunctiva have revealed an unexpectedly diverse microbial community. All analyzed samples contained ubiquitous (core) genera that included commensal, environmental, and opportunistic pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21571682

  8. Close Encounters of Lymphoid Cells and Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Adalia, Aranzazu; Veiga, Esteban

    2016-01-01

    During infections, the first reaction of the host against microbial pathogens is carried out by innate immune cells, which recognize conserved structures on pathogens, called pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Afterward, some of these innate cells can phagocytose and destroy the pathogens, secreting cytokines that would modulate the immune response to the challenge. This rapid response is normally followed by the adaptive immunity, more specific and essential for a complete pathogen clearance in many cases. Some innate immune cells, usually named antigen-presenting cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, are able to process internalized invaders and present their antigens to lymphocytes, triggering the adaptive immune response. Nevertheless, the traditional boundary of separated roles between innate and adaptive immunity has been blurred by several studies, showing that very specialized populations of lymphocytes (cells of the adaptive immunity) behave similarly to cells of the innate immunity. These “innate-like” lymphocytes include γδ T cells, invariant NKT cells, B-1 cells, mucosal-associated invariant T cells, marginal zone B cells, and innate response activator cells, and together with the newly described innate lymphoid cells are able to rapidly respond to bacterial infections. Strikingly, our recent data suggest that conventional CD4+ T cells, the paradigm of cells of the adaptive immunity, also present innate-like behavior, capturing bacteria in a process called transinfection. Transinfected CD4+ T cells digest internalized bacteria like professional phagocytes and secrete large amounts of proinflammatory cytokines, protecting for further bacterial challenges. In the present review, we will focus on the data showing such innate-like behavior of lymphocytes following bacteria encounter. PMID:27774092

  9. Freeing Water from Viruses and Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Four years ago, Argonide Corporation, a company focused on the research, production, and marketing of specialty nano materials, was seeking to develop applications for its NanoCeram[R] fibers. Only 2 nanometers in diameter, these nano aluminum oxide fibers possessed unusual bio-adhesive properties. When formulated into a filter material, the electropositive fibers attracted and retained electro-negative particles such as bacteria and viruses in water-based solutions. This technology caught the interest of NASA as a possible solution for improved water filtration in space cabins. NASA's Johnson Space Center awarded Sanford, Florida-based Argonide a Phase I Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to determine the feasibility of using the company's filter for purifying recycled space cabin water. Since viruses and bacteria can be carried aboard space cabins by space crews, the ability to detect and remove these harmful substances is a concern for NASA. The Space Agency also desired an improved filter to polish the effluent from condensed and waste water, producing potable drinking water. During its Phase I partnership with NASA, Argonide developed a laboratory-size filter capable of removing greater than 99.9999 percent of bacteria and viruses from water at flow rates more than 200 times faster than virus-rated membranes that remove particles by sieving. Since the new filter s pore size is rather large compared to other membranes, it is also less susceptible to clogging by small particles. In September 2002, Argonide began a Phase II SBIR project with Johnson to develop a full-size cartridge capable of serving a full space crew. This effort, which is still ongoing, enabled the company to demonstrate that its filter media is an efficient absorbent for DNA and RNA.

  10. Migration of magnetotactic bacteria in porous media.

    PubMed

    Rismani Yazi, Saeed; Nosrati, Reza; Stevens, Corey A; Vogel, David; Escobedo, Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) migrate in complex porous sediments where fluid flow is ubiquitous. Here, we demonstrate that magnetotaxis enables MTB to migrate effectively through porous micromodels. Directed MTB can circumvent curved obstacles by traveling along the boundaries and pass flat obstacles by repeatedly switching between forward and backward runs. Magnetotaxis enables directed motion of MTB through heterogeneous porous media, overcoming tortuous flow fields with local velocities as high as 250  μ m s -1 . Our findings bring new insights into the migration behaviour of MTB in their natural habitats and their potential in vivo applications as microbiorobots.

  11. THE TOTAL LUMINOUS EFFICIENCY OF LUMINOUS BACTERIA

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, E. Newton

    1925-01-01

    Methods are described for measuring the light emitted by an emulsion of luminous bacteria of given thickness, and calculating the light emitted by a single bacterium, measuring 1.1 x 2.2 micra, provided there is no absorption of light in the emulsion. At the same time, the oxygen consumed by a single bacterium was measured by recording the time for the bacteria to use up .9 of the oxygen dissolved in sea water from air (20 per cent oxygen). The luminescence intensity does not diminish until the oxygen concentration falls below 2 per cent, when the luminescence diminishes rapidly. Above 2 per cent oxygen (when the oxygen dissolving in sea water from pure oxygen at 760 mm. Hg pressure = 100 per cent) the bacteria use equal amounts of oxygen in equal times, while below 2 per cent oxygen it seems very likely that rate of oxygen absorption is proportional to oxygen concentration. By measuring the time for a tube of luminous bacteria of known concentration saturated with air (20 per cent oxygen) to begin to darken (2 per cent oxygen) we can calculate the oxygen absorbed by one bacterium per second. The bacteria per cc. are counted on a blood counting slide or by a centrifugal method, after measuring the volume of a single bacterium (1.695 x 10–12 cc.). Both methods gave results in good agreement with each other. The maximum value for the light from a single bacterium was 24 x 10–14 lumens or 1.9 x 10–14 candles. The maximum value for lumen-seconds per mg. of oxygen absorbed was 14. The average value for lumen-seconds per mg. O2 was 9.25. The maximum values were selected in calculating the efficiency of light production, since some of the bacteria counted may not be producing light, although they may still be using oxygen. The "diet" of the bacteria was 60 per cent glycerol and 40 per cent peptone. To oxidize this mixture each mg. of oxygen would yield 3.38 gm. calories or 14.1 watts per second. 1 lumen per watt is therefore produced by a normal bacterium which

  12. Modeling Transformation and Conjugation in Bacteria Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, John; Dong, J. J.

    The rise of antibiotic resistance in bacteria populations is a growing threat to medical treatment of diseases. Transformation, where a cell absorbs a plasmid from its environment, and conjugation, direct transfer of a plasmid from one cell to another, are the two main mechanisms of emergence of antibiotic resistance. We model the processes using a combined approach of Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation and differential equations to describe the plasmid-carrying and plasmid-free populations. Through analysis of our results, we characterize the conditions that lead to dominance of the antibiotic resistant population. NSF-DMR #1248387.

  13. Small but Mighty: Cell Size and Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Levin, Petra Anne; Angert, Esther R

    2015-06-08

    Our view of bacteria is overwhelmingly shaped by their diminutive nature. The most ancient of organisms, their very presence was not appreciated until the 17th century with the invention of the microscope. Initially, viewed as "bags of enzymes," recent advances in imaging, molecular phylogeny, and, most recently, genomics have revealed incredible diversity within this previously invisible realm of life. Here, we review the impact of size on bacterial evolution, physiology, and morphogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  14. Envelope Structures of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Mithila; Walker, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Gram-positive organisms, including the pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterococcus faecalis, have dynamic cell envelopes that mediate interactions with the environment and serve as the first line of defense against toxic molecules. Major components of the cell envelope include peptidoglycan, which is a well-established target for antibiotics, teichoic acids, capsular polysaccharides, surface proteins, and phospholipids. These components can undergo modification to promote pathogenesis, decrease susceptibility to antibiotics and host immune defenses, and enhance survival in hostile environments. This chapter will cover the structure, biosynthesis and important functions of major cell envelope components in Gram-positive bacteria. Possible targets for new antimicrobials will be noted. PMID:26919863

  15. Nitrate reduction in sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Marietou, Angeliki

    2016-08-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRBs) gain their energy by coupling the oxidation of organic substrate to the reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Several SRBs are able to use alternative terminal electron acceptors to sulfate such as nitrate. Nitrate-reducing SRBs have been isolated from a diverse range of environments. In order to be able to understand the significance of nitrate reduction in SRBs, we need to examine the ecology and physiology of the nitrate-reducing SRB isolates. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Polymorphic transformation of helical flagella of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sookkyung; Howard Berg Collaboration; William Ko Collaboration; Yongsam Kim Collaboration; Wanho Lee Collaboration; Charles Peskin Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria such as E. coli swim in an aqueous environment by utilizing the rotation of flagellar motors and alternate two modes of motility, runs and tumbles. Runs are steady forward swimming driven by bundles of flagellar filaments whose motors are turning CCW; tumbles involve a reorientation of the direction of swimming triggered by motor reversals. During tumbling, the helical flagellum undergoes polymorphic transformations, which is a local change in helical pitch, helical radius, and handedness. In this work, we investigate the underlying mechanism of structural conformation and how this polymorphic transition plays a role in bacterial swimming. National Science Foundation.

  17. Ethylene-producing bacteria that ripen fruit.

    PubMed

    Digiacomo, Fabio; Girelli, Gabriele; Aor, Bruno; Marchioretti, Caterina; Pedrotti, Michele; Perli, Thomas; Tonon, Emil; Valentini, Viola; Avi, Damiano; Ferrentino, Giovanna; Dorigato, Andrea; Torre, Paola; Jousson, Olivier; Mansy, Sheref S; Del Bianco, Cristina

    2014-12-19

    Ethylene is a plant hormone widely used to ripen fruit. However, the synthesis, handling, and storage of ethylene are environmentally harmful and dangerous. We engineered E. coli to produce ethylene through the activity of the ethylene-forming enzyme (EFE) from Pseudomonas syringae. EFE converts a citric acid cycle intermediate, 2-oxoglutarate, to ethylene in a single step. The production of ethylene was placed under the control of arabinose and blue light responsive regulatory systems. The resulting bacteria were capable of accelerating the ripening of tomatoes, kiwifruit, and apples.

  18. Persistent and susceptible bacteria with individual deaths.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Fabio

    2014-02-21

    The aim of this paper is to study two models for a bacterial population subject to antibiotic treatments. It is known that some bacteria are not sensitive to antibiotics. These bacteria, called persisters, are in a state called persistence and each bacterium can switch from this state to a non-persistent (or susceptible) state and back (with rates b and a respectively). Our models extend those introduced in Garet et al. (2012) by adding a random natural life cycle for each bacterium and by allowing bacteria in the susceptible state to escape the action of the antibiotic with a fixed probability 1-p (while every bacterium in a persistent state survives with probability 1). This last mechanism of survival to the antibiotics differs from the persistent state one (where reproduction is forbidden) since in this case the bacterium can replicate. We study two different models. In the first model we "inject" the antibiotics in the system at fixed, deterministic times while in the second one the time intervals are random. We show that, in order to kill eventually the whole bacterial population, these time intervals cannot be "too large". The maximum admissible length is increasing with respect to p; we see that even when p is close to 1, this interval length can be significantly smaller than in the case p=1. While in the case p=1 switching back and forth to the persistent state is the only chance of surviving for bacteria, when p<1 and the death rate in the persistent state, say dr, is positive then the situation is more complex. In this case our model suggests that if dr and b are positive (and fixed) then for higher values of p there is an interval for the rate a, say (0,ap) where switching to the persistent state is a good strategy while for a>ap the situation is less favorable than a=0. On the other hand, for smaller values of p the best strategy is a=0, that is, not switching. Finally, when dr=0, switching to the susceptible state is always a better strategy, from the

  19. The Interaction between Heterotrophic Bacteria and Coliform, Fecal Coliform, Fecal Streptococci Bacteria in the Water Supply Networks.

    PubMed

    Amanidaz, Nazak; Zafarzadeh, Ali; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and coliform, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria in water supply networks. This study was conducted during 2013 on water supply distribution network in Aq Qala City, Golestan Province, Northern Iran and standard methods were applied for microbiological analysis. The surface method was applied to test the heterotrophic bacteria and MPN method was used for coliform, fecal coliform and fecal streptococci bacteria measurements. In 114 samples, heterotrophic bacteria count were over 500 CFU/ml, which the amount of fecal coliform, coliform, and fecal streptococci were 8, 32, and 20 CFU/100 ml, respectively. However, in the other 242 samples, with heterotrophic bacteria count being less than 500 CFU/ml, the amount of fecal coliform, coliform, and fecal streptococci was 7, 23, and 11 CFU/100ml, respectively. The relationship between heterotrophic bacteria, coliforms and fecal streptococci was highly significant (P<0.05). We observed the concentration of coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria being high, whenever the concentration of heterotrophic bacteria in the water network systems was high. Interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and coliform, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria in the Aq Qala City water supply networks was not notable. It can be due to high concentrations of organic carbon, bio-films and nutrients, which are necessary for growth, and survival of all microorganisms.

  20. The Interaction between Heterotrophic Bacteria and Coliform, Fecal Coliform, Fecal Streptococci Bacteria in the Water Supply Networks

    PubMed Central

    AMANIDAZ, Nazak; ZAFARZADEH, Ali; MAHVI, Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study investigated the interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and coliform, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria in water supply networks. Methods: This study was conducted during 2013 on water supply distribution network in Aq Qala City, Golestan Province, Northern Iran and standard methods were applied for microbiological analysis. The surface method was applied to test the heterotrophic bacteria and MPN method was used for coliform, fecal coliform and fecal streptococci bacteria measurements. Results: In 114 samples, heterotrophic bacteria count were over 500 CFU/ml, which the amount of fecal coliform, coliform, and fecal streptococci were 8, 32, and 20 CFU/100 ml, respectively. However, in the other 242 samples, with heterotrophic bacteria count being less than 500 CFU/ml, the amount of fecal coliform, coliform, and fecal streptococci was 7, 23, and 11 CFU/100ml, respectively. The relationship between heterotrophic bacteria, coliforms and fecal streptococci was highly significant (P<0.05). We observed the concentration of coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria being high, whenever the concentration of heterotrophic bacteria in the water network systems was high. Conclusion: Interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and coliform, fecal coliforms, fecal streptococci bacteria in the Aq Qala City water supply networks was not notable. It can be due to high concentrations of organic carbon, bio-films and nutrients, which are necessary for growth, and survival of all microorganisms. PMID:26811820

  1. Bacteria in atmospheric waters: Detection, characteristics and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wei; Niu, Hongya; Murata, Kotaro; Wu, Zhijun; Hu, Min; Kojima, Tomoko; Zhang, Daizhou

    2018-04-01

    In this review paper, we synthesize the current knowledges about bacteria in atmospheric waters, e.g., cloud, fog, rain, and snow, most of which were obtained very recently. First, we briefly describe the importance of bacteria in atmospheric waters, i.e., the essentiality of studying bacteria in atmospheric waters in understanding aerosol-cloud-precipitation-climate interactions in the Earth system. Next, approaches to collect atmospheric water samples for the detection of bacteria and methods to identify the bacteria are summarized and compared. Then the available data on the abundance, viability and community composition of bacteria in atmospheric waters are summarized. The average bacterial concentration in cloud water was usually on the order 104-105 cells mL-1, while that in precipitation on the order 103-104 cells mL-1. Most of the bacteria were viable or metabolically active. Their community composition was highly diverse and differed at various sites. Factors potentially influencing the bacteria, e.g., air pollution levels and sources, meteorological conditions, seasonal effect, and physicochemical properties of atmospheric waters, are described. After that, the implications of bacteria present in atmospheric waters, including their effect on nucleation in clouds, atmospheric chemistry, ecosystems and public health, are briefly discussed. Finally, based on the current knowledges on bacteria in atmospheric waters, which in fact remains largely unknown, we give perspectives that should be paid attention to in future studies.

  2. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  3. Bioactivation of Phytoestrogens: Intestinal Bacteria and Health.

    PubMed

    Landete, J M; Arqués, J; Medina, M; Gaya, P; de Las Rivas, B; Muñoz, R

    2016-08-17

    Phytoestrogens are polyphenols similar to human estrogens found in plants or derived from plant precursors. Phytoestrogens are found in high concentration in soya, flaxseed and other seeds, fruits, vegetables, cereals, tea, chocolate, etc. They comprise several classes of chemical compounds (stilbenes, coumestans, isoflavones, ellagitannins, and lignans) which are structurally similar to endogenous estrogens but which can have both estrogenic and antiestrogenic effects. Although epidemiological and experimental evidence indicates that intake of phytoestrogens in foods may be protective against certain chronic diseases, discrepancies have been observed between in vivo and in vitro experiments. The microbial transformations have not been reported so far in stilbenes and coumestans. However, isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans are metabolized by intestinal bacteria to produce equol, urolithins, and enterolignans, respectively. Equol, urolithin, and enterolignans are more bioavailable, and have more estrogenic/antiestrogenic and antioxidant activity than their precursors. Moreover, equol, urolithins and enterolignans have anti-inflammatory effects and induce antiproliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities. The transformation of isoflavones, ellagitanins, and lignans by intestinal microbiota is essential to be protective against certain chronic diseases, as cancer, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and menopausal symptoms. Bioavailability, bioactivity, and health effects of dietary phytoestrogens are strongly determined by the intestinal bacteria of each individual.

  4. Phototargeting oral black-pigmented bacteria.

    PubMed

    Soukos, Nikolaos S; Som, Sovanda; Abernethy, Abraham D; Ruggiero, Karriann; Dunham, Joshua; Lee, Chul; Doukas, Apostolos G; Goodson, J Max

    2005-04-01

    We have found that broadband light (380 to 520 nm) rapidly and selectively kills oral black-pigmented bacteria (BPB) in pure cultures and in dental plaque samples obtained from human subjects with chronic periodontitis. We hypothesize that this killing effect is a result of light excitation of their endogenous porphyrins. Cultures of Prevotella intermedia and P. nigrescens were killed by 4.2 J/cm2, whereas P. melaninogenica required 21 J/cm2. Exposure to light with a fluence of 42 J/cm2 produced 99% killing of P. gingivalis. High-performance liquid chromatography demonstrated the presence of various amounts of different porphyrin molecules in BPB. The amounts of endogenous porphyrin in BPB were 267 (P. intermedia), 47 (P. nigrescens), 41 (P. melaninogenica), and 2.2 (P. gingivalis) ng/mg. Analysis of bacteria in dental plaque samples by DNA-DNA hybridization for 40 taxa before and after phototherapy showed that the growth of the four BPB was decreased by 2 and 3 times after irradiation at energy fluences of 4.2 and 21 J/cm2, respectively, whereas the growth of the remaining 36 microorganisms was decreased by 1.5 times at both energy fluences. The present study suggests that intraoral light exposure may be used to control BPB growth and possibly benefit patients with periodontal disease.

  5. Phototargeting Oral Black-Pigmented Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Soukos, Nikolaos S.; Som, Sovanda; Abernethy, Abraham D.; Ruggiero, Karriann; Dunham, Joshua; Lee, Chul; Doukas, Apostolos G.; Goodson, J. Max

    2005-01-01

    We have found that broadband light (380 to 520 nm) rapidly and selectively kills oral black-pigmented bacteria (BPB) in pure cultures and in dental plaque samples obtained from human subjects with chronic periodontitis. We hypothesize that this killing effect is a result of light excitation of their endogenous porphyrins. Cultures of Prevotella intermedia and P. nigrescens were killed by 4.2 J/cm2, whereas P. melaninogenica required 21 J/cm2. Exposure to light with a fluence of 42 J/cm2 produced 99% killing of P. gingivalis. High-performance liquid chromatography demonstrated the presence of various amounts of different porphyrin molecules in BPB. The amounts of endogenous porphyrin in BPB were 267 (P. intermedia), 47 (P. nigrescens), 41 (P. melaninogenica), and 2.2 (P. gingivalis) ng/mg. Analysis of bacteria in dental plaque samples by DNA-DNA hybridization for 40 taxa before and after phototherapy showed that the growth of the four BPB was decreased by 2 and 3 times after irradiation at energy fluences of 4.2 and 21 J/cm2, respectively, whereas the growth of the remaining 36 microorganisms was decreased by 1.5 times at both energy fluences. The present study suggests that intraoral light exposure may be used to control BPB growth and possibly benefit patients with periodontal disease. PMID:15793117

  6. The predominant bacteria isolated from radicular cysts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To detect predominant bacteria associated with radicular cysts and discuss in light of the literature. Material and methods Clinical materials were obtained from 35 radicular cysts by aspiration. Cultures were made from clinical materials by modern laboratory techniques, they underwent microbiologic analysis. Results The following are microorganisms isolated from cultures: Streptococcus milleri Group (SMG) (23.8%) [Streptococcus constellatus (19.1%) and Streptococcus anginosus (4.7%)], Streptococcus sanguis (14.3%), Streptococcus mitis (4.7%), Streptococcus cremoris (4.7%), Peptostreptococcus pevotii (4.7%), Prevotella buccae (4.7%), Prevotella intermedia (4.7%), Actinomyces meyeri (4.7%), Actinomyces viscosus (4.7%), Propionibacterium propionicum (4.7%), Bacteroides capillosus (4.7%), Staphylococcus hominis (4.7%), Rothia denticariosa (4.7%), Gemella haemolysans (4.7%), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (4.7%). Conclusions Results of this study demonstrated that radicular cysts show a great variety of anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacterial flora. It was observed that all isolated microorganisms were the types commonly found in oral flora. Although no specific microorganism was found, Streptococcus spp. bacteria (47.5%) – especially SMG (23.8%) – were predominantly found in the microorganisms isolated. Furthermore, radicular cysts might be polymicrobial originated. Although radicular cyst is an inflammatory cyst, some radicular cyst fluids might be sterile. PMID:24011184

  7. Magnetotactic bacteria and magnetosomes - Scope and challenges.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Jobin John; Suthindhiran, K

    2016-11-01

    Geomagnetism aided navigation has been demonstrated by certain organisms which allows them to identify a particular location using magnetic field. This attractive technique to recognize the course was earlier exhibited in numerous animals, for example, birds, insects, reptiles, fishes and mammals. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are one of the best examples for magnetoreception among microorganisms as the magnetic mineral functions as an internal magnet and aid the microbe to move towards the water columns in an oxic-anoxic interface (OAI). The ability of MTB to biomineralize the magnetic particles (magnetosomes) into uniform nano-sized, highly crystalline structure with uniform magnetic properties has made the bacteria an important topic of research. The superior properties of magnetosomes over chemically synthesized magnetic nanoparticles made it an attractive candidate for potential applications in microbiology, biophysics, biochemistry, nanotechnology and biomedicine. In this review article, the scope of MTB, magnetosomes and its challenges in research and industrial application have been discussed in brief. This article mainly focuses on the application based on the magnetotactic behaviour of MTB and magnetosomes in different areas of modern science. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Long-term preservation of anammox bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rothrock, Michael J; Vanotti, Matias B; Szögi, Ariel A; Gonzalez, Maria Cruz Garcia; Fujii, Takao

    2011-10-01

    Deposit of useful microorganisms in culture collections requires long-term preservation and successful reactivation techniques. The goal of this study was to develop a simple preservation protocol for the long-term storage and reactivation of the anammox biomass. To achieve this, anammox biomass was frozen or lyophilized at two different freezing temperatures (-60°C and in liquid nitrogen (-200°C)) in skim milk media (with and without glycerol), and the reactivation of anammox activity was monitored after a 4-month storage period. Of the different preservation treatments tested, only anammox biomass preserved via freezing in liquid nitrogen followed by lyophilization in skim milk media without glycerol achieved stoichiometric ratios for the anammox reaction similar to the biomass in both the parent bioreactor and in the freshly harvested control treatment. A freezing temperature of -60°C alone, or in conjunction with lyophilization, resulted in the partial recovery of the anammox bacteria, with an equal mixture of anammox and nitrifying bacteria in the reactivated biomass. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the successful reactivation of anammox biomass preserved via sub-zero freezing and/or lyophilization. The simple preservation protocol developed from this study could be beneficial to accelerate the integration of anammox-based processes into current treatment systems through a highly efficient starting anammox biomass.

  9. Insects as alternative hosts for phytopathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nadarasah, Geetanchaly; Stavrinides, John

    2011-05-01

    Phytopathogens have evolved specialized pathogenicity determinants that enable them to colonize their specific plant hosts and cause disease, but their intimate associations with plants also predispose them to frequent encounters with herbivorous insects, providing these phytopathogens with ample opportunity to colonize and eventually evolve alternative associations with insects. Decades of research have revealed that these associations have resulted in the formation of bacterial-vector relationships, in which the insect mediates dissemination of the plant pathogen. Emerging research, however, has highlighted the ability of plant pathogenic bacteria to use insects as alternative hosts, exploiting them as they would their primary plant host. The identification of specific bacterial genetic determinants that mediate the interaction between bacterium and insect suggests that these interactions are not incidental, but have likely arisen following the repeated association of microorganisms with particular insects over evolutionary time. This review will address the biology and ecology of phytopathogenic bacteria that interact with insects, including the traditional role of insects as vectors, as well as the newly emerging paradigm of insects serving as alternative primary hosts. Also discussed is one case where an insect serves as both host and vector, which may represent a transitionary stage in the evolution of insect-phytopathogen associations. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Effect of tigecycline on selected multiresistant bacteria].

    PubMed

    Kolár, Milan; Hanulík, Vojtech; Chromá, Magdalena

    2009-02-01

    Currently, one of the most serious problems in medicine is the increasing resistance of pathogenic bacteria to antimicrobial drugs. Bacterial resistance may potentially be solved in particular by decreasing the consumption of antibiotics and increasing the quality of their use. Equally important, however, is the development of new antimicrobial drugs and their use in clinical practice. One of the new antibiotic agents is tigecycline of the glycylcycline group. The presented work aimed at assessing its in vitro effect on selected multiresistant bacteria. Clinical samples were collected from patients hospitalized in the University Hospital Olomouc to isolate ESBL- and AmpC beta-lactamase-producing enterobacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). In the isolates, susceptibility to tigecycline was determined by the standard microdilution method. A total of 350 isolates were tested (100 MRSA, 10 0 VRE, 100 ESBL-positive and 50 AmpC-positive enterobacteria). In the cases of VRE and MRSA, no resistance to tigecycline was detected and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) did not exceed 0.25 mg/l and 0.5 mg/l, respectively. In ESBL-positive enterobacteria, 97% susceptibility (MIC range = or <0.06 to 4 mg/l) was detected; in AmpC-positive enterobacteria, the MIC range was = or <0.03-2 mg/l and susceptibility reached 98 %. Tigecycline may be considered a suitable alternative in the treatment of infections caused by the above-mentioned multiresistant strains.

  11. [The frequency of bacteria in human gallstones].

    PubMed

    Lévay, Bernadett; Szabó, Györgyi; Szijártó, Attila; Gamal, Eldin Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    Complications caused by lost gallstones within the abdominal cavity are well known. Abscesses, perforation of the gastro-intestinal tract were all described in the literature, but gallstones were found in hernial sac, or even in sputum after it penetrated through the diaphragm into the respiratory tract. These complications can develop between several weeks to several years postoperatively. Most complications can be treated surgically only. Fifty gallstones and bile samples were collected from 50 patients who underwent cholecystectomy (36 female / 14 male, avarge age: 60.8 ± 6.8 years). All samples were sent for microbiological examination. bacterial colonization of the gallstone and the bile were found in 16 cases. Four of them showed acute inflammation in the gallbladder while pathological signs of chronic inflammation in the gallbladder wall were detected in eight cases. Empyema was found in four cases. Bacteria from enteral origin (Esherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis, Enterobacter cloacae) was detected in 13 cases, while non-enteral (Klebsiella penumoniae, Streptococcus alfa-haemoliticus) colony were detected in three cases. Positive bacterial cultures were identified in twelve female and fourmale patients. Different types of bacteria can be found in the gallstones, which may cause various complications.

  12. Antibiotic Resistance in Plant-Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sundin, George W; Wang, Nian

    2018-06-01

    Antibiotics have been used for the management of relatively few bacterial plant diseases and are largely restricted to high-value fruit crops because of the expense involved. Antibiotic resistance in plant-pathogenic bacteria has become a problem in pathosystems where these antibiotics have been used for many years. Where the genetic basis for resistance has been examined, antibiotic resistance in plant pathogens has most often evolved through the acquisition of a resistance determinant via horizontal gene transfer. For example, the strAB streptomycin-resistance genes occur in Erwinia amylovora, Pseudomonas syringae, and Xanthomonas campestris, and these genes have presumably been acquired from nonpathogenic epiphytic bacteria colocated on plant hosts under antibiotic selection. We currently lack knowledge of the effect of the microbiome of commensal organisms on the potential of plant pathogens to evolve antibiotic resistance. Such knowledge is critical to the development of robust resistance management strategies to ensure the safe and effective continued use of antibiotics in the management of critically important diseases. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Phytopathology Volume 56 is August 25, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  13. Magnetotactic bacteria on Earth and on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKay, Christopher P.; Friedmann, E. Imre; Frankel, Richard B.; Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2003-01-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin.

  14. Magnetotactic bacteria on Earth and on Mars.

    PubMed

    McKay, Christopher P; Friedmann, E Imre; Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2003-01-01

    Continued interest in the possibility of evidence for life in the ALH84001 Martian meteorite has focused on the magnetite crystals. This review is structured around three related questions: is the magnetite in ALH84001 of biological or non-biological origin, or a mixture of both? does magnetite on Earth provide insight to the plausibility of biogenic magnetite on Mars? could magnetotaxis have developed on Mars? There are credible arguments for both the biological and non-biological origin of the magnetite in ALH84001, and we suggest that more studies of ALH84001, extensive laboratory simulations of non-biological magnetite formation, as well as further studies of magnetotactic bacteria on Earth will be required to further address this question. Magnetite grains produced by bacteria could provide one of the few inorganic traces of past bacterial life on Mars that could be recovered from surface soils and sediments. If there was biogenic magnetite on Mars in sufficient abundance to leave fossil remains in the volcanic rocks of ALH84001, then it is likely that better-preserved magnetite will be found in sedimentary deposits on Mars. Deposits in ancient lakebeds could contain well-preserved chains of magnetite clearly indicating a biogenic origin.

  15. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2007-12-04

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  16. Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Wise, Arlene A.; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.

    2004-08-10

    Detection of phenols using engineered bacteria. A biosensor can be created by placing a reporter gene under control of an inducible promoter. The reporter gene produces a signal when a cognate transcriptional activator senses the inducing chemical. Creation of bacterial biosensors is currently restricted by limited knowledge of the genetic systems of bacteria that catabolize xenobiotics. By using mutagenic PCR to change the chemical specificity of the Pseudomonas species CF600 DmpR protein, the potential for engineering novel biosensors for detection of phenols has been demonstrated. DmpR, a well-characterized transcriptional activator of the P. CF600's dmp operon mediates growth on simple phenols. Transcription from Po, the promoter heading the dmp operon, is activated when the sensor domain of DmpR interacts with phenol and mono-substituted phenols. By altering the sensor domain of the DmpR, a group of DmpR derivatives that activate transcription of a Po-lacZ fusion in response to eight of the EPA's eleven priority pollutant phenols has been created. The assays and the sensor domain mutations that alter the chemical specificity of DmpR is described.

  17. Co-electrospinning of bacteria and viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salalha, Wael; Kuhn, Jonathan; Chervinsky, Shmuel; Zussman, Eyal

    2006-03-01

    Co-electrospinning provides a novel and highly versatile approach towards composite fibers with diameters ranging from a few hundred nm down to 30 nm with embedded elements. In the present work, co-electrospinning of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and viruses (T7, T4, λ) or bacteria (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus albus) was carried out. These preparations should have applications for tissue engineering, gene therapy, phage therapy and biosensing. The average diameter of the co-spun nanofibers was about 300 nm. We found that the encapsulated viruses and bacteria manage to survive the electrospinning process, its pressure buildup in the core of the fiber and the electrostatic field in the co-electrospinning process. Approximately 10% of the Escherichia coli and 20% of Staphylococcus albus cells are viable after spinning. Approximately 5% of the bacterial viruses were also viable after the electrospinning. It should be noted that the encapsulated cells and viruses remain stable for two months without a further decrease in number. These results demonstrate the potential of the co-electrospinning process for the encapsulation and immobilization of bio-objects and the possibility of adapting them to technical applications (e.g., bio-chips).

  18. Sulphur bacteria mediated formation of Palaeoproterozoic phosphorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joosu, Lauri; Lepland, Aivo; Kirsimäe, Kalle

    2014-05-01

    Modern phosphorite formation is typically associated with high productivity in upwelling areas where apatite (Ca-phosphate) precipitation is mediated by sulphur oxidising bacteria [1]. They inhabit the oxic/anoxic interface within the upper few centimetres of sediment column, accumulating phosphate in their cells under oxic conditions and releasing it rapidly when conditions become anoxic. Sulphur bacteria are known to live in close association with a consortium of anaerobic methane oxidising archaea and syntrophic sulphate-reducing bacteria. Paleoproterozoic, c. 2.0 Ga Zaonega Formation in Karelia, Russia contains several P-rich intervals in the upper part of 1500 m thick succession of organic-rich sedimentary rocks interlayered with mafic tuffs and lavas. Apatite in these P-rich intervals forms impure laminae, lenses and round-oval nodules which diameters typically range from 300 to 1000 μm. Individual apatite particles in P-rich laminae and nodules commonly occur as cylinders that are 1-8 μm long and have diameters of 0.5-4 μm. Cross-sections of best preserved cylindrical apatite particles reveal a thin outer rim whereas the internal parts consist of small anhedral elongated crystallites, intergrown with carbonaceous material. During recrystallization the outer rim thickens towards interior and cylinders may attain hexagonal crystal habit, but their size and shape remains largely unchanged [2]. The sizes of Zaonega nodules are similar to giant sulphide-oxidising bacteria known from modern and ancient settings [3, 4]. Individual apatite cylinders and aggregates have shapes and sizes similar to the methanotrophic archaea that inhabit microbial mats in modern seep/vent areas where they operate in close associations with sulphur-oxidising microbial communities [5]. Seep/vent influence during the Zaonega phosphogenesis is indicated by variable, though positive Eu anomaly, expected in magmatically active sedimentary environment experiencing several lava flows

  19. Antibacterial Activities of Endophytic Bacteria Isolated from Taxus brevifolia Against Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Islam, Nurul; Choi, Jaehyuk; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2018-05-01

    Endophytes are a potential source of novel bioactive compounds with medicinal properties. In this study, 41 endophytic bacteria (EB) were isolated from tissues of a medicinally important plant Taxus brevifolia (Pacific yew). The objective was to screen all the EB isolates for their antibacterial effects against five foodborne pathogenic bacteria: Bacillus cereus ATCC10876, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC12600, Listeria monocytogenes ATCC19115, Escherichia coli ATCC43890, and Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC19585. Among the EB isolates, T. brevifolia seed (TbS)-8, T. brevifolia fleshy part of fruit (TbFl)-10, T. brevifolia leaf (TbL)-22, TbS-29, and TbL-34 exerted significant antibacterial activity against the tested foodborne pathogens. Especially TbFl-10 showed the highest antibacterial activity against all the tested bacteria and was identified as Paenibacillus kribbensis (Pk). Furthermore, an ethyl acetate extract of Pk-TbFl-10 possessed antibacterial activities against the tested five foodborne pathogenic bacteria, with zones of inhibition from 15.71 ± 2.85 to 13.01 ± 2.12 mm. Scanning electron microscopy analysis revealed ruptured, lysed, shrunk, and swollen cells of all the tested foodborne pathogens treated with the ethyl acetate extract of Pk-TbFl-10, suggesting that a metabolite(s) of Pk-TbFl-10 penetrates the cell membrane and causes cell lysis leading to cell death. Our results indicate that Pk-TbFl-10 isolated from T. brevifolia can serve as a novel source of natural antibacterial agents against foodborne pathogenic bacteria, with potential applications in the pharmaceutical industry.

  20. The role of adhesins in bacteria motility modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Jacinta; Gibiansky, Maxsim; Jin, Fan; Gordon, Vernita; Motto, Dominick; Shrout, Joshua; Parsek, Matthew; Wong, Gerard

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial biofilms are multicellular communities responsible for a broad range of infections. To investigate the early-stage formation of biofilms, we have developed high-throughput techniques to quantify the motility of surface-associated bacteria. We translate microscopy movies of bacteria into a searchable database of trajectories using tracking algorithms adapted from colloidal physics. By analyzing the motion of both wild-type (WT) and isogenic knockout mutants, we have previously characterized fundamental motility mechanisms in P. aeruginosa. Here, we develop biometric routines to recognize signatures of adhesion and trapping. We find that newly attached bacteria move faster than previously adherent bacteria, and are more likely to be oriented out-of-plane. Motility appendages influence the bacterium's ability to become trapped: WT bacteria exhibit two types of trapped trajectories, whereas flagella-deficient bacteria rarely become trapped. These results suggest that flagella play a key role in adhesion.

  1. Lactic acid bacteria of meat and meat products.

    PubMed

    Egan, A F

    1983-09-01

    When the growth of aerobic spoilage bacteria is inhibited, lactic acid bacteria may become the dominant component of the microbial flora of meats. This occurs with cured meats and with meats packaged in films of low gas permeability. The presence of a flora of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria on vacuum-packaged fresh chilled meats usually ensures that shelf-life is maximal. When these organisms spoil meats it is generally by causing souring, however other specific types of spoilage do occur. Some strains cause slime formation and greening of cured meats, and others may produce hydrogen sulphide during growth on vacuum-packaged beef. The safety and stability of fermented sausages depends upon fermentation caused by lactic acid bacteria. Overall the presence on meats of lactic acid bacteria is more desirable than that of the types of bacteria they have replaced.

  2. Deployable micro-traps to sequester motile bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Giacomo, Raffaele; Krödel, Sebastian; Maresca, Bruno; Benzoni, Patrizia; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman; Daraio, Chiara

    2017-04-01

    The development of strategies to reduce the load of unwanted bacteria is a fundamental challenge in industrial processing, environmental sciences and medical applications. Here, we report a new method to sequester motile bacteria from a liquid, based on passive, deployable micro-traps that confine bacteria using micro-funnels that open into trapping chambers. Even in low concentrations, micro-traps afford a 70% reduction in the amount of bacteria in a liquid sample, with a potential to reach >90% as shown by modelling improved geometries. This work introduces a new approach to contain the growth of bacteria without chemical means, an advantage of particular importance given the alarming growth of pan-drug-resistant bacteria.

  3. Deployable micro-traps to sequester motile bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Di Giacomo, Raffaele; Krödel, Sebastian; Maresca, Bruno; Benzoni, Patrizia; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman; Daraio, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The development of strategies to reduce the load of unwanted bacteria is a fundamental challenge in industrial processing, environmental sciences and medical applications. Here, we report a new method to sequester motile bacteria from a liquid, based on passive, deployable micro-traps that confine bacteria using micro-funnels that open into trapping chambers. Even in low concentrations, micro-traps afford a 70% reduction in the amount of bacteria in a liquid sample, with a potential to reach >90% as shown by modelling improved geometries. This work introduces a new approach to contain the growth of bacteria without chemical means, an advantage of particular importance given the alarming growth of pan-drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:28378786

  4. Deployable micro-traps to sequester motile bacteria.

    PubMed

    Di Giacomo, Raffaele; Krödel, Sebastian; Maresca, Bruno; Benzoni, Patrizia; Rusconi, Roberto; Stocker, Roman; Daraio, Chiara

    2017-04-05

    The development of strategies to reduce the load of unwanted bacteria is a fundamental challenge in industrial processing, environmental sciences and medical applications. Here, we report a new method to sequester motile bacteria from a liquid, based on passive, deployable micro-traps that confine bacteria using micro-funnels that open into trapping chambers. Even in low concentrations, micro-traps afford a 70% reduction in the amount of bacteria in a liquid sample, with a potential to reach >90% as shown by modelling improved geometries. This work introduces a new approach to contain the growth of bacteria without chemical means, an advantage of particular importance given the alarming growth of pan-drug-resistant bacteria.

  5. Rapid, quantitative determination of bacteria in water. [adenosine triphosphate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Thomas, R. R.; Jeffers, E. L.; Deming, J. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A bioluminescent assay for ATP in water borne bacteria is made by adding nitric acid to a water sample with concentrated bacteria to rupture the bacterial cells. The sample is diluted with sterile, deionized water, then mixed with a luciferase-luciferin mixture and the resulting light output of the bioluminescent reaction is measured and correlated with bacteria present. A standard and a blank also are presented so that the light output can be correlated to bacteria in the sample and system noise can be substracted from the readings. A chemiluminescent assay for iron porphyrins in water borne bacteria is made by adding luminol reagent to a water sample with concentrated bacteria and measuring the resulting light output of the chemiluminescent reaction.

  6. Phototrophic bacteria and their role in the biogeochemical sulfur cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trueper, H. G.

    1985-01-01

    An essential step that cannot be bypassed in the biogeochemical cycle of sulfur today is dissimilatory sulfate reduction by anaerobic bacteria. The enormous amounts of sulfides produced by these are oxidized again either anaerobically by phototrophic bacteria or aerobically by thiobacilli and large chemotrophic bacteria (Beggiatoa, Thiovulum, etc.). Phototrophic bacteria use sulfide, sulfur, thiosulfate, and sulfite as electron donors for photosynthesis. The most obvious intermediate in their oxidative sulfur metabolism is a long chain polysulfide that appears as so called sulfur globules either inside (Chromatiaceae) or outside (Ectothiorhodospiraceae, Chlorobiaceae, and some of the Rhodospirillaceae) the cells. The assimilation of sulfur compounds in phototrophic bacteria is in principle identical with that of nonphototrophic bacteria. However, the Chlorobiaceae and some of the Chromatiaceae and Rhodospirillaceae, unable to reduce sulfate, rely upon reduced sulfur for biosynthetic purposes.

  7. Biotechnological applications of acetic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Raspor, Peter; Goranovic, Dusan

    2008-01-01

    The acetic acid bacteria (AAB) have important roles in food and beverage production, as well as in the bioproduction of industrial chemicals. In recent years, there have been major advances in understanding their taxonomy, molecular biology, and physiology, and in methods for their isolation and identification. AAB are obligate aerobes that oxidize sugars, sugar alcohols, and ethanol with the production of acetic acid as the major end product. This special type of metabolism differentiates them from all other bacteria. Recently, the AAB taxonomy has been strongly rearranged as new techniques using 16S rRNA sequence analysis have been introduced. Currently, the AAB are classified in ten genera in the family Acetobacteriaceae. AAB can not only play a positive role in the production of selected foods and beverages, but they can also spoil other foods and beverages. AAB occur in sugar- and alcohol-enriched environments. The difficulty of cultivation of AAB on semisolid media in the past resulted in poor knowledge of the species present in industrial processes. The first step of acetic acid production is the conversion of ethanol from a carbohydrate carried out by yeasts, and the second step is the oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid carried out by AAB. Vinegar is traditionally the product of acetous fermentation of natural alcoholic substrates. Depending on the substrate, vinegars can be classified as fruit, starch, or spirit substrate vinegars. Although a variety of bacteria can produce acetic acid, mostly members of Acetobacter, Gluconacetobacter, and Gluconobacter are used commercially. Industrial vinegar manufacturing processes fall into three main categories: slow processes, quick processes, and submerged processes. AAB also play an important role in cocoa production, which represents a significant means of income for some countries. Microbial cellulose, produced by AAB, possesses some excellent physical properties and has potential for many applications. Other

  8. Fate and transport of bacteria injected into aquifers

    Harvey, Ronald W.

    1993-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the fate and transport of bacteria introduced into aquifers, including the potential use of genetically engineered bacteria for biorestoration, are highlighted by new findings in the following areas: modeling of bacterial attachment during transport through porous media, the long-term survival of a chlorobenzoate-degrading bacterium injected into a contaminated sandy aquifer, and molecular techniques that may be used in tracking genetically engineered bacteria in groundwater environments.

  9. Characterization of Bacteria Associated with Pinewood Nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus

    PubMed Central

    Vicente, Claudia S. L.; Nascimento, Francisco; Espada, Margarida; Barbosa, Pedro; Mota, Manuel; Glick, Bernard R.; Oliveira, Solange

    2012-01-01

    Pine wilt disease (PWD) is a complex disease integrating three major agents: the pathogenic agent, the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; the insect-vector Monochamus spp.; and the host pine tree, Pinus sp. Since the early 80's, the notion that another pathogenic agent, namely bacteria, may play a role in PWD has been gaining traction, however the role of bacteria in PWD is still unknown. The present work supports the possibility that some B. xylophilus-associated bacteria may play a significant role in the development of this disease. This is inferred as a consequence of: (i) the phenotypic characterization of a collection of 35 isolates of B. xylophilus-associated bacteria, in different tests broadly used to test plant pathogenic and plant growth promoting bacteria, and (ii) greenhouse experiments that infer the pathogenicity of these bacteria in maritime pine, Pinus pinaster. The results illustrate the presence of a heterogeneous microbial community associated with B. xylophilus and the traits exhibited by at least, some of these bacteria, appear to be related to PWD symptoms. The inoculation of four specific B. xylophilus-associated bacteria isolates in P. pinaster seedlings resulted in the development of some PWD symptoms suggesting that these bacteria likely play an active role with B. xylophilus in PWD. PMID:23091599

  10. Quantification and Qualification of Bacteria Trapped in Chewed Gum

    PubMed Central

    Wessel, Stefan W.; van der Mei, Henny C.; Morando, David; Slomp, Anje M.; van de Belt-Gritter, Betsy; Maitra, Amarnath; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE)-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR), yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 108 bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing of gum can trap

  11. Genetically engineered acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria by bacteriophage transduction

    SciT

    Ward, T.E.; Bruhn, D.F.; Bulmer, D.F.

    1989-05-10

    A bacteriophage capable of infecting acidophilic heterotrophic bacteria and processes for genetically engineering acidophilic bacteria for biomining or sulfur removal from coal are disclosed. The bacteriophage is capable of growth in cells existing at pH at or below 3.0. Lytic forms of the phage introduced into areas experiencing acid drainage kill the bacteria causing such drainage. Lysogenic forms of the phage having genes for selective removal of metallic or nonmetallic elements can be introduced into acidophilic bacteria to effect removal of the desired element from ore or coal. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. When pathogenic bacteria meet the intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Rolhion, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota is a large and diverse microbial community that inhabits the intestinal tract, containing about 100 trillion bacteria from 500–1000 distinct species that, collectively, provide multiple benefits to the host. The gut microbiota contributes to nutrient absorption and maturation of the immune system, and also plays a central role in protection of the host from enteric bacterial infection. On the other hand, many enteric pathogens have developed strategies in order to be able to outcompete the intestinal community, leading to infection and/or chronic diseases. This review will summarize findings describing the complex relationship occurring between the intestinal microbiota and enteric pathogens, as well as how future therapies can ultimately benefit from such discoveries. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The new bacteriology’. PMID:27672153

  13. Genetics in methylotrophic bacteria: Appendix. Final report

    SciT

    Lidstrom, M.E.

    This research has focused primarily on promoters in Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 and in methanotrophic bacteria. In Methylobacterium extorquens work continued on the moxF promoter. The author constructed chromosomal lacZ fusions of this promoter to avoid the regulation problems of plasmid-borne fragments and has shown that this is regulated normally in the chromosome. She has constructed lacZ fusions to some of the mox genes involved in the synthesis of the cofactor, PQQ, in order to carry out similar analysis of transcription of PQQ genes. The author has continued to isolate mox genes in methanotrophs for the purpose of studying their promotersmore » and transcriptional regulation.« less

  14. Painting with light-powered bacteria.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Jochen; Martinez, Vincent A; Dawson, Angela; Pilizota, Teuta; Poon, Wilson C K

    2018-02-22

    Self-assembly is a promising route for micro- and nano-fabrication with potential to revolutionise many areas of technology, including personalised medicine. Here we demonstrate that external control of the swimming speed of microswimmers can be used to self assemble reconfigurable designer structures in situ. We implement such 'smart templated active self assembly' in a fluid environment by using spatially patterned light fields to control photon-powered strains of motile Escherichia coli bacteria. The physics and biology governing the sharpness and formation speed of patterns is investigated using a bespoke strain designed to respond quickly to changes in light intensity. Our protocol provides a distinct paradigm for self-assembly of structures on the 10 μm to mm scale.

  15. [Toxic shock syndrome caused by pyogenic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Gábor, Zsuzsa; Szekeres, Sándor; Gacs, Mária

    2003-01-12

    Case reports and review of the literature. Severe toxic shock syndrome caused by invasive infection with pyogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus or group A Streptococcus pyogenes, with high mortality rates in cases of the latter, remained one of the most problematic chapters of critical care medicine to date. To give an overview on the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, the complex therapeutical approaches of the syndrome and, on the role and mechanisms of action of bacterial superantigens in the pathophysiological processes as well. Literary data, and some illustrative selected cases demonstrate that, the incidence of TSS shows increasing tendency worldwide and, that otherwise healthy, younger people are the most frequently affected. As for prognosis: early diagnosis and treatment with sufficient radicality are of decisive importance.

  16. Characterisation and identification of bacteria using SERS.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Roger M; Goodacre, Royston

    2008-05-01

    Within microbiology Raman spectroscopy is considered as a very important whole-organism fingerprinting technique, which is used to characterise, discriminate and identify microorganisms and assess how they respond to abiotic or biotic stress. Enhancing the sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy is very beneficial for the rapid analysis of bacteria (and indeed biological systems in general), where the ultimate goal is to achieve this without the need for lengthy cell culture. Bypassing this step would provide significant benefits in many areas such as medical, environmental and industrial microbiology, microbial systems biology, biological warfare countermeasures and bioprocess monitoring. In this tutorial review we will report on the advances made in bacterial studies, a relatively new and exciting application area for SERS.

  17. [Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria].

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, José E; García-Sánchez, Enrique; García-García, María Inmaculada

    2014-02-01

    The anaerobic bacteria resistance to antibiotics is increasing, and even has appeared against the most active of those, like metronidazol and carbapenems. This fact forces to make and periodical sensibility tests -at least in the most aggressive and virulent species, in cases that they are isolated from life locations and in the absence of therapeutic response- to check the local sensibility and to establish suitable empiric therapies, all based on multicentric studies carried out in order to this or well to check the activity of new antibiotics. For the laboratory routine, the easiest sensibility method is the E-test/MIC evaluator. Another alternative is microdilution, that's only normalized for Bacteroides. There are preliminary facts that allow the use of disc diffusion method in some species of Bacteroides and Clostridium. For the temporal and multicentric studies, the procedure is dilution in agar plate, the reference method. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Flagella and motility behaviour of square bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Alam, M; Claviez, M; Oesterhelt, D; Kessel, M

    1984-01-01

    Square bacteria are shown to have right-handed helical (RH) flagella. They swim forward by clockwise (CW), and backwards by counterclockwise (CCW) rotation of their flagella. They are propelled by several or single filaments arising at several or single points on the cell surface. When there are several filaments a stable bundle is formed that does not fly apart during the change from clockwise to counterclockwise rotation or vice versa. In addition to the flagella attached to the cells, large amounts of detached flagella aggregated into thick super-flagella, can be observed at all phases of growth. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6526006

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  20. Water quality indicators: bacteria, coliphages, enteric viruses.

    PubMed

    Lin, Johnson; Ganesh, Atheesha

    2013-12-01

    Water quality through the presence of pathogenic enteric microorganisms may affect human health. Coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and coliphages are normally used as indicators of water quality. However, the presence of above-mentioned indicators do not always suggest the presence of human enteric viruses. It is important to study human enteric viruses in water. Human enteric viruses can tolerate fluctuating environmental conditions and survive in the environment for long periods of time becoming causal agents of diarrhoeal diseases. Therefore, the potential of human pathogenic viruses as significant indicators of water quality is emerging. Human Adenoviruses and other viruses have been proposed as suitable indices for the effective identification of such organisms of human origin contaminating water systems. This article reports on the recent developments in the management of water quality specifically focusing on human enteric viruses as indicators.

  1. Physical mode of bacteria and virus coevolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Pu; Niestemski, Liang; Deem, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Single-cell hosts such as bacteria or archaea possess an adaptive, heritable immune system that protects them from viral invasion. This system, known as the CRISPR-Cas system, allows the host to recognize and incorporate short foreign DNA or RNA sequences from viruses or plasmids. The sequences form what are called ``spacers'' in the CRISPR. Spacers in the CRISPR loci provide a record of the host and predator coevolution history. We develop a physical model to study the dynamics of this coevolution due to immune pressure. Hosts and viruses reproduce, die, and evolve due to viral infection pressure, host immune pressure, and mutation. We will discuss the differing effects of point mutation and recombination on CRISPR evolution. We will also discuss the effect of different spacer deletion mechanisms. We will describe population structure of hosts and viruses, how spacer diversity depends on position within CRISPR, and match of the CRISPR spacers to the virus population.

  2. Ecology of the oral microbiome: beyond bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jonathon L.; Bor, Batbileg; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2017-01-01

    Although great strides have been made in understanding the complex bacterial community inhabiting the human oral cavity, for a variety of (mainly technical) reasons the ecological contributions of oral fungi, viruses, phages, and the candidate phyla radiation (CPR) group of ultra-small bacteria have remained understudied. Several recent reports have illustrated the diversity and importance of these organisms in the oral cavity, while TM7x and Candida albicans have served as crucial paradigms for CPR species and oral fungi, respectively. A comprehensive understanding of the oral microbiota and its influence on host health and disease will require a holistic view that emphasizes interactions among different residents within the oral community, as well as their interaction with the host. PMID:28089325

  3. Biology of Moderately Halophilic Aerobic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ventosa, Antonio; Nieto, Joaquín J.; Oren, Aharon

    1998-01-01

    The moderately halophilic heterotrophic aerobic bacteria form a diverse group of microorganisms. The property of halophilism is widespread within the bacterial domain. Bacterial halophiles are abundant in environments such as salt lakes, saline soils, and salted food products. Most species keep their intracellular ionic concentrations at low levels while synthesizing or accumulating organic solutes to provide osmotic equilibrium of the cytoplasm with the surrounding medium. Complex mechanisms of adjustment of the intracellular environments and the properties of the cytoplasmic membrane enable rapid adaptation to changes in the salt concentration of the environment. Approaches to the study of genetic processes have recently been developed for several moderate halophiles, opening the way toward an understanding of haloadaptation at the molecular level. The new information obtained is also expected to contribute to the development of novel biotechnological uses for these organisms. PMID:9618450

  4. Streptomyces Bacteria as Potential Probiotics in Aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Loh Teng-Hern; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han; Goh, Bey-Hing

    2016-01-01

    In response to the increased seafood demand from the ever-going human population, aquaculture has become the fastest growing animal food-producing sector. However, the indiscriminate use of antibiotics as a biological control agents for fish pathogens has led to the emergence of antibiotic resistance bacteria. Probiotics are defined as living microbial supplement that exert beneficial effects on hosts as well as improvement of environmental parameters. Probiotics have been proven to be effective in improving the growth, survival and health status of the aquatic livestock. This review aims to highlight the genus Streptomyces can be a good candidate for probiotics in aquaculture. Studies showed that the feed supplemented with Streptomyces could protect fish and shrimp from pathogens as well as increase the growth of the aquatic organisms. Furthermore, the limitations of Streptomyces as probiotics in aquaculture is also highlighted and solutions are discussed to these limitations. PMID:26903962

  5. Stress Physiology of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Alegría, Ángel; Bron, Peter A.; de Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Lemos, José A.; Linares, Daniel M.; Ross, Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Varmanen, Pekka; Ventura, Marco; Zúñiga, Manuel; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are important starter, commensal, or pathogenic microorganisms. The stress physiology of LAB has been studied in depth for over 2 decades, fueled mostly by the technological implications of LAB robustness in the food industry. Survival of probiotic LAB in the host and the potential relatedness of LAB virulence to their stress resilience have intensified interest in the field. Thus, a wealth of information concerning stress responses exists today for strains as diverse as starter (e.g., Lactococcus lactis), probiotic (e.g., several Lactobacillus spp.), and pathogenic (e.g., Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp.) LAB. Here we present the state of the art for LAB stress behavior. We describe the multitude of stresses that LAB are confronted with, and we present the experimental context used to study the stress responses of LAB, focusing on adaptation, habituation, and cross-protection as well as on self-induced multistress resistance in stationary phase, biofilms, and dormancy. We also consider stress responses at the population and single-cell levels. Subsequently, we concentrate on the stress defense mechanisms that have been reported to date, grouping them according to their direct participation in preserving cell energy, defending macromolecules, and protecting the cell envelope. Stress-induced responses of probiotic LAB and commensal/pathogenic LAB are highlighted separately due to the complexity of the peculiar multistress conditions to which these bacteria are subjected in their hosts. Induction of prophages under environmental stresses is then discussed. Finally, we present systems-based strategies to characterize the “stressome” of LAB and to engineer new food-related and probiotic LAB with improved stress tolerance. PMID:27466284

  6. Stress Physiology of Lactic Acid Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Alegría, Ángel; Bron, Peter A; de Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Lemos, José A; Linares, Daniel M; Ross, Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Varmanen, Pekka; Ventura, Marco; Zúñiga, Manuel; Tsakalidou, Effie; Kok, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are important starter, commensal, or pathogenic microorganisms. The stress physiology of LAB has been studied in depth for over 2 decades, fueled mostly by the technological implications of LAB robustness in the food industry. Survival of probiotic LAB in the host and the potential relatedness of LAB virulence to their stress resilience have intensified interest in the field. Thus, a wealth of information concerning stress responses exists today for strains as diverse as starter (e.g., Lactococcus lactis), probiotic (e.g., several Lactobacillus spp.), and pathogenic (e.g., Enterococcus and Streptococcus spp.) LAB. Here we present the state of the art for LAB stress behavior. We describe the multitude of stresses that LAB are confronted with, and we present the experimental context used to study the stress responses of LAB, focusing on adaptation, habituation, and cross-protection as well as on self-induced multistress resistance in stationary phase, biofilms, and dormancy. We also consider stress responses at the population and single-cell levels. Subsequently, we concentrate on the stress defense mechanisms that have been reported to date, grouping them according to their direct participation in preserving cell energy, defending macromolecules, and protecting the cell envelope. Stress-induced responses of probiotic LAB and commensal/pathogenic LAB are highlighted separately due to the complexity of the peculiar multistress conditions to which these bacteria are subjected in their hosts. Induction of prophages under environmental stresses is then discussed. Finally, we present systems-based strategies to characterize the "stressome" of LAB and to engineer new food-related and probiotic LAB with improved stress tolerance. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Growth of bacteria in 3-d colonies

    PubMed Central

    Mugler, Andrew; Kim, Justin

    2017-01-01

    The dynamics of growth of bacterial populations has been extensively studied for planktonic cells in well-agitated liquid culture, in which all cells have equal access to nutrients. In the real world, bacteria are more likely to live in physically structured habitats as colonies, within which individual cells vary in their access to nutrients. The dynamics of bacterial growth in such conditions is poorly understood, and, unlike that for liquid culture, there is not a standard broadly used mathematical model for bacterial populations growing in colonies in three dimensions (3-d). By extending the classic Monod model of resource-limited population growth to allow for spatial heterogeneity in the bacterial access to nutrients, we develop a 3-d model of colonies, in which bacteria consume diffusing nutrients in their vicinity. By following the changes in density of E. coli in liquid and embedded in glucose-limited soft agar, we evaluate the fit of this model to experimental data. The model accounts for the experimentally observed presence of a sub-exponential, diffusion-limited growth regime in colonies, which is absent in liquid cultures. The model predicts and our experiments confirm that, as a consequence of inter-colony competition for the diffusing nutrients and of cell death, there is a non-monotonic relationship between total number of colonies within the habitat and the total number of individual cells in all of these colonies. This combined theoretical-experimental study reveals that, within 3-d colonies, E. coli cells are loosely packed, and colonies produce about 2.5 times as many cells as the liquid culture from the same amount of nutrients. We verify that this is because cells in liquid culture are larger than in colonies. Our model provides a baseline description of bacterial growth in 3-d, deviations from which can be used to identify phenotypic heterogeneities and inter-cellular interactions that further contribute to the structure of bacterial

  8. Bacteria survival probability in bactericidal filter paper.

    PubMed

    Mansur-Azzam, Nura; Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Woo, Su Gyeong; Vyhnalkova, Renata; Eisenberg, Adi; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2014-05-01

    Bactericidal filter papers offer the simplicity of gravity filtration to simultaneously eradicate microbial contaminants and particulates. We previously detailed the development of biocidal block copolymer micelles that could be immobilized on a filter paper to actively eradicate bacteria. Despite the many advantages offered by this system, its widespread use is hindered by its unknown mechanism of action which can result in non-reproducible outcomes. In this work, we sought to investigate the mechanism by which a certain percentage of Escherichia coli cells survived when passing through the bactericidal filter paper. Through the process of elimination, the possibility that the bacterial survival probability was controlled by the initial bacterial load or the existence of resistant sub-populations of E. coli was dismissed. It was observed that increasing the thickness or the number of layers of the filter significantly decreased bacterial survival probability for the biocidal filter paper but did not affect the efficiency of the blank filter paper (no biocide). The survival probability of bacteria passing through the antibacterial filter paper appeared to depend strongly on the number of collision between each bacterium and the biocide-loaded micelles. It was thus hypothesized that during each collision a certain number of biocide molecules were directly transferred from the hydrophobic core of the micelle to the bacterial lipid bilayer membrane. Therefore, each bacterium must encounter a certain number of collisions to take up enough biocide to kill the cell and cells that do not undergo the threshold number of collisions are expected to survive. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Diversity of Rumen Bacteria in Canadian Cervids

    PubMed Central

    Gruninger, Robert J.; Sensen, Christoph W.; McAllister, Timothy A.; Forster, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Interest in the bacteria responsible for the breakdown of lignocellulosic feedstuffs within the rumen has increased due to their potential utility in industrial applications. To date, most studies have focused on bacteria from domesticated ruminants. We have expanded the knowledge of the microbial ecology of ruminants by examining the bacterial populations found in the rumen of non-domesticated ruminants found in Canada. Next-generation sequencing of 16S rDNA was employed to characterize the liquid and solid-associated bacterial communities in the rumen of elk (Cervus canadensis), and white tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Despite variability in the microbial populations between animals, principle component and weighted UniFrac analysis indicated that bacterial communities in the rumen of elk and white tail deer are distinct. Populations clustered according to individual host animal and not the association with liquid or solid phase of the rumen contents. In all instances, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the dominant bacterial phyla, although the relative abundance of these differed among ruminant species and between phases of rumen digesta, respectively. In the elk samples Bacteroidetes were more predominant in the liquid phase whereas Firmicutes was the most prevalent phyla in the solid digesta (P = 1×10−5). There were also statistically significant differences in the abundance of OTUs classified as Fibrobacteres (P = 5×10−3) and Spirochaetes (P = 3×10−4) in the solid digesta of the elk samples. We identified a number of OTUs that were classified as phylotypes not previously observed in the rumen environment. Our results suggest that although the bacterial diversity in wild North American ruminants shows overall similarities to domesticated ruminants, we observed a number of OTUs not previously described. Previous studies primarily focusing on domesticated ruminants do not fully represent the microbial diversity of the rumen and

  10. Diversity of rumen bacteria in canadian cervids.

    PubMed

    Gruninger, Robert J; Sensen, Christoph W; McAllister, Timothy A; Forster, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Interest in the bacteria responsible for the breakdown of lignocellulosic feedstuffs within the rumen has increased due to their potential utility in industrial applications. To date, most studies have focused on bacteria from domesticated ruminants. We have expanded the knowledge of the microbial ecology of ruminants by examining the bacterial populations found in the rumen of non-domesticated ruminants found in Canada. Next-generation sequencing of 16S rDNA was employed to characterize the liquid and solid-associated bacterial communities in the rumen of elk (Cervus canadensis), and white tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus). Despite variability in the microbial populations between animals, principle component and weighted UniFrac analysis indicated that bacterial communities in the rumen of elk and white tail deer are distinct. Populations clustered according to individual host animal and not the association with liquid or solid phase of the rumen contents. In all instances, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were the dominant bacterial phyla, although the relative abundance of these differed among ruminant species and between phases of rumen digesta, respectively. In the elk samples Bacteroidetes were more predominant in the liquid phase whereas Firmicutes was the most prevalent phyla in the solid digesta (P = 1×10(-5)). There were also statistically significant differences in the abundance of OTUs classified as Fibrobacteres (P = 5×10(-3)) and Spirochaetes (P = 3×10(-4)) in the solid digesta of the elk samples. We identified a number of OTUs that were classified as phylotypes not previously observed in the rumen environment. Our results suggest that although the bacterial diversity in wild North American ruminants shows overall similarities to domesticated ruminants, we observed a number of OTUs not previously described. Previous studies primarily focusing on domesticated ruminants do not fully represent the microbial diversity of the rumen and

  11. Effect of air pollution on the total bacteria and pathogenic bacteria in different sizes of particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Hao; Yao, Xiangwu; Zhou, Meng; Wang, Jiaqi; He, Zhanfei; Zhang, Huihui; Lou, Liping; Mao, Weihua; Zheng, Ping; Hu, Baolan

    2018-02-01

    In recent years, air pollution events have occurred frequently in China during the winter. Most studies have focused on the physical and chemical composition of polluted air. Some studies have examined the bacterial bioaerosols both indoors and outdoors. But few studies have focused on the relationship between air pollution and bacteria, especially pathogenic bacteria. Airborne PM samples with different diameters and different air quality index values were collected in Hangzhou, China from December 2014 to January 2015. High-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA was used to categorize the airborne bacteria. Based on the NCBI database, the "Human Pathogen Database" was established, which is related to human health. Among all the PM samples, the diversity and concentration of total bacteria were lowest in the moderately or heavily polluted air. However, in the PM2.5 and PM10 samples, the relative abundances of pathogenic bacteria were highest in the heavily and moderately polluted air respectively. Considering the PM samples with different particle sizes, the diversities of total bacteria and the proportion of pathogenic bacteria in the PM10 samples were different from those in the PM2.5 and TSP samples. The composition of PM samples with different sizes range may be responsible for the variances. The relative humidity, carbon monoxide and ozone concentrations were the main factors, which affected the diversity of total bacteria and the proportion of pathogenic bacteria. Among the different environmental samples, the compositions of the total bacteria were very similar in all the airborne PM samples, but different from those in the water, surface soil, and ground dust samples. Which may be attributed to that the long-distance transport of the airflow may influence the composition of the airborne bacteria. This study of the pathogenic bacteria in airborne PM samples can provide a reference for environmental and public health researchers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  12. Determination of Ammonia Oxidizing Bacteria and Nitrate Oxidizing Bacteria in Wastewater and Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Somilez Asya

    2014-01-01

    The process of water purification has many different physical, chemical, and biological processes. One part of the biological process is the task of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Both play critical roles in the treatment of wastewater by oxidizing toxic compounds. The broad term is nitrification, a naturally occurring process that is carried out by AOB and NOB by using oxidation to convert ammonia to nitrite and nitrite to nitrate. To monitor this biological activity, bacterial staining was performed on wastewater contained in inoculum tanks and biofilm samples from bioreactors. Using microscopy and qPCR, the purpose of this experiment was to determine if the population of AOB and NOB in wastewater and membrane bioreactors changed depending on temperature and hibernation conditions to determine the optimal parameters for AOB/NOB culture to effectively clean wastewater.

  13. BioNLP Shared Task--The Bacteria Track.

    PubMed

    Bossy, Robert; Jourde, Julien; Manine, Alain-Pierre; Veber, Philippe; Alphonse, Erick; van de Guchte, Maarten; Bessières, Philippe; Nédellec, Claire

    2012-06-26

    We present the BioNLP 2011 Shared Task Bacteria Track, the first Information Extraction challenge entirely dedicated to bacteria. It includes three tasks that cover different levels of biological knowledge. The Bacteria Gene Renaming supporting task is aimed at extracting gene renaming and gene name synonymy in PubMed abstracts. The Bacteria Gene Interaction is a gene/protein interaction extraction task from individual sentences. The interactions have been categorized into ten different sub-types, thus giving a detailed account of genetic regulations at the molecular level. Finally, the Bacteria Biotopes task focuses on the localization and environment of bacteria mentioned in textbook articles. We describe the process of creation for the three corpora, including document acquisition and manual annotation, as well as the metrics used to evaluate the participants' submissions. Three teams submitted to the Bacteria Gene Renaming task; the best team achieved an F-score of 87%. For the Bacteria Gene Interaction task, the only participant's score had reached a global F-score of 77%, although the system efficiency varies significantly from one sub-type to another. Three teams submitted to the Bacteria Biotopes task with very different approaches; the best team achieved an F-score of 45%. However, the detailed study of the participating systems efficiency reveals the strengths and weaknesses of each participating system. The three tasks of the Bacteria Track offer participants a chance to address a wide range of issues in Information Extraction, including entity recognition, semantic typing and coreference resolution. We found common trends in the most efficient systems: the systematic use of syntactic dependencies and machine learning. Nevertheless, the originality of the Bacteria Biotopes task encouraged the use of interesting novel methods and techniques, such as term compositionality, scopes wider than the sentence.

  14. Seed-vectored endophytic bacteria modulate development of rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Verma, S K; Kingsley, K; Irizarry, I; Bergen, M; Kharwar, R N; White, J F

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the removal of indigenous bacteria from rice seeds on seedling growth and development. Here we report the presence of three indigenous endophytic bacteria in rice seeds that play important roles in modulating seedling development (shoot and root lengths, and formation of root hairs and secondary roots) and defence against pathogens. Seed-associated bacteria were removed using surface sterilization with NaOCl (bleach) followed by antibiotic treatment. When bacteria were absent, growth of seedlings in terms of root hair development and overall seedling size was less than that of seedlings that contained bacteria. Reactive oxygen staining of seedlings showed that endophytic bacteria became intracellular in root parenchyma cells and root hairs. Roots containing endophytic bacteria were seen to stain densely for reactive oxygen, while roots free of bacteria stained lightly for reactive oxygen. Bacteria were isolated and identified as Enterobacter asburiae (VWB1), Pantoea dispersa (VWB2) and Pseudomonas putida (VWB3) by 16S rDNA sequencing. Bacteria were found to produce indole acetic acid (auxins), inhibited the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum and solubilized phosphate. Reinoculation of bacteria onto seedlings derived from surface-disinfected rice and Bermuda grass seeds significantly restored seedling growth and development. Rice seeds harbour indigenous bacterial endophytes that greatly influence seedling growth and development, including root and shoot lengths, root hair formation and disease susceptibility of rice seedlings. This study shows that seeds of rice naturally harbour bacterial endophytes that play key roles in modulation of seedling development. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Number of Bacteria and Time of Coincubation With Bacteria Required for the Development of Acanthamoeba Keratitis.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hayate; Hattori, Takaaki; Koike, Naohito; Ehara, Tomoko; Narimatsu, Akitomo; Kumakura, Shigeto; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Goto, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    We hypothesized that bacteria may be a factor contributing to the development of Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK). We investigated interactions between Acanthamoeba and Pseudomonas aeruginosa for the development of keratitis in rabbit corneas. Acanthamoeba castellanii (ATCC50492) and P. aeruginosa (PAO-1) were used. Two densities of P. aeruginosa (high, 1 × 10/mL; low, 3 × 10/mL) and 2 durations of coincubation (long, 6 h; short, 2 h) of Acanthamoeba with 1 × 10/mL of P. aeruginosa were tested. Acanthamoeba alone or Acanthamoeba coincubated with P. aeruginosa was inoculated into rabbit corneas. After inoculation, levofloxacin (LVFX) eye drops were administered. The clinical score of the cornea was evaluated after inoculation. Acanthamoeba alone did not produce keratitis during a 5-day observation period. Rabbit corneas inoculated with Acanthamoeba coincubated with low-density P. aeruginosa followed by topical LVFX were clear with few infiltrates. Corneas inoculated with Acanthamoeba coincubated with high-density P. aeruginosa followed by LVFX treatment developed severe keratitis, and clinical scores were significantly higher compared with high-density P. aeruginosa alone followed by LVFX treatment (scores 7, 9.6, 8.5 vs. 3, 3.5, 3.25 on days 1-3, all P < 0.01). The long (6 h) coincubation time of Acanthamoeba with high-density P. aeruginosa resulted in more severe keratitis compared with short (2 h) coincubation (scores, 9.7, 12.7, 12.1, 9.8, 8.7 vs. 7, 9.6, 8.5, 6.9, 5.6 on days 1-5, all P < 0.01). These results suggest that the presence of bacteria is essential and a critical number of bacteria is required for the development of AK. The time of coexistence with bacteria may be an important determinant of the severity of AK.

  16. Detection of Sulphate-Reducing Bacteria and Others Cultivable Facultative Bacteria in Dental Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Lúcio de Souza; Dias, Eliane Pedra; Heggendorn, Christiane; Lutterbach, Márcia T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Aim To detect for the presence of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and evaluate the possible association between SRB and cultivable facultative bacterial of oral sites with different periodontal conditions. Methods The study was carried out on 9 samples from different oral sites in 8 patients (two samples were collected from the same patient). Material was collected using modified Postgate E culture medium, indicated for the growth and isolation of SRB. In addition, a reducing solution for anaerobic bacteria was used as a transport solution for facultative bacteria and identified by polymerase chain reaction amplification (PCR) and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Results SRB was found in 3 patient samples: the first in a root fragment, the second in a root fragment and a healthy tooth with vertical bone loss and a mobility degree of 3; and the third in a healthy tooth extracted for orthodontic treatment. In the final patient, the cultivable facultative species Lactobacillus casei was identified. Other facultative bacterial species were identified in patient 5 (Kurthia Gibsonii) and patient 7 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Conclusions The detection of SRB in different dental tissues with distinct periodontal features demonstrated that new studies need to be developed in order to determine the true role of SRB in the oral microbiota. In addition, it was possible to verify the presence of Lactobacillus casei together with SRB in one sample. PMID:27688355

  17. Mechanistic modeling of biocorrosion caused by biofilms of sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dake; Li, Yingchao; Gu, Tingyue

    2016-08-01

    Biocorrosion is also known as microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Most anaerobic MIC cases can be classified into two major types. Type I MIC involves non-oxygen oxidants such as sulfate and nitrate that require biocatalysis for their reduction in the cytoplasm of microbes such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and nitrate reducing bacteria (NRB). This means that the extracellular electrons from the oxidation of metal such as iron must be transported across cell walls into the cytoplasm. Type II MIC involves oxidants such as protons that are secreted by microbes such as acid producing bacteria (APB). The biofilms in this case supply the locally high concentrations of oxidants that are corrosive without biocatalysis. This work describes a mechanistic model that is based on the biocatalytic cathodic sulfate reduction (BCSR) theory. The model utilizes charge transfer and mass transfer concepts to describe the SRB biocorrosion process. The model also includes a mechanism to describe APB attack based on the local acidic pH at a pit bottom. A pitting prediction software package has been created based on the mechanisms. It predicts long-term pitting rates and worst-case scenarios after calibration using SRB short-term pit depth data. Various parameters can be investigated through computer simulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Laminar flow assisted anisotropic bacteria absorption for chemotaxis delivery of bacteria-attached microparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Keon; Oh, Darong; Son, Seok Young; Yoo, Hyung Jung; Song, Byeonghwa; Cho, Dong-il Dan; Seo, Jong-Mo; Kim, Sung Jae

    2016-12-01

    The concepts of microrobots has been drawn significant attentions recently since its unprecedented applicability in nanotechnology and biomedical field. Bacteria attached microparticles presented in this work are one of pioneering microrobot technology for self-propulsion or producing kinetic energy from ambient for their motions. Microfluidic device, especially utilizing laminar flow characteristics, were employed for anisotropic attachment of Salmonella typhimurium flagellated chemotactic bacteria to 30 um × 30 um and 50 um × 50 um microparticles that made of biodegradable polymer. Any toxic chemicals or harmful treatments were excluded during the attachment process and it finished within 100 s for the anisotropic attachment. The attachments were directly confirmed by fluorescent intensity changes and SEM visualization. Chemotaxis motions were tracked using aspartate and the maximum velocity of the bacteria-attached microrobot was measured to be 5 um/s which is comparable to prior state of art technologies. This reusable and scalable method could play a key role in chemotaxis delivery of functional microparticles such as drug delivery system.

  19. Acetic acid bacteria: A group of bacteria with versatile biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Saichana, Natsaran; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Adachi, Osao; Frébort, Ivo; Frebortova, Jitka

    2015-11-01

    Acetic acid bacteria are gram-negative obligate aerobic bacteria assigned to the family Acetobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria. They are members of the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, Gluconacetobacter, Acidomonas, Asaia, Kozakia, Swaminathania, Saccharibacter, Neoasaia, Granulibacter, Tanticharoenia, Ameyamaea, Neokomagataea, and Komagataeibacter. Many strains of Acetobacter and Komagataeibacter have been known to possess high acetic acid fermentation ability as well as the acetic acid and ethanol resistance, which are considered to be useful features for industrial production of acetic acid and vinegar, the commercial product. On the other hand, Gluconobacter strains have the ability to perform oxidative fermentation of various sugars, sugar alcohols, and sugar acids leading to the formation of several valuable products. Thermotolerant strains of acetic acid bacteria were isolated in order to serve as the new strains of choice for industrial fermentations, in which the cooling costs for maintaining optimum growth and production temperature in the fermentation vessels could be significantly reduced. Genetic modifications by adaptation and genetic engineering were also applied to improve their properties, such as productivity and heat resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Intestinal irony: how probiotic bacteria outcompete bad bugs.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Guenter

    2013-07-17

    In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Deriu et al. present a mechanistic explanation underlying the benefits of certain probiotic bacteria. Intestinal bacteria compete for the essential nutrient iron, leading to replacement of pathogenic Salmonella by the probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle, which is better equipped with iron acquisition systems, and resolution of infectious colitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid separation of bacteria from blood — Chemical aspects

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Mahsa; Wood, Ryan L.; Buchanan, Clara M.; Bledsoe, Colin G.; Wood, Madison E.; McClellan, Daniel S.; Blanco, Rae; Ravsten, Tanner V.; Husseini, Ghaleb A.; Hickey, Caroline L.; Robison, Richard A.; Pitt, William G.

    2017-01-01

    To rapidly diagnose infectious organisms causing blood sepsis, bacteria must be rapidly separated from blood, a very difficult process considering that concentrations of bacteria are many orders of magnitude lower than concentrations of blood cells. We have successfully separated bacteria from red and white blood cells using a sedimentation process in which the separation is driven by differences in density and size. Seven mL of whole human blood spiked with bacteria is placed in a 12-cm hollow disk and spun at 3000 rpm for 1 min. The red and white cells sediment more than 30-fold faster than bacteria, leaving much of the bacteria in the plasma. When the disk is slowly decelerated, the plasma flows to a collection site and the red and white cells are trapped in the disk. Analysis of the recovered plasma shows that about 36% of the bacteria is recovered in the plasma. The plasma is not perfectly clear of red blood cells, but about 94% have been removed. This paper describes the effects of various chemical aspects of this process, including the influence of anticoagulant chemistry on the separation efficiency and the use of wetting agents and platelet aggregators that may influence the bacterial recovery. In a clinical scenario, the recovered bacteria can be subsequently analyzed to determine their species and resistance to various antibiotics. PMID:28365426

  2. IMPACT OF SOIL MANAGEMENT ON COTTON RHIZOSPHERE BACTERIA

    Soil dwelling bacteria and fungi are responsible for a number of ecosystem services critical to agriculture. In particular, bacteria living in the rhizosphere (portion of soil directly influenced by plant roots) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi have been shown to improve nutrient and water uptake an...

  3. Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides produced by mutant bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Gene R. (Inventor); Kern, Roger G. (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Structurally altered capsular polysaccharides are produced by mutant bacteria. These polysaccharides are isolated by selecting a wild type bacterial strain and a phage producing degradative enzymes that have substrate specificity for the capsular polysaccharides produced by the wild type bacteria. Phage-resistant mutants producing capsular polysaccharides are selected and the structurally altered capsular polysaccharide is isolated therefrom.

  4. Phage-bacteria infection networks: From nestedness to modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Cesar O.; Valverde, Sergi; Weitz, Joshua S.

    2013-03-01

    Bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) are the most abundant biological life-forms on Earth. However, very little is known regarding the structure of phage-bacteria infections. In a recent study we re-evaluated 38 prior studies and demonstrated that phage-bacteria infection networks tend to be statistically nested in small scale communities (Flores et al 2011). Nestedness is consistent with a hierarchy of infection and resistance within phages and bacteria, respectively. However, we predicted that at large scales, phage-bacteria infection networks should be typified by a modular structure. We evaluate and confirm this hypothesis using the most extensive study of phage-bacteria infections (Moebus and Nattkemper 1981). In this study, cross-infections were evaluated between 215 marine phages and 286 marine bacteria. We develop a novel multi-scale network analysis and find that the Moebus and Nattkemper (1981) study, is highly modular (at the whole network scale), yet also exhibits nestedness and modularity at the within-module scale. We examine the role of geography in driving these modular patterns and find evidence that phage-bacteria interactions can exhibit strong similarity despite large distances between sites. CFG acknowledges the support of CONACyT Foundation. JSW holds a Career Award at the Scientific Interface from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund and acknowledges the support of the James S. McDonnell Foundation

  5. Bacteria of living and dead larvae of Porthetria dispar (L.)

    John D. Podgwaite; Benjamin J. Cosenza

    1966-01-01

    A preliminary study of the bacteria associated with living and dead larvae of the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar (L.)) was undertaken to determine what types of micro-organisms may be associated with disease in this insect. Specific objectives of this study were to enumerate the types of aerobic bacteria, and if possible to further elucidate the role...

  6. Nitrogen acquisition in Agave tequilana from degradation of endophytic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Beltran-Garcia, Miguel J.; White, Jr., James F.; Prado, Fernanda M.; Prieto, Katia R.; Yamaguchi, Lydia F.; Torres, Monica S.; Kato, Massuo J.; Medeiros, Marisa H. G.; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Plants form symbiotic associations with endophytic bacteria within tissues of leaves, stems, and roots. It is unclear whether or how plants obtain nitrogen from these endophytic bacteria. Here we present evidence showing nitrogen flow from endophytic bacteria to plants in a process that appears to involve oxidative degradation of bacteria. In our experiments we employed Agave tequilana and its seed-transmitted endophyte Bacillus tequilensis to elucidate organic nitrogen transfer from 15N-labeled bacteria to plants. Bacillus tequilensis cells grown in a minimal medium with 15NH4Cl as the nitrogen source were watered onto plants growing in sand. We traced incorporation of 15N into tryptophan, deoxynucleosides and pheophytin derived from chlorophyll a. Probes for hydrogen peroxide show its presence during degradation of bacteria in plant tissues, supporting involvement of reactive oxygen in the degradation process. In another experiment to assess nitrogen absorbed as a result of endophytic colonization of plants we demonstrated that endophytic bacteria potentially transfer more nitrogen to plants and stimulate greater biomass in plants than heat-killed bacteria that do not colonize plants but instead degrade in the soil. Findings presented here support the hypothesis that some plants under nutrient limitation may degrade and obtain nitrogen from endophytic microbes. PMID:25374146

  7. Nitrogen acquisition in Agave tequilana from degradation of endophytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Beltran-Garcia, Miguel J; White, James F; Prado, Fernanda M; Prieto, Katia R; Yamaguchi, Lydia F; Torres, Monica S; Kato, Massuo J; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Di Mascio, Paolo

    2014-11-06

    Plants form symbiotic associations with endophytic bacteria within tissues of leaves, stems, and roots. It is unclear whether or how plants obtain nitrogen from these endophytic bacteria. Here we present evidence showing nitrogen flow from endophytic bacteria to plants in a process that appears to involve oxidative degradation of bacteria. In our experiments we employed Agave tequilana and its seed-transmitted endophyte Bacillus tequilensis to elucidate organic nitrogen transfer from (15)N-labeled bacteria to plants. Bacillus tequilensis cells grown in a minimal medium with (15)NH4Cl as the nitrogen source were watered onto plants growing in sand. We traced incorporation of (15)N into tryptophan, deoxynucleosides and pheophytin derived from chlorophyll a. Probes for hydrogen peroxide show its presence during degradation of bacteria in plant tissues, supporting involvement of reactive oxygen in the degradation process. In another experiment to assess nitrogen absorbed as a result of endophytic colonization of plants we demonstrated that endophytic bacteria potentially transfer more nitrogen to plants and stimulate greater biomass in plants than heat-killed bacteria that do not colonize plants but instead degrade in the soil. Findings presented here support the hypothesis that some plants under nutrient limitation may degrade and obtain nitrogen from endophytic microbes.

  8. Stalking Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria in Common Vegetables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, David; Boeke, Caroline; Josowitz, Rebecca; Loya, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    The study developed a simple experimental protocol for studying antibiotic resistant bacteria that will allow students to determine the proportion of such bacteria found on common fruit and vegetable crops. This protocol can open up the world of environmental science and show how human behavior can dramatically alter ecosystems.

  9. Production of Value-added Products by Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are a group of facultative anaerobic, catalase negative, nonmotile and nonsporeforming–Gram positive bacteria. Most LAB utilize high energy C sources including monomer sugars to produce energy to maintain cellular structure and function. This anaerobic fermentation proce...

  10. Biochanin A improves fiber fermentation by cellulolytic bacteria

    The objective was to determine the effect of the isoflavone biochanin A (BCA) on rumen cellulolytic bacteria and consequent fermentative activity. When bovine microbial rumen cell suspensions (n = 3) were incubated (24 h, 39 °C) with ground hay, cellulolytic bacteria proliferated, short chain fatty...

  11. EVALUATION OF MEDIA FOR RECOVERY OF AEROSOLIZED BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disease transmission by airborne bacteria is well known.Bacterial burden in indoor air is estimated by sampling the air and estimating Colony Forming Unites (CFU) using a variety of media.In this study, the recovery of bacteria, after aerosolization in an aerosol chamber, and emp...

  12. Method of separating bacteria from free living amoebae

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1994-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  13. Enumerating Spore-Forming Bacteria Airborne with Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Barengoltz, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory method has been conceived to enable the enumeration of (1) Cultivable bacteria and bacterial spores that are, variously, airborne by themselves or carried by, parts of, or otherwise associated with, other airborne particles; and (2) Spore-forming bacteria among all of the aforementioned cultivable microbes.

  14. Use of thermophilic bacteria for bioremediation of petroleum contaminants

    SciT

    Al-Maghrabi, I.M.A.; Bin Aqil, A.O.; Chaalal, O.

    1999-01-01

    Several strains of thermophilic bacteria were isolated from the environment of the United Arab Emirates. These bacteria show extraordinary resistance to heat and have their maximum growth rate around 60--80 C. This article investigates the potential of using these facultative bacteria for both in situ and ex situ bioremediation of petroleum contaminants. In a series of batch experiments, bacterial growth was observed using a computer image analyzer following a recently developed technique. These experiments showed clearly that the growth rate is enhanced in the presence of crude oil. This is coupled with a rapid degradation of the crude oil. Thesemore » bacteria were found to be ideal for breaking down long-chain organic molecules at a temperature of 40 C, which is the typical ambient temperature of the Persian Gulf region. The same strains of bacteria are also capable of surviving in the presence of the saline environment that can prevail in both sea water and reservoir connate water. This observation prompted further investigation into the applicability of the bacteria in microbial enhanced oil recovery. In the United Arab Emirates, the reservoirs are typically at a temperature of around 85 C. Finally, the performance of the bacteria is tested in a newly developed bioreactor that uses continuous aeration through a transverse slotted pipe. This reactor also uses mixing without damaging the filamentous bacteria. In this process, the mechanisms of bioremediation are identified.« less

  15. Distribution and Identification of Luminous Bacteria from the Sargasso Sea

    PubMed Central

    Orndorff, S. A.; Colwell, R. R.

    1980-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri and Lucibacterium harveyi constituted 75 of the 83 luminous bacteria isolated from Sargasso Sea surface waters. Photobacterium leiognathi and Photobacterium phosphoreum constituted the remainder of the isolates. Luminescent bacteria were recovered at concentrations of 1 to 63 cells per 100 ml from water samples collected at depths of 160 to 320 m. Two water samples collected at the thermocline yielded larger numbers of viable, aerobic heterotrophic and luminous bacteria. Luminescent bacteria were not recovered from surface microlayer samples. The species distribution of the luminous bacteria reflected previously recognized growth patterns; i.e., L. harveyi and V. fischeri were predominant in the upper, warm waters (only one isolate of P. phosphoreum was obtained from surface tropical waters). PMID:16345575

  16. 3D printing of bacteria into functional complex materials

    PubMed Central

    Schaffner, Manuel; Rühs, Patrick A.; Coulter, Fergal; Kilcher, Samuel; Studart, André R.

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent advances to control the spatial composition and dynamic functionalities of bacteria embedded in materials, bacterial localization into complex three-dimensional (3D) geometries remains a major challenge. We demonstrate a 3D printing approach to create bacteria-derived functional materials by combining the natural diverse metabolism of bacteria with the shape design freedom of additive manufacturing. To achieve this, we embedded bacteria in a biocompatible and functionalized 3D printing ink and printed two types of “living materials” capable of degrading pollutants and of producing medically relevant bacterial cellulose. With this versatile bacteria-printing platform, complex materials displaying spatially specific compositions, geometry, and properties not accessed by standard technologies can be assembled from bottom up for new biotechnological and biomedical applications. PMID:29214219

  17. Thermal control of virulence factors in bacteria: A hot topic

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Oliver; Wheeler, Jun; Tang, Christoph M

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria sense environmental cues, including the local temperature, to control the production of key virulence factors. Thermal regulation can be achieved at the level of DNA, RNA or protein and although many virulence factors are subject to thermal regulation, the exact mechanisms of control are yet to be elucidated in many instances. Understanding how virulence factors are regulated by temperature presents a significant challenge, as gene expression and protein production are often influenced by complex regulatory networks involving multiple transcription factors in bacteria. Here we highlight some recent insights into thermal regulation of virulence in pathogenic bacteria. We focus on bacteria which cause disease in mammalian hosts, which are at a significantly higher temperature than the outside environment. We outline the mechanisms of thermal regulation and how understanding this fundamental aspect of the biology of bacteria has implications for pathogenesis and human health. PMID:25494856

  18. 3D printing of bacteria into functional complex materials.

    PubMed

    Schaffner, Manuel; Rühs, Patrick A; Coulter, Fergal; Kilcher, Samuel; Studart, André R

    2017-12-01

    Despite recent advances to control the spatial composition and dynamic functionalities of bacteria embedded in materials, bacterial localization into complex three-dimensional (3D) geometries remains a major challenge. We demonstrate a 3D printing approach to create bacteria-derived functional materials by combining the natural diverse metabolism of bacteria with the shape design freedom of additive manufacturing. To achieve this, we embedded bacteria in a biocompatible and functionalized 3D printing ink and printed two types of "living materials" capable of degrading pollutants and of producing medically relevant bacterial cellulose. With this versatile bacteria-printing platform, complex materials displaying spatially specific compositions, geometry, and properties not accessed by standard technologies can be assembled from bottom up for new biotechnological and biomedical applications.

  19. Cationic Conjugated Polymers-Induced Quorum Sensing of Bacteria Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengbo; Lu, Huan; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Jiangyan; Liu, Libing; Lv, Fengting; Wang, Shu

    2016-03-15

    Bacteria quorum sensing (QS) has attracted significant interest for understanding cell-cell communication and regulating biological functions. In this work, we demonstrate that water-soluble cationic conjugated polymers (PFP-G2) can interact with bacteria to form aggregates through electrostatic interactions. With bacteria coated in the aggregate, PFP-G2 can induce the bacteria QS system and prolong the time duration of QS signal molecules (autoinducer-2 (AI-2)) production. The prolonged AI-2 can bind with specific protein and continuously regulate downstream gene expression. Consequently, the bacteria show a higher survival rate against antibiotics, resulting in decreased antimicrobial susceptibility. Also, AI-2 induced by PFP-G2 can stimulate 55.54 ± 12.03% more biofilm in E. coli. This method can be used to understand cell-cell communication and regulate biological functions, such as the production of signaling molecules, antibiotics, other microbial metabolites, and even virulence.

  20. Presence of Pathogenic Bacteria and Viruses in the Daycare Environment.

    PubMed

    Ibfelt, Tobias; Engelund, Eva Hoy; Permin, Anders; Madsen, Jonas Stenløkke; Schultz, Anna Charlotte; Andersen, Leif Percival

    2015-10-01

    The number of children in daycare centers (DCCs) is rising. This increases exposure to microorganisms and infectious diseases. Little is known about which bacteria and viruses are present in the DCC environment and where they are located. In the study described in this article, the authors set out to determine the prevalence of pathogenic bacteria and viruses and to find the most contaminated fomites in DCCs. Fifteen locations in each DCC were sampled for bacteria, respiratory viruses, and gastrointestinal viruses. The locations were in the toilet, kitchen, and playroom areas and included nursery pillows, toys, and tables, among other things. Coliform bacteria were primarily found in the toilet and kitchen areas whereas nasopharyngeal bacteria were found mostly on toys and fabric surfaces in the playroom. Respiratory viruses were omnipresent in the DCC environment, especially on the toys.

  1. Natural soil reservoirs for human pathogenic and fecal indicator bacteria

    Boschiroli, Maria L; Falkinham, Joseph; Favre-Bonte, Sabine; Nazaret, Sylvie; Piveteau, Pascal; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Byappanahalli, Muruleedhara; Delaquis, Pascal; Hartmann, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Soils receive inputs of human pathogenic and indicator bacteria through land application of animal manures or sewage sludge, and inputs by wildlife. Soil is an extremely heterogeneous substrate and contains meso- and macrofauna that may be reservoirs for bacteria of human health concern. The ability to detect and quantify bacteria of human health concern is important in risk assessments and in evaluating the efficacy of agricultural soil management practices that are protective of crop quality and protective of adjacent water resources. The present chapter describes the distribution of selected Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in soils. Methods for detecting and quantifying soilborne bacteria including extraction, enrichment using immunomagnetic capture, culturing, molecular detection and deep sequencing of metagenomic DNA to detect pathogens are overviewed. Methods for strain phenotypic and genotypic characterization are presented, as well as how comparison with clinical isolates can inform the potential for human health risk.

  2. Modeling of stochastic motion of bacteria propelled spherical microbeads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabagi, Veaceslav; Behkam, Bahareh; Cheung, Eugene; Sitti, Metin

    2011-06-01

    This work proposes a stochastic dynamic model of bacteria propelled spherical microbeads as potential swimming microrobotic bodies. Small numbers of S. marcescens bacteria are attached with their bodies to surfaces of spherical microbeads. Average-behavior stochastic models that are normally adopted when studying such biological systems are generally not effective for cases in which a small number of agents are interacting in a complex manner, hence a stochastic model is proposed to simulate the behavior of 8-41 bacteria assembled on a curved surface. Flexibility of the flagellar hook is studied via comparing simulated and experimental results for scenarios of increasing bead size and the number of attached bacteria on a bead. Although requiring more experimental data to yield an exact, certain flagellar hook stiffness value, the examined results favor a stiffer flagella. The stochastic model is intended to be used as a design and simulation tool for future potential targeted drug delivery and disease diagnosis applications of bacteria propelled microrobots.

  3. Detection of pathogenic gram negative bacteria using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Divya, M. P.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Thomas, Sabu; Philip, John

    2012-11-01

    Detection of viable bacteria is of prime importance in all fields of microbiology and biotechnology. Conventional methods of enumerating bacteria are often time consuming and labor-intensive. All living organisms generate heat due to metabolic activities and hence, measurement of heat energy is a viable tool for detection and quantification of bacteria. In this article, we employ a non-contact and real time method - infrared thermography (IRT) for measurement of temperature variations in four clinically significant gram negative pathogenic bacteria, viz. Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We observe that, the energy content, defined as the ratio of heat generated by bacterial metabolic activities to the heat lost from the liquid medium to the surrounding, vary linearly with the bacterial concentration in all the four pathogenic bacteria. The amount of energy content observed in different species is attributed to their metabolisms and morphologies that affect the convection velocity and hence heat transport in the medium.

  4. Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Potential of the Bifurcaria bifurcata Epiphytic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Horta, André; Pinteus, Susete; Alves, Celso; Fino, Nádia; Silva, Joana; Fernandez, Sara; Rodrigues, Américo; Pedrosa, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Surface-associated marine bacteria are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine brown alga, Bifurcaria bifurcata, and the evaluation of the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1) extraction. The antioxidant activity of extracts was performed by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Antimicrobial activities were evaluated against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. A total of 39 Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria were isolated and 33 were identified as Vibrio sp. (48.72%), Alteromonas sp. (12.82%), Shewanella sp. (12.26%), Serratia sp. (2.56%), Citricoccus sp. (2.56%), Cellulophaga sp. (2.56%), Ruegeria sp. (2.56%) and Staphylococcus sp. (2.56%). Six (15.38%) of the 39 bacteria Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria presented less than a 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) match, and some of those could be new. The highest antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity (against B. subtilis) was exhibited by strain 16 (Shewanella sp.). Several strains also presented high antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, mainly belonging to Alteromonas sp. and Vibrio sp. There were no positive results against fungi and Gram-negative bacteria. Bifurcaria bifurcata epiphytic bacteria were revealed to be excellent sources of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds. PMID:24663118

  5. Antioxidant and antimicrobial potential of the Bifurcaria bifurcata epiphytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Horta, André; Pinteus, Susete; Alves, Celso; Fino, Nádia; Silva, Joana; Fernandez, Sara; Rodrigues, Américo; Pedrosa, Rui

    2014-03-24

    Surface-associated marine bacteria are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine brown alga, Bifurcaria bifurcata, and the evaluation of the antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1) extraction. The antioxidant activity of extracts was performed by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Antimicrobial activities were evaluated against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans. A total of 39 Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria were isolated and 33 were identified as Vibrio sp. (48.72%), Alteromonas sp. (12.82%), Shewanella sp. (12.26%), Serratia sp. (2.56%), Citricoccus sp. (2.56%), Cellulophaga sp. (2.56%), Ruegeria sp. (2.56%) and Staphylococcus sp. (2.56%). Six (15.38%) of the 39 bacteria Bifurcaria bifurcata-associated bacteria presented less than a 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) match, and some of those could be new. The highest antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity (against B. subtilis) was exhibited by strain 16 (Shewanella sp.). Several strains also presented high antimicrobial activity against S. aureus, mainly belonging to Alteromonas sp. and Vibrio sp. There were no positive results against fungi and Gram-negative bacteria. Bifurcaria bifurcata epiphytic bacteria were revealed to be excellent sources of natural antioxidant and antimicrobial compounds.

  6. Marine Protists Are Not Just Big Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Patrick J; Campo, Javier Del

    2017-06-05

    The study of marine microbial ecology has been completely transformed by molecular and genomic data: after centuries of relative neglect, genomics has revealed the surprising extent of microbial diversity and how microbial processes transform ocean and global ecosystems. But the revolution is not complete: major gaps in our understanding remain, and one obvious example is that microbial eukaryotes, or protists, are still largely neglected. Here we examine various ways in which protists might be better integrated into models of marine microbial ecology, what challenges this will present, and why understanding the limitations of our tools is a significant concern. In part this is a technical challenge - eukaryotic genomes are more difficult to characterize - but eukaryotic adaptations are also more dependent on morphology and behaviour than they are on the metabolic diversity that typifies bacteria, and these cannot be inferred from genomic data as readily as metabolism can be. We therefore cannot simply follow in the methodological footsteps of bacterial ecology and hope for similar success. Understanding microbial eukaryotes will require different approaches, including greater emphasis on taxonomically and trophically diverse model systems. Molecular sequencing will continue to play a role, and advances in environmental sequence tag studies and single-cell methods for genomic and transcriptomics offer particular promise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Metal Cycling by Bacteria: Moving Electrons Around

    Nealson, Ken

    2017-12-09

    About 20 years ago, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was isolated from a manganese-rich lack in upstate New York, and subsequently shown to utilize solid forms of oxidized manganese or iron as an electron acceptor. Recent studies of metal-reducing bacterial have unveiled a number of unexpected properties of microbes that have enlarged our view of microbes and their role(s) in natural ecosystems. For example, the processes of metal reduction themselves are fundamental to the carbon cycle in many lakes and sediments, where iron and manganese account for the major portion of organic carbon oxidation in many sediments. On more modest spatial scales, iron and manganese reduction can be linked to the oxidation of a wide variety of carbon compounds, many of them recalcitrant and/or toxic. One remarkable property of metal reducers is their ability to reduce solid, often highly crystalline substrates such as iron and manganese oxides and oxyhydroxides. It is now clear that this is done via the utilization of enzymes located on the outer wall of the bacteria - enzymes that apparently interact directly with these solid substrates. Molecular and genomic studies combined have revealed the genes and protoeins responsible for these activities, and many facets of the regulation. This talk focuses on the general features and properties of these remarkable organisms that seem to communicate via electron transfer across a wide variety of soluable, insoluable, and even "inert" substrates, and the way that these processes may be mechanistically linked.

  8. Characterizing relationships among fecal indicator bacteria ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Bed sediments of streams and rivers may store high concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) and pathogens. Due to resuspension events, these contaminants can be mobilized into the water column and affect overall water quality. Other bacterial indicators such as microbial source tracking (MST) markers, developed to determine potential sources of fecal contamination, can also be resuspended from bed sediments. The primary objective of this study was to predict occurrence of waterborne pathogens in water and streambed sediments using a simple statistical model that includes traditionally measured FIB, environmental parameters and source allocation, using MST markers as predictor variables. Synoptic sampling events were conducted during baseflow conditions downstream from agricultural (AG), forested (FORS), and wastewater pollution control plant (WPCP) land uses. Concentrations of FIB and MST markers were measured in water and sediments, along with occurrences of the enteric pathogens Campylobacter, Listeria and Salmonella, and the virulence gene that carries Shiga toxin, stx2. Pathogens were detected in water more often than in underlying sediments. Shiga toxin was significantly related to land use, with concentrations of the ruminant marker selected as an independent variable that could correctly classify 76% and 64% of observed Shiga toxin occurrences in water and sediment, respectively. FIB concentrations and water quality parameters were also selected a

  9. Coliform Bacteria for Bioremediation of Waste Hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Raw, domestic sewage of Kuwait City contained about 106 ml−1 colony forming units of Enterobacter hormaechei subsp. oharae (56.6%), Klebsiella spp. (36%), and Escherichia coli (7.4%), as characterized by their 16S rRNA-gene sequences. The isolated coliforms grew successfully on a mineral medium with crude oil vapor as a sole source of carbon and energy. Those strains also grew, albeit to different degrees, on individual n-alkanes with carbon chains between C9 and C36 and on the individual aromatic hydrocarbons, toluene, naphthalene, phenanthrene, and biphenyl as sole sources of carbon and energy. These results imply that coliforms, like other hydrocarbonoclastic microorganisms, oxidize hydrocarbons to the corresponding alcohols and then to aldehydes and fatty acids which are biodegraded by β-oxidation to acetyl CoA. The latter is a well-known key intermediate in cell material and energy production. E. coli cells grown in the presence of n-hexadecane (but not in its absence) exhibited typical intracellular hydrocarbon inclusions, as revealed by transmission electron microscopy. Raw sewage samples amended with crude oil, n-hexadecane, or phenanthrene lost these hydrocarbons gradually with time. Meanwhile, the numbers of total and individual coliforms, particularly Enterobacter, increased. It was concluded that coliform bacteria in domestic sewage, probably in other environmental materials too, are effective hydrocarbon-biodegrading microorganisms. PMID:29082238

  10. Incidence and significance of intraperitoneal anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stone, H H; Kolb, L D; Geheber, C E

    1975-01-01

    To amplify recent interest in anaerobic infections following abdominal disease, trauma, or surgery, 512 consecutive patients subjected to emergency celiotomy had both aerobic and anaerobic cultures taken of peritoneal fluid as well as all complicating wound and intra-abdominal infections. Average time between peritoneal entry of abscess drainage and specimen incubating under anaerobic conditions was less than two minutes. During 4 of the seven study months, patients had antibiotic therapy randomized, with clindaymcin or cephalothin being sole parenteral agents and given intravenously prior to operation and for 5 days thereafter. Results demonstrated that anaerobes uniformly contaminate the peritoneal cavity whenever distal or obstructed intestine has been perforated, irrespective of the cause. Although all but one of the 123 complicating wound and intra-abdominal infections were due solely or at least in part to aerobic pathogens, 2/3 of such infections also contained one or more different anaerobic species acting in synergism with the aerobes. No significant difference in incidence of postoperative infection or in infecting bacteria could be found with respect to antibiotic administered or etiology of perforation. Indeed, duration of bacterial exposure to atmospheric oxygen was the most critical factor influencing culture recoverability of anaerobic organisms, likelihood of ensuing wound or peritoneal sepsis participated in by an anaerobe, and success in control of established infections harboring anaerobes. PMID:1130885

  11. Sporulation in Bacteria: Beyond the Standard Model.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Elizabeth A; Miller, David A; Angert, Esther R

    2014-10-01

    Endospore formation follows a complex, highly regulated developmental pathway that occurs in a broad range of Firmicutes. Although Bacillus subtilis has served as a powerful model system to study the morphological, biochemical, and genetic determinants of sporulation, fundamental aspects of the program remain mysterious for other genera. For example, it is entirely unknown how most lineages within the Firmicutes regulate entry into sporulation. Additionally, little is known about how the sporulation pathway has evolved novel spore forms and reproductive schemes. Here, we describe endospore and internal offspring development in diverse Firmicutes and outline progress in characterizing these programs. Moreover, comparative genomics studies are identifying highly conserved sporulation genes, and predictions of sporulation potential in new isolates and uncultured bacteria can be made from these data. One surprising outcome of these comparative studies is that core regulatory and some structural aspects of the program appear to be universally conserved. This suggests that a robust and sophisticated developmental framework was already in place in the last common ancestor of all extant Firmicutes that produce internal offspring or endospores. The study of sporulation in model systems beyond B. subtilis will continue to provide key information on the flexibility of the program and provide insights into how changes in this developmental course may confer advantages to cells in diverse environments.

  12. Isolation and characterization of novel chitinolytic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gürkök, Sümeyra; Görmez, Arzu

    2016-04-01

    Chitin, a linear polymer of β-1,4-N-acetylglucosamine units, is one of the most abundant biopolymers widely distributed in the marine and terrestrial environments. It is found as a structural component of insects, crustaceans and the cell walls of fungi. Chitinases, the enzymes degrading chitin by cleaving the β-(1-4) bond, have gained increased attention due to their wide range of biotechnological applications, especially for biocontrol of harmful insects and phytopathogenic fungi in agriculture. In the present study, 200 bacterial isolates from Western Anatolia Region of Turkey were screened for chitinolytic activity on agar media amended with colloidal chitin. Based on the chitin hydrolysis zone, 13 isolates were selected for further study. Bacterial isolates with the highest chitinase activity were identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Arthrobacter oxydans, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Brevibacillus reuszeri, Kocuria erythromyxa, Kocuria rosea, Novosphingobium capsulatum, Rhodococcus bratislaviensis, Rhodococcus fascians and Staphylococcus cohnii by MIS and BIOLOG systems. The next aims of the study are to compare the productivity of these bacteria quantitatively, to purify the enzyme from the most potent producer and to apply the pure enzyme for the fight against the phytopathogenic fungi and harmful insects.

  13. Genetic information transfer promotes cooperation in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dimitriu, Tatiana; Lotton, Chantal; Bénard-Capelle, Julien; Misevic, Dusan; Brown, Sam P.; Lindner, Ariel B.; Taddei, François

    2014-01-01

    Many bacterial species are social, producing costly secreted “public good” molecules that enhance the growth of neighboring cells. The genes coding for these cooperative traits are often propagated via mobile genetic elements and can be virulence factors from a biomedical perspective. Here, we present an experimental framework that links genetic information exchange and the selection of cooperative traits. Using simulations and experiments based on a synthetic bacterial system to control public good secretion and plasmid conjugation, we demonstrate that horizontal gene transfer can favor cooperation. In a well-mixed environment, horizontal transfer brings a direct infectious advantage to any gene, regardless of its cooperation properties. However, in a structured population transfer selects specifically for cooperation by increasing the assortment among cooperative alleles. Conjugation allows cooperative alleles to overcome rarity thresholds and invade bacterial populations structured purely by stochastic dilution effects. Our results provide an explanation for the prevalence of cooperative genes on mobile elements, and suggest a previously unidentified benefit of horizontal gene transfer for bacteria. PMID:25024219

  14. Monitoring sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria

    SciT

    Tanner, R.S.

    1995-12-31

    Simple yet precise and accurate methods for monitoring sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfide remain useful for the study of bacterial souring and corrosion. Test kits are available to measure sulfide in field samples. A more precise methylene blue sulfide assay for both field and laboratory studies is described here. Improved media, compared to that in API RP-38, for enumeration of SRB have been formulated. One of these, API-RST, contained cysteine (1.1 mM) as a reducing agent, which may be a confounding source of sulfide. While cysteine was required for rapid enumeration of SRB from environmental samples, the concentration of cysteinemore » in medium could be reduced to 0.4 mM. It was also determined that elevated levels of yeast extract (>1 g/liter) could interfere with enumeration of SRB from environmental samples. The API-RST medium was modified to a RST-11 medium. Other changes in medium composition, in addition to reduction of cysteine, included reduction of the concentration of phosphate from 3.4 mM to 2.2 mM, reduction of the concentration of ferrous iron from 0.8 mM to 0.5 mM and preparation of a stock mineral solution to ease medium preparation. SRB from environmental samples could be enumerated in a week in this medium.« less

  15. Magnetotactic Bacteria as Potential Sources of Bioproducts

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Ana Carolina V.; Abreu, Fernanda; Silva, Karen Tavares; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Lins, Ulysses

    2015-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) produce intracellular organelles called magnetosomes which are magnetic nanoparticles composed of magnetite (Fe3O4) or greigite (Fe3S4) enveloped by a lipid bilayer. The synthesis of a magnetosome is through a genetically controlled process in which the bacterium has control over the composition, direction of crystal growth, and the size and shape of the mineral crystal. As a result of this control, magnetosomes have narrow and uniform size ranges, relatively specific magnetic and crystalline properties, and an enveloping biological membrane. These features are not observed in magnetic particles produced abiotically and thus magnetosomes are of great interest in biotechnology. Most currently described MTB have been isolated from saline or brackish environments and the availability of their genomes has contributed to a better understanding and culturing of these fastidious microorganisms. Moreover, genome sequences have allowed researchers to study genes related to magnetosome production for the synthesis of magnetic particles for use in future commercial and medical applications. Here, we review the current information on the biology of MTB and apply, for the first time, a genome mining strategy on these microorganisms to search for secondary metabolite synthesis genes. More specifically, we discovered that the genome of the cultured MTB Magnetovibrio blakemorei, among other MTB, contains several metabolic pathways for the synthesis of secondary metabolites and other compounds, thereby raising the possibility of the co-production of new bioactive molecules along with magnetosomes by this species. PMID:25603340

  16. Towards lactic acid bacteria-based biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Mazzoli, Roberto; Bosco, Francesca; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Bayer, Edward A; Pessione, Enrica

    2014-11-15

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have long been used in industrial applications mainly as starters for food fermentation or as biocontrol agents or as probiotics. However, LAB possess several characteristics that render them among the most promising candidates for use in future biorefineries in converting plant-derived biomass-either from dedicated crops or from municipal/industrial solid wastes-into biofuels and high value-added products. Lactic acid, their main fermentation product, is an attractive building block extensively used by the chemical industry, owing to the potential for production of polylactides as biodegradable and biocompatible plastic alternative to polymers derived from petrochemicals. LA is but one of many high-value compounds which can be produced by LAB fermentation, which also include biofuels such as ethanol and butanol, biodegradable plastic polymers, exopolysaccharides, antimicrobial agents, health-promoting substances and nutraceuticals. Furthermore, several LAB strains have ascertained probiotic properties, and their biomass can be considered a high-value product. The present contribution aims to provide an extensive overview of the main industrial applications of LAB and future perspectives concerning their utilization in biorefineries. Strategies will be described in detail for developing LAB strains with broader substrate metabolic capacity for fermentation of cheaper biomass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ecology, Diversity, and Evolution of Magnetotactic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bazylinski, Dennis A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are widespread, motile, diverse prokaryotes that biomineralize a unique organelle called the magnetosome. Magnetosomes consist of a nano-sized crystal of a magnetic iron mineral that is enveloped by a lipid bilayer membrane. In cells of almost all MTB, magnetosomes are organized as a well-ordered chain. The magnetosome chain causes the cell to behave like a motile, miniature compass needle where the cell aligns and swims parallel to magnetic field lines. MTB are found in almost all types of aquatic environments, where they can account for an important part of the bacterial biomass. The genes responsible for magnetosome biomineralization are organized as clusters in the genomes of MTB, in some as a magnetosome genomic island. The functions of a number of magnetosome genes and their associated proteins in magnetosome synthesis and construction of the magnetosome chain have now been elucidated. The origin of magnetotaxis appears to be monophyletic; that is, it developed in a common ancestor to all MTB, although horizontal gene transfer of magnetosome genes also appears to play a role in their distribution. The purpose of this review, based on recent progress in this field, is focused on the diversity and the ecology of the MTB and also the evolution and transfer of the molecular determinants involved in magnetosome formation. PMID:24006473

  18. Mechanism of quinolone resistance in anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Oh, H; Edlund, C

    2003-06-01

    Several recently developed quinolones have excellent activity against a broad range of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and are thus potential drugs for the treatment of serious anaerobic and mixed infections. Resistance to quinolones is increasing worldwide, but is still relatively infrequent among anaerobes. Two main mechanisms, alteration of target enzymes (gyrase and topoisomerase IV) caused by chromosomal mutations in encoding genes, or reduced intracellular accumulation due to increased efflux of the drug, are associated with quinolone resistance. These mechanisms have also been found in anaerobic species. High-level resistance to the newer broad-spectrum quinolones often requires stepwise mutations in target genes. The increasing emergence of resistance among anaerobes may be a consequence of previous widespread use of quinolones, which may have enriched first-step mutants in the intestinal tract. Quinolone resistance in the Bacteroides fragilis group strains is strongly correlated with amino acid substitutions at positions 82 and 86 in GyrA (equivalent to positions 83 and 87 of Escherichia coli). Several studies have indicated that B. fragilis group strains possess efflux pump systems that actively expel quinolones, leading to resistance. DNA gyrase seems also to be the primary target for quinolones in Clostridium difficile, since amino acid substitutions in GyrA and GyrB have been detected in resistant strains. To what extent other mechanisms, such as mutational events in other target genes or alterations in outer-membrane proteins, contribute to resistance among anaerobes needs to be further investigated.

  19. Fluid dynamic effects on staphylococci bacteria biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Erica; Bayles, Kenneth; Endres, Jennifer; Wei, Timothy

    2016-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteria are able to form biofilms and distinctive tower structures that facilitate their ability to tolerate treatment and to spread within the human body. The formation of towers, which break off, get carried downstream and serve to initiate biofilms in other parts of the body are of particular interest here. It is known that flow conditions play a role in the development, dispersion and propagation of biofilms in general. The influence of flow on tower formation, however, is not at all understood. This work is focused on the effect of applied shear on tower development. The hypothesis being examined is that tower structures form within a specific range of shear stresses and that there is an as yet ill defined fluid dynamic phenomenon that occurs hours before a tower forms. In this study, a range of shear stresses is examined that brackets 0.6 dynes/cm2, the nominal shear stress where towers seem most likely to form. This talk will include µPTV measurements and cell density data indicating variations in flow and biofilm evolution as a function of the applied shear. Causal relations between flow and biofilm development will be discussed.

  20. Chemical markers for bacteria in extraterrestrial samples.

    PubMed

    Fox, Alvin

    2002-11-01

    Interplanetary missions to collect pristine Martian surface samples for analysis of organic molecules, and to search for evidence of life, are in the planning phases. The only extraterrestrial samples currently on Earth are lunar dust and rocks, brought back by the Apollo (U.S.) and Luna (Soviet Union) missions to the moon, and meteorites. Meteorites are contaminated when they pass through the Earth's atmosphere, and during environmental exposure on Earth. Lunar fines have been stored on Earth for over 30 years under conditions designed to avoid chemical but not microbiological contamination. It has been extremely difficult to draw firm conclusions about the origin of chemicals (including amino acids) in extraterrestrial samples. Of particular concern has been the possibility of bacterial contamination. Recent work using state-of-the-art gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) has dramatically lowered the chemical background, allowing a clear demonstration that lunar fines are remarkably different from terrestrial dust in that they generally lack certain chemical markers (muramic acid and 3-hydroxy fatty acids) characteristic of Earth's bacteria. Thus, lunar dust might be used as a negative control, in conjunction with GC-MS/MS analyses, in future analytical studies of lunar dust and meteorites. Such analyses may also be important in studies designed to search for the presence of life on Mars. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Structure determination and total synthesis of a novel antibacterial substance, AB0022A, produced by a cellular slime mold.

    PubMed

    Sawada, T; Aono, M; Asakawa, S; Ito, A; Awano, K

    2000-09-01

    A novel antibacterial substance, AB0022A, was isolated from the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium purpureum K1001. It inhibited the growth of Gram-positive bacteria, and its MICs ranged from 0.39 to 50 microg/ml. Because AB0022A was a highly substituted aromatic compound, we could not determine its structure based on only its physico-chemical and spectral data. We therefore used a dehalogenated derivative from AB0022A and deduced that its structure was 1,9-dihydroxy-3,7-dimethoxy-2-hexanoyl-4,6,8-trichlorodibenzofuran . To confirm this structure, we synthesized the compound having the deduced structure. The synthetic compound was identical to naturally occurring AB0022A.

  2. [Effects of traditional Chinese medicine on oral bacteria biofilm].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin; Li, Ji-yao; Zhu, Bing; Zhou, Xue-dong

    2007-10-01

    To investigate the effects of compounds of Galla chinensis extract (GCE) and Nidus vespae extract-1 (WVE1) on oral bacteria biofilm structure and activity and to determine the possibility of caries prevention by the compounds. The morphology and activity of treated-oral bacterial biofilm and untreated-oral bacterial biofilm were observed by using fluorescence microscope in combination of idio-fluorochrome to label the died and living bacteria. The visible light semiquantitative method was used to measure biomass glucosyltransferase (GTF, A620) values and to determine the effects of active compounds of GCE and NVE1 on GTF of oral bacteria biofilm. The living bacteria in the untreated 24 h bacterial biofilm was dominant, and only a small number of died bacteria were found, the biofilm structure was regular and clear. GCE, GCE-B and NVE1 could inhibit the bacteria in the dental biofilm, which showed significant difference with the negative control. GCE and NVE1 could also inhibit GTF activity of 24 h bacterial biofilm in comparison with the negative control. The traditional Chinese medicine Galla chinensis and Nidus vespae could not only inhibit bacteria growth on oral bacterial biofilm, but also function by adjusting biofilm structure, composition and GTF activity of 24 h bacterial biofilm.

  3. Amoeba-Resisting Bacteria and Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    La Scola, Bernard; Boyadjiev, Ioanna; Greub, Gilbert; Khamis, Atieh; Martin, Claude

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the role of amoeba-associated bacteria as agents of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), we tested the water from an intensive care unit (ICU) every week for 6 months for such bacteria isolates; serum samples and bronchoalveolar lavage samples (BAL) were also obtained from 30 ICU patients. BAL samples were examined for amoeba-associated bacteria DNA by suicide-polymerase chain reaction, and serum samples were tested against ICU amoeba-associated bacteria. A total of 310 amoeba-associated bacteria from10 species were isolated. Twelve of 30 serum samples seroconverted to one amoeba-associated bacterium isolated in the ICU, mainly Legionella anisa and Bosea massiliensis, the most common isolates from water (p=0.021). Amoeba-associated bacteria DNA was detected in BAL samples from two patients whose samples later seroconverted. Seroconversion was significantly associated with VAP and systemic inflammatory response syndrome, especially in patients for whom no etiologic agent was found by usual microbiologic investigations. Amoeba-associated bacteria might be a cause of VAP in ICUs, especially when microbiologic investigations are negative. PMID:12890321

  4. Differentiating the growth phases of single bacteria using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strola, S. A.; Marcoux, P. R.; Schultz, E.; Perenon, R.; Simon, A.-C.; Espagnon, I.; Allier, C. P.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a longitudinal study of bacteria metabolism performed with a novel Raman spectrometer system. Longitudinal study is possible with our Raman setup since the overall procedure to localize a single bacterium and collect a Raman spectrum lasts only 1 minute. Localization and detection of single bacteria are performed by means of lensfree imaging, whereas Raman signal (from 600 to 3200 cm-1) is collected into a prototype spectrometer that allows high light throughput (HTVS technology, Tornado Spectral System). Accomplishing time-lapse Raman spectrometry during growth of bacteria, we observed variation in the net intensities for some band groups, e.g. amides and proteins. The obtained results on two different bacteria species, i.e. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis clearly indicate that growth affects the Raman chemical signature. We performed a first analysis to check spectral differences and similarities. It allows distinguishing between lag, exponential and stationary growth phases. And the assignment of interest bands to vibration modes of covalent bonds enables the monitoring of metabolic changes in bacteria caused by growth and aging. Following the spectra analysis, a SVM (support vector machine) classification of the different growth phases is presented. In sum this longitudinal study by means of a compact and low-cost Raman setup is a proof of principle for routine analysis of bacteria, in a real-time and non-destructive way. Real-time Raman studies on metabolism and viability of bacteria pave the way for future antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  5. Incorporation of therapeutically modified bacteria into gut microbiota inhibits obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhongyi; Guo, Lilu; Zhang, Yongqin; L. Walzem, Rosemary; Pendergast, Julie S.; Printz, Richard L.; Morris, Lindsey C.; Matafonova, Elena; Stien, Xavier; Kang, Li; Coulon, Denis; McGuinness, Owen P.; Niswender, Kevin D.; Davies, Sean S.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic disorders, including obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, are widespread in Westernized nations. Gut microbiota composition is a contributing factor to the susceptibility of an individual to the development of these disorders; therefore, altering a person’s microbiota may ameliorate disease. One potential microbiome-altering strategy is the incorporation of modified bacteria that express therapeutic factors into the gut microbiota. For example, N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs) are precursors to the N-acylethanolamide (NAE) family of lipids, which are synthesized in the small intestine in response to feeding and reduce food intake and obesity. Here, we demonstrated that administration of engineered NAPE-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 bacteria in drinking water for 8 weeks reduced the levels of obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet. Mice that received modified bacteria had dramatically lower food intake, adiposity, insulin resistance, and hepatosteatosis compared with mice receiving standard water or control bacteria. The protective effects conferred by NAPE-expressing bacteria persisted for at least 4 weeks after their removal from the drinking water. Moreover, administration of NAPE-expressing bacteria to TallyHo mice, a polygenic mouse model of obesity, inhibited weight gain. Our results demonstrate that incorporation of appropriately modified bacteria into the gut microbiota has potential as an effective strategy to inhibit the development of metabolic disorders. PMID:24960158

  6. Incorporation of therapeutically modified bacteria into gut microbiota inhibits obesity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhongyi; Guo, Lilu; Zhang, Yongqin; Walzem, Rosemary L; Pendergast, Julie S; Printz, Richard L; Morris, Lindsey C; Matafonova, Elena; Stien, Xavier; Kang, Li; Coulon, Denis; McGuinness, Owen P; Niswender, Kevin D; Davies, Sean S

    2014-08-01

    Metabolic disorders, including obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, are widespread in Westernized nations. Gut microbiota composition is a contributing factor to the susceptibility of an individual to the development of these disorders; therefore, altering a person's microbiota may ameliorate disease. One potential microbiome-altering strategy is the incorporation of modified bacteria that express therapeutic factors into the gut microbiota. For example, N-acylphosphatidylethanolamines (NAPEs) are precursors to the N-acylethanolamide (NAE) family of lipids, which are synthesized in the small intestine in response to feeding and reduce food intake and obesity. Here, we demonstrated that administration of engineered NAPE-expressing E. coli Nissle 1917 bacteria in drinking water for 8 weeks reduced the levels of obesity in mice fed a high-fat diet. Mice that received modified bacteria had dramatically lower food intake, adiposity, insulin resistance, and hepatosteatosis compared with mice receiving standard water or control bacteria. The protective effects conferred by NAPE-expressing bacteria persisted for at least 4 weeks after their removal from the drinking water. Moreover, administration of NAPE-expressing bacteria to TallyHo mice, a polygenic mouse model of obesity, inhibited weight gain. Our results demonstrate that incorporation of appropriately modified bacteria into the gut microbiota has potential as an effective strategy to inhibit the development of metabolic disorders.

  7. Symbiotic bacteria enable olive fly larvae to overcome host defences

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Yosef, Michael; Pasternak, Zohar; Jurkevitch, Edouard; Yuval, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    Ripe fruit offer readily available nutrients for many animals, including fruit fly larvae (Diptera: Tephritidae) and their associated rot-inducing bacteria. Yet, during most of their ontogeny, fruit remain chemically defended and effectively suppress herbivores and pathogens by high levels of secondary metabolites. Olive flies (Bactrocera oleae) are uniquely able to develop in unripe olives. Unlike other frugivorous tephritids, the larvae maintain bacteria confined within their midgut caeca. We examined the interaction between larvae, their associated bacteria, and fruit chemical defence, hypothesizing that bacterial contribution to larval development is contingent on the phenology of fruit defensive chemistry. We demonstrate that larvae require their natural complement of bacteria (Candidatus Erwinia dacicola: Enterobacteriaceae) in order to develop in unripe olives. Conversely, when feeding on ripe fruit, larval development proceeds independently of these bacteria. Our experiments suggest that bacteria counteract the inhibitory effect of oleuropein—the principal phenolic glycoside in unripe olives. In light of these results, we suggest that the unique symbiosis in olive flies, compared with other frugivorous tephritids, is understood by considering the relationship between the fly, bacteria and fruit chemistry. When applied in an evolutionary context, this approach may also point out the forces which shaped symbioses across the Tephritidae. PMID:26587275

  8. Multiresistant Bacteria Isolated from Chicken Meat in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Zarfel, Gernot; Galler, Herbert; Luxner, Josefa; Petternel, Christian; Reinthaler, Franz F.; Haas, Doris; Kittinger, Clemens; Grisold, Andrea J.; Pless, Peter; Feierl, Gebhard

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistant bacteria (MDR bacteria), such as extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) Enterobacteriaceae, methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), pose a challenge to the human health care system. In recent years, these MDR bacteria have been detected increasingly outside the hospital environment. Also the contamination of food with MDR bacteria, particularly of meat and meat products, is a concern. The aim of the study was to evaluate the occurrence of MDR bacteria in chicken meat on the Austrian market. For this study, 50 chicken meat samples were analysed. All samples originated from chickens slaughtered in Austrian slaughterhouses and were marked as produced in Austria. Samples were analysed for the presence of ESBL Enterobacteriaceae, methicillin resistant Staphylococci and VRE. Resistance genes of the isolated bacteria were characterised by PCR and sequencing. In the present study 26 ESBL producing E. coli, five mecA gene harbouring Staphylococci (but no MRSA), and four VRE were detected in chicken meat samples of Austrian origin. In 24 (48%) of the samples no ESBL Enterobacteriaceae, MRSA, methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus (MRCNS) or VRE could be detected. None of the samples contained all three types of investigated multiresistant bacteria. In concordance to previous studies, CTX-M-1 and SHV-12 were the dominant ESBL genes. PMID:25485979

  9. Rapid separation of very low concentrations of bacteria from blood.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Clara M; Wood, Ryan L; Hoj, Taalin R; Alizadeh, Mahsa; Bledsoe, Colin G; Wood, Madison E; McClellan, Daniel S; Blanco, Rae; Hickey, Caroline L; Ravsten, Tanner V; Husseini, Ghaleb A; Robison, Richard A; Pitt, William G

    2017-08-01

    A rapid and accurate diagnosis of the species and antibiotic resistance of bacteria in septic blood is vital to increase survival rates of patients with bloodstream infections, particularly those with carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE) infections. The extremely low levels in blood (1 to 100CFU/ml) make rapid diagnosis difficult. In this study, very low concentrations of bacteria (6 to 200CFU/ml) were separated from 7ml of whole blood using rapid sedimentation in a spinning hollow disk that separated plasma from red and white cells, leaving most of the bacteria suspended in the plasma. Following less than a minute of spinning, the disk was slowed, the plasma was recovered, and the bacteria were isolated by vacuum filtration. The filters were grown on nutrient plates to determine the number of bacteria recovered from the blood. Experiments were done without red blood cell (RBC) lysis and with RBC lysis in the recovered plasma. While there was scatter in the data from blood with low bacterial concentrations, the mean average recovery was 69%. The gender of the blood donor made no statistical difference in bacterial recovery. These results show that this rapid technique recovers a significant amount of bacteria from blood containing clinically relevant low levels of bacteria, producing the bacteria in minutes. These bacteria could subsequently be identified by molecular techniques to quickly identify the infectious organism and its resistance profile, thus greatly reducing the time needed to correctly diagnose and treat a blood infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacteria on external fixators: which prep is best?

    PubMed

    Stinner, Daniel J; Beltran, Michael J; Masini, Brendan D; Wenke, Joseph C; Hsu, Joseph R

    2012-03-01

    There are no established guidelines for the surgical prep of an external fixator in the operative field. This study investigates the effectiveness of different prep solutions and methods of application. Forty external fixator constructs, consisting of a rod, pin, and pin to rod coupling device, were immersed in a broth of Staphylococcus aureus (lux) for 12 hours. Constructs were then randomized into four treatment groups: chlorhexidine-gluconate (CHG) (4%) scrub, CHG (4%) spray, povidone-iodine (PI) (10%) scrub, and PI (10%) spray. Each construct was imaged with a specialized photon capturing camera system yielding the quantitative and spatial distribution of bacteria both before and after the prep. Each pin to bar clamp was loosened and moved 2 cm down the construct, simulating an external fixator adjustment, and reimaged. Spatial distribution of bacteria and total bacteria counts were compared. There was a similar reduction in bacteria after surgical prep when comparing all four groups independently (p = 0.19), method of application (spray vs. scrub, p = 0.27), and different solutions (CHG vs. PI, p = 0.41). Although bacteria were evident in newly exposed areas after external fixator adjustment, most notably within the loosened pin to bar clamp, it did not result in an increase in bacteria counts (all four groups, p = 0.11; spray vs. scrub, p = 0.18; CHG vs. PI, p = 0.99). Although there was no increase in bacteria counts after the simulated external fixator adjustment, it did expose additional bacteria previously unseen. Although there was no difference in surgical prep solution or method of application, consideration must be given to performing an additional surgical prep of the newly exposed surface after loosening of each individual external fixator component as this may further minimize potential bacteria exposure.

  11. Evolution and diversity of Rickettsia bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Weinert, Lucy A; Werren, John H; Aebi, Alexandre; Stone, Graham N; Jiggins, Francis M

    2009-01-01

    Background Rickettsia are intracellular symbionts of eukaryotes that are best known for infecting and causing serious diseases in humans and other mammals. All known vertebrate-associated Rickettsia are vectored by arthropods as part of their life-cycle, and many other Rickettsia are found exclusively in arthropods with no known secondary host. However, little is known about the biology of these latter strains. Here, we have identified 20 new strains of Rickettsia from arthropods, and constructed a multi-gene phylogeny of the entire genus which includes these new strains. Results We show that Rickettsia are primarily arthropod-associated bacteria, and identify several novel groups within the genus. Rickettsia do not co-speciate with their hosts but host shifts most often occur between related arthropods. Rickettsia have evolved adaptations including transmission through vertebrates and killing males in some arthropod hosts. We uncovered one case of horizontal gene transfer among Rickettsia, where a strain is a chimera from two distantly related groups, but multi-gene analysis indicates that different parts of the genome tend to share the same phylogeny. Conclusion Approximately 150 million years ago, Rickettsia split into two main clades, one of which primarily infects arthropods, and the other infects a diverse range of protists, other eukaryotes and arthropods. There was then a rapid radiation about 50 million years ago, which coincided with the evolution of life history adaptations in a few branches of the phylogeny. Even though Rickettsia are thought to be primarily transmitted vertically, host associations are short lived with frequent switching to new host lineages. Recombination throughout the genus is generally uncommon, although there is evidence of horizontal gene transfer. A better understanding of the evolution of Rickettsia will help in the future to elucidate the mechanisms of pathogenicity, transmission and virulence. PMID:19187530

  12. NUTRITION AND METABOLISM OF MARINE BACTERIA1

    PubMed Central

    Takacs, Frank P.; Matula, Tibor I.; MacLeod, Robert A.

    1964-01-01

    Takacs, Frank P. (McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada), Tibor I. Matula, and Robert A. MacLeod. Nutrition and metabolism of marine bacteria. XIII. Intracellular concentrations of sodium and potassium ions in a marine pseudomonad. J. Bacteriol. 87:510–518. 1964.—Washed cells of a marine pseudomonad were suspended in buffered salt solutions containing, in addition to MgSO4, NaCl and KCl at various concentrations. The cells were centrifuged from the medium and analyzed for Na+ and K+. Inulin and C14-carboxypolyglucose were employed to estimate the volume of extracellular fluid associated with the packed cells. Intracellular Na+ and K+ concentrations were determined by correcting for the amount of Na+ and K+ in the extracellular fluid. At all levels of Na+ in the suspending medium (0 to 1 m), the intracellular and extracellular Na+ concentrations within the limits of experimental error were the same. The intracellular K+ concentrations were approximately double the extracellular concentrations at the two levels of K+ tested (0.01 and 0.15 m) and were not influenced by the amount of Na+ present. Intracellular and extracellular Cl− concentrations were the same at the one level of Cl− examined. The intracellular fluid volume varied with the NaCl or KCl concentration of the suspending medium, being greatest in the absence of added salts, decreasing to a minimum at 0.3 m salt, and then increasing slightly at higher salt concentrations. Most of the intracellular Na+ could be removed by washing with solutions of MgSO4 or sucrose, but a small amount [10 to 15 μmoles/g (dry weight)] remained bound to the cells. PMID:14129666

  13. Occurrence of foodborne bacteria in Alberta feedlots.

    PubMed

    Van Donkersgoed, Joyce; Bohaychuk, Valerie; Besser, Thomas; Song, Xin-Ming; Wagner, Bruce; Hancock, Dale; Renter, David; Dargatz, David

    2009-02-01

    The occurrence of generic Escherichia coli, E. coli O157, Salmonella, and Campylobacter in cattle manure, beef carcasses, catch basin water, and soils receiving manure application was determined in 21 Alberta feedlots. In cattle manure, generic E. coli (98%, 2069/2100) and Campylobacter (76%, 1590/2100) were frequently detected; E. coli O157 (7%, 143/2100) and Salmonella (1%, 20/2100) were less frequently detected. Samples from beef carcasses in the cooler following Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point interventions yielded only 1 isolate each of generic E. coli and Campylobacter (1/1653) and no Salmonella (0/1653). Catch basin water specimens were positive for generic E. coli in both the spring (62%, 13/21) and the fall (52%, 11/21). Other bacteria were detected only in the spring water specimens, including E. coli O157 (29%, 6/21), Salmonella (5%, 1/21), and Campylobacter (52%, 11/21). Generic E. coli was frequently isolated from soil specimens (30%, 27/88), but E. coli O157 was not found in soil samples obtained in the spring and was only occasionally detected in the fall samples (9%, 3/32). Salmonella were occasionally found in the soil specimens collected in the spring (3%, 2/56), but not in the fall season (0/32). Campylobacter jejuni was frequent in cattle manure (66%, 1070/1623), but rare in carcass and environmental samples. E. coli O157 and Salmonella were rarely detected in cattle or the environment. Generic E. coli and Salmonella were rarely detected on carcasses.

  14. Two Different Rickettsial Bacteria Invading Volvox carteri

    PubMed Central

    Kawafune, Kaoru; Hongoh, Yuichi; Hamaji, Takashi; Sakamoto, Tomoaki; Kurata, Tetsuya; Hirooka, Shunsuke; Miyagishima, Shin-ya; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacteria of the family Rickettsiaceae are principally associated with arthropods. Recently, endosymbionts of the Rickettsiaceae have been found in non-phagotrophic cells of the volvocalean green algae Carteria cerasiformis, Pleodorina japonica, and Volvox carteri. Such endosymbionts were present in only C. cerasiformis strain NIES-425 and V. carteri strain UTEX 2180, of various strains of Carteria and V. carteri examined, suggesting that rickettsial endosymbionts may have been transmitted to only a few algal strains very recently. However, in preliminary work, we detected a sequence similar to that of a rickettsial gene in the nuclear genome of V. carteri strain EVE. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we explored the origin of the rickettsial gene-like sequences in the endosymbiont-lacking V. carteri strain EVE, by performing comparative analyses on 13 strains of V. carteri. By reference to our ongoing genomic sequence of rickettsial endosymbionts in C. cerasiformis strain NIES-425 cells, we confirmed that an approximately 9-kbp DNA sequence encompassing a region similar to that of four rickettsial genes was present in the nuclear genome of V. carteri strain EVE. Phylogenetic analyses, and comparisons of the synteny of rickettsial gene-like sequences from various strains of V. carteri, indicated that the rickettsial gene-like sequences in the nuclear genome of V. carteri strain EVE were closely related to rickettsial gene sequences of P. japonica, rather than those of V. carteri strain UTEX 2180. Conclusion/Significance At least two different rickettsial organisms may have invaded the V. carteri lineage, one of which may be the direct ancestor of the endosymbiont of V. carteri strain UTEX 2180, whereas the other may be closely related to the endosymbiont of P. japonica. Endosymbiotic gene transfer from the latter rickettsial organism may have occurred in an ancestor of V. carteri. Thus, the rickettsiae may be widely associated with V. carteri, and

  15. Effect of dielectrophoretic force on swimming bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Phu; Marcos

    2015-07-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has been applied widely in bacterial manipulation such as separating, concentrating, and focusing. Previous studies primarily focused on the collective effects of DEP force on the bacterial population. However, the influence of DEP force on the swimming of a single bacterium had not been investigated. In this study, we present a model to analyze the effect of DEP force on a swimming helically flagellated bacterium, particularly on its swimming direction and velocity. We consider a simple DEP force that acts along the X-direction, and its strength as well as direction varies with the X- and Y-positions. Resistive force theory is employed to compute the hydrodynamic force on the bacterium's flagellar bundle, and the effects of both DEP force and rotational diffusion on the swimming of the bacterium are simultaneously taken into consideration using the Fokker-Planck equation. We show the mechanism of how DEP force alters the orientation and velocity of the bacterium. In most cases, the DEP force dominantly influences the orientation of the swimming bacterium; however, when the DEP force strongly varies along the Y-direction, the rotational diffusion is also responsible for determining the bacterium's reorientation. More interestingly, the variance of DEP force along the Y-direction causes the bacterium to experience a translational velocity perpendicular to its primary axis, and this phenomenon could be utilized to focus the bacteria. Finally, we show the feasibility of applying our findings to achieve bacterial focusing. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. An ancient divergence among the bacteria. [methanogenic phylogeny

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balch, W. E.; Magrum, L. J.; Fox, G. E.; Wolfe, R. S.; Woese, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNZs from two species of met methanogenic bacteria, the mesophile Methanobacterium ruminantium and the thermophile Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, have been characterized in terms of the oligonucleotides produced by digestion with T1 ribonuclease. These two organisms are found to be sufficiently related that they can be considered members of the same genus or family. However, they bear only slight resemblance to 'typical' Procaryotic genera; such as Escherichia, Bacillus and Anacystis. The divergence of the methanogenic bacteria from other bacteria may be the most ancient phylogenetic event yet detected - antedating considerably the divergence of the blue green algal line for example, from the main bacterial line.

  17. [Establishment of Assessment Method for Air Bacteria and Fungi Contamination].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua-ling; Yao, Da-jun; Zhang, Yu; Fang, Zi-liang

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, in order to settle existing problems in the assessment of air bacteria and fungi contamination, the indoor and outdoor air bacteria and fungi filed concentrations by impact method and settlement method in existing documents were collected and analyzed, then the goodness of chi square was used to test whether these concentration data obeyed normal distribution at the significant level of α = 0.05, and combined with the 3σ principle of normal distribution and the current assessment standards, the suggested concentrations ranges of air microbial concentrations were determined. The research results could provide a reference for developing air bacteria and fungi contamination assessment standards in the future.

  18. Importance of lactic acid bacteria in Asian fermented foods

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria play important roles in various fermented foods in Asia. Besides being the main component in kimchi and other fermented foods, they are used to preserve edible food materials through fermentation of other raw-materials such as rice wine/beer, rice cakes, and fish by producing organic acids to control putrefactive microorganisms and pathogens. These bacteria also provide a selective environment favoring fermentative microorganisms and produce desirable flavors in various fermented foods. This paper discusses the role of lactic acid bacteria in various non-dairy fermented food products in Asia and their nutritional and physiological functions in the Asian diet. PMID:21995342

  19. Chapter A7. Section 7.1. Fecal Indicator Bacteria

    Myers, Donna N.; Sylvester, Marc A.

    1997-01-01

    Fecal indicator bacteria are used to assess the microbiological quality of water because, although not typically disease causing, they are correlated with the presence of several waterborne disease-causing organisms. The concentration of indicator bacteria is a measure of water safety for body-contact recreation or for consumption. This report provides information on the equipment, sampling protocols, and identification, enumeration, and calculation procedures that are in standard use by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel for the collection of data on fecal indicator bacteria.

  20. Control of microfabricated structures powered by flagellated bacteria using phototaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steager, Edward; Kim, Chang-Beom; Patel, Jigarkumar; Bith, Socheth; Naik, Chandan; Reber, Lindsay; Kim, Min Jun

    2007-06-01

    Flagellated bacteria have been employed as microactuators in low Reynolds number fluidic environments. SU-8 microstructures have been fabricated and released on the surface of swarming Serratia marcescens, and the flagella propel the structures along the swarm surface. Phototactic control of these structures is demonstrated by exposing the localized regions of the swarm to ultraviolet light. The authors additionally discuss the control of microstructures in an open channel powered by bacteria which have been docked through a blotting technique. A tracking algorithm has been developed to analyze swarming patterns of the bacteria as well as the kinematics of the microstructures.

  1. Membrane-active macromolecules kill antibiotic-tolerant bacteria and potentiate antibiotics towards Gram-negative bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Uppu, Divakara S. S. M.; Konai, Mohini M.; Sarkar, Paramita; Samaddar, Sandip; Fensterseifer, Isabel C. M.; Farias-Junior, Celio; Krishnamoorthy, Paramanandam; Shome, Bibek R.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic bacterial biofilms place a massive burden on healthcare due to the presence of antibiotic-tolerant dormant bacteria. Some of the conventional antibiotics such as erythromycin, vancomycin, linezolid, rifampicin etc. are inherently ineffective against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly in their biofilms. Here, we report membrane-active macromolecules that kill slow dividing stationary-phase and antibiotic tolerant cells of Gram-negative bacteria. More importantly, these molecules potentiate antibiotics (erythromycin and rifampicin) to biofilms of Gram-negative bacteria. These molecules eliminate planktonic bacteria that are liberated after dispersion of biofilms (dispersed cells). The membrane-active mechanism of these molecules forms the key for potentiating the established antibiotics. Further, we demonstrate that the combination of macromolecules and antibiotics significantly reduces bacterial burden in mouse burn and surgical wound infection models caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Carbapenemase producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (KPC) clinical isolate respectively. Colistin, a well-known antibiotic targeting the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram-negative bacteria fails to kill antibiotic tolerant cells and dispersed cells (from biofilms) and bacteria develop resistance to it. On the contrary, these macromolecules prevent or delay the development of bacterial resistance to known antibiotics. Our findings emphasize the potential of targeting the bacterial membrane in antibiotic potentiation for disruption of biofilms and suggest a promising strategy towards developing therapies for topical treatment of Gram-negative infections. PMID:28837596

  2. Bacteria and genetically modified bacteria as cancer therapeutics: Current advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Nallar, Shreeram C; Xu, De-Qi; Kalvakolanu, Dhan V

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria act as pro- or anti- tumorigenic agents. Whole bacteria or cytotoxic or immunogenic peptides carried by them exert potent anti-tumor effects in the experimental models of cancer. The use of attenuated microorganism(s) e.g., BCG to treat human urinary bladder cancer was found to be superior compared to standard chemotherapy. Although the phase-I clinical trials with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, has shown limited benefits in human subjects, a recent pre-clinical trial in pet dogs with tumors reported some subjects benefited from this treatment strain. In addition to the attenuated host strains derived by conventional mutagenesis, recombinant DNA technology has been applied to a few microorganisms that have been evaluated in the context of tumor colonization and eradication using mouse models. There is an enormous surge in publications describing bacterial anti-cancer therapies in the past 15years. Vectors for delivering shRNAs that target oncogenic products, express tumor suppressor genes and immunogenic proteins have been developed. These approaches have showed promising anti-tumor activity in mouse models against various tumors. These can be potential therapeutics for humans in the future. In this review, some conceptual and practical issues on how to improve these agents for human applications are discussed. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Bacteria profile and antibiogram of the bacteria isolated from the exposed pulp of dog canine teeth.

    PubMed

    Almansa Ruiz, José Carlos; Jonker, Annelize; Bosman, Anna-Mari; Steenkamp, Gerhard

    2018-04-27

    Twenty-seven microbiological samples were taken from root canals (RC) of the canine teeth of 20 dogs where the pulps were non-vital and exposed due to complicated crown fractures. These pulps were cultured for aerobic/anaerobic bacteria. Antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates was determined using the Kirby-Bauer diffusion test. A total of 49 cultivable isolates, belonging to 27 different microbial species and 18 different genera, were recovered from the 27 RCs sampled. Twenty (40.81 per cent) of the cultivable isolates were Gram positive while 29 (59.19 per cent) were Gram negative. Facultative anaerobes were the most common bacteria (77.56 per cent). Aerobic isolates represented 18.36 per cent, and strict anaerobes 4.08 per cent. The antimicrobials with the highest in vitro efficacy were gentamicin (100 per cent) and enrofloxacin (93.32 per cent). © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Mineral deposition in bacteria-filled and bacteria-free calcium bodies in the crustacean Hyloniscus riparius (Isopoda: Oniscidea).

    PubMed

    Vittori, Miloš; Rozman, Alenka; Grdadolnik, Jože; Novak, Urban; Štrus, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Crustacean calcium bodies are epithelial sacs which contain a mineralized matrix. The objectives of this study were to describe the microscopic anatomy of calcium bodies in the terrestrial isopod Hyloniscus riparius and to establish whether they undergo molt-related structural changes. We performed 3D reconstruction of the calcium bodies from paraffin sections and analyzed their structure with light and electron microscopy. In addition, we analyzed the chemical composition of their mineralized matrices with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Two pairs of these organs are present in H. riparius. One pair is filled with bacteria while the other pair is not. In non-molting animals, the bacteria-filled calcium bodies contain apatite crystals and the bacteria-free calcium bodies enclose CaCO3-containing concretions with little organic matrix. During preparation for molt, an additional matrix layer is deposited in both pairs of calcium bodies. In the bacteria-filled calcium bodies it contains a mixture of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate, whereas only calcium carbonate is present in bacteria-free calcium bodies. After ecdysis, all mineral components in bacteria-free calcium bodies and the additional matrix layer in bacteria-filled calcium bodies are completely resorbed. During calcium resorption, the apical surface of the calcium body epithelium is deeply folded and electron dense granules are present in spaces between epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the presence of bacteria might be linked to calcium phosphate mineralization. Calcium bodies likely provide a source of calcium and potentially phosphate for the mineralization of the new cuticle after molt. Unlike other terrestrial isopods, H. riparius does not form sternal CaCO3 deposits and the bacteria-free calcium bodies might functionally replace them in this species.

  5. Mineral Deposition in Bacteria-Filled and Bacteria-Free Calcium Bodies in the Crustacean Hyloniscus riparius (Isopoda: Oniscidea)

    PubMed Central

    Vittori, Miloš; Rozman, Alenka; Grdadolnik, Jože; Novak, Urban; Štrus, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Crustacean calcium bodies are epithelial sacs which contain a mineralized matrix. The objectives of this study were to describe the microscopic anatomy of calcium bodies in the terrestrial isopod Hyloniscus riparius and to establish whether they undergo molt-related structural changes. We performed 3D reconstruction of the calcium bodies from paraffin sections and analyzed their structure with light and electron microscopy. In addition, we analyzed the chemical composition of their mineralized matrices with micro-Raman spectroscopy. Two pairs of these organs are present in H. riparius. One pair is filled with bacteria while the other pair is not. In non-molting animals, the bacteria-filled calcium bodies contain apatite crystals and the bacteria-free calcium bodies enclose CaCO3-containing concretions with little organic matrix. During preparation for molt, an additional matrix layer is deposited in both pairs of calcium bodies. In the bacteria-filled calcium bodies it contains a mixture of calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate, whereas only calcium carbonate is present in bacteria-free calcium bodies. After ecdysis, all mineral components in bacteria-free calcium bodies and the additional matrix layer in bacteria-filled calcium bodies are completely resorbed. During calcium resorption, the apical surface of the calcium body epithelium is deeply folded and electron dense granules are present in spaces between epithelial cells. Our results indicate that the presence of bacteria might be linked to calcium phosphate mineralization. Calcium bodies likely provide a source of calcium and potentially phosphate for the mineralization of the new cuticle after molt. Unlike other terrestrial isopods, H. riparius does not form sternal CaCO3 deposits and the bacteria-free calcium bodies might functionally replace them in this species. PMID:23554963

  6. Maintenance of Laboratory Strains of Obligately Anaerobic Rumen Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Teather, Ronald M.

    1982-01-01

    Cultures of rumen bacteria can be stored at −20°C for at least 2 years in a liquid medium containing 20% glycerol. Thawing, sampling, and refreezing do not significantly affect viability. PMID:7125660

  7. Bacteria can mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guo-Hong; Zou, Cheng-Gang; Ji, Xing-Lai; Liu, Tong; Zhao, Pei-Ji; Liang, Lian-Ming; Xu, Jian-Ping; An, Zhi-Qiang; Zheng, Xi; Qin, Yue-Ke; Tian, Meng-Qing; Xu, You-Yao; Ma, Yi-Cheng; Yu, Ze-Fen; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Liu, Shu-Qun; Niu, Xue-Mei; Yang, Jin-Kui; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    In their natural habitat, bacteria are consumed by bacterivorous nematodes; however, they are not simply passive preys. Here we report a defensive mechanism used by certain bacteria to mobilize nematode-trapping fungi to kill nematodes. These bacteria release urea, which triggers a lifestyle switch in the fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora from saprophytic to nematode–predatory form; this predacious form is characterized by formation of specialized cellular structures or ‘traps’. The bacteria significantly promote the elimination of nematodes by A. oligospora. Disruption of genes involved in urea transport and metabolism in A. oligospora abolishes the urea-induced trap formation. Furthermore, the urea metabolite ammonia functions as a signal molecule in the fungus to initiate the lifestyle switch to form trap structures. Our findings highlight the importance of multiple predator–prey interactions in prey defense mechanisms. PMID:25514608

  8. Disinfection of bacteria attached to granular activated carbon.

    PubMed Central

    LeChevallier, M W; Hassenauer, T S; Camper, A K; McFeters, G A

    1984-01-01

    Heterotrophic plate count bacteria, coliform organisms, and pathogenic microorganisms attached to granular activated carbon particles were examined for their susceptibility to chlorine disinfection. When these bacteria were grown on carbon particles and then disinfected with 2.0 mg of chlorine per liter (1.4 to 1.6 mg of free chlorine residual per liter after 1 h) for 1 h, no significant decrease in viable counts was observed. Washed cells attached to the surface of granular activated carbon particles showed similar resistance to chlorine, but a progressive increase in sublethal injury was found. Observations made by scanning electron microscope indicated that granular activated carbon was colonized by bacteria which grow in cracks and crevices and are coated by an extracellular slime layer. These data suggest a possible mechanism by which treatment and disinfection barriers can be penetrated and pathogenic bacteria may enter drinking water supplies. Images PMID:6508306

  9. Swarming bacteria migrate by Lévy Walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariel, Gil; Rabani, Amit; Benisty, Sivan; Partridge, Jonathan D.; Harshey, Rasika M.; Be'Er, Avraham

    2015-09-01

    Individual swimming bacteria are known to bias their random trajectories in search of food and to optimize survival. The motion of bacteria within a swarm, wherein they migrate as a collective group over a solid surface, is fundamentally different as typical bacterial swarms show large-scale swirling and streaming motions involving millions to billions of cells. Here by tracking trajectories of fluorescently labelled individuals within such dense swarms, we find that the bacteria are performing super-diffusion, consistent with Lévy walks. Lévy walks are characterized by trajectories that have straight stretches for extended lengths whose variance is infinite. The evidence of super-diffusion consistent with Lévy walks in bacteria suggests that this strategy may have evolved considerably earlier than previously thought.

  10. Surface structure influences contact killing of bacteria by copper

    PubMed Central

    Zeiger, Marco; Solioz, Marc; Edongué, Hervais; Arzt, Eduard; Schneider, Andreas S

    2014-01-01

    Copper kills bacteria rapidly by a mechanism that is not yet fully resolved. The antibacterial property of copper has raised interest in its use in hospitals, in place of plastic or stainless steel. On the latter surfaces, bacteria can survive for days or even weeks. Copper surfaces could thus provide a powerful accessory measure to curb nosocomial infections. We here investigated the effect of the copper surface structure on the efficiency of contact killing of Escherichia coli, an aspect which so far has received very little attention. It was shown that electroplated copper surfaces killed bacteria more rapidly than either polished copper or native rolled copper. The release of ionic copper was also more rapid from electroplated copper compared to the other materials. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the bacteria nudged into the grooves between the copper grains of deposited copper. The findings suggest that, in terms of contact killing, more efficient copper surfaces can be engineered. PMID:24740976

  11. New insight on the response of bacteria to fluoride.

    PubMed

    Breaker, R R

    2012-01-01

    Fluoride has been used for decades to prevent caries and it is well established that this anion can inhibit the growth of bacteria. However, the precise effects that fluoride has on bacteria and the mechanisms that bacteria use to overcome fluoride toxicity have largely remained unexplored. Recently, my laboratory reported the discovery of biological systems that bacteria use to sense fluoride and reduce fluoride toxicity. These sensors and their associated genes are very widespread in biology, which has implications for a number of issues that are central to the use of fluoride for dental care. Below I provide a summary of our findings, comment on some of the key prospects for expanding our understanding of fluoride's effects on biology, and propose some future uses of this knowledge. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. New Insight on the Response of Bacteria to Fluoride

    PubMed Central

    Breaker, R.R.

    2012-01-01

    Fluoride has been used for decades to prevent caries and it is well established that this anion can inhibit the growth of bacteria. However, the precise effects that fluoride has on bacteria and the mechanisms that bacteria use to overcome fluoride toxicity have largely remained unexplored. Recently, my laboratory reported the discovery of biological systems that bacteria use to sense fluoride and reduce fluoride toxicity. These sensors and their associated genes are very widespread in biology, which has implications for a number of issues that are central to the use of fluoride for dental care. Below I provide a summary of our findings, comment on some of the key prospects for expanding our understanding of fluoride's effects on biology, and propose some future uses of this knowledge. PMID:22327376

  13. Molecular and chemical dialogues in bacteria-protozoa interactions.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunxu; Mazzola, Mark; Cheng, Xu; Oetjen, Janina; Alexandrov, Theodore; Dorrestein, Pieter; Watrous, Jeramie; van der Voort, Menno; Raaijmakers, Jos M

    2015-08-06

    Protozoan predation of bacteria can significantly affect soil microbial community composition and ecosystem functioning. Bacteria possess diverse defense strategies to resist or evade protozoan predation. For soil-dwelling Pseudomonas species, several secondary metabolites were proposed to provide protection against different protozoan genera. By combining whole-genome transcriptome analyses with (live) imaging mass spectrometry (IMS), we observed multiple changes in the molecular and chemical dialogues between Pseudomonas fluorescens and the protist Naegleria americana. Lipopeptide (LP) biosynthesis was induced in Pseudomonas upon protozoan grazing and LP accumulation transitioned from homogeneous distributions across bacterial colonies to site-specific accumulation at the bacteria-protist interface. Also putrescine biosynthesis was upregulated in P. fluorescens upon predation. We demonstrated that putrescine induces protozoan trophozoite encystment and adversely affects cyst viability. This multifaceted study provides new insights in common and strain-specific responses in bacteria-protozoa interactions, including responses that contribute to bacterial survival in highly competitive soil and rhizosphere environments.

  14. Motility of magnetotactic bacteria/MTB to Geomagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidajatullah-Maksoed, Fatahillah

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria with motility directed by a local geomagnetic fields have been observed in marine sediments'' discussed by R. Blakemore, 1975. Magnetotactic bacteria/MTB discovered in 1963 by Salvatore Bellini. For ``off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope was used to correlates the physical & magnetic microstructure of magnetite nanocrystals in magnetotactic bacteria'' sought ``single-domain magnetite in hemopelagic sediments'' from JF Stolz. Otherwise, for potential source of bioproducts- product meant from result to multiplier -of magnetotactic bacteria[ACV Araujo, et.al, 2014 ] of marine drugs retrieved the `measurement of cellular chemotaxis with ECIS/Taxis, from KM Pietrosimone, 2012, whereas after ``earth magnetic field role on small living models'' are other interpretation of ``taxis'' as a movement of a cell instead usual ``tax'' for yew's taxus cuspidate, hired car & taxes in financial realms. Acknowledgements to HE. Mr. H. TUK SETYOHADI, Jl. Sriwijaya Raya 3, South-Jakarta, INDONESIA.

  15. Spatio-temporal patterns of bacteria caused by collective motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitsunezaki, So

    2006-04-01

    In incubation experiments on bacterial colonies of Proteus mirabilis, collective motion of bacteria is found to generate macroscopic turbulent patterns on the surface of agar media. We propose a mathematical model to describe the time evolution of the positional and directional distributions of motile bacteria in such systems, and investigate this model both numerically and analytically. It is shown that as the average density of bacteria increases, nonuniform swarming patterns emerge from a uniform stationary state. For a sufficient large density, we find that spiral patterns are caused by interactions between the local bacteria densities and the rotational mode of the collective motion. Unidirectional spiral patterns similar to those observed in experiments appear in the case in which the equilibrium directional distribution is asymmetric.

  16. Identification of active fluorescence stained bacteria by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Mario; Beyer, Beatrice; Pietsch, Christian; Radt, Benno; Harz, Michaela; Rösch, Petra; Popp, Jürgen

    2008-04-01

    Microorganisms can be found everywhere e.g. in food both as useful ingredients or harmful contaminations causing food spoilage. Therefore, a fast and easy to handle analysis method is needed to detect bacteria in different kinds of samples like meat, juice or air to decide if the sample is contaminated by harmful microorganisms. Conventional identification methods in microbiology require always cultivation and therefore are time consuming. In this contribution we present an analysis approach to identify fluorescence stained bacteria on strain level by means of Raman spectroscopy. The stained bacteria are highlighted and can be localized easier against a complex sample environment e.g. in food. The use of Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrical methods allows the identification of single bacteria within minutes.

  17. Airborne bacteria in the atmosphere: Presence, purpose, and potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smets, Wenke; Moretti, Serena; Denys, Siegfried; Lebeer, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Numerous recent studies have highlighted that the types of bacteria present in the atmosphere often show predictable patterns across space and time. These patterns can be driven by differences in bacterial sources of the atmosphere and a wide range of environmental factors, including UV intensity, precipitation events, and humidity. The abundance of certain bacterial taxa is of interest, not only for their ability to mediate a range of chemical and physical processes in the atmosphere, such as cloud formation and ice nucleation, but also for their implications -both beneficial and detrimental-for human health. Consequently, the widespread importance of airborne bacteria has stimulated the search for their applicability. Improving air quality, modelling the dispersal of airborne bacteria (e.g. pathogens) and biotechnological purposes are already being explored. Nevertheless, many technological challenges still need to be overcome to fully understand the roles of airborne bacteria in our health and global ecosystems.

  18. Commensal Fungi Recapitulate the Protective Benefits of Intestinal Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tony T; Shao, Tzu-Yu; Ang, W X Gladys; Kinder, Jeremy M; Turner, Lucien H; Pham, Giang; Whitt, Jordan; Alenghat, Theresa; Way, Sing Sing

    2017-12-13

    Commensal intestinal microbes are collectively beneficial in preventing local tissue injury and augmenting systemic antimicrobial immunity. However, given the near-exclusive focus on bacterial species in establishing these protective benefits, the contributions of other types of commensal microbes remain poorly defined. Here, we show that commensal fungi can functionally replace intestinal bacteria by conferring protection against injury to mucosal tissues and positively calibrating the responsiveness of circulating immune cells. Susceptibility to colitis and influenza A virus infection occurring upon commensal bacteria eradication is efficiently overturned by mono-colonization with either Candida albicans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The protective benefits of commensal fungi are mediated by mannans, a highly conserved component of fungal cell walls, since intestinal stimulation with this moiety alone overrides disease susceptibility in mice depleted of commensal bacteria. Thus, commensal enteric fungi safeguard local and systemic immunity by providing tonic microbial stimulation that can functionally replace intestinal bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fecal Indicator Bacteria and Environmental Observations: Validation of Virtual Beach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Contamination of recreational waters by fecal material is often assessed using indicator bacteria such as enterococci. Enumeration based on culturing methods can take up to 48 hours to complete, limiting the accuracy of water quality evaluations. Molecular microbial techniques em...

  20. Chemical signaling between plants and plant-pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Vittorio; Fuqua, Clay

    2013-01-01

    Studies of chemical signaling between plants and bacteria in the past have been largely confined to two models: the rhizobial-legume symbiotic association and pathogenesis between agrobacteria and their host plants. Recent studies are beginning to provide evidence that many plant-associated bacteria undergo chemical signaling with the plant host via low-molecular-weight compounds. Plant-produced compounds interact with bacterial regulatory proteins that then affect gene expression. Similarly, bacterial quorum-sensing signals result in a range of functional responses in plants. This review attempts to highlight current knowledge in chemical signaling that takes place between pathogenic bacteria and plants. This chemical communication between plant and bacteria, also referred to as interkingdom signaling, will likely become a major research field in the future, as it allows the design of specific strategies to create plants that are resistant to plant pathogens.

  1. ETV Tech Brief: Rapid Fungi and Bacteria Detection Technologies

    EPA Science Inventory

    Technical brief that summarizes the results for Mycometer, Inc. Mycometer®-test and Bactiquant®-test, which are rapid detection technologies for fungi and bacteria. The brief summarizes the results of the verification report and statement.

  2. EXPLORATORY OCCURRENCE OF HETEROTROPHIC BACTERIA IN POTABLE WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heterotrophic bacteria (HPC) are common to community distribution systems conveying treated drinking water to consumers. There are known opportunistic pathogens among these organisms, for example some Legionella and some Aeromonas strains; and there may be others of which we are ...

  3. Interactions between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria in the gut

    PubMed Central

    Bäumler, Andreas J.; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    The microbiome has an important role in human health. Changes in the microbiota can confer resistance to or promote infection by pathogenic bacteria. Antibiotics have a profound impact on the microbiota that alters the nutritional landscape of the gut and can lead to the expansion of pathogenic populations. Pathogenic bacteria exploit microbiota-derived sources of carbon and nitrogen as nutrients and regulatory signals to promote their own growth and virulence. By eliciting inflammation, these bacteria alter the intestinal environment and use unique systems for respiration and metal acquisition to drive their expansion. Unravelling the interactions between the microbiota, the host and pathogenic bacteria will produce strategies for manipulating the microbiota against infectious diseases. PMID:27383983

  4. CRISPR-Cas Technologies and Applications in Food Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stout, Emily; Klaenhammer, Todd; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2017-02-28

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins form adaptive immune systems that occur in many bacteria and most archaea. In addition to protecting bacteria from phages and other invasive mobile genetic elements, CRISPR-Cas molecular machines can be repurposed as tool kits for applications relevant to the food industry. A primary concern of the food industry has long been the proper management of food-related bacteria, with a focus on both enhancing the outcomes of beneficial microorganisms such as starter cultures and probiotics and limiting the presence of detrimental organisms such as pathogens and spoilage microorganisms. This review introduces CRISPR-Cas as a novel set of technologies to manage food bacteria and offers insights into CRISPR-Cas biology. It primarily focuses on the applications of CRISPR-Cas systems and tools in starter cultures and probiotics, encompassing strain-typing, phage resistance, plasmid vaccination, genome editing, and antimicrobial activity.

  5. Antibiotic-induced population fluctuations and stochastic clearance of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Le, Dai; Şimşek, Emrah; Chaudhry, Waqas

    2018-01-01

    Effective antibiotic use that minimizes treatment failures remains a challenge. A better understanding of how bacterial populations respond to antibiotics is necessary. Previous studies of large bacterial populations established the deterministic framework of pharmacodynamics. Here, characterizing the dynamics of population extinction, we demonstrated the stochastic nature of eradicating bacteria with antibiotics. Antibiotics known to kill bacteria (bactericidal) induced population fluctuations. Thus, at high antibiotic concentrations, the dynamics of bacterial clearance were heterogeneous. At low concentrations, clearance still occurred with a non-zero probability. These striking outcomes of population fluctuations were well captured by our probabilistic model. Our model further suggested a strategy to facilitate eradication by increasing extinction probability. We experimentally tested this prediction for antibiotic-susceptible and clinically-isolated resistant bacteria. This new knowledge exposes fundamental limits in our ability to predict bacterial eradication. Additionally, it demonstrates the potential of using antibiotic concentrations that were previously deemed inefficacious to eradicate bacteria. PMID:29508699

  6. USING PUBLIC-DOMAIN MODELS TO ESTIMATE BEACH BACTERIA CONCENTRATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Stretches of beach along popular Huntington Beach, California are occassionally closed to swimming due to high levels of bacteria. One hypothesized source is the treated wastewater plume from the Orange County Sanitation District's (OCSD) ocean outfall. While three independent sc...

  7. Stop the Spread of Superbugs: Help Fight Drug Resistant Bacteria

    MedlinePlus

    ... those that cause colds or flu. Unfortunately, many antibiotics prescribed to people and to animals are unnecessary. And the overuse and misuse of antibiotics helps to create drug-resistant bacteria. Here’s how ...

  8. Small Talk: Cell-to-Cell Communication in Bacteria

    Bassler, Bonnie [Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

    2017-12-09

    Cell-cell communication in bacteria involves the production, release, and subsequent detection of chemical signaling molecules called autoinducers. This process, called quorum sensing, allows bacteria to regulate gene expression on a population-wide scale. Processes controlled by quorum sensing are usually ones that are unproductive when undertaken by an individual bacterium but become effective when undertaken by the group. For example, quorum sensing controls bioluminescence, secretion of virulence factors, biofilm formation, sporulation, and the exchange of DNA. Thus, quorum sensing is a mechanism that allows bacteria to function as multi-cellular organisms. Bacteria make, detect, and integrate information from multiple autoinducers, some of which are used exclusively for intra-species communication while others enable communication between species. Research is now focused on the development of therapies that interfere with quorum sensing to control bacterial virulence.

  9. Antibacterial effect of electrolyzed water on oral bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Bong-Kyu

    2006-08-01

    This study investigated the antibacterial effect of electrolyzed water on oral bacteria both in vitro and in vivo. Tap water was electrolyzed in a water vessel using platinum cell technology. The electrolyzed tap water (called Puri-water) was put in contact with five major periodontopathogens or toothbrushes contaminated with these bacteria for 30 sec. In addition, Puri-water was used as a mouthwash for 30 sec in 16 subjects and the antibacterial effect on salivary bacteria was evaluated. Puri-water significantly reduced the growth of all periodontopathogens in culture and on toothbrushes, and that of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in saliva, when compared to the effect of tap water. It also significantly reduced mutans streptococci growing on mitis salivarius-bacitracin agar. Our results demonstrate that the electrolyzed tap water is effective as a mouthwash and for toothbrush disinfection.

  10. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria from Reflected Light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  11. Interactions between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria in the gut.

    PubMed

    Bäumler, Andreas J; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2016-07-07

    The microbiome has an important role in human health. Changes in the microbiota can confer resistance to or promote infection by pathogenic bacteria. Antibiotics have a profound impact on the microbiota that alters the nutritional landscape of the gut and can lead to the expansion of pathogenic populations. Pathogenic bacteria exploit microbiota-derived sources of carbon and nitrogen as nutrients and regulatory signals to promote their own growth and virulence. By eliciting inflammation, these bacteria alter the intestinal environment and use unique systems for respiration and metal acquisition to drive their expansion. Unravelling the interactions between the microbiota, the host and pathogenic bacteria will produce strategies for manipulating the microbiota against infectious diseases.

  12. Sulfur cycling and metabolism of phototrophic and filamentous sulfur bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.; Brune, D.; Poplawski, R.; Schmidt, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria taken from different habitate (Alum Rock State Park, Palo Alto salt marsh, and Big Soda Lake) were grown on selective media, characterized by morphological and pigment analysis, and compared with bacteria maintained in pure culture. A study was made of the anaerobic reduction of intracellular sulfur globules by a phototrophic sulfur bacterium (Chromatium vinosum) and a filamentous aerobic sulfur bacterium (Beggiatoa alba). Buoyant densities of different bacteria were measured in Percoll gradients. This method was also used to separate different chlorobia in mixed cultures and to assess the relative homogeneity of cultures taken directly or enriched from natural samples (including the purple bacterial layer found at a depth of 20 meters at Big Soda Lake.) Interactions between sulfide oxidizing bacteria were studied.

  13. Vibrio bacteria in raw oysters: managing risks to human health.

    PubMed

    Froelich, Brett A; Noble, Rachel T

    2016-03-05

    The human-pathogenic marine bacteria Vibrio vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus are strongly correlated with water temperature, with concentrations increasing as waters warm seasonally. Both of these bacteria can be concentrated in filter-feeding shellfish, especially oysters. Because oysters are often consumed raw, this exposes people to large doses of potentially harmful bacteria. Various models are used to predict the abundance of these bacteria in oysters, which guide shellfish harvest policy meant to reduce human health risk. Vibrio abundance and behaviour varies from site to site, suggesting that location-specific studies are needed to establish targeted risk reduction strategies. Moreover, virulence potential, rather than simple abundance, should be also be included in future modeling efforts. © 2016 The Author(s).

  14. Multidrug resistance in enteric and other gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    George, A M

    1996-05-15

    In Gram-negative bacteria, multidrug resistance is a term that is used to describe mechanisms of resistance by chromosomal genes that are activated by induction or mutation caused by the stress of exposure to antibiotics in natural and clinical environments. Unlike plasmid-borne resistance genes, there is no alteration or degradation of drugs or need for genetic transfer. Exposure to a single drug leads to cross-resistance to many other structurally and functionally unrelated drugs. The only mechanism identified for multidrug resistance in bacteria is drug efflux by membrane transporters, even though many of these transporters remain to be identified. The enteric bacteria exhibit mostly complex multidrug resistance systems which are often regulated by operons or regulons. The purpose of this review is to survey molecular mechanisms of multidrug resistance in enteric and other Gram-negative bacteria, and to speculate on the origins and natural physiological functions of the genes involved.

  15. The Use of Bacteria for Remediation of Mercury Contaminated Groundwater

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many processes of mercury transformation in the environment are bacteria mediated. Mercury properties cause some difficulties of remediation of mercury contaminated environment. Despite the significance of the problem of mercury pollution, methods of large scale bioremediation ...

  16. Impacts of Gut Bacteria on Human Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Jie; Li, Sha; Gan, Ren-You; Zhou, Tong; Xu, Dong-Ping; Li, Hua-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gut bacteria are an important component of the microbiota ecosystem in the human gut, which is colonized by 1014 microbes, ten times more than the human cells. Gut bacteria play an important role in human health, such as supplying essential nutrients, synthesizing vitamin K, aiding in the digestion of cellulose, and promoting angiogenesis and enteric nerve function. However, they can also be potentially harmful due to the change of their composition when the gut ecosystem undergoes abnormal changes in the light of the use of antibiotics, illness, stress, aging, bad dietary habits, and lifestyle. Dysbiosis of the gut bacteria communities can cause many chronic diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, obesity, cancer, and autism. This review summarizes and discusses the roles and potential mechanisms of gut bacteria in human health and diseases. PMID:25849657

  17. Chromosomal duplications in bacteria, fruit flies, and humans

    SciT

    Lupski, J.R.; Weinstock, G.M.; Roth, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    Tandem duplication of chromosomal segments has been recognized as a frequent mutational mechanism in several genetic model systems. In bacteria, fruit flies, and humans, duplications form by similar molecular mechanisms and appear to be important in genome evolution. 80 refs.

  18. Periodontal Bacteria and Prediabetes Prevalence in ORIGINS

    PubMed Central

    Demmer, R.T.; Jacobs, D.R.; Singh, R.; Zuk, A.; Rosenbaum, M.; Papapanou, P.N.; Desvarieux, M.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus are known to be associated. The relationship between periodontal microbiota and early diabetes risk has not been studied. We investigated the association between periodontal bacteria and prediabetes prevalence among diabetes-free adults. ORIGINS (the Oral Infections, Glucose Intolerance and Insulin Resistance Study) cross sectionally enrolled 300 diabetes-free adults aged 20 to 55 y (mean ± SD, 34 ± 10 y; 77% female). Prediabetes was defined as follows: 1) hemoglobin A1c values ranging from 5.7% to 6.4% or 2) fasting plasma glucose ranging from 100 to 125 mg/dL. In 1,188 subgingival plaque samples, 11 bacterial species were assessed at baseline, including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, Tannerella forsythia, and Actinomyces naeslundii. Full-mouth clinical periodontal examinations were performed, and participants were defined as having no/mild periodontitis vs. moderate/severe periodontitis per the definition of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / American Academy of Periodontology. Modified Poisson regression evaluated prediabetes prevalence across bacterial tertiles. Prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals for third vs. first tertiles are presented. All analyses were adjusted for cardiometabolic risk factors. All results presented currently arise from the baseline cross section. Prediabetes prevalence was 18%, and 58% of participants had moderate/severe periodontitis. Prevalence ratios (95% confidence intervals) summarizing associations between bacterial levels and prediabetes were as follows: A. actinomycetemcomitans, 2.48 (1.34, 4.58), P = 0.004; P. gingivalis, 3.41 (1.78, 6.58), P = 0.0003; T. denticola, 1.99 (0.992, 4.00), P = 0.052; T. forsythia, 1.95 (1.0, 3.84), P = 0.05; A. naeslundii, 0.46 (0.25, 0.85), P = 0.01. The prevalence ratio for prediabetes among participants with moderate/severe vs. no/mild periodontitis was 1.47 (0.78, 2.74), P

  19. Bacteria as Emerging Indicators of Soil Condition

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Syrie M.; Buckley, Hannah L.; Case, Bradley S.; Curran-Cournane, Fiona; Taylor, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial communities are important for the health and productivity of soil ecosystems and have great potential as novel indicators of environmental perturbations. To assess how they are affected by anthropogenic activity and to determine their ability to provide alternative metrics of environmental health, we sought to define which soil variables bacteria respond to across multiple soil types and land uses. We determined, through 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, the composition of bacterial communities in soil samples from 110 natural or human-impacted sites, located up to 300 km apart. Overall, soil bacterial communities varied more in response to changing soil environments than in response to changes in climate or increasing geographic distance. We identified strong correlations between the relative abundances of members of Pirellulaceae and soil pH, members of Gaiellaceae and carbon-to-nitrogen ratios, members of Bradyrhizobium and the levels of Olsen P (a measure of plant available phosphorus), and members of Chitinophagaceae and aluminum concentrations. These relationships between specific soil attributes and individual soil taxa not only highlight ecological characteristics of these organisms but also demonstrate the ability of key bacterial taxonomic groups to reflect the impact of specific anthropogenic activities, even in comparisons of samples across large geographic areas and diverse soil types. Overall, we provide strong evidence that there is scope to use relative taxon abundances as biological indicators of soil condition. IMPORTANCE The impact of land use change and management on soil microbial community composition remains poorly understood. Therefore, we explored the relationship between a wide range of soil factors and soil bacterial community composition. We included variables related to anthropogenic activity and collected samples across a large spatial scale to interrogate the complex relationships between various bacterial

  20. Bacteria as Emerging Indicators of Soil Condition.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Syrie M; Buckley, Hannah L; Case, Bradley S; Curran-Cournane, Fiona; Taylor, Matthew; Lear, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial communities are important for the health and productivity of soil ecosystems and have great potential as novel indicators of environmental perturbations. To assess how they are affected by anthropogenic activity and to determine their ability to provide alternative metrics of environmental health, we sought to define which soil variables bacteria respond to across multiple soil types and land uses. We determined, through 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, the composition of bacterial communities in soil samples from 110 natural or human-impacted sites, located up to 300 km apart. Overall, soil bacterial communities varied more in response to changing soil environments than in response to changes in climate or increasing geographic distance. We identified strong correlations between the relative abundances of members of Pirellulaceae and soil pH, members of Gaiellaceae and carbon-to-nitrogen ratios, members of Bradyrhizobium and the levels of Olsen P (a measure of plant available phosphorus), and members of Chitinophagaceae and aluminum concentrations. These relationships between specific soil attributes and individual soil taxa not only highlight ecological characteristics of these organisms but also demonstrate the ability of key bacterial taxonomic groups to reflect the impact of specific anthropogenic activities, even in comparisons of samples across large geographic areas and diverse soil types. Overall, we provide strong evidence that there is scope to use relative taxon abundances as biological indicators of soil condition. The impact of land use change and management on soil microbial community composition remains poorly understood. Therefore, we explored the relationship between a wide range of soil factors and soil bacterial community composition. We included variables related to anthropogenic activity and collected samples across a large spatial scale to interrogate the complex relationships between various bacterial community attributes and

  1. Use of Bacteria To Stabilize Archaeological Iron

    PubMed Central

    Comensoli, Lucrezia; Maillard, Julien; Albini, Monica; Sandoz, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron artifacts are common among the findings of archaeological excavations. The corrosion layer formed on these objects requires stabilization after their recovery, without which the destruction of the item due to physicochemical damage is likely. Current technologies for stabilizing the corrosion layer are lengthy and generate hazardous waste products. Therefore, there is a pressing need for an alternative method for stabilizing the corrosion layer on iron objects. The aim of this study was to evaluate an alternative conservation-restoration method using bacteria. For this, anaerobic iron reduction leading to the formation of stable iron minerals in the presence of chlorine was investigated for two strains of Desulfitobacterium hafniense (strains TCE1 and LBE). Iron reduction was observed for soluble Fe(III) phases as well as for akaganeite, the most troublesome iron compound in the corrosion layer of archaeological iron objects. In terms of biogenic mineral production, differential efficiencies were observed in assays performed on corroded iron coupons. Strain TCE1 produced a homogeneous layer of vivianite covering 80% of the corroded surface, while on the coupons treated with strain LBE, only 10% of the surface was covered by the same mineral. Finally, an attempt to reduce iron on archaeological objects was performed with strain TCE1, which led to the formation of both biogenic vivianite and magnetite on the surface of the artifacts. These results demonstrate the potential of this biological treatment for stabilizing archaeological iron as a promising alternative to traditional conservation-restoration methods. IMPORTANCE Since the Iron Age, iron has been a fundamental material for the building of objects used in everyday life. However, due to its reactivity, iron can be easily corroded, and the physical stability of the object built is at risk. This is particularly true for archaeological objects on which a potentially unstable corrosion layer is

  2. Buoyant densities of phototrophic sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerrero, R.

    1985-01-01

    The buoyant densities of bacterial cells are greatly influenced by the accumulation of intracellular reserve material. The buoyant density of phototrophic bacteria that are planktonic is of particular interest, since these organisms must remain in the photic zone of the water column for optimal growth. Separation of cells by their buoyant density may also be of use in separating and identifying organisms from a natural population. The bacteria used were obtained from pure cultures, enrichments, or samples taken directly from the environment.

  3. Bad bacteria in acute appendicitis: rare but relevant.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, Alexander; Malkomes, Patrizia; Habbe, Nils; Bechstein, Wolf Otto; Liese, Juliane

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial infections are a factor for morbidity in patients with acute appendicitis (AA). The spreading of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria is a significant problem in surgery, and the most relevant MDR pathogens are summarized as Enterobacteriaceae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterococci (ESKAPE) bacteria. Data regarding the species and distribution of bacteria in AA are available, but information about the resistances and their relevance is deficient. In this retrospective study, we analyzed microbiological swabs of patients with AA. The outcome parameters of patients after laparoscopic appendectomy were analyzed against microbiological results, including antibiotic resistance testing. Positive swabs were compared with bacteria cultivated after alternative abdominal emergency surgery (AES). In total, 584 patients with AA were included and had a mean age of 35.5 years. In 216 patients (36.9%), a swab was taken, and in 128 (59.3%) swabs, bacteria could be cultivated. The most frequent organisms were Escherichia coli, Bacteroides species, and Pseudomonas. In 9.4% of the positive AA swabs, MDR germs were cultivated, and all of them were ESKAPE pathogens. Patients with MDR bacteria in AA suffered more infectious complications (p = 0.006) and needed longer hospitalizations (p < 0.009). In AES, aside from appendicitis, a different spectrum containing more MDR bacteria was cultivated (5.9 vs. 20.9%; p < 0.0001). Although they occur less frequently in appendectomy compared to emergency surgeries for other abdominal diseases, MDR bacteria are traceable in this common disease and contribute to additional morbidity.

  4. Removal of bacteria from stallion semen by colloid centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Morrell, J M; Klein, C; Lundeheim, N; Erol, E; Troedsson, M H T

    2014-02-01

    Bacteria (environmental contaminants and occasionally potential pathogens) are found in most stallion ejaculates and may negatively affect sperm quality during storage. Since the use of antibiotics can lead to the development of resistance, an alternative means of microbial control is desirable. The removal of bacteria from stallion semen using Single Layer Centrifugation through Androcoll-E was investigated. Known doses of cultured bacteria were added to freshly collected ejaculates (15mL aliquots) before processing by Single Layer Centrifugation. The resulting sperm pellets and controls (not processed by Single Layer Centrifugation) were cultured and the bacteria identified. In experiment 1, doses of E. coli from 2×10(2) to 2×10(7) colony forming units were added to aliquots of semen. In experiment 2, Taylorella equigenitalis or a mix of E. coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (approximately 7×10(6), 5×10(6), and 6×10(6)cfu, respectively) were added to 15mL aliquots of semen. In experiment 1, more than 90% of the bacteria were removed where loading doses were >×10(4)cfu/mL. In experiment 2, varying proportions of different bacteria were removed, ranging from 68% for naturally occurring Corynebacterium spp. to >97% for added cultured E. coli. Thus, Single Layer Centrifugation can separate spermatozoa from many, but not all bacteria in stallion ejaculates and could be a useful alternative to adding antibiotics to semen extenders to control bacterial contamination. However, further research is needed to determine the effect of small numbers of bacteria on sperm quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Isolation of carbohydrate-metabolizing, extremely halophilic bacteria.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomlinson, G. A.; Hochstein, L. I.

    1972-01-01

    Four previously unrecognized strains of extremely halophilic bacteria that utilize carbohydrates have been isolated. Gas production proved an unreliable index of carbohydrate metabolism; therefore, carbohydrate utilization was measured by determining acid formation and sugar disappearance during growth. By these procedures, carbohydrate utilization was readily detected. The results suggest that carbohydrate dissimilation by extremely halophilic bacteria may be more common than previously thought and that the apparent rarity of carbohydrate-metabolizing halophiles may be an artifact of the isolation procedures used.

  6. In vitro activity of ABT-492 against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sillerström, E; Wahlund, E; Nord, C E

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the in vitro activity of ABT-492 compared with that of other antimicrobial agents against anaerobic bacteria. The activity of ABT-492 was investigated against 369 clinical isolates of anaerobic bacteria by the agar dilution method and was compared with that of moxifloxacin, piperacillin, cefoxitin, imipenem, clindamycin and metronidazole. ABT-492 and imipenem were the most active antimicrobial agents tested.

  7. Physiological characteristics of bacteria isolated from water brines within permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbakova, V.; Rivkina, E.; Laurinavichuis, K.; Pecheritsina, S.; Gilichinsky, D.

    2004-01-01

    In the Arctic there are lenses of overcooled water brines (cryopegs) sandwiched within permafrost marine sediments 100 120 thousand years old. We have investigated the physiological properties of the pure cultures of anaerobic Clostridium sp. strain 14D1 and two strains of aerobic bacteria Psychrobacter sp. isolated from these cryopegs. The structural and physiological characteristics of new bacteria from water brines have shown their ability to survive and develop under harsh conditions, such as subzero temperatures and high salinity.

  8. Material and method for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Adler, H.I.

    1984-10-09

    A material and method is disclosed for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria which includes a nutrient media containing a hydrogen donor and sterile membrane fragments of bacteria having an electron transfer system which reduces oxygen to water. Dissolved oxygen in the medium is removed by adding the sterile membrane fragments to the nutrient medium and holding the medium at a temperature of about 10 to about 60 C until the dissolved oxygen is removed. No Drawings

  9. Occurrence of squalene in methanol-grown bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, I; Shechter, I

    1978-01-01

    The nonpolar lipids of methanol-grown bacteria which utilize one-carbon (C1) compounds via the RMP pathway (Pseudomonas C, Pseudomonas methylotropha, and Methylomonas methanolica) were found to contain squalene in concentrations between 0.1 to 1.16 mg/g of cell (dry weight). Squalene could not be detected in lipid extracts of methanol-grown bacteria which utilize C1 compounds via the serine pathway. PMID:98521

  10. Material and method for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Howard I.

    1984-01-01

    A material and method for promoting the growth of anaerobic bacteria which includes a nutrient media containing a hydrogen donor and sterile membrane fragments of bacteria having an electron transfer system which reduces oxygen to water. Dissolved oxygen in the medium is removed by adding the sterile membrane fragments to the nutrient medium and holding the medium at a temperature of about 10.degree. to about 60.degree. C. until the dissolved oxygen is removed.

  11. Mycoplasma and associated bacteria isolated from ovine pink-eye.

    PubMed

    Langford, E V

    1971-01-01

    A mycoplasma was recovered from the untreated conjunctival membranes of nine sheep affected by Pink-eye. It was neither isolated from the conjunctiva of treated animals which were affected nor from the conjunctiva of normal animals either in contact or not in contact with affected animals. Bacteria found on normal conjunctival membranes were Neisseria ovis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermididis, Streptococcus and Bacillus spp. Bacteria found in clinical cases of Pink-eye were N. ovis, E. coli, a Streptococcus and Pseudomonas spp.

  12. Microfluidic Transducer for Detecting Nanomechanical Movements of Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, Vural; Ekinci, Kamil

    2017-11-01

    Various nanomechanical movements of bacteria are currently being explored as an indication of bacterial viability. Most notably, these movements have been observed to subside rapidly and dramatically when the bacteria are exposed to an effective antibiotic. This suggests that monitoring bacterial movements, if performed with high fidelity, can offer a path to various clinical microbiological applications, including antibiotic susceptibility tests. Here, we introduce a robust and sensitive microfluidic transduction technique for detecting the nanomechanical movements of bacteria. The technique is based on measuring the electrical fluctuations in a microchannel which the bacteria populate. These electrical fluctuations are caused by the swimming of motile, planktonic bacteria and random oscillations of surface-immobilized bacteria. The technique provides enough sensitivity to detect even the slightest movements of a single cell and lends itself to smooth integration with other microfluidic methods and devices; it may eventually be used for rapid antibiotic susceptibility testing. We acknowledge support from Boston University Office of Technology Development, Boston University College of Engineering, NIH (1R03AI126168-01) and The Wallace H. Coulter Foundation.

  13. Bacteria-based concrete: from concept to market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiktor, V.; Jonkers, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of self-healing concrete—a concrete which can autonomously repair itself after crack formation, with no or limited human intervention—has received a lot of attention over the past 10 years as it could help structures to last longer and at a lower maintenance cost. This paper gives an overview on the key aspects and recent advances in the development of the bacteria-based self-healing concrete developed at the University of Technology of Delft (The Netherlands). Research started with the screening and selection of concrete compatible bacteria and nutrients. Several types of encapsulated bacteria and nutrients have been developed and tested. The functionality of these healing agents was demonstrated by showing metabolic activity of activated bacterial spores by oxygen consumption measurements and by regain of material functionality in form of regain of water tightness. Besides development of bacteria-based self-healing concrete, a bacteria-based repair mortar and liquid system were developed for the treatment of aged concrete structures. Field trials have been carried out with either type of bacteria-based systems and the promising results have led to a spinoff company Basilisk Self-Healing Concrete with the aim to further develop these systems and bring them to the market.

  14. Community proteogenomics reveals insights into the physiology of phyllosphere bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Delmotte, Nathanaël; Knief, Claudia; Chaffron, Samuel; Innerebner, Gerd; Roschitzki, Bernd; Schlapbach, Ralph; von Mering, Christian; Vorholt, Julia A.

    2009-01-01

    Aerial plant surfaces represent the largest biological interface on Earth and provide essential services as sites of carbon dioxide fixation, molecular oxygen release, and primary biomass production. Rather than existing as axenic organisms, plants are colonized by microorganisms that affect both their health and growth. To gain insight into the physiology of phyllosphere bacteria under in situ conditions, we performed a culture-independent analysis of the microbiota associated with leaves of soybean, clover, and Arabidopsis thaliana plants using a metaproteogenomic approach. We found a high consistency of the communities on the 3 different plant species, both with respect to the predominant community members (including the alphaproteobacterial genera Sphingomonas and Methylo bacterium) and with respect to their proteomes. Observed known proteins of Methylobacterium were to a large extent related to the ability of these bacteria to use methanol as a source of carbon and energy. A remarkably high expression of various TonB-dependent receptors was observed for Sphingomonas. Because these outer membrane proteins are involved in transport processes of various carbohydrates, a particularly large substrate utilization pattern for Sphingomonads can be assumed to occur in the phyllosphere. These adaptations at the genus level can be expected to contribute to the success and coexistence of these 2 taxa on plant leaves. We anticipate that our results will form the basis for the identification of unique traits of phyllosphere bacteria, and for uncovering previously unrecorded mechanisms of bacteria-plant and bacteria-bacteria relationships. PMID:19805315

  15. Topological Defects in a Living Nematic Ensnare Swimming Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genkin, Mikhail M.; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2017-01-01

    Active matter exemplified by suspensions of motile bacteria or synthetic self-propelled particles exhibits a remarkable propensity to self-organization and collective motion. The local input of energy and simple particle interactions often lead to complex emergent behavior manifested by the formation of macroscopic vortices and coherent structures with long-range order. A realization of an active system has been conceived by combining swimming bacteria and a lyotropic liquid crystal. Here, by coupling the well-established and validated model of nematic liquid crystals with the bacterial dynamics, we develop a computational model describing intricate properties of such a living nematic. In faithful agreement with the experiment, the model reproduces the onset of periodic undulation of the director and consequent proliferation of topological defects with the increase in bacterial concentration. It yields a testable prediction on the accumulation of bacteria in the cores of +1 /2 topological defects and depletion of bacteria in the cores of -1 /2 defects. Our dedicated experiment on motile bacteria suspended in a freestanding liquid crystalline film fully confirms this prediction. Our findings suggest novel approaches for trapping and transport of bacteria and synthetic swimmers in anisotropic liquids and extend a scope of tools to control and manipulate microscopic objects in active matter.

  16. [Experimental interaction of halophilic prokaryotes and opportunistic bacteria in brine].

    PubMed

    Selivanova, E A; Nemtseva, N V

    2013-01-01

    Study the effect of extremely halophilic archaea and moderately halophilic bacteria on preservation of opportunistic bacteria in brine. 17 strains of moderately halophilic bacteria and 2 strains of extremely halophilic archaea were isolated from continental hypersaline lake Razval of Sol-Iletsk area of Orenburg Region. Identification of pure cultures of prokaryotes was carried out taking into account their phenotype properties and based on determination of 16S RNA gene sequence. The effect of halophilic prokaryote on elimination of Escherichia coli from brine was evaluated during co-cultivation. Antagonistic activity of cell extracts of the studied microorganisms was evaluated by photometric method. A more prolonged preservation of an E. coli strain in brine in the presence of live cells of extremely halophilic archaea Halorubrum tebenquichense and moderately halophilic bacteria Marinococcus halophilus was established. Extracts of cells of extremely halophilic archaea and moderately halophilic bacteria on the contrary displayed antagonistic activity. The protective effect of live cells of halophilic prokaryotes and antagonistic activity of their cell extracts change the period of conservation of opportunistic bacteria in brine that regulates inter-microbial interactions and changes the period of self-purification that reflects the sanitary condition of a hypersaline water body.

  17. Electron microscopic examination of uncultured soil-dwelling bacteria.

    PubMed

    Amako, Kazunobu; Takade, Akemi; Taniai, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Shin-ichi

    2008-05-01

    Bacteria living in soil collected from a rice paddy in Fukuoka, Japan, were examined by electron microscopy using a freeze-substitution fixation method. Most of the observed bacteria could be categorized, based on the structure of the cell envelope and overall morphology, into one of five groups: (i) bacterial spore; (ii) Gram-positive type; (iii) Gram-negative type; (iv) Mycobacterium like; and (v) Archaea like. However, a few of the bacteria could not be readily categorized into one of these groups because they had unique cell wall structures, basically resembling those of Gram-negative bacteria, but with the layer corresponding to the peptidoglycan layer in Gram-negative bacteria being extremely thick, like that of the cortex of a bacterial spore. The characteristic morphological features found in many of these uncultured, soil-dwelling cells were the nucleoid being in a condensed state and the cytoplasm being shrunken. We were able to produce similar morphologies in vitro using a Salmonella sp. by culturing under low-temperature, low-nutrient conditions, similar to those found in some natural environments. These unusual morphologies are therefore hypothesized to be characteristic of bacteria in resting or dormant stages.

  18. Potency of Amylase-producing Bacteria and Optimization Amylase Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indriati, G.; Megahati, R. R. P.; Rosba, E.

    2018-04-01

    Enzymes are capable to act as biocatalyst for a wide variety of chemical reactions. Amylase have potential biotechnological applications in a wide range of industrial processes and account for nearly 30% of the world’s enzyme market. Amylase are extracellular enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of internal α-1,4-glycosidic linkages in starch to dextrin, and other small carbohydrate molecules constituted of glucose units. Although enzymes are produced from animal and plant sources, the microbial sources are generally the most suitable for commercial applications. Bacteria from hot springs is widely used as a source of various enzymes, such as amylase. But the amount of amylase-producing bacteria is still very limited. Therefore it is necessary to search sources of amylase-producing bacteria new, such as from hot springs Pariangan. The purpose of this study was to isolation of amylase-producing bacteria from Pariangan hot spring, West Sumatera and amylase activity optimization. The results were obtained 12 isolates of thermophilic bacteria and 5 isolates of amyalse-producing bacteria with the largest amylolytic index of 3.38 mm. The highest amylase activity was obtained at 50°C and pH 7.5.

  19. The role of bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant sulfur supply

    PubMed Central

    Gahan, Jacinta; Schmalenberger, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Plant growth is highly dependent on bacteria, saprophytic, and mycorrhizal fungi which facilitate the cycling and mobilization of nutrients. Over 95% of the sulfur (S) in soil is present in an organic form. Sulfate-esters and sulfonates, the major forms of organo-S in soils, arise through deposition of biological material and are transformed through subsequent humification. Fungi and bacteria release S from sulfate-esters using sulfatases, however, release of S from sulfonates is catalyzed by a bacterial multi-component mono-oxygenase system. The asfA gene is used as a key marker in this desulfonation process to study sulfonatase activity in soil bacteria identified as Variovorax, Polaromonas, Acidovorax, and Rhodococcus. The rhizosphere is regarded as a hot spot for microbial activity and recent studies indicate that this is also the case for the mycorrhizosphere where bacteria may attach to the fungal hyphae capable of mobilizing organo-S. While current evidence is not showing sulfatase and sulfonatase activity in arbuscular mycorrhiza, their effect on the expression of plant host sulfate transporters is documented. A revision of the role of bacteria, fungi and the interactions between soil bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant S supply was conducted. PMID:25566295

  20. [Streptoverticillium griseoviridum n. sp., a producer of the candidin-amphotericin B group, antifungal heptaene nonaromatic antibiotic 0185].

    PubMed

    Konev, Iu E; Efimova, V M; Etingov, E D; Zaval'naia, N M

    1978-02-01

    An actinomyceteous strain LIA-0185 producing a heptaenic non-aromatic antibiotic of the candidin type was isolated from a soil sample taken in the Georgian SSR under the programme of screening antifungal antibiotics. The taxonomic study of the strain showed that it belonged to the series of viridoflavum and had the following main taxonomic features: the sporophores in the whorls, straight, remote: the aerial mycelium from yellow to dark-olive-grey; the substrate mycelium olive; the soluble pigment absent; the melanine pigment was produced on the peptone medium; the culture formed H2S; assimilated glucose, mannose, inozide and to a lesser extent fructose; did not assimilate arabinose, xylose, sucrose, lactose, ramnose and raffinose. The strain inhibited the growth of yeast and fungi, grampositive bacteria and actinomycetes and produced a complex of non-aromatic heptaenic antibiotics. The actinomycete differed from the other whorl cultures. It was classified as a new species Sv. griseoviridum sp. nov. The antibiotic complex was a mixture of 2 components, i. e. I and II present approximately in equal amounts. Component II was analogous to candidin. Component I was a new original substance.

  1. [The value of glucose-positive coliform bacteria and potentially pathogenic bacteria as indicators of epidemiological safety of tap water].

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, P V; Aleshnia, V V; Panasovets, O P; Morozova, A A; Artemova, T Z; Talaeva, Iu G; Zagaĭnova, A V; Gipp, E K

    2012-01-01

    Due to intensive anthropogenic pollution of water environment generally accepted indicators of epidemic security of water bodies - common bacteria and thermotolerant coliform bacteria do not always permit to obtain an objective characterization of bacterial contamination of tap water. From the point of view of authors the integral index - glucose positive coliform bacteria most adequately reflect the sanitary-hygienic and epidemiological situation of water bodies. In monitoring for bacterial quality of tap water it is advisable to determine glucose positive coliform bacteria, that will provide the relevance of estimation of the epidemiological safety of water use. According to the method developed by the authors the calculation of the index of population risk of acute intestinal infections occurrence in dependence on the quality of tap water in Azov and Tsimlyansk towns.

  2. [The significance of glucose positive coliform bacteria and potentially pathogenic bacteria as an indicator of epidemiological safety of tap water].

    PubMed

    Zhuravlev, P V; Aleshnya, V V; Panasovets, O P; Morozova, A A; Artemova, T Z; Talaeva, Yu G; Zagaynova, A V

    2013-01-01

    Due to intensive anthropogenic pollution of water environment generally accepted indicators of epidemic security of water bodies--common bacteria (CB) and thermotolerant coliform bacteria (TCB) do not always permit to obtain an objective characterization of bacterial contamination of tap water. From the point of view of authors the integral index--glucose positive coliform bacteria most adequately reflect the sanitary-hygienic and epidemiological situation of water bodies. In monitoring for bacterial quality of tap water it is advisable to determine glucose positive coliform bacteria, that will provide the relevance of estimation of the epidemiological safety of water use. According to the method developed by the authors the calculation of the index of population risk of acute intestinal infections (AHI) occurrence in dependence on the quality of tap water in Azov and Tsimlyansk towns.

  3. Bacteria interface pickering emulsions stabilized by self-assembled bacteria-chitosan network.

    PubMed

    Wongkongkatep, Pravit; Manopwisedjaroen, Khajohnpong; Tiposoth, Perapon; Archakunakorn, Somwit; Pongtharangkul, Thunyarat; Suphantharika, Manop; Honda, Kohsuke; Hamachi, Itaru; Wongkongkatep, Jirarut

    2012-04-03

    An oil-in-water Pickering emulsion stabilized by biobased material based on a bacteria-chitosan network (BCN) was developed for the first time in this study. The formation of self-assembled BCN was possible due to the electrostatic interaction between negatively charged bacterial cells and polycationic chitosan. The BCN was proven to stabilize the tetradecane/water interface, promoting formation of highly stable oil-in-water emulsion (o/w emulsion). We characterized and visualized the BCN stabilized o/w emulsions by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). Due to the sustainability and low environmental impact of chitosan, the BCN-based emulsions open up opportunities for the development of an environmental friendly new interface material as well as the novel type of microreactor utilizing bacterial cells network.

  4. Purification Techniques of Bacteriocins from Lactic Acid Bacteria and Other Gram-Positive Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saavedra, Lucila; Sesma, Fernando

    The search for new antimicrobial peptides produced by lactic acid ­bacteria and other Gram-positive microorganisms has become an interesting field of research in the past decades. The fact that bacteriocins are active against numerous foodborne and human pathogens, are produced by generally regarded as safe (GRAS) microorganisms, and are readily degraded by proteolytic host systems makes them attractive candidates for biotechnological applications. However, before suggesting or choosing a new bacteriocin for future technology developments, it is necessary to elucidate its biochemical structure and its mode of action, which may be carried out once the bacteriocin is purified to homogeneity. This chapter focuses on describing the main strategies used for the purification of numerous bacteriocins.

  5. Evaluation of Petrifilm Lactic Acid Bacteria Plates for Counting Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food.

    PubMed

    Kanagawa, Satomi; Ohshima, Chihiro; Takahashi, Hajime; Burenqiqige; Kikuchi, Misato; Sato, Fumina; Nakamura, Ayaka; Mohamed, Shimaa M; Kuda, Takashi; Kimura, Bon

    2018-06-01

    Although lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are used widely as starter cultures in the production of fermented foods, they are also responsible for food decay and deterioration. The undesirable growth of LAB in food causes spoilage, discoloration, and slime formation. Because of these adverse effects, food companies test for the presence of LAB in production areas and processed foods and consistently monitor the behavior of these bacteria. The 3M Petrifilm LAB Count Plates have recently been launched as a time-saving and simple-to-use plate designed for detecting and quantifying LAB. This study compares the abilities of Petrifilm LAB Count Plates and the de Man Rogosa Sharpe (MRS) agar medium to determine the LAB count in a variety of foods and swab samples collected from a food production area. Bacterial strains isolated from Petrifilm LAB Count Plates were identified by 16S rDNA sequence analysis to confirm the specificity of these plates for LAB. The results showed no significant difference in bacterial counts measured by using Petrifilm LAB Count Plates and MRS medium. Furthermore, all colonies growing on Petrifilm LAB Count Plates were confirmed to be LAB, while yeast colonies also formed in MRS medium. Petrifilm LAB Count Plates eliminated the plate preparation and plate inoculation steps, and the cultures could be started as soon as a diluted food sample was available. Food companies are required to establish quality controls and perform tests to check the quality of food products; the use of Petrifilm LAB Count Plates can simplify this testing process for food companies.

  6. ATP Synthesis in the Extremely Halophilic Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, Lawrence I.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The proton-translocating ATPases are multimeric enzymes that carry out a multitude of essential functions. Their origin and evolution represent a seminal event in the early evolution of life. Amino acid sequences of the two largest subunits from archaeal ATPases (A-ATPases), vacuolar ATPases (V-ATPases), and FOF1-ATP syntheses (FATPases) suggest these ATPases evolved from an ancestral vacuolar-like ATP syntheses. A necessary consequence of this notion is that the A-ATPases are ATP syntheses. With the possible exception of the A-ATPase from Halobacterium salinarium. no A-ATPase has been demonstrated to synthesize ATP. The evidence for this case is dubious since ATP synthesis occurs only when conditions are distinctively unphysiological. We demonstrated that ATP synthesis in H.saccharovorum is inconsistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. In order to determine if this phenomenon was unique to H. saccharovorum, ATP synthesis was examined in various extremely halophilic bacteria with the goal of ascertaining if it resembled what occurred in a. saccharovorum, or was consistent with the operation of an A-type ATPase. A-, V-, and F-type ATPases respond singularly to certain inhibitors. Therefore, the effect of these inhibitors on ATP synthesis in several extreme halophiles was determined. Inhibitors that either blocked or collapsed proton-gradients inhibited the steady state synthesis of ATP thus verifying that synthesis took place at the expense of a proton gradient. Azide, an inhibitor of F-ATPases inhibited ATP synthesis. Since the arginine-dependent synthesis of ATP, which occurs by way of substrate-level phosphorylation, was unaffected by azide, it was unlikely that azide acted as an "uncoupler." N -ethylmaleimide and nitrate, which inhibit V- and A-ATPases, either did not inhibit ATP synthesis or resulted in higher steady-state levels of ATP. These results suggest there are two types of proton-motive ATPases in the extreme halophiles (and presumably in other

  7. Monitoring of airborne bacteria and aerosols in different wards of hospitals - Particle counting usefulness in investigation of airborne bacteria.

    PubMed

    Mirhoseini, Seyed Hamed; Nikaeen, Mahnaz; Khanahmd, Hossein; Hatamzadeh, Maryam; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The presence of airborne bacteria in hospital environments is of great concern because of their potential role as a source of hospital-acquired infections (HAI). The aim of this study was the determination and comparison of the concentration of airborne bacteria in different wards of four educational hospitals, and evaluation of whether particle counting could be predictive of airborne bacterial concentration in different wards of a hospital. The study was performed in an operating theatre (OT), intensive care unit (ICU), surgery ward (SW) and internal medicine (IM) ward of four educational hospitals in Isfahan, Iran. A total of 80 samples were analyzed for the presence of airborne bacteria and particle levels. The average level of bacteria ranged from 75-1194 CFU/m (3) . Mean particle levels were higher than class 100,000 cleanrooms in all wards. A significant correlation was observed between the numbers of 1-5 µm particles and levels of airborne bacteria in operating theatres and ICUs. The results showed that factors which may influence the airborne bacterial level in hospital environments should be properly managed to minimize the risk of HAIs especially in operating theaters. Microbial air contamination of hospital settings should be performed by the monitoring of airborne bacteria, but particle counting could be considered as a good operative method for the continuous monitoring of air quality in operating theaters and ICUs where higher risks of infection are suspected.

  8. Bacteria, biofilm and honey: a study of the effects of honey on 'planktonic' and biofilm-embedded chronic wound bacteria.

    PubMed

    Merckoll, Patricia; Jonassen, Tom Øystein; Vad, Marie Elisabeth; Jeansson, Stig L; Melby, Kjetil K

    2009-01-01

    Chronically infected wounds are a costly source of suffering. An important factor in the failure of a sore to heal is the presence of multiple species of bacteria, living cooperatively in highly organized biofilms. The biofilm protects the bacteria from antibiotic therapy and the patient's immune response. Honey has been used as a wound treatment for millennia. The components responsible for its antibacterial properties are now being elucidated. The study aimed to determine the effects of different concentrations of 'Medihoney' therapeutic honey and Norwegian Forest Honey 1) on the real-time growth of typical chronic wound bacteria; 2) on biofilm formation; and 3) on the same bacteria already embedded in biofilm. Reference strains of MRSE, MRSA, ESBL Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were incubated with dilution series of the honeys in microtitre plates for 20 h. Growth of the bacteria was assessed by measuring optical density every 10 min. Growth curves, biofilm formation and minimum bactericidal concentrations are presented. Both honeys were bactericidal against all the strains of bacteria. Biofilm was penetrated by biocidal substances in honey. Reintroduction of honey as a conventional wound treatment may help improve individual wound care, prevent invasive infections, eliminate colonization, interrupt outbreaks and thereby preserve current antibiotic stocks.

  9. Large numbers of interleukins-22- and -17A-producing T helper cells in cholangiocarcinoma related to liver fluke infection.

    PubMed

    Su, Si-Biao; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Huang, Fei-Fei; Cen, Yu; Jiang, Hai-Xing

    2017-08-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) associated with liver fluke infection involves inflammatory and immune processes; however, whether these involve the proinflammatory cytokine IL-17A and proliferative cytokine IL-22 remains unclear. Here, numbers of IL-22- and IL-17A-producing Th cells and cytokine concentrations in 30 patients with CCA and long-term liver fluke infection, 40 patients with liver-fluke infection but not CCA, and 16 healthy controls were compared. Analyses were performed using immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, ELISA and RT-PCR. Immunohistochemical staining showed weaker expression of IL-22 and IL-17A in patients with CCA with than in those without liver fluke infection (P < 0.01). Flow cytometry revealed significantly greater median proportions of IL-22-producing T helper cells in patients with CCA (2.2%) than in those without it (0.69%) or controls (0.4%, P < 0.001). Similar results were obtained for IL-17A-producing T helper cells. ELISA revealed plasma concentrations of IL-22 were 1.3-fold higher in patients with CCA than in those without it and 4.6-fold higher than in controls (P < 0.001). Plasma concentrations of IL-17A were 2.5-fold higher in patients with CCA than in those without it, and 21-fold higher than in controls (P < 0.001). Amounts of IL-22 and IL-17A mRNAs in blood were significantly higher in patients with CCA than in the other two groups. Proportions of CD4 + CD45RO + T cells producing IL-22 correlated with proportions producing IL-17A (r = 0.759; P < 0.001), and plasma concentrations of IL-22 correlated with those of IL-17A (r = 0.726; P < 0.001). These results suggest that both IL-17A and IL-22 affect development of CCA related to liver fluke infection. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  10. Bacteria versus selenium: A view from the inside out

    Staicu, Lucian; Oremland, Ronald S.; Tobe, Ryuta; Mihara, Hisaaki

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria and selenium (Se) are closely interlinked as the element serves both essential nutrient requirements and energy generation functions. However, Se can also behave as a powerful toxicant for bacterial homeostasis. Conversely, bacteria play a tremendous role in the cycling of Se between different environmental compartments, and bacterial metabolism has been shown to participate to all valence state transformations undergone by Se in nature. Bacteria possess an extensive molecular repertoire for Se metabolism. At the end of the 1980s, a novel mode of anaerobic respiration based on Se oxyanions was experimentally documented for the first time. Following this discovery, specific enzymes capable of reducing Se oxyanions and harvesting energy were found in a number of anaerobic bacteria. The genes involved in the expression of these enzymes have later been identified and cloned. This iterative approach undertaken outside-in led to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of Se transformations in bacteria. Based on the extensive knowledge accumulated over the years, we now have a full(er) view from the inside out, from DNA-encoding genes to enzymes and thermodynamics. Bacterial transformations of Se for assimilatory purposes have been the object of numerous studies predating the investigation of Se respiration. Remarkable contributions related to the understating of the molecular picture underlying seleno-amino acid biosynthesis are reviewed herein. Under certain circumstances, Se is a toxicant for bacterial metabolism and bacteria have evolved strategies to counteract this toxicity, most notably by the formation of elemental Se (nano)particles. Several biotechnological applications, such as the production of functional materials and the biofortification of crop species using Se-utilizing bacteria, are presented in this chapter.

  11. Enzymatic Digestion for Improved Bacteria Separation from Leafy Green Vegetables.

    PubMed

    Wang, Danhui; Wang, Ziyuan; He, Fei; Kinchla, Amanda J; Nugen, Sam R

    2016-08-01

    An effective and rapid method for the separation of bacteria from food matrix remains a bottleneck for rapid bacteria detection for food safety. Bacteria can strongly attach to a food surface or internalize within the matrix, making their isolation extremely difficult. Traditional methods of separating bacteria from food routinely involve stomaching, blending, and shaking. However, these methods may not be efficient at removing all the bacteria from complex matrices. Here, we investigate the benefits of using enzyme digestion followed by immunomagnetic separation to isolate Salmonella from spinach and lettuce. Enzymatic digestion using pectinase and cellulase was able to break down the structure of the leafy green vegetables, resulting in the detachment and release of Salmonella from the leaves. Immunomagnetic separation of Salmonella from the liquefied sample allowed an additional separation step to achieve a more pure sample without leaf debris that may benefit additional downstream applications. We have investigated the optimal combination of pectinase and cellulase for the digestion of spinach and lettuce to improve sample detection yields. The concentrations of enzymes used to digest the leaves were confirmed to have no significant effect on the viability of the inoculated Salmonella. Results reported that the recovery of the Salmonella from the produce after enzyme digestion of the leaves was significantly higher (P < 0.05) than traditional sample preparation methods to separate bacteria (stomaching and manually shaking). The results demonstrate the potential for use of enzyme digestion prior to separation can improve the efficiency of bacteria separation and increase the likelihood of detecting pathogens in the final detection assay.

  12. Probing minority population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tianxun; Zheng, Yan; Yan, Ya; Yang, Lingling; Yao, Yihui; Zheng, Jiaxin; Wu, Lina; Wang, Xu; Chen, Yuqing; Xing, Jinchun; Yan, Xiaomei

    2016-06-15

    The evolution and spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has become a major threat to public health. Advanced tools are urgently needed to quickly diagnose antibiotic-resistant infections to initiate appropriate treatment. Here we report the development of a highly sensitive flow cytometric method to probe minority population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria via single cell detection. Monoclonal antibody against TEM-1 β-lactamase and Alexa Fluor 488-conjugated secondary antibody were used to selectively label resistant bacteria green, and nucleic acid dye SYTO 62 was used to stain all the bacteria red. A laboratory-built high sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM) was applied to simultaneously detect the side scatter and dual-color fluorescence signals of single bacteria. By using E. coli JM109/pUC19 and E. coli JM109 as the model systems for antibiotic-resistant and antibiotic-susceptible bacteria, respectively, as low as 0.1% of antibiotic-resistant bacteria were accurately quantified. By monitoring the dynamic population change of a bacterial culture with the administration of antibiotics, we confirmed that under the antimicrobial pressure, the original low population of antibiotic-resistant bacteria outcompeted susceptible strains and became the dominant population after 5hours of growth. Detection of antibiotic-resistant infection in clinical urine samples was achieved without cultivation, and the bacterial load of susceptible and resistant strains can be faithfully quantified. Overall, the HSFCM-based quantitative method provides a powerful tool for the fundamental studies of antibiotic resistance and holds the potential to provide rapid and precise guidance in clinical therapies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The aerobic activity of metronidazole against anaerobic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dione, Niokhor; Khelaifia, Saber; Lagier, Jean-Christophe; Raoult, Didier

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the aerobic growth of strictly anaerobic bacteria was demonstrated using antioxidants. Metronidazole is frequently used to treat infections caused by anaerobic bacteria; however, to date its antibacterial activity was only tested in anaerobic conditions. Here we aerobically tested using antioxidants the in vitro activities of metronidazole, gentamicin, doxycycline and imipenem against 10 common anaerobic and aerobic bacteria. In vitro susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method, and minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by Etest. Aerobic culture of the bacteria was performed at 37°C using Schaedler agar medium supplemented with 1mg/mL ascorbic acid and 0.1mg/mL glutathione; the pH was adjusted to 7.2 by 10M KOH. Growth of anaerobic bacteria cultured aerobically using antioxidants was inhibited by metronidazole after 72h of incubation at 37°C, with a mean inhibition diameter of 37.76mm and an MIC of 1μg/mL; however, strains remained non-sensitive to gentamicin. No growth inhibition of aerobic bacteria was observed after 24h of incubation at 37°C with metronidazole; however, inhibition was observed with doxycycline and imipenem used as controls. These results indicate that bacterial sensitivity to metronidazole is not related to the oxygen tension but is a result of the sensitivity of the micro-organism. In future, both culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing of strictly anaerobic bacteria will be performed in an aerobic atmosphere using antioxidants in clinical microbiology laboratories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  14. Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hospodsky, Denina; Qian, Jing; Nazaroff, William W.; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Bibby, Kyle; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Peccia, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study presents evidence for elevated concentrations of indoor airborne bacteria due to human occupancy, and investigates the sources of these bacteria. Samples were collected in a university classroom while occupied and when vacant. The total particle mass concentration, bacterial genome concentration, and bacterial phylogenetic populations were characterized in indoor, outdoor, and ventilation duct supply air, as well as in the dust of ventilation system filters and in floor dust. Occupancy increased the total aerosol mass and bacterial genome concentration in indoor air PM10 and PM2.5 size fractions, with an increase of nearly two orders of magnitude in airborne bacterial genome concentration in PM10. On a per mass basis, floor dust was enriched in bacterial genomes compared to airborne particles. Quantitative comparisons between bacterial populations in indoor air and potential sources suggest that resuspended floor dust is an important contributor to bacterial aerosol populations during occupancy. Experiments that controlled for resuspension from the floor implies that direct human shedding may also significantly impact the concentration of indoor airborne particles. The high content of bacteria specific to the skin, nostrils, and hair of humans found in indoor air and in floor dust indicates that floors are an important reservoir of human-associated bacteria, and that the direct particle shedding of desquamated skin cells and their subsequent resuspension strongly influenced the airborne bacteria population structure in this human-occupied environment. Inhalation exposure to microbes shed by other current or previous human occupants may occur in communal indoor environments. PMID:22529946

  15. Platelets and Infections – Complex Interactions with Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Damien, Pauline; Chabert, Adrien; Pozzetto, Bruno; Cognasse, Fabrice; Garraud, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Platelets can be considered sentinels of vascular system due to their high number in the circulation and to the range of functional immunoreceptors they express. Platelets express a wide range of potential bacterial receptors, including complement receptors, FcγRII, Toll-like receptors but also integrins conventionally described in the hemostatic response, such as GPIIb–IIIa or GPIb. Bacteria bind these receptors either directly, or indirectly via fibrinogen, fibronectin, the first complement C1q, the von Willebrand Factor, etc. The fate of platelet-bound bacteria is questioned. Several studies reported the ability of activated platelets to internalize bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Porphyromonas gingivalis, though there is no clue on what happens thereafter. Are they sheltered from the immune system in the cytoplasm of platelets or are they lysed? Indeed, while the presence of phagolysosome has not been demonstrated in platelets, they contain antimicrobial peptides that were shown to be efficient on S. aureus. Besides, the fact that bacteria can bind to platelets via receptors involved in hemostasis suggests that they may induce aggregation; this has indeed been described for Streptococcus sanguinis, S. epidermidis, or C. pneumoniae. On the other hand, platelets are able to display an inflammatory response to an infectious triggering. We, and others, have shown that platelet release soluble immunomodulatory factors upon stimulation by bacterial components. Moreover, interactions between bacteria and platelets are not limited to only these two partners. Indeed, platelets are also essential for the formation of neutrophil extracellular traps by neutrophils, resulting in bacterial clearance by trapping bacteria and concentrating antibacterial factors but in enhancing thrombosis. In conclusion, the platelet–bacteria interplay is a complex game; its fine analysis is complicated by the fact that the inflammatory component adds to the aggregation response

  16. Phenotypic and Phylogenetic Characterization of Ruminal Tannin-Tolerant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Karen E.; Thonney, Michael L.; Woolston, Tina K.; Zinder, Stephen H.; Pell, Alice N.

    1998-01-01

    The 16S rRNA sequences and selected phenotypic characteristics were determined for six recently isolated bacteria that can tolerate high levels of hydrolyzable and condensed tannins. Bacteria were isolated from the ruminal contents of animals in different geographic locations, including Sardinian sheep (Ovis aries), Honduran and Colombian goats (Capra hircus), white-tail deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from upstate New York, and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) from Oregon. Nearly complete sequences of the small-subunit rRNA genes, which were obtained by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing, were used for phylogenetic characterization. Comparisons of the 16S rRNA of the six isolates showed that four of the isolates were members of the genus Streptococcus and were most closely related to ruminal strains of Streptococcus bovis and the recently described organism Streptococcus gallolyticus. One of the other isolates, a gram-positive rod, clustered with the clostridia in the low-G+C-content group of gram-positive bacteria. The sixth isolate, a gram-negative rod, was a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae in the gamma subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. None of the 16S rRNA sequences of the tannin-tolerant bacteria examined was identical to the sequence of any previously described microorganism or to the sequence of any of the other organisms examined in this study. Three phylogenetically distinct groups of ruminal bacteria were isolated from four species of ruminants in Europe, North America, and South America. The presence of tannin-tolerant bacteria is not restricted by climate, geography, or host animal, although attempts to isolate tannin-tolerant bacteria from cows on low-tannin diets failed. PMID:9758806

  17. Phenotypic and phylogenetic characterization of ruminal tannin-tolerant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nelson, K E; Thonney, M L; Woolston, T K; Zinder, S H; Pell, A N

    1998-10-01

    The 16S rRNA sequences and selected phenotypic characteristics were determined for six recently isolated bacteria that can tolerate high levels of hydrolyzable and condensed tannins. Bacteria were isolated from the ruminal contents of animals in different geographic locations, including Sardinian sheep (Ovis aries), Honduran and Colombian goats (Capra hircus), white-tail deer (Odocoileus virginianus) from upstate New York, and Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) from Oregon. Nearly complete sequences of the small-subunit rRNA genes, which were obtained by PCR amplification, cloning, and sequencing, were used for phylogenetic characterization. Comparisons of the 16S rRNA of the six isolates showed that four of the isolates were members of the genus Streptococcus and were most closely related to ruminal strains of Streptococcus bovis and the recently described organism Streptococcus gallolyticus. One of the other isolates, a gram-positive rod, clustered with the clostridia in the low-G+C-content group of gram-positive bacteria. The sixth isolate, a gram-negative rod, was a member of the family Enterobacteriaceae in the gamma subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. None of the 16S rRNA sequences of the tannin-tolerant bacteria examined was identical to the sequence of any previously described microorganism or to the sequence of any of the other organisms examined in this study. Three phylogenetically distinct groups of ruminal bacteria were isolated from four species of ruminants in Europe, North America, and South America. The presence of tannin-tolerant bacteria is not restricted by climate, geography, or host animal, although attempts to isolate tannin-tolerant bacteria from cows on low-tannin diets failed.

  18. Unravelling the contribution of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria to cocoa fermentation using inoculated organisms.

    PubMed

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Fleet, Graham H; Zhao, Jian

    2018-08-20

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of the bean pulp by microorganisms is essential for developing the precursors of chocolate flavour. Currently, the cocoa fermentation is still conducted by an uncontrolled traditional process via a consortium of indigenous species of yeasts, lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria. Although the essential contribution of yeasts to the production of good quality beans and, typical chocolate character is generally agreed, the roles of lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria are less certain. The objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of LAB and AAB in cocoa bean fermentation by conducting small scale laboratory fermentations under aseptic conditions, inoculated with different groups of microorganisms previously isolated from spontaneous cocoa fermentations. The inoculation protocols were: (1) four yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae; (2) four yeasts plus the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum; (3) four yeasts plus the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateuri and (4) four yeasts plus two lactic acid bacteria and two acetic acid bacteria. Only the inoculated species were detected in the microbiota of their respective fermentations. Beans from the inoculated fermentations showed no significant differences in colour, shell weights and concentrations of residual sugars, alcohols and esters (p>0.05), but they were slightly different in contents of lactic acid and acetic acid (p<0.05). All beans were fully brown and free of mould. Residual sugar levels were less than 2.6 mg/g while the shell contents and ethanol were in the range of 11-13.4% and 4.8-7 mg/g, respectively. Beans fermented in the presence of LAB contained higher levels of lactic acid (0.6-1.2 mg/g) whereas higher concentrations of acetic acid

  19. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. 113.27 Section 113.27 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator or elsewhere exempted... Seed Bacteria shall be tested for extraneous viable bacteria and fungi as prescribed in this section. A...

  20. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. 113.27 Section 113.27 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator or elsewhere exempted... Seed Bacteria shall be tested for extraneous viable bacteria and fungi as prescribed in this section. A...